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Sample records for absolute sea surface

  1. Absolute surface energy for zincblende semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. B.; Wei, Su-Huai

    2003-03-01

    Recent advance in nanosciences requires the determination of surface (or facet) energy of semiconductors, which is often difficult due to the polar nature of some of the most important surfaces such as the (111)A/(111)B surfaces. Several approaches have been developed in the past [1-3] to deal with the problem but an unambiguous division of the polar surface energies is yet to come [2]. Here we show that an accurate division is indeed possible for the zincblende semiconductors and will present the results for GaAs, ZnSe, and CuInSe2 [4], respectively. A general trend emerges, relating the absolute surface energy to the ionicity of the bulk materials. [1] N. Chetty and R. M. Martin, Phys. Rev. B 45, 6074 (1992). [2] N. Moll, et al., Phys. Rev. B 54, 8844 (1996). [3] S. Mankefors, Phys. Rev. B 59, 13151 (1999). [4] S. B. Zhang and S.-H. Wei, Phys. Rev. B 65, 081402 (2002).

  2. Absolute optical surface measurement with deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wansong; Sandner, Marc; Gesierich, Achim; Burke, Jan

    Deflectometry utilises the deformation and displacement of a sample pattern after reflection from a test surface to infer the surface slopes. Differentiation of the measurement data leads to a curvature map, which is very useful for surface quality checks with sensitivity down to the nanometre range. Integration of the data allows reconstruction of the absolute surface shape, but the procedure is very error-prone because systematic errors may add up to large shape deviations. In addition, there are infinitely many combinations for slope and object distance that satisfy a given observation. One solution for this ambiguity is to include information on the object's distance. It must be known very accurately. Two laser pointers can be used for positioning the object, and we also show how a confocal chromatic distance sensor can be used to define a reference point on a smooth surface from which the integration can be started. The used integration algorithm works without symmetry constraints and is therefore suitable for free-form surfaces as well. Unlike null testing, deflectometry also determines radius of curvature (ROC) or focal lengths as a direct result of the 3D surface reconstruction. This is shown by the example of a 200 mm diameter telescope mirror, whose ROC measurements by coordinate measurement machine and deflectometry coincide to within 0.27 mm (or a sag error of 1.3μm). By the example of a diamond-turned off-axis parabolic mirror, we demonstrate that the figure measurement uncertainty comes close to a well-calibrated Fizeau interferometer.

  3. Validation of Mean Absolute Sea Level of the North Atlantic obtained from Drifter, Altimetry and Wind Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maximenko, Nikolai A.

    2003-01-01

    Mean absolute sea level reflects the deviation of the Ocean surface from geoid due to the ocean currents and is an important characteristic of the dynamical state of the ocean. Values of its spatial variations (order of 1 m) are generally much smaller than deviations of the geoid shape from ellipsoid (order of 100 m) that makes the derivation of the absolute mean sea level a difficult task for gravity and satellite altimetry observations. Technique used by Niiler et al. for computation of the absolute mean sea level in the Kuroshio Extension was then developed into more general method and applied by Niiler et al. (2003b) to the global Ocean. The method is based on the consideration of balance of horizontal momentum.

  4. Absolute surface metrology by rotational averaging in oblique incidence interferometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weihao; He, Yumei; Song, Li; Luo, Hongxin; Wang, Jie

    2014-06-01

    A modified method for measuring the absolute figure of a large optical flat surface in synchrotron radiation by a small aperture interferometer is presented. The method consists of two procedures: the first step is oblique incidence measurement; the second is multiple rotating measurements. This simple method is described in terms of functions that are symmetric or antisymmetric with respect to reflections at the vertical axis. Absolute deviations of a large flat surface could be obtained when mirror antisymmetric errors are removed by N-position rotational averaging. Formulas are derived for measuring the absolute surface errors of a rectangle flat, and experiments on high-accuracy rectangle flats are performed to verify the method. Finally, uncertainty analysis is carried out in detail. PMID:24922410

  5. Absolute surface reconstruction by slope metrology and photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yue

    Developing the manufacture of aspheric and freeform optical elements requires an advanced metrology method which is capable of inspecting these elements with arbitrary freeform surfaces. In this dissertation, a new surface measurement scheme is investigated for such a purpose, which is to measure the absolute surface shape of an object under test through its surface slope information obtained by photogrammetric measurement. A laser beam propagating toward the object reflects on its surface while the vectors of the incident and reflected beams are evaluated from the four spots they leave on the two parallel transparent windows in front of the object. The spots' spatial coordinates are determined by photogrammetry. With the knowledge of the incident and reflected beam vectors, the local slope information of the object surface is obtained through vector calculus and finally yields the absolute object surface profile by a reconstruction algorithm. An experimental setup is designed and the proposed measuring principle is experimentally demonstrated by measuring the absolute surface shape of a spherical mirror. The measurement uncertainty is analyzed, and efforts for improvement are made accordingly. In particular, structured windows are designed and fabricated to generate uniform scattering spots left by the transmitted laser beams. Calibration of the fringe reflection instrument, another typical surface slope measurement method, is also reported in the dissertation. Finally, a method for uncertainty analysis of a photogrammetry measurement system by optical simulation is investigated.

  6. Simultaneous estimation of lithospheric uplift rates and absolute sea level change in southwest Scandinavia from inversion of sea level data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Lars; Hansen, Jens Morten; Hede, Mikkel Ulfeldt; Clemmensen, Lars B.; Pejrup, Morten; Noe-Nygaard, Nanna

    2014-11-01

    Relative sea level curves contain coupled information about absolute sea level change and vertical lithospheric movement. Such curves may be constructed based on, for example tide gauge data for the most recent times and different types of geological data for ancient times. Correct account for vertical lithospheric movement is essential for estimation of reliable values of absolute sea level change from relative sea level data and vise versa. For modern times, estimates of vertical lithospheric movement may be constrained by data (e.g. GPS-based measurements), which are independent from the relative sea level data. Similar independent data do not exist for ancient times. The purpose of this study is to test two simple inversion approaches for simultaneous estimation of lithospheric uplift rates and absolute sea level change rates for ancient times in areas where a dense coverage of relative sea level data exists and well-constrained average lithospheric movement values are known from, for example glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) models. The inversion approaches are tested and used for simultaneous estimation of lithospheric uplift rates and absolute sea level change rates in southwest Scandinavia from modern relative sea level data series that cover the period from 1900 to 2000. In both approaches, a priori information is required to solve the inverse problem. A priori information about the average vertical lithospheric movement in the area of interest is critical for the quality of the obtained results. The two tested inversion schemes result in estimated absolute sea level rise of ˜1.2/1.3 mm yr-1 and vertical uplift rates ranging from approximately -1.4/-1.2 mm yr-1 (subsidence) to about 5.0/5.2 mm yr-1 if an a priori value of 1 mm yr-1 is used for the vertical lithospheric movement throughout the study area. In case the studied time interval is broken into two time intervals (before and after 1970), absolute sea level rise values of ˜0.8/1.2 mm yr-1 (before

  7. Stitching interferometry and absolute surface shape metrology: similarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Michael

    2001-12-01

    Stitching interferometry is a method of analysing large optical components using a standard small interferometer. This result is obtained by taking multiple overlapping images of the large component, and numerically stitching these sub-apertures together by computing a correcting Tip- Tilt-Piston correction for each sub-aperture. All real-life measurement techniques require a calibration phase. By definition, a perfect surface does not exist. Methods abound for the accurate measurement of diameters (viz., the Three Flat Test). However, we need total surface knowledge of the reference surface, because the stitched overlap areas will suffer from the slightest deformation. One must not be induced into thinking that Stitching is the cause of this error: it simply highlights the lack of absolute knowledge of the reference surface, or the lack of adequate thermal control, issues which are often sidetracked... The goal of this paper is to highlight the above-mentioned calibration problems in interferometry in general, and in stitching interferometry in particular, and show how stitching hardware and software can be conveniently used to provide the required absolute surface shape metrology. Some measurement figures will illustrate this article.

  8. Absolute surface energies, fracture toughness, and cracking in nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Cyrus E.; Janotti, Anderson; van de Walle, Chris G.

    2014-03-01

    Growth of high quality single crystals and epitaxial layers of GaN is critical for producing high-efficiency optoelectronic and power electronic devices. One of the fundamental material properties that govern growth of single crystals is the absolute surface energy of the crystallographic planes. Knowledge of these energies is required to understand and optimize growth rates of different facets in GaN, and provide fracture toughnesses for brittle fracture. By means of hybrid functional calculations, we have determined absolute surface energies for the non-polar {11-20} a and {10-10} m planes, and approximated values for polar (0001) + c and (000-1) - c planes in wurtzite GaN. For all surfaces, we consider low-energy bare and hydrogenated reconstructions under a variety of conditions relevant to experimental growth techniques. We find that the energies of the m and a planes are similar, and constant over the range of conditions studied. In contrast, the energies of the polar planes are strongly condition dependent. Even so, we find that the + c polar plane is systematically lower in energy than the - c plane. We have used our surface energies to determine brittle fracture toughnesses in AlN and GaN, as well as the critical thickness for cracking of AlGaN on GaN.

  9. Determination of the absolute configuration of sialic acids in gangliosides from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata.

    PubMed

    Kisa, Fumiaki; Yamada, Koji; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Inagaki, Masanori; Higuchi, Ryuichi

    2007-07-01

    Enantiomeric pairs of sialic acid, D- and L-NeuAc (N-acetylneuraminic acid), were converted to D- and L-arabinose, respectively, by chemical degradation. Using this method, the absolute configuration of the sialic acid residues, NeuAc and NeuGc (N-glycolylneuraminic acid), in the gangliosides from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata was determined to be the D-form. Although naturally occurring sialic acids have been believed to be the D-form on the basis of biosynthetic evidence, this is the first report of the determination of the absolute configuration of the sialic acid residues in gangliosides using chemical methods. PMID:17603199

  10. Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Video Gallery

    The heat of the sun also forces evaporation at the ocean's surface, which puts water vapor into the atmosphere but leaves minerals and salts behind, keeping the ocean salty. The salinity of the oce...

  11. Sea Surface Height 1993 - 2011

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts year-to-year variability in sea surface height, and chronicles two decades of El Niño and La Niña events. It was created using NASA ocean altimetry data from 1993 to 2011, ...

  12. Estimating the Ocean Flow Field From Combined Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Surface Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stammer, Detlef

    2000-01-01

    The primary focus of this project was on the estimation of the three-dimensional, absolute and time-evolving general circulation of the global ocean from a combined analysis of remotely sensed fields of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface height (SSH). The synthesis of those two fields was performed with other relevant physical data, and appropriate dynamical ocean models with emphasis on constraining ocean general circulation models by a combination of both SST and SSH data. This effort is directly related to an attempt to describe the mechanisms which give rise to observed SST and its variability on seasonal and inter-annual timescales, its relation to ocean-atmosphere interaction, and the dynamical coupling between the ocean mixed layer and the deep interior ocean. This is one of the fundamental climate related questions being pursued currently under the CLIVAR Program. Because of the strong turbulent mixing associated with atmospheric fluxes of momentum, heat and freshwater through the sea surface, the ocean forms a shallow surface boundary layer, the mixed layer which is largely homogeneous in its constituents. The relation between the temperature of the remotely sensed "skin" and the bulk of the mixed layer is largely understood (Reynolds and Smith 1994; Emery et al., 1995). However, because the surface mixed layer is effectively decoupled from the underlying ocean dynamics, an interpretation of satellite SST observations in isolation and in direct use for dynamical studies is very difficult. As a result, the impact of SST data on the understanding of ocean variability.

  13. Absolute determination of inelastic mean-free paths and surface excitation parameters by absolute reflection electron energy loss spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomi, T.; Goto, K.

    2005-11-01

    An analytical approach was proposed for simultaneously determining an inelastic mean-free path (IMFP) and a surface excitation parameter (SEP) with absolute units by the analysis of an absolute experimental reflection electron energy loss spectrum. The IMFPs and SEPs in Ni were deduced for electrons of 300 to 3000 eV. The obtained IMFPs were in good agreement with those calculated using the TPP-2M equation. The Chen-type empirical formula was proposed for determining the SEP. The results confirmed the applicability of the present approach for determining the IMFP and SEP for medium-energy electrons.

  14. Density and Absolute Salinity of the Baltic Sea 2006-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistel, R.; Weinreben, S.; Wolf, H.; Seitz, S.; Spitzer, P.; Adel, B.; Nausch, G.; Schneider, B.; Wright, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    The brackish water of the Baltic Sea is a mixture of ocean water from the Atlantic/North Sea with fresh water from various rivers draining a large area of lowlands and mountain ranges. The evaporation-precipitation balance results in an additional but minor excess of fresh water. The rivers carry different loads of salts washed out of the ground, in particular calcium carbonate, which cause a composition anomaly of the salt dissolved in the Baltic Sea in comparison to Standard Seawater. Directly measured seawater density shows a related anomaly when compared to the density computed from the equation of state as a function of Practical Salinity, temperature and pressure. Samples collected from different regions of the Baltic Sea during 2006-2009 were analysed for their density anomaly. The results obtained for the river load deviate significantly from similar measurements carried out forty years ago; the reasons for this decadal variability are not yet fully understood. An empirical formula is derived which estimates Absolute from Practical Salinity of Baltic Sea water, to be used in conjunction with the new Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater 2010 (TEOS-10), endorsed by IOC/UNESCO in June 2009 as the substitute for the 1980 International Equation of State, EOS-80. Our routine measurements of the samples were accompanied by studies of additional selected properties which are reported here: conductivity, density, chloride, bromide and sulphate content, total CO2 and alkalinity.

  15. Density and Absolute Salinity of the Baltic Sea 2006-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feistel, R.; Weinreben, S.; Wolf, H.; Seitz, S.; Spitzer, P.; Adel, B.; Nausch, G.; Schneider, B.; Wright, D. G.

    2009-08-01

    The brackish water of the Baltic Sea is a mixture of ocean water from the Atlantic/North Sea with fresh water from various rivers draining a large area of lowlands and mountain ranges. The evaporation-precipitation balance results in an additional but minor excess of fresh water. The rivers carry different loads of salts washed out of the ground, in particular calcium carbonate, which cause a composition anomaly of the salt dissolved in the Baltic Sea in comparison to Standard Seawater. Directly measured seawater density shows a related anomaly when compared to the density computed from the equation of state as a function of Practical Salinity, temperature and pressure. Samples collected from different regions of the Baltic Sea during 2006-2009 were analysed for their density anomaly. The results obtained for the river load deviate significantly from similar measurements carried out forty years ago; the reasons for this decadal variability are not yet fully understood. An empirical formula is derived which estimates Absolute from Practical Salinity of Baltic Sea water, to be used in conjunction with the new Thermodynamic Equation of Seawater 2010 (TEOS-10), endorsed by IOC/UNESCO in June 2009 as the substitute for the 1980 International Equation of State, EOS-80. Our routine measurements of the samples were accompanied by studies of additional selected properties which are reported here: conductivity, density, chloride, bromide and sulphate content, total CO2 and alkalinity.

  16. MODIS Global Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Every day the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measures sea surface temperature over the entire globe with high accuracy. This false-color image shows a one-month composite for May 2001. Red and yellow indicates warmer temperatures, green is an intermediate value, while blues and then purples are progressively colder values. The new MODIS sea surface temperature product will be particularly useful in studies of temperature anomalies, such as El Nino, as well as research into how air-sea interactions drive changes in weather and climate patterns. In the high resolution image, notice the amazing detail in some of the regional current patterns. For instance, notice the cold water currents that move from Antarctica northward along South America's west coast. These cold, deep waters upwell along an equatorial swath around and to the west of the Galapagos Islands. Note the warm, wide currents of the Gulf Stream moving up the United States' east coast, carrying Caribbean warmth toward Newfoundland and across the Atlantic toward Western Europe. Note the warm tongue of water extending from Africa's east coast to well south of the Cape of Good Hope. MODIS was launched in December 1999 aboard NASA's Terra satellite. For more details on this and other MODIS data products, please see NASA Unveils Spectacular Suite of New Global Data Products from MODIS. Image courtesy MODIS Ocean Group, NASA GSFC, and the University of Miami

  17. Absolute age of lunar regolith material from the Sea of Fertility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinogradov, A. P.; Artemov, Y. M.

    1974-01-01

    By averaging the absolute age of lunar regolith materials from the Sea of Fertility for the fine regolith fraction from the core zone V, an age of 4.65 10 to the 9th power + 0.4 10 to the 9th power years was obtained, employing as the primordial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio 0.69884 (ADOR). Also close to this age value is the age estimate based on the Pb-207/Pb-206 ratio. Using the value 0.69898 (BABI) as a primordial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio reduces the calculated age of the fine regolith fraction to 4.25 X 10 to the 9th power years. The fine fraction of lunar regolith from the Sea of Fertility is also characterized by a minimum addition of radiogenic Sr-87, a minimum Rb/Sr ratio, and a maximum K/Rb ratio compared with analogous lunar material from other points.

  18. Estimating the Ocean Flow Field from Combined Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Surface Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stammer, Detlef; Lindstrom, Eric (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This project was part of a previous grant at MIT that was moved over to the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) together with the principal investigator. The final report provided here is concerned only with the work performed at SIO since January 2000. The primary focus of this project was the study of the three-dimensional, absolute and time-evolving general circulation of the global ocean from a combined analysis of remotely sensed fields of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface height (SSH). The synthesis of those two fields was performed with other relevant physical data, and appropriate dynamical ocean models with emphasis on constraining ocean general circulation models by a combination of both SST and SSH data. The central goal of the project was to improve our understanding and modeling of the relationship between the SST and its variability to internal ocean dynamics, and the overlying atmosphere, and to explore the relative roles of air-sea fluxes and internal ocean dynamics in establishing anomalies in SST on annual and longer time scales. An understanding of those problems will feed into the general discussion on how SST anomalies vary with time and the extend to which they interact with the atmosphere.

  19. Analysis of sea level and sea surface temperature changes in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betul Avsar, Nevin; Jin, Shuanggen; Kutoglu, Hakan; Erol, Bihter

    2016-07-01

    The Black Sea is a nearly closed sea with limited interaction with the Mediterranean Sea through the Turkish Straits. Measurement of sea level change will provide constraints on the water mass balance and thermal expansion of seawaters in response to climate change. In this paper, sea level changes in the Black Sea are investigated between January 1993 and December 2014 using multi-mission satellite altimetry data and sea surface temperature (SST) data. Here, the daily Maps of Sea Level Anomaly (MSLA) gridded with a 1/8°x1/8° spatial resolution from AVISO and the NOAA 1/4° daily Optimum Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature (OISST) Anomaly data set are used. The annual cycles of sea level and sea surface temperature changes reach the maximum values in November and January, respectively. The trend is 3.16±0.77 mm/yr for sea level change and -0.06±0.01°C/yr for sea surface temperature during the same 22-year period. The observed sea level rise is highly correlated with sea surface warming for the same time periods. In addition, the geographical distribution of the rates of the Black Sea level and SST changes between January 1993 and December 2014 are further analyzed, showing a good agreement in the eastern Black Sea. The rates of sea level rise and sea surface warming are larger in the eastern part than in the western part except in the northwestern Black Sea. Finally, the temporal correlation between sea level and SST time series are presented based on the Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis.

  20. Sea Surface Salinity : Research Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, David; Lagerloef, Gary; Font, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) can be important in regulating sea surface temperature (SST). Two technological breakthrough satellite SSS missions, Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), are currently producing high-quality SSS data. This paper provides an overview of the importance of SSS for weather and climate applications and describes the Aquarius and SMOS missions. The newness of adequately sampled SSS data prompted a first-time at-sea field campaign devoted to improved understanding of SSS variations.

  1. New satellite record of sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-02-01

    Sea surface temperature is one of the key variables scientists track in studying climate changes; it is also important to meteorology and oceanography. Merchant et al. describe a new 20-year record of sea surface temperature. The record was created using infrared imagery from the Along-Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSR) as part of the ATSR Reprocessing for Climate (ARC) project.

  2. Absolute surface metrology by differencing spatially shifted maps from a phase-shifting interferometer.

    PubMed

    Bloemhof, E E

    2010-07-15

    Surface measurements of precision optics are commonly made with commercially available phase-shifting Fizeau interferometers that provide data relative to flat or spherical reference surfaces whose unknown errors are comparable to those of the surface being tested. A number of ingenious techniques provide surface measurements that are "absolute," rather than relative to any reference surface. Generally, these techniques require numerous measurements and the introduction of additional surfaces, but still yield absolute information only along certain lines over the surface of interest. A very simple alternative is presented here, in which no additional optics are required beyond the surface under test and the transmission flat (or sphere) defining the interferometric reference surface. The optic under test is measured in three positions, two of which have small lateral shifts along orthogonal directions, nominally comparable to the transverse spatial resolution of the interferometer. The phase structure in the reference surface then cancels out when these measurements are subtracted in pairs, providing a grid of absolute surface height differences between neighboring resolution elements of the surface under test. The full absolute surface, apart from overall phase and tip/tilt, is then recovered by standard wavefront reconstruction techniques. PMID:20634825

  3. Problems in determining sea surface topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, J. A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Anticipated problems for determining ocean dynamics signals from sea surface topography are discussed. The needs for repeated tracks are listed if oceanic tides or ocean turbulence are to be determined.

  4. Aquarius Observations of Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Video Gallery

    This visualization shows changes in global sea surface salinity, as measured by NASA’s Aquarius instrument aboard the Aquarius/SAC-D spacecraft, from December 2011 through December 2012. Red repr...

  5. SMOS Sea Surface Salinity Validation in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yongzheng; Li, Xiaoming; Dong, Qing

    2013-01-01

    In November 2009, the European Space Agency (ESA) launched the first soil moisture and ocean salinity (SMOS) satellite, which represented the first use of spaceborne remote sensing tools to probe global sea surface salinity (SSS). The SMOS satellite carries a microwave imaging radiometer with aperture synthesis (MIRAS) for detection in the microwave L-band as the only payload. The MIRAS instrument is expected to provide a global SSS distribution with a spatial resolution of approximately 100 km and an accuracy of 0.1-0.2 practical salinity units (psu). The South China Sea is semi-enclosed, and the sea conditions are relatively complex. The suitability of ESA SMOS salinity products for the South China Sea has not been validated. Therefore, using SSS data measured during an expedition in the South China Sea, which was sponsored by China Natural Science Foundation and conducted in the fall of 2011, this paper validated the SSS products released by ESA, which were retrieved using three sea surface roughness models. To analyze the effect of the spatial resolution on the weekly average SMOS SSS distribution, the weekly average salinity data were averaged to reduce the spatial resolution to 0.25 ° x 0.25°. These average data were then compared to the measured data, followed by an analysis of the error variation. In addition, the effects of the orbital track (ascending or descending) on the SSS retrieval were analyzed.

  6. Nitrogen surface water retention in the Baltic Sea drainage basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stålnacke, P.; Pengerud, A.; Vassiljev, A.; Smedberg, E.; Mörth, C.-M.; Hägg, H. E.; Humborg, C.; Andersen, H. E.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we estimate the surface water retention of nitrogen (N) in all the 117 drainage basins to the Baltic Sea with the use of a statistical model (MESAW) for source apportionment of riverine loads of pollutants. Our results show that the MESAW model was able to estimate the N load at the river mouth of 88 Baltic Sea rivers, for which we had observed data, with a sufficient degree of precision and accuracy. The estimated retention parameters were also statistically significant. Our results show that around 380 000 t of N are annually retained in surface waters draining to the Baltic Sea. The total annual riverine load from the 117 basins to the Baltic Sea was estimated at 570 000 t of N, giving a total surface water N retention of around 40%. In terms of absolute retention values, three major river basins account for 50% of the total retention in the 117 basins; i.e. around 104 000 t of N are retained in Neva, 55 000 t in Vistula and 32 000 t in Oder. The largest retention was found in river basins with a high percentage of lakes as indicated by a strong relationship between N retention (%) and share of lake area in the river drainage areas. For example in Göta älv, we estimated a total N retention of 72%, whereof 67% of the retention occurred in the lakes of that drainage area (Lake Vänern primarily). The obtained results will hopefully enable the Helsinki Commission (HELCOM) to refine the nutrient load targets in the Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP), as well as to better identify cost-efficient measures to reduce nutrient loadings to the Baltic Sea.

  7. Simultaneous measurements of skin sea surface temperature and sea surface emissivity from a single thermal imagery.

    PubMed

    Yoshimori, Kyu; Tamba, Sumio; Yokoyama, Ryuzo

    2002-08-20

    A novel method, to our knowledge, to measure simultaneously the thermal emissivity and skin temperature of a sea surface has been developed. The proposed method uses an infrared image that includes a sea surface and a reference object located near the surface. By combining this image with sky radiation temperature, we retrieve both skin sea surface temperature and sea surface emissivity from the single infrared image. Because the method requires no knowledge of thermal radiative properties of actual sea surfaces, it can be used even for a contaminated sea surface whose emissivity is hard to determine theoretically, e.g., oil slicks or slicks produced by biological wastes. Experimental results demonstrate that the estimated emissivity agrees with the theoretical prediction and, also, the recovered temperature distribution of skin sea surface has no appreciable high-temperature area that is due to reflection of the reference object. The method allows the acquisition of match-up data of radiometric sea surface temperatures that precisely correspond to the satellite observable data. PMID:12206200

  8. Comparing the role of absolute sea-level rise and vertical tectonic motions in coastal flooding, Torres Islands (Vanuatu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballu, Valérie; Bouin, Marie-Noëlle; Siméoni, Patricia; Crawford, Wayne C.; Calmant, Stephane; Boré, Jean-Michel; Kanas, Tony; Pelletier, Bernard

    2011-08-01

    Since the late 1990s, rising sea levels around the Torres Islands (north Vanuatu, southwest Pacific) have caused strong local and international concern. In 2002-2004, a village was displaced due to increasing sea incursions, and in 2005 a United Nations Environment Programme press release referred to the displaced village as perhaps the world's first climate change "refugees." We show here that vertical motions of the Torres Islands themselves dominate the apparent sea-level rise observed on the islands. From 1997 to 2009, the absolute sea level rose by 150 + /-20 mm. But GPS data reveal that the islands subsided by 117 + /-30 mm over the same time period, almost doubling the apparent gradual sea-level rise. Moreover, large earthquakes that occurred just before and after this period caused several hundreds of mm of sudden vertical motion, generating larger apparent sea-level changes than those observed during the entire intervening period. Our results show that vertical ground motions must be accounted for when evaluating sea-level change hazards in active tectonic regions. These data are needed to help communities and governments understand environmental changes and make the best decisions for their future.

  9. Comparing the role of absolute sea-level rise and vertical tectonic motions in coastal flooding, Torres Islands (Vanuatu)

    PubMed Central

    Ballu, Valérie; Bouin, Marie-Noëlle; Siméoni, Patricia; Crawford, Wayne C.; Calmant, Stephane; Boré, Jean-Michel; Kanas, Tony; Pelletier, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Since the late 1990s, rising sea levels around the Torres Islands (north Vanuatu, southwest Pacific) have caused strong local and international concern. In 2002–2004, a village was displaced due to increasing sea incursions, and in 2005 a United Nations Environment Programme press release referred to the displaced village as perhaps the world’s first climate change “refugees.” We show here that vertical motions of the Torres Islands themselves dominate the apparent sea-level rise observed on the islands. From 1997 to 2009, the absolute sea level rose by 150 + /-20 mm. But GPS data reveal that the islands subsided by 117 + /-30 mm over the same time period, almost doubling the apparent gradual sea-level rise. Moreover, large earthquakes that occurred just before and after this period caused several hundreds of mm of sudden vertical motion, generating larger apparent sea-level changes than those observed during the entire intervening period. Our results show that vertical ground motions must be accounted for when evaluating sea-level change hazards in active tectonic regions. These data are needed to help communities and governments understand environmental changes and make the best decisions for their future. PMID:21795605

  10. Absolute measurement of optical flat surface shape based on the conjugate differential method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya; Ma, Jun; Zhu, Rihong; Yuan, Caojin; Chen, Lei; Cai, Huijuan; Sun, Weiyuan

    2015-11-16

    In this paper the conjugate differential method is proposed to measure the absolute surface shape of the flat mirror using a phase-shifting interferometer. The conjugate differential method is derived from the differential method, which extracts absolute phase differences by introducing the slight transverse shifts of the optic. It employs the measurement schemes making transverse shifts on the orthogonally bilateral symmetry positions. So the measurement procedures have been changed into four-step tests to get the phase difference map instead of three-step tests for the differential method. The precision of the slope approximation is enhanced by reducing couplings between multi-step tests, and the reliability of the measurements can be improved. Several differential wavefront reconstruction methods, such as Fourier transform, Zernike polynomial fitting and Hudgin model method, can be applied to reconstruct the absolute surface shape from the differencing phase maps in four different simulation environment. They were also used to reconstruct the absolute surface shape with the conjugate differential method in the experiment. Our method accords with the classical three-flat test better than the traditional differential method, where the deviation of RMS value between the conjugate differential method and the three-flat test is less than 0.3 nm. PMID:26698450

  11. Precise orbit computation and sea surface modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakker, Karel F.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Rummel, R.; Vermaat, E.; Deruijter, W. P. M.; Vandermade, J. W.; Zimmerman, J. T. F.

    1991-01-01

    The research project described below is part of a long-term program at Delft University of Technology aiming at the application of European Remote Sensing satellite (ERS-1) and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter measurements for geophysical purposes. This program started in 1980 with the processing of Seasat laser range and altimeter height measurements and concentrates today on the analysis of Geosat altimeter data. The objectives of the TOPEX/POSEIDON research project are the tracking of the satellite by the Dutch mobile laser tracking system MTLRS-2, the computation of precise TOPEX/POSEIDON orbits, the analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of the orbit errors, the improvement of ERS-1 orbits through the information obtained from the altimeter crossover difference residuals for crossing ERS-1 and TOPEX/POSEIDON tracks, the combination of ERS-1 and TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter data into a single high-precision data set, and the application of this data set to model the sea surface. The latter application will focus on the determination of detailed regional mean sea surfaces, sea surface variability, ocean topography, and ocean currents in the North Atlantic, the North Sea, the seas around Indonesia, the West Pacific, and the oceans around South Africa.

  12. Simulation of ionic surfaces from an absolutely convergent solution of the Madelung problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, D.

    1995-04-01

    The classic Madelung problem is cast into an absolutely convergent form that is readily evaluated by direct lattice summation, revealing a net r{sup {minus}5} range of the net Coulomb potential in ionic crystals and liquids. The realization that Coulomb interactions in condensed systems can actually be rather short ranged (provided the system is overall neutral) leads to the prediction, verified by computer simulations for rocksalt-structure surfaces, that all surfaces in predominantly ionic crystals should be fundamentally reconstructed. The work also provides a conceptual framework for the theoretical treatment of polar surfaces, as demonstrated for the case of the (111) surfaces of NaCl and MgO.

  13. Sea surface and remotely sensed temperatures off Cape Mendocino, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, L. C.; Arvesen, J. C.; Frydenlund, D.; Myers, J. S.; Short, K.

    1985-01-01

    During September 3 to 5, 1979, a multisensor oceanographic experiment was conducted off Cape Mendocino, California. The purpose of this experiment was to validate the use of remote sensing techniques over an area along the U.S. west coast where coasted upwelling is known to be intense. Remotely sensed mutlispectral data, including thermal infrared imagery, were collected above an upwelling feature off Cape Mendocino. Data were acquired from the TIRNOS-N and NOAA-6 polar orbiting satellites, the NASA Ames Research Center's high altitude U-2 aircraft, and a U.S. Coast Guard C-130 aircraft. Supporting surface truth data over the same feature were collected aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship, OCEANOGRAPHER. Atmospheric soundings were also taken aboard the ship. The results indicate that shipboard measurements of sea surface temperatures can be reproduction within 1 C or better through remote observation of absolute infrared radiance values (whether measured aboard the NOAA polar orbiting satellite, the U-2 aircraft, or the Coast Guard aircraft) by using appropriate atmospheric corrections. Also, the patterns of sea surface temperature which were derived independently from the various remote platforms provide a consistent interpretation of the surface temperature field.

  14. Climate modulation on sea surface height in China seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Xidong; Cao, Yingzhi; Zhang, Lianxin; Shao, Caixia; Sun, Chunjian; Wu, Xinrong; Fu, Hongli; Xuan, Lili

    2015-09-01

    The climate modulation on the sea surface height (SSH) in China seas is investigated using a China Ocean Reanalysis (CORA) dataset from 1958-2008. The dataset is constructed by assimilating the temperature/salinity profiles derived from the satellite altimetry data and historical observational temperature/salinity profiles. Based on the Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF), the CORA sea surface height anomaly (SSHa) is decomposed, and the interannual and decadal variability of the first three leading modes are analyzed. On the interannual timescale, the first principal component (PC1) is significant positively correlated with the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). On the decadal timescale, North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO) has significant negative correlation with PC1 whereas Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) is in phase with PC3. Analysis shows that the decadal variability of SSH is mainly modulated by the wind stress curl variability related to the NPGO and PDO. In addition, the effect of net heat flux associated to the NPGO and PDO on SSH is also investigated, with net heat flux variability in the Luzon strait and tropic Pacific found to influence the decadal variability of SSH.

  15. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation over Oil-Covered Sea Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Jin, Wei; Guo, Li-Xin

    2012-07-01

    An exhaustive analysis of electromagnetic wave propagation over an oil-covered sea surface in an evaporation duct environment is studied in comparison with those of the oil-free sea surface. Instead of using the traditional rms height formula, which only considers the oil-free sea surface, we reduce the rms height of a one-dimensional oil-covered sea surface based on the Pierson-Moskowitz sea spectrum. Then, the electromagnetic wave propagation over the oil-covered sea surface in an evaporation duct environment with different wind speeds and frequencies is discussed by the parabolic equation for a fully oil-covered sea surface. In addition, the influence of the fractional filling factor on the electromagnetic wave propagation over non-fully oil-covered sea surface is also investigated. The results show that the oil film can reduce the sea surface roughness and strengthen the trapping effect in an evaporation duct environment.

  16. Three modes of interdecadal trends in sea surface temperature and sea surface height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Pradal, M.

    2013-12-01

    It might be thought that sea surface height and sea surface temperature would be tightly related. We show that this is not necessarily the case on a global scale. We analysed this relationship in a suite of coupled climate models run under 1860 forcing conditions. The models are low-resolution variants of the GFDL Earth System Model, reported in Galbraith et al. (J. Clim. 2011). 1. Correlated changes in global sea surface height and global sea surface temperature. This mode corresponds to opening and closing of convective chimneys in the Southern Ocean. As the Southern Ocean destratifies, sea ice formation is suppressed during the winter and more heat is taken up during the summer. This mode of variability is highly correlated with changes in the top of the atmosphere radiative budget and weakly correlated with changes in the deep ocean circulation. 2. Uncorrelated changes in global sea surface height and global sea surface temperature. This mode of variability is associated with interdecadal variabliity in tropical winds. Changes in the advective flux of heat to the surface ocean play a critical role in driving these changes, which also result in significant local changes in sea level. Changes sea ice over the Southern Ocean still result in changes in solar absorption, but these are now largely cancelled by changes in outgoing longwave radiation. 3. Anticorrelated changes in global sea surface height and global sea surface temperatures. By varying the lateral diffusion coefficient in the ocean model, we are able to enhance and suppress convection in the Southern and Northern Pacific Oceans. Increasing the lateral diffusion coefficients shifts the balance sources of deep water away from the warm salty deep water of the North Atlantic and towards cold fresh deep water from the other two regions. As a result, even though the planet as a whole warms, the deep ocean cools and sea level falls, with changes of order 30 cm over 500 years. The increase in solar absorption

  17. Satellite monitoring of sea surface pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielder, G.; Telfer, D. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Image processing techniques developed are well adapted to the exploration and isolation of local areas which exhibit small temperature differences between themselves and their surroundings. In the worst case of imagery of small areal extent of sea surface having no coastal boundary in the area, there is yet no method of distinguishing unambiguously an oil spill from fog, cloud, the effect produced by shallow sediments, or the effects of naturally occuring thermal fronts. In the case of uniform slicks of liquid North Sea oil in still air, laboratory simulation experiments show that, for oil thicknesses in excess of 1 or 2 mm, there is, under equilibrium conditions, little dependence of oil surface temperature on the thickness of the oil layer. The surface temperature of oil is consistently higher than that of water, the difference being about 1 K at low values of relative humidity, but tending to increase as the relative humidity increases.

  18. Tropical cyclone rainfall area controlled by relative sea surface temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yanluan; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-01-01

    Tropical cyclone rainfall rates have been projected to increase in a warmer climate. The area coverage of tropical cyclones influences their impact on human lives, yet little is known about how tropical cyclone rainfall area will change in the future. Here, using satellite data and global atmospheric model simulations, we show that tropical cyclone rainfall area is controlled primarily by its environmental sea surface temperature (SST) relative to the tropical mean SST (that is, the relative SST), while rainfall rate increases with increasing absolute SST. Our result is consistent with previous numerical simulations that indicated tight relationships between tropical cyclone size and mid-tropospheric relative humidity. Global statistics of tropical cyclone rainfall area are not expected to change markedly under a warmer climate provided that SST change is relatively uniform, implying that increases in total rainfall will be confined to similar size domains with higher rainfall rates. PMID:25761457

  19. Global mean sea surface based upon SEASAT altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    A global mean sea surface based upon the SEASAT altimeter data was derived. A combination of crossing arc techniques, accurate SEASAT reference orbits, and a previously computed GOES-3/SEASAT mean sea surface were used in the computation process. This mean sea surface provides a basis for the determination of global ocean circulation patterns and for detailed analysis of the Earth's internal structure. A contour map of the global mean sea surface is presented.

  20. Twentieth-Century Sea Surface Temperature Trends

    PubMed

    Cane; Clement; Kaplan; Kushnir; Pozdnyakov; Seager; Zebiak; Murtugudde

    1997-02-14

    An analysis of historical sea surface temperatures provides evidence for global warming since 1900, in line with land-based analyses of global temperature trends, and also shows that over the same period, the eastern equatorial Pacific cooled and the zonal sea surface temperature gradient strengthened. Recent theoretical studies have predicted such a pattern as a response of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system to an exogenous heating of the tropical atmosphere. This pattern, however, is not reproduced by the complex ocean-atmosphere circulation models currently used to simulate the climatic response to increased greenhouse gases. Its presence is likely to lessen the mean 20th-century global temperature change in model simulations. PMID:9020074

  1. Sea surface temperature - Observations from geostationary satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. J.; Smith, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Multispectral image data acquired from the VISSR atmospheric sounder (VAS) on the geostationary GOES satellites were used to estimate sea surface temperatures (SST). A procedure was developed to screen VAS visible and infrared data for cloud-free regions for estimation of SST from the clear infrared radiances. A data set of matches between the VAS radiances and high quality buoy estimates of SST was produced. A linear regression analysis of these matches was performed to generate an empirical algorithm relating the VAS window channel brightness temperatures to the estimates of SST recorded by NOAA fixed environment buoys. Daily maps of SST during Hurricanes Alicia (1983) and Debbie (1982) demonstrated the ability of VAS to monitor air-sea interactions at high temporal and spatial scales.

  2. Atlantic deep-sea stratigraphy: extension of absolute chronology to 320,000 years.

    PubMed

    Ku, T L; Broecker, W S

    1966-01-28

    Thorium-230 measurements on a core of globigerina ooze from the Caribbean Sea substantiate the prediction of Ericson et al. that the paleontological boundary U-V (Sangamon-Illinoian boundary in their scheme) in the Atlantic sediments has an age of close to 320,000 years. As the ages derived by Ericson et al. were based on extrapolations of mean sedimentation rates established by carbon-14 and protactinium-231 dating of the upper sections of this and other cores, this result confirms the assumption that sedimentation rates in the Caribbean Sea have not changed significantly during the past several hundred thousand years. The uranium content of the ocean as indicated by the deposition rate of thorium-230 was no more than 30 percent higher during glacial than during interglacial periods. PMID:17798520

  3. The visual surface brightness relation and the absolute magnitudes of RR Lyrae stars. I - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manduca, A.; Bell, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical relation analogous to the Barnes-Evans relation between stellar surface brightness and V-R color is derived which is applicable to the temperatures and gravities appropriate to RR Lyrae stars. Values of the visual surface brightness and V-R colors are calculated for model stellar atmospheres with effective temperatures between 6000 and 8000 K, log surface gravities from 2.2 to 3.5, and A/H anbundance ratios from -0.5 to -3.0. The resulting relation is found to be in reasonable agreement with the empirical relation of Barnes, Evans and Moffet (1978), with, however, small sensitivities to gravity and metal abundance. The relation may be used to derive stellar angular diameters from (V,R) photometry and to derive radii, distances, and absolute magnitudes for variable stars when combined with a radial velocity curve. The accuracies of the radii and distances (within 10%) and absolute magnitudes (within 0.25 magnitudes) compare favorably with those of the Baade-Wesselink method currently in use.

  4. Absolute testing of surface based on sub-aperture stitching interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xin; Xu, Fuchao; Xie, Weimin; Xing, Tingwen

    2015-02-01

    Large-aperture optical elements are widely employed in high-power laser system, astronomy, and outer-space technology. Sub-aperture stitching is an effective way to extend the lateral and vertical dynamic range of a conventional interferometer. Most of the commercial available sub-aperture stitching interferometers measure the surface with a standard lens that produces a reference wavefront, and the precision of the interferometer is generally limited by the standard lens. The test accuracy can be achieved by removing the error of reference surface by the absolute testing method. In our paper we use the different sub-apertures as the different flats to get the profile of the reference lens. Only two lens in the testing process which is fewer than the traditional 3-flat method. In the testing equipment, we add a reflective lens and a lens which can transparent and reflect to get the non rationally symmetric errors of the testing flat. The arithmetic is present in this paper which uses the absolute testing method to improve the testing accuracy of the sub-aperture stitching interferometers by removing the errors caused by reference surface.

  5. Absolute height measurement of specular surfaces with modified active fringe reflection photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongyu; Jiang, Xiangqian; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Zonghua

    2014-07-01

    Deflectometric methods have been studied for more than a decade for slope measurement of specular freeform surfaces through utilization of the deformation of a sample pattern after reflection from a tested sample surface. Usually, these approaches require two-directional fringe patterns to be projected on a LCD screen or ground glass and require slope integration, which leads to some complexity for the whole measuring process. This paper proposes a new mathematical measurement model for measuring topography information of freeform specular surfaces, which integrates a virtual reference specular surface into the method of active fringe reflection photogrammetry and presents a straight-forward relation between height of the tested surface and phase signals. This method only requires one direction of horizontal or vertical sinusoidal fringe patterns to be projected from a LCD screen, resulting in a significant reduction in capture time over established methods. Assuming the whole system has been precalibrated during the measurement process, the fringe patterns are captured separately via the virtual reference and detected freeform surfaces by a CCD camera. The reference phase can be solved according to the spatial geometric relation between the LCD screen and the CCD camera. The captured phases can be unwrapped with a heterodyne technique and optimum frequency selection method. Based on this calculated unwrapped-phase and that proposed mathematical model, absolute height of the inspected surface can be computed. Simulated and experimental results show that this methodology can conveniently calculate topography information for freeform and structured specular surfaces without integration and reconstruction processes.

  6. A multiproxy reconstruction of Hebridean Shelf Sea spring sea surface temperatures from 1805-2010 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, D.; Butler, P.; Williams, S.; Scourse, J. D.; Richardson, C.; Wanamaker, A. D.; Austin, W.; Cage, A.; Sayer, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present a multiproxy reconstruction of Hebridean shelf sea (Tiree Passage; NW Scotland) spring sea surface temperatures (SSTs) for the period AD 1805-2010. The reconstruction is based on growth increment series from the first absolutely dated annually-resolved multi-centennial Glycymeris glycymeris bivalve mollusc sclerochronology and is coupled with previously published stable oxygen isotopes (δ18O) from benthic foraminifera sampled from a dated sediment core from nearby Loch Sunart. The independent series contain significant correlations with SSTs across complementary frequency domains. The low frequency component of the sedimentary archive was combined with the mid and high frequency components of the G. glycymeris chronology indices to create a single multiproxy series. Split calibration-verification statistics (reduction of error, RE, coefficient of efficiency, CE, and R2) indicate that the multiproxy record, calibrated to local instrumental sea surface temperatures, contains significant precision and skill at reconstructing spring SSTs (RE=0.59, CE=0.26, R2=0.54). These data demonstrate that bivalve sclerochronologies, when combined with low frequency proxies such as sediment archives, can facilitate statistically robust reconstructions of palaeoceanographic variability over the late Holocene for hydrographically-significant regions of the temperate marine system previously void of annually-resolved archives. The reconstructed SSTs contain a general warming trend of 0.60 ×0.14oC per century. Only four years in the reconstructed period (1999, 2000, 2002 and 2003) exceed temperatures greater than two standard deviations higher than the reconstructed mean SST (9.03oC), whilst just three years in the first half of the 19th century (1835, 1838 and 1840) fall more than 2σ below the reconstructed mean (6.80oC).

  7. Sea Surface Temperature and Vegetation Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a composite MODIS image showing the 'green wave' of spring in North America and sea surface temperature in the ocean, collected over an 8-day period during the first week in April 2000. On land, the darker green pixels show where the most green foliage is being produced due to photosynthetic activity. Yellows on land show where there is little or no productivity and red is a boundary zone. In the ocean, orange and yellows show warmer waters and blues show colder values.

  8. A global monthly sea surface temperature climatology

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, D.J.; Trenberth, K.E.; Reynolds, R.W. NOAA, Climate Analysis Center, Washington, DC )

    1992-09-01

    The paper presents a new global 2 deg x 2 deg monthly sea surface temperature (SST) climatology, referred here to as the Shea-Trenberth-Reynolds (STR) climatology, which was derived by modifying a 1950-1979-based SST climatology from the Climate Analysis Center (CAC), by using data from the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set to improve the SST estimates in the regions of the Kuroshio and the Gulf Stream. A comparison of the STR climatology with the Alexander and Mobley SST climatology showed that the STR climatology is warmer in the Northern Hemisphere, and colder poleward of 45 deg S. 22 refs.

  9. Absolute and relative intrasession reliability of surface EMG variables for voluntary precise forearm movements.

    PubMed

    Carius, Daniel; Kugler, Patrick; Kuhwald, Hans-Marten; Wollny, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    The reliability of surface electromyography (EMG) derived parameters is of high importance, but there is distinct lack of studies concerning the reliability during dynamic contractions. Especially Amplitude, Fourier and Wavelet parameter in conjunction have not been tested so far. The interpretation of the EMG variables might be difficult because the movement itself introduces additional factors that affect its characteristics. The aim of this study was to determine the relative and absolute intrasession reliability of electromyographic (EMG) variables of selected arm muscles during concurrent precise elbow extension/flexion movements at different force levels and movement speed. Participants (all-male: n = 17, range 20-32 years) were asked to adapt to a gross-motor visuomotor tracking task (elbow extension/flexion movement) using a custom-built lever arm apparatus. After sufficient adaptation surface electromyography was used to record the electrical activity of mm. biceps brachii, brachioradialis and triceps brachii, and the signal amplitude (RMS [μV]) and the mean frequency of the power spectrum (MNF [Hz]) were computed. Additionally Wavelet analysis was used. Relative reproducibility (intraclass correlation) for signal amplitude, mean frequency of the power spectrum and Wavelet intensity during dynamic contractions was fair to good, independent of force level and movement speed (ICC = 0.71-0.98). The amount of absolute intrasession reliability (coefficient of variation) of EMG variables depends on muscle and force level. PMID:26391454

  10. Sea surface temperature variability in the Colombian Basin, Caribbean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Ochoa, Mauricio; Beier, Emilio; Bernal, Gladys; Barton, Eric Desmond

    2012-06-01

    Daily sea surface temperature (SST) data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) database with ∼4 km of spatial resolution were analyzed for the period 1985-2009 in the Colombian Basin using harmonic and empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis. The data were compared with observational records in the Rosario Island National Park at 10 m depth (T10) from March 2003 to August 2005. SST values were higher than T10 from June to October (rainy season), but similar from December to February (dry season); both data sets have similar coefficient of variation. The mean SST distribution varies spatially, with minimum SST values in the coastal zone of La Guajira Peninsula and maximum values in the Darien and Mosquitos Gulfs. The seasonal variability explains up to 75% of the total variability in La Guajira, a high value compared with 40% in the Mosquitos Gulf. The most important feature of the splitting of SST variation into annual and semiannual harmonics in La Guajira is the relationship between their amplitudes. These are of the same order, which is not common in other ocean zones, where the semiannual component is only a small fraction of the annual dominated by the solar warming. The river water discharge, highest from August to November, produces low density surface water, reduces vertical mixing and limits the absorption of solar radiation to a thin surface layer, explaining the discrepancy between SST and T10 in the rainy season. The decomposition of the SST in EOFs indicated that the dominant mode of the basin is a uniform interannual variation in phase with the North Tropical Atlantic Index. The second mode, representing the variability of the Guajira upwelling, covaried strongly with the second mode of wind stress curl. The third mode reflected the role of the vertical atmospheric circulation cell associated with the Caribbean Low Level Jet off Central America.

  11. Sea Surface Temperature from EUMETSAT Including Sentinel-3 SLSTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, Anne; Bonekamp, Hans; Montagner, Francois; Santacesaria, Vincenzo; Tomazic, Igor

    2015-12-01

    The paper gives an overview of sea surface temperature (SST) activities at EUMETSAT including information on SST planned from the Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR). Operational oceanography activities within the Marine Applications group at EUMETSAT continue with a focus on SST, sea surface winds, sea-ice products, radiative fluxes, significant wave height and sea surface topography. These are achieved through the mandatory, optional and third-party programmes, and for some products with the EUMETSAT Ocean and Sea-Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF). Progress towards products from sea-ice surface temperature, ocean colour products, turbidity and aerosol optical depth over water continue. Information on oceanography products from EUMETSAT can be found through the product navigator (http://navigator.eumetsat.int). EUMETSAT have been collaborating with ESA for a number of years on the development of SST for SLSTR.

  12. Absolute Sea Level Monitoring and Altimeter Calibration At Gavdos, Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, E. C.; Gavdos Team

    We present the mean sea level (MSL) monitoring aspect of the altimeter calibration fa- cility under deployment on western Crete and the isle of Gavdos. The Eastern Mediter- ranean area is one of great interest for its intense tectonic activity as well as for its regional oceanography. Recent observations have convincingly demonstrated the im- portance of that area for the regional meteorological and climatological changes. Tide- gauge monitoring with GPS has gained importance lately since tectonics contaminate the inferred sea level variations, and a global network of tide-gauges with long his- torical records can be used as satellite altimeter calibration sites for current and fu- ture missions (e.g. TOPEX/POSEIDON, GFO, JASON-1, ENVISAT, etc.). This is at present a common IOC-GLOSS-IGS effort, already underway (TIGA). Crete hosts two of the oldest tide-gauges in the regional network and our project will further ex- pand it to the south of the island with a new site on the isle of Gavdos, the southernmost European parcel of land. One component of our "GAVDOS" project is the repeated occupation of two already in existence tide-gauge sites at Souda Bay and Heraklion, and their tie to the new facility. We show here initial results from positioning of these sites and some of the available tidal records. Gavdos is situated under a ground-track crossing point of the present T/P and JASON-1 orbits. It is an ideal calibration site if the tectonic motions are monitored precisely and continuously. Our plans include the deployment of additional instrumentation at this site: GPS and DORIS beacons for positioning, transponders for direct calibration, water vapor radiometers, GPS-loaded buoys, airborne surveys with gravimeters and laser profiling lidars, etc., to ensure the best possible and most reliable results.

  13. Modern average global sea-surface temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweitzer, Peter N.

    1993-01-01

    The data contained in this data set are derived from the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Multichannel Sea Surface Temperature data (AVHRR MCSST), which are obtainable from the Distributed Active Archive Center at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif. The JPL tapes contain weekly images of SST from October 1981 through December 1990 in nine regions of the world ocean: North Atlantic, Eastern North Atlantic, South Atlantic, Agulhas, Indian, Southeast Pacific, Southwest Pacific, Northeast Pacific, and Northwest Pacific. This data set represents the results of calculations carried out on the NOAA data and also contains the source code of the programs that made the calculations. The objective was to derive the average sea-surface temperature of each month and week throughout the whole 10-year series, meaning, for example, that data from January of each year would be averaged together. The result is 12 monthly and 52 weekly images for each of the oceanic regions. Averaging the images in this way tends to reduce the number of grid cells that lack valid data and to suppress interannual variability.

  14. Sea surface temperature variability: patterns and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Deser, Clara; Alexander, Michael A; Xie, Shang-Ping; Phillips, Adam S

    2010-01-01

    Patterns of sea surface temperature (SST) variability on interannual and longer timescales result from a combination of atmospheric and oceanic processes. These SST anomaly patterns may be due to intrinsic modes of atmospheric circulation variability that imprint themselves upon the SST field mainly via surface energy fluxes. Examples include SST fluctuations in the Southern Ocean associated with the Southern Annular Mode, a tripolar pattern of SST anomalies in the North Atlantic associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation, and a pan-Pacific mode known as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (with additional contributions from oceanic processes). They may also result from coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions, such as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon in the tropical Indo-Pacific, the tropical Atlantic Niño, and the cross-equatorial meridional modes in the tropical Pacific and Atlantic. Finally, patterns of SST variability may arise from intrinsic oceanic modes, notably the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. PMID:21141660

  15. Sea surface wind stress in stratified atmospheric flow

    SciTech Connect

    Myrhaug, D.; Slaattelid, O.H.

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents the wind shear stress on the sea surface as well as the velocity profile in stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer flow over wind waves by using similarity theory. For a given geostrophic velocity, Coriolis parameter, spectral peak period and stratification parameter the sea surface shear stress is determined. Further, the direction of the sea surface shear stress and the velocity profile are given. Parameterizations of the results are also presented. Finally, the engineering relevance of the results is discussed.

  16. Satellite Sensed Skin Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donlon, Craig

    1997-01-01

    Quantitative predictions of spatial and temporal changes the global climate rely heavily on the use of computer models. Unfortunately, such models cannot provide the basis for climate prediction because key physical processes are inadequately treated. Consequently, fine tuning procedures are often used to optimize the fit between model output and observational data and the validation of climate models using observations is essential if model based predictions of climate change are to be treated with any degree of confidence. Satellite Sea Surface Temperature (SST) observations provide high spatial and temporal resolution data which is extremely well suited to the initialization, definition of boundary conditions and, validation of climate models. In the case of coupled ocean-atmosphere models, the SST (or more correctly the 'Skin' SST (SSST)) is a fundamental diagnostic variable to consider in the validation process. Daily global SST maps derived from satellite sensors also provide adequate data for the detection of global patterns of change which, unlike any other SST data set, repeatedly extend into the southern hemisphere extra-tropical regions. Such data are essential to the success of the spatial 'fingerprint' technique, which seeks to establish a north-south asymmetry where warming is suppressed in the high latitude Southern Ocean. Some estimates suggest that there is a greater than 80% chance of directly detecting significant change (97.5 % confidence level) after 10-12 years of consistent global observations of mean sea surface temperature. However, these latter statements should be qualified with the assumption that a negligible drift in the observing system exists and that biases between individual instruments required to derive a long term data set are small. Given that current estimates for the magnitude of global warming of 0.015 K yr(sup -1) - 0.025 K yr(sup -1), satellite SST data sets need to be both accurate and stable if such a warming trend is to

  17. Middle Pliocene sea surface temperature variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; Chandler, M.A.; Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    Estimates of sea surface temperature (SST) based upon foraminifer, diatom, and ostracod assemblages from ocean cores reveal a warm phase of the Pliocene between about 3.3 and 3.0 Ma. Pollen records and plant megafossils, although not as well dated, show evidence for a warmer climate at about the same time. Increased greenhouse forcing and altered ocean heat transport are the leading candidates for the underlying cause of Pliocene global warmth. Despite being a period of global warmth, this interval encompasses considerable variability. Two new SST reconstructions are presented that are designed to provide a climatological error bar for warm peak phases of the Pliocene and to document the spatial distribution and magnitude of SST variability within the mid-Pliocene warm period. These data suggest long-term stability of low-latitude SST and document greater variability in regions of maximum warming. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Sea surface temperatures from VAS MSI data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure is developed for estimating sea surface temperatures from multispectral image data acquired from the VISSR atmospheric sounder on the geostationary GOES satellites. Theoretical regression equations for two and three infrared window channels are empirically tuned using clear field of view satellite radiances matched with reports of SST from NOAA fixed environmental buoys. The empirical regression equations are then used to produce daily regional analyses of SST. Monthly mean SST's for the western North Atlantic and the eastern equatorial Pacific during March and July 1982 were produced for use in the SST Intercomparison Workshop Series. Workshop results showed VAS SST's have a scatter of 0.8-1.0 C and a slight warm bias with respect to the other measurements of SST. The VAS SST's show no discernible bias in the region of El Chichon volcanic aerosol cloud.

  19. The Impact of Sea Surface Temperature Front on Stratus-Sea Fog over the Yellow and East China Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Li, M.; Liu, F.

    2013-12-01

    A stratus-sea fog event occurred on 3 June 2011 over the Yellow and East China Seas (as shown in figure) is investigated observationally and numerically. Emphasis is put on the influences of the sea surface temperature front (SSTF) and of the synoptic circulations on the transition of stratus to sea fog. The southerly winds from a synoptic high pressure transport water vapor from the East China Sea to the Yellow Sea, while the subsidence induced by the high contributes to the formation of the temperature inversion on the top of the stratus or stratocumulus that appears mainly over the warm flank of a sea surface temperature front in the East China Sea. Forced by the SSTF, there is a secondary cell within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), with a sinking branch on the cold flank and a rising one on the warm flank of the SSTF. This sinking branch, in phase with the synoptic subsidence, forces the stratus or stratocumulus to lower in the elevation getting close to the sea surface as these clouds move northward driven by the southerly winds. The cloud droplets can either reach to the sea surface directly or evaporate into water vapor that may condense again when coming close to the cold sea surface to form fog. In this later case, the stratus and fog may separate. The cooling effect of cold sea surface counteracts the adiabatic heating induced by the subsidence and thus helps the transition of stratus to sea fog in the southern Yellow Sea. By smoothing the SSTF in the numerical experiment, the secondary cell weakens and the sea fog patches shrink obviously over the cold flank of the SSTF though the synoptic subsidence and moist advection still exist. A conceptual model is suggested for the transition of stratus to sea fog in the Yellow and East China Seas, which is helpful for the forecast of sea fog over these areas. The satellite visible image of the stratus-fog event. The fog appears in the Yellow Sea and the stratocumulus in the East China Sea.

  20. Absolute magnetization of the seafloor at a basalt-hosted hydrothermal site: Insights from a deep-sea submersible survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szitkar, Florent; Dyment, Jérôme; Fouquet, Yves; Choi, Yujin; Honsho, Chie

    2015-02-01

    The analysis of high-resolution vector magnetic data acquired by deep-sea submersibles (DSSs) requires the development of specific approaches adapted to their uneven tracks. We present a method that takes advantage of (1) the varying altitude of the DSS above the seafloor and (2) high-resolution multibeam bathymetric data acquired separately, at higher altitude, by an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, to estimate the absolute magnetization intensity and the magnetic polarity of the shallow subseafloor along the DSS path. We apply this method to data collected by DSS Nautile on a small active basalt-hosted hydrothermal site. The site is associated with a lack of magnetization, in agreement with previous findings at the same kind of sites: the contrast between nonmagnetic sulfide deposits/stockwork zone and strongly magnetized basalt is sufficient to explain the magnetic signal observed at such a low altitude. Both normal and reversed polarities are observed in the lava flows surrounding the site, suggesting complex history of accumulating volcanic flows.

  1. A multispectral method of determining sea surface temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shenk, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    A multispectral method for determining sea surface temperatures is discussed. The specifications of the equipment and the atmospheric conditions required for successful multispectral data acquisition are described. Examples of data obtained in the North Atlantic Ocean are presented. The differences between the actual sea surface temperatures and the equivalent blackbody temperatures as determined by a radiometer are plotted.

  2. Correlations between altimetric sea surface height and radiometric sea surface temperature in the South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Matthew S.; Allen, Myles; Guymer, Trevor; Saunders, Mark

    1998-04-01

    In the last decade, satellite altimetric measurements of sea surface height (SSH) and infrared radiometric measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) have provided a wealth of information about ocean circulation and atmosphere-ocean interactions. SSH is a depth-integrated quantity dependent upon the temperature and salinity structure of the water column and on the depth independent barotropic contribution. SST from infrared radiometers is a surface parameter representing the temperature of the top few microns of the ocean surface. Hence any relationship between SST and SSH provides dynamical information about the coupling between the ocean surface and subsurface. It also offers a promise of new techniques such as interpolating SSH data using SST and of improved calculations of eddy kinetic energy. We use SST data from the along-track scanning radiometer on ERS-I and SSH data from the TOPEX/POSEIDON instrument to examine the relationship between SST and SSH anomalies within the South Atlantic region for 1993 and 1994. We find that positive (≈0.2-0.6) spatial cross correlations between SST and SSH anomalies at zero lag are present throughout the region at large scales (wavelengths >1000 km). Small-scale correlations, however, are high (≈0.7) only in areas associated with fronts and mesoscale variability. These small-scale correlations are seasonal, being strongest in winter and weakest in summer. We discuss the application of these correlations to various techniques requiring the synergistic use of SSH and SST data.

  3. Estimation of absolute water surface temperature based on atmospherically corrected thermal infrared multispectral scanner digital data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Airborne remote sensing systems, as well as those on board Earth orbiting satellites, sample electromagnetic energy in discrete wavelength regions and convert the total energy sampled into data suitable for processing by digital computers. In general, however, the total amount of energy reaching a sensor system located at some distance from the target is composed not only of target related energy, but, in addition, contains a contribution originating from the atmosphere itself. Thus, some method must be devised for removing or at least minimizing the effects of the atmosphere. The LOWTRAN-6 Program was designed to estimate atmospheric transmittance and radiance for a given atmospheric path at moderate spectral resolution over an operational wavelength region from 0.25 to 28.5 microns. In order to compute the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) digital values which were recorded in the absence of the atmosphere, the parameters derived from LOWTRAN-6 are used in a correction equation. The TIMS data were collected at 1:00 a.m. local time on November 21, 1983, over a recirculating cooling pond for a power plant in southeastern Mississippi. The TIMS data were analyzed before and after atmospheric corrections were applied using a band ratioing model to compute the absolute surface temperature of various points on the power plant cooling pond. The summarized results clearly demonstrate the desirability of applying atmospheric corrections.

  4. Stratospheric Impact of Varying Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Nielsen, Jon E.; Waugh, Darryn; Pawson, Steven

    2004-01-01

    The Finite-Volume General Circulation Model (FVGCM) has been run in 50 year simulations with the: 1) 1949-1999 Hadley Centre sea surface temperatures (SST), and 2) a fixed annual cycle of SSTs. In this presentation we first show that the 1949-1999 FVGCM simulation produces a very credible stratosphere in comparison to an NCEP/NCAR reanalysis climatology. In particular, the northern hemisphere has numerous major and minor stratospheric warming, while the southern hemisphere has only a few over the 50-year simulation. During the northern hemisphere winter, temperatures are both warmer in the lower stratosphere and the polar vortex is weaker than is found in the mid-winter southern hemisphere. Mean temperature differences in the lower stratosphere are shown to be small (less than 2 K), and planetary wave forcing is found to be very consistent with the climatology. We then will show the differences between our varying SST simulation and the fixed SST simulation in both the dynamics and in two parameterized trace gases (ozone and methane). In general, differences are found to be small, with subtle changes in planetary wave forcing that lead to reduced temperatures in the SH and increased temperatures in the NH.

  5. Fouling-resistant surfaces of tropical sea stars.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Jana; Walker-Smith, Genefor; Warén, Anders; De Nys, Rocky

    2007-01-01

    Qualitative evidence suggests sea stars are free of fouling organisms; however the presence of fouling-resistant surfaces of sea stars has not previously been documented. Field surveys were conducted in northern Queensland, Australia, during the wet and dry seasons and several tropical sea star species were examined for surface-associated micro- and macro-organisms. Mean bacterial abundances on seven sea star species were approximately 10(4) to 10(5) cells cm(-2) during both seasons. There were no consistent trends in bacterial abundances with season, species and aboral positions on sea star arms. No common generalist fouling organisms, such as algae, barnacles, serpulid polychaetes, bryozoans and ascidians, were found on any specimens of 12 sea star species. However, low numbers of parasitic and commensal macro-organisms were found on six sea star species. The gastropods Parvioris fulvescens, Asterolamia hians, Thyca (Granulithyca) nardoafrianti and Thyca crystallina were found exclusively on the sea stars Archaster typicus, Astropecten indicus, Nardoa pauciforis and Linckia laevigata, respectively. The shrimp Periclimenes soror was only found on Acanthaster planci, and the polychaete Ophiodromus sp. on A. typicus. The copepods Stellicola illgi and Paramolgus sp. were only found on L. laevigata and Echinaster luzonicus, respectively. As no common generalist fouling organisms were discovered, sea stars offer an excellent model to investigate the mechanisms driving fouling-resistant surfaces and the selective settlement of specialist invertebrates. PMID:17882628

  6. An alternative to reduction of surface pressure to sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deardorff, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The pitfalls of the present method of reducing surface pressure to sea level are reviewed, and an alternative, adjusted pressure, P, is proposed. P is obtained from solution of a Poisson equation over a continental region, using the simplest boundary condition along the perimeter or coastline where P equals the sea level pressure. The use of P would avoid the empiricisms and disadvantages of pressure reduction to sea level, and would produce surface pressure charts which depict the true geostrophic wind at the surface.

  7. Sea-ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, F. F.; Sharma, G. D.; Burns, J. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Over 1500 water samples from surface and from standard hydrographic depths were collected during June and July 1973 from Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska. The measurement of temperature, salinity, and productivity indicated that various distinct water masses cover the Bering Sea Shelf. The suspended load in surface waters will be correlated with the ERTS-1 imagery as it becomes available to delineate the surface water circulation. The movement of ice floes in the Bering Strait and Bering Sea indicated that movement of ice varies considerably and may depend on wind stress as well as ocean currents.

  8. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  9. Absolute surface energy calculations of Wurtzite (0001)/(000-1): a study of ZnO and GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingzhao; Zhang, Yiou; Tse, Kinfai; Deng, Bei; Xu, Hu; Zhu, Junyi

    The accurate absolute surface energies of (0001)/(000-1) surfaces of wurtzite structures are crucial in determining the thin film growth mode of important energy materials. However, the surface energies still remain to be solved due to the intrinsic difficulty of calculating dangling bond energy of asymmetrically bonded surface atoms. We used a pseudo-hydrogen passivation method to estimate the dangling bond energy and calculate the polar surfaces of ZnO and GaN. The calculations were based on the pseudo chemical potentials obtained from a set of tetrahedral clusters or simple pseudo-molecules, using density functional theory approaches, for both GGA and HSE. And the surface energies of (0001)/(000-1) surfaces of wurtzite ZnO and GaN we obtained showed relatively high self-consistencies. A wedge structure calculation with a new bottom surface passivation scheme of group I and group VII elements was also proposed and performed to show converged absolute surface energy of wurtzite ZnO polar surfaces. Part of the computing resources was provided by the High Performance Cluster Computing Centre, Hong Kong Baptist University. This work was supported by the start-up funding and direct Grant with the Project code of 4053134 at CUHK.

  10. Sea surface temperature of the coastal zones of France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deschamps, P. Y.; Crepon, M.; Monget, J. M.; Verger, F. (Principal Investigator); Frouin, R.; Cassanet, J.; Wald, L.

    1980-01-01

    The various thermal gradients in the coastal zones of France were mapped with regard to natural phenomena and man made thermal effluents. The mesoscale thermal features of the English Channel, the Bay of Biscay, and the northwestern Mediterranean Sea were also studied. The evolution of the thermal gradients generated by the main estuaries of the French coastal zones was investigated along with the modeling of diurnal heating of the sea surface and its influence on the oceanic surface layers.

  11. Observation of Sea Ice Surface Thermal States Under Cloud Cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Perovich, D. K.; Gow, A. J.; Kwok, R.; Barber, D. G.; Comiso, J. C.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Clouds interfere with the distribution of short-wave and long-wave radiations over sea ice, and thereby strongly affect the surface energy balance in polar regions. To evaluate the overall effects of clouds on climatic feedback processes in the atmosphere-ice-ocean system, the challenge is to observe sea ice surface thermal states under both clear sky and cloudy conditions. From laboratory experiments, we show that C-band radar (transparent to clouds) backscatter is very sensitive to the surface temperature of first-year sea ice. The effect of sea ice surface temperature on the magnitude of backscatter change depends on the thermal regimes of sea ice thermodynamic states. For the temperature range above the mirabilite (Na2SO4.10H20) crystallization point (-8.2 C), C-band data show sea ice backscatter changes by 8-10 dB for incident angles from 20 to 35 deg at both horizontal and vertical polarizations. For temperatures below the mirabilite point but above the crystallization point of MgCl2.8H2O (-18.0 C), relatively strong backwater changes between 4-6 dB are observed. These backscatter changes correspond to approximately 8 C change in temperature for both cases. The backscattering mechanism is related to the temperature which determines the thermodynamic distribution of brine volume in the sea ice surface layer. The backscatter is positively correlated to temperature and the process is reversible with thermodynamic variations such as diurnal insolation effects. From two different dates in May 1993 with clear and overcast conditions determined by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), concurrent Earth Resources Satellite 1 (ERS-1) C-band ice observed with increases in backscatter over first-year sea ice, and verified by increases in in-situ sea ice surface temperatures measured at the Collaborative-Interdisciplinary Cryosphere Experiment (C-ICE) site.

  12. Mesoscale variability of the absolute dynamic topography in the Drake Passage and Scotia Sea in 1993-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshlyakov, Mikhail; Repina, Irina; Tarakanov, Roman

    2016-04-01

    Daily numerical maps of the absolute dynamics topography (ADT), which are published by the French CLS agency (www.aviso.oceanobs.com) were used for the investigation of synoptic (mesoscale) ocean eddies in the Drake Passage and Scotia Sea in 1993-2014. Parts of these maps with the closed ADT isopleths (isohypses) were detected by a precise numerical algorithm and were interpreted as places of the location of cyclonic and anticyclonic mesoscale eddies. In addition, curves of ζ²(t), where t is time and ζ (t) is disturbance of ADT relative to the mean value in 1993-2014 at a given point, were plotted at a number of points within the studied ocean region. These curves show two well pronounced time scales ("periods") of ζ²(t) fluctuations: a lesser scale of 100-500 days and a greater scale varying generally from 2 to 4.5 years manifesting as changes in the time intervals with low and high amplitudes of the lesser time scale ζ²(t) fluctuations. Comparison of the ζ²(t) curves with the ADT maps shows that these lesser scale fluctuations are related to the behavior of individual eddies: their propagation through a given point in the ocean, eddy generation or absorption of an eddy by an ACC jet. The theory of the geostrophic ocean turbulence allows us to suppose that the above mentioned greater time scale of ζ²(t) fluctuations is related to the energy exchange between the ACC jets and mesoscale eddies that appears in a given ocean region, as an alternation of the periods of intense generation of eddies by ACC jets and periods of increased reverse energy transfer from the eddies to jets. The fact revealed in this work that cyclonic (anticyclonic) eddies are adjacent from the north (south) to the ACC jets agrees with this supposition and opens the possibilities to analyze the dynamic influence of the eddy interaction with the individual ACC jets separately.

  13. Probabilistic surface reconstruction of relative sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choblet, Gael; Husson, Laurent; Bodin, Thomas; Capdeville, Yann

    2013-04-01

    Relative sea level is shaped by multiple processes (mantle dynamic topography, plate tectonics, glacio-isostatic adjustment, present day melting of continental ice, anthropogenic causes…), most of which induce spatial gradients in relative sea level fluctuations. The evaluation of the global mean sea level rise is a also a key variable to decipher sea level evolution. Tide gauges represent the only mean to monitor sea-level rise on the scale of the 20th century, while the high quality satellite altimetry era is too short to be immune from short-term fluctuations. Tide gauge data compiled by the Permanent Service for the Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) converts into local estimates of sea level rise. Classically, these in situ observations are averaged spatially in order to infer the global mean sea level trend. However, the strongly heterogeneous distribution of tide gauges (e.g. very sparse in the Southern hemisphere) makes this approach relatively prone to uncertainties, given that sea level rise strongly varies geographically. Last, the societal consequences for coastal communities raise the prominent need for local (rather than global) sea level estimates. An alternative is therefore to provide a global surface reconstruction of relative sea level leading to both local variations and a better constrained global average. Here, we propose such a model from tide gauge records using a probabilistic scheme based on the reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm (as described by Bodin et al., JGR, 2012 for the example of the Australian Moho). This method allows to infer both model and parameter space so that not only the functions within the model but also the number of functions itself are free to vary. This is particulalry relevant to the case of tide gauges that are unevenly distributed on the surface of the Earth and whose record lengths are strongly variable. In addition, Bayesian statistics leads to a probabilistic representation (rather than a best fitting

  14. Application of Land Surface Data Assimilation to Simulations of Sea Breeze Circulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackaro, Scott; Lapenta, William M.; Blackwell, Keith; Suggs, Ron; McNider, Richard T.; Jedlovec, Gary; Kimball, Sytske

    2003-01-01

    A technique has been developed for assimilating GOES-derived skin temperature tendencies and insolation into the surface energy budget equation of a mesoscale model so that the simulated rate of temperature change closely agrees with the satellite observations. A critical assumption of the technique is that the availability of moisture (either from the soil or vegetation) is the least known term in the model's surface energy budget. Therefore, the simulated latent heat flux, which is a function of surface moisture availability, is adjusted based upon differences between the modeled and satellite- observed skin temperature tendencies. An advantage of this technique is that satellite temperature tendencies are assimilated in an energetically consistent manner that avoids energy imbalances and surface stability problems that arise from direct assimilation of surface shelter temperatures. The fact that the rate of change of the satellite skin temperature is used rather than the absolute temperature means that sensor calibration is not as critical. The sea/land breeze is a well-documented mesoscale circulation that affects many coastal areas of the world including the northern Gulf Coast of the United States. The focus of this paper is to examine how the satellite assimilation technique impacts the simulation of a sea breeze circulation observed along the Mississippi/Alabama coast in the spring of 2001. The technique is implemented within the PSUNCAR MM5 V3-5 and applied at spatial resolutions of 12- and 4-km. It is recognized that even 4-km grid spacing is too coarse to explicitly resolve the detailed, mesoscale structure of sea breezes. Nevertheless, the model can forecast certain characteristics of the observed sea breeze including a thermally direct circulation that results from differential low-level heating across the land-sea interface. Our intent is to determine the sensitivity of the circulation to the differential land surface forcing produced via the

  15. Land Surface Data Assimilation and the Northern Gulf Coast Land/Sea Breeze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapenta, William M.; Blackwell, Keith; Suggs, Ron; McNider, Richard T.; Jedlovec, Gary; Kimball, Sytske; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A technique has been developed for assimilating GOES-derived skin temperature tendencies and insolation into the surface energy budget equation of a mesoscale model so that the simulated rate of temperature change closely agrees with the satellite observations. A critical assumption of the technique is that the availability of moisture (either from the soil or vegetation) is the least known term in the model's surface energy budget. Therefore, the simulated latent heat flux, which is a function of surface moisture availability, is adjusted based upon differences between the modeled and satellite observed skin temperature tendencies. An advantage of this technique is that satellite temperature tendencies are assimilated in an energetically consistent manner that avoids energy imbalances and surface stability problems that arise from direct assimilation of surface shelter temperatures. The fact that the rate of change of the satellite skin temperature is used rather than the absolute temperature means that sensor calibration is not as critical. The sea/land breeze is a well-documented mesoscale circulation that affects many coastal areas of the world including the northern Gulf Coast of the United States. The focus of this paper is to examine how the satellite assimilation technique impacts the simulation of a sea breeze circulation observed along the Mississippi/Alabama coast in the spring of 2001. The technique is implemented within the PSU/NCAR MM5 V3-4 and applied on a 4-km domain for this particular application. It is recognized that a 4-km grid spacing is too coarse to explicitly resolve the detailed, mesoscale structure of sea breezes. Nevertheless, the model can forecast certain characteristics of the observed sea breeze including a thermally direct circulation that results from differential low-level heating across the land-sea interface. Our intent is to determine the sensitivity of the circulation to the differential land surface forcing produced via the

  16. Sea surface signature of tropical cyclones using microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kil, Bumjun; Burrage, Derek; Wesson, Joel; Howden, Stephan

    2013-06-01

    Measuring the sea surface during tropical cyclones (TC) is challenging due to severe weather conditions that prevent shipboard measurements and clouds which mask the sea surface for visible satellite sensors. However, sea surface emission in the microwave L-band can penetrate rain and clouds and be measured from space. The European Space Agency (ESA) MIRAS L-band radiometer on the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite enables a view of the sea surface from which the effects of tropical cyclones on sea surface emissivity can be measured. The emissivity at these frequencies is a function of sea surface salinity (SSS), sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface roughness, polarization, and angle of emission. If the latter four variables can be estimated, then models of the sea surface emissivity can be used to invert SSS from measured brightness temperature (TB). Actual measured TB from space also has affects due to the ionosphere and troposphere, which have to be compensated for, and components due to the galactic and cosmic background radiation those have to be removed. In this research, we study the relationships between retrieved SSS from MIRAS, and SST and precipitation collected by the NASA TMI sensor from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite during Hurricane Isaac, in August 2012. During the slower movement of the storm, just before landfall on the vicinity of the Louisiana Shelf, higher precipitation amounts were associated with lower SSS and slightly increased SST. This increased trend of SST and lower SSS under regions of high precipitation are indicative of inhibited vertical mixing. The SMOS Level 2 SSS were filtered by a stepwise process with removal of high uncertainty in TB under conditions of strong surface roughness which are known to create noise. The signature of increased SST associated with increasing precipitation was associated with decreased SSS during the storm. Although further research is required, this study

  17. Modelling Sea Ice and Surface Wave Interactions in Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosekova, L.; Aksenov, Y.; Coward, A.; Williams, T.; Bertino, L.; Nurser, A. J. G.

    2015-12-01

    In the Polar Oceans, the surface ocean waves break up sea ice cover and create the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ), an area between the sea-ice free ocean and pack ice characterized by highly fragmented ice. This band of sea ice cover is undergoing dramatic changes due to sea ice retreat, with a widening of up to 39% in the Arctic Ocean reported over the last three decades and projections predicting a continuing increase. The surface waves, sea ice and ocean interact in the MIZ through multiple complex feedbacks and processes which are not accounted for in any of the present-day climate models. To address this issue, we present a model development which implements surface ocean wave effects in the global Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) NEMO, coupled to the CICE sea ice model. Our implementation takes into account a number of physical processes specific to the MIZ dynamics. Incoming surface waves are attenuated due to scattering and energy dissipation induced by the presence of ice cover, which is in turn fragmented in response to flexural stresses. This fragmentation modifies the floe size distribution and impacts the sea ice thermodynamics by increasing lateral melting and thus affecting momentum and heat transfer between sea ice and the upper ocean. In addition, the dynamics of the sea ice is modified by a combined rheology that takes into account floe collisions and allows for a more realistic representation of the MIZ. We present results from the NEMO OGCM at 1 and 0.25 degree resolution with a wave-ice interaction module. The module introduces two new diagnostics previously unavailable in OGCM's: surface wave spectra in sea ice covered areas, and floe size distribution (FSD) due to wave-induced fragmentation. We evaluate the sea ice and wave simulations with available observational estimates, and analyze the impact of these MIZ processes on the ocean and sea ice state. We focus on ocean mixing, stratification, circulation and the role of the MIZ in ocean

  18. Simulated sea surface temperature and heat fluxes in different climates of the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Döscher, Ralf; Meier, H E Markus

    2004-06-01

    The physical state of the Baltic Sea in possible future climates is approached by numerical model experiments with a regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model driven by different global simulations. Scenarios and recent climate simulations are compared to estimate changes. The sea surface is clearly warmer by 2.9 degrees C in the ensemble mean. The horizontal pattern of average annual mean warming can largely be explained in terms of ice-cover reduction. The transfer of heat from the atmosphere to the Baltic Sea shows a changed seasonal cycle: a reduced heat loss in fall, increased heat uptake in spring, and reduced heat uptake in summer. The interannual variability of surface temperature is generally increased. This is associated with a smoothed frequency distribution in northern basins. The overall heat budget shows increased solar radiation to the sea surface, which is balanced by changes of the other heat flux components. PMID:15264603

  19. Fine-resolution simulation of surface current and sea ice in the Arctic Mediterranean Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiying; Zhang, Xuehong; Yu, Rucong; Liu, Hailong; Li, Wei

    2007-04-01

    A fine-resolution model is developed for ocean circulation simulation in the National Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG), Chinese Academy of Sciences, and is applied to simulate surface current and sea ice variations in the Arctic Mediterranean Seas. A dynamic sea ice model in elastic-viscous-plastic rheology and a thermodynamic sea ice model are employed. A 200-year simulation is performed and a dimatological average of a 10-year period (141st 150th) is presented with focus on sea ice concentration and surface current variations in the Arctic Mediterranean Seas. The model is able to simulate well the East Greenland Current, Beaufort Gyre and the Transpolar Drift, but the simulated West Spitsbergen Current is small and weak. In the March climatology, the sea ice coverage can be simulated well except for a bit more ice in east of Spitsbergen Island. The result is also good for the September scenario except for less ice concentration east of Greenland and greater ice concentration near the ice margin. The extra ice east of Spitsbergen Island is caused by sea ice current convergence forced by atmospheric wind stress.

  20. Comparison of TOPEX sea surface heights and tide gauge sea levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchum, Gary T.

    1994-01-01

    TOPEX sea surface height data from the first 300 days of the mission are compared to sea level data from 71 tide gauges. The initial comparison uses sea surface height data processed according to standard procedures as defined in the users handbook. It is found that the median correlations for island and for coastal tide gauges are 0.53 and 0.42, respectively. The analogous root mean square (RMS) differences between the two data sets are 7.9 and 10.4 cm. The comparisons improve significantly when a 60-day harmonic is fit to the differences and removed. This period captures aliased M(sub 2) and S(sub 2) tidal energy that is not removed by the tide model. Making this correction and smoothing the sea surface height data over 25-km along-track segments results in median correlations of 0.58 and 0.46 for the islands and coastal stations, and median RMS differences of 5.8 and 7.7 cm, respectively. Removing once per revolution signals from the sea surface heights results in degraded comparisons with the sea levels. It is also found that a number of stations have poor comparisons due to propagating signals that introduce temporal lags between the altimeter and tide gauge time series. A final comparison is made by eliminating stations where this propagation effect is large, discarding two stations that are suspected to have problems with the sea level data, smoothing over 10-day intervals, and restricting attention to islands gauges. This results in a set of 552 data pairs that have a correlation of 0.66 and a RMS difference of 4.3 cm. The conclusion is that on timescales longer than about 10 days the RMS sea surface height errors are less than or of the order of several centimeters.

  1. Radar Backscatter Across the Gulf Stream Sea Surface Temperature Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Li, F. K.; Walsh, E. J.; Lou, S. H.

    1998-01-01

    Ocean backscatter signatures were measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne NUSCAT K(sub u)-band scatterometer across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front. The measurements were made during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) off the coast of Virginia and Maryland in the winter of 1991.

  2. The PRISM palaeoclimate reconstruction and Pliocene sea-surface temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, I present a summary of the Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) palaeoenvironmental reconstruction, with emphasis on its historical development and range of boundary condition datasets. Sea-surface temperature (SST), sea level, sea ice, land cover (vegetation and ice) and topography are discussed as well as many of the assumptions required to create an integrated global-scale reconstruction. New multiproxy research shows good general agreement on the magnitude of mid-Pliocene SST warming. Future directions, including maximum and minimum SST analyses and deep ocean temperature estimates aimed at a full three-dimensional reconstruction, are presented. ?? The Micropalaeontological Society 2007.

  3. Absolute model ages of mantled surfaces in Malea Planum and Utopia Planitia, Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willmes, M.; Hiesinger, H.; Reiss, D.; Zanetti, M.

    2009-04-01

    The surface of Mars is partially covered by a latitude-dependent ice-rich smooth mantle in the middle and high latitudes (±30-60°) [1, 2]. These deposits relate to changes in the obliquity of Mars which have led to major shifts in the Martian climate and repeated global episodes of deposition [3]. The deposits vary in thickness and are usually independent of local geology, topography and elevation. In this study we have determined absolute model ages for the mantled surface units in Utopia Planitia (northern hemisphere) and Malea Planum (southern hemisphere) using crater statistics [4]. These regions show a specific type of mantle degradation called scalloped terrain, and modelled crater retention ages of the easily eroded mantle in these regions reveal the time since the last resurfacing. Images from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) (25-50 cm/pixel spatial resolution) on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) were analyzed, continuous areas of smooth mantle were mapped, and small, fresh, unmodified craters were counted. Both regions show degradation features of the mantle in varying degrees. The mantle in Utopia Planitia appears heavily modified by polygonal fractures and scalloped depressions [5]. Scalloped depressions are also found in Malea Planum, but the mantle appears much smoother and less modified by periglacial processes [5, 6]. The study areas totalled 722 km² in Utopia Planitia, and 296 km² in Malea Planum. Model ages for these regions were determined using the chronology function of Hartmann and Neukum [4] and the production function Ivanov [7]. The model ages show that the mantle unit for the area mapped in Utopia Planitia is 0.65 (+0.35/-0.41) to 2.9 (+0.69/-0.75) Myr old and Malea Planum is 3.0 (+1.5/-1.7) to 4.5 (+1.3/-1.4) Myr old, and that both regions represent very recent Amazonian terrain. This is also in agreement with the observed young degradation features described by [6, 8]. We acknowledge that the

  4. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of GEOSAT sea surface height, SSMI surface wind speed, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, and ECMWF surface wind components during 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Zlotnicki, V.; Newman, J.; Brown, O.; Wentz, F.

    1991-01-01

    Monthly mean global distributions for 1988 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map. Distributions are included for sea surface height variation estimated from GEOSAT; surface wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on NOAA spacecrafts; and the Cartesian components of the 10m height wind vector computed by the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting. Charts of monthly mean value, sampling distribution, and standard deviation value are displayed. Annual mean distributions are displayed.

  5. Investigating enhanced atmospheric-sea surface coupling and interactions in the Irish Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskell, John; Horsburgh, Kevin; Plater, Andy J.

    2013-02-01

    Enhanced atmospheric-sea surface coupling is investigated in the Irish Sea. The implications for so-called Proudman resonance are considered for a hindcast of an event that produced a significant, pressure-induced storm surge at the port of Liverpool. Time-series of non-dimensional gain along the depression track show resonant enhancement of the pressure-driven residual elevations in the central, deeper region of the Irish Sea when a depression moves at the speed of a shallow water wave (gh0.5). However, in the relatively shallow eastern Irish Sea the wind stress is the dominant surge-generating mechanism. Wind-generated surge magnitude is influenced by the propagation speed of the depression which controls the timing of momentum input with respect to tidal depth variations. Large surges at Liverpool are mostly caused by an almost linear summation of the wind- and pressure-induced surge components when the wind stress acts over low water and/or the rising tide. However, it is possible for the interaction of wind stress and pressure to reduce the total surge when a pressure-induced sea-level increase reduces the effect of the wind stress. The Irish Sea is too small for significant resonant enhancement due to atmospheric-sea surface coupling and surge magnitudes are strongly dependent on the intensity of the depression and the magnitude of the wind stress.

  6. The interannual oscillation of sea surface temperature in the South China Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Faxiu; Yu Shenyu; Fu Gang; Wang Dongxiao

    1994-12-31

    The South China Sea (SCS) is located in the area of the Asia monsoons and is a quasi-closed deep basin near the tropical western Pacific. The sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA) in the South China Sea have an influence on the precipitation in flood season in the South China. The anomalies of the Asia monsoons have great effect on SST in the SCS. This paper aims at finding the features of the interannual oscillation of SST and discussing the mechanism of the SST oscillation in the SCS.

  7. Satellite-derived sea surface height and sea surface wind data fusion for spilled oil tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozai, K.

    Data fusion is defined as a framework with the purpose of obtaining information of 'greater quality'. Within the framework tools are expressed for the alliance of data originating from different sources. The exact definition of 'greater quality' is stated in this context as more reliable prediction for the trajectory of spilled oil from two different microwave sensor data, namely ERS-2 altimeter and ADEOS/NSCAT scatterometer data. An example is presented in the case of trajectory of bow section and associated oil upwelling from the sunken tanker Nakhodka occurred from January to June in 1997 in Japan Sea. Spill distance is defined as a horizontal distance from the oil upwelling point to the location of sunken Nakhodka and a spill direction is defined as an angle made by the geographic north and the line corresponding to the spill distance. Geostrophic current vectors are derived from ERS-2 altimeter and wind-induced current vectors are derived from ADEOS/NSCAT scatterometer data. These two different satellite-derived vectors are 'fused' together in the surface current model to estimate and evaluate the trajectory of bow section and associated oil upwelling from the sunken tanker Nakhodka. Result of comparison between the estimated and the observed trajectory of bow section indicates that the estimated trajectory is agreed well with the observed one in the first half of drift period, while in the latter half of drift period the estimated trajectory is not agreed well with the observed one, which may be attributable to changes of wind directions within 24 hours from the satellite overpasses. Moreover the comparison between spill vector and 'fused' surface current vector shows the good correspondence in terms of direction when in situ wind accelerates the surface current vector, while the comparison between the twos shows the bad correspondence when the temporal changes of wind vector occurs.

  8. Macrofauna under sea ice and in the open surface layer of the Lazarev Sea, Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Hauke; van Franeker, Jan-Andries; Cisewski, Boris; Leach, Harry; Van de Putte, Anton P.; Meesters, Erik (H. W. G.); Bathmann, Ulrich; Wolff, Wim J.

    2011-10-01

    A new fishing gear was used to sample the macrozooplankton and micronekton community in the surface layer (0-2 m) under ice and in open water, the Surface and Under Ice Trawl (SUIT). In total, 57 quantitative hauls were conducted in the Lazarev Sea (Southern Ocean) during 3 different seasons (autumn 2004, winter 2006, summer 2007/2008). At least 46 species from eight phyla were caught in all 3 seasons combined. Biomass density was dominated by Antarctic krill Euphausia superba. The average biomass density was highest under the winter sea ice and lowest under the young ice in autumn. In summer, macrozooplankton biomass was dominated by ctenophores in open water and by Antarctic krill under ice. The community composition varied significantly among seasons, and according to the presence of sea ice. The response of the community composition to the presence of sea ice was influenced by species that were significantly more abundant in open water than under ice ( Cyllopus lucasii, Hyperiella dilatata), only seasonally abundant under ice ( Clione antarctica), or significantly associated with sea ice ( Eusirus laticarpus). A number of abundant species showed distinct diel patterns in the surface occurrence both under ice and in open water, indicating that the surface layer serves as a foraging ground predominantly at night. Our results emphasize the potential of a number of non-euphausiid macrozooplankton and micronekton species to act as energy transmitters between the production of sea ice biota and the pelagic food web. By providing a regional-scale quantitative record of macrofauna under Antarctic sea ice covering 3 seasons, this study adds new and direct evidence that the ice-water interface layer is a major functional node in the ecosystem of the Antarctic seasonal sea ice zone.

  9. Long-term changes in sea surface temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    Historical observations of sea surface temperature since 1856 have been improved by applying corrections to compensate for the predominant use of uninsulated or partly insulated buckets until the Second World War. There are large gaps in coverage in the late nineteenth century and around the two world wars, but a range of statistical techniques suggest that these gaps do not severely prejudice estimates of global and regional climatic change. Nonetheless, to improve the analysis on smaller scales, many unused historical data are to be digitized and incorporated. For recent years, satellite-based sea surface temperatures have improved the coverage, after adjustments for their biases relative to in situ data. An initial version of a nominally globally complete sea ice and interpolated sea surface temperature data set, beginning in 1871, has been created for use in numerical simulations of recent climate. Long time series of corrected regional, hemispheric, and global sea surface temperatures are mostly consistent with corresponding night marine air temperature series, and confirm the regionally specific climatic changes portrayed in the Scientific Assessments of the intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The observations also show an El Nino-like oscillation on bidecadal and longer time scales.

  10. Calving seismicity from iceberg-sea surface interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomaus, T.C.; Larsen, C.F.; O'Neel, S.; West, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Iceberg calving is known to release substantial seismic energy, but little is known about the specific mechanisms that produce calving icequakes. At Yahtse Glacier, a tidewater glacier on the Gulf of Alaska, we draw upon a local network of seismometers and focus on 80 hours of concurrent, direct observation of the terminus to show that calving is the dominant source of seismicity. To elucidate seismogenic mechanisms, we synchronized video and seismograms to reveal that the majority of seismic energy is produced during iceberg interactions with the sea surface. Icequake peak amplitudes coincide with the emergence of high velocity jets of water and ice from the fjord after the complete submergence of falling icebergs below sea level. These icequakes have dominant frequencies between 1 and 3 Hz. Detachment of an iceberg from the terminus produces comparatively weak seismic waves at frequencies between 5 and 20 Hz. Our observations allow us to suggest that the most powerful sources of calving icequakes at Yahtse Glacier include iceberg-sea surface impact, deceleration under the influence of drag and buoyancy, and cavitation. Numerical simulations of seismogenesis during iceberg-sea surface interactions support our observational evidence. Our new understanding of iceberg-sea surface interactions allows us to reattribute the sources of calving seismicity identified in earlier studies and offer guidance for the future use of seismology in monitoring iceberg calving.

  11. Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean

    PubMed Central

    Tamisiea, Mark E.; Hughes, Chris W.; Williams, Simon D. P.; Bingley, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records. Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level. Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates. Analysis of all of the data reveals the need for long-term and stable observation systems to assess accurately the regional changes as well as to improve our ability to estimate future changes in sea level. While information from many scientific disciplines is needed to understand sea-level change, this review focuses on contributions from geodesy and the role of the ocean's bounding surfaces: the sea surface and the Earth's crust. PMID:25157196

  12. Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean.

    PubMed

    Tamisiea, Mark E; Hughes, Chris W; Williams, Simon D P; Bingley, Richard M

    2014-09-28

    The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records. Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level. Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates. Analysis of all of the data reveals the need for long-term and stable observation systems to assess accurately the regional changes as well as to improve our ability to estimate future changes in sea level. While information from many scientific disciplines is needed to understand sea-level change, this review focuses on contributions from geodesy and the role of the ocean's bounding surfaces: the sea surface and the Earth's crust. PMID:25157196

  13. Sea surface temperature of the coastal zones of France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deschamps, P. Y.; Crepon, M.; Monget, J. M.; Verger, F. (Principal Investigator); Frouin, R.; Cassanet, J.; Wald, L.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal gradients in French coastal zones for the period of one year were mapped in order to enable a coherent study of certain oceanic features detectable by the variations in the sea surface temperature field and their evolution in time. The phenomena examined were mesoscale thermal features in the English Channel, the Bay of Biscay, and the northwestern Mediterranean; thermal gradients generated by French estuary systems; and diurnal heating in the sea surface layer. The investigation was based on Heat Capacity Mapping Mission imagery.

  14. Biological control of surface temperature in the Arabian Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyendranath, Shubha; Gouveia, Albert D.; Shetye, Satish R.; Ravindran, P.; Platt, Trevor

    1991-01-01

    In the Arabian Sea, the southwest monsoon promotes seasonal upwelling of deep water, which supplies nutrients to the surface layer and leads to a marked increase in phytoplankton growth. Remotely sensed data on ocean color are used here to show that the resulting distribution of phytoplankton exerts a controlling influence on the seasonal evolution of sea surface temperature. This results in a corresponding modification of ocean-atmosphere heat exchange on regional and seasonal scales. It is shown that this biological mechanism may provide an important regulating influence on ocean-atmosphere interactions.

  15. Inelastic mean-free paths and surface excitation parameters by absolute reflection electron-energy loss measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatomi, T.; Goto, K.

    2007-06-01

    An analytical approach is proposed for simultaneously determining the inelastic mean-free path (IMFP), the surface excitation parameter (SEP), and the differential SEP (DSEP) in absolute units from an absolute reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS) spectrum under the assumption that the normalized differential inelastic mean-free path for bulk excitations and the elastic scattering cross section are known. This approach was applied to an analysis of REELS spectra for Ni, and the IMFP, SEP, and DSEP in Ni for 300-3000eV electrons were determined. The resulting IMFPs showed good agreement with those calculated using the TPP-2M predictive equations and with those calculated from optical data. The deduced DSEPs show a reasonable agreement with those theoretically predicted. The obtained SEPs were compared with those calculated using several predictive equations. The present SEP results agreed well with the Chen formula with a material parameter proposed for Ni. The present approach has high potential for the experimental determination of IMFPs, SEPs, and DSEPs in absolute units.

  16. Variability of sea surface temperatures and sea ice in Baffin Bay during the last two millennia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksman, Mimmi; Miettinen, Arto; Kucera, Michal

    2013-04-01

    The Arctic region has undergone very rapid changes in the past 50 years. Climate models predict accelerating rates of change in the Arctic and long-term perspectives on natural climate variability are therefore needed to understand these changes and their further effects. We used marine fossil diatom assemblages from Baffin Bay to investigate August sea surface temperatures (aSSTs) and sea ice variability during the last two millennia. The Baffin Bay area is sensitive to changes in the climate system due to its location, where it is influenced by Atlantic and Arctic water masses. The top most 77 cm of a 600 cm long marine sediment core (GeoTü SL-170) was used for a high resolution study of quantitative SST and sea ice reconstructions based on fossil marine planktonic diatoms. A calibration dataset consisting of 155 surface samples from the North Atlantic and a new set of 24 surface samples from Baffin Bay with 52 diatom species was utilized to convert diatom counts to aSSTs using the weighted averaging partial least squares (WA-PLS) transfer function method. The sea ice reconstruction was based on a qualitative method for specific diatom assemblages and quantitative sea ice reconstructions for the May sea ice cover based on the Maximum likelihood (ML) transfer function method. The age model for the core is based on the 14C method. Our data shows a slight warming trend of the surface waters in Baffin Bay for the last ca. 2 kyr. The most dominating diatom species is Thalassiosira gravida spores, which represents typical "Baffin Current assemblage". The highest aSSTs occurred during the Medieval Warm Period (MWP), presumably due to the increased advection of warm Atlantic water from the West Greenland Current into Baffin Bay. After the MWP, the sediment was poor in diatoms during the Little Ice Age (LIA) suggesting that the study area was covered by sea ice also in the summertime.

  17. Archaeal diversity in surface sediments of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Wei, Y.; Zhang, C.

    2010-12-01

    The South China Sea is one of the largest marginal seas on Earth and known to be one of the global hot spots of biodiversity. Yet, little is known about the abundance, diversity, and distribution of archaea in it. In this study the diversity and distribution of archaea in the surface sediments of the South China Sea were investigated. The samples were collected from seven sites from south to north of the sea with water depths ranging from 1455 m to 3697 m. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the relative abundances of Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota species (OTUs at 2% cutoff) varied from site to site (Eury: 19.4%-67.6%, Cren: 32.4%-80.6%); however, they were about equal in species distribution (46.9% and 53.1%, respectively) for the total seven archaeal clone libraries. The Crenarchaeota predominates in MD05-2902 and MD05-2904 (80.6% and 70.4%); the Euryarchaeota predominates in MD05-2894 (67.6%). The archaeal groups MGI, MBGB, MCG and SAGMEG were dominant in most of the surface samples. MBGE was only dominant in MD05-2894 (64.7%). Overall, these results indicate that the community structures of archaea vary considerably in the surface sediments of the South China Sea.

  18. Spatial and temporal variability of sea-surface temperature fronts in the coastal Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustapha, Sélima Ben; Larouche, Pierre; Dubois, Jean-Marie

    2016-08-01

    An analysis of 11 years of sea surface temperatures images allowed the determination of the frontal occurrence probability in the southeastern Beaufort Sea using the single-image edge detection method. Results showed that, as the season progresses, fronts become more detectable due to solar heating of the surface layer. Some recurrent features can be identified in the summer time frontal climatology such as the Mackenzie River plume front, the Cape Bathurst front, the Mackenzie Trough front and the Amundsen Gulf front. These areas may be playing an important role in the biological processes acting as drivers to local enhanced biological productivity.

  19. Dynamical processes of transfer at the sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, S. A.

    This review describes the dynamical processes of transport from, and immediately below, the sea surface, particularly those which involve convergence and the separation of flow, and which result in the renewal of surface water at horizontal scales ranging from millimeters to hundreds of meters. Turbulence at or near the sea surface derives from several processes - breaking waves and the bubbles they may produce, precipitation and spray, Langmuir circulation and thermal convection, and turbulence which is internally generated by shear. Interest in the subject derives from the requirements to predict air-sea fluxes of heat, momentum and gases, to develop climate models, to interpret satellite images of the sea surface, including those of ship wakes, and to predict upper ocean structure, including mixing layer depth, in models of phytoplankton blooms and acoustic propagation. The general effect of subsurface turbulence on the sea surface, and the effects of surfactants, is described, and each process is discussed in turn. Laboratory experiments and theoretical studies have contributed particularly to the understanding of the interaction of vortices and turbulence with the surface and to the consequences of breaking waves. They point to the development of instability in the flow ahead of steep waves carrying parasitic capillary waves, which may contribute to the onset of flow separation on the leading face of the waves and the development of a rotor, or ‘roller’, below the wave crest, shown most clearly in the pattern of streamlines in a frame of reference moving forward with the wave. The conditions near the flow separation line on the wave surface ahead of the rotor may be similar to those produced by vortices approaching a free surface. Detailed observation of breaking waves at sea is lacking, but some progress has been made using acoustics to detect the clouds of subsurface bubbles formed by the larger breakers and the depth to which they penetrate. The

  20. A comprehensive comparison between satellite-measured skin and multichannel sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wick, Gary A.; Emery, William J.; Schluessel, Peter

    1992-01-01

    Three algorithms for computing sea-surface temperature (SST) from AVHRR channel-4 and -5 brightness temperatures were compared using 1-week blocks of global-area-coverage (GAC) data archived at NCAR. These are the multichannel SST (MCSST), the cross-product SST (CPSST), and the AVHRR-only satellite-measured ocean-surface skin temperature (SMSST). Maps of each SST product were produced and were compared for various time periods. The difference between the algorithms range from +1.6 to -1.2 K, resulting from the different forms of both the algorithms and the ground truth from which the algorithms were derived. It is concluded that, for the study of relative SST patterns, any of the algorithms can be used. However, for applications requiring accurate absolute temperature measurements, the differences are significant and the derivation of the algorithm must be considered when an algorithm is selected.

  1. Sea-surface and deep-magnetic data at Vavilov Seamount, Tyrrhenian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muccini, Filippo; Cocchi, Luca; Locritani, Marina; Carmisciano, Cosmo

    2016-04-01

    Sea surface and deep magnetic data were acquired at Vavilov seamount, in the Tyrrhenian sea. Vavilov seamount is located in the central portion of the homonymous Vavilov basin. The seamount stands about 2800 meters above the seafloor at 3600 meters depth, with the top at about 800 meters below the sea level. Oceanization of the basin occurred during the Late Miocene-Early Pliocene. The magnetic data were collected in 2011 on board the Nave Ammiraglio Magnaghi by using a Marine Magnetics Seaspy magnetometer. The sea surface magnetic survey was realized with two different grids: the first regional one, with 13 parallel lines about 43 Km long, 3 Km spaced (104° N oriented) and 6 tie control lines about 40 Km long, 5 Km spaced (014° N oriented). The second one was realized to better define the volcanic structure of the seamount, and was achieved by acquiring 12 magnetic parallel lines (104° N), 18 Km long and 1 Km spaced. The deep magnetic data were collected by towing a magnetic sensor coupled with a L3 sidescan sonar Klein 3000. A set of 5 parallel lines were acquired in correspondence of the bathymetric top of the seamount with the sensor flying at about constant depth of 700 meters. These data represents the first near-bottom magnetic data collected for Vavilov seamount and it allows comparison between sea-surface and deep magnetic data.

  2. The Aquarius Mission: Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koblinsky, Chester; Chao, Y.; deCharon, A.; Edelstein, W.; Hildebrand, P.; Lagerloef, G.; LeVine, D.; Pellerano, F.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Ruf, C.

    2001-01-01

    Aquarius is a new satellite mission concept to study the impact of the global water cycle on the ocean, including the response of the ocean to buoyancy forcing and the subsequent feedback of the ocean on the climate. The measurement objective of Aquarius is sea surface salinity, which reflects the concentration of freshwater at the ocean surface. Salinity affects the dielectric constant of sea water and, consequently, the radiometric emission of the sea surface to space. Rudimentary space observations with an L-band radiometer were first made from Skylab in the mid-70s and numerous aircraft missions of increasing quality and improved technology have been conducted since then. Technology is now available to carry out a global mission, which includes both an accurate L band (1.413 Ghz) radiometer and radar system in space and a global array of in situ observations for calibration and validation, in order to address key NASA Earth Science Enterprise questions about the global cycling of water and the response of the ocean circulation to climate change. The key scientific objectives of Aquarius examine the cycling of water at the ocean's surface, the response of the ocean circulation to buoyancy forcing, and the impact of buoyancy forcing on the ocean's thermal feedback to the climate. Global surface salinity will also improve our ability to model the surface solubility chemistry needed to estimate the air-sea exchange of CO2. In order to meet these science objectives, the NASA Salinity Sea Ice Working Group over the past three years has concluded that the mission measurement goals should be better than 0.2 practical salinity units (psu) accuracy, 100 km resolution, and weekly to revisits. The Aquarius mission proposes to meet these measurement requirements through a real aperture dual-polarized L band radiometer and radar system. This system can achieve the less than 0.1 K radiometric temperature measurement accuracy that is required. A 3 m antenna at approx. 600km

  3. Sea Surface Salinity: The Next Remote Sensing Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagerloef, Gary S. E.; Swift, Calvin T.; LeVine, David M.

    1995-01-01

    A brief history of salinity remote sensing is presented. The role of sea surface salinity (SSS) in the far north Atlantic and the influence of salinity variations on upper ocean dynamics in the tropics are described. An assessment of the present state of the technology of the SSS satellite remote sensing is given.

  4. Loki Patera as the Surface of a Magma Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Davies, A. G.; Veeder, G. J.; Rathbun, J. A.; Johnson, T. V.

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by the finding of Schubert et al that Io's figure is consistent with a hydrostatic shape, we explore the consequences of modeling Loki Patera as the surface of a large magma sea. This model is attractive because of its sheer simplicity and its usefulness in interpreting and predicting observations. Here, we report on that work.

  5. Three-way partitioning of sea surface temperature measurement error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelton, D.

    1983-01-01

    Given any set of three 2 degree binned anomaly sea surface temperature (SST) data sets by three different sensors, estimates of the mean square error of each sensor estimate is made. The above formalism performed on every possible triplet of sensors. A separate table of error estimates is then constructed for each sensor.

  6. Polarized infrared emissivity of one-dimensional Gaussian sea surfaces with surface reflections.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongkun; Pinel, Nicolas; Bourlier, Christophe

    2011-08-10

    Surface reflection is an important phenomenon that must be taken into account when studying sea surface infrared emissivity, especially at large observation angles. This paper models analytically the polarized infrared emissivity of one-dimensional sea surfaces with shadowing effect and one surface reflection, by assuming a Gaussian surface slope distribution. A Monte Carlo ray-tracing method is employed as a reference. It is shown that the present model agrees well with the reference method. The emissivity calculated by the present model is then compared with measurements. The comparisons show that agreements are greatly improved by taking one surface reflection into account. The Monte Carlo ray-tracing results of sea surface infrared emissivity with two and three reflections are also determined. Their contributions are shown to be negligible. PMID:21833139

  7. Geoacoustic characteristics of surface sediments in the southern Korean Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S.; Kim, D. C.; Lee, G.

    2012-12-01

    In the southwestern East Sea, South Sea, and southeastern Yellow Sea, surface sediment core samples were acquired to understand geoacoustic properties offshore of the Korean Peninsula. Some of the samples, sediment texture (mean grain size), physical properties, and compressional wave velocity were measured. And the other samples, we also converted from mean grain size data to sound velocity using empirical equation calculated from the existing data, and constructed the geoacoustic database. From these processes, we produced the distribution map of geoacoustic characteristics throughout the study area. The distribution map shows the considerably similar pattern to the mean grain size data. Coastal regions, particularly on the river mouths, mean grain sizes are generally small and sound velocity values are under 1,550 m/s. They are believed to present mud deposits from the adjacent rivers. Ulleung Basin, shows approximately 1,500 m/s sound velocity, the region is composed of fine sediments deposited in the deep sea environment. Mean grain size and sound velocity increases in the outer shelf, it is related to coarse relict sediment that deposited in the coastal environment during sea level lowstand. The distinguishing features of surface sediment such as fine coastal mud and coarser mid-shelf deposits, they are well reflected on the geoacoustic distribution map. It is possible to consider that, consequently, geoacoustic characteristics are in close connection with sediment texture and geophysical properties.

  8. Surface heat flux parameterizations and tropical Pacific sea surface temperature simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Giese, B.S. University Corp. for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO ); Cayan, D.R. )

    1993-04-15

    The authors report on a study of the problem of getting good model results for the sea surface temperature in the tropical Pacific ocean. The tropical Pacific is particularly important because of its size, the large areas of warm surface temperature, its impact on global atmospheric circulation, and the fact that it serves as an indicator of climatic variations. To simulate sea surface temperature it is necessary to have an energy budget which fits into a general ocean circulation model. The main input, from solar flux, is not well known in the tropical Pacific. The authors use two different models to describe the latent flux and the radiative flux at the sea surface. Parameters of concern include the relative humidity, air-sea temperature difference, latent heat formulae, and radiative heat flux. They use these parameters in their models in different ways, and compare results with measurement sets from the Tropical Pacific.

  9. Surface heat budget at the Nordic Seas in Lagrangian observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Lama, Marta S.; Isachsen, Pål E.; Koszalka, Inga; Lacasce, Joseph H.

    2014-05-01

    In the Nordic Seas, the warm, inflowing Atlantic Water is cooled until it is dense enough to sink. Thereafter it circulates at depth, eventually feeding the North Atlantic Deep Water. The air-sea interaction which facilitates this cooling is a complex process involving diverse phenomena, from surface heating to turbulent entrainment at the base of the ocean surface mixed layer. In the present study, we use 486 freely-drifting surface buoys to observe temperature changes on water parcels and the response to air-sea heat fluxes. Such Lagrangian observations advantageously 'filter out' horizontal heat fluxes, since the buoys are advected by the flow, allowing one to focus on the vertical exchanges. We examine the temporal evolution of temperature on the drifters and the correlations with surface heat fluxes, obtained from ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalyses. The frequency spectra indicate a clear ω-2 dependence at frequencies higher than roughly 1/40 days-1. The temperature fluctuations on the other hand are correlated with surface fluxes only at the longer time scales. We then show how the Lagrangian temperature can be represented as a stochastic process, with a deterministic portion determined by the low frequency atmospheric forcing and a white noise perturbation. This is in line with previous studies of the ocean surface response to stochastic wind forcing. What distinguishes the present model is the deterministic part, which must account for the gradual cooling of the water parcels.

  10. SeaRover: An Emerging Technology for Sea Surface Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, T.; Kudela, R.; Curcio, J.; Davidson, K.; Darling, D.; Kirkwood, B.

    2005-12-01

    Introduction - SeaRover is envisioned as an autonomous surface vehicle (ASV) for coastal operations. It is intended to lower the cost of existing marine survey applications while enabling new science missions. The current conceptual design is a small vehicle with hull and propulsion system optimized to eliminate cavitation and EM noise. SeaRover will make significant advances over existing platforms by providing longer duration science missions, better positioning and mission control, larger power budgets for instrumentation and significantly lower operational costs than existing vehicles. Science Enabled by SeaRover - SeaRover's unique design and autonomous capability provides several advantages compared to traditional autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV's) and crewed surface vessels: (1) Near surface sampling: SeaRover can sample within the top 1-2 meters. This is difficult to do with crewed vessels because of draft and perturbations from the hull. (2) Adaptive monitoring of dynamic events: SeaRover will be capable of intelligent decision making, as well as real-time remote control. This will enable highly-responsive autonomous tracking of moving phenomena (e.g., algal bloom). (3) Long term monitoring: SeaRover can be deployed for extended periods of time, allowing it to be used for longitudinal baseline studies. SeaRover will represent an advance over existing platforms in terms of: (1) Mobility: operational range from 10-1000 km, GPS accuracy, trajectory control with meter precision, and launch in hours. (2) Duration: from days up to months. (3) Payload and Power: accommodate approximately 100 kg for a 6m hull. Its surface design will allow access to wind and sun energy. (4) Communication: radio, wireless, satellite, direct data return. (5) Operational Cost: target costs are $2K/day (24 hour operation), with no onboard operator. (6) Recovery/Reusability: autonomous return to safe harbor provides sample return and on-base maintenance. Large science and power

  11. Pseudo-Hydrogen Passivation: A Novel Way to Calculate Absolute Surface Energy of Zinc Blende (111)/(͞1 ͞1 ͞1) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiou; Zhang, Jingzhao; Tse, Kinfai; Wong, Lun; Chan, Chunkai; Deng, Bei; Zhu, Junyi

    2016-02-01

    Determining accurate absolute surface energies for polar surfaces of semiconductors has been a great challenge in decades. Here, we propose pseudo-hydrogen passivation to calculate them, using density functional theory approaches. By calculating the energy contribution from pseudo-hydrogen using either a pseudo molecule method or a tetrahedral cluster method, we obtained (111)/ surfaces energies of Si, GaP, GaAs, and ZnS with high self-consistency. This method quantitatively confirms that surface energy is determined by the number and the energy of dangling bonds of surface atoms. Our findings may greatly enhance the basic understandings of different surfaces and lead to novel strategies in the crystal growth.

  12. Pseudo-Hydrogen Passivation: A Novel Way to Calculate Absolute Surface Energy of Zinc Blende (111)/(¯1 ¯1 ¯1) Surface

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiou; Zhang, Jingzhao; Tse, Kinfai; Wong, Lun; Chan, Chunkai; Deng, Bei; Zhu, Junyi

    2016-01-01

    Determining accurate absolute surface energies for polar surfaces of semiconductors has been a great challenge in decades. Here, we propose pseudo-hydrogen passivation to calculate them, using density functional theory approaches. By calculating the energy contribution from pseudo-hydrogen using either a pseudo molecule method or a tetrahedral cluster method, we obtained (111)/ surfaces energies of Si, GaP, GaAs, and ZnS with high self-consistency. This method quantitatively confirms that surface energy is determined by the number and the energy of dangling bonds of surface atoms. Our findings may greatly enhance the basic understandings of different surfaces and lead to novel strategies in the crystal growth. PMID:26831640

  13. On the surface heat fluxes in the Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Launiainen, Jouko; Vihma, Timo

    Turbulent surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat in the Weddell Sea were studied using drifting marine meteorological buoys with satellite telemetry. In 1990-1992 a total of 5 buoys were deployed on the sea ice, in the open ocean, and on the edge of a floating continental ice shelf. The buoys measured, among others, wind speed, air temperature and humidity with duplicate sensors and yielded year-round time series. The heat fluxes were calculated by the gradient and bulk methods based on the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Over the sea ice, a downward flux of 15 to 20 W/m2 was observed in winter (with typical variations of 10 to 20 W/m2 between successive days) and 5 W/m2 in summer. For the latent heat flux, the results suggested a small evaporation of 0 to 5 W/m2 in summer and weak condensation in winter. The highest diurnal values, up to 20 W/m2, were connected with evaporation. Because of stable stratification, the transfer coefficients of heat and moisture were reduced to 80% of their neutral values, on the average. Over the leads and coastal polynyas, an upward sensible heat flux of 100 to 300 W/m2 was typical, except in summer when the air temperature was close to the sea surface temperature. Over the continental shelf ice, the sensible heat flux was predominantly downwards (15 to 20 W/m2), compensating the negative radiation balance of the snow surface. Over the snow and ice surfaces the magnitude of turbulent fluxes was smaller than that of radiative fluxes, while over the open water in winter sensible heat flux was the largest term. Modification of the continental air-mass flowing out from the shelf ice to the open sea was studied with aerological soundings made from a research vessel. Associated turbulent heat exchange was estimated on the basis of three methods: modification in the temperature profiles, surface observations, and diabatic resistance laws for the atmospheric boundary layer. If we estimate an area-averaged turbulent heat exchange

  14. Sea surface temperature modelling in the Sea of Iroise: assessment of boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou, Nicolas; Chapalain, Georges; Duvieilbourg, Eric

    2013-07-01

    The present study investigates the sensitivity of the COupled Hydrodynamical-Ecological model for REgioNal and Shelf seas (COHERENS) to predict sea surface temperature (SST) patterns in the Sea of Iroise (western end of French Brittany) in relation to the spatial and temporal resolutions of open boundary conditions (OBCs). Two sources of daily operational OBCs of temperature are considered, derived from (1) the Mercator Global Ocean and (2) the Iberian Biscay Irish analysis and forecasting systems delivering predictions at spatial resolutions of 1/12° and 1/36°, respectively. Coastal model performance is evaluated by comparing SST predictions with recently available field data collected (1) along the route of a vessel travelling between the coast and the isle of Ushant and (2) at two offshore stations. The comparison is extended to SST spatial distribution derived from remote-sensing observations. The influence of OBC spatial resolution is exhibited in the north-eastern area of the Sea of Iroise in relation to the intrusion of cold surface waters. OBC temporal resolution is found to have a lower impact advocating for the implementation of climatological temperature forcings to predict major SST patterns in the Sea of Iroise.

  15. Sea surface temperature and salinity seasonal changes in the western Solomon and Bismarck Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcroix, Thierry; Radenac, Marie-Hélène; Cravatte, Sophie; Alory, Gaël.; Gourdeau, Lionel; Léger, Fabien; Singh, Awnesh; Varillon, David

    2014-04-01

    We analyze mean and seasonal change of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and Salinity (SSS) in the Solomon and Bismarck Seas, using 1977-2009 in situ data collected from Voluntary Observing Ships. Covariability of these two variables with surface wind, altimeter-derived and model-derived horizontal currents, precipitation, and Sepik River discharge are examined. SST and SSS show large annual oscillations in the Solomon Sea, with the coldest and saltiest waters occurring in July/August mainly due to horizontal advection. In contrast, they show large semiannual oscillations in the Bismarck Sea. There, the coldest and saltiest waters happen in January/February, when the northwest monsoon winds drive coastal upwelling, and in July/August, when the New Guinea Coastal Current advects cold and high-salinity waters from the Solomon Sea through Vitiaz Strait. The low SSS values observed in April/May, stuck between the January/February and July/August SSS maxima, are further enhanced by the Sepik River discharge annual maximum. A high-resolution model strengthens the conclusions we derive from observations. The impacts of ENSO on SST and SSS are also discussed with, for instance, saltier-than-average and fresher-than-average waters during the 2002-2003 El Niño and 2007-2008 La Niña, respectively.

  16. Summer Surface Layer Thermal Response to Surface Gravity Waves in the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Han, G.; Deng, Z.; Wang, X.

    2010-12-01

    A three-dimensional ocean model is applied to study the summer surface layer thermal response to surface gravity waves in the Yellow sea and the East China Sea(YES).The parameterization schemes of wave breaking developed by Mellor and Blumberg(2004) and Langmuir circulation developed by Kantha and Clayson(2004) are both included in the Mellor-Yamada turbulence closure model(Mellor and Yamada, 1982). Numerical results show that both surface wave breaking and Langmuir circulation determine the depth of surface boundary layer of temperature in the YES in summer. Langmuir circulation is able to obtain the turbulent kinetic energy injected by breaking waves near the surface and transport it downward to greater depths. A diagnostic analysis of the momentum balance shows that surface gravity waves can decrease the velocity near the surface and make the flow near the surface more homogeneous vertically in the YES. In addition, a diagnostic analysis of the temperature equation has been done for studying the heat budget. Diagnostic results show that more heat that is brought from surface in the YES can been transferred into the deeper layer owing to the surface gravity waves, which can induce local temperature there increase more rapidly. Besides, diagnostic results also suggest that surface gravity waves are likely to decrease upwelling near the bank in the region.

  17. On model differences and skill in predicting sea surface temperature in the Nordic and Barents Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langehaug, H. R.; Matei, D.; Eldevik, T.; Lohmann, K.; Gao, Y.

    2016-04-01

    The Nordic Seas and the Barents Sea is the Atlantic Ocean's gateway to the Arctic Ocean, and the Gulf Stream's northern extension brings large amounts of heat into this region and modulates climate in northwestern Europe. We have investigated the predictive skill of initialized hindcast simulations performed with three state-of-the-art climate prediction models within the CMIP5-framework, focusing on sea surface temperature (SST) in the Nordic Seas and Barents Sea, but also on sea ice extent, and the subpolar North Atlantic upstream. The hindcasts are compared with observation-based SST for the period 1961-2010. All models have significant predictive skill in specific regions at certain lead times. However, among the three models there is little consistency concerning which regions that display predictive skill and at what lead times. For instance, in the eastern Nordic Seas, only one model has significant skill in predicting observed SST variability at longer lead times (7-10 years). This region is of particular promise in terms of predictability, as observed thermohaline anomalies progress from the subpolar North Atlantic to the Fram Strait within the time frame of a couple of years. In the same model, predictive skill appears to move northward along a similar route as forecast time progresses. We attribute this to the northward advection of SST anomalies, contributing to skill at longer lead times in the eastern Nordic Seas. The skill at these lead times in particular beats that of persistence forecast, again indicating the potential role of ocean circulation as a source for skill. Furthermore, we discuss possible explanations for the difference in skill among models, such as different model resolutions, initialization techniques, and model climatologies and variance.

  18. Role of Absolute Humidity in the Inactivation of Influenza Viruses on Stainless Steel Surfaces at Elevated Temperatures ▿

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, James; Rudnick, Stephen; First, Melvin; Spengler, John

    2010-01-01

    Influenza virus has been found to persist in the environment for hours to days, allowing for secondary transmission of influenza via inanimate objects known as fomites. We evaluated the efficacy of heat and moisture for the decontamination of surfaces for the purpose of preventing of the spread of influenza. Aqueous suspensions of influenza A virus were deposited onto stainless steel coupons, allowed to dry under ambient conditions, and exposed to temperatures of 55°C, 60°C, or 65°C and relative humidity (RH) of 25%, 50%, or 75% for up to 1 h. Quantitative virus assays were performed on the solution used to wash the viruses from these coupons, and results were compared with the solution used to wash coupons treated similarly but left under ambient conditions. Inactivation of influenza virus on surfaces increased with increasing temperature, RH, and exposure time. Reductions of greater than 5 logs of influenza virus on surfaces were achieved at temperatures of 60 and 65°C, exposure times of 30 and 60 min, and RH of 50 and 75%. Our data also suggest that absolute humidity is a better predictor of surface inactivation than RH and allows the prediction of survival using two parameters rather than three. Modest amounts of heat and adequate moisture can provide effective disinfection of surfaces while not harming surfaces, electrical systems, or mechanical components, leaving no harmful residues behind after treatment and requiring a relatively short amount of time. PMID:20435770

  19. Sea surface determination from space: The GSFC geoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.; Mcgoogan, J.; Marsh, J.; Lerch, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    The determination of the sea surface/geoid and its relative variation were investigated and results of the altimeter experiment on Skylab to test the geoid are discussed. The spaceborne altimeter on Skylab revealed that the sea surface of the world's oceans can be measured with an accuracy in the meter range. Surface variations are discussed as they relate to those computed from satellite orbital dynamics and ground based gravity data. The GSFC geoid was constructed from about 400,000 satellite tracking data (range, range rate, angles) and about 20,000 ground gravity observations. One of the last experiments on Skylab was to measure and/or test this geoid over almost one orbit. It was found that the computed water surface deviates between 5 to 20 m from the measured one. Further outlined are the influence of orbital errors on the sea surface, and numerical examples are given based upon real tracking data. Orbital height error estimates were computed for geodetic type satellites and are found to be in the order of 0.2 to 5 meters.

  20. Covariation of Mesoscale Ocean Color and Sea-Surface Temperature Patterns in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGillicuddy, D. J.; Kosnyrev, V. K.; Ryan, J. P.; Yoder, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    During the lifetime of the Coastal Zone Color Scanner, there were 21 instances in which both satellite-derived ocean color and sea-surface temperature are simultaneously available over large areas of the Sargasso Sea. These images reveal close correspondence between mesoscale structures observed in temperature and pigment fields. In general, higher (lower) pigment biomass occurs in mesoscale features consisting of cold (warm) temperature anomalies. This relationship is consistent with the idea that upward displacement of isopycnals at the base of the euphotic zone by mesoscale eddies is an important mechanism of nutrient supply in the region.

  1. Sea ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, F. F. (Principal Investigator); Sharma, G. D.; Burns, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Sediments contributed by the Copper River in the Gulf of Alaska are carried westward along the shore as a distinct plume. Oceanic water relatively poor in suspended material appears to intrude near Montague Island, and turbid water between Middleton Island and Kayak Island is the result of Ekman between transport. An anticlockwise surface water circulation is observed in this region. Ground truth data indicate striking similarity with ERTS-1 imagery obtained on October 12, 1972. Observations of ERTS-1 imagery reveal that various characteristics and distribution of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean can be easily studied. Formation of different types of sea ice and their movement is quite discrenible. Sea ice moves parallel to the cost in near shore areas and to the northerly direction away from the coast.

  2. Microbial community genomics in eastern Mediterranean Sea surface waters.

    PubMed

    Feingersch, Roi; Suzuki, Marcelino T; Shmoish, Michael; Sharon, Itai; Sabehi, Gazalah; Partensky, Frédéric; Béjà, Oded

    2010-01-01

    Offshore waters of the eastern Mediterranean Sea are one of the most oligotrophic regions on Earth in which the primary productivity is phosphorus limited. To study the unexplored function and physiology of microbes inhabiting this system, we have analyzed a genomic library from the eastern Mediterranean Sea surface waters by sequencing both termini of nearly 5000 clones. Genome recruitment strategies showed that the majority of high-scoring pairs corresponded to genomes from the Alphaproteobacteria (SAR11-like and Rhodobacterales), Cyanobacteria (Synechococcus and high-light adapted Prochlorococcus) and diverse uncultured Gammaproteobacteria. The community structure observed, as evaluated by both protein similarity scores or metabolic potential, was similar to that found in the euphotic zone of the ALOHA station off Hawaii but very different from that of deep aphotic zones in both the Mediterranean Sea and the Pacific Ocean. In addition, a strong enrichment toward phosphate and phosphonate uptake and utilization metabolism was also observed. PMID:19693100

  3. Microhydrodynamics of flotation processes in the sea surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammatika, Marianne; Zimmerman, William B.

    2001-10-01

    The uppermost surface of the ocean forms a peculiarly important ecosystem, the sea surface microlayer (SML). Comprising the top 1-1000 μm of the ocean surface, the SML concentrates many chemical substances, particularly those that are surface active. Important economically as a nursery for fish eggs and larvae, the SML unfortunately is also especially vulnerable to pollution. Contaminants that settle out from the air, have low solubility, or attach to floatable matter tend to accumulate in the SML. Bubbles contribute prominently to the dynamics of air-sea exchanges, playing an important role in geochemical cycling of material in the upper ocean and SML. In addition to the movement of bubbles, the development of a bubble cloud interrelates with the single particle dynamics of all other bubbles and particles. In the early sixties, several in situ oceanographic techniques revealed an "unbelievably immense" number of coastal bubbles of radius 15-300 μm. The spatial and temporal variation of bubble numbers were studied; acoustical oceanographers now use bubbles as tracers to determine ocean processes near the ocean surface. Sea state and rain noises have both been definitively ascribed to the radiation from huge numbers of infant micro bubbles [The Acoustic Bubble. Academic Press, San Diego]. Our research programme aims at constructing a hydrodynamic model for particle transport processes occurring at the microscale, in multi-phase flotation suspensions. Current research addresses bubble and floc microhydrodynamics as building blocks for a microscale transport model. This paper reviews sea surface transport processes in the microlayer and the lower atmosphere, and identifies those amenable to microhydrodynamic modelling and simulation. It presents preliminary simulation results including the multi-body hydrodynamic mobility functions for the modelling of "dynamic bubble filters" and floc suspensions. Hydrodynamic interactions versus spatial anisotropy and size of

  4. Surface Circulation of Lakes and Nearly Land-Locked Seas

    PubMed Central

    Emery, K. O.; Csanady, G. T.

    1973-01-01

    The pattern of surface circulation has been mapped for more than 40 lakes, marginal seas, estuaries, and lagoons. All are within the northern hemisphere, and all except one are known to have a counterclockwise pattern. This consistent pattern is attributed to the drag of wind blowing across the bodies of water. Warmer surface water is displaced to the right-hand shore zone (facing downwind), where it produces greater surface turbulence and, thus, greater wind drag. This effect leads to counterclockwise water circulation regardless of the direction and, within limits, the duration of the wind. PMID:16592051

  5. Improving the WRF model's simulation over sea ice surface through coupling with a complex thermodynamic sea ice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Huang, J.; Luo, Y.; Zhao, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice plays an important role in the air-ice-ocean interaction, but it is often represented simply in many regional atmospheric models. The Noah sea ice model, which has been widely used in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, exhibits cold bias in simulating the Arctic sea ice temperature when validated against the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) in situ observations. According to sensitivity tests, this bias is attributed not only to the simulation of snow depth and turbulent fluxes but also to the heat conduction within snow and ice. Compared with the Noah sea ice model, the high-resolution thermodynamic snow and ice model (HIGHTSI) has smaller bias in simulating the sea ice temperature. HIGHTSI is further coupled with the WRF model to evaluate the possible added value from better resolving the heat transport and solar penetration in sea ice from a complex thermodynamic sea ice model. The cold bias in simulating the surface temperature over sea ice in winter by the original Polar WRF is reduced when HIGHTSI rather than Noah is coupled with the WRF model, and this also leads to a better representation of surface upward longwave radiation and 2 m air temperature. A discussion on the impact of specifying sea ice thickness in the WRF model is presented. Consistent with previous research, prescribing the sea ice thickness with observational information would result in the best simulation among the available methods. If no observational information is available, using an empirical method based on the relationship between sea ice concentration and sea ice thickness could mimic the large-scale spatial feature of sea ice thickness. The potential application of a thermodynamic sea ice model in predicting the change in sea ice thickness in a RCM is limited by the lack of sea ice dynamic processes in the model and the coarse assumption on the initial value of sea ice thickness.

  6. Sea surface temperature anomalies, planetary waves, and air-sea feedback in the middle latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankignoul, C.

    1985-01-01

    Current analytical models for large-scale air-sea interactions in the middle latitudes are reviewed in terms of known sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies. The scales and strength of different atmospheric forcing mechanisms are discussed, along with the damping and feedback processes controlling the evolution of the SST. Difficulties with effective SST modeling are described in terms of the techniques and results of case studies, numerical simulations of mixed-layer variability and statistical modeling. The relationship between SST and diabatic heating anomalies is considered and a linear model is developed for the response of the stationary atmosphere to the air-sea feedback. The results obtained with linear wave models are compared with the linear model results. Finally, sample data are presented from experiments with general circulation models into which specific SST anomaly data for the middle latitudes were introduced.

  7. Skylab S-193 Radscat microwave measurements of sea surface winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Fung, A. K.; Young, J. D.; Claassen, J. P.; Chan, H. L.; Afarani, M.; Pierson, W. J.; Cardone, V. J.; Hayes, J.; Spring, W.; Greenwood, C.

    1975-01-01

    The S-193 Radscat made extensive measurements of many sea conditions. Measurements were taken in a tropical hurricane (Ava), a tropical storm (Christine), and in portions of extratropical cyclones. Approximately 200 scans of ocean data at 105 kilometer spacings were taken during the first two Skylab missions and another 200 during the final mission when the characteristics of the measurements changed due to damage of the antenna. Backscatter with four transmit/receive polarization combinations and emissions with horizontal and vertical receive polarizations were measured. Other surface parameters investigated for correlation with the measurements included sea temperature, air/sea temperature difference, and gravity-wave spectrum. Methods were developed to correct the microwave measurements for atmospheric effects. The radiometric data were corrected accurately for clear sky and light cloud conditions only. The radiometer measurements were used to recover the surface scattering characteristics for all atmospheric conditions excluding rain. The radiometer measurements also detected the presence of rain which signaled when the scattering measurement should not be used for surface wind estimation. Regression analysis was used to determine empirically the relation between surface parameters and the microwave measurements, after correction for atmospheric effects. Results indicate a relationship approaching square-law at 50 deg between differential scattering coefficient and wind speed with horizontally polarized scattering data showing slightly more sensitivity to wind speed than vertically polarized data.

  8. The incident solar irradiance at the sea surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Tran, AN; Collins, Donald J.

    1990-01-01

    Computations have been performed of the incident spectral irradiance at the sea surface using LOWTRAN-7 as the basis to describe the incident scalar and vector irradiance in terms of the true solar zenith angle and the nominal visibility in the atmosphere. These computations have been used to describe the contributions to the incident irradiance from the direct and the sky components of the total irradiance and the average cosine of the sky component as a measure of the radiance distribution of the sky for varying atmospheric conditions. Comparisons of the computations from LOWTRAN-7 have been made with the results from other models, and with data obtained from field measurements, and excellent agreement has been obtained for the daily profiles of the vector and scalar irradiance at the surface. These computations have been used to provide a description of the irradiance at the sea surface for use in the analysis of remotely sensed data based on information on the radiative transfer through the atmosphere above the sea surface.

  9. Correlation and coherence analysis between sea surface temperature and altimetric sea level anomaly data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbylut-Górska, Maria; Kosek, Wiesław; Wnęk, Agnieszka; Młocek, Wojciech; Rutkowska, Agnieszka; Popiński, Waldemar; Niedzielski, Tomasz

    2016-04-01

    One of the main causes of the sea level variations is the steric effect caused by changes of local sea surface temperature (SST). To show how the altimetric Sea Level Anomaly (SLA) data are related to the SST data, correlation coefficients between them as a function of geographic location were computed. The analysis showed a high positive correlation (about 0.7), especially in the Northern and South-Eastern parts of the Pacific Ocean and a large part of the Atlantic Ocean. There is a negative correlation of about 0.5 in the South-East part of Indian Ocean, on the Arafura Sea and the Red Sea. In addition the time-frequency coherence and semblance functions between the SLA and SST data were calculated using Fourier transform band pass filter. The maps of such coherence and semblance functions in frequency bands corresponding to the annual oscillation and its integer multiplicities were computed. The most imporntat contribution to the correlation coefficient values has the annual oscillation in the SST and SLA data.

  10. Sea surface salinity and temperature seasonal changes in the Solomon and Bismarck Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcroix, Thierry; Radenac, Marie-Helene; Cravatte, Sophie; Gourdeau, Lionel; Alory, Gael

    2014-05-01

    Small SST and SSS (an indicator of iron-rich Papua New Guinea river outflows) changes in the Solomon and Bismarck Seas may be transported to the equatorial Pacific and have strong climatic and biological impacts. We analyze mean and seasonal change of SST and SSS in the Solomon and Bismarck Seas, using 1977-2009 in situ data collected from Voluntary Observing Ships. Co-variability of these two variables with surface wind, altimeter-derived current anomalies, precipitation, and Sepik river discharge is examined. SST and SSS show large annual oscillations in the Solomon Sea, with the coldest and saltiest waters occurring in July/August mainly due to horizontal advection. In contrast, they show large semi-annual oscillations in the Bismarck Sea. There, the coldest and saltiest waters happen in January/February, when the northwest monsoon winds drive coastal upwelling, and in July/August, when the New Guinea Coastal Current advects cold and high-salinity waters from the Solomon Sea through Vitiaz Strait. The low SSS values observed in April/May, stuck between the two SSS maxima, are further enhanced by the Sepik river discharge annual maximum. A high-resolution model strengthens the conclusions we derive from observations. The impacts of ENSO on SST and SSS are also discussed.

  11. Estimation of the sea surface's two-scale backscatter parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between the sea-surface normalized radar cross section and the friction velocity vector is determined using a parametric two-scale scattering model. The model parameters are found from a nonlinear maximum likelihood estimation. The estimation is based on aircraft scatterometer measurements and the sea-surface anemometer measurements collected during the JONSWAP '75 experiment. The estimates of the ten model parameters converge to realistic values that are in good agreement with the available oceanographic data. The rms discrepancy between the model and the cross section measurements is 0.7 db, which is the rms sum of a 0.3 db average measurement error and a 0.6 db modeling error.

  12. Satellite-Derived Sea Surface Temperature: Workshop-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.

    1984-01-01

    Global accuracies and error characteristics of presently orbiting satellite sensors are examined. The workshops are intended to lead to a better understanding of present capabilities for sea surface temperature measurement and to improve measurement concepts for the future. Data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer AVHRR and Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer is emphasized. Some data from the High Resolution Infrared Sounder HIRS and AVHRR are also examined. Comparisons of satellite data with ship and eXpendable BathyThermograph XBT measurement show standard deviations in the range 0.5 to 1.3 C with biases of less than 0.4 C, depending on the sensor, ocean region, and spatial/temporal averaging. The Sea Surface Temperature SST anomaly maps show good agreement in some cases, but a number of sensor related problems are identified.

  13. Satellite-Derived Sea Surface Temperature: Workshop 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.

    1983-01-01

    Satellite measurements of sea surface temperature are now possible using a variety of sensors. The present accuracies of these methods are in the range of 0.5 to 2.0 C. This makes them potentially useful for synoptic studies of ocean currents and for global monitoring of climatological anomalies. To improve confidence in the satellite data, objective evaluations of sensor accuracies are necessary, and the conditions under which these accuracies degrade need to be understood. The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) on the Nimbus-7 satellite was studied. Sea surface temperatures, derived from November 1979 SMMR data, were compared globally against ship measurements and climatology, using facilities of the JPL Pilot Ocean Data System. Methods for improved data analysis and plans for additional workshops to incorporate data from other sensors were discussed.

  14. Unravelling air-sea interactions driven by photochemistry in the sea-surface microlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Christian; Alpert, Peter; Tinel, Liselotte; Rossignol, Stéphanie; Perrier, Sébastien; Bernard, Francois; Ciuraru, Raluca; Hayeck, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Interfaces are ubiquitous in the environment, and in addition many atmospheric key processes, such as gas deposition, aerosol and cloud formation are, at one stage or the other, strongly impacted by physical- and chemical processes occurring at interfaces. Unfortunately, these processes have only been suggested and discussed but never fully addressed because they were beyond reach. We suggest now that photochemistry or photosensitized reactions exist at interfaces, and we will present and discuss their possible atmospheric implications. Obviously, one of the largest interface is the sea-surface microlayer (SML), which is a region lying at the uppermost tens to hundreds of micrometres of the water surface, with physical, chemical and biological properties that differ from those of the underlying sub-surface water. Organic film formation at the sea surface is made possible in the presence of an excess of surface-active material. Hydrophobic surfactant films are typically believed to play the role of a physical barrier to air-sea exchanges, especially at low wind speed. We will show that dissolved organic matter (DOM) can trigger photochemistry at the air-sea interface, releasing unsaturated, functionalized volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including isoprene,... acting as precursors for the formation of organic aerosols, that were thought, up to now, to be solely of biological origin! In addition, we suggest that when arranged at an air/water interface, hydrophobic surfactant can have weak chemical interactions among them, which can trigger the absorption of sunlight and can consequently induce photochemistry at such interfaces. A major question arises from such observations, namely: can the existence of such weak intra- or intermolecular interactions and the subsequent photochemistry be generalized to many other atmospheric objects such as aerosols? This topic will be presented and discussed.

  15. Tetrahedral cluster and pseudo molecule: New approaches to Calculate Absolute Surface Energy of Zinc Blende (111)/(-1-1-1) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiou; Zhang, Jingzhao; Tse, Kinfai; Wong, Lun; Chan, Chunkai; Deng, Bei; Zhu, Junyi

    Determining accurate absolute surface energies for polar surfaces of semiconductors has been a great challenge in decades. Here, we propose pseudo-hydrogen passivation to calculate them, using density functional theory approaches. By calculating the energy contribution from pseudo-hydrogen using either a pseudo molecule method or a tetrahedral cluster method, we obtained (111)/(-1-1-1) surfaces energies of Si, GaP, GaAs, and ZnS with high self-consistency. Our findings may greatly enhance the basic understandings of different surfaces and lead to novel strategies in the crystal growth. We would like to thank Su-huai Wei for helpful discussions. Computing resources were provided by the High Performance Cluster Computing Centre, Hong Kong Baptist University. This work was supported by the start-up funding and direct Grant with the Project.

  16. The satellite altimeter data derived mean sea surface GSFC98

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan M.

    2000-03-01

    The GSFC98 mean sea surface (MSS) was computed on a 2' oceanwide grid for latitudes below 80°. The data used included 3-years of TOPEX data (Cycles 9 to 119), 1.5-years of ERS-1 35-day repeat cycle (Cycles 1 to 18), 2-years of Geosat ERM data (Cycles 1 to 42), 2 ERS-1 168-day repeat cycles, and 18 months of the Geosat Geodetic Mission data. All non-TOPEX satellite altimeter data were adjusted to the mean of TOPEX data in 2° × 30° blocks. After the adjustment, the mean sea surface height was gridded into 2' nodes using least squares collocation and an iteration procedure to reduce the ocean variability. To validate the mean sea surfaces, three comparisons were made. The GSFC98 MSS, along with OSU95 [Yi, 1995] and CSR95 [Kim et al., 1995], were compared with 6-years of TOPEX and 3-years of ERS-2 mean tracks which were not used in the MSS computations. Finally, the marine gravity anomalies were computed from the three MSS implied geoid undulations using the inverse Stokes integral. The marine gravity anomalies were compared with ship gravity data in selected areas. The ship gravity comparison is an independent assessment of the quality of the MSSs, especially at intermediate and short wavelengths. Finally, the inter-comparisons between the mean sea surfaces were made. The root mean square values of the differences were 6.8, 6.8, and 7.2 cm between GSFC98/OSU95, GSFC98/CSR95, and OSU95/CSR95. The differences agree well with the error estimation of GSFC98 MSS.

  17. Japanese Whaling Ships' Sea Surface Temperatures 1946-84.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierzejewska, Anna W.; Wu, Zhongxiang; Newell, Reginald E.; Miyashita, Tomio

    1997-03-01

    Japanese whaling ship data, a homogeneous dataset mainly covering the southern high-latitude oceans, may be used to fill in gaps in recent sea surface temperature datasets, contributing a fair number of additional observations in this area. The Japanese whaling ship data are treated separately here for the period 1946-84, and they show no significant temperature changes during this period in the main fishing region of 60°-70°S or in the west Pacific warm pool.

  18. The weighted curvature approximation in scattering from sea surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérin, Charles-Antoine; Soriano, Gabriel; Chapron, Bertrand

    2010-07-01

    A family of unified models in scattering from rough surfaces is based on local corrections of the tangent plane approximation through higher-order derivatives of the surface. We revisit these methods in a common framework when the correction is limited to the curvature, that is essentially the second-order derivative. The resulting expression is formally identical to the weighted curvature approximation, with several admissible kernels, however. For sea surfaces under the Gaussian assumption, we show that the weighted curvature approximation reduces to a universal and simple expression for the off-specular normalized radar cross-section (NRCS), regardless of the chosen kernel. The formula involves merely the sum of the NRCS in the classical Kirchhoff approximation and the NRCS in the small perturbation method, except that the Bragg kernel in the latter has to be replaced by the difference of a Bragg and a Kirchhoff kernel. This result is consistently compared with the resonant curvature approximation. Some numerical comparisons with the method of moments and other classical approximate methods are performed at various bands and sea states. For the copolarized components, the weighted curvature approximation is found numerically very close to the cut-off invariant two-scale model, while bringing substantial improvement to both the Kirchhoff and small-slope approximation. However, the model is unable to predict cross-polarization in the plane of incidence. The simplicity of the formulation opens new perspectives in sea state inversion from remote sensing data.

  19. Middle Pliocene sea surface temperatures: A global reconstruction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.; Barron, J.; Poore, R.

    1996-01-01

    Identification and analyses of Pliocene marine microfossils from 64 globally distributed stratigraphic sequences have been used to produce a middle Pliocene sea surface temperature reconstruction of the Earth. This reconstruction shows little or no change from current conditions in low latitude regions and significant warming of the ocean surface at mid and higher latitudes of both hemispheres. This pattern of warming is consistent with terrestrial records and suggests a combination of enhanced meridional ocean heat transport and enhanced greenhouse effect were responsible for the middle Pliocene warmth.

  20. Spatial and temporal variability of satellite-derived sea surface temperature in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramska, Malgorzata; Jakowczyk, Mateusz

    2016-04-01

    The Barents Sea (BS) is an important region for studying climate change. This sea is located on the main pathway of the heat transported from low to high latitudes. Since oceanic conditions in the BS may influence vast areas of the Arctic Ocean, it is important to continue to monitor this region and to analyze the available oceanographic data sets. One of the important quantities that can be used to track climate change is the sea surface temperature (SST). In this study we have analyzed the 32-years (1982-2013) NOAA Optimum Interpolation SST Version 2 data for the BS. Our results indicate that the regionally averaged SST trend in the BS (~0.03 oC/year) is greater than the global trend. This trend varies spatially with the lowest values north from 76°N and the highest values (~0.06oC/year) in proximity of Svalbard and in coastal regions near the White Sea. The SST and 2-m air temperature (AT) trends are high in winter months in the open Barents Sea region located west from Novaya Zemlya. Such trends can be linked to a significant retreat of sea ice in this area in recent years. In this paper we also documented spatial patterns in the annual cycle of SST in the BS. We have shown that the interannual variability of SST is similar in different regions of the BS and well correlated with the interannual patterns in AT variability. This work was funded by the Norway Grants (NCBR contract No. 201985, project NORDFLUX). Partial support for MS comes from the Institute of Oceanology (IO PAN).

  1. Data-Model Comparisons for Sea Surface Waves from the ASIAEX East China Sea Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Zhou, Ji-Xun; Rogers, Peter H.

    2010-09-01

    During ASIAEX, surface directional wave spectra were recorded for nine consecutive days. Data are analyzed in this paper to show the characteristics of the surface wave field in the East China Sea. Three surface spectrum models, Pierson-Moskowitz, JONSWAP, and Toba, are evaluated and compared with the ASIAEX RMS surface wave height data. The data-model comparisons show that the JONSWAP-Mitsuyasu model is the best fit to the experimental results. Model performance can be improved by a combined model, JONSWAP-Mitsuyasu for U/cp<0.8 and Toba-Donelan for U/cp>0.8. The preliminary results suggest that locally measured wave age can be used to find the most appropriate surface model for acoustic prediction purposes.

  2. Microwave emission measurements of sea surface roughness, soil moisture, and sea ice structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, P.; Wilheit, T. T.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the microwave radiometers to be carried aboard the Nimbus 5 and 6 satellites and proposed for one of the earth observatory satellites, remote measurements of microwave radiation at wavelengths ranging from 0.8 to 21 cm have been made of a variety of the earth's surfaces from the NASA CV-990 A/C. Brightness temperatures of sea water surfaces of varying roughness, of terrain with varying soil moisture, and of sea ice of varying structure were observed. In each case, around truth information was available for correlation with the microwave brightness temperature. The utility of passive microwave radiometry in determining ocean surface wind speeds, at least for values higher than 7 meters/second has been demonstrated. In addition, it was shown that radiometric signatures can be used to determine soil moisture in unvegetated terrain to within five percentage points by weight. Finally, it was demonstrated that first year thick, multi-year, and first year thin sea ice can be distinguished by observing their differing microwave emissivities at various wavelengths.

  3. Chemical characterization of dissolved organic compounds from coastal sea surface microlayers (Baltic Sea, Germany).

    PubMed

    van Pinxteren, Manuela; Müller, Conny; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Stolle, Christian; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2012-10-01

    The physicochemical properties of the sea surface microlayer (SML), i.e. the boundary layer between the air and the sea, and its impact on air-sea exchange processes have been investigated for decades. However, a detailed description about these processes remains incomplete. In order to obtain a better chemical characterization of the SML, in a case study three pairs of SML and corresponding bulk water samples were taken in the southern Baltic Sea. The samples were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon and dissolved total nitrogen, as well as for several organic nitrogen containing compounds and carbohydrates, namely aliphatic amines, dissolved free amino acids, dissolved free monosaccharides, sugar alcohols, and monosaccharide anhydrates. Therefore, reasonable analytical procedures with respect to desalting and enrichment were established. All aliphatic amines and the majority of the investigated amino acids (11 out of 18) were found in the samples with average concentrations between 53 ng L(-1) and 1574 ng L(-1). The concentrations of carbohydrates were slightly higher, averaging 2900 ng L(-1). Calculation of the enrichment factor (EF) between the sea surface microlayer and the bulk water showed that dissolved total nitrogen was more enriched (EF: 1.1 and 1.2) in the SML than dissolved organic carbon (EF: 1.0 and 1.1). The nitrogen containing organic compounds were generally found to be enriched in the SML (EF: 1.9-9.2), whereas dissolved carbohydrates were not enriched or even depleted (EF: 0.7-1.2). Although the investigated compounds contributed on average only 0.3% to the dissolved organic carbon and 0.4% to the total dissolved nitrogen fraction, these results underline the importance of single compound analysis to determine SML structure, function, and its potential for a transfer of compounds into the atmosphere. PMID:22475414

  4. SMOS sea surface salinity maps of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Olmedo, Estrella; Turiel, Antonio; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Martinez, Justino; Portabella, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    Salinity and temperature gradients drive the thermohaline circulation of the oceans, and play a key role in the ocean-atmosphere coupling. The strong and direct interactions between the ocean and the cryosphere (primarily through sea ice and ice shelves) is also a key ingredient of the thermohaline circulation. The ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, launched in 2009, has the objective measuring soil moisture over the continents and sea surface salinity over the oceans. Although the mission was originally conceived for hydrological and oceanographic studies [1], SMOS is also making inroads in the cryospheric monitoring. SMOS carries an innovative L-band (1.4 GHz, or 21-cm wavelength), passive interferometric radiometer (the so-called MIRAS) that measures the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the Earth's surface, at about 50 km spatial resolution wide swath (1200-km), and with a 3-day revisit time at the equator, but a more frequent one at the poles. Although the SMOS radiometer operating frequency offers almost the maximum sensitivity of the brightness temperature (TB) to sea surface salinity (SSS) variations, this is rather low, , i.e.,: 90% of ocean SSS values span a range of brightness temperatures of only 5K at L-band. This sensitivity is particularly low in cold waters. This implies that the SSS retrieval requires high radiometric performance. Since the SMOS launch, SSS Level 3 maps have been distributed by several expert laboratories including the Barcelona Expert Centre (BEC). However, since the TB sensitivity to SSS decreases with decreasing sea surface temperature (SST), large retrieval errors had been reported when retrieving salinity values at latitudes above 50⁰N. Two new processing algorithms, recently developed at BEC, have led to a considerable improvement of the SMOS data, allowing for the first time to derive SSS maps in cold waters. The first one is to empirically characterize and correct the systematic biases with six

  5. The gelatinous nature of the sea-surface microlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurl, Oliver

    2013-04-01

    The sea-surface microlayer (SML) represents the interfacial layer between the ocean and atmosphere and covers the ocean's surface extensivly. Gel-like transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) in the SML were studied in oceanic and coastal SML and subsurface water samples. The TEP enrichment factor, determined as the ratio of the TEP concentration in the SML to that in the corresponding subsurface water are typically in a range of 2 to 5. The enrichment of gel-like particles include three mechanisms: (i) ascend of positive buoyant gels, (ii) adsorption and aggregation of dissolved pre-cursor material to gels on ascending bubbles, and (iii) aggregation processes in the SML through dilation/compression of the water surface. For example, the aggregation rates in the SML were generally enhanced over those in the bulk surface waters by factors of 2 to 30. Based on our studies investigating the gelatinous nature of the SML, the new emerging consensus is that the SML is a biofilm-like and microbial-rich habitat. The hypothesis of a biofilm-like coverage of the ocean's surface has wide implications on biogeochemical cycling, air-sea gas exchange and the production of organic-rich aerosols affecting formation of cloud condensation nuclei.

  6. Seasonal variability of the Red Sea, from GRACE time-variable gravity and altimeter sea surface height measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahr, John; Smeed, David; Leuliette, Eric; Swenson, Sean

    2014-05-01

    Seasonal variability of sea surface height and mass within the Red Sea, occurs mostly through the exchange of heat with the atmosphere and wind-driven inflow and outflow of water through the strait of Bab el Mandab that opens into the Gulf of Aden to the south. The seasonal effects of precipitation and evaporation, of water exchange through the Suez Canal to the north, and of runoff from the adjacent land, are all small. The flow through the Bab el Mandab involves a net mass transfer into the Red Sea during the winter and a net transfer out during the summer. But that flow has a multi-layer pattern, so that in the summer there is actually an influx of cool water at intermediate (~100 m) depths. Thus, summer water in the southern Red Sea is warmer near the surface due to higher air temperatures, but cooler at intermediate depths (especially in the far south). Summer water in the northern Red Sea experiences warming by air-sea exchange only. The temperature profile affects the water density, which impacts the sea surface height but has no effect on vertically integrated mass. Here, we study this seasonal cycle by combining GRACE time-variable mass estimates, altimeter (Jason-1, Jason-2, and Envisat) measurements of sea surface height, and steric sea surface height contributions derived from depth-dependent, climatological values of temperature and salinity obtained from the World Ocean Atlas. We find good consistency, particularly in the northern Red Sea, between these three data types. Among the general characteristics of our results are: (1) the mass contributions to seasonal SSHT variations are much larger than the steric contributions; (2) the mass signal is largest in winter, consistent with winds pushing water into the Red Sea through the Strait of Bab el Mandab in winter, and out during the summer; and (3) the steric signal is largest in summer, consistent with summer sea surface warming.

  7. An empirically derived inorganic sea spray source function incorporating sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, M. E.; Zieger, P.; Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Grythe, H.; Kirkevåg, A.; Rosati, B.; Riipinen, I.; Nilsson, E. D.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed an inorganic sea spray source function that is based upon state-of-the-art measurements of sea spray aerosol production using a temperature-controlled plunging jet sea spray aerosol chamber. The size-resolved particle production was measured between 0.01 and 10 μm dry diameter. Particle production decreased non-linearly with increasing seawater temperature (between -1 and 30 °C) similar to previous findings. In addition, we observed that the particle effective radius, as well as the particle surface, particle volume and particle mass, increased with increasing seawater temperature due to increased production of particles with dry diameters greater than 1 μm. By combining these measurements with the volume of air entrained by the plunging jet we have determined the size-resolved particle flux as a function of air entrainment. Through the use of existing parameterisations of air entrainment as a function of wind speed, we were subsequently able to scale our laboratory measurements of particle production to wind speed. By scaling in this way we avoid some of the difficulties associated with defining the "white area" of the laboratory whitecap - a contentious issue when relating laboratory measurements of particle production to oceanic whitecaps using the more frequently applied whitecap method. The here-derived inorganic sea spray source function was implemented in a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (FLEXPART - FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model). An estimated annual global flux of inorganic sea spray aerosol of 5.9 ± 0.2 Pg yr-1 was derived that is close to the median of estimates from the same model using a wide range of existing sea spray source functions. When using the source function derived here, the model also showed good skill in predicting measurements of Na+ concentration at a number of field sites further underlining the validity of our source function. In a final step, the sensitivity of a large-scale model (NorESM - the

  8. Microwave Imager Measures Sea Surface Temperature Through Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image was acquired over Tropical Atlantic and U.S. East Coast regions on Aug. 22 - Sept. 23, 1998. Cloud data were collected by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data were collected aboard the NASA/NASDA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite by The TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). TMI is the first satellite microwave sensor capable of accurately measuring sea surface temperature through clouds, as shown in this scene. For years scientists have known there is a strong correlation between sea surface temperature and the intensity of hurricanes. But one of the major stumbling blocks for forecasters has been the precise measurement of those temperatures when a storm begins to form. In this scene, clouds have been made translucent to allow an unobstructed view of the surface. Notice Hurricane Bonnie approaching the Carolina Coast (upper left) and Hurricane Danielle following roughly in its path (lower right). The ocean surface has been falsely colored to show a map of water temperature--dark blues are around 75oF, light blues are about 80oF, greens are about 85oF, and yellows are roughly 90oF. A hurricane gathers energy from warm waters found at tropical latitudes. In this image we see Hurricane Bonnie cross the Atlantic, leaving a cooler trail of water in its wake. As Hurricane Danielle followed in Bonnie's path, the wind speed of the second storm dropped markedly, as available energy to fuel the storm dropped off. But when Danielle left Bonnie's wake, wind speeds increased due to temperature increases in surface water around the storm. As a hurricane churns up the ocean, it's central vortex draws surface heat and water into the storm. That suction at the surface causes an upwelling of deep water. At depth, tropical ocean waters are significantly colder than water found near the surface. As they're pulled up to meet the storm, those colder waters essentially leave a footprint in the storm's wake

  9. Sea-surface altimetry airborne observations using synoptic GNSS reflectometry at the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribó, Serni; Fabra, Fran; Cardellach, Estel; Li, Weiqiang; Rius, Antonio; Praks, Jaan; Rouhe, Erkka; Seppänen, Jaakko; Martín-Neira, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Recent GNSS-R (Global Navigation Satellite System-Reflections) observations over the Baltic Sea have been taken using the SPIR (Software PARIS Interferometric Receiver) from an airborne platform at 3 km altitude. This newly developed instrument is capable of acquiring GNSS signals transmitted by multiple satellites simultaneously that have been reflected of the sea-surface. Reflections are usually gathered in off-nadir configuration using the instrument's beam-forming capabilities, which results in an increase of the instrument's swath. In this way, this technique opens the door to densify in space and time sea-altimetry observations to enhance future mesoscale and sub-mesoscale ocean altimetry. The altimetric observations collected during the Baltic Sea campaign have been analysed in terms of their power spectral densities. We consider the sequence of observations as an ergodic process that has contributions from the actual true altimetry as well as the observation noise. In this way it is possible to relate the expected ground resolution of the observations with the obtainable altimetric uncertainty. Results will be presented.

  10. Late Cretaceous (late Campanian-Maastrichtian) sea-surface temperature record of the Boreal Chalk Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Nicolas; Harlou, Rikke; Schovsbo, Niels H.; Stemmerik, Lars; Surlyk, Finn

    2016-02-01

    The last 8 Myr of the Cretaceous greenhouse interval were characterized by a progressive global cooling with superimposed cool/warm fluctuations. The mechanisms responsible for these climatic fluctuations remain a source of debate that can only be resolved through multi-disciplinary studies and better time constraints. For the first time, we present a record of very high-resolution (ca. 4.5 kyr) sea-surface temperature (SST) changes from the Boreal epicontinental Chalk Sea (Stevns-1 core, Denmark), tied to an astronomical timescale of the late Campanian-Maastrichtian (74 to 66 Ma). Well-preserved bulk stable isotope trends and calcareous nannofossil palaeoecological patterns from the fully cored Stevns-1 borehole show marked changes in SSTs. These variations correlate with deep-water records of climate change from the tropical South Atlantic and Pacific oceans but differ greatly from the climate variations of the North Atlantic. We demonstrate that the onset and end of the early Maastrichtian cooling and of the large negative Campanian-Maastrichtian boundary carbon isotope excursion are coincident in the Chalk Sea. The direct link between SSTs and δ13C variations in the Chalk Sea reassesses long-term glacio-eustasy as the potential driver of carbon isotope and climatic variations in the Maastrichtian.

  11. Late Cretaceous (Late Campanian-Maastrichtian) sea surface temperature record of the Boreal Chalk Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, N.; Harlou, R.; Schovsbo, N. H.; Stemmerik, L.; Surlyk, F.

    2015-11-01

    The last 8 Myr of the Cretaceous greenhouse interval were characterized by a progressive global cooling with superimposed cool/warm fluctuations. The mechanisms responsible for these climatic fluctuations remain a source of debate that can only be resolved through multi-disciplinary studies and better time constraints. For the first time, we present a record of very high-resolution (ca. 4.5 kyr) sea-surface temperature (SST) changes from the Boreal epicontinental Chalk Sea (Stevns-1 core, Denmark), tied to an astronomical time scale of the late Campanian-Maastrichtian (74 to 66 Myr). Well-preserved bulk stable isotope trends and calcareous nannofossil palaeoecological patterns from the fully cored Stevns-1 borehole show marked changes in SSTs. These variations correlate with deep-water records of climate change from the tropical South Atlantic and Pacific oceans but differ greatly from the climate variations of the North Atlantic. We demonstrate that the onset and end of the early Maastrichtian cooling and of the large negative Campanian-Maastrichtian boundary carbon isotope excursion are coincident in the Chalk Sea. The direct link between SSTs and δ13C variations in the Chalk Sea reassesses long-term glacio-eustasy as the potential driver of carbon isotope and climatic variations in the Maastrichtian.

  12. Analysis and Modelling of Sea-Surface Doppler Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fois, F.; Hoogeboom, P.; Le Chevalier, F.; Stoffelen, A.

    2012-12-01

    The modelling of the Doppler spectrum of a time-varying ocean surface has gained considerable attention in the last decades. Knowledge of how the evolution of the ocean surface wave spectrum affects the scattered electromagnetic field is essential for a quantitative understanding of the properties of the measured microwave Doppler spectra. Complicated hydrodynamics, influencing the motion of the ocean surface waves, make this understanding significantly difficult. Non linear hydrodynamics couple the motion of the large and small waves and, consequently, change statistical characteristics and shapes of the surface-wave components. These hydrodynamic surface interactions are not included in the simplest linear sea-surface model, which assumes that each surface harmonic propagates according to the dispersion relation typical of water waves. In the past decades, Bass [1968] and Barrick [1972] used a surface perturbation theory to predict the Doppler spectra; Valenzuela and Laing [1970], instead, obtained similar results by using a composite surface model. Later, Doppler spectra were studied by Thompson [1989], who computed the spectra using a time-dependent composite model. Zavorotny and Voronovich [1998] made use of an approximate "two-scale" surface model based on a directional wave spectrum. However, currently available analytical scattering models are unreliable at high incidence angles and do not provide a full-polarimetric information. Exact numerical simulations of microwave scattering from time-varying ocean-like surfaces are highly recommended to eliminate concerns on the applicability of approximate models and to provide a validation tool for approximate scattering theories. A more realistic model, that accounts for hydrodynamic surface interactions, is the non-linear model for surface waves by Creamer et ali [1989]. Rino et ali [ 1991] were the first to use the Creamer model to simulate the Doppler spectra from dynamically evolving surface realizations

  13. Radar optimization for sea surface and geodetic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harger, R. O.

    1974-01-01

    The efficient estimation of geoid and sea state parameters is discussed, and the optimum processing structures, including maximum likelihood estimators, and their accuracy limits are given for a model. The model accounts for random surface reflectivity, sea height, and additive noise, and allows for arbitrary radar system parameters, based on the assumption the received signal is a sample function of a normal random process. The integral equation associated with the Gaussian signal in Gaussian noise inference problem was solved. It is shown that the optimum processing is generally a mixture of coherent and incoherent integrations which may be viewed as a weighted summation of received power of the match-filtered received data. When estimates are correlated, the strongest correlation appears between geoid and asymmetry estimates, and between wave height standard deviation and reflectivity estimates.

  14. Sea surface temperature contributes to marine crocodylomorph evolution.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jeremy E; Amiot, Romain; Lécuyer, Christophe; Benton, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    During the Mesozoic and Cenozoic, four distinct crocodylomorph lineages colonized the marine environment. They were conspicuously absent from high latitudes, which in the Mesozoic were occupied by warm-blooded ichthyosaurs and plesiosaurs. Despite a relatively well-constrained stratigraphic distribution, the varying diversities of marine crocodylomorphs are poorly understood, because their extinctions neither coincided with any major biological crises nor with the advent of potential competitors. Here we test the potential link between their evolutionary history in terms of taxic diversity and two abiotic factors, sea level variations and sea surface temperatures (SST). Excluding Metriorhynchoidea, which may have had a peculiar ecology, significant correlations obtained between generic diversity and estimated Tethyan SST suggest that water temperature was a driver of marine crocodylomorph diversity. Being most probably ectothermic reptiles, these lineages colonized the marine realm and diversified during warm periods, then declined or became extinct during cold intervals. PMID:25130564

  15. Impact of sea surface temperature front on stratus-sea fog over the Yellow and East China Seas — a case study with implications for climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Man; Zhang, Suping

    2013-06-01

    A stratus-sea fog event that occurred over the Yellow and East China Seas on 3 June 2011 is investigated using observations and a numerical model, with a focus on the effects of background circulation and Sea Surface Temperature Front (SSTF) on the transition of stratus into sea fog. Southerly winds of a synoptic high-pressure circulation transport water vapor to the Yellow Sea, creating conditions favorable for sea fog/stratus formation. The subsidence from the high-pressure contributes to the temperature inversion at the top of the stratus. The SSTF forces a secondary circulation within the ABL (Atmospheric Boundary Layer), the sinking branch of which on the cold flank of SSTF helps lower the stratus layer further to reach the sea surface. The cooling effect over the cold sea surface counteracts the adiabatic warming induced by subsidence. The secondary circulation becomes weak and the fog patches are shrunk heavily with the smoothed SSTF. A conceptual model is proposed for the transition of stratus into sea fog over the Yellow and East China Seas. Finally, the analyses suggest that sea fog frequency will probably decrease due to the weakened SSTF and the reduced subsidence of secondary circulation under global warming.

  16. Spatial heterogeneity of ocean surface boundary conditions under sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthélemy, Antoine; Fichefet, Thierry; Goosse, Hugues

    2016-06-01

    The high heterogeneity of sea ice properties implies that its effects on the ocean are spatially variable at horizontal scales as small as a few meters. Previous studies have shown that taking this variability into account in models could be required to simulate adequately mixed layer processes and the upper ocean temperature and salinity structures. Although many advanced sea ice models include a subgrid-scale ice thickness distribution, potentially providing heterogeneous surface boundary conditions, the information is lost in the coupling with a unique ocean grid cell underneath. The present paper provides a thorough examination of boundary conditions at the ocean surface in the NEMO-LIM model, which can be used as a guideline for studies implementing subgrid-scale ocean vertical mixing schemes. Freshwater, salt, solar heat and non-solar heat fluxes are examined, as well as the norm of the surface stress. All of the thermohaline fluxes vary considerably between the open water and ice fractions of grid cells. To a lesser extent, this is also the case for the surface stress. Moreover, the salt fluxes in both hemispheres and the solar heat fluxes in the Arctic show a dependence on the ice thickness category, with more intense fluxes for thinner ice, which promotes further subgrid-scale heterogeneity. Our analysis also points out biases in the simulated open water fraction and in the ice thickness distribution, which should be investigated in more details in order to ensure that the latter is used to the best advantage.

  17. Multisensor monitoring of sea surface state of the coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrova, Olga; Mityagina, Marina; Bocharova, Tatina

    Results of many-year monitoring of the state of coastal zone based on a multisensor approach are presented. The monitoring is aimed at solving the following tasks: operational mapping of parameters characterizing the state and pollution (coastal, ship and biogenic) of water; analysis of meteorological state and its effect on the drift and spread of pollutants; study of coastal circulation patterns and their impact on the drift and spread of pollutants; deriving typical pollution distribution patterns in the coastal zone.Processing and analysis is performed using data in visual, infrared and microwave ranges from ERS-2 SAR, Envisat ASAR/MERIS, Terra and Aqua MODIS and NOAA AVHRR instruments. These are complimented with ground data from meteorological stations on the shore and results of satellite data processing of previous periods. The main regions of interest are the Russian sectors of the Black and Azov Seas, southeastern part of the Baltic Sea, and northern and central regions of the Caspian Sea. Adjacent coasts are extremely populated and have well-developed industry, agriculture and rapidly growing tourist sectors. The necessity of constant monitoring of the sea state there is obvious.The monitoring activities allow us to accumulate extensive material for the study of hydrodynamic processes in the regions, in particular water circulation. Detailing the occurrence, evolution and drift of smalland meso-scale vortex structures is crucial for the knowledge of the mechanisms determining mixing and circulation processes in the coastal zone. These mechanisms play an important role in ecological, hydrodynamic and meteorological status of a coastal zone. Special attention is paid to the sea surface state in the Kerch Strait, where a tanker catastrophe took place on November 11, 2007 causing a spillage of over 1.5 thousand tons of heavy oil. The Kerch Strait is characterized by a complex current system with current directions changing to their opposites depending on

  18. Three Years of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Radiometric Calibration Validation using Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.; Broberg, Steve; Elliott, Denis; Gaiser, Steve; Gregorich, Dave

    2006-01-01

    This paper evaluates the absolute accuracy and stability of the radiometric calibration of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) by analyzing the difference between the brightness temperatures measured at 2616 cm(exp -1) and those calculated at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), using the Real-Time Global Sea Surface Temperature (RTGSST) for cloud-free night tropical oceans between +/- 30 degrees latitude. The TOA correction is based on radiative transfer. The analysis of the first 3 years of AIRS radiances verifies the absolute calibration at 2616 cm(exp -1) to better than 200 mK, with better than 16 mK/yr stability. The AIRS radiometric calibration uses an internal full aperture wedge blackbody with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable prelaunch calibration coefficients. The calibration coefficients have been unchanged since launch. The analysis uses very tight cloud filtering, which selects about 7000 cloud-free tropical ocean spectra per day, about 0.5% of the data. The absolute accuracy and stability of the radiometry demonstrated at 2616 cm(sup -1) are direct consequences of the implementation of AIRS as a thermally controlled, cooled grating-array spectrometer and meticulous attention to details. Comparable radiometric performance is inferred from the AIRS design for all 2378 channels. AIRS performance sets the benchmark for what can be achieved with a state-of-the-art hyperspectral radiometer from polar orbit and what is expected from future hyperspectral sounders. AIRS was launched into a 705 km altitude polar orbit on NASA's Earth Observation System (EOS) Aqua spacecraft on 4 May 2002. AIRS covers the 3.7-15.4 micron region of the thermal infrared spectrum with a spectral resolution of nu/Delta nu = 1200 and has returned 3.7 million spectra of the upwelling radiance each day since the start of routine data gathering in September 2002.

  19. Satellite Altimetric Mappings of Arctic Sea Surface Topography: An Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdoo, D. C.; Farrell, S. L.; Laxon, S. W.; Zwally, H. J.; Yi, D.; Coakley, B.; Cochran, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Increasingly precise mappings of sea surface topography (SST) in the Arctic Ocean are being derived from near-polar satellite altimeters such as the laser system - Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) - onboard NASA's ICESat and the radar systems onboard ESA's ERS-2 and Envisat. These mappings of sea surface topography (SST) have important oceanographic and geodetic applications. For example, because the geoid does conform closely to sea surface topography we can use altimetric SST measurements to estimate gravity (e.g., see the ARCtic Satellite-only (ARCS) field, McAdoo et al. 2008) particularly in regions lacking "true" surface gravity observations. Also, by differencing mappings of mean SST with a gravimetric geoid - particularly a geoid underpinned by a GRACE mean field model - we can estimate the dynamic ocean topography (DOT) and circulation of the Arctic Ocean. However, accurate estimates of DOT (e.g. accuracies better than a decimeter) require that we have very precise knowledge of the geoid and mean SST. Comparing a mean SST derived from ICESat/GLAS data spanning several years with a corresponding mean SST derived from ERS-2 data reveals short- wavelength differences or discrepancies of order 40 - 60 cm in certain areas of the Arctic Ocean such as the Chukchi Borderland. In order to attribute a portion of these discrepancies to laser or radar altimeter measurement error, we convert these mean SST fields to equivalent gravity fields and compare with gravity observations from several of the unclassified SCICEX/U.S. Navy submarine cruises (Edwards and Coakley, 2003; http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/res/pi/SCICEX/ ). This comparison enables us to quantify short-wavelength errors in both laser and radar altimetric mean SST models.

  20. Albatrosses as Ocean Samplers of Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, S. A.; Kappes, M.; Tremblay, Y.; Costa, D. P.; Weber, R.; Weimerskirch, H.

    2006-12-01

    Albatrosses are unique ocean voyagers because they range so widely and travel at speeds exceeding 90 km per hour. Because they can integrate vast areas of open-ocean, albatrosses are ideal ocean samplers. Between 2003 and 2005 breeding seasons, 21 Laysan and 15 black-footed albatrosses (body mass 2.5 to 3.5 kg) were equipped with 6 g leg-mounted geolocation archival data loggers at Tern Island, French Frigate Shoals, Northwest Hawaiian Islands. The tags sampled environmental temperatures every 480 or 540 s and provided a single location per day for the duration of deployment. Whenever an albatross landed on the sea surface to feed or rest, the tag sampled sea surface temperature (SST). After nearly one year of deployment, 31 albatrosses were recaptured and 29 tags provided complete records. A total of 377,455 SST readings were obtained over 7,360 bird-days at sea. Given the location errors in the geolocation methodology (200 km) and the lack of temporal resolution (1 location per day), the SST measurements can only be used to characterize broad-scale correlates between albatross distribution and the ocean environment. However, in February 2006, we deployed 45 g GPS data loggers on 10 breeding albatrosses for 2-4 day deployments. The GPS loggers were attached to feathers on the albatrosses backs, they sampled every 10 s, and were accurate to within 10 m. One albatross was also equipped with the same leg-mounted archival tag that sampled SST every 8 s. This albatross collected 6,289 SST measurements with complementary GPS quality locations in 3 days at sea. These results highlight the efficacy of albatrosses as ocean samplers. Given that Laysan and black- footed albatrosses range throughout the North Pacific Ocean, it is conceivable that these seabirds could someday become sentinels of changing oceanic conditions. Moreover, these technologies provide exciting new information about the oceanic habitats of North Pacific albatrosses.

  1. Numerical study on the interannual oscillation of sea surface temperature in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Xiao; Zhou, Fa-Xiu; Fu, Gang; Qin, Zeng-Hao

    1996-03-01

    A two and a half layer oceanic model of wind-driven, thermodynamical general circulation is applied to study the interannual oscillation of sea surface temperature (SST) in the South China Sea (SCS). The model consists of two active layers: the upper mixed layer (UML) and the seasonal thermocline, with the motionless abyss beneath them. The governing equations which include momentum, continuity and sea temperature for each active layer, can describe the physics of Boussinseq approximation, reduced gravity and equatorial β-plane. The formulas for the heat flux at the surface and at the interface between two active layers are designed on the Haney scheme. The entrainment and detrainment at the bottom of the UML induces vertical transport of mass, momentum and heat, and couples of dynamic and thermodynamic effects. Using leap-frog integrating scheme and the Arakawa—C grid the model is forced by a time-dependent wind anomaly stress pattern obtained from category analysis of COADS. The numerical results indicate that there is a kind of oscillation with about 30 months period. The paper supports the opinion that the SST interannual oscillation is the oceanic response to the forcing by monsoon wind anomalies in the SCS.

  2. Modern Tasman Sea surface reservoir ages from deep-sea black corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komugabe, Aimée F.; Fallon, Stewart J.; Thresher, Ronald E.; Eggins, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Marine reservoir ages are a key element in calculating and constraining uncertainty in radiocarbon age estimates and are also essential to better understand regional ocean circulation. In this study, we present a new method to reconstruct long-term, high-resolution sea surface reservoir ages based on analysis of the organic skeleton of deep-sea (560 m) black coral (Anthozoa, Antipatharia). Our results confirm that antipatharians are extremely slow growing (typical radial growth rate for a South Pacific specimen around 0.03 mm/yr). Coupled uranium series and radiocarbon measurements were made on black coral collected live from the Norfolk Ridge (north Tasman Sea) to provide the first modern reservoir ages for this region. At the Norfolk Ridge, the average reservoir age between 1790 AD and 1900 AD was ∼330 years. This was followed by a steep decrease over time of about 70 years to 1950 AD (our most modern value). This indicates an increase in surface ocean ventilation of water masses in this region. These results are consistent with observational studies for the early twentieth century, which suggest significant changes in regional circulation of the southwest pacific.

  3. Retrieval of eddy dynamics from SMOS sea surface salinity measurements in the Algerian Basin (Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isern-Fontanet, Jordi; Olmedo, Estrella; Turiel, Antonio; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; García-Ladona, Emilio

    2016-06-01

    The circulation in the Algerian Basin is characterized by the presence of fresh-core eddies that propagate along the coast or at distances between 100 and 200 km from the coast. Enhancements in the processing of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) data have allowed to produce, for the first time, satellite sea surface salinity (SSS) maps in the Mediterranean Sea that capture the signature of Algerian eddies. SMOS data can be used to track them for long periods of time, especially during winter. SMOS SSS maps are well correlated with in situ measurements although the former has a smaller dynamical range. Despite this limitation, SMOS SSS maps capture the key dynamics of Algerian eddies allowing to retrieve velocities from SSS with the correct sign of vorticity.

  4. Microwave Remote Sensing Modeling of Ocean Surface Salinity and Winds Using an Empirical Sea Surface Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.

    2004-01-01

    Active and passive microwave remote sensing techniques have been investigated for the remote sensing of ocean surface wind and salinity. We revised an ocean surface spectrum using the CMOD-5 geophysical model function (GMF) for the European Remote Sensing (ERS) C-band scatterometer and the Ku-band GMF for the NASA SeaWinds scatterometer. The predictions of microwave brightness temperatures from this model agree well with satellite, aircraft and tower-based microwave radiometer data. This suggests that the impact of surface roughness on microwave brightness temperatures and radar scattering coefficients of sea surfaces can be consistently characterized by a roughness spectrum, providing physical basis for using combined active and passive remote sensing techniques for ocean surface wind and salinity remote sensing.

  5. Simulations of The Extreme Precipitation Event Enhanced by Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly over the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakan Doǧan, Onur; Önol, Barış

    2016-04-01

    Istanbul Technical University, Aeronautics and Astronautics Faculty, Meteorological Engineering, Istanbul, Turkey In this study, we examined the extreme precipitation case over the Eastern Black Sea region of Turkey by using regional climate model, RegCM4. The flood caused by excessive rain in August 26, 2010 killed 12 people and the landslides in Rize province have damaged many buildings. The station based two days total precipitation exceeds 200 mm. One of the usual suspects for this extreme event is positive anomaly of sea surface temperature (SST) over the Black Sea where the significant warming trend is clear in the last three decades. In August 2010, the monthly mean SST is higher than 3 °C with respect to the period of 1981-2010. We designed three sensitivity simulations with RegCM4 to define the effects of the Black Sea as a moisture source. The simulation domain with 10-km horizontal resolution covers all the countries bordering the Black Sea and simulation period is defined for entire August 2010. It is also noted that the spatial variability of the precipitation produced by the reference simulation (Sim-0) is consistent with the TRMM data. In terms of analysis of the sensitivity to SST, we forced the simulations by subtracting 1 °C (Sim-1), 2 °C (Sim-2) and 3 °C (Sim-3) from the ERA-Interim 6-hourly SST data (considering only the Black Sea). The sensitivity simulations indicate that daily total precipitation for all these simulations gradually decreased based on the reference simulation (Sim-0). 3-hourly maximum precipitation rates for Sim-0, Sim-1, Sim-2 and Sim-3 are 32, 25, 13 and 10.5 mm respectively over the hotspot region. Despite the fact that the simulations signal points out the same direction, degradation of the precipitation intensity does not indicate the same magnitude for all simulations. It is revealed that 2 °C (Sim-2) threshold is critical for SST sensitivity. We also calculated the humidity differences from the simulation and these

  6. Radio emission of sea surface at centimeter wavelengths and is fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseytlin, N. M.; Shutko, A. M.; Zhislin, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    The eigen thermal radio emission of the sea was examined as well as the agitated surface of the sea when the reflection (scattering) is similar in nature to diffused scattering. The contribution of this emission to the total emission of the sea is practically constant in time, and the time fluctuations of the radio emissions of the sea are basically determined only by a change in the eigen emission of the sea, connected with the agitation.

  7. Retrieval of near-surface bio-optical properties of the Arabian Sea from remotely sensed ocean colour data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, M. H.; Trees, C. C.; Aiken, J.; Bale, A. J.; Moore, G. F.; Barlow, R. G.; Cummings, D. G.

    1999-03-01

    The use of CZCS-type band-ratio algorithms to estimate the diffuse attenuation coefficient, percentage light depths, and near-surface optically weighted phytoplankton pigment concentrations from remotely sensed ocean colour data was investigated on two cruises in the Arabian Sea and Gulf of Oman during autumn and winter 1994. The variations of upwelling radiance and downwelling irradiance with depth were measured along with phytoplankton pigment concentrations by HPLC. A spectroradiometer was used on the second cruise to investigate the feasibility of measuring water-leaving radiance from above the sea surface. Retrieval of the diffuse downwelling attenuation coefficient at 490 nm was accurate to within 22% of the actual value across both cruises. There was also a robust relationship between the diffuse attenuation coefficient and the 10, 1 and 0.1% light depths. Above-surface estimates of water-leaving radiance agreed with SeaWiFS-standard estimates to within 10% between 443 and 555 nm. The global 443 : 555 band-ratio algorithms of Aiken et al. [NASA Tech. Memo 104566, Vol. 29, SeaWiFS Technical Report Series, 34 pp] estimated near-surface chlorophyll- a and fluorometric pigment concentrations with mean absolute errors of less than 35% of the actual values (which were all less than 2.0 mg m -3). The performance of algorithms based on the 490 : 555 ratio was poorer. The estimates given by the algorithms were generally higher than the measured pigment concentrations and the variance of the accuracy of the estimates was high. There appears to be no significant change in the performance of the algorithms between cruises (approximately 2 1/2 months apart in time). There is no evidence that the Gulf of Oman should be treated as a separate bio-optical province to the Arabian Sea/Omani shelf area for the purpose of the retrieval of near-surface pigment concentrations from ocean colour observations.

  8. Estimation of subsurface thermal structure using sea surface height and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Yong Q. (Inventor); Jo, Young-Heon (Inventor); Yan, Xiao-Hai (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of determining a subsurface temperature in a body of water is disclosed. The method includes obtaining surface temperature anomaly data and surface height anomaly data of the body of water for a region of interest, and also obtaining subsurface temperature anomaly data for the region of interest at a plurality of depths. The method further includes regressing the obtained surface temperature anomaly data and surface height anomaly data for the region of interest with the obtained subsurface temperature anomaly data for the plurality of depths to generate regression coefficients, estimating a subsurface temperature at one or more other depths for the region of interest based on the generated regression coefficients and outputting the estimated subsurface temperature at the one or more other depths. Using the estimated subsurface temperature, signal propagation times and trajectories of marine life in the body of water are determined.

  9. Joint variability of global runoff and global sea surface temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Wolock, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Global land surface runoff and sea surface temperatures (SST) are analyzed to identify the primary modes of variability of these hydroclimatic data for the period 1905-2002. A monthly water-balance model first is used with global monthly temperature and precipitation data to compute time series of annual gridded runoff for the analysis period. The annual runoff time series data are combined with gridded annual sea surface temperature data, and the combined dataset is subjected to a principal components analysis (PCA) to identify the primary modes of variability. The first three components from the PCA explain 29% of the total variability in the combined runoff/SST dataset. The first component explains 15% of the total variance and primarily represents long-term trends in the data. The long-term trends in SSTs are evident as warming in all of the oceans. The associated long-term trends in runoff suggest increasing flows for parts of North America, South America, Eurasia, and Australia; decreasing runoff is most notable in western Africa. The second principal component explains 9% of the total variance and reflects variability of the El Ni??o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and its associated influence on global annual runoff patterns. The third component explains 5% of the total variance and indicates a response of global annual runoff to variability in North Aflantic SSTs. The association between runoff and North Atlantic SSTs may explain an apparent steplike change in runoff that occurred around 1970 for a number of continental regions.

  10. Ocean backscatter across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, S.V.; Li, F.K.

    1997-06-01

    Ocean backscatter was measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with the airborne NUSCAT K{sub u}-band scatterometer, across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment off the coast of Virginia and Maryland in the winter of 1991. Backscatter across the front between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration experimental coastal buoy A (44024) on the cold side and Discus C buoy (44023) on the warm side shows a difference of more than 5 dB for vertical polarization in many cases. This large frontal backscatter change is observed in all upwind, downwind, and crosswind directions. The sea surface temperature difference measured by the buoys was about 9{degrees}C. The corresponding difference in wind speed cannot account for the large backscatter change in view of geophysical model functions depending only on neutral wind velocity such as SASS. The measured backscatter also has larger upwind-downwind and upwind-crosswind ratios compared to the model results. Furthermore, NUSCAT data reveal that upwind backscatter on the cold side was smaller than or close to crosswind backscatter on the warm side for incidence angles between 30{degrees} to 50{degrees}. This suggests that the temperature front can be detected by the scatterometer at these incidence angles for different wind directions in the cold and warm sides.

  11. Sea Surface Temperature and Vegetation Index from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a composite MODIS image showing the 'green wave' of spring in North America and sea surface temperature in the ocean, collected over an 8-day period during the first week in April 2000. On land, the darker green pixels show where the most green foliage is being produced due to photosynthetic activity. Yellows on land show where there is little or no productivity and red is a boundary zone. In the ocean, orange and yellows show warmer waters and blues show colder values. (MODIS Data Type: MODIS-PFM)

  12. Spherical harmonic expansion of the Levitus Sea surface topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelis, Theodossios

    1987-01-01

    Prior information for the stationary sea surface topography (SST) may be needed in altimetric solutions that intend to simultaneously improve the gravity field and determine the SST. For this purpose the oceanographically derived SST estimates are represented by a spherical harmonic expansion. The spherical harmonic coefficients are computed from a least squares adjustment of the data covering the majority of the oceanic regions of the world. Several tests are made to determine the optimum maximum degree of solution and the best configuration of the geometry of the data in order to obtain a solution that fits the data and also provides a good spectral representation of the SST.

  13. Sea surface Ka-band radar cross-section from field observations in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurovsky, Yury; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Grodsky, Semyon; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    An interest in Ka-band radar backscattering from the ocean surface is growing due to better spatial resolution and more accurate Doppler anomaly estimate. But, available empirical models of Ka-band cross-section are quite scarce and sometime controversial. Here we present multi-year (2009-2015) field measurements of Ka-band co-polarized (VV and HH) sea surface normalized radar cross-section (NRCS) from research platform in the Black sea collected in a wide range of observation and sea state conditions. The data are fitted by polynomial function of incidence angle, azimuth and wind speed with accounting for measured radar antenna pattern. This empirical NRCS is compared with published Ka- and Ku-band data. Our Ka-band NRCS is close to Ku-band, but is 5-7 dB higher than 'pioneer' measurements by Masuko et al. (1986). Following the two-scale Bragg paradigm, the NRCS is split into polarized (Bragg) and non-polarized components and analyzed in terms of polarization ratio (VV/HH) and polarization difference (VV-HH) to estimate wave spectra at the Bragg wave number. Non-polarized component dominates at low incidence angles <30° due to specular reflection from regular surface. At larger incidence angles, the relative non-polarized contribution decreases, but grows again at HH-polarization approaching 0.7-0.8 at 65° for 10 m/s wind speed, suggesting that backscattering from breaking waves dominates HH NRCS at low grazing angles. At high incidence angles (>60°) NRCS azimuth dependency is unimodal (upwind peak) for HH and bimodal (with up- and downwind peaks) for VV polarization. This again can be attributed to different backscattering mechanisms for VV and HH polarizations. With decreasing of incidence angle, up- to downwind ratio tends to 1, and under light wind conditions (4-6 m/s) can be less than 1. The same situation is observed for polarization difference, which reflects Bragg backscattering properties only. This effect can be explained by enhanced roughness on

  14. Attributing extreme precipitation in the Black Sea region to sea surface warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Edmund; Semenov, Vladimir; Maraun, Douglas; Park, Wonsun; Chernokulsky, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Higher sea surface temperatures (SSTs) warm and moisten the overlying atmosphere, increasing the low-level atmospheric instability, the moisture available to precipitating systems and, hence, the potential for intense convective systems. Both the Mediterranean and Black Sea regions have seen a steady increase in summertime SSTs since the early 1980s, by over 2 K in places. This raises the question of how this SST increase has affected convective precipitation extremes in the region, and through which mechanisms any effects are manifested. In particular, the Black Sea town of Krymsk suffered an unprecedented precipitation extreme in July 2012, which may have been influenced by Black Sea warming, causing over 170 deaths. To address this question, we adopt two distinct modelling approaches to event attribution and compare their relative merits. In the first, we use the traditional probabilistic event attribution approach involving global climate model ensembles representative of the present and a counterfactual past climate where regional SSTs have not increased. In the second, we use the conditional event attribution approach, taking the 2012 Krymsk precipitation extreme as a showcase example. Under the second approach, we carry out ensemble sensitivity experiments of the Krymsk event at convection-permitting resolution with the WRF regional model, and test the sensitivity of the event to a range of SST forcings. Both experiments show the crucial role of recent Black Sea warming in amplifying the 2012 Krymsk precipitation extreme. In the conditional event attribution approach, though, the explicit simulation of convective processes provides detailed insight into the physical mechanisms behind the extremeness of the event, revealing the dominant role of dynamical (i.e. static stability and vertical motions) over thermodynamical (i.e. increased atmospheric moisture) changes. Additionally, the wide range of SST states tested in the regional setup, which would be

  15. Temporal and spatial variations of sea surface temperature in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Chente; Lin, Chiyuan; Chen, Shihchin; Shyu, Chungzen

    2000-03-01

    Sea surface temperature of the East China Sea (ECS) were analyzed using the NOAA/AVHRR SST images. These satellite images reveal surface features of ECS including mainly the Kuroshio Current, Kuroshio Branch Current, Taiwan Warm Current, China coastal water, Changjiang diluted water and Yellow Sea mixed cold water. The SST of ECS ranges from 27 to 29°C in summer; some cold eddies were found off northeast Taiwan and to the south of Changjiang mouth. SST anomalies at the center of these eddies were about 2-5°C. The strongest front usually occurs in May each year and its temperature gradient is about 5-6°C over a cross-shelf distance of 30 nautical miles. The Yellow Sea mixed cold water also provides a contrast from China Coastal waters shoreward of the 50 m isobath; cross-shore temperature gradient is about 6-8°C over 30 nautical miles. The Kuroshio intrudes into ECS preferably at two locations. The first is off northeast Taiwan; the subsurface water of Kuroshio is upwelled onto the shelf while the main current is deflected seaward. The second site is located at 31°N and 128°E, which is generally considered as the origin of the Tsushima Warm Current. More quantitatively, a 2-year time series of monthly SST images is examined using EOF analysis to determine the spatial and temporal variations in the northwestern portion of ECS. The first spatial EOF mode accounts for 47.4% of total spatial variance and reveals the Changjiang plume and coastal cold waters off China. The second and third EOF modes account for 16.4 and 9.6% of total variance, respectively, and their eigenvector images show the intrusion of Yellow Sea mixed cold waters and the China coastal water. The fourth EOF mode accounts for 5.4% of total variance and reveals cold eddies around Chusan Islands. The temporal variance EOF analysis is less revealing in this study area.

  16. A high-resolution global sea surface temperature climatology

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, R.W.; Smith, T.M.

    1995-06-01

    In response to the development of a new higher-resolution sea surface temperature (SST) analysis at the National Meteorological Center (NMC), a new monthly 1{degrees} global sea surface temperature climatology was constructed from two intermediate climatologies: the 2{degrees} SST climatology used a 30-yr 1950-1979 base period between roughly 40{degrees}S and 60{degrees}N based on in situ (ship and buoy) SST data supplemented by four years (1982-1985) of satellite SST retrievals, and sea-ice coverage data over a 12-yr period (1982-1993). The final climatology was combined from these two products so that a 1{degrees} resolution was maintained and the base period was adjusted to the 1950-1979 period wherever possible (approximately between 40{degrees}S and 60{degrees}N). Compared to the 2{degrees} climatology, the 1{degrees} climatology resolves equatorial upwelling and fronts much better. This leads to a better matching of the scales of the new analysis and climatology. In addition, because the magnitudes of large-scale features are consistently maintained in both the older 2{degrees} and the new 1{degrees} climatologies, climate monitoring of large-scale anomalies will be minimally affected by the analysis change. The use of 12 years of satellite SST retrievals makes this new climatology useful for many additional purposes because its effective resolution actually approaches 1{degrees} everywhere over the global ocean and because the mean SST values are more accurate south of 40{degrees}S than climatologies without these data. 12 refs., 16 figs.

  17. Global interoperability in the oceanographic sea surface temperature community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, E. M.; Casey, K. S.; Vazquez, J.; Habermann, T.; Bingham, A.; Thompson, C. K.; Donlon, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Project is an international consortium of data providers coordinated across four continents providing sea surface temperature (SST) products from nearly every SST observing satellite in common data and metadata formats since 2005. It currently provides Level 2P data for 13 unique sensors with over 40 combined Level 2, 3 and 4 products. The entire project produces on the order of 35 Gbytes/day and distributes over 3 Tbytes/ month from a variety of access nodes. Although these combined data throughputs are modest by the standards of future NASA Decadal missions, GHRSST has achieved a large measure of success by implementing a regional/global task sharing framework built on self describing data formats, standardized metadata content and data access protocols early in its mission. We will present some of these implementation strategies, lessons learned and history with regard to standardizing products while reducing barriers to interoperability that the project undertook leading up to the present. We will also discuss recent revisions of data and metadata product specifications, and new tools and services that the project will implement in the near future to further reduce barriers, and improve discovery, metadata and access.

  18. Emerita analoga recruit populations and correlations with sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettway, J.; Quan, H.; Juarez, F.; Vicencio, M.; Ng, N.; Careers in Science Intern Program

    2010-12-01

    The Careers in Science program at the California Academy of Sciences is a science internship for students from groups traditionally under-represented in the sciences. Starting in 2003, interns have participated in the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association's LiMPETS Sandy Beach Monitoring program, assessing populations of Emerita analoga, the Pacific mole crab. E. analoga, an inhabitant of intertidal swash zones along the coast from Alaska to Baja California, is an important species in the sandy beach intertidal food web. Weekly, during the months of June, July and August, a group of interns go to stairwell 18 of San Francisco’s Ocean Beach in Golden Gate National Recreational Area to systematically collect live E. analoga samples and data. Along a 50 meter sampling area, five transects with ten samples in the swash zone are taken and recorded. Collected E. analoga are sexed (male, female, female w/eggs, and recruit) and measured for carapace size. Newly settled E. analoga (recruit) populations have declined in recent years. However, beginning in 2009, recruit populations began to increase in number, particularly in 2010. Our group hypothesized that this increase in recruitment is correlated with increased sea surface temperature. It has been reported that some planktonic animals become more abundant in warmer waters after a major temperature shift. After examining the data, we did not find a correlation between sea surface temperature and recruit populations, leading us to further questions on the cause of this increase in E. analoga recruits.

  19. Mean sea surface and gravity investigations using TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    From a broad point of view, we will be concerned with studying global ocean circulation patterns on the basis of ocean surface determinations with geoid undulation information. In addition, we will study local variations of the gravity field implied by the altimeter data. These general goals are reflected in the title of our investigation. To meet our general goal, we have defined a number of specific objectives: (1) sea surface topography representation; (2) mean sea surface determination; (3) development of local geoid models; (4) mean sea surface comparisons; (5) sea surface topographic files; and (6) gravity anomaly determination.

  20. Sea surface salinity variability in the East China Sea observed by the Aquarius instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Lee, J. H.; de Matthaeis, P.; Yueh, S. H.; Hong, C. S.; Pang, I.; Lagerloef, G. S. E.

    2014-12-01

    This study demonstrates that the spaceborne Aquarius instrument is able to monitor the sea surface salinity (SSS) variations in the East China Sea (ECS), where routine observations are difficult. The two geophysical contaminants enter the sidelobes of the Aquarius antenna and bias the coastal SSS low: the emission from the land surface and the radiofrequency interference (RFI). Away from about one Aquarius pixel (150 km) from the coastline, the Aquarius SSS is fairly insensitive (less than about 0.2 psu) to the radiometric details of the method to correct for the land emission. The ascending orbits appear to be affected by unfiltered RFI much less than the descending tracks. The Aquarius SSS along the ascending tracks is low over the ECS by 0.40 to 0.93 psu (with respect to the in situ data during the two separate 7-day periods) and is biased low by 0.41 to 1.07 psu (accuracy, or the time-mean of difference from the regional model along three Aquarius tracks over a 18-month period). The presence of the ascending and descending differences in the Aquarius SSS, and the spatially widespread bias suggest that the bias is attributed to the unfiltered RFI originating from strong point sources (rather than to the land contamination from weak distributed sources, or to other seasonally-varying geophysical contaminants). Despite the bias, the Aquarius data describe well the temporal and spatial variability of the ECS SSS. The temporal trend and magnitude of salinity changes agree remarkably between Aquarius and a regional numerical model, during both the freshwater discharge season from the Yangtze river and the rest of the year. The river discharge rate correlates with the Aquarius SSS with the coefficient of 0.71 on a seasonal scale with the discharge leading the SSS changes. The Aquarius SSS increases away from the coast, in response to the river outflow. The interannual changes in the Aquarius SSS capture the effect of the regional drought in summer 2013. Kim et al., in

  1. Sea surface temperature anomalies in the South China Sea during mature phase of ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Fuwen; Pan, Aijun; Zhang, Shanwu; Cha, Jing; Sun, Haowei

    2016-05-01

    Based on the 18-year (1993-2010) National Centers for Environmental Prediction optimum interpolation sea surface temperature (SST) and simple ocean data assimilation datasets, this study investigated the patterns of the SST anomalies (SSTAs) that occurred in the South China Sea (SCS) during the mature phase of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation. The most dominant characteristic was that of the outof-phase variation between southwestern and northeastern parts of the SCS, which was influenced primarily by the net surface heat flux and by horizontal thermal advection. The negative SSTA in the northeastern SCS was caused mainly by the loss of heat to the atmosphere and because of the cold-water advection from the western Pacific through the Luzon Strait during El Niño episodes. Conversely, it was found that the anomalous large-scale atmospheric circulation and weakened western boundary current during El Niño episodes led to the development of the positive SSTA in the southwestern SCS.

  2. Comparison of sea surface winds derived from active and passive microwaves instruments on the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Biasio, Francesco; Zecchetto, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    In order to characterize the energy and momentum fluxes at the air-sea interface, the surface wind vector must be known with adequate spatial and temporal coverages. Satellite-borne active and passive microwaves instruments perform such measurements. In the Mediterranean Sea, and in general in enclosed or semi-enclosed basins, an adequate coverage is yet more difficult to achieve than in open sea, because of the presence of vast coastal areas and elevated orography near the coastline. This study aims to compare the performance of three of such instruments (two actives and one passive) over several years of activity over the Mediterranean Sea, in order to delve into the possibility of using the three data-sets as a common reference for marine meteorology investigations, dramatically improving the availability of surface wind data in the Mediterranean Sea. They are the METOP-A ASCAT scatterometer, the QuikSCAT SeaWinds scatterometer and the Coriolis WindSat radiometer. ASCAT and QuikSCAT data are freely available for download, at spatial resolution of 25 km by 25 km and 12.5 km by 12.5 km, from the Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center PO.DAAC (http://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov). ASCAT near real time data have 2 hours latency. The time span covered by these data is March 2007-present for ASCAT, July 1999-November 2009 for QuikSCAT. In the Mediterranean Sea the nominal temporal coverage is less then 2 hit per point per day for both. WindSat data have spatial resolution of 25 km by 25 km, cover the period February 2003-present, and are freely available for download from Remote Sensing Systems (http://www.ssmi.com). They are available as delayed datasets covering one day at a time. The two collocated datasets cover the period February 2003 - November 2009 (WindSat - QuikSCAT) and March 2009 - November 2010 (WindSat - ASCAT), and offer the means to perform: - a comparison of the performances of active and passive microwaves instruments; - a very long

  3. Global monthly sea surface nitrate fields estimated from remotely sensed sea surface temperature, chlorophyll, and modeled mixed layer depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteaga, Lionel; Pahlow, Markus; Oschlies, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Information about oceanic nitrate is crucial for making inferences about marine biological production and the efficiency of the biological carbon pump. While there are no optical properties that allow direct estimation of inorganic nitrogen, its correlation with other biogeochemical variables may permit its inference from satellite data. Here we report a new method for estimating monthly mean surface nitrate concentrations employing local multiple linear regressions on a global 1° by 1° resolution grid, using satellite-derived sea surface temperature, chlorophyll, and modeled mixed layer depth. Our method is able to reproduce the interannual variability of independent in situ nitrate observations at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series, the Hawaii Ocean Time series, the California coast, and the southern New Zealand region. Our new method is shown to be more accurate than previous algorithms and thus can provide improved information on temporal and spatial nutrient variations beyond the climatological mean at regional and global scales.

  4. Interannual variability in stratiform cloudiness and sea surface temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J.R.; Leovy, C.B.

    1994-12-01

    Marine stratiform cloudiness (MSC)(stratus, stratocumulus, and fog) is widespread over subtropical oceans west of the continents and over midlatitude oceans during summer, the season when MSC has maximum influence on surface downward radiation and is most influenced by boundary-layer processes. Long-term datasets of cloudiness and sea surface teperature (SST) from surface observations from 1952 to 1981 are used to examine interannual variations in MSC and SST. Linear correlations of anomalies in seasonal MSC amount with seasonal SST anomalies are negative and significant in midlatitude and eastern subtropical oceans, especially during summer. Significant negative correlations between SST and nimbostratus and nonprecipitating midlevel cloudiness are also observed at midlatitudes during summer, suggesting that summer storm tracks shift from year to year following year-to-year meridional shifts in the SST gradient. Over the 30-yr period, there are significant upward trends in MSC amount over the northern midlatitude oceans and a significant downward trend off the coast of California. The highest correlations and trends occur where gradients in MSC and SST are strongest. During summer, correlations between SST and MSC anomalies peak at zero lag in midlatitudes where warm advection prevails, but SST lags MSC in subtropical regions where cold advection predominates. This difference is attributed to a tendency for anomalies in latent heat flux to compensate anomalies in surface downward radiation in warm advection regions but not in cold advection regions.

  5. Interannual variability in stratiform cloudiness and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Joel R.; Leovy, Conway B.

    1994-01-01

    Marine stratiform cloudiness (MSC)(stratus, stratocumulus, and fog) is widespread over subtropical oceans west of the continents and over midlatitude oceans during summer, the season when MSC has maximum influence on surface downward radiation and is most influenced by boundary-layer processes. Long-term datasets of cloudiness and sea surface teperature (SST) from surface observations from 1952 to 1981 are used to examine interannual variations in MSC and SST. Linear correlations of anomalies in seasonal MSC amount with seasonal SST anomalies are negative and significant in midlatitude and eastern subtropical oceans, especially during summer. Significant negative correlations between SST and nimbostratus and nonprecipitating midlevel cloudiness are also observed at midlatitudes during summer, suggesting that summer storm tracks shift from year to year following year-to-year meridional shifts in the SST gradient. Over the 30-yr period, there are significant upward trends in MSC amount over the northern midlatitude oceans and a significant downward trend off the coast of California. The highest correlations and trends occur where gradients in MSC and SST are strongest. During summer, correlations between SST and MSC anomalies peak at zero lag in midlatitudes where warm advection prevails, but SST lags MSC in subtropical regions where cold advection predominates. This difference is attributed to a tendency for anomalies in latent heat flux to compensate anomalies in surface downward radiation in warm advection regions but not in cold advection regions.

  6. Persistence of Rainfall Imprint on SMOS Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Jacqueline; Reverdin, Gilles; Martin, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission monitors sea surface salinity (SSS) over the global ocean for more than 5 years. In previous studies, Boutin et al. (2014) have shown a clear freshening of SMOS SSS under rain cells of about -0.14pss/mm/hr at moderate wind speed (3-12m/s). This order of magnitude is compatible with in situ drifters observations taken at 45cm depth while SMOS SSS are at about 1cm depth and at a mean spatial resolution of 43km. Using Aquarius satellite SSS, Meissner and Wentz (2014) found a SSS decrease under rain cells of -0.12pss/mm/hr at 7 m/s wind speed, consistent with SMOS estimate considering the lower spatial resolution of Aquarius SSS (about 150km); Santos-Garcia et al. (2014) found an influence of the rain history preceding by a few hours the Aquarius measurement. In most cases, drifters observations also suggest that about half of the freshening observed locally disappears after one hour, likely because of mixing with surrounding waters. In this presentation, we will investigate the temporal and spatial evolution of SMOS SSS after a rain event. Rainfall information will be either derived from SSM/Is measurements (during periods when three SSM/Is satellites provide adequate sampling before and simultaneous to SMOS measurements) or from the NOAA CMORPH products. In order to separate instantaneous from historical effects, we distinguish two cases: 1) rainfall occurs at less than 30mn from SMOS observation but no rain occurred before; 2) rainfall occurred previous to SMOS observation (up to 3 hours before) but has stopped at least 30mn before SMOS acquisition. In addition to looking at the temporal evolution of SMOS SSS under the rain cell, since both vertical mixing and horizontal stirring may occur, we also investigate the size of the fresh SSS region relative to the size of the rain cell. Boutin, J., N. Martin, G. Reverdin, S. Morisset, X. Yin, L. Centurioni, and N. Reul (2014), Sea surface salinity under rain

  7. Reevaluation of mid-Pliocene North Atlantic sea surface temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Marci M.; Dowsett, Harry J.; Dwyer, Gary S.; Lawrence, Kira T.

    2008-01-01

    Multiproxy temperature estimation requires careful attention to biological, chemical, physical, temporal, and calibration differences of each proxy and paleothermometry method. We evaluated mid-Pliocene sea surface temperature (SST) estimates from multiple proxies at Deep Sea Drilling Project Holes 552A, 609B, 607, and 606, transecting the North Atlantic Drift. SST estimates derived from faunal assemblages, foraminifer Mg/Ca, and alkenone unsaturation indices showed strong agreement at Holes 552A, 607, and 606 once differences in calibration, depth, and seasonality were addressed. Abundant extinct species and/or an unrecognized productivity signal in the faunal assemblage at Hole 609B resulted in exaggerated faunal-based SST estimates but did not affect alkenone-derived or Mg/Ca–derived estimates. Multiproxy mid-Pliocene North Atlantic SST estimates corroborate previous studies documenting high-latitude mid-Pliocene warmth and refine previous faunal-based estimates affected by environmental factors other than temperature. Multiproxy investigations will aid SST estimation in high-latitude areas sensitive to climate change and currently underrepresented in SST reconstructions.

  8. A Robust Mechanical Sensing System for Unmanned Sea Surface Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulczycki, Eric A.; Magnone, Lee J.; Huntsberger, Terrance; Aghazarian, Hrand; Padgett, Curtis W.; Trotz, David C.; Garrett, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    The need for autonomous navigation and intelligent control of unmanned sea surface vehicles requires a mechanically robust sensing architecture that is watertight, durable, and insensitive to vibration and shock loading. The sensing system developed here comprises four black and white cameras and a single color camera. The cameras are rigidly mounted to a camera bar that can be reconfigured to mount multiple vehicles, and act as both navigational cameras and application cameras. The cameras are housed in watertight casings to protect them and their electronics from moisture and wave splashes. Two of the black and white cameras are positioned to provide lateral vision. They are angled away from the front of the vehicle at horizontal angles to provide ideal fields of view for mapping and autonomous navigation. The other two black and white cameras are positioned at an angle into the color camera's field of view to support vehicle applications. These two cameras provide an overlap, as well as a backup to the front camera. The color camera is positioned directly in the middle of the bar, aimed straight ahead. This system is applicable to any sea-going vehicle, both on Earth and in space.

  9. Bistatic electromagnetic scattering and detection of pollutant on a sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanmi, Helmi; Khenchaf, Ali; Comblet, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    We present the study and analysis of the variations of the bistatic electromagnetic (EM) signature of the sea surface contaminated by pollutants. Therefore, we start with the numerical analyses of the pollutant effect on the geometrical and physical characteristics of sea surface. Then, we evaluate the EM scattering coefficients of the clean and polluted sea surfaces observed in bistatic configuration by using the numerical forward-backward method. The obtained numerical results of the EM scattering coefficients are studied and given as a function of various parameters: sea state, wind velocity, type of pollutant (sea surface polluted by oil emulsion and sea surface covered by oil layer), incidence and scattering angles, frequencies bands (C, X, and Ku), and radar polarization.

  10. Bistatic scattering from a contaminated sea surface observed in C, X, and Ku bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanmi, H.; Khenchaf, A.; Comblet, F.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the work presented in this paper focuses on the study and analysis of variations of the bistatic electromagnetic signature of the sea surface contaminated by pollutants. Therefore, we will start the numerical analyses of the pollutant effect on the geometrical and physical characteristics of sea surface. Then, we will evaluate the electromagnetic (EM) scattering coefficients of the clean and polluted sea surface observed in bistatic configuration by using the numerical Forward-Backward Method (FBM). The obtained numerical results of the electromagnetic scattering coefficients are studied and given as a function of various parameters: sea state, wind velocity, type of pollutant (sea surface polluted by oil emulsion, and sea surface covered by oil layer), incidence and scattering angles, frequencies bands (C, X and Ku) and radar polarization.

  11. Sea surface wind measurement over offshore wind farm using TerraSAR-X data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Ming; Lehner, Susanne; Brusch, Stephan; Ren, Yong-Zheng

    2011-11-01

    A TerraSAR-X Stripmap image over the North Sea shows significant spatial variations of sea surface wind field over the offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus. In the present study, we demonstrate the tempting potential of using high resolution SAR to investigate spatial variations of sea surface wind field over the offshore wind farms. A newly developed X-band Geophysical Model Function (GMF) XMOD2 is applied on the TS-X data to retrieve sea surface wind speed. By comparing the TS-X retrieved sea surface wind field to results of the DWD wind field, in situ observations on the FiNO platform, as well as the satellite measurement derived from the polarimetric microwave radiometer WindSat, it is found that the SAR estimated wind field not only agrees well with other measurements, but also presents the fine-scale features of sea surface wind field over the offshore wind farm.

  12. Electromagnetic scattering and Doppler spectrum simulation of time-varying oil-covered nonlinear sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pengju; Guo, Lixin; Jia, Chungang

    2016-01-01

    Based on the model of Lombardini et al. [J. Atmos. Ocean. Technol. 6(6), 882-890 (1989)], which can predict the hydrodynamic damping of rough sea surfaces in the presence of oil films, the influence of sea slicks on the sea surface roughness spectrum and sea surface geometrical structure is examined briefly in the present study. On this basis, the influence of sea slicks on the angular distribution of the bistatic scattering coefficient of sea surfaces and the Doppler spectrum signature of backscattered radar sea-echo is investigated in detail based on a frequency-domain numerical method of the parallel fast multiple method. Simulation results show that Doppler spectrum signatures including Doppler shift and spectral bandwidth of radar sea-echo are significantly affected by sea slicks, which are qualitatively consistent with wave-tank or open sea measurements. Moreover, simulation results indicate that the Doppler spectrum signature is a promising technique for remote sensing of oil films floating on sea surfaces.

  13. Sources of polyfluoroalkyl compounds in the North Sea, Baltic Sea and Norwegian Sea: Evidence from their spatial distribution in surface water.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Lutz; Gerwinski, Wolfgang; Theobald, Norbert; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2010-02-01

    The spatial distribution of 15 polyfluoroalkyl compounds (PFCs) in surface water was investigated in the North Sea, Baltic Sea and Norwegian Sea. In addition, an interlaboratory comparison of the sampling techniques and analysis was conducted. Highest concentration in the North Sea was found near the coast, whereas the summation operatorPFC concentration decreased rapidly from 18.4 to 0.07 ng l(-1) towards the open North Sea. The river Elbe could identify as a local input source for PFCs into the North Sea, whereas perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA) was transported into the sampling area with the easterly current. In contrast to the North Sea, the distribution of PFCs in the Baltic Sea was relatively homogenous, where diffuse sources dominated. In general, the composition profile was influenced from local sources caused by human activities, whereas atmospheric depositions of here analysed PFCs were negligible, but it could have possibly an influence on low contaminated sites like the open North Sea or Norwegian Sea. PMID:19818459

  14. Comparison of geographical trend patterns in sea level and sea surface temperature in the Pacific Ocean during 1993-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanisamy, Hindumathi; Cazenave, Anny; Delcroix, Thierry; Meyssignac, Benoit; Balmaseda, Magdalena; Merchant, Christopher

    2013-04-01

    It is now well established that geographical trend patterns in satellite altimetry-based sea level are mostly caused by non uniform steric trend patterns, the largest contribution being due to the thermosteric component. In the Pacific Ocean, the observed sea level trend pattern over 1993-2011 results from a superposition two types of signals: (1) a strong positive trend V-shaped anomaly located 120°E and 160° E in longitude and ~20°S-20°N in latitude and (2) another V-shaped anomaly of much broader scale -extending to mid-latitudes in the central Pacific-, quite similar to the dominant large-scale trend pattern observed in sea surface temperature (SST). Previous studies have shown that the type (1) signal is related to El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The type (2) signal reflects the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), the dominant component of large-scale SST variability in the Pacific. In this study, we analyze altimetry-based sea level, steric sea level and SST over the 1993-2011 time span to discriminate between the near surface and deeper thermosteric contributions to sea level. The sea level and SST data are based on the recently available products from the ESA Climate Change Initiative project and several other products like HadiSST, ERAINTERIM. Steric data are based on an updated version of the Ishii and Kimoto (2009) data. We compute the thermosteric contribution to sea level in different layers from the surface to the 700 m depth, and through correlation and Empirical Orthogonal Function analyses, explore the spatio-temporal coherence between the three variables (sea level, depth-dependent steric sea level and SST).

  15. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  16. Detecting nonlinearities in microwave return from the sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heia, Karsten; Eltoft, Torbjorn

    1994-12-01

    In this paper we discuss the properties of two different methods for extracting information of non-linear mechanisms influencing the backscatter of microwaves from the ocean surface. In the first of these methods, denoted the Multi Frequency Technique (MFT), several frequencies, distributed in a narrow band around a carrier frequency, are simultaneously transmitted, and the non-linearities are detected as secondary peaks in their mutual cross-product spectrum. This technique has been extensively discussed in earlier papers as a proper method for extracting sea surface information (Alpers, W., and K. Hasselmann, 1978). The second method uses only the transmitted frequency and the non-linear effects are detected as secondary (or over-harmonic) frequency peaks in the bispectrum of the backscattered signal. This method has been successfully applied to studies of non-linear wave-wave iterations in experimental plasma physics, but has to the authors' knowledge not been used in studies of microwave scattering from the sea surface. We refer to this method as the Bispectral Analysis Technique (BAT). In order to correctly interpret the different signatures observed in microwave remote sensing of the ocean surface, it is important to fully understand how various physical phenomena influence the backscattered signal. The data used in this work, are generated by a numerical simulator. Based on the Holliday scattering model and a theoretical description of the power spectrum of the surface elevation, we are able to study in detail how various physical and geometrical conditions influence the backscattered signal. Specifically, we address the problem of detecting non-linear hydrodynamical phenomena induced by non-linear hydrodynamical phenomena (Stokes-type gravity waves) or non-linear modulation mechanisms (tilt and hydrodynamic modulation), using the MFT and BAT. We show in this paper that both methods are capable of detecting non-linear features, but that the performance is

  17. Satellite-Derived Sea Surface Temperature: Workshop 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This is the third of a series of three workshops, sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, to investigate the state of the art in global sea surface temperature measurements from space. Three workshops were necessary to process and analyze sufficient data from which to draw conclusions on the accuracy and reliability of the satellite measurements. In this workshop, the final two (out of a total of four) months of satellite and in situ data chosen for study were processed and evaluated. Results from the AVHRR, HIRS, SMMR, and VAS sensors, in comparison with in situ data from ships, XBTs, and buoys, confirmed satellite rms accuracies in the 0.5 to 1.0 C range, but with variable biases. These accuracies may degrade under adverse conditions for specific sensors. A variety of color maps, plots, and statistical tables are provided for detailed study of the individual sensor SST measurements.

  18. Improved accuracy of the remote sensing of sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalu, G.; Prabhakara, C.; Lo, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described for determining the water vapor content to within + or - 0.4 g/sq cm from remotely sensed radiances in three infrared channels, 11, 13, 18 microns. Using this method, it is possible to significantly improve the accuracy of sea surface temperature (SST) over what is obtainable with the two channel technique. A radiative computational scheme for the radiative transfer equation is used to study the manner in which the equivalent radiative temperature of the atmosphere changes as a function of wave number for different atmospheric conditions. Average climatological conditions are used to simulate the radiative response of the atmosphere. This radiative transfer simulation is used to compute brightness temperatures for radiosonde profiles obtained from oceanographic ships, which temperatures are in turn used to estimate the SST. Nimbus 4 IRIS spectral measurements corresponding to the profiles were used in the same way for purposes of comparison.

  19. Sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to sea surface temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.L. )

    1993-06-01

    Increased occurrence of more intense tropical storms intruding further poleward has been foreshadowed as one of the potential consequences of global warming. This scenario is based almost entirely on the general circulation model predictions of warmer sea surface temperature (SST) with increasing levels of atmospheric CO[sub 2] and some theories of tropical cyclone intensification that support the notion of more intense systems with warmer SST. Whether storms are able to achieve this theoretically determined more intense state depends on whether the temperature of the underlying water is the dominant factor in tropical cyclone intensification. An examination of the historical data record in a number of ocean basins is used to identify the relative importance of SST in the tropical cyclone intensification process. The results reveal that SST alone is an inadequate predictor of tropical cyclone intensity. Other factors known to affect tropical cyclone frequency and intensity are discussed. 16 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Sea surface: fate and biological effects of mixed contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.T.; Crecelius, E.A.; Long, E.; Kiesser, S.L.; Stubin, A.I.; Gurtisen, J.M.; Apts, C.W.

    1985-09-01

    This research on the microlayer (upper 50 micrometers of the sea surface) confirms that many contaminants partition at this interface. High concentrations of polynuclear aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons were found in the microlayer of urban bays in Puget Sound. In some cases, concentrations exceeded water quality criteria by several orders of magnitude. At the same sites, subsurface bulk water showed no detectable contamination. Fertilized neustonic eggs of sand sole (Psettichthys melanostictus), were exposed to collected microlayer samples during their first week of embryonic and larval development. Compared to the rural site and/or central Puget Sound, exposure of embryos to microlayer from several urban bay sites resulted in delayed hatching, increased embryo mortality, and kyphosis (bent spine abnormalities) in hatched larvae. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Eddies contribute to striations in sea surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-03-01

    Scientists recently observed striations in sea surface topography in all ocean basins. These striations appear as alternating mesoscale jet-like structures; they have speeds on the order of 1 centimeter per second and are typically separated by about 200 kilometers in the meridional direction. The cause of these striations has been debated. Contributing to this scientific discussion, Buckingham and Cornillon used a database of tracked eddies and a contour identification and eddy removal algorithm to show that eddies are a significant source of striations. The authors noted that a small portion of the energy was unaccounted for by propagating eddies, allowing for the existence of weak zonal flows. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, doi:10.1029/2012JC008231, 2013)

  2. Surface buoyant plumes from melting icebergs in the Labrador Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovsky, Alexander E.; Yashayaev, Igor

    2014-09-01

    Canada's Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) conducts annual surveys in the Labrador Sea along the repeat hydrography line AR7W. The occupation of the AR7W line in May 2013 was followed by the experiment aimed at resolving the imprint of melting drifting icebergs on the upper layer thermohaline characteristics in the Labrador Sea. We present high-resolution observations around two icebergs conducted with the towed undulating platform Moving Vessel Profiler (MVP). The first iceberg drifted in relatively warm water of Atlantic origin (~2.5-3.1 °C) off Greenland, while the second iceberg was on the Labrador shelf in cold water below 0 °C. Both icebergs had a lengthscale of O(100 m). In both cases surface buoyant plumes fed by melt water and attached to the iceberg were observed. The plumes were evident in the anomalous thermohaline characteristics of the seawater. Their density anomalies were sufficiently strong to produce visible frontal structures, which imply a development of the intrinsic dynamics associated with a plume. The first plume formed over a time interval of ~10 h, while the second plume formed over several days and extended for more than 1 km (tenfold the iceberg's size). Strong vertical displacements of the pycnocline were observed near the second iceberg. They are interpreted as the internal wave wake. This interpretation is based on the temporal scale of these oscillations (local buoyancy frequency), as well as on the spatial orientation of these waves with respect to the iceberg drift relative to the pycnocline. The observed internal waves partially overlapped with the plume and affected its structure. The saline seawater splashing by swell contributed to the surface melting of the icebergs. Scaling analysis of the second plume suggests that it could be in the “rotational” dynamic regime with recirculating anticyclonic flow.

  3. The effects of sea surface temperature gradients on surface turbulent fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, John

    A positive correlation between sea surface temperature (SST) and wind stress perturbation near strong SST gradients (DeltaSST) has been observed in different parts of the world ocean, such as the Gulf Stream in the North Atlantic and the Kuroshio Extension east of Japan. These changes in winds and SSTs can modify near-surface stability, surface stress, and latent and sensible heat fluxes. In general, these small scale processes are poorly modeled in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and climate models. Failure to account for these air--sea interactions produces inaccurate values of turbulent fluxes, and therefore a misrepresentation of the energy, moisture, and momentum budgets. Our goal is to determine the change in these surface turbulent fluxes due to overlooking the correlated variability in winds, SSTs, and related variables. To model these air--sea interactions, a flux model was forced with and without SST--induced changes to the surface wind fields. The SST modification to the wind fields is based on a baroclinic argument as implemented by the University of Washington Planetary Boundary-Layer (UWPBL) model. Other input parameters include 2-m air temperature, 2-m dew point temperature, surface pressure (all from ERA--interim), and Reynolds Daily Optimum Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature (OISST). Flux model runs are performed every 6 hours starting in December 2002 and ending in November 2003. From these model outputs, seasonal, monthly, and daily means of the difference between DeltaSST and no DeltaSST effects on sensible heat flux (SHF), latent heat flux (LHF), and surface stress are calculated. Since the greatest impacts occur during the winter season, six additional December-January-February (DJF) seasons were analyzed for 1987--1990 and 1999--2002. The greatest differences in surface turbulent fluxes are concentrated near strong SST fronts associated with the Gulf Stream and Kuroshio Extension. On average, 2002---2003 DJF seasonal differences in SHF

  4. Seasonal sea surface temperature anomaly prediction for coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Charles A.; Pegion, Kathy; Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Alexander, Michael A.; Tommasi, Desiree; Bond, Nicholas A.; Fratantoni, Paula S.; Gudgel, Richard G.; Kristiansen, Trond; O'Brien, Todd D.; Xue, Yan; Yang, Xiasong

    2015-09-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies are often both leading indicators and important drivers of marine resource fluctuations. Assessment of the skill of SST anomaly forecasts within coastal ecosystems accounting for the majority of global fish yields, however, has been minimal. This reflects coarse global forecast system resolution and past emphasis on the predictability of ocean basin-scale SST variations. This paper assesses monthly to inter-annual SST anomaly predictions in coastal "Large Marine Ecosystems" (LMEs). We begin with an analysis of 7 well-observed LMEs adjacent to the United States and then examine how mechanisms responsible for prediction skill in these systems are reflected in predictions for LMEs globally. Historical SST anomaly estimates from the 1/4° daily Optimal Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature reanalysis (OISST.v2) were first found to be highly consistent with in-situ measurements for 6 of the 7 U.S. LMEs. Thirty years of retrospective forecasts from climate forecast systems developed at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (CM2.5-FLOR) and the National Center for Environmental Prediction (CFSv2) were then assessed against OISST.v2. Forecast skill varied widely by LME, initialization month, and lead but there were many cases of high skill that also exceeded that of a persistence forecast, some at leads greater than 6 months. Mechanisms underlying skill above persistence included accurate simulation of (a) seasonal transitions between less predictable locally generated and more predictable basin-scale SST variability; (b) seasonal transitions between different basin-scale influences; (c) propagation of SST anomalies across seasons through sea ice; and (d) re-emergence of previous anomalies upon the breakdown of summer stratification. Globally, significant skill above persistence across many tropical systems arises via mechanisms (a) and (b). Combinations of all four mechanisms contribute to less prevalent but nonetheless

  5. Hydraulic exchange between a coral reef and surface sea water

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, G.W.; Sansone, F.J.; Li, Yuan-Hui

    1992-10-01

    Hydraulic exchange between overlying sea water and the internal structure of a patch reef in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii, was studied with an array of wells, 1, 2, and 4 m deep. Two natural chemical tracers, radon, and salinity, were used to calculate the exchange rate between surface sea water and reef interstitial waters. Dissolved radon concentrations are substantially higher in interstitial waters than is surface water. The degree of radon enrichment is quantitatively related to the time elapsed since interstitial water had equilibrated with the atmosphere. Residence time estimates are 1-40 days, with deeper wells having slower exchange. The average residence time for 1-m-deep wells was 2.1 days. A rainstorm-induced dilution of the salinity of Kaneohe Bay provides the second tracer. Samples of surface and reef interstitial waters following this salinity perturbation are used to calculate an average residence time of 2.6 days at a depth of 1 m and 42 days at a depth of 2 m. Three types of physical forces thought to cause exchange between surface and interstitial water are considered by measurement of the forcing functions and reef permeability. Hydraulic conductivities are about 50 m/d, with lower values near the seaward side of the reef. Most exchange seems to be caused by high-frequency, wave-driven oscillatory pumping and by unidirectional hydraulic head gradients (of uncertain origin) that are stable for at least 3-4 days. Wave-driven mixing is probably more important shallower in the reef, whereas head-driven flow may dominate deeper in the reef. Tidal pumping does not seem to contribute to exchange. All methods indicate that exchange in the upper part of Checker Reef is primarily through vertical exchange. The best estimate for the residence time of water at a depth of 1 m is 2 days. Water at depths of 204 m probably has a residence time of weeks to months. 49 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. A case study of sea breeze blocking regulated by sea surface temperature along the English south coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, J. K.; Chagnon, J. M.; Gray, S. L.

    2013-09-01

    The sensitivity of sea breeze structure to sea surface temperature (SST) and coastal orography is investigated in convection-permitting Met Office Unified Model simulations of a case study along the south coast of England. Changes in SST of 1 K are shown to significantly modify the structure of the sea breeze. On the day of the case study the sea breeze was partially blocked by coastal orography, particularly within Lyme Bay. The extent to which the flow is blocked depends strongly on the static stability of the marine boundary layer. In experiments with colder SST, the marine boundary layer is more stable, and the degree of blocking is more pronounced. The implications of prescribing fixed SST from climatology in numerical weather prediction model forecasts of the sea breeze are discussed.

  7. The mean sea surface height and geoid along the Geosat subtrack from Bermuda to Cape Cod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Kathryn A.; Joyce, Terrence M.; Schubert, David M.; Caruso, Michael J.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of near-surface velocity and concurrent sea level along an ascending Geosat subtrack were used to estimate the mean sea surface height and the Earth's gravitational geoid. Velocity measurements were made on three traverses of a Geosat subtrack within 10 days, using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). A small bias in the ADCP velocity was removed by considering a mass balance for two pairs of triangles for which expendable bathythermograph measurements were also made. Because of the large curvature of the Gulf Stream, the gradient wind balance was used to estimate the cross-track component of geostrophic velocity from the ADCP vectors; this component was then integrated to obtain the sea surface height profile. The mean sea surface height was estimated as the difference between the instantaneous sea surface height from ADCP and the Geosat residual sea level, with mesoscale errors reduced by low-pass filtering. The error estimates were divided into a bias, tilt, and mesoscale residual; the bias was ignored because profiles were only determined within a constant of integration. The calculated mean sea surface height estimate agreed with an independent estimate of the mean sea surface height from Geosat, obtained by modeling the Gulf Stream as a Gaussian jet, within the expected errors in the estimates: the tilt error was 0.10 m, and the mesoscale error was 0.044 m. To minimize mesoscale errors in the estimate, the alongtrack geoid estimate was computed as the difference between the mean sea level from the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission and an estimate of the mean sea surface height, rather than as the difference between instantaneous profiles of sea level and sea surface height. In the critical region near the Gulf Stream the estimated error reduction using this method was about 0.07 m. Differences between the geoid estimate and a gravimetric geoid were not within the expected errors: the rms mesoscale difference was 0.24 m rms.

  8. Biofilm-like properties of the sea surface and predicted effects on air-sea CO2 exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurl, Oliver; Stolle, Christian; Van Thuoc, Chu; The Thu, Pham; Mari, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    Because the sea surface controls various interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere, it has a profound function for marine biogeochemistry and climate regulation. The sea surface is the gateway for the exchange of climate-relevant gases, heat and particles. Thus, in order to determine how the ocean and the atmosphere interact and respond to environmental changes on a global scale, the characterization and understanding of the sea surface are essential. The uppermost part of the water column is defined as the sea-surface microlayer and experiences strong spatial and temporal dynamics, mainly due to meteorological forcing. Wave-damped areas at the sea surface are caused by the accumulation of surface-active organic material and are defined as slicks. Natural slicks are observed frequently but their biogeochemical properties are poorly understood. In the present study, we found up to 40 times more transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), the foundation of any biofilm, in slicks compared to the underlying bulk water at multiple stations in the North Pacific, South China Sea, and Baltic Sea. We found a significant lower enrichment of TEP (up to 6) in non-slick sea surfaces compared to its underlying bulk water. Moreover, slicks were characterized by a large microbial biomass, another shared feature with conventional biofilms on solid surfaces. Compared to non-slick samples (avg. pairwise similarity of 70%), the community composition of bacteria in slicks was increasingly (avg. pairwise similarity of 45%) different from bulk water communities, indicating that the TEP-matrix creates specific environments for its inhabitants. We, therefore, conclude that slicks can feature biofilm-like properties with the excessive accumulation of particles and microbes. We also assessed the potential distribution and frequency of slick-formation in coastal and oceanic regions, and their effect on air-sea CO2 exchange based on literature data. We estimate that slicks can reduce CO2

  9. Relationships between near-surface plankton concentrations, hydrography, and satellite-measured sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, A. C.; Emery, W. J.

    1988-01-01

    Sea surface temperatures (SSTs) mapped by IR satellite images and in situ hydrographic measurements off the west coast of British Columbia for early-winter and midsummer periods were correlated with in situ measurements of surface chlorophyll and zooplankton concentration. Correlations between winter log(e) transformed zooplankton concentrations and SSTs demonstrated that IR satellite imagery could explain 49 percent of the sampled zooplankton concentration variance. A least-squares-fit nonlinear equation showed that satellite-measured SST patterns explained 72 percent of the log(e) transformed chlorophyll variance. However, summer zooplankton concentrations were not consistently related to satellite temperature patterns.

  10. Summer surface layer thermal response to surface gravity waves in the Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Han, Guijun; Wang, Dongxiao; Deng, Zengan; Li, Wei

    2012-07-01

    The Princeton Ocean Model (POM) with generalized coordinate system (POMgcs) is used to study the summer surface-layer thermal response to surface gravity waves in the Yellow Sea (YS). The parameterization schemes of wave breaking developed by Mellor and Blumberg (J Phys Oceanogr 34:693-698, 2004) and Kantha and Clayson (Ocean Model 6:101-124, 2004), respectively, and Stokes production developed by Kantha and Clayson (Ocean Model 6:101-124, 2004) are both included in the Mellor-Yamada turbulence closure model Mellor and Yamada (Rev Geophys 20:851-875, 1982) of POMgcs. Numerical results show that surface gravity waves impact the depth of surface mixed layer of temperature in the YS in summer. The surface mixed layer in the YS cannot be reproduced well and has a visible difference from the observation if the parameterization schemes are not included. A diagnostic analysis of turbulent kinetic energy suggests that both Stokes production and wave breaking play key roles in enhancing the turbulent mixing near the sea surface in the YS. Stokes production seems to have a greater impact throughout the upper mixed layer in the YS in summer than that of wave breaking. In addition, a diagnostic analysis of the momentum balance shows that Coriolis-Stokes forcing has a significant effect on the momentum budget in the upper layer in the YS, and surface gravity waves are able to reduce the velocity of mean flow near the surface and make the mean flow near the surface more homogeneous vertically in the YS.

  11. Analyses of global sea surface temperature 1856-1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Alexey; Cane, Mark A.; Kushnir, Yochanan; Clement, Amy C.; Blumenthal, M. Benno; Rajagopalan, Balaji

    1998-08-01

    Global analyses of monthly sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies from 1856 to 1991 are produced using three statistically based methods: optimal smoothing (OS), the Kaiman filter (KF) and optimal interpolation (OI). Each of these is accompanied by estimates of the error covariance of the analyzed fields. The spatial covariance function these methods require is estimated from the available data; the timemarching model is a first-order autoregressive model again estimated from data. The data input for the analyses are monthly anomalies from the United Kingdom Meteorological Office historical sea surface temperature data set (MOHSST5) [Parker et al., 1994] of the Global Ocean Surface Temperature Atlas (GOSTA) [Bottomley et al., 1990]. These analyses are compared with each other, with GOSTA, and with an analysis generated by projection (P) onto a set of empirical orthogonal functions (as in Smith et al. [1996]). In theory, the quality of the analyses should rank in the order OS, KF, OI, P, and GOSTA. It is found that the first four give comparable results in the data-rich periods (1951-1991), but at times when data is sparse the first three differ significantly from P and GOSTA. At these times the latter two often have extreme and fluctuating values, prima facie evidence of error. The statistical schemes are also verified against data not used in any of the analyses (proxy records derived from corals and air temperature records from coastal and island stations). We also present evidence that the analysis error estimates are indeed indicative of the quality of the products. At most times the OS and KF products are close to the OI product, but at times of especially poor coverage their use of information from other times is advantageous. The methods appear to reconstruct the major features of the global SST field from very sparse data. Comparison with other indications of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation cycle show that the analyses provide usable information on

  12. Sea, ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, G. D.; Wright, F. F.; Burns, J. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 imagery has been extremely useful in understanding the tidal water movements in a large estuary such as Cook Inlet. As more imagery obtained during various tidal stages become available it appears that complex and fast changing micro-circulation patterns develop in various regions of Cook Inlet during each advancing and receding tide. More ERTS-1 synoptic imagery is needed to fully understand the effect of the approach of tidal front on the water movements in the various regions through the estuary. The conventional onboard ship data gathered during various cruises although revealed the overall circulation pattern in Cook Inlet but failed to show micro-subgyres which develop in various regions during each tide which are discernible on ther ERTS-1 imagery. Suspended load distribution in the Bering Sea during summer varies significantly. In areas of phytoplankton bloom and at the river mouths the suspended load is higher than the 1 mg/1 which is found over most areas. The influence of major rivers on temperature, salinity, and suspended load in surface water as well as at shallow depth is apparent. On the Bering shelf a strong pycnocline generally at depth 10-20 m is formed by surface fresh water flow which retains sediment in suspension over extended periods.

  13. Horizontal advection, diffusion and plankton spectra at the sea surface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, A.; Clayton, S.; Pasquero, C.

    2009-04-01

    Plankton patchiness is ubiquitous in the oceans, and various physical and biological processes have been proposed as its generating mechanisms. However, a coherent statement on the problem is missing, due to both a small number of suitable observations and to an incomplete understanding of the properties of reactive tracers in turbulent media. Abraham (1998) suggested that horizontal advection may be the dominant process behind the observed distributions of phytoplankton and zooplankton, acting to mix tracers with longer reaction times (Rt) down to smaller scales. Conversely, Mahadevan and Campbell (2002) attributed the relative distributions of sea surface temperature and phytoplankton to small scale upwelling, where tracers with longer Rt are able to homogenize more than those with shorter reaction times. Neither of the above mechanisms can explain simultaneously the (relative) spectral slopes of temperature, phytoplankton and zooplankton. Here, with a simple advection model and a large suite of numerical experiments, we concentrate on some of the physical processes influencing the relative distributions of tracers at the ocean surface, and we investigate: 1) the impact of the spatial scale of tracer supply; 2) the role played by coherent eddies on the distribution of tracers with different Rt; 3) the role of diffusion (so far neglected). We show that diffusion determines the distribution of temperature, regardless of the nature of the forcing. We also find that coherent structures together with differential diffusion of tracers with different Rt impact the tracer distributions. This may help in understanding the highly variable nature of observed plankton spectra.

  14. Air-sea interaction and spatial variability of the surface evaporation duct in a coastal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Ian M.

    Aircraft observations are presented of the horizontal variability in the depth of the surface evaporation duct and the relationship with the mesoscale structure of air-sea interaction processes. The 2-dimensional fields of near-surface wind, stress, wind-stress curl, air and sea-surface temperature are measured directly for flow around a headland. The sea surface temperature field indicates cold upwelling driven by the wind-stress curl. Boundary-layer stability responds rapidly to the spatial changes in surface temperature. These changes result in modification of the evaporation duct, which decreases significantly in depth over the cooler upwelling water.

  15. Long-Range Correlations of Global Sea Surface Temperature.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Scaling behaviors of the global monthly sea surface temperature (SST) derived from 1870-2009 average monthly data sets of Hadley Centre Sea Ice and SST (HadISST) are investigated employing detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The global SST fluctuations are found to be strong positively long-range correlated at all pertinent time-intervals. The value of scaling exponent is larger in the tropics than those in the intermediate latitudes of the northern and southern hemispheres. DFA leads to the scaling exponent α = 0.87 over the globe (60°S~60°N), northern hemisphere (0°N~60°N), and southern hemisphere (0°S~60°S), α = 0.84 over the intermediate latitude of southern hemisphere (30°S~60°S), α = 0.81 over the intermediate latitude of northern hemisphere (30°N~60°N) and α = 0.90 over the tropics 30°S~30°N [fluctuation F(s) ~ sα], which the fluctuations of monthly SST anomaly display long-term correlated behaviors. Furthermore, the larger the standard deviation is, the smaller long-range correlations (LRCs) of SST in the corresponding regions, especially in three distinct upwelling areas. After the standard deviation is taken into account, an index χ = α * σ is introduced to obtain the spatial distributions of χ. There exists an obvious change of global SST in central east and northern Pacific and the northwest Atlantic. This may be as a clue on predictability of climate and ocean variabilities. PMID:27100397

  16. Long-Range Correlations of Global Sea Surface Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lei; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Scaling behaviors of the global monthly sea surface temperature (SST) derived from 1870–2009 average monthly data sets of Hadley Centre Sea Ice and SST (HadISST) are investigated employing detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The global SST fluctuations are found to be strong positively long-range correlated at all pertinent time-intervals. The value of scaling exponent is larger in the tropics than those in the intermediate latitudes of the northern and southern hemispheres. DFA leads to the scaling exponent α = 0.87 over the globe (60°S~60°N), northern hemisphere (0°N~60°N), and southern hemisphere (0°S~60°S), α = 0.84 over the intermediate latitude of southern hemisphere (30°S~60°S), α = 0.81 over the intermediate latitude of northern hemisphere (30°N~60°N) and α = 0.90 over the tropics 30°S~30°N [fluctuation F(s) ~ sα], which the fluctuations of monthly SST anomaly display long-term correlated behaviors. Furthermore, the larger the standard deviation is, the smaller long-range correlations (LRCs) of SST in the corresponding regions, especially in three distinct upwelling areas. After the standard deviation is taken into account, an index χ = α * σ is introduced to obtain the spatial distributions of χ. There exists an obvious change of global SST in central east and northern Pacific and the northwest Atlantic. This may be as a clue on predictability of climate and ocean variabilities. PMID:27100397

  17. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  18. Impact of Interdecadal Sea Level and Sea Surface Temperature Variability on Primary Productivity and Harmful Algal Blooms in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) are increasing in frequency and intensity on global, regional and local scales. Although climate change has been suggested as one of the key factors, very few interdecadal studies comparing HABs to low frequency physical forcing have been performed. Interannual to interdecadal variability in sea level and sea surface temperature along the Southern California Coast have been shown to have high correlation with the El Nino-La Nina signal. This is important in the study of phytoplankton, because abnormally low sea level corresponds to increased sea surface nutrient concentrations in this region. The California current is stronger during these times, and the higher nutrient water found to the north is advected southward. We have determined that primary productivity is most highly correlated with interdecadal sea level variability derived from tide gage data at a lag of approximately 2 months. This is consistent with previous zooplankton studies. In preparation for a potential El Nino event, we have expanded our analysis to include parameters such as sea surface temperature, salinity and nutrient concentrations from spaceborne and in situ instruments. We have also expanded our research to allow for analysis of several of the most prevalent HAB species. This work is the first step in our effort to create a model to predict and locate Southern California HAB events in the future.

  19. Snow melt on sea ice surfaces as determined from passive microwave satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark R.

    1987-01-01

    SMMR data for the year 1979, 1980 and 1984 have been analyzed to determine the variability in the onset of melt for the Arctic seasonal sea ice zone. The results show melt commencing in either the Kara/Barents Seas or Chukchi Sea and progressing zonally towards the central Asian coast (Laptev Sea). Individual regions had interannual variations in melt onset in the 10-20 day range. To determine whether daily changes occur in the sea ice surface melt, the SMMR 18 and 37 GHz brightness temperature data are analyzed at day/night/twilight periods. Brightness temperatures illustrate diurnal variations in most regions during melt. In the East Siberian Sea, however, daily variations are observed in 1979, throughout the analysis period, well before any melt would usually have commenced. Understanding microwave responses to changing surface conditions during melt will perhaps give additional information about energy budgets during the winter to summer transition of sea ice.

  20. An Improved DINEOF Algorithm for Filling Missing Values in Spatio-Temporal Sea Surface Temperature Data

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Bo; Su, Fenzhen; Meng, Yunshan

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an improved Data INterpolating Empirical Orthogonal Functions (DINEOF) algorithm for determination of missing values in a spatio-temporal dataset is presented. Compared with the ordinary DINEOF algorithm, the iterative reconstruction procedure until convergence based on every fixed EOF to determine the optimal EOF mode is not necessary and the convergence criterion is only reached once in the improved DINEOF algorithm. Moreover, in the ordinary DINEOF algorithm, after optimal EOF mode determination, the initial matrix with missing data will be iteratively reconstructed based on the optimal EOF mode until the reconstruction is convergent. However, the optimal EOF mode may be not the best EOF for some reconstructed matrices generated in the intermediate steps. Hence, instead of using asingle EOF to fill in the missing data, in the improved algorithm, the optimal EOFs for reconstruction are variable (because the optimal EOFs are variable, the improved algorithm is called VE-DINEOF algorithm in this study). To validate the accuracy of the VE-DINEOF algorithm, a sea surface temperature (SST) data set is reconstructed by using the DINEOF, I-DINEOF (proposed in 2015) and VE-DINEOF algorithms. Four parameters (Pearson correlation coefficient, signal-to-noise ratio, root-mean-square error, and mean absolute difference) are used as a measure of reconstructed accuracy. Compared with the DINEOF and I-DINEOF algorithms, the VE-DINEOF algorithm can significantly enhance the accuracy of reconstruction and shorten the computational time. PMID:27195692

  1. Geotechnical properties of surface and near-surface deposits in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, George H.; Yincan, Ye

    Shelf deposits in the East China Sea are primarily relict sands with overlying fine-grained cohesive deposits occurring along the innermost shelf and as a more or less isolated deposit on the midshelf. Considering these surface and near-surface (0 to 1.5 m) cohesive deposits as a unit, the innermost shelf sediments are slightly coarser (more silt) than those of the midshelf which commonly contain more clay-size material. The inner shelf sediments also display higher mean wet bulk densities (1.48 to 1.88 mg m -3) and shear strengths (4.0 to 9.8 kPa), but lower water contents (64 to 81%) and porosities (62 to 66%) than those found associated with the midshelf deposits. Available data indicate that the midshelf mud deposit is primarily derived from the reworking of Huanghe (Yellow River) coastal deposits that were laid down at a time when the river debouched into the Yellow Sea to the north of the Changjiang. Some portion of the midshelf mud may be derived from the Changjiang. These midshelf 'fines' apparently are caught up in a large circulation gyre over the shelf which accounts for their isolated nature. Strong bottom and near-bottom currents, as well as winter storm wave activity, are primary mechanisms resulting in both suspended sediment and bedload transport on the shelf of the East China Sea.

  2. Copper in the sediment and sea surface microlayer near a fallowed, open-net fish farm.

    PubMed

    Loucks, Ronald H; Smith, Ruth E; Fisher, Clyde V; Fisher, E Brian

    2012-09-01

    Sediment and sea surface microlayer samples near an open-net salmon farm in Nova Scotia, were analysed for copper. Copper is a constituent of the feed and is an active ingredient of anti-foulants. The salmon farm was placed in fallow after 15 years of production. Sampling was pursued over 27 months. Elevated copper concentrations in the sediments indicated the farm site as a source. Bubble flotation due to gas-emitting sediments from eutrophication is a likely process for accumulating copper in the sea surface microlayer at enriched concentrations. Elevated and enriched concentrations in the sea surface microlayer over distance from the farm site led, as a result of wind-drift, to an enlarged farm footprint. The levels of copper in both sediments and sea surface microlayer exceeded guidelines for protection of marine life. Over the 27 months period, copper levels persisted in the sediments and decreased gradually in the sea surface microlayer. PMID:22704150

  3. Global monitoring of Sea Surface Salinity with Aquarius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagerloef, G. S. E.; LeVine, D. M.; Chao, Yi; Colomb, R.; Nollmann, I.

    2005-01-01

    Aquarius is a microwave remote sensing system designed to obtain global maps of the surface salinity field of the oceans from space. It will be flown on the Aquarius/SAC-D mission, a partnership between the USA (NASA) and Argentina (CONAE) with launch scheduled for late in 2008. The objective of Aquarius is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean. This will provide data to address scientific questions associated with ocean circulation and its impact on climate. For example, salinity is needed to understand the large scale thermohaline circulation, driven by buoyancy, which moves large masses of water and heat around the globe. Of the two variables that determine buoyancy (salinity and temperature), temperature is already being monitored. Salinity is the missing variable needed to understand this circulation. Salinity also has an important role in energy exchange between the ocean and atmosphere, for example in the development of fresh water lenses (buoyant water that forms stable layers and insulates water below from the atmosphere) which alter the air-sea coupling. Aquarius is a combination radiometer and scatterometer (radar) operating at L-band (1.413 GHz for the radiometer and 1.26 GHz for the scatterometer). The primary instrument,for measuring salinity is the radiometer which is able to detect salinity because of the modulation salinity produces on the thermal emission from sea water. This change is detectable at the long wavelength end of the microwave spectrum. The scatterometer will provide a correction for surface roughness (waves) which is one of the greatest unknowns in the retrieval. The sensor will be in a sun-synchronous orbit at about 650 km with equatorial crossings of 6am/6pm. The antenna for these two instruments is a 3 meter offset fed reflector with three feeds arranged in pushbroom fashion looking away from the sun toward the shadow side of the orbit to

  4. Aquarius: A Mission to Monitor Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lagerloef, G. S. E.; Pellerano, F.; Yueh, S.; Colomb, R.

    2006-01-01

    Aquarius is a combination radiometer and scatterometer (radar) operating at L-band (1.413 GHz for the radiometer and 1.26 GHz for the scatterometer). The primary instrument for measuring salinity is the radiometer. The scatterometer will provide a correction for surface roughness (waves) which is one of the largest potential sources of error in the retrieval. Unique features of the sensor are the large reflector (2.5 meter offset fed reflector with three feeds), polarimetric operation, and the tight thermal control. The three feeds produce three beams arranged to image in pushbroom fashion looking to the side of the orbit away from the sun to avoid sunglint. Polarimetric operation is included to assist in correcting for Faraday rotation which can be important at L-band. The tight thermal control is necessary to meet stability requirements (less than 0.12K drift over 7 days) which have been imposed to assist in meeting the science requirements for the retrieval of surface salinity (0.2 psu). The sensor will be in a sun-synchronous orbit at about 650 km with equatorial crossings of 6ad6pm (ascending at 6 pm). The objective is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean. To accomplish this, the measurement goals are a spatial resolution of 100 km and retrieval accuracy of 0.2 psu globally on a monthly basis. Aquarius is being developed by NASA and is a partnership between JPL and the Goddard Space Flight Center. The SAC-D mission is being developed by CONAE and will include the spacecraft and several additional instruments, including visible and infrared cameras and a microwave radiometer to monitor rain and wind velocity over the oceans, and sea ice.

  5. Estimation of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Using Marine Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Satish Kumar; Dewangan, Pawan; Sain, Kalachand

    2016-04-01

    Not much attention is given to direct wave arrivals in marine seismic data that are acquired for petroleum exploration and prospecting. These direct arrivals are usually muted out in routine seismic data processing. In the present study, we process these direct arrivals to accurately estimate soundspeed in near-surface seawater and invert for sea surface temperature. The established empirical equation describing the relationships among temperature, salinity, pressure and soundspeed is used for the inversion. We also discuss processing techniques, such as first-break picking and cross-correlation for the estimation of soundspeed, that are well known among petroleum-industry geophysicists. The accuracy of the methods is directly linked to the data quality and signal processing. The novelty in our approach is in the data conditioning, which consists essentially of spectral balancing based on a wavelet transform that compensates for spherical spreading and increases the signal-to-noise ( S/ N) ratio. The 2D seismic data used in this paper are from the offshore Krishna-Godavari Basin east of India. We observe a significantly higher soundspeed of 1545 m/s for near-surface water than the commonly used value of ~1500 m/s. The estimated temperature (from velocity) is about 30 °C. Interestingly, the estimated temperature matches well with the temperature recorded in the CTD profile acquired in the study area during the month of May, the month corresponding to the acquisition of seismic data. Furthermore, the estimated temperatures during different times of data acquisition correlate well with the expected diurnal variation in temperature.

  6. Mapping photosynthetically available radiation at the sea surface using GOCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jongkuk; Kim, Jihye; Yang, Hyun; Moon, Jeong-Eon; Frouin, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) controls the composition of marine ecosystem by affecting the growth of phytoplankton, thus estimating PAR at the ocean surface accurately is important to understand the marine ecological environment. Although many studies have been attempted to estimate PAR employing ocean colour satellite data since 2003, previous studies using data from the polar orbit systems had spatial and temporal limitations to estimate accurate daily PAR. Here, we estimate daily PAR from Geostationary Ocean Colour Imager (GOCI) which collects data eight times a day at an hour interval in daytime and compare it with in-situ measurement and MODIS-based daily PAR. The algorithm we developed in this study, employed GOCI visible bands (centred at (412, 443, 490, 555, 660, 680 nm) which belongs to the range of PAR by calculating albedo at the layer of clouds and the sea surface to estimate daily PAR. The resultant value was validated by comparing the in-situ measurements acquired from an ocean research station, Socheongcho between February and May 2015, which showed a similar pattern with somewhat GOCI-base PAR's overestimations. The comparison with the results from MODIS, a polar orbit system showed that a good agreement with each other was illustrated at clear sky conditions, while MODIS showed some over- or underestimations at cloudy conditions with irregular patterns. This study shows that GOCI can estimate effectively the daily PAR with its advantages of acquiring data more frequently than other polar orbit ocean colour satellites by reducing the uncertainties induced by insufficient images to map the daily PAR at ocean surface.

  7. Surface Buoyant Plumes from Melting Icebergs in the Labrador Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovsky, Alexander; Yashayaev, Igor

    2014-05-01

    Canada's Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) conducts annual surveys in the Labrador Sea along the repeat hydrography line AR7W. Since 2012, these shipboard surveys have been supplemented by underway CTD and optical measurements in the upper 200 m layer conducted with the towed undulating platform Moving Vessel Profiler (MVP). The MVP hydrographic data reveal rich variability of the upper layer salinity field on different spatial scales. The occupation of the AR7W line in May 2013 was followed by the experiment aimed at resolving the imprint of melting drifting icebergs on the upper layer thermohaline characteristics in the Labrador Sea. Here we present observations around two icebergs: the first iceberg drifted in relatively warm water of Atlantic origin (~2.5-3.1°C) off Greenland, while the second iceberg was on the Labrador shelf in cold water below 0°C. Both icebergs had a lengthscale of O(100 m). In both cases surface buoyant plumes fed by melt water and attached to the iceberg were observed. The plumes were evident in the anomalous thermohaline characteristics of the seawater. Their density anomalies were sufficiently strong to produce visible frontal structures, which imply a development of the intrinsic dynamics associated with a plume. The first plume formed over a time interval of ~10 hr, while the second plume formed over several days and extended for more than 1 km (tenfold the iceberg's size). Strong vertical displacements of the pycnocline were observed near the second iceberg. They are interpreted as the internal wave wake. This interpretation is based on the temporal scale of these oscillations (local buoyancy frequency), as well as on the spatial orientation of these waves with respect to the iceberg drift relative to the pycnocline. The observed internal waves partially overlapped with the plume and affected its structure. The saline seawater splashing by swell contributed to the surface melting of the icebergs. Scaling analysis of the

  8. Sea Surface Global Climate Datasets With Compatible High Resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Bates, J. J.; Reynolds, R. W.

    2007-05-01

    Present day global ocean observing system consists of multiple satellites and in-situ platforms. Blending of these observations has made it possible to produce gridded global climate datasets with increasingly higher resolutions that are demanded by the research and operational forecast communities. However, caution must be exercised when producing and utilizing global high resolution products: under-sampling could result in significant alias errors for variables with higher frequency variability. The resolutions of the blended products have to be compatible with the available observational data density or frequency. In this paper we present a case study, taking sea surface wind speed as an example. Sea surface wind speed has been observed from multiple satellites and in-situ instruments. These long-term satellites ranged from one DMSP (the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program) satellite (F08) in mid 1987 to the present six or more satellites since June 2002. We shall show that on a global 0.25° grid, blended products with temporal resolutions of 6-hours, 12-hours and daily have become feasible since mid 2002, mid 1995 and January 1991, respectively (with greater than 75 percent time coverage and greater than 90 percent spatial coverage between 65°S-65°N). Thus, for a uniform long-term climate product on a global 0.25° grid and over the whole time period (July 1987 to present), a near Gaussian 3-D (x, y, t) interpolation was used with the spatial and time windows of 125 km and 12-hours. To take advantage of the high data density of the later years (since mid 2002), 4 times per day snapshots have been generated. Documentation of the feasibility study, data production, data visualization, sub-setting and downloading can be obtained at: http:www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/satellite.html; http:nomads.ncdc.noaa.gov:8085/las/servlets/dataset; ftp:eclipse.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub. Our analysis shows that the unique sampling times of the AMSR-E are largely responsible for the

  9. Mean sea surface and geoid gradient comparisons with TOPEX altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Richard H.; Yi, Yuchan; Wang, Yan Ming

    1994-01-01

    Cycles 4 to 54 of TOPEX data have been analyzed through comparisons with the mean sea surface given on the disturbed geophysical data record (GDR). Two inverted barometer correction procedures were considered for the data reduction. One used a constant atmospheric pressure for all data while the one adopted for use, for most computations, introduced a cycle average pressure. The maximum difference between the two estimates was 3.0 cm with a clear annual signal. With the modified correction the TOPEX sea surface was compared to The Ohio State University (OSU) mean sea surface, given on the GDR, to estimate three translations ( delta x = -2.3 cm; delta y = 25.0 cm; delta z = -0.3 cm) and a bias (43.3 cm) between the two surfaces. The only significant translation is delta y which indicates the reference frame of the TOPEX system differs from that used in the OSU mean sea surface system. The bias between the TOPEX mean sea surface and the OSU mean sea surface was used to estimate an equatorial radius of 6,378,136.55 m based on an 18-cm biased estimate of the TOPEX altimeter. Examination of the average difference, by cycle, between the TOPEX sea surface and the OSU mean sea surface suggested a bias change of 3.1 +/- 2.2 mm/yr with a positive sign indicating the average ocean surface is rising or the altimeter measured distance is decreasing. Models were implemented that solved directly for a bias, bias rate annual/semiannual, and tide correction terms. The computations indicated that a simultaneous solution for this bias, bias rate, and annual/semiannual terms gave the most accurate results. Nonsimultaneous solutions led to slightly different bias rate values. The root mean square difference between the TOPEX sea surface and OSU sea surface, after translation and bias correction, was +/- 17 cm for a typical cycle. Some locations were indentified where the difference could reach 2.3 cm and were repeated over several cycles indicating errors in the mean sea surface. Most

  10. Sea level and turbidity controls on mangrove soil surface elevation change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Adame, Maria Fernanda; Bennion, Vicki; Hayes, Matthew; Reef, Ruth; Santini, Nadia; Cahoon, Donald R.

    2015-02-01

    Increases in sea level are a threat to seaward fringing mangrove forests if levels of inundation exceed the physiological tolerance of the trees; however, tidal wetlands can keep pace with sea level rise if soil surface elevations can increase at the same pace as sea level rise. Sediment accretion on the soil surface and belowground production of roots are proposed to increase with increasing sea level, enabling intertidal habitats to maintain their position relative to mean sea level, but there are few tests of these predictions in mangrove forests. Here we used variation in sea level and the availability of sediments caused by seasonal and inter-annual variation in the intensity of La Nina-El Nino to assess the effects of increasing sea level on surface elevation gains and contributing processes (accretion on the surface, subsidence and root growth) in mangrove forests. We found that soil surface elevation increased with mean sea level (which varied over 250 mm during the study) and with turbidity at sites where fine sediment in the water column is abundant. In contrast, where sediments were sandy, rates of surface elevation gain were high, but not significantly related to variation in turbidity, and were likely to be influenced by other factors that deliver sand to the mangrove forest. Root growth was not linked to soil surface elevation gains, although it was associated with reduced shallow subsidence, and therefore may contribute to the capacity of mangroves to keep pace with sea level rise. Our results indicate both surface (sedimentation) and subsurface (root growth) processes can influence mangrove capacity to keep pace with sea level rise within the same geographic location, and that current models of tidal marsh responses to sea level rise capture the major feature of the response of mangroves where fine, but not coarse, sediments are abundant.

  11. SeaWIFS Postlaunch Technical Report Series. Volume 13; The SeaWiFS Photometer Revision for Incident Surface Measurement (SeaPRISM) Field Commissioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Zibordi, Giuseppe; Berthon, Jean-Francois; Bailey, Sean W.; Pietras, Christophe M.; Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the scientific activities that took place at the Acqua Alta Oceanographic Tower (AAOT) in the northern Adriatic Sea off the coast of Italy from 2-6 August 1999. The ultimate objective of the field campaign was to evaluate the capabilities of a new instrument called the SeaWiFS Photometer Revision for Incident Surface Measurements (SeaPRISM). SeaPRISM is based on a CE-318 sun photometer made by CIMEL Electronique (Paris, France). The CE-318 is an automated, robotic system which measures the direct sun irradiance plus the sky radiance in the sun plane and in the almucantar plane. The data are transmitted over a satellite link, and this remote operation capability has made the device very useful for atmospheric measurements. The revision to the CE-318 that makes the instrument potentially useful for SeaWiFS calibration and validation activities is to include a capability for measuring the radiance leaving the sea surface in wavelengths suitable for the determination of chlorophyll a concentration. The initial evaluation of this new capability involved above- and in-water measurement protocols. An intercomparison of the water-leaving radiances derived from SeaPRISM and an in-water system showed the overall spectral agreement was approximately 8.6%, but the blue-green channels intercompared at the 5% level. A blue-green band ratio comparison was at the 4% level.

  12. Sea-surface temperature fronts in the Yellow and East China Seas from TRMM microwave imager data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Daji; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Feng

    2010-06-01

    Swath data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission microwave imager of sea-surface temperatures (SST) from 1998 to 2005 have been used to analyze the climatology and seasonal variability of the SST fronts in the Yellow and East China Seas (YES). Seven fronts have been identified and placed into three categories, namely, (1) the shelf-break front (Kuroshio Front), (2) the coastal fronts (Zhe-Min, Jiangsu, Shangdong Peninsula, Western Korean, and Western Chejudo Fronts), and (3) the shelf front (Western Yellow Sea Shelf Front). The Kuroshio Front exists from December through May, with the maximum SST gradient and highest frontal probability in April. The five coastal fronts exist year-round, all with their maximum SST gradient and highest frontal probability in February. The shelf front in the western Yellow Sea exists only from January to March. Frontogenesis in winter is due to effects of both air-sea heat exchange and advection by currents. The coastal fronts in the stratified months are expressed as tidal fronts. The coastal frontal zones coincide with the major spawning grounds of fish in the YES. The overwintering fishery ground in the Yellow Sea overlaps with the narrow band of favorable water temperature in the frontal zone. The overwintering grounds in the East China Sea are broad and bounded by fronts.

  13. Sea surface salinity variability in the East China Sea observed by the Aquarius instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-bum; Lee, Jae Hak; de Matthaeis, Paolo; Yueh, Simon; Hong, Chang-Su; Lee, Joon-Ho; Lagerloef, Gary

    2014-10-01

    This study demonstrates that the spaceborne Aquarius instrument is able to monitor the sea surface salinity (SSS) variations in the East China Sea (ECS) with the spatial resolution of about 150 km at 7 day interval, where routine observations are difficult. The two geophysical contaminants enter the sidelobes of the Aquarius antenna and bias the coastal SSS low: the emission from the land surface and the radiofrequency interference (RFI). Away from about one Aquarius pixel (150 km) from the coastline, the Aquarius SSS is fairly insensitive (less than about 0.2 psu) to the radiometric details of the method to correct for the land emission. The ascending orbits appear to be affected by unfiltered RFI much less than the descending tracks. The Aquarius SSS along the ascending tracks is low over the ECS by 0.40-0.93 psu (with respect to the in situ data during the two separate 7 day periods) and is biased low by 0.41-1.07 psu (accuracy, or the time-mean of difference from the regional model along three Aquarius tracks over a 18 month period). The presence of the ascending and descending differences in the Aquarius SSS, and the spatially widespread bias suggest that the bias is attributed to the unfiltered RFI originating from strong point sources (rather than to the land contamination from weak distributed sources, or to other seasonally varying geophysical contaminants). Despite the bias, the Aquarius data describe well the temporal and spatial variability of the ECS SSS. The temporal trend and magnitude of salinity changes agree remarkably between Aquarius and a regional numerical model, during both the freshwater discharge season from the Yangtze river and the rest of the year. The precision of the Aquarius observation in the ECS is comparable with the Aquarius mission requirement (0.2 psu one-sigma for a monthly average over the open ocean). The river discharge rate correlates with the Aquarius SSS with the coefficient of 0.71 on a seasonal scale with the discharge

  14. New approaches for calculating absolute surface energies of wurtzite (0001)/(000 1 ¯ ): A study of ZnO and GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingzhao; Zhang, Yiou; Tse, Kinfai; Deng, Bei; Xu, Hu; Zhu, Junyi

    2016-05-01

    The accurate absolute surface energies of (0001)/(000 1 ¯ ) surfaces of wurtzite structures are crucial in determining the thin film growth mode of important energy materials. However, the surface energies still remain to be solved due to the intrinsic difficulty of calculating the dangling bond energy of asymmetrically bonded surface atoms. In this study, we used a pseudo-hydrogen passivation method to estimate the dangling bond energy and calculate the polar surfaces of ZnO and GaN. The calculations were based on the pseudo chemical potentials obtained from a set of tetrahedral clusters or simple pseudo-molecules, using density functional theory approaches. The surface energies of (0001)/(000 1 ¯ ) surfaces of wurtzite ZnO and GaN that we obtained showed relatively high self-consistencies. A wedge structure calculation with a new bottom surface passivation scheme of group-I and group-VII elements was also proposed and performed to show converged absolute surface energy of wurtzite ZnO polar surfaces, and these results were also compared with the above method. The calculated results generally show that the surface energies of GaN are higher than those of ZnO, suggesting that ZnO tends to wet the GaN substrate, while GaN is unlikely to wet ZnO. Therefore, it will be challenging to grow high quality GaN thin films on ZnO substrates; however, high quality ZnO thin film on GaN substrate would be possible. These calculations and comparisons may provide important insights into crystal growth of the above materials, thereby leading to significant performance enhancements in semiconductor devices.

  15. Spatial Statistical Estimation for Massive Sea Surface Temperature Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Y.; Vazquez, J.; Nguyen, H.; Braverman, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    We combine several large remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST) datasets to create a single high-resolution SST dataset that has no missing data and provides an uncertainty associated with each value. This high resolution dataset will optimize estimates of SST in critical parts of the world's oceans, such as coastal upwelling regions. We use Spatial Statistical Data Fusion (SSDF), a statistical methodology for predicting global spatial fields by exploiting spatial correlations in the data. The main advantages of SSDF over spatial smoothing methodologies include the provision of probabilistic uncertainties, the ability to incorporate multiple datasets with varying footprints, measurement errors and biases, and estimation at any desired resolution. In order to accommodate massive input and output datasets, we introduce two modifications of the existing SSDF algorithm. First, we compute statistical model parameters based on coarse resolution aggregated data. Second, we use an adaptive spatial grid that allows us to perform estimation in a specified region of interest, but incorporate spatial dependence between locations in that region and all locations globally. Finally, we demonstrate with a case study involving estimations on the full globe at coarse resolution grid (30 km) and a high resolution (1 km) inset for the Gulf Stream region.

  16. Method for modelling sea surface clutter in complicated propagation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dockery, G. D.

    1990-04-01

    An approach for predicting clutter levels in complicated propagation conditions using an advanced propagation model and one of several empirical clutter cross-section models is described. Incident power and grazing angle information is obtained using a parabolic equation/Fourier split-step technique to predict the distribution of energy in complicated, range-varying environments. Such environments also require the use of an algorithm that establishes a physically reasonable range-interpolation scheme for the measured refractivity profiles. The reflectivity of the sea surface is represented using a clutter cross-section model that was developed originally by the Georgia Institutue of Technology and subsequently modified to include the effects of arbitrary refractive conditions. Predicted clutter power levels generated by the new procedure are compared with clutter measured at 2.9 GHz during propagation experiments conducted at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility on Virginia's Eastern Shore. During these experiments, high-resolution refractivity data were collected in both range and altitude by an instrumented helicopter.

  17. Ultra Stable Microwave Radiometers for Future Sea Surface Salinity Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Tanner, Alan B.; Pellerano, Fernando A.; Horgan, Kevin A.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Earth Science System Pathfinder (ESSP) mission Aquarius will measure global sea surface salinity with 100-km spatial resolution every 8 days with an average monthly salinity accuracy of 0.2 psu (parts per thousand). This requires an L-band low-noise radiometer with the long-term calibration stability of less than 0.1 K over 8 days. This three-year research program on ultra stable radiometers has addressed the radiometer requirements and configuration necessary to achieve this objective for Aquarius and future ocean salinity missions. The system configuration and component performance have been evaluated with radiometer testbeds at both JPL and GSFC. The research has addressed several areas including component characterization as a function of temperature, a procedure for the measurement and correction for radiometer system non-linearity, noise diode calibration versus temperature, low noise amplifier performance over voltage, and temperature control requirements to achieve the required stability. A breadboard radiometer, utilizing microstrip-based technologies, has been built to demonstrate this long-term stability. This report also presents the results of the radiometer test program, a detailed radiometer noise model, and details of the operational switching sequence optimization that can be used to achieve the low noise and stability requirements. Many of the results of this research have been incorporated into the Aquarius radiometer design and will allow this instrument to achieve its goals.

  18. The Effect of Ocean Currents on Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stammer, Detlef; Leeuwenburgh, Olwijn

    2000-01-01

    We investigate regional and global-scale correlations between observed anomalies in sea surface temperature and height. A strong agreement between the two fields is found over a broad range of latitudes for different ocean basins. Both time-longitude plots and wavenumber-frequency spectra suggest an advective forcing of SST anomalies by a first-mode baroclinic wave field on spatial scales down to 400 km and time scales as short as 1 month. Even though the magnitude of the mean background temperature gradient is determining for the effectiveness of the forcing, there is no obvious seasonality that can be detected in the amplitudes of SST anomalies. Instead, individual wave signatures in the SST can in some cases be followed over periods of two years. The phase relationship between SST and SSH anomalies is dependent upon frequency and wavenumber and displays a clear decrease of the phase lag toward higher latitudes where the two fields come into phase at low frequencies. Estimates of the damping coefficient are larger than generally obtained for a purely atmospheric feedback. From a global frequency spectrum a damping time scale of 2-3 month was found. Regionally results are very variable and range from 1 month near strong currents to 10 month at low latitudes and in the sub-polar North Atlantic. Strong agreement is found between the first global EOF modes of 10 day averaged and spatially smoothed SST and SSH grids. The accompanying time series display low frequency oscillations in both fields.

  19. Extracting the Global Sea Surface Temperature Evolutions of Different Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, J.; Wu, Z.

    2012-12-01

    A new data analysis procedure, involving empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) analysis and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD), is employed to extract the evolutions of global Sea Surface Temperature (SST) of different timescales spanning the period from 1880 to 2009 (130 yr). Specifically, EOF analysis serves as a means of lossy data compression to eliminate the spatial-temporally incoherent, noise-like part of the data; and EEMD decomposes SST time series into different time scales, which facilitates research on SST-related weather and climate phenomena that have various timescales. Through validation, it is shown that the difference between the results and the original SST time series are mostly white noises, both spatially and temporally incoherent. We apply the results to study El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events. Each ENSO event is examined and we find an oceanic region off Baja California coast ( ) that is instrumental to some ENSO events, especially those recently called ENSO Modoki, whose initial warming may be traced back to earlier warming signals from Baja California.

  20. Laser imaging of small surface vessels and people at sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove; Elmqvist, Magnus; Karlsson, Kjell; Larsson, Håkan; Axelsson, Maria

    2010-04-01

    The development of new asymmetric threats to civilian and naval ships has been a relatively recent occurrence. The bombing of the USS Cole is one example and the pirate activities outside Somalia another. There is a need to recognize targets at long ranges and possibly also their intentions to prepare for counteractions. Eye safe laser imaging at 1.5 μm offers target recognition at long ranges during day and night. The 1.5 μm wavelength is suitable for observing small targets at the sea surface such as boats and swimmers due to the low reflectivity of water compared to potential targets. Turbulence and haze limits the sensor performance and their influence is estimated for some cases of operational interest. For comparison, passive EO images have been recorded with the same camera to investigate the difference between sun illuminated and laser illuminated images. Examples of laser images will be given for a variety of targets and external conditions.Image segmentation for future automated recognition development is described and examplified. Examples of relevant 1.5 μm laser reflectivities of small naval targets are also presented. Finally a discussion of system aspects is made.

  1. Measurements of the infrared emissivity of a wind-roughened sea surface.

    PubMed

    Hanafin, Jennifer A; Minnett, Peter J

    2005-01-20

    Spectral statistical-analysis techniques were developed and applied to high-spectral-resolution infrared measurements of the sea surface. The effective incidence angle of a ship-borne instrument in typical at-sea conditions was found to introduce errors of up to 0.7 K in sea-surface temperature retrievals at a 55 degrees view angle. The sea-surface emissivity was determined over the 8-12-microm window at view angles of 40 degrees and 55 degrees and at wind speeds up to 13 ms(-1). The emissivity was found to increase in magnitude with increasing wind speed, rather than decrease, as predicted by widely used parameterizations. Use of these parameterizations can cause significant bias in remote sensing of sea-surface temperature in noncalm conditions. PMID:15717830

  2. Sea surface temperature and torrential rains in the Valencia region: modelling the role of recharge areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, Francisco J.

    2016-04-01

    Heavy rain events are frequently recorded in the Western Mediterranean causing economic and human losses. A main factor in the development of torrential rains is ocean-atmosphere exchange of heat and moisture that can destabilize air masses travelling over the sea. The study of air mass trajectories previous to the rain event permits the identification of sea areas that could probably contribute to the development or intensification of rainfall. From a Mediterranean sea surface temperature climatology, its spatio-temporal distribution patterns have been studied showing two main distribution modes in winter and summer and transitional regimes in spring and autumn. Hence, three heavy precipitation events, for such winter and summer sea temperature regimes and for fall transition, affecting the Valencia region have been selected to study the effect of sea surface temperature in torrential rains. Simulations with perturbed sea surface temperature in different areas along the air mass path were run to compare results with unperturbed simulation. The variation of sea surface temperature in certain areas caused significant changes in model accumulated values and its spatial distribution. Therefore, the existence of areas that at a greater extent favour air-sea interaction leading to the development of torrential rainfall in the Valencia region is shown. This methodology could be extended to other Mediterranean regions to look for such potential recharge areas. The identification of sea areas that contribute to the development or intensification of heavy rain events in the Mediterranean countries could be a useful prognosis and/or monitoring tool.

  3. Arctic Sea Salt Aerosol from Blowing Snow and Sea Ice Surfaces - a Missing Natural Source in Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, M. M.; Norris, S. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Nishimura, K.; Jones, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric particles in the polar regions consist mostly of sea salt aerosol (SSA). SSA plays an important role in regional climate change through influencing the surface energy balance either directly or indirectly via cloud formation. SSA irradiated by sunlight also releases very reactive halogen radicals, which control concentrations of ozone, a pollutant and greenhouse gas. However, models under-predict SSA concentrations in the Arctic during winter pointing to a missing source. It has been recently suggested that salty blowing snow above sea ice, which is evaporating, to be that source as it may produce more SSA than equivalent areas of open ocean. Participation in the 'Norwegian Young Sea Ice Cruise (N-ICE 2015)' on board the research vessel `Lance' allowed to test this hypothesis in the Arctic sea ice zone during winter. Measurements were carried out from the ship frozen into the pack ice North of 80º N during February to March 2015. Observations at ground level (0.1-2 m) and from the ship's crows nest (30 m) included number concentrations and size spectra of SSA (diameter range 0.3-10 μm) as well as snow particles (diameter range 50-500 μm). During and after blowing snow events significant SSA production was observed. In the aerosol and snow phase sulfate is fractionated with respect to sea water, which confirms sea ice surfaces and salty snow, and not the open ocean, to be the dominant source of airborne SSA. Aerosol shows depletion in bromide with respect to sea water, especially after sunrise, indicating photochemically driven release of bromine. We discuss the SSA source strength from blowing snow in light of environmental conditions (wind speed, atmospheric turbulence, temperature and snow salinity) and recommend improved model parameterisations to estimate regional aerosol production. N-ICE 2015 results are then compared to a similar study carried out previously in the Weddell Sea during the Antarctic winter.

  4. Terrestrial basking sea turtles are responding to spatio-temporal sea surface temperature patterns

    PubMed Central

    Van Houtan, Kyle S.; Halley, John M.; Marks, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Naturalists as early as Darwin observed terrestrial basking in green turtles (Chelonia mydas), but the distribution and environmental influences of this behaviour are poorly understood. Here, we examined 6 years of daily basking surveys in Hawaii and compared them with the phenology of local sea surface temperatures (SST). Data and models indicated basking peaks when SST is coolest, and we found this timeline consistent with bone stress markings. Next, we assessed the decadal SST profiles for the 11 global green turtle populations. Basking generally occurs when winter SST falls below 23°C. From 1990 to 2014, the SST for these populations warmed an average 0.04°C yr−1 (range 0.01–0.09°C yr−1); roughly three times the observed global average over this period. Owing to projected future warming at basking sites, we estimated terrestrial basking in green turtles may cease globally by 2100. To predict and manage for future climate change, we encourage a more detailed understanding for how climate influences organismal biology. PMID:25589483

  5. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II: Electromagnetic backscattering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xie; William, Perrie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, the Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service Program.

  6. Surface and basal sea ice melt from autonomous buoy arrays during the 2014 sea ice retreat in the Beaufort/Chukchi Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksym, T. L.; Wilkinson, J.; Hwang, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    As the Arctic continues its transition to a seasonal ice cover, the nature and role of the processes driving sea ice retreat are expected to change. Key questions revolve around how the coupling between dynamics and thermodynamic processes and potential changes in the role of melt ponds contribute to an accelerated seasonal ice retreat. To address these issues, 44 autonomous platforms were deployed in four arrays in the Beaufort Sea in March, 2014, with an additional array deployed in August in the Chukchi Sea to monitor the evolution of ice conditions during the seasonal sea ice retreat. Each "5-dice" array included four or five co-sited ice mass balance buoys (IMB) and wave buoys with digital cameras, and one automatic weather station (AWS) at the array center. The sensors on these buoys, combined with satellite imagery monitoring the large-scale evolution of the ice cover, provide a near-complete history of the processes involved in the seasonal melt of sea ice. We present a preliminary analysis of the contributions of several key processes to the seasonal ice decay. The evolution of surface ponding was observed at several sites with differing ice types and surface morphologies. The records of surface melt and ice thickness demonstrate a key role of ice type in driving the evolution of the ice cover. Analysis of the surface forcing and estimates of solar energy partitioning between the surface and upper ocean is compared to the surface and basal mass balance from the IMBs. The role of ice divergence and deformation in driving sea ice decay - in particular its role in accelerating thermodynamic melt processes - is discussed.

  7. Black sea surface temperature anomaly on 5th August 1998 and the ozone layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manev, A.; Palazov, K.; Raykov, St.; Ivanov, V.

    2003-04-01

    BLACK SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE ANOMALY ON 5th AUGUST 1998 AND THE OZONE LAYER THICKNESS A. Manev , K. Palazov , St. Raykov, V. Ivanov Solar Terrestrial Influences Laboratory, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences amanev@abv.bg This paper focuses on the peculiarities of the Black Sea surface temperature anomaly on 05.08.1998. Researching the daily temperature changes in a number of control fields in the course of 8-10 years, we have found hidden correlations and anomalous deviations in the sea surface temperatures on a global scale. Research proves the statistical reliability of the temperature anomaly on the entire Black Sea surface registered on 04.-05.08.1998. In the course of six days around these dates the temperatures are up to 2°C higher than the maximum temperatures in this period in the other seven years. A more detailed analysis of the dynamics of the anomaly required the investigation of five Black Sea surface characteristic zones of 75x75 km. The analysis covers the period 20 days - 10 days before and 10 days after the anomaly. Investigations aimed at interpreting the reasons for the anomalous heating of the surface waters. We have tried to analyze the correlation between sea surface temperature and the global ozone above the Black Sea by using simultaneously data from the two satellite systems NOAA and TOMS. Methods of processing and comparing the data from the two satellite systems are described. The correlation coefficients values for the five characteristic zones are very high and close, which proves that the character of the correlation ozone - sea surface temperature is the same for the entire Black Sea surface. Despite the high correlation coefficient, we have proved that causality between the two phenomena at the time of the anomaly does not exit.

  8. Interaction Between Surface Heat Budgets, Sea Surface Temperature and Deep Convection in the Tropical Western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Dah; Lin, Po-Hsiung; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The surface heat budgets, sea surface temperature (SST), clouds and winds in the tropical western Pacific are analyzed and compared for the periods April-June 1998 and 1999. The spring of 1998 is in the later phase of a strong El Nino, whereas the spring of 1999 is in a period of a La Nina. The surface shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiative fluxes are retrieved from Japanese Geostationary Meteorological Satellite radiance measurements, while the surface turbulent fluxes (latent and sensible heat) are derived from SSM/I-Inferred surface air humidity and winds. The SST and sea-air temperature differences are taken from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. Deep convection is inferred from the outgoing longwave radiation of NOAA's polar-orbiting satellites. The longitudinal shift in maximum SST, deep convection and winds during El Nino and La Nina have a large impact on the spatial distribution of surface heating. Changes in clouds between these two periods have a large impact on the monthly-mean radiative heating, exceeding 60 W m(exp -2) over large oceanic regions. Similarly, the differences in wind speeds and SST have a large impact on the latent cooling, exceeding 40 W m(exp -2) over large oceanic areas. However, the maximum impacts on radiative and latent heat fluxes occur in different regions. The regions of maximum impact on radiative fluxes coincide with the regions of maximum change in clouds, whereas regions of maximum impact on turbulent heat fluxes coincide with the regions of maximum change in trade winds. The time-evolution of SST in relation to that of surface heat fluxes and winds are investigated and compared between the two El Nino and La Nina periods. In regions where wind speeds (or wind stresses) are large, the change in SST agrees well with the change in the net surface heating, indicating a deep ocean mixed layer associated with strong trade winds. On the other hand, in regions where radiative fluxes are large, the change in SST does not agree well with the

  9. Airborne Spectral Measurements of Surface-Atmosphere Anisotropy for Arctic Sea Ice and Tundra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, G. Thomas; Tsay, Si-Chee; King, Michael D.; Li, Jason Y.; Soulen, Peter F.

    1999-01-01

    Angular distributions of spectral reflectance for four common arctic surfaces: snow-covered sea ice, melt-season sea ice, snow-covered tundra, and tundra shortly after snowmelt were measured using an aircraft based, high angular resolution (1-degree) multispectral radiometer. Results indicate bidirectional reflectance is higher for snow-covered sea ice than melt-season sea ice at all wavelengths between 0.47 and 2.3 pm, with the difference increasing with wavelength. Bidirectional reflectance of snow-covered tundra is higher than for snow-free tundra for measurements less than 1.64 pm, with the difference decreasing with wavelength. Bidirectional reflectance patterns of all measured surfaces show maximum reflectance in the forward scattering direction of the principal plane, with identifiable specular reflection for the melt-season sea ice and snow-free tundra cases. The snow-free tundra had the most significant backscatter, and the melt-season sea ice the least. For sea ice, bidirectional reflectance changes due to snowmelt were more significant than differences among the different types of melt-season sea ice. Also the spectral-hemispherical (plane) albedo of each measured arctic surface was computed. Comparing measured nadir reflectance to albedo for sea ice and snow-covered tundra shows albedo underestimated 5-40%, with the largest bias at wavelengths beyond 1 pm. For snow-free tundra, nadir reflectance underestimates plane albedo by about 30-50%.

  10. Deghosting towed streamer data in τ/p domain based on rough sea surface reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing-Yan; Pan, Dong-Ming; Shi, Wen-Ying; Fang, Zhong-Yu; Dan, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Li-Xia

    2015-12-01

    Currently, the deghosting of towed streamer seismic data assumes a flat sea level and a sea-surface reflection coefficient of -1; this decreases the precision of deghosting. A new method that considers the rough sea surface is proposed to suppress ghost reflections. The proposed deghosting method obtains the rough sea surface reflection coefficient using Gaussian statistics, and calculates the optimized deghosting operator in the τ/ p domain. The proposed method is closer to the actual sea conditions, offers an improved deghosting operator, removes the ghost reflections from marine towed seismic data, widens the bandwidth and restores the low-frequency information, and finally improves the signal-tonoise ratio and resolution of the seismic data.

  11. Subpolar gyre and radiative forcings moderate sea surface temperatures of the Norwegian Sea during the mid-Piacenzian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachem, Paul; Risebrobakken, Bjørg; McClymont, Erin

    2016-04-01

    The mid-Piacenzian age (ca. 3.3-3.0 Ma) of the Pliocene epoch has been proposed as a possible reference for future warm climate states. We have developed a new set of orbital-resolution alkenone-based sea surface temperature (SST) and ice rafted debris (IRD) records from the Norwegian Sea. SSTs in the Norwegian Sea were 2-3°C warmer in the mid-Piacenzian compared to the Holocene average. There is notable orbital-scale SST variability with a range of 4°C. The most likely cause of the average long-term warmth is a higher atmospheric CO2 concentration. A correlation of SST variability with the presence of Greenland-sourced IRD suggests a common climate forcing acting across the Nordic Seas region. The orbital-scale variability was in part caused by interplay of obliquity and precession, as low SSTs coincide with times of low northern summer insolation. Changes of the SST gradient between the Norwegian Sea and North Atlantic sites suggest that the subpolar gyre was at least of comparable strength as during the Holocene. The North Atlantic Current (NAC) influence on the Norwegian Sea SSTs does not appear to have been stronger than during the Holocene.

  12. A case study of sea breeze blocking regulated by sea surface temperature along the English south coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, J. K.; Chagnon, J. M.; Gray, S. L.

    2014-05-01

    The sensitivity of sea breeze structure to sea surface temperature (SST) and coastal orography is investigated in convection-permitting Met Office Unified Model simulations of a case study along the south coast of England. Changes in SST of 1 K are shown to significantly modify the structure of the sea breeze immediately offshore. On the day of the case study, the sea breeze was partially blocked by coastal orography, particularly within Lyme Bay. The extent to which the flow is blocked depends strongly on the static stability of the marine boundary layer. In experiments with colder SST, the marine boundary layer is more stable, and the degree of blocking is more pronounced. Although a colder SST would also imply a larger land-sea temperature contrast and hence a stronger onshore wind - an effect which alone would discourage blocking - the increased static stability exerts a dominant control over whether blocking takes place. The implications of prescribing fixed SST from climatology in numerical weather prediction model forecasts of the sea breeze are discussed.

  13. Variability of sea surface temperature in the Japan Sea and its relationship to the wind-curl field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusenkova, O. O.; Lobanov, V. B.; Kaplunenko, D. D.

    2008-08-01

    The variability of sea surface temperature (SST) in the Japan Sea is investigated using the complex EOF analysis of daily data produced at Tohoku University, Japan (New Generation SST; 2002-2006). The relationship with the wind field is investigated from the daily NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data with a 1° spatial resolution. Anomalies in the SST (SSTAs) are calculated by subtracting the basin-average annual variation estimated as a leading mode of temperature. The leading mode of an SSTA represents a adjustment to the annual mean variation, most significant in December in the zone of subtropical waters entering the sea through the Korean Strait and in the northwestern sea, over which a cyclonic wind curl develops in the cold period. The semiannual variability mode is identified, which is characterized by the largest temperature increase (decrease) in the western branch of the subarctic front (in the Tatar Strait), which lags by two months behind the semiannual changes in wind curl over the sea. An episodic SSTA movement is detected in the northern part of the sea, which moves from east to west along the western branch of the Tsushima Warm Current with a speed corresponding in magnitude to an advective scale.

  14. Methane excess in Arctic surface water-triggered by sea ice formation and melting.

    PubMed

    Damm, E; Rudels, B; Schauer, U; Mau, S; Dieckmann, G

    2015-01-01

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence that sea ice is a potential source. We show that methane release from sea ice into the ocean occurs via brine drainage during freezing and melting i.e. in winter and spring. In summer under a fractional sea ice cover, reduced turbulence restricts gas transfer, then seawater acts as buffer in which methane remains entrained. However, in autumn and winter surface convection initiates pronounced efflux of methane from the ice covered ocean to the atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that sea ice-sourced methane cycles seasonally between sea ice, sea-ice-influenced seawater and the atmosphere, while the deeper ocean remains decoupled. Freshening due to summer sea ice retreat will enhance this decoupling, which restricts the capacity of the deeper Arctic Ocean to act as a sink for this greenhouse gas. PMID:26553610

  15. Methane excess in Arctic surface water- triggered by sea ice formation and melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damm, E.; Rudels, B.; Schauer, U.; Mau, S.; Dieckmann, G.

    2015-11-01

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence that sea ice is a potential source. We show that methane release from sea ice into the ocean occurs via brine drainage during freezing and melting i.e. in winter and spring. In summer under a fractional sea ice cover, reduced turbulence restricts gas transfer, then seawater acts as buffer in which methane remains entrained. However, in autumn and winter surface convection initiates pronounced efflux of methane from the ice covered ocean to the atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that sea ice-sourced methane cycles seasonally between sea ice, sea-ice-influenced seawater and the atmosphere, while the deeper ocean remains decoupled. Freshening due to summer sea ice retreat will enhance this decoupling, which restricts the capacity of the deeper Arctic Ocean to act as a sink for this greenhouse gas.

  16. Methane excess in Arctic surface water- triggered by sea ice formation and melting

    PubMed Central

    Damm, E.; Rudels, B.; Schauer, U.; Mau, S.; Dieckmann, G.

    2015-01-01

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence that sea ice is a potential source. We show that methane release from sea ice into the ocean occurs via brine drainage during freezing and melting i.e. in winter and spring. In summer under a fractional sea ice cover, reduced turbulence restricts gas transfer, then seawater acts as buffer in which methane remains entrained. However, in autumn and winter surface convection initiates pronounced efflux of methane from the ice covered ocean to the atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that sea ice-sourced methane cycles seasonally between sea ice, sea-ice-influenced seawater and the atmosphere, while the deeper ocean remains decoupled. Freshening due to summer sea ice retreat will enhance this decoupling, which restricts the capacity of the deeper Arctic Ocean to act as a sink for this greenhouse gas. PMID:26553610

  17. Optimum interpolation analysis of Aquarius sea surface salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnichenko, Oleg; Hacker, Peter; Maximenko, Nikolai; Lagerloef, Gary; Potemra, James

    2016-01-01

    A new high-resolution sea surface salinity (SSS) analysis has been produced using Aquarius satellite observations from September 2011 to June 2015. The motivation for the new product is twofold: to produce Level-4 SSS analysis that is consistent with existing in situ observations such as from Argo profile data, and to reduce the large-scale satellite biases that have existed in all versions of the standard Level-3 Aquarius products. The new product is a weekly SSS analysis on a nearly global 0.5° grid. The analysis method is optimum interpolation (OI) that takes into account analyzed errors of the observations, specific to the Aquarius instrument. The method also includes a large-scale correction for satellite biases, filtering of along-track SSS data prior to OI, and the use of realistic correlation scales of SSS anomalies. All these features of the analysis are shown to result in more accurate SSS maps. In particular, the method reduces the effects of relative biases between the Aquarius beams and eliminates most of the large-scale, space-varying, and time-varying satellite biases relative to in situ data, including spurious annual signals. Statistical comparison between the weekly OI SSS maps and concurrent buoy data demonstrates that the global root-mean-square error of the analysis is smaller than 0.2 pss for nearly all weeks over the ˜4 year period of comparison. The utility of the OI SSS analysis is also exemplified by the derived patterns of regional SSS variability.

  18. Testing for deterministic trends in global sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Susana

    2010-05-01

    The identification and estimation of trends is a frequent and fundamental task in the analysis of hydrometeorological records. The task is challenging because even time series generated by purely random processes can exhibit visually appealing trends that can be misleadingly taken as evidence of non-stationary behavior. Hydrometeorological time series exhibiting long range dependence can also exhibit trend-like features that can be mistakenly interpreted as a trend, leading to erroneous forecasts and interpretations of the variability structure of the series, particularly in terms of statistical uncertainty. In practice the overwhelming majority of trends in hydro-climatic records are reported as the slope from a linear regression model. It is therefore important to assess when a linear regression model is a reasonable description for a time series. One could think that if a derived slope is statistically significant, particularly if inference is performed carefully, the linear regression model would be appropriate. However, stochastic features, such as long-range dependence can produce statistically significant linear trends. Therefore, the plausibility of the linear regression model needs to be tested itself, in addition to testing if the trend slope is statistically significant. In this work parametric statistical tests are applied in order to evaluate the trend-stationary assumption in global sea surface temperature for the period from January 1900 to December 2008. The fit of a linear deterministic model to the spatially-averaged global mean SST series yields a statistically significant positive slope, suggesting an increasing linear trend. However, statistical testing rejects the hypothesis of a deterministic linear trend with a stationary stochastic noise. This is supported by the form of the temporal structure of the detrended series, which exhibits large positive values up to lags of 5 years, indicating temporal persistence.

  19. Sampling Errors in Satellite-derived Infrared Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Minnett, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Sea Surface Temperature (SST) measured from satellites has been playing a crucial role in understanding geophysical phenomena. Generating SST Climate Data Records (CDRs) is considered to be the one that imposes the most stringent requirements on data accuracy. For infrared SSTs, sampling uncertainties caused by cloud presence and persistence generate errors. In addition, for sensors with narrow swaths, the swath gap will act as another sampling error source. This study is concerned with quantifying and understanding such sampling errors, which are important for SST CDR generation and for a wide range of satellite SST users. In order to quantify these errors, a reference Level 4 SST field (Multi-scale Ultra-high Resolution SST) is sampled by using realistic swath and cloud masks of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Advanced Along Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR). Global and regional SST uncertainties are studied by assessing the sampling error at different temporal and spatial resolutions (7 spatial resolutions from 4 kilometers to 5.0° at the equator and 5 temporal resolutions from daily to monthly). Global annual and seasonal mean sampling errors are large in the high latitude regions, especially the Arctic, and have geographical distributions that are most likely related to stratus clouds occurrence and persistence. The region between 30°N and 30°S has smaller errors compared to higher latitudes, except for the Tropical Instability Wave area, where persistent negative errors are found. Important differences in sampling errors are also found between the broad and narrow swath scan patterns and between day and night fields. This is the first time that realistic magnitudes of the sampling errors are quantified. Future improvement in the accuracy of SST products will benefit from this quantification.

  20. Data-Model Comparison of Pliocene Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowsett, H. J.; Foley, K.; Robinson, M. M.; Bloemers, J. T.

    2013-12-01

    The mid-Piacenzian (late Pliocene) climate represents the most geologically recent interval of long-term average warmth and shares similarities with the climate projected for the end of the 21st century. As such, its fossil and sedimentary record represents a natural experiment from which we can gain insight into potential climate change impacts, enabling more informed policy decisions for mitigation and adaptation. We present the first systematic comparison of Pliocene sea surface temperatures (SST) between an ensemble of eight climate model simulations produced as part of PlioMIP (Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project) and the PRISM (Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping) Project mean annual SST field. Our results highlight key regional (mid- to high latitude North Atlantic and tropics) and dynamic (upwelling) situations where there is discord between reconstructed SST and the PlioMIP simulations. These differences can lead to improved strategies for both experimental design and temporal refinement of the palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. Scatter plot of multi-model-mean anomalies (squares) and PRISM3 data anomalies (large blue circles) by latitude. Vertical bars on data anomalies represent the variability of warm climate phase within the time-slab at each locality. Small colored circles represent individual model anomalies and show the spread of model estimates about the multi-model-mean. While not directly comparable in terms of the development of the means nor the meaning of variability, this plot provides a first order comparison of the anomalies. Encircled areas are a, PRISM low latitude sites outside of upwelling areas; b, North Atlantic coastal sequences and Mediterranean sites; c, large anomaly PRISM sites from the northern hemisphere. Numbers identify Ocean Drilling Program sites.

  1. Modes of variability of global sea surface temperature, free atmosphere temperature and oceanic surface energy flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Wenjie; Newell, R.E.; Wu, Zhong-Xiang

    1994-11-01

    Monthly mean sea surface temperature (SST), free air temperature from satellite microwave sounding units (MSU) and oceanic surface energy fluxes are subjected to empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis for a common decade to investigate the physical relationships involved. The first seasonal modes of surface solar energy flux and SST show similar inter-hemispheric patterns with an annual cycle. Solar flux appears to control this pattern of SST. The first seasonal mode of MSU is similar with, additionally, land-sea differences; MSU is apparently partly controlled by absorption of solar near-infrared radiation and partly by sensible heat from from the land surface. The second and third seasonal eigenvector of SST and solar flux exhibit semi-annual oscillations associated with a pattern of cloudiness in the subtropics accompanying the translation of the Hadley cell rising motion between the hemispheres. The second seasonal mode of MSU is dominated by an El Nino Signal. The first nonseasonal EOFs of SST and solar flux exhibit El Nino characteristics with solar pattern being governed by west-to-east translation of a Walker cell type pattern. The first non-seasonal EOF of MSU shows a tropical strip pattern for the El Nino mode, which is well correlated with the latent heat fluxes in the tropical east Pacific but not in the tropical west Pacific. Two possible explanations are: an increase in subsidence throughout the tropical strip driven by extra evaporation in the tropical east Pacific and consequent additional latent heat liberation; a decrease of meridional heat flux out of the tropics. 56 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. A Sea-Surface Radiation Data Set for Climate Applications in the Tropical Western Pacific and South China Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Yan, Michael M.-H.

    2000-01-01

    The sea-surface shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes have been retrieved from the radiances measured by Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 5. The surface radiation data set covers the domain 40S-40N and 90E-170W. The temporal resolution is 1 day, and the spatial resolution is 0.5 deg x 0.5 deg latitude-longitude. The retrieved surface radiation have been validated with the radiometric measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measuring (ARM) site on Manus island in the equatorial western Pacific for a period of 15 months. It has also been validated with the measurements at the radiation site on Dungsha island in the South China Sea during the South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX) Intensive Observing Period (May and June 1998). The data set is used to study the effect of El Nino and East Asian Summer monsoon on the heating of the ocean in the tropical western Pacific and the South China Sea. Interannual variations of clouds associated with El Nino and the East Asian Summer monsoon have a large impact on the radiative heating of the ocean. It has been found that the magnitude of the interannual variation of the seasonal mean surface radiative heating exceeds 40 W/sq m over large areas. Together with the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) shortwave fluxes at top of the atmosphere and the radiative transfer calculations of clear-sky fluxes, this surface radiation data set is also used to study the impact of clouds on the solar heating of the atmosphere. It is found that clouds enhance the atmospheric solar heating by approx. 20 W/sq m in the tropical western Pacific and the South China Sea. This result is important for evaluating the accuracy of solar flux calculations in clear and cloudy atmospheres.

  3. SEASAT altimetry for surface height of inland seas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welker, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    The capability of spaceborne altimetry to record the level, or monitor changes in the level, of inland seas was assessed. SEASAT altimetry data from Lake Baikal in Siberia; the Caspian, Black, and Aral Seas in the southern Soviet Union; the Great Salt Lake in the United States; lakes and reservoirs in northwestern and central China; and snow cover in northwestern India and on the Tibetan Plateau were examined.

  4. Simulation and Prediction of North Pacific Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienert, Fabian

    The first part of this thesis is an assessment of the ability of global climate models to reproduce observed features of the leading Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) mode of North Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies known as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). My results are that 1) the models as group produce a realistic pattern of the PDO. The simulated variance of the PDO index is overestimated by roughly 30%. 2) The tropical influence on North Pacific SSTs is biased systematically in these models. The simulated response to El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) forcing is delayed compared to the observed response. This tendency is consistent with model biases toward deeper oceanic mixed layers in winter and spring and weaker air-sea feedbacks in the winter half-year. Model biases in mixed layer depths and air-sea feedbacks are also associated with a model mean ENSO-related signal in the North Pacific whose amplitude is overestimated by roughly 30%. Finally, model power spectra of the PDO signal and its ENSO-forced component are "redder" than observed due to errors originating in the tropics and extratropics. 3) The models are quite successful at capturing the influence of both the tropical Pacific related and the extratropical part of the PDO on North American surface temperature. 4) The models capture some of the influence of the PDO on North American precipitation mainly due to its tropical Pacific related part. In the second part of this thesis, I investigate the ability of one such coupled ocean-atmosphere climate model, carefully initialized with observations, to dynamically predict the future evolution of the PDO on seasonal to decadal time scales. I find that 1) CHFP2 is successful at predicting the PDO at the seasonal time scale measured by mean-square skill score and correlation skill. Weather "noise" unpredictable at the seasonal time scale generated by substantial North Pacific storm track activity that coincides with a shallow oceanic

  5. Regional studies using sea surface temperature fields derived from satellite infrared measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, A. E.

    1972-01-01

    Three examples of sea surface temperature distributions over the western Atlantic are presented. These were detected by means of data from the scanning radiometer on the Improved Tiros Operational Satellite 1 (ITOS 1) under relatively clear sky conditions.

  6. Moderate-Resolution Sea Surface Temperature Data for the Nearshore North Pacific

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic defining habitat suitability for nearshore marine and estuarine organisms. The purpose of this publication is to provide access to an easy-to-use coastal SST dataset for ecologists, biogeographers...

  7. Global measurements of sea surface temperature, wind speed and atmospheric water content from satellite microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, E. G.; Swanson, L.

    1983-01-01

    The Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) was launched on the Seasat and Nimbus 7 satellites in 1978. The SMMR has the ability to measure sea surface temperature and wind speed with the aid of microwaves. In addition, the instrument was designed to measure water vapor and cloud liquid water with better spatial resolution than previous microwave radiometers, and to make sea-ice measurements with higher precision. A description is presented of the results of global analyses of sea surface temperature, wind speed, water vapor, and cloud liquid water, taking into account data provided by the SMMR on the Seasat satellite. It is found that the SMMR data show good self-consistency, and can usefully measure global distributions of sea surface temperatures, surface winds, water vapor, and cloud liquid water.

  8. Texture as a visual cueing element in computer image generation. I. Representation of the sea surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bookout, G.; Sinacori, J.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to advance hypotheses about texture as a visual cueing medium in simulation and to provide guidelines for data base modelers in the use of computer image generator resources to provide effective visual cues for simulation purposes. The emphasis is on a texture decoration of the earth's surface data base in order to support low-level flight, i.e., flight at elevations above the surface of 500 feet or less. The appearance of the surface of the sea is the focus of this paper. The physics of the sea's appearance are discussed and guidelines are given for its representation for sea states from 0 (calm) to 5 (fresh breeze of 17-21 knots and sixfoot waves, peak-to-trough). The viewpoints considered vary from 500 feet above the mean sea surface to an altitude just above the wave crests. 7 refs.

  9. Moderate-resolution sea surface temperature data for the Arctic Ocean Ecoregions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic in determining the suitability and sustainability of habitats for marine organisms. Of particular interest is the fate of the Arctic Ocean, which provides critical habitat to commercially important fish (M...

  10. Distribution and pollution assessment of heavy metals in surface sediments in the Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xin; Teng, Ankang; Xu, Wenzhe; Liu, Xiaoshou

    2014-06-15

    Heavy metal concentrations in surface sediments at 56 stations during two cruises in the Yellow Sea in summer and winter, 2011 were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The pollution status was assessed via the Geoaccumulation index and Hankanson potential ecological risk index. Higher concentrations of heavy metals (except for Mn) were found in the central Southern Yellow Sea and the western Northern Yellow Sea. The higher contents of Mn were much closer to Shandong Peninsula. Correlation analyses indicated that Pb, Cu, Fe, Ni, Zn and Co probably had the same origin and were controlled by grain size and total organic carbon. Pollution assessment showed that most areas of the Yellow Sea were not or lowly contaminated with the exception of the northwest and south parts of the Southern Yellow Sea showing Cd-contamination. The pollution status of the Yellow Sea in summer was worse than that in winter. PMID:24703395

  11. Physically-based Ice Thickness and Surface Roughness Retrievals over Rough Deformed Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Gaiser, Peter; Allard, Richard; Posey, Pamela; Hebert, David; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline; Polashenski, Christopher; Claffey, Keran

    2016-04-01

    The observations of sea ice thickness and ice surface roughness are critical for our understanding of the state of the changing Arctic. Currently, the Radar and/or LiDAR data of sea ice freeboard are used to infer sea ice thickness via isostasy. The underlying assumption is that the LiDAR signal returns at the air/snow interface and radar signal at the snow/ice interface. The elevations of these interfaces are determined based on LiDAR/Radar return waveforms. However, the commonly used threshold-based surface detection techniques are empirical in nature and work well only over level/smooth sea ice. Rough sea ice surfaces can modify the return waveforms, resulting in significant Electromagnetic (EM) bias in the estimated surface elevations, and thus large errors in the ice thickness retrievals. To understand and quantify such sea ice surface roughness effects, a combined EM rough surface and volume scattering model was developed to simulate radar returns from the rough sea ice 'layer cake' structure. A waveform matching technique was also developed to fit observed waveforms to a physically-based waveform model and subsequently correct the roughness induced EM bias in the estimated freeboard. This new EM Bias Corrected (EMBC) algorithm was able to better retrieve surface elevations and estimate the surface roughness parameter simultaneously. Both the ice thickness and surface roughness retrievals are validated using in-situ data. For the surface roughness retrievals, we applied this EMBC algorithm to co-incident LiDAR/Radar measurements collected during a Cryosat-2 under-flight by the NASA IceBridge missions. Results show that not only does the waveform model fit very well to the measured radar waveform, but also the roughness parameters derived independently from the LiDAR and radar data agree very well for both level and deformed sea ice. For sea ice thickness retrievals, validation based on in-situ data from the coordinated CRREL/NRL field campaign demonstrates

  12. Characterization of Sea Lettuce Surface Functional Groups by Potentiometric Titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebling, A. M.; Schijf, J.

    2008-12-01

    In pursuit of our ultimate goal to better understand the prodigious capacity of the marine macroalga Ulva lactuca (sea lettuce) for adsorbing a broad range of dissolved trace metals from seawater, we performed an initial characterization of its surface functional groups. Specifically, the number of distinct functional groups as well as their individual bulk concentrations and acid dissociation constants (pKas) were determined by potentiometric titrations in NaCl solutions of various ionic strengths (I = 0.01-5.0 M), under inert nitrogen atmosphere at 25°C. Depending on the ionic strength, Ulva samples were manually titrated down to pH 2 or 3 with 1 N HCl and then up to pH 10 with 1 N NaOH in steps of 0.1-0.2 units, continuously monitoring pH with a glass combination electrode. Titrations of a dehydrated Ulva standard reference material (BCR-279) were compared with fresh Ulva tissue cultured in our laboratory. A titration in filtered natural seawater was also compared with one in an NaCl solution of equal ionic strength. Equilibrium constants for the ionization of water in NaCl solutions as a function of ionic strength were obtained from the literature. Fits to the titration data ([H]T vs. pH) were performed with the FITEQL4.0 computer code using non-electrostatic 3-, 4-, and 5-site models, either by fixing ionic strength at its experimental value or by allowing it to be extrapolated to zero, while considering all functional group pKas and bulk concentrations as adjustable parameters. Since pKas and bulk concentrations were found to be strongly correlated, the latter were also fixed in some cases to further constrain the pKas. Whereas these calculations are currently ongoing, preliminary results point to three, possibly four, functional groups with pKas of about 4.1, 6.3, and 9.5 at I = 0. Bulk concentrations of the three groups are very similar, about 5-6×10-4 mol/g based on dry weight, which suggests that all are homogeneously distributed over the surface and

  13. Impact of surface roughness on L-band emissivity of the sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernecki, M.; Kaleschke, L.; Hendricks, S.; Søbjærg, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    In March 2014 a joint experiment IRO2/SMOSice was carried out in the Barents Sea. R/V Lance equipped with meteorological instruments, electromagnetic sea ice thickness probe and engine monitoring instruments, was performing a series of tests in different ice conditions in order to validate the ice route optimization (IRO) system, advising on his route through pack ice. In parallel cal/val activities for sea ice thickness product obtained from SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission) L-band radiometer were carried out. Apart from helicopter towing the EMbird thickness probe, Polar 5 aircraft was serving the area during the experiment with L-band radiometer EMIRAD2 and Airborne Laser Scanner (ALS) as primary instruments. Sea ice Thickness algorithm using SMOS brightness temperature developed at University of Hamburg, provides daily maps of thin sea ice (up to 0.5-1 m) in polar regions with resolution of 35-50 km. So far the retrieval method was not taking into account surface roughness, assuming that sea ice is a specular surface. Roughness is a stochastic process that can be characterized by standard deviation of surface height σ and by shape of the autocorrelation function R to estimate it's vertical and horizontal scales respectively. Interactions of electromagnetic radiation with the surface of the medium are dependent on R and σ and they scales with respect to the incident wavelength. During SMOSice the radiometer was observing sea ice surface at two incidence angles 0 and 40 degrees and simultaneously the surface elevation was scanned with ALS with ground resolution of ~ 0.25 m. This configuration allowed us to calculate σ and R from power spectral densities of surface elevation profiles and quantify the effect of surface roughness on the emissivity of the sea ice. First results indicate that Gaussian autocorrelation function is suitable for deformed ice, for other ice types exponential function is the best fit.

  14. Productivity and sea surface temperature are correlated with the pelagic larval duration of damselfishes in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Robitzch, Vanessa S N; Lozano-Cortés, Diego; Kandler, Nora M; Salas, Eva; Berumen, Michael L

    2016-04-30

    We examined the variation of pelagic larval durations (PLDs) among three damselfishes, Dascyllus aruanus, D. marginatus, and D. trimaculatus, which live under the influence of an environmental gradient in the Red Sea. PLDs were significantly correlated with latitude, sea surface temperature (SST), and primary production (CHLA; chlorophyll a concentrations). We find a consistent decrease in PLDs with increasing SST and primary production (CHLA) towards the southern Red Sea among all species. This trend is likely related to higher food availability and increased metabolic rates in that region. We suggest that food availability is a potentially stronger driver of variation in PLD than temperature, especially in highly oligotrophic regions. Additionally, variations in PLDs were particularly high among specimens of D. marginatus, suggesting a stronger response to local environmental differences for endemic species. We also report the first average PLD for this species over a broad geographic range (19.82±2.92days). PMID:26654297

  15. Antarctic Sea Ice Thickness From Surface Elevation: A Multi-Sensor Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necsoiu, M.; Lewis, M. J.; Parra, J.; Ackley, S. F.; Weissling, B.; Hwang, B.

    2011-12-01

    Sea ice is an important component of the climate system affecting ocean-atmospheric interactions and global energy balance. The assessment of sea ice thickness using satellite and airborne laser altimetry is largely dependent upon isostatic buoyancy relationships between snow, ice, slush and ocean water. The use of these relationships in estimating sea ice thickness is complicated by a number of factors including spatial resolution, changing sea level reference, varying snow and ice density, and snow-ice interface flooding. Previous work has suggested that the effects of these factors can be reduced using a multi-sensor approach. The X-band backscatter from TerraSAR-X (TSX) is sensitive to surface roughness, snow and ice properties, and the presence of wet snow. The combined use of TSX for sea ice characterization and laser altimetry has the potential to provide more accurate estimates of sea ice thickness. In this study, we examine the feasibility of using TSX dual-polarized backscatter data to determine ice characteristics in the Bellingshausen and Amundsen Sea in the Antarctic region. Actual surface sea ice characteristics were derived from sea ice station measurements during the J.C. Ross (ICEBell) and Oden Southern Ocean (OSO) expeditions during the austral summer of 2010-11. Data from ice mass-balance buoys emplaced during the two cruises continued through summer melt and bridged the transition into fall freeze up conditions in the snow pack and ice cover. Shannon entropy derived from TSX, measures the statistical disorder of a medium illuminated by the radar, being a sum of two contributions related to intensity and the degree of polarization. A geostatistical approach is employed to correlate measured surface properties and sea ice freeboard with TSX-derived Shannon entropy. The floes are subsequently classified based on Shannon entropy and used in an empirically-based buoyancy model to estimate sea ice thickness. This approach is then compared with

  16. Proxy data constraints on Cretaceous sea surface temperature evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Charlotte L.; Robinson, Stuart A.; O'Connor, Lauren K.; Pancost, Richard D.

    2015-04-01

    It is well established that greenhouse conditions prevailed during the Cretaceous. However, constraining the exact nature of the greenhouse gas forcing, climatic warming and climate sensitivity remains an ongoing topic of research. Proxy temperature data provide valuable observational constraints on Cretaceous climate. In particular, much of our understanding of Cretaceous climate warmth comes from marine temperature proxy data reconstructions derived using planktic foraminiferal oxygen isotope (δ18O) palaeothermometry and, more recently, the TEX86 proxy, based on the distribution of marine isoprenoidal glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether lipids (GDGTs). Both of these proxies provide estimates of sea surface temperature (SST), however each technique is subject to a number of proxy-specific caveats. For example, δ18O values in planktic foraminifer may be compromised by preservation and/or diagenetic alteration, while the TEX86 proxy has undergone several temperature calibration re-evaluations and the exact mechanism that relates GDGT production to SST is not fully understood. Here we synthesise and reinterpret available TEX86- and δ18O-SST proxy data for the entire Cretaceous. For the TEX86 data, where possible we re-evaluate the fractional abundance of all individual GDGTs. By utilising fractional GDGT abundances we are also able to compute methane indices and branched and isoprenoid tetraether (BIT) indices, as well as apply both the TEX86H and TEX86L temperature calibrations. For each of the two SST proxy techniques, TEX86 and δ18O, we apply consistent temperature calibrations and place all data on a common timescale. Our new data-based SST synthesis allows us to examine long term temperature trends in the Cretaceous, including latitudinal temperature gradient variations, and evaluate global versus regional temperature patterns. Through considering both TEX86 and planktic foraminiferal δ18O data we critically compare the application of these two techniques

  17. Improving Streamflow Forecasts Using Predefined Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalra, A.; Ahmad, S.

    2011-12-01

    With the increasing evidence of climate variability, water resources managers in the western United States are faced with greater challenges of developing long range streamflow forecast. This is further aggravated by the increases in climate extremes such as floods and drought caused by climate variability. Over the years, climatologists have identified several modes of climatic variability and their relationship with streamflow. These climate modes have the potential of being used as predictor in models for improving the streamflow lead time. With this as the motivation, the current research focuses on increasing the streamflow lead time using predefine climate indices. A data driven model i.e. Support Vector Machine (SVM) based on the statistical learning theory is used to predict annual streamflow volume 3-year in advance. The SVM model is a learning system that uses a hypothesis space of linear functions in a Kernel induced higher dimensional feature space, and is trained with a learning algorithm from the optimization theory. Annual oceanic-atmospheric indices, comprising of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), El Niño-Southern Oscillations (ENSO), and a new Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data set of "Hondo" Region for a period of 1906-2005 are used to generate annual streamflow volumes. The SVM model is applied to three gages i.e. Cisco, Green River, and Lees Ferry in the Upper Colorado River Basin in the western United States. Based on the performance measures the model shows very good forecasts, and the forecast are in good agreement with measured streamflow volumes. Previous research has identified NAO and ENSO as main drivers for extending streamflow forecast lead-time in the UCRB. Inclusion of "Hondo Region" SST information further improve the model's forecasting ability. The overall results of this study revealed that the annual streamflow of the UCRB is significantly influenced by

  18. ENSO signature in the SMOS sea surface salinity maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballabrera, J.; Umbert, M.; Hoareau, N.; Turiel, A.; Font, J.

    2012-12-01

    Until recently, the role of salinity observations in the operational simulation and prediction of ENSO was neglected because of the historical lack of observations and because leading intermediate coupled models had significant predictive skill without directly accounting for salinity effects. In Ballabrera-Poy et al., (2002), the potential role of sea surface salinity (SSS) observations on the statistical predictions of ENSO was investigated. It was shown that, although SSS observations would play little role in statistical nowcasts of ENSO, they would provide a significant role in the 6-12 month predictions. The European Space Agency (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Earth Explorer opportunity mission was launched on November 2, 2009, becoming the first satellite mission addressing the challenge of measuring SSS from space with the help of MIRAS (Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis), a novel two-dimensional interferometer operating at L-band (1.4 GHz). Although the L-band frequency is the optimal for ocean salinity measurements, the retrieval of SSS information requires special care because of the low sensitivity of the brightness temperature to SSS: from 0.2-0.8 K per salinity unit. Maps of 10-day averages of SSS in 1x1 degree boxes are distributed by the SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre on Radiometric Calibration and Ocean Salinity (SMOS-BEC, http://www.smos-bec.icm.csic.es). These maps are derived from the SMOS reprocessing campaign released to the SMOS user community in March 2011, and span the period from January 2010 through December 2011. The current accuracy of these SSS maps ranges from 0.2-0.4, depending on the ocean region being considered (Umbert et al., 2012). During the period of the reprocessing campaign, the equatorial Pacific has been in a quasi-continuous La Niña state. During the cold phases of ENSO, positive anomalies of SSS are expected with a largest anomalous values in the western warm-fresh pool. The anomalies

  19. Robust comparison of climate models with observations using blended land air and ocean sea surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowtan, Kevin; Hausfather, Zeke; Hawkins, Ed; Jacobs, Peter; Mann, Michael E.; Miller, Sonya K.; Steinman, Byron A.; Stolpe, Martin B.; Way, Robert G.

    2015-08-01

    The level of agreement between climate model simulations and observed surface temperature change is a topic of scientific and policy concern. While the Earth system continues to accumulate energy due to anthropogenic and other radiative forcings, estimates of recent surface temperature evolution fall at the lower end of climate model projections. Global mean temperatures from climate model simulations are typically calculated using surface air temperatures, while the corresponding observations are based on a blend of air and sea surface temperatures. This work quantifies a systematic bias in model-observation comparisons arising from differential warming rates between sea surface temperatures and surface air temperatures over oceans. A further bias arises from the treatment of temperatures in regions where the sea ice boundary has changed. Applying the methodology of the HadCRUT4 record to climate model temperature fields accounts for 38% of the discrepancy in trend between models and observations over the period 1975-2014.

  20. Sea surface temperature and torrential rains in the Valencia region: modelling the role of recharge areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, F.; Valiente, J. A.; Estrela, M. J.

    2015-02-01

    Heavy rain events are frequently recorded in the Western Mediterranean causing economic losses and even human casualties. The Western Mediterranean is a deep and almost closed sea surrounded by high mountain ranges and with little exchange of water with the Atlantic ocean. A main factor in the development of torrential rains are ocean-atmosphere exchanges of heat and moisture that can potentially destabilize air masses travelling over the sea. The study of air mass trajectories previous to the rain event permits the identification of sea areas that could probably contribute to the development or intensification of rainfall. From a previous Mediterranean sea surface temperature climatology, its spatio-temporal distribution patterns have been studied showing two main distribution modes in winter and summer and transitional regimes in spring and autumn. Hence, three heavy precipitation events, for such winter and summer sea temperature regimes and for fall transition, affecting the Valencia region have been selected to study the effect of sea surface temperature in torrential rains. Simulations with perturbed sea surface temperature in different areas along the air mass path were run to compare results with unperturbed simulation. The variation of sea surface temperature in certain areas caused significant changes in model accumulated values and its spatial distribution. Therefore, the existence of recharge areas where air-sea interaction favors the development of torrential rainfall in Valencia region has been shown. This methodology could be extended to the whole Mediterranean basin to look for such potential recharge areas. The identification of sea areas that contribute to the development or intensification of heavy rain events in the Mediterranean countries could be a useful prognosis and/or monitoring tool.

  1. Sea surface temperature and torrential rains in the Valencia region: modelling the role of recharge areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, F.; Valiente, J. A.; Estrela, M. J.

    2015-07-01

    Heavy rain events are frequently recorded in the Western Mediterranean causing economic losses and even human casualties. The Western Mediterranean is a deep and almost closed sea surrounded by high mountain ranges and with little exchange of water with the Atlantic ocean. A main factor in the development of torrential rains is ocean-atmosphere exchanges of heat and moisture that can potentially destabilize air masses travelling over the sea. The study of air mass trajectories previous to the rain event permits the identification of sea areas that could probably contribute to the development or intensification of rainfall. From a previous Mediterranean sea surface temperature climatology, its spatio-temporal distribution patterns have been studied showing two main distribution modes in winter and summer and transitional regimes in spring and autumn. Hence, three heavy precipitation events, for such winter and summer sea temperature regimes and for fall transition, affecting the Valencia region have been selected to study the effect of sea surface temperature in torrential rains. Simulations with perturbed sea surface temperature in different areas along the air mass path were run to compare results with unperturbed simulation. The variation of sea surface temperature in certain areas caused significant changes in model accumulated values and its spatial distribution. Therefore, the existence of areas that at a greater extent favour air-sea interaction leading to the development of torrential rainfall in the Valencia region has been shown. This methodology could be extended to the whole Mediterranean basin to look for such potential recharge areas. The identification of sea areas that contribute to the development or intensification of heavy rain events in the Mediterranean countries could be a useful prognosis and/or monitoring tool.

  2. Processes controlling surface, bottom and lateral melt of Arctic sea ice in a state of the art sea ice model.

    PubMed

    Tsamados, Michel; Feltham, Daniel; Petty, Alek; Schroeder, David; Flocco, Daniela

    2015-10-13

    We present a modelling study of processes controlling the summer melt of the Arctic sea ice cover. We perform a sensitivity study and focus our interest on the thermodynamics at the ice-atmosphere and ice-ocean interfaces. We use the Los Alamos community sea ice model CICE, and additionally implement and test three new parametrization schemes: (i) a prognostic mixed layer; (ii) a three equation boundary condition for the salt and heat flux at the ice-ocean interface; and (iii) a new lateral melt parametrization. Recent additions to the CICE model are also tested, including explicit melt ponds, a form drag parametrization and a halodynamic brine drainage scheme. The various sea ice parametrizations tested in this sensitivity study introduce a wide spread in the simulated sea ice characteristics. For each simulation, the total melt is decomposed into its surface, bottom and lateral melt components to assess the processes driving melt and how this varies regionally and temporally. Because this study quantifies the relative importance of several processes in driving the summer melt of sea ice, this work can serve as a guide for future research priorities. PMID:26347538

  3. Sea surface temperature variability in the Norwegian Sea during the late Pliocene linked to subpolar gyre strength and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachem, Paul E.; Risebrobakken, Bjørg; McClymont, Erin L.

    2016-07-01

    The mid-Piacenzian warm period (3.264-3.025 Ma) of the Pliocene epoch has been proposed as a possible reference for future warm climate states. However, there is significant disagreement over the magnitude of high latitude warming between data and models for this period of time, raising questions about the driving mechanisms and responsible feedbacks. We have developed a new set of orbital-resolution alkenone-based sea surface temperature (SST) and ice rafted debris (IRD) records from the Norwegian Sea spanning 3.264-3.14 Ma. The SSTs in the Norwegian Sea were 2-3 °C warmer than the Holocene average, likely caused by the radiative effect of higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations. There is notable obliquity-driven SST variability with a range of 4 °C, shown by evolutive spectra. The correlation of SST variability with the presence of IRD suggests a common climate forcing acting across the Nordic Seas region. Changes of the SST gradient between the Norwegian Sea and North Atlantic sites suggest that the subpolar gyre was at least as strong as during the Holocene, and that the northward heat transport by the North Atlantic Current was comparable.

  4. Verification of Geosat sea surface topography in the Gulf Stream extension with surface drifting buoys and hydrographic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willebrand, J.; KäSe, R. H.; Stammer, D.; Hinrichsen, H.-H.; Krauss, W.

    1990-03-01

    Altimeter data from Geosat have been analyzed in the Gulf Stream extension area. Horizontal maps of the sea surface height anomaly relative to an annual mean for various 17-day intervals were constructed using an objective mapping procedure. The mean sea level was approximated by the dynamic topography from climatological hydrographic data. Geostrophic surface velocities derived from the composite maps (mean plus anomaly) are significantly correlated with surface drifter velocities observed during an oceanographie experiment in the spring of 1987. The drifter velocities contain much energy on scales less than 100 km which are not resolved in the altimetric maps. It is shown that the composite sea surface height also agrees well with ground verification from hydrographic data along sections in a triangle between the Azores, Newfoundland, and Bermuda, except in regions of high mean gradients.

  5. Last Glacial Maximum sea surface temperature and sea-ice extent in the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Verena; Esper, Oliver; Gersonde, Rainer; Lamy, Frank; Tiedemann, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    Sea surface temperatures and sea-ice extent are most critical variables to evaluate the Southern Ocean paleoceanographic evolution in relation to the development of the global carbon cycle, atmospheric CO2 and ocean-atmosphere circulation. Here we present diatom transfer function-based summer sea surface temperature (SSST) and winter sea-ice (WSI) estimates from the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean to bridge a gap in information that has to date hampered a well-established reconstruction of the last glacial Southern Ocean at circum-Antarctic scale. We studied the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at the EPILOG time slice (19,000-23,000 calendar years before present) in 17 cores and consolidated our LGM picture of the Pacific sector taking into account published data from its warmer regions. Our data display a distinct east-west differentiation with a rather stable WSI edge north of the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge in the Ross Sea sector and a more variable WSI extent over the Amundsen Abyssal Plain. The zone of maximum cooling (>4 K) during the LGM is in the present Subantarctic Zone and bounded to its south by the 4 °C isotherm. The isotherm is in the SSST range prevailing at the modern Antarctic Polar Front, representing a circum-Antarctic feature, and marks the northern edge of the glacial Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). The northward deflection of colder than modern surface waters along the South American continent led to a significant cooling of the glacial Humboldt Current surface waters (4-8 K), which affected the temperature regimes as far north as tropical latitudes. The glacial reduction of ACC temperatures may also have resulted in significant cooling in the Atlantic and Indian Southern Ocean, thus enhancing thermal differentiation of the Southern Ocean and Antarctic continental cooling. The comparison with numerical temperature and sea-ice simulations yields discrepancies, especially concerning the estimates of the sea-ice fields, but some simulations

  6. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of SSMI surface wind speed, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, AMI surface wind velocity, TOPEX/POSEIDON sea surface height, and ECMWF surface wind velocity during 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Fu, L.; Knauss, W.; Pihos, G.; Brown, O.; Freilich, M.; Wentz, F.

    1995-01-01

    The following monthly mean global distributions for 1993 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map: 10-m height wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) on a United States (U.S.) Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR/2) on a U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite; 10-m height wind speed and direction estimated from the Active Microwave Instrument (AMI) on the European Space Agency (ESA) European Remote Sensing (ERS-1) satellite; sea surface height estimated from the joint U.S.-France Topography Experiment (TOPEX)/POSEIDON spacecraft; and 10-m height wind speed and direction produced by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF). Charts of annual mean, monthly mean, and sampling distributions are displayed.

  7. Absolute spectrum and charge ratio of cosmic ray muons in the energy region from 0.2 GeV to 100 GeV at 600 m above sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Pascale, M. P.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Golden, R. L.; Grimani, C.; Kimbell, B. L.; Stephens, S. A.; Stochaj, S. J.; Webber, W. R.; Basini, G.

    1993-01-01

    We have determined the momentum spectrum and charge ratio of muons in the region from 250 MeV/c to 100 GeV/c using a superconducting magnetic spectrometer. The absolute differential spectrum of muons obtained in this experiment at 600 m above sea level is in good agreement with the previous measurements at sea level. The differential spectrum can be represented by a power law with a varying index, which is consistent with zero below 450 MeV/c and steepens to a value of -2.7 +/- 0.1 between 20 and 100 GeV/c. The integral f1ux of muons measured in this experiment span a very large range of momentum and is in excellent agreement with the earlier results. The positive to negative muon ratio appears to be constant in the entire momentum range covered in this experiment within the errors and the mean value is 1.220 +/- 0.044. The absolute momentum spectrum and the charge ratio measured in this experiment are also consistent with the theoretical expectations. This is the only experiment which covers a wide range of nearly three decades in momentum from a very low momentum.

  8. Experimental validation of the MODTRAN 5.3 sea surface radiance model using MIRAMER campaign measurements.

    PubMed

    Ross, Vincent; Dion, Denis; St-Germain, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Radiometric images taken in mid-wave and long-wave infrared bands are used as a basis for validating a sea surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) being implemented into MODTRAN 5 (Berk et al. [Proc. SPIE5806, 662 (2005)]). The images were obtained during the MIRAMER campaign that took place in May 2008 in the Mediterranean Sea near Toulon, France. When atmosphere radiances are matched at the horizon to remove possible calibration offsets, the implementation of the BRDF in MODTRAN produces good sea surface radiance agreement, usually within 2% and at worst 4% from off-glint azimuthally averaged measurements. Simulations also compare quite favorably to glint measurements. The observed sea radiance deviations between model and measurements are not systematic, and are well within expected experimental uncertainties. This is largely attributed to proper radiative coupling between the surface and the atmosphere implemented using the DISORT multiple scattering algorithm. PMID:22614400

  9. Lightning in the Mediterranean and its relation with sea-surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotroni, V.; Lagouvardos, K.

    2016-03-01

    Here we present the analysis of lightning activity over the Mediterranean, based on a 10 year long dataset (2005-2014) provided by the ZEUS long-range lightning detection system. The major hot-spots of lightning activity are identified, with a clear predominance during the warm period of the year over land in the vicinity of the major topographic features of the area. Special emphasis is also given on the discussion of the seasonal distribution of lightning. In addition, we investigate the relationship of lightning with sea-surface temperature, obtained by high-resolution satellite measurements and we conclude that the number of lightning strokes is positively correlated with the sea-surface temperature during autumn when also the maximum lightning activity over the sea is depicted. We suggest that higher sea surface temperature further destabilises the lower tropospheric layers, enhancing thus convection and therefore lightning.

  10. Sea Surface Temperature Seesaw between the Subpolar North Atlantic and the Norwegian Sea during the Late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miettinen, A.; Divine, D.; Koc, N.; Godtliebsen, F.; Hall, I. R.

    2012-12-01

    August sea surface temperature (aSST) record based on fossil diatom assemblages is generated from a 2800-year-long marine sediment core Rapid 21-COM from the Iceland Basin, in the northern subpolar North Atlantic. The record has a resolution of 2-10 years for interval 800-2004 AD representing the highest-resolution diatom SST reconstruction from the subpolar North Atlantic for this period, and 40 years for interval 800 BC-800 AD. The record is compared with the high-resolution aSST record from core CR948/2011 from the Vøring Plateau, in the Norwegian Sea, to explore the variability of the aSST gradient between these areas during the late Holocene. The aSST records show persistent opposite climate trends toward warming in the subpolar North Atlantic and cooling in the Norwegian Sea during the late Holocene. An apparent tendency to coherent antiphased aSST variations between the sites is also revealed for the shorter time scales implying an aSST seesaw between the northern subpolar North Atlantic and the Norwegian Sea to operate during the late Holocene. At the multicentennial scale of aSST variability of 600-900 years, the records are nearly in antiphase with warmer (colder) periods in the subpolar North Atlantic corresponding to the colder (warmer) periods in the Norwegian Sea. At the shorter time scale of 200-450 years, the records display a phase-locked behaviour with a tendency for the positive aSST anomalies in the Norwegian Sea to lead by ca. 30 years the negative aSST anomalies in the subpolar North Atlantic. This aSST seesaw might have had a strong effect on two major climate anomalies in the northwest Europe during the past Millennium: Medieval Warm Period (MWP) and the Little Ice Age (LIA). During the MWP warming of the sea surface in the Norwegian Sea occurred in parallel with cooling in the northern subpolar North Atlantic, whereas the opposite pattern emerged during the LIA. Coupled changes in aSST between the northern subpolar North Atlantic and the

  11. Dissolved organic matter in newly formed sea ice and surface seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longnecker, Krista

    2015-12-01

    Changes in sea ice in the Arctic will have ramifications on regional and global carbon cycling. Research to date has primarily focused on the regional impacts to biological activity and global impacts on atmospheric processes. The current project considers the molecular-level composition of organic carbon within sea ice compared to the organic matter in seawater. The project revealed that the composition of organic matter within sea ice was more variable than the composition of organic matter within the surface ocean. Furthermore, sea ice samples presented two distinct patterns in the composition of organic matter with a portion of the sea ice samples containing protein-like organic matter. Yet, the samples were collected in the early winter period when little biological activity is expected. Thus, one hypothesis is that physical processes acting during the formation of sea ice selectively transferred organic matter from seawater into sea ice. The present project expands our understanding of dissolved organic matter in sea ice and surface seawater and thereby increases our knowledge of carbon cycling in polar regions.

  12. Multi-sensor satellite survey of surface oil pollution in the Caspian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mityagina, Marina I.; Lavrova, Olga Y.

    2015-10-01

    The results of long-term satellite survey of the aquatic area of the Caspian Sea are presented. The patterns of surface oil pollution of the Caspian Sea are described and analysed. It is demonstrated that surface oil pollution is often caused by natural causes, namely by natural hydrocarbon seepages and mud volcanoes activity on the sea bottom. A combined analysis of oil film signatures in satellite radar and optical imagery data is performed. Mapping of the main types of surface pollution of the Caspian Sea is performed and areas of the heaviest pollution are outlined and analysed. Dependence of radar signatures of sea surface oil patches on the wind/wave conditions is investigated. The large amount of the data available allowed us to make some generalizations and obtain statistically significant results on a spatial and temporal variability of various sea surface film manifestations in SAR images. The impact of dynamic and circulation processes and natural factors (current meandering, vortical activity, temperature and wind patterns) on spatial and temporal distributions and intensity of oil films is studied. The connection between manifestations of natural seepages and mud volcanoes and earthquake activity in South Caspian and adjacent areas is established.

  13. Trophic dynamics of deep-sea megabenthos are mediated by surface productivity.

    PubMed

    Tecchio, Samuele; van Oevelen, Dick; Soetaert, Karline; Navarro, Joan; Ramírez-Llodra, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Most deep-sea benthic ecosystems are food limited and, in the majority of cases, are driven by the organic matter falling from the surface or advected downslope. Species may adapt to this scarceness by applying a wide variety of responses, such as feeding specialisation, niche width variation, and reduction in metabolic rates. The Mediterranean Sea hosts a gradient of food availability at the deep seafloor over its wide longitudinal transect. In the Mediterranean, broad regional studies on trophic habits are almost absent, and the response of deep-sea benthos to different trophic conditions is still speculative. Here, we show that both primary and secondary production processes taking place at surface layers are key drivers of deep-sea food web structuring. By employing an innovative statistical tool, we interpreted bulk-tissue δ(13)C and δ(15)N isotope ratios in benthic megafauna, and associated surface and mesopelagic components from the 3 basins of the Mediterranean Sea at 3 different depths (1200, 2000, and 3000 m). The trophic niche width and the amplitude of primary carbon sources were positively correlated with both primary and secondary surface production indicators. Moreover, mesopelagic organic matter utilization processes showed an intermediate position between surface and deep benthic components. These results shed light on the understanding of deep-sea ecosystems functioning and, at the same time, they demand further investigation. PMID:23691098

  14. Trophic Dynamics of Deep-Sea Megabenthos Are Mediated by Surface Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Tecchio, Samuele; van Oevelen, Dick; Soetaert, Karline; Navarro, Joan; Ramírez-Llodra, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Most deep-sea benthic ecosystems are food limited and, in the majority of cases, are driven by the organic matter falling from the surface or advected downslope. Species may adapt to this scarceness by applying a wide variety of responses, such as feeding specialisation, niche width variation, and reduction in metabolic rates. The Mediterranean Sea hosts a gradient of food availability at the deep seafloor over its wide longitudinal transect. In the Mediterranean, broad regional studies on trophic habits are almost absent, and the response of deep-sea benthos to different trophic conditions is still speculative. Here, we show that both primary and secondary production processes taking place at surface layers are key drivers of deep-sea food web structuring. By employing an innovative statistical tool, we interpreted bulk-tissue δ13C and δ15N isotope ratios in benthic megafauna, and associated surface and mesopelagic components from the 3 basins of the Mediterranean Sea at 3 different depths (1200, 2000, and 3000 m). The trophic niche width and the amplitude of primary carbon sources were positively correlated with both primary and secondary surface production indicators. Moreover, mesopelagic organic matter utilization processes showed an intermediate position between surface and deep benthic components. These results shed light on the understanding of deep-sea ecosystems functioning and, at the same time, they demand further investigation. PMID:23691098

  15. Sea Surface Wind Field by X-Band TerraSAR-X and Tandem-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, Susanne; Li, Xiaoming; Ren, Yongzheng; He, Mingxia

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we present the newly developed Geophysical Model Function (GMF), denoted XMOD2, to retrieve the sea surface wind field from X-band TerraSAR-X/Tandem-X (TS-X/TD-X) data. In contrary to the previous XMOD1, XMOD2 is based on a nonlinear GMF, and moreover it also depicts the difference between upwind and downwind of the sea surface backscatter. By exploiting 371 collocations, the retrieved TS-X/TD-X sea surface wind speed by XMOD2 agrees well with in situ buoy measurements with a bias of 0.39 m/s, an RMSE of 1.52 m/s and a scatter index (SI) of 16.1%. To evaluate the sea surface wind field retrieved from X-band SAR, we conducted a joint campaign in the South China Sea in August, 2011. Examples of sea surface wind field retrieved from the TS-X/TD-X data acquired in the campaign are shown for demonstration.

  16. Increasing positive trend in the Antarctic sea ice extent and associated surface temperature changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comiso, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The maximum extent of the Antarctic sea ice in 2014 was more than 20 x 106 km2 which is likely the highest during the satellite era. The updated historical record of the sea ice cover, as derived from multichannel passive microwave data, now shows a trend of 2.05 ± 0.18% per decade and 2.70 ± 0.20 % per decade for ice extent and ice area, respectively. This indicates not only a continuation of the positive trend but also a slight increase in the trends reported previously. A newly enhanced sea ice concentration data actually yield slightly more modest trends in the sea ice extent and ice area of 1.55 ± 0.17 % per decade and 2.40 ± 0.20 % per decade, respectively. The difference is mainly due to an improved matching of calibrations in the enhanced data for the different satellite sensors that provide the historical time series. The updated data also show regional shifts in the trends with a decrease in the positive trend in the Ross Sea, a decrease in the negative trend in the Bellingshausen/Amundsen Seas, and an increase in the positive trend in the other sectors. Such shifts undermine the previous hypothesis that the positive trend of Antarctic sea ice is primarily caused by increases in ice production in the Ross Sea. On the other hand, it is observed that surface temperatures for the same period, as derived from satellite data, show a general cooling in areas near the ice margin. Surface temperatures are also shown to be highly correlated with the extent of the sea ice cover. Such results suggests that the assimilation of satellite surface temperature data in numerical climate models may be needed to improve the performance of these models and enable better agreements with the observed trends of sea ice in the Southern Hemisphere.

  17. Simulation of a polarized laser beam reflected at the sea surface: modeling and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenger, Frédéric

    2015-05-01

    A 3-D simulation of the polarization-dependent reflection of a Gaussian shaped laser beam on the dynamic sea surface is presented. The simulation considers polarized or unpolarized laser sources and calculates the polarization states upon reflection at the sea surface. It is suitable for the radiance calculation of the scene in different spectral wavebands (e.g. near-infrared, SWIR, etc.) not including the camera degradations. The simulation also considers a bistatic configuration of laser source and receiver as well as different atmospheric conditions. In the SWIR, the detected total power of reflected laser light is compared with data collected in a field trial. Our computer simulation combines the 3-D simulation of a maritime scene (open sea/clear sky) with the simulation of polarized or unpolarized laser light reflected at the sea surface. The basic sea surface geometry is modeled by a composition of smooth wind driven gravity waves. To predict the input of a camera equipped with a linear polarizer, the polarized sea surface radiance must be calculated for the specific waveband. The s- and p-polarization states are calculated for the emitted sea surface radiance and the specularly reflected sky radiance to determine the total polarized sea surface radiance of each component. The states of polarization and the radiance of laser light specularly reflected at the wind-roughened sea surface are calculated by considering the s- and p- components of the electric field of laser light with respect to the specular plane of incidence. This is done by using the formalism of their coherence matrices according to E. Wolf [1]. Additionally, an analytical statistical sea surface BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) is considered for the reflection of laser light radiances. Validation of the simulation results is required to ensure model credibility and applicability to maritime laser applications. For validation purposes, field measurement data (images and

  18. Robust Comparison of Climate Models with Observations Using Blended Land Air and Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausfather, Z.; Jacobs, P.; Cowtan, K.; Hawkins, E.; Mann, M. E.; Miller, S. K.; Steinman, B. A.; Way, R. G.; Stolpe, M.

    2015-12-01

    Model-observation comparisons provide an important test of climate models' ability to realistically simulate the transient evolution of the system. A great deal of attention has recently focused on the so-called "hiatus" period of the past ~15 years, when estimates of recent surface temperature evolution fall at the lower end of climate model projections. This work quantifies a systematic bias in model-observation comparisons arising from differential warming rates between sea surface temperatures and surface air temperatures over oceans. Global mean temperatures from climate model simulations are typically calculated using surface air temperatures, while the corresponding observations are based on a blend of air and sea surface temperatures. A further bias arises from the treatment of temperatures in regions where the sea ice boundary has changed. We discuss the magnitude of these biases, and their implications for the evaluation of climate model performance over the "hiatus" period and the full instrumental record.

  19. Sea surface height variability in the North East Atlantic from satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterlini, Paul; de Vries, Hylke; Katsman, Caroline

    2016-08-01

    Data from 21 years of satellite altimeter measurements are used to identify and understand the major contributing components of sea surface height variability (SSV) on monthly time-scales in the North East Atlantic. A number of SSV drivers is considered, which are categorised into two groups; local (wind and sea surface temperature) and remote (sea level pressure and the North Atlantic oscillation index). A multiple linear regression model is constructed to model the SSV for a specific target area in the North Sea basin. Cross-correlations between candidate regressors potentially lead to ambiguity in the interpretation of the results. We therefore use an objective hierarchical selection method based on variance inflation factors to select the optimal number of regressors for the target area and accept these into the regression model if they can be associated to SSV through a direct underlying physical forcing mechanism. Results show that a region of high SSV exists off the west coast of Denmark and that it can be represented well with a regression model that uses local wind, sea surface temperature and sea level pressure as primary regressors. The regression model developed here helps to understand sea level change in the North East Atlantic. The methodology is generalised and easily applied to other regions.

  20. Sound scattering from rough bubbly ocean surface based on modified sea surface acoustic simulator and consideration of various incident angles and sub-surface bubbles' radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolghasi, Alireza; Ghadimi, Parviz; Chekab, Mohammad A. Feizi

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve the capabilities and precision of a recently introduced Sea Surface Acoustic Simulator (SSAS) developed based on optimization of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff-Fresnel (HKF) method. The improved acoustic simulator, hereby known as the Modified SSAS (MSSAS), is capable of determining sound scattering from the sea surface and includes an extended Hall-Novarini model and optimized HKF method. The extended Hall-Novarini model is used for considering the effects of sub-surface bubbles over a wider range of radii of sub-surface bubbles compared to the previous SSAS version. Furthermore, MSSAS has the capability of making a three-dimensional simulation of scattered sound from the rough bubbly sea surface with less error than that of the Critical Sea Tests (CST) experiments. Also, it presents scattered pressure levels from the rough bubbly sea surface based on various incident angles of sound. Wind speed, frequency, incident angle, and pressure level of the sound source are considered as input data, and scattered pressure levels and scattering coefficients are provided. Finally, different parametric studies were conducted on wind speeds, frequencies, and incident angles to indicate that MSSAS is quite capable of simulating sound scattering from the rough bubbly sea surface, according to the scattering mechanisms determined by Ogden and Erskine. Therefore, it is concluded that MSSAS is valid for both scattering mechanisms and the transition region between them that are defined by Ogden and Erskine.

  1. A Simple Technique for Creating Regional Composites of Sea Surface Temperature from MODIS for Use in Operational Mesoscale NWP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knievel, Jason C.; Rife, Daran L.; Grim, Joseph A.; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Hacker, Joshua P.; Ge, Ming; Fisher, Henry H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a simple technique for creating regional, high-resolution, daytime and nighttime composites of sea surface temperature (SST) for use in operational numerical weather prediction (NWP). The composites are based on observations from NASA s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Aqua and Terra. The data used typically are available nearly in real time, are applicable anywhere on the globe, and are capable of roughly representing the diurnal cycle in SST. The composites resolution is much higher than that of many other standard SST products used for operational NWP, including the low- and high-resolution Real-Time Global (RTG) analyses. The difference in resolution is key because several studies have shown that highly resolved SSTs are important for driving the air sea interactions that shape patterns of static stability, vertical and horizontal wind shear, and divergence in the planetary boundary layer. The MODIS-based composites are compared to in situ observations from buoys and other platforms operated by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) off the coasts of New England, the mid-Atlantic, and Florida. Mean differences, mean absolute differences, and root-mean-square differences between the composites and the NDBC observations are all within tenths of a degree of those calculated between RTG analyses and the NDBC observations. This is true whether or not one accounts for the mean offset between the skin temperatures of the MODIS dataset and the bulk temperatures of the NDBC observations and RTG analyses. Near the coast, the MODIS-based composites tend to agree more with NDBC observations than do the RTG analyses. The opposite is true away from the coast. All of these differences in point-wise comparisons among the SST datasets are small compared to the 61.08C accuracy of the NDBC SST sensors. Because skin-temperature variations from land to water so strongly affect the development and life cycle of the sea breeze, this

  2. Biweekly Sea Surface Temperature over the South China Sea and its association with the Western North Pacific Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaid, B. H.

    2015-10-01

    The association of the biweekly intraseasonal (BWI) oscillation in the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) over the South China Sea (SCS) and the Western North Pacific Summer Monsoon is authenticated using version 4 the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager data (SST and rain) and heat fluxes from Ocean Atmosphere Flux project data during 1998-2012. The results suggest that the SCS involves ocean-atmosphere coupling on biweekly timescales. The positive biweekly SST anomalies lead the rain anomalies over the SCS by 3 days, with a significant correlation coefficient (r = 0.6, at 99 % significance levels) between the SST-rain anomalies. It is evident from lead/lag correlation between biweekly SST and zonal wind shear that warm ocean surface induced by wind shear may contribute to a favorable condition of the convective activity over the SCS. The present study suggests that ocean-to-atmospheric processes induced by the BWI oscillation in the SCS SST results in enhanced sea level pressure and surface shortwave radiation flux during the summer monsoon. Besides, it is observed that the SCS BWI oscillation in the changes of SST causes a feedback in the atmosphere by modifying the atmospheric instability. This suggests that the active/break biweekly cycle of the SST over the SCS is related by sea level pressure, surface heat fluxes and atmospheric instability. The potential findings here indicate that the biweekly SST over the SCS play an important role in the eastward and the southward propagation of the biweekly anomalies in the Western North Pacific.

  3. Nonlinear aspects of sea surface temperature in Monterey Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breaker, Laurence C.

    2006-04-01

    Nonlinear aspects of sea surface temperature (SST) in Monterey Bay are examined, based on an 85-year record of daily observations from Pacific Grove, California. Oceanic processes that affect the waters of Monterey Bay are described, processes that could contribute to nonlinearity in the record. Exploratory data analysis reveals that the record at Pacific Grove is non-Gaussian and, most likely, nonstationary. A more recent test for stationarity based on a power law approximation to the slope of the power spectrum indicates that the record is stationary for frequencies up to ∼8 cycles per year (∼45 days), but nonstationary at higher frequencies. To examine the record at Pacific Grove for nonlinear behavior, third-order statistics, including the skewness, statistical measures of asymmetry, the bicorrelation, and the bispectrum, were employed. The bicorrelation revealed maxima located approximately 365 days apart, reflecting a nonlinear contribution to the annual cycle. Based on a 365-day moving window, the running skewness is positive almost 80% of the time, reflecting the overall impact of warming influences. The asymmetry is positive approximately 75% of the time, consistent with the asymmetric shape of the mean annual cycle. Based on the skewness and asymmetry, nonlinearities in the record, when they occur, appear to be event-driven with time scales possibly as short as several days, to several years. In many cases, these events are related to warm water intrusions into the bay, and El Niño warming episodes. The power spectrum indicates that the annual cycle is a dominant source of variability in the record and that there is a relatively strong semiannual component as well. To determine whether or not the annual and semiannual cycles are harmonically related, the bispectrum and bicoherence were calculated. The bispectrum is nonzero, providing a strong indication of nonlinearity in the record. The bicoherence indicates that the annual cycle is a major source

  4. The organic sea surface microlayer in the upwelling region off Peru and implications for air-sea exchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, A.; Galgani, L.

    2015-07-01

    The sea surface microlayer (SML) is at the very surface of the ocean, linking the hydrosphere with the atmosphere, and central to a range of global biogeochemical and climate-related processes. The presence and enrichment of organic compounds in the SML have been suggested to influence air-sea gas exchange processes as well as the emission of primary organic aerosols. Among these organic compounds, primarily of plankton origin, are dissolved exopolymers, specifically polysaccharides and proteins, and gel particles, such as Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP) and Coomassie Stainable Particles (CSP). These organic substances often accumulate in the surface ocean when plankton productivity is high. Here, we report results obtained in December 2012 during the SOPRAN Meteor 91 cruise to the highly productive, coastal upwelling regime off Peru. Samples were collected from the SML and from ~ 20 cm below, and were analyzed for polysaccharidic and proteinaceous compounds, gel particles, total and dissolved organic carbon, bacterial and phytoplankton abundance. Our study provides insight to the physical and biological control of organic matter enrichment in the SML, and discusses the potential role of organic matter in the SML for air-sea exchange processes.

  5. Iron and macro-nutrient concentrations in sea ice and their impact on the nutritional status of surface waters in the southern Okhotsk Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanna, Naoya; Toyota, Takenobu; Nishioka, Jun

    2014-08-01

    To elucidate the roles of sea ice in biogeochemical cycles in the Sea of Okhotsk, the concentrations of macro-nutrients (NO3 + NO2, PO4, SiO2, and NH4) and trace elements (Fe, Al) were measured in samples of sea ice, overlying snow, and seawater. The oxygen isotope ratio (δ18O) in the sea ice was used to distinguish between snow ice and seawater-origin ice. Except for NH4, the macro-nutrient concentrations were lower in sea ice than in surface water in the ice-covered area. A linear relationship between salinity and concentrations of NO3 + NO2, PO4, and SiO2 in the sea ice indicated that these macro-nutrients originated mainly from seawater. The Fe concentrations in sea ice were variable and several orders of magnitude higher than those in surface water in the ice-covered area. The Fe concentrations in the sea ice were positively correlated with Al concentrations, the suggestion being that the Fe contained in the sea ice originated mainly from lithogenic mineral particles. The annual Fe flux into the surface water from sea ice melting in the southern Sea of Okhotsk was estimated to be ∼740 μmol Fe m-2 yr-1. This flux is comparable to the reported annual atmospheric Fe flux (267-929 μmol Fe m-2 yr-1) in the western North Pacific. In spring, sea ice melting may slightly dilute macro-nutrient concentrations but increase Fe concentrations in surface water. These results suggest that sea ice may contribute to phytoplankton growth by release of Fe into the water column and have a large impact on biogeochemical cycles in the Sea of Okhotsk.

  6. Comparing robust and physics-based sea surface temperature retrievals for high resolution, multi-spectral thermal sensors using one or multiple looks

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.B.; Szymanski, J.J.; Theiler, J.P.

    1999-04-04

    With the advent of multi-spectral thermal imagers such as EOS's ASTER high spatial resolution thermal imagery of the Earth's surface will soon be a reality. Previous high resolution sensors such as Landsat 5 had only one spectral channel in the thermal infrared and its utility to determine absolute sea surface temperatures was limited to 6-8 K for water warmer than 25 deg C. This inaccuracy resulted from insufficient knowledge of the atmospheric temperature and water vapor, inaccurate sensor calibration, and cooling effects of thin high cirrus clouds. The authors will present two studies of algorithms and compare their performance. The first algorithm they call robust since it retrieves sea surface temperatures accurately over a fairly wide range of atmospheric conditions using linear combinations of nadir and off-nadir brightness temperatures. The second they call physics-based because it relies on physics-based models of the atmosphere. It attempts to come up with a unique sea surface temperature which fits one set of atmospheric parameters.

  7. The Sensitivity of African Easterly Waves to Eastern Tropical Atlantic Sea-Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druyan, Leonard M.; Fulakeza, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The results of two regional atmospheric model simulations are compared to assess the influence of the eastern tropical Atlantic sea-surface temperature maximum on local precipitation, transient easterly waves and the West African summer monsoon. Both model simulations were initialized with reanalysis 2 data (US National Center for Environmental Prediction and Department of Energy) on 15 May 2006 and extended through 6 October 2006, forced by synchronous reanalysis 2 lateral boundary conditions introduced four times daily. One simulation uses 2006 reanalysis 2 sea-surface temperatures, also updated four times daily, while the second simulation considers ocean forcing absent the sea-surface temperature maximum, achieved here by subtracting 3 K at every ocean grid point between 0 and 15 N during the entire simulation. The simulation with 2006 sea-surface temperature forcing produces a realistic distribution of June-September mean precipitation and realistic westward propagating swaths of maximum rainfall, based on validation against Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) estimates. The simulation without the sea-surface temperature maximum produces only 57% of the control June-September total precipitation over the eastern tropical Atlantic and about 83% of the Sahel precipitation. The simulation with warmer ocean temperatures generates generally stronger circulation, which in turn enhances precipitation by increasing moisture convergence. Some local precipitation enhancement is also attributed to lower vertical thermal stability above the warm water. The study shows that the eastern tropical Atlantic sea-surface temperature maximum enhances the strength of transient easterly waves and broadens the spatial extent of associated precipitation. However, large-scale circulation and its interaction with the African continent, and not sea-surface temperatures, control the timing and trajectories of the waves.

  8. Reconstructing Variations of Global Sea-Surface Temperature during the Last Interglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, J. S.; Clark, P. U.; He, F.; Parnell, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The last interglaciation (LIG; ~130-116 ka) was the most recent period in Earth history with higher-than-present global sea level (≥6 m) under similar-to-preindustrial concentrations of atmospheric CO2, suggesting additional feedbacks related to albedo, insolation, and ocean circulation in generating the apparent climatic differences between the LIG and present Holocene. However, our understanding of how much warmer the LIG sea surface was relative to the present interglaciation remains uncertain, with current estimates suggesting from 0°C to 2°C warmer than late-20thcentury average global temperatures. Moreover, the timing, spatial expression, and amplitude of regional and global sea surface temperature variability related to other climate forcing during the LIG are poorly constrained, largely due to uncertainties in age control and proxy temperature reconstructions. An accurate characterization of global and regional temperature change during the LIG can serve as a benchmark for paleoclimate modeling intercomparison projects and help improve understanding of sea-level sensitivity to temperature change. We will present a global compilation (~100 published records) of sea surface temperature (SST) and other climate reconstructions spanning the LIG. Using a Monte Carlo-enabled cross-correlation maximization algorithm to climatostratigraphically align proxy records and then account for both the resulting chronologic and proxy calibration uncertainties with Bayesian statistical inference, our results quantify the spatial timing, amplitude, and uncertainty in estimates of global and regional sea surface temperature change during the LIG and its relation to potential forcings.

  9. Sea, ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, F. F.; Sharma, G. D.; Burns, J. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Salinity and temperature measurements in the Bering Sea indicate that the Yukon River outflow extends as far as 200 km from its mouth. The fresh water flow from the Yukon River flows north and east into Norton Sound. Various levels of suspended sediment concentration in waters have been successfully color coded using a VP-8 color density slicing image analyzer. The 70 mm negative transparencies have provided the best fit for the ground truth observations.

  10. Sensitivity of Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance to perturbations in sea surface temperature and sea ice cover: a study with the regional climate model MAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, B.; Fettweis, X.; van de Berg, W. J.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Erpicum, M.

    2014-10-01

    During recent summers (2007-2012), several surface melt records were broken over the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS). The extreme summer melt resulted in part from a persistent negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), favoring warmer atmospheric conditions than normal over the GrIS. Simultaneously, large anomalies in sea ice cover (SIC) and sea surface temperature (SST) were observed in the North Atlantic, suggesting a possible connection. To assess the direct impact of 2007-2012 SIC and SST anomalies on GrIS surface mass balance (SMB), a set of sensitivity experiments was carried out with the regional climate model MAR forced by ERA-Interim. These simulations suggest that perturbations in SST and SIC in the seas surrounding Greenland do not considerably impact GrIS SMB, as a result of the katabatic wind blocking effect. These offshore-directed winds prevent oceanic near-surface air, influenced by SIC and SST anomalies, from penetrating far inland. Therefore, the ice sheet SMB response is restricted to coastal regions, where katabatic winds cease. A topic for further investigation is how anomalies in SIC and SST might have indirectly affected the surface melt by changing the general circulation in the North Atlantic region, hence favoring more frequent warm air advection towards the GrIS.

  11. Resonant generation of internal waves on the soft sea bed by a surface water wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Feng

    1995-08-01

    The nonlinear response of an initially flat sea bed to a monochromatic surface progressive wave was studied using the multiple scale perturbation method. Two opposite-traveling subliminal internal ``mud'' waves are selectively excited and form a resonant triad with the surface wave. The amplitudes of the internal waves grow on a time scale much longer than the period of the surface wave. It was found that the sea bed response is critically dependent on the density ratio of water and soil, depth of water, and depth and viscosity of the saturated soil. The result of instability analysis is in qualitative agreement with the result of a wave flume experiment.

  12. Investigation on the GPS single scattering from a 2-D largescale sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yiwen; Guo, Lixin

    2014-05-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) signals reflected from the ocean surface can be used for various remote sensing purposes. In this paper, we develop a facet model to simulate the received GPS single from a 2-D largescale sea surface. In this model, the sea surface is envisaged as a two-scale profile on which the long waves are locally approximated by planar facets. The microscopic profile within a facet is assumed to be represented by a set of sinusoidal ripple patches. The complex reflective function of each modified facet is evaluated by a modified formula of the original Bass and Fuks' two-scale model, in which the phase factor of each facet is with the capillary wave modification. The scattering field and the bistatic scattering coefficient of facet model is derived in detail. With received GPS single, we give a detail analysis of the polarization property, the scattering property of GPS scattering signal over the sea surface.

  13. On the effect of sea spray on the aerodynamic surface drag under severe winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Ezhova, Ekaterina; Soustova, Irina; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the effect of the sea spray on the air-sea momentum exchange during the entire "life cycle" of a droplet, torn off the crest of a steep surface wave, and its fall down to the water, in the framework of a model covering the following aspects of the phenomenon: (1) motion of heavy particle in the driving air flow (equations of motion); (2) structure of the wind field (wind velocity, wave-induced disturbances, turbulent fluctuations); (3) generation of the sea spray; and (4) statistics of droplets (size distribution, wind speed dependence). It is demonstrated that the sea spray in strong winds leads to an increase in the surface drag up to 40 % on the assumption that the velocity profile is neutral.

  14. Evaporation and Solar Irradiance as Regulators of Sea Surface Temparature in Annual and Interrannual Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy

    1994-01-01

    After numerical studies showed that global climate is sensitive to small changes in sea surface temperature (Ts), considerabel effort has been devoted to examine the role of surface fluxes in changing upper ocean heat balance and Ts, particularly in the tropical Pacific where interannual signals, such as El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), have major economic and ecological impacts.

  15. Pliocene pre-glacial North Atlantic: A coupled sea surface-deep ocean circulation climate response

    SciTech Connect

    Ishman, S.E.; Dowsett, H.J. . National Center)

    1992-01-01

    A latitudinal transect of North Atlantic Deep Sea Drilling Project Holes from the equatorial region to 56 N in the 2,300- to 3,000-meter depth range was designed for a high-resolution study of coupled sea surface and deep ocean response to climate change. Precise age control was provided using magnetostratigraphic and biostratigraphic data from the cores to identify the 4.0 to 2.2 Ma interval, a period of warm-to-cool climatic transitions in the North Atlantic. The objective is to evaluate incremental (10 kyr) changes in sea surface temperatures (SST) and deep North Atlantic circulation patterns between 4.0 and 2.2 Ma to develop a coupled sea surface-deep ocean circulation response model. Sea surface temperature (SST) estimates are based on planktic foraminifer-based factor-analytic transfer functions. Oxygen isotopic data from paired samples provide tests of the estimated temperature gradients between localities. Benthic foraminifer assemblage data and [partial derivative]O-18 and [partial derivative]C-13 Isotopic data are used to quantitatively determine changes in deep North Atlantic circulation. These data are used to determine changes in source area (North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) or Antarctic Bottom Water) and (or) in the components of NADW that were present (Upper or Lower NADW). These paired paleoceanographic sea surface and deep circulation interpretations over a 1.8 my interval form the basis for a coupled sea surface-deep circulation response model for the Pliocene North Atlantic Ocean.

  16. Electrometric method to determine the surface impedance of an ice-sea water bilayer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkuev, Yu. B.; Naguslaeva, I. B.; Khaptanov, V. B.; Dembelov, M. G.

    2016-02-01

    An electrometric method to determine the surface impedance of an ice-sea water bilayer system is suggested. The complex impedance (its magnitude and phase) of this system is determined at very low, low, and medium frequencies from electrometric, rather than radio, measurements. For the ice-sea water system, it is sufficient to determine the conductivity and thickness of a water sample from drilling data.

  17. Reconstructing Holocene sea surface salinity changes in the Northern Aegean Sea: evidence from morphological variations of Emiliania huxleyi-coccoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrle, Jens O.; Gebühr, Christina; Bollmann, Jörg; Giesenberg, Annika; Kranzdorf, Philip

    2013-04-01

    The Aegean Sea is a key area for our understanding of the impact of changes in the hydrological cycle on ocean circulation in the Mediterranean Sea. The Aegean Sea appears to be very sensitive to climate changes in Europe because of its small volume and the position between high- and low-latitude climate regimes. Therefore, it is assumed to record environmental change, especially changes in sea surface water salinity (SSS) without a significant time lag with respect to the forcing process (Rohling et al., 2002). However, up to date, SSS cannot be easily reconstructed from geological archives because several assumptions need to be made that lead to a significant error of the salinity estimates (e.g. Rohling, 2000). Here, we present the first high resolution SSS reconstruction from a Holocene sediment core based on a recently developed transfer function using the morphological variation of Emiliania huxleyi coccoliths (Bollmann & Herrle 2007, Bollmann et al., 2009). The core is located in the northern Aegean Sea (eastern Mediterranean Basin) and covers the time period 3 -11ka ago. Sea surface water salinity in the Aegean Sea has varied in concert with temperature oscillations as recorded in Greenland ice cores (iGISP2 ice core δ18O record) with a periodicity of about 900 years (Schulz & Paull, 2002). Four major SSS events can be identified at about 3.9, 4.7, 6.4, 7.4, and 8.2 ka in the northern Aegean Sea that correlate with increases in GISP2 δ18O (Schulz & Paull, 2002) as well as decreasing percentages of tree pollen studied at the same core expect for 3.9 ka (Kotthoff et al., 2008). The most prominent salinity increase occurred during the short-lived 8.2 kyr cold event (e.g., Rohling & Pälike, 2005), which was most likely triggered by a melt-water related perturbation of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning and associated decrease of ocean heat transport to the North Atlantic. We suggest that the salinity fluctuations in the northern Aegean Sea are related to

  18. Impact of Typhoon-induced sea surface cooling on the track of next Typhoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Y.; Horiguchi, M.; Kodera, K.; Tachibana, Y.; Yamazaki, K.

    2015-12-01

    Typhoons (TCs) MATMO, HALONG, and NAKRI (2014), which caused Japan catastrophic disaster, landed the western part of Japan. The TCs came to Japan one after another during late July to early August 2014. The tracks of these TCs were similar, i.e., the TCs followed the western edge of the subtropical northwestern Pacific high (SNPH). However, the tracks gradually reached to Japan, which were associated with weakening the westward expansion of the SNPH. It was found that the changes in westward expansion of the SNPH were associated with TC-induced sea surface cooling of previous Typhoon. It has previously been reported that TC-induced sea surface cooling is mainly caused by Ekman upwelling and vertical turbulent mixing. The TCs MATMO, HALONG, and NAKRI passed around the Philippines, and induced sea surface cooling of this area. The sea surface temperatures of this area are important for Pacific-Japan pattern, which was associated with the westward expansion of the SNPH. Consequently, previous Typhoon induced sea surface cooling around the Philippines, which weakening the westward expansion of the SNPH. Then, the tracks of next Typhoon were changed, and gradually reached to Japan.

  19. Aerosol-cloud-land surface interactions within tropical sea breeze convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Leah D.; Heever, Susan C.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the influence of aerosols, surface roughness length, soil moisture, and synergistic interactions among these factors on tropical convective rainfall focused along a sea breeze front are explored within idealized cloud-resolving modeling simulations using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). The idealized RAMS domain setup is representative of the coastal Cameroon rainforest in equatorial Africa. In order to assess the potential sensitivity of sea breeze convection to increasing anthropogenic activity and deforestation occurring in such regions, 27 total simulations are performed in which combinations of enhanced aerosol concentrations, reduced surface roughness length, and reduced soil moisture are included. Both enhanced aerosols and reduced soil moisture are found to individually reduce the precipitation due to reductions in downwelling shortwave radiation and surface latent heat fluxes, respectively, while perturbations to the roughness length do not have a large impact on the precipitation. The largest soil moisture perturbations dominate the precipitation changes due to reduced low-level moisture available to the convection, but if the soil moisture perturbation is more moderate, synergistic interactions between soil moisture and aerosols enhance the sea breeze precipitation. This is found to result from evening convection that forms ahead of the sea breeze only when both effects are present. Interactions between the resulting gust fronts and the sea breeze front locally enhance convergence and therefore the rainfall. The results of this study underscore the importance of considering the aerosol-cloud-land surface system responses to perturbations in aerosol loading and land surface characteristics.

  20. Influence of ice thickness and surface properties on light transmission through Arctic sea ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katlein, Christian; Arndt, Stefanie; Nicolaus, Marcel; Jakuba, Michael V.; Laney, Samuel; Elliott, Stephen; Whitcomb, Louis L.; McFarland, Christopher J.; Suman, Stefano; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Boetius, Antje; German, Christopher R.

    2015-04-01

    The observed changes in physical properties of sea ice such as decreased thickness and increased melt pond cover severely impact the energy balance of Arctic sea ice. Increased light transmission leads to increased deposition of solar energy and thus plays a crucial role for sea-ice-melt as well as for the amount and timing of under-ice primary production. Recent developments in underwater technology provide new opportunities to undertake challenging research at the largely inaccessible underside of sea ice. We measured spectral under-ice radiance and irradiance onboard the new Nereid Under-Ice (Nereid-UI) underwater robotic vehicle, during a cruise of the R/V Polarstern to 83°N 6°W in the Arctic Ocean in July 2014. Nereid-UI is a next generation hybrid remotely operated vehicle (H-ROV) designed for both remotely-piloted and autonomous surveys underneath fixed and moving sea ice. Here we present results from the first comprehensive scientific dive of Nereid-UI employing its interdisciplinary sensor suite. We combine under-ice optical measurements with three dimensional under-ice topography (multibeam sonar) and aerial images of the surface conditions. We investigate the influence of spatially varying ice-thickness and surface properties on the spatial variability of light transmittance on floe scale. Our results indicate that surface properties dominate the spatial distribution of the under-ice light field, while sea ice-thickness and snow-depth are most important for mean light levels.

  1. Simple heterogeneity parametrization for sea surface temperature and chlorophyll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skákala, Jozef; Smyth, Timothy J.

    2016-06-01

    Using satellite maps this paper offers a complex analysis of chlorophyll & SST heterogeneity in the shelf seas around the southwest of the UK. The heterogeneity scaling follows a simple power law and is consequently parametrized by two parameters. It is shown that in most cases these two parameters vary only relatively little with time. The paper offers a detailed comparison of field heterogeneity between different regions. How much heterogeneity is in each region preserved in the annual median data is also determined. The paper explicitly demonstrates how one can use these results to calculate representative measurement area for in situ networks.

  2. Sea Ice Remote Sensing Using Surface Reflected GPS Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, Attila; Maslanik, James; Zavorotny, Valery U.; Axelrad, Penina; Katzberg, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a new research effort to extend the application of Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reflections, received by airborne instruments, to cryospheric remote sensing. Our experimental results indicate that reflected GPS signals have potential to provide information on the presence and condition of sea and freshwater ice as well as the freeze/thaw state of frozen ground. In this paper we show results from aircraft experiments over the ice pack near Barrow, Alaska indicating correlation between forward-scattered GPS returns and RADARSAT backscattered measurements.

  3. Seasonal and interannual patterns of sea surface temperature in Banda Sea as revealed by self-organizing map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskandar, Iskhaq

    2010-05-01

    Seasonal and interannual variations of sea surface temperature (SST) in the Banda Sea are studied for the period of January 1985 through December 2007. A neural network pattern recognition approach based on self-organizing map (SOM) has been applied to monthly SST from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Oceans Pathfinder. The principal conclusions of this paper are outlined as follows. There are three different patterns associated with the variations in the monsoonal winds: the southeast and northwest monsoon patterns, and the monsoon-break patterns. The southeast monsoon pattern is characterized by low SST due to the prevailing southeasterly winds that drive Ekman upwelling. The northwest monsoon pattern, on the other hand, is one of high SST distributed uniformly in space. The monsoon-break pattern is a transitional pattern between the northwest and southeast monsoon patterns, which is characterized by moderate SST patterns. On interannual time-scale, the SST variations are significantly influenced by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) phenomena. Low SST is observed during El Niño and/or positive IOD events, while high SST appears during La Niña event. Low SST in the Banda Sea during positive IOD event is induced by upwelling Kelvin waves generated in the equatorial Indian Ocean which propagate along the southern coast of Sumatra and Java before entering the Banda Sea through the Lombok and Ombai Straits as well as through the Timor Passage. On the other hand, during El Niño (La Niña) events, upwelling (downwelling) Rossby waves associated with off-equatorial divergence (convergence) in response to the equatorial westerly (easterly) winds in the Pacific, partly scattered into the Indonesian archipelago which in turn induce cool (warm) SST in the Banda Sea.

  4. Late Quaternary surface circulation in the east equatorial South Atlantic: Evidence from Alkenone sea surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Ralph R.; Müller, Peter J.; Ruhland, GöTz

    1995-04-01

    Angola Basin and Walvis Ridge records of past sea surface temperatures (SST) derived from the alkenone Uk37 index are used to reconstruct the surface circulation in the east equatorial South Atlantic for the last 200,000 years. Comparison of SST estimates from surface sediments between 5° and 20°S with modern SST data suggests that the alkenone temperatures represent annual mean values of the surface mixed layer. Alkenone-derived temperatures for the warm climatic maxima of the Holocene and the penultimate interglacial are 1 to 4°C higher than latest Holocene values. All records show glacial to interglacial differences of about 3.5°C in annual mean SST, which is about 1.5°C greater than the difference estimated by CLIMAP (1981) for the eastern Angola Basin. At the Walvis Ridge, significant SST variance is observed at all of the Earth's orbital periodicities. SST records from the Angola Basin vary predominantly at 23- and 100-kyr periodicities. For the precessional cycle, SST changes at the Walvis Ridge correspond to variations of boreal summer insolation over Africa and lead ice volume changes, suggesting that the east equatorial South Atlantic is sensitive to African monsoon intensity via trade-wind zonality. Angola Basin SST records lag those from the Walvis Ridge and the equatorial Atlantic by about 3 kyr. The comparison of Angola Basin and Walvis Ridge SST records implies that the Angola-Benguela Front (ABF) (currently at about 14-16°S) has remained fairly stationary between 12° and 20°S (the limits of our cores) during the last two glacial-interglacial cycles. The temperature contrast associated with the ABF exhibits a periodic 23-kyr variability which is coherent with changes in boreal summer insolation over Africa. These observations suggest that surface waters north of the present ABF have not directly responded to monsoon-modulated changes in the trade-wind vector, that the central field of zonally directed trades in the southern hemisphere was not

  5. Surfactant-Associated Bacteria in the Sea Surface Microlayer and their Effect on Remote Sensing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, N.; Vella, K.; Tartar, A.; Matt, S.; Shivji, M.; Perrie, W. A.; Soloviev, A.

    2012-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar remote sensing captures various fine-scale features on the ocean surface such as coastal discharges, oil pollution, vessel traffic, algal blooms and sea slicks. Although numerous factors potentially affect the synthetic aperture radar imaging process, the influence of biogenic and anthropogenic surfactants has been suggested as one of the primary parameters, especially under relatively low wind conditions. Surfactants have a tendency to dampen the short gravity-capillary ocean waves causing the sea surface to smoothen, thus allowing the radar to detect areas of surfactants. Surfactants are found in sea slicks, which are the accumulation of organic material shaped as elongated bands on the ocean's surface. Sea slicks are often observable with the naked eye due to their glassy appearance and can also be seen on synthetic aperture radar images as dark scars. While the sources of surfactants can vary, some are known to be of marine bacteria origin. Countless numbers of marine bacteria are present in the oceanic environment, and their biogeochemical contributions cannot be overlooked. Not only does marine-bacteria produce surfactants, but they also play an important role in the transformation of surfactants. In this study, we profiled the surfactant-associated bacteria composition within the biogenic thin layer of the ocean surface more commonly referred as the sea surface microlayer. Bacterial samples were collected from the sea surface microlayer for comparative analysis from both within and outside of sea slick areas as well as the underlying subsurface water. The bacterial microlayer sampling coincided with synthetic aperture radar satellite, RADARSAT-2, overpasses to demonstrate the simultaneous in-situ measurements during a satellite image capture. The sea surface microlayer sampling method was designed to enable aseptic bacterial sampling. A 47 mm polycarbonate membrane was utilized at each sampling site to obtain a snapshot of the

  6. Evaluation of empirical retracking of Cryosat2 sea surface data in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, M.; Andersen, O. B.; Stenseng, L.

    2012-04-01

    Waveform retracking of satellite data is used for sea surface height determination. In the Arctic Region, these echo waveforms contain reflections from various cryosphere features such as sea ice, ice sheets, new frozen water etc. Cryosat2 data has Level1b components which record the power waveforms of the echoes as well as Level2 components which provide the sea surface height as developed by the retrackers used by the space agencies. A retracker based on the combination of OCOG (Offset Centre of Gravity) method and Threshold method is used to develop the sea surface height in the Arctic Region. This is to be compared with the Level2 sea surface height components available in the Cryosat2 data. The threshold retracker uses the statistical properties of the echo waveform to compute two difference thresholds (start and stop) for the neighboring power bins. Next, a loop is run to check the power differences throughout the waveform for neighboring bins. If this power difference is greater than the start threshold, the system records the beginning of a subwaveform. Further when the power difference of neighboring bins of this sub-waveform is less than the stop threshold, this is recorded as the end of the subwaveform. As a result the power waveform is divided into various subwaveforms each having one peak. The first subwaveform corresponds to the peak for the leading edge. Next, the OCOG method is used to determine the center of gravity of the first subwaveform. This provides the position of the leading edge and thereby the sea surface height is obtained. It is observed that applying the OCOG method on just the leading edge subwaveform results in improved sea surface determination as compared to its application on the complete waveform. The retracked data is subsequently evaluated for its ability to determine geophysical changes related to bathymetry and compared with existing marine gravity surveys in the Arctic Ocean. This presentation will also give an outline of

  7. Sea surface wind field by TerraSAR-X and Tandem-X data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoming; Lehner, Susanne

    2013-04-01

    A new Geophysical Model Function (GMF), denoted XMOD2, is developed to retrieve the sea surface wind field from X-band TerraSAR-X/Tandem-X (TS-X/TD-X) data. In contrary to the previous XMOD1, XMOD2 is based on a nonlinear GMF, and moreover it also depicts the difference between upwind and downwind of the sea surface backscatter. By exploiting 371 collocations, the retrieved TS-X/TD-X sea surface wind speed U10 by XMOD2 agrees well with in situ buoy measurements with a bias of 0.39 m/s, an RMSE of 1.52 m/s and a scatter index (SI) of 16.1%. To apply XMOD2 to TS-X/TD-X data acquired at HH polarization, we verify the X-band SAR Polarization Ratio (PR) models by comparing the retrieved sea surface wind speed to in situ buoy measurements as well. Based on 62 collocated pairs, it is found that by using the Elfouhaily type PR model and XMOD2 yields better U10 retrieval with a bias of -0.27 m/s, an RMSE of 2.06 m/s and a SI of 22.7% than using the X-PR model which yields a bias of -0.98 m, and RMSE of 2.30 m and a SI of 23.4%. Several TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X ScanSAR images are acquired in October, 2012 to track the Hurricane Sandy. Three of the images are acquired in the open sea, which are presented in this chapter to demonstrate observations of sea surface wind and wave extracted from X-band ScanSAR image with high spatial resolution of 17 m in the hurricane. In the case of the TerraSAR-X image acquired on October 26, 2012, we analyze the peak wave direction and length of swell generated by Hurricane Sandy, as well as interaction of swell with the Abaco Island, Bahamas. In the other two cases, sea surface wind field derived from the TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X acquired on October 27 and 28 are presented. The sea surface wind speed retrieved by the X-band Geophysical Model Function (GMF) XMOD2 using wind direction derived from SAR images and the NOAA Hurricane Research Division (HRD) wind analyses are both presented for comparisons. We also compare the retrieved sea surface

  8. An initial estimate of the global distribution of diurnal variation in sea surface salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fine, E. C.; Bryan, F. O.; Large, W. G.; Bailey, D. A.

    2015-05-01

    Diurnal variations in sea surface salinity (SSS) have been observed at a few selected locations with adequate in situ instrumentation. Such variations result primarily from imbalances between surface freshwater fluxes and vertical mixing of deeper water to the surface. New observations becoming available from satellite salinity remote sensing missions could help to constrain estimates of diurnal variations in air-sea exchange of freshwater, and provide insight into the processes governing diurnal variability of mixing processes in the upper ocean. Additionally, a better understanding of variation in near surface salinity is required to compare satellite measured SSS with in situ measurements at a few meters depth. The diurnal SSS variations should be reflected as differences between ascending and descending pass retrievals from the Aquarius and SMOS satellites; however, the diurnal signal can be masked by inadequacies of the geophysical corrections used in processing the satellite measurements. In this study, we quantify the expected range of diurnal SSS variations using a model developed for predicting diurnal sea surface temperature variations. We present estimates for the mean and variance of the global diurnal SSS cycle, contrasting it with the diurnal cycle of sea surface temperature. We find the SSS diurnal cycle can be significant throughout the tropics, with mean amplitudes of up to 0.1 psu in areas with heavy precipitation. Predicted maximum diurnal ranges approach 2 psu in select regions. Surface freshening in Aquarius salinity retrievals is shown to be larger for ascending than descending passes, consistent with the expectations from the model simulation.

  9. A GIS Approach to Wind,SST(Sea Surface Temperature) and CHL(Chlorophyll) variations in the Caspian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkhalili, Seyedhamzeh

    2016-07-01

    Chlorophyll is an extremely important bio-molecule, critical in photosynthesis, which allows plants to absorb energy from light. At the base of the ocean food web are single-celled algae and other plant-like organisms known as Phytoplankton. Like plants on land, Phytoplankton use chlorophyll and other light-harvesting pigments to carry out photosynthesis. Where Phytoplankton grow depends on available sunlight, temperature, and nutrient levels. In this research a GIS Approach using ARCGIS software and QuikSCAT satellite data was applied to visualize WIND,SST(Sea Surface Temperature) and CHL(Chlorophyll) variations in the Caspian Sea.Results indicate that increase in chlorophyll concentration in coastal areas is primarily driven by terrestrial nutrients and does not imply that warmer SST will lead to an increase in chlorophyll concentration and consequently Phytoplankton abundance.

  10. Reconstructing past sea surface temperatures: Correcting for diagenesis of bulk marine carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Schrag, D.P.; DePaolo, D.J. |; Richter, F.M.

    1995-06-01

    A numerical model which describes oxygen isotope exchange during burial and recrystallization of deep-sea carbonate is used to obtain information on how sea surface temperatures have varied in the past by correcting measured {delta}{sup 18}O values of bulk carbonate for diagenetic overprinting. Comparison of bulk carbonate and planktonic foraminiferal {delta}{sup 18}O records from ODP site 677A indicates that the oxygen isotopic composition of bulk carbonate does reflect changes in sea surface temperature and {delta}{sup 18}O. At ODP Site 690, we calculate that diagenetic effects are small, and that both bulk carbonate and planktonic foraminiferal {delta}{sup 18}O records accurately reflect Paleogene warming of high latitude surface oceans, biased from diagenesis by no more than 1{degrees}C. The same is likely to be true for other high latitude sites where sedimentation rates are low. At DSDP sites 516 and 525, the effects of diagenesis are more significant. Measured {delta}{sup 18}O values of Eocene bulk carbonates are more than 2% lower at deeply buried site 516 than at site 525, consistent with the model prediction that the effects of diagenesis should be proportional to sedimentation rate. Model-corrections reconcile the differences in the data between the two sites; the resulting paleotemperature reconstruction indicates a 4{degrees}C cooling of mid-latitude surface oceans since the Eocene. We show that the data are consistent with constant equatorial sea surface temperatures through most of the Cenozoic, with the possible exception of the early Eocene, when slightly higher temperatures are indicated. We suggest that the lower equatorial sea surface temperatures for the Eocene and Oligocene reported in other oxygen isotope studies are artifacts of diagenetic recrystallization, and that it is impossible to reconstruct accurately equatorial sea surface temperatures without explicitly accounting for diagenetic overprinting.

  11. Sea ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan Continental Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, F. F. (Principal Investigator); Sharma, G. D.; Burn, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The boundaries of land-fast ice, distribution of pack ice, and major polynya were studied in the vicinity of the Bering Strait. Movement of pack ice during 24 hours was determined by plotting the distinctly identifiable ice floes on ERTS-1 imagery obtained from two consecutive passes. Considerably large shallow area along the western Seward Peninsula just north of the Bering Strait is covered by land fast ice. This ice hinders the movement of ice formed in eastern Chukchi Sea southward through the Bering Strait. The movement of ice along the Russian coast is relatively faster. Plotting of some of the ice floes indicated movement of ice in excess of 30 km in and south of the Bering Strait between 6 and 7 March, 1973. North of the Bering Strait the movement approached 18 km. The movement of ice observed during March 6 and 7 considerably altered the distribution and extent of polynya. These features when continually plotted should be of considerable aid in navigation of ice breakers. The movement of ice will also help delineate the migration and distribution of sea mammals.

  12. Phytoplankton assemblages and lipid biomarkers indicate sea-surface warming and sea-ice decline in the Ross Sea during Marine Isotope sub-Stage 5e

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Julian D.; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Peterse, Francien; Barcena, Maria A.; Albertazzi, Sonia; Asioli, Alessandra; Giglio, Federico; Langone, Leonardo; Tateo, Fabio; Trincardi, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    The Marine Isotope sub-Stage 5e (~ 125 - 119 kyrs BP), the last interglacial period before the present, is believed to have been globally warmer (~ 2°C) than today. Studying this time interval might therefore provide insights into near future climate state given the ongoing climate change and global temperature increase. Of particular interest are the expected changes in polar ice cover. One important aspect of the cryosphere is sea-ice, which influences albedo, deep and surface water currents, and phytoplankton production, and thus affects the global climate system. To investigate whether changes in sea-ice cover occurred in the Southern Ocean close to Antarctica during Marine Isotope sub-Stage 5e dinoflagellate and diatom assemblages have been analyzed in core AS05-10, drilled in the continental slope off the Drygalski basin (Ross Sea) at a water depth of 2377 m. The core was drilled within the frame of the PNRA 2009/A2.01 project, an Italian project with a multidisciplinary approach, and covers the interval from Present to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 7. The core stratigraphy is based on diatom bioevents and on the climate cyclicity provided by the variations of the diatom assemblages. For this study we focused on the interval from MIS7 to MIS5. A strong reduction of sea-ice-loving diatom taxa with respect to open water-loving diatom taxa is observed during MIS5. In general the production of phytoplankton increases at the base of MIS5 and then slowly decreases. Dinoflagellate cysts, particularly heterotrophic species, are abundant during MIS5e only. The sea surface temperature reconstruction based on the TEX86L, a proxy based on lipid biomarkers produced by Thaumarcheota, shows a 4°C temperature increase from MIS6 to MIS5e. A slightly smaller temperature increase is observed at the onset of MIS7, but this stage is barren of heterotrophic dinoflagellates. All proxies together seem to indicate that the retreat of the summer sea-ice in the Ross Sea during MIS5e was

  13. Near-Surface Circulation in the Solomon Sea Derived from Lagrangian Drifter Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristova, H. G.; Kessler, W. S.

    2010-12-01

    A low-latitude western boundary current in the Solomon Sea in the southwest Pacific Ocean carries waters from the subtropical gyre toward the tropics. Despite its importance as a major pathway connecting the subtropics to the equator, our knowledge about the Solomon Sea circulation remains incomplete and direct observations are sparse. Here, we use the Global Drifter Program (GDP) dataset to map out the near-surface circulation in the vicinity of the Solomon Sea. The analysis is based on pseudo-eulerian statistics computed from nearly 500 satellite-tracked drifting buoys drogued at 15m depth that have transited through the region during the 16-year period from 1994 to 2009. To the east of the Solomon Sea, the seasonally averaged velocity field outlines the changes in intensity and position of the main regional currents - the South Equatorial Current (SEC) and the South Equatorial CounterCurrent (SECC). Within the Solomon Sea, the drifters suggest a surface flow to the northwest that hugs the Papua New Guinea coast and exits equatorward through Vitiaz Strait. The flow is at its maximum during the austral winter, when the southeast monsoon winds are also at their strongest, while it is much weaker and undefined during the austral summer, reversing direction in the southeastern part of the basin at this time. The surface flow in Solomon Strait, the other major opening toward the equator, is to the southwest (into the sea) year around. Consistent with findings from altimetry data, the drifters single out the interior of the Solomon Sea as a region of enhanced eddy kinetic energy. The drifter-derived velocity field is compared with other observational climatologies, such as the CSIRO Atlas of the Regional Seas (CARS).

  14. Sea-surface temperature and salinity mapping from remote microwave radiometric measurements of brightness temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hans-Juergen, C. B.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique to measure remotely sea surface temperature and salinity was demonstrated with a dual frequency microwave radiometer system. Accuracies in temperature of 1 C and in salinity of part thousand for salinity greater than 5 parts per thousand were attained after correcting for the influence of extraterrestrial background radiation, atmospheric radiation and attenuation, sea-surface roughness, and antenna beamwidth. The radiometers, operating at 1.43 and 2.65 GHz, comprise a third-generation system using null balancing and feedback noise injection. Flight measurements from an aircraft at an altitude of 1.4 km over the lower Chesapeake Bay and coastal areas of the Atlantic Ocean resulted in contour maps of sea-surface temperature and salinity with a spatial resolution of 0.5 km.

  15. Nitric Acid-Sea Salt Reactions: Implications for Nitrogen Deposition to Water Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Sørensen, L. L.

    2000-05-01

    Many previous studies have indicated the importance of nitric acid (HNO3) reactions on sea salt particles for flux divergence of HNO3 in the marine surface layer. The potential importance of this reaction in determining the spatial and temporal patterns of nitrogen dry deposition to marine ecosystems is investigated using models of sea spray generation and particle- and gas-phase dry deposition. Under horizontally homogeneous conditions with near-neutral stability and for wind speeds between 3.5 and 10 m s1, transfer of HNO3 to the particle phase to form sodium nitrate may decrease the deposition velocity of nitrogen by over 50%, leading to greater horizontal transport prior to deposition to the sea surface. Conversely, for wind speeds above 10 m s1, transfer of nitrogen to the particle phase would increase the deposition rate and hence decrease horizontal transport prior to surface removal.

  16. Investigation of Optical Flow Techniques for Extracting Non-Rigid Sea Surface Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalenoei, E.; Sharifi, M. A.; Hasanlou, M.

    2014-10-01

    This paper is about performance evaluation of two optical flow (OF) methods for extracting sea surface curved motions like eddies. By incorporating a simple matrix and its rotation in programming procedure, curved motion can be obtained. These two OF methods are Horn/Schunk and Lucas/Kanade. The Horn/Schunk method depends on a smoothness parameter (α) and when it changes, smoothness and reality change too. The Lucas/Kanade method is more complex than previous one. It depends on two parameters, smoothness parameter (Sigma) and window size (Win). Different values for Win and Sigma change smoothness and reality of the flows. Sea surface currents are extracted from two sequential sea surface temperature (SST) images by using OF methods. By using these methods and selecting the appropriate parameters like smoothness (for Horn/Schunk) and window size and smoothness (for Lucas/Kanade) extracting real flows or smooth flows are possible and investigated in this paper.

  17. Statistical characterization of short wind waves from stereo images of the sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, A. S.; Yurovskaya, M. V.; Dulov, V. A.; Hauser, D.; GuéRin, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    We propose a methodology to extract short-scale statistical characteristics of the sea surface topography by means of stereo image reconstruction. The possibilities and limitations of the technique are discussed and tested on a data set acquired from an oceanographic platform at the Black Sea. A validation is made with simultaneous in situ measurements as well as results from the literature. We show that one- and two-point properties of the short-scale roughness can be well estimated without resorting to an interpolation procedure or an underlying surface model. We obtain the first cumulants of the probability distribution of small-scale elevations and slopes as well as related structure functions. We derive an empirical parametrization for the skewness function that is of primary importance in analytical scattering models from the sea surface.

  18. The impact of sea surface currents in wave power potential modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zodiatis, George; Galanis, George; Kallos, George; Nikolaidis, Andreas; Kalogeri, Christina; Liakatas, Aristotelis; Stylianou, Stavros

    2015-11-01

    The impact of sea surface currents to the estimation and modeling of wave energy potential over an area of increased economic interest, the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, is investigated in this work. High-resolution atmospheric, wave, and circulation models, the latter downscaled from the regional Mediterranean Forecasting System (MFS) of the Copernicus marine service (former MyOcean regional MFS system), are utilized towards this goal. The modeled data are analyzed by means of a variety of statistical tools measuring the potential changes not only in the main wave characteristics, but also in the general distribution of the wave energy and the wave parameters that mainly affect it, when using sea surface currents as a forcing to the wave models. The obtained results prove that the impact of the sea surface currents is quite significant in wave energy-related modeling, as well as temporally and spatially dependent. These facts are revealing the necessity of the utilization of the sea surface currents characteristics in renewable energy studies in conjunction with their meteo-ocean forecasting counterparts.

  19. Surface waves contribute to ice retreat in Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-08-01

    Surface waves, created by blowing wind, play a role in energy and nutrient transport and also shape coasts through erosion. Because the Arctic Ocean is usually covered by ice year-round, surface waves of the central Arctic Ocean have not been studied extensively.

  20. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  1. Modulation of the sea-surface temperature in the Southeast Pacific by the atmospheric low-level coastal jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xiaodong; Wang, Shouping; Holt, Teddy R.; Martin, Paul J.; O'Neill, Larry

    2013-09-01

    The atmospheric low-level coastal jet (LLCJ) in the Southeast Pacific (SEP) region is characterized as either a strong-forcing jet (colder and drier air) or weak-forcing jet (warm and moist) based on the location of the Southeast Pacific high-pressure system (SEPH). The sea-surface temperature (SST) changes corresponding to a particularly strong-forcing jet (29-30 October) and weak-forcing jet (22-23 November) are investigated in this study using the two-way air-ocean coupled model COAMPS® and satellite observation data. Results indicate that the coupled simulation reduces the overall absolute bias 50% for the surface wind speed, 70% for the cloud liquid water path, and 15% for SST as compared to the uncoupled simulation. The coupled simulation reduces excessive SST cooling, especially during the strong-forcing jet period along the coastal area where offshore transport of upwelled cold water is too strong from the uncoupled simulation. The coupled simulation also reduces the excessive warming from the uncoupled simulation by providing better cloud coverage. The prominent mechanisms in cooling SST along the coast are the same for both the strong-forcing and weak-forcing jets, namely vigorous upwelling and horizontal advection. However, the mechanisms along the jet path differ from along the coast, with air-sea heat exchange the most important process, resulting in cooling SST during the strong-forcing jet period but warming SST during the weak-forcing jet period. The advances and differences of the present study as compared with previous studies are discussed in detail in the paper.

  2. Analyzing the Effects of Climate Change on Sea Surface Temperature in Monitoring Coral Reef Health in the Florida Keys Using Sea Surface Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jason; Burbank, Renane; Billiot, Amanda; Schultz, Logan

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses use of 4 kilometer satellite-based sea surface temperature (SST) data to monitor and assess coral reef areas of the Florida Keys. There are growing concerns about the impacts of climate change on coral reef systems throughout the world. Satellite remote sensing technology is being used for monitoring coral reef areas with the goal of understanding the climatic and oceanic changes that can lead to coral bleaching events. Elevated SST is a well-documented cause of coral bleaching events. Some coral monitoring studies have used 50 km data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) to study the relationships of sea surface temperature anomalies to bleaching events. In partnership with NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the University of South Florida's Institute for Marine Remote Sensing, this project utilized higher resolution SST data from the Terra's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and AVHRR. SST data for 2000-2010 was employed to compute sea surface temperature anomalies within the study area. The 4 km SST anomaly products enabled visualization of SST levels for known coral bleaching events from 2000-2010.

  3. Wind-Driven Angular Dependence of Sea-Surface Reflectance Measured with an Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, David M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Cutten, Dean R.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of wind-stress on the optical properties of the ocean surface have been studied for several decades. In particular, the classic study by Cox and Munk (1954) linking sea-surface wind field to wave slope statistics provides a phenomenology by which the sea-surface wind velocity can be estimated from direct measurement of the wave-modulated surface reflectance. A limited number of studies along these lines have been conducted using airborne or spaceborne lidar systems. In these instances, truthing was provided by in situ ship reports or satellite microwave remote sensing instruments (e.g., ERS scatterometer, SSM/I). During the second deployment of the MACAWS Doppler wind lidar in the summer of 1996 measurements of sea-surface reflectance as a function of azimuth- and nadir-viewing angles were acquired off the California coast. MACAWS data products include directly measured winds, as well as calibrated backscatter/reflectance profiles, thus enabling comparison of the winds inferred from sea-surface reflectance measurements with those deriving from the Doppler-processed direct line-of-sight (LOS) estimates. Additional validation data was extracted from the ERS and SSM/I satellite microwave sensor archives maintained by the JPL Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO- DAAC).

  4. Annual variations in sea surface wind speed around Japan observed by ASCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeyama, Y.; Shimada, S.; Ohsawa, T.; Kozai, K.; Kogaki, T.

    2015-12-01

    Sea surface wind speeds and these statistics can be applied for many marine industrial activities. For example, the averaged wind speed is crucial information for a site selection of an offshore wind farm. It has widely been recognized that a total amount of the offshore wind generation is strongly depended on the annual average wind speeds. A advanced scatterometer (ASCAT), which is a kind of scatterometer aboard METOP-A and B, has observed sea surface wind speeds at the height of 10 m above the sea surface approximately twice a day using active microwaves. The annual average wind speed can be calculated from the observed wind speed. For an actual use of the annual average wind speed, generalities and representativeness of the wind speed must be clarified. To investigate annual variations in sea surface wind speed around Japan (120°E to 165°E, 19°N to 49°N), the annual average wind speeds and these standard deviations are calculated from 5 years of ASCAT observations from 2010 through 2014. It is found that there are some sea areas where standard deviations are relatively higher than their surroundings. Annual average wind speed maps indicate that the high standard deviation is caused by strong winds from Eurasia in the winter of 2011 in part of North Pacific Ocean and Sea of Okhotsk. Additionally standard deviations for only winter are also higher than for summer in those sea areas. Therefore the strong wind speed in the winter of a particular year can easily affect to the annual average wind speed. Meanwhile off the coast of Niigata and Hokkaido, there are also higher standard deviation areas than their surroundings. Differences between monthly maximum wind speeds for the winter and minimum wind speeds for the summer in these areas are larger and the large differences seem to be a cause of the high standard deviations.

  5. Influence of ice thickness and surface properties on light transmission through Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katlein, C.; Arndt, S.; Nicolaus, M.; Perovich, D. K.; Jakuba, M.; Suman, S.; Elliott, S.; Whitcomb, L. L.; McFarland, C.; Gerdes, R.; Boetius, A.

    2015-12-01

    The changes in physical properties of sea ice such as decreased thickness and increased melt pond cover observed over the last decades severely impact the energy budget of Arctic sea ice. Increased light transmission leads to increased deposition of solar energy in the upper ocean and thus plays a crucial role in the amount and timing of sea-ice-melt and under-ice primary production. Recent developments in underwater technology provide new opportunities to undertake challenging research at the largely inaccessible underside of sea ice. We measured spectral under-ice radiance and irradiance onboard the new Nereid Under-Ice (NUI) underwater robotic vehicle, during a cruise of the R/V Polarstern to 83°N 6°W in the Arctic Ocean in July 2014. NUI is a next generation hybrid remotely operated vehicle (H-ROV) designed for both remotely-piloted and autonomous surveys underneath land-fast and moving sea ice. Here we present results from one of the first comprehensive scientific dives of NUI employing its interdisciplinary sensor suite. We combine under-ice optical measurements with three-dimensional under-ice topography and aerial images of the surface conditions. We investigate the influence of spatially varying ice-thickness and surface properties during summer on the spatial variability of light transmittance. Results show that surface properties dominate the spatial distribution of the under-ice light field on small scales (<1000m²), while sea ice-thickness is the most important predictor for light transmission on larger scales. In addition, we suggest an algorithm to obtain histograms of light transmission from distributions of sea ice thickness and surface albedo.

  6. Influence of ice thickness and surface properties on light transmission through Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katlein, Christian; Arndt, Stefanie; Nicolaus, Marcel; Perovich, Donald K.; Jakuba, Michael V.; Suman, Stefano; Elliott, Stephen; Whitcomb, Louis L.; McFarland, Christopher J.; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Boetius, Antje; German, Christopher R.

    2015-09-01

    The observed changes in physical properties of sea ice such as decreased thickness and increased melt pond cover severely impact the energy budget of Arctic sea ice. Increased light transmission leads to increased deposition of solar energy in the upper ocean and thus plays a crucial role for amount and timing of sea-ice-melt and under-ice primary production. Recent developments in underwater technology provide new opportunities to study light transmission below the largely inaccessible underside of sea ice. We measured spectral under-ice radiance and irradiance using the new Nereid Under-Ice (NUI) underwater robotic vehicle, during a cruise of the R/V Polarstern to 83°N 6°W in the Arctic Ocean in July 2014. NUI is a next generation hybrid remotely operated vehicle (H-ROV) designed for both remotely piloted and autonomous surveys underneath land-fast and moving sea ice. Here we present results from one of the first comprehensive scientific dives of NUI employing its interdisciplinary sensor suite. We combine under-ice optical measurements with three dimensional under-ice topography (multibeam sonar) and aerial images of the surface conditions. We investigate the influence of spatially varying ice-thickness and surface properties on the spatial variability of light transmittance during summer. Our results show that surface properties such as melt ponds dominate the spatial distribution of the under-ice light field on small scales (<1000 m2), while sea ice-thickness is the most important predictor for light transmission on larger scales. In addition, we propose the use of an algorithm to obtain histograms of light transmission from distributions of sea ice thickness and surface albedo.

  7. Towards GPS Surface Reflection Remote Sensing of Sea Ice Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komjathy, A.; Maslanik, J. A.; Zavorotny, V. U.; Axelrad, P.; Katzberg, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the research to extend the application of Global Positioning System (GPS) signal reflections, received by airborne instruments, to cryospheric remote sensing. The characteristics of the GPS signals and equipment afford the possibility of new measurements not possible with existing radar and passive microwave systems. In particular, the GPS receiving systems are small and light-weight, and as such are particularly well suited to be deployed on small aircraft or satellite platforms with minimal impact. Our preliminary models and experimental results indicate that reflected GPS signals have potential to provide information on the presence and condition of sea and fresh-water ice as well as the freeze/thaw state of frozen ground. In this paper we show results from aircraft experiments over the ice pack near Barrow, Alaska suggesting correlation between forward scattered GPS returns and RADARSAT backscattered signals.

  8. The Gephyrocapsa Sea Surface Paleothermometer Put To The Test: Comparison With Alkenone and Foraminifera Proxies Off NW Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderiks, J.; Bollmann, J.

    In Holocene deep-sea sediments, the relative abundance of different morphotypes within the coccolithophore genus Gephyrocapsa is closely correlated with sea sur- face temperature (Bollmann, 1997). Based on this relationship, a regional temperature transfer function was established using a set of 35 Holocene sediments from the NE Atlantic, covering a temperature range from 14C to 24C. Using this approach, ab- solute annual mean sea surface temperatures for a given location can be calculated from the relative abundance of two Gephyrocapsa morphotypes, Gephyrocapsa Cold and Gephyrocapsa Equatorial, with a standard deviation of +/-1.06C. A global regres- sion model (N=110) was applied as well, which calculates absolute mean sea surface temperatures from the relative abundance of three Gephyrocapsa morphotypes, with a standard deviation of +/-1.78C. Using both calibration models, we have estimated sea surface temperatures during the Last Glacial Maximum in a dispersed set of eigh- teen well-dated gravity cores off NW Africa (16-35N; 20-8W). The regional model revealed that annual mean temperatures during the LGM were 4 to 6C colder than today in the Canary Islands region, with lowest temperatures (14-15.5C) off-shore Morocco and south of the volcanic islands, likely due to intensified upwelling related to stronger trade winds. These values are consistent with estimates from the CLIMAP Project (1981) and other paleotemperature reconstructions for the same region. In con- trast, offshore Cape Blanc, our temperature estimates for the LGM are significantly warmer (Ttoday -LGM <4C) than proposed by CLIMAP (Ttoday -LGM 6-10C). Nevertheless, our results support temperature reconstructions based on alkenones that also indicate rather small temperature changes (Ttoday -LGM <3C) in this area (e.g. Zhao et al., 2000). Glacial sea surface temperature estimates derived from the global calibration are on average 1C warmer than those derived from the regional model. However, the

  9. Quantitative estimation of Holocene surface salinity variation in the Black Sea using dinoflagellate cyst process length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Kenneth Neil; Bradley, Lee R.; Takano, Yoshihito; Mudie, Petra J.; Marret, Fabienne; Aksu, Ali E.; Hiscott, Richard N.; Verleye, Thomas J.; Mousing, Erik A.; Smyrnova, Ludmila L.; Bagheri, Siamak; Mansor, Mashhor; Pospelova, Vera; Matsuoka, Kazumi

    2012-04-01

    Reconstruction of salinity in the Holocene Black Sea has been an ongoing debate over the past four decades. Here we calibrate summer surface water salinity in the Black Sea, Sea of Azov and Caspian Sea with the process length of the dinoflagellate cyst Lingulodinium machaerophorum. We then apply this calibration to make a regional reconstruction of paleosalinity in the Black Sea, calculated by averaging out process length variation observed at four core sites from the Black Sea with high sedimentation rates and dated by multiple mollusk shell ages. Results show a very gradual change of salinity from ˜14 ± 0.91 psu around 9.9 cal ka BP to a minimum ˜12.3 ± 0.91 psu around 8.5 cal ka BP, reaching current salinities of ˜17.1 ± 0.91 psu around 4.1 cal ka BP. The resolution of our sampling is about 250 years, and it fails to reveal a catastrophic salinization event at ˜9.14 cal ka BP advocated by other researchers. The dinoflagellate cyst salinity-proxy does not record large Holocene salinity fluctuations, and after early Holocene freshening, it shows correspondence to the regional sea-level curve of Brückner et al. (2010) derived from Balabanov (2007).

  10. Temporal variability of remotely sensed suspended sediment and sea surface temperature patterns in Mobile Bay, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, J.B.; Stumpf, R.P.; Schroeder, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    Distribution patterns of suspended sediments and sea surface temperatures in, Mobile Bay were derived from algorithms using digital data from the visible, near infrared, and infrared channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the NOAA-TIROS-N satellite. Closely spaced AVHRR scenes for January 20, 24, and 29, 1982, were compared with available environmental information taken during the same period. A complex interaction between river discharge, winds, and astronomical tides controlled the distribution patterns of suspended sediments. These same variables, coupled with air temperatures, also governed the distribution patterns of sea surface temperatures. ?? 1990 Estuarine Research Federation.

  11. Production of global sea surface temperature fields for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory workshop comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilland, J. E.; Njoku, E. G.; Chelton, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is measured from space by the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR), scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR), high resolution infrared sounder (HIRS) and VISSR atmospheric sounder (VAS). Typical accuracies have been reported from 0.5 C regionally to 2.0 C on a global basis. To evaluate the accuracy of the satellite-derived sea surface temperatures, a series of three workshops was organized to provide uniform data reduction and analysis. The analytical techniques used to intercompare satellite and in situ measurements are described in detail. Selected results showed the overall average rms errors were in the range 0.5-1.0 C.

  12. Freely Decaying Weak Turbulence for Sea Surface Gravity Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onorato, M.; Osborne, A. R.; Serio, M.; Resio, D.; Pushkarev, A.; Zakharov, V. E.; Brandini, C.

    2002-09-01

    We study the long-time evolution of deep-water ocean surface waves in order to better understand the behavior of the nonlinear interaction processes that need to be accurately predicted in numerical models of wind-generated ocean surface waves. Of particular interest are those nonlinear interactions which are predicted by weak turbulence theory to result in a wave energy spectrum of the form of |k|-2.5. We numerically implement the primitive Euler equations for surface waves and demonstrate agreement between weak turbulence theory and the numerical results.

  13. Freely decaying weak turbulence for sea surface gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Onorato, M; Osborne, A R; Serio, M; Resio, D; Pushkarev, A; Zakharov, V E; Brandini, C

    2002-09-30

    We study the long-time evolution of deep-water ocean surface waves in order to better understand the behavior of the nonlinear interaction processes that need to be accurately predicted in numerical models of wind-generated ocean surface waves. Of particular interest are those nonlinear interactions which are predicted by weak turbulence theory to result in a wave energy spectrum of the form of [k](-2.5). We numerically implement the primitive Euler equations for surface waves and demonstrate agreement between weak turbulence theory and the numerical results. PMID:12366050

  14. Succession of the sea-surface microlayer in the Baltic Sea under natural and experimentally induced low-wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolle, C.; Nagel, K.; Labrenz, M.; Jürgens, K.

    2010-05-01

    The sea-surface microlayer (SML) is located within the boundary between the atmosphere and hydrosphere. The high spatial and temporal variability of the SML's properties, however, have hindered a clear understanding of interactions between biotic and abiotic parameters at or across the air-water interface. Among the factors changing the physical and chemical environment of the SML, wind speed is an important one. In order to examine the temporal effects of minimized wind influence, SML samples were obtained from the southern Baltic Sea and from mesocosm experiments in a marina to study naturally and artificially calmed sea surfaces. Organic matter concentrations as well as abundance, 3H-thymidine incorporation, and the community composition of bacteria in the SML (bacterioneuston) compared to the underlying bulk water (ULW) were analyzed. In all SML samples, dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen were only slightly enriched and showed low temporal variability, whereas particulate organic carbon and nitrogen were generally greatly enriched and highly variable. This was especially pronounced in a dense surface film (slick) that developed during calm weather conditions as well as in the artificially calmed mesocosms. Overall, bacterioneuston abundance and productivity correlated with changing concentrations of particulate organic matter. Moreover, changes in the community composition in the field study were stronger in the particle-attached than in the non-attached bacterioneuston. This implies that decreasing wind enhances the importance of particle-attached assemblages and finally induces a succession of the bacterial community in the SML. Eventually, under very calm meteorological conditions, there is an uncoupling of the bacterioneuston from the ULW.

  15. Co-incident 3D mapping of sea ice surface elevation and ice draft in the Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doble, M. J.; Forsberg, R.; Haas, C.; Hanson, S.; Hendriks, S.; Martin, T.; Skourup, H.; Wadhams, P.

    2007-12-01

    Co-incident measurements of sea ice freeboard, thickness and draft were made during the Applied Physics Laboratory Ice Station (APLIS), in April 2007. The campaign was the first time that full three-dimensional mapping of sea ice freeboard and sea ice draft have been achieved simultaneously. Freeboard was measured across a swath width of 300 m at 1 m spatial resolution, using a laser profilometer flown aboard a Twin Otter aircraft. Ice draft was measured across a swath width of approximately 80 m at 0.5 m spatial resolution, using a Gavia AUV fitted with a GeoAcoustics phase-measuring swath sonar. Ice thickness was also measured along co-incident tracks using a helicopter-borne electromagnetic sounding instrument (HEM bird). The laser profilometer and AUV-mounted sonar rely on the assumption of isostatic balance when deriving ice thickness estimates from the ice surface and underside profiles, while the HEM bird records both surfaces simultaneously and independently, though averaging over a significant footprint (30 m) for the underside of the ice. Though the extent of the APLIS dataset was limited by the radius of AUV operations, the dataset will significantly improve our understanding of ice volume in deformed ice areas, particularly our understanding of the contribution of ridges and rubble fields to total Arctic ice volume, their isostatic balance and questions of block-scale porosity. The data will serve to better constrain the effects of porosity and footprint on the operational HEM measurements and, conversely, the HEM measurements will allow conclusions about the impact of the isostatic balance assumption on ice thickness estimates derived from mapping of one surface.

  16. Winter sea surface temperature reflected by the TEX86 proxy in core sediments from the coastal northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Wang, P.; Zhao, M.; Zhang, C.

    2013-12-01

    Although TEX86 is widely used as a sea surface temperature proxy for the open ocean, the validity of TEX86 in the coastal seas has yet to be tested. In this study, three sediment cores from the coastal northwestern South China Sea (SCS) (water depth 33 m for core A9, 73 m for core, and 102 m for core A9, respectively) were analyzed using lipid biomarker approaches. The distribution of archaeal core lipids varied in core A9 and A7 but remained constant in A5. TEX86-based temperature according to Kim et al. (2010) averaged 17.2 × 0.4 οC (n=30), 20.9 × 0.3 οC (n=19) and 23.0 × 0.3 οC(n=16) in core A9, A7 and A5, respectively. These results show that temperature changed little with sediment depth at each location and increased by about 3 οC between the two adjacent locations. These are lower than the annual SST (24.5-25.7 οC) and much lower than the summer SST (>28 οC), indicating that organisms producing the TEX86-related compounds mostly lived in the winter season.

  17. Distributions of the sea-surface temperature fronts in the Baltic Sea as derived from satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahru, Matt; Håkansson, Bertil; Rud, Ove

    1995-05-01

    A 9-month time series of satellite infrared imagery was used to examine the sea surface temperature (SST) variability in the northern and central Baltic Sea. Objective multi-level edge detection techniques were applied to find sharp SST gradient areas known as fronts. The spatial distribution of frontal frequency was calculated over time periods from a few days to 9 months covering different thermal and wind conditions. The 9-month average frequency that a front is detected in a pixel of 1.1 x 1.1 km is up to 10% in certain areas whereas the median is around 2%. Large scale fronts are aligned to the coast and isobaths, and occur predominantly in areas of straight and uniformly sloping bottom topography. The major frontal areas are along the eastern coast of the Bothnian Sea and along the north-western coast of the Gulf of Finland. Low large-scale frontal frequency is characteristic to areas with highly structured bottom topography. The major mechanism of front generation is coastal upwelling, being complemented by coastal jets, eddies, differential heating and cooling, and water exchange between basins with different water characteristics. Filaments ("squirts") originating from upwelling areas are shown to be an important mechanism for transporting water and substances over long distances.

  18. Effects of irregular sea surface and evaporation duct on radar detection performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marom, Moshe

    1988-06-01

    The detection performance of microwave search radars operating in close proximity to the sea surface is evaluated. The effects of media characteristics on the propagation of electromagnetic waves have been incorporated. Specular and diffused scattering from a rough surface, and the effects of the curvature of the earth's surface have been included in the study. Additionally, surface ducting effects caused by atmospheric anomalies are presented. Some design and operational considerations which can improve the detection performance of a surface search radar, are also presented.

  19. The Arctic sea surface microlayer: a source of atmospheric ice nuclei?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Benjamin; Wilson, Theodore; Whale, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The Arctic climate is changing faster than almost anywhere else on the planet and future warming is predicted to exceed global mean changes. Central to this climate sensitivity are changes in cloud cover, water content, ice content and particle size. Low level stratus clouds which are ubiquitous in the Arctic region, frequently exist in a thermodynamically unstable mixed phase state; hence they are sensitive to ice nuclei. A key limitation in our ability to quantitatively understand and model these clouds is the identity, concentration and efficiency of ice nucleating particles in the Arctic. One potential source of ice nuclei in this region is from the sea surface microlayer which is enriched in organic material and thought to become concentrated in aerosol particles produced through bubble bursting. During the summer of 2013 we sampled sea surface microlayer using a remote control rotating drum sampler during the Aerosol-Cloud Coupling and Climate Interaction in the Arctic (ACCACIA) cruise. The samples were brought back on board the RSS James Clark Ross where we used a droplet freezing instrument to test for ice nuclei in these samples. We found that the concentration of ice nuclei in the sea surface microlayer was massively enhanced over the bulk sea water and were able to freeze droplets up to -7 C. We found that the sea surface microlayer was active in 15 sites between 70 N and 83 N. Tests showed that these ice nuclei were sensitive to heat which is consistent with a biogenic origin of these nuclei. Using filters we were also able to show that the bulk of the ice nucleating particles were on the order of 100s nm. These results show that there is a reservoir of ice nucleating particles in the sea surface microlayer which have the potential to influence Arctic clouds.

  20. The influence of surface wave on water exchange in the Bohai Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Weijun; Wu, Guoxiang; Liang, Bingchen; Xu, Tiaojian; Chen, Xiaobo; Yang, Zhiwen; Xie, Mingxiao; Jiang, Meirong

    2016-04-01

    A three-dimensional wave-current coupled modeling system has been applied to analyze the water motions for the Bohai Sea and its adjacent waters. Two different methods of estimating the water exchange through the Bohai Strait have been employed, consisting of particle tracking and passive dye. The objectives of this study are to account for the surface wave role in the water exchange processes between the Bohai Sea and the outer waters, to test the response of the flushing characteristics of the Bohai Sea to different aspects of wave actions, and to obtain a quantitative and qualitative estimate of the half-life time under different experiment conditions. By comparing the simulations of water exchange with or without wave-current interactions, we find that waves can improve the Bohai Sea vertically mean water exchange capability, with more obvious enhancements for the surface layer where concentrated actions function. A series of numerical experiments indicate that turbulent kinetic energy from wave dissipation is the major positive influence, while wave-dependent surface stress, radiation stress, and Stokes drift have a minor effect. These results suggest that wave-driven mixing should be considered in the Bohai Sea water exchange processes, preferably using a half-life model based on concentration advection-diffusion model.

  1. Multivariable integration method for estimating sea surface salinity in coastal waters from in situ data and remotely sensed data using random forest algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Meiling; Liu, Xiangnan; Liu, Da; Ding, Chao; Jiang, Jiale

    2015-02-01

    A random forest (RF) model was created to estimate sea surface salinity (SSS) in the Hong Kong Sea, China, by integrating in situ and remotely sensed data. Optical remotely sensed data from China's HJ-1 satellite and in situ data were collected. The prediction model of salinity was developed by in situ environmental variables in the ocean, namely sea surface temperature (SST), pH, total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) and Chl-a, which are strongly related to SSS according to Pearson's correlation analysis. The large-scale SSS was estimated using the established salinity model with the same input parameters. The ordinary kriging interpolation using in situ data and the retrieval model based on remotely sensed data were developed to obtain the large-scale input parameters of the model. The different number of trees in the forest (ntree) and the number of features at each node (mtry) were adjusted in the RF model. The results showed that an optimum RF model was obtained with mtry=32 and ntree=2000, and the most important variable of the model for SSS prediction was SST, followed by TIN, Chl-a and pH. Such an RF model was successful in evaluating the temporal-spatial distribution of SSS and had a relatively low estimation error. The root mean square error (RMSE) was less than 2.0 psu, the mean absolute error (MAE) was below 1.5 psu, and the absolute percent error (APE) was lower than 5%. The final RF salinity model was then compared with a multiple linear regression model (MLR), a back-propagation artificial neural network model, and a classification and regression trees (CART) model. The RF had a lower estimation error than the other three models. In addition, the RF model was used extensively under different periods and could be universal. This demonstrated that the RF algorithm has the capability to estimate SSS in coastal waters by integrating in situ and remotely sensed data.

  2. An European historical reconstruction of sea surface dynamics (waves and storm surge) for coastal impact studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menendez, Melisa; Perez, Jorge; Cid, Alba; Castanedo, Sonia; Losada, Inigo; Medina, Raul; Mendez, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Despite their outstanding relevance in coastal processes, a study of the sea surface dynamics due to atmospheric wind and pressure variations are rather limited in comparison with the mean sea level rise. Data of waves and surges along the European region are scarce and in-homogeneous, not only in terms of spatial coverage but also in terms of temporal coverage. This study presents two databases focused on a historical reconstruction of: (i) the wind-generated waves (GOW) and (ii) the meteorological sea level component (GOS). The GOW and GOS datasets cover the whole European coast (North Atlantic, North Sea, Baltic Sea, Mediterranean Sea and Black Sea) at high-spatial resolution from 1979 to present. The meteorological sea level component (storm surge) has been generated by the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS). To take into account non-linear interactions between tides and surges, both dynamics were simulated jointly. Final results of meteorological component of sea level were obtained by subtracting the astronomical tide from the simulated sea surface. The model was set-up for Europe using an orthogonal grid, with a horizontal resolution ranging between 3.5 to 11 km. A spatial domain of approximately 5 km was used for the Black Sea. Local coastal waves can be the integrated result of the ocean surface over a large region of influence. GOW-Europe is designed from a multigrid approach based on the overlapping of two-way nested domains. The coarser spatial resolution along the European coast of GOW is 15 km. The generation and propagation of the sea surface waves of GOW-Europe are simulated with the model WAVEWATCH III v4.18. Effects of non-linear wave-wave interactions, whitecapping and depth-induced refraction are considered in the propagation model. In order to validate GOW and GOS over Europe with available observations, an exhaustive comparison with in-situ and remote measurements was developed. In-situ buoys and tide-gauges are used to compare hourly time

  3. Aquarius and Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.; Lagerloef, G. S. E.; Torrusio, S.

    2012-01-01

    Aquarius is an L-band radiometer and scatterometer instrument combination designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. The instrument is designed to provide global salinity maps on a monthly basis with a spatial resolution of 150 km and an accuracy of 0.2 psu. The science objective is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean. This data will promote understanding of ocean circulation and its role in the global water cycle and climate.

  4. Short-term effects of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons on sea-surface microlayer phytoneuston

    SciTech Connect

    Riznyk, R.Z.; Hardy, J.T.; Pearson, W.; Jabs, L.

    1987-06-01

    The Puget Sound area, in the state of Washington, is characterized by an increasing population reflected by the growth of Seattle and Tacoma and their respective industrial-based economies. Previous work on the sea-surface microlayer of Puget Sound has shown that contaminant metals and organics are present at some sites at concentrations from 10 to more than 1000 times greater than in underlying sea water. Since the sea-surface microlayer may contain an inordinately high concentration of PAHs relative to the water column, the authors decided to investigated the short-term effect of these hydrophobic contaminants on phytoneuston community dynamics under controlled in situ conditions during this summer season when bloom conditions can prevail in areas of Puget Sound.

  5. A study of oceanic surface heat fluxes in the Greenland, Norwegian, and Barents Seas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    This study examines oceanic surface heat fluxes in the Norwegian, Greenland, and Barents seas using the gridded Navy Fleet Numerical Oceanography Central surface analysis and the First GARP Global Experiment (FGGE) IIc cloudiness data bases. Monthly and annual means of net and turbulent heat fluxes are computed for the FGGE year 1979. The FGGE IIb data base consisting of individual observations provides particularly good data coverage in this region for a comparison with the gridded Navy winds and air temperatures. The standard errors of estimate between the Navy and FGGE IIb winds and air temperatures are 3.6 m/s and 2.5 C, respectively. The computations for the latent and sensible heat fluxes are based on bulk formulas with the same constant heat exchange coefficient of 0.0015. The results show extremely strong wintertime heat fluxes in the northern Greenland Sea and especially in the Barents Sea in contrast to previous studies.

  6. Quantifying surface water runoff from Wadi Arogut towards the Dead Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Stefan; Khayat, Saed; Marei, Amer

    2015-04-01

    The surrounded area of the Dead Sea, especially the west side suffers from many hydrological problems. While the Dead Sea level drop considered a major problem that affect the quality of the surrounded freshwater resources, a lot of the surface water flood from the adjacent Wadi are lost through direct run off without any exploitation. Therefore, it is necessary to maintain a type of balance between surface water exploitation through the Wadi and at the same time allow a sufficient amount of flow to the Dead Sea to ensure its sustainability. In this study, we choose one of the larger tributaries in the western side of the Dead Sea basin. The stream was modelled for runoff response to different rainfall amount and climate conditions (dry, normal, and wet seasons) which were chosen from the rainy seasons in the previous 30 years. Finally, the amount of surface water contribution from each of the three seasons of the Dead Sea was quantified. The outcome of the model shows the results from the normal rainy season, which is frequently reoccurs and common in the region. The model data show that such events normally contribute with about 18-22 MCM annually to the Dead Sea. The problem is with the recurrence of dry season such as 2005/2006, by which the amount of the surface water decrease and consequently has adverse effect on the Dead Sea. However, the presence of less frequent thunder storm season such as that one in 1991/1992 has also a positive effect on the Dead Sea level. In the rainy season 1991/1992 there was a higher amount of rainfall over the study area that reaches around 155 MCM. Despite the presence of this high amount most of the recharge lost to the ground as groundwater recharge. The high amount of rain increases the amount of inundated surface water out of the Wadi banks and covers more surfaces all over the study area, which in role promote more water loss to the ground. That is why the total loss (rather than surface runoff) was much higher (77

  7. Using remote sensing imagery to monitoring sea surface pollution cause by abandoned gold-copper mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, H. M.; Ren, H.; Lee, Y. T.

    2010-08-01

    The Chinkuashih Benshen mine was the largest gold-copper mine in Taiwan before the owner had abandoned the mine in 1987. However, even the mine had been closed, the mineral still interacts with rain and underground water and flowed into the sea. The polluted sea surface had appeared yellow, green and even white color, and the pollutants had carried by the coast current. In this study, we used the optical satellite images to monitoring the sea surface. Several image processing algorithms are employed especial the subpixel technique and linear mixture model to estimate the concentration of pollutants. The change detection approach is also applied to track them. We also conduct the chemical analysis of the polluted water to provide the ground truth validation. By the correlation analysis between the satellite observation and the ground truth chemical analysis, an effective approach to monitoring water pollution could be established.

  8. The Effect of Sea-Surface Sun Glitter on Microwave Radiometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    A relatively simple model for the microwave brightness temperature of sea surface Sun glitter is presented. The model is an accurate closeform approximation for the fourfold Sun glitter integral. The model computations indicate that Sun glitter contamination of on orbit radiometer measurements is appreciable over a large swath area. For winds near 20 m/s, Sun glitter affects the retrieval of environmental parameters for Sun angles as large as 20 to 25 deg. The model predicted biases in retrieved wind speed and sea surface temperature due to neglecting Sun glitter are consistent with those experimentally observed in SEASAT SMMR retrievals. A least squares retrieval algorithm that uses a combined sea and Sun model function shows the potential of retrieving accurate environmental parameters in the presence of Sun glitter so long as the Sun angles and wind speed are above 5 deg and 2 m/s, respectively.

  9. Major mid-late Holocene cooling in the East China Sea revealed by an alkenone sea surface temperature record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meixun; Ding, Ling; Xing, Lei; Qiao, Shuqing; Yang, Zuosheng

    2014-12-01

    Although the mid-late Holocene cold and dry event about 4000 years ago (the 4 ka event) has been observed almost globally, it was most prominent in terrestrial climate proxies from the lower latitudes. Here we evaluate the oceanic response to this event in terms of a Holocene sea surface temperature (SST) record reconstructed using the U37K' index for Core B3 on the continental shelf of the East China Sea. The record reveals a large temperature drop of about 5°C from the mid-Holocene (24.7°C at 5.6 ka) to the 4 ka event (19.2°C at 3.8 ka). This mid-late Holocene cooling period in Core B3 correlated with (i) decreases in the East Asia summer monsoon intensity and (ii) the transition period with increased El Niño/Southern Oscillation activities in the Equatorial Pacific. Our SST record provides oceanic evidence for a more global nature of the mid-late Holocene climate change, which was most likely caused by a southward migration of the Intertropical Converge Zone in response to the decreasing summer solar insolation in the Northern Hemisphere. However, the large SST drop around Core B3 indicates that the mid-late Holocene cooling was regionally amplified by the initiation/strengthening of eddy circulation/cold front which caused upwelling and resulted in additional SST decrease. Upwelling during the mid-late Holocene also enhanced with surface productivity in the East China Sea as reflected by higher alkenone content around Core B3.

  10. Scanner for measuring fine sea-surface structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, J.; Haimbach, S. P.; Hsu, Y.-H. L.

    1981-01-01

    An optical scanner using the principle of light reflection has been designed for determining directional slope distributions of the wind-disturbed water surface. The instrument has been tested successfully in the laboratory and could be used in the field. Some sample results along with procedures for data analysis are also presented.

  11. Airborne Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Temperature Using the Ball Experimental Sea Surface Temperature (BESST) Radiometer With A Discussion of the 2013 Marginal Ice Zone Observation Processes EXperiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tooth, M.; Emery, W. J.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne remote sensing has opened up new possibilities for scientists to study oceanic and atmospheric problems that are relevant to industry, environmental groups, and the scientific community as a whole. Data obtained from these platforms can provide much higher resolution imagery in comparison to satellite observations that allow for more detailed analyses of important regions. Sea surface temperature (SST) data obtained from instruments like the BESST radiometer can be used to provide more insight into issues like natural disasters and oceanographic problems of interest; such as the influence of melting sea ice on SST. During the 2013 Marginal Ice Zone Observation Processes EXperiment (MIZOPEX), BESST was flown on a Scan Eagle UAS in the Alaskan Marginal Ice Zone to acquire SST data. These observations will be discussed, along with possible future uses for the BESST radiometer.

  12. Surface water mass composition changes captured by cores of Arctic land-fast sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, I. J.; Eicken, H.; Mahoney, A. R.; Van Hale, R.; Gough, A. J.; Fukamachi, Y.; Jones, J.

    2016-04-01

    In the Arctic, land-fast sea ice growth can be influenced by fresher water from rivers and residual summer melt. This paper examines a method to reconstruct changes in water masses using oxygen isotope measurements of sea ice cores. To determine changes in sea water isotope composition over the course of the ice growth period, the output of a sea ice thermodynamic model (driven with reanalysis data, observations of snow depth, and freeze-up dates) is used along with sea ice oxygen isotope measurements and an isotopic fractionation model. Direct measurements of sea ice growth rates are used to validate the output of the sea ice growth model. It is shown that for sea ice formed during the 2011/2012 ice growth season at Barrow, Alaska, large changes in isotopic composition of the ocean waters were captured by the sea ice isotopic composition. Salinity anomalies in the ocean were also tracked by moored instruments. These data indicate episodic advection of meteoric water, having both lower salinity and lower oxygen isotopic composition, during the winter sea ice growth season. Such advection of meteoric water during winter is surprising, as no surface meltwater and no local river discharge should be occurring at this time of year in that area. How accurately changes in water masses as indicated by oxygen isotope composition can be reconstructed using oxygen isotope analysis of sea ice cores is addressed, along with methods/strategies that could be used to further optimize the results. The method described will be useful for winter detection of meteoric water presence in Arctic fast ice regions, which is important for climate studies in a rapidly changing Arctic. Land-fast sea ice effective fractionation coefficients were derived, with a range of +1.82‰ to +2.52‰. Those derived effective fractionation coefficients will be useful for future water mass component proportion calculations. In particular, the equations given can be used to inform choices made when

  13. Particle fluxes in the Almeria-Oran Front: control by coastal upwelling and sea surface circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Vidal, A.; Calafat, A.; Canals, M.; Fabres, J.

    2004-12-01

    Particle flux data were obtained from one instrumented array moored under the direct influence of the Almeria-Oran Front (AOF) in the Eastern Alboran Sea, Western Mediterranean Sea, within the frame of the "Mediterranean Targeted Project II-MAss Transfer and Ecosystem Response" (MTPII-MATER) EU-funded research project. The mooring line was deployed from July 1997 to May 1998, and was equipped with three sequential sampling sediment trap-current meter pairs at 645, 1170 and 2210 m (30 m above the seafloor). The settling material was analysed to obtain total mass, organic carbon, opal, calcium carbonate and lithogenic fluxes. Qualitative analyses of SST and SeaWiFS images allowed monitoring the location and development of the Western and Eastern Alboran Sea gyres and associated frontal systems to determine their influence on particle fluxes. Particle flux time series obtained at the three depths showed a downward decrease of the time-weighed total mass flux annual means, thus illustrating the role of pelagic particle settling. The total mass flux was dominated by the lithogenic fraction followed by calcium carbonate, opal and organic carbon. The time series at the various depths were rather similar, with two strong synchronous biogenic peaks (up to 98 mg m -2 day -1 of organic carbon and 156 mg m -2 day -1 of opal) recorded in July 1997 and May 1998. Through comparing the fluctuations of the lithogenic and calcium carbonate-rich fluxes with the biogenic flux, we observed that the non-biogenic fluxes remained roughly constant, while the biogenic flux responded strongly to seasonal variations throughout the water column. Overall, the temporal variability of particle fluxes appeared to be linked to the evolution of several tens of kilometres in length sea surface hydrological structures and circulation of the Alboran Sea. Periodic southeastward advective displacements of waters from upwelling events off the southern Spanish coast were observed on SST and SeaWiFS images

  14. Correlation between the surface temperature and thickness of Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, A. H.; Vaccaro, A.; Phillips, S.; Blake, D.; Herman, R. B.

    2012-12-01

    A study was conducted to investigate a possible correlation between the surface temperature and thickness of Arctic sea ice. Surface temperatures were measured with an infrared (IR) sensor while the ice thickness was determined using a capacitively coupled resistivity array. It was postulated that there would be an inverse correlation between the thickness and surface temperature of the sea ice. Thicker sea ice should better insulate the surface from the warmer seawater underneath, causing the surface temperature to vary inversely with sea ice thickness. This study was performed on the Chukchi Sea ice just offshore from Barrow, Alaska. Data was collected along two survey lines, each over 200m long, one parallel and one perpendicular to the shoreline. An IR sensor measured ice surface temperature, and this data was compared to both ground penetrating radar (250MHz and 500MHz) and capacitively coupled resistivity data. Ground penetrating radar was unable to yield a determination of the thickness of the ice. This was not surprising given the ice-to-water transition that starts with solid ice, proceeds through an intervening region of cracked ice and slush, and finally ends with seawater. [1] Resistivity data was collected at approximately 3 points per horizontal meter. With multiple receivers and passes along the survey lines, data was obtained at more than 8 vertical depths in the ice that was approximately 3 meters thick. The resistivity array yielded images indicating the thickness of the sea ice and the location and shape of the ice/water boundary. While the model-dependent nature of resistivity data processing is acknowledged, we have reasonable confidence in the results for the relative thickness of the ice. The temperature of the ice surface was determined via a calibrated (±0.1°C) IR sensor controlled with a data logger. Temperature measurements were collected at approximately 50 points per linear meter. The comparison of the temperature and resistivity data

  15. Analysis of near-shore sea surface temperatures in the Northern Pacific

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies report a warming trend in Pacific Ocean temperatures over the last 50 years. However, much less is known about temperature change in the near-coastal environment, which is particularly sensitive to climatic change. In near-shore regions in situ sea surface temper...

  16. Tightly linked zonal and meridional sea surface temperature gradients over the past five million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Alexey V.; Burls, Natalie J.; Lawrence, Kira T.; Peterson, Laura C.

    2015-12-01

    The climate of the tropics and surrounding regions is defined by pronounced zonal (east-west) and meridional (equator to mid-latitudes) gradients in sea surface temperature. These gradients control zonal and meridional atmospheric circulations, and thus the Earth’s climate. Global cooling over the past five million years, since the early Pliocene epoch, was accompanied by the gradual strengthening of these temperature gradients. Here we use records from the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, including a new alkenone palaeotemperature record from the South Pacific, to reconstruct changes in zonal and meridional sea surface temperature gradients since the Pliocene, and assess their connection using a comprehensive climate model. We find that the reconstructed zonal and meridional temperature gradients vary coherently over this time frame, showing a one-to-one relationship between their changes. In our model simulations, we systematically reduce the meridional sea surface temperature gradient by modifying the latitudinal distribution of cloud albedo or atmospheric CO2 concentration. The simulated zonal temperature gradient in the equatorial Pacific adjusts proportionally. These experiments and idealized modelling indicate that the meridional temperature gradient controls upper-ocean stratification in the tropics, which in turn controls the zonal gradient along the equator, as well as heat export from the tropical oceans. We conclude that this tight linkage between the two sea surface temperature gradients posits a fundamental constraint on both past and future climates.

  17. Radial orbit error reduction and sea surface topography determination using satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelis, Theodossios

    1987-01-01

    A method is presented in satellite altimetry that attempts to simultaneously determine the geoid and sea surface topography with minimum wavelengths of about 500 km and to reduce the radial orbit error caused by geopotential errors. The modeling of the radial orbit error is made using the linearized Lagrangian perturbation theory. Secular and second order effects are also included. After a rather extensive validation of the linearized equations, alternative expressions of the radial orbit error are derived. Numerical estimates for the radial orbit error and geoid undulation error are computed using the differences of two geopotential models as potential coefficient errors, for a SEASAT orbit. To provide statistical estimates of the radial distances and the geoid, a covariance propagation is made based on the full geopotential covariance. Accuracy estimates for the SEASAT orbits are given which agree quite well with already published results. Observation equations are develped using sea surface heights and crossover discrepancies as observables. A minimum variance solution with prior information provides estimates of parameters representing the sea surface topography and corrections to the gravity field that is used for the orbit generation. The simulation results show that the method can be used to effectively reduce the radial orbit error and recover the sea surface topography.

  18. Sea surface height and steric height increases in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-06-01

    Sea surface height has increased by 3 millimeters per year, globally averaged, since 1993. Some fraction of sea surface height change is due to added water from melting glaciers, for instance, and some is due to increasing heat and salinity changes (steric effects). Focusing on the Southern Hemisphere, Sutton and Roemmich analyzed temperature and salinity data from the Argo float array in relation to earlier data from the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) to estimate the steric changes. These were compared with the total sea surface height changes over the same period seen in satellite altimetric data. They found that on decadal time scales, about half of the rise in sea surface height in the Southern Ocean is due to steric effects, with the proportion increasing southward. The accompanying increase in ocean heat content south of 30°S can account for most of the global heat content change during this period. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/ 2011GL046802, 2011)

  19. Remotely-sensed sea surface temperatuares (SST) of Northeaster Pacific Coastal Zones

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is an important indicator of long-term trends and geographical temperature patterns; however there have been relatively few long-term records of SST in near-coastal habitats. In situ SST measurements are irregular in both space and time. Therefore, w...

  20. Statistical Analysis of Spatio-temporal Variations of Sea Surface Height Observed by Topex Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabrikant, A.; Glazman, R. E.; Greysukh, A.

    1994-01-01

    Using non-gridded Topex altimeter data, high resolution 2-d power spectra and spatio-temporal autocorrelation functions of sea surface height (SSH) variations are estimated and employed for studying anisotropic SSH fields varying in a broad range of scales.

  1. Ecoregional analysis of nearshore sea-surface temperature in the North Pacific

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aim Sea surface temperature (SST) has been a parameter widely-identified to be useful to the investigation of marine species distribution, migration, and invasion, especially as SSTs are predicted to be affected by climate change. Here we use a remotely-sensed dataset to focus on...

  2. Six Pseudoalteromonas Strains Isolated from Surface Waters of Kabeltonne, Offshore Helgoland, North Sea

    PubMed Central

    Wichels, Antje; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    Draft genomes are presented for 6 Pseudoalteromonas sp. strains isolated from surface waters at Kabeltonne, Helgoland, a long-term ecological research station in the North Sea. These strains contribute knowledge of the genomic underpinnings of a developing model system to study phage-host dynamics of a particle-associated ocean copiotroph. PMID:26868390

  3. Six Pseudoalteromonas Strains Isolated from Surface Waters of Kabeltonne, Offshore Helgoland, North Sea.

    PubMed

    Duhaime, Melissa B; Wichels, Antje; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2016-01-01

    Draft genomes are presented for 6 Pseudoalteromonas sp. strains isolated from surface waters at Kabeltonne, Helgoland, a long-term ecological research station in the North Sea. These strains contribute knowledge of the genomic underpinnings of a developing model system to study phage-host dynamics of a particle-associated ocean copiotroph. PMID:26868390

  4. On the relationship between water vapor over the oceans and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    1989-01-01

    Monthly mean precipitable water data obtained from passive microwave radiometry were correlated with the National Meteorological Center (NMC) blended sea surface temperature data. It is shown that the monthly mean water vapor content of the atmosphere above the oceans can generally be prescribed from the sea surface temperature with a standard deviation of 0.36 g/sq cm. The form of the relationship between precipitable water and sea surface temperature in the range T(sub s) greater than 18 C also resembles that predicted from simple arguments based on the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. The annual cycle of the globally integrated mass of Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) water vapor is shown to differ from analyses of other water vapor data in both phase and amplitude and these differences point to a significant influence of the continents on water vapor. Regional scale analyses of water vapor demonstrate that monthly averaged water vapor data, when contrasted with the bulk sea surface temperature relationship developed in this study, reflect various known characteristics of the time mean large-scale circulation over the oceans. A water vapor parameter is introduced to highlight the effects of large-scale motion on atmospheric water vapor. Based on the magnitude of this parameter, it is shown that the effects of large-scale flow on precipitable water vapor are regionally dependent, but for the most part, the influence of circulation is generally less than about + or - 20 percent of the seasonal mean.

  5. Characteristics of 13.9 GHz radar scattering from oil films on the sea surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Croswell, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    Aircraft microwave scatterometer measurements are presented, which were made in 1979 as part of a project to study the response of a number of active and passive microwave and optical remote sensors to an oil-covered sea surface conducted by NASA Langley Research Center. A 13.9-GHz Doppler scatterometer with a fan beam antenna and coherent detection was used to measure radar backscatter as a function of incidence angle. The radar scattering signature of the clear surface and signatures of the surface covered with various crude oil films are compared. Reductions in Ku band microwave backscatter up to 14 dB are observed for both treated and untreated LaRosa and Murban crude oil films deposited on the sea surface. Maximum Ku band sensitivity to the effects of the oil in terms of differential scatter is observed in the 25-35 deg incidence angle region.

  6. Improving the Altimeter Derived Geostrophic Currents Using High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature Images: A Feasibility Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, M.-H.; Santoleri, R.; Giffa, A.; Piterbarg, L.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of spatial and temporal ocean surface currents at high resolution is essential for a variety of applications. The altimeter observing system, by providing global and repetitive measurements of the Sea Surface Height, has been by far the most exploited system to estimate ocean surface currents in the past 20 years. However it does not allow observing currents departing from the geostrophic equilibrium, nor is capable to resolve the shortest spatial scales of the currents. In order to go beyond these limits, we investigate how the high spatial and temporal resolution information from Sea Surface Temperature (SST) images can improve the altimeter currents by adapting a method first proposed by [1]. It consists in inverting the SST evolution equation for the velocity by prescribing the source and sink terms and by using the altimeter currents as background. The method feasibility is tested using simulated data based on the Mercator-Ocean system.

  7. Analysis of 30 Years Sea Surface Elevation (sse) Data Obtained From A Global Ocean Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, M.

    In this presentation the sea surface elevation (SSE) as obtained from a global OGCM will be analysed. The model used is the Hamburg LSG model with a 2 degree hori- zontal resolution, 23 layers in the vertical and a 10 day timestep. The model has a free surface and includes the thermo- and halosteric effects. It is integrated for 50 years forced by monthly NCEP reanalyzes data (1950-1999). The last 30 years of model output are analyzed on regional to global scale to judge the role of the different contributions to the interannual sea level variations as there are: horizontal redistribution of volume (mass), surface freshwater flux (precipitaion- evaporation) and steric effects. On the global scale the surface freshwater flux can clearly be identified as the main contributor, while on regional to local scale it is the steric effect.

  8. Aquarius: An Instrument to Monitor Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lagerloef, G. S .E.; Colomb, R.; Yueh, S.; Pellerano, F.

    2007-01-01

    Aquarius is a combined passive/active L-band microwave instrument that is being developed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. The data will support studies of the coupling between ocean circulation, global water cycle, and climate. Aquarius is part of the Aquarius/SAC-D mission, which is a partnership between the U.S. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) and Argentina (CONAE). The primary science objective of this mission is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large-scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean with a spatial resolution of 150 km and a retrieval accuracy of 0.2 psu globally on a monthly basis.

  9. Freely Decaying Weak Turbulence For Sea Surface Gravity Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onorato, M.; Osborne, A.; Resio, D.; Pushkarev, A.; Zakharov, V.; Serio, M.; Brandini, C.

    We study numerically the generation of power laws in the framework of weak turbu- lence theory for surface gravity waves in deep water. Starting from a random wave field, we let the system evolve numerically according to the nonlinear Euler equations for gravity waves in infinitely deep water. In agreement with the theory of Zakharov and Filonenko, we find the formation of a power spectrum characterized by a power law of the form of |k|-2 . .5

  10. Microwave radiometer and scatterometer design for the aquarius sea surface Salinity Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William J.; Yueh, Simon H.; Pellerano, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of sea surface salinity with L-band microwave radiometers is a very challenging task. Since the L-band brightness temperature variations associated with salinity changes are small, it is necessary to have a very sensitive and stable radiometer. In addition, the corrections for the ocean surface roughness require real time scatterometer measurements. The designs of the Aquarius radiometer and scatterometer are described in this paper.

  11. A simple method to determine evaporation duct height in the sea surface boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musson-Genon, Luc; Gauthier, Sylvie; Bruth, Eric

    1992-09-01

    A formulation to determine the evaporation duct height in the sea surface boundary layer is presented. This formulation is based upon the theory of similarity of Monin Obukhov by using analytical solutions currently used in the field of numerical weather prediction. The proposed solution is simple, coherent with the surface boundary layer parameterization used in the Meteo France and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts weather prediction models and gives good results when compared to more traditional methods.

  12. Rising Mediterranean Sea Surface Temperatures Amplify Extreme Summer Precipitation in Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Volosciuk, Claudia; Maraun, Douglas; Semenov, Vladimir A.; Tilinina, Natalia; Gulev, Sergey K.; Latif, Mojib

    2016-01-01

    The beginning of the 21st century was marked by a number of severe summer floods in Central Europe associated with extreme precipitation (e.g., Elbe 2002, Oder 2010 and Danube 2013). Extratropical storms, known as Vb-cyclones, cause summer extreme precipitation events over Central Europe and can thus lead to such floodings. Vb-cyclones develop over the Mediterranean Sea, which itself strongly warmed during recent decades. Here we investigate the influence of increased Mediterranean Sea surface temperature (SST) on extreme precipitation events in Central Europe. To this end, we carry out atmosphere model simulations forced by average Mediterranean SSTs during 1970–1999 and 2000–2012. Extreme precipitation events occurring on average every 20 summers in the warmer-SST-simulation (2000–2012) amplify along the Vb-cyclone track compared to those in the colder-SST-simulation (1970–1999), on average by 17% in Central Europe. The largest increase is located southeast of maximum precipitation for both simulated heavy events and historical Vb-events. The responsible physical mechanism is increased evaporation from and enhanced atmospheric moisture content over the Mediterranean Sea. The excess in precipitable water is transported from the Mediterranean Sea to Central Europe causing stronger precipitation extremes over that region. Our findings suggest that Mediterranean Sea surface warming amplifies Central European precipitation extremes. PMID:27573802

  13. Rising Mediterranean Sea Surface Temperatures Amplify Extreme Summer Precipitation in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Volosciuk, Claudia; Maraun, Douglas; Semenov, Vladimir A; Tilinina, Natalia; Gulev, Sergey K; Latif, Mojib

    2016-01-01

    The beginning of the 21st century was marked by a number of severe summer floods in Central Europe associated with extreme precipitation (e.g., Elbe 2002, Oder 2010 and Danube 2013). Extratropical storms, known as Vb-cyclones, cause summer extreme precipitation events over Central Europe and can thus lead to such floodings. Vb-cyclones develop over the Mediterranean Sea, which itself strongly warmed during recent decades. Here we investigate the influence of increased Mediterranean Sea surface temperature (SST) on extreme precipitation events in Central Europe. To this end, we carry out atmosphere model simulations forced by average Mediterranean SSTs during 1970-1999 and 2000-2012. Extreme precipitation events occurring on average every 20 summers in the warmer-SST-simulation (2000-2012) amplify along the Vb-cyclone track compared to those in the colder-SST-simulation (1970-1999), on average by 17% in Central Europe. The largest increase is located southeast of maximum precipitation for both simulated heavy events and historical Vb-events. The responsible physical mechanism is increased evaporation from and enhanced atmospheric moisture content over the Mediterranean Sea. The excess in precipitable water is transported from the Mediterranean Sea to Central Europe causing stronger precipitation extremes over that region. Our findings suggest that Mediterranean Sea surface warming amplifies Central European precipitation extremes. PMID:27573802

  14. The impact of variable sea ice roughness on changes in Arctic Ocean surface stress: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Torge; Tsamados, Michel; Schroeder, David; Feltham, Daniel L.

    2016-03-01

    The Arctic sea ice cover is thinning and retreating, causing changes in surface roughness that in turn modify the momentum flux from the atmosphere through the ice into the ocean. New model simulations comprising variable sea ice drag coefficients for both the air and water interface demonstrate that the heterogeneity in sea ice surface roughness significantly impacts the spatial distribution and trends of ocean surface stress during the last decades. Simulations with constant sea ice drag coefficients as used in most climate models show an increase in annual mean ocean surface stress (0.003 N/m2 per decade, 4.6%) due to the reduction of ice thickness leading to a weakening of the ice and accelerated ice drift. In contrast, with variable drag coefficients our simulations show annual mean ocean surface stress is declining at a rate of -0.002 N/m2 per decade (3.1%) over the period 1980-2013 because of a significant reduction in surface roughness associated with an increasingly thinner and younger sea ice cover. The effectiveness of sea ice in transferring momentum does not only depend on its resistive strength against the wind forcing but is also set by its top and bottom surface roughness varying with ice types and ice conditions. This reveals the need to account for sea ice surface roughness variations in climate simulations in order to correctly represent the implications of sea ice loss under global warming.

  15. Simulation studies of the influence of sea-surface temperature anomalies on the Sahelian circulation and rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Semazzi, F. H. M.; Mehta, V.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to find out if sea surface temperature (SST) - African rainfall relationships could be simulated in a global climate model (GCM). If indeed that were possible, researchers generated useful diagnostics that can enable them to understand the physical mechanisms which lead to rainfall fluctuations over Africa in response to sea surface temperature anomalies over global ocean.

  16. An analysis of the relationship between cloud anomalies and sea surface temperature anomalies in a global circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Thomas C.; Barnett, Tim P.; Roeckner, Erich; Vonder Haar, Thomas H.

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between the sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs) and the anomalies of the monthly mean cloud cover (including the high-level, low-level, and total cloud cover), the outgoing longwave radiation, and the reflected solar radiation was analyzed using a least absolute deviations regression at each grid point over the open ocean for a 6-yr period. The results indicate that cloud change in association with a local 1-C increase in SSTAs cannot be used to predict clouds in a potential future world where all the oceans are 1-C warmer than at present, because much of the observed cloud changes are due to circulation changes, which in turn are related not only to changes in SSTAs but to changes in SSTA gradients. However, because SSTAs are associated with changes in the local ocean-atmosphere moisture and heat fluxes as well as significant changes in circulation (such as ENSO), SSTAs can serve as a surrogate for many aspects of global climate change.

  17. Aliased tidal errors in TOPEX/POSEIDON sea surface height data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlax, Michael G.; Chelton, Dudley B.

    1994-01-01

    Alias periods and wavelengths for the M(sub 2, S(sub 2), N(sub 2), K(sub 1), O(sub 1), and P(sub 1) tidal constituents are calculated for TOPEX/POSEIDON. Alias wavelenghts calculated in previous studies are shown to be in error, and a correct method is presented. With the exception of the K(sub 1) constituent, all of these tidal aliases for TOPEX/POSEIDON have periods shorter than 90 days and are likely to be confounded with long-period sea surface height signals associated with real ocean processes. In particular, the correspondence between the periods and wavelengths of the M(sub 2) alias and annual baroclinic Rossby waves that plagued Geosat sea surface height data is avoided. The potential for aliasing residual tidal errors in smoothed estimates of sea surface height is calculated for the six tidal constituents. The potential for aliasing the lunar tidal constituents M(sub 2), N(sub 2) and O(sub 1) fluctuates with latitude and is different for estimates made at the crossovers of ascending and descending ground tracks than for estimates at points midway between crossovers. The potential for aliasing the solar tidal constituents S(sub 2), K(sub 1) and P(sub 1) varies smoothly with latitude. S(sub 2) is strongly aliased for latitudes within 50 degress of the equator, while K(sub 1) and P(sub 1) are only weakly aliased in that range. A weighted least squares method for estimating and removing residual tidal errors from TOPEX/POSEIDON sea surface height data is presented. A clear understanding of the nature of aliased tidal error in TOPEX/POSEIDON data aids the unambiguous identification of real propagating sea surface height signals. Unequivocal evidence of annual period, westward propagating waves in the North Atlantic is presented.

  18. Using hyperspectral image enhancement method for small size object detection on the sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lu; Noro, Naoki; Takara, Yohei; Ando, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2015-10-01

    Small size object detection in vast ocean plays an important role in rescues after accident or disaster. One of the promising approach is a hyperspectral imaging system (HIS). However, due to the limitation of HIS sensor's resolution, interested target might occupy only several pixels or less in the image, it's difficult to detect small object, moreover the sun glint of the sea surface make it even more difficult. In this paper, we propose an image analysis technique suitable for the computer aided detection of small objects on the sea surface, especially humans. We firstly separate objects from background by adapting a previously proposed image enhancement method and then apply a linear unmixing method to define the endmember's spectrum. At last, we use spectral angle mapping method to classify presented objects and thus detect small size object. The proposed system provides the following results for supporting the detection of humans and other small objects on the sea surface; an image with spectral color enhancement, alerts of various objects, and the human detection results. This multilayered approach is expected to reduce the oversight, i.e., false negative error. Results of the proposed technique have been compared with existent methods, and our method has successfully enhance the hyperspectral image, and detect small object from the sea surface with high human detection rate, shows the ability to further detection of human in this study). The result are less influenced by the sun glint effects. This study helps recognizing small objects on the sea surface, and it leads to advances in the rescuing system using aircraft equipped HIS technology.

  19. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  20. Rainfall on microwave return from the sea surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliven, L. F.; Giovanangeli, J.-P.

    1988-01-01

    The long range goal remains unchanged; to conduct experiments and develop/test theoretical models to permit useful algorithms to be constructed for microwave systems that observe oceanic processes. This topic is relevant to altimeters, scatterometers, and rain rate measurements. The current focus is attention to scatterometer wind velocity measurement. One component of the laboratory efforts is an experiment conducted, in the wind wave tank at the GSFC/WFF, to quantify the effect of rain-generated surface wave brightening of radar cross section. Laboratory conditions can be characterized as light wind, functional rain rates, a single drop size, and a 36 GHz radar system at 30 degrees inclination.

  1. The Impact of Dielectric Constant Model and Surface Reference on Differences Between SMOS and Aquarius Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinnat, E. P.; Boutin, J.; Yin, X.; LeVine, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    Two ongoing space missions share the scientific objective of mapping the global Sea Surface Salinity (SSS), yet their observations show significant discrepancies. ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and NASA's Aquarius use L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometers to measure emission from the sea surface and retrieve SSS. Significant differences in SSS retrieved by both sensors are observed, with SMOS SSS being generally lower than Aquarius SSS, except for very cold waters where SMOS SSS is the highest overall. Figure 1 is an example of the difference between the SSS retrieved by SMOS and Aquarius averaged over one month and 1 degree in longitude and latitude. Differences are mostly between -1 psu and +1 psu (psu, practical salinity unit), with a significant regional and latitudinal dependence. We investigate the impact of the vicarious calibration and retrieval algorithm used by both mission on these differences.

  2. Sea, ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan Continental Shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, F. F. (Principal Investigator); Sharma, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Two cruises were conducted in Cook Inlet to obtain ground truth. Forty-seven stations during 22-23 August and 68 stations during 25-29 September 1972 were occupied and temperature, salinity, percent light transmission, and suspended load of surface waters obtained. Similar data at various depths was also obtained at selected stations. Cook Inlet is an estuary with complex mixing of river discharges and ocean water. The Upper Cook Inlet shows a gradual and systematic decrease in salinity, however, west of Kenai the mixing of waters is complex. The sediments in suspension originating at the head of the inlet generally settle out east of Kenai and Drift River. Sediment load in suspension decreased gradually from 1700 mg/1 near Anchorage to about 50 mg/1 in the Narrows. In the Lower Cook Inlet the suspended load varied between 1-10 mg/1. Surface waters with sediments in suspension and ocean water with relatively lower sediment concentration are clearly discernible in ERTS-1 images obtained during September 18, 1972 pass over Cook Inlet. The movement and mixing of these waters can also be delineated in the images.

  3. Iceberg ploughmark features on bottom surface of the South-Eastern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorokhov, Dmitry; Sivkov, Vadim; Dorokhova, Evgenia; Krechik, Viktor

    2016-04-01

    A detail swath bathymetry, side-scan sonar and acoustic profiling combined with sediment sampling during the 64th cruise of RV "Academic Mstislav Keldysh" (October 2015) allowed to identify new geomorphological features of the South-Eastern Baltic Sea bottom surface. The extended chaotic ploughmarks (furrows) in most cases filled with thin layer of mud were discovered on surface of the Gdansk-Gotland sill glacial deposits. They are observed on the depth of more than 70 m and have depth and width from 1 to 10 m. Most of them are v- or u-shaped stepped depressions. The side-scan records of similar geomorpholoical features are extensively reported from Northern Hemisphere and Antarctica (Goodwin et al., 1985; Dowdeswell et al., 1993). Ploughmarks are attributed to the action of icebergs scouring into the sediment as they touch bottom. We are suggest that furrows discovered in the South-Eastern Baltic Sea are also the result of iceberg scouring during the Baltic Ice Lake stage (more than 11 600 cal yr BP (Bjorck, 2008)). This assumption confirmed by occurrence of fragmental stones and boulders on the sea bottom surface which are good indicators of iceberg rafting (Lisitzin, 2003). Ice ploughmarks at sea bottom surface were not occurred before in the South-Eastern Baltic Sea. The study was financed by Russian Scientific Fund, grant number 14-37-00047. References Bjorck S. The late Quaternary development of the Baltic Sea Basin. In: The BACC Author Team (eds) Assessment of climate change for the Baltic Sea Basin. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. 2008. Dowdeswell J. A., Villinger H., Whittington R. J., Marienfeld P. Iceberg scouring in Scoresby Sund and on the East Greenland continental shelf // Marine Geology. V. 111. N. 1-2. 1993. P. 37-53. Goodwin C. R., Finley J. C., Howard L. M. Ice scour bibliography. Environmental Studies Revolving Funds Report No. 010. Ottawa. 1985. 99 pp. Lisitzin A. P. Sea-Ice and Iceberg Sedimentation in the Ocean: Recent and Past. Springer

  4. Multidecadal Variability Simulated With an Atmospheric General Circulation Model Forced With Observed Sea Surface Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosfeld, K.; Rimbu, N.; Lohmann, G.; Lunkeit, F.

    2002-12-01

    We investigate the response of an atmospheric general circulation model to observed sea surface temperature for the instrumental period 1856-2000. The model used is the {nderline P}ortable {nderline U}niversity {nderline M}odel of the {nderline A}tmosphere (PUMA) developed at the University of Hamburg for long-term climate studies. When the model is forced with global sea surface temperatures (SSTs) the model interdecadal variability is dominated by the Atlantic Interdecadal Mode (AIM) and its associated teleconnection patterns. The modeled interdecadal variability sea surface patterns are in good agreement with analysis of observational time series in an ensemble mode integration. Positive SST anomalies and a sea level pressure (SLP) dipole pattern dominate the North Atlantic while a strong positive anomaly in SLP is characteristic for the North Pacific Ocean. Although the observational database is short, investigations of the typical AIM patterns before and after the climate shift in the 1970's suggest an oscillatory multidecadal mode rather than a singular event for that period. Additional experiments with ''Atlantic only'' forcing depict strong sensitivities of the relative roles of Atlantic and Pacific SST data initiating variability at multidecadal time scales. Our results have implications for climate predictability on long time scales from observed SST data.

  5. Linking surface salinity anomalies and water column stability in the Greenland Sea gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvset, Siv; Brakstad, Ailin; Våge, Kjetil; Olsen, Are; Jeansson, Emil; Mork, Kjell-Arne

    2016-04-01

    The importance and relevance of deep convection in the Greenland Sea gyre is a topic of continued research, and several studies the past decade have shown significant changes to the hydrography of the gyre. In this study we use Argo data up to and including 2015 to show that the water column stratification in the Greenland Sea gyre, which was very weak in the late 1980s, increased throughout the 1990s, but started decreasing again in the mid-2000s. These observed changes in water column stability are associated with salinity changes at 1000 m in the gyre. By cross-correlating changes in the gyre with hydrographic time series of surface water masses we find that warm and saline surface waters exert influence on the water column to depths exceeding 1000 m, and have had an impact on the water mass structure in the Greenland Sea gyre. Such a link between surface anomalies and water column stability in the Greenland Sea gyre could have strong implications for deep ocean oxygen levels and storage of carbon.

  6. Low-frequency variability of surface air temperature over the Barents Sea: causes and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Linden, Eveline C.; Bintanja, Richard; Hazeleger, Wilco; Graversen, Rune G.

    2016-08-01

    The predominant decadal to multidecadal variability in the Arctic region is a feature that is not yet well-understood. It is shown that the Barents Sea is a key region for Arctic-wide variability. This is an important topic because low-frequency changes in the ocean might lead to large variations in the sea-ice cover, which then cause massive changes in the ocean-atmosphere heat exchanges. Here we describe the mechanism driving surface temperatures and heat fluxes in the Barents Sea based primarily on analyzes of one global coupled climate model. It is found that the ocean drives the low-frequency changes in surface temperature, whereas the atmosphere compensates the oceanic transport anomalies. The seasonal dependence and the role of individual components of the ocean-atmosphere energy budget are analyzed in detail, showing that seasonally-varying climate mechanisms play an important role. Herein, sea ice is governing the seasonal response, by acting as a lid that opens and closes during warm and cold periods, respectively, thereby modulating the surface heat fluxes.

  7. Sea Surface Temperature Coupling to Madden-Julian Oscillations over the Indonesian Maritime Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napitu, A. M.; Gordon, A. L.; Pujiana, K.

    2014-12-01

    The intraseasonal SST characteristics within the Indonesian Seas and their responses to the Madden-Julian Oscillations [MJO] are examined through analyses of observed and reanalysis datasets. Intraseasonal variation accounts for about 30% of SST variability, with the strongest signature is observed in Banda and Timor seas. The MJO signature in SST is evident in the form of energy peak at 35-45 days, amplification during the Northwest Monsoon (boreal winter), and eastward propagation. SST responds to sea-air heat flux associated with MJO with net heat flux into the ocean (atmosphere) characterizing the suppressed (active) phase of MJO. The influence of MJO on Banda Sea SST is greatest during La Niña periods, which are favorable for deeper thermocline conditions, which diminish the role of ocean processes driving vertical heat transfer between subsurface and surface layers. Diminished influence of ocean processes results in dominance of surface heat fluxes associated with MJO in governing intraseasonal SST variability. During El Niño, the role of ocean processes is favorable to mediate heat transfer between lower and upper layer of the ocean surface as thermocline is shallower. The ocean component heat fluxes then compete with MJO forced heat fluxes in governing SST variability as indicated by less pronounced eastward propagation.

  8. Numerical reconstruction of trajectory of small-size surface drifter in the Mediterranean sea. Reconstruction of surface drift in the Mediterranean sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchekinova, Elena Y.; Kumkar, Yogesh; Coppini, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we addressed the effects of wind-induced drift on Lagrangian trajectories of surface sea objects using high-resolution ocean forecast and atmospheric data. Application of stochastic Leeway model for prediction of trajectories drift was considered for the numerical reconstruction of the Elba accident that occurred during the period 21.06.2009-22.06.2009: a person on an inflatable raft was lost in the vicinity of the Elba Island coast; from the initial position, the person on a raft drifted southwards in the open sea and later he was found on a partially deflated raft during rescue operation. For geophysical forcing, we used high-resolution currents from the Mediterranean Forecasting System and atmospheric wind from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. To investigate the effect of wind on trajectory behavior, numerical simulations were performed using different categories of drifter-like particles similar to a person on an inflatable raft. An algorithm of spatial clustering was used to differentiate the most probable search areas with a high density of particles. Our results showed that the simulation scenarios using particles with characteristics of draft-limited sea drifters provided better prediction of an observed trajectory in terms of the probability density of particles.

  9. Sea surface carbon dioxide at the Georgia time series site (2006-2007): Air-sea flux and controlling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Cai, Wei-Jun; Hu, Xinping; Sabine, Christopher; Jones, Stacy; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Jiang, Li-Qing; Reimer, Janet J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) in surface seawater was continuously recorded every three hours from 18 July 2006 through 31 October 2007 using a moored autonomous pCO2 (MAPCO2) system deployed on the Gray's Reef buoy off the coast of Georgia, USA. Surface water pCO2 (average 373 ± 52 μatm) showed a clear seasonal pattern, undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere in cold months and generally oversaturated in warm months. High temporal resolution observations revealed important events not captured in previous ship-based observations, such as sporadically occurring biological CO2 uptake during April-June 2007. In addition to a qualitative analysis of the primary drivers of pCO2 variability based on property regressions, we quantified contributions of temperature, air-sea exchange, mixing, and biological processes to monthly pCO2 variations using a 1-D mass budget model. Although temperature played a dominant role in the annual cycle of pCO2, river inputs especially in the wet season, biological respiration in peak summer, and biological production during April-June 2007 also substantially influenced seawater pCO2. Furthermore, sea surface pCO2 was higher in September-October 2007 than in September-October 2006, associated with increased river inputs in fall 2007. On an annual basis this site was a moderate atmospheric CO2 sink, and was autotrophic as revealed by monthly mean net community production (NCP) in the mixed layer. If the sporadic short productive events during April-May 2007 were missed by the sampling schedule, one would conclude erroneously that the site is heterotrophic. While previous ship-based pCO2 data collected around this buoy site agreed with the buoy CO2 data on seasonal scales, high resolution buoy observations revealed that the cruise-based surveys undersampled temporal variability in coastal waters, which could greatly bias the estimates of air-sea CO2 fluxes or annual NCP, and even produce contradictory results.

  10. Sperm-engulfing response of sea urchin egg surfaces inseminated with acrosome-reacted starfish sperm.

    PubMed

    Kyozuka, K; Osanai, K

    1988-10-01

    Sperm-egg interaction was examined in two interclass combinations of sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus nudus and Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus) eggs and starfish (Asterina pectinifera and Asterias amurensis) sperm. Cross-fertilization was unsuccessful between these combinations. When the vitelline coat-free sea urchin eggs were mixed with acrosome-reacted starfish sperm, the elongated microvilli on the egg surface wrapped the sperm head. This sperm-engulfing response observed on the denuded egg surface was induced only in sperm immediately after initiation of the acrosome reaction. Further fertilization events, such as gamete membrane fusion or discharge of cortical granules, did not proceed. These observations suggest that acrosome-reacted sperm can induce a local response on the heterologous egg surface, that is independent of gamete membrane fusion and egg activation. PMID:3229729

  11. Impact of the Sun on Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M; Abraham, Saji; Wentz, F; Lagerloef, G S

    2005-01-01

    The sun is a sufficiently strong source of radiation at L-band to be an important source of interference for radiometers on future satellite missions such as SMOS, Aquarius, and Hydros designed to monitor soil moisture and sea surface salinity. Radiation from the sun can impact passive remote sensing systems in several ways, including line-of-sight radiation that comes directly from the sun and enters through antenna side lobes and radiation that is reflected from the surface to the radiometer. Examples are presented in the case of Aquarius, a pushbroom radiometer with three beams designed to monitor sea surface salinity. Near solar minimum, solar contamination is not a problem unless the sun enters near the main beam. But near solar maximum, contamination from the sun equivalent to a change of salinity on the order of 0.1 psu can occur even when the signal enters in sidelobes far from the main beam.

  12. Seasonal variations of sea-surface salinity and temperature in the tropical Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donguy, Jean-Rene; Meyers, Gary

    1996-02-01

    Measurements of sea-surface temperature and sea-surface salinity obtained from ships-of-opportunity are used to map the fields in the tropical Indian Ocean. The seasonal variation is described in detail along the six shipping tracks that have the best data coverage: Gulf of Aden to La Reunion island, Persian Gulf to Cape Town, Gulf of Aden to east Africa, Gulf of Aden to Indonesia, Sri Lanka to Torres Strait through Malacca Strait, and along the west coast of Australia. Seasonal variation with large amplitude is found in an extensive area in the western Indian Ocean. In the eastern Indian Ocean, seasonal variation is small, except where it is linked to local features such as coastal upwelling, local wind or rainfall-runoff. Water masses, defined from the surface T- S diagram, are related to winds and currents or are formed locally. The movement of these water masses is linked to currents driven by the monsoon circulation.

  13. Transequatorial effects of sea surface temperature anomalies in a global general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spar, J.

    1972-01-01

    The global response of the atmosphere to a persistent anomalous pool of warm sea surface temperatures in the extratropical Pacific Ocean is examined in terms of the meridional pole-to-pole profile of the zonally-averaged 600 mb surface for periods up to 90 days. Following an initial hydrostatic inflation of the isobaric surface in the latitude of the warm pool, effects spread poleward within the hemisphere, then begin to appear after about two to three weeks in high latitudes of the opposite hemisphere, but with little or no response in the tropics. The same sea temperature anomaly field generates a stronger response in winter than in summer, and a very different reaction when located in the Southern Hemisphere than when in the Northern Hemisphere.

  14. Error trends in SASS winds as functions of atmospheric stability and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. T.

    1983-01-01

    Wind speed measurements obtained with the scatterometer instrument aboard the Seasat satellite are compared equivalent neutral wind measurements obtained from ship reports in the western N. Atlantic and eastern N. Pacific where the concentration of ship reports are high and the ranges of atmospheric stability and sea surface temperature are large. It is found that at low wind speeds the difference between satellite measurements and surface reports depends on sea surface temperature. At wind speeds higher than 8 m/s the dependence was greatly reduced. The removal of systematic errors due to fluctuations in atmospheric stability reduced the r.m.s. difference from 1.7 m/s to 0.8 m/s. It is suggested that further clarification of the effects of fluctuations in atmospheric stability on Seasat wind speed measurements should increase their reliability in the future.

  15. Multisensor satellite data integration for sea surface wind speed and direction determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glackin, D. L.; Pihos, G. G.; Wheelock, S. L.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques to integrate meteorological data from various satellite sensors to yield a global measure of sea surface wind speed and direction for input to the Navy's operational weather forecast models were investigated. The sensors were launched or will be launched, specifically the GOES visible and infrared imaging sensor, the Nimbus-7 SMMR, and the DMSP SSM/I instrument. An algorithm for the extrapolation to the sea surface of wind directions as derived from successive GOES cloud images was developed. This wind veering algorithm is relatively simple, accounts for the major physical variables, and seems to represent the best solution that can be found with existing data. An algorithm for the interpolation of the scattered observed data to a common geographical grid was implemented. The algorithm is based on a combination of inverse distance weighting and trend surface fitting, and is suited to combing wind data from disparate sources.

  16. A reevaluation of Stogryn's apparent temperature theory over the sea surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, A. K.; Eom, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    The emission theory for the sea surface by Stogryn has been reevaluated. Results agree with Stogryn's paper except for small nadir angles where the apparent temperature versus wind speed behavior is in reverse of what was reported by Stogryn. By plotting the change in contributions by the sea surface emission and sky temperature scattered toward the radiometer as a function of nadir angle at two different wind speeds, it is found that the sky temperature effect is dominating at small nadir angles, while the change in surface emission becomes increasingly more important at larger nadir angles. It is also found that at nadir higher emission is associated with the polarization where E(arrow) field is aligned along the upwind direction than the one along the crosswind direction.

  17. Preliminary intercomparison and validation of ECMWF 40-year reanalysis (ERA-40) sea-surface fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos Buarque, S.; Giordani, H.; Caniaux, G.; Planton, S.

    2003-04-01

    The ECMWF Re-Analysis 40-year (ERA-40) sea-surface heat fluxes has been evaluated in comparison with three major reanalysis: the ERA-15 (1979-93), the NCEP1 (from 1948) and the GEOS-1 (1980-95). The ERA-40 Project identifies four streams, which cover different periods. All streams are currently running and some discontinuities at the end of streams occur. Two discontinuities zones have being over the period overlapping the three reanalysis and consequently the intercomparison period covers only three years (1980-82). This intercomparison takes into account different forecast lengths and ranges from the forecast base time, which can biases intercomparisons. The short-range forecast of sea-surface heat fluxes from ERA-40 and ERA-15 are used to quantify its changes as a function of the range from the forecast base time. Results show that latent heat flux increases as a function of the range from the forecast base time, leveling off after 24 hours. Sensible and radiative fluxes exhibit stability after 6 hours. Accordingly, sea-surface heat fluxes from ERA-40 are compared with NCEP/NCAR following the same forecast length and range from the forecast base time for the periods 1957-67 (with no satellite observations) and 1996-2000 (with continuous satellite observations). ERA-40 assimilated data take into account a wide selection of sources, which reduces strongly the possibility of validation with independent estimates. However three experiments are used to validate ERA-40 sea-surface turbulent and momentum fluxes with in-situ flux measurements: POMME (September 2000 to October 2001, NE Atlantic), Equalant99 (July to August 1999, Tropical Atlantic) and FETCH (March to April 1998, Mediterranean sea).

  18. Pliocene-Pleistocene evolution of sea surface and intermediate water temperatures from the southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClymont, Erin L.; Elmore, Aurora C.; Kender, Sev; Leng, Melanie J.; Greaves, Mervyn; Elderfield, Henry

    2016-06-01

    Over the last 5 million years, the global climate system has evolved toward a colder mean state, marked by large-amplitude oscillations in continental ice volume. Equatorward expansion of polar waters and strengthening temperature gradients have been detected. However, the response of the mid latitudes and high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere is not well documented, despite the potential importance for climate feedbacks including sea ice distribution and low-high latitude heat transport. Here we reconstruct the Pliocene-Pleistocene history of both sea surface and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) temperatures on orbital time scales from Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 593 in the Tasman Sea, southwest Pacific. We confirm overall Pliocene-Pleistocene cooling trends in both the surface ocean and AAIW, although the patterns are complex. The Pliocene is warmer than modern, but our data suggest an equatorward displacement of the subtropical front relative to present and a poleward displacement of the subantarctic front of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Two main intervals of cooling, from ~3 Ma and ~1.5 Ma, are coeval with cooling and ice sheet expansion noted elsewhere and suggest that equatorward expansion of polar water masses also characterized the southwest Pacific through the Pliocene-Pleistocene. However, the observed trends in sea surface temperature and AAIW temperature are not identical despite an underlying link to the ACC, and intervals of unusual surface ocean warmth (~2 Ma) and large-amplitude variability in AAIW temperatures (from ~1 Ma) highlight complex interactions between equatorward displacements of fronts associated with the ACC and/or varying poleward heat transport from the subtropics.

  19. Global Changes in the Sea Ice Cover and Associated Surface Temperature Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comiso, Josefino C.

    2016-06-01

    The trends in the sea ice cover in the two hemispheres have been observed to be asymmetric with the rate of change in the Arctic being negative at -3.8 % per decade while that of the Antarctic is positive at 1.7 % per decade. These observations are confirmed in this study through analyses of a more robust data set that has been enhanced for better consistency and updated for improved statistics. With reports of anthropogenic global warming such phenomenon appears physically counter intuitive but trend studies of surface temperature over the same time period show the occurrence of a similar asymmetry. Satellite surface temperature data show that while global warming is strong and dominant in the Arctic, it is relatively minor in the Antarctic with the trends in sea ice covered areas and surrounding ice free regions observed to be even negative. A strong correlation of ice extent with surface temperature is observed, especially during the growth season, and the observed trends in the sea ice cover are coherent with the trends in surface temperature. The trend of global averages of the ice cover is negative but modest and is consistent and compatible with the positive but modest trend in global surface temperature. A continuation of the trend would mean the disappearance of summer ice by the end of the century but modelling projections indicate that the summer ice could be salvaged if anthropogenic greenhouse gases in the atmosphere are kept constant at the current level.

  20. Surface Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Tomography on a First-Year Sea Ice Pressure Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuber, A.; Rabenstein, L.; Lehmann-Horn, J. A.; Eicken, H.; Mahoney, A.; Hendricks, S.

    2012-04-01

    The porosity of the keel of a sea ice pressure ridge is one of the critical parameters required to understand the mass budget and evolution of the Arctic sea ice cover. Sea ice pressure ridges are built when drifting ice floes collide due to convergent forces, i.e., due to ocean currents or winds. The resulting ice fragments enclose water-filled cavities in the keel of the ridge. The determination of the keel porosity using drilling yields limited and potentially inaccurate information because of the small footprint and errors involved. Since the porosity within the keel equals its liquid water content, surface-NMR can be applied, a method which is directly sensitive to unbound hydrogen protons. This study shows the results of the first application of surface-NMR on sea ice to determine ridge porosity. A surface-NMR tomography, using seven coincident soundings, was performed on a first-year sea ice pressure ridge on landfast ice off Barrow, Alaska, in April 2011. The inversion indicated a water content in the ridge's shallower part of 31 ± 7%, and of 49 ± 7% in its deeper part. The error range of 7% results from noise, but also from the uncertainty and the simplification implicit in the assumed ridge geometry. The obtained values are much higher than the values obtained from drilling: 10% and 27% respectively. Hence, ridge porosities obtained from direct measurements may result in substantially underestimated ridge melt rates and overestimated total ice volume. The algorithm employed for forward modelling and inversion of surface-NMR data has been extensively tested in a preceding modelling study. It has been shown that the main challenge in deriving subsurface liquid volume fractions from surface-NMR on sea ice is due to the high electric conductivity values of the ocean of up to 3 S/m. Hence, the geometry of the sea ice pressure ridge and the associated electric conductivity distribution of the subsurface need to be represented accurately in the forward

  1. The Sea Surface Temperature Variation during the Spring Tide and Neap Tide in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Jen; Kuo, Nan-Jung; Ho, Chung-Ru; Lo, Yao-Tsai

    2016-04-01

    The sea surface temperature (SST) data of MODIS/Terra (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) are used to analyze the SST difference between the spring tide and the neap tide in the South China Sea (SCS) from 2001 to 2013. The 4 stations from north to south in the SCS are used to investigate the variation of SST. The results show the lowest SST found on January and the highest SST found on June. The standard deviation of SST in shallow regions (St. 1 and St. 4) are larger than the deep regions (St. 2 and St. 3). During the winter and spring the standard deviation of SST at the neap tide are greater than the spring tide period. From the later winter to early summer, the SST during the neap tide period is greater than the spring tide period. They are more obvious in the shallow regions. Meanwhile the influence of tide action in the shallow regions is greater than it in the deep regions.

  2. Application of a sea surface temperature front composite algorithm in the Bohai, Yellow, and East China Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Bo; Su, Fenzhen; Meng, Yunshan; Du, Yunyan; Fang, Shenghui

    2016-05-01

    The oceanic front is a narrow zone in which water properties change abruptly within a short distance. The sea surface temperature (SST) front is an important type of oceanic front, which plays a signifi cant role in many fi elds including fi sheries, the military, and industry. Satellite-derived SST images have been used widely for front detection, although these data are susceptible to infl uence by many objective factors such as clouds, which can cause missing data and a reduction in front detection accuracy. However, front detection in a single SST image cannot fully refl ect its temporal variability and therefore, the long-term mean frequency of occurrence of SST fronts and their gradients are often used to analyze the variations of fronts over time. In this paper, an SST front composite algorithm is proposed that exploits the frontal average gradient and frequency more eff ectively. Through experiments based on MODIS Terra and Aqua data, we verifi ed that fronts could be distinguished better by using the proposed algorithm. Additionally through its use, we analyzed the monthly variations of fronts in the Bohai, Yellow, and East China Seas, based on Terra data from 2000 to 2013.

  3. Alkylphenols in surface sediments of the Yellow Sea and East China Sea inner shelf: occurrence, distribution and fate.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiao-yong; Li, Yan-xia; Li, Xian-guo; Zhang, Da-hai; Gao, Yi

    2014-07-01

    Alkylphenols (APs) have been found as ubiquitous environmental pollutants with reproductive and developmental toxicity. In this study, APs in surface sediments of the Yellow Sea (YS) and East China Sea (ECS) inner shelf were analyzed to assess influences of riverine and atmospheric inputs of pollutants on the marine environment. NP concentrations ranged from 349.5 to 1642.8 ng/g (average 890.1 ng/g) in the YS sediments and from 31.3 to 1423.7 ng/g (average 750.1 ng/g) in the ECS inner shelf sediments. NP distribution pattern was mainly controlled by the sedimentary environment. OP concentration was 0.8-9.3 ng/g (average 4.7 ng/g) in the YS sediments and 0.7-11.1 ng/g (average 5.1 ng/g) in the ECS sediments. Assessment of the influence of distances from land on OP concentrations provided evidence for the predominance of coastal riverine and/or atmospheric inputs rather than long-range transport. And the biological pump may play an important role for sequestration of OP in the nearshore area. PMID:24411839

  4. Improving Surface Mass Balance Over Ice Sheets and Snow Depth on Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Lora Suzanne; Box, Jason; Kurtz, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Surface mass balance (SMB) over ice sheets and snow on sea ice (SOSI) are important components of the cryosphere. Large knowledge gaps remain in scientists' abilities to monitor SMB and SOSI, including insufficient measurements and difficulties with satellite retrievals. On ice sheets, snow accumulation is the sole mass gain to SMB, and meltwater runoff can be the dominant single loss factor in extremely warm years such as 2012. SOSI affects the growth and melt cycle of the Earth's polar sea ice cover. The summer of 2012 saw the largest satellite-recorded melt area over the Greenland ice sheet and the smallest satellite-recorded Arctic sea ice extent, making this meeting both timely and relevant.

  5. Sea Surface Wakes Observed by Spaceborne SAR in the Offshore Wind Farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoming; Lehner, Susanne; Jacobsen, Sven

    2014-11-01

    In the paper, we present some X-band spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) TerraSAR-X (TS-X) images acquired at the offshore wind farms in the North Sea and the East China Sea. The high spatial resolution SAR images show different sea surface wake patterns downstream of the offshore wind turbines. The analysis suggests that there are major two types of wakes among the observed cases. The wind turbine wakes generated by movement of wind around wind turbines are the most often observed cases. In contrast, due to the strong local tidal currents in the near shore wind farm sites, the tidal current wakes induced by tidal current impinging on the wind turbine piles are also observed in the high spatial resolution TS-X images. The discrimination of the two types of wakes observed in the offshore wind farms is also described in the paper.

  6. Evaluation of sea surface salinity retrieval from SMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tong; Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank; Lagerloef, Gary

    2016-04-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite, launched on January 29, 2015, has been delivering measurements since April 2015. Although SMAP's primary mission objective is to measure soil moisture, its L-band radiometer-radar design that is similar to Aquarius (NASA's ocean salinity measuring satellite that ended its operation in June 2015) provides a potential mean to continue Aquarius' legacy. SMAP's radiometer, designed for land applications, has less precision than its Aquarius counterpart. However, the spatial resolution of SMAP's measurements is better than that of Aquarius by several times. SMAP's radar, which would have provided wind measurements needed to correct for surface roughness effect on SSS retrieval, stopped functioning in July 2015. Despite this, the Aquarius team has used the Aquarius experience to retrieve SSS from SMAP's radiometer measurements using auxiliary wind measurements. This presentation evaluates the fidelity of the SMAP SSS in depicting various oceanographic features from open oceans to coastal regions. A quantitative comparison between SMAP SSS and in-situ Argo float measurements and between SMAP and satellite SSS from Aquarius and SMOS during their overlapping periods will be presented. The evaluation demonstrates the very encouraging SSS retrieval from SMAP, which provides temporal continuity of SSS measurements beyond Aquarius.

  7. Identifying key drivers of sea surface variability from satellite altimetry in the North-East Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterlini, Paul; de Vries, Hylke

    2015-04-01

    Sea surface height variability (SSV) operates in varying temporal and spatial scales and acts as a source of noise when trying to perform long term trend analysis on the sea surface height (SSH). SSV can be removed through a simple running average process but this approach takes no account of individual contributors to the SSV. This study seeks to identify (and ultimately remove) the major contributing components of the SSV in the North-East Atlantic to expose the underlying changes in the SSH signal. This allows a trend analysis on the "cleaned" SSH for an accurate determination of sea level rise. Observations of sea level anomalies (SLA) are taken from 21 years of satellite altimeter data and are used to estimate the SSV in the North-East Atlantic. Seasonal signals are removed and monthly means calculated. The SSV is decomposed into global, regional and local components and a simple multiple linear regression model is constructed on the basis of these components to model the explained SSV. Initial results show that a region of high SSV exists off the west coast of Denmark and can be well represented with a regression model which uses local wind and global temperature as primary regressors. The same model does not capture a more diffuse region of high SSV in the Atlantic Ocean which suggests that the SSV is driven by other physical processes and highlights the need for specific spatial analyses when seeking to model SSV. This work will help in understanding regional sea level change over the past 21 years and to provide a foundation for estimates of local sea level change in the near future.

  8. Model study on the dependence of primary marine aerosol emission on the sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, S.; Tegen, I.; Wolke, R.; van Pinxteren, M.

    2014-01-01

    Primary marine aerosol composed of sea salt and organic material is an important contributor to the global aerosol load. By comparing measurements from two EMEP (co-operative programme for monitoring and evaluation of the long-range transmissions of air-pollutants in Europe) intensive campaigns in June 2006 and January 2007 with results from an atmospheric transport model this work shows that accounting for the influence of the sea surface temperature on the emission of primary marine aerosol improves the model results towards the measurements in both months. Different sea surface temperature dependencies were evaluated. Using correction functions based on Sofiev et al. (2011) and Jaeglé et al. (2011) improves the model results for coarse mode particles. In contrast, for the fine mode aerosols no best correction function could be found. The model captures the low sodium concentrations at the marine station Virolahti II (Finland), which is influenced by air masses from the low salinity Baltic Sea, as well as the higher concentrations at Cabauw (Netherlands) and Auchencorth Moss (Scotland). These results indicate a shift towards smaller sizes with lower salinity for the emission of dry sea salt aerosols. Organic material was simulated as part of primary marine aerosol assuming an internal mixture with sea salt. A comparison of the model results for primary organic carbon with measurements by a Berner-impactor at Sao Vincente (Cape Verde) indicated that the model underpredicted the observed organic carbon concentration. This leads to the conclusion that the formation of secondary organic material needs to be included in the model to improve the agreement with the measurements.

  9. Sea surface height variability during 1986-1988 in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Yi ); Halpern, D.; Perigaud, C. )

    1993-04-15

    The authors present model results which compare sea surface heights monitored by Geosat altimeters with a tropical Pacific Ocean general circulation model for the period 1986 to 1988. They feel the altimeter data is of sufficient quality now, and capable of giving global information collected in short time windows, that it warrants combining this information into modern general circulation models. Here the authors compare the altimeter data with the model results, over a period which includes the 1987 El Nino, 1988 La Nina, and Dec 1986 equatorial Kelvin wave event. The results correlate fairly well, and compare well with surface measurements available from a number of surface monitoring sites.

  10. Clay mineral associations in fine-grained surface sediments of the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irion, Georg; Zöllmer, Volker

    1999-03-01

    With the help of about 500 samples of surface sediments from the North Sea crude maps of the distributions of the clay minerals illite, chlorite, smectite and kaolinite were constructed. Illite, with 51%, is the dominant clay mineral, followed by smectite (27%), chlorite (12%), and kaolinite (10%). There are well-distinguished areas of different concentrations of the individual clay mineral associations. Illite and chlorite show highest values in the north, kaolinite concentrations are high in a corridor a few hundred kilometres wide between the east coast of the UK and the Danish/south Norwegian coast. Smectite is high in the German Bight and in the southwestern North Sea. The distribution patterns of the clay mineral associations are mainly explained by late Quaternary history and by recent to sub-recent sedimentary processes. During the Pleistocene cold periods illite- and chlorite-rich sediments from the Fennoscandian Shield were transported by the great inland ice-masses in a southward direction. The present high sea-level erosion on the east coast of Great Britain provides the North Sea with kaolinite-rich fine-grained sediments. Smectites inherited from Elsterian deposits in the southeast corner and probably from sub-recent Elbe sediments are responsible for their higher values in the German Bight. The high values of smectite in the southwest may have originated from Cretaceous sediments eroded on the banks of the Strait of Dover. The present contribution of riverine suspended load to the North Sea appears to be low.

  11. Scale effect and optimum relations for sea surface planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedov, L.

    1947-01-01

    From the general dimensional and mechanical similarity theory it follows that a condition of steady motion of a given shape\\bottom with constant speed on the surface of water is determined by four nondimensional parameters. By considering the various systems of independent parameters which are applied in theory and practice and special tests, there is determined their mutual relations and their suitability as planning characteristics. In studying the scale effect on the basis of the Prnndtl formula for the friction coefficient for a turbulent condition the order of magnitude is given of the error in applying the model data to full scale in the case of a single-step bottom For a bottom of complicated shape it is shown how from the test data of the hydrodynamic characteristics for one speed with various loads, or one load with various speeds, there may be obtained by simple computation with good approximation the hydrodynamic characteristics for a different speed or for a different load. (These considerations may be of use in solving certain problems on the stability of planning.) This permits extrapolating the curve of resistance against speed for large speeds inaccessible in the tank tests or for other loads which were not tested. The data obtained by computation are in good agreement with the test results. Problems regarding the optimum trim angle or the optimum width in the case of planning of a flat plate are considered from the point of view of the minimum resistance for a given load on the water and planning speeds. Formulas and graphs are given for the optimum value of the planning coefficient and the corresponding values of the trim angle and width of the flat plate.

  12. Trends in Sea Ice Cover, Sea Surface Temperature, and Chlorophyll Biomass Across a Marine Distributed Biological Observatory in the Pacific Arctic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, K. E.; Grebmeier, J. M.; Cooper, L. W.; Wood, C.; Panday, P. K.

    2011-12-01

    The northern Bering and Chukchi Seas in the Pacific Arctic Region (PAR) are among the most productive marine ecosystems in the world and act as important carbon sinks, particularly during May and June when seasonal sea ice-associated phytoplankton blooms occur throughout the region. Recent dramatic shifts in seasonal sea ice cover across the PAR should have profound consequences for this seasonal phytoplankton production as well as the intimately linked higher trophic levels. In order to investigate ecosystem responses to these observed recent shifts in sea ice cover, the development of a prototype Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO) is now underway in the PAR. The DBO is being developed as an internationally-coordinated change detection array that allows for consistent sampling and monitoring at five spatially explicit biologically productive locations across a latitudinal gradient: (1) DBO-SLP (south of St. Lawrence Island (SLI)), (2) DBO-NBS (north of SLI), (3) DBO-SCS (southern Chukchi Sea), (4) DBO-CCS (central Chukchi Sea), and (5) DBO-BCA (Barrow Canyon Arc). Standardized measurements at many of the DBO sites were made by multiple research cruises during the 2010 and 2011 pilot years, and will be expanded with the development of the DBO in coming years. In order to provide longer-term context for the changes occurring across the PAR, we utilize multi-sensor satellite data to investigate recent trends in sea ice cover, chlorophyll biomass, and sea surface temperatures for each of the five DBO sites, as well as a sixth long-term observational site in the Bering Strait. Satellite observations show that over the past three decades, trends in sea ice cover in the PAR have been heterogeneous, with significant declines in the Chukchi Sea, slight declines in the Bering Strait region, but increases in the northern Bering Sea south of SLI. Declines in the persistence of seasonal sea ice cover in the Chukchi Sea and Bering Strait region are due to both earlier sea

  13. Impact of Surface Roughness on AMSR-E Sea Ice Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroeve, Julienne C.; Markus, Thorsten; Maslanik, James A.; Cavalieri, Donald J.; Gasiewski, Albin J.; Heinrichs, John F.; Holmgren, Jon; Perovich, Donald K.; Sturm, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the sensitivity of Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) brightness temperatures (Tbs) to surface roughness by a using radiative transfer model to simulate AMSR-E Tbs as a function of incidence angle at which the surface is viewed. The simulated Tbs are then used to examine the influence that surface roughness has on two operational sea ice algorithms, namely: 1) the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Team (NT) algorithm and 2) the enhanced NT algorithm, as well as the impact of roughness on the AMSR-E snow depth algorithm. Surface snow and ice data collected during the AMSR-Ice03 field campaign held in March 2003 near Barrow, AK, were used to force the radiative transfer model, and resultant modeled Tbs are compared with airborne passive microwave observations from the Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer. Results indicate that passive microwave Tbs are very sensitive even to small variations in incidence angle, which can cause either an over or underestimation of the true amount of sea ice in the pixel area viewed. For example, this paper showed that if the sea ice areas modeled in this paper mere assumed to be completely smooth, sea ice concentrations were underestimated by nearly 14% using the NT sea ice algorithm and by 7% using the enhanced NT algorithm. A comparison of polarization ratios (PRs) at 10.7,18.7, and 37 GHz indicates that each channel responds to different degrees of surface roughness and suggests that the PR at 10.7 GHz can be useful for identifying locations of heavily ridged or rubbled ice. Using the PR at 10.7 GHz to derive an "effective" viewing angle, which is used as a proxy for surface roughness, resulted in more accurate retrievals of sea ice concentration for both algorithms. The AMSR-E snow depth algorithm was found to be extremely sensitive to instrument calibration and sensor viewing angle, and it is concluded that more work is needed to investigate the sensitivity of the gradient ratio at 37 and

  14. Sea-surface temperature gradients across blue whale and sea turtle foraging trajectories off the Baja California Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etnoyer, Peter; Canny, David; Mate, Bruce R.; Morgan, Lance E.; Ortega-Ortiz, Joel G.; Nichols, Wallace J.

    2006-02-01

    Sea-surface temperature (SST) fronts are integral to pelagic ecology in the North Pacific Ocean, so it is necessary to understand their character and distribution, and the way these features influence the behavior of endangered and highly migratory species. Here, telemetry data from sixteen satellite-tagged blue whales ( Balaenoptera musculus) and sea turtles ( Caretta caretta, Chelonia mydas, and Lepidochelys olivacea) are employed to characterize 'biologically relevant' SST fronts off Baja California Sur. High residence times are used to identify presumed foraging areas, and SST gradients are calculated across advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) images of these regions. The resulting values are compared to classic definitions of SST fronts in the oceanographic literature. We find subtle changes in surface temperature (between 0.01 and 0.10 °C/km) across the foraging trajectories, near the lowest end of the oceanographic scale (between 0.03 and 0.3 °C/km), suggesting that edge-detection algorithms using gradient thresholds >0.10 °C/km may overlook pelagic habitats in tropical waters. We use this information to sensitize our edge-detection algorithm, and to identify persistent concentrations of subtle SST fronts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean between 2002 and 2004. The lower-gradient threshold increases the number of fronts detected, revealing more potential habitats in different places than we find with a higher-gradient threshold. This is the expected result, but it confirms that pelagic habitat can be overlooked, and that the temperature gradient parameter is an important one.

  15. Surface connection between different areas in Mediterranean Sea derived from drifter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celentano, Paolo; Carlson, Daniel F.; Falco, Pierpaolo; Zambianchi, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    The surface connection of five study areas in the Mediterranean Sea (Sicily Strait, Gulf of Lyon, Ionian Sea, Alborán Sea and Crete Passage) is studied by looking at the statistical properties of near-surface lagrangian trajectories. The choice of the areas is due to the geographical distribution of data and the key role of these sub-basins in the dynamics of the Mediterranean. We used Lagrangian drifter data taken from the Mediterranean Surface Velocity Programme (http://nettuno.ogs.trieste.it/sire/medsvp/). The most common surface drifter used is the CODE-type drifter (Davis, 1985), designed to follow the vertical average velocity of the upper 1 m layer of the water column. The dataset consist of 1547 trajectories, deployed between 1986 and 2015 in all Mediterranean sub basins. By examining the drifter paths through the study areas, we computed transit and residence time, pseudo-Eulerian statistics and connection probabilities. Given the small number of drifters and the non-normal distribution of transit times, it is possible to use a bootstrap method (Efron and Tibshirani, 1986) to estimate the average transit time. In particular, we divided it into forward and backward transit times to consider the time taken by drifters respectively, from the exit of study area to end of its trajectory and from the deployment position to the study area. The main results indicate that the transit time between Sicily Strait and coast of Libya is about 83-103 days and between the Strait and the Gulf of Lyon is approximately 134 days. The time to reach the Adriatic Sea from the Ionian is around 30-40 days; the drifters take around 70 days to go from Alborán Sea to Sardinia channel and 43 days between Crete and the Ionian Sea. The Ionian Sea due has the highest number of drifter trajectories and the highest residence time, about 42 days. Also the Crete Passage has a high value of residence time, approximately 35 days; the other study areas are characterized by residence times of

  16. Sea surface density gradients in the Nordic Seas during the Holocene as revealed by paired microfossil and isotope proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Nieuwenhove, Nicolas; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Bauch, Henning A.; Vernal, Anne

    2016-03-01

    We attempt to assess the Holocene surface-subsurface seawater density gradient on millennial time scale based on the reconstruction of potential density (σθ) by combining data from dinoflagellate cyst assemblages and planktic foraminiferal (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (s)) stable oxygen isotopes (δ18Oc). Following several calibration exercises, the likeliness of favorable seasonal preconditioning to open ocean convection is evaluated. The reconstructed σθ values reveal unfavorable conditions for vertical convection in the western Nordic Seas prior to ~7-6.5 ka B.P., with a westward increase and persistence of surface water buoyancy. Active overturning became more likely after 6.5 ka B.P. as suggested by a reduced and recurrently inverted vertical σθ gradient, while intermittent eastward spreading of lower density surface waters continued to modulate the area of potential overturning. Despite some reservation regarding the accuracy of the σθ values reconstructed, the documentation of relative changes of σθ gradients through time and space is suggested as a helpful tool for the appraisal of past overturning likeliness.

  17. Distribution of total mercury in surface sediments of the western Jade Bay, Lower Saxonian Wadden Sea, southern North Sea.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huafang; Liebezeit, Gerd; Ziehe, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    A total of 114 surface sediment samples was equidistantly collected in the western part of the Jade Bay, southern North Sea, to analyse total mercury contents as well as grain size distribution and total organic carbon (TOC) contents. Total mercury was determined by oxygen combustion-gold amalgamation. Validation, precision and accuracy of the method were evaluated and controlled with two certified reference materials (HISS-1 and MESS-3). Total mercury contents varied between 8 and 243 ng/g dry sediment with a mean value of 103 ng/g dw. The mercury levels in surface sediments showed an inhomogeneous spatial distribution with higher contents in near-dike areas. The values are mostly in the range of natural background values (50–100 ng/g dw) and positively related to TOC and clay/silt contents (<63 μm). The present total mercury contents are compared to those of previous studies, in order to estimate possible temporal trends of mercury contents in the study area over the last decades. Moreover, the comparison to sediment quality guidelines indicated that the surface sediments of the Jade Bay are not mercury contaminated. These results also suggested that the current mercury contents of Jade Bay surficial sediments are mostly affected by atmospheric deposition and re-emission. PMID:22301998

  18. SIMMAX: A modern analog technique to deduce Atlantic sea surface temperatures from planktonic foraminifera in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflaumann, Uwe; Duprat, Josette; Pujol, Claude; Labeyrie, Laurent D.

    1996-02-01

    We present a data set of 738 planktonic foraminiferal species counts from sediment surface samples of the eastern North Atlantic and the South Atlantic between 87°N and 40°S, 35°E and 60°W including published Climate: Long-Range Investigation, Mapping, and Prediction (CLIMAP) data. These species counts are linked to Levitus's [1982] modern water temperature data for the four caloric seasons, four depth ranges (0, 30, 50, and 75 m), and the combined means of those depth ranges. The relation between planktonic foraminiferal assemblages and sea surface temperature (SST) data is estimated using the newly developed SIMMAX technique, which is an acronym for a modern analog technique (MAT) with a similarity index, based on (1) the scalar product of the normalized faunal percentages and (2) a weighting procedure of the modern analog's SSTs according to the inverse geographical distances of the most similar samples. Compared to the classical CLIMAP transfer technique and conventional MAT techniques, SIMMAX provides a more confident reconstruction of paleo-SSTs (correlation coefficient is 0.994 for the caloric winter and 0.993 for caloric summer). The standard deviation of the residuals is 0.90°C for caloric winter and 0.96°C for caloric summer at 0-m water depth. The SST estimates reach optimum stability (standard deviation of the residuals is 0.88°C) at the average 0- to 75-m water depth. Our extensive database provides SST estimates over a range of -1.4 to 27.2°C for caloric winter and 0.4 to 28.6°C for caloric summer, allowing SST estimates which are especially valuable for the high-latitude Atlantic during glacial times. An electronic supplement of this material may be obtained on adiskette or Anonymous FTP from KOSMOS.AGU.ORG. (LOGIN toAGU's FTP account using ANONYMOUS as the username and GUESTas the password. Go to the right directory by typing CD APPEND. TypeLS to see what files are available. Type GET and the name of the file toget it. Finally type EXIT to

  19. No inter-gyre pathway for sea-surface temperature anomalies in the North Atlantic

    PubMed Central

    Foukal, Nicholas P.; Lozier, M. Susan

    2016-01-01

    Recent Lagrangian analyses of surface drifters have questioned the existence of a surface current connecting the Gulf Stream (GS) to the subpolar gyre (SPG) and have cast doubt on the mechanism underlying an apparent pathway for sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies between the two regions. Here we use modelled Lagrangian trajectories to determine the fate of surface GS water and satellite SST data to analyse pathways of GS SST anomalies. Our results show that only a small fraction of the surface GS water reaches the SPG, the water that does so mainly travels below the surface mixed layer, and GS SST anomalies do not propagate into the SPG on interannual timescales. Instead, the inter-gyre heat transport as part of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation must be accomplished via subsurface pathways. We conclude that the SST in the SPG cannot be predicted by tracking SST anomalies along the GS. PMID:27103496

  20. No inter-gyre pathway for sea-surface temperature anomalies in the North Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Foukal, Nicholas P; Lozier, M Susan

    2016-01-01

    Recent Lagrangian analyses of surface drifters have questioned the existence of a surface current connecting the Gulf Stream (GS) to the subpolar gyre (SPG) and have cast doubt on the mechanism underlying an apparent pathway for sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies between the two regions. Here we use modelled Lagrangian trajectories to determine the fate of surface GS water and satellite SST data to analyse pathways of GS SST anomalies. Our results show that only a small fraction of the surface GS water reaches the SPG, the water that does so mainly travels below the surface mixed layer, and GS SST anomalies do not propagate into the SPG on interannual timescales. Instead, the inter-gyre heat transport as part of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation must be accomplished via subsurface pathways. We conclude that the SST in the SPG cannot be predicted by tracking SST anomalies along the GS. PMID:27103496

  1. No inter-gyre pathway for sea-surface temperature anomalies in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foukal, Nicholas P.; Lozier, M. Susan

    2016-04-01

    Recent Lagrangian analyses of surface drifters have questioned the existence of a surface current connecting the Gulf Stream (GS) to the subpolar gyre (SPG) and have cast doubt on the mechanism underlying an apparent pathway for sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies between the two regions. Here we use modelled Lagrangian trajectories to determine the fate of surface GS water and satellite SST data to analyse pathways of GS SST anomalies. Our results show that only a small fraction of the surface GS water reaches the SPG, the water that does so mainly travels below the surface mixed layer, and GS SST anomalies do not propagate into the SPG on interannual timescales. Instead, the inter-gyre heat transport as part of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation must be accomplished via subsurface pathways. We conclude that the SST in the SPG cannot be predicted by tracking SST anomalies along the GS.

  2. Spatial trend patterns of Sea Surface Temperature, 20°C isotherm depth and sea level in the Pacific Ocean during 1993 - 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanisamy, H. K.; Cazenave, A. A.; Delcroix, T. C.; Meyssignac, B.

    2013-12-01

    Analysis and comparison of spatial trend patterns and variability of observed sea level, steric sea level and Sea Surface Temperature (SST) in the Pacific Ocean during the altimetry era (1993-2012) shows that the observed sea level trend patterns in this region result from the superposition of two main signals: (1) a strong broad scale V-shaped positive trend anomaly-extending to mid-latitudes in the central Pacific and (2) another very strong positive trend anomaly located between 120°E and 160° E longitude and ~20°S-20°N latitude (Tropical Pacific). The type (1) signal also observed in SST is characteristic of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and reflects the ocean-atmosphere coupling. The type (2) signal related to El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), is steric in origin and as shown in several previous studies is mostly due to the deepening of the thermocline. In this study, we further show that the depth of the 20°C isotherm (supposed to represent the thermocline) presents a spatial trend pattern highly correlated to that of observed sea level. The computed steric sea level associated with the 20°C isotherm depth (i.e. steric sea level calculated between 0m and 20°C isotherm depth) explains the observed sea level trend very well. The results imply that PDO and ENSO related signals explain most of the observed sea level trend pattern in the Pacific Ocean. A supplementary study on the impact of geostrophic surface currents on sea level change in the Tropical Pacific is also performed.

  3. Sea surface and subsurface circulation dynamics off equatorial Peru during the last ~17 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nürnberg, Dirk; Böschen, Tebke; Doering, Kristin; Mollier-Vogel, Elfi; Raddatz, Jacek; Schneider, Ralph

    2015-07-01

    The complex deglacial to Holocene oceanographic development in the Gulf of Guayaquil (Eastern Equatorial Pacific) is reconstructed for sea surface and subsurface ocean levels from (isotope) geochemical proxies based on marine sediment cores. At sea surface, southern sourced Cold Coastal Water and tropical Equatorial Surface Water/Tropical Surface Water are intimately related. In particular since ~10 ka, independent sea surface temperature proxies capturing different seasons emphasize the growing seasonal contrast in the Gulf of Guayaquil, which is in contrast to ocean areas further offshore. Cold Coastal Water became rapidly present in the Gulf of Guayaquil during the austral winter season in line with the strengthening of the Southeast Trades, while coastal upwelling off Peru gradually intensified and expanded northward in response to a seasonally changing atmospheric circulation pattern affecting the core locations intensively since 4 ka BP. Equatorial Surface Water, instead, was displaced and Tropical Surface Water moved northward together with the Equatorial Front. At subsurface, the presence of Equatorial Under Current-sourced Equatorial Subsurface Water was continuously growing, prominently since ~10-8 ka B.P. During Heinrich Stadial 1 and large parts of the Bølling/Allerød, and similarly during short Holocene time intervals at ~5.1-4 ka B.P. and ~1.5-0.5 ka B.P., the admixture of Equatorial Subsurface Water was reduced in response to both short-term weakening of Equatorial Under Current strength from the northwest and emplacement by tropical Equatorial Surface Water, considerably warming the uppermost ocean layers.

  4. Variability of sea ice melt and meteoric water input in the surface Labrador Current off Newfoundland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, M.; Reverdin, G.; Pierre, C.; Khatiwala, S.; Tournadre, B.; Olafsdottir, S.; Naamar, A.

    2016-04-01

    The respective contributions of saline (Atlantic and Pacific water) and freshwater (sea ice melt, meteoric water) components in the surface Labrador Current are quantified using salinity, δ18O, and nutrient data collected between 2012 and 2015 east of Newfoundland to investigate the seasonal variability of salinity in relation with the different freshwater contributions. Nutrient data indicate that the surface saline water is composed on average over 2012-2015 of roughly 62% Atlantic Water and 38% Pacific Water. A large salinity seasonal cycle of ≈ 1.5 peak-to-peak amplitude is found over the middle continental shelf, which is explained by the freshwater input seasonal variability: 2/3 of the amplitude of the salinity seasonal cycle can be explained by meteoric water input and 1/3 by the sea ice melt. A smaller seasonal salinity cycle (≈1.3) is observed over the inner shelf compared to the middle shelf, because of smaller variability in the large meteoric water inputs. Furthermore, the data reveal that sea ice melt (SIM) input was particularly important during July 2014, following a larger extension of sea ice over the Labrador shelf during the 2013/2014 winter season, compared to both previous winter seasons. Some patches of large SIM contribution observed during July 2014 and April 2015 were located on the continental slope or further offshore. The comparison of 2012-2015 data with data collected in 1994-1995 shows that the surface water over the Newfoundland shelf and slope is strongly affected by sea ice processes in both periods and suggests a larger contribution of brines over the slope during 1994-1995.

  5. Unpolarized infrared emissivity with shadow from anisotropic rough sea surfaces with non-Gaussian statistics.

    PubMed

    Bourlier, Christophe

    2005-07-10

    The emissivity of two-dimensional anisotropic rough sea surfaces with non-Gaussian statistics is investigated. The emissivity derivation is of importance for retrieval of the sea-surface temperature or equivalent temperature of a rough sea surface by infrared thermal imaging. The well-known Cox-Munk slope probability-density function, considered non-Gaussian, is used for the emissivity derivation, in which the skewness and the kurtosis (related to the third- and fourth-order statistics, respectively) are included. The shadowing effect, which is significant for grazing angles, is also taken into account. The geometric optics approximation is assumed to be valid, which means that the rough surface is modeled as a collection of facets reflecting locally the light in the specular direction. In addition, multiple reflections are ignored. Numerical results of the emissivity are presented for Gaussian and non-Gaussian statistics, for moderate wind speeds, for near-infrared wavelengths, for emission angles ranging from 0 degrees (nadir) to 90 degrees (horizon), and according to the wind direction. In addition, the emissivity is compared with both measurements and a Monte Carlo ray-tracing method. PMID:16045222

  6. A sea surface salinity dipole mode in the tropical Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuhong; Du, Yan; Qu, Tangdong

    2016-01-01

    Based on the 10 years sea surface salinity (SSS) data from Argo, we identified a salinity dipole mode in the tropical Indian Ocean, termed S-IOD: a pattern of interannual SSS variability with anomalously low-salinity in the central equatorial and high-salinity in the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean. The S-IOD matures in November-December, lagging the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) mode derived from sea surface temperature (SST) by 2 months. For the period of observations, the S-IOD persists longer than the IOD, until the following September-October. Oscillations of the two S-IOD poles are governed by different processes. Ocean advection associated with equatorial current variability dominates the SSS anomalies of the northern pole, while surface freshwater flux variability plays a key role in the SSS anomalies of the southern pole, where anomalous precipitation is sustained by preformed sea surface temperature anomalies. The S-IOD concurs with the strong IOD, reflecting an ocean-atmosphere coupling through the SST-precipitation-SSS feedback.

  7. Variation of the microwave brightness temperature of sea surfaces covered with mineral and monomolecular oil films

    SciTech Connect

    Blume, H.J.; Alpers, W.; Huehnerfuss, H.

    1983-07-01

    Airborne microwave radiometer measurements over mineral and monomolecular oil films and adjacent clean sea surfaces are reported. An artificial crude-oil spill experiment in the New York Bight area showed a brightness temperature increase of the sea surface at 1.43 GHz as expected from a multilayered system with different dielectric constants. However, a monomolecular surface-film experiment with oleyl alcohol conducted in the North Sea during MARSEN in 1979 showed a strong brightness temperature depression at 1.43 GHz and no change in brightness temperature at 2.65 GHz. It is postulated that the monomolecular layer, because of its physical and chemical properties, polarized the underlying water molecules so strongly that the emissivity decreased from 0.31 to 0.016. It is estimated that the effective dielectric constant changed from 90 to 5.2 x 10/sup 4/. Because these phenomena occurred at 1.43 GHz it may be concluded that this frequency is very close to the center of a new anomalous dispersion region resulting from a restructuring of the water layer below the surface film.

  8. The Transient Circulation Response to Radiative Forcings and Sea Surface Warming

    SciTech Connect

    Staten, Paul; Reichler, Thomas; Lu, Jian

    2014-08-27

    Tropospheric circulation shifts have strong potential to impact surface climate. But the magnitude of these shifts in a changing climate, and the attending regional hydrological changes, are difficult to project. Part of this difficulty arises from our lack of understanding of the physical mechanisms behind the circulation shifts themselves. In order to better delineate circulation shifts and their respective causes, we decompose the circulation response into (1) the "direct" response to radiative forcings themselves, and (2) the "indirect" response to changing sea surface temperatures. Using ensembles of 90-day climate model simulations with immediate switch-on forcings, including perturbed greenhouse gas concentrations, stratospheric ozone concentrations, and sea surface temperatures, we document the direct and indirect transient responses of the zonal mean general circulation, and investigate the roles of previously proposed mechanisms in shifting the midlatitude jet. We find that both the direct and indirect wind responses often begin in the lower stratosphere. Changes in midlatitude eddies are ubiquitous and synchronous with the midlatitude zonal wind response. Shifts in the critical latitude of wave absorption on either flank of the jet are not indicted as primary factors for the poleward shifting jet, although we see some evidence for increasing equatorward wave reflection over the southern hemisphere in response to sea surface warming. Mechanisms for the northern hemisphere jet shift are less clear.

  9. Climatological variations of total alkalinity and total inorganic carbon in the Mediterranean Sea surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemayel, E.; Hassoun, A. E. R.; Benallal, M. A.; Goyet, C.; Rivaro, P.; Abboud-Abi Saab, M.; Krasakopoulou, E.; Touratier, F.; Ziveri, P.

    2015-08-01

    A compilation of several cruises data from 1998 to 2013 was used to derive polynomial fits that estimate total alkalinity (AT) and total inorganic carbon (CT) from measurements of salinity and temperature in the Mediterranean Sea surface waters. The optimal equations were chosen based on the 10-fold cross validation results and revealed that a second and third order polynomials fit the AT and CT data respectively. The AT surface fit showed an improved root mean square error (RMSE) of ±10.6 μmol kg-1. Furthermore we present the first annual mean CT parameterization for the Mediterranean Sea surface waters with a RMSE of ±14.3 μmol kg-1. Excluding the marginal seas of the Adriatic and the Aegean, these equations can be used to estimate AT and CT in case of the lack of measurements. The seven years averages (2005-2012) mapped using the quarter degree climatologies of the World Ocean Atlas 2013 showed that in surface waters AT and CT have similar patterns with an increasing eastward gradient. The surface variability is influenced by the inflow of cold Atlantic waters through the Strait of Gibraltar and by the oligotrophic and thermohaline gradient that characterize the Mediterranean Sea. The summer-winter seasonality was also mapped and showed different patterns for AT and CT. During the winter, the AT and CT concentrations were higher in the western than in the eastern basin, primarily due to the deepening of the mixed layer and upwelling of dense waters. The opposite was observed in the summer where the eastern basin was marked by higher AT and CT concentrations than in winter. The strong evaporation that takes place in this season along with the ultra-oligotrophy of the eastern basin determines the increase of both AT and CT concentrations.

  10. Tug of war on summertime circulation between radiative forcing and sea surface warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, T. A.; Voigt, A.

    2015-07-01

    During summertime, monsoons and subtropical anticyclones shape precipitation and regional circulation patterns across the globe. In state-of-the-art climate models, the average response of the Asian monsoon cyclone, Pacific ocean anticyclone and jet stream to global warming is weak and responses of different models are diverse. Here we use a suite of simulations with atmospheric general circulation models with prescribed sea surface temperatures to separate the circulation responses to direct radiative forcing and indirect sea surface temperature warming. We find that the two contributions oppose each other. Using idealized aquaplanet simulations, we show that the different circulation responses are directly connected to the opposite responses of land-sea thermal contrast to the two forcing components. This tug of war on the circulation response to global warming is analogous to the seasonal response to insolation, which involves opposite land-sea thermal contrasts and circulation patterns governed by quasi-equilibrium thermodynamics and stationary-wave dynamics. We conclude that it is important to distinguish weak circulation responses to global warming that arise owing to compensating effects that are robust and physically understood from those that are associated with genuine uncertainty. We note that compensation places fundamental limits on the detection and attribution of circulation responses to global warming.

  11. On recording sea surface elevation with accelerometer buoys: lessons from ITOP (2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Clarence O.; Lund, Björn; Waseda, Takuji; Graber, Hans C.

    2014-06-01

    Measurements of significant wave height are made routinely throughout the world's oceans, but a record of the sea surface elevation ( η) is rarely kept. This is mostly due to memory limitations on data, but also, it is thought that buoy measurements of sea surface elevation are not as accurate as wave gauges mounted on stationary platforms. Accurate records of η which contain rogue waves (defined here as an individual wave at least twice the significant wave height) are of great interest to scientists and engineers. Using field data, procedures for tilt correcting and double integrating accelerometer data to produce a consistent record of η are given in this study. The data in this study are from experimental buoys deployed in the recent Impact of Typhoons on the Ocean in the Pacific (ITOP) field experiment which occurred in 2010. The statistics from the ITOP buoys is under that predicted by Rayleigh theory, but matches the distributions of Boccotti and others (Tayfun and Fedele) (Ocean Eng 34:1631-1649, 2007). Rogue waves were recorded throughout the experiment under various sea state conditions. Recommendations, as a result of lessons learned during ITOP, are made for the routine recording of η which may not add significantly to the existing data burden. The hope is that we might one day collect a worldwide database of rogue waves from the existing buoy network, which would progress our understanding of the rogue wave phenomenon and make work at sea safer.

  12. Spatial Diversity of Bacterioplankton Communities in Surface Water of Northern South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuchao; Zou, Tao; Yu, Shuxian; Wang, Yinchu; Qin, Song; Wang, Guangyi

    2014-01-01

    The South China Sea is one of the largest marginal seas, with relatively frequent passage of eddies and featuring distinct spatial variation in the western tropical Pacific Ocean. Here, we report a phylogenetic study of bacterial community structures in surface seawater of the northern South China Sea (nSCS). Samples collected from 31 sites across large environmental gradients were used to construct clone libraries and yielded 2,443 sequences grouped into 170 OTUs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed 23 bacterial classes with major components α-, β- and γ-Proteobacteria, as well as Cyanobacteria. At class and genus taxon levels, community structure of coastal waters was distinctively different from that of deep-sea waters and displayed a higher diversity index. Redundancy analyses revealed that bacterial community structures displayed a significant correlation with the water depth of individual sampling sites. Members of α-Proteobacteria were the principal component contributing to the differences of the clone libraries. Furthermore, the bacterial communities exhibited heterogeneity within zones of upwelling and anticyclonic eddies. Our results suggested that surface bacterial communities in nSCS had two-level patterns of spatial distribution structured by ecological types (coastal VS. oceanic zones) and mesoscale physical processes, and also provided evidence for bacterial phylogenetic phyla shaped by ecological preferences. PMID:25402458

  13. Concentration of iodine-129 in surface seawater at subarctic and subtropical circulations in the Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takashi; Otosaka, Shigeyoshi; Togawa, Orihiko

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the migration of anthropogenic 129I in the environment, we measured 129I concentrations at both subarctic (above 40oN) and subtropical (below 40oN) circulations in the surface seawater of the Japan Sea. The averaged concentrations of stations 193, 194, 201, 206 and 210 above 200 m were (2.1 ± 0.3) × 1010 atoms/m3, (2.0 ± 0.2) × 1010 atoms/m3, (1.6 ± 0.3) × 1010 atoms/m3, (1.4 ± 0.3) × 1010 atoms/m3 and (1.7 ± 0.3) × 1010 atoms/m3, respectively. The averaged concentration at the subarctic circulation in the Japan Sea above 200 m (1.9 × 1010 atoms/m3) was higher than that in the subtropical circulation (1.5 × 1010 atoms/m3). This latitudinal distribution pattern of 129I is not consistent with those of bomb-derived radionuclides such as 14C, 90Sr and 137Cs. Taking into account latitudinal location and the total amount of releases from reprocessing plants, this discriminating latitudinal distribution of 129I in the Japan Sea would indicate that a significant amount of 129I originating from active reprocessing plants in Europe is supplied to the surface of the Japan Sea.

  14. A multi-centennial time series of well-constrained ΔR values for the Irish Sea derived using absolutely-dated shell samples from the mollusc Arctica islandica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, P. G.; Scourse, J. D.; Richardson, C. A.; Wanamaker, A. D., Jr.

    2009-04-01

    Determinations of the local correction (ΔR) to the globally averaged marine radiocarbon reservoir age are often isolated in space and time, derived from heterogeneous sources and constrained by significant uncertainties. Although time series of ΔR at single sites can be obtained from sediment cores, these are subject to multiple uncertainties related to sedimentation rates, bioturbation and interspecific variations in the source of radiocarbon in the analysed samples. Coral records provide better resolution, but these are available only for tropical locations. It is shown here that it is possible to use the shell of the long-lived bivalve mollusc Arctica islandica as a source of high resolution time series of absolutely-dated marine radiocarbon determinations for the shelf seas surrounding the North Atlantic ocean. Annual growth increments in the shell can be crossdated and chronologies can be constructed in a precise analogue with the use of tree-rings. Because the calendar dates of the samples are known, ΔR can be determined with high precision and accuracy and because all the samples are from the same species, the time series of ΔR values possesses a high degree of internal consistency. Presented here is a multi-centennial (AD 1593 - AD 1933) time series of 31 ΔR values for a site in the Irish Sea close to the Isle of Man. The mean value of ΔR (-62 14C yrs) does not change significantly during this period but increased variability is apparent before AD 1750.

  15. Ship motion estimation from polarized Doppler spectra from ship wakes on two-dimensional sea surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wang-Qiang; Zhang, Min; Nie, Ding; Sun, Rong-Qing

    2016-07-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to investigate the Doppler spectra from ship wakes on two-dimensional sea surfaces and further estimate the ship motion characteristics. The analysis of the ship wakes is helpful to detect the existence of ships on sea surface. And it will be an alternative method when the radar cross-section values are not competent to identify the ship target. In the study, Doppler spectra for different polarizations are compared with and without ship's wakes based on the second-order small slope approximation method. As expected, there appears the second spectral peak when ship's wake is considered. Moreover, the ship velocities, wind speed, and direction are also analyzed. As the results shown, there is a good linearity relation between the position of the second Doppler spectral peak and the ship velocity. Therefore, it is feasible to detect ship according the Doppler spectra.

  16. Predicting East African spring droughts using Pacific and Indian Ocean sea surface temperature indices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Funk, Christopher C.; Hoell, Andrew; Shukla, Shraddhanand; Blade, Ileana; Liebmann, Brant; Roberts, Jason B.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2014-01-01

    In southern Ethiopia, Eastern Kenya, and southern Somalia poor boreal spring rains in 1999, 2000, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2011 contributed to severe food insecurity and high levels of malnutrition. Predicting rainfall deficits in this region on seasonal and decadal time frames can help decision makers support disaster risk reduction while guiding climate-smart adaptation and agricultural development. Building on recent research that links more frequent droughts to a stronger Walker Circulation, warming in the Indo-Pacific warm pool, and an increased western Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) gradient, we explore the dominant modes of East African rainfall variability, links between these modes and sea surface temperatures, and a simple index-based monitoring-prediction system suitable for drought early warning.

  17. Investigation on global positioning system signal scattering and propagation over the rough sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Guo, Li-Xin; Wu, Zhen-Sen

    2010-05-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of polarization properties, scattering properties and propagation properties of global positioning system (GPS) scattering signal over the rough sea surface. To investigate the polarization and the scattering properties, the scattering field and the bistatic scattering coefficient of modified Kirchhoff approximation using the tapered incident wave is derived in detail. In modeling the propagation properties of the GPS scattering signal in the evaporation duct, the initial field of parabolic equation traditionally computed by the antenna pattern using fast Fourier transform (FFT) is replaced by the GPS scattering field. And the propagation properties of the GPS scattering signal in the evaporation duct with different evaporation duct heights and elevation angles of GPS are discussed by the improved discrete mixed Fourier transform taking into account the sea surface roughness.

  18. Comparison of SMOS and Aquarius Sea Surface Salinity and Analysis of Possible Causes for the Differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinnat, E. P.; Boutin, J.; Yin, X.; Le Vine, D. M.; Waldteufel, P.; Vergely, J. -L.

    2014-01-01

    Two ongoing space missions share the scientific objective of mapping the global Sea Surface Salinity (SSS), yet their observations show significant discrepancies. ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and NASA's Aquarius use L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometers to measure emission from the sea surface and retrieve SSS. Significant differences in SSS retrieved by both sensors are observed, with SMOS SSS being generally lower than Aquarius SSS, except for very cold waters where SMOS SSS is the highest overall. Figure 1 is an example of the difference between the SSS retrieved by SMOS and Aquarius averaged over one month and 1 degree in longitude and latitude. Differences are mostly between -1 psu and +1 psu (psu, practical salinity unit), with a significant regional and latitudinal dependence. We investigate the impact of the vicarious calibration and some components of the retrieval algorithm used by both mission on these differences.

  19. First spaceborne observation of sea surface height using GPS-Reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarizia, Maria Paola; Ruf, Christopher; Cipollini, Paolo; Zuffada, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    An analysis of spaceborne Global Positioning System reflectometry (GPS-R) data from the TechDemoSat-1 (TDS-1) satellite is carried out to image the ocean sea surface height (SSH). An SSH estimation algorithm is applied to GPS-R delay waveforms over two regions in the South Atlantic and the North Pacific. Estimates made from TDS-1 overpasses during a 6 month period are aggregated to produce SSH maps of the two regions. The maps generally agree with the global DTU10 mean sea surface height. The GPS-R instrument is designed to make bistatic measurements of radar cross section for ocean wind observations, and its altimetric performance is not optimized. The differences observed between measured and DTU10 SSH can be attributed to limitations with the GPS-R instrument and the lack of precision orbit determination by the TDS-1 platform. These results represent the first observations of SSH by a spaceborne GPS-R instrument.

  20. Small angle neutron scattering on an absolute intensity scale and the internal surface of diatom frustules from three species of differing morphologies.

    PubMed

    Garvey, C J; Strobl, M; Percot, A; Saroun, J; Haug, J; Vyverman, W; Chepurnov, V A; Ferris, J M

    2013-05-01

    The internal nanostructure of the diatoms Cyclotella meneghiniana, Seminavis robusta and Achnanthes subsessilis was investigated using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to examine thin biosilica samples, consisting of isotropic (powder) from their isolated cell walls. The interpretation of SANS data was assisted by several other measurements. The N2 adsorption, interpreted within the Branuer-Emmet-Teller isotherm, yielded the specific surface area of the material. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy indicates that the isolated material is amorphous silica with small amounts of organic cell wall materials acting as a filling material between the silica particles. A two-phase (air and amorphous silica) model was used to interpret small angle neutron scattering data. After correction for instrumental resolution, the measurements on two SANS instruments covered an extended range of scattering vectors 0.0011 nm(-1) < q < 5.6 nm(-1), giving an almost continuous SANS curve over a range of scattering vectors, q, on an absolute scale of intensity for each sample. Each of the samples gave a characteristic scattering curve where log (intensity) versus log (q) has a -4 dependence, with other features superimposed. In the high-q regime, departure from this behaviour was observed at a length-scales equivalent to the proposed unitary silica particle. The limiting Porod scattering law was used to determine the specific area per unit of volume of each sample illuminated by the neutron beam. The Porod behaviour, and divergence from this behaviour, is discussed in terms of various structural features and the proposed mechanisms for the bio-assembly of unitary silica particles in frustules. PMID:23377745

  1. Plasticity of Noddy Parents and Offspring to Sea-Surface Temperature Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Devney, Carol A.; Caley, M. Julian; Congdon, Bradley C.

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral and/or developmental plasticity is crucial for resisting the impacts of environmental stressors. We investigated the plasticity of adult foraging behavior and chick development in an offshore foraging seabird, the black noddy (Anous minutus), during two breeding seasons. The first season had anomalously high sea-surface temperatures and ‘low’ prey availability, while the second was a season of below average sea-surface temperatures and ‘normal’ food availability. During the second season, supplementary feeding of chicks was used to manipulate offspring nutritional status in order to mimic conditions of high prey availability. When sea-surface temperatures were hotter than average, provisioning rates were significantly and negatively impacted at the day-to-day scale. Adults fed chicks during this low-food season smaller meals but at the same rate as chicks in the unfed treatment the following season. Supplementary feeding of chicks during the second season also resulted in delivery of smaller meals by adults, but did not influence feeding rate. Chick begging and parental responses to cessation of food supplementation suggested smaller meals fed to artificially supplemented chicks resulted from a decrease in chick demands associated with satiation, rather than adult behavioral responses to chick condition. During periods of low prey abundance, chicks maintained structural growth while sacrificing body condition and were unable to take advantage of periods of high prey abundance by increasing growth rates. These results suggest that this species expresses limited plasticity in provisioning behavior and offspring development. Consequently, responses to future changes in sea-surface temperature and other environmental variation may be limited. PMID:20686693

  2. Project GEOS-C. [designed to measure the topography of ocean surface and the sea state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An oceanographic-geodetic satellite, designated Geodynamics Experimental Ocean Satellite-C (GEOS-C), an earth-orbiting spacecraft designed to measure precisely the topography of the ocean surface and the sea state (wave height, wave period, wave propagation direction) is described. Launch operations, spacecraft description, and mission objectives are included along with a brief flight history of the NASA satellite geodesy program. Principal investigations to be performed by the GEOS-C mission are discussed.

  3. Validation Campaigns for Sea Surface Wind and Wind Profile by Ground-Based Doppler Wind Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhishen; Wu, Songhua; Song, Xiaoquan; Liu, Bingyi; Li, Zhigang

    2010-12-01

    According to the research frame of ESA-MOST DRAGON Cooperation Program (ID5291), Chinese partners from Ocean Remote Sensing Institute of Ocean University of China have carried out a serial of campaigns for ground-based lidar validations and atmospheric observations. ORSI/OUC Doppler wind lidar has been developed and deployed to accurately measure wind speed and direction over large areas in real time -- an application useful for ADM-Aeolus VAL/CAL, aviation safety, weather forecasting and sports. The sea surface wind campaigns were successfully accomplished at the Qingdao sailing competitions during the 29th Olympic Games. The lidar located at the seashore near the sailing field, and made a horizontal scan over the sea surface, making the wind measurement in real time and then uploading the data to the local meteorological station every 10 minutes. In addition to the sea surface wind campaigns, ORSI/OUC Doppler wind lidar was deployed on the wind profile observations for the China's Shenzhou 7 spacecraft landing zone weather campaigns in September 2008 in Inner Mongolia steppe. Wind profile was tracked by the mobile Doppler lidar system to help to predict the module's landing site. During above ground tests, validation lidar is tested to be able to provide an independent and credible measurement of radial wind speed, wind profile, 3D wind vector, aerosol- backscattering ratio, aerosol extinction coefficient, extinction-to-backscatter ratio in the atmospheric boundary layer and troposphere, sea surface wind vectors, which will be an independent and very effective validation tool for upcoming ADM-Aeolus project.

  4. Effects of light polarization and waves slope statistics on the reflectance factor of the sea surface.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, Davide; Kajiyama, Tamito

    2016-04-18

    Above-water radiometry depends on estimates of the reflectance factor ρ of the sea surface to compute the in situ water-leaving radiance. The Monte Carlo code for ocean color simulations MOX is used in this study to analyze the effect of different environmental components on ρ values. A first aspect is examining the reflectance factor without and by accounting for the sky-radiance polarization. The influence of the sea-surface statistics at discrete grid points is then considered by presenting a new scheme to define the variance of the waves slope. Results at different sun elevations and sensor orientations indicate that the light polarization effect on ρ simulations reduces from ∼17 to ∼10% when the wind speed increases from 0 to 14m s-1. An opposite tendency characterizes the modeling of the sea-surface slope variance, with ρ differences up to ∼12% at a wind speed of 10m s-1. The joint effect of polarization and the the sea-surface statistics displays a less systematic dependence on the wind speed, with differences in the range ∼13 to ∼18%. The ρ changes due to the light polarization and the variance of the waves slope become more relevant at sky-viewing geometries respectively lower and higher than 40° with respect to the zenith. An overall compensation of positive and negative offsets due to light polarization is finally documented when considering different sun elevations. These results address additional investigations which, by combining the modeling and experimental components of marine optics, better evaluate specific measurement protocols for collecting above-water radiometric data in the field. PMID:27137234

  5. Linkages Between Multiscale Global Sea Surface Temperature Change and Precipitation Variabilities in the US

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. M.; Weng, Heng-Yi

    1999-01-01

    A growing number of evidence indicates that there are coherent patterns of variability in sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly not only at interannual timescales, but also at decadal-to-inter-decadal timescale and beyond. The multi-scale variabilities of SST anomaly have shown great impacts on climate. In this work, we analyze multiple timescales contained in the globally averaged SST anomaly with and their possible relationship with the summer and winter rainfall in the United States over the past four decades.

  6. Glacial North Atlantic: Sea-surface conditions reconstructed by GLAMAP 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflaumann, U.; Sarnthein, M.; Chapman, M.; D'Abreu, L.; Funnell, B.; Huels, M.; Kiefer, T.; Maslin, M.; Schulz, H.; Swallow, J.; van Kreveld, S.; Vautravers, M.; Vogelsang, E.; Weinelt, M.

    2003-09-01

    The response of the tropical ocean to global climate change and the extent of sea ice in the glacial nordic seas belong to the great controversies in paleoclimatology. Our new reconstruction of peak glacial sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the Atlantic is based on census counts of planktic foraminifera, using the Maximum Similarity Technique Version 28 (SIMMAX-28) modern analog technique with 947 modern analog samples and 119 well-dated sediment cores. Our study compares two slightly different scenarios of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the Environmental Processes of the Ice Age: Land, Oceans, Glaciers (EPILOG), and Glacial Atlantic Ocean Mapping (GLAMAP 2000) time slices. The comparison shows that the maximum LGM cooling in the Southern Hemisphere slightly preceeded that in the north. In both time slices sea ice was restricted to the north western margin of the nordic seas during glacial northern summer, while the central and eastern parts were ice-free. During northern glacial winter, sea ice advanced to the south of Iceland and Faeroe. In the central northern North Atlantic an anticyclonic gyre formed between 45° and 60°N, with a cool water mass centered west of Ireland, where glacial cooling reached a maximum of >12°C. In the subtropical ocean gyres the new reconstruction supports the glacial-to-interglacial stability of SST as shown by () [1981]. The zonal belt of minimum SST seasonality between 2° and 6°N suggests that the LGM caloric equator occupied the same latitude as today. In contrast to the CLIMAP reconstruction, the glacial cooling of the tropical east Atlantic upwelling belt reached up to 6°-8°C during Northern Hemisphere summer. Differences between these SIMMAX-based and published U37k- and Mg/Ca-based equatorial SST records are ascribed to strong SST seasonalities and SST signals that were produced by different planktic species groups during different seasons.

  7. Deep-Sea Trench Microbiology Down to 10.9 Kilometers Below the Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, D. H.

    2012-12-01

    Deep-sea trenches, extending to more than 10.9 km below the sea surface, are among the most remote and infrequently sampled habitats. As a result a global perspective of microbial diversity and adaptation is lacking in these extreme settings. I will present the results of studies of deep-sea trench microbes collected in the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT), Tonga Trench, New Britain Trench and Mariana Trench. The samples collected include sediment, seawater and animals in baited traps. The analyses to be described include microbial community activity and viability measurements as a function of hydrostatic pressure, microbial culturing at high pressure under various physiological conditions, phylogenetics and metagenome and single-cell genome characterizations. Most of the results to date stem from samples recovered from the PRT. The deep-sea PRT Trench microbes have more in common at the species level with other deep-sea microbial communities previously characterized in the Pacific Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea than with the microbial populations above them in shallow waters. They also harbor larger genomes with more genes assigned to signal transduction, transcription, replication, recombination and repair and inorganic ion transport. The overrepresented transporters in the PRT metagenome include di- and tri-carboxylate transporters that correspond to the prevailing catabolic processes such as butanoate, glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism. A surprisingly high abundance of sulfatases for the degradation of sulfated polysaccharides were also present in the PRT. But, perhaps the most dramatic adaptational feature of the PRT microbes is heavy metal resistance, as reflected in the high numbers of metal efflux systems present. Single-cell genomics approaches have proven particularly useful for placing PRT metagenomic data into context.

  8. On the observability of bottom topography from measurements of tidal sea surface height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaron, Edward D.

    2016-06-01

    The question of whether features of the ocean bottom topography can be identified from measurements of water level is investigated using a simplified one-dimensional barotropic model. Because of the nonlinear dependence of the sea surface height on the water depth, a linearized analysis is performed concerning the identification of a Gaussian bump within two specific depth profiles, (1) a constant depth domain, and, (2) a constant depth domain adjoining a near-resonant continental shelf. Observability is quantified by examining the estimation error in a series of identical-twin experiments varying data density, tide wavelength, assumed (versus actual) topographic correlation scale, and friction. For measurements of sea surface height that resolve the scale of the topographic perturbation, the fractional error in the bottom topography is approximately a factor of 10 larger than the fractional error of the sea surface height. Domain-scale and shelf-scale resonances may lead to inaccurate topography estimates due to a reduction in the effective number of degrees of freedom in the dynamics, and the amplification of nonlinearity. A realizability condition for the variance of the topography error in the limit of zero bottom depth is proposed which is interpreted as a bound on the fractional error of the topography. Appropriately designed spatial covariance models partly ameliorate the negative impact of shelf-scale near-resonance, and highlight the importance of spatial covariance modeling for bottom topography estimation.

  9. Abrupt changes in early Holocene tropical sea surface temperature derived from coral records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, J. Warren; Récy, Jacques; Taylor, Fred; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Cabioch, Guy

    1997-02-01

    For many high-latitude regions of the globe, it is now clear that the transition to modern climate following the Last Glacial Maximum was punctuated by a number of rapid and substantial climate oscillations1,2. In contrast, relatively little is known about how the tropics responded to the deglaciation, because few high-resolution records are available from lower latitudes. Corals have recently been shown to provide an important source of tropical climate records because they can be easily and accurately dated, using either 14C or 230Th, and because past sea surface temperatures can be recovered from the Sr/Ca ratios in coral skeletons. Here we use this technique to derive several early Holocene sea surface temperature records from a coral drill core recovered from Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu in the tropical southwest Pacific Ocean. These records indicate that sea surface temperatures in this region were depressed by as much as 6.5 °C below modern values at ~ 10,350 calendar years BP, but rose very abruptly during the following 1,500 years. This temperature increase lags the post-Younger Dryas increase observed in a coral record from the tropical Atlantic Ocean3by about 3,000 years, an unexpected phase-shift that may ultimately shed light on the mechanisms of deglacial climate change.

  10. An Integer Precise Point Positioning technique for sea surface observations using a GPS buoy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fund, F.; Perosanz, F.; Testut, L.; Loyer, S.

    2013-04-01

    GPS data dedicated to sea surface observation are usually processed using differential techniques. Unfortunately, the precision of resulting kinematic positions is baseline-length dependent. So, high precision sea surface observations using differential GPS techniques are limited to coasts, lakes, and rivers. Recent improvements in GPS satellite products (orbits, clocks, and phase biases) make phase ambiguity fixing at the zero difference level achievable and opens up the observation of the sea surface without geographical constraints. This paper recalls the concept of the Integer Precise Point Positioning technique and discusses the precision of GPS buoy positioning. A sequential version of the GINS software has been implemented to achieve single epoch GPS positioning. We used 1 Hz data from a two week GPS campaign conducted in the Kerguelen Islands. A GPS buoy has been moored close to a radar gauge and 90 m away from a permanent GPS station. This infrastructure offers the opportunity to compare both kinematic Integer Precise Point Positioning and classical differential GPS positioning techniques to in situ radar gauge data. We found that Precise Point Positioning results are not significantly biased with respect to radar gauge data and that horizontal time series are consistent with differential processing at the sub-centimetre precision level. Nevertheless, standard deviations of height time series with respect to radar gauge data are typically [4-5] cm. The dominant driver for noise at this level is attributed to errors in tropospheric estimates which propagate into position solutions.

  11. The effect of wind-generated bubbles on sea-surface backscattering at 940 Hz.

    PubMed

    van Vossen, Robbert; Ainslie, Michael A

    2011-11-01

    Reliable predictions of sea-surface backscattering strength are required for sonar performance modeling. These are, however, difficult to obtain as measurements of sea-surface backscattering are not available at small grazing angles relevant to low-frequency active sonar (1-3 kHz). Accurate theoretical predictions of scattering strength require a good understanding of physical mechanisms giving rise to the scattering and the relative importance of these. In this paper, scattering from individual resonant bubbles is introduced as a potential mechanism and a scattering model is derived that incorporates the contribution from these together with that of rough surface scattering. The model results are fitted to Critical Sea Test (CST) measurements at a frequency of 940 Hz, treating the number of large bubbles, parameterized through the spectral slope of the size spectrum for bubbles whose radii exceed 1 mm, as a free parameter. This procedure illustrates that the CST data can be explained by scattering from a small number of large resonant bubbles, indicating that these provide an alternative mechanism to that of scattering from bubble clouds. PMID:22088015

  12. Assessing Confidence in Pliocene Sea Surface Temperatures to Evaluate Predictive Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowsett, Harry J.; Robinson, Marci M.; Haywood, Alan M.; Hill, Daniel J.; Dolan, Aisling. M.; Chan, Wing-Le; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Chandler, Mark A.; Rosenbloom, Nan A.; Otto-Bliesner, Bette L.; Bragg, Fran J.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Stoll, Danielle K.; Foley, Kevin M.; Riesselman, Christina

    2012-01-01

    In light of mounting empirical evidence that planetary warming is well underway, the climate research community looks to palaeoclimate research for a ground-truthing measure with which to test the accuracy of future climate simulations. Model experiments that attempt to simulate climates of the past serve to identify both similarities and differences between two climate states and, when compared with simulations run by other models and with geological data, to identify model-specific biases. Uncertainties associated with both the data and the models must be considered in such an exercise. The most recent period of sustained global warmth similar to what is projected for the near future occurred about 3.33.0 million years ago, during the Pliocene epoch. Here, we present Pliocene sea surface temperature data, newly characterized in terms of level of confidence, along with initial experimental results from four climate models. We conclude that, in terms of sea surface temperature, models are in good agreement with estimates of Pliocene sea surface temperature in most regions except the North Atlantic. Our analysis indicates that the discrepancy between the Pliocene proxy data and model simulations in the mid-latitudes of the North Atlantic, where models underestimate warming shown by our highest-confidence data, may provide a new perspective and insight into the predictive abilities of these models in simulating a past warm interval in Earth history.This is important because the Pliocene has a number of parallels to present predictions of late twenty-first century climate.

  13. Response of sea surface properties to Hurricane Dennis in the eastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuanmin; Muller-Karger, Frank E.

    2007-04-01

    Sea Surface Reflectance (SSR) and Sea Surface Temperature (SST) were assessed in the eastern Gulf of Mexico in early July 2005 after passage of Hurricane Dennis, a category 4 storm, using data from the MODIS, SeaWiFS, and AVHRR satellite sensors, historical hydrographic and nutrient surveys, and a simple vertical water column mixing model. The bathymetric gradient across the shelf break, the offshore deep nutricline, and nearby Loop Current eddies led to unique SSR and SST changes after the passage of Dennis. In waters shallower than 50 m, a strong sediment resuspension event led to higher SSR in the visible and an increase in the MODIS fluorescence line height (FLH). These variables returned to pre-storm conditions after about 10 days. The FLH change indicates increasing biomass in the short response time (<2 days), which might have been due to resuspended benthic and/or near-bottom algae, as opposed to simply new primary production in the overlying water column. The SST changes occurred almost entirely along the right side of the hurricane track (-1.96 +/- 0.66°C for an area of 158,600 km2). Waters >50 m deep cooled down significantly, but there was no apparent change in SSR, presumably because the nutricline was too deep to be affected by vertical mixing due to the storm. The three-dimensional hydrographic and nutrient structure in waters near the west Florida shelf defines what changes may be detected at the surface with remote sensing.

  14. Assessing confidence in Pliocene sea surface temperatures to evaluate predictive models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, Harry J.; Robinson, Marci M.; Haywood, Alan M.; Hill, Daniel J.; Dolan, Aisling M.; Stoll, Danielle K.; Chan, Wing-Le; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Chandler, Mark A.; Rosenbloom, Nan A.; Otto-Bliesner, Bette L.; Bragg, Fran J.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Foley, Kevin M.; Riesselman, Christina R.

    2012-01-01

    In light of mounting empirical evidence that planetary warming is well underway, the climate research community looks to palaeoclimate research for a ground-truthing measure with which to test the accuracy of future climate simulations. Model experiments that attempt to simulate climates of the past serve to identify both similarities and differences between two climate states and, when compared with simulations run by other models and with geological data, to identify model-specific biases. Uncertainties associated with both the data and the models must be considered in such an exercise. The most recent period of sustained global warmth similar to what is projected for the near future occurred about 3.3–3.0 million years ago, during the Pliocene epoch. Here, we present Pliocene sea surface temperature data, newly characterized in terms of level of confidence, along with initial experimental results from four climate models. We conclude that, in terms of sea surface temperature, models are in good agreement with estimates of Pliocene sea surface temperature in most regions except the North Atlantic. Our analysis indicates that the discrepancy between the Pliocene proxy data and model simulations in the mid-latitudes of the North Atlantic, where models underestimate warming shown by our highest-confidence data, may provide a new perspective and insight into the predictive abilities of these models in simulating a past warm interval in Earth history. This is important because the Pliocene has a number of parallels to present predictions of late twenty-first century climate.

  15. Labrador Sea surface temperature control on the summer weather in the Eastern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnatiuk, Natalia; Vihma, Timo; Bobylev, Leonid

    2016-04-01

    Many studies have addressed the linkages between the Arctic Amplification and mid-latitude weather patterns. Most of them have focused on the effects of changes in sea ice, terrestrial snow or open ocean SST on the air temperature in selected mid-latitude areas. However, when analysing such potential linkages, one should be aware that from the point of view of the atmosphere it is almost the same whether the thermal forcing originates from the sea ice melt, snowmelt, or changes in SST. Most important is to quantify how the atmosphere responds to anomalies in the surface temperature and then affects weather patterns in remote areas. For this purpose, we studied the hemispheric-scale relationships between anomalies in the Northern Hemisphere Earth surface temperature (Ts) and 2-m air temperature (T2m) in mid-latitudes (Central and Eastern Europe). Using regression analyses based on the ERA-Interim reanalysis data, we assessed the said temperature relationships with focus on the lagged monthly and inter-seasonal linkages. Technically we divided the Northern Hemisphere in equal areas with a size of 15x10 degr