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Sample records for absolute solar spectral

  1. The solar absolute spectral irradiance 1150-3173 A - May 17, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, G. H.; Rottman, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    The full-disk solar spectral irradiance in the spectral range 1150-3173 A was obtained from a rocket observation above White Sands Missile Range, NM, on May 17, 1982, half way in time between solar maximum and solar minimum. Comparison with measurements made during solar maximum in 1980 indicate a large decrease in the absolute solar irradiance at wavelengths below 1900 A to approximately solar minimum values. No change above 1900 A from solar maximum to this flight was observed to within the errors of the measurements. Irradiance values lower than the Broadfoot results in the 2100-2500 A spectral range are found, but excellent agreement with Broadfoot between 2500 and 3173 A is found. The absolute calibration of the instruments for this flight was accomplished at the National Bureau of Standards Synchrotron Radiation Facility which significantly improves calibration of solar measurements made in this spectral region.

  2. Usability of a Fourier transform spectroradiometer for absolute surface spectral solar UV irradiance measurements.

    PubMed

    Meindl, Peter; Wähmer, Martin; Monte, Christian

    2014-10-20

    The suitability of a commercially available Fourier transform spectrometer equipped with a fiber-coupled global entrance optic as a reference spectroradiometer for the measurement of spectral solar ultraviolet irradiance at ground level has been investigated. The instrument has been characterized with respect to the wavelength uncertainty, and a calibration of the spectral irradiance responsivity has been performed by using the calculable irradiance of a high temperature black-body radiator and by using a secondary irradiance standard lamp. The relative standard uncertainty of solar irradiance measurements in the wavelength range from 310 nm to 400 nm with this spectroradiometer, based on the described methodology, is 1.6% for solar zenith angles of less than 60°. PMID:25401540

  3. Absolute high spectral resolution measurements of surface solar radiation for detection of water vapour continuum absorption.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, T D; Coleman, M; Browning, H; Tallis, L; Ptashnik, I V; Shine, K P

    2012-06-13

    Solar-pointing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy offers the capability to measure both the fine scale and broadband spectral structure of atmospheric transmission simultaneously across wide spectral regions. It is therefore suited to the study of both water vapour monomer and continuum absorption behaviours. However, in order to properly address this issue, it is necessary to radiatively calibrate the FTIR instrument response. A solar-pointing high-resolution FTIR spectrometer was deployed as part of the 'Continuum Absorption by Visible and Infrared radiation and its Atmospheric Relevance' (CAVIAR) consortium project. This paper describes the radiative calibration process using an ultra-high-temperature blackbody and the consideration of the related influence factors. The result is a radiatively calibrated measurement of the solar irradiation at the ground across the IR region from 2000 to 10 000 cm(-1) with an uncertainty of between 3.3 and 5.9 per cent. This measurement is shown to be in good general agreement with a radiative-transfer model. The results from the CAVIAR field measurements are being used in ongoing studies of atmospheric absorbers, in particular the water vapour continuum. PMID:22547234

  4. SOLSPEC investigation on board the International Space Station: The Absolute Solar Spectral Irradiance in the Infrared Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, Gérard; Harder, Jerry; Shapiro, Alexander; Woods, Thomas; Perrin, Jean-Marie; Snow, Marty; Sukhodolov, Timofei; Schmutz, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Onboard the SOLAR payload of the International Space Station (ISS), the SOLSPEC spectrometer measures the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) from 16 to 2900 nm. This instrument uses lamps to monitor its behavior in orbit. In particular, it employs two tungsten ribbon lamps in the IR domain (1000-2900 nm). Initially, the infrared absolute irradiance scale was determined from the preflight laboratory calibration coefficients and the in-flight measurements gathered at first light in April 2008. Subsequent publications suggest a systematic discrepancy between SOLAR-ISS measurements and the ATLAS 3 spectrum obtained from SOLSPEC observations onboard the shuttle-ATLAS missions with the discrepancy reaching 10 % at 1800 nm. We show that such a discrepancy has strong implications for the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and the brightness temperature of the lower solar photosphere. Furthermore, comparisons with independent spectra either obtained on ground and in space will be also shown and commented. The origin of the ATLAS 3 to SOLSPEC differences have been extensively analyzed; the onboard lamp and solar data time series indicates that the IR spectrometer did not reach a permanent regime until after several months of operation. The solar measurements at first light and in permanent regime show a difference, which provides an effective wavelength dependent correction factor for the first light spectrum. The SOLSPEC-ISS spectrum obtained in this permanent regime is consistent with the ATLAS 3 spectrum within their combined uncertainties and will be identified in the literature as SOLAR 2rev. We present analysis of this SOLAR 2rev spectrum in terms of its contribution to TSI, the lower photospheric temperature, and comparisons with independently measured IR spectra from ground-based and on-orbit platforms.

  5. Solar cell spectral response characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalewski, E. F.; Geist, J.

    1979-01-01

    The absolute spectral response of solar cells is reported in the 400-1000-nm spectral region. Measurements were performed using two different types of monochromatic sources: amplitude-stabilized CW laser lines and interference filters with an incandescent lamp. Both types of calibration procedures use electrical substitution radiometry as the basis of traceability to absolute SI units. The accuracy of the calibration is shown to be limited by the nonideal characteristics of the solar cells themselves, specifically spatial nonuniformities and nonlinearities induced by high light levels.

  6. Multiple-integrating sphere spectrophotometer for measuring absolute spectral reflectance and transmittance.

    PubMed

    Zerlaut, G A; Anderson, T E

    1981-11-01

    A spectroreflectometer/transmissometer is described that permits determination of absolute optical characteristics in the 300-2600-nm wavelength region (which is essentially the complete solar spectrum). The uniqueness of the instrument derives from use of three rapidly interchangeable 20-cm (8-in.) integrating spheres to measure (1) absolute hemispherical spectral reflectance as a function of angles of incidence from -40 to +40 degrees employing an Edwards-type integrating sphere with a center-mounted sample [using small 2.5-cm (1-in.) diam specimens], (2) absolute hemispherical and absolute diffuse spectral reflectance at an angle of incidence of 20 degrees employing a sphere with a wall-mounted sample (for large specimens) and a screened detector, and (3) absolute hemispherical and absolute directional (near-normal exitance) transmittance employing a complete integrating sphere with the only ports being for the sample and reference beams. Data are presented that demonstrate the ability to measure the spectral reflectance of nonmirror surfaces to an absolute accuracy of 0.995 (an uncertainty of +/-0.005 reflectance units) in both reflectance spheres and of highly specular mirrors to an absolute accuracy of 0.993 (an uncertainty of +/-0.007 reflectance units). Spectral transmittance can be measured to an absolute accuracy of better than 0.995 (an uncertainty of +/-0.005 transmittance units). PMID:20372262

  7. Spectral distribution of solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecherikunnel, A. T.; Richmond, J.

    1980-01-01

    Available quantitative data on solar total and spectral irradiance are examined in the context of utilization of solar irradiance for terrestrial applications of solar energy. The extraterrestrial solar total and spectral irradiance values are also reviewed. Computed values of solar spectral irradiance at ground level for different air mass values and various levels of atmospheric pollution or turbidity are presented. Wavelengths are given for computation of solar, absorptance, transmittance and reflectance by the 100 selected-ordinate method and by the 50 selected-ordinate method for air mass 1.5 and 2 solar spectral irradiance for the four levels of atmospheric pollution.

  8. Peripheral absolute threshold spectral sensitivity in retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed Central

    Massof, R W; Johnson, M A; Finkelstein, D

    1981-01-01

    Dark-adapted spectral sensitivities were measured in the peripheral retinas of 38 patients diagnosed as having typical retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and in 3 normal volunteers. The patients included those having autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance patterns. Results were analysed by comparisons with the CIE standard scotopic spectral visibility function and with Judd's modification of the photopic spectral visibility function, with consideration of contributions from changes in spectral transmission of preretinal media. The data show 3 general patterns. One group of patients had absolute threshold spectral sensitivities that were fit by Judd's photopic visibility curve. Absolute threshold spectral sensitivities for a second group of patients were fit by a normal scotopic spectral visibility curve. The third group of patients had absolute threshold spectral sensitivities that were fit by a combination of scotopic and photopic spectral visibility curves. The autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive modes of inheritance were represented in each group of patients. These data indicate that RP patients have normal rod and/or cone spectral sensitivities, and support the subclassification of patients described previously by Massof and Finkelstein. PMID:7459312

  9. Absolute radiometry and the solar constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willson, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A series of active cavity radiometers (ACRs) are described which have been developed as standard detectors for the accurate measurement of irradiance in absolute units. It is noted that the ACR is an electrical substitution calorimeter, is designed for automatic remote operation in any environment, and can make irradiance measurements in the range from low-level IR fluxes up to 30 solar constants with small absolute uncertainty. The instrument operates in a differential mode by chopping the radiant flux to be measured at a slow rate, and irradiance is determined from two electrical power measurements together with the instrumental constant. Results are reported for measurements of the solar constant with two types of ACRs. The more accurate measurement yielded a value of 136.6 plus or minus 0.7 mW/sq cm (1.958 plus or minus 0.010 cal/sq cm per min).

  10. Solar spectral irradiance model validation using Solar Spectral Irradiance and Solar Radius measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, Gérard; Zhu, Ping; Shapiro, Alexander; Sofia, Sabatino; Tagirov, Rinat; Van Ruymbeke, Michel; Schmutz, Werner

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the reliable solar spectral irradiance (SSI) data for solar and climate physics is now well acknowledged. In particular, the irradiance time series are necessary for most of the current studies concerning climate evolution. However, space instruments are vulnerable to the degradation due to the environment while ground based measurements are limited in wavelength range and need atmospheric effects corrections. This is why SSI modeling is necessary to understand the mechanism of the solar irradiance variability and to provide long and uninterrupted irradiance records to climate and Earth atmosphere scientists. Here we present COSI (COde for Solar Irradiance) model of the SSI variability. The COSI model is based on the Non local thermodynamic Equilibrium Spectral SYnthesis Code (NESSY). We validate NESSY by two independent datasets: - The SSI at solar minimum occurring in 2008, - The radius variation with wavelength and absolute values determined from PREMOS and BOS instruments onboard the PICARD spacecraft. Comparisons between modeling and measured SSI will be shown. However, since SSI measurements have an accuracy estimated between 2 to 3%, the comparison with the solar radius data provides a very important additional constrains on model. For that, 17 partial solar occultations by the Moon are used providing solar radii clearly showing the dependence of the solar radius with wavelength. These results are compared with the NESSY predictions. The agreement between NESSY and observations is within the model and measurements accuracy.

  11. The total and spectral solar irradiance and its possible variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thekaekara, M. P.

    1975-01-01

    The present status of knowledge of the total and spectral irradiance of the sun is briefly reviewed. Currently accepted values of the solar constant and the extraterrestrial solar spectral irradiance are presented along with a discussion of how they were derived. Data on the variability of the solar constant are shown to be conflicting and inconclusive. Some of the alleged sun-weather relationships are cited in support of the need of knowing more precisely the variations in total and spectral solar irradiance. An overview of a solar monitoring program is discussed, with special emphasis on the Solar Energy Monitor in Space experiment which was proposed for several spacecraft missions. It is a combination of a solar constant detector and a prism monochromator. The determination of absolute values and the possible variations of the total and spectral solar irradiance, from measurements outside of the atmosphere is discussed.

  12. First derivative versus absolute spectral reflectance of citrus varieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazquez, Carlos H.; Nigg, H. N.; Hedley, Lou E.; Ramos, L. E.; Sorrell, R. W.; Simpson, S. E.

    1996-06-01

    Spectral reflectance measurements from 400 to 800 nm were taken from immature and mature leaves of grapefruit ('McCarty' and 'Rio Red'), 'Minneola' tangelo, 'Satsuma' mandarin, 'Dancy' tangerine, 'Nagami' oval kumquat, and 'Valencia' sweet orange, at the Florida Citrus Arboretum, Division of Plant Industry, Winter Haven, Florida. Immature and mature leaves of 'Minneola' tangelo had greater percent reflectance in the 400 to 800 nm range than the other varieties and leaf ages measured. The slope of the citrus spectral curves in the 800 nm range was not as sharp as conventional spectrometers, but had a much higher reflectance value than those obtained with a DK-2 spectrometer. Statistical analyses of absolute spectral data yielded significant differences between mature and immature leaves and between varieties. First derivative data analyses did not yield significant differences between varieties.

  13. Solar Spectral Irradiance and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T.; Cahalan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectrally resolved solar irradiance is recognized as being increasingly important to improving our understanding of the manner in which the Sun influences climate. There is strong empirical evidence linking total solar irradiance to surface temperature trends - even though the Sun has likely made only a small contribution to the last half-century's global temperature anomaly - but the amplitudes cannot be explained by direct solar heating alone. The wavelength and height dependence of solar radiation deposition, for example, ozone absorption in the stratosphere, absorption in the ocean mixed layer, and water vapor absorption in the lower troposphere, contribute to the "top-down" and "bottom-up" mechanisms that have been proposed as possible amplifiers of the solar signal. New observations and models of solar spectral irradiance are needed to study these processes and to quantify their impacts on climate. Some of the most recent observations of solar spectral variability from the mid-ultraviolet to the near-infrared have revealed some unexpected behavior that was not anticipated prior to their measurement, based on an understanding from model reconstructions. The atmospheric response to the observed spectral variability, as quantified in climate model simulations, have revealed similarly surprising and in some cases, conflicting results. This talk will provide an overview on the state of our understanding of the spectrally resolved solar irradiance, its variability over many time scales, potential climate impacts, and finally, a discussion on what is required for improving our understanding of Sun-climate connections, including a look forward to future observations.

  14. Mid-infrared absolute spectral responsivity scale based on an absolute cryogenic radiometer and an optical parametric oscillator laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Shi, Xueshun; Chen, Haidong; Liu, Yulong; Liu, Changming; Chen, Kunfeng; Li, Ligong; Gan, Haiyong; Ma, Chong

    2016-06-01

    We are reporting on a laser-based absolute spectral responsivity scale in the mid-infrared spectral range. By using a mid-infrared tunable optical parametric oscillator as the laser source, the absolute responsivity scale has been established by calibrating thin-film thermopile detectors against an absolute cryogenic radiometer. The thin-film thermopile detectors can be then used as transfer standard detectors. The extended uncertainty of the absolute spectral responsivity measurement has been analyzed to be 0.58%–0.68% (k  =  2).

  15. From Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, S. R.; Lindler, D.

    2016-05-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R˜1000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18–1.03 μ. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsl/. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We have therefore developed an observing procedure, data-reduction procedure, and correction algorithms that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1%.

  16. Sounding rocket measurement of the absolute solar EUV flux utilizing a silicon photodiode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogawa, H. S.; Mcmullin, D.; Judge, D. L.; Canfield, L. R.

    1990-01-01

    A newly developed stable and high quantum efficiency silicon photodiode was used to obtain an accurate measurement of the integrated absolute magnitude of the solar extreme UV photon flux in the spectral region between 50 and 800 A. The adjusted daily 10.7-cm solar radio flux and sunspot number were 168.4 and 121, respectively. The unattenuated absolute value of the solar EUV flux at 1 AU in the specified wavelength region was 6.81 x 10 to the 10th photons/sq cm per s. Based on a nominal probable error of 7 percent for National Institute of Standards and Technology detector efficiency measurements in the 50- to 500-A region (5 percent on longer wavelength measurements between 500 and 1216 A), and based on experimental errors associated with the present rocket instrumentation and analysis, a conservative total error estimate of about 14 percent is assigned to the absolute integral solar flux obtained.

  17. A New Measurement of the Absolute Spectral Reflectance of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, S. J.; Lau, E.; Steutel, D.; Stopar, J. D.; Wilcox, B. B.; Lucey, P. G.

    2003-01-01

    The spectral reflectance of the Moon is an important property for studies of lunar geology, quantitative physical modeling of the moon, and in-flight calibration of spacecraft sensors. Previous studies have claimed that telescopic absolute reflectance values for the Moon are greater than laboratory reflectance measurements by a factor of two. In order to confirm these results, we performed ground-based observations of the lunar surface using a visible/near-infrared spectroradiometer and compared the measured lunar surface radiance to solar radiance corrected for atmospheric scattering and absorption. These data were compared to previously obtained laboratory reflectance measurements from Apollo soil samples.

  18. Characterization of the DARA solar absolute radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finsterle, W.; Suter, M.; Fehlmann, A.; Kopp, G.

    2011-12-01

    The Davos Absolute Radiometer (DARA) prototype is an Electrical Substitution Radiometer (ESR) which has been developed as a successor of the PMO6 type on future space missions and ground based TSI measurements. The DARA implements an improved thermal design of the cavity detector and heat sink assembly to minimize air-vacuum differences and to maximize thermal symmetry of measuring and compensating cavity. The DARA also employs an inverted viewing geometry to reduce internal stray light. We will report on the characterization and calibration experiments which were carried out at PMOD/WRC and LASP (TRF).

  19. Absolute spectral radiance responsivity calibration of sun photometers

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Qiuyun; Zheng Xiaobing; Zhang Wei; Wang Xianhua; Li Jianjun; Li Xin; Li Zhengqiang

    2010-03-15

    Sun photometers are designed to measure direct solar irradiance and diffused sky radiance for the purpose of atmospheric parameters characterization. A sun photometer is usually calibrated by using a lamp-illuminated integrating sphere source for its band-averaged radiance responsivity, which normally has an uncertainty of 3%-5% at present. Considering the calibration coefficients may also change with time, a regular high precision calibration is important to maintain data quality. In this paper, a tunable-laser-based facility for spectral radiance responsivity calibration has been developed at the Key Laboratory of Optical Calibration and Characterization, Chinese Academy of Sciences. A reference standard radiance radiometer, calibrated against cryogenic radiometer, is used to determine the radiance from a laser-illuminated integrating sphere source. Spectral radiance responsivity of CIMEL CE318-2 sun photometer is calibrated using this new calibration system with a combined standard uncertainty of about 0.8%. As a validation, the derived band-averaged radiance responsivity are compared to that from a Goddard Space Flight Center lamp-based sphere calibration and good agreements (difference <1.4%) are found from 675 to 1020 nm bands.

  20. Measurements of Absolute Abundances in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  1. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSOLUTE ABUNDANCES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Harry P.

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  2. Absolute measurement of the extreme UV solar flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Ogawa, H. S.; Judge, D. L.; Phillips, E.

    1984-01-01

    A windowless rare-gas ionization chamber has been developed to measure the absolute value of the solar extreme UV flux in the 50-575-A region. Successful results were obtained on a solar-pointing sounding rocket. The ionization chamber, operated in total absorption, is an inherently stable absolute detector of ionizing UV radiation and was designed to be independent of effects from secondary ionization and gas effusion. The net error of the measurement is + or - 7.3 percent, which is primarily due to residual outgassing in the instrument, other errors such as multiple ionization, photoelectron collection, and extrapolation to the zero atmospheric optical depth being small in comparison. For the day of the flight, Aug. 10, 1982, the solar irradiance (50-575 A), normalized to unit solar distance, was found to be 5.71 + or - 0.42 x 10 to the 10th photons per sq cm sec.

  3. Spectral solar radiation data base documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Riordan, C.J.; Myers, D.R.; Hulstrom, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), Electric Power Research Institute, Florida Solar Energy Center, and Pacific Gas and Electric Company cooperated to produce a spectral solar radiation data base representing a range of atmospheric conditions. These data will help to characterize the neutral variability in the spectral (color) content to outdoor solar radiation so that the sensitivity of spectrally selective solar devices (such as photovoltaics) to these variations can be studied quantitatively. Volume 1 of this report documents the history, approach, content, and format of the data base; Volume 2 contains graphs and field notes for each of the spectral data sets. The data reside on magnetic tape at SERI.

  4. Absolute spectral response measurements of different photodiodes useful for applications in the UV spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelizzo, Maria G.; Ceccherini, Paolo; Garoli, Denis; Masut, Pietro; Nicolosi, Piergiorgio

    2004-09-01

    Long UV radiation exposure can result in damages of biological tissues, as burns, skin aging, erythema and even melanoma cancer. In the past years an increase of melanoma cancer has been observed and associated to the atmospheric ozone deployment. Attendance of sun tanning unit centers has become a huge social phenomena, and the maximum UV radiation dose that a human being can receive is regulated by law. On the other side, UV radiation is largely used for therapeutic and germicidal purposes. In all these areas, spectroradiometer and radiomenter are needed for monitoring UVA (315-400 nm), UVB (280-315 nm) and UVC (100-280 nm) irradiance. We have selected some commercial photodiodes which can be used as solid state detectors in these instruments. We have characterized them by measuring their absolute spectral response in the 200 - 400 nm spectral range.

  5. Absolute Abundance Measurements in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry

    2014-06-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with EVE/SDO and EIS/Hinode. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines Fe XV-XXIV and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (F). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is F=1.17+-0.22. Furthermore, we have compared the EVE measurements with corresponding flare observations of intermediate temperature S, Ar, Ca, and Fe emission lines taken with EIS. Our initial calculations also indicate a photospheric composition for these observations. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation in the non-flaring corona occurs.

  6. The Measurement of the Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability during the Solar Cycle 24 using SOLAR/SOLSPEC on ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolsée, David; Pereira, Nuno; Pandey, Praveen; Cessateur, Gaël; Gillotay, Didier; Foujols, Thomas; Hauchecorne, Alain; Bekki, Slimane; Marchand, Marion; Damé, Luc; Meftah, Mustapha; Bureau, Jerôme

    2016-04-01

    Since April 2008, SOLAR/SOLSPEC measures the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) from 166 nm to 3088 nm. The instrument is a part of the Solar Monitoring Observatory (SOLAR) payload, externally mounted on the Columbus module of the International Space Station. As the SSI is a key input for the validation of solar physics models, together with playing a role in the climate system and photochemistry of the Earth atmosphere, SOLAR/SOLSPEC spectral measurements becomes important. In this study, the in-flight operations and performances of the instrument -including the engineering corrections- will be presented for seven years of the SOLAR mission. Following an accurate absolute calibration, the SSI variability in the UV as measured by SOLAR/SOLSPEC in the course of the solar cycle 24 will be presented and compared to other instruments. The accuracy of these measurements will be also discussed here.

  7. Absolute intensities of CO2 lines in the 3140-3410/cm spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Devi, V. Malathy; Ferry-Leeper, Penelope S.; Rinsland, Curtis P.

    1988-01-01

    Absolute intensities for 430 transitions belonging to eleven rotation-vibration bands of (C-12)(O-16)2, (C-13)(O-16)2, and (O-16)(C-18)(O-18) in the 3140-3410/cm spectral region have been determined by analyzing spectra recorded at 0.01/cm resolution with the Fourier transform spectrometer in the McMath solar telescope complex at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak. The data were recorded at room temperature and low pressures (less than 10 torr) using a natural sample of carbon dioxide. Intensities were derived using a nonlinear least-squares spectral fitting procedure, and the values obtained for each band have been analyzed to determine the vibrational band intensity and nonrigid rotor coefficients. An alternative mathematical formulation is shown in the case of bands for which the Coriolis effect is large and the Q-branch line intensities were not determinable either because they were severely blended or absent from the spectra. Comparison are made between the results obtained in this study and other published values.

  8. Absolute Radiometer for Reproducing the Solar Irradiance Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapritskii, V. I.; Pavlovich, M. N.

    1989-01-01

    A high-precision absolute radiometer with a thermally stabilized cavity as receiving element has been designed for use in solar irradiance measurements. The State Special Standard of the Solar Irradiance Unit has been built on the basis of the developed absolute radiometer. The Standard also includes the sun tracking system and the system for automatic thermal stabilization and information processing, comprising a built-in microcalculator which calculates the irradiance according to the input program. During metrological certification of the Standard, main error sources have been analysed and the non-excluded systematic and accidental errors of the irradiance-unit realization have been determined. The total error of the Standard does not exceed 0.3%. Beginning in 1984 the Standard has been taking part in a comparison with the Å 212 pyrheliometer and other Soviet and foreign standards. In 1986 it took part in the international comparison of absolute radiometers and standard pyrheliometers of socialist countries. The results of the comparisons proved the high metrological quality of this Standard based on an absolute radiometer.

  9. Calibration of the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; Barnes, Robert; Baize, Rosemary; O'Connell, Joseph; Hair, Jason

    2010-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) plans to observe climate change trends over decadal time scales to determine the accuracy of climate projections. The project relies on spaceborne earth observations of SI-traceable variables sensitive to key decadal change parameters. The mission includes a reflected solar instrument retrieving at-sensor reflectance over the 320 to 2300 nm spectral range with 500-m spatial resolution and 100-km swath. Reflectance is obtained from the ratio of measurements of the earth s surface to those while viewing the sun relying on a calibration approach that retrieves reflectance with uncertainties less than 0.3%. The calibration is predicated on heritage hardware, reduction of sensor complexity, adherence to detector-based calibration standards, and an ability to simulate in the laboratory on-orbit sources in both size and brightness to provide the basis of a transfer to orbit of the laboratory calibration including a link to absolute solar irradiance measurements.

  10. Comparison of Solar UV Spectral Irradiance from SUSIM and SORCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, J. S.; Floyd, L.; McMullin, D.

    2014-10-01

    Knowledge of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) is important in determining the impact of solar variability on climate. Observations of UV SSI have been made by the Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SUSIM) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), the Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE), and the Solar Irradiance Monitor (SIM), both on the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite. Measurements by SUSIM and SORCE overlapped from 2003 to 2005. SUSIM and SORCE observations represent ˜ 20 years of absolute UV SSI. Unfortunately, significant differences exist between these two data sets. In particular, changes in SORCE UV SSI measurements, gathered at moderate and minimum solar activity, are a factor of two greater than the changes in SUSIM observations over the entire solar cycle. In addition, SORCE UV SSI have a substantially different relationship with the Mg ii index than did earlier UV SSI observations. Acceptance of these new SORCE results impose significant changes on our understanding of UV SSI variation. Alternatively, these differences in UV SSI observations indicate that some or all of these instruments have changes in instrument responsivity that are not fully accounted for by the current calibration. In this study, we compare UV SSI changes from SUSIM with those from SIM and SOLSTICE. The primary results are that (1) long-term observations by SUSIM and SORCE generally do not agree during the overlap period (2003 - 2005), (2) SUSIM observations during this overlap period are consistent with an SSI model based on Mg ii and early SUSIM SSI, and (3) when comparing the spectral irradiance for times of similar solar activity on either side of solar minimum, SUSIM observations show slight differences while the SORCE observations show variations that increase with time between spectra. Based on this work, we conclude that the instrument responsivity for SOLSTICE and SIM need to be reevaluated before these

  11. Spectral Measurements of Pulse Solar Simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, T. W.

    1998-11-12

    Spectral measurements of pulse solar simulators are used to quantify the wavelength-dependant characteristics of the light. Because every PV device has a unique spectral response, it is important to know the spectral irradiance and to periodically monitor the spectra for changes. Measurements are made at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) using several different techniques including the NREL-developed Pulse Analysis Spectroradiometer System (PASS).

  12. Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Lindblom, Joakim F.; O'Neal, Ray H.; Allen, Maxwell J.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Hoover, Richard B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper descibes the design and the characteristics of the Multispectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA), a new rocket spectroheliograph to be launched in August 1990. The MSSTA includes five multilayer Ritchey-Chretien telescopes covering the spectral range 150-300 A and eight multilayer Herschelian telescopes covering the spectral range 40-1550 A, making it possible to obtain spectrohelipgrams over the soft X-ray/extreme UV/FUV spectral range. The MSSTA is expected to obtain information regarding the structure and dynamics of the solar atmosphere in the temperature range 10 to the 4th-10 to the 7th K.

  13. Rotational Variability in Ultraviolet Solar Spectral Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, M. A.; Richard, E. C.; Harder, J. W.; Thuillier, G. O.

    2011-12-01

    There are currently many observations and models of the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) in the ultraviolet (UV). The models and the observations are often in agreement, but sometimes have significant differences. Using the decline of solar cycle 23 and the rise of solar cycle 24 as a test case, we will investigate the systematic differences between the short term SSI variation observed by satellite instruments and the predictions of proxy models.

  14. Solar Spectral Irradiance Changes during Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, S. V.; DeLand, M. T.

    2014-07-01

    We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow long-term (years) and short-term (weeks) changes in the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the 265-500 nm spectral range. During solar Cycle 24, in the relatively line-free regions the SSI changed by ~0.6% ± 0.2% around 265 nm. These changes gradually diminish to 0.15% ± 0.20% at 500 nm. All strong spectral lines and blends, with the notable exception of the upper Balmer lines, vary in unison with the solar "continuum." Besides the lines with strong chromospheric components, the most involved species include Fe I blends and all prominent CH, NH, and CN spectral bands. Following the general trend seen in the solar "continuum," the variability of spectral lines also decreases toward longer wavelengths. The long-term solar cycle SSI changes are closely, to within the quoted 0.1%-0.2% uncertainties, matched by the appropriately adjusted short-term SSI variations derived from the 27 day rotational modulation cycles. This further strengthens and broadens the prevailing notion about the general scalability of the UV SSI variability to the emissivity changes in the Mg II 280 nm doublet on timescales from weeks to years. We also detect subtle deviations from this general rule: the prominent spectral lines and blends at λ >~ 350 nm show slightly more pronounced 27 day SSI changes when compared to the long-term (years) trends. We merge the solar data from Cycle 21 with the current Cycle 24 OMI and GOME-2 observations and provide normalized SSI variations for the 170-795 nm spectral region.

  15. Solar Spectral Irradiance Changes During Cycle 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchenko, Sergey; Deland, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow long-term (years) and short-term (weeks) changes in the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the 265-500 nm spectral range. During solar Cycle 24, in the relatively line-free regions the SSI changed by approximately 0.6% +/- 0.2% around 265 nm. These changes gradually diminish to 0.15% +/- 0.20% at 500 nm. All strong spectral lines and blends, with the notable exception of the upper Balmer lines, vary in unison with the solar "continuum." Besides the lines with strong chromospheric components, the most involved species include Fe I blends and all prominent CH, NH, and CN spectral bands. Following the general trend seen in the solar "continuum," the variability of spectral lines also decreases toward longer wavelengths. The long-term solar cycle SSI changes are closely, to within the quoted 0.1%-0.2% uncertainties, matched by the appropriately adjusted short-term SSI variations derived from the 27 day rotational modulation cycles. This further strengthens and broadens the prevailing notion about the general scalability of the UV SSI variability to the emissivity changes in the Mg II 280 nm doublet on timescales from weeks to years. We also detect subtle deviations from this general rule: the prominent spectral lines and blends at lambda approximately or greater than 350 nm show slightly more pronounced 27 day SSI changes when compared to the long-term (years) trends. We merge the solar data from Cycle 21 with the current Cycle 24 OMI and GOME-2 observations and provide normalized SSI variations for the 170-795 nm spectral region.

  16. Spectral Solar Radiation Data Base at NREL

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI)*, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), and Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) cooperated to produce a spectral solar radiation data base representing a range of atmospheric conditions (or climates) that is applicable to several different types of solar collectors. Data that are included in the data base were collected at FSEC from October 1986 to April 1988, and at PG&E from April 1987 to April 1988. FSEC operated one EPRI and one SERI spectroradiometer almost daily at Cape Canaveral, which contributed nearly 2800 spectra to the data base. PG&E operated one EPRI spectroradiometer at San Ramon, Calif., as resources permitted, contributing nearly 300 spectra to the data base. SERI collected about 200 spectra in the Denver/Golden, Colo., area form November 1987 to February 1988 as part of a research project to study urban spectral solar radiation, and added these data to the data base. *In September 1991 the Solar Energy Research Institute became the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. [Description taken from http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/old_data/spectral/

  17. High spectral resolution in the solar spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baret, F.; Green, R. O.

    1994-01-01

    A session dedicated to high spectral resolution in the solar spectrum, covering topics of calibration, atmospheric correction, geology/pedology, inland water, and vegetation, is reported. The session showed a high degree of diversity in the topics and the approaches used. It was highlighted that high spectral resolution data could provide atmospherically corrected ground level calibrated reflectance values. Important advances were shown in the use of radiative transfer models applied either on water bodies or vegetation. Several studies highlighted the high degree of redundancy contained in high spectral resolution data.

  18. SOLAR/SOLSPEC ultraviolet solar spectral irradiance variability since 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damé, Luc; Bolsee, David; Hauchecorne, Alain; Meftah, Mustapha; Bekki, Slimane; Pereira, Nuno

    2016-07-01

    The SOLAR/SOLSPEC experiment measures the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) from the Space Station since April 2008. Measurements are carried between 166 nm and 3088 nm by three double-monochromators. SSI, particularly in the ultraviolet, is a key input to determine the dynamics and coupling of Earth's atmosphere in response to solar and terrestrial inputs. In-flight operations and performances of the instrument, including corrections, will be presented for the 8 years of the mission. After an accurate calibration following recent special on-orbit new operations, we present the variability measured in the UV by SOLAR/SOLSPEC. The accuracy of these measurements will be discussed.

  19. Instrumentation and First Results of the Reflected Solar Demonstration System for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, Joel; Thome, Kurtis; Hair, Jason; McAndrew, Brendan; Jennings, Don; Rabin, Douglas; Daw, Adrian; Lundsford, Allen

    2012-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission key goals include enabling observation of high accuracy long-term climate change trends, use of these observations to test and improve climate forecasts, and calibration of operational and research sensors. The spaceborne instrument suites include a reflected solar spectroradiometer, emitted infrared spectroradiometer, and radio occultation receivers. The requirement for the RS instrument is that derived reflectance must be traceable to Sl standards with an absolute uncertainty of <0.3% and the error budget that achieves this requirement is described in previo1L5 work. This work describes the Solar/Lunar Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS), a calibration demonstration system for RS instrument, and presents initial calibration and characterization methods and results. SOLARIS is an Offner spectrometer with two separate focal planes each with its own entrance aperture and grating covering spectral ranges of 320-640, 600-2300 nm over a full field-of-view of 10 degrees with 0.27 milliradian sampling. Results from laboratory measurements including use of integrating spheres, transfer radiometers and spectral standards combined with field-based solar and lunar acquisitions are presented. These results will be used to assess the accuracy and repeatability of the radiometric and spectral characteristics of SOLARIS, which will be presented against the sensor-level requirements addressed in the CLARREO RS instrument error budget.

  20. Absolute velocity measurement using three-beam spectral-domain Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P.; Verma, Y.; Kumar, S.; Gupta, P. K.

    2015-09-01

    We report the development of a three-beam spectral-domain Doppler optical coherence tomography setup that allows single interferometer-based measurement of absolute flow velocity. The setup makes use of galvo-based phase shifting to remove complex conjugate mirror artifact and a beam displacer in the sample arm to avoid cross talk image. The results show that the developed approach allows efficient utilization of the imaging range of the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography setup for three-beam-based velocity measurement.

  1. Variation in spectral irradiance of the SES solar simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnutt, A. E.

    1971-01-01

    A test to determine the spectral characteristics of the solar simulation produced by the solar environment simulator (SES) comprised a statistical analysis to determine the spectral variance, and its effect on the average absorptivity of surface coatings.

  2. Solar abundances with the SPICE spectral imager on Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giunta, Alessandra; Haberreiter, Margit; Peter, Hardi; Vial, Jean-Claude; Harrison, Richard; Parenti, Susanna; Innes, Davina; Schmutz, Werner; Buchlin, Eric; Chamberlin, Phillip; Thompson, William; Bocchialini, Karine; Gabriel, Alan; Morris, Nigel; Caldwell, Martin; Auchere, Frederic; Curdt, Werner; Teriaca, Luca; Hassler, Donald M.; DeForest, Craig; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats; Philippon, Anne; Janvier, Miho; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Griffin, Douglas; Baudin, Frederic; Davila, Joseph; Fludra, Andrzej; Waltham, Nick; Eccleston, Paul; Gottwald, Alexander; Klein, Roman; Hanley, John; Walls, Buddy; Howe, Chris; Schuehle, Udo; Gyo, Manfred; Pfiffner, Dany

    2016-07-01

    Elemental composition of the solar atmosphere and in particular abundance bias of low and high First Ionization Potential (FIP) elements are a key tracer of the source regions of the solar wind. These abundances and their spatio-temporal variations, as well as the other plasma parameters , will be derived by the SPICE (Spectral Imaging of the Coronal Environment) EUV spectral imager on the upcoming Solar Orbiter mission. SPICE is designed to provide spectroheliograms (spectral images) using a core set of emission lines arising from ions of both low-FIP and high-FIP elements. These lines are formed over a wide range of temperatures, enabling the analysis of the different layers of the solar atmosphere. SPICE will use these spectroheliograms to produce dynamic composition maps of the solar atmosphere to be compared to in-situ measurements of the solar wind composition of the same elements (i.e. O, Ne, Mg, Fe). This will provide a tool to study the connectivity between the spacecraft (the Heliosphere) and the Sun. We will discuss the SPICE capabilities for such composition measurements.

  3. Solar cycle variation in UV solar spectral irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng Yeo, Kok; Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami K.

    2015-08-01

    Solar spectral irradiance, SSI, in the UV has been measured from space, almost without interruption, since 1978. This is accompanied by the development of models aimed at reconstructing SSI by relating its variability to solar magnetic activity. The various satellite records and model reconstructions differ significantly in terms of the variation over the solar cycle, with the consequence that their application to climate models yield qualitatively different results. Here, we highlight the key discrepancies between available records and reconstructions, and discuss the possible underlying causes.

  4. Preliminary error budget for the reflected solar instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, K.; Gubbels, T.; Barnes, R.

    2011-10-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as the most critical method to determine the accuracy of climate change. The CLARREO Project will implement a spaceborne earth observation mission designed to provide rigorous SI-traceable observations (i.e., radiance, reflectance, and refractivity) that are sensitive to a wide range of key decadal change variables. The instrument suite includes emitted infrared spectrometers, global navigation receivers for radio occultation, and reflected solar spectrometers. The measurements will be acquired for a period of five years and will enable follow-on missions to extend the climate record over the decades needed to understand climate change. This work describes a preliminary error budget for the RS sensor. The RS sensor will retrieve at-sensor reflectance over the spectral range from 320 to 2300 nm with 500-m GIFOV and a 100-km swath width. The current design is based on an Offner spectrometer with two separate focal planes each with its own entrance aperture and grating covering spectral ranges of 320-640, 600-2300 nm. Reflectance is obtained from the ratio of measurements of radiance while viewing the earth's surface to measurements of irradiance while viewing the sun. The requirement for the RS instrument is that the reflectance must be traceable to SI standards at an absolute uncertainty <0.3%. The calibration approach to achieve the ambitious 0.3% absolute calibration uncertainty is predicated on a reliance on heritage hardware, reduction of sensor complexity, and adherence to detector-based calibration standards. The design above has been used to develop a preliminary error budget that meets the 0.3% absolute requirement. Key components in the error budget are geometry differences between the solar and earth views, knowledge of attenuator behavior when viewing the sun, and

  5. Normal incidence spectrophotometer using high density transmission grating technology and highly efficiency silicon photodiodes for absolute solar EUV irradiance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogawa, H. S.; Mcmullin, D.; Judge, D. L.; Korde, R.

    1992-01-01

    New developments in transmission grating and photodiode technology now make it possible to realize spectrometers in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region (wavelengths less than 1000 A) which are expected to be virtually constant in their diffraction and detector properties. Time dependent effects associated with reflection gratings are eliminated through the use of free standing transmission gratings. These gratings together with recently developed and highly stable EUV photodiodes have been utilized to construct a highly stable normal incidence spectrophotometer to monitor the variability and absolute intensity of the solar 304 A line. Owing to its low weight and compactness, such a spectrometer will be a valuable tool for providing absolute solar irradiance throughout the EUV. This novel instrument will also be useful for cross-calibrating other EUV flight instruments and will be flown on a series of Hitchhiker Shuttle Flights and on SOHO. A preliminary version of this instrument has been fabricated and characterized, and the results are described.

  6. Experimental feasibility of the airborne measurement of absolute oil fluorescence spectral conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne lidar oil spill experiments carried out to determine the practicability of the AOFSCE (absolute oil fluorescence spectral conversion efficiency) computational model are described. The results reveal that the model is suitable over a considerable range of oil film thicknesses provided the fluorescence efficiency of the oil does not approach the minimum detection sensitivity limitations of the lidar system. Separate airborne lidar experiments to demonstrate measurement of the water column Raman conversion efficiency are also conducted to ascertain the ultimate feasibility of converting such relative oil fluorescence to absolute values. Whereas the AOFSCE model is seen as highly promising, further airborne water column Raman conversion efficiency experiments with improved temporal or depth-resolved waveform calibration and software deconvolution techniques are thought necessary for a final determination of suitability.

  7. Measurement and modelling of spectral solar radiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehne, K.; Czeplak, G.

    1996-03-01

    Small band measurements of spectral solar radiation by means of commercially available spectral radiometers, which are generally designed for laboratory work, require thorough aptitude tests and mostly special fitting measures. For the already available DM 150, first of all an entrance optics to correct cosine errors, a thermostatted weathercasing, as well as a special control lamp device for field use were developped. An international IEA-field intercomparison of 12 spectral radiometers in the Oberpfaffenhofen area of DLR showed deviations between the global radiation spectra of (+/-)15% and (+/-)40% for the best and the worst case, resp. The latter was caused by the operational requirements in the field and the mechanical instabilities of some radiometers (including the DM 150). Generally a remarkable portion of the deviations belongs to calibration uncertainties and imperfect cosine corrections. With regard to the summarized experience only principal recommendations on the use of spectral radiometers are given. Measured data of atmospheric heat radiation A and other meteorological data of 16 IEA stations were compiled in a data base at MOH to facilitate the fast uniform validation of 30 formulae for parametrization of A. For the case of sky clouded in 3 layers a parametrization formula was improved and successfully validated. A special reliable A-formula could be developped from the sufficiently high number of data of station Schleswig for the case of low cloudiness only.

  8. Thorough subcells diagnosis in a multi-junction solar cell via absolute electroluminescence-efficiency measurements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoqiang; Zhu, Lin; Yoshita, Masahiro; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Kim, Changsu; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    World-wide studies on multi-junction (tandem) solar cells have led to record-breaking improvements in conversion efficiencies year after year. To obtain detailed and proper feedback for solar-cell design and fabrication, it is necessary to establish standard methods for diagnosing subcells in fabricated tandem devices. Here, we propose a potential standard method to quantify the detailed subcell properties of multi-junction solar cells based on absolute measurements of electroluminescence (EL) external quantum efficiency in addition to the conventional solar-cell external-quantum-efficiency measurements. We demonstrate that the absolute-EL-quantum-efficiency measurements provide I-V relations of individual subcells without the need for referencing measured I-V data, which is in stark contrast to previous works. Moreover, our measurements quantify the absolute rates of junction loss, non-radiative loss, radiative loss, and luminescence coupling in the subcells, which constitute the "balance sheets" of tandem solar cells. PMID:25592484

  9. Preliminary Error Budget for the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; Gubbels, Timothy; Barnes, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) plans to observe climate change trends over decadal time scales to determine the accuracy of climate projections. The project relies on spaceborne earth observations of SI-traceable variables sensitive to key decadal change parameters. The mission includes a reflected solar instrument retrieving at-sensor reflectance over the 320 to 2300 nm spectral range with 500-m spatial resolution and 100-km swath. Reflectance is obtained from the ratio of measurements of the earth s surface to those while viewing the sun relying on a calibration approach that retrieves reflectance with uncertainties less than 0.3%. The calibration is predicated on heritage hardware, reduction of sensor complexity, adherence to detector-based calibration standards, and an ability to simulate in the laboratory on-orbit sources in both size and brightness to provide the basis of a transfer to orbit of the laboratory calibration including a link to absolute solar irradiance measurements. The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe high-accuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as the most critical method to determine the accuracy of climate change projections such as those in the IPCC Report. A rigorously known accuracy of both decadal change observations as well as climate projections is critical in order to enable sound policy decisions. The CLARREO Project will implement a spaceborne earth observation mission designed to provide rigorous SI traceable observations (i.e., radiance, reflectance, and refractivity) that are sensitive to a wide range of key decadal change variables, including: 1) Surface temperature and atmospheric temperature profile 2) Atmospheric water vapor profile 3) Far infrared water vapor greenhouse 4) Aerosol properties and anthropogenic aerosol direct radiative forcing 5) Total and spectral solar

  10. Absolute Rovibrational Intensities of C-12O2-16 Absorption Bands in the 3090-3850/ CM Spectral Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.

    1998-01-01

    A multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fitting technique has been used to determine the absolute intensities for approximately 1500 spectral lines in 36 vibration - rotation bands Of C-12O2-16 between 3090 and 3850/ cm. A total of six absorption spectra of a high- purity (99.995% minimum) natural sample of carbon dioxide were used in the analysis. The spectral data (0.01/cm resolution) were recorded at room temperature and low pressure (1 to 10 Torr) using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer of the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak. The absorption path lengths for these spectra varied between 24.86 and 385.76 m. The first experimental determination of the intensity of the theoretically predicted 2(nu)(sub 2, sup 2) + nu(sub 3) "forbidden" band has been made. The measured line intensities obtained for each band have been analyzed to determine the vibrational band intensity, S(sub nu), in /cm/( molecule/sq cm) at 296 K, square of the rotationless transition dipole moment |R|(exp 2) in Debye, as well as the nonrigid rotor coefficients. The results are compared to the values listed in the 1996 HITRAN database which are obtained using the direct numerical diagonalization (DND) technique as well as to other published values where available.

  11. Multivariate Analysis of Solar Spectral Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Rabbette, M.

    2001-01-01

    Principal component analysis is used to characterize approximately 7000 downwelling solar irradiance spectra retrieved at the Southern Great Plains site during an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) shortwave intensive operating period. This analysis technique has proven to be very effective in reducing a large set of variables into a much smaller set of independent variables while retaining the information content. It is used to determine the minimum number of parameters necessary to characterize atmospheric spectral irradiance or the dimensionality of atmospheric variability. It was found that well over 99% of the spectral information was contained in the first six mutually orthogonal linear combinations of the observed variables (flux at various wavelengths). Rotation of the principal components was effective in separating various components by their independent physical influences. The majority of the variability in the downwelling solar irradiance (380-1000 nm) was explained by the following fundamental atmospheric parameters (in order of their importance): cloud scattering, water vapor absorption, molecular scattering, and ozone absorption. In contrast to what has been proposed as a resolution to a clear-sky absorption anomaly, no unexpected gaseous absorption signature was found in any of the significant components.

  12. Comparison of absolute spectral irradiance responsivity measurement techniques using wavelength-tunable lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ahtee, Ville; Brown, Steven W.; Larason, Thomas C.; Lykke, Keith R.; Ikonen, Erkki; Noorma, Mart

    2007-07-10

    Independent methods for measuring the absolute spectral irradiance responsivity of detectors have been compared between the calibration facilities at two national metrology institutes, the Helsinki University of Technology (TKK), Finland, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The emphasis is on the comparison of two different techniques for generating a uniform irradiance at a reference plane using wavelength-tunable lasers. At TKK's Laser Scanning Facility (LSF) the irradiance is generated by raster scanning a single collimated laser beam, while at the NIST facility for Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Responsivity Calibrations with Uniform Sources (SIRCUS), lasers are introduced into integrating spheres to generate a uniform irradiance at a reference plane. The laser-based irradiance responsivity results are compared to a traditional lamp-monochromator-based irradiance responsivity calibration obtained at the NIST Spectral Comparator Facility (SCF). A narrowband filter radiometer with a24 nm bandwidth and an effective band-center wavelength of 801 nm was used as the artifact. The results of the comparison between the different facilities, reported for the first time in the near-infrared wavelength range, demonstrate agreement at the uncertainty level of less than 0.1%. This result has significant implications in radiation thermometry and in photometry as well as in radiometry.

  13. Direct solar spectral irradiance and transmittance measurements from 350 to 2500 nm.

    PubMed

    Kindel, B C; Qu, Z; Goetz, A F

    2001-07-20

    A radiometrically stable, commercially available spectroradiometer was used in conjunction with a simple, custom-designed telescope to make spectrally continuous measurements of solar spectral transmittance and directly transmitted solar spectral irradiance. The wavelength range of the instrument is 350-2500 nm and the resolution is 3-11.7 nm. Laboratory radiometric calibrations show the instrument to be stable to better than 1.0% over a nine-month period. The instrument and telescope are highly portable, can be set up in a matter of minutes, and can be operated by one person. A method of absolute radiometric calibration that can be tied to published top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) solar spectra in valid Langley channels as well as regions of strong molecular absorption is also presented. High-altitude Langley plot calibration experiments indicate that this technique is limited ultimately by the current uncertainties in the TOA solar spectra, approximately 2-3%. Example comparisons of measured and modtran-modeled direct solar irradiance show that the model can be parameterized to agree with measurements over the large majority of the wavelength range to the 3% level for the two example cases shown. Side-by-side comparisons with a filter-based solar radiometer are in excellent agreement, with a mean absolute difference of tau = 0.0036 for eight overlapping wavelengths over three experiment days. PMID:18360373

  14. The IAG solar flux atlas: Accurate wavelengths and absolute convective blueshift in standard solar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiners, A.; Mrotzek, N.; Lemke, U.; Hinrichs, J.; Reinsch, K.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new solar flux atlas with the aim of understanding wavelength precision and accuracy in solar benchmark data. The atlas covers the wavelength range 405-2300 nm and was observed at the Institut für Astrophysik, Göttingen (IAG), with a Fourier transform spectrograph (FTS). In contrast to other FTS atlases, the entire visible wavelength range was observed simultaneously using only one spectrograph setting. We compare the wavelength solution of the new atlas to the Kitt Peak solar flux atlases and to the HARPS frequency-comb calibrated solar atlas. Comparison reveals systematics in the two Kitt Peak FTS atlases resulting from their wavelength scale construction, and shows consistency between the IAG and the HARPS atlas. We conclude that the IAG atlas is precise and accurate on the order of ± 10 m s-1 in the wavelength range 405-1065 nm, while the Kitt Peak atlases show deviations as large as several ten to 100 m s-1. We determine absolute convective blueshift across the spectrum from the IAG atlas and report slight differences relative to results from the Kitt Peak atlas that we attribute to the differences between wavelength scales. We conclude that benchmark solar data with accurate wavelength solution are crucial to better understand the effect of convection on stellar radial velocity measurements, which is one of the main limitations of Doppler spectroscopy at m s -1 precision. Data (FITS files of the spectra) and Table A.1 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A65

  15. Solar total and spectral irradiance reconstruction over last 9000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chi-Ju; Usoskin, Ilya; Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami K.

    2016-07-01

    Although the mechanisms of solar influence on Earth climate system are not yet fully understood, solar total and spectral irradiance are considered to be among the main determinants. Solar total irradiance is the total flux of solar radiative energy entering Earth's climate system, whereas the spectral irradiance describes this energy is distributed over the spectrum. Solar irradiance in the UV band is of special importance since it governs chemical processes in the middle and upper atmosphere. On timescales of the 11-year solar cycle and shorter, solar irradiance is measured by space-based instruments while models are needed to reconstruct solar irradiance on longer timescale. The SATIRE-M model (Spectral And Total Irradiance Reconstruction over millennia) is employed in this study to reconstruct solar irradiance from decadal radionuclide isotope data such as 14C and 10Be stored in tree rings and ice cores, respectively. A reconstruction over the last 9000 years will be presented.

  16. Absolute spectral irradiance measurements of lightning from 375 to 880 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orville, R. E.; Henderson, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The time-integrated emissions from cloud-to-ground lightning have been recorded in the 375-880 nm region, using a spectrometer-detector and multichannel analyzer system capable of absolute spectral irradiance measurements. A schematic drawing of the detector-analyzer system is presented, and the experimental setup is described. A total of ten flashes containing 46 individual strikes were recorded and compared to recordings of 500 flashes from 1981. The average spectral irradiance from 375 to 695 nm for flashes at about 15 km was 3.5 x 10 to the -5th J/sq m per stroke with a standard deviation of 2.0 x 10 to the -5th and a range from 0.7 x 10 to the 0.7-6.8 x 10 to the -5th J/sq m per stroke. The average stroke spectra irradiance from 650 to 880 nm for the same strokes was 1.2 x 10 to the -5th, with a standard deviation of 0.7 x 10 to the -5th and a range from 0.5 to 3.2 x 10 to the -5th J/sq m per stroke. A summary table of spectral irradiance values in 50 nm increment is presented. Analysis of the spectral emission data show that unresolved neutral hydrogen lines (NI) at 744.2 nm were more intense than H-alpha emission at 656.3 nm. The strong emission of a flash with a continuing current was identified as cyanogen (CN) emission.

  17. Climate Response to Spectral Solar Forcing from GISS GCMAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, G.; Cahalan, R. F.; Rind, D. H.; Jonas, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Harder, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Solar variations impose a unique external forcing to Earth's climate. Recent observations from Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) on Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) indicate different spectral irradiance variations, both amplitude and phase, from previously models. The current version of Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Global Climate Middle Atmosphere Model (GCMAM) couples atmosphere with ocean, and has interactive atmospheric chemistry with a model top near the mesopause, allowing us to examine the full climate response to spectral solar forcing. We use the GCMAM to examine the climate response to two types of spectral solar forcing, with one from reconstruction and the other based on SORCE observations. We show different ozone and temperature responses to the two solar forcing scenarios on decadal time scale (i.e., solar minimum minus solar maximum) and long- term trends on centennial time scales. We further discuss mechanisms for Sun Climate connection.

  18. Solar spectral irradiance and atmospheric transmission at Mauna Loa Observatory.

    PubMed

    Shaw, G E

    1982-06-01

    A radiometer was operated at the Mauna Loa Observatory during calendar year 1980 to estimate the spectral irradiance of the sun and its possible fluctuation in time near the peak of solar activity. Data were also acquired on seasonal trends of atmospheric transmissivity above the marine mixing layer in the central Pacific. Spectral irradiance remained constant to at least (1/2)% at all wavelengths monitored. Furthermore its absolute magnitude was in agreement with the Labs and Neckel values to +/-2% except at blue wavelengths where the Mauna Loa values are from 4 to 12% higher and at lambda = 850 nm where the Mauna Loa value is 9% lower. The residual aerosol optical depth above Mauna Loa Observatory during 1980 averaged tau(0) = 0.020. An intrusion of dust into the central Pacific from the Gobi Desert (as deduced by the composition of collected particles) invaded the Central Pacific from Mar. to May 1980 and caused a perturbation in optical depth (at lambda = 500 nm) of Deltatau(0) ~ 0.01-0.02. The optical depth increment caused by the Mt. St. Helens volcano was <0.005 in the 2-month period following the eruption. PMID:20389986

  19. Solar spectral irradiance and atmospheric transmission at Mauna Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, G.E.

    1982-06-01

    A radiometer was operated at the Mauna Loa Observatory during calendar year 1980 to estimate the spectral irradiance of the sun and its possible fluctuation in time near the peak of solar activity. Data were also acquired on seasonal trends of atmospheric transmissivity above the marine mixing layer in the central Pacific. Spectral irradiance remained c constant to at least 1/2% at all wavelengths monitored. Furthermore its absolute magnitude was in agreement with the Labs and Neckel values to +- 2% except at blue wavelengths where the Mauna Loa values are from 4 to 12% higher and at lambda = 850 nm where the Mauna Loa value is 9% lower. The residual aerosol optical depth above Mauna Loa Observatory during 1980 averaged tau/sub 0/ = 0.020. An intrusion of dust into the central Pacific from the Gobi Desert (as deduced by the composition of collected particles) invaded the Central Pacific from Mar. to May 19890 and caused a perturbation in optical depth (at lambda = 500 nm) of ..delta..tau/sub 0/approx.0.01--0.02. The optical depth increment caused by the Mt. St. Helens volcano was <0.005 in the 2-month period following the eruption.

  20. Spectral analyses of solar-like stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Amanda P.

    2015-03-01

    Accurate stellar parameters are important not just to understand the stars themselves, but also for understanding the planets that orbit them. Despite the availability of high quality spectra, there are still many uncertainties in stellar spectroscopy. In this thesis, the finer details of spectroscopic analyses are discussed and critically evaluated, with a focus on improving the stellar parameters. Using high resolution, high signal-to-noise HARPS spectra, accurate parameters were determined for 22 WASP stars. It is shown that there is a limit to the accuracy of stellar parameters that can be achieved, despite using high S/N spectra. It is also found that the selection of spectral lines used and the accuracy of atomic data is crucial, and different line lists can result in different values of parameters. Different spectral analysis methods often give vastly different results even for the same spectrum of the same star. Here it is shown that many of these discrepancies can be explained by the choice of lines used and by the various assumptions made. This will enable a more reliable homogeneous study of solar-like stars in the future. The Rossiter-McLaughlin effect observed for transiting exoplanets often requires prior knowledge of the projected rotational velocity (vsini). This is usually provided via spectroscopy, however this method has uncertainties as spectral lines are also broadened by photospheric velocity fields known as "macroturbulence". Using rotational splitting frequencies for 28 Kepler stars that were provided via asteroseismology, accurate vsini values have been determined. By inferring the macroturbulence for 28 Kepler stars, it was possible to obtain a new calibration between macroturbulence, effective temperature and surface gravity. Therefore macroturbulence, and thus vsini, can now be determined with confidence for stars that do not have asteroseismic data available. New spectroscopic vsini values were then determined for the WASP planet host

  1. Effects of relative and absolute frequency in the spectral weighting of loudness.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Suyash Narendra; Wróblewski, Marcin; Schmid, Kendra K; Jesteadt, Walt

    2016-01-01

    The loudness of broadband sound is often modeled as a linear sum of specific loudness across frequency bands. In contrast, recent studies using molecular psychophysical methods suggest that low and high frequency components contribute more to the overall loudness than mid frequencies. In a series of experiments, the contribution of individual components to the overall loudness of a tone complex was assessed using the molecular psychophysical method as well as a loudness matching task. The stimuli were two spectrally overlapping ten-tone complexes with two equivalent rectangular bandwidth spacing between the tones, making it possible to separate effects of relative and absolute frequency. The lowest frequency components of the "low-frequency" and the "high-frequency" complexes were 208 and 808 Hz, respectively. Perceptual-weights data showed emphasis on lowest and highest frequencies of both the complexes, suggesting spectral-edge related effects. Loudness matching data in the same listeners confirmed the greater contribution of low and high frequency components to the overall loudness of the ten-tone complexes. Masked detection thresholds of the individual components within the tone complex were not correlated with perceptual weights. The results show that perceptual weights provide reliable behavioral correlates of relative contributions of the individual frequency components to overall loudness of broadband sounds. PMID:26827032

  2. Demonstrating the Error Budget for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory Through Solar Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; McAndrew, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as a method to determine the accuracy of climate change. A CLARREO objective is to improve the accuracy of SI-traceable, absolute calibration at infrared and reflected solar wavelengths to reach on-orbit accuracies required to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps and observe climate change at the limit of natural variability. Such an effort will also demonstrate National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) approaches for use in future spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the results of laboratory and field measurements with the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. SOLARIS allows testing and evaluation of calibration approaches, alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. Results of laboratory calibration measurements are provided to demonstrate key assumptions about instrument behavior that are needed to achieve CLARREO's climate measurement requirements. Absolute radiometric response is determined using laser-based calibration sources and applied to direct solar views for comparison with accepted solar irradiance models to demonstrate accuracy values giving confidence in the error budget for the CLARREO reflectance retrieval.

  3. Future Long-term Measurements of Solar Spectral Irradiance by JPSS TSIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, E. C.; Harber, D.; Harder, J. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Brown, S.; Smith, A.; Lykke, K.

    2011-12-01

    To advance scientific understanding of how solar variability affects climate processes it is important to maintain accurate, long-term records of solar irradiance. Continuation of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) measurements is needed to characterize poorly understood wavelength-dependent climate processes. Measurement challenges in quantifying the influence of SSI variability on climate are achieving sufficient radiometric absolute accuracy and maintaining the long-term relative accuracy. The Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) is a dual-instrument package that will acquire solar irradiance as part of the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). The TSIS Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) instrument will continue the SSI measurements that began with the SORCE SIM in 2003. The TSIS SIM incorporates design and calibration improvements to better quantify long-term SSI variability. Specific improvements include the pre-launch SI-traceable calibration, the measurement precision, and the long-term relative stability needed to meet the requirements for establishing a climate record of SSI into the future. To quantify the absolute accuracy over the full spectral range, we have developed a SIM Radiometer Facility (SIMRF) utilizing the NIST Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Responsivity Calibrations using Uniform Sources (SIRCUS). This comprehensive facility includes tuneable laser light sources from the ultraviolet to the near infrared matched in radiant power to the solar spectrum and tied to a cryogenic radiometer traceable to the NIST Primary Optical Watt Radiometer (POWR). The full characterization and calibration follows a measurement equation approach at the unit-level for full validation of the end-to-end performance at the instrument-level to achieve a combined standard uncertainty of 0.25% .

  4. Solar resource assessment with a solar spectral irradiance meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsiankou, Viktar; Hinzer, Karin; Muron, Aaron; Haysom, Joan; Schriemer, Henry; Myrskog, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    The SSIM prototype was designed at the University of Ottawa as a cost-effective alternative to a field spectrora-diometer. The instrument was installed at the University of Ottawa's CPV testing facility in September, 2013, collecting the environmental and spectral data from October, 2013 to March, 2014. The SSIM's performance was compared against an ASD field spectroradiometer and an Eppley pyrheliometer during a six month study. It was observed that the SSIM can accurately reproduce the solar spectrum and the direct normal irradiance. The mean difference between the SSIM and the Eppley pyrheliometer was within ±1.5% for cloudless periods in October, 2013. However, bandpass filter degradation and moisture ingress limited the long term performance of the device.

  5. Observation and Modeling of the Solar Transition Region. 1; Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oluseyi, Hakeem M.; Walker, A. B. C., II; Porter, Jason; Hoover, Richard B.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    We report on observations of the solar atmosphere in several extreme-ultraviolet and far-ultraviolet bandpasses obtained by the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array, a rocket-borne spectroheliograph, on flights in 1987, 1991, and 1994, spanning the last solar maximum. Quiet-Sun emission observed in the 171-175 Angstrom bandpass, which includes lines of O v, O VI, Fe IX, and Fe X, has been analyzed to test models of the temperatures and geometries of the structures responsible for this emission. Analyses of intensity variations above the solar limb reveal scale heights consistent with a quiet-Sun plasma temperature of 500,000 less than or equal to T (sub e) less than or equal to 800,000 K. The structures responsible for the quiet-Sun EUV emission are modeled as small quasi-static loops. We submit our models to several tests. We compare the emission our models would produce in the bandpass of our telescope to the emission we have observed. We find that the emission predicted by loop models with maximum temperatures between 700,000 and 900,000 K are consistent with our observations. We also compare the absolute flux predicted by our models in a typical upper transition region line to the flux measured by previous observers. Finally, we present a preliminary comparison of the predictions of our models with diagnostic spectral line ratios from previous observers. Intensity modulations in the quiet Sun are observed to occur on a scale comparable to the supergranular scale. We discuss the implications that a distribution of loops of the type we model here would have for heating the local network at the loops' footpoints.

  6. Infrared spectral emittance profiles of spectrally selective solar absorbing layers at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Soule, D E; Smith, D W

    1977-11-01

    A study was made to characterize parametrically the spectrally selective absorptance profiles of typical interference, bulk absorption, and mixed-type absorbing layers for solar-thermal conversion at temperatures to 500 degrees C. A five parameter empirical Fermi function was used to model the spectral absorptance converted from the measured spectral reflectance. An alternative method using the Fermi model is presented for defining the ir spectral emittance profile, as scaled to the measured hemispherical total emittahce. PMID:20174248

  7. Solar spectral irradiance and total solar irradiance at a solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevolenskaya, E. E.; Shapovalov, S. N.; Kostuchenko, I. G.

    2014-12-01

    Results are presented for a wavelet analysis of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the ultraviolet to infrared range and total solar irradiance (TSI). The study is based on data collected by the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment ( SORCE) satellite from March 10, 2007 to January 23, 2010. Cross-wavelet analysis finds relationships of varying degrees of tightness between SSI, TSI, and magnetic flux in a sunspot zone on the surface rotation timescales of solar activity complexes. Wavelet coherence shows how magnetic flux variations within a latitudinal sunspot zone are related with spectral irradiance variations. For example, variations in ultraviolet radiation at UV 200.5 nm are in phase with those of the magnetic flux associated with solar activity complexes. However, there is an unusual interval UV 310 to 380 nm, in which coherent structures disappear and UV radiation variations do not follow the changes in the magnetic flux.

  8. Thorough subcells diagnosis in a multi-junction solar cell via absolute electroluminescence-efficiency measurements

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaoqiang; Zhu, Lin; Yoshita, Masahiro; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Kim, Changsu; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    World-wide studies on multi-junction (tandem) solar cells have led to record-breaking improvements in conversion efficiencies year after year. To obtain detailed and proper feedback for solar-cell design and fabrication, it is necessary to establish standard methods for diagnosing subcells in fabricated tandem devices. Here, we propose a potential standard method to quantify the detailed subcell properties of multi-junction solar cells based on absolute measurements of electroluminescence (EL) external quantum efficiency in addition to the conventional solar-cell external-quantum-efficiency measurements. We demonstrate that the absolute-EL-quantum-efficiency measurements provide I–V relations of individual subcells without the need for referencing measured I–V data, which is in stark contrast to previous works. Moreover, our measurements quantify the absolute rates of junction loss, non-radiative loss, radiative loss, and luminescence coupling in the subcells, which constitute the “balance sheets” of tandem solar cells. PMID:25592484

  9. Future Long-term Measurements of Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability: Achievements and Lessons from the SORCE SIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, E. C.; Harder, J. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T. N.; Lykke, K.; Brown, S.

    2010-12-01

    In order to advance understanding of how natural and anthropogenic process affect Earth’s climate system there is a strong scientific importance of maintaining accurate, long-term records of climate forcing. The continuation of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) measurements are needed to characterize poorly understood wavelength dependent climate processes. A major challenge quantifying the influence of SSI variability relates directly to the radiometric absolute accuracy and long-term precision of the measurements. The strong reliance on radiative transfer modeling for interpretation and quantification of the deposition of solar radiation in the atmosphere makes it imperative that the spectral distribution of radiant energy entering the atmosphere be known to a high degree of absolute accuracy (tied directly to international standards). The Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) is a solar spectral radiometer that continuously monitors the SSI across the wavelength region spanning the ultraviolet, visible and near infrared (200 nm - 2400 nm, a region encompassing 96% of the total solar irradiance). A future SIM instrument is included as part of the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) to continue the measurement of SSI, which began with the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE), launched in 2003. SORCE SIM measurements have now monitored SSI for a sufficiently long time and over a wide range in solar activity to quantify wavelength-dependent variability form the UV to the near IR. The analysis of the SORCE SIM measurements of solar spectral variability have resulted in a number of instrument design refinements central to maintaining the long-term calibration to SI irradiance standards and achieve the necessary measurement precision and long-term reproducibility (0.05-0.01% per year) to meet the needs for establishing a climate record of solar spectral irradiance into the future.

  10. Spectral light management for solar energy conversion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Cameron; Mojiri, Ahmad; Rosengarten, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Due to the inherent broadband nature of the solar radiation, combined with the narrow spectral sensitivity range of direct solar to electricity devices, there is a massive opportunity to manipulate the solar spectrum to increase the functionality and efficiency of solar energy conversion devices. Spectral splitting or manipulation facilitates the efficient combination of both high-temperature solar thermal systems, which can absorb over the entire solar spectrum to create heat, and photovoltaic cells, which only convert a range of wavelengths to electricity. It has only recently been possible, with the development of nanofabrication techniques, to integrate micro- and nano-photonic structures as spectrum splitters/manipulators into solar energy conversion devices. In this paper, we summarize the recent developments in beam splitting techniques, and highlight some relevant applications including combined PV-thermal collectors and efficient algae production, and suggest paths for future development in this field.

  11. Spectral changes in the zenith skylight during total solar eclipses.

    PubMed

    Hall, W N

    1971-06-01

    The relative spectral intensity of the zenith sky was measured with an optical scanning spectrometer at Nantucket Island, Massachusetts, during the total solar eclipse of 7 March 1970. The spectral ratios I(5100 A)/I(4300 A) and I(5900 A)/I(5100 A) at Nantucket remained unchanged for 96% or less obscuration of the sun by the moon. The results are compared with other recent relative spectral intensity measurements made during total solar eclipses. Comparison with other eclipse measurements for solar elevation angle at totality less than 45 degrees shows a blue color shift consistent with rayleigh scattering. Eclipses with solar elevation angles at totality greater than 45 degrees do not show consistent color shifts. This inconsistency may be due to difficulty in establishing a suitable reference spectrum for comparison with the spectral distribution of the zenith sky at totality. Selection of a suitable reference spectrum is discussed. PMID:20111100

  12. Development of a SWIR solar spectral radiometer for the ARM program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Murcray, F.

    1998-09-01

    The goal of this grant was to develop an absolutely calibrated spectral radiometer covering the 1 to 5 {micro}m spectral region of the DOE ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements) program. This instrument is called the Absolute Solar Transmittance Interferometer (ASTI). This effort was based on earlier results from grant DE-FG02-92ER61360. The instrument is based on a small, commercially available interferometer, built by Bomem, Inc., of Quebec, Canada. For the earlier grant, the authors constructed a breadboard version of ASTI, which was used to study the linearity, zero offset, gain stability, etc. These all indicated that an instrument of this type could achieve precision of 1% or better, with accuracy limited by the calibration standards (nominally 3%). For this grant they constructed a prototype instrument for possible use at the ARM sites.

  13. Lyman alpha solar spectral irradiance line profile observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Martin; Machol, Janet; Quemerais, Eric; Curdt, Werner; Kretschmar, Matthieu; Haberreiter, Margit

    2016-04-01

    Solar lyman alpha solar spectral irradiance measurements are available on a daily basis, but only the 1-nm integrated flux is typically published. The International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern, Switzerland has sponsored a team to make higher spectral resolution data available to the community. Using a combination of SORCE/SOLSTICE and SOHO/SUMER observations plus empirical and semi-empirical modeling, we will produce a dataset of the line profile. Our poster will describe progress towards this goal.

  14. Analysis of Solar Spectral Irradiance Measurements from the SBUV/2-Series and the SSBUV Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Hilsenrath, Ernest

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a NOAA-11 SBUV/2 solar spectral irradiance data set which is free from long-term instrument drift, then perform scientific analysis using the data set. During the current period of performance, 29 February 1996 through 31 August 1996, we finalized the NOAA-11 SBUV/2 characterization using internal data. This included updating the instrument's electronic, photomultiplier tube gain, wavelength, diffuser degradation, and goniometric calibrations. We have also completed the SSBUV characterization, 1989-1994, and produced SSBUV irradiances for the first seven SSBUV flights. Both of these steps were needed before the long-term calibration of the NOAA-11 SBUV/2 solar spectral irradiance data set via SSBUV can be undertaken. A second major aspect of this work is to compare solar spectral irradiances from the SBUV/2 instruments and SSBUV with corresponding data from other instruments. In the preceding six months, SSBUV data from the ATLAS-3 (November 1994) mission were compared to coincident SUSIM ATLAS-3 data. The GOME instrument was launched by the European Space Agency in early 1995 and began making solar irradiance measurements in May 1995. Working with GOME scientists, we are using SSBUV data to validate the GOME solar irradiance data. Based in part on those findings, the GOME absolute calibration data were reanalyzed.

  15. The Impact of Different Absolute Solar Irradiance Values on Current Climate Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, David H.; Lean, Judith L.; Jonas, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of the preindustrial and doubled CO2 climates are made with the GISS Global Climate Middle Atmosphere Model 3 using two different estimates of the absolute solar irradiance value: a higher value measured by solar radiometers in the 1990s and a lower value measured recently by the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment. Each of the model simulations is adjusted to achieve global energy balance; without this adjustment the difference in irradiance produces a global temperature change of 0.48C, comparable to the cooling estimated for the Maunder Minimum. The results indicate that by altering cloud cover the model properly compensates for the different absolute solar irradiance values on a global level when simulating both preindustrial and doubled CO2 climates. On a regional level, the preindustrial climate simulations and the patterns of change with doubled CO2 concentrations are again remarkably similar, but there are some differences. Using a higher absolute solar irradiance value and the requisite cloud cover affects the model's depictions of high-latitude surface air temperature, sea level pressure, and stratospheric ozone, as well as tropical precipitation. In the climate change experiments it leads to an underestimation of North Atlantic warming, reduced precipitation in the tropical western Pacific, and smaller total ozone growth at high northern latitudes. Although significant, these differences are typically modest compared with the magnitude of the regional changes expected for doubled greenhouse gas concentrations. Nevertheless, the model simulations demonstrate that achieving the highest possible fidelity when simulating regional climate change requires that climate models use as input the most accurate (lower) solar irradiance value.

  16. Deployment dynamics of a simplified spinning IKAROS solar sail via absolute coordinate based method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiang; Tian, Qiang; Hu, Hai-Yan

    2013-02-01

    The spinning solar sail of large scale has been well developed in recent years. Such a solar sail can be considered as a rigid-flexible multibody system mainly composed of a spinning central rigid hub, a number of flexible thin tethers, sail membranes, and tip masses. A simplified interplanetary kite-craft accelerated by radiation of the Sun (IKAROS) model is established in this study by using the absolute-coordinate-based (ACB) method that combines the natural coordinate formulation (NCF) describing the central rigid hub and the absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF) describing flexible parts. The initial configuration of the system in the second-stage deployment is determined through both dynamic and static analyses. The huge set of stiff equations of system dynamics is solved by using the generalized-alpha method, and thus the deployment dynamics of the system can be well understood.

  17. Spectral sensitization of nanocrystalline solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Spitler, Mark T.; Ehret, Anne; Stuhl, Louis S.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to dye sensitized polycrystalline photoelectrochemical solar cells for use in energy transduction from light to electricity. It concerns the utility of highly absorbing organic chromophores as sensitizers in such cells and the degree to which they may be utilized alone and in combination to produce an efficient photoelectrochemical cell, e.g., a regenerative solar cell.

  18. High solar cycle spectral variations inconsistent with stratospheric ozone observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, W. T.; Haigh, J. D.; Rozanov, E. V.; Kuchar, A.; Sukhodolov, T.; Tummon, F.; Shapiro, A. V.; Schmutz, W.

    2016-03-01

    Solar variability can influence surface climate, for example by affecting the mid-to-high-latitude surface pressure gradient associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation. One key mechanism behind such an influence is the absorption of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation by ozone in the tropical stratosphere, a process that modifies temperature and wind patterns and hence wave propagation and atmospheric circulation. The amplitude of UV variability is uncertain, yet it directly affects the magnitude of the climate response: observations from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite show broadband changes up to three times larger than previous measurements. Here we present estimates of the stratospheric ozone variability during the solar cycle. Specifically, we estimate the photolytic response of stratospheric ozone to changes in spectral solar irradiance by calculating the difference between a reference chemistry-climate model simulation of ozone variability driven only by transport (with no changes in solar irradiance) and observations of ozone concentrations. Subtracting the reference from simulations with time-varying irradiance, we can evaluate different data sets of measured and modelled spectral irradiance. We find that at altitudes above pressure levels of 5 hPa, the ozone response to solar variability simulated using the SORCE spectral solar irradiance data are inconsistent with the observations.

  19. Terrestrial solar spectral distributions derived from broadband hourly solar radiation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Daryl R.

    2009-08-01

    Multiple junction and thin film photovoltaic (PV) technologies respond differently to varying terrestrial spectral distributions of solar energy. PV device and system designers are concerned with the impact of spectral variation on PV specific technologies. Spectral distribution data is generally very rare, expensive, and difficult to obtain. We modified an existing empirical spectral conversion model to convert hourly broadband global (total hemispherical) horizontal and direct normal solar radiation to representative spectral distributions. Hourly average total hemispherical and direct normal beam solar radiation, such as provided in typical meteorological year (TMY) data are model spectral model input data. Default or prescribed atmospheric aerosols and water vapor are possible inputs. Individual hourly and monthly and annual average spectral distributions are computed for a specified tilted surface. The spectral range is from 300 nm to 1400 nm. The model is a modified version of the Nann and Riordan SEDES2 model. Measured hemispherical spectral distributions for a wide variety of conditions at the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Co. and Florida Solar Energy Center (Cocoa, FL) show that reasonable spectral accuracy of about +/-20% is obtainable, with notable exceptions for weather events such as snow.

  20. Spectral analysis of natural solar ultraviolet B to promote synthesis of vitamin D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Min-Wei; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Han-Chao; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a spectral analysis system for the measurement of solar ultraviolet B over long durations. The proposed system provides high resolution at low cost in a highly robust and flexible format. We obtained information pertaining to the absolute irradiance of sunlight in a fixed location with the aim of identifying the best period in which to seek exposure to the sun with regard to maximizing the synthesis of vitamin D while minimizing damage to the skin. This study also provides a means of establishing a database for the development of healthy lamp technology.

  1. Spectral estimates of solar radiation intercepted by corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Daughtry, C. S. T.; Gallo, K. P.

    1982-01-01

    Reflectance factor data were acquired with a Landsat band radiometer throughout two growing seasons for corn (Zea mays L.) canopies differing in planting dates, populations, and soil types. Agronomic data collected included leaf area index (LAI), biomass, development stage, and final grain yields. The spectral variable, greenness, was associated with 78 percent of the variation in LAI over all treatments. Single observations of LAI or greenness have limited value in predicting corn yields. The proportions of solar radiation intercepted (SRI) by these canopies were estimated using either measured LAI or greenness. Both SRI estimates, when accumulated over the growing season, accounted for approximately 65 percent of the variation in yields. Models which simulated the daily effects of weather and intercepted solar radiation on growth had the highest correlations to grain yields. This concept of estimating intercepted solar radiation using spectral data represents a viable approach for merging spectral and meteorological data for crop yield models.

  2. Absolute solar 30.4 nm flux from sounding rocket observations during the solar cycle 23 minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Darrell L.; McMullin, Donald R.; Ogawa, Howard S.

    A transmission grating extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer, nominally identical to the Charge, Element, and Isotope Analysis System/Solar EUV Monitor (CELIAS/SEM) instrument on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), has obtained accurate measurements of the integrated absolute solar extreme ultraviolet irradiance in an 8 nm band pass centered at 30.4 nm. The spectrometer also measured the EUV/soft X-ray flux, but those data will be reported in a later paper. The instrument was launched on two sounding rocket flights from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, on June 26, 1996, and again on August 11, 1997, to provide a SOHO underflight calibration database in the EUV. The full disk solar 30.4+/-40nm fluxes measured by it on the above 2 days were 1.21×1010 and 1.42×1010 photons cm-2 s-1 at 1 AU, respectively. These measurements have an absolute 1σ uncertainty of 8.1%.

  3. Correction for spectral mismatch effects on the calibration of a solar cell when using a solar simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Seaman, C.H.

    1981-01-15

    A general expression has been derived to enable calculation of the calibration error resulting from simulator-solar AMX spectral mismatch and from reference cell-test cell spectral mismatch. The information required includes the relative spectral response of the reference cell, the relative spectral response of the cell under test, and the relative spectral irradiance of the simulator (over the spectral range defined by cell response). The spectral irradiance of the solar AMX is assumed to be known.

  4. Modelling rotational and cyclical spectral solar irradiance variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Yvonne

    Solar irradiance changes are highly wavelength dependent: solar-cycle variations in the UV can be on the order of tens of percent, while changes in the visible are typically only of the order of one or two permille. With the launch of a number of instruments to measure spectral solar irradiance, we are now for a first time in a good position to explore the changing solar irradiance over a large range of wavelengths and to test our irradiance models as well as some of their underlying assumptions. I will introduce some of the current modelling approaches and present model-data comparisons, using the SATIRE irradiance model and SORCE/SIM measurements as an example. I will conclude by highlighting a number of outstanding questions regarding the modelling of spectral irradiance and current approaches to address these.

  5. 1/f noise in the UV solar spectral irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varotsos, Costas A.; Melnikova, Irina; Efstathiou, Maria N.; Tzanis, Chris

    2013-02-01

    The investigation of the intrinsic properties of the solar spectral irradiance as a function of the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength is attempted by exploiting rare observations performed at the Villard St. Pancrace station of the Lille University of Sciences and Technology ranging from 278 to 400 nm with a step of 0.05 nm every half an hour from nearly sunrise to sunset. To achieve this goal, the modern method of the detrended fluctuation analysis was applied on the solar spectral irradiance values versus wavelength. This analysis revealed that the solar incident flux at the top of the atmosphere and the solar spectral irradiance at the ground during two overcast sky days fluctuate with the UV wavelength exhibiting persistent long-range power-law behavior. More interestingly, the exponent of the power-law relationship between the fluctuations of the solar spectral irradiance versus UV wavelength at both the top of the atmosphere and the ground is consistently close to unity (of 1/f-type) throughout the day. This 1/f behavior has been detected in many complex dynamical systems, but despite much effort to derive a theory for its widespread occurrence in nature, it remains unexplained so far. According to the above-mentioned findings we speculate that the 1/f property of the incident solar UV flux at the top of the atmosphere could probably drive both the 1/f behavior depicted in the atmospheric components and the solar UV irradiance at the Earth's surface. The latter could influence the UV-sensitive biological ecosystems, giving rise to a 1/f-type variability in the biosphere, which has already been proven by recent observational data. We finally propose that Wien approximation could be multiplied by a 1/f function of wavelength (e.g., of the type of the fractional Brownian motion) in order to reproduce the aforementioned 1/f feature of the solar UV flux.

  6. Solar Spectral Irradiance Observations from the PICARD/PREMOS Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, G.; Schöll, M.; Schmutz, W. K.; Wehrli, C.; Groebner, J.; Haberreiter, M.; Kretzschmar, M.; Shapiro, A.; Thuillier, G. O.; Finsterle, W.; Fox, N.; Hochedez, J. F.; Koller, S.; Meftah, M.; Nyeki, S.; Pfiffner, D.; Roth, H.; Rouze, M.; Spescha, M.; Tagirov, R.; Werner, L.; Wyss, J.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather and space climate studies require accurate Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) observations. The PREcision Monitoring Sensor (PREMOS) instrument aboard the PICARD satellite acquired solar irradiance measurements in specific spectral windows in the UV, visible and near infrared from October 2010 to March 2014. This contribution aims at presenting the Level 3 data, corrected for non solar features as well as for degradation. These level 3 data has been tested over different scientific cases, such as observations during the Venus transit and the presence of the p-mode signature within high-cadence data. The PREMOS Level 3 data have also been compared to others data sets, namely the SOLSTICE and SIM instruments aboard SORCE, for nearly 3 and half years. An excellent correlation has been found for the UV spectral ranges. We have also found a rather good correlation for visible and near-infrared observations for short-term variations, for which an error of about 200 ppm has been estimated within PREMOS visible and near-infrared observations. The PREMOS data could also be used to address several scientific topics, i.e. for validating semi-empirical models of the solar irradiance. We will emphasize about our new irradiance model, COSIR for Code of Solar Irradiance Reconstruction, which is successful at reproducing the solar modulation as seen in the PREMOS, SoHO/Virgo and SORCE data.

  7. Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. V - Temperature diagnostic response to the optically thin solar plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deforest, Craig E.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Allen, Max J.; Paris, Elizabeth S.; Willis, Tom D.; Lindblom, Joakim F.; O'Neal, Ray H.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Hoover, Richard B.

    1991-01-01

    The compact soft X-ray/EUV/FUV multilayer coated telescopes developed for solar chromosphere, corona, and corona/solar-wind interface studies permit the use of conventional (Cassegrain, Herschelian, etc.) configurations. The multilayer coatings also allow a narrow-wavelength band to be selected for imaging. NASA's Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array is composed of 17 of these compact telescopes; attention is given to their ability to obtain temperature-diagnostic information concerning the solar plasma.

  8. Solar Confocal Interferometers for Sub-Picometer-Resolution Spectral Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Pietraszewski, Chris; West, Edward A.; Dines, Terence C.

    2006-01-01

    The confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer allows sub-picometer spectral resolution of Fraunhofer line profiles. Such high spectral resolution is needed to keep pace with the higher spatial resolution of the new set of large-aperture solar telescopes. The line-of-sight spatial resolution derived for line profile inversions would then track the improvements of the transverse spatial scale provided by the larger apertures. The confocal interferometer's unique properties allow a simultaneous increase in both etendue and spectral power. Methods: We have constructed and tested two confocal interferometers. Conclusions: In this paper we compare the confocal interferometer with other spectral imaging filters, provide initial design parameters, show construction details for two designs, and report on the laboratory test results for these interferometers, and propose a multiple etalon system for future testing of these units and to obtain sub-picometer spectral resolution information on the photosphere in both the visible and near-infrared.

  9. Spatial and spectral studies of solar phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, K. L.; Kulander, J. L.; Martin, S. F.; Ramsey, H. E.

    1971-01-01

    Work proceeded simultaneously in four different areas of solar research. These were: (1) assembly and testing of the components of a multiple-slit H alpha spectrograph, (2) simultaneous observations of the wings of the H alpha line with a newly modified filter, (3) analysis of H alpha high resolution observations in conjunction with magnetic field observations obtained at Kitt Peak, and (4) theoretical analysis of the D3 line HeI.

  10. Photographic films for the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Deforest, Craig E.; Allen, Maxwell J.; Lindblom, Joakim F.; Gilliam, Lou; November, Larry; Brown, Todd; Dewan, Clyde A.

    1992-01-01

    The rocketborne Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA) uses an array of Ritchey-Chretien, Cassegrain, and Herschelian telescopes to produce ultrahigh-resolution full-disk images of the sun within the soft X-ray, EUV, and FUV ranges. Such imaging of the solar disk and corona out to several solar radii placed great demands on the MSSTA's data storage capabilities; in addition, its photographic films required very low outgassing rates. Results are presented from calibration tests conducted on the MSSTA's emulsions, based on measurements at NIST's synchrotron facility.

  11. Spectral Calibration of the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Kobayashi, Ken; Cirtain, Jonathan; Gary, Allen; Davis, John; Reader, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the scientific goals of a sounding rocket program called the Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI), presents a brief description of the optics that were developed to meet those goals and discusses the spectral, spatial and polarization characteristics of SUMI's Toroidal Variable-Line-Space (TVLS) gratings; which are critical to SUMI's measurements of the magnetic field in the Sun's transition region.

  12. High angular resolution absolute intensity of the solar continuum from 1400 to 1790 A.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, G. E.; Moe, O. K.

    1972-01-01

    Absolute intensities of the solar UV continuum from 1400 to 1790 A have been measured from rocket spectra taken on August 13, 1970. The spectra had an angular resolution of 2 arc sec by 1 arc min, and the pointing accuracy of the instrument was plus or minus 2 arc sec. This permits us to study the center-to-limb variation of the intensity with a spatial resolution of 2 arc sec. Four positions on the solar disk have been studied corresponding to values of cos theta = 0.12, 0.22, 0.28 and 0.72, where theta is the heliocentric position angle. The measurements give higher values for the intensity than recent photoelectric measurement, but are in good agreement with the intensities of Widing et al.

  13. A Compact Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor for Future Small Satellite and CubeSat Science Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, E. C.; Harber, D.; Snow, M. A.; Harder, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate and continuous measurements of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) is recognized as being increasingly important to advancing our understanding of the solar influence on Earth's climate. For example, the magnitude of SSI UV variability has significant implications, both directly and indirectly, for the response of the stratosphere and mesosphere, whereas the visible and near infrared SSI variability influences the radiative balance, thermal structure, and dynamics of the lower atmosphere and ocean layers. Recent SSI measurements are providing critical inputs in evaluating and improving present climate models, however they are not yet of sufficient accuracy to stand alone without overlapping records - gaps in the observational record, caused by future mission delays or early failures of existing missions, effectively destroy our ability to link records from different instruments into a continuous, long-term climate quality record. Recent advancements in calibration facilities and techniques make it now possible to improve significantly the accuracy and traceability of future SSI observations and assure quantification of uncertainty as input to increasingly more sophisticated climate models. The goal of the proposed compact SSI monitor is to cover 200-2400 nm with the required SI-traceable accuracy and on-orbit stability to meet the solar input measurement requirements defined in the Earth Science Decadal Survey for establishing benchmark climate records. Building upon our experiences and resources from the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) program, the instrument will reduce the cost, size, and characterization and calibration schedule of a solar spectral irradiance monitor with SI-traceable absolute calibration at the 0.2% uncertainty level (k=1) while maintaining 100 ppm relative stability. System level performance characterizations and final end-to-end absolute irradiance calibration will be accomplished with the LASP Spectral Radiometer

  14. The source of multi spectral energy of solar energetic electron

    SciTech Connect

    Herdiwijaya, Dhani

    2015-04-16

    We study the solar energetic electron distribution obtained from ACE and GOES satellites which have different altitudes and electron spectral energy during the year 1997 to 2011. The electron spectral energies were 0.038–0.315 MeV from EPAM instrument onboard ACE satellite and >2 MeV from GOES satellite. We found that the low electron energy has no correlation with high energy. In spite of we have corrected to the altitude differences. It implied that they originated from time dependent events with different sources and physical processes at the solar atmosphere. The sources of multi spectral energetic electron were related to flare and CME phenomena. However, we also found that high energetic electron comes from coronal hole.

  15. Advancing tandem solar cells by spectrally selective multilayer intermediate reflectors.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Andre; Paetzold, Ulrich W; Zhang, Chao; Merdzhanova, Tsvetelina; Lambertz, Andreas; Ulbrich, Carolin; Bittkau, Karsten; Rau, Uwe

    2014-08-25

    Thin-film silicon tandem solar cells are composed of an amorphous silicon top cell and a microcrystalline silicon bottom cell, stacked and connected in series. In order to match the photocurrents of the top cell and the bottom cell, a proper photon management is required. Up to date, single-layer intermediate reflectors of limited spectral selectivity are applied to match the photocurrents of the top and the bottom cell. In this paper, we design and prototype multilayer intermediate reflectors based on aluminum doped zinc oxide and doped microcrystalline silicon oxide with a spectrally selective reflectance allowing for improved current matching and an overall increase of the charge carrier generation. The intermediate reflectors are successfully integrated into state-of-the-art tandem solar cells resulting in an increase of overall short-circuit current density by 0.7 mA/cm(2) in comparison to a tandem solar cell with the standard single-layer intermediate reflector. PMID:25322181

  16. The solar spectral irradiance 1200-3184 a near solar maximum, 15 July 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, G. H.; Rottman, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    Full disk solar spectral irradiances near solar maximum were obtained in the spectral range 1200 to 3184 A at a spectral resolution of approximately 1 A from rocket observations above White Sands Missile Range. Comparison with measurements made during solar minimum confirm a large increase at solar maximum in the solar irradiance near 1200 A with no change within the measurement errors near 2000 A. Irradiances in the range 1900 to 2100 A are in excellent agreement with previous measurements, and those in the 2100 to 2500 A range are lower than separate previous results in this range. Agreement is found with previous values 2500 to 2900 A A, and then fall below those values 2900 to 3184 A.

  17. Validation of short-pulse-laser-based measurement setup for absolute spectral irradiance responsivity calibration.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Michaela; Nevas, Saulius; Sperling, Armin

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes the validation process of mode-locked lasers in the "tunable lasers in photometry" (TULIP) setup at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) regarding spectral irradiance responsivity calibrations. Validation has been carried out in the visible spectral range, 400-700 nm, with two different photometer heads and in the long wavelength range, 690-780 nm, with a filtered radiometer. A comparison of the results against those from two different validated measurement setups has been carried out for validation. For the visible spectral range, the comparison is conducted against the data obtained from a lamp-based monochromator setup for spectral irradiance responsivity calibrations and against the photometric values (integral quantity) measured at the photometric bench setup of PTB. For the long wavelength range, comparisons against results from two different lamp-based monochromator measurement setups were made. Additionally, the effect of different radiation bandwidths on interference oscillations has been determined for a filter radiometer without a diffuser. A procedure for the determination of the optimum bandwidth of the setup for the respective measurement device is presented. PMID:24921865

  18. Solar Confocal interferometers for Sub-Picometer-Resolution Spectral Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Pietraszewski, Chris; West, Edward A.; Dines. Terence C.

    2007-01-01

    The confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer allows sub-picometer spectral resolution of Fraunhofer line profiles. Such high spectral resolution is needed to keep pace with the higher spatial resolution of the new set of large-aperture solar telescopes. The line-of-sight spatial resolution derived for line profile inversions would then track the improvements of the transverse spatial scale provided by the larger apertures. In particular, profile inversion allows improved velocity and magnetic field gradients to be determined independent of multiple line analysis using different energy levels and ions. The confocal interferometer's unique properties allow a simultaneous increase in both etendue and spectral power. The higher throughput for the interferometer provides significant decrease in the aperture, which is important in spaceflight considerations. We have constructed and tested two confocal interferometers. A slow-response thermal-controlled interferometer provides a stable system for laboratory investigation, while a piezoelectric interferometer provides a rapid response for solar observations. In this paper we provide design parameters, show construction details, and report on the laboratory test for these interferometers. The field of view versus aperture for confocal interferometers is compared with other types of spectral imaging filters. We propose a multiple etalon system for observing with these units using existing planar interferometers as pre-filters. The radiometry for these tests established that high spectral resolution profiles can be obtained with imaging confocal interferometers. These sub-picometer spectral data of the photosphere in both the visible and near-infrared can provide important height variation information. However, at the diffraction-limited spatial resolution of the telescope, the spectral data is photon starved due to the decreased spectral passband.

  19. The influence of solar spectral variations on global radiative balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng-Ling; Tao, Le-Ren; Cui, Guo-Min; Xu, Jia-Liang; Hua, Tse-Chao

    2015-01-01

    The total solar irradiance (TSI) has been the sole solar input in many climate models for lack of long and reliable time series of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) measurements currently. However, based on the recent SSI measurements by the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment, which is able to provide full and accurate SSI measurements, the influence of SSI variations on global radiative balance between the descending phase of previous solar cycle in December 2007 and the ascending phase of the current solar cycle in the first half 2010 has been studied in this paper. The results show that the relatively larger TSI in the first half 2010 was mainly due to the ultraviolet and near infrared radiation enhancements, with average increases of 0.11% in 200-400 nm and 0.05% in 760-4000 nm respectively, while the radiation in visible region of 400-760 nm decreased by 0.05%. According to the measurements of ozone from the Aura-Microwave Limb Sounder satellite, the global average stratospheric ozone increased markedly in the layer of 25-40 km at the same time. The visible radiation decrease and stratospheric ozone increase together contributed to the smaller solar radiation at the tropopause for each month of the first half 2010 as compared with that in December 2007, with the maximum decrease of 0.15 W m-2 in March 2010. The study reveals that SSI variations in the ascending solar phase may also cool the Earth-atmosphere system.

  20. Spectral solar irradiance before and during a Harmattan dust spell

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyefa, Z.D.; Holmgren, B.

    1996-09-01

    Measurements of the ground-level spectral distributions of the direct, diffuse and global solar irradiance between 300 and 1100 nm were made at Akure (7.15{degree}N, 5.5{degree}E), Nigeria, in December 1991 before and during a Harmattan dust spell employing a spectroradiometer (LICOR LI-1800) with 6 nm resolution. The direct spectral solar irradiance which was initially reduced before the dust storm was further attenuated by about 50% after the spell. Estimated values of the Angstrom turbidity coefficient {beta} indicated an increase of about 146% of this parameter while the Angstrom wavelength-exponent {alpha} decreased by about 65% within the 2-day study period. The spectral diffuse-to-direct and diffuse-to-global ratios suggest that the main cause of the significant reduction in solar irradiance at the surface was the scattering by the aerosol which led to an increase in the diffuse component. The global irradiance though reduced, was less sensitive to changing Harmattan conditions. It is recommended that solar energy devices that use radiation from Sun and sky be used under fluctuating Harmattan conditions. There are some deviations from the Angstrom formula under very turbid Harmattan conditions which could be explained by the relative increase of the particle sizes. 31 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlisle, Candace; Wedge, Ronnice; Wu, Dong; Stello, Harry; Robinson, Renee

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the Total and Spectral solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) is to acquire measurements to determine the direct and indirect effects of solar radiation on climate. TSIS total solar irradiance measurements will extend a 37-year long uninterrupted measurement record of incoming solar radiation, the dominant energy source driving the Earths climate and the most precise indicator of changes in the Suns energy output. TSIS solar spectral irradiance measurements will determine the regions of the Earths multi-layered atmosphere that are affected by solar variability, from which the solar forcing mechanisms causing changes in climate can be quantified. TSIS includes two instruments: the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM), integrated into a single payload. The TSIS TIM and SIM instruments are upgraded versions of the two instruments that are flying on the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) mission launched in January 2003. TSIS was originally planned for the nadir-pointing National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) spacecraft. The TSIS instrument passed a Critical Design Review (CDR) for NPOESS in December 2009. In 2010, TSIS was re-planned for the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Polar Free Flyer (PFF). The TSIS TIM, SIM, and associated electronics were built, tested, and successfully completed pre-ship review as of December 2013.In early 2014, NOAA and NASA agreed to fly TSIS on the International Space Station (ISS). In the FY16 Presidents Budget, NASA assumes responsibility for the TSIS mission on ISS. The TSIS project includes requirements, interface, design, build and test of the TSIS payload, including an updated pointing system, for accommodation on the ISS. It takes advantage of the prior development of the TSIS sensors and electronics. The International Space Station (ISS) program contributions include launch services and robotic installation of the TSIS payload

  2. Modeling of the Solar Spectral Irradiance as observed by LYRA/PROBA2 and PREMOS/PICARD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A.; Cessateur, G.; Dominique, M.; Krivova, N. A.; Lachat, D.; Rozanov, E.; Schmutz, W. K.; Shapiro, A. V.; Tagirov, R. V.; Thuillier, G. O.; Wehrli, C.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements and modeling of the solar irradiance have gained an increased attention during the last few decades. Nevertheless a complete picture of the solar variability is still missing. Therefore a launch of every new space mission devoted to the measurements of the spectral solar irradiance provides a crucial piece of complementary information and nourishes the theoretical models. We present here spectral solar irradiance data from the recent European missions PROBA-2 (launched on November 2, 2009) and PICARD (launched on June 15, 2010) and their theoretical interpretation. The PREMOS package onboard PICARD comprises two experiments, one observing solar irradiance in five (two UV, one visible and two near infrared) spectral channels with filter radiometers the other measuring TSI with absolute radiometers. LYRA is a solar VUV radiometer onboard PROBA-2, which is a technologically oriented ESA micro-mission, and is observing the solar irradiance in two UV and two EUV spectral channels. The passbands of the UV channels in the both experiments were selected on the ground of relevance for the terrestrial ozone concentration. The PREMOS and LYRA measurements were carefully corrected for the degradation and cleaned for non-solar signatures. We provide a comparison with the VIRGO/SOHO and SOLSTICE+SIM/SORCE data. Both LYRA and PREMOS have observed several solar eclipses. The analysis of these observations allows us to accurately retrieve the center-to-limb variations (CLV) of the solar brightness, which play an important role in the modeling of the solar irradiance variability on the time scale of the solar rotation. We show that the calculations with the recently developed and published COde for Solar Irradiance (COSI) yield the CLV which are in a good agreement with the measurements. The irradiance in all channels shows a clear variability on time-scale of the solar rotation. The amplitude and the profile of the variability strongly depend on the wavelength. We use

  3. Rocket measurements of the solar spectral irradiance during solar minimum, 1972-1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rottman, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    Five sounding rocket experiments conducted between December 1972 and March 1977, a period spanning solar minimum between cycles 20 and 21, provide full disc solar irradiance data in the spectral range 120-190 nm. The five measurements have been combined to give a solar minimum reference table. This spectrum is compared with other measurements obtained during the same time period. A table of intensities for the strong emission lines at wavelengths between 120 and 190 nm is presented.

  4. Modeling the spectral solar irradiance in the SOTERIA Project Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Luis Eduardo; Dudok de Wit, Thierry; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Cessateur, Gaël

    The evolution of the radiative energy input is a key element to understand the variability of the Earth's neutral and ionized atmospheric components. However, reliable observations are limited to the last decades, when observations realized above the Earth's atmosphere became possible. These observations have provide insights about the variability of the spectral solar irradiance on time scales from days to years, but there is still large uncertainties on the evolu-tion on time scales from decades to centuries. Here we discuss the physics-based modeling of the ultraviolet solar irradiance under development in the Solar-Terrestrial Investigations and Archives (SOTERIA) project framework. In addition, we compare the modeled solar emission with variability observed by LYRA instrument onboard of Proba2 spacecraft.

  5. Solar UV Spectral Irradiance Measured by SUSIM During Solar Cycle 22 and 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, J. S.; Floyd, L. E.; McMullin, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the impact of solar variability on terrestrial climate requires detailed knowledge of both solar spectral irradiance (SSI) and total solar irradiance (TSI). Observations of SSI in the ultraviolet (UV) have been made by various space-based missions since 1978. Of these missions, the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) included the Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SUSIM) experiment which measured the UV SSI from 1991 into 2005. In this talk, we present the UV spectral irradiance observations from SUSIM on UARS during solar cycles 22 and 23 along with results of a recent review of the calibration, stability, and in-flight performance. Another more recent mission is the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite which carries the Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) and Solar Irradiance Monitor (SIM). Together, the SORCE instruments have measured the UV, Visible, and IR SSI over the period of 2003 to the present. This talk will include a comparison between SUSIM and SORCE during the period of overlapping observations as well as comparisons of UV spectra observed at various times, particularly during the last two solar minima. These comparisons show that the UV observations by SORCE are inconsistent with those measured by SUSIM.

  6. SOLAR RADIO BURSTS WITH SPECTRAL FINE STRUCTURES IN PREFLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yin; Tan, Baolin; Huang, Jing; Tan, Chengming; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana; Simões, Paulo J.A.

    2015-01-20

    Good observations of preflare activities are important for us to understand the origin and triggering mechanism of solar flares, and to predict the occurrence of solar flares. This work presents the characteristics of microwave spectral fine structures as preflare activities of four solar flares observed by the Ondřejov radio spectrograph in the frequency range of 0.8-2.0 GHz. We found that these microwave bursts which occurred 1-4 minutes before the onset of flares have spectral fine structures with relatively weak intensities and very short timescales. They include microwave quasi-periodic pulsations with very short periods of 0.1-0.3 s and dot bursts with millisecond timescales and narrow frequency bandwidths. Accompanying these microwave bursts are filament motions, plasma ejection or loop brightening in the EUV imaging observations, and non-thermal hard X-ray emission enhancements observed by RHESSI. These facts may reveal certain independent, non-thermal energy releasing processes and particle acceleration before the onset of solar flares. They may help us to understand the nature of solar flares and to predict their occurrence.

  7. PREMOS Absolute Radiometer Calibration and Implications to on-orbit Measurements of the Total Solar Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehlmann, A.; Kopp, G.; Schmutz, W. K.; Winkler, R.; Finsterle, W.; Fox, N.

    2011-12-01

    On orbit measurements starting in the late 1970's, have revealed the 11 year cycle of the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI). However, the absolute results from individual experiments differ although all instrument teams claim to measure an absolute value. Especially the data from the TIM/SORCE experiment confused the community as it measures 0.3 % lower than the other instruments, e.g. VIRGO/SOHO by PMOD/WRC, which clearly exceeds the uncertainty stated for the absolute characterization of the experiments. The PREMOS package on the PICARD platform launched in June 2010 is the latest space experiment by PMOD/WRC measuring the TSI. We have put great effort in the calibration and characterization of this instrument in order to resolve the inter-instrument differences. We performed calibrations at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in London and the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) in Boulder against national SI standards for radiant power using a laser beam with a diameter being smaller than the aperture of the instrument. These measurements together with the World Radiometric Reference (WRR) calibration in Davos allowed to compare the WRR and the SI radiant power scale. We found that the WRR lies 0.18 % above the SI radiant power scale which explains a part of the VIRGO-TIM difference. The Total solar irradiance Radiometer Facility (TRF) at the LASP allows to generate a beam that over fills the apertures of our instruments, giving the presently best available representation of solar irradiance in a laboratory. These irradiance calibrations revealed a stray light contribution between 0.09 and 0.3 % to the measurements which had been underestimated in the characterization of our instruments. Using the irradiance calibrations, we found that the WRR lies 0.32 % above the TRF scale which in turn explains the full VIRGO-TIM difference. The first light PREMOS measurements in space confirmed our findings. If we use the WRR calibration, PREMOS yields a TSI

  8. Radiation scales on which standard values of the solar constant and solar spectral irradiance are based

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thekaekara, M. P.

    1972-01-01

    The question of radiation scales is critically examined. There are two radiation scales which are of fundamental validity and there are several calibration standards and radiation scales which have been set up for practical convenience. The interrelation between these scales is investigated. It is shown that within the limits of accuracy of irradiance measurements in general and solar irradiance measurements in particular, the proposed standard values of the solar constant and solar spectrum should be considered to be on radiation scales of fundamental validity; those based on absolute electrical units and on the thermodynamic Kelvin temperature scale.

  9. A rare gas optics-free absolute photon flux and energy analyzer for solar and planetary observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, Darrell L.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a prototype spectrometer for space applications requiring long term absolute EUV photon flux measurements. In this recently developed spectrometer, the energy spectrum of the incoming photons is transformed directly into an electron energy spectrum by taking advantage of the photoelectric effect in one of several rare gases at low pressures. Using an electron energy spectrometer, followed by an electron multiplier detector, pulses due to individual electrons are counted. The overall efficiency of this process can be made essentially independent of gain drifts in the signal path, and the secular degradation of optical components which is often a problem in other techniques is avoided. A very important feature of this approach is its freedom from the problem of overlapping spectral orders that plagues grating EUV spectrometers. An instrument with these features has not been flown before, but is essential to further advances in our understanding of solar EUV flux dynamics, and the coupled dynamics of terrestrial and planetary atmospheres. The detailed characteristics of this optics-free spectrometer are presented in the publications section.

  10. Spectral Calibration of the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper will describe the scientific goals of a sounding rocket program called the Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI), present a brief description of the optics that were developed to meet those goals and discuss the spectral, spatial and polarization characteristics of SUMI's Toroidal Variable-Line-Space (TVLS) gratings which are critical to SUMI's measurements of the magnetic field in the Sun's transition region.

  11. A Helium-Cooled Absolute Cavity Radiometer For Solar And Laboratory Irradiance Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foukal, P.; Miller, P.

    1983-09-01

    We describe the design and testing of a helium-cooled absolute radiometer (HCAR) devel-oped for highly reproducible measurements of total solar irradiance and ultraviolet flux, and for laboratory standards uses. The receiver of this cryogenic radiometer is a blackened cone of pure copper whose temperature is sensed by a germanium resistance thermometer. During a duty cycle, radiant power input is compared to electrical heating in an accurate resistor wound on the receiver, as in conventional self-calibrating radiometers of the PACRAD and ACR type. But operation at helium temperatures enables us to achieve excellent radia-tive shielding between the receiver and the radiometer thermal background. This enables us to attain a sensitivity level of 10-7 watts at 30 seconds integration time, at least 10 times better than achieved by room temperature cavities. The dramatic drop of copper specific heat at helium temperatures reduces the time constant for a given mass of receiver, by a factor of 103. Together with other cryogenic materials properties such as electrical superconductivity and the high thermal conductivity of copper, this can be used to greatly reduce non-equivalence errors between electrical and radiant heating, that presently limit the absolute accuracy of radiometers to approximately 0,2%. Absolute accuracy of better than 0.01% has been achieved with a similar cryogenic radiometer in laboratory measurements of the Stefan-Boltzmann constant at NPL in the U.K. Electrical and radiometric tests con-ducted so far on our prototype indicate that comparable accuracy and long-term reproducibility can be achieved in a versatile instrument of manageable size for Shuttle flight and laboratory standards uses. This work is supported at AER under NOAA contract NA8ORAC00204 and NSF grant DMR-8260273.

  12. The absolute chronology and thermal processing of solids in the solar protoplanetary disk.

    PubMed

    Connelly, James N; Bizzarro, Martin; Krot, Alexander N; Nordlund, Åke; Wielandt, Daniel; Ivanova, Marina A

    2012-11-01

    Transient heating events that formed calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) and chondrules are fundamental processes in the evolution of the solar protoplanetary disk, but their chronology is not understood. Using U-corrected Pb-Pb dating, we determined absolute ages of individual CAIs and chondrules from primitive meteorites. CAIs define a brief formation interval corresponding to an age of 4567.30 ± 0.16 million years (My), whereas chondrule ages range from 4567.32 ± 0.42 to 4564.71 ± 0.30 My. These data refute the long-held view of an age gap between CAIs and chondrules and, instead, indicate that chondrule formation started contemporaneously with CAIs and lasted ~3 My. This time scale is similar to disk lifetimes inferred from astronomical observations, suggesting that the formation of CAIs and chondrules reflects a process intrinsically linked to the secular evolution of accretionary disks. PMID:23118187

  13. Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability in November/December 2012: Comparison of Observations by Instruments on the International Space Station and Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, G.; Schmidtke, G.; Erhardt, C.; Nikutowski, B.; Shapiro, A. I.; Bolduc, C.; Lean, J.; Krivova, N.; Charbonneau, P.; Cessateur, G.; Haberreiter, M.; Melo, S.; Delouille, V.; Mampaey, B.; Yeo, K. L.; Schmutz, W.

    2014-12-01

    Onboard the International Space Station (ISS), two instruments are observing the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) at wavelengths from 16 to 2900 nm. Although the ISS platform orientation generally precludes pointing at the Sun more than 10 - 14 days per month, in November/December 2012 a continuous period of measurements was obtained by implementing an ISS `bridging' maneuver. This enabled observations to be made of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) during a complete solar rotation. We present these measurements, which quantify the impact of active regions on SSI, and compare them with data simultaneously gathered from other platforms, and with models of spectral irradiance variability. Our analysis demonstrates that the instruments onboard the ISS have the capability to measure SSI variations consistent with other instruments in space. A comparison among all available SSI measurements during November-December 2012 in absolute units with reconstructions using solar proxies and observed solar activity features is presented and discussed in terms of accuracy.

  14. Solar Cycle Spectral Irradiance Variation and Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Swartz, W. H.; Jackman, C. H.; Fleming, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    Recent measurements from the SIM instrument on the SORCE satellite have been interpreted by Harder et al (Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L07801, doi:10.1029/2008GL036797, 2009) as implying a different spectral irradiance variation over the solar cycle than that put forward by Lean (Geophys. Res. Lett., 27, 2425-2428, 2000). When we inserted this new wavelength dependent solar cycle variation into our 3D CCM we found a different solar cycle dependence of the ozone concentration as a function of altitude from that we derived using the traditional Lean wavelength dependence. Examination of these results led us to realize that the main issue is the solar cycle variation of radiation at wavelengths less than 240 nm versus the solar cycle variation of radiation at wavelengths between 240 nm and 300 nm. The impact of wavelengths less than 240 nm occurs through photodissociation of O2 leading to the production of ozone. The impact of wavelengths between 240 nm and 300 nm occurs through photodissociation of O3 leading to an increase in O atoms and enhanced ozone destruction. Thus one wavelength region gives an in-phase relationship of ozone with the solar cycle while the other wavelength region gives an out-of-phase relationship of ozone with the solar cycle. We have used the Goddard two-dimensional (2D) photochemistry transport model to examine this relationship in more detail. We calculate the altitude and latitude sensitivity of ozone to changes in the solar UV irradiance as a function of wavelength. These results can be used to construct the ozone response to arbitrary wavelength dependencies of solar UV variation.

  15. Spectral irradiance curve calculations for any type of solar eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.; Merrill, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    A simple procedure is described for calculating the eclipse function (EF), alpha, and hence the spectral irradiance curve (SIC), (1-alpha), for any type of solar eclipse: namely, the occultation (partial/total) eclipse and the transit (partial/annular) eclipse. The SIC (or the EF) gives the variation of the amount (or the loss) of solar radiation of a given wavelength reaching a distant observer for various positions of the moon across the sun. The scheme is based on the theory of light curves of eclipsing binaries, the results of which are tabulated in Merrill's Tables, and is valid for all wavelengths for which the solar limb-darkening obeys the cosine law: J = sub c (1 - X + X cost gamma). As an example of computing the SIC for an occultation eclipse which may be total, the calculations for the March 7, 1970, eclipse are described in detail.

  16. Absolute spectral characterization of silicon barrier diode: Application to soft X-ray fusion diagnostics at Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Vezinet, D.; Mazon, D.; Malard, P.

    2013-07-14

    This paper presents an experimental protocol for absolute calibration of photo-detectors. Spectral characterization is achieved by a methodology that unlike the usual line emissions-based method, hinges on the Bremsstrahlung radiation of a Soft X-Ray (SXR) tube only. Although the proposed methodology can be applied virtually to any detector, the application presented in this paper is based on Tore Supra's SXR diagnostics, which uses Silicon Surface Barrier Diodes. The spectral response of these n-p junctions had previously been estimated on a purely empirical basis. This time, a series of second-order effects, like the spatial distribution of the source radiated power or multi-channel analyser non linearity, are taken into account to achieve accurate measurements. Consequently, a parameterised physical model is fitted to experimental results and the existence of an unexpected dead layer (at least 5 {mu}m thick) is evidenced. This contribution also echoes a more general on-going effort in favour of long-term quality of passive radiation measurements on Tokamaks.

  17. Drug Treated Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective and Bipolar Disorder Patients Evaluated by qEEG Absolute Spectral Power and Mean Frequency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wix-Ramos, Richard; Moreno, Xiomara; Capote, Eduardo; González, Gilbert; Uribe, Ezequiel

    2014-01-01

    Objective Research of electroencephalograph (EEG) power spectrum and mean frequency has shown inconsistent results in patients with schizophrenic, schizoaffective and bipolar disorders during medication when compared to normal subjects thus; the characterization of these parameters is an important task. Methods We applied quantitative EEG (qEEG) to investigate 38 control, 15 schizophrenic, 7 schizoaffective and 11 bipolar disorder subjects which remaine under the administration of psychotropic drugs (except control group). Absolute spectral power (ASP), mean frequency and hemispheric electrical asymmetry were measured by 19 derivation qEEG. Group mean values were compared with non parametrical Mann-Whitney test and spectral EEG maps with z-score method at p < 0.05. Results Most frequent drug treatments for schizophrenic patients were neuroleptic+antiepileptic (40% of cases) or 2 neuroleptics (33.3%). Schizoaffective patients received neuroleptic+benzodiazepine (71.4%) and for bipolar disorder patients neuroleptic+antiepileptic (81.8%). Schizophrenic (at all derivations except for Fp1, Fp2, F8 and T6) and schizoaffective (only at C3) show higher values of ASP (+57.7% and +86.1% respectively) compared to control group. ASP of bipolar disorder patients did not show differences against control group. The mean frequency was higher at Fp1 (+14.2%) and Fp2 (+17.4%) in bipolar disorder patients than control group, but no differences were found in frequencies between schizophrenic or schizoaffective patients against the control group. Majority of spectral differences were found at the left hemisphere in schizophrenic and schizoaffective but not in bipolar disorder subjects. Conclusion The present report contributes to characterize quantitatively the qEEG in drug treated schizophrenic, schizoaffective or bipolar disorder patients. PMID:24851121

  18. Impacts of hyperspectral sensor spectral coverage, sampling and resolution on cross-comparison with broadband sensor for reflective solar bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Aisheng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Wenny, Brian

    2013-09-01

    A new generation of hyperspectral imagers requires a much higher absolute accuracy for reflected solar radiation measurements to further improve climate monitoring capabilities. For example, the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission, a future satellite mission led and developed by NASA and partner organizations, is currently considered to consist of two hyperspectral imagers that cover the reflected solar (RS) and infrared radiation. The design of the CLARREO RS instrument operates from 320 to 2300 nm with 4 nm in spectral sampling and 8 nm in spectral resolution. In this study, the sensitivity of spectral coverage, sampling and resolution of the CLARREO RS type instrument is tested for their impacts on integrated radiances using the relative spectral responses (RSR) of existing broadband sensors. As a proxy, our hyperspectral data is based on MODTRAN simulations and SCIAMACHY observations and the RSR data is from those used in MODIS, VIIRS and AVHRR level 1B (L1B) products. The sensitivity is conducted for ocean, forest, desert, snow and cloud.

  19. Solar activity forecast: Spectral analysis and neurofuzzy prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholipour, Ali; Lucas, Caro; Araabi, Babak N.; Shafiee, Masoud

    2005-04-01

    Active research in the last two decades indicates that the physical precursor and solar dynamo techniques are preferred as practical tools for long-term prediction of solar activity. But why should we omit more than 23 cycles of solar activity history, and just use empirical methods or simple autoregressive methods on the basis of observations for the latest eight cycles? In this article, a method based on spectral analysis and neurofuzzy modeling is proposed that is capable of issuing very accurate long-term prediction of sunspot number time series. A locally linear neurofuzzy model is optimized for each of the principal components obtained from singular spectrum analysis, and the multi-step predicted values are recombined to make the sunspot number time series. The proposed method is used for solar cycles 22 and 23 and the results are remarkably good in comparison to the predictions made by solar dynamo and precursor methods. An early prediction of the maximum smoothed international sunspot number for cycle 24 is 145 in 2011 2012.

  20. A self-consistent, absolute isochronal age scale for young moving groups in the solar neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Cameron P. M.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Naylor, Tim

    2015-11-01

    We present a self-consistent, absolute isochronal age scale for young ( ≲ 200 Myr), nearby ( ≲ 100 pc) moving groups in the solar neighbourhood based on homogeneous fitting of semi-empirical pre-main-sequence model isochrones using the τ2 maximum-likelihood fitting statistic of Naylor & Jeffries in the MV, V - J colour-magnitude diagram. The final adopted ages for the groups are as follows: 149^{+51}_{-19} {Myr} for the AB Dor moving group, 24 ± 3 Myr for the β Pic moving group (BPMG), 45^{+11}_{-7} {Myr} for the Carina association, 42^{+6}_{-4} {Myr} for the Columba association, 11 ± 3 Myr for the η Cha cluster, 45 ± 4 Myr for the Tucana-Horologium moving group (Tuc-Hor), 10 ± 3 Myr for the TW Hya association and 22^{+4}_{-3} {Myr} for the 32 Ori group. At this stage we are uncomfortable assigning a final, unambiguous age to the Argus association as our membership list for the association appears to suffer from a high level of contamination, and therefore it remains unclear whether these stars represent a single population of coeval stars. Our isochronal ages for both the BPMG and Tuc-Hor are consistent with recent lithium depletion boundary (LDB) ages, which unlike isochronal ages, are relatively insensitive to the choice of low-mass evolutionary models. This consistency between the isochronal and LDB ages instils confidence that our self-consistent, absolute age scale for young, nearby moving groups is robust, and hence we suggest that these ages be adopted for future studies of these groups. Software implementing the methods described in this study is available from http://www.astro.ex.ac.uk/people/timn/tau-squared/.

  1. Sensitivity of the photolysis rate to the uncertainties in spectral solar irradiance variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhodolov, Timofei; Rozanov, Eugene; Bais, Alkiviadis; Tourpali, Kleareti; Shapiro, Alexander; Telford, Paul; Peter, Thomas; Schmutz, Werner

    2014-05-01

    The state of the stratospheric ozone layer and temperature structure are mostly maintained by the photolytical processes. Therefore, the uncertainties in the magnitude and spectral composition of the spectral solar irradiance (SSI) evolution during the declining phase of 23rd solar cycle have substantial implications for the modeling of the middle atmosphere evolution, leading not only to a pronounced differences in the heating rates but also affecting photolysis rates. To estimate the role of SSI uncertainties we have compared the most important photolysis rates (O2, O3, and NO2) calculated with the reference radiation code libRadtran using SSI for June 2004 and February 2009 obtained from two models (NRL, COSI) and one observation data set based on SORCE observations. We found that below 40 km changes in the ozone and oxygen photolysis can reach several tenths of % caused by the changes of the SSI in the Harley and Huggins bands for ozone and several % for oxygen caused by the changes of the SSI in the Herzberg continuum and Schumann-Runge bands. For the SORCE data set these changes are 2-4 times higher. We have also evaluated the ability of the several photolysis rates calculation methods widely used in atmospheric models to reproduce the absolute values of the photolysis rates and their response to the implied SSI changes. With some remarks all schemes show good results in the middle stratosphere compare to libRadtran. However, in the troposphere and mesosphere there are more noticeable differences.

  2. Error budget for a calibration demonstration system for the reflected solar instrument for the climate absolute radiance and refractivity observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; McAndrew, Brendan

    2013-09-01

    A goal of the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission is to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends over decadal time scales. The key to such a goal is to improving the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration across infrared and reflected solar wavelengths allowing climate change to be separated from the limit of natural variability. The advances required to reach on-orbit absolute accuracy to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps exist at NIST in the laboratory, but still need demonstration that the advances can move successfully from to NASA and/or instrument vendor capabilities for spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the radiometric calibration error budget for the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. The goal of the CDS is to allow the testing and evaluation of calibration approaches, alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. The resulting SI-traceable error budget for reflectance retrieval using solar irradiance as a reference and methods for laboratory-based, absolute calibration suitable for climatequality data collections is given. Key components in the error budget are geometry differences between the solar and earth views, knowledge of attenuator behavior when viewing the sun, and sensor behavior such as detector linearity and noise behavior. Methods for demonstrating this error budget are also presented.

  3. Error Budget for a Calibration Demonstration System for the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; McAndrew, Brendan

    2013-01-01

    A goal of the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission is to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends over decadal time scales. The key to such a goal is to improving the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration across infrared and reflected solar wavelengths allowing climate change to be separated from the limit of natural variability. The advances required to reach on-orbit absolute accuracy to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps exist at NIST in the laboratory, but still need demonstration that the advances can move successfully from to NASA and/or instrument vendor capabilities for spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the radiometric calibration error budget for the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. The goal of the CDS is to allow the testing and evaluation of calibration approaches, alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. The resulting SI-traceable error budget for reflectance retrieval using solar irradiance as a reference and methods for laboratory-based, absolute calibration suitable for climatequality data collections is given. Key components in the error budget are geometry differences between the solar and earth views, knowledge of attenuator behavior when viewing the sun, and sensor behavior such as detector linearity and noise behavior. Methods for demonstrating this error budget are also presented.

  4. Solar spectral irradiance and summary outputs using excel.

    PubMed

    Diffey, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The development of an Excel spreadsheet is described that calculates solar spectral irradiance between 290-3000 nm on an unshaded, horizontal surface under a cloudless sky at sea level, together with summary outputs such as global UV index, illuminance and percentage of energy in different wavebands. A deliberate goal of the project was to adopt the principle of Ockham's razor and to develop a model that is as simple as it can be commensurate with delivering results of adequate accuracy. Consequently, just four inputs are required-geographical latitude, month, day of month and time of day-resulting in a spreadsheet that is easily usable by anyone with an interest in sunlight and solar power irrespective of their background. The accuracy of the calculated data is sufficient for many applications where knowledge of the ultraviolet, visible and infrared levels in sunlight is of interest. PMID:25644778

  5. Reconstruction of spectral solar irradiance since 1700 from simulated magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasi-Espuig, M.; Jiang, J.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.; Unruh, Y. C.; Yeo, K. L.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present a reconstruction of the spectral solar irradiance since 1700 using the SATIRE-T2 (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstructions for the Telescope era version 2) model. This model uses as input magnetograms simulated with a surface flux transport model fed with semi-synthetic records of emerging sunspot groups. Methods: The record of sunspot group areas and positions from the Royal Greenwich Observatory (RGO) is only available since 1874. We used statistical relationships between the properties of sunspot group emergence, such as the latitude, area, and tilt angle, and the sunspot cycle strength and phase to produce semi-synthetic sunspot group records starting in the year 1700. The semi-synthetic records are fed into a surface flux transport model to obtain daily simulated magnetograms that map the distribution of the magnetic flux in active regions (sunspots and faculae) and their decay products on the solar surface. The magnetic flux emerging in ephemeral regions is accounted for separately based on the concept of extended cycles whose length and amplitude are linked to those of the sunspot cycles through the sunspot number. The magnetic flux in each surface component (sunspots, faculae and network, and ephemeral regions) was used to compute the spectral and total solar irradiance (TSI) between the years 1700 and 2009. This reconstruction is aimed at timescales of months or longer although the model returns daily values. Results: We found that SATIRE-T2, besides reproducing other relevant observations such as the total magnetic flux, reconstructs the TSI on timescales of months or longer in good agreement with the PMOD composite of observations, as well as with the reconstruction starting in 1878 based on the RGO-SOON data. The model predicts an increase in the TSI of 1.2+0.2-0.3 Wm-2 between 1700 and the present. The spectral irradiance reconstruction is in good agreement with the UARS/SUSIM measurements as well as the Lyman-α composite. The

  6. The Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, A. B. C., Jr.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Hoover, Richard B.

    1997-01-01

    In 1987, our consortium pioneered the application of normal incidence multilayer X-ray optics to solar physics by obtaining the first high resolution narrow band, "thermally differentiated" images of the corona', using the emissions of the Fe IX/Fe X complex at ((lambda)lambda) approx. 171 A to 175 A, and He II Lyman (beta) at 256 A. Subsequently, we developed a rocket borne solar observatory, the Multi Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA) that pioneered multi-thermal imaging of the solar atmosphere, using high resolution narrow band X-ray, EUV and FUV optical systems. Analysis of MSSTA observations has resulted in four significant insights into the structure of the solar atmosphere: (1) the diameter of coronal loops is essentially constant along their length; (2) models of the thermal and density structure of polar plumes based on MSSTA observations have been shown to be consistent with the thesis that they are the source of high speed solar wind streams; (3) the magnetic structure of the footpoints of polar plumes is monopolar, and their thermal structure is consistent with the thesis that the chromosphere at their footpoints is heated by conduction from above; (4) coronal bright points are small loops, typically 3,500 - 20,000 km long (5 sec - 30 sec); their footpoints are located at the poles of bipolar magnetic structures that are are distinguished from other network elements by having a brighter Lyman a signature. Loop models derived for 26 bright points are consistent with the thesis that the chromosphere at their footpoints is heated by conduction from the corona.

  7. Test Plan for a Calibration Demonstration System for the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; Hair, Jason; McAndrew, Brendan; Daw, Adrian; Jennings, Donald; Rabin, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe high-accuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as the most critical method to determine the accuracy of climate change. One of the major objectives of CLARREO is to advance the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration at infrared and reflected solar wavelengths. This advance is required to reach the on-orbit absolute accuracy required to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps while remaining sufficiently accurate to observe climate change to within the uncertainty of the limit of natural variability. While these capabilities exist at NIST in the laboratory, there is a need to demonstrate that it can move successfully from NIST to NASA and/or instrument vendor capabilities for future spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the test plan for the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. The goal of the CDS is to allow the testing and evaluation of calibration approaches , alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. The end result of efforts with the SOLARIS CDS will be an SI-traceable error budget for reflectance retrieval using solar irradiance as a reference and methods for laboratory-based, absolute calibration suitable for climate-quality data collections. The CLARREO mission addresses the need to observe high-accuracy, long-term climate change trends and advance the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration. The current work describes the test plan for the SOLARIS which is the calibration demonstration

  8. The Solar Spectral Irradiance as a Function of the Mg II Index for Atmosphere and Climate Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuillier, Gerard; DeLand, Matthew; Shapiro, Alexander; Schmutz, Werner; Bolsee, David; Melo, Stella

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method to reconstruct the solar spectrum irradiance in the Ly alpha-400 nm region, and its variability, based on the Mg II index and neutron monitor. Measurements of the solar spectral irradiance available in the literature have been made with different instruments at different times and different spectral ranges. However, climate studies require harmonized data sets. This new approach has the advantage of being independent of the absolute calibration and aging of the instruments. First, the Mg II index is derived using solar spectra from Ly alpha (121 nm) to 410 nm measured from 1978 to 2010 by several space missions. The variability of the spectra with respect to a chosen reference spectrum as a function of time and wavelength is scaled to the derived Mg II index. The set of coefficients expressing the spectral variability can be applied to the chosen reference spectrum to reconstruct the solar spectra within a given time frame or Mg II index values. The accuracy of this method is estimated using two approaches: by direct comparison with particular cases where solar spectra are available from independent measurements, and by calculating the standard deviation between the measured spectra and their reconstruction. From direct comparisons with measurements we obtain an accuracy of about 1 to 2 %, which degrades towards Ly alpha. In a further step, we extend our solar spectral irradiance reconstruction back to the Maunder Minimum introducing the relationship between the Mg II index and the neutron monitor data. Consistent measurements of the Mg II index are not available prior to 1978. However, we observe that over the last three solar cycles, the Mg II index shows strong correlation with the modulation potential determined from the neutron monitor data. Assuming that this correlation can be applied to the past, we reconstruct the Mg II index from the modulation potential back to the Maunder Minimum, and obtain the corresponding solar

  9. A Different View of Solar Cycle Spectral Variations: Total Energy during Isolated Solar Outburst Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, T. N.

    2014-12-01

    The solar spectral irradiance (SSI) varies on all time scales, and these variations are highly dependent on wavelength. The daily and 27-day solar rotation variations are best understood from many different satellite observations over the past five decades. There has also been much progress in understanding the longer term 11-year solar activity cycle variations. However, instrument degradation corrections are not as accurate as sometimes needed for long-term studies, thus there can be challenges in understanding the solar cycle variations at some wavelengths. In particular, the Harder et al. (GRL, 36, L07801, 2009) results for the near ultraviolet (NUV), visible, and near infrared (NIR) have indicated more NUV variation and some out-of-phase variation for some visible and NIR wavelengths. These variations have been challenged as they are inconsistent with some prior measurements and with some SSI models. A different approach to study the solar cycle variations, but without the need for long-term instrument degradation corrections, is to examine the total energy during isolated solar outburst periods. A solar active region typically appears suddenly and then takes about seven months to decay and disperse back into the quiet Sun network. The isolated outburst period refers to when only one major active region dominates the irradiance variation. The solar outburst energy, which includes all phases of active region evolution, could be considered to be the primary cause for solar cycle variations. Using TIMED, SDO, and SORCE extreme ultraviolet and far ultraviolet observations, the outburst energy (7 months) spectral variation is found to be very similar to their multi-year (solar cycle) variation. The same approach is applied for studying the NUV-Visible-NIR variations from SORCE, and these new results provide a different, and perhaps more accurate, indicator of SSI variation.

  10. Solar wind density spectra around the ion spectral break

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemecek, Zdenek; Safrankova, Jana; Nemec, Frantisek; Prech, Lubomir; Pitna, Alexander; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Zastenker, Georgy N.

    2015-04-01

    The paper presents a large statistical analysis of ˜ 5800 frequency spectra of the solar wind density fluctuations in the range of 0.001-5 Hz (corresponding spatial scales 100-5×105 km). The analysis confirms that the spectrum consists of three segments divided by two breakpoints and that both breakpoint locations are controlled by the gyrostructure frequency, fg defined as a ratio of the solar wind bulk speed and thermal ion gyroradius. Each from three segments can be described by a power-law function with a spectral index where the first segment corresponding to the MHD scale is followed by a plateau, and the third segment can be associated with kinetic turbulence. As it follows from the statistics, the values of spectral indices depend on the density fluctuation level; its increasing level leads to steepening of each segment. The index -1.8 can be typically found at MHD scales and averaging of spectra in the frequency domain leads to the index of -8/3 at kinetic scales, whereas averaging in frequencies normalized to fg provides a value of -7/3.

  11. Solar Wind Density Spectra around the Ion Spectral Break

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.; Němec, F.; Přech, L.; Pitňa, A.; Chen, C. H. K.; Zastenker, G. N.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a large statistical analysis of ≈ 5800 frequency spectra of the solar wind density fluctuations in the range 0.001-5 Hz (corresponding to spatial scales of 100-5 × 105 km). The analysis confirms that the spectrum consists of three segments divided by two breakpoints and that each of the segments can be described by a power-law function with a spectral index α. The first segment corresponds to MHD scales and is followed by a plateau, and the third segment can be associated with the kinetic range. The statistics show that the values of the spectral slopes depend on the density fluctuations; their increasing amplitude leads to a steepening of each segment. The index of -1.8 can typically be found at MHD scales and averaging of the spectra in the frequency domain leads to an index of -8/3 at kinetic scales, whereas averaging in frequencies normalized to the ion gyrostructure frequency, fg, defined as the ratio of the solar wind bulk speed and thermal ion gyroradius, provides a value of -7/3. Both breakpoint locations are controlled by the gyrostructure frequency.

  12. Model Calculations of Solar Spectral Irradiance in the 3.7 Micron Band for Earth Remote Sensing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven; Fontenla, Juan M.

    2006-01-01

    Since the launch of the first Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument aboard TIROS-N, measurements in the 3.7 micron atmospheric window have been exploited for use in cloud detection and screening, cloud thermodynamic phase and surface snow/ice discrimination, and quantitative cloud particle size retrievals. The utility of the band has led to the incorporation of similar channels on a number of existing satellite imagers and future operational imagers. Daytime observations in the band include both reflected solar and thermal emission energy. Since 3.7 micron channels are calibrated to a radiance scale (via onboard blackbodies), knowledge of the top-of-atmosphere solar irradiance in the spectral region is required to infer reflectance. Despite the ubiquity of 3.7 micron channels, absolute solar spectral irradiance data comes from either a single measurement campaign (Thekaekara et al. 1969) or synthetic spectra. In this study, we compare historical 3.7 micron band spectral irradiance data sets with the recent semi-empirical solar model of the quiet-Sun by Fontenla et al. (2006). The model has expected uncertainties of about 2 % in the 3.7 pm spectral region. We find that channel-averaged spectral irradiances using the observations reported by Thekaekara et al. are 3.2-4.1% greater than those derived from the Fontenla et al. model for MODIS and AVHRR instrument bandpasses; the Kurucz spectrum (1995) as included in the MODTRAN4 distribution, gives channel-averaged irradiances 1.2-1.5 % smaller than the Fontenla model. For the MODIS instrument, these solar irradiance uncertainties result in cloud microphysical retrievals uncertainties comparable with other fundamental reflectance error sources.

  13. Reconstruction of solar spectral resource using limited spectral sampling for concentrating photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsiankou, Viktar; Hinzer, Karin; Mohammed, Jafaru; Muron, Aaron; Wilkins, Matthew; Haysom, Joan; Schriemer, Henry; Myrskog, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    One of the challenges associated with forecasting and evaluating concentrating photovoltaic system (CPV) performance in diverse locations is the lack of high-quality spectral solar resource data. Various local atmospheric conditions such as air mass, aerosols, and atmospheric gases affect daily CPV module operation. A multi-channel filter radiometer (MFCR) can be used to quantify these effects at relatively low cost. The proposed method of selectively sampling the solar spectrum at specific wavelength channels to spectrally reconstruct incident irradiance is described and extensively analyzed. Field spectroradiometer (FSR) measurements at the University of Ottawa's CPV testing facility (45.42°N, 75.68°W) are fed into our model to mimic the outputs from the MCFR. The analysis is performed over a two year period (2011-2012), using 46,564 spectra. A recommendation is made to use four aerosols channels at 420, 500, 780, and 1050 nm, one ozone channel at 610 nm and one water vapour channel at 940 nm, all of which can be measured with ubiquitous Si photodiodes. A simulation of this MFCR channel configuration produces an RMS error under 1.5% over 96% of the 350-1830 nm range, when compared with the FSR, for the 2012 data set in Ottawa.

  14. Spectral response and efficiency of a silicon solar cell below water surface

    SciTech Connect

    Muaddi, J.A.; Jamal, M.A. )

    1992-07-01

    Solar radiation below water surface is modified in that the total solar energy is decreased and the spectral width is reduced. The extent of this modification depends upon the depth in water. This change in the solar radiation reflects its effects on the performance of the light measuring devices such as solar cells, where the efficiency of these cells depends upon the spectral distribution of the incident light. For a silicon solar cell, a computational work has been performed to reconstruct the spectral response curves of the cell at various depths in water, and to calculate the efficiency at these depths relative to the cell efficiency at the water surface.

  15. Enhancement of Spectral Response of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shuai

    Dye-Sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is a class of third-generation solar devices. A notable feature of DSSC is that it can be manufactured by solution-based approach; this non-vacuum processing renders significant reduction in manufacturing costs. Different from conventional solar cells, in a DSSC, mesoporous semiconductor film with large surface areas is utilized for anchoring dye molecules, serving as light absorbing layer. Dye sensitizers play an important role in determining the final performance in DSSCs. Since the first highly-efficient DSSC was reported in 1991 sensitized by a ruthenium-based dye, numerous researchers have been focused on the development and characterization of various kinds of dyes for the applications in DSSCs. These include mainly metal complexes dyes, organic dyes, porphyrins and phthalocyanines dyes. The first part of my thesis work is to develop and test new dyes for DSSCs and a series of phenothiazine-based organic dyes and new porphyrin dyes are reported during the process. It has been realized that extending the response of dye sensitizers to a wider range of the solar spectrum is a key step in further improving the device efficiency. Typically, there are two ways for expanding the strong spectral response of DSSCs from visible to far red/NIR region. One approach is called co-sensitization. Herein, we demonstrate a new co-sensitization concept where small molecules is used to insert the interstitial site of between the pre-adsorbed large molecules. In this case, the co-adsorbed small ones is found to improve the light response and impede the back recombination, finally leading to the power conversion efficiency over 10% in conventional DSSC devices and a record-equaling efficiency of 9.2% in quasi-solid-state devices. I also implemented graphene sheets in the anode films for better charge transfer efficiency and break the energy conversion limit of co-sensitization in DSSCs. The optimal configuration between porphyrin dyes and

  16. Solar Spectral Irradiance Variations in 240 - 1600 nm During the Recent Solar Cycles 21 - 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagaran, J.; Weber, M.; Deland, M. T.; Floyd, L. E.; Burrows, J. P.

    2011-08-01

    Regular solar spectral irradiance (SSI) observations from space that simultaneously cover the UV, visible (vis), and the near-IR (NIR) spectral region began with SCIAMACHY aboard ENVISAT in August 2002. Up to now, these direct observations cover less than a decade. In order for these SSI measurements to be useful in assessing the role of the Sun in climate change, records covering more than an eleven-year solar cycle are required. By using our recently developed empirical SCIA proxy model, we reconstruct daily SSI values over several decades by using solar proxies scaled to short-term SCIAMACHY solar irradiance observations to describe decadal irradiance changes. These calculations are compared to existing solar data: the UV data from SUSIM/UARS, from the DeLand & Cebula satellite composite, and the SIP model (S2K+VUV2002); and UV-vis-IR data from the NRLSSI and SATIRE models, and SIM/SORCE measurements. The mean SSI of the latter models show good agreement (less than 5%) in the vis regions over three decades while larger disagreements (10 - 20%) are found in the UV and IR regions. Between minima and maxima of Solar Cycles 21, 22, and 23, the inferred SSI variability from the SCIA proxy is intermediate between SATIRE and NRLSSI in the UV. While the DeLand & Cebula composite provide the highest variability between solar minimum and maximum, the SIP/Solar2000 and NRLSSI models show minimum variability, which may be due to the use of a single proxy in the modeling of the irradiances. In the vis-IR spectral region, the SCIA proxy model reports lower values in the changes from solar maximum to minimum, which may be attributed to overestimations of the sunspot proxy used in modeling the SCIAMACHY irradiances. The fairly short timeseries of SIM/SORCE shows a steeper decreasing (increasing) trend in the UV (vis) than the other data during the descending phase of Solar Cycle 23. Though considered to be only provisional, the opposite trend seen in the visible SIM data

  17. A Statistical Study of Spectral Hardening in Solar Flares and Related Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, J.; Krucker, S.; Lin, R. P.

    2009-12-01

    Using hard X-ray observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we investigate the reliability of spectral hardening during solar flares as an indicator of related solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Earth. All RHESSI data are analyzed, from February 2002 through the end of Solar Cycle 23, thereby expanding upon recent work on a smaller sample of flares. Previous investigations have found very high success when associating soft-hard-harder (SHH) spectral behavior with energetic proton events, and confirmation of this link would suggest a correlation between electron acceleration in solar flares and SEPs seen in interplanetary space. In agreement with these past findings, we find that of 37 magnetically well-connected flares (W30-W90), 12 of 18 flares with SHH behavior produced SEP events and none of 19 flares without SHH behavior produced SEPs. This demonstrates a statistically significant dependence of SHH and SEP observations, a link that is unexplained in the standard scenario of SEP acceleration at the shock front of coronal mass ejections, and encourages further investigation of the mechanisms which could be responsible.

  18. A Statistical Study of Spectral Hardening in Solar Flares and Related Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, James A.; Krucker, Säm; Lin, R. P.

    2009-12-01

    Using hard X-ray observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we investigate the reliability of spectral hardening during solar flares as an indicator of related solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Earth. All RHESSI data are analyzed, from 2002 February through the end of Solar Cycle 23, thereby expanding upon recent work on a smaller sample of flares. Previous investigations have found very high success when associating soft-hard-harder (SHH) spectral behavior with energetic proton events, and confirmation of this link would suggest a correlation between electron acceleration in solar flares and SEPs seen in interplanetary space. In agreement with these past findings, we find that of 37 magnetically well-connected flares (W30-W90), 12 of 18 flares with SHH behavior produced SEP events and none of 19 flares without SHH behavior produced SEPs. This demonstrates a statistically significant dependence of SHH and SEP observations, a link that is unexplained in the standard scenario of SEP acceleration at the shock front of coronal mass ejections and encourages further investigation of the mechanisms which could be responsible.

  19. A STATISTICAL STUDY OF SPECTRAL HARDENING IN SOLAR FLARES AND RELATED SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Grayson, James A.; Krucker, Saem; Lin, R. P. E-mail: krucker@ssl.berkeley.ed

    2009-12-20

    Using hard X-ray observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we investigate the reliability of spectral hardening during solar flares as an indicator of related solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Earth. All RHESSI data are analyzed, from 2002 February through the end of Solar Cycle 23, thereby expanding upon recent work on a smaller sample of flares. Previous investigations have found very high success when associating soft-hard-harder (SHH) spectral behavior with energetic proton events, and confirmation of this link would suggest a correlation between electron acceleration in solar flares and SEPs seen in interplanetary space. In agreement with these past findings, we find that of 37 magnetically well-connected flares (W30-W90), 12 of 18 flares with SHH behavior produced SEP events and none of 19 flares without SHH behavior produced SEPs. This demonstrates a statistically significant dependence of SHH and SEP observations, a link that is unexplained in the standard scenario of SEP acceleration at the shock front of coronal mass ejections and encourages further investigation of the mechanisms which could be responsible.

  20. Solar Spectral Radiative Forcing During the Southern African Regional Science Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Pommier, J.; Bergstrom, R.; Gore, W.; Howard, S.; Rabbette, M.; Schmid, B.; Hobbs, P. V.; Tsay, S. C.

    2003-01-01

    During the dry season component of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI) in late winter 2000, the net solar spectral irradiance was measured at flight levels throughout biomass burning haze layers. From these measurements, the flux divergence, fractional absorption, instantaneous heating rate, and absorption efficiency were derived. Two cases are examined: on 24 August 2000 off the coast of Mozambique in the vicinity of Inhaca Island and on 6 September 2000 in a very thick continental haze layer over Mongu, Zambia. The measured absolute absorption was substantially higher for the case over Mongu where the measured midvisible optical depth exceeded unity. Instantaneous heating from aerosol absorption was 4 K d(sup -1) over Mongu, Zambia and 1.5 K d(sup -1) near Inhaca Island, Mozambique. However, the spectral absorption efficiency was nearly identical for both cases. Although the observations over Inhaca Island preceded the river of smoke from the southern African continent by nearly 2 weeks, the evidence here suggests a continental influence in the lower tropospheric aerosol far from source regions of burning.

  1. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Spectral and spectral-frequency methods of investigating atmosphereless bodies of the Solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busarev, Vladimir V.; Prokof'eva-Mikhailovskaya, Valentina V.; Bochkov, Valerii V.

    2007-06-01

    A method of reflectance spectrophotometry of atmosphereless bodies of the Solar system, its specificity, and the means of eliminating basic spectral noise are considered. As a development, joining the method of reflectance spectrophotometry with the frequency analysis of observational data series is proposed. The combined spectral-frequency method allows identification of formations with distinctive spectral features, and estimations of their sizes and distribution on the surface of atmospherelss celestial bodies. As applied to investigations of asteroids 21 Lutetia and 4 Vesta, the spectral frequency method has given us the possibility of obtaining fundamentally new information about minor planets.

  2. The Effects of Water Vapor and Clouds on the Spectral Distribution of Solar Radiation at the...

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Mariani, P.; Gore, Warren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    During the Subsonic Contrail and Cloud Effect Special Study (SUCCESS) a Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer was deployed at the surface in a zenith observing position. The instrument measured the solar spectral downwelling irradiance between 350 and 2500 nm with 10 nm resolution. From April 12 through April 29 approximately 18000 spectra were acquired, under a variety of meteorological conditions including cloud free, cirrus, Stearns, and cumulonimbus clouds. This study focuses on the effect of cirrus and cirrus contrails on the spectral distribution of solar irradiance at the surface and on inferring cirrus properties from their spectral transmittance. The observations have also proven to be useful for comparing the solar spectral irradiance measurements with model predictions, and in particular, for inferring the amount of solar radiation absorbed in the clear and cloudy atmosphere.

  3. Solar Spectral Irradiance, Solar Activity, and the Near-Ultra-Violet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontenla, J. M.; Stancil, P. C.; Landi, E.

    2015-08-01

    The previous calculations of the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) by the Solar Radiation Physical Modeling, version 2 system, are updated in this work by including new molecular photodissociation cross-sections of important species, and many more levels and lines in its treatment of non-LTE radiative transfer. The current calculations including the new molecular photodissociation opacities produce a reduced over-ionizaton of heavy elements in the lower chromosphere and solve the problems with prior studies of the UV SSI in the wavelength range 160-400 nm and now reproduce the available observations with much greater accuracy. Calculations and observations of the near-UV at 0.1 nm resolution and higher are compared. The current set of physical models includes four quiet-Sun and five active-region components, from which radiance is computed for ten observing angles. These radiances are combined with images of the solar disk to obtain the SSI and Total Solar Irradiance and their variations. The computed SSI is compared with measurements from space at several nm resolution and agreement is found within the accuracy level of these measurements. An important result is that the near-UV SSI increase with solar activity is significant for the photodissociation of ozone in the terrestrial atmosphere because a number of highly variable upper chromospheric lines overlap the ozone Hartley band.

  4. Spectral Diagnostics and Radiative Hydrodynamics of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J. X.

    2011-03-01

    Solar flares are one of the most significant active phenomena in the solar atmosphere. It is involved in very complicated physical processes, including energy release, plasma instability, acceleration and propagation of energetic particles, radiation and dynamics of the flaring atmosphere, mass motions and ejections, and so on. Enhanced radiation during flares spans virtually the entire electromagnetic spectrum originating from different layers of the solar atmosphere. High energetic particles and strong radiations that are produced during the flare eruptions play a major role in space weather. Therefore, it is very important and necessary to study the mechanisms of solar flares. In this thesis, combined with ground and space observations, the theoretical calculations are used to study the spectral features and radiation mechanisms of solar flares. In particular, our research is concentrated on the diagnostics of non-thermal processes and origin of the white-light flares. The main contents are described as follows: (1) Different chromospheric lines are used to diagnose the heating mechanisms in flares. We calculate the Hα and Ca II 8542 Å line profiles based on four different atmospheric models, including the effects of non-thermal electron beams with various energy fluxes. These two lines have different responses to the thermal and non-thermal effects, and can be used to diagnose the thermal and non-thermal heating processes. We apply our method to an X-class flare occurred on 2001 October 19 and find that the non-thermal effects at the outer edge of the flare ribbon are more notable than that at the inner edge, while the temperature at the inner edge seems higher. On the other hand, the results show that non-thermal effects increase rapidly in the rise phase and decrease quickly in the decay phase, but the atmospheric temperature can still keep relatively high for some time after getting to its maximum. For the two kernels that we analyze, the maximum energy

  5. Absolute integrated intensity and individual line parameters for the 6.2-micron band of NO2. [in solar spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Bonomo, F. S.; Williams, W. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Snider, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    The absolute integrated intensity of the 6.2-micron band of NO2 at 40 C was determined from quantitative spectra at about 10 per cm resolution by the spectral band model technique. A value of 1430 plus or minus 300 per sq cm per atm was obtained. Individual line parameters, positions, intensities, and ground-state energies were derived, and line-by-line calculations were compared with the band model results and with the quantitative spectra obtained at about 0.5 per cm resolution.

  6. The spectral irradiance of some solar simulators and its effect on cell measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Seaman, C.H.; Anspaugh, B.E.; Downing, R.G.; Estey, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    Moderate resolution spectral irradiance measurements in the range 300 nm to 1100 nm have been made of eight radiant sources which are currently being used as solar simulators. Spectral irradiance data are presented in graphical form. To demonstrate the interplay of source spectral distribution and cell spectral response, measurements of short circuit current of five cells of differing response characteristics have been made with these sources. These results are presented in tabular and graphical form.

  7. The measurement of solar spectral irradiances at wavelengths between 40 and 4000 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    Two 1/8-meter Ebert-Fastie spectrometers were refurbished and upgraded in order to measure the solar spectral irradiances between 1160 A and 3100 A. An evacuated 1/4-meter normal-incidence spectrometer was also fabricated for spectral irradiance measurements over the wavelength range from 1250 A to 250 A. Procedures were developed for the calibration of all three instruments utilizing standards at the National Bureau of Standards. The two 1/8-meter spectrometers were flown to measure the solar spectral irradiances near solar maximum on two different dates. Data from these flights were analyzed. The performance of the spectrometers, and the results of an analysis of the variabilities of the solar spectral irradiances over the solar cycles 20 and 21 are discussed.

  8. Spectral Irradiance Calibration in the Infrared. X. A Self-Consistent Radiometric All-Sky Network of Absolutely Calibrated Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Martin; Walker, Russell G.; Carter, Brian; Hammersley, Peter; Kidger, Mark; Noguchi, Kunio

    1999-04-01

    We start from our six absolutely calibrated continuous stellar spectra from 1.2 to 35 μm for K0, K1.5, K3, K5, and M0 giants. These were constructed as far as possible from actual observed spectral fragments taken from the ground, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, and the IRAS Low Resolution Spectrometer, and all have a common calibration pedigree. From these we spawn 422 calibrated ``spectral templates'' for stars with spectral types in the ranges G9.5-K3.5 III and K4.5-M0.5 III. We normalize each template by photometry for the individual stars using published and/or newly secured near- and mid-infrared photometry obtained through fully characterized, absolutely calibrated, combinations of filter passband, detector radiance response, and mean terrestrial atmospheric transmission. These templates continue our ongoing effort to provide an all-sky network of absolutely calibrated, spectrally continuous, stellar standards for general infrared usage, all with a common, traceable calibration heritage. The wavelength coverage is ideal for calibration of many existing and proposed ground-based, airborne, and satellite sensors, particularly low- to moderate-resolution spectrometers. We analyze the statistics of probable uncertainties, in the normalization of these templates to actual photometry, that quantify the confidence with which we can assert that these templates truly represent the individual stars. Each calibrated template provides an angular diameter for that star. These radiometric angular diameters compare very favorably with those directly observed across the range from 1.6 to 21 mas.

  9. Nimbus 7 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) spectral scan solar irradiance and Earth radiance product user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlesinger, Barry M.; Cebula, Richard P.; Heath, Donald F.; Fleig, Albert J.

    1988-01-01

    The archived tape products from the spectral scan mode measurements of solar irradiance (SUNC tapes) and Earth radiance (EARTH tapes) by the Solar Backscatter UV (SBUV) instrument aboard Nimbus 7 are described. Incoming radiation from 160 to 400 nm is measured at intervals of 0.2 nm. The scan-to-scan repeatability of the solar irradiance measurements ranges from approximately 0.5 to 1 percent longward of 280 nm, to 2 percent around 210 nm and 4 percent near 175 nm. The repeatability of the Earth radiance values ranges from 2 to 3 percent at longer wavelengths and low zenith angles to 10 percent at shorter wavelengths and high zenith angles. The tape formats are described in detail, including file structure and contents of each type of record. Catalogs of the tapes and the time period covered are provided, along with lists of the days lacking solar irradiance measurements and the days dedicated to Earth radiance measurements. The method for production of the tapes is outlined and quality control measures are described. How radiances and irradiances are derived from the raw counts, the corrections for changes in instrument sensitivity, and related uncertainties are discussed.

  10. Errors in short circuit measurements due to spectral mismatch between sunlight and solar simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, H. B.

    1976-01-01

    Errors in short circuit current measurement were calculated for a variety of spectral mismatch conditions. The differences in spectral irradiance between terrestrial sunlight and three types of solar simulator were studied, as well as the differences in spectral response between three types of reference solar cells and various test cells. The simulators considered were a short arc xenon lamp AMO sunlight simulator, an ordinary quartz halogen lamp, and an ELH-type quartz halogen lamp. Three types of solar cells studied were a silicon cell, a cadmium sulfide cell and a gallium arsenide cell.

  11. Simulator spectral characterization using balloon calibrated solar cells with narrow band pass filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodelle, G. S.; Brooks, G. R.; Seaman, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    The development and implementation of an instrument for spectral measurement of solar simulators for testing solar cell characteristics is reported. The device was constructed for detecting changes in solar simulator behavior and for comparing simulator spectral irradiance to solar AM0 output. It consists of a standard solar cell equipped with a band pass filter narrow enough so that, when flown on a balloon to sufficient altitude along with sufficient numbers of cells, each equipped with filters of different bandpass ratings, the entire spectral response of the standard cell can be determined. Measured short circuit currents from the balloon flights thus produce cell devices which, when exposed to solar simulator light, have a current which does or does not respond as observed under actual AM0 conditions. Improvements of the filtered cells in terms of finer bandpass filter tuning and measurement of temperature coefficients are indicated.

  12. MODIS On-orbit Spectral Calibration for the Reflective Solar Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, X.; Che, N.; Barnes, W.

    2004-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) makes observations in 36 spectral bands with wavelengths from 0.41 to 14.5 microns. The bands with center wavelengths below 2.2 microns are referred as the reflective solar bands (RSB) with their radiometric calibration performed by a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM). This paper focuses on the MODIS spectral calibration performed by its unique on-board calibrator (OBC): the Spectro-Radiometric Calibration Assembly (SRCA). When operated in the spectral mode, the SRCA acts as a monochromator with internal spherical integration source (SIS) that measures the spectral responses for all the reflective solar bands. A wavelength calibrator, a didymium filter with known spectral profile, is utilized to calibrate the wavelength scale for the grating positions during each SRCA spectral calibration activity. The capability of self-wavelength calibration allows the SRCA to track the center wavelength shifts and to monitor the spectral response changes throughout the instruments lifetime. The MODIS spectral calibration, same for both Terra and Aqua missions, is performed every three months on-orbit. An overview of MODIS spectral characterization approach and a summary of the on-orbit results will be presented in this paper.

  13. Absolute measurement of subnanometer scale vibration of cochlear partition of an excised guinea pig cochlea using spectral-domain phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Choudhury, Niloy; Jacques, Steven L.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Chen, Fangyi; Zha, Dingjun; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2012-01-01

    Direct measurement of absolute vibration parameters from different locations within the mammalian organ of Corti is crucial for understanding the hearing mechanics such as how sound propagates through the cochlea and how sound stimulates the vibration of various structures of the cochlea, namely, basilar membrane (BM), recticular lamina, outer hair cells and tectorial membrane (TM). In this study we demonstrate the feasibility a modified phase-sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography system to provide subnanometer scale vibration information from multiple angles within the imaging beam. The system has the potential to provide depth resolved absolute vibration measurement of tissue microstructures from each of the delay-encoded vibration images with a noise floor of ~0.3nm at 200Hz.

  14. Solar Spectral Proxy Irradiance from GOES (SSPRING): a model for solar EUV irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, Katherine; Snow, Martin; Viereck, Rodney; Machol, Janet

    2016-02-01

    Several currently operating instruments are able to measure the full EUV spectrum at sufficient wavelength resolution for use in upper-atmosphere modeling, the effects of space weather, and modeling satellite drag. However, no missions are planned at present to succeed the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) missions, which currently provide these data sources. To develop a suitable replacement for these measurements, we use two broadband EUV channels on the NOAA GOES satellites, the magnesium core-to-wing ratio (Mg II index) from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) as well as EUV and Mg II time averages to model the EUV spectrum from 0.1 to 105 nm at 5-nm spectral resolution and daily time resolution. A Levenberg-Marquardt least squares fitting algorithm is used to determine a coefficient matrix that best reproduces a reference data set when multiplied by input data. The coefficient matrix is then applied to model data outside of the fitting interval. Three different fitting intervals are tested, with a variable fitting interval utilizing all days of data before the prediction date producing the best results. The correlation between the model results and the observed spectrum is found to be above 95% for the 0.1-50 nm range, and between 74% and 95% for the 50-105 nm range. We also find a favorable comparison between our results and the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM). These results provide a promising potential source for an empirical EUV spectral model after direct EUV measurements are no longer available, and utilize a similar EUV modeling technique as the upcoming GOES-R satellites.

  15. Atmospheric Sensitivity to Spectral Top-of-Atmosphere Solar Irradiance Perturbations, Using MODTRAN-5 Radiative Transfer Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G.; Berk, A.; Harder, G.; Fontenla, J.; Shettle, E.; Pilewski, P.; Kindel, B.; Chetwynd, J.; Gardner, J.; Hoke, M.; Jordan, A.; Lockwood, R.; Felde, G.; Archarya, P.

    2006-12-01

    expected to be very small in visible wavelengths, although absolute power is substantial. SORCE's Spectral Irradiance Monitor measurements are readily included in comparative MOD5 calculations. (2) The embedded solar irradiance within MOD5 must be compatible with the chosen band model resolution binning. By matching resolutions some issues related to the correlated-k band model parameterizations can be tested. Two high resolution solar irradiances, the MOD5 default irradiance (Kurucz) and a new compilation associated with Solar Radiation Physical Modeling project (Fontenla), are compared to address the potential impact of discrepancies between any sets of irradiances. The magnitude of solar variability, as measured and calculated, can lead to subtle changes in heating/cooling rates throughout the atmosphere, as a function of altitude and wavelength. By holding chemical & dynamical responses constant, only controlled distributions of absorbing gases, aerosols and clouds will contribute to observed 1st order radiative effects.

  16. Quantifying solar spectral irradiance in aquatic habitats for the assessment of photoenhanced toxicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, M.G.; Little, E.E.; Calfee, R.; Diamond, S.

    2000-01-01

    The spectra and intensity of solar radiation (solar spectral irradiance [SSI]) was quantified in selected aquatic habitats in the vicinity of an oil field on the California coast. Solar spectral irradiance measurements consisted of spectral scans (280-700 rim) and radiometric measurements of ultraviolet (UV): UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm). Solar spectral irradiance measurements were taken at the surface and at various depths in two marsh ponds, a shallow wetland, an estuary lagoon, and the intertidal area of a high-energy sandy beach. Daily fluctuation in SSI showed a general parabolic relationship with time; maximum structure-activity relationship (SAR) was observed at approximate solar noon. Solar spectral irradiance measurements taken at 10-cm depth at approximate solar noon in multiple aquatic habitats exhibited only a twofold variation in visible light and UVA and a 4.5-fold variation in UVB. Visible light ranged from 11,000 to 19,000 ??W/cm2, UVA ranged from 460 to 1,100 ??W/cm2, and UVB ranged from 8.4 to 38 ??W/cm2. In each habitat, the attenuation of light intensity with increasing water depth was differentially affected over specific wavelengths of SSI. The study results allowed the development of environmentally realistic light regimes necessary for photoenhanced toxicity studies.

  17. Quantifying solar spectral irradiance in aquatic habitats for the assessment of photoenhanced toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, M.G.; Little, E.E.; Calfee, R.; Diamond, S.

    2000-04-01

    The spectra and intensity of solar radiation (solar spectral irradiance [SSI]) was quantified in selected aquatic habitats in the vicinity of an oil field on the California coast. Solar spectral irradiance measurements consisted of spectral scans and radiometric measurements of ultraviolet (UV): UVB and UVA. Solar spectral irradiance measurements were taken at the surface and at various depths in two marsh ponds, a shallow wetland, an estuary lagoon, and the intertidal area of a high-energy sandy beach. Daily fluctuation in SSI showed a general parabolic relationship with time; maximum structure-activity relationship (SAR) was observed at approximate solar noon. Solar spectral irradiance measurements taken at 10-cm depth at approximate solar noon in multiple aquatic habitats exhibited only a twofold variation in visible light and UVA and a 4.5-fold variation in UVB. Visible light ranged from 11,000 to 19,000 {micro}W/cm{sup 2}, UVA ranged from 460 to 1,100 {micro}W/cm{sup 2}, and UVB ranged from 8.4 to 38 {micro}W/cm{sup 2}. In each habitat, the attenuation of light intensity with increasing water depth was differentially affected over specific wavelengths of SSI. The study results allowed the development of environmentally realistic light regimes necessary for photoenhanced toxicity studies.

  18. Solar Spectral Irradiance at 782 nm as Measured by the SES Sensor Onboard Picard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Irbah, A.; Cessateur, G.; Bekki, S.; Damé, L.; Bolsée, D.; Pereira, N.

    2016-04-01

    Picard is a satellite dedicated to the simultaneous measurement of the total and solar spectral irradiance, the solar diameter, the solar shape, and to the Sun's interior through the methods of helioseismology. The satellite was launched on June 15, 2010, and pursued its data acquisitions until March 2014. A Sun Ecartometry Sensor (SES) was developed to provide the stringent pointing requirements of the satellite. The SES sensor produced an image of the Sun at 782 ± 2.5 nm. From the SES data, we obtained a new time series of the solar spectral irradiance at 782 nm from 2010 to 2014. During this period of Solar Cycle 24, the amplitude of the changes has been of the order of ± 0.08 %, corresponding to a range of about 2× 10^{-3} W m^{-2} nm^{-1}. SES observations provided a qualitatively consistent evolution of the solar spectral irradiance variability at 782 nm. SES data show similar amplitude variations with the semi-empirical model Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S), whereas the Spectral Irradiance Monitor instrument (SIM) onboard the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment satellite (SORCE) highlights higher amplitudes.

  19. Reconstruction of total and spectral solar irradiance in the satellite era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok Leng, Yeo; Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami

    2014-05-01

    Total and spectral solar irradiance are key to understanding the influence of the Sun on changes in the Earth's climate, and also represent a useful index of solar activity from the apparent relationship with solar magnetism. We present a SATIRE-S model reconstruction of total and spectral solar irradiance spanning the period of 1974 to 2013. The model ascribes variation in solar irradiance, on timescales greater than a day, to the occurrence and evolution of magnetic structures on the photosphere. This is an update of preceding efforts with the model based on full disc magnetograms from the KPVT and SoHO/MDI. We extended the model to the present with similar observations from SDO/HMI, and cross calibrated the various magnetogram data sets to yield a single, consistent solar irradiance time series. The decadal trend in the PMOD composite record of total solar irradiance is almost exactly reproduced, giving support to solar surface magnetism as a driver of secular variation in solar irradiance. The reconstruction exhibits excellent agreement with various measurements of spectral solar irradiance (R2 ≠³ 0.9) but diverge significantly from the observations from SORCE/SIM, adding to existing evidence that SIM measurements might contain unresolved instrumental trends.

  20. Dynamic Power Spectral Analysis of Solar Measurements from Photospheric, Chromospheric, and Coronal Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouwer, S. D.; Pap, J.; Donnelly, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    An important aspect in the power spectral analysis of solar variability is the quasistationary and quasiperiodic nature of solar periodicities. In other words, the frequency, phase, and amplitude of solar periodicities vary on time scales ranging from active region lifetimes to solar cycle time scales. Here, researchers employ a dynamic, or running, power spectral density analysis to determine many periodicities and their time-varying nature in the projected area of active sunspot groups (S sub act). The Solar Maximum Mission/Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (SMM/ACRIM) total solar irradiance (S), the Nimbus-7 MgII center-to-wing ratio (R (MgII sub c/w)), the Ottawa 10.7 cm flux (F sub 10.7), and the GOES background x ray flux (X sub b) for the maximum, descending, and minimum portions of solar cycle 21 (i.e., 1980 to 1986) are used. The technique dramatically illustrates several previously unrecognized periodicities. For example, a relatively stable period at about 51 days has been found in those indices which are related to emerging magnetic fields. The majority of solar periodicities, particularly around 27, 150 and 300 days, are quasiperiodic because they vary in amplitude and frequency throughout the solar cycle. Finally, it is shown that there are clear differences between the power spectral densities of solar measurements from photospheric, chromospheric, and coronal sources.

  1. First Steps Towards a Homogeneous Solar Spectral Irradiance Data Set: Selection, merging and quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, Micha; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Dudok de Wit, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    The Sun varies over different timescales, from minutes to months, decades and millennia. Its variation is an important driver of terrestrial climate change and as such a significant input to climate models. While several observations exist to date over a broad frequency range, they are sparse over both frequency and time. As part of the SOLID (First European comprehensive SOlar Irradiance Data Exploitation) project we will show first results of constructing a homogeneous solar spectral irradiance data set of the UV. By combining a large variety of solar spectral irradiance data sets, we aim to reconstruct spectral solar variability further back in time and to deliver a data set that can be used by others, e.g. climate researchers in order to account for the non-constant solar forcing. We present the data used, together with preliminary internal uncertainty and error-estimates, self-consistent quality assessments, gap-filling methods and selection criteria. We use a combination of observed solar spectral irradiance from several missions, starting with OSO III in 1967, as well as available proxy data to identify outliers and trace them back to either instrumental or physical cause. The SOLID project is part of the seventh European framework programme. SOLID brings together representatives from all European solar space experiments and European teams specialized in irradiance modelling, reconstruction and solar image processing.

  2. A Fast Radiative Transfer Parameterization Under Cloudy Condition in Solar Spectral Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Liu, X.; Yang, P.; Wang, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) system, which is proposed and developed by NASA, will directly measure the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (IR), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (RS), and radio occultation (RO). IR, RS, and RO measurements provide information on the most critical but least understood climate forcings, responses, and feedbacks associated with the vertical distribution of atmospheric temperature and water vapor, broadband reflected and emitted radiative fluxes, cloud properties, surface albedo, and surface skin temperature. To perform Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE) for long term climate observations, accurate and fast radiative transfer models are needed. The principal component-based radiative transfer model (PCRTM) is one of the efforts devoted to the development of fast radiative transfer models for simulating radiances and reflecatance observed by various hyperspectral instruments. Retrieval algorithm based on PCRTM forward model has been developed for AIRS, NAST, IASI, and CrIS. It is very fast and very accurate relative to the training radiative transfer model. In this work, we are extending PCRTM to UV-VIS-near IR spectral region. To implement faster cloudy radiative transfer calculations, we carefully investigated the radiative transfer process under cloud condition. The cloud bidirectional reflectance was parameterized based on off-line 36-stream multiple scattering calculations while few other lookup tables were generated to describe the effective transmittance and reflectance of the cloud-clear-sky coupling system in solar spectral region. The bidirectional reflectance or the irradiance measured by satellite may be calculated using a simple fast radiative transfer model providing the type of cloud (ice or water), optical depth of the cloud, optical depth of both atmospheric trace gases above and below clouds, particle size of the cloud, as well

  3. Relative spectral absorption of solar radiation by water vapor and cloud droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, R.; Ridgway, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    A moderate (20/cm) spectral resolution model which accounts for both the highly variable spectral transmission of solar radiation through water vapor within and above cloud, as well as the more slowly varying features of absorption and anisotropic multiple scattering by the cloud droplets, is presented. Results from this model as applied to the case of a typical 1 km thick stratus cloud in a standard atmosphere, with cloud top altitude of 2 km and overhead sun, are discussed, showing the relative importance of water vapor above the cloud, water vapor within the cloud, and cloud droplets on the spectral absorption of solar radiation.

  4. An influence of solar spectral variations on radiative forcing of climate.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Joanna D; Winning, Ann R; Toumi, Ralf; Harder, Jerald W

    2010-10-01

    The thermal structure and composition of the atmosphere is determined fundamentally by the incoming solar irradiance. Radiation at ultraviolet wavelengths dissociates atmospheric molecules, initiating chains of chemical reactions-specifically those producing stratospheric ozone-and providing the major source of heating for the middle atmosphere, while radiation at visible and near-infrared wavelengths mainly reaches and warms the lower atmosphere and the Earth's surface. Thus the spectral composition of solar radiation is crucial in determining atmospheric structure, as well as surface temperature, and it follows that the response of the atmosphere to variations in solar irradiance depends on the spectrum. Daily measurements of the solar spectrum between 0.2 µm and 2.4 µm, made by the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) instrument on the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite since April 2004, have revealed that over this declining phase of the solar cycle there was a four to six times larger decline in ultraviolet than would have been predicted on the basis of our previous understanding. This reduction was partially compensated in the total solar output by an increase in radiation at visible wavelengths. Here we show that these spectral changes appear to have led to a significant decline from 2004 to 2007 in stratospheric ozone below an altitude of 45 km, with an increase above this altitude. Our results, simulated with a radiative-photochemical model, are consistent with contemporaneous measurements of ozone from the Aura-MLS satellite, although the short time period makes precise attribution to solar effects difficult. We also show, using the SIM data, that solar radiative forcing of surface climate is out of phase with solar activity. Currently there is insufficient observational evidence to validate the spectral variations observed by SIM, or to fully characterize other solar cycles, but our findings raise the possibility that the

  5. The Variability of Solar Spectral Irradiance and Solar Surface Indices Through the Solar Activity Cycles 21-23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniz Goker, Umit

    2016-07-01

    A study of variations of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the wavelength ranges 121.5 nm-300.5 nm for the period 1981-2009 is presented. We used various data for ultraviolet (UV) spectral lines and international sunspot number (ISSN) from interactive data centers as SME (NSSDC), UARS (GDAAC), SORCE (LISIRD) and SIDC, respectively. We developed a special software for extracting the data and reduced this data by using the MATLAB. In this respect, we revealed negative correlations of intensities of UV (289.5 nm-300.5 nm) emission lines originating in the solar chromosphere with the ISSN index during the unusually prolonged minimum between the solar cycles (SCs) 23 and 24. We also compared our results with the ground-based telescopes as Solar Irradiance Platform, Stanford Data (SFO), Kodaikanal Data (KKL) and NGDC Homepage (Rome and Learmonth Solar Observatories). We studied the variations of total solar irradiance (TSI), magnetic field, sunspots/sunspot groups, Ca II K-flux, faculae and plage areas data with these ground-based telescopes, respectively. We reduced the selected data using the Phyton programming language and plot with the IDL programme. Therefore, we found that there was a decrease in the area of bright faculae and chromospheric plages while the percentage of dark faculae and plage decrease, as well. However, these decreases mainly occurred in small sunspots, contrary to this, these terms in large sunspot groups were comparable to previous SCs or even larger. Nevertheless, negative correlations between ISSN and SSI data indicate that these emissions are in close connection with the classes of sunspots/sunspot groups and "PLAGE" regions. Finally, we applied the time series of the chemical elements correspond to the wavelengths 121.5 nm-300.5 nm and compared with the ISSN data. We found an unexpected increasing in the 298.5 nm for the Fe II element. The variability of Fe II (298.5 nm) is in close connection with the plage regions and the sizes of the

  6. Application of Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability in a Earth Atmospheric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, J. W.; Merkel, A.; Fontenla, J.; Marsh, D.; Woods, T. N.

    2010-12-01

    The Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) measures solar spectral variability in the 200-2400 nm range, accounting for about 97% of the total solar irradiance (TSI). SIM monitored the descending phase of solar cycle 23 and is now continuing these observations into the rising phase of cycle 24. The SIM observations indicate a slower evolutionary trend in solar spectral irradiance (SSI) over solar cycle times periods that are both in and out of phase with the TSI. To estimate the atmospheric response to the solar variability implied by these observations, quiet sun and active solar reference spectra were created as input into the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). The SIM observations were combined with the SORCE SOLSTICE instrument in the 110-240 nm range and SRPM (Solar Radiation Physical Modeling) estimates in the infrared beyond the 2400 nm measurement limit of SIM to generate the reference spectra. The model output suggest a very different response in ozone than from atmospheric forcing from semi-empirical models of SSI. The model predicts a reduction in lower mesosphere at higher solar activity and a large increase in mid- to upper stratosphere. This structure can be explained by enhanced production of HOx,, and O3 self-healing effect. This structure is commensurate with contemporaneous observations of O3 from AURA-MLS and SABER.

  7. The new climate data record of total and spectral solar irradiance: Current progress and future steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, Odele; Lean, Judith; Rottman, Gary; Pilewskie, Peter; Snow, Martin; Lindholm, Doug

    2016-04-01

    We present a climate data record of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI), with associated time and wavelength dependent uncertainties, from 1610 to the present. The data record was developed jointly by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado Boulder and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) as part of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Climate Data Record (CDR) Program, where the data record, source code, and supporting documentation are archived. TSI and SSI are constructed from models that determine the changes from quiet Sun conditions arising from bright faculae and dark sunspots on the solar disk using linear regression of proxies of solar magnetic activity with observations from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM), Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM), and SOlar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE). We show that TSI can be separately modeled to within TIM's measurement accuracy from solar rotational to solar cycle time scales and we assume that SSI measurements are reliable on solar rotational time scales. We discuss the model formulation, uncertainty estimates, and operational implementation and present comparisons of the modeled TSI and SSI with the measurement record and with other solar irradiance models. We also discuss ongoing work to assess the sensitivity of the modeled irradiances to model assumptions, namely, the scaling of solar variability from rotational-to-cycle time scales and the representation of the sunspot darkening index.

  8. Accurate Determination of the TOA Solar Spectral NIR Irradiance Using a Primary Standard Source and the Bouguer-Langley Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolsée, D.; Pereira, N.; Decuyper, W.; Gillotay, D.; Yu, H.; Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Cuevas, E.; Redondas, A.; Hernandéz, Y.; Weber, M.

    2014-07-01

    We describe an instrument dedicated to measuring the top of atmosphere (TOA) solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the near-infrared (NIR) between 600 nm and 2300 nm at a resolution of 10 nm. Ground-based measurements are performed through atmospheric NIR windows and the TOA SSI values are extrapolated using the Bouguer-Langley technique. The interest in this spectral range arises because it plays a main role in the Earth's radiative budget and also because it is employed to validate models used in solar physics. Moreover, some differences were observed between recent ground-based and space-based instruments that take measurements in the NIR and the reference SOLSPEC(ATLAS3) spectrum. In the 1.6 μm region, the deviations vary from 6 % to 10 %. Our measuring system named IRSPERAD has been designed by Bentham (UK) and has been radiometrically characterized and absolutely calibrated against a blackbody at the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy and at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany), respectively. A four-month measurement campaign was carried out at the Izaña Atmospheric Observatory (Canary Islands, 2367 m a.s.l.). A set of top-quality solar measurements was processed to obtain the TOA SSI in the NIR windows. We obtained an average standard uncertainty of 1 % for 0.8 μm< λ<2.3 μm. At 1.6 μm, corresponding to the minimum opacity of the solar photosphere, we obtained an irradiance of 234.31±1.29 mWm-2 nm-1. Between 1.6 μm and 2.3 μm, our measurements show a disagreement varying from 6 % to 8 % relative to ATLAS3, which is not explained by the declared standard uncertainties of the two experiments.

  9. What Do Millimeter Continuum and Spectral Line Observations Tell Us about Solar System Bodies?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, Stefanie N.

    2013-01-01

    Solar system objects are generally cold and radiate at low frequencies and tend to have strong molecular rotational transitions. Millimeter continuum and spectral line observations provide detailed information for nearly all solar system bodies. At these wavelengths, details of the bulk physical composition of icy surfaces, the size and albedo of small objects, the composition of planetary atmospheres can be measured as well as monitoring of time variable phenomena for extended periods (not restricted to nighttime observations), etc. Major issues in solar system science can be addressed by observations in the millimeter/sub-millimeter regime such as the origin of the solar system (isotope ratios, composition) and the evolution of solar system objects (dynamics, atmospheric constituents, etc). ALMA s exceptional sensitivity, large spectral bandwidth, high spectral resolution, and angular resolution (down to 10 milliarcsec) will enable researchers for the first time to better resolve the smallest bodies in the solar system and provide detailed maps of the larger objects. Additionally, measurements with nearly 8 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth to fully characterize solar system object s spectrum and detect trace species. The spatial information and line profiles can be obtained over 800 GHz of bandwidth in 8 receiver bands to not only assist in the identification of spectral lines and emission components for a given species but also to help elucidate the chemistry of the extraterrestrial bodies closest to us.

  10. Temperature effect on measurements of spectral responsivity of reference solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xuebo; Quan, Chenggen; Li, Yuanbo; Ng, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells, or solar cells, take advantage of the photoelectric effect to convert solar energy to electricity. With rapidly increasing of demands of new and green energy, solar energy industry becomes more important in the global economic development. PV cells are the building blocks of all PV systems because they are the devices that convert sunlight to electricity. Characterization and performance testing are critical to the development of existing and emerging photovoltaic technologies and the growth of the solar industry. As new solar products are being developed and manufactured, the energy conversion efficiency and other critical parameters must be accurately measured and tested under globally recognized standard testing conditions which include solar cell temperature, spectral distribution and total irradiance level of solar radiation on the cell to be tested. The aim of this paper is to investigate one of critical parameters - solar cell temperature effect on measurement of spectral responsivity of the cell. When a reference solar cell is illuminated by solar radiation, the cell temperature will vary with different irradiance levels. Consequently it will affect the accurate measurement of spectral responsivity of the cell. In order to better understand the temperature effect on the measurement, temperature coefficients of reference solar cell in spectral range from 300 nm to 1000 nm are measured in temperature range from 25 oC to 35 oC. The measurement uncertainties of temperature coefficient are evaluated and described in this paper according to JCGM 100: 2008 (ISO/IEC Guide 98-3) - Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement.

  11. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  12. A New Climate Data Record of Solar Spectral Irradiance from 1610 to Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, O.; Lean, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Snow, M. A.; Lindholm, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a climate data record of Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI), with associated time and wavelength dependent uncertainties, from 1610 to the present. The data record was developed jointly by the University of Colorado at Boulder's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) as part of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Climate Data Record (CDR) Program, where the data record, source code, and supporting documentation are archived. SSI is constructed from models that determine the changes from quiet Sun conditions arising from bright faculae and dark sunspots on the solar disk using linear regression of proxies of solar magnetic activity with observations from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM); the measurements are assumed to be reliable on solar rotational time scales. We extend the SSI record to longer time scales by reproducing the integral of the SSI with independent measurements of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measurements made by the SORCE Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM); TSI can be separately modeled to within TIM's measurement accuracy from solar rotational to solar cycle time scales. We discuss the model formulation, uncertainty estimates, and operational implementation and present comparisons of the modeled SSI with the measurement record and with other solar irradiance models. We also discuss future work to improve the Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record with new measurements from the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS), different proxy representations of sunspot darkening and facular brightening, including the improved composite record of Mg II index being developed as part of the European-led SOlar Irradiance Data exploitation (SOLID) project, and to expand the uncertainty estimates to include model assumptions.

  13. Latitudinal Variation of Solar Wind Speed and Mass Flux in the Acceleration Region of the Solar Wind during Solar Minimum Inferred from Spectral Broadening measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, R.; Goldstein, R.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we use an aggregate of S-band 2.3 GHz (13 cm) spectral broadening observations conducted during solar minimum conditions by the Mariner 4, Pioneer 10, Mariner 10, Helios 1 & 2 and Viking spacecraft to infer the first measurements of the latitudinal variation of solar wind speed and mass flux in the acceleration region of the solar wind at 3-8 R(sub o).

  14. Instrument development for atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM): Status of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer - extended Resolution (AERI-X), the Solar Radiance Transmission Interferometer (SORTI), and the Absolute Solar Transmission Inferometer (ASTI)

    SciTech Connect

    Murcray, F.; Stephen, T.; Kosters, J.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes three instruments currently under developemnt for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program at the University of Denver: the AERI-X (Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer-Extended Resolution) and the SORTI (Solar R adiance Transmission Interferometer), and ASTI (Absolute Solar transmission Interferometer).

  15. Solar Spectral Irradiance as observed by LYRA/PROBA2 and PREMOS/PICARD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cessateur, G.; Shapiro, A. I.; Dominique, M.; Kretzschmar, M.; Krivova, N.; Shapiro, A. V.; Schmutz, W.; Schoell, M.; Solanki, S.; Tagirov, R.; Thuillier, G.; Wehrli, C.; Yeo, K. L.

    2012-04-01

    Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance are key input parameters to atmospheric/oceanic and space weather models. Both vary on time-scales ranging from days to millennia, although a complete picture of the solar irradiance variability is still missing. The recent launch of two European missions PROBA-2 with LYRA radiometer onboard and PICARD with PREMOS package onboard provides therefore valuable information and nourishes theoretical models. Both instruments covers the solar spectrum from the EUV to near-infrared. Here we present spectral solar irradiance data from these two recent missions. After a proper correction of the degradation and non-solar signatures, we compare these data with those from the VIRGO/SOHO and SOLSTICE+SIM/SORCE experiments. Both LYRA and PREMOS have also observed several solar eclipses, which allows us to accurately retrieve the center-to-limb variations (CLVs) of the quiet Sun's brightness at the wavelengths of the corresponding channels. CLVs play indeed an important role in modelling of the solar irradiance variability. We show that calculations with the published COde for Solar Irradiance (COSI) yield CLVs that are in good agreement with measurements. Finally we use COSI to model the variability of the irradiance, assuming that the latter is determined by the evolution of the solar surface magnetic field as seen with SDO/HMI data. These theoretical results are compared to PREMOS and LYRA measurements.

  16. Recent Progress and Spectral Robustness Study for Mechanically Stacked Multi-junction Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lu; Flamand, Giovanni; Poortmans, Jef

    2010-10-01

    Multi-terminal mechanically stacked multi-junction solar cells are an attractive candidate for terrestrial concentrator photovoltaics applications. Unlike monolithically integrated multi-junction solar cells which require current matching, all the available photon currents can be fully extracted from each junction of a mechanically stacked solar cell. Therefore, it has a high performance potential, and more importantly is less sensitive to spectrum variations. Lower losses due to current mismatch translate into a higher annual energy output for the mechanical stack. This paper presents the baseline processing developed at imec for the mechanical stacking process, and the most recent cell results by means of this technology. A GaAs-Ge dual-junction mechanically stacked multi-junction solar cell is demonstrated, with 24.7% plus 2.52% under AM1.5g, and 27.7% plus 4.42% under 30Suns concentration. In addition, spectral sensitivity is studied for both monolithically stacked and mechanically stacked solar cells, to learn the influence of spectrum variations on multi-junction solar cell performance. SMARTS model is used to predict the spectral irradiances, with solar radiation and meteorological elements from typical meteorological year 3 (TMY3) data set. The generated spectra are then fed into TCAD numerical simulation tool, to simulate the device performance. The simulation results show a reduced spectral sensitivity for mechanically stacked cell, and there is a 6% relative gain in annual energy production for the site studied (Las Vegas), compared with the monolithic stack.

  17. Total-light imager with flat spectral response for solar photometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Foukal, P; Libonate, S

    2001-03-01

    Certain applications in imaging photometry and radiometry require a telescope-detector system with (preferably constant) response over a wide spectral range from the ultraviolet through the infrared. We describe the design and characterization of the Solar Bolometric Imager (SBI), a 30-cm-aperture Dall-Kirkham telescope combined with a gold-blacked, 80, 000-element thermal array detector. Our SBI prototype provides spectrally uniform imaging in total solar light (0.28-2.6 mum) of heat-flow inhomogeneities at the solar photosphere, with better than 5-arc sec angular resolution over a 6.5 x 13 arc min field of view. A balloon-borne SBI would avoid most atmospheric transmission variation over this spectral range, enabling accurate study of the sources of total irradiance variation. PMID:18357099

  18. Absolute radiant power measurement for the Au M lines of laser-plasma using a calibrated broadband soft X-ray spectrometer with flat-spectral response

    SciTech Connect

    Troussel, Ph.; Villette, B.; Oudot, G.; Tassin, V.; Bridou, F.; Delmotte, F.; Krumrey, M.

    2014-01-15

    CEA implemented an absolutely calibrated broadband soft X-ray spectrometer called DMX on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) in 1999 to measure radiant power and spectral distribution of the radiation of the Au plasma. The DMX spectrometer is composed of 20 channels covering the spectral range from 50 eV to 20 keV. The channels for energies below 1.5 keV combine a mirror and a filter with a coaxial photo-emissive detector. For the channels above 5 keV the photoemissive detector is replaced by a conductive detector. The intermediate energy channels (1.5 keV < photon energy < 5 keV) use only a filter and a coaxial detector. A further improvement of DMX consists in flat-response X-ray channels for a precise absolute measurement of the photon flux in the photon energy range from 0.1 keV to 6 keV. Such channels are equipped with a filter, a Multilayer Mirror (MLM), and a coaxial detector. We present as an example the development of channel for the gold M emission lines in the photon energy range from 2 keV to 4 keV which has been successfully used on the OMEGA laser facility. The results of the radiant power measurements with the new MLM channel and with the usual channel composed of a thin titanium filter and a coaxial detector (without mirror) are compared. All elements of the channel have been calibrated in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's National Metrology Institute, at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin using dedicated well established and validated methods.

  19. Absolute radiant power measurement for the Au M lines of laser-plasma using a calibrated broadband soft X-ray spectrometer with flat-spectral response.

    PubMed

    Troussel, Ph; Villette, B; Emprin, B; Oudot, G; Tassin, V; Bridou, F; Delmotte, F; Krumrey, M

    2014-01-01

    CEA implemented an absolutely calibrated broadband soft X-ray spectrometer called DMX on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) in 1999 to measure radiant power and spectral distribution of the radiation of the Au plasma. The DMX spectrometer is composed of 20 channels covering the spectral range from 50 eV to 20 keV. The channels for energies below 1.5 keV combine a mirror and a filter with a coaxial photo-emissive detector. For the channels above 5 keV the photoemissive detector is replaced by a conductive detector. The intermediate energy channels (1.5 keV < photon energy < 5 keV) use only a filter and a coaxial detector. A further improvement of DMX consists in flat-response X-ray channels for a precise absolute measurement of the photon flux in the photon energy range from 0.1 keV to 6 keV. Such channels are equipped with a filter, a Multilayer Mirror (MLM), and a coaxial detector. We present as an example the development of channel for the gold M emission lines in the photon energy range from 2 keV to 4 keV which has been successfully used on the OMEGA laser facility. The results of the radiant power measurements with the new MLM channel and with the usual channel composed of a thin titanium filter and a coaxial detector (without mirror) are compared. All elements of the channel have been calibrated in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's National Metrology Institute, at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin using dedicated well established and validated methods. PMID:24517761

  20. Ocean color spectral variability studies using solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Swift, Robert N.

    1987-01-01

    It is suggested that chlorophyll-induced ocean color spectral variability can be studied using only a passive airborne spectroradiometer instrument, with solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence used as the standard against which all correlations are performed. The intraspectral correlation (ISC) method is demonstrated with results obtained during an airborne mapping mission in the New York Bight. The curvature algorithm is applied to the solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence at about 690 nm, and good agreement is found with results obtained using active-passive correlation spectroscopy. The ISC method has application to spectral variability and resulting chlorophyll concentration measurement in different environmental conditions and in different water types.

  1. Antireflection treatment of thickness sensitive spectrally selective (TSSS) paints for thermal solar absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Lundh, M.; Waeckelgaard, E.; Blom, T.

    2010-01-15

    There are several methods to produce solar absorbers, and one cheap alternative is painted absorbers, preferably painted with a spectrally selective paint. The optical properties of Thickness Sensitive Spectrally Selective (TSSS) paints are, however, limited by the thickness of the paint layer. In this study it is shown that the solar absorptance of two commercial TSSS paints can be increased between 0.01 and 0.02 units with an antireflection treatment using a silicon dioxide layer deposited from silica-gel. It was found that the thermal emittance (100 C) did not change significantly after the treatment. (author)

  2. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE HIGHLY ECCENTRIC, SOLAR-TYPE ECLIPSING BINARY HD 74057

    SciTech Connect

    Sowell, James R.; Henry, Gregory W.; Fekel, Francis C. E-mail: gregory.w.henry@gmail.com

    2012-01-15

    We have obtained Stroemgren b and y differential photometric observations of the solar-type eclipsing binary HD 74057 plus follow-up high-resolution, red wavelength spectroscopic observations. The system has an orbital period of 31.2198 days, a high eccentricity of 0.47, and is seen almost exactly edge on with an inclination of 89.{sup 0}8. The two main-sequence G0 stars are nearly identical in all physical characteristics. We used the Wilson-Devinney program to obtain a simultaneous solution of our photometric and spectroscopic observations. The resulting masses of the components are M{sub 1} = 1.138 {+-} 0.003 M{sub Sun} and M{sub 2} = 1.131 {+-} 0.003 M{sub Sun }, and the radii are R{sub 1} = 1.064 {+-} 0.002 R{sub Sun} and R{sub 2} = 1.049 {+-} 0.002 R{sub Sun }. The effective temperatures are 5900 K (fixed) and 5843 K, and the iron abundance, [Fe/H], is estimated to be +0.07. A comparison with evolutionary tracks suggests that the system may be even more metal rich. The components rotate with periods of 8.4 days, significantly faster than the predicted pseudosynchronous period of 12.7 days. We see evidence that one or both components have cool spots. Both stars are close to the zero-age main sequence and are about 1.0 Gyr old.

  3. Solar albedo and spectral reflectance for Apollo 15 and 16 lunar fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birkebak, R. C.; Dawson, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    The spectral directional reflectance of Apollo 15 and 16 fines was obtained for bulk densities of approximately 1000 and 1600 kg/cu m. The solar albedo as a function of illumination was calculated from these results. Comparison of solar albedos shows that Apollo 11, 12, and 15 soils fall into one group and the Apollo 14 and 16 soil results into a second group corresponding to mare or lunar highland materials.

  4. High-resolution solar spectral irradiance from extreme ultraviolet to far infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontenla, J. M.; Harder, J.; Livingston, W.; Snow, M.; Woods, T.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents new extremely high-resolution solar spectral irradiance (SSI) calculations covering wavelengths from 0.12 nm to 100 micron obtained by the Solar Irradiance Physical Modeling (SRPM) system. Daily solar irradiance spectra were constructed for most of Solar Cycle 23 based on a set of physical models of the solar features and non-LTE calculations of their emitted spectra as function of viewing angle, and solar images specifying the distribution of features on the solar disk. Various observational tests are used to assess the quality of the spectra provided here. The present work emphasizes the effects on the SSI of the upper chromosphere and full-non-LTE radiative transfer calculation of level populations and ionizations that are essential for physically consistent results at UV wavelengths and for deep lines in the visible and IR. This paper also considers the photodissociation continuum opacity of molecular species, e.g., CH and OH, and proposes the consideration of NH photodissociation which can solve the puzzle of the missing near-UV opacity in the spectral range of the near-UV. Finally, this paper is based on physical models of the solar atmosphere and extends the previous lower-layer models into the upper-transition-region and coronal layers that are the dominant source of photons at wavelengths shorter than ˜50 nm (except for the He II 30.4 nm line, mainly formed in the lower-transition-region).

  5. Spectral analysis and modeling of solar flares chromospheric condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauzzi, Gianna; Graham, David; Kowalski, Adam; Zangrilli, Luca; Simoes, Paulo; Allred, Joel C.

    2016-05-01

    We follow up on our recent analysis of the X1.1 flare SOL2014-09-10T17:45, where we studied the impulsive phase dynamics of tens of individual flaring "kernels", in both coronal (Fe XXI) and chromospheric (MgII) lines observed at high cadence with IRIS.We concentrate here on the chromospheric aspect of the phenomenon, extending the analysis to multiple spectral lines of Mg II, Fe II, Si I, C II. We show that many flaring kernels display high velocity downflows in the spectra of all these chromospheric lines, exhibiting distinct, transient and strongly redshifted spectral components.From modeling using RADYN with the thick-target interpretation, the presence of two spectral components appears to be consistent with a high flux beam of accelerated electrons, characterized by a hard spectrum. In particular the highest energy electrons heat the denser, lower layers of the atmosphere, while the bulk of the beam energy, deposited higher in the atmosphere, is sufficient to produce chromospheric evaporation with a corresponding condensation.

  6. Absolute oscillator strengths for lines of neutral cobalt between 2276 A and 9357 A and a redetermination of the solar cobalt abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardon, B. L.; Smith, P. L.; Scalo, J. M.; Testerman, L.; Whaling, W.

    1982-09-01

    Absolute oscillator strengths of neutral cobalt have been determined from hook measurements for 159 transitions and emission intensity measurements for 314 transitions between 2276 Å and 9357 Å. Ninety-five of these transitions were subjected to the procedure developed by Cardon, Smith, and Whaling which fits combined absorption and emission data to a set of consistent, optimum, relative oscillator strengths and upper level lifetimes. These relative values were normalized to the radiative lifetimes of Figger et al. and of Marek and Vogt obtained by pulsed laser fluorescence. Absolute oscillator strengths for 362 transitions and 36 lifetimes were determined. Typical uncertainties in the reported absolute oscillator strengths are ±15-25% (2/3 confidence level). Equivalent widths were obtained for nineteen solar cobalt lines with the McMath solar telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. These widths were used to redetermine the solar cobalt abundance, assuming the photospheric model of Holweger and a microturbulence velocity of 1.0 km s-1. The adopted solar cobalt abundance is the mean value log Co/NH> + 12 = 4.92 ± 0.08 (±19%), from the 19 cobalt transitions. This value is in excellent agreement with the solar values of Ross and Aller, of Biemont, and of Holweger and that of Cameron for carbonaceous chondrites.

  7. Absolute oscillator strengths for lines of neutral cobalt between 2276 A and 9357 A and a redetermination of the solar cobalt abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Cardon, B.L.; Smith, P.L.; Scalo, J.M.; Testerman, L.; Whaling, W.

    1982-09-01

    Absolute oscillator strengths of neutral cobalt have been determined from hook measurements for 159 transitions and emission intensity measurements for 314 transitions between 2276 A and 9357 A. Ninety-five of these transitions were subjected to the procedure developed by Cardon, Smith, and Whaling which fits combined absorption and emission data to a set of consistent, optimum, relative oscillator strengths and upper level lifetimes. These relative values were normalized to the radiative lifetimes of Figger et al. and of Marek and Vogt obtained by pulsed laser fluorescence. Absolute oscillator strengths for 362 transitions and 36 lifetimes were determined. Typical uncertainties in the reported absolute oscillator strengths are +- 15-25% (2/3 confidence level). Equivalent widths were obtained for nineteen solar cobalt lines with the McMath solar telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. These widths were used to redetermine the solar cobalt abundance, assuming the photospheric model of Holweger and a microturbulence velocity of 1.0 km s/sup -1/. The adopted solar cobalt abundance is the mean value log +12 = 4.92 +- 0.08 ( +- 19%), from the 19 cobalt transitions. This value is in excellent agreement with the solar values of Ross and Aller, of Biemont, and of Holweger and that of Cameron for carbonaceous chondrites.

  8. Radiation Dose Assessments of Solar Particle Events with Spectral Representation at High Energies for the Improvement of Radiation Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Atwell, William; Tylka, Allan J.; Dietrich, William F.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    For radiation dose assessments of major solar particle events (SPEs), spectral functional forms of SPEs have been made by fitting available satellite measurements up to approx.100 MeV. However, very high-energy protons (above 500 MeV) have been observed with neutron monitors (NMs) in ground level enhancements (GLEs), which generally present the most severe radiation hazards to astronauts. Due to technical difficulties in converting NM data into absolutely normalized fluence measurements, those functional forms were made with little or no use of NM data. A new analysis of NM data has found that a double power law in rigidity (the so-called Band function) generally provides a satisfactory representation of the combined satellite and NM data from approx.10 MeV to approx.10 GeV in major SPEs (Tylka & Dietrich 2009). We use the Band function fits to re-assess human exposures from large SPEs. Using different spectral representations of large SPEs, variations of exposure levels were compared. The results can be applied to the development of approaches of improved radiation protection for astronauts, as well as the optimization of mission planning and shielding for future space missions.

  9. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  10. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp.

    PubMed

    Fat'yanov, O V; Asimow, P D

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30,000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  11. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Fat’yanov, O. V. Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-15

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  12. Detection of Solar Rotational Variability in the Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) 190 - 222 nm Spectral Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A. V.; Shapiro, A. I.; Dominique, M.; Dammasch, I. E.; Wehrli, C.; Rozanov, E.; Schmutz, W.

    2013-08-01

    We analyze the variability of the spectral solar irradiance during the period from 7 January 2010 until 20 January 2010 as measured by the Herzberg channel (190 - 222 nm) of the Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) onboard PROBA2. In this period of time, observations by the LYRA nominal unit experienced degradation and the signal produced by the Herzberg channel frequently jumped from one level to another. Both factors significantly complicate the analysis. We present the algorithm that allowed us to extract the solar variability from the LYRA data and compare the results with SORCE/SOLSTICE measurements and with modeling based on the Code for the Solar Irradiance (COSI).

  13. Using the solar elevation angle and radiance conversion to normalize forest spectral signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, E. M.; Lu, Y.-C.

    1984-01-01

    A number of spectral signals associated with forest cover were selected in order to test the usefulness of adjustments to Landsat MSS digital count values. The signatures were taken from 26 independent regional land cover inventories in the northeastern US. A regression analysis was conducted which revealed a significant relationship between digital count values and variation in the solar elevation angles in MSS bands four, six, and seven for deciduous forests and in all MSS bands for conifers. When signatures were adjusted for solar elevation angles and MSS sensor calibration differences, the dependence on solar elevation angle was reduced. The adjustments also significantly reduced the variance with Level II forest categories among scenes.

  14. Observations of Solar Spectral Irradiance Change During Cycle 22 from NOAA-9 SBUV/2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLand, Matthew T.; Cebula, Richard P.; Hilsenrath, Ernest

    2003-01-01

    The NOM-9 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet, model 2 (SBUV/2) instrument is one of a series of instruments providing daily solar spectral irradiance measurements in the middle and near ultraviolet since 1978. The SBUV/2 instruments are primarily designed to measure stratospheric profile and total column ozone, using the directional albedo as the input to the ozone processing algorithm. As a result, the SBUV/2 instrument does not have onboard monitoring of all time-dependent response changes. We have applied internal comparisons and vicarious (external) comparisons to determine the long-term instrument characterization for NOAA-9 SBUV/2 to derive accurate solar spectral irradiances from March 1985 to May 1997 spanning two solar cycle minima with a single instrument. The NOAA-9 data show an amplitude of 9.3(+/- 2.3)% (81-day averaged) at 200-205 nm for solar cycle 22. This is consistent with the result of (Delta)F(sub 200-205) = 8.3(+/- 2.6)% for cycle 21 from Nimbus-7 SBUV and (Delta)F(sub 200-205) = 10(+/- 2)% (daily values) for cycle 23 from UARS SUSIM. NOAA-9 data at 245-250 nm show a solar cycle amplitude of (Delta)F(sub 245-250) = 5.7(+/- 1.8)%. NOAA-9 SBUV/2 data can be combined with other instruments to create a 25-year record of solar UV irradiance.

  15. The future of solar spectral irradiance in the ultraviolet with the SOLSIM double-monochromator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damé, Luc; Bolsee, David; Rouanet, Nicolas; Gilbert, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) in the UV, and its variability, are of prime importance to quantify the solar forcing on the climate through radiation and their interactions with the local stratosphere, noticeably through the "top-down" mechanism amplifying UV solar forcing on the climate (UV affects stratospheric dynamics and temperatures, altering interplanetary waves and weather patterns both poleward and downward to the lower stratosphere and tropopause regions). SOLSIM (Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor) is a newly designed double-monochromator instrument covering the 170 - 340 nm ultraviolet spectral range. It is an enhanced and optimized version of the previously flown SOLSPEC instrument externally mounted on the Columbus module of the International Space Station. While SOLSPEC had 3 double-monochromators to cover the UV to the IR, the SOLSIM spectrometer is covering only the UV but with an almost constant 0.65 nm spectral resolution from 170 to 340 nm. To avoid thermal issues with the instrument, a sun-synchronous polar orbit 18h-6h (for almost constant observing) is preferred to the Space Station (SOLSIM is part of the model payload of the SUITS/SWUSV proposed mission). Characteristics, performances and calibrations foreseen for this new generation SSI instrument will be presented.

  16. Absolute isotopic composition of molybdenum and the solar abundances of the p-process nuclides Mo92,94

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieser, M. E.; de Laeter, J. R.

    2007-05-01

    The isotopic composition of molybdenum has been measured with high precision using a thermal ionization mass spectrometer, the linearity of which has been verified by measuring the isotopically-certified reference material for strontium (NIST 987). The abundance sensitivity of the mass spectrometer in the vicinity of the molybdenum ion beams has been carefully examined to ensure the absence of tailing effects. Particular care was given to ensuring that potential isobaric interferences from zirconium and ruthenium did not affect the measurement of the isotopic composition of molybdenum. Gravimetric mixtures of two isotopically enriched isotopes, Mo92 and Mo98, were analyzed mass spectrometrically to calibrate the mass spectrometer, in order to establish the isotope fractionation of the spectrometer for the molybdenum isotopes. This enabled the “absolute” isotopic composition of molybdenum to be determined. An accurate determination of the isotopic composition is required in order to calculate the atomic weight of molybdenum, which is one of the least accurately known values of all the elements. The absolute isotope abundances (in atom %) of molybdenum measured in this experiment are as follows: Mo92=14.5246±0.0015; Mo94=9.1514±0.0074; Mo95=15.8375±0.0098; Mo96=16.672±0.019; Mo97=9.5991±0.0073; Mo98=24.391±0.018; and Mo100=9.824±0.050, with uncertainties at the 1s level. These values enable an atomic weight Ar(Mo) of 95.9602±0.0023 (1s) to be calculated, which is slightly higher than the current Standard Atomic Weight Ar(Mo) =95.94±0.02 and with a much improved uncertainty interval. These “absolute” isotope abundances also enable the Solar System abundances of molybdenum to be calculated for astrophysical purposes. Of particular interest are the Solar System abundances of the two p-process nuclides—Mo92 and Mo94, which are present in far greater abundance than p-process theory suggests. The Solar System abundances for Mo92 and Mo94 of 0.364±0

  17. Climate variability related to the 11 year solar cycle as represented in different spectral solar irradiance reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruschke, Tim; Kunze, Markus; Misios, Stergios; Matthes, Katja; Langematz, Ulrike; Tourpali, Kleareti

    2016-04-01

    Advanced spectral solar irradiance (SSI) reconstructions differ significantly from each other in terms of the mean solar spectrum, that is the spectral distribution of energy, and solar cycle variability. Largest uncertainties - relative to mean irradiance - are found for the ultraviolet range of the spectrum, a spectral region highly important for radiative heating and chemistry in the stratosphere and troposphere. This study systematically analyzes the effects of employing different SSI reconstructions in long-term (40 years) chemistry-climate model (CCM) simulations to estimate related uncertainties of the atmospheric response. These analyses are highly relevant for the next round of CCM studies as well as climate models within the CMIP6 exercise. The simulations are conducted by means of two state-of-the-art CCMs - CESM1(WACCM) and EMAC - run in "atmosphere-only"-mode. These models are quite different with respect to the complexity of the implemented radiation and chemistry schemes. CESM1(WACCM) features a chemistry module with considerably higher spectral resolution of the photolysis scheme while EMAC employs a radiation code with notably higher spectral resolution. For all simulations, concentrations of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances, as well as observed sea surface temperatures (SST) are set to average conditions representative for the year 2000 (for SSTs: mean of decade centered over year 2000) to exclude anthropogenic influences and differences due to variable SST forcing. Only the SSI forcing differs for the various simulations. Four different forcing datasets are used: NRLSSI1 (used as a reference in all previous climate modeling intercomparisons, i.e. CMIP5, CCMVal, CCMI), NRLSSI2, SATIRE-S, and the SSI forcing dataset recommended for the CMIP6 exercise. For each dataset, a solar maximum and minimum timeslice is integrated, respectively. The results of these simulations - eight in total - are compared to each other with respect to their

  18. Tropospheric Response to Estimated Spectrally Discriminated Solar Forcing Over the Past 500 Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, David; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The GISS Global Climate Middle Atmosphere Model (GCMAM) is used to investigate the effect of estimated solar irradiance changes on climate for the past 500 years. This model is employed to allow the impact of UV variations on the stratosphere to affect the troposphere via wave-mean flow interactions. Multiple experiments are done with only a total solar irradiance change (peaking at 0.2 percent from the Maunder Minimum to today); with estimated spectrally-varying irradiance changes (i.e., peak changes of 0.7 percent in the UV, 0.2 percent in the visible and near IR; and 0.07 percent in the IR greater than 1 micron); and the spectrally-varying changes in conjunction with model calculated ozone responses in the stratosphere. Results of the varying temperature patterns and radiation response will be discussed. Of interest is whether the different methods of forcing the solar-induced climate change produce different spatial surface temperature signatures, particularly ones that can be differentiated from greenhouse gas warming. In preliminary tests, spectrally-varying solar forcing with induced ozone changes for solar maximum minus solar minimum conditions results in a temperature signal that is primarily at high latitudes.The high latitude response arises due to solar/ozone-induced alterations in the stratospheric wind field that affect planetary wave propagation from the troposphere, and alter tropospheric advection patterns. In contrast, forcing by total solar irradiance changes produces significant response at low and subtropical latitudes as well, driven by water vapor and cloud feedbacks to the radiative perturbation.

  19. Spectral scaling laws of solar wind fluctuations at 1 AU: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta, John J.

    2013-06-13

    In-situ measurements of solar wind fluctuations at 1 AU show that the reduced energy spectrum, equal to the sum of the reduced kinetic plus magnetic energy spectra, is characterized by a power-law scaling k{sup -{alpha}} in the inertial range with an average spectral exponent {alpha} Asymptotically-Equal-To 3/2, a result confirmed by independent analyses using data from different spacecraft. Magnetic field and electron density spectra at kinetic scales {rho}{sup -1}{sub i} < k < {rho}{sup -1}{sub e} both have a spectral index of approximately 2.7. These and other recent observations of spectral scaling laws in the solar wind using single spacecraft measurements are briefly reviewed. The first part of this review, Part 1, is contained in a separate paper in these proceedings.

  20. Photoelectrons as a tool to evaluate spectral and temporal variations of solar EUV and XUV irradiance models over solar rotation and solar cycle time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Woods, T. N.; Fontenla, J. M.; Richards, P. G.; Tobiska, W.; Solomon, S. C.; Warren, H. P.

    2010-12-01

    Solar radiation below 50 nm produces a substantial portion of the F region ionization and most of the E region ionization that drives chemical reactions in the thermosphere. Because of a lack of high temporal and spectral resolution Solar EUV and XUV observations, particularly below 27 nm, various solar irradiance models have been developed. We have developed a technique to use observations of escaping photoelectron fluxes from the FAST satellite and two different photoelectron production codes driven by model solar irradiance values to systematically examine differences between observed and calculated escaping photoelectron fluxes. We have compared modeled and observed photoelectron fluxes from the start of TIMED/SEE data availability (2002) to the end of FAST photoelectron observations (2009). Solar irradiance inputs included TIMED/SEE data, which is derived from a model below 27 nm, and the FISM Version 1, the SRPM predictive model based on solar observation, HEUVAC, S2000, and NRL, solar irradiance models. We used the GLOW and FLIP photoelectron production codes. We find that model photoelectron spectra generated using the HEUVAC solar irradiance model have the best overall agreement with observations. Photoelectron spectra generated with the the TIMED/SEE based FISM model best agree with the observations on solar cycle time scales. Below ~27 nm all but the HEUVAC solar irradiance model produces photoelectron fluxes that are systematically below observations. We also noted systematic differences in the photoelectron energy spectra below 25 eV produced by the GLOW and FLIP photoelectron production codes for all solar irradiance inputs.

  1. Temperature Responses to Spectral Solar Variability on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahalan, Robert; Wen, Guoyong; Pilewskie, Peter; Harder, Jerald

    2010-05-01

    We apply two scenarios of 11-year solar spectral forcing, namely SIM-based out-of-phase variations and proxy-based in-phase variations, as input to a time-dependent radiative-convective model (RCM), and also to the GISS modelE GCM. For both scenarios, and both models, we find that the maximum temperature response occurs in the upper stratosphere, and temperature responses decrease downward to the surface. The upper stratospheric temperature peak-to-peak responses to out-of-phase solar forcing are ~0.6 K in RCM and ~0.9 K over the tropical region in GCM simulations, a factor of ~5 times as large as responses to in-phase solar forcing. Stratospheric responses are in-phase with TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) variations. The modeled upper stratospheric temperature response to the SORCE SIM observed SSI (Spectral Solar Irradiance) forcing resembles 11-year temperature variations observed with HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment). Surface responses to the two SSI scenarios are small for both RCM and GCM studies, as compared to stratospheric responses. Though solar irradiance variations on centennial time scale are not well known, the two scenarios of reconstructed TSI time series (i.e., one based on 11-year cycles with background [Lean 2000] and the second from flux transport that has much less background change [Wang, Lean, and Sheeley, 2005]) provide a range of variations of TSI on centennial time scales. We apply phase relations among different spectral irradiance bands both from SIM observation and proxy reconstructions to the two scenarios of historical TSI. The spectral solar forcing is used to drive the RCM. The updated atmosphere and ocean mixed coupled RCM including diffusion to deep-ocean provides a first-order estimate of climate response. We report the different responses of stratosphere, troposphere, and ocean surface to these 4 scenarios of centennial spectral solar forcing. We further discuss the mechanisms for atmosphere-ocean and stratosphere

  2. Enhancement of solar cell performance by employing planar spectral converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Sark, W. G. J. H. M.

    2005-10-01

    The effect on solar cell performance of planar converters containing quantum dots (QDs) as wavelength-shifting entities on top of multicrystalline silicon cells was investigated by means of model studies with varying incident spectra. These included global, direct, and diffuse spectra with Air Mass (AM) values ranging from 1 to 10. In case of AM1.5, a planar converter with QDs emitting at 603nm yields a short-circuit current increase of 6.3%, 9.6%, and 28.6% for direct, global, and diffuse irradiation, respectively, as a result of the larger blue/green content of diffuse spectra with respect to direct and global ones. For other AM values, similar results are calculated, with a lower increase toward high AM values.

  3. Temporal and spectral variations of the photoelectron flux and solar irradiance during an X class solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, T. N.; Richards, P. G.

    2008-06-01

    Photoelectrons are the main energy source of airglow used to diagnose the state of the ionosphere-thermosphere system. Because of measurement uncertainties and substantial gaps in the historical record, parameterized models of the EUV irradiance and photoelectron flux are generally used to estimate airglow intensities. This paper compares observed and modeled photoelectron spectra from an X3 class flare that occurred on July 15, 2002. The photoelectron data were obtained from the FAST satellite. Model photoelectron spectra were obtained from the Field Line Inter-hemispheric Plasma (FLIP) model using 10 s cadence solar spectra at 1 nm resolution from the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM). The observed and modeled spectra agree well temporally and spectrally within the uncertainties of the models and data. Systematic differences found between observed and modeled photoelectron spectra suggest that the solar irradiance from FISM could be improved at wavelengths shortward of 17 nm.

  4. Enhancing solar cell efficiency: the search for luminescent materials as spectral converters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoyong; Han, Sanyang; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xiaogang

    2013-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) technologies for solar energy conversion represent promising routes to green and renewable energy generation. Despite relevant PV technologies being available for more than half a century, the production of solar energy remains costly, largely owing to low power conversion efficiencies of solar cells. The main difficulty in improving the efficiency of PV energy conversion lies in the spectral mismatch between the energy distribution of photons in the incident solar spectrum and the bandgap of a semiconductor material. In recent years, luminescent materials, which are capable of converting a broad spectrum of light into photons of a particular wavelength, have been synthesized and used to minimize the losses in the solar-cell-based energy conversion process. In this review, we will survey recent progress in the development of spectral converters, with a particular emphasis on lanthanide-based upconversion, quantum-cutting and down-shifting materials, for PV applications. In addition, we will also present technical challenges that arise in developing cost-effective high-performance solar cells based on these luminescent materials. PMID:23072924

  5. Spectral estimates of intercepted solar radiation by corn and soybean canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Brooks, C. C.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Bauer, M. E.; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1982-01-01

    Attention is given to the development of methods for combining spectral and meteorological data in crop yield models which are capable of providing accurate estimates of crop condition and yields throughout the growing season. The present investigation is concerned with initial tests of these concepts using spectral and agronomic data acquired in controlled experiments. The data were acquired at the Purdue University Agronomy Farm, 10 km northwest of West Lafayette, Indiana. Data were obtained throughout several growing seasons for corn and soybeans. Five methods or models for predicting yields were examined. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that estimating intercepted solar radiation using spectral data is a viable approach for merging spectral and meteorological data in crop yield models.

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF INTERMITTENCY ON THE SPECTRAL ANISOTROPY OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Tu, Chuanyi; He, Jiansen; Wang, Linghua; Marsch, Eckart

    2014-03-01

    The relation between the intermittency and the anisotropy of the power spectrum in the solar wind turbulence is studied by applying the wavelet technique to the magnetic field and flow velocity data measured by the WIND spacecraft. It is found that when the intermittency is removed from the turbulence, the spectral indices of the power spectra of the field and velocity turn out to be independent of the angle θ{sub RB} between the direction of the local scale-dependent background magnetic field and the heliocentric direction. The spectral index becomes –1.63 ± 0.02 for magnetic field fluctuations and –1.56 ± 0.02 for velocity fluctuations. These results may suggest that the recently found spectral anisotropy of solar wind power spectra in the inertial range could result from turbulence intermittency. As a consequence, a new concept is here proposed of an intermittency-associated sub-range of the inertial domain adjacent to the dissipation range. Since spectral anisotropy was previously explained as evidence for the presence of a ''critical balance'' type turbulent cascade, and also for the existence of kinetic Alfvén waves, this new finding may stimulate fresh thoughts on how to analyze and interpret solar wind turbulence and the associated heating.

  7. Observed Variability of the Solar Mg II h Spectral Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, D.; Bryans, P.; De Pontieu, B.; McIntosh, S.; Leenaarts, J.; Carlsson, M.

    2015-10-01

    The Mg ii h&k doublet are two of the primary spectral lines observed by the Sun-pointing Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). These lines are tracers of the magnetic and thermal environment that spans from the photosphere to the upper chromosphere. We use a double-Gaussian model to fit the Mg ii h profile for a full-Sun mosaic data set taken on 2014 August 24. We use the ensemble of high-quality profile fits to conduct a statistical study on the variability of the line profile as it relates the magnetic structure, dynamics, and center-to-limb viewing angle. The average internetwork profile contains a deeply reversed core and is weakly asymmetric at h2. In the internetwork, we find a strong correlation between h3 wavelength and profile asymmetry as well as h1 width and h2 width. The average reversal depth of the h3 core is inversely related to the magnetic field. Plage and sunspots exhibit many profiles that do not contain a reversal. These profiles also occur infrequently in the internetwork. We see indications of magnetically aligned structures in plage and network in statistics associated with the line core, but these structures are not clear or extended in the internetwork. The center-to-limb variations are compared to predictions of semi-empirical model atmospheres. We measure a pronounced limb darkening in the line core that is not predicted by the model. The aim of this work is to provide a comprehensive measurement baseline and preliminary analysis on the observed structure and formation of the Mg ii profiles observed by IRIS.

  8. GISS GCMAM Modeled Climate Responses to Total and Spectral Solar Forcing on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Guoyong; Cahalan, Robert; Rind, David; Jonas, Jeffrey; Pilewskie, Peter; Harder, Jerry

    2014-05-01

    We examine the influence of the SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) SIM (Spectral Irradiance Monitor) observed spectral solar irradiance (SSI) variations on Earth's climate. We apply two reconstructed spectral solar forcing scenarios, one SIM based, the other based on the SATIRE (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction) model, as inputs to the GISS (Goddard Institute for Space Studies) GCMAM (Global Climate Middle Atmosphere Model) to examine the climate responses on decadal and centennial time scales. We show that the atmosphere has different temperature, ozone, and dynamic responses to the two solar spectral forcing scenarios, even when the variations in TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) are the same. We find that solar variations under either scenario contribute a small fraction of the observed temperature increase since the industrial revolution. The trend of global averaged surface air temperature response to the SIM-based solar forcing is 0.02 °C/century, about half of the temperature trend to the SATIRE-based SSI. However the temporal variation of the surface air temperature for the SIM-based solar forcing scenario is much larger compared to its SATIRE counterpart. Further research is required to examine TSI and SSI variations in the ascending phase of solar cycle 24, to assess their implications for the solar influence on climate.

  9. GISS GCMAM Modeled Climate Responses to Total and Spectral Solar Forcing on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, G.; Cahalan, R. F.; Rind, D. H.; Jonas, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Harder, J. W.; Krivova, N.

    2014-12-01

    We examine the influence of the SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) SIM (Spectral Irradiance Monitor) observed spectral solar irradiance (SSI) variations on Earth's climate. We apply two reconstructed spectral solar forcing scenarios, one SIM based, the other based on the SATIRE (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction) model, as inputs to the GISS (Goddard Institute for Space Studies) GCMAM (Global Climate Middle Atmosphere Model) to examine the climate responses on decadal and centennial time scales. We show that the atmosphere has different temperature, ozone, and dynamic responses to the two solar spectral forcing scenarios, even when the variations in TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) are the same. We find that solar variations under either scenario contribute a small fraction of the observed temperature increase since the industrial revolution. The trend of global averaged surface air temperature response to the SIM-based solar forcing is 0.02 °C/century, about half of the temperature trend to the SATIRE-based SSI. However the temporal variation of the surface air temperature for the SIM-based solar forcing scenario is much larger compared to its SATIRE counterpart. Further research is required to examine TSI and SSI variations in the ascending phase of solar cycle 24, to assess their implications for the solar influence on climate.

  10. Free Flyer Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) and Climate Services Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R.; Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T.

    2012-01-01

    NOAA's planned Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) mission will fly along with the NOAA user service payloads Advanced Data Collection System (ADCS) and Search and Rescue Satellite Aided Tracking (SARSAT). In ' order to guarantee continuity in the 33-year solar irradiance climate data record, TSIS must be launched in time to overlap with current on-orbit solar irradiance instruments. Currently TSIS is moving towards a launch rcadinss date of January 2015. TSIS provides for continuation of the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) ,currently onboard NASA's Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) platform, launched in January 2003. The difficulty of ensuring continuity has increased due to the launch failure of NASA's Glory mission with its improved TIM. Achieving the needed overlap must now rely on extending SORCE. and maintaining the TSIS schedule. TSIS is one component of a NASA-NOAA joint program (JPSS) planned to transition certain climate observations to operational mode. We summarize issues of continuity, improvements being made to the TIM and 81M sensors, and plans to provide for traceability of total and spectral irradiance measurements to ground-based cryogenic standards.

  11. The solar ultraviolet spectral irradiance monitor (SUSIM) experiment on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, G. E.; Edlow, K. L.; Floyd, L. E., IV; Lean, J. L.; Vanhoosier, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    The state of solar ultraviolet irradiance measurements in 1978, when NASA requested proposals for a new generation of solar ultraviolet monitors to be flown on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), is described. To overcome the radiometric uncertainties that plagued the measurements at this time, the solar ultraviolet spectral irradiance monitor (SUSIM) instrument design included in-flight calibration light sources and multichannel photometers. Both are aimed at achieving a maximum precision of the SUSIM measurements over a long period of time, e.g., one solar cycle. The design of the SUSIM-UARS instrument is compared with the original design specifications for the UARS instruments. Details including optical train, filters, detectors, and contamination precautions are described. Also discussed are the SUSIM-UARS preflight calibration and characterization, as well as the results of the inflight performance of the instrument during the first 3 months of operation. Finally, flight operations, observation strategy, and data reduction schemes are outlined.

  12. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography features of mild and severe acute solar retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Hossein, Mohammad; Jabbarpoor Bonyadi, Mohammad Hossein; Bonyadi, Jabbarpour; Soheilian, Rasam; Soheilian, Masoud; Peyman, Gholam A

    2011-01-01

    Photochemical/thermal retinal damage that results from unprotected solar eclipse viewing has vague presentations and sometimes misleading diagnosis, especially in cases with unclear history. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technique useful in differential diagnosis that can reveal characteristic foveal alterations in solar retinopathy to an unprecedented quasi histologic level. The authors present high-resolution SD-OCT findings correlated with clinical findings in three eyes of two cases with acute solar retinopathy. SD-OCT can precisely define the site and extent of damage in acute solar retinopathy. In mild forms, damage may be limited to the outer retina with inner segment/outer segment disruption. In severe forms, full thickness macular damage may be seen. Advances in retinal imaging have improved our ability to provide precise correlation with clinical presentation and prognosis. PMID:21899248

  13. The Measurement of the Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability at 782 nm during the Solar Cycle 24 using the SES on-board PICARD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, Mustapha; Hauchecorne, Alain; Irbah, Abdanour; Bekki, Slimane

    2016-04-01

    A Sun Ecartometry Sensor (SES) was developed to provide the stringent pointing requirements of the PICARD satellite. The SES sensor produced an image of the Sun at 782+/-5 nm. From the SES data, we obtained a new time series of the solar spectral irradiance at 782nm from 2010 to 2014. SES observations provided a qualitatively consistent evolution of the solar spectral irradiance variability at 782 nm during the solar cycle 24. Comparisons will be made with Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S) semi-empirical model and with the Spectral Irradiance Monitor instrument (SIM) on-board the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment satellite (SORCE). These data will help to improve the representation of the solar forcing in the IPSL Global Circulation Model.

  14. Global and diffuse solar radiation and its spectral distribution at Macerata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murri, A.

    1981-03-01

    Measurements of global and diffuse solar radiation and global solar radiation in various spectral regions are reported which cover the period 1964-1978 at Macerata, Italy. The measurements were made with thermally compensated Moll thermopiles in the entire 300-2800 nm spectral region and in eight spectral bands within it. Mean monthly insolation values range from 2283 J/sq cm per day in July to 497 J/sq cm per day in December for global radiation, and from 753 J/sq cm in June to 238 J/sq cm in December for the diffuse component. Maximum and minimum values of insolation in the individual spectral bands are found in the same periods as the global maxima and minima, with the exception of minima in the GG 495, Bg 14 and UG 1 filters, which occur in January. Detailed analysis of intensities in three spectral bands during periods of arbitrary and fair weather reveals the dominant contribution of radiation in the infrared to the total intensities, particularly during atmospheric disturbances.

  15. Spectral structures and their generation mechanisms for solar radio type-I bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Masuda, S.; Tsuchiya, F.; Morioka, A.; Misawa, H.

    2014-07-01

    The fine spectral structures of solar radio type-I bursts were observed by the solar radio telescope AMATERAS. The spectral characteristics, such as the peak flux, duration, and bandwidth, of the individual burst elements were satisfactorily detected by the highly resolved spectral data of AMATERAS with the burst detection algorithm that is improved in this study. The peak flux of the type-I bursts followed a power-law distribution with a spectral index of 2.9-3.3, whereas their duration and bandwidth were distributed more exponentially. There were almost no correlations between the peak flux, duration, and bandwidth. That means there was no similarity in the shapes of the burst spectral structures. We defined the growth rate of a burst as the ratio between its peak flux and duration. There was a strong correlation between the growth rate and peak flux. These results suggest that the free energy of type-I bursts that is originally generated by nonthermal electrons is modulated in the subsequent stages of the generation of nonthermal electrons, such as plasma wave generation, radio wave emissions, and propagation. The variation of the timescale of the growth rate is significantly larger than that of the coronal environments. These results can be explained by the situation wherein the source region may have the inhomogeneity of an ambient plasma environment, such as the boundary of open and closed field lines, and the superposition of entire emitted bursts was observed by the spectrometer.

  16. A Different View of Solar Spectral Irradiance Variations: Modeling Total Energy over Six-Month Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Snow, Martin; Harder, Jerald; Chapman, Gary; Cookson, Angela

    2015-10-01

    A different approach to studying solar spectral irradiance (SSI) variations, without the need for long-term (multi-year) instrument degradation corrections, is examining the total energy of the irradiance variation during 6-month periods. This duration is selected because a solar active region typically appears suddenly and then takes 5 to 7 months to decay and disperse back into the quiet-Sun network. The solar outburst energy, which is defined as the irradiance integrated over the 6-month period and thus includes the energy from all phases of active region evolution, could be considered the primary cause for the irradiance variations. Because solar cycle variation is the consequence of multiple active region outbursts, understanding the energy spectral variation may provide a reasonable estimate of the variations for the 11-year solar activity cycle. The moderate-term (6-month) variations from the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments can be decomposed into positive (in-phase with solar cycle) and negative (out-of-phase) contributions by modeling the variations using the San Fernando Observatory (SFO) facular excess and sunspot deficit proxies, respectively. These excess and deficit variations are fit over 6-month intervals every 2 months over the mission, and these fitted variations are then integrated over time for the 6-month energy. The dominant component indicates which wavelengths are in-phase and which are out-of-phase with solar activity. The results from this study indicate out-of-phase variations for the 1400 - 1600 nm range, with all other wavelengths having in-phase variations.

  17. Measured and modeled trends in the solar spectral irradiance variability using the SORCE SIM and SOLSTICE instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, J. W.; Fontenla, J. M.; Rast, M. P.; Snow, M. A.; Woods, T. N.

    2011-12-01

    The Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) measures solar spectral variability in the 200-2400 nm range accounting for about 97% of the total solar irradiance (TSI). SIM concurrently measures ultraviolet variability from 200-310 nm with the higher spectral resolution Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE). These instruments monitored the descending phase of solar cycle 23 and are now continuing these observations in the rising phase of cycle 24. SIM and SOLSTICE observations clearly show rotational modulation of spectral irradiance due to the evolution of dark sunspots and bright faculae that respectively deplete and enhance solar radiation. In addition to this well-known phenomenon, SORCE observations indicate a slower evolutionary trend in solar spectral irradiance (SSI) over solar cycle time-scales that are both in and out of phase with the TSI, with the ultraviolet component indicating significantly larger UV variability than reported from the UARS era instruments. Wavelengths where the brightness temperature is less than Teff = 5770 K are in phase, and where the brightness temperature > Teff in the visible and infrared, the time series show an anti-solar cycle trend. This observation is discussed in terms of the Solar Radiation Physical Modeling (SRPM) program employing solar images from Precision Solar Photometric Telescope (PSPT) that provides the areas of active regions on the solar disk as function of time to generate a modeled SSI time series that is concurrent with the SORCE observations but extending back to solar maximum conditions. Comparative studies of the SIM and SOLSTICE will be presented along with analysis of solar variability derived from SRPM and PSPT.

  18. Pulse Analysis Spectroradiometer System for Measuring the Spectral Distribution of Flash Solar Simulators: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas, A. M.; Myers, D. R.

    2008-07-01

    Flashing artificial light sources are used extensively in photovoltaic module performance testing and plant production lines. There are several means of attempting to measure the spectral distribution of a flash of light; however, many of these approaches generally capture the entire pulse energy. We report here on the design and performance of a system to capture the waveform of flash at individual wavelengths of light. Any period within the flash duration can be selected, over which to integrate the flux intensity at each wavelength. The resulting spectral distribution is compared with the reference spectrum, resulting in a solar simulator classification.

  19. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators

    PubMed Central

    Good, Philipp; Cooper, Thomas; Querci, Marco; Wiik, Nicolay; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300−2500 nm at incidence angles 15–60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0–60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350–1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article “Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators” in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells. PMID:26862556

  20. Theoretical Performance of a Multi-Order Spectral Imager for the Solar Transition Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrier, Hans; Kankelborg, C.

    2012-05-01

    The 2006 sounding rocket launch of the Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph (MOSES) provided simultaneous imaging and spectroscopy of the solar atmosphere through the use of 3 projections provided by a concave reflection grating. A new, more flexible instrument design has been proposed that allows the use of 4-8+ projections to obtain higher moments of the spectral line profile in a configuration that also provides increased sensitivity and improved manufacturability. The optical performance of this instrument is investigated and optimized with respect to grating design parameters, and its scientific utility is discussed.

  1. SUITS/SWUSV: a small-size mission to address solar spectral variability, space weather and solar-climate relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damé, Luc; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain; Meftah, Mustapha; Bekki, Slimane

    2016-07-01

    We present the SUITS/SWUSV microsatellite mission investigation: "Solar Ultraviolet Influence on Troposphere/Stratosphere, a Space Weather & Ultraviolet Solar Variability" mission. SUITS/SWUSV was developed to determine the origins of the Sun's activity, understand the flaring process (high energy flare characterization) and onset of CMEs (forecasting). Another major objective is to determine the dynamics and coupling of Earth's atmosphere and its response to solar variability (in particular UV) and terrestrial inputs. It therefore includes the prediction and detection of major eruptions and coronal mass ejections (Lyman-Alpha and Herzberg continuum imaging) the solar forcing on the climate through radiation and their interactions with the local stratosphere (UV spectral irradiance measures from 170 to 400 nm). The mission is proposed on a sun-synchronous polar orbit 18h-6h (for almost constant observing) and proposes a 7 instruments model payload of 65 kg - 65 W with: SUAVE (Solar Ultraviolet Advanced Variability Experiment), an optimized telescope for FUV (Lyman-Alpha) and MUV (200-220 nm Herzberg continuum) imaging (sources of variability); SOLSIM (Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor), a spectrometer with 0.65 nm spectral resolution from 170 to 340 nm; SUPR (Solar Ultraviolet Passband Radiometers), with UV filter radiometers at Lyman-Alpha, Herzberg, MgII index, CN bandhead and UV bands coverage up to 400 nm; HEBS (High Energy Burst Spectrometers), a large energy coverage (a few tens of keV to a few hundreds of MeV) instrument to characterize large flares; EPT-HET (Electron-Proton Telescope - High Energy Telescope), measuring electrons, protons, and heavy ions over a large energy range; ERBO (Earth Radiative Budget and Ozone) NADIR oriented; and a vector magnetometer. Complete accommodation of the payload has been performed on a PROBA type platform very nicely. Heritage is important both for instruments (SODISM and PREMOS on PICARD, LYRA on PROBA-2, SOLSPEC on ISS

  2. Role of spectral non-idealities in the design of solar thermophotovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Lenert, Andrej; Nam, Youngsuk; Bierman, David M; Wang, Evelyn N

    2014-10-20

    To bridge the gap between theoretically predicted and experimentally demonstrated efficiencies of solar thermophotovoltaics (STPVs), we consider the impact of spectral non-idealities on the efficiency and the optimal design of STPVs over a range of PV bandgaps (0.45-0.80 eV) and optical concentrations (1-3,000x). On the emitter side, we show that suppressing or recycling sub-bandgap radiation is critical. On the absorber side, the relative importance of high solar absorptance versus low thermal emittance depends on the energy balance. Both results are well-described using dimensionless parameters weighting the relative power density above and below the cutoff wavelength. This framework can be used as a guide for materials selection and targeted spectral engineering in STPVs. PMID:25607318

  3. Recent variability of the solar spectral irradiance and its impact on climate modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolli, I.; Matthes, K.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Krivova, N. A.; Tourpali, K.; Weber, M.; Unruh, Y. C.; Gray, L.; Langematz, U.; Pilewskie, P.; Rozanov, E.; Schmutz, W.; Shapiro, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Woods, T. N.

    2013-04-01

    The lack of long and reliable time series of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) measurements makes an accurate quantification of solar contributions to recent climate change difficult. Whereas earlier SSI observations and models provided a qualitatively consistent picture of the SSI variability, recent measurements by the SORCE (SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment) satellite suggest a significantly stronger variability in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral range and changes in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) bands in anti-phase with the solar cycle. A number of recent chemistry-climate model (CCM) simulations have shown that this might have significant implications on the Earth's atmosphere. Motivated by these results, we summarize here our current knowledge of SSI variability and its impact on Earth's climate. We present a detailed overview of existing SSI measurements and provide thorough comparison of models available to date. SSI changes influence the Earth's atmosphere, both directly, through changes in shortwave (SW) heating and therefore, temperature and ozone distributions in the stratosphere, and indirectly, through dynamical feedbacks. We investigate these direct and indirect effects using several state-of-the art CCM simulations forced with measured and modelled SSI changes. A unique asset of this study is the use of a common comprehensive approach for an issue that is usually addressed separately by different communities. We show that the SORCE measurements are difficult to reconcile with earlier observations and with SSI models. Of the five SSI models discussed here, specifically NRLSSI (Naval Research Laboratory Solar Spectral Irradiance), SATIRE-S (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstructions for the Satellite era), COSI (COde for Solar Irradiance), SRPM (Solar Radiation Physical Modelling), and OAR (Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma), only one shows a behaviour of the UV and visible irradiance qualitatively resembling that of the recent SORCE

  4. Far ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet rocket instrumentation for measuring the solar spectral irradiance and terrestrial airglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.; Rottman, Gary J.

    1992-01-01

    A sounding-rocket experiment is being developed for the study of EUV spectral irradiance and its effects on the upper atmosphere, using three solar EUV instruments devised by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. These include a 25-cm Rowland circle EUV spectrograph, an array of Si X-UV photodiodes, and an X-UV imager with 20 arcsec resolution of the sun.

  5. Far ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet rocket instrumentation for measuring the solar spectral irradiance and terrestrial airglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.; Rottman, Gary J.

    1992-06-01

    A sounding-rocket experiment is being developed for the study of EUV spectral irradiance and its effects on the upper atmosphere, using three solar EUV instruments devised by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. These include a 25-cm Rowland circle EUV spectrograph, an array of Si X-UV photodiodes, and an X-UV imager with 20 arcsec resolution of the sun.

  6. Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. IV - The soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindblom, Joakim F.; O'Neal, Ray H.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Powell, Forbes R.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Hoover, Richard B.

    1991-01-01

    NASA's Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array uses various combinations of thin foil filters composed of Al, C, Te, Be, Mo, Rh, and phthalocyanine to achieve the requisite radiation-rejection characteristics. Such rejection is demanded by the presence of strong EUV radiation at longer wavelengths where the specular reflectivity of multilayer mirrors can cause 'contamination' of the image in the narrow band defined by the Bragg condition.

  7. Measuring solar spectral and angle-of-incidence effects on photovoltaic modules and solar irradiance sensors

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.L.; Kratochvil, J.A.; Boyson, W.E.

    1997-11-01

    Historically, two time-of-day dependent factors have complicated the characterization of photovoltaic module and array performance; namely, changes in the solar spectrum over the day and optical effects in the module that vary with the solar angle-of-incidence. This paper describes straightforward methods for directly measuring the effects of these two factors. Measured results for commercial modules, as well as for typical solar irradiance sensors (pyranometers) are provided. The empirical relationships obtained from the measurements can be used to improve the methods used for system design, verification of performance after installation, and diagnostic monitoring of performance during operation.

  8. Latitudinal variation of speed and mass flux in the acceleration region of the solar wind inferred from spectral broadening measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard; Goldstein, Richard M.

    1994-01-01

    Spectral broadening measurements conducted at S-band (13-cm wavelength) during solar minimum conditions in the heliocentric distance range of 3-8 R(sub O) by Mariner 4, Pioneer 10, Mariner 10, Helios 1, Helios 2, and Viking have been combined to reveal a factor of 2.6 reduction in bandwidth from equator to pole. Since spectral broadening bandwidth depends on electron density fluctuation and solar wind speed, and latitudinal variation of the former is available from coherence bandwidth measurements, the remote sensing spectral broadening measurements provide the first determination of the latitudinal variation of solar wind speed in the acceleration region. When combined with electron density measurements deduced from white-light coronagraphs, this result also leads to the first determination of the latitudinal variation of mass flux in the acceleration region. From equator to pole, solar wind speed increases by a factor of 2.2, while mass flux decreases by a factor of 2.3. These results are consistent with measurements of solar wind speed by multi-station intensity scintillation measurements, as well as measurements of mass flux inferred from Lyman alpha observations, both of which pertain to the solar wind beyond 0.5 AU. The spectral broadening observations, therefore, strengthen earlier conclusions about the latitudinal variation of solar wind speed and mass flux, and reinforce current solar coronal models and their implications for solar wind acceleration and solar wind modeling.

  9. Point-focus spectral splitting solar concentrator for multiple cells concentrating photovoltaic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maragliano, Carlo; Chiesa, Matteo; Stefancich, Marco

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we present and experimentally validate a low-cost design of a spectral splitting concentrator for the efficient conversion of solar energy. The optical device consists of a dispersive prismatic lens made of polycarbonate designed to simultaneously concentrate solar light and split it into its spectral components. With respect to our previous implementation, this device concentrates light along two axes and generates a light pattern compatible with the dimensions of a set of concentrating photovoltaic cells, while providing a higher concentration ratio. The mathematical framework and the constructive approach used for the design are presented and the device performance is simulated using ray-tracing software. We obtain spectral separation in the visible range within a 3 × 1 cm2 area and a maximum concentration of 210× for a single wavelength. The device is fabricated by injection molding and its performance is experimentally investigated. We measure an optical transmissivity above 90% in the range 400-800 nm and we observe a spectral distribution in good accordance with simulations. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of the device for cost effective high efficiency concentrated photovoltaic systems.

  10. Accounting for spectral albedo, solar light penetration and impurity content in detailed snowpack simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Marie; Lafaysse, Matthieu; Picard, Ghislain; Arnaud, Laurent; Libois, Quentin; Morin, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    The energy balance of the snowpack, driven in particular by its spectral albedo and the penetration depth of solar light, is of primary importance to drive the time evolution of snow on the ground. Here we introduce new developments of the detailed snowpack model SURFEX/ISBA-Crocus (Brun et al., 1992 ; Vionnet et al., 2012) which now includes a spectrally-resolved two-stream calculation of solar light absorption within the snowpack (Libois et al. ,2013) and of the spectral partitioning of the direct and diffuse atmospheric irradiance and a prognostic snow impurity content. The added value of these refined representation of processes is evaluated with respect to field measurements of snow spectral reflectance and snow water equivalent. Simulations were performed at Col de Porte site (Chartreuse, France, 1325 m a.s.l.) using in situ meteorological forcings during winter 2013-2014 and aerosols deposition fluxes from MOCAGE chemistry transport atmospheric model. A major Saharian dust deposition event occurred in February 2014. Using simulations and measurements, we investigate in particular the impact of this event on the physical characteristics of the snowpack with a special focus on metamorphism and on the timing of melt.

  11. Voyager 2 solar plasma and magnetic field spectral analysis for intermediate data sparsity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallana, Luca; Fraternale, Federico; Iovieno, Michele; Fosson, Sophie M.; Magli, Enrico; Opher, Merav; Richardson, John D.; Tordella, Daniela

    2016-05-01

    The Voyager probes are the furthest, still active, spacecraft ever launched from Earth. During their 38 year trip, they have collected data regarding solar wind properties (such as the plasma velocity and magnetic field intensity). Unfortunately, a complete time evolution of the measured physical quantities is not available. The time series contains many gaps which increase in frequency and duration at larger distances. The aim of this work is to perform a spectral and statistical analysis of the solar wind plasma velocity and magnetic field using Voyager 2 data measured in 1979, when the gap density is between the 30% and 50%. For these gap densities, we show the spectra of gapped signals inherit the characteristics of the data gaps. In particular, the algebraic decay of the intermediate frequency range is underestimated and discrete peaks result not from the underlaying data but from the gap sequence. This analysis is achieved using five different data treatment techniques coming from the multidisciplinary context: averages on linearly interpolated subsets, correlation without data interpolation, correlation of linearly interpolated data, maximum likelihood data reconstruction, and compressed sensing spectral estimation. With five frequency decades, the spectra we obtained have the largest frequency range ever computed at five astronomical units from the Sun; spectral exponents have been determined for all the components of the velocity and magnetic field fluctuations. Void analysis is also useful in recovering other spectral properties such as micro and integral scales.

  12. Spectral Evolution of Coronal Hard X-ray Sources during Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krucker, Sam; Lin, R. P.

    2006-06-01

    Hard X-ray (HXR) emissions during solar flares are most prominent at chromospheric footpoints of flare loops which reveal where flare-accelerated electrons lose their energy by collision. The lower density in the corona makes it much more difficult to detect coronal HXR emissions, but coronal HXR sources directly reveal insights into the acceleration region (e.g. Masuda et al. 1994). Observations with Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) give for the first time detailed spatial and spectral observations in the HXR range. Initial results of a few events reveal at least two different spectral behavior, possibly indicating two different acceleration mechanisms: (1) Coronal HXR sources with a 'soft-hard-soft' behavior (Battaglia & Benz 2006), and (2) sources that show spectral hardening in time, i.e. a 'soft-hard-harder' behavior (Krucker et al. 2005). After a short review of recent RHESSI observations, we will present statistical results on the spectral evolution of coronal HXR sources of 50 partly occulted limb flares seen by RHESSI.

  13. PROBING THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE USING OSCILLATIONS OF INFRARED CO SPECTRAL LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, M. J.; Schad, T.; Cox, E.

    2011-06-10

    Oscillations were observed across the whole solar disk using the Doppler shift and line center intensity of spectral lines from the CO molecule near 4666 nm with the National Solar Observatory's McMath/Pierce solar telescope. Power, coherence, and phase spectra were examined, and diagnostic diagrams reveal power ridges at the solar global mode frequencies to show that these oscillations are solar p-modes. The phase was used to determine the height of formation of the CO lines by comparison with the IR continuum intensity phase shifts as measured in Kopp et al.; we find that the CO line formation height varies from 425 km < z < 560 km as we move from disk center toward the solar limb 1.0 > {mu} > 0.5. The velocity power spectra show that while the sum of the background and p-mode power increases with height in the solar atmosphere as seen in previous work, the power in the p-modes only (background subtracted) decreases with height. The CO line center intensity weakens in regions of stronger magnetic fields, as does the p-mode oscillation power. Across most of the solar surface the phase shift is larger than the expected value of 90{sup 0} for an adiabatic atmosphere. We fit the phase spectra at different disk positions with a simple atmospheric model to determine that the acoustic cutoff frequency is about 4.5 mHz with only small variations, but that the thermal relaxation frequency drops significantly from 2.7 to 0 mHz at these heights in the solar atmosphere.

  14. Investigation of spectral responsivity of InAs QD-embedded GaAs solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Christopher G.; Forbes, David V.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Hubbard, Seth M.

    2011-02-01

    GaAs p-i-n solar cells embedded with varying number of QD layers (0-60) were grown by OMVPE. 1x1 cm2 cells were fabricated and standard solar cell testing was performed. Illuminated AM0 current-voltage characteristics were measured of both a baseline and 10-layer quantum dot (QD) embedded GaAs p-i-n. The QD solar cell (QDSC) gave an short circuit current of 23.1 mA/cm2 increase in of 0.7mA/cm2 above the baseline with no QDs. The QD embedded cell also showed limited loss in open circuit voltage characteristics of 0.99 V compared to 1.04 V of the baseline. Conversion efficiencies were 13.4 and 13.8 for the QDSC and baseline solar cell, respectively. Spectral responsivity measurements revealed equivalent GaAs response in the visible for the baseline, 10x and 20x layer QD samples, while systematically degraded emitter lifetime was found to be responsible for loss in visible responsivities for the 60x QDSC. Sub-GaAs bandgap response gave a systematic increase of 0.25 mA/QD layer. Spectral responsivity modeling was used and found that bulk GaAs emitter and i-region lifetimes degraded from 102 ns to 102 ps, with increasing number of QD layers.

  15. Using local correlation tracking to solar spectral information from a slitless spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrier, Hans T.; Kankelborg, Charles C.

    2015-10-01

    The Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph (MOSES) is a sounding rocket instrument that utilizes a concave spherical diffraction grating to form simultaneous solar images in the diffraction orders m = 0, +1, and -1. The large 2D field of view allows a single exposure to capture spatial and spectral information for large, complex solar features in their entirety. Most of the solar emission within the instrument passband comes from a single bright emission line. The m = 0 image is simply an intensity as a function of position, integrated over the passband of the instrument. Dispersion in the images at m = +/-1 leads to a field-dependent displacement that is proportional to Doppler shift. Our goal is to estimate the Doppler shift as a function of position for every exposure. However, the interpretation of the data is not straightforward. Imaging an extended object such as the Sun without an entrance slit results in the overlapping of spectral and spatial information in the two dispersed images. We demonstrate the use of local correlation tracking as a means to quantify the differences between the m = 0 image and either one of the dispersed images. The result is a vector displacement field that may be interpreted as a measurement of the Doppler shift. Since two dispersed images are available, we can generate two independent Doppler maps from the same exposure. We compare these to produce an error estimate.

  16. Making of a solar spectral irradiance dataset I: observations, uncertainties, and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöll, Micha; Dudok de Wit, Thierry; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Haberreiter, Margit

    2016-03-01

    Context. Changes in the spectral solar irradiance (SSI) are a key driver of the variability of the Earth's environment, strongly affecting the upper atmosphere, but also impacting climate. However, its measurements have been sparse and of different quality. The "First European Comprehensive Solar Irradiance Data Exploitation project" (SOLID) aims at merging the complete set of European irradiance data, complemented by archive data that include data from non-European missions. Aims: As part of SOLID, we present all available space-based SSI measurements, reference spectra, and relevant proxies in a unified format with regular temporal re-gridding, interpolation, gap-filling as well as associated uncertainty estimations. Methods: We apply a coherent methodology to all available SSI datasets. Our pipeline approach consists of the pre-processing of the data, the interpolation of missing data by utilizing the spectral coherency of SSI, the temporal re-gridding of the data, an instrumental outlier detection routine, and a proxy-based interpolation for missing and flagged values. In particular, to detect instrumental outliers, we combine an autoregressive model with proxy data. We independently estimate the precision and stability of each individual dataset and flag all changes due to processing in an accompanying quality mask. Results: We present a unified database of solar activity records with accompanying meta-data and uncertainties. Conclusions: This dataset can be used for further investigations of the long-term trend of solar activity and the construction of a homogeneous SSI record.

  17. Modeling the Climate Responses to Spectral Solar Variability on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahalan, Robert; Wen, Guoyong; Pilewskie, Peter; Harder, Jerald

    We apply two scenarios of external forcing, namely the SIM-based out-of-phase variations and the proxy-based in-phase variations, as input to a time-dependent radiative-convective model (RCM), and also to the GISS modelE GCM, to compute climate responses to solar variation on decadal time scale. We find that the maximum temperature response occurs in the upper stratosphere, while temperature response decreases downward to the surface for both scenarios, and both models. The upper stratospheric temperature peak-to-peak responses to out-of-phase solar forcing are 0.6 K in RCM and 0.9 K over the tropical region in GCM simulations, a factor of 5 times as large as responses to in-phase solar forcing. Stratospheric responses are in-phase with TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) variations. The modeled upper stratospheric temperature responses to the SORCE SIM observed SSI (Spectral Solar Irradiance) forcing are similar to the HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment) observed 11-year temperature variations. Surface responses to the two SSI scenarios are small for both RCM and GCM studies, as compared to the stratospheric responses. Though solar irradiance variations on centennial time scale are not well known, the two sce-narios of reconstructed TSI time series (i.e., the one based on 11-year cycle with background [Lean 2000] and the other one from flux transport that has much less background component [Wang, Lean, and Sheeley, 2005]) provide potential range of variations of TSI on centennial time scale. We apply phase relations among different spectral irradiance bands both from SIM observation and proxy reconstructions to the two scenarios of historical TSI to derive the as-sociated historical SSI. The historical SSI is used to drive the RCM. The updated atmosphere and ocean mixed coupled RCM including diffusion to deep-ocean will provide the first order estimate of temperature response to SSI variation on centennial time scales. We anticipate the stratosphere, troposphere, and

  18. Spectral splitting photovoltaics using perovskite and wideband dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Takumi; Nonomura, Kazuteru; Joong Jeon, Nam; Giordano, Fabrizio; Abate, Antonio; Uchida, Satoshi; Kubo, Takaya; Seok, Sang Il; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael; Segawa, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    The extension of the light absorption of photovoltaics into the near-infrared region is important to increase the energy conversion efficiency. Although the progress of the lead halide perovskite solar cells is remarkable, and high conversion efficiency of >20% has been reached, their absorption limit on the long-wavelength side is ~800 nm. To further enhance the conversion efficiency of perovskite-based photovoltaics, a hybridized system with near-infrared photovoltaics is a useful approach. Here we report a panchromatic sensitizer, coded DX3, that exhibits a broad response into the near-infrared, up to ~1100 nm, and a photocurrent density exceeding 30 mA cm-2 in simulated air mass 1.5 standard solar radiation. Using the DX3-based dye-sensitized solar cell in conjunction with a perovskite cell that harvests visible light, the hybridized mesoscopic photovoltaics achieved a conversion efficiency of 21.5% using a system of spectral splitting.

  19. Researches of the Electrotechnical Laboratory, no. 830: Measurement of the solar spectral irradiance at Tanashi, Tokyo (III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habu, M.; Suzuki, M.; Nagasaka, T.

    1983-01-01

    Spectral irradiance on the horizontal plane produced by global solar radiation, that is, the combination of direct solar radiation and sky brightness was measured. Measured data of 318 sets were obtained and are classified according to seasons, grades of atmospheric turbidity, and total cloud amount. The relationships between the correlated color temperature of solar radiation and solar altitude, between the chromaticity coordinates of solar radiation and the Planckian locus, and between the illuminance produced by global solar radiation and solar altitude were examined. Tables show untreated measured values for each set, and data obtained by linear interpolation from the measured values. The spectral irradiance curve is given for easier intutitional understanding of the measured values.

  20. Spectral Analysis on Solar Flares with an Emission > 300 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, R.; Connaughton, V.

    2013-12-01

    The continuum gamma-ray emission from solar flares is caused when a population of electrons is accelerated to relativistic speeds and interacts with the solar plasma. However, it has been theorized that the gamma-ray emission from some brighter flares comes from two populations of electrons. Using the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM), we studied the gamma-ray emission spectra of solar flares and paid special attention to the solar flares that showed emission above 300 keV. We found that the emission above 300 keV was better fit with a broken power-law than a single power-law, evidence that the gamma-ray emission from certain solar flares involved two populations of electrons. Specifically, our best model involved a broken power law that had a steeper slope before the break in energy than after. We studied the spectral parameters as a function of time during the period of the high-energy emission. We also found that solar flares with emission above 300 keV form a small subset (~4%) of flares that trigger GBM above 20 keV. One of the flares with an emission greater than 300 keV was fitted with a Broken Power Law model. Only data from the BGO detector was used in making the plots. Various parameters of the fit have been plotted vs. time with the top two graphs representing the light curves of the flare from different detectors (BGO-0 and NaI-4). A spectral fit for bn100612038 for the time interval of [45s-50s] using only the BGO (0) detector file. Data from this fit was used in creating the other plots.

  1. Spectrally-resolved Soft X-ray Observations and the Temperature Structure of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, Amir; Warren, Harry; McTiernan, James; Woods, Thomas N.

    2015-04-01

    Solar X-ray observations provide important diagnostics of plasma heating and particle acceleration, during solar flares and quiescent periods. How the corona is heated to its ~1-3 MK nominal temperature remains one of the fundamental unanswered questions of solar physics; heating of plasma to tens of MK during solar flares -- particularly to the hottest observed temperatures of up to ~50 MK -- is also still poorly understood. Soft X-ray emission (~0.1-10 keV; or ~0.1-10 nm) is particularly sensitive to hot coronal plasma and serves as a probe of the thermal processes driving coronal plasma heating. Spectrally- and temporally-resolved measurements are crucial for understanding these energetic processes, but there have historically been very few such observations. We present new solar soft X-ray spectra from the Amptek X123-SDD, measuring quiescent solar X-ray emission from ~0.5 to ~30 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution from two SDO/EVE calibration sounding rocket underflights in 2012 and 2013. Combined with observations from RHESSI, GOES/XRS, SDO/EVE, and SDO/AIA, the temperature distribution derived from these data suggest significant hot (5-10 MK) emission from active regions, and the 2013 spectra suggest a low-FIP enhancement of only ~1.6 relative to the photosphere, 40% of the usually-observed value from quiescent coronal plasma. We explore the implications of these findings on coronal heating. We discuss future missions for spectrally-resolved soft X-ray observations using the X123-SDD, including the upcoming MinXSS 3U CubeSat using the X123-SDD and scheduled for deployment in mid-2015, and the CubIXSS 6U CubeSat mission concept.

  2. Satellite observations of polar mesospheric clouds by the solar backscattered ultraviolet spectral radiometer - Evidence of a solar cycle dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Gary E.; Mcpeters, Richard D.; Jensen, Eric J.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented on eight years of satellite observations of the polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) by the SBUV spectral radiometer, showing that PMCs occur in the summertime polar cap regions of both hemispheres and that they exhibit year-to-year variability. It was also found that the increase in the PMC occurrence frequency was inversely correlated with solar activity. Two kinds of hemispherical asymmetries could be identified: (1) PMCs in the Northern Hemisphere were significantly brighter than in the Southern Hemisphere, in accordance with previous results derived from SME data; and (2) the solar cycle response in the south is more pronounced than in the north. The paper also describes the cloud detection algorithm.

  3. Efficient near-infrared quantum cutting and downshift in Ce3+-Pr3+ codoped SrLaGa3S6O suitable for solar spectral converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gongguo; Cui, Qiuyu; Liu, Guodong

    2016-03-01

    A novel solar spectral converter SrLaGa3S6O:Ce3+, Pr3+ for Si solar cells is developed. The luminescence spectra and the decay curves were investigated. The results show that through dual-mode NIR downconversions mechanism (quantum cutting and downshift), it can almost convert UV-blue-red (250-625 nm) photons into an intense NIR emission (930-1060 nm), perfectly matching the maximum spectral response of Si solar cells. The solar utilization of Si solar cell has been greatly broadening and enhancing. We believe this phosphor may open a new route for designing an advanced solar spectral converter for Si solar cells.

  4. The Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. II - Soft X-ray/EUV reflectivity of the multilayer mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Weed, J. W.; Hoover, Richard B. C., Jr.; Allen, Max J.; Lindblom, Joakim F.; O'Neal, Ray H.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Deforest, Craig E.; Paris, Elizabeth S.; Walker, Arthur B. C.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed seven compact soft X-ray/EUV (XUV) multilayer coated and two compact FUV interference film coated Cassegrain and Ritchey-Chretien telescopes for a rocket borne observatory, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. We report here on extensive measurements of the efficiency and spectral bandpass of the XUV telescopes carried out at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory.

  5. Using phase scintillation spectral measurements to determine angle-of-arrival fluctuations during solar superior conjunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Christian M.; Morabito, David D.; Woo, Richard

    2010-06-01

    In this study, we develop a complete theoretical approach to derive the angle-of-arrival fluctuations (AAF) of radio signals passing through the turbulent solar plasma medium during solar superior conjunctions. Using the power spectra of phase fluctuations measured at various solar elongation angles (or impact heliocentric distances) from the Cassini spacecraft, we have defined the dependence of the AAF variance on the heliocentric distance as ˜r-3.5 within a range very close to the Sun. This quantity decreases with increasing distance, with a slope significantly less steep than that previously expected. The AAF expression is theoretically derived by assuming a frozen turbulence and by converting a phase temporal variation into a spatial variation. To perform this calculation, the solar plasma medium is treated as an anisotropic ionized medium by applying the Booker electron irregularity spectrum model and the phase expression in term of the electron refractive index. Using the phase spectral measurements from the Cassini spacecraft during a solar superior conjunction, coefficients of the expression are calibrated, and the final AAF results are quantitatively obtained.

  6. Spectral Fits Of Protons During Solar Particle Events Measured With The PAMELA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martucci, Matteo; Mergè, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    The great challenge in constraining scenarios for particle acceleration through modeling the properties of solar energetic particles (SEPs) is due to the fact that the signatures of acceleration itself are heavily modified by transport within interplanetary space. PAMELA (Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics) offers unique possibilities to study the link between the highest energy solar events and the low-energy in-situ observations, bridging a critical gap in energy. We report spacecraft measurements of the energy spectra of solar protons properties during 3 Ground Level Events or GLEs of Solar Cycle 23 and 24 (December 13th of 2006, May 17th of 2012 and January 6th of 2014). The measurements were made by seven instruments on the ACE, GOES, STEREO and PAMELA spacecraft and extend from 0.1 MeV/n to 2 GeV/n. All of the proton spectra exhibit spectral breaks at energies ranging around tens of MeVand all are well fit by a multiple power-law shape (following the so called Band function). Fits with simple power law are also presented. A comparison of GLE events with a sample of other SEP events (which took place in the current solar cycle) is also carried out to show that GLEs generally have harder spectra.

  7. Analysis of Solar Spectral Irradiance Measurements from the SBUV/2-Series and the SSBUV Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Hilsenrath, Ernest

    1997-01-01

    During this period of performance, 1 March 1997 - 31 August 1997, the NOAA-11 SBUV/2 solar spectral irradiance data set was validated using both internal and external assessments. Initial quality checking revealed minor problems with the data (e.g. residual goniometric errors, that were manifest as differences between the two scans acquired each day). The sources of these errors were determined and the errors were corrected. Time series were constructed for selected wavelengths and the solar irradiance changes measured by the instrument were compared to a Mg II proxy-based model of short- and long-term solar irradiance variations. This analysis suggested that errors due to residual, uncorrected long-term instrument drift have been reduced to less than 1-2% over the entire 5.5 year NOAA-11 data record. Detailed statistical analysis was performed. This analysis, which will be documented in a manuscript now in preparation, conclusively demonstrates the evolution of solar rotation periodicity and strength during solar cycle 22.

  8. Spectral irradiance variations: comparison between observations and the SATIRE model on solar rotation time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Y. C.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.; Harder, J. W.; Kopp, G.

    2008-07-01

    Aims: We test the reliability of the observed and calculated spectral irradiance variations between 200 and 1600 nm over a time span of three solar rotations in 2004. Methods: We compare our model calculations to spectral irradiance observations taken with SORCE/SIM, SoHO/VIRGO, and UARS/SUSIM. The calculations assume LTE and are based on the SATIRE (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction) model. We analyse the variability as a function of wavelength and present time series in a number of selected wavelength regions covering the UV to the NIR. We also show the facular and spot contributions to the total calculated variability. Results: In most wavelength regions, the variability agrees well between all sets of observations and the model calculations. The model does particularly well between 400 and 1300 nm, but fails below 220 nm, as well as for some of the strong NUV lines. Our calculations clearly show the shift from faculae-dominated variability in the NUV to spot-dominated variability above approximately 400 nm. We also discuss some of the remaining problems, such as the low sensitivity of SUSIM and SORCE for wavelengths between approximately 310 and 350 nm, where currently the model calculations still provide the best estimates of solar variability.

  9. Synthetic spectral analysis of a kinetic model for slow-magnetosonic waves in solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Wenzhi; He, Jiansen; Zhang, Lei; Vocks, Christian; Marsch, Eckart; Tu, Chuanyi; Peter, Hardi; Wang, Linghua

    2016-03-01

    We propose a kinetic model of slow-magnetosonic waves to explain various observational features associated with the propagating intensity disturbances (PIDs) occurring in the solar corona. The characteristics of slow mode waves, e.g, inphase oscillations of density, velocity, and thermal speed, are reproduced in this kinetic model. Moreover, the red-blue (R-B) asymmetry of the velocity distribution as self-consistently generated in the model is found to be contributed from the beam component, as a result of the competition between Landau resonance and Coulomb collisions. Furthermore, we synthesize the spectral lines and make the spectral analysis, based on the kinetic simulation data of the flux tube plasmas and the hypothesis of the surrounding background plasmas. It is found that the fluctuations of parameters of the synthetic spectral lines are basically consistent with the observations: (1) the line intensity, Doppler shift, and line width are fluctuating in phase; (2) the R-B asymmetry usually oscillate out of phase with the former three parameters; (3) the blueward asymmetry is more evident than the redward asymmetry in the R-B fluctuations. The oscillations of line parameters become weakened for the case with denser surrounding background plasmas. Similar to the observations, there is no doubled-frequency oscillation of the line width for the case with flux-tube plasmas flowing bulkly upward among the static background plasmas. Therefore, we suggest that the "wave + beam flow" kinetic model may be a viable interpretation for the PIDs observed in the solar corona.

  10. How Solar Flare Spectral Characteristics Determine the Thermosphere-Ionosphere Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.; Qian, L.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of flare irradiance in the X-ray and EUV spectral regions by the Solar EUV Experiment on the TIMED satellite, the X-ray Photometer System on the SORCE satellite, and the X-ray monitors on the GOES spacecraft, have been used to demonstrate the importance of different flare spectral characteristics and temporal development in causing rapid changes in the thermosphere and ionosphere. Now, observations by the EUV Variability Experiment on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), show striking variability of coronal lines in the crucial 7-37 nm region during different types and phases of flares. Very limited measurements of this spectral region were made by TIMED and SORCE, so these new observations yield insight into the magnitude and distribution of flare-driven changes in the thermosphere and ionosphere. We present results of simulations using flare spectra measured by TIMED, SORCE, and SDO as input to the NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model, and compare the results to measurements of thermosphere and ionosphere density changes.

  11. An Evaluation of Total Solar Reflectance and Spectral Band Ratioing Techniques for Estimating Soil Water Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reginato, R. J.; Vedder, J. F.; Idso, S. B.; Jackson, R. D.; Blanchard, M. B.; Goettelman, R.

    1977-01-01

    For several days in March of 1975, reflected solar radiation measurements were obtained from smooth and rough surfaces of wet, drying, and continually dry Avondale loam at Phoenix, Arizona, with pyranometers located 50 cm above the ground surface and a multispectral scanner flown at a 300-m height. The simple summation of the different band radiances measured by the multispectral scanner proved equally as good as the pyranometer data for estimating surface soil water content if the multispectral scanner data were standardized with respect to the intensity of incoming solar radiation or the reflected radiance from a reference surface, such as the continually dry soil. Without this means of standardization, multispectral scanner data are most useful in a spectral band ratioing context. Our results indicated that, for the bands used, no significant information on soil water content could be obtained by band ratioing. Thus the variability in soil water content should insignificantly affect soil-type discrimination based on identification of type-specific spectral signatures. Therefore remote sensing, conducted in the 0.4- to 1.0-micron wavelength region of the solar spectrum, would seem to be much More suited to identifying crop and soil types than to estimating of soil water content.

  12. REDSHIFTS, WIDTHS, AND RADIANCES OF SPECTRAL LINES EMITTED BY THE SOLAR TRANSITION REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, U.; Dammasch, I. E.; Doschek, G. A.

    2011-12-20

    A long-standing problem in understanding the physics of the transition region has been the ubiquitous redshifts of transition region ultraviolet spectral lines relative to chromospheric emission lines, a result known since the Skylab era. Extended spectral scans performed for various regions of the solar disk by the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory contain thousands of line profiles per study and allow a thorough investigation of the redshift phenomenon. In using these data from seven distinct disk areas made in lines spanning the chromosphere to coronal temperature range, we derive a relationship between Doppler wavelength shifts and radiances and a relationship between line widths and radiances. While chromospheric and coronal lines emitted by very bright plasmas may in some cases show pronounced redshifts, transition-region lines predominantly show redshifts everywhere in the quiet Sun and in active regions. In coronal holes, however, they display a reduced shift, which at times altogether disappears. The observations and the findings will be described, and possible explanations will be considered.

  13. WHAT DO SPECTRAL LINE PROFILE ASYMMETRIES TELL US ABOUT THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE?

    SciTech Connect

    MartInez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo; McIntosh, Scott W.

    2011-05-10

    Recently, analysis of solar spectra obtained with the EUV Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) onboard the Hinode satellite has revealed the ubiquitous presence of asymmetries in transition region (TR) and coronal spectral line profiles. These asymmetries have been observed especially at the footpoints of coronal loops and have been associated with strong upflows that may play a significant role in providing the corona with hot plasma. Here, we perform a detailed study of the various processes that can lead to spectral line asymmetries, using both simple forward models and state-of-the-art three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations of the solar atmosphere using the Bifrost code. We describe a novel technique to determine the presence and properties of faint secondary components in the wings of spectral line profiles. This method is based on least-squares fitting of observed so-called R(ed)B(lue) asymmetry profiles with pre-calculated RB asymmetry profiles for a wide variety of secondary component properties. We illustrate how this method could be used to perform reliable double Gaussian fits that are not over- or under-constrained. We also find that spectral line asymmetries appear in TR and coronal lines that are synthesized from our three-dimensional MHD simulations. Our models show that the spectral asymmetries are a sensitive measure of the velocity gradient with height in the TR of coronal loops. The modeled TR shows a large gradient of velocity that increases with height: this occurs as a consequence of ubiquitous, episodic heating at low heights in the model atmosphere. We show that the contribution function of spectral lines as a function of temperature is critical for sensitivity to velocity gradients and thus line asymmetries: lines that are formed over a temperature range that includes most of the TR are the most sensitive. As a result, lines from lithium-like ions (e.g., O VI) are found to be the most sensitive to line asymmetries. We compare the simulated line

  14. What do Spectral Line Profile Asymmetries Tell us About the Solar Atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo; McIntosh, Scott W.

    2011-05-01

    Recently, analysis of solar spectra obtained with the EUV Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) onboard the Hinode satellite has revealed the ubiquitous presence of asymmetries in transition region (TR) and coronal spectral line profiles. These asymmetries have been observed especially at the footpoints of coronal loops and have been associated with strong upflows that may play a significant role in providing the corona with hot plasma. Here, we perform a detailed study of the various processes that can lead to spectral line asymmetries, using both simple forward models and state-of-the-art three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations of the solar atmosphere using the Bifrost code. We describe a novel technique to determine the presence and properties of faint secondary components in the wings of spectral line profiles. This method is based on least-squares fitting of observed so-called R(ed)B(lue) asymmetry profiles with pre-calculated RB asymmetry profiles for a wide variety of secondary component properties. We illustrate how this method could be used to perform reliable double Gaussian fits that are not over- or under-constrained. We also find that spectral line asymmetries appear in TR and coronal lines that are synthesized from our three-dimensional MHD simulations. Our models show that the spectral asymmetries are a sensitive measure of the velocity gradient with height in the TR of coronal loops. The modeled TR shows a large gradient of velocity that increases with height: this occurs as a consequence of ubiquitous, episodic heating at low heights in the model atmosphere. We show that the contribution function of spectral lines as a function of temperature is critical for sensitivity to velocity gradients and thus line asymmetries: lines that are formed over a temperature range that includes most of the TR are the most sensitive. As a result, lines from lithium-like ions (e.g., O VI) are found to be the most sensitive to line asymmetries. We compare the simulated line

  15. Identification of coronal sources of the solar wind from solar images in the EUV spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemzin, V. A.; Shugai, Yu. S.

    2015-01-01

    Methods of localizing coronal sources of the solar wind (SW), such as coronal holes, quasi-stationary fluxes from active regions, and transient sources associated with small-scale active phenomena are considered based on vacuum-ultraviolet (EUV) images of the corona at low solar activity during the initial period of the 24th solar cycle (2010). It is shown that a SW velocity profile can be calculated from the relative areas of coronal holes (CH) at the central part of the disk based on the images in the ranges of 193 and 171 Å. The images in the 193 Å describe the geometry of large HCs that represent sources of fast SW well. The images in 171 Å are a better visualization of small CHs, based on which the profile of a slow SW component was calculated to a high accuracy (up to 65 km/s). According to Hinode/EIS data of October 15, 2010, using the Doppler spectroscopy method at the streamer base over the active region 11112, the source of the outgoing plasma flux with the mean velocity of 17 km/s was localized in the magnetic field region with an intensity of less than 200 Gauss. According to the estimate, the density of the plasma flux from this source is an order of magnitude greater than the value required for explaining the distinction between the calculated and measured profiles of a slow SW velocity. For finding the transient SW component based on small-scale flare activity, SW parameters were analyzed for the periods of flares accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and for the periods without flares, according to the data obtained in 2010 from the ACE and GOES satellites and by coronagraphs on the STEREO-A and - B spacecraft. The ion ratios C+6/C+5 and O+7/O+6 and the mean charge of Fe ions for periods with flares were shown to be shifted toward large values, suggesting the presence of a hot SW component associated with flare activity. A noticeable correlation between the maximum charge of Fe ions and the peak power of a flare, previously observed for

  16. Phase Coupling Between Spectral Components of Collapsing Langmuir Solitons in Solar Type III Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the high time resolution observations of one of the Langmuir wave packets obtained in the source region of a solar type III radio burst. This wave packet satisfies the threshold condition of the supersonic modulational instability, as well as the criterion of a collapsing Langmuir soliton, i.e., the spatial scale derived from its peak intensity is less than that derived from its short time scale. The spectrum of t his wave packet contains an intense spectral peak at local electron plasma frequency, f(sub pe) and relatively weaker peaks at 2f(sub pe) and 3f(sub pe). We apply the wavelet based bispectral analysis technique on this wave packet and compute the bicoherence between its spectral components. It is found that the bicoherence exhibits two peaks at (approximately f(sub pe), approximately f(sub pe)) and (approximately f(sub pe) approximately 2f(sub pe)), which strongly suggest that the spectral peak at 2f(sub pe) probably corresponds to the second harmonic radio emission, generated as a result of the merging of antiparallel propagating Langmuir waves trapped in the collapsing Langmuir soliton, and, the spectral peak at 3f(sub pe) probably corresponds to the third harmonic radio emission, generated as a result of merging of a trapped Langmuir wave and a second harmonic electromagnetic wave.

  17. TEMPORAL SPECTRAL SHIFT AND POLARIZATION OF A BAND-SPLITTING SOLAR TYPE II RADIO BURST

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Guohui; Chen, Yao; Lv, Maoshui; Kong, Xiangliang; Feng, Shiwei; Guo, Fan; Li, Gang

    2014-10-01

    In many type II solar radio bursts, the fundamental and/or the harmonic branches of the bursts can split into two almost parallel bands with similar spectral shapes and frequency drifts. However, the mechanisms accounting for this intriguing phenomenon remain elusive. In this study, we report a special band-splitting type II event in which spectral features appear systematically earlier on the upper band (with higher frequencies) than on the lower band (with lower frequencies) by several seconds. Furthermore, the emissions carried by the splitting band are moderately polarized with the left-hand polarized signals stronger than the right-hand ones. The polarization degree varies in a range of –0.3 to –0.6. These novel observational findings provide important constraints on the underlying physical mechanisms of band-splitting of type II radio bursts.

  18. Measurement and modeled data of solar spectral global direct and diffuse radiation at Valencia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachorro, Victoria E.; de Frutos, Angel M.; Utrillas, Pilar; Martinez-Lozano, Jose A.

    1994-12-01

    Since December, 1992 a continuing data bank of measurements of global, direct and diffuse solar irradiance for clear skies is being compiled at Valencia, Spain). The measurements are performed with the commercial LICOR spectroradiometer from 300 - 1100 nm with a spectral resolution of 6 nm. As a complementary work to irradiance measurements an extensive comparative task is being carried out between these experimental data and modelled ones. The chosen model is a detailed narrow band model developed at the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique of the Universite of Lille, France) which uses a two-flux method to solve the radiative transfer equation. The multilayer model (17 atmospheric levels) considers the atmosphere as a plane-parallel absorbing and scattering medium where total, direct and diffuse spectral irradiance values are calculated at each level. Preliminary analysis shows promising results but the difficulty in modelling aerosol properties to fit experimental data is clearly manifested.

  19. Spectral band difference effects on radiometric cross-calibration between multiple satellite sensors in the Landsat solar-reflective spectral domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teillet, Philippe M.; Fedosejevs, Gunar; Thome, Kurtis J.

    2004-11-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of radiometric calibration errors due to differences in spectral response functions between satellite sensors when attempting cross-calibration based on near-simultaneous imaging of common ground targets in analogous spectral bands. Five Earth observation sensors on three satellite platforms were included on the basis of their overpass times being within 45 minutes of each other on the same day (Landsat-7 ETM+; EO-1 ALI; Terra MODIS; Terra ASTER; Terra MISR). The simulation study encompassed spectral band difference effects (SBDE) on cross-calibration between all combinations of the sensors considered, using the Landsat solar reflective spectral domain as a framework. Scene content was simulated using ground target spectra for the calibration test sites at Railroad Valley Playa, Nevada and Niobrara Grassland, Nebraska. Results were obtained as a function of calibration test site, satellite sensor, and spectral region. Overall, in the absence of corrections for SBDE, the Railroad Valley Playa site is a "good" to "very good" ground target for cross-calibration between most but not all satellite sensors considered in most but not all spectral regions investigated. "Good" and "very good" are defined as SBDEs within +/- 3 % and +/- 1 %, respectively. Without SBDE corrections, the Niobrara test site is only "good" for cross-calibration between certain sensor combinations in some spectral regions. The paper includes recommendations for spectral data and tools that would facilitate cross-calibration between multiple satellite sensors.

  20. In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of the thematic mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, K. R.; Holm, R. G.; Kastner, C. J.; Palmer, J. M.; Slater, P. N.; Dinguirard, M.; Ezra, C. E.; Jackson, R. D.; Savage, R. K.

    1983-01-01

    The TM multispectral scanner system was calibrated in an absolute manner before launch. To determine the temporal changes of the absolute radiometric calibration of the entire system, spectroradiometric measurements of the ground and the atmosphere were made simultaneously with TM collections over White Sands, New Mexico. By entering the measured values in an atmospheric radiative transfer program, the radiance levels of the in four of the spectral bands of the TM were determined. Tables show values for the reflectance of snow at White Sands measured by a modular 8 channel radiometer, and values for exoatmospheric irradiance within the TM passbands, calculated for the Earth-Sun distance using a solar radiometer.

  1. The effect of minority carrier mobility variations on solar cell spectral response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, V. G.; Godlewski, M. P.; Trivisonno, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of multistep diffused, high voltage 0.1 ohm-cm solar cells suggests that the increased voltage capability of these cells is correlated with localized variations in the base minority carrier mobility. An attempt to calculate the behavior of those cells revealed unexpected results. It is shown, contrary to what was expected, that spatial variations in the mobility effects severe changes in the short-circuit current and the spectral response. Variations in cell output as a result of imposing abrupt, linear, and exponential mobility variations are presented.

  2. EUV/FUV response characteristics of photographic films for the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Deforest, Craig E.; Allen, Maxwell J.; Lindblom, Joakim F.

    1991-01-01

    The photographic film employed by NASA's Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array must have high-to-ultrahigh resolution; since the spacecraft bearing the telescope must be evacuated to prevent the failure of delicate EUV and soft X-ray filters due to acoustic vibration during launch, the films must also have very low outgassing rates. An account is presently given of the properties of important new emulsions selected for flight, together with response-characteristics data for the experimental XUV 100 film and an uncoated Spectroscopic 649 emulsion.

  3. Spectral reflectance properties of electroplated and converted zinc for use as a solar selective coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E.; Curtis, H. B.; Gianelos, L.

    1975-01-01

    The spectral reflectance properties of electroplated and chemically converted zinc were measured for both chromate and chloride conversion coatings. The reflectance properties were measured for various times of conversion and for conversion at various chromate concentrations. The values of absorptance, integrated over the solar spectrum, and of infrared emittance, integrated over black body radiation at 250 F were then calculated from the measured reflectance values. The interdependent variations of absorptance and infrared emittance were plotted. The results indicate that the optimum combination of the highest absorptance in the solar spectrum and the lowest emittance in the infrared of the converted electroplated zinc is produced by chromate conversion at 1/2 concentration of the standard NEOSTAR chromate black solution for 0.50 minute or by chloride conversion for 0.50 minute.

  4. SPECTRAL SCALING LAWS IN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE SIMULATIONS AND IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Boldyrev, Stanislav; Carlos Perez, Jean; Borovsky, Joseph E.; Podesta, John J.

    2011-11-15

    The question is addressed as to what extent incompressible magnetohydrodynamics can describe random magnetic and velocity fluctuations measured in the solar wind. It is demonstrated that distributions of spectral indices for the velocity, magnetic field, and total energy obtained from high-resolution numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are qualitatively and quantitatively similar to solar wind observations at 1 AU. Both simulations and observations show that in the inertial range the magnetic field spectrum E{sub b} is steeper than the velocity spectrum E{sub v} with E{sub b} {approx}> E{sub v} and that the magnitude of the residual energy E{sub R} = E{sub v} - E{sub b} decreases nearly following a k{sup -2}{sub perpendicular} scaling.

  5. Spectral anisotropy of solar wind turbulence in the inertial range and dissipation range

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta, J. J.

    2010-03-25

    Wavelet analysis is a tool that can simultaneously analyze spacecraft data in both time and frequency. This enables the magnetic energy spectrum (trace spectrum) to be measured for different angles between the local mean magnetic field B{sub 0} and the direction of the mean flow within a single data set. Examples obtained around solar minimum using Ulysses data at high latitudes and Stereo data for high-speed streams in the ecliptic plane show that the spectral exponent in the inertial range varies nearly monotonically from approximately 1.6 when B{sub 0} is perpendicular to the flow to 2.0 when B{sub 0} is parallel to the flow, roughly consistent with anisotropic theories of incompressible MHD turbulence. This and other new information about the 3D wavector spectrum of solar wind fluctuations in the inertial range and the dissipation range are briefly discussed.

  6. Spectral reflectance properties of electroplated and converted zinc for use as a solar selective coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E.; Curtis, H. B.; Gianelos, L.

    1975-01-01

    The spectral reflectance properties of electroplated and chemically converted zinc were measured for both chromate and chloride conversion coatings. The reflectance properties were measured for various times of conversion and for conversion at various chromate concentrations. The values of absorptance, alpha, integrated over the solar spectrum, and of infrared emittance, epsilon, integrated over black body radiation at 250 F were then calculated from the measured reflectance values. The interdependent variations of alpha and epsilon were plotted. The results indicate that the optimum combination of the highest absorptance in the solar spectrum and the lowest emittance in the infrared of the converted electroplated zinc is produced by chromate conversion at 1/2 concentration of the standard NEOSTAR chromate black solution for 0.50 minute or by chloride conversion for 0.50 minute.

  7. Modeling the Temperature Responses to Spectral Solar Variability on Decadal and Centennial Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Wen, G.; Pilewskie, P.; Harder, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric temperature responses to decadal solar variations are computed for two scenarios of solar spectral irradiance (SSI), SIM-based out-of-phase and proxy-based in-phase variations, using a time-dependent radiative-convective model (RCM), and also GISS modelE (GCM.) For both scenarios and both models, maximum responses occur in upper stratosphere, decreasing downward to the surface. Upper stratospheric temperature peak-to-peak responses to out-of-phase forcing are ~0.6 K in RCM and ~0.9 K over tropics in GCM, ~5x as large as responses to in-phase forcing. Stratospheric responses are in-phase with TSI (Total Solar Irradiance). Modeled upper stratospheric temperature responses to SIM-based forcing are similar to 11-year temperature variations observed with HALOE (Halogen Occultation Experiment). For both RCM and GCM, surface responses to the two scenarios are significantly smaller than stratospheric responses. On centennial timescales, SSI variations are poorly known. However, two scenarios of reconstructed TSI, one based on 11-year cycle with background [Lean 2000] and the other on flux transport with much less background [Wang, Lean, and Sheeley, 2005], provide a potential range of TSI variations. We apply phase relations among different SSI bands both from SIM observations and proxy reconstructions to the two scenarios of historical TSI to derive associated historical SSI, which then drives the RCM. The updated atmosphere and ocean mixed coupled RCM including diffusion to deep-ocean provide a first order estimate of temperature responses to SSI variations on centennial time scales. We discuss potential mechanisms for atmosphere-ocean and stratosphere-troposphere couplings responsible for the climate responses to spectral solar variations.

  8. The SPICE Spectral Imager on Solar Orbiter: Linking the Sun to the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fludra, Andrzej; Haberreiter, Margit; Peter, Hardi; Vial, Jean-Claude; Harrison, Richard; Parenti, Susanna; Innes, Davina; Schmutz, Werner; Buchlin, Eric; Chamberlin, Phillip; Thompson, William; Gabriel, Alan; Morris, Nigel; Caldwell, Martin; Auchere, Frederic; Curdt, Werner; Teriaca, Luca; Hassler, Donald M.; DeForest, Craig; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats; Philippon, Anne; Janvier, Miho; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Griffin, Douglas; Davila, Joseph; Giunta, Alessandra; Waltham, Nick; Eccleston, Paul; Gottwald, Alexander; Klein, Roman; Hanley, John; Walls, Buddy; Howe, Chris; Schuehle, Udo

    2016-07-01

    The SPICE (Spectral Imaging of the Coronal Environment) instrument is one of the key remote sensing instruments onboard the upcoming Solar Orbiter Mission. SPICE has been designed to contribute to the science goals of the mission by investigating the source regions of outflows and ejection processes which link the solar surface and corona to the heliosphere. In particular, SPICE will provide quantitative information on the physical state and composition of the solar atmosphere plasma. For example, SPICE will access relative abundances of ions to study the origin and the spatial/temporal variations of the 'First Ionization Potential effect', which are key signatures to trace the solar wind and plasma ejections paths within the heliosphere. Here we will present the instrument and its performance capability to attain the scientific requirements. We will also discuss how different observation modes can be chosen to obtain the best science results during the different orbits of the mission. To maximize the scientific return of the instrument, the SPICE team is working to optimize the instrument operations, and to facilitate the data access and their exploitation.

  9. Ultraviolet Spectral Synthesis and Oxygen in Metal-Poor Solar-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, R. C.

    1999-05-01

    This report outlines the progress and pitfalls of calculating spectra from first principles in the 2300 -- 3400A region for metal-poor solar-type stars, and how they relate to the derivation of abundances of key species such as oxygen and magnesium. This work is part of a NASA-supported effort with Ben Dorman of Goddard Space Flight Center to develop ab initio spectra suitable for galaxy analysis, and also part of a HST-oriented program with Karel Schrijver of Lockheed Martin to characterize the chromospheric activity of the oldest solar-type stars. The first task has been a reanalysis of the basic stellar parameters of temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity for solar-temperature stars ranging from one-fifth to one-three hundredth solar metallicity, demanding agreement in line strengths and profiles of strong lines and weak, in both optical and ultraviolet, and in the ultraviolet flux distribution. These cross-checks are built in to ensure convergence to a unique solution, or to highlight where standard assumptions are breaking down. Once agreement is achieved for the most metal-deficient stars, the line list used for the spectral calculations is re-examined, and somewhat more metal-rich stars are matched. Abundance results for oxygen from various approaches will be described, from the near-UV OH, 6300A [O I], and near-IR O I lines, and from adopting laboratory versus theoretical versus astrophysical atomic and molecular constants.

  10. Spectrally-selective all-inorganic scattering luminophores for solar energy-harvesting clear glass windows.

    PubMed

    Alghamedi, Ramzy; Vasiliev, Mikhail; Nur-E-Alam, Mohammad; Alameh, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    All-inorganic visibly-transparent energy-harvesting clear laminated glass windows are the most practical solution to boosting building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) energy outputs significantly while reducing cooling- and heating-related energy consumption in buildings. By incorporating luminophore materials into lamination interlayers and using spectrally-selective thin-film coatings in conjunction with CuInSe2 solar cells, most of the visible solar radiation can be transmitted through the glass window with minimum attenuation while ultraviolet (UV) radiation is down-converted and routed together with a significant part of infrared radiation to the edges for collection by solar cells. Experimental results demonstrate a 10 cm × 10 cm vertically-placed energy-harvesting clear glass panel of transparency exceeding 60%, invisible solar energy attenuation greater than 90% and electrical power output near 30 Wp/m(2) mainly generated by infrared (IR) and UV radiations. These results open the way for the realization of large-area visibly-transparent energy-harvesting clear glass windows for BIPV systems. PMID:25321890

  11. Spectral reflectance properties of black chrome for use as a solar selective coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    The NASA-Lewis Research Center has determined that a widely available commercially electroplated decorative finish known as black chrome has desirable solar selective properties. Black chrome electroplated coating has high absorbtance in the solar spectrum and low emissivity in the 250 F blackbody thermal spectrum. The spectral reflectance properties of a commercially prepared black chrome on steel have been measured. Values are presented for reflectance of the black chrome, and compared with the reflectance of black paint and with two available samples of black nickel which had been prepared for solar selective properties. The reflectance of black chrome, of the two black nickels, and of black paint integrated over the solar spectrum for air mass 2 were 0.132, 0.123, 0.133, and 0.033, respectively. The reflectance of the black chrome, two black nickels, and of the black paint integrated over the blackbody spectrum for 250 F from 3 to 15 microns are 0.912, 0.934, 0.891, and 0.033, respectively. These reflectance measurements indicate absorptivity-to-emissivity values of 9.8, 13.8, 8.0, and 1.00, respectively.

  12. Comparison of spectral-domain and time-domain optical coherence tomography in solar retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Han Joo; Yoo, Eun Seok; Kim, Chul Gu; Kim, Jong Woo

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to compare spectral-domain (SD) and time-domain (TD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings in patients with solar retinopathy. Complete ocular examinations and OCT were performed in two patients presenting with acute solar retinopathy soon after observation of an eclipse. Both patients were evaluated with SD-OCT and TD-OCT at the same time. SD-OCT demonstrated characteristic defects at the level of the inner and outer segment junction of the photoreceptors in all the affected eyes and decreased reflectiveness of the retinal pigment epithelium layer. TD-OCT images showed unremarkable findings in two eyes with deteriorated visual acuity. SD-OCT improves diagnosis and assessment of the degree and nature of foveal damage in patients with solar retinopathy and may be an important tool for use in identifying foveal damage not detected by TD-OCT. SD-OCT may be preferable to TD-OCT for confirmation or assessment of the degree of foveal damage in patients with solar retinopathy. PMID:21860577

  13. Spectral analysis of the solar wind turbulence in the vicinity of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, Eliza; Echim, Marius; Munteanu, Costel; Voitcu, Gabriel; Zhang, Tielong; Barabash, Stanislav; Budnik, Elena; Fedorov, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    In this study we analyze magnetic field data provided by Venus Express (VEX) between 2007 and 2008. During each of the probe's eccentric polar orbit around Venus, VEX performs plasma and magnetic field measurements in the environment around the planet both in Venus induced magnetosphere and in the solar wind at several tens of thousands of kilometers away from the magnetosphere. This latter data set has a unique scientific value as it provides observations of magnetic turbulence in the solar wind around 0.72 AU, in the vicinity of Venus. We discuss a semi-automated method to select solar wind magnetic field data at 1 Hz from Venus Express Magnetometer (MAG) data by using plasma data from the Analyser of Space Plasma and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA). The time intervals when VEX is in the solar wind are automatically determined for 2007 and 2008. We apply a Fourier transform on the selected data and calculate the power spectral densities (PSD) of the turbulent magnetic field through Welch's algorithm. We compute the PSD of the three components of the magnetic field for the time intervals when both MAG and ASPERA were operating in the solar wind, for each VEX orbit between 1st of January 2007 and 31st of December 2008. The data base includes a number of 374 individual spectra. We discuss the spectral properties of turbulence and illustrate similarities between fast and slow wind during the minimum phase of the solar cycle for each of VEX's orbit which satisfies the selection criteria for a period of two years. Research supported by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no 313038/STORM, and a grant of the Romanian Ministry of National Education, CNCS - UEFISCDI, project number PN-II-ID-PCE-2012-4-0418. Data analysis was done with the AMDA science analysis system provided by the Centre de Données de la Physique des Plasmas (IRAP, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse) supported by CNRS and CNES.

  14. A simple framework for modelling the photochemical response to solar spectral irradiance variability in the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muncaster, R.; Bourqui, M. S.; Chabrillat, S.; Viscardy, S.; Melo, S. M. L.; Charbonneau, P.

    2012-08-01

    The stratosphere is thought to play a central role in the atmospheric response to solar irradiance variability. Recent observations suggest that the spectral solar irradiance (SSI) variability involves significant time-dependent spectral variations, with variable degrees of correlation between wavelengths, and new reconstructions are being developed. In this paper, we propose a simplified modelling framework to characterise the effect of short term SSI variability on stratospheric ozone. We focus on the pure photochemical effect, for it is the best constrained one. The photochemical effect is characterised using an ensemble simulation approach with multiple linear regression analysis. A photochemical column model is used with interactive photolysis for this purpose. Regression models and their coefficients provide a characterisation of the stratospheric ozone response to SSI variability and will allow future inter-comparisons between different SSI reconstructions. As a first step in this study, and to allow comparison with past studies, we take the representation of SSI variability from the Lean (1997) solar minimum and maximum spectra. First, solar maximum-minimum response is analysed for all chemical families and partitioning ratios, and is compared with past studies. The ozone response peaks at 0.18 ppmv (approximately 3%) at 37 km altitude. Second, ensemble simulations are regressed following two linear models. In the simplest case, an adjusted coefficient of determination R2 larger than 0.97 is found throughout the stratosphere using two predictors, namely the previous day's ozone perturbation and the current day's solar irradiance perturbation. A better accuracy (R2 larger than 0.9992) is achieved with an additional predictor, the previous day's solar irradiance perturbation. The regression models also provide simple parameterisations of the ozone

  15. A STATISTICAL STUDY OF THE SPECTRAL HARDENING OF CONTINUUM EMISSION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, X.; Chen, Y.; Li, G. E-mail: gang.li@uah.edu

    2013-09-10

    The observed hard X-ray and {gamma}-ray continuum in solar flares is interpreted as Bremsstrahlung emission of accelerated non-thermal electrons. It has been noted for a long time that in many flares the energy spectra show hardening at energies around or above 300 keV. In this paper, we first conduct a survey of spectral hardening events that were previously studied in the literature. We then perform a systematic examination of 185 flares from the Solar Maximum Mission. We identify 23 electron-dominated events whose energy spectra show clear double power laws. A statistical study of these events shows that the spectral index below the break ({gamma}{sub 1}) anti-correlates with the break energy ({epsilon}{sub b}). Furthermore, {gamma}{sub 1} also anti-correlates with Fr, the fraction of photons above the break compared to the total photons. A hardening spectrum, as well as the correlations between ({gamma}{sub 1}, {epsilon}{sub b}) and ({gamma}{sub 1}, Fr), provide stringent constraints on the underlying electron acceleration mechanism. Our results support a recent proposal that electrons are being accelerated diffusively at a flare termination shock with a width of the order of an ion inertial length scale.

  16. HARD X-RAY AND MICROWAVE EMISSIONS FROM SOLAR FLARES WITH HARD SPECTRAL INDICES

    SciTech Connect

    Kawate, T.; Nishizuka, N.; Oi, A.; Ohyama, M.; Nakajima, H.

    2012-03-10

    We analyze 10 flare events that radiate intense hard X-ray (HXR) emission with significant photons over 300 keV to verify that the electrons that have a common origin of acceleration mechanism and energy power-law distribution with solar flares emit HXRs and microwaves. Most of these events have the following characteristics. HXRs emanate from the footpoints of flare loops, while microwaves emanate from the tops of flare loops. The time profiles of the microwave emission show delays of peak with respect to those of the corresponding HXR emission. The spectral indices of microwave emissions show gradual hardening in all events, while the spectral indices of the corresponding HXR emissions are roughly constant in most of the events, though rather rapid hardening is simultaneously observed in some for both indices during the onset time and the peak time. These characteristics suggest that the microwave emission emanates from the trapped electrons. Then, taking into account the role of the trapping of electrons for the microwave emission, we compare the observed microwave spectra with the model spectra calculated by a gyrosynchrotron code. As a result, we successfully reproduce the eight microwave spectra. From this result, we conclude that the electrons that have a common acceleration and a common energy distribution with solar flares emit both HXR and microwave emissions in the eight events, though microwave emission is contributed to by electrons with much higher energy than HXR emission.

  17. Solar spectral conversion for improving the photosynthetic activity in algae reactors.

    PubMed

    Wondraczek, Lothar; Batentschuk, Miroslaw; Schmidt, Markus A; Borchardt, Rudolf; Scheiner, Simon; Seemann, Benjamin; Schweizer, Peter; Brabec, Christoph J

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable biomass production is expected to be one of the major supporting pillars for future energy supply, as well as for renewable material provision. Algal beds represent an exciting resource for biomass/biofuel, fine chemicals and CO2 storage. Similar to other solar energy harvesting techniques, the efficiency of algal photosynthesis depends on the spectral overlap between solar irradiation and chloroplast absorption. Here we demonstrate that spectral conversion can be employed to significantly improve biomass growth and oxygen production rate in closed-cycle algae reactors. For this purpose, we adapt a photoluminescent phosphor of the type Ca0.59Sr0.40Eu0.01S, which enables efficient conversion of the green part of the incoming spectrum into red light to better match the Qy peak of chlorophyll b. Integration of a Ca0.59Sr0.40Eu0.01S backlight converter into a flat panel algae reactor filled with Haematococcus pluvialis as a model species results in significantly increased photosynthetic activity and algae reproduction rate. PMID:23797513

  18. Solar spectral conversion for improving the photosynthetic activity in algae reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wondraczek, Lothar; Batentschuk, Miroslaw; Schmidt, Markus A.; Borchardt, Rudolf; Scheiner, Simon; Seemann, Benjamin; Schweizer, Peter; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2013-06-01

    Sustainable biomass production is expected to be one of the major supporting pillars for future energy supply, as well as for renewable material provision. Algal beds represent an exciting resource for biomass/biofuel, fine chemicals and CO2 storage. Similar to other solar energy harvesting techniques, the efficiency of algal photosynthesis depends on the spectral overlap between solar irradiation and chloroplast absorption. Here we demonstrate that spectral conversion can be employed to significantly improve biomass growth and oxygen production rate in closed-cycle algae reactors. For this purpose, we adapt a photoluminescent phosphor of the type Ca0.59Sr0.40Eu0.01S, which enables efficient conversion of the green part of the incoming spectrum into red light to better match the Qy peak of chlorophyll b. Integration of a Ca0.59Sr0.40Eu0.01S backlight converter into a flat panel algae reactor filled with Haematococcus pluvialis as a model species results in significantly increased photosynthetic activity and algae reproduction rate.

  19. On the temporal variability of the surface solar radiation by means of spectral representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengulescu, Marc; Blanc, Philippe; Wald, Lucien

    2016-07-01

    This work deals with the temporal variability of daily means of the global broadband surface solar irradiance (SSI) impinging on a horizontal plane by studying a decennial time-series of high-quality measurements recorded at a BSRN ground station. Since the data have a non-linear and non-stationary character, two time-frequency-energy representations of signal processing are compared in their ability to resolve the temporal variability of the pyranometric signal. First, the continuous wavelet transform is used to construct the wavelet power spectrum of the data. Second, the adaptive, noise-assisted empirical mode decomposition is employed to extract the intrinsic mode functions of the signal, followed by Hilbert spectral analysis. In both spectral representations, the temporal variability of the SSI is portrayed having clearly distinguishable features: a plateau between scales of two days and two-three months that has decreasing power with increasing scale, a large spectral peak corresponding to the annual variability cycle, and a low power regime in between the previous two. It is shown that the data-driven, noise-assisted method yields a somewhat more sparse representation and that it is a suitable tool for inspecting the temporal variability of SSI measurements.

  20. Coherent Events and Spectral Shape at Ion Kinetic Scales in the Fast Solar Wind Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, Sonny; Alexandrova, Olga; Zaslavsky, Arnaud

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we investigate spectral and phase coherence properties of magnetic fluctuations in the vicinity of the spectral transition from large, magnetohydrodynamic to sub-ion scales using in situ measurements of the Wind spacecraft in a fast stream. For the time interval investigated by Leamon et al. (1998) the phase coherence analysis shows the presence of sporadic quasi-parallel Alfvén ion cyclotron (AIC) waves as well as coherent structures in the form of large-amplitude, quasi-perpendicular Alfvén vortex-like structures and current sheets. These waves and structures importantly contribute to the observed power spectrum of magnetic fluctuations around ion scales; AIC waves contribute to the spectrum in a narrow frequency range whereas the coherent structures contribute to the spectrum over a wide frequency band from the inertial range to the sub-ion frequency range. We conclude that a particular combination of waves and coherent structures determines the spectral shape of the magnetic field spectrum around ion scales. This phenomenon provides a possible explanation for a high variability of the magnetic power spectra around ion scales observed in the solar wind.

  1. Survey of the spectral properties of turbulence in the solar wind, the magnetospheres of Venus and Earth, at solar minimum and maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echim, Marius M.

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the European FP7 project STORM ("Solar system plasma Turbulence: Observations, inteRmittency and Multifractals") we analyze the properties of turbulence in various regions of the solar system, for the minimum and respectively maximum of the solar activity. The main scientific objective of STORM is to advance the understanding of the turbulent energy transfer, intermittency and multifractals in space plasmas. Specific analysis methods are applied on magnetic field and plasma data provided by Ulysses, Venus Express and Cluster, as well as other solar system missions (e.g. Giotto, Cassini). In this paper we provide an overview of the spectral properties of turbulence derived from Power Spectral Densities (PSD) computed in the solar wind (from Ulysses, Cluster, Venus Express) and at the interface of planetary magnetospheres with the solar wind (from Venus Express, Cluster). Ulysses provides data in the solar wind between 1992 and 2008, out of the ecliptic, at radial distances ranging between 1.3 and 5.4 AU. We selected only those Ulysses data that satisfy a consolidated set of selection criteria able to identify "pure" fast and slow wind. We analyzed Venus Express data close to the orbital apogee, in the solar wind, at 0.72 AU, and in the Venus magnetosheath. We investigated Cluster data in the solar wind (for time intervals not affected by planetary ions effects), the magnetosheath and few crossings of other key magnetospheric regions (cusp, plasma sheet). We organize our PSD results in three solar wind data bases (one for the solar maximum, 1999-2001, two for the solar minimum, 1997-1998 and respectively, 2007-2008), and two planetary databases (one for the solar maximum, 2000-2001, that includes PSD obtained in the terrestrial magnetosphere, and one for the solar minimum, 2007-2008, that includes PSD obtained in the terrestrial and Venus magnetospheres and magnetosheaths). In addition to investigating the properties of turbulence for the minimum

  2. International Intercomparison of Solar UVR Spectral Measurement Systems in Melbourne in 2013.

    PubMed

    Gies, Peter; Hooke, Rebecca; McKenzie, Richard; O'Hagan, John; Henderson, Stuart; Pearson, Andy; Khazova, Marina; Javorniczky, John; King, Kerryn; Tully, Matt; Kotkamp, Michael; Forgan, Bruce; Rhodes, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring ambient solar UVR levels provides information on how much there is in both real time and historically. Quality assurance of ambient measurements of solar UVR is critical to ensuring accuracy and stability and this can be achieved by regular intercomparisons of spectral measurement systems with those of other organizations. In October and November of 2013 a solar UVR spectroradiometer from Public Health England (PHE) was brought to Melbourne for a campaign of intercomparisons with a new Bentham spectrometer of Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) and one at the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BOM), supported by New Zealand's National Institute for Water and Atmosphere (NIWA). Given all three spectroradiometers have calibrations that are traceable to various national standards, the intercomparison provides a chance to determine measurement uncertainties and traceability that support UV measurement networks in Australia, New Zealand and the UK. UV Index measurements from all three systems were compared and ratios determined for clear sky conditions when the scans from each instrument were within 2 min of each other. While wavelengths below 305 nm showed substantial differences between the PHE unit and the two other systems, overall the intercomparison results were encouraging, with mean differences in measured UV Index between the BOM/NIWA and those of PHE and ARPANSA of <0.1% and 7.5%, respectively. PMID:26147793

  3. Effects of Spectral Error in Efficiency Measurements of GaInAs-Based Concentrator Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C. R.; Wanlass, M. W.; Moriarty, T.; Steiner, M. A.; Emery, K. A.

    2014-03-01

    This technical report documents a particular error in efficiency measurements of triple-absorber concentrator solar cells caused by incorrect spectral irradiance -- specifically, one that occurs when the irradiance from unfiltered, pulsed xenon solar simulators into the GaInAs bottom subcell is too high. For cells designed so that the light-generated photocurrents in the three subcells are nearly equal, this condition can cause a large increase in the measured fill factor, which, in turn, causes a significant artificial increase in the efficiency. The error is readily apparent when the data under concentration are compared to measurements with correctly balanced photocurrents, and manifests itself as discontinuities in plots of fill factor and efficiency versus concentration ratio. In this work, we simulate the magnitudes and effects of this error with a device-level model of two concentrator cell designs, and demonstrate how a new Spectrolab, Inc., Model 460 Tunable-High Intensity Pulsed Solar Simulator (T-HIPSS) can mitigate the error.

  4. Spectral distribution of solar radiation on clear days - A comparison between measurements and model estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, V.

    1984-05-01

    The distribution of direct and scattered solar radiant energy in the UV (295-385-nm), blue (385-495-nm), green-orange (495-630-nm), red (630-695-nm), and IR (695-2800-nm) bands commonly used in precision spectral pyranometers is estimated for clear sky conditions as a function of solar height, using a plane-parallel atmosphere model and data on the seasonal variation of the UV component at latitude 59.7 deg N. Integrated daily fluxes are also calculated for selected days of the year, and the results are compared with experimental measurements in graphs and tables. The model is found to give reasonable agreement with the observations, but fails to account for a significant blue shift with increasing solar height at heights above 15 deg. The measured distribution for March is given as UV 4.2, blue 8.9, green-orange 21.8, red 12.4, and IR 52.9 percent; for July, the respective values are 4.6, 16.1, 18.0, 10.7, and 50.6 percent.

  5. Spectral splitting photovoltaics using perovskite and wideband dye-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Takumi; Nonomura, Kazuteru; Joong Jeon, Nam; Giordano, Fabrizio; Abate, Antonio; Uchida, Satoshi; Kubo, Takaya; Seok, Sang Il; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael; Segawa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The extension of the light absorption of photovoltaics into the near-infrared region is important to increase the energy conversion efficiency. Although the progress of the lead halide perovskite solar cells is remarkable, and high conversion efficiency of >20% has been reached, their absorption limit on the long-wavelength side is ∼800 nm. To further enhance the conversion efficiency of perovskite-based photovoltaics, a hybridized system with near-infrared photovoltaics is a useful approach. Here we report a panchromatic sensitizer, coded DX3, that exhibits a broad response into the near-infrared, up to ∼1100 nm, and a photocurrent density exceeding 30 mA cm−2 in simulated air mass 1.5 standard solar radiation. Using the DX3-based dye-sensitized solar cell in conjunction with a perovskite cell that harvests visible light, the hybridized mesoscopic photovoltaics achieved a conversion efficiency of 21.5% using a system of spectral splitting. PMID:26538097

  6. Spectral reflectance properties of black chrome for use as a solar selective coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    The NASA-Lewis Research Center has determined that a widely available commercially electroplated decorative finish known as black chrome has desirable solar selective properties. The spectral reflectance properties of a commercially prepared black chrome on steel were measured. Values are presented for reflectance of the black chrome, and compared with the reflectance of black paint (Nextel) and with two available samples of black nickel which had been prepared for solar selective properties. The reflectance of black chrome, of the two black nickels, and of black paint integrated over the solar spectrum for air mass 2 were 0.132, 0.123, 0.133, and 0.033, respectively. The reflectance of the black chrome, two black nickels, and of the black paint integrated over the blackbody spectrum for 250 F from 3 to 15 microns are 0.912, 0.934, 0.891, and 0.033, respectively. These reflectance measurements indicate absorptivity-to-emissivity values of 9.8, 13.8, 8.0, and 1.00, respectively.

  7. SPATIALLY AND SPECTRALLY RESOLVED OBSERVATIONS OF A ZEBRA PATTERN IN A SOLAR DECIMETRIC RADIO BURST

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bin; Bastian, T. S.; Gary, D. E.; Jing Ju

    2011-07-20

    We present the first interferometric observation of a zebra-pattern radio burst with simultaneous high spectral ({approx}1 MHz) and high time (20 ms) resolution. The Frequency-Agile Solar Radiotelescope Subsystem Testbed (FST) and the Owens Valley Solar Array (OVSA) were used in parallel to observe the X1.5 flare on 2006 December 14. By using OVSA to calibrate the FST, the source position of the zebra pattern can be located on the solar disk. With the help of multi-wavelength observations and a nonlinear force-free field extrapolation, the zebra source is explored in relation to the magnetic field configuration. New constraints are placed on the source size and position as a function of frequency and time. We conclude that the zebra burst is consistent with a double-plasma resonance model in which the radio emission occurs in resonance layers where the upper-hybrid frequency is harmonically related to the electron cyclotron frequency in a coronal magnetic loop.

  8. Spectral sensitivity dependence on the details of preparation for P3HT:PCBM bulk heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendova-Vassileva, M.; Popkirov, G.; Vitanov, P.

    2014-12-01

    The performance of bulk heterojunction P3HT :PCBM polymer solar cells is studied using current-voltage and spectral sensitivity measurements. Front transparent contacts of either ITO or a sputtered multilayer TiO2/Ag/TiO2 transparent conductive electrode are applied. Thin PEDOT:PSS and P3HT:PCBM polymer layers are deposited on these substrates by spin coating. The degradation of the solar cells is studied by subjecting them to UV irradiation. The obtained spectral sensitivity curves are analyzed in comparison with the optical absorption spectra of the transparent electrodes and active layers employed. It is observed that there is a pronounced dependence of the spectral sensitivity curves on the thermal treatment and UV irradiation applied to the solar cells. The performance of the multilayer TiO2/Ag/TiO2 transparent conductive electrodes is also studied in comparison with that of the ITO ones.

  9. Spectral Properties of Large Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events. I. Fe, O, and Seed Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.; Dayeh, M. A.; Ebert, R. W.; Mccomas, D. J.; Li, G.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Schwadron, N. A.; Smith, C. W.

    2016-01-01

    We have surveyed ˜0.1-100 MeV nucleon-1 O and Fe fluence spectra during 46 isolated, large gradual SEP events observed at ACE during solar cycles 23 and 24. Most SEP spectra are well represented by the four-parameter Band function with a normalization constant, low-energy spectral slope, high-energy spectral slope, and break energy. The O and Fe spectral slopes are similar and most spectra steepen above the break energy, probably due to common acceleration and transport processes affecting different ion species. SEP spectra above the break energies depend on the origin of the seed population; larger contributions of suprathermal flare material result in higher Fe/O ratios and flatter spectra at higher energies. SEP events with steeper O spectra at low energies and higher break energies are associated with slower coronal mass ejections (CMEs), while those associated with fast (>2000 km s-1) CMEs and ground level enhancements have harder or flatter spectra at low and high energies, and O break energies between ˜1 and 10 MeV nucleon-1. The latter events are enriched in 3He and higher-energy Fe, and have Fe spectra that rollover at significantly lower energies compared with O, probably because Fe ions with smaller Q/M ratios can escape from the distant shock more easily than O ions with larger Q/M ratios. We conclude that SEP spectral properties result from many complex and competing effects, namely Q/M-dependent scattering, shock properties, and the origin of the seed populations, all of which must be taken into account to develop a comprehensive picture of CME-driven shock acceleration of large gradual SEP events.

  10. Optical Sensing of Ecosystem Carbon Fluxes Combining Spectral Reflectance Indices with Solar Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huemmrich, K. F.; Middleton, E.; Corp, L. A.; Campbell, P. K.; Kustas, W. P.

    2014-12-01

    Optical sampling of spectral reflectance and solar induced fluorescence provide information on the physiological status of vegetation that can be used to infer stress responses and estimates of production. Multiple repeated observations are required to observe the effects of changing environmental conditions on vegetation. This study examines the use of optical signals to determine inputs to a light use efficiency (LUE) model describing productivity of a cornfield where repeated observations of carbon flux, spectral reflectance and fluorescence were collected. Data were collected at the Optimizing Production Inputs for Economic and Environmental Enhancement (OPE3) fields (39.03°N, 76.85°W) at USDA Beltsville Agricultural Research Center. Agricultural Research Service researchers measured CO2 fluxes using eddy covariance methods throughout the growing season. Optical measurements were made from the nearby tower supporting the NASA FUSION sensors. The sensor system consists of two dual channel, upward and downward looking, spectrometers used to simultaneously collect high spectral resolution measurements of reflected and fluoresced light from vegetation canopies. Estimates of chlorophyll fluorescence, combined with measures of vegetation pigment content and the Photosynthetic Reflectance Index (PRI) derived from the spectral reflectance are compared with CO2 fluxes over diurnal periods for multiple days. PRI detects changes in Xanthophyll cycle pigments using reflectance at 531 nm compared to a reference band at 570 nm. The relationships among the different optical measurements indicate that they are providing different types of information on the vegetation and that combinations of these measurements provide improved retrievals of CO2 fluxes than any index alone.

  11. Quality assurance of solar spectral UV-measurements: methods and use of the SHICrivm software tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. E.; den Outer, P. N.; Slaper, H.

    2003-04-01

    Ground-based UV-irradiance measurements are crucial for determining the long-term changes and trends in biologically and/or photo-chemically relevant solar UV-radiation reaching the Earth's surface. Such changes in UV-radiation levels have probably occurred and/or are expected due to ozone depletion and climate change. In order to analyse UV-irradiation levels in relation to atmospheric parameters and to facilitate an assessment of the European UV-climate a European database (EUVDatabase) has been set up within the EDUCE-project (EC-contract EVK2-CT-1999-00028). High quality UV-data-sets from across the continent are assessable from the EUVDatabase (http://uv.fmi.fi/uvdb/). An accurate analysis of the UV-climate and long term changes therein requires quality assurance of the spectral data. The SHICrivm software tool (http://www.rivm.nl/shicrivm) is developed to analyse several quality aspects of measured UV-spectra. The SHICrivm tool is applied to over one million spectra from the EUVDatabase and detects for each measured spectrum: the accuracy of the wavelength calibration from 290 up to 500 nm, the lowest detectable irradiance level, the occurrence of non-natural spikes in spectra, deviations in spectral shape, and identifies possible irradiance scale errors in the UV-range. In addition the SHIC-package can be used to correct wavelength scale errors and non-natural spectral spikes. A deconvolution and convolution algorithm is included to improve the comparibility of spectra obtained with different instruments, and to allow a fully comparable analysis of biologically weighted UV-dose for instruments with various spectral characteristics. Within the context of the EDUCE-project data from over 20 UV-monitoring stations are retrieved from the database and a quality assessment is performed using the SHIC-tool. The quality parameters are presented by means of a simple scheme of coloured quality flags. Spectra that meet the WMO-criteria for spectral measurements are

  12. High Spectral Resolution, High Cadence, Imaging X-Ray Microcalorimeters for Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandler, Simon R.; Bailey, Catherine N.; Bookbinder, Jay A.; DeLuca, Edward E.; Chervenak, Jay A.; Eckart, Megan E.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Kelley, Daniel P.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Sadleir, Jack E.; Smith, Stephen J.; Smith, Randall K.

    2010-01-01

    High spectral resolution, high cadence, imaging x-ray spectroscopy has the potential to revolutionize the study of the solar corona. To that end we have been developing transition-edge-sensor (TES) based x-ray micro calorimeter arrays for future solar physics missions where imaging and high energy resolution spectroscopy will enable previously impossible studies of the dynamics and energetics of the solar corona. The characteristics of these x-ray microcalorimeters are significantly different from conventional micro calorimeters developed for astrophysics because they need to accommodate much higher count rates (300-1000 cps) while maintaining high energy resolution of less than 4 eV FWHM in the X-ray energy band of 0.2-10 keV. The other main difference is a smaller pixel size (less than 75 x 75 square microns) than is typical for x-ray micro calorimeters in order to provide angular resolution less than 1 arcsecond. We have achieved at energy resolution of 2.15 eV at 6 keV in a pixel with a 12 x 12 square micron TES sensor and 34 x 34 x 9.1 micron gold absorber, and a resolution of 2.30 eV at 6 keV in a pixel with a 35 x 35 micron TES and a 57 x 57 x 9.1 micron gold absorber. This performance has been achieved in pixels that are fabricated directly onto solid substrates, ie. they are not supported by silicon nitride membranes. We present the results from these detectors, the expected performance at high count-rates, and prospects for the use of this technology for future Solar missions.

  13. Spectral Absorption of Solar Radiation by Aerosols during ACE-Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Pommier, J.; Rabbette, M.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Redermann, J.; Higurashi, A.; Nakajima, T.; Quinn, P. K.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), the upward and downward spectral solar radiant fluxes were measured with the Spectral Solar Flux Radiometer (SSFR), and the aerosol optical depth was measured with the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) aboard the Center for INterdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft. IN this paper, we examine the data obtained for two cases: a moderately thick aerosol layer, 12 April, and a relatively thin aerosol case, 16 April 2001. ON both days, the Twin Otter flew vertical profiles in the Korean Strait southeast of Gosan Island. For both days we determine the aerosol spectral absorption of the layer and estimate the spectral aerosol absorption optical depth and single-scattering albedo. The results for 12 April show that the single-scattering albedo increases with wavelength from 0.8 at 400 nm to 0.95 at 900 nm and remains essentially constant from 950 to 1700 nm. On 16 April the amount of aerosol absorption was very low; however, the aerosol single-scattering albedo appears to decrease slightly with wavelength in the visible region. We interpret these results in light of the two absorbing aerosol species observed during the ACE-asia study: mineral dust and black carbon. The results for 12 April are indicative of a mineral dust-black carbon mixture. The 16 April results are possibly caused by black carbon mixed with nonabsorbing pollution aerosols. For the 12 April case we attempt to estimate the relative contributions of the black carbon particles and the mineral dust particles. We compare our results with other estimates of the aerosol properties from a Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite analysis and aerosol measurements made aboard the Twin Otter, aboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Ronald H Brown ship, and at ground sites in Gosan and Japan. The results indicate a relatively complicated aerosol

  14. Peak Flux Distributions of Solar Radio Type-i Bursts from Highly Resolved Spectral Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, K.; Masuda, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Tsuchiya, F.; Morioka, A.; Misawa, H.

    2013-05-01

    Solar radio type-I bursts were observed on 2011 January 26 by high resolution observations with the radio telescope AMATERAS in order to derive their peak flux distributions. We have developed a two-dimensional auto burst detection algorithm that can distinguish each type-I burst element from complex noise storm spectra that include numerous instances of radio frequency interference (RFI). This algorithm removes RFI from the observed radio spectra by applying a moving median filter along the frequency axis. Burst and continuum components are distinguished by a two-dimensional maximum and minimum search of the radio dynamic spectra. The analysis result shows that each type-I burst element has one peak flux without double counts or missed counts. The peak flux distribution of type-I bursts derived using this algorithm follows a power law with a spectral index between 4 and 5.

  15. Spectral Properties of ZnO-LiYbO2 Hybrid Phosphor for Silicon Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Song; Tanabe, Setsuhisa; Qiu, Jianrong

    2011-05-01

    We report on the luminescent properties of ZnO-LiYbO2 hybrid phosphor, in which the broadband spectral modification can be realized to benefit the enhancement of silicon solar cell photovoltaic conversion efficiency. Under the excitation of ZnO band-band absorption and exciton absorption in the near-UV region, the intense Yb3+ emission around 1000 nm can be observed. The occurrence of energy transfer from ZnO to Yb3+ was proved by the excitation and emission measurement. The emission spectra between the ZnO-LiYbO2 hybrid phosphor and the LiYbO2 crystal under the direct excitation of Yb3+ ions with 937 nm LD was compared, which indicates that the Yb3+ ions that were diffused into ZnO lattice with the help of Li+, rather than those constitute of LiYbO2 crystals, are responsible for the intense infrared emission.

  16. On the causes of spectral enhancements in solar wind power spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unti, T.; Russell, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    Enhancements in power spectra of the solar-wind ion flux in the frequency neighborhood of 0.5 Hz had been noted by Unti et al. (1973). It was speculated that these were due to convected small-scale density irregularities. In this paper, 54 flux spectra calculated from OGO 5 data are examined. It is seen that the few prominent spectral peaks which occur were not generated by density irregularities, but were due to several different causes, including convected discontinuities and propagating transverse waves. A superposition of many spectra, however, reveals a moderate enhancement at a frequency corresponding to convected features with a correlation length of a proton gyroradius, consistent with the results of Neugebauer (1975).

  17. PEAK FLUX DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR RADIO TYPE-I BURSTS FROM HIGHLY RESOLVED SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, K.; Masuda, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Tsuchiya, F.; Morioka, A.; Misawa, H.

    2013-05-01

    Solar radio type-I bursts were observed on 2011 January 26 by high resolution observations with the radio telescope AMATERAS in order to derive their peak flux distributions. We have developed a two-dimensional auto burst detection algorithm that can distinguish each type-I burst element from complex noise storm spectra that include numerous instances of radio frequency interference (RFI). This algorithm removes RFI from the observed radio spectra by applying a moving median filter along the frequency axis. Burst and continuum components are distinguished by a two-dimensional maximum and minimum search of the radio dynamic spectra. The analysis result shows that each type-I burst element has one peak flux without double counts or missed counts. The peak flux distribution of type-I bursts derived using this algorithm follows a power law with a spectral index between 4 and 5.

  18. Spectral index of solar cosmic-ray flux from the analysis of ground-level enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero-Lopez, R. A.; Moraal, H.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we analyze the ground-level enhancement of the cosmic-ray intensity due to solar energetic particles as observed on 29 September 1989, by using two pairs of standard and lead-free neutron monitors. This enables one to separate spectral and anisotropy effects. This has been done previously by several authors for other events, but in this paper we make use of the large size and long duration of this event, as well as the fact that it is perhaps the best-observed one in the whole data base since 1942. It is shown that the method is more sensitive than the standard method that uses neutron monitors at different locations. The analysis provides a prototype for what can potentially be achieved by a new generation of mini neutron monitors.

  19. Solar spectral optical properties of pigments--Part II: survey ofcommon colorants

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, Ronnen; Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem

    2004-06-15

    Various pigments are characterized by determination ofparameters S (backscattering) and K (absorption) as functions ofwavelength in the solar spectral range of 300 to 2500 nm. Measured valuesof S for generic titanium dioxide (rutile) white pigment are in roughagreement with values computed from the Mie theory, supplemented by asimple multiple scattering model. Pigments in widespread use areexamined, with particular emphasis on those that may be useful forformulating non-white materials that can reflect the near-infrared (NIR)portion of sunlight, such as the complex inorganic color pigments (mixedmetal oxides). These materials remain cooler in sunlight than comparablecolors. NIR-absorptive pigments are to be avoided. High NIR reflectancecan be produced by a reflective metal substrate, a NIR-reflectiveunderlayer, or directly by the use of a pigment that scatters strongly inthe NIR.

  20. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  1. Small Pitch Transition-Edge Sensors with Broadband High Spectral Resolution for Solar Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Adams, J. S.; Eckart, M. E.; Smith, Adams; Bailey, C. N.; Bandler, S. R.; Chevenak, J. A.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing small pitch transition-edge sensor (TES) X-ray detectors optimized for solar astronomy. These devices are fabricated on thick Si substrates with embedded Cu heat-sink layer. We use 35 x 35 square micrometers Mo/Au TESs with 4.5 micrometer thick Au absorbers. We have tested devices with different geometric absorber stem contact areas with the TES and surrounding substrate area. This allows us to investigate the loss of athermal phonons to the substrate. Results show a correlation between thc stem contact area and a broadening in the spectral line shape indicative of athermal phonon loss. When the contact area is minimized we have obtained exceptional broadband spectral resolution of 1.28 plus or minus 0.03 eV at an energy of 1.5 keV, 1.58 plus or minus 0.07 eV at 5.9 keV and 1.96 plus or minus 0.08 eV at 8 keV. The linearity in the measured gain scale is understood in the context of the longitudinal proximity effect from the electrical bias leads resulting in transition characteristics that are strongly dependent upon TES size.

  2. Measurements of solar spectral downwelling irradiance in the water column of a large reservoir in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potes, Miguel; João Costa, Maria; Salgado, Rui; Morais, Manuela; Bortoli, Daniele; Kostadinov, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Periodic profiles of spectral downwelling irradiance were performed at Alqueva reservoir, southeast of Portugal, with a new apparatus developed by the team. The device presents a hemispherical tip (180° of FOV) allowing measurements to be independent of solar zenith angle. It is coupled to a portable spectroradiometer through a fiber bundle driven by a customized frame for protection and to keep the tip pointing to the zenith direction in underwater environment. The profiles obtained can be used to estimate the spectral and broadband light attenuation coefficients in the water column. The attenuation coefficients are relevant for the water surface layer energy budget, in particular, this coefficient is important in the computation of the water surface temperature, which is a key parameter for heat and moisture transfers between the reservoirs and the atmosphere, namely by the lake models. A comparison measurement was performed with this new apparatus (180° of FOV) and the previous device (22° of FOV) in order to demonstrate the importance of using the hemispherical radiance. The comparison show resembling results between both devices, however the previous device tends to underestimate the attenuation coefficient and increase the degree of uncertainty.

  3. A high temperature hybrid photovoltaic-thermal receiver employing spectral beam splitting for linear solar concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojiri, Ahmad; Stanley, Cameron; Rosengarten, Gary

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV-T) solar collectors are capable of delivering heat and electricity concurrently. Implementing such receivers in linear concentrators for high temperature applications need special considerations such as thermal decoupling of the photovoltaic (pv) cells from the thermal receiver. Spectral beam splitting of concentrated light provides an option for achieving this purpose. In this paper we introduce a relatively simple hybrid receiver configuration that spectrally splits the light between a high temperature thermal fluid and silicon pv cells using volumetric light filtering by semi-conductor doped glass and propylene glycol. We analysed the optical performance of this device theoretically using ray tracing and experimentally through the construction and testing of a full scale prototype. The receiver was mounted on a commercial parabolic trough concentrator in an outdoor experiment. The prototype receiver delivered heat and electricity at total thermal efficiency of 44% and electrical efficiency of 3.9% measured relative to the total beam energy incident on the primary mirror.

  4. A Simple Optical Model Well Explains Plasmonic-Nanoparticle-Enhanced Spectral Photocurrent in Optically Thin Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-12-01

    A simple optical model for photocurrent enhancement by plasmonic metal nanoparticles atop solar cells has been developed. Our model deals with the absorption, reflection, and scattering of incident sunlight as well as radiation efficiencies on metallic nanoparticles. Our calculation results satisfactorily reproduce a series of experimental spectral data for optically thin GaAs solar cells with Ag and Al nanoparticles of various dimensions, demonstrating the validity of our modeling approach. Our model is likely to be a powerful tool for investigations of surface plasmon-enhanced thin-film solar cells. PMID:27142874

  5. A Simple Optical Model Well Explains Plasmonic-Nanoparticle-Enhanced Spectral Photocurrent in Optically Thin Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-05-01

    A simple optical model for photocurrent enhancement by plasmonic metal nanoparticles atop solar cells has been developed. Our model deals with the absorption, reflection, and scattering of incident sunlight as well as radiation efficiencies on metallic nanoparticles. Our calculation results satisfactorily reproduce a series of experimental spectral data for optically thin GaAs solar cells with Ag and Al nanoparticles of various dimensions, demonstrating the validity of our modeling approach. Our model is likely to be a powerful tool for investigations of surface plasmon-enhanced thin-film solar cells.

  6. Assessing the relationship between spectral solar irradiance and stratospheric ozone using Bayesian inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, William T.; Mortlock, Daniel J.; Egerton, Jack S.; Haigh, Joanna D.

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the relationship between spectral solar irradiance (SSI) and ozone in the tropical upper stratosphere. We find that solar cycle (SC) changes in ozone can be well approximated by considering the ozone response to SSI changes in a small number of individual wavelength bands between 176 and 310 nm, operating independently of each other. Additionally, we find that the ozone varies approximately linearly with changes in the SSI. Using these facts, we present a Bayesian formalism for inferring SC SSI changes and uncertainties from measured SC ozone profiles. Bayesian inference is a powerful, mathematically self-consistent method of considering both the uncertainties of the data and additional external information to provide the best estimate of parameters being estimated. Using this method, we show that, given measurement uncertainties in both ozone and SSI datasets, it is not currently possible to distinguish between observed or modelled SSI datasets using available estimates of ozone change profiles, although this might be possible by the inclusion of other external constraints. Our methodology has the potential, using wider datasets, to provide better understanding of both variations in SSI and the atmospheric response.

  7. Spectral Absorption Depth Profile: A Step Forward to Plasmonic Solar Cell Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Mohammad K.; Mukhaimer, Ayman W.; Drmosh, Qasem A.

    2016-07-01

    Absorption depth profile, a deterministic and key factor that defines the quality of excitons generation rate in optoelectronic devices, is numerically predicted using finite different time domain analysis. A typical model, nanoparticles array on silicon slab, was devised considering the concept of plasmonic solar cell design. The trend of spectral absorption depth profile distributions at various wavelengths of the solar spectrum, 460 nm, 540 nm, 650 nm, 815 nm, and 1100 nm, was obtained. A stronger and well-distributed absorption profile was obtained at ˜650 nm of the solar spectrum (i.e. ˜1.85 eV, c-Si bandgap), although the absorbing layer was affected more than a half micron depth at shorter wavelengths. Considering the observations obtained from this simulation, we have shown a simple two-step method in fabricating ultra-pure silver (Ag) nanoparticles that can be used as plasmonic nanoscatterers in a thin film solar cell. The morphology and elemental analysis of as-fabricated Ag nanoparticles was confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and FESEM-coupled electron diffraction spectroscopy. The size of the as-fabricated Ag nanoparticles was found to range from 50 nm to 150 nm in diameter. Further investigations on structural and optical properties of the as-fabricated specimen were carried out using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption, photoluminesce, and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Preferential growth of ZnO along {002} was confirmed by XRD pattern that was more intense and broadened at increasing annealing temperatures. The lattice parameter c was found to increase, whereas grain size increased with increasing annealing temperature. The optical bandgap was also observed to decrease from 3.31 eV to 3.25 eV at increasing annealing temperatures through UV-Vis measurements. This parallel investigation on optical properties by simulation is in line with experimental studies and, in fact, facilitates devising optimum process cost for

  8. Absolute Stellar Parameters of KIC 09246715: A Double-giant Eclipsing System with a Solar-like Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hełminiak, K. G.; Ukita, N.; Kambe, E.; Konacki, M.

    2015-11-01

    We present our results of a combined analysis of radial velocity and light curves (LCs) of a double-lined spectroscopic and eclipsing binary KIC 09246715, observed photometrically by the Kepler satellite and spectroscopically with the OAO-1.88 m telescope with the HIgh-Dispersion Echelle Spectrograph. The target was claimed to be composed of two red giants, one of which is showing solar-like oscillations. We have found that the mass and radius of the primary are {M}1=2.169+/- 0.024 {M}⊙ and {R}1=8.47+/- 0.13 {R}⊙ , and of the secondary are {M}2=2.143+/- 0.025 {M}⊙ and {R}2=8.18+/- 0.09 {R}⊙ , which confirms their double-giant status. Our secondary is the star to which the oscillations were attributed. Results of its previous asteroseismic analysis are in agreement with ours, only significantly less precise, but the subsequent LC-based study failed to derive the correct mass and radius of our primary. KIC 09246715 is one of the rare cases where asteroseismic parameters of a solar-like oscillator were confirmed by an independent method and only the third example of a Galactic double-giant eclipsing binary with masses and radii measured with precision below 2%.

  9. Solar thermal drying of apricots: Effect of spectrally-selective cabinet materials on drying rate and quality metrics (abstract)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solar thermal (ST) drying is currently not in widespread commercial use due to concerns about slow drying rates and poor product quality. ST dryer cabinets could be constructed from spectrally-selective materials (materials which transmit only certain sunlight wavelength bands), but these types of ...

  10. Spectral attenuation of solar radiation in Patagonian fjord and coastal waters and implications for algal photobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huovinen, Pirjo; Gómez, Iván

    2011-03-01

    The spectral attenuation of solar irradiation was measured during summer in two types of coastal waters in southern Chile, a north Patagonian fjord (Seno Reloncaví) and open coast (Valdivia). In order to relate the light availability with the light requirements of upper subtidal seaweeds, the saturating irradiance for photosynthesis ( Ek) from P- I curves was measured. In addition the UV risk was assessed. Based on the z1% of PAR, the lower limit of the euphotic zone in the studied systems averaged 21 m ( Kd 0.24 m -1) in Seno Reloncaví and 18 m ( Kd 0.27 m -1) in the coast of Valdivia. Photosynthesis of the studied seaweeds was saturated at markedly lower irradiances than found in their natural depths at the time of the study. Solar radiation penetrating into these depths at both locations largely supports the light requirements for the photosynthesis of subtidal species: 50-160 μmol m -2 s -1 for seaweeds from Seno Reloncaví (7 m tidal range) and 20-115 μmol m -2 s -1 for Valdivia assemblages (2 m tidal range). Optimal light conditions to saturate photosynthesis ( Ek) were present at 10-16 m water depth. The attenuation of solar irradiation did not vary significantly between the fjord and coastal sites of this study. However, the underwater light climates to which seaweeds are exposed in these sites vary significantly because of the stronger influence of tidal range affecting the fjord system as compared with the open coastal site. The patterns of UV-B penetration in these water bodies suggest that seaweeds living in upper littoral zones such as the intertidal and shallow subtidal (<3 m) may be at risk.

  11. Spectral dependence of the internal quantum efficiency of organic solar cells: effect of charge generation pathways.

    PubMed

    Armin, Ardalan; Kassal, Ivan; Shaw, Paul E; Hambsch, Mike; Stolterfoht, Martin; Lyons, Dani M; Li, Jun; Shi, Zugui; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul

    2014-08-13

    The conventional picture of photocurrent generation in organic solar cells involves photoexcitation of the electron donor, followed by electron transfer to the acceptor via an interfacial charge-transfer state (Channel I). It has been shown that the mirror-image process of acceptor photoexcitation leading to hole transfer to the donor is also an efficient means to generate photocurrent (Channel II). The donor and acceptor components may have overlapping or distinct absorption characteristics. Hence, different excitation wavelengths may preferentially activate one channel or the other, or indeed both. As such, the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of the solar cell may likewise depend on the excitation wavelength. We show that several model high-efficiency organic solar cell blends, notably PCDTBT:PC70BM and PCPDTBT:PC60/70BM, exhibit flat IQEs across the visible spectrum, suggesting that charge generation is occurring either via a dominant single channel or via both channels but with comparable efficiencies. In contrast, blends of the narrow optical gap copolymer DPP-DTT with PC70BM show two distinct spectrally flat regions in their IQEs, consistent with the two channels operating at different efficiencies. The observed energy dependence of the IQE can be successfully modeled as two parallel photodiodes, each with its own energetics and exciton dynamics but both having the same extraction efficiency. Hence, an excitation-energy dependence of the IQE in this case can be explained as the interplay between two photocurrent-generating channels, without recourse to hot excitons or other exotic processes. PMID:25089640

  12. Absolute irradiance of the Moon for on-orbit calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.; Kieffer, H.H.

    2002-01-01

    The recognized need for on-orbit calibration of remote sensing imaging instruments drives the ROLO project effort to characterize the Moon for use as an absolute radiance source. For over 5 years the ground-based ROLO telescopes have acquired spatially-resolved lunar images in 23 VNIR (Moon diameter ???500 pixels) and 9 SWIR (???250 pixels) passbands at phase angles within ??90 degrees. A numerical model for lunar irradiance has been developed which fits hundreds of ROLO images in each band, corrected for atmospheric extinction and calibrated to absolute radiance, then integrated to irradiance. The band-coupled extinction algorithm uses absorption spectra of several gases and aerosols derived from MODTRAN to fit time-dependent component abundances to nightly observations of standard stars. The absolute radiance scale is based upon independent telescopic measurements of the star Vega. The fitting process yields uncertainties in lunar relative irradiance over small ranges of phase angle and the full range of lunar libration well under 0.5%. A larger source of uncertainty enters in the absolute solar spectral irradiance, especially in the SWIR, where solar models disagree by up to 6%. Results of ROLO model direct comparisons to spacecraft observations demonstrate the ability of the technique to track sensor responsivity drifts to sub-percent precision. Intercomparisons among instruments provide key insights into both calibration issues and the absolute scale for lunar irradiance.

  13. Spectral broadening and phase scintillation measurements using interplanetary spacecraft radio links during the peak of solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, David D.

    2009-12-01

    When an interplanetary spacecraft is in a solar superior conjunction configuration, the received radio signals are degraded by several effects that generally increase in magnitude as the angle between the spacecraft and the Sun (Sun-Earth-Probe or SEP angle) decreases as viewed by a terrestrial tracking station. During periods of quiescent solar activity, phase scintillation and spectral broadening follow well-defined trends as a function of solar impact distance (SEP angle) and link frequency. During active solar periods, the magnitudes of these effects increase above background levels predicted by the quiet period models. Several such events were observed during the solar superior conjunction of the Cassini spacecraft during the peak of solar cycle 23 in May 2000. Pronounced features in the spectral broadening data above the quiet background appear to be associated with Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), and last for extended periods of time ranging from ˜30 min to ˜4 h. These features are coincident with periods of increased activity seen in the region of the spacecraft signal source on coronal white light images, and tend to be related or matched with EIT flare events and possibly long-duration flare events seen in satellite X-ray data. Several such features were captured in the May 2000 Cassini solar conjunction phase scintillation and spectral broadening data at X band (8.4 GHz) and Ka band (32 GHz) radio frequencies, and are presented here. Such characterizations are beneficial in understanding the impact of such events in future interplanetary communication scenarios during solar conjunction periods.

  14. Dual-mode spectral convertors as a simple approach for the enhancement of hematite's solar water splitting efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atabaev, Timur Sh.; Vu, Hong Ha Thi; Ajmal, Muhammad; Kim, Hyung-Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2015-06-01

    Storing solar energy via a chemical fuel of hydrogen from water splitting represents a clean alternative for petroleum fuel. Thus, it is highly desirable for the production of hydrogen using environment-friendly and cost-effective methods. Most photoelectrodes used for this conversion are semiconductor materials whose band gaps match the UV and visible radiation of solar energy. However, further improvement in electrodes performance may be possible by improving photoabsorption efficiency in near-infrared region. This report represents our attempt to utilize IR photons for water splitting, and thus, spectral convertors were incorporated within the hematite nanorods (NRs) grown directly on a FTO glass. The results demonstrate that incorporation of spectral convertors within the hematite NRs leads to higher efficiency and performance in solar water splitting, because the convertors enable harvesting more photons both at UV and IR regions than conventional hematite.

  15. New Instruments for Spectrally-Resolved Solar Soft X-ray Observations from CubeSats, and Larger Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Shih, A.; Warren, H. P.; DeForest, C. E.; Woods, T. N.

    2015-12-01

    Solar soft X-ray (SXR) observations provide important diagnostics of plasma heating, during solar flares and quiescent times. Spectrally- and temporally-resolved measurements are crucial for understanding the dynamics and evolution of these energetic processes; spatially-resolved measurements are critical for understanding energy transport. A better understanding of the thermal plasma informs our interpretation of hard X-ray (HXR) observations of nonthermal particles, improving our understanding of the relationships between particle acceleration, plasma heating, and the underlying release of magnetic energy during reconnection. We introduce a new proposed mission, the CubeSat Imaging X-ray Solar Spectrometer (CubIXSS), to measure spectrally- and spatially-resolved SXRs from the quiescent and flaring Sun from a 6U CubeSat platform in low-Earth orbit during a nominal 1-year mission. CubIXSS includes the Amptek X123-SDD silicon drift detector, a low-noise, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) instrument enabling solar SXR spectroscopy from ~0.5 to ~30 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM spectral resolution with low power, mass, and volume requirements. An X123-CdTe cadmium-telluride detector is also included for ~5-100 keV HXR spectroscopy with ~0.5-1 keV FWHM resolution. CubIXSS also includes a novel spectro-spatial imager -- the first ever solar imager on a CubeSat -- utilizing a pinhole aperture and X-ray transmission diffraction grating to provide full-Sun imaging from ~0.1 to ~10 keV, with ~25 arcsec and ~0.1 Å FWHM spatial and spectral resolutions, respectively. We discuss scaled versions of these instruments, with greater sensitivity and dynamic range, and significantly improved spectral and spatial resolutions for the imager, for deployment on larger platforms such as Small Explorer missions.

  16. UV-VIS-NIR luminescence properties of an intense 5d broadband sensitized Eu2SiS4:Er3+ suitable for solar spectral converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gongguo; Cui, Qiuyu; Liu, Guodong

    2016-07-01

    A novel broadband sensitized near-infrared emitting phosphor, Eu2SiS4:Er3+, was developed as promising solar spectral converter for Si solar cells. Eu2SiS4:Er3+ has broadband absorptions ranging from 250 nm to 550 nm which can efficiently facilitate the UV-green part of the solar photon flux spectrum and exhibits intense NIR emission of Er3+, perfectly matching the maximum spectral response of Si solar cells. The NIR integrated emission intensity of Eu2SiS4:0.02Er3+ is 6.14 times as intense as that of a dual-mode solar spectral converter CaLaGa3S6O:0.01Ce3+, 0.06Pr3+. These results demonstrate that Eu2SiS4:Er3+ phosphor is a promising candidate used as solar spectral converter.

  17. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  18. An algorithm to evaluate solar irradiance and effective dose rates using spectral UV irradiance at four selected wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Anav, A; Rafanelli, C; Di Menno, I; Di Menno, M

    2004-01-01

    The paper shows a semi-analytical method for environmental and dosimetric applications to evaluate, in clear sky conditions, the solar irradiance and the effective dose rates for some action spectra using only four spectral irradiance values at selected wavelengths in the UV-B and UV-A regions (305, 320, 340 and 380 nm). The method, named WL4UV, is based on the reconstruction of an approximated spectral irradiance that can be integrated, to obtain the solar irradiance, or convoluted with an action spectrum to obtain an effective dose rate. The parameters required in the algorithm are deduced from archived solar spectral irradiance data. This database contains measurements carried out by some Brewer spectrophotometers located in various geographical positions, at similar altitudes, with very different environmental characteristics: Rome (Italy), Ny Alesund (Svalbard Islands, Norway) and Ushuaia (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina). To evaluate the precision of the method, a double test was performed with data not used in developing the model. Archived Brewer measurement data, in clear sky conditions, from Rome and from the National Science Foundation UV data set in San Diego (CA, USA) and Ushuaia, where SUV 100 spectroradiometers operate, were drawn randomly. The comparison of measured and computed irradiance has a relative deviation of about +/-2%. The effective dose rates for action spectra of Erythema, DNA and non-Melanoma skin cancer have a relative deviation of less than approximately 20% for solar zenith angles <50 degrees . PMID:15266087

  19. Shape, Pose, and Material Recovery of Solar-Illuminated Surfaces from Compressive Spectral-Polarimetric Image Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, S.; Zhang, Q.; Plemmons, R.

    2013-09-01

    Passive solar illumination of a space object gives rise, in general, to both specular reflections and diffuse scattering which a ground-based imaging system would observe as spatially localized glints and spatially generalized brightness patterns, respectively. The glints have nontrivial polarimetric signatures but their spectral signatures are typically only slightly modified versions of the solar spectrum, while the diffuse, generalized scattering is essentially unpolarized and spatially uniform over a pure material but carries spectral signatures that are characteristic of the surface material content. The spatial shape and extension of a glint about a point at which the surface normal of the underlying smooth mean surface bisects the solar angle in the solar illumination plane are determined directly by the degree of roughness of the underlying mean smooth surface. By contrast, the diffuse scattering is largely independent of the angle of incidence of sunlight locally at a surface point, with a uniform spectral signature. It is this dichotomy of features between specular and diffuse scattering in the spectral-polarimetric data that can permit one to recover rather robustly the three-dimensional (3D) shape, pose, and spectral signature of a solar-reflecting surface from its spatial-spectral-polarimetric brightness data. Indeed, for a smooth mean surface made of a pure material that can be characterized via a low-dimensional parametric shape model and thus permits a highly sparse mathematical description, the recovery of these surface attributes as well as its roughness can be obtained well even from compressive spectral-polarimetric image data obtained using a focal-plane spatial code. Such data can be obtained from systems like the Coded-Aperture Snapshot Spectral Polarimetric Imager (CASSPI) [1]. Here we present a computer-simulation-based analysis of the feasibility of our approach to disentangle the spectral, geometrical, and textural (roughness) attributes

  20. Relationship between the durations of jumps in solar wind time series and the frequency of the spectral break

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podesta, John J.; Borovsky, Joseph E.

    2016-03-01

    Several physically motivated examples of stochastic processes that exhibit discontinuous jumps at random times are used to show that if the discontinuous jumps are replaced by continuous or smooth transitions with an average duration Δt, then the power spectral density of the process develops a high-frequency spectral break at a frequency of order ωb = π/Δt. Conversely, if the spectrum of the original process is altered by imposing a high-frequency spectral break, as may be accomplished by filtering with a low-pass filter of some kind, then the discontinuous jumps in the original signal are replaced by continuous jumps having a duration of magnitude Δt = π/ωb, where ωb is the break frequency of the altered spectrum. These results suggest that for any stochastic process containing randomly occurring jumps in the time domain and a high-frequency spectral break in the spectral domain with break frequency ωb, the average durations of the jumps are of order Δt = π/ωb. This result is closely connected with the sampling theorem and the uncertainty principle for Fourier transform pairs and demonstrates that the physical processes responsible for the dissipation of solar wind turbulence also determine the thicknesses of the strongest current sheets in the solar wind.

  1. High spectral resolution measurements of a solar flare hard X-ray burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Schwartz, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    Observations are reported of an intense solar flare hard X-ray burst on June 27, 1980, made with a balloon-borne array of liquid nitrogen-cooled Ge detector which provided unprecedented spectral resolution (no more than 1 keV FWHM). The hard X-ray spectra throughout the impulsive phase burst fitted well to a double power-law form, and emission from an isothermal 0.1-1 billion K plasma can be specifically excluded. The temporal variations of the spectrum indicate that the hard X-ray burst is made up of two superposed components: individual spikes lasting about 3-15 sec, which have a hard spectrum and a break energy of 30-65 keV; and a slowly varying component characterized by a soft spectrum with a constant low-energy slope and a break energy which increases from 25 kev to at least 100 keV through the event. The double power-law shape indicates that DC electric field acceleration, similar to that occurring in the earth's auroral zone, may be the source of the energetic electrons which produce the hard X-ray emission.

  2. Characterization of MODIS mirror side difference in the reflective solar spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, X.; Angal, A.; Sun, J.; Wu, A.; Choi, T.; Xiong, X.

    2011-10-01

    The MODIS instruments onboard the Terra and Aqua spacecraft, launched in December 1999 and May 2002, respectively, have successfully operated through the present time. MODIS collects the Earth view (EV) data via a twosided paddle wheel scan mirror at angles of incidence (AOI) from 10.5 to 65.5 degrees. Reflective properties between the two mirror sides are not identical with large differences seen in Terra MODIS reflective solar bands (RSB). This paper describes a methodology to calculate and monitor MODIS RSB mirror side differences using EV observations. The longterm trends of response differences between two mirror sides are evaluated using different EV targets. Results show that the on-orbit changes in the properties of the scan mirror are wavelength and AOI dependent with large mirror side differences observed at shorter wavelengths in larger AOI. Starting from 2005, the mirror side difference has gradually exhibited a seasonally dependent feature in Terra MODIS visible spectral bands, which is mainly due to the changes in the scan mirror polarization property. In addition to fully characterizing on-orbit changes of the MODIS scan mirror properties, results and discussions provided in this paper will help clarify their impacts on the Level 1B data products and support future efforts to maintain MODIS data quality.

  3. Temporal and spectral characteristics of solar flare hard X-ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Kiplinger, A. L.; Orwig, L. E.; Frost, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission observations of three flares that impose stringent constraints on physical models of the hard X-ray production during the impulsive phase are presented. Hard X-ray imaging observations of the flares on 1980 November 5 at 22:33 UT show two patches in the 16 to 30 keV images that are separated by 70,000 km and that brighten simultaneously to within 5 s. Observations to O V from one of the footprints show simultaneity of the brightening in this transition zone line and in the total hard X-ray flux to within a second or two. These results suggest but do not require the existence of electron beams in this flare. The rapid fluctuations of the hard X-ray flux within some flares on the time scales of 1 s also provide evidence for electron beams and limits on the time scale of the energy release mechanism. Observations of a flare on 1980 June 6 at 22:34 UT show variations in the 28 keV X-ray counting rate from one 20 ms interval to the next over a period of 10 s. The hard X-ray spectral variations measured with 128 ms time resolution for one 0.5 s spike during this flare are consistent with the predictions of thick-target non-thermal beam model.

  4. Physics of Solar Prominences: I—Spectral Diagnostics and Non-LTE Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrosse, N.; Heinzel, P.; Vial, J.-C.; Kucera, T.; Parenti, S.; Gunár, S.; Schmieder, B.; Kilper, G.

    2010-04-01

    This review paper outlines background information and covers recent advances made via the analysis of spectra and images of prominence plasma and the increased sophistication of non-LTE ( i.e. when there is a departure from Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium) radiative transfer models. We first describe the spectral inversion techniques that have been used to infer the plasma parameters important for the general properties of the prominence plasma in both its cool core and the hotter prominence-corona transition region. We also review studies devoted to the observation of bulk motions of the prominence plasma and to the determination of prominence mass. However, a simple inversion of spectroscopic data usually fails when the lines become optically thick at certain wavelengths. Therefore, complex non-LTE models become necessary. We thus present the basics of non-LTE radiative transfer theory and the associated multi-level radiative transfer problems. The main results of one- and two-dimensional models of the prominences and their fine-structures are presented. We then discuss the energy balance in various prominence models. Finally, we outline the outstanding observational and theoretical questions, and the directions for future progress in our understanding of solar prominences.

  5. Lunar absolute reflectance as observed by Chang'E-1 Imaging Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiang; Ling, ZongCheng; Liu, JianZhong; Wu, ZhongChen; Li, Bo; Ni, YuHeng

    2015-08-01

    Lunar absolute reflectance, which describes the fraction of solar radiation reflected by the Moon, is fundamental for the Chang'E-1 Imaging Interferometer (IIM) to map lunar mineralogical and elemental distributions. Recent observations made by the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) onboard the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) spacecraft indicate that temporal variation in the solar radiation might have non-negligible influence on reflectance calculation, and the SIM measurements are different from the two previously used solar irradiances, i.e., ATLAS3 and Newkur. To provide reliable science results, we examined solar irradiance variability with the SIM daily observations, derived lunar absolute reflectances from the IIM 2A radiance with the SIM, ATLAS3 and Newkur data, and compared them with the Chandrayaan-1 Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3), the Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) and the Kaguya Multispectral Imager (MI) results. The temporal variability of the SIM solar irradiance is 0.25%-1.1% in the IIM spectral range, and less than 0.2% during the IIM observations. Nevertheless, the differences between the SIM measurements and the ATLAS3 and Newkur data can respectively rise up to 8% and 5% at particular IIM bands, resulting in discrepancy between which might affect compositional mapping. The IIM absolute reflectance we derived for the Moon using the SIM data, except for the last two bands, is consistent with the ROLO and the MI observations, although it is lower.

  6. Ultraviolet spectral distribution and erythema-weighted irradiance from indoor tanning devices compared with solar radiation exposures.

    PubMed

    Sola, Yolanda; Baeza, David; Gómez, Miguel; Lorente, Jerónimo

    2016-08-01

    Concern regarding the impact of indoor tanning devices on human health has led to different regulations and recommendations, which set limits on erythema-weighted irradiance. Here, we analyze spectral emissions from 52 tanning devices in Spanish facilities and compare them with surface solar irradiance for different solar zenith angles. Whereas most of the devices emitted less UV-B radiation than the midday summer sun, the unweighted UV-A irradiance was 2-6 times higher than solar radiation. Moreover, the spectral distributions of indoor devices were completely different from that of solar radiation, differing in one order of magnitude at some UV-A wavelengths, depending on the lamp characteristics. In 21% of the devices tested, the erythema-weighted irradiance exceeded 0.3Wm(-2): the limit fixed by the European standard and the Spanish regulation. Moreover, 29% of the devices fall within the UV type 4 classification, for which medical advice is required. The high variability in erythema-weighted irradiance results in a wide range of exposure times to reach 1 standard erythemal dose (SED: 100Jm(-2)), with 62% of devices requiring exposures of <10min to reach 1 SED. Nevertheless, the unweighted UV-A dose during this time period would be from 1.4 to 10.3 times more than the solar UV-A dose. PMID:27318601

  7. Structure, optical properties and thermal stability of Al2O3-WC nanocomposite ceramic spectrally selective solar absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang-Hu; Wang, Cheng-Bing; Guo, Zhi-Ming; Geng, Qing-Fen; Theiss, Wolfgang; Liu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    Traditional metal-dielectric composite coating has found important application in spectrally selective solar absorbers. However, fine metal particles can easily diffuse, congregate, or be oxidized at high temperature, which causes deterioration in the optical properties. In this work, we report a new spectrally selective solar absorber coating, composed of low Al2O3 ceramic volume fraction (Al2O3(L)-WC) layer, high Al2O3 ceramic volume fraction (Al2O3(H)-WC layer) and Al2O3 antireflection layer. The features of our work are: 1) compared with the metal-dielectric composites concept, Al2O3-WC nanocomposite ceramic successfully achieves the all-ceramic concept, which exhibits a high solar absorptance of 0.94 and a low thermal emittance of 0.08, 2) Al2O3 and WC act as filler material and host material, respectively, which are different from traditional concept, 3) Al2O3-WC nanocomposite ceramic solar absorber coating exhibits good thermal stability at 600 °C. In addition, the solar absorber coating is successfully modelled by a commercial optical simulation programme, the result of which agrees with the experimental results.

  8. Spectral Analyses and Radiation Exposures from Several Ground-Level Enhancement (GLE) Solar Proton Events: A Comparison of Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, William; Tylka, Allan; Dietrich, William; Badavi, Francis; Rojdev, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    Several methods for analyzing the particle spectra from extremely large solar proton events, called Ground-Level Enhancements (GLEs), have been developed and utilized by the scientific community to describe the solar proton energy spectra and have been further applied to ascertain the radiation exposures to humans and radio-sensitive systems, namely electronics. In this paper 12 GLEs dating back to 1956 are discussed, and the three methods for describing the solar proton energy spectra are reviewed. The three spectral fitting methodologies are EXP [an exponential in proton rigidity (R)], WEIB [Weibull fit: an exponential in proton energy], and the Band function (BAND) [a double power law in proton rigidity]. The EXP and WEIB methods use low energy (MeV) GLE solar proton data and make extrapolations out to approx.1 GeV. On the other hand, the BAND method utilizes low- and medium-energy satellite solar proton data combined with high-energy solar proton data deduced from high-latitude neutron monitoring stations. Thus, the BAND method completely describes the entire proton energy spectrum based on actual solar proton observations out to 10 GeV. Using the differential spectra produced from each of the 12 selected GLEs for each of the three methods, radiation exposures are presented and discussed in detail. These radiation exposures are then compared with the current 30-day and annual crew exposure limits and the radiation effects to electronics.

  9. Multiscale comparative spectral analysis of satellite total solar irradiance measurements from 2003 to 2013 reveals a planetary modulation of solar activity and its nonlinear dependence on the 11 yr solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.; Willson, R. C.

    2013-11-01

    Herein we adopt a multiscale dynamical spectral analysis technique to compare and study the dynamical evolution of the harmonic components of the overlapping ACRIMSAT/ACRIM3 (Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor Satellite/Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor 3), SOHO/VIRGO (Solar and Heliopheric Observatory/Variability of solar Irradiance and Gravity Oscillations), and SORCE/TIM (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment/Total Irradiance Monitor) total solar irradiance (TSI) records during 2003.15 to 2013.16 in solar cycles 23 and 24. The three TSI time series present highly correlated patterns. Significant power spectral peaks are common to these records and are observed at the following periods: ~ 0.070 yr, ~ 0.097 yr, ~ 0.20 yr, ~ 0.25 yr, ~ 0.30-0.34 yr, and ~ 0.39 yr. Less certain spectral peaks occur at about 0.55 yr, 0.60-0.65 yr and 0.7-0.9 yr. Four main frequency periods at ~ 4.8 days (~ 0.068 yr), ~ 27.3 days (~ 0.075 yr), at ~ 34-35 days (~ 0.093-0.096 yr), and ~ 36-38 days (~ 0.099-0.104 yr) characterize the solar rotation cycle. The amplitude of these oscillations, in particular of those with periods larger than 0.5 yr, appears to be modulated by the ~ 11 yr solar cycle. Similar harmonics have been found in other solar indices. The observed periodicities are found highly coherent with the spring, orbital and synodic periods of Mercury, Venus, Earth and Jupiter. We conclude that solar activity is likely modulated by planetary gravitational and electromagnetic forces acting on the Sun. The strength of the Sun's response to planetary forcing depends nonlinearly on the state of internal solar dynamics; planetary-Sun coupling effects are enhanced during solar activity maxima and attenuated during minima.

  10. A New SATIRE-S Spectral Solar Irradiance Reconstruction for Solar Cycles 21-23 and Its Implications for Stratospheric Ozone*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, William T.; Krivova, Natalie A.; Unruh, Yvonne C.; Haigh, Joanna D.; Solanki, Sami K.

    2014-11-01

    We present a revised and extended total and spectral solar irradiance (SSI) reconstruction, which includes a wavelength-dependent uncertainty estimate, spanning the last three solar cycles using the SATIRE-S model. The SSI reconstruction covers wavelengths between 115 and 160,000 nm and all dates between August 1974 and October 2009. This represents the first full-wavelength SATIRE-S reconstruction to cover the last three solar cycles without data gaps and with an uncertainty estimate. SATIRE-S is compared with the NRLSSI model and SORCE/SOLSTICE ultraviolet (UV) observations. SATIRE-S displays similar cycle behaviour to NRLSSI for wavelengths below 242 nm and almost twice the variability between 242 and 310 nm. During the decline of last solar cycle, between 2003 and 2008, SSI from SORCE/SOLSTICE version 12 and 10 typically displays more than three times the variability of SATIRE-S between 200 and 300 nm. All three datasets are used to model changes in stratospheric ozone within a 2D atmospheric model for a decline from high solar activity to solar minimum. The different flux changes result in different modelled ozone trends. Using NRLSSI leads to a decline in mesospheric ozone, while SATIRE-S and SORCE/SOLSTICE result in an increase. Recent publications have highlighted increases in mesospheric ozone when considering version 10 SORCE/SOLSTICE irradiances. The recalibrated SORCE/SOLSTICE version 12 irradiances result in a much smaller mesospheric ozone response than when using version 10 and now similar in magnitude to SATIRE-S. This shows that current knowledge of variations in spectral irradiance is not sufficient to warrant robust conclusions concerning the impact of solar variability on the atmosphere and climate.

  11. A Model for Solar Spectral Irradiance and Radiance at the Bottom and Top of a Cloudless Atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justus, C. G.; Paris, M. V.

    1985-03-01

    A simple model is presented that, in a cloud-free atmosphere, calculates solar spectral direct and diffuse irradiance and directional radiance at the surface, spectral absorption within the atmosphere and the upward reflected spectral irradiance or directional radiance at the top of the atmosphere. The irradiance model, based on similar approaches by Brine and Iqbal and others, evaluates the spectral irradiances between 0.29 and 4.0 m, with a resolution that varies from 0.005 to 0.1 m. Absorption by water vapor, ozone and the uniformly mixed gases is included, as are both scattering and absorption by atmospheric aerosols, which are modeled with simple wavelength-dependent optical depth, single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter functions. Comparisons are presented of the model results with spectral irradiance and radiance computed by other more sophisticated models and with measurements from both ground-based and satellite instruments. The reasonable accuracy and simplicity of the model make it suitable for a number of applications, especially those involving tests of the sensitivity of spectral irradiances or radiances to variations in water vapor, ozone and various aerosol parameters.

  12. A model for solar spectral irradiance and radiance at the bottom and top of a cloudless atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justus, C. G.; Paris, M. V.

    1985-03-01

    A simple model is presented that, in a cloud-free atmosphere, calculates solar spectral direct and diffuse irradiance and directional radiance at the surface, spectral absorption within the atmosphere and the upward reflected spectral irradiance or directional radiance at the top of the atmosphere. The irradiance model, based on similar approaches by Brine and Iqbal and others, evaluates the spectral irradiances between 0.29 and 4.0 microns, with a resolution that varies from 0.005 to 0.1 micron. Absorption by water vapor, ozone and the uniformly mixed gases is included, as are both scattering and absorption by atmospheric aerosols, which are modeled with simple wavelength-dependent optical depth, single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter functions. Comparisons are presented of the model results with spectral irradiance and radiance computed by other more sophisticated models and with measurements from both ground-based and satellite instruments. The reasonable accuracy and simplicity of the model make it suitable for a number of applications, especially those involving tests of the sensitivity of spectral irradiances or radiances to variations in water vapor, ozone and various aerosol parameters.

  13. Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. II - Soft X-ray/EUV reflectivity of the multilayer mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Weed, J. W.; Hoover, Richard B.; Allen, Maxwell J.; Lindblom, Joakim F.; O'Neal, Ray H.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Deforest, Craig E.; Paris, Elizabeth S.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The Multispectral Solar Telescope Array is a rocket-borne observatory which encompasses seven compact soft X-ray/EUV, multilayer-coated, and two compact far-UV, interference film-coated, Cassegrain and Ritchey-Chretien telescopes. Extensive measurements are presented on the efficiency and spectral bandpass of the X-ray/EUV telescopes. Attention is given to systematic errors and measurement errors.

  14. Quantyfing the global lightning activity in absolute unints using Schumann resonance spectral decomposition method and the data from the World ELF Radiolocation Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrda, M.; Kulak, A.; Mlynarczyk, J.; Ostrowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    we derived the possible locations of the storm center on the African continent and hence we construct the 2D thunderstorms activity maps. Moreover, we calculated the thunderstorm intensities in absolute units C2 m2 s-1 and compared them with our previous findings [Dyrda et al., 2014].

  15. Simulation for spectral response of solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shiwei; Xu, Jintong; Li, Xiangyang

    2015-04-01

    In this article, we introduced how to build a physical model of refer to the device structure and parameters. Simulations for solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes spectral characteristics were conducted in use of Silvaco TCAD, where device structure and parameters are comprehensively considered. In simulation, the effects of polarization, Urbach tail, mobility, saturated velocities and lifetime in AlGaN device was considered. Especially, we focused on how the concentration-dependent Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination model affects simulation results. By simulating, we analyzed the effects in spectral response caused by TAUN0 and TAUP0, and got the values of TAUN0 and TAUP0 which can bring a result coincides with test results. After that, we changed their values and made the simulation results especially the part under 255 nm performed better. In conclusion, the spectral response between 200 nm and 320 nm of solar-blind AlGaN based p-i-n photodiodes were simulated and compared with test results. We also found that TAUN0 and TAUP0 have a large impact on spectral response of AlGaN material.

  16. Statistical Analysis of the High-Frequency Spectral Break of the Solar Wind Turbulence at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovskii, S. A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Smith, Charles W.

    2008-03-01

    The physical mechanism responsible for the dissipation of the solar wind turbulence and the resulting plasma heating is not completely understood. To be a viable means of dissipation, any mechanism has to reproduce several observational features of the turbulence spectra. One important characteristic of the spectrum is its high-frequency break, where the spectral slope becomes considerably steeper than the Kolmogorov-like scaling law observed in the inertial range. The onset of the spectral steepening can be inferred from the observations fairly accurately, and it is a good benchmark to test various theories of the turbulence dissipation. In this paper, a large database of magnetic field spectra and plasma parameters at 1 AU measured by the ACE spacecraft is used to determine the spectral break. The statistical correlation of the data points calculated according to existing theoretical formulae for the break is analyzed, and the least-squares fits to the data are compared with the theoretically predicted scalings. It is concluded that the position of the spectral break is not determined just by a scale of the turbulent fluctuations, but by a combination of their scale and the amplitude at that scale. This suggests that the dissipation of the solar wind turbulence is an essentially nonlinear process.

  17. Statistical Analysis of the High-Frequency Spectral Break of the Solar Wind Turbulence at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovskii, S.; Vasquez, B.; Smith, C.

    2007-12-01

    The physical mechanism responsible for the dissipation of the solar wind turbulence and the resulting plasma heating is not completely understood. To be a viable means of dissipation, any mechanism has to reproduce several observational features of the turbulence spectra. One of the important characteristics of the spectrum is its high-frequency break where the spectral slope becomes considerably steeper than the Kolmogorov-like scaling law observed in the inertial range. The onset of the spectral steepening can be inferred from the observations fairly accurately and it is a good benchmark to test various theories of the turbulence dissipation. We use a large database of magnetic field spectra and plasma parameters at 1 AU measured by the ACE spacecraft to determine the spectral break. The statistical correlation of the data points calculated according to various theoretical formulas for the break is analyzed and the least squares fits to the data are compared with the theoretically predicted scalings. We conclude that the position of the spectral break is not determined just by a scale of the turbulent fluctuations but by a combination of their scale and the amplitude at that scale. This means that the dissipation of the solar wind turbulence is an essentially nonlinear process.

  18. The angular distributions of ultraviolet spectral irradiance at different solar elevation angles under clear sky conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Hu, LiWen; Wang, Fang; Gao, YanYan; Zheng, Yang; Wang, Yu; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the angular distributions of UVA, UVB, and effective UV for erythema and vitamin D (vitD) synthesis, the UV spectral irradiances were measured at ten inclined angles (from 0° to 90°) and seven azimuths (from 0° to 180°) at solar elevation angle (SEA) that ranged from 18.8° to 80° in Shanghai (31.22° N, 121.55° E) under clear sky and the albedo of ground was 0.1. The results demonstrated that in the mean azimuths and with the back to the sun, the UVA, UVB, and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances increased with the inclined angles and an increase in SEA. When facing toward the sun at 0°-60° inclined angles, the UVA first increased and then decreased with an increase in SEA; at other inclined angles, the UVA increased with SEA. At 0°-40° inclined angles, the UVB and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances first increased and then decreased with an increase in SEA, and their maximums were achieved at SEA 68.7°; at other inclined angles, the above three irradiances increased with an increase in SEA. The maximum UVA, UVB, and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances were achieved at an 80° inclined angle at SEA 80° (the highest in our measurements); the cumulative exposure of the half day achieved the maximum at a 60° inclined angle, but not on the horizontal. This study provides support for the assessment of human skin sun exposure.

  19. The angular distributions of ultraviolet spectral irradiance at different solar elevation angles under clear sky conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Hu, LiWen; Wang, Fang; Gao, YanYan; Zheng, Yang; Wang, Yu; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the angular distributions of UVA, UVB, and effective UV for erythema and vitamin D (vitD) synthesis, the UV spectral irradiances were measured at ten inclined angles (from 0° to 90°) and seven azimuths (from 0° to 180°) at solar elevation angle (SEA) that ranged from 18.8° to 80° in Shanghai (31.22° N, 121.55° E) under clear sky and the albedo of ground was 0.1. The results demonstrated that in the mean azimuths and with the back to the sun, the UVA, UVB, and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances increased with the inclined angles and an increase in SEA. When facing toward the sun at 0°-60° inclined angles, the UVA first increased and then decreased with an increase in SEA; at other inclined angles, the UVA increased with SEA. At 0°-40° inclined angles, the UVB and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances first increased and then decreased with an increase in SEA, and their maximums were achieved at SEA 68.7°; at other inclined angles, the above three irradiances increased with an increase in SEA. The maximum UVA, UVB, and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances were achieved at an 80° inclined angle at SEA 80° (the highest in our measurements); the cumulative exposure of the half day achieved the maximum at a 60° inclined angle, but not on the horizontal. This study provides support for the assessment of human skin sun exposure. PMID:25994798

  20. Optical Spectral Observations of a Flickering White-light Kernel in a C1 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Cauzzi, Gianna; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-01

    We analyze optical spectra of a two-ribbon, long-duration C1.1 flare that occurred on 2011 August 18 within AR 11271 (SOL2011-08-18T15:15). The impulsive phase of the flare was observed with a comprehensive set of space-borne and ground-based instruments, which provide a range of unique diagnostics of the lower flaring atmosphere. Here we report the detection of enhanced continuum emission, observed in low-resolution spectra from 3600 Å to 4550 Å acquired with the Horizontal Spectrograph at the Dunn Solar Telescope. A small, <=0.''5 (1015 cm2) penumbral/umbral kernel brightens repeatedly in the optical continuum and chromospheric emission lines, similar to the temporal characteristics of the hard X-ray variation as detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on the Fermi spacecraft. Radiative-hydrodynamic flare models that employ a nonthermal electron beam energy flux high enough to produce the optical contrast in our flare spectra would predict a large Balmer jump in emission, indicative of hydrogen recombination radiation from the upper flare chromosphere. However, we find no evidence of such a Balmer jump in the bluemost spectral region of the continuum excess. Just redward of the expected Balmer jump, we find evidence of a "blue continuum bump" in the excess emission which may be indicative of the merging of the higher order Balmer lines. The large number of observational constraints provides a springboard for modeling the blue/optical emission for this particular flare with radiative-hydrodynamic codes, which are necessary to understand the opacity effects for the continuum and emission line radiation at these wavelengths.

  1. OPTICAL SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS OF A FLICKERING WHITE-LIGHT KERNEL IN A C1 SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Cauzzi, Gianna; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-10

    We analyze optical spectra of a two-ribbon, long-duration C1.1 flare that occurred on 2011 August 18 within AR 11271 (SOL2011-08-18T15:15). The impulsive phase of the flare was observed with a comprehensive set of space-borne and ground-based instruments, which provide a range of unique diagnostics of the lower flaring atmosphere. Here we report the detection of enhanced continuum emission, observed in low-resolution spectra from 3600 Å to 4550 Å acquired with the Horizontal Spectrograph at the Dunn Solar Telescope. A small, ≤0.''5 (10{sup 15} cm{sup 2}) penumbral/umbral kernel brightens repeatedly in the optical continuum and chromospheric emission lines, similar to the temporal characteristics of the hard X-ray variation as detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on the Fermi spacecraft. Radiative-hydrodynamic flare models that employ a nonthermal electron beam energy flux high enough to produce the optical contrast in our flare spectra would predict a large Balmer jump in emission, indicative of hydrogen recombination radiation from the upper flare chromosphere. However, we find no evidence of such a Balmer jump in the bluemost spectral region of the continuum excess. Just redward of the expected Balmer jump, we find evidence of a ''blue continuum bump'' in the excess emission which may be indicative of the merging of the higher order Balmer lines. The large number of observational constraints provides a springboard for modeling the blue/optical emission for this particular flare with radiative-hydrodynamic codes, which are necessary to understand the opacity effects for the continuum and emission line radiation at these wavelengths.

  2. Using Spectral Shape and Predictor Fluence to Evaluate Temporal Exposures to Solar Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2016-01-01

    Real-time estimation of exposure levels has been considered in NASA's operational strategies and structural capability for the protection of astronauts from exposure to large solar particle events (SPEs) with high energy levels. The temporal profile of dose rates is also important for the analysis of dose-rate-dependent biological responses, the improvement of radiation protection by minimizing the overall exposure levels at sensitive organ sites, and the optimization of future mission planning. However, making a realistic temporal estimation in a timely manner has not been readily available because the exposure analysis relies on required components. They include the complete energy spectrum of SPE to define the boundary condition for radiation transport simulation, the radiation transport code with detailed shielding and body geometry models to determine particle transmission into areas of internal shielding and at each critical body organ, and the assessment of organ dosimetric quantities and biological risks by applying the corresponding response models for space radiation against the particle spectra that have been accurately determined from the transport code. This paper introduces the process of estimating temporal exposures to SPEs by implementing the distributions of the organ doses and the spectral shape dependencies of the major SPEs. The probability that a dose to a blood-forming organ will exceed the NASA limit is simultaneously calculated by taking into account the variability of detailed spectra of SPEs at a given temporal flux. These temporal evaluations of SPEs can be applied to the development of real-time guidance on improving mitigation of adverse effects during space missions.

  3. Estimates of leaf area index from spectral reflectance of wheat under different cultural practices and solar angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asrar, G.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Yoshida, M.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of management practices and solar illumination angle on the leaf area index (LAI) was estimated from measurements of wheat canopy reflectance evaluated by two methods, a regression formula and an indirect technique. The date of planting and the time of irrigation in relation to the stage of plant growth were found to have significant effects on the development of leaves in spring wheat. A reduction in soil moisture adversely affected both the duration and magnitude of the maximum LAI for late planting dates. In general, water stress during vegetative stages resulted in a reduction in maximum LAI, while water stress during the reproductive period shortened the duration of green LAI in spring wheat. Canopy geometry and solar angle also affected the spectral properties of the canopies, and hence the estimated LAI. Increase in solar zenith angles resulted in a general increase in estimated LAI obtained from both methods.

  4. Correlations of solar cycle 22 UV irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floyd, L.; Brueckner, G.; Crane, P.; Prinz, D.; Herring, L.

    1997-01-01

    The solar ultraviolet spectral irradiance monitor (SUSIM) onboard the upper atmosphere research satellite (UARS) is an absolutely calibrated UV spectrometer which has measured the solar spectral irradiance over the wavelengths 115 nm to 410 nm since October 1991. This data set now extends for about six years from near the peak of solar cycle 22, through its minimum, to the initial rise associated with solar cycle 23. Generally, the time series of UV spectral irradiances obtained shows behavior similar to that of other solar activity indices. The conditions on the sun, which can in result in dominant 13.5-day periodicity, are analyzed and illustrated. It is found that any combination of presence or absence of dominant 13.5-day in UV irradiance and solar wind velocity is possible depending entirely on the particular surface distribution and orientation of solar active regions.

  5. Construction of a SORCE-based Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) Record for Input into Chemistry Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, J. W.; Fontenla, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a research program to produce a solar spectral irradiance (SSI) record suitable for whole atmosphere chemistry-climate model (CCM) transient studies over the 2001-2015 time period for Solar Cycle 23 and 24 (SC23-24). Climate simulations during this time period are particularly valuable because SC23-24 represents the best-observed solar cycle in history - both from the perspective of solar physics and in terms of Earth observation systems. This record will be based predominantly on the observed irradiance of the SORCE mission as measured by the SIM and SOLSTICE instruments from April of 2003 to the present time. The SSI data record for this proposed study requires very broad wavelength coverage (115-100000 nm), daily spectral coverage, compliance of the integrated SSI record with the TSI, and well-defined and documented uncertainty estimates. While the majority of the record will be derived from SORCE observations, extensions back to the SC23 maximum time period (early 2001) and closure of critical gaps in the SORCE record will be generated employing the Fontenla et al. (2015) Solar Radiation Physical Model (SRPMv2). Since SRPM is a physics-based model, estimates of the SSI for wavelengths outside the SORCE measurement range can be meaningfully included. This model now includes non-LTE contributions from metals in the atomic number range 22-28 (i.e. titanium through nickel) as well as important molecular photo-disassociation contributions from molecules such as NH, molecular hydrogen, CH, and OH led have led to greatly improved agreement between the model and the observed 0.1 nm SOLSTICE spectrum. Thus comparative studies of the SORCE observations with SRPMv2 provide meaningful insight into the nature of solar variability critical for subsequent Earth atmospheric modeling efforts.

  6. The Sun-Earth connect 1: A fractional d-matrix of solar emissions compared to spectral analysis evidence of solar measurements and climate proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert G. V.

    2016-02-01

    The possibility that there is a constant ratio underpinning published solar cycles provides an opportunity to explore the harmonics within emission processes. This idea is initially developed by a phenomenological matrix where the elements or emission phases are underpinned by a cyclic fractional dimension d (0.39807) which is shown here to include the fine structure constant (1/137.0356). The Sun's Carrington synodic rotation (27.275d) multiplied by the inverse of the fine structure constant creates elements of this d-matrix which yields possible sequences of self-similar phase periods between harmonic elements of solar emissions. The periodicities of the Carrington rotation is defined by row 1 (R1) and subsequent rows R2,R3,R4 are the potential phase periods of possible twisting permutations of the tachocline. For solar measurements, the first four rows of the matrix predict at least 98% of the top hundred significant periodicities determined from multi-taper spectral analysis of solar data sets (the satellite ACRIM composite irradiance; the terrestrial 10.7cm Penticton Adjusted Daily Radio Flux, Series D; and the historical mean monthly International Sunspot Number). At centennial and millennial time scales, the same matrix predicts 'average' significant periodicities (greater than 95%) reported in 23 published climate data sets. This discovery suggests there is strong empirical evidence for a d-cyclic fractional 'solar clock', where the corresponding spectrum of cycles and switching events are embedded into the historical, climatic and geological records of the Earth.

  7. Solar radius determination from SODISM/PICARD and HMI/SDO observations of the decrease of the spectral solar radiance during the 2012 June Venus transit

    SciTech Connect

    Hauchecorne, A.; Meftah, M.; Irbah, A.; Hochedez, J.-F.

    2014-03-10

    On 2012 June 5-6, the transit of Venus provided a rare opportunity to determine the radius of the Sun using solar imagers observing a well-defined object, namely, the planet and its atmosphere, partially occulting the Sun. A new method has been developed to estimate the solar radius during a planetary transit. It is based on the estimation of the spectral solar radiance decrease in a region around the contact between the planet and the Sun at the beginning of the ingress and at the end of the egress. The extrapolation to zero of the radiance decrease versus the Sun-to-Venus apparent angular distance allows estimation of the solar radius at the time of first and fourth contacts. This method presents the advantage of being almost independent on the plate scale, the distortion, the refraction by the planetary atmosphere, and on the point-spread function of the imager. It has been applied to two space solar visible imagers, SODISM/PICARD and HMI/SDO. The found results are mutually consistent, despite their different error budgets: 959.''85 ± 0.''19 (1σ) for SODISM at 607.1 nm and 959.''90 ± 0.''06 (1σ) for HMI at 617.3 nm.

  8. Solar Radius Determination from Sodism/Picard and HMI/SDO Observations of the Decrease of the Spectral Solar Radiance during the 2012 June Venus Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauchecorne, A.; Meftah, M.; Irbah, A.; Couvidat, S.; Bush, R.; Hochedez, J.-F.

    2014-03-01

    On 2012 June 5-6, the transit of Venus provided a rare opportunity to determine the radius of the Sun using solar imagers observing a well-defined object, namely, the planet and its atmosphere, partially occulting the Sun. A new method has been developed to estimate the solar radius during a planetary transit. It is based on the estimation of the spectral solar radiance decrease in a region around the contact between the planet and the Sun at the beginning of the ingress and at the end of the egress. The extrapolation to zero of the radiance decrease versus the Sun-to-Venus apparent angular distance allows estimation of the solar radius at the time of first and fourth contacts. This method presents the advantage of being almost independent on the plate scale, the distortion, the refraction by the planetary atmosphere, and on the point-spread function of the imager. It has been applied to two space solar visible imagers, SODISM/PICARD and HMI/SDO. The found results are mutually consistent, despite their different error budgets: 959.''85 ± 0.''19 (1σ) for SODISM at 607.1 nm and 959.''90 ± 0.''06 (1σ) for HMI at 617.3 nm.

  9. The detection and interpretation of long-term atmospheric change: Tasks in association with the shuttle solar backscatter ultraviolet spectral radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, John E.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives are to develop techniques to detect and remove long-term instrument drifts from the operational Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV/2) data base using periodic measurements made by the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Spectral Radiometer and to evaluate the potential effects of scattering by atmospheric aerosols on our ability to detect trends in ozone using SBUV-class instruments.

  10. Comparison between various models of solar spectral irradiance and experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Cachorro, V.E.; de Frutos, A.M.; Casanova, J.L.

    1985-10-01

    Three models of spectral direct irradiance of the sum at the ground are compared with experimental spectral measurements. Satisfactory agreement is obtained although their behavior is quite different mainly in the absorption bands. The turbidity parameters required by the model are obtained from the measured data and the water vapor by simultaneous radiosondage.

  11. Spectral Signature of Column Solar Radiation Absorption During the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE). Revision

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hirok, William; Gautier, Catherine; Ricchiazzi, Paul

    1999-11-01

    Spectral and broadband shortwave radiative flux data obtained from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) are compared with 3-D radiative transfer computations for the cloud field of October 30, 1995. Because the absorption of broadband solar radiation in the cloudy atmosphere deduced from observations and modeled differ by 135 Wm{sup -2}, we performed a consistency analysis using spectral observations and the model to integrate for wavelengths between the spectral observations. To match spectral measurements, aerosols need a reduction in both single scattering albedo (from 0.938 to 0.82) and asymmetry factor (from 0.67 to 0.61), and cloud droplets require a three-fold increase in co-albedo. Even after modifying the model inputs and microphysics the difference in total broadband absorption is still of the order of 75Wm{sup -2}. Finally, an unexplained absorber centered around 1.06 {micro}m appears in the comparison that is much too large to be explained by dimers.

  12. The making of a new solar spectral irradiance composite - overview of the results from the SOLID Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberreiter, M.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Kretzschmar, M.; Schöll, M.; Del Zanna, G.; Ermolli, I.

    2015-12-01

    Solar spectral irradiance (SSI) is a key driver for the Earth's climate system. To understand in detail the processes at play a consistent SSI time series with realistic uncertainty estimates is needed as input for climate models. However, irradiance observations exist only as numerous and disperse data sets. Also, different SSI instruments show varying instrumental noise and degradation. Due to these effects it is a challenge to build a consistent SSI data set. Within the European Project SOLID we developed tools to derive an objective SSI time series based on existing SSI measurements, complemented with reconstruction models. We present the SOLID SSI composite with a focus on the UV spectral range and compare it with other available SSI reconstructions.

  13. [Research on absolute calibration of sun channel of sun photometer using laser raster scanning method].

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Bin; Li, Jian-Jun; Zheng, Xiao-Bing

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, a new calibration method of absolute spectral irradiance responsivity of sun channel of sun photometer was developed. A tunable laser was used as source and a standard tranfer detector, calibrated against cryogenic absolute radiometer, was used to measure laser beam power. By raster scanning of a single collimated laser beam to generate the uniform irradiance field at the plane of effective aperture stop of sun photometer, the absolute irradiance responsivity of center wavelength of the 870 nm unpolarized sun channels of sun photometer was obtained accurately. The relative spectral irradiance responsivity of corresponding channel was obtained by using lamp-monochromator system and then used to acquire the absolute spectral irradiance responsivity in the laboratory. On the basis of the above results, the top-of-the-atmosphere responsive constant V0 was obtained by integration with extraterrestrial solar spectral irradiance data. Comparing the calibration result with that from GSFC, NASA in 2009, the difference is only 3.75%. In the last, the uncertainties of calibration were evaluated and reached to 2.06%. The principle feasibility of the new method was validated. PMID:23586268

  14. Spectral Kernel Approach to Study Radiative Response of Climate Variables and Interannual Variability of Reflected Solar Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Zhonghai; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Loukachine, Constantin; Charlock, Thomas P.; Young, David; Noeel, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The radiative kernel approach provides a simple way to separate the radiative response to different climate parameters and to decompose the feedback into radiative and climate response components. Using CERES/MODIS/Geostationary data, we calculated and analyzed the solar spectral reflectance kernels for various climate parameters on zonal, regional, and global spatial scales. The kernel linearity is tested. Errors in the kernel due to nonlinearity can vary strongly depending on climate parameter, wavelength, surface, and solar elevation; they are large in some absorption bands for some parameters but are negligible in most conditions. The spectral kernels are used to calculate the radiative responses to different climate parameter changes in different latitudes. The results show that the radiative response in high latitudes is sensitive to the coverage of snow and sea ice. The radiative response in low latitudes is contributed mainly by cloud property changes, especially cloud fraction and optical depth. The large cloud height effect is confined to absorption bands, while the cloud particle size effect is found mainly in the near infrared. The kernel approach, which is based on calculations using CERES retrievals, is then tested by direct comparison with spectral measurements from Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY) (a different instrument on a different spacecraft). The monthly mean interannual variability of spectral reflectance based on the kernel technique is consistent with satellite observations over the ocean, but not over land, where both model and data have large uncertainty. RMS errors in kernel ]derived monthly global mean reflectance over the ocean compared to observations are about 0.001, and the sampling error is likely a major component.

  15. Scale-dependent Normalized Amplitude and Weak Spectral Anisotropy of Magnetic Field Fluctuations in the Solar Wind Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Tu, Chuanyi; Marsch, Eckart; He, Jiansen; Wang, Linghua

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence in the solar wind was recently reported to be anisotropic, with the average power spectral index close to -2 when sampling parallel to the local mean magnetic field B0 and close to -5/3 when sampling perpendicular to the local B0. This result was widely considered to be observational evidence for the critical balance theory (CBT), which is derived by making the assumption that the turbulence strength is close to one. However, this basic assumption has not yet been checked carefully with observational data. Here we present for the first time the scale-dependent magnetic-field fluctuation amplitude, which is normalized by the local B0 and evaluated for both parallel and perpendicular sampling directions, using two 30-day intervals of Ulysses data. From our results, the turbulence strength is evaluated as much less than one at small scales in the parallel direction. An even stricter criterion is imposed when selecting the wavelet coefficients for a given sampling direction, so that the time stationarity of the local B0 is better ensured during the local sampling interval. The spectral index for the parallel direction is then found to be -1.75, whereas the spectral index in the perpendicular direction remains close to -1.65. These two new results, namely that the value of the turbulence strength is much less than one in the parallel direction and that the angle dependence of the spectral index is weak, cannot be explained by existing turbulence theories, like CBT, and thus will require new theoretical considerations and promote further observations of solar-wind turbulence.

  16. Vicarious satellite calibration in the solar spectral range by means of calculated radiances and its application to Meteosat.

    PubMed

    Koepke, P

    1982-08-01

    The method of vicarious calibration by means of calculated radiances allows absolute calibration of satellite radiometers in orbit. It works by comparing counts from the radiometer to be calibrated with corresponding absolute radiances, calculated from actual values of the relevant optically acting parameters of the atmosphere and the earth's surface. The method is applied to the VIS-channel (it measures in the visible and near IR) of the European geostationary satellite Meteosat-1. To minimize uncertainties, the procedure is carried out over different surfaces, at different atmospheric conditions, and at different sun and satellite angles. The ratio between the effective radiances (the radiances at the satellite weighted with its spectral response) and the measured 6-bit counts of the Meteosat-1-VIS-channel is the calibration constant c(sat) = 2.66 W . m(-2) . sr(-1)/count. The accuracy of the calibration is +/-6%. The inaccuracy is mainly due to the broad digitization steps of the channel. Conversion factors are presented which allow one to calculate from the effective radiance the radiance at the satellite (the radiance leaving the atmosphere). PMID:20396128

  17. Spectral properties of water ice and contaminants. [of importance to remote sensing of ice in solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucey, P. G.; Clark, R. N.

    1985-01-01

    For remote sensing studies of ices in the solar system, it is important to understand the optical properties of water ice, and mixtures of ice and particulate materials. The present paper has the objective to review the current understanding of the spectral properties of ice, and mixtures of ice and particulates. The review is to provide a basis for the understanding of the remote sensing of ice. It is found that reflectance spectra of ice-soil intimate mixtures are complex, nonlinear functions of the optical and physical properties of the components which comprise the surface.

  18. Measures of the solar spectral irradiance between 1200 and 3000 A. [tables (data)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.; Thekaekara, M. P.

    1976-01-01

    Tabulated data on solar flux measurements are presented. The measurements, taken from balloons, rockets and satellites, are not new data, but have been critically re-evaluated. The eleven year sunspot cycle is discussed. Also discussed is the brightness temperature. The effect of solar radiation at various wavelengths, on the photochemistry of stratospheric ozone is briefly discussed.

  19. Introducing a new learning method for fuzzy descriptor systems with the aid of spectral analysis to forecast solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirmomeni, Masoud; Shafiee, Masoud; Lucas, Caro; Araabi, Babak Nadjar

    2006-12-01

    In the last two decades, researches indicate that the physical precursor and solar dynamo techniques are preferred as practical tools for long term prediction of solar activity. But, why more than 23 cycles of solar activity history should be omitted and just use the empirical methods or simple autoregressive methods on the basis of observations for the latest eight cycles? In this article, a method based on fuzzy descriptor systems (as a generalization of ordinary Takagi Sugeno (T S) neuro-fuzzy models), developed by the authors to yield a satisfactory solution to the unresolved problem of nonlinear descriptor system identification, and singular spectrum analysis (SSA) as one of the spectral analysis is proposed to forecast some of solar activity's indexes in the way that, a fuzzy descriptor model is optimized for each of the principal components obtained from SSA, and the multi step predicted values are recombined to make the disturbance storm time (DST) and proton flux indexes. The proposed method is used for forecasting hourly DST index in 2001 and daily average of the DST index from 1957 to 2005 and proton flux index in 2001. The results are remarkably good in the predictions of DST and proton flux indexes.

  20. Investigation of Faint Galactic Carbon Stars from the First Byurakan Spectral sky Survey. Optical Variability. I. N-Type AGB Carbon Stars. K-band Absolute Magnitudes and Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigoyan, K. S.; Sarkissian, A.; Russeil, D.; Mauron, N.; Kostandyan, G.; Vartanian, R.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Paronyan, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this paper is to present an optical variability study of the comparatively faint carbon (C) stars which have been discovered by searching the First Byurakan Survey (FBS) low-resolution (lr) spectral plates at high Galactic latitudes using recent wide-area variability databases. The light curves from the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and Northern Sky Variability Survey (NSVS) databases were exploited to study theit variability nature. In this paper, first in this series, the variability classes are presented for 54 N-type Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) C stars. One finds that 9 stars belongs to the group of Mira-type, 43 are Semi-Regular (SR), and 2 stars are Irregular (Irr)-type variables. The variability types of 27 objects has been established for the first time. K-band absolute magnitudes, distances, and height from the Galactic plane were estimated for all of them. We aim to better understand the nature of the selected C stars through spectroscopy, 2MASS photometric colors, and variability data. Most of the tools used in this study are developed within the framework of the Astronomical Virtual Observatory.

  1. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  2. Analysis of Solar Spectral Irradiance Measurements from the SBUV/2-Series and the SSBUV Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Hilsenrath, Ernest

    1997-01-01

    The NOAA-9 SBEV/2 instrument has made the first regular measurements ot solar UV activity over a complete solar cycle, beginning in March 1985 and continuing as of this writing. The NOAA-9 solar irradiance data set includes the minimum between Cycles 21-22 and the current minimum at the end of Cycle 22. Although overall solar activity is low during these periods, 27-day rotational modulation is frequently present. The episode of 13-day periodicity observed during September 1994 - March 1995 shows that phenomena previously associated with high levels of solar activity can occur at any point in the solar cycle. The 205 nm irradiance and Mg II index measured by NOAA-9 showed very similar behavior during the Cycle 21-22 minimum in 1985-1986, when 27-day periodicity dominated short-term solar variations, but behaved differently in 1994-1995 during the episode of 13-day periodicity. We plan further investigations into the physical causes of this result, since it affects the extent to which the Mg II index is an accurate proxy for 205 nm irradiance variations during such episodes. The NOAA-9 Mg II data are available.

  3. The Solar Spectral Irradiance Measured on Board the International Space Station and the Picard Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, G. O.; Bolsee, D.; Schmidtke, G.; Schmutz, W. K.

    2011-12-01

    On board the International Space Station, the spectrometers SOL-ACES and SOLSPEC measure the solar spectrum irradiance from 17 to 150 nm and 170 to 2900 nm, respectively. On board PICARD launched on 15 June 2010, the PREMOS instrument consists in a radiometer and several sunphotometers operated at several fixed wavelengths. We shall present spectra at different solar activity levels as well as their quoted accuracy. Comparison with similar data from other missions presently running in space will be shown incorporating the PREMOS measurements. Some special solar events will be also presented and interpreted.

  4. Role of Lorentz-Stark broadening of hydrogen spectral lines in magnetized plasmas: Applications to magnetic fusion and solar physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, Eugene

    2015-05-01

    Broadening of hydrogen spectral lines in plasmas is an important diagnostic tool for many applications (here and below by "hydrogen atoms" and "hydrogen spectral lines" we mean atoms and spectral lines of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium). In magnetized plasmas radiating hydrogen atoms moving with the velocity v across the magnetic field B experience a Lorentz electric field EL=v×B/c in addition to other electric fields. Since the velocity v has a distribution, so does the Lorentz field, thus making an additional contribution to the broadening of spectral lines. Compared to previous studies of this contribution, we cover the following new aspects. First, we consider the Lorentz-Doppler broadening of highly-excited hydrogen lines and produce new analytical results for arbitrary strength of the magnetic field B. We show for the first time that in the high-B case, the π-components of hydrogen lines are significantly suppressed compared to the σ-components. Second, we derive analytically Lorentz-broadened profiles of highly-excited hydrogen lines. We obtain expressions for the principal quantum number nmax of the last observable hydrogen line in the spectral series. These expressions differ very significantly from the corresponding Inglis-Teller result and constitute a new diagnostic method allowing to measure the product T1/2B, where T is the atomic temperature. Third, we consider magnetized plasmas containing a low-frequency electrostatic turbulence. This kind of turbulence causes anomalous transport phenomena (e.g., the anomalous resistivity) and is therefore very important to be diagnosed. We derive analytically distributions of the total electric field and the corresponding Stark profiles of hydrogen lines. We demonstrate that our findings lead to a significantly revised interpretation of the previous and future experimental data in magnetic fusion and the observational data in solar physics.

  5. The SATIRE-S model and why getting solar cycle spectral irradiance trends correct is so important

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, William; Haigh, Joanna; Krivova, Natalie; Unruh, Yvonne; Solanki, Sami

    2014-05-01

    There is currently a wide range of potential spectral solar irradiance (SSI) solar cycle (SC) amplitudes suggested by observations and models. Therefore, SSI SC changes are still not fully understood. The magnitude of the SC flux changes has a direct impact upon the temperature and chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere. To contribute to an understanding of the solar-climate connection, it is critical that we, as the solar community, communicate effectively with the climate community, providing uncertainties in SSI data and assessments of possible SSI options. We present the SATIRE-S reconstruction in the context of these SSI datasets. SATIRE-S is a physically based, consistent SSI reconstruction over the last three solar cycles. It shows different SC spectral variability at all wavelengths compared to the NRLSSI model, widely used in climate research. Most-importantly, SC changes in the ultra-violet (UV) can be twice as large in SATIRE-S as NRLSSI. Typically NRLSSI provides a lower limit of SC SSI UV variability. SORCE satellite observations provide SC magnitudes at the upper limit of variability, exceeding that of SATIRE-S by a factor of three at some UV wavelengths. There is currently no way to be certain if any of these three SSI datasets, or others, is correct. We also present the SSI datasets in terms of their impact on stratospheric ozone, within a 2D atmospheric model, as an example of why it is important to get SC changes correct. Using NRLSSI results in the 2D atmospheric model, we see a decrease in ozone concentration at all altitudes from solar maximum to minimum. SATIRE-S and SORCE/SOLSTICE observations instead show an increase in ozone concentration in the mesosphere. The magnitude of the increase in the mesosphere when using SOLSTICE also depends greatly upon the version of the data, which means that studies using different data versions of SOLSTICE may lead to different conclusions. These results highlight why an accurate understanding of SC SSI

  6. Doppler wavelength shifts of ultraviolet spectral lines in solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Cohen, L.

    1982-01-01

    Doppler shifts are measured for solar UV emission lines formed in the lower transition region of active regions. Doppler shifts in different regions at the same solar location, variations of Doppler shift with position of an active region on the disk, and variations of Doppler shift with time at the same solar location in the same active region were studied. Observations were made with the NRL slit spectrograph on Skylab. Excluding flare and flare-related phenomena, only redshifts are found whose magnitudes correspond to downflow velocities between about 4 and 17 km/s. Shifts are largest for lines formed between about 50,000 and 100,000 K, and are distinctly less for lines formed above 100,000 K. The shifts persist out to the limb, but not above it. There is no obvious change in redshift for lines measured at the same solar location over time intervals of about 20 minutes.

  7. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  8. A high resolution solar atlas for fluorescence calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, M. F.; Ohlmacher, J. T.; Schleicher, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics required of a solar atlas to be used for studying the fluorescence process in comets are examined. Several sources of low resolution data were combined to provide an absolutely calibrated spectrum from 2250 A to 7000A. Three different sources of high resolution data were also used to cover this same spectral range. The low resolution data were then used to put each high resolution spectrum on an absolute scale. The three high resolution spectra were then combined in their overlap regions to produce a single, absolutely calibrated high resolution spectrum over the entire spectral range.

  9. Spectrally selective reflector surfaces for heat reduction in concentrator solar cells: modeling and applications of TiO₂:Nb-based thin films.

    PubMed

    Maghanga, Christopher M; Niklasson, Gunnar A; Granqvist, Claes G; Mwamburi, Mghendi

    2011-07-01

    The energy conversion efficiency of a conventional pn junction solar cell decreases as the temperature increases, and this may eventually lead to failures in the photovoltaic system, especially if it uses concentrated solar radiation. In this work, we show that spectrally selective reflector (SSR) surfaces can be important for reducing the heat buildup on passively cooled solar cells. We outline a computational scheme for optimizing DC magnetron-sputtered TiO₂:Nb-based SSRs tailored for silicon solar cells and find good agreement of the reflectance with an experimental realization of the optimal SSR. A figure of merit for SSRs has also been derived and applied to the experimental data. PMID:21743532

  10. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) solar spectral irradiance (SSI) for ionospheric application - history and contemporary state-of-art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtke, G.; Jacobi, Ch.; Nikutowski, B.; Erhardt, Ch.

    2014-11-01

    After a historical survey of space related EUV measurements in Germany and the role of Karl Rawer in pursuing this work, we describe present developments in EUV spectroscopy and provide a brief outlook on future activities. The group of Karl Rawer has performed the first scientific space project in Western Europe on 19th October 1954. Then it was decided to include the field of solar EUV spectroscopy in ionospheric investigations. Starting in 1957 an intensified development of instrumentation was going on to explore solar EUV radiation, atmospheric airglow and auroral emissions until the institute had to stop space activities in the early nineteen-eighties. EUV spectroscopy was continued outside of the institute during eight years. This area of work was supported again by the institute developing the Auto-Calibrating Spectrometers (SolACES) for a mission on the International Space Station (ISS). After more than six years in space the instrument is still in operation. Meanwhile the work on the primary task also to validate EUV data available from other space missions has made good progress. The first results of validating those data and combine them into one set of EUV solar spectral irradiance are very promising. It will be recommended for using it by the science and application community. Moreover, a new low-cost type of an EUV spectrometer is presented for monitoring the solar EUV radiation. It shall be further developed for providing EUV-TEC data to be applied in ionospheric models replacing the Covington index F10.7. Applying these data for example in the GNSS signal evaluation a more accurate determination of GNSS receiver positions is expected for correcting the propagation delays of navigation signals traveling through the ionosphere from space to earth. - Latest results in the field of solar EUV spectroscopy are discussed, too.

  11. LWS FST: Determine and Quantify the Responses of Atmospheric/Ionospheric Composition and Temperature to Solar XUV Spectral Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talaat, E. R.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Qian, L.; Richards, P. G.; Ridley, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    We present a summary of the research plans and preliminary results of our 2009 Living With a Star Focus Science Team. Focus Area Description: With the recent availability of comprehensive solar spectral measurements at X-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) wavelengths, together with upper atmospheric chemistry and transport models, quantification of the full range of solar effects on chemically active minor constituents and ion composition in the ionospherethermosphere- mesosphere (I-T-M) system is now possible. Additional solar-driven variation is caused by the energetic particle environment, ranging from auroral fluxes to galactic cosmic rays. These sources have important influences on the chemistry, energetics, and dynamics of the lower thermosphere and ionosphere (e.g., on nitric oxide and ozone) via direct energy deposition and modulation of ion-neutral frictional heating. Observations of neutral composition and temperature for different phases of the solar cycle and for sporadic events are available through NASA missions like the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics mission (TIMED), as well as from other space- and groundbased instruments. Observations of ionospheric electron density are available through a variety of sources. In view of these advances, models of atmospheric/ionospheric composition and energetics that fully exploit the available estimates of external energetic inputs can now be developed to more accurately quantify solar effects in the middle and upper atmosphere. We seek to determine how well our understanding of atmospheric/ionospheric processes, as incorporated in state-of-the-art models, is able to explain observed compositional and temperature effects in the middle and upper atmosphere caused by external energetic inputs, in order to be able to predict these effects under both normal and extreme conditions.

  12. A Different View of Solar Spectral Irradiance Variations: Modeling Total Energy of a Solar Outburst Period in 2005 and its Comparison to Solar Cycle 23 and 24 Measured Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Snow, Martin; Harder, Jerald; Chapman, Gary; Cookson, Angela

    2015-08-01

    A different approach to studying solar spectral irradiance (SSI) variations, without the need for long-term (multi-year) instrument degradation corrections, is by examining the total energy of the irradiance variation during solar outburst periods. A solar active region typically appears suddenly and then takes about seven months to decay and disperse back into the quiet Sun network. An outburst period is defined as a time when one major active region dominates the irradiance variation. The solar outburst energy, which includes the energy from all phases of active region evolution, could be considered the primary cause for irradiance variations. Because solar cycle variation is the consequence of multiple active region outbursts, understanding the variation from a single active region outburst can provide a reasonable estimate of the variations for the 11-year solar activity cycle. The moderate-term (~6 months) variations from the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments during a solar outburst period in early 2005 are decomposed into positive (in-phase with solar cycle) and negative (out-of-phase) contributions by modeling the variations using the San Fernando Observatory (SFO) facular excess and sunspot deficit proxies, respectively. These fitted excess and deficit variations are then integrated over time for the energy during this outburst period, and the dominant component indicates which wavelengths are in-phase and which are out-of-phase with solar activity. The results from this study indicate out-of-phase variations for the 1210-1600 nm range, with all other wavelengths having in-phase variations.

  13. CuO-PANI nanostructure with tunable spectral selectivity for solar selective coating application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cindrella, L.; Prabhu., S.

    2016-08-01

    CuO-PANI nanostructure has been demonstrated as the solar selective absorber coating for the first time. The effortless chemical methods and easily scalable techniques such as precipitation, in-situ polymerization and spray coating were adopted for the fabrication of CuO nanorods and CuO-PANI nanostructures for solar application. The synthesis was carried out without using any template. The morphology and phase structure of fabricated CuO nanorods and CuO-PANI nanostructure coatings were studied by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The energy dispersive X-ray spectra and elemental mapping confirm the presence of the chosen elements in the nanostructure. The solar absorptance (αs), thermal emittance (εt) and selectivity (ξ) of the nanostructure coatings on glass substrate were optimized to 0.94, 0.01 and 94 respectively by changing the polyaniline content on the surface of the CuO nanorods. The efficiency of the solar selective coatings were evaluated. The optimized solar absorber coating of CuO-PANI nanostructure is highly promising for its selective optical properties.

  14. Can we use the ozone response in a CCM to say which solar spectral irradiance is most likely correct?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, William; Rozanov, Eugene; Shapiro, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Ozone plays a key role in the temperature structure of the Earth's atmosphere and absorbs damaging ultraviolet (UV) solar radiation. Evidence suggests that variations in stratospheric ozone resulting from changes in solar UV output may have an important role to play in weather over the North Atlantic and Europe on decadal timescales through a "top-down" coupling with the troposphere. However, the magnitude of the stratospheric response to the Sun over the 11-year solar cycle (SC) depends primarily on how much the UV changes. SC UV changes differ significantly between different observational instruments and the observations and models. The substantial disagreements between existing SSI datasets lead to different atmospheric responses when they are used in climate models and, therefore, we still cannot fully understand and simulate the ozone variability. We use the SOCOL chemistry-climate model, in specified dynamics mode, to calculate the atmospheric response from using different spectral irradiance from the SATIRE-S and NRLSSI models and with SORCE observations and a constant Sun. We compare the ozone and hydroxl results from these runs with observations to try to determine which SSI dataset is most likely to be correct. This is important to get a better understanding of which SSI dataset should be used in climate modelling and what magnitude of UV variability the Sun has. This will lead to a better understanding of the Sun's influence upon our climate and weather.

  15. The Importance of Solar Spectral Irradiance to the Sun-Earth Connection: Lessons-learned from SORCE and Their Relevance to Future Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, J. W.; Snow, M. A.; Richard, E. C.; Rast, M.; Merkel, A. W.; Woods, T. N.

    2014-12-01

    The Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) mission has provided for the first time solar spectral irradiance (SSI) observations over a full solar cycle time period with wavelength coverage from the X-ray through the near infrared. This paper will discuss the lessons-learned from SORCE including the need to develop more effective methods to track on-orbit spectroscopic response and sensitivity degradation. This is especially important in using these data products as input to modern day chemistry-climate models that require very broad spectral coverage with moderate-to-high spectral and temporal resolution to constrain the solar component to the atmospheric response. A basic requirement to obtain this essential climate record is to 1) perform preflight radiometric calibrations that are traceable SI standards along with a complete specification of the instruments spectroscopic response, and 2) design the instrument to have the ability to perform instrument-only sensitivity corrections to objectively account for on-orbit degradation. The development of the NIST SIRCUS (National Institute of Science and Technology, Sources for Irradiance and Radiance Calibration with Uniform Sources) now permits the full characterization of the spectral radiometer's response, and on-orbit degradation characterization through comparisons of redundant detectors and spectrometers appears to be the most practical method to perform these corrections for the near ultraviolet through the near infrared. Going forward, we discuss a compact spectral radiometer development that will couple with advances in CubeSat technology to allow for shorter mission lengths, relatively inexpensive development and launch costs, and reduce the risk of data gaps between successive missions without compromising measurement accuracy. We also discuss the development of a radiometric solar imager that will both greatly improve the interpretation of existing Sun-as-a-star irradiance observations and provide a

  16. RATAN-600 radio telescope in the 24th solar-activity cycle. III. System of data acquisition and control of the solar spectral facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldin, S. V.; Garaimov, V. I.

    2011-07-01

    We report the development of a multichannel data acquisition and control system for the Spectral and Polarization High-Resolution Solar Research System, installed at the RATAN-600 radio telescope. This facility provides high-speed registration of signals from 240 channels and controls the preparation for observations and the process of automatic observations. The hardware is made in the form factor of 3U Evromekhanika modules. The measurement facility is controlled by the software based on the QT cross-platform library (the open source version), which can be run both on Linux and Windows operating systems. The data are written to a magnetic carrier and then transferred to the computer network of the Special Astrophysical Observatory for archiving, and can be accessed by external users.

  17. SPECTRAL SLOPE VARIATION AT PROTON SCALES FROM FAST TO SLOW SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, R.; Trenchi, L.; Telloni, D.

    2014-09-20

    We investigated the behavior of the spectral slope of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations at proton scales for selected high-resolution time intervals from the WIND and MESSENGER spacecraft at 1 AU and 0.56 AU, respectively. The analysis was performed within the profile of high-speed streams, moving from fast to slow wind regions. The spectral slope showed a large variability between –3.75 and –1.75 and a robust tendency for this parameter to be steeper within the trailing edge, where the speed is higher, and to be flatter within the subsequent slower wind, following a gradual transition between these two states. The value of the spectral index seems to depend firmly on the power associated with the fluctuations within the inertial range; the higher the power, the steeper the slope. Our results support previous analyses suggesting that there must be some response of the dissipation mechanism to the level of the energy transfer rate along the inertial range.

  18. Performance of the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array. III - Optical characteristics of the Ritchey-Chretien and Cassegrain telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Baker, Phillip C.; Hadaway, James B.; Johnson, R. B.; Peterson, Cynthia; Gabardi, David R.; Walker, Arthur B., Jr.; Lindblom, J. F.; Deforest, Craig; O'Neal, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    The Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA), which is a sounding-rocket-borne observatory for investigating the sun in the soft X-ray/EUV and FUV regimes of the electromagnetic spectrum, utilizes single reflection multilayer coated Herschelian telescopes for wavelengths below 100 A, and five doubly reflecting multilayer coated Ritchey-Chretien and two Cassegrain telescopes for selected wavelengths in the EUV region between 100 and 1000 A. The paper discusses the interferometric alignment, testing, focusing, visible light testing, and optical performance characteristics of the Ritchey-Chretien and Cassegrain telescopes of MSSTA. A schematic diagram of the MSSTA Ritchey-Chretien telescope is presented together with diagrams of the system autocollimation testing.

  19. Design and analysis of optical systems for the Stanford/MSFC Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Johnson, R. Barry; Hoover, Richard B.; Lindblom, Joakim F.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the design and the theoretical ray trace analysis of the optical systems which will comprise the primary imaging components for the Stanford/MSFC Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA). This instrument is being developed for ultra-high resolution investigations of the sun from a sounding rocket. Doubly reflecting systems of sphere-sphere, ellipsoid-sphere (Dall-Kirkham), paraboloid-hyperboloid (Cassegrain), and hyperboloid-hyperboloid (Ritchey-Chretien) configurations were analyzed. For these mirror systems, ray trace analysis was performed and through-focus spot diagrams, point spread function plots, and geometrical and diffraction MTFs were generated. The results of these studies are presented along with the parameters of the Ritchey-Chretien optical system selected for the MSSTA flight. The payload, which incorporates seven of these Ritchey-Chretien systems, is now being prepared for launch in late September 1989.

  20. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    Eosinophils; Absolute eosinophil count ... the white blood cell count to give the absolute eosinophil count. ... than 500 cells per microliter (cells/mcL). Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk ...

  1. Experimental study of spectral and spatial distribution of solar X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.; Catura, R. C.; Culhane, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The study of the physical conditions within the solar corona and the development of instrumentation and technical expertise necessary for advanced studies of solar X-ray emission are reported. Details are given on the Aerobee-borne-X-ray spectrometer/monochromator and also on the observing program. Preliminary discussions of some results are presented and include studies of helium-like line emission, mapping O(VII) and Ne(IX) lines, survey of O(VII) and Ne(IX) lines, study of plage regions and small flares, and analysis of line emission from individual active regions. It is concluded that the use of large-area collimated Bragg spectrometers to scan narrow wavelength intervals and the capability of the SPARCS pointing control to execute a complex observing program are established.

  2. The two-micron spectral characteristics of the Titanian haze derived from Cassini/VIMS solar occultation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Chae Kyung; Kim, Sang Joon; Courtin, Régis; Sohn, Mirim; Lee, Dong-Hun

    2013-11-01

    Vertically-resolved spectral characteristics of the Titanian haze in the 2-μm wavelength range were derived from solar occultation spectra measured by Cassini/VIMS on January 15, 2006. At the various altitudes probed by the solar occultation measurements, we reproduced the observed spectra using a radiative transfer program including absorption by CH4 ro-vibrational bands, collision-induced absorption by N2-N2 pairs, and H2-N2 dimers, as well as absorption and scattering by the haze particles. The retrieved optical depth spectra (or τ-spectra) for the haze show marked variations in the 2.1-2.8 μm range, with peaks near 2.30 and 2.35 μm, and the relative amplitude of these peaks changing with altitude. The gross spectral shape of the τ-spectra is found similar to the typical 2-μm absorption spectra of the alkane group of hydrocarbon (CnH2n+2) ices. The τ-spectra retrieved at 2 μm and those previously retrieved at 3 μm by Kim et al. (2011) are simultaneously reproduced by combinations of 2- and 3-μm absorbance spectra of alkane ices such as CH4, C2H6, C5H12, C6H14, with the addition of a nitrile ice, CH3CN. These combinations are neither unique nor limited and need more fine-tuning to fit the detailed features of the τ-spectra. There is a need for additional laboratory measurements of absorbance and indices of refraction for a wider variety of hydrocarbon and nitrile ices in the temperature range relevant to Titan.

  3. EVIDENCE FOR THE FULL HARD X-RAY SPECTRAL SIGNATURE OF NONUNIFORM IONIZATION IN A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Su Yang; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R. E-mail: gordon.d.holman@nasa.gov

    2011-04-20

    The hard X-ray (HXR) emission from solar flares is observed primarily from the footpoints of flare magnetic loops, where nonthermal electrons are understood to emit thick-target bremsstrahlung as they stream from the fully ionized hot corona to the denser, cooler, and partially ionized chromosphere. The change in the plasma ionization along the path of the electrons should result in a characteristic upward break and corresponding flattening of the X-ray spectrum with increasing energy at lower energies, and a downward break at higher energies. Due to the presence of thermal emission, the upward break usually cannot be observed. We report the first evidence for both breaks in spectra measured with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) during the GOES X1.2 class flare that happened on 2002 October 31. The RHESSI X-ray spectral analysis shows both the breakup at {approx}49 keV and the breakdown at {approx}134 keV at the HXR peak time. The time evolution of both breaks also agrees with the nonuniform ionization (NUI) model. Other possible explanations for the breaks are considered, but the NUI model provides the simplest explanation for the spectral shape and its time evolution. We find that the average column density of the fully ionized plasma changed from 2 x10{sup 19} cm{sup -2} in the rise phase to 7 x10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} after the peak. This indicates that plasma in the target was heated and became ionized during the flare, in agreement with heating by the nonthermal electrons and chromospheric evaporation expected in the collisional thick-target model.

  4. Quantitative Determination of Luminescent Coupling in Multijunction Solar Cells from Spectral Photovoltage Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuertes Marrón, D.; Barrigón, E.; Ochoa, M.; Artacho, I.

    2016-07-01

    We present a simple method to quantify the magnitude of luminescent coupling (LC) between stacked subcells in multijunction photovoltaic devices. The effect of luminescence produced at high-band-gap subcells on underlying low-gap units within the same device can be directly accessed as a measurable open-circuit voltage difference by comparing two photovoltage spectra. Additionally, our study unambiguously identifies LC as the modulation mechanism across multijunction solar cells generating a response from buried subcells in photoreflectance measurements.

  5. Assessment of performances of sun zenith angle and altitude parameterisations of atmospheric radiative transfer for spectral surface downwelling solar irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, L.; Blanc, Ph.

    2010-09-01

    Satellite-derived assessments of surface downwelling solar irradiance are more and more used by engineering companies in solar energy. Performances are judged satisfactory for the time being. Nevertheless, requests for more accuracy are increasing, in particular in the spectral definition and in the decomposition of the global radiation into direct and diffuse radiations. One approach to reach this goal is to improve both the modelling of the radiative transfer and the quality of the inputs describing the optical state. Within their joint project Heliosat-4, DLR and MINES ParisTech have adopted this approach to create advanced databases of solar irradiance succeeding to the current ones HelioClim and SolEMi. Regarding the model, we have opted for libRadtran, a well-known model of proven quality. As many similar models, running libRadtran is very time-consuming when it comes to process millions or more pixels or grid cells. This is incompatible with real-time operational process. One may adopt the abacus approach, or look-up tables, to overcome the problem. The model is run for a limited number of cases, covering the whole range of values taken by the various inputs of the model. Abaci are such constructed. For each real case, the irradiance value is computed by interpolating within the abaci. In this way, real-time can be envisioned. Nevertheless, the computation of the abaci themselves requires large computing capabilities. In addition, searching the abaci to find the values to interpolate can be time-consuming as the abaci are very large: several millions of values in total. Moreover, it raises the extrapolation problem of parameter out-of-range during the utilisation of the abaci. Parameterisation, when possible, is a means to reduce the amount of computations to be made and subsequently, the computation effort to create the abaci, the size of the abaci, the extrapolation and the searching time. It describes in analytical manner and with a few parameters the

  6. Vegetation Red-edge Spectral Modeling for Solar-induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence Retrieval at O2-B Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Zhang, L.; Qiao, N.; Zhang, X.; Li, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Remotely sensed solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) has been considered an ideal probe in monitoring global vegetation photosynthesis. However, challenges in accurate estimate of faint SIF (less than 5% of the total reflected radiation in near infrared bands) from the observed apparent reflected radiation greatly limit its wide applications. Currently, the telluric O2-B (~688nm) and O2-A (~761nm) have been proved to be capable of SIF retrieval based on Fraunhofer line depth (FLD) principle. They may still work well even using conventional ground-based commercial spectrometers with typical spectral resolutions of 2~5 nm and high enough signal-to-noise ratio (e.g., the ASD spectrometer). Nevertheless, almost all current FLD based algorithms were mainly developed for O2-A, a few concentrating on the other SIF emission peak in O2-B. One of the critical reasons is that it is very difficult to model the sudden varying reflectance around O2-B band located in the red-edge spectral region (about 680-800 nm). This study investigates a new method by combining the established inverted Gaussian reflectance model (IGM) and FLD principle using diurnal canopy spectra with relative low spectral resolutions of 1 nm (FluorMOD simulations) and 3 nm (measured by ASD spectrometer) respectively. The IGM has been reported to be an objective and good method to characterize the entire vegetation red-edge reflectance. Consequently, the proposed SIF retrieval method (hereinafter called IGMFLD) could exploit all the spectral information along the whole red-edge (680-800 nm) to obtain more reasonable reflectance and fluorescence correction coefficients than traditional FLD methods such as the iFLD. Initial results show that the IGMFLD can better capture the spectrally non-linear characterization of the reflectance in 680-800 nm and thereby yields much more accurate SIFs in O2-B than typical FLD methods, including sFLD, 3FLD and iFLD (see figure 1). Finally, uncertainties and prospect

  7. Middle Atmosphere Response to Different Descriptions of the 11-Year Solar Cycle in Spectral Irradiance in a Chemistry-Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, W. H.; Stolarski, R. S.; Oman, L. D.; Fleming, E. L.; Jackman, C. H.

    2012-01-01

    The 11-year solar cycle in solar spectral irradiance (SSI) inferred from measurements by the SOlar Radiation & Climate Experiment (SORCE) suggests a much larger variation in the ultraviolet than previously accepted. We present middle atmosphere ozone and temperature responses to the solar cycles in SORCE SSI and the ubiquitous Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) SSI reconstruction using the Goddard Earth Observing System chemistry-climate model (GEOS CCM). The results are largely consistent with other recent modeling studies. The modeled ozone response is positive throughout the stratosphere and lower mesosphere using the NRL SSI, while the SORCE SSI produces a response that is larger in the lower stratosphere but out of phase with respect to total solar irradiance above 45 km. The modeled responses in total ozone are similar to those derived from satellite and ground-based measurements, 3-6 Dobson Units per 100 units of 10.7-cm radio flux (F10.7) in the tropics. The peak zonal mean tropical temperature response 50 using the SORCE SSI is nearly 2 K per 100 units 3 times larger than the simulation using the NRL SSI. The GEOS CCM and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2-D coupled model are used to examine how the SSI solar cycle affects the atmosphere through direct solar heating and photolysis processes individually. Middle atmosphere ozone is affected almost entirely through photolysis, whereas the solar cycle in temperature is caused both through direct heating and photolysis feedbacks, processes that are mostly linearly separable. Further, the net ozone response results from the balance of ozone production at wavelengths less than 242 nm and destruction at longer wavelengths, coincidentally corresponding to the wavelength regimes of the SOLar STellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) and Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) on SORCE, respectively. A higher wavelength-resolution analysis of the spectral response could allow for a better prediction of the

  8. Spectral albedos of sea ice and incident solar irradiance in the southern Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenfell, Thomas C.; Perovich, Donald K.

    1984-01-01

    Spectral albedos and incident spectral irradiances have been measured over the wavelength range 400 to 2400 nm on the sea ice near the Naval Arctic Research Laboratory (NARL) at Pt. Barrow, Alaska. The observation interval extended from mid-May, when the ice was still relatively cold, until mid-June, when summer melting was fully established. The temporal dependence of albedo for the available surface types was obtained over this time interval showing a general decrease from snow and snow-covered ice to blue ice and melt ponds. Data were also obtained for glacier ice on the Athabasca glacier, for melting lake ice, and for certain other nonice surfaces in the vicinity of NARL. Snow and ice albedos are characteristically highest at visible wavelengths, decreasing strongly in the infrared because of the increase in absorption by ice and water. Local maxima in the spectra correspond to minima in the ice and water absorption. Variations in albedo are due primarily to differences in the vapor bubble density, crystal structure, and free water content of the upper layers of the ice. Incident spectral shortwave radiation was measured as a function of cloudiness, and the optical thickness of arctic clouds is significantly less than the thickest clouds at lower latitudes. The decrease of the infrared component relatiave to the visible portion of the irradiance with increasing cloud cover is determined. This can give rise to an increase in wavelength-integrated albedos of as much as 15%. Using the present data, a graphical method is outlined by which visible near-infrared satellite imagery can be used to distinguish among melt ponds, open leads, and other spring and summer sea ice surface types.

  9. Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling Tools and Applications for Photovoltaic Devices: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.; Emery, K. E.; Gueymard, C.

    2002-05-01

    This conference paper describes the variations in terrestrial spectral irradiance on photovoltaic devices can be an important consideration in photovoltaic device design and performance. This paper describes three available atmospheric transmission models, MODTRAN, SMARTS2, and SPCTRAL2. We describe the basics of their operation and performance, and applications in the photovoltaic community. Examples of model input and output data and comparisons between the model results for each under similar conditions are presented. The SMARTS2 model is shown to be much easier to use, as accurate as the complex MODTRAN model, and more accurate than the historical NREL SPCTRAL2 model.

  10. First evidence of non-Gaussian solar flare EUV spectral line profiles and accelerated non-thermal ion motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Labrosse, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Context. The properties of solar flare plasma can be determined from the observation of optically thin lines. The emitting ion distribution determines the shape of the spectral line profile, with an isothermal Maxwellian ion distribution producing a Gaussian profile. Non-Gaussian line profiles may indicate more complex ion distributions. Aims: We investigate the possibility of determining flare-accelerated non-thermal ion and/or plasma velocity distributions. Methods: We study EUV spectral lines produced during a flare SOL2013-05-15T01:45 using the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). The flare is located close to the eastern solar limb with an extended loop structure, allowing the different flare features: ribbons, hard X-ray (HXR) footpoints and the loop-top source to be clearly observed in UV, EUV and X-rays. EUV line spectroscopy is performed in seven different regions covering the flare. We study the line profiles of the isolated and unblended Fe XVI lines (λ262.9760 Å ) mainly formed at temperatures of ~2 to 4 MK. Suitable Fe XVI line profiles at one time close to the peak soft X-ray emission and free of directed mass motions are examined using: 1. a higher moments analysis, 2. Gaussian fitting, and 3. by fitting a kappa distribution line profile convolved with a Gaussian to account for the EIS instrumental profile. Results: Fe XVI line profiles in the flaring loop-top, HXR footpoint and ribbon regions can be confidently fitted with a kappa line profile with an extra variable κ, giving low, non-thermal κ values between 2 and 3.3. An independent higher moments analysis also finds that many of the spectral line kurtosis values are higher than the Gaussian value of 3, even with the presence of a broad Gaussian instrumental profile. Conclusions: A flare-accelerated non-thermal ion population could account for both the observed non-Gaussian line profiles, and for the Fe XVI "excess" broadening found from Gaussian fitting, if the emitting ions are interacting

  11. Solar monochromatic images in magneto-sensitive spectral lines and maps of vector magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shihui, Y.; Jiehai, J.; Minhan, J.

    1985-01-01

    A new method which allows by use of the monochromatic images in some magneto-sensitive spectra line to derive both the magnetic field strength as well as the angle between magnetic field lines and line of sight for various places in solar active regions is described. In this way two dimensional maps of vector magnetic fields may be constructed. This method was applied to some observational material and reasonable results were obtained. In addition, a project for constructing the three dimensional maps of vector magnetic fields was worked out.

  12. Nanocomposite Architecture for Rapid, Spectrally-Selective Electrochromic Modulation of Solar Transmittance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongwook; Ong, Gary K; Wang, Yang; LeBlanc, Gabriel; Williams, Teresa E; Mattox, Tracy M; Helms, Brett A; Milliron, Delia J

    2015-08-12

    Two active electrochromic materials, vacancy-doped tungsten oxide (WO(3-x)) nanocrystals and amorphous niobium oxide (NbOx) glass are arranged into a mesostructured architecture. In a strategy applicable across electrochemical applications, the critical dimensions and interfacial connections in the nanocomposite are designed to optimize pathways for electrochemical charging and discharging. The result is an unprecedented optical range for modulation of visible and near-infrared solar radiation with rapid switching kinetics that indicate the WO(3-x) nanocrystal framework effectively pumps charge out of the normally sluggish NbOx glass. The material is durable for at least 2000 electrochemical cycles. PMID:26189324

  13. The composition of solar wind turbulence near the spectral break: Processes and instabilities at kinetic scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podesta, John J.

    2016-03-01

    Observations of the magnetic helicity spectrum as a function of the angle θBV between the direction of the local mean magnetic field and the solar wind flow velocity are reviewed. A summary of the current physical interpretation of this magnetic helicity "map" in terms of linear plasma waves is presented and the role of different kinetic processes are briefly discussed with an emphasis on the nature and origin of the parallel propagating waves. Possible contradictions between the physical interpretation of these wave observations and observations of ion distribution functions are also pointed out.

  14. A formula for calculating theoretical photoelectron fluxes resulting from the He/+/ 304 A solar spectral line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, P. G.; Torr, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    A simplified method for the evaluation of theoretical photoelectron fluxes in the upper atmosphere resulting from the solar radiation at 304 A is presented. The calculation is based on considerations of primary and cascade (secondary) photoelectron production in the two-stream model, where photoelectron transport is described by two electron streams, one moving up and one moving down, and of loss rates due to collisions with neutral gases and thermal electrons. The calculation is illustrated for the case of photoelectrons at an energy of 24.5 eV, and it is noted that the 24.5-eV photoelectron flux may be used to monitor variations in the solar 304 A flux. Theoretical calculations based on various ionization and excitation cross sections of Banks et al. (1974) are shown to be in generally good agreement with AE-E measurements taken between 200 and 235 km, however the use of more recent, larger cross sections leads to photoelectron values a factor of two smaller than observations but in agreement with previous calculations. It is concluded that a final resolution of the photoelectron problem may depend on a reevaluation of the inelastic electron collision cross sections.

  15. Light trapping efficiency comparison of Si solar cell textures using spectral photoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Barugkin, Chog; Allen, Thomas; Chong, Teck K; White, Thomas P; Weber, Klaus J; Catchpole, Kylie R

    2015-04-01

    The band-to-band absorption enhancement due to various types of light trapping structures is studied experimentally with photoluminescence (PL) on monocrystalline silicon wafers. Four basic light trapping structures are examined: reactive ion etched texture (RIE), metal-assisted etched texture (MET), random pyramid texture (RAN) and plasmonic Ag nanoparticles with a diffusive reflector (Ag/DR). We also compare two novel combined structures of front side RIE/rear side RAN and front side RIE/rear side Ag/DR. The use of photoluminescence allows us to measure the absorption due to band-to-band transitions only, and excludes parasitic absorption from free carriers and other sources. The measured absorptance spectra are used to calculate the maximum generation current for each structure, and the light trapping efficiency is compared to a recently-proposed figure of merit. The results show that by combining RIE with RAN and Ag/DR, we can fabricate two structures with excellent light trapping efficiencies of 55% and 52% respectively, which is well above previously reported values for similar wafer thicknesses. A comparison of the measured band-band absorption and the EQE of back-contact silicon solar cells demonstrates that PL extracted absorption provides a very good indication of long wavelength performance for high efficiency silicon solar cells. PMID:25968804

  16. ON THE SPECTRAL HARDENING AT {approx}>300 keV IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.; Kong, X.; Zank, G.; Chen, Y.

    2013-05-20

    It has long been noted that the spectra of observed continuum emissions in many solar flares are consistent with double power laws with a hardening at energies {approx}>300 keV. It is now widely believed that at least in electron-dominated events, the hardening in the photon spectrum reflects an intrinsic hardening in the source electron spectrum. In this paper, we point out that a power-law spectrum of electrons with a hardening at high energies can be explained by the diffusive shock acceleration of electrons at a termination shock with a finite width. Our suggestion is based on an early analytical work by Drury et al., where the steady-state transport equation at a shock with a tanh profile was solved for a p-independent diffusion coefficient. Numerical simulations with a p-dependent diffusion coefficient show hardenings in the accelerated electron spectrum that are comparable with observations. One necessary condition for our proposed scenario to work is that high-energy electrons resonate with the inertial range of the MHD turbulence and low-energy electrons resonate with the dissipation range of the MHD turbulence at the acceleration site, and the spectrum of the dissipation range {approx}k {sup -2.7}. A {approx}k {sup -2.7} dissipation range spectrum is consistent with recent solar wind observations.

  17. Power Spectral Density of Fluctuations of Bulk and Thermal Speeds in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.; Němec, F.; Přech, L.; Chen, C. H. K.; Zastenker, G. N.

    2016-07-01

    This paper analyzes solar wind power spectra of bulk and thermal speed fluctuations that are computed with a time resolution of 32 ms in the frequency range of 0.001–2 Hz. The analysis uses measurements of the Bright Monitor of the Solar Wind on board the Spektr-R spacecraft that are limited to 570 km s‑1 bulk speed. The statistics, based on more than 42,000 individual spectra, show that: (1) the spectra of bulk and thermal speeds can be fitted by two power-law segments; (2) despite their large variations, the parameters characterizing frequency spectrum fits computed on each particular time interval are very similar for both quantities; (3) the median slopes of the bulk and thermal speeds of the segment attributed to the MHD scale are ‑1.43 and ‑1.38, respectively, whereas they are ‑3.08 and ‑2.43 in the kinetic range; (4) the kinetic range slopes of bulk and thermal speed spectra become equal when either the ion density or magnetic field strength are high; (5) the break between MHD and kinetic scales seems to be controlled by the ion β parameter; (6) the best scaling parameter for bulk and thermal speed variations is a sum of the inertial length and proton thermal gyroradius; and (7) the above conclusions can be applied to the density variations if the background magnetic field is very low.

  18. On the Spectral Hardening at gsim300 keV in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Kong, X.; Zank, G.; Chen, Y.

    2013-05-01

    It has long been noted that the spectra of observed continuum emissions in many solar flares are consistent with double power laws with a hardening at energies gsim300 keV. It is now widely believed that at least in electron-dominated events, the hardening in the photon spectrum reflects an intrinsic hardening in the source electron spectrum. In this paper, we point out that a power-law spectrum of electrons with a hardening at high energies can be explained by the diffusive shock acceleration of electrons at a termination shock with a finite width. Our suggestion is based on an early analytical work by Drury et al., where the steady-state transport equation at a shock with a tanh profile was solved for a p-independent diffusion coefficient. Numerical simulations with a p-dependent diffusion coefficient show hardenings in the accelerated electron spectrum that are comparable with observations. One necessary condition for our proposed scenario to work is that high-energy electrons resonate with the inertial range of the MHD turbulence and low-energy electrons resonate with the dissipation range of the MHD turbulence at the acceleration site, and the spectrum of the dissipation range ~k -2.7. A ~k -2.7 dissipation range spectrum is consistent with recent solar wind observations.

  19. Spectral Analysis of Magnetic Fluctuations at Proton Scales from Fast to Slow Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, R.; Telloni, D.

    2015-10-01

    This Letter investigates the spectral characteristics of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations at proton scales during several time intervals chosen along the speed profile of a fast stream. The character of the fluctuations within the first frequency decade, beyond the high-frequency break located between the fluid and kinetic regimes, strongly depends on the type of wind. While the fast wind shows a clear signature of both right-handed and left-handed polarized fluctuations, possibly associated with Kinetic {Alfv}\\acute{{{e}}}{{n}} Wave (KAW) and ion-cyclotron waves, respectively, the rarefaction region, where the wind speed and the Alfvénicity of low-frequency fluctuations decrease, shows a rapid disappearance of the ion-cyclotron signature followed by a more gradual disappearance of KAWs. Moreover, the power associated with perpendicular and parallel fluctuations also experiences rapid depletion, however, retaining the power anisotropy in favor of the perpendicular spectrum.

  20. Physics of Solar Prominences: I-Spectral Diagnostics and Non-LTE Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrosse, N.; Heinzel, P.; Vial, J.-C,; Kucera, T.; Parenti, S.; Gunar, S.; Schmieder, B.; Kilper, G.

    2010-01-01

    This review paper outlines background information and covers recent advances made via the analysis of spectra and images of prominence plasma and the increased sophistication of non-LTE (i.e. when there is a departure from Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium) radiative transfer models. We first describe the spectral inversion techniques that have been used to infer the plasma parameters important for the general properties of the prominence plasma in both its cool core and the hotter prominence-corona transition region. We also review studies devoted to the observation of bulk motions of the prominence plasma and to the determination of prominence mass. However, a simple inversion of spectroscopic data usually fails when the lines become optically thick at certain wavelengths. Therefore, complex

  1. An intense NIR emission from Ca14Al10Zn6O35:Mn(4+),Yb(3+)via energy transfer for solar spectral converters.

    PubMed

    Lü, Wei; Jiao, Mengmeng; Shao, Baiqi; Zhao, Lingfei; Feng, Yang; You, Hongpeng

    2016-01-14

    To date, most current reports on the development and optimization of solar spectral converters have described the utilization of energy transfer among rare-earth ions. Here, we introduce non-rare-earth ion Mn(4+) to transfer energy to Yb(3+), which can exhibit strong near-infrared luminescence. It can harvest UV-blue photons and exhibits intense NIR emission of Yb(3+) around 1000 nm, perfectly matching the maximum spectral response of Si solar cells. It demonstrates for the first time that efficient energy transfer occurs with a decrease in the excited state lifetime and red photoluminescence (PL) from Mn(4+) with increasing Yb(3+) concentration. These results demonstrate that the Mn(4+) ions can be an efficient and direct sensitizer harvesting UV-blue photons. It could provide new avenues for developing harvesting Si-based solar cells. PMID:26608908

  2. Spectral properties of the extreme solar system objects 2012 DR30 and 2013 AZ60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, G.; Kiss, Cs.; Duffard, R.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Licandro, J.

    2014-04-01

    2012 DR30 and 2013 AZ60 represent two examples of TNOs with very large aphelion distances (2405 and 1951 AU, respectively), thus standing for the currently best candidates of possible scattered-in Oort-cloud objects. Though they possibly shared a similar dynamical scenario, the two bodies exhibit surprisingly diverging prediction for orbital evolution and also quite different surface properties (Kiss et al. 2013, Kiss et al. 2014). Here we compare these optical and infrared photometry and spectra of the two bodies. Both show a generaly flat spectrum, but with significantly differing slope. We find clear signs of water ice on 2013 DR30 particulary, which is an exciting diagnostic of a possible water reservoir at very large perihelion distances, and on the other hand, suggests a close link between the giant cometary nuclei of the Oort Cloud (for that Hale-Bopp is the only known example in our Solar System) and these exotic TNOs.

  3. Spectral and Imaging Observations of a White-light Solar Flare in the Mid-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penn, Matt; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh; Jhabvala, Murzy; Jennings, Don; Lunsford, Allen; Kaufmann, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    We report high-resolution observations at mid-infrared wavelengths of a minor solar flare, SOL2014-09-24T17:50 (C7.0), using Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector cameras at an auxiliary of the McMath-Pierce telescope. The flare emissions, the first simultaneous observations in two mid-infrared bands at 5.2 and 8.2 μ {{m}} with white-light and hard X-ray coverage, revealed impulsive time variability with increases on timescales of ˜4 s followed by exponential decay at ˜10 s in two bright regions separated by about 13\\prime\\prime . The brightest source is compact, unresolved spatially at the diffraction limit (1\\_\\_AMP\\_\\_farcs;72 at 5.2 μ {{m}}). We identify the IR sources as flare ribbons also seen in white-light emission at 6173 Å observed by SDO/HMI, with twin hard X-ray sources observed by Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, and with EUV sources (e.g., 94 Å) observed by SDO/AIA. The two infrared points have nearly the same flux density (fν, W m-2 Hz) and extrapolate to a level of about an order of magnitude below that observed in the visible band by HMI, but with a flux of more than two orders of magnitude above the free-free continuum from the hot (˜15 MK) coronal flare loop observed in the X-ray range. The observations suggest that the IR emission is optically thin; this constraint and others suggest major contributions from a density less than about 4× {10}13 cm-3. We tentatively interpret this emission mechanism as predominantly free-free emission in a highly ionized but cool and rather dense chromospheric region.

  4. NIMBUS-7 SBUV (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet) observations of solar UV spectral irradiance variations caused by solar rotation and active-region evolution for the period November 7, 1978 - November 1, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.; Repoff, T. P.; Donnelly, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of temporal variations of the solar UV spectral irradiance over several days to a few weeks in the 160-400 nm wavelength range are presented. Larger 28-day variations and a second episode of 13-day variations occurred during the second year of measurements. The thirteen day periodicity is not a harmonic of the 28-day periodicity. The 13-day periodicity dominates certain episodes of solar activity while others are dominated by 28-day periods accompanied by a week 14-day harmonic. Techniques for removing noise and long-term trends are described. Time series analysis results are presented for the Si II lines near 182 nm, the Al I continuum in the 190 nm to 205 nm range, the Mg I continuum in the 210 nm to 250 nm range, the MgII H & K lines at 280 nm, the Mg I line at 285 nm, and the Ca II K & H lines at 393 and 397 nm.

  5. The 238U/235U isotope ratio of the Earth and the solar system: Constrains from a gravimetrically calibrated U double spike and implications for absolute Pb-Pb ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyer, Stefan; Noordmann, Janine; Brennecka, Greg; Richter, Stephan

    2010-05-01

    The ratio of 238U and 235U, the two primordial U isotopes, has been assumed to be constant on Earth and in the solar system. The commonly accepted value for the 238U/235U ratio, which has been used in Pb-Pb dating for the last ~ 30 years, was 137.88. Within the last few years, it has been shown that 1) there are considerable U isotope variations (~1.3‰) within terrestrial material produced by isotope fractionation during chemical reactions [1-3] and 2) there are even larger isotope variations (at least 3.5‰) in calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) in meoteorites that define the currently accepted age of the solar system [4]. These findings are dramatic for geochronology, as a known 238U/235U is a requirement for Pb-Pb dating, the most precise dating technique for absolute ages. As 238U/235U variations can greatly affect the reported absolute Pb-Pb age, understanding and accurately measuring variation of the 238U/235U ratio in various materials is critical, With these new findings, the questions also arises of "How well do we know the average U isotope composition of the Earth and the solar system?" and "How accurate can absolute Pb-Pb ages be?" Our results using a gravimetrically calibrated 233U/236U double spike IRMM 3636 [5] indicate that the U standard NBL 950a, which was commonly used to define the excepted "natural" 238U/235U isotope ratio, has a slightly lower 238U/235U of 137.836 ± 0.024. This value is indistinguishable from the U isotope compositions for NBL 960 and NBL112A, which have been determined by several laboratories, also using the newly calibrated U double spike IRMM 3636 [6]. These findings provide new implications about the average U isotope composition of the Earth and the solar system. Basalts display a very tight range of U isotope variations (~0.25-0.32‰ relative to SRM 950a). Their U isotope composition is also very similar to that of chondrites [4], which however appear to show a slightly larger spread. Accepting terrestrial

  6. Absolute intensity measurements of CO2 bands in the 2395-2680/cm region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malathy Devi, V.; Benner, D. C.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    Absolute intensities for over 800 transitions belonging to twelve bands of (C-12)(O-16)2, (O-16)(C-12)(O-18), (O-16)(C-12)(O-17), and (O-16)(C-13)(O-18) molecules in the 2395-2680/cm spectral region have been derived using a nonlinear least-squares spectral fitting procedure. The data used in the analysis were recorded at room temperature and low pressure with the 0.01/cm resolution Fourier transform spectrometer in the McMath solar telescope complex at the National Solar Observatory. The measured intensities obtained for each band have been analyzed to derive the vibrational band intensity and F-factor coefficients. The results are compared with other published values.

  7. Measurements of absolute line intensities in carbon dioxide bands near 5.2 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Benner, D. C.; Devi, V. M.

    1985-01-01

    A nonlinear least-squares spectral fitting procedure has been used to derive experimental absolute intensities for over 300 unblended lines belonging to twelve CO2 bands in the 5.2-micron region. The spectral data were recorded at 0.01/cm resolution and room temperature with the Fourier transform spectrometer in the McMath solar telescope complex at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak and have a signal-to-rms noise ratio of 2000-4000. A natural sample of carbon dioxide was used as the sample gas. For each band, the measured line intensities have been analyzed to derive the vibrational band intensity and coefficients of the F factor. The results are compared to the values used to calculate the intensities in the 1982 Air Force Geophysics Laboratory line parameters compilation.

  8. Measuring the Spectral Expression of Carbon Dioxide in the Solar Reflected Spectrum with AVIRIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is a low-concentration, but important, component of the Earth's atmosphere. This gas absorbs electromagnetic radiation (EMR) in several regions of the spectrum. Absorption of energy by carbon dioxide adds heat to the atmosphere. In the world today, the burning of fossil fuels and other anthropogenic processes adds carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Other natural processes in the Earth's system both add and remove carbon dioxide. Overall, measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide at selected sites around the globe show an increased carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere. A figure shows the measured carbon dioxide from Mauna Loa, Hawaii, from 1958 to 2000. Overall, the concentration has increased from 315 to 365 ppm at this site over this period. (There is also a yearly cycle to the concentration that is timed with and hypothesized to be related to the vegetation growing season in the Northern Hemisphere.) The overall expected effect of this increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide is trapping of heat in the atmosphere and global warming. While this overall relationship between carbon dioxide and global warming seems straightforward, many of the specific details relating to regional and local sources and sinks and gradients of carbon dioxide are not well understood. A remote sensing capability to measure carbon dioxide could provide important inputs for scientific research to better understand the distribution and change in atmospheric carbon dioxide at detailed spatial and temporal levels. In pursuit of this remote sensing of carbon dioxide objective, this paper analyzes the expression of carbon dioxide in the spectral range measured by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imagery Spectrometer (AVIRIS). Based on these analyses, a spectral-fitting algorithm that uses AVIRIS measured spectra and MODTRAN radiative-transfer code modeled spectra to derive total column carbon dioxide abundance has been developed. This algorithm has been applied to an AVIRIS

  9. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  10. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  11. The temperature of solar flares determined from X-ray spectral line ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.

    1987-01-01

    The effect on derived solar flare plasma temperatures of (1) a power-law distribution of emission measure as a function of temperature, (2) a high-temperature isothermal source coupled to a low-temperature power-law distribution of emission measure, and (3) two isothermal sources is calculated for line ratios involving the ions S XV, Ca XIX, Ca XX, Fe XXV, Ni XXVII, and Fe XXVI. It is shown that if the Fe XXV temperature is less than about 25 million K, as is true for the majority of flares, then about 75 percent or more of the emission measure is produced by plasma at temperatures equal to or less than the Fe XXV temperature plus about 3 million K. If the Fe XXV temperature is 20 million K or higher, this percentage can be larger. This result is obtained even if a superhot component exists that extends up to several hundred million degrees. Temperatures determined from Fe XXVI demonstrate the presence of a superhot component.

  12. Spectral response of the solar atmosphere to an X-class flare event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacatus, Daniela Adriana; Donea, Alina

    2016-05-01

    The only X-class flare of 2015 observed by IRIS occurred at 16:22 UT on 11 March 2015, in AR 12297. This flare generated significant seismic transients in the photosphere at the eastern location of the flare. IRIS observations of the chromosphere and transition region help us understand the physics of the sunquake. In this work we will analyse this event using data from IRIS, SDO, and RHESSI. The IRIS rasters scanned the area between the main footpoints of the solar flare, and a wealth of chromospheric information has been inferred about the dynamics of the event. The main X-ray emission dominates the eastern flare footpoint, being missed by the IRIS slit. Significant enhancements in the chromospheric and TR lines intensities were identified. The forbidden line of Fe XXI 1354.1 Å is detected after the flare peak revealing the coronal responses to the flare. Plasma downflows of up to 300 km/s were identified in the majority of the observed lines, consistent with magnetic field local reconfiguration. We have also analysed an erupting filament developing at an earlier time, which moved rapidly towards the eastern part of the active region. We discuss the possibility that this filament might have pre-conditioned the chromosphere for the flare process.

  13. Exposure to Non-Extreme Solar UV Daylight: Spectral Characterization, Effects on Skin and Photoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Marionnet, Claire; Tricaud, Caroline; Bernerd, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    The link between chronic sun exposure of human skin and harmful clinical consequences such as photo-aging and skin cancers is now indisputable. These effects are mostly due to ultraviolet (UV) rays (UVA, 320–400 nm and UVB, 280–320 nm). The UVA/UVB ratio can vary with latitude, season, hour, meteorology and ozone layer, leading to different exposure conditions. Zenithal sun exposure (for example on a beach around noon under a clear sky) can rapidly induce visible and well-characterized clinical consequences such as sunburn, predominantly induced by UVB. However, a limited part of the global population is exposed daily to such intense irradiance and until recently little attention has been paid to solar exposure that does not induce any short term clinical impact. This paper will review different studies on non-extreme daily UV exposures with: (1) the characterization and the definition of the standard UV daylight and its simulation in the laboratory; (2) description of the biological and clinical effects of such UV exposure in an in vitro reconstructed human skin model and in human skin in vivo, emphasizing the contribution of UVA rays and (3) analysis of photoprotection approaches dedicated to prevent the harmful impact of such UV exposure. PMID:25546388

  14. Exposure to non-extreme solar UV daylight: spectral characterization, effects on skin and photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Marionnet, Claire; Tricaud, Caroline; Bernerd, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    The link between chronic sun exposure of human skin and harmful clinical consequences such as photo-aging and skin cancers is now indisputable. These effects are mostly due to ultraviolet (UV) rays (UVA, 320-400 nm and UVB, 280-320 nm). The UVA/UVB ratio can vary with latitude, season, hour, meteorology and ozone layer, leading to different exposure conditions. Zenithal sun exposure (for example on a beach around noon under a clear sky) can rapidly induce visible and well-characterized clinical consequences such as sunburn, predominantly induced by UVB. However, a limited part of the global population is exposed daily to such intense irradiance and until recently little attention has been paid to solar exposure that does not induce any short term clinical impact. This paper will review different studies on non-extreme daily UV exposures with: (1) the characterization and the definition of the standard UV daylight and its simulation in the laboratory; (2) description of the biological and clinical effects of such UV exposure in an in vitro reconstructed human skin model and in human skin in vivo, emphasizing the contribution of UVA rays and (3) analysis of photoprotection approaches dedicated to prevent the harmful impact of such UV exposure. PMID:25546388

  15. Ion-scale spectral break of solar wind turbulence at high and low beta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. K.; Leung, L.; Boldyrev, S.; Maruca, B. A.; Bale, S. D.

    2014-11-01

    The power spectrum of magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind at 1 AU displays a break between two power laws in the range of spacecraft-frame frequencies 0.1 to 1 Hz. These frequencies correspond to spatial scales in the plasma frame near the proton gyroradius ρi and proton inertial length di. At 1 AU it is difficult to determine which of these is associated with the break, since di=ρi/√(β⊥i) and the perpendicular ion plasma beta is typically β⊥i˜1. To address this, several exceptional intervals with β⊥i≪1 and β⊥i≫1 were investigated, during which these scales were well separated. It was found that for β⊥i≪1 the break occurs at di and for β⊥i≫1 at ρi, i.e., the larger of the two scales. Possible explanations for these results are discussed, including Alfvén wave dispersion, damping, and current sheets.

  16. Ion-scale spectral break of solar wind turbulence at high and low beta

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C H K; Leung, L; Boldyrev, S; Maruca, B A; Bale, S D

    2014-01-01

    The power spectrum of magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind at 1 AU displays a break between two power laws in the range of spacecraft-frame frequencies 0.1 to 1 Hz. These frequencies correspond to spatial scales in the plasma frame near the proton gyroradius ρi and proton inertial length di. At 1 AU it is difficult to determine which of these is associated with the break, since and the perpendicular ion plasma beta is typically β⊥i∼1. To address this, several exceptional intervals with β⊥i≪1 and β⊥i≫1 were investigated, during which these scales were well separated. It was found that for β⊥i≪1 the break occurs at di and for β⊥i≫1 at ρi, i.e., the larger of the two scales. Possible explanations for these results are discussed, including Alfvén wave dispersion, damping, and current sheets. PMID:26074642

  17. Solar cell measurement standardization devices and procedures: Final subcontract report, April 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Zafonte, L.; Downing, R.G.; Mueller, R.; Anspaugh, B.; Weiss, R.; Webster, R.

    1986-11-01

    This report quantitatively evaluates the spectral mismatch error for the reference cell method. The spectral mismatch error for various crystalline silicon test cell/reference cell combinations under several popular solar simulators is compared with the red/blue ratio method. The absolute spectral response of seven Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) block 4 modules was measured using a modified LAPSS model solar simulator. The spectral mismatch error for these modules using reference cells of a similar type under the JPL LAPSS varied from +1.0% to -1.3%.

  18. Spectral properties of plant leaves pertaining to urban landscape design of broad-spectrum solar ultraviolet radiation reduction.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Haruka; Zhu, Hui; Wu, Yunying; Ma, Ruijun

    2010-03-01

    Human exposure to harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation has important public health implications. Actual human exposure to solar UV radiation depends on ambient UV irradiance, and the latter is influenced by ground reflection. In urban areas with higher reflectivity, UV exposure occurs routinely. To discover the solar UV radiation regulation mechanism of vegetation, the spectral reflectance and transmittance of plant leaves were measured with a spectrophotometer. Typically, higher plants have low leaf reflectance (around 5%) and essentially zero transmittance throughout the UV region regardless of plant species and seasonal change. Accordingly, incident UV radiation decreases to 5% by being reflected and is reduced to zero by passing through a leaf. Therefore, stratified structures of vegetation are working as another terminator of UV rays, protecting whole terrestrial ecosystems, while vegetation at waterfronts contributes to protect aquatic ecosystems. It is possible to protect the human population from harmful UV radiation by urban landscape design of tree shade and the botanical environment. Even thin but uniformly distributed canopy is effective in attenuating UV radiation. To intercept diffuse radiation, UV screening by vertical structures such as hedges should be considered. Reflectivity of vegetation is around 2%, as foliage surfaces reduce incident UV radiation via reflection, while also eliminating it by transmittance. Accordingly, vegetation reduces incident UV radiation to around 2% by reflection. Vegetation influence on ambient UV radiation is broad-spectrum throughout the UV region. Only trees provide cool UV protective shade. Urban landscapes aimed at abating urban heat islands integrated with a reduction of human UV over-exposure would contribute to mitigation of climate change. PMID:19777267

  19. High-resolution X-ray spectra of solar flares. IV - General spectral properties of M type flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Kreplin, R. W.; Mariska, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    The spectral characteristics in selected narrow regions of the X-ray spectrum of class M solar flares are analyzed. High-resolution spectra in the ranges 1.82-1.97, 2.98-3.07, 3.14-3.24 and 8.26-8.53 A, which contain lines important for the determination of electron temperature and departure from ionization equilibrium, were recorded by spaceborne Bragg crystal spectrometers. Temperatures of up to 20,000,000 K are obtained from line ratios during flare rise phases in M as well as X flares, while in the decay phase the calcium temperature can be as low as 8,000,000 K, which is significantly lower than in X flares. Large nonthermal motions (on the order of 130 km/sec at most) are also observed in M as well as X flares, which are largest during the soft X-ray rise phase. Finally, it is shown that the method proposed by Gabriel and Phillips (1979) for detecting departures of electrons from Maxwellian velocity distributions is not sufficiently sensitive to give reliable results for the present data.

  20. Silicon Nanowires for Solar Thermal Energy Harvesting: an Experimental Evaluation on the Trade-off Effects of the Spectral Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Sekone, Abdoul Karim; Chen, Yu-Bin; Lu, Ming-Chang; Chen, Wen-Kai; Liu, Chia-An; Lee, Ming-Tsang

    2016-12-01

    Silicon nanowire possesses great potential as the material for renewable energy harvesting and conversion. The significantly reduced spectral reflectivity of silicon nanowire to visible light makes it even more attractive in solar energy applications. However, the benefit of its use for solar thermal energy harvesting remains to be investigated and has so far not been clearly reported. The purpose of this study is to provide practical information and insight into the performance of silicon nanowires in solar thermal energy conversion systems. Spectral hemispherical reflectivity and transmissivity of the black silicon nanowire array on silicon wafer substrate were measured. It was observed that the reflectivity is lower in the visible range but higher in the infrared range compared to the plain silicon wafer. A drying experiment and a theoretical calculation were carried out to directly evaluate the effects of the trade-off between scattering properties at different wavelengths. It is clearly seen that silicon nanowires can improve the solar thermal energy harnessing. The results showed that a 17.8 % increase in the harvest and utilization of solar thermal energy could be achieved using a silicon nanowire array on silicon substrate as compared to that obtained with a plain silicon wafer. PMID:26729219

  1. Silicon Nanowires for Solar Thermal Energy Harvesting: an Experimental Evaluation on the Trade-off Effects of the Spectral Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekone, Abdoul Karim; Chen, Yu-Bin; Lu, Ming-Chang; Chen, Wen-Kai; Liu, Chia-An; Lee, Ming-Tsang

    2016-01-01

    Silicon nanowire possesses great potential as the material for renewable energy harvesting and conversion. The significantly reduced spectral reflectivity of silicon nanowire to visible light makes it even more attractive in solar energy applications. However, the benefit of its use for solar thermal energy harvesting remains to be investigated and has so far not been clearly reported. The purpose of this study is to provide practical information and insight into the performance of silicon nanowires in solar thermal energy conversion systems. Spectral hemispherical reflectivity and transmissivity of the black silicon nanowire array on silicon wafer substrate were measured. It was observed that the reflectivity is lower in the visible range but higher in the infrared range compared to the plain silicon wafer. A drying experiment and a theoretical calculation were carried out to directly evaluate the effects of the trade-off between scattering properties at different wavelengths. It is clearly seen that silicon nanowires can improve the solar thermal energy harnessing. The results showed that a 17.8 % increase in the harvest and utilization of solar thermal energy could be achieved using a silicon nanowire array on silicon substrate as compared to that obtained with a plain silicon wafer.

  2. Development of Surfaces Optically Suitable for Flat Solar Panels. [using a reflectometer which separately evaluates spectral and diffuse reflectivities of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A reflectometer which can separately evaluate the spectral and diffuse reflectivities of surfaces is described. A phase locked detection system for the reflectometer is also described. A selective coating on aluminum potentially useful for flat plate solar collector applications is presented. The coating is composed of strongly bound copper oxide (divalent) and is formed by an etching process performed on an aluminum alloy with high copper content. Fabrication costs are expected to be small due to the one stop fabrication process. A number of conclusions gathered from the literature as to the required optical properties of flat plate solar collectors are discussed.

  3. Reconstruction of total and spectral solar irradiance from 1974 to 2013 based on KPVT, SoHO/MDI, and SDO/HMI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, K. L.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.; Glassmeier, K. H.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Total and spectral solar irradiance are key parameters in the assessment of solar influence on changes in the Earth's climate. Aims: We present a reconstruction of daily solar irradiance obtained using the SATIRE-S model spanning 1974 to 2013 based on full-disc observations from the KPVT, SoHO/MDI, and SDO/HMI. Methods: SATIRE-S ascribes variation in solar irradiance on timescales greater than a day to photospheric magnetism. The solar spectrum is reconstructed from the apparent surface coverage of bright magnetic features and sunspots in the daily data using the modelled intensity spectra of these magnetic structures. We cross-calibrated the various data sets, harmonizing the model input so as to yield a single consistent time series as the output. Results: The model replicates 92% (R2 = 0.916) of the variability in the PMOD TSI composite including the secular decline between the 1996 and 2008 solar cycle minima. The model also reproduces most of the variability in observed Lyman-α irradiance and the Mg II index. The ultraviolet solar irradiance measurements from the UARS and SORCE missions are mutually consistent up to about 180 nm before they start to exhibit discrepant rotational and cyclical variability, indicative of unresolved instrumental effects. As a result, the agreement between model and measurement, while relatively good below 180 nm, starts to deteriorate above this wavelength. As with earlier similar investigations, the reconstruction cannot reproduce the overall trends in SORCE/SIM SSI. We argue, from the lack of clear solar cycle modulation in the SIM record and the inconsistency between the total flux recorded by the instrument and TSI, that unaccounted instrumental trends are present. Conclusions: The daily solar irradiance time series is consistent with observations from multiple sources, demonstrating its validity and utility for climate models. It also provides further evidence that photospheric magnetism is the prime driver of

  4. Temporal Evolution of Spectral and Angular Characteristics of SEP Particles during Several GLEs of Solar Cycle 23 Derived from NM Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishev, Alexander; Usoskin, Ilya; Kocharov, Leon

    High-energy charged particles of solar origin could represent a severe radiation risk for astronauts and air crew. In addition, they could disrupt technological systems. When a ground-based neutron monitor register abrupt increases in solar energetic particles (SEPs), we observe a special case of solar energetic particle event, a ground-level enhancement (GLE). In order to derive the spectral and angular characteristics of GLE particles a precise computation of solar energetic particle propagation in the Earth's magnetosphere and atmosphere is necessary. It consists of detailed computation of assymptotic cones for neutron monitors (NMs) and application of inverse method using the newly computed neutron monitor yield function. Assymptotic directions are computed using the Planetocosmics code and realistic magnetospheric models, namely IGRF as the internal model and Tsyganenko 89 with the corresponding Kp index as the external one. The inverse problem solution is performed on the basis of non-linear least squares method, namely Levenberg-Marqurdt. In the study presented here, we analyse several major GLEs of the solar cycle 23 as well as the first GLE event of the solar cycle 24, namely GLE69, GLE70 and GLE 71. The SEP spectra and pitch angle distribution are obtained at different momenta since the event's onset. The obtained characteristics are compared with previously reported results. The obtained results are briefly discussed.

  5. Core and wing densities of asymmetric coronal spectral profiles: Implications for the mass supply of the solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Patsourakos, S.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Young, P. R. E-mail: james.a.klimchuk@nasa.gov

    2014-02-01

    Recent solar spectroscopic observations have shown that coronal spectral lines can exhibit asymmetric profiles, with enhanced emissions at their blue wings. These asymmetries correspond to rapidly upflowing plasmas at speeds exceeding ≈50 km s{sup –1}. Here, we perform a study of the density of the rapidly upflowing material and compare it with that of the line core that corresponds to the bulk of the plasma. For this task, we use spectroscopic observations of several active regions taken by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer of the Hinode mission. The density sensitive ratio of the Fe XIV lines at 264.78 and 274.20 Å is used to determine wing and core densities. We compute the ratio of the blue wing density to the core density and find that most values are of order unity. This is consistent with the predictions for coronal nanoflares if most of the observed coronal mass is supplied by chromospheric evaporation driven by the nanoflares. However, much larger blue wing-to-core density ratios are predicted if most of the coronal mass is supplied by heated material ejected with type II spicules. Our measurements do not rule out a spicule origin for the blue wing emission, but they argue against spicules being a primary source of the hot plasma in the corona. We note that only about 40% of the pixels where line blends could be safely ignored have blue wing asymmetries in both Fe XIV lines. Anticipated sub-arcsecond spatial resolution spectroscopic observations in future missions could shed more light on the origin of blue, red, and mixed asymmetries.

  6. Core and Wing Densities of Asymmetric Coronal Spectral Profiles: Implications for the Mass Supply of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patsourakos, S.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Young, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent solar spectroscopic observations have shown that coronal spectral lines can exhibit asymmetric profiles, with enhanced emissions at their blue wings. These asymmetries correspond to rapidly upflowing plasmas at speeds exceeding approximately equal to 50 km per sec. Here, we perform a study of the density of the rapidly upflowing material and compare it with that of the line core that corresponds to the bulk of the plasma. For this task, we use spectroscopic observations of several active regions taken by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer of the Hinode mission. The density sensitive ratio of the Fe(sub XIV) lines at 264.78 and 274.20 Angstroms is used to determine wing and core densities.We compute the ratio of the blue wing density to the core density and find that most values are of order unity. This is consistent with the predictions for coronal nanoflares if most of the observed coronal mass is supplied by chromospheric evaporation driven by the nanoflares. However, much larger blue wing-to-core density ratios are predicted if most of the coronal mass is supplied by heated material ejected with type II spicules. Our measurements do not rule out a spicule origin for the blue wing emission, but they argue against spicules being a primary source of the hot plasma in the corona. We note that only about 40% of the pixels where line blends could be safely ignored have blue wing asymmetries in both Fe(sub XIV) lines. Anticipated sub-arcsecond spatial resolution spectroscopic observations in future missions could shed more light on the origin of blue, red, and mixed asymmetries.

  7. A Synergistic Approach to Atmospheric Compensation of Neon's Airborne Hyperspectral Imagery Utilizing an Airborne Solar Spectral Irradiance Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, L.; Karpowicz, B. M.; Kindel, B. C.; Schmidt, S.; Leisso, N.; Kampe, T. U.; Pilewskie, P.

    2014-12-01

    A wide variety of critical information regarding bioclimate, biodiversity, and biogeochemistry is embedded in airborne hyperspectral imagery. Most, if not all of the primary signal relies upon first deriving the surface reflectance of land cover and vegetation from measured hyperspectral radiance. This places stringent requirements on terrain, and atmospheric compensation algorithms to accurately derive surface reflectance properties. An observatory designed to measure bioclimate, biodiversity, and biogeochemistry variables from surface reflectance must take great care in developing an approach which chooses algorithms with the highest accuracy, along with providing those algorithms with data necessary to describe the physical mechanisms that affect the measured at sensor radiance. The Airborne Observation Platform (AOP) part of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is developing such an approach. NEON is a continental-scale ecological observation platform designed to collect and disseminate data to enable the understanding and forecasting of the impacts of climate change, land use change, and invasive species on ecology. The instrumentation package used by the AOP includes a visible and shortwave infrared hyperspectral imager, waveform LiDAR, and high resolution (RGB) digital camera. In addition to airborne measurements, ground-based CIMEL sun photometers will be used to help characterize atmospheric aerosol loading, and ground validation measurements with field spectrometers will be made at select NEON sites. While the core instrumentation package provides critical information to derive surface reflectance of land surfaces and vegetation, the addition of a Solar Spectral Irradiance Radiometer (SSIR) is being investigated as an additional source of data to help identify and characterize atmospheric aerosol, and cloud contributions contributions to the radiance measured by the hyperspectral imager. The addition of the SSIR provides the opportunity to

  8. Core and Wing Densities of Asymmetric Coronal Spectral Profiles: Implications for the Mass Supply of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsourakos, S.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Young, P. R.

    2014-02-01

    Recent solar spectroscopic observations have shown that coronal spectral lines can exhibit asymmetric profiles, with enhanced emissions at their blue wings. These asymmetries correspond to rapidly upflowing plasmas at speeds exceeding ≈50 km s-1. Here, we perform a study of the density of the rapidly upflowing material and compare it with that of the line core that corresponds to the bulk of the plasma. For this task, we use spectroscopic observations of several active regions taken by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer of the Hinode mission. The density sensitive ratio of the Fe XIV lines at 264.78 and 274.20 Å is used to determine wing and core densities. We compute the ratio of the blue wing density to the core density and find that most values are of order unity. This is consistent with the predictions for coronal nanoflares if most of the observed coronal mass is supplied by chromospheric evaporation driven by the nanoflares. However, much larger blue wing-to-core density ratios are predicted if most of the coronal mass is supplied by heated material ejected with type II spicules. Our measurements do not rule out a spicule origin for the blue wing emission, but they argue against spicules being a primary source of the hot plasma in the corona. We note that only about 40% of the pixels where line blends could be safely ignored have blue wing asymmetries in both Fe XIV lines. Anticipated sub-arcsecond spatial resolution spectroscopic observations in future missions could shed more light on the origin of blue, red, and mixed asymmetries.

  9. Absolute biological needs.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Absolute needs (as against instrumental needs) are independent of the ends, goals and purposes of personal agents. Against the view that the only needs are instrumental needs, David Wiggins and Garrett Thomson have defended absolute needs on the grounds that the verb 'need' has instrumental and absolute senses. While remaining neutral about it, this article does not adopt that approach. Instead, it suggests that there are absolute biological needs. The absolute nature of these needs is defended by appeal to: their objectivity (as against mind-dependence); the universality of the phenomenon of needing across the plant and animal kingdoms; the impossibility that biological needs depend wholly upon the exercise of the abilities characteristic of personal agency; the contention that the possession of biological needs is prior to the possession of the abilities characteristic of personal agency. Finally, three philosophical usages of 'normative' are distinguished. On two of these, to describe a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' is to describe it as value-dependent. A description of a phenomenon or claim as 'normative' in the third sense does not entail such value-dependency, though it leaves open the possibility that value depends upon the phenomenon or upon the truth of the claim. It is argued that while survival needs (or claims about them) may well be normative in this third sense, they are normative in neither of the first two. Thus, the idea of absolute need is not inherently normative in either of the first two senses. PMID:23586876

  10. Preliminary experiment requirements document for Solar and Terrestrial Atmospheres Spectrometer (STAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The principal scientific objective of the Solar and Terrestrial Atmospheres Spectrometer (STAS) project is the measurement of the absolute ultraviolet solar spectral irradiance with: (1) resolution of better than 15 mA, and (2) absolute irradiance uncertainty at the state of the art (less than or equal to 3%). High measurement accuracy coupled with high spectral resolution are necessary to identify the nature of the radiation, its variability, and to identify solar processes which may cause the changes. Solar radiation between 1200 and 3600 A dominates the photochemistry of the mesosphere and stratosphere. Some important minor species, such as NO, show very complex and fundamentally narrow structure in their photodestruction cross sections, especially in the region of the Schumann-Runge bands of O2. Understanding the photochemical processes in the terrestrial atmosphere requires knowledge of both the cross sections and of the solar spectrum with the highest possible resolution and accuracy.

  11. Changes in photochemically significant solar UV spectral irradiance as estimated by the composite Mg II index and scale factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deland, Matthew T.; Cebula, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the impact of solar ultraviolet irradiance variations on stratospheric ozone abundances currently requires the use of proxy indicators. The Mg II core-to-wing index has been developed as an indicator of solar UV activity between 175-400 nm that is independent of most instrument artifacts, and measures solar variability on both rotational and solar cycle time scales. Linear regression fits have been used to merge the individual Mg II index data sets from the Nimbus-7, NOAA-9, and NOAA-11 instruments onto a single reference scale. The change in 27-dayrunning average of the composite Mg II index from solar maximum to solar minimum is approximately 8 percent for solar cycle 21, and approximately 9 percent for solar cycle 22 through January 1992. Scaling factors based on the short-term variations in the Mg II index and solar irradiance data sets have been developed to estimate solar variability at mid-UV and near-UV wavelengths. Near 205 nm, where solar irradiance variations are important for stratospheric photo-chemistry and dynamics, the estimated change in irradiance during solar cycle 22 is approximately 10 percent using the composite Mg II index and scale factors.

  12. Measurements of solar radiation at Mauna Loa Observatory, 1978-1985, with emphasis on the effects of the eruption of El Chichon. Data report

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, E.G.; DeLuisi, J.J.; Austring, A.P.

    1987-07-01

    Results from three different projects that involved either absolute or relative measurement of solar radiation at the NOAA Mauna Loa Observatory are reported. Included are measurements, in summary form, of broadband solar irradiance, spectral aerosol optical depth, and spectral diffuse-sky irradiance. Each data set includes the influence of the stratospheric debris from the eruption of El Chichon. Procedures that were used to acquire and finalize the observational records are documented.

  13. Simultaneous measurement of the total solar irradiance and solar diameter by the PICARD mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, Gérard; Dewitte, Steven; Schmutz, Werner; Picard Team

    2006-01-01

    A mission dedicated to simultaneous measurements of the solar diameter, spectral, and total solar irradiance is presently in development for launch end of the year 2008 on board of a microsatellite under the responsibility of Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales. The payload will consist of an imaging telescope, three filter radiometers with in total twelve channels, and two independent absolute radiometers. The scientific aims are presented as well as the concepts and properties of the instrumentation. This mission is named PICARD after the pioneering work of Jean Picard (1620-1682) who precisely determined the solar diameter during the Maunder minimum.

  14. A Change in the Solar He II EUV Global Network Structure as an Indicator of the Geo-Effectiveness of Solar Minima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didkovsky, L.; Gurman, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Solar activity during 2007 - 2009 was very low, causing anomalously low thermospheric density. A comparison of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance in the He II spectral band (26 to 34 nm) from the Solar Extreme ultraviolet Monitor (SEM), one of instruments on the Charge Element and Isotope Analysis System (CELIAS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) for the two latest solar minima showed a decrease of the absolute irradiance of about 15 +/- 6 % during the solar minimum between Cycles 23 and 24 compared with the Cycle 22/23 minimum when a yearly running-mean filter was used. We found that some local, shorter-term minima including those with the same absolute EUV flux in the SEM spectral band show a higher concentration of spatial power in the global network structure from the 30.4 nm SOHO/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) images for the local minimum of 1996 compared with the minima of 2008 - 2011.We interpret this higher concentration of spatial power in the transition region's global network structure as a larger number of larger-area features on the solar disk. These changes in the global network structure during solar minima may characterize, in part, the geo-effectiveness of the solar He II EUV irradiance in addition to the estimations based on its absolute levels.

  15. The absolute path command

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it canmore » provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.« less

  16. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  17. Geometries, Electronic Structures, And Spectral Properties Of Some Metal Free Phthalonitrile Derivatives For Enhancement Of The Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Anbarasan, P. M.

    2010-08-06

    New technologies for direct solar energy conversion have gained more attention in the last few years. In particular, Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) are promising in terms of efficiency and low cost [1,2]. Benefited from systematic device engineering and continuous material innovation, a state of the art DSC with a ruthenium sensitizer has achieved a validated efficiency of 11.1%[3] measured under the air mass 1.5 global (AM1.5G) conditions.The optimized geometries of the 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile are shown in Fig. 1(a). The frontier molecular orbitals (MO) energies of the dyes 3, 4 Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Nitrophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile are shown in Fig. 1(b). The HOMO-LUMO gap of the dye 3, 4 Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile in vacuum is 5.96 eV, 5.54 eV, 5.57 eV, 5.76 eV respectively. The geometries, electronic structures, polarizabilities, and hyperpolarizabilities of dyes 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile were studied by using density functional theory with hybrid functional B3LYP, and the UV-Vis spectra were investigated by using TDDFT methods. The NBO results suggest that 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile are all (D-pi-A) systems. The calculated isotropic polarizability of 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile is. 85.76, 112.72, 26.63 and 115.13 a.u., respectively. The calculated polarizability anisotropy invariant of 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile is 74.451, 83.533, 62.653 and 88.526 a.u., respectively. The hyperpolarizabilities of 3, 4-Pyridinedicarbonitrile, 3-Aminophthalonitrile, 4-Aminophthalonitrile and 4-Methylphthalonitrile is 0

  18. Inferring water vapor amounts with solar spectral irradiance: Measurements, modeling, and comparisons with in situ water vapor profiles in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere from ATTREX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindel, B. C.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, S.; Thornberry, T. D.; Rollins, D. W.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Bui, T. V.

    2013-12-01

    The Airborne Tropical TRopopause Experiment (ATTREX) flew six science missions on the NASA Global Hawk aircraft from NASA Dryden, California to the Pacific tropics to sample the upper troposphere, lower stratosphere (UTLS) during February and March of 2013. After transit to the tropics, the aircraft performed a series of vertical profiles from the cruising altitude of about 18 km down to 14 km sampling the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). A science focus of ATTREX is to examine water vapor and its transport through the TTL. The extremely cold temperatures found in the TTL act to limit the transport of water vapor from the troposphere to stratosphere, making this region critical to the water vapor budget of the stratosphere. Here we investigate the use of the strong water bands centered at 1400 and 1900 nm in the telluric solar spectrum to infer the small water vapor amounts through the TTL. Measurements of spectral irradiance from the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) at the top and bottom of the aircraft profiles are used to produce transmission spectra. These are compared with atmospheric radiative transfer calculations of transmission through the layer. The measured water vapor profile from the NOAA water vapor instrument, as well as temperature and pressure, were used in the modeling, providing a rare opportunity to compare water vapor amount inferred from solar transmittance to in situ measurements. Prospects for the use of these bands for determining the total column water vapor amount from the UTLS to the top of the atmosphere from aircraft are also discussed.

  19. High-spatial resolution and high-spectral resolution detector for use in the measurement of solar flare hard X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, U. D.; Orwig, Larry E.

    1988-01-01

    In the areas of high spatial resolution, the evaluation of a hard X-ray detector with 65 micron spatial resolution for operation in the energy range from 30 to 400 keV is proposed. The basic detector is a thick large-area scintillator faceplate, composed of a matrix of high-density scintillating glass fibers, attached to a proximity type image intensifier tube with a resistive-anode digital readout system. Such a detector, combined with a coded-aperture mask, would be ideal for use as a modest-sized hard X-ray imaging instrument up to X-ray energies as high as several hundred keV. As an integral part of this study it was also proposed that several techniques be critically evaluated for X-ray image coding which could be used with this detector. In the area of high spectral resolution, it is proposed to evaluate two different types of detectors for use as X-ray spectrometers for solar flares: planar silicon detectors and high-purity germanium detectors (HPGe). Instruments utilizing these high-spatial-resolution detectors for hard X-ray imaging measurements from 30 to 400 keV and high-spectral-resolution detectors for measurements over a similar energy range would be ideally suited for making crucial solar flare observations during the upcoming maximum in the solar cycle.

  20. Nonlinear Generation of Kinetic-scale Waves by Magnetohydrodynamic Alfvén Waves and Nonlocal Spectral Transport in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. S.; Voitenko, Y.; Wu, D. J.; De Keyser, J.

    2014-04-01

    We study the nonlocal nonlinear coupling and generation of kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) and kinetic slow waves (KSWs) by magnetohydrodynamic Alfvén waves (MHD AWs) in conditions typical for the solar wind in the inner heliosphere. This cross-scale process provides an alternative to the turbulent energy cascade passing through many intermediate scales. The nonlinearities we study are proportional to the scalar products of wave vectors and hence are called "scalar" ones. Despite the strong Landau damping of kinetic waves, we found fast growing KAWs and KSWs at perpendicular wavelengths close to the ion gyroradius. Using the parametric decay formalism, we investigate two independent decay channels for the pump AW: forward decay (involving co-propagating product waves) and backward decay (involving counter-propagating product waves). The growth rate of the forward decay is typically 0.05 but can exceed 0.1 of the pump wave frequency. The resulting spectral transport is nonlocal and anisotropic, sharply increasing perpendicular wavenumbers but not parallel ones. AWs and KAWs propagating against the pump AW grow with about the same rate and contribute to the sunward wave flux in the solar wind. Our results suggest that the nonlocal decay of MHD AWs into KAWs and KSWs is a robust mechanism for the cross-scale spectral transport of the wave energy from MHD to dissipative kinetic scales in the solar wind and similar media.

  1. Absolute line intensities in CO2 bands near 4.8 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Benner, D. C.; Devi, V. M.

    1986-01-01

    Absolute intensities for 726 unblended lines in 20 bands of C-12(O-16)2, C-13(O-16)2, O-16C-12O-18, and O-16C-12O-17 in the 4.8-micron spectral region have been determined using a natural sample of ultrahigh-purity CO2. Spectral data were recorded at low pressure (less than 10 torr) and room temperature with the Fourier transform spectrometer in the McMath solar telescope complex on Kitt Peak. Derived vibrational band intensities and coefficients of the F factor for each band were compared to values of the 1982 Air Force Geophysics Laboratory line parameters compilation. The present work fills out the CO2 lines in the 5-micron band systems. Lines in the strongest of these measured bands are being used to infer atmospheric pressure from high-resolution stratospheric spectra recorded during the Spacelab 3 Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy experiment.

  2. Carbon nanotube-based tandem absorber with tunable spectral selectivity: transition from near-perfect blackbody absorber to solar selective absorber.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, N; Krupanidhi, S B; Barshilia, Harish C

    2014-04-23

    CVD grown CNT thin film with a thickness greater than 10 μm behaves like a near-perfect blackbody absorber (i.e., α/ε = 0.99/0.99). Whereas, for a thickness ≤ 0.4 µm, the CNT based tandem absorber acts as a spectrally selective coating (i.e., α/ε = 0.95/0.20). These selective coatings exhibit thermal stability up to 650 °C in vacuum, which can be used for solar thermal power generation. PMID:24474148

  3. Spectral Studies of UV and Solar Photocatalytic Degradation of AZO Dye and Textile Dye Effluents Using Green Synthesized Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mariselvam, R.; Ranjitsingh, A. J. A.; Mosae Selvakumar, P.; Alarfaj, Abdullah A.; Munusamy, Murugan A.

    2016-01-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of the chemical dye AZO and dye effluents in different time duration has been investigated using biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles. Dye industry effluents and AZO dye undergo degradation to form harmless intermediate and colourless products following irradiation by UV and solar light in the presence of green synthesized silver nanoparticles. The degree of degradation was tested under the experimental conditions such as PH, temperature, and absorbance of the dye in UV and solar light was measured. The degradation was higher in the UV light source than in the solar light source. Green synthesized silver nanoparticles in the UV light source were found to expedite the dye degradation process. PMID:27382364

  4. Sentinel-2/MSI absolute calibration: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonjou, V.; Lachérade, S.; Fougnie, B.; Gamet, P.; Marcq, S.; Raynaud, J.-L.; Tremas, T.

    2015-10-01

    Sentinel-2 is an optical imaging mission devoted to the operational monitoring of land and coastal areas. It is developed in partnership between the European Commission and the European Space Agency. The Sentinel-2 mission is based on a satellites constellation deployed in polar sun-synchronous orbit. It will offer a unique combination of global coverage with a wide field of view (290km), a high revisit (5 days with two satellites), a high resolution (10m, 20m and 60m) and multi-spectral imagery (13 spectral bands in visible and shortwave infra-red domains). CNES is involved in the instrument commissioning in collaboration with ESA. This paper reviews all the techniques that will be used to insure an absolute calibration of the 13 spectral bands better than 5% (target 3%), and will present the first results if available. First, the nominal calibration technique, based on an on-board sun diffuser, is detailed. Then, we show how vicarious calibration methods based on acquisitions over natural targets (oceans, deserts, and Antarctica during winter) will be used to check and improve the accuracy of the absolute calibration coefficients. Finally, the verification scheme, exploiting photometer in-situ measurements over Lacrau plain, is described. A synthesis, including spectral coherence, inter-methods agreement and temporal evolution, will conclude the paper.

  5. Extended short-wavelength spectral response of organic/(silver nanoparticles/Si nanoholes nanocomposite films) hybrid solar cells due to localized surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhixin; Xu, Ling; Zhang, Wengping; Ge, Zhaoyun; Xu, Jun; Su, Weining; Yu, Yao; Ma, Zhongyuan; Chen, Kunji

    2015-04-01

    In this letter, we investigated spectral and opto-electronic conversion properties of the inorganic/organic hybrid cells by using silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)/Si nanoholes (SiNHs) nanocomposite films, which were fabricated by the modified metal-assisted electroless etching (EE) method. It was found that the optical absorption spectra of the films with AgNPs demonstrate a clear peak and show the enhancement of total absorption at the short wavelength. The results of current-voltage (I-V) measurements show that solar cells with AgNPs exhibit an increase of the power conversion efficiency by a factor of 2-3, in comparison with those of the samples without AgNPs. Moreover, higher external quantum efficiency (EQE) values in AgNPs-decorated solar cells were confirmed in the short-wavelength spectral region (400-700 nm), which were essential to achieve high-performance photovoltaic cells. We thought these were mainly attributed to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effects and increased light scattering of AgNPs.

  6. Analysis of the sensitivity of the composition and temperature of the stratosphere to the variability of spectral solar radiation fluxes induced by the 11-year cycle of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyshlyaev, S. P.; Galin, V. Ya.; Blakitnaya, P. A.; Lemishchenko, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of the gas composition of the atmosphere and its temperature to the changes in spectral radiation fluxes during the 11-year cycle of solar activity has been analyzed with a chemistry-climate model of the lower and middle atmosphere. For this, the data of satellite measurements acquired in the first decade of the 21st century were used. The results of the model calculations showed that, in addition to the increase in the spectral flux in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen that leads to the growth of the ozone content, the changes in the flux at longer wavelengths are significant for the composition and temperature of the atmosphere. The changes of the ozone destruction rate in different catalytic cycles partly compensate each other; in these processes, the destruction rate increases in the reaction with atomic oxygen, while it decreases in the hydrogen and chlorine cycles.

  7. Rapid spectral and flux time variations in a solar burst observed at various dm-mm wavelengths and at hard X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zodivaz, A. M.; Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Costa, J. E. R.; Takakura, T.; Cliver, E. W.; Tapping, K. F.

    1986-01-01

    A solar burst was observed with high sensitivity and time resolution at cm-mm wavelengths by two different radio observatories (Itapetinga and Algonquin), with high spectral time resolution at dm-mm wavelengths by patrol instruments (Sagamore Hill), and at hard X-rays (HXM Hinotori). At the onset of the major burst time structure there was a rapid rise in the spectral turnover frequency (from 5 to 15 GHz), in about 10s, coincident to a reduction of the spectral index in the optically thin part of the spectrum. The burst maxima were not time coincident at the optically thin radio frequencies and at the different hard X-ray energy ranges. The profiles at higher radio frequencies exhibited better time coincidence to the high energy X-rays. The hardest X-ray spectrum (-3) coincided with peak radio emission at the higher frequency (44 GHz). The event appeared to be built up by a first major injection of softer particles followed by other injections of harder particles. Ultrafast time structures were identified as superimposed on the burst emission at the cm-mm high sensitivity data at X-rays, with predominant repetition rates ranging from 2.0 to 3.5 Hz.

  8. Completing the Next Generation Spectral Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Michael

    2014-10-01

    We propose to complete our STIS UV+optical snapshot program, the Next Generation SpectralLibrary, which now stands at 380 targets. When complete the NGSL will comprise 600 stars,roughly equally divided among four metallicities, very low {[Fe/H] < -1.5}, low {-1.5 <[Fe/H] < -0.5}, near-solar {-0.3 < [Fe/H] < 0.1}, and super-solar {[Fe/H] > 0.2},well-sampling the entire HR-diagram in each bin. The finished NGSL will be invaluable formodeling the integrated light of galaxies and clusters, as well as calibrating the stellareffective temperature scale to <1% precision. Included in the updated target list forCycle 22 are select "touchstone" stars with precise radii measured with long baselineinterferometry, which will be used in the absolute calibration of the stellar effectivetemperature scale. Upon completion, the NGSL will surpass all extant spectral librariesbecause of its combination of UV spectral coverage and comprehensive metallicity range,with lasting archival value well into the JWST era and beyond. Because of the universalutility and community-broad nature of this venture, we waive the proprietary period.While snapshot proposals are ineligible for the UV initiative, the scientific returns fromthis program stem mainly from the HST/STIS UV capabilities.

  9. Short- and long-term variability of spectral solar UV irradiance at Thessaloniki, Greece: effects of changes in aerosols, total ozone and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountoulakis, Ilias; Bais, Alkiviadis F.; Fragkos, Konstantinos; Meleti, Charickleia; Tourpali, Kleareti; Zempila, Melina Maria

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we discuss the short- and the long-term variability of spectral UV irradiance at Thessaloniki, Greece, using a long, quality-controlled data set from two Brewer spectrophotometers. Long-term changes in spectral UV irradiance at 307.5, 324 and 350 nm for the period 1994-2014 are presented for different solar zenith angles and discussed in association with changes in total ozone column (TOC), aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloudiness observed in the same period. Positive changes in annual mean anomalies of UV irradiance, ranging from 2 to 6 % per decade, have been detected both for clear- and all-sky conditions. The changes are generally greater for larger solar zenith angles and for shorter wavelengths. For clear-skies, these changes are, in most cases, statistically significant at the 95 % confidence limit. Decreases in the aerosol load and weakening of the attenuation by clouds lead to increases in UV irradiance in the summer, of 7-9 % per decade for 64° solar zenith angle. The increasing TOC in winter counteracts the effect of decreasing AOD for this particular season, leading to small, statistically insignificant, negative long-term changes in irradiance at 307.5 nm. Annual mean UV irradiance levels are increasing from 1994 to 2006 and remain relatively stable thereafter, possibly due to the combined changes in the amount and optical properties of aerosols. However, no statistically significant corresponding turning point has been detected in the long-term changes of AOD. The absence of signatures of changes in AOD in the short-term variability of irradiance in the UV-A may have been caused by changes in the single scattering albedo of aerosols, which may counteract the effects of changes in AOD on irradiance. The anti-correlation between the year-to-year variability of the irradiance at 307.5 nm and TOC is clear and becomes clearer as the AOD decreases.

  10. Collection efficiency measurements for solar cell research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, H. L.; Olsen, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    A system was established for measuring absolute, spectral collection efficiency that is well suited to solar cell research and development. Determination of spectral collection efficiency involves measurements of the incident photon intensity, the device reflection coefficient, and the cell short circuit current. A monochromatic photon flux is obtained with a high intensity Bausch and Lomb monochromator, and an Epply thermopile detector is used to measure incident intensity. Normal incidence reflectivity measurements are achieved with a prism type beam splitter. The experimental approach is discussed, measurements of the reflectivity of evaporated silver films are considered. Collection efficiency measurements of silicon solar cells are presented, and collection efficiency studies of Cu20 solar cells are discussed.

  11. Resolving Differences in Absolute Irradiance Measurements Between the SOHO/CELIAS/SEM and the SDO/EVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, S. R.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, D. L.

    2014-08-01

    The Solar EUV Monitor (SEM) onboard SOHO has measured absolute extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray solar irradiance nearly continuously since January 1996. The EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on SDO, in operation since April of 2010, measures solar irradiance in a wide spectral range that encompasses the band passes (26 - 34 nm and 0.1 - 50 nm) measured by SOHO/SEM. However, throughout the mission overlap, irradiance values from these two instruments have differed by more than the combined stated uncertainties of the measurements. In an effort to identify the sources of these differences and eliminate them, we investigate in this work the effect of reprocessing the SEM data using a more accurate SEM response function (obtained from synchrotron measurements with a SEM sounding-rocket clone instrument taken after SOHO was already in orbit) and time-dependent, measured solar spectral distributions - i.e., solar reference spectra that were unavailable prior to the launch of the SDO. We find that recalculating the SEM data with these improved parameters reduces mean differences with the EVE measurements from about 20 % to less than 5 % in the 26 - 34 nm band, and from about 35 % to about 15 % for irradiances in the 0.1 - 7 nm band extracted from the SEM 0.1 - 50 nm channel.

  12. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  13. Transient climate simulation from the Maunder Minimum to present day using prescribed changes in GHG, total/spectral solar irradiance and ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangehl, Thomas; Cubasch, Ulrich; Schimanke, Semjon

    A fully coupled AO-GCM including representation of the middle atmosphere is used for tran-sient simulation of climate from 1630 to 2000 AD. For better representation of changes in the UV/visible part of the solar spectrum an improved short-wave radiation scheme is implemented. The model is driven by changes in GHG concentrations, solar activity and volcanic eruptions. Solar variability is introduced via changes in total/spectral solar irradiance (TSI/SSI) and pre-scribed changes in stratospheric ozone. The secular trend in TSI is in the range of 0.1 percent increase from Maunder Minimum to present-day. Volcanic eruptions are represented via abrupt reduction in TSI. With the applied forcings the model does not simulate a clear reduction of the annual Northern Hemisphere (NH) mean near surface temperature during Maunder Minimum. By contrast the Dalton Minimum is characterized by distinct cooling and there is a significant raise of NH mean near surface temperature until the end of the 20th century. Focusing on the North Atlantic/European region the winter mean near surface temperature change pat-tern from Late Maunder Minimum (1675-1715) to present-day (1960-1990) reveals maximum warming over north-eastern Europe and cooling over the western North Atlantic with maxi-mum cooling west of Greenland. These changes can partly be explained by a shift of the NAO towards a more positive phase. The simulated changes in tropospheric circulation are discussed with special emphasize on the role of the solar forcing. Besides the stratospheric solar forcing which may affect NAO variability via downward propagation of the solar signal from the strato-sphere to the troposphere the magnitude of the secular trend in TSI might play a role. For the period from Maunder Minimum to present-day the simulation shows less near surface temper-ature increase especially over arctic regions when compared to simulations performed with the same model including the standard radiation scheme but

  14. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of Narrow-Swath Imaging Sensors with Reference to Non-Coincident Wide-Swath Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, Joel; Thome, Kurtis; Lockwood, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    An inter-calibration method is developed to provide absolute radiometric calibration of narrow-swath imaging sensors with reference to non-coincident wide-swath sensors. The method predicts at-sensor radiance using non-coincident imagery from the reference sensor and knowledge of spectral reflectance of the test site. The imagery of the reference sensor is restricted to acquisitions that provide similar view and solar illumination geometry to reduce uncertainties due to directional reflectance effects. Spectral reflectance of the test site is found with a simple iterative radiative transfer method using radiance values of a well-understood wide-swath sensor and spectral shape information based on historical ground-based measurements. At-sensor radiance is calculated for the narrow-swath sensor using this spectral reflectance and atmospheric parameters that are also based on historical in situ measurements. Results of the inter-calibration method show agreement on the 2 5 percent level in most spectral regions with the vicarious calibration technique relying on coincident ground-based measurements referred to as the reflectance-based approach. While the variability of the inter-calibration method based on non-coincident image pairs is significantly larger, results are consistent with techniques relying on in situ measurements. The method is also insensitive to spectral differences between the sensors by transferring to surface spectral reflectance prior to prediction of at-sensor radiance. The utility of this inter-calibration method is made clear by its flexibility to utilize image pairings with acquisition dates differing in excess of 30 days allowing frequent absolute calibration comparisons between wide- and narrow-swath sensors.

  15. Hilbert-Huang spectral analysis for characterizing the intrinsic time-scales of variability in decennial time-series of surface solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengulescu, Marc; Blanc, Philippe; Wald, Lucien

    2016-04-01

    An analysis of the variability of the surface solar irradiance (SSI) at different local time-scales is presented in this study. Since geophysical signals, such as long-term measurements of the SSI, are often produced by the non-linear interaction of deterministic physical processes that may also be under the influence of non-stationary external forcings, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), an adaptive, noise-assisted, data-driven technique, is employed to extract locally - in time and in space - the embedded intrinsic scales at which a signal oscillates. The transform consists of two distinct steps. First, by means of the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD), the time-series is "de-constructed" into a finite number - often small - of zero-mean components that have distinct temporal scales of variability, termed hereinafter the Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs). The signal model of the components is an amplitude modulation - frequency modulation (AM - FM) one, and can also be thought of as an extension of a Fourier series having both time varying amplitude and frequency. Following the decomposition, Hilbert spectral analysis is then employed on the IMFs, yielding a time-frequency-energy representation that portrays changes in the spectral contents of the original data, with respect to time. As measurements of surface solar irradiance may possibly be contaminated by the manifestation of different type of stochastic processes (i.e. noise), the identification of real, physical processes from this background of random fluctuations is of interest. To this end, an adaptive background noise null hypothesis is assumed, based on the robust statistical properties of the EMD when applied to time-series of different classes of noise (e.g. white, red or fractional Gaussian). Since the algorithm acts as an efficient constant-Q dyadic, "wavelet-like", filter bank, the different noise inputs are decomposed into components having the same spectral shape, but that are translated to the

  16. ABSOLUTE POLARIMETRY AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    OKADA; BRAVAR, A.; BUNCE, G.; GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; MAKDISI, Y.; NASS, A.; WOOD, J.; ZELENSKI, Z.; ET AL.

    2007-09-10

    Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy Of {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} < 5%. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power A{sub N} of this process has allowed us to achieve {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} = 4.2% in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of AN in the CNI region (four-momentum transfer squared 0.001 < -t < 0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2}) are also discussed. We point out the current issues and expected optimum accuracy in 2006 and the future.

  17. Coronal Radio Occultation Experiments with the Helios Solar Probes: Correlation/Spectral Analysis of Faraday Rotation Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, A. I.; Lukanina, L. A.; Rogashkova, A. I.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Chashei, I. V.; Bird, M. K.; Pätzold, M.

    2015-09-01

    The coronal Faraday rotation (FR) experiments using the linearly polarized signals of the Helios-1 and Helios-2 interplanetary probes remain a unique investigation of the magnetic field of the solar corona and its aperiodic and quasi-periodic variations. The unexpectedly long lifetime of these spacecraft (1974 - 1986) enabled studies from very deep solar-activity minimum (1975 - 1976) into the strong activity maximum (1979). Important experimental data were also obtained for the rising (1977 - 1978) and declining (1980 - 1984) branches of the solar-activity cycle. Previous publications have presented results of the initial experimental data only for coronal-sounding experiments performed during individual solar-conjunction opportunities. This report is a more detailed analysis of the Helios FR measurements for the entire period 1975 - 1984. Radial profiles of the FR fluctuation (FRF) intensity recorded during the deepest solar-activity minimum in 1975 - 1976 are shown to differ distinctly from those during the strong solar-activity maximum in 1979. In particular, the decrease of the FRF intensity with solar-offset distance is substantially steeper in 1979 than in 1975/1976. In all cases, however, the FR data reveal quasi-periodic wave-like fluctuations in addition to the random background with a power-law spectrum. The dominant period of these fluctuations, recorded during 35 % of the total measurement time, is found to be close to five minutes. Large-scale FR variations at considerably longer periods (1.1 - 2.7 hours) were observed during 20 % of the measurement time. Knowing the intrinsic motion of the radio ray path from spacecraft to Earth and making a reasonable assumption about the solar-wind velocity, FRF observations at widely spaced ground stations have been used to estimate the velocity of coronal Alfvén waves. The velocity values range between 290 and 550 km s-1 at heliocentric distances between 3.5 and 4.5 R⊙ and are marginally lower (150 - 450 km s

  18. Precision spectroscopy with a frequency-comb-calibrated solar spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, H.-P.

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of the velocity field of the plasma at the solar surface is a standard diagnostic tool in observational solar physics. Detailed information about the energy transport as well as on the stratification of temperature, pressure and magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere are encoded in Doppler shifts and in the precise shape of the spectral lines. The available instruments deliver data of excellent quality and precision. However, absolute wavelength calibration in solar spectroscopy was so far mostly limited to indirect methods and in general suffers from large systematic uncertainties of the order of 100 m/s. During the course of this thesis, a novel wavelength calibration system based on a laser frequency comb was deployed to the solar Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT), Tenerife, with the goal of enabling highly accurate solar wavelength measurements at the level of 1 m/s on an absolute scale. The frequency comb was developed in a collaboration between the Kiepenheuer-Institute for Solar Physics, Freiburg, Germany and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics, Garching, Germany. The efforts cumulated in the new prototype instrument LARS (Lars is an Absolute Reference Spectrograph) for solar precision spectroscopy which is in preliminary scientific operation since~2013. The instrument is based on the high-resolution echelle spectrograph of the VTT for which feed optics based on single-mode optical fibres were developed for this project. The setup routinely achieves an absolute calibration accuracy of 60 cm/s and a repeatability of 2.5 cm/s. An unprecedented repeatability of only 0.32 cm/s could be demonstrated with a differential calibration scheme. In combination with the high spectral resolving power of the spectrograph of 7x10^5 and virtually absent internal scattered light, LARS provides a spectral purity and fidelity that previously was the domain of Fourier-transform spectrometers only. The instrument therefore provides unique capabilities for

  19. Reflected solar radiation from horizontal, vertical and inclined surfaces: ultraviolet and visible spectral and broadband behaviour due to solar zenith angle, orientation and surface type.

    PubMed

    Turner, J; Parisi, A V; Turnbull, D J

    2008-07-24

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation affects human life and UV exposure is a significant everyday factor that individuals must be aware of to ensure minimal damaging biological effects to themselves. UV exposure is affected by many complex factors. Albedo is one factor, involving reflection from flat surfaces. Albedo is defined as the ratio of reflected (upwelling) irradiance to incident (downwelling) irradiance and is generally accepted only for horizontal surfaces. Incident irradiance on a non horizontal surface from a variety of incident angles may cause the reflectivity to change. Assumptions about the reflectivity of a vertical surface are frequently made for a variety of purposes but are rarely quantified. As urban structures are dominated by vertical surfaces, using albedo to estimate influence on UV exposure is limiting when incident (downwelling) irradiance is not normal to the surface. Changes to the incident angle are affected by the solar zenith angle, surface position and orientation and surface type. A new characteristic describing reflection from a surface has been used in this research. The ratio of reflected irradiance (from any surface position of vertical, horizontal or inclined) to global (or downwelling) irradiance (RRG) has been calculated for a variety of metal building surfaces in winter time in the southern hemisphere for both the UV and visible radiation spectrum, with special attention to RRG in the UV spectrum. The results show that the RRG due to a vertical surface can exceed the RRG due to a horizontal surface, at smaller solar zenith angles as well as large solar zenith angles. The RRG shows variability in reflective capacities of surface according to the above mentioned factors and present a more realistic influence on UV exposure than albedo for future investigations. Errors in measuring the RRG at large solar zenith angles are explored, which equally highlights the errors in albedo measurement at large solar zenith angles. PMID:18490174

  20. HST Stellar Standards with 1% Accuracy in Absolute Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlin, R. C.

    2007-04-01

    Free of any atmospheric contamination, the {Hubble Space Telescope} provides the best available spectrophotometry from the far-UV to the near-IR for stars as faint as V˜16. The HST CALSPEC standard star network is based on three standard candles: the hot, pure hydrogen white dwarf (WD) stars G 191B2B, GD 153, and GD 71, which have Hubeny NLTE flux calculations that require the atomic physics for only one atom. These model flux distributions are normalized to the absolute flux for Vega of 3.46×10-9 erg cm-2 s-1 Å-1 at 5556 Å using precise Landolt V band photometry and the V bandpass function corrected for atmospheric transmission by M. Cohen. The three primary WD standards provide absolute flux calibrations for FOS, STIS and NICMOS spectrophotometry from these instruments on the HST. About 32 stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) have been constructed with a primary pedigree from the STIS data, which extends from 1150 Å for the hot stars to a long wavelength limit of 1 μm. NICMOS grism spectrophotometry provides an extension to 1.9 μm in the IR for 17 of the HST standards and longward to 2.5 μm for a few of the brighter stars. Included among these HST standards are Vega, the Sloan standard BD+17 4708, three bright solar analog candidates, three cool stars of type M or later, and five hot WDs. In addition, four K giants and four main sequence A-stars have NICMOS spectrophotometry from 0.8-2.5 μm. The WD fluxes are compared to their modeled SEDs and demonstrate an internal precision of 1-2%, while the A-stars agree with the Cohen IR fluxes to ˜2%. Three solar analog candidate stars differ from the solar spectrum by up to 10% in the region of heavy line blanketing from 3000-4000 Å and show differences in shape of ˜5% in the IR around 1.8 μm.

  1. A p-Type Quantum Dot/Organic Donor:Acceptor Solar-Cell Structure for Extended Spectral Response

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Hou, Jianhui; Dayal, Smita; Huo, Lijun; Kopidakis, Nikos; Beard, Matthew C.; Luther, Joseph M.

    2011-06-21

    A coupled PbS quantum dot film and a PSBTBT:PCBM bulk heterojunction layer contribute comparable photocurrent in a new stacked solar-cell architecture with sensitivity in the near infrared and an efficiency >4%. With a focus on the energy level alignment between components, time-resolved microwave photoconductivity is used to elucidate the charge transport pathways for electrons and holes.

  2. Diurnal and seasonal dynamics of canopy-level solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence and spectral reflectance indices in a cornfield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A collaborative field campaign was undertaken to examine the temporal dynamics of canopy-level solar-induced fluorescence (SIF) and the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) in conjunction with photosynthetic light use efficiency (LUE) obtained from fluxes measured at an instrumented tower. We condu...

  3. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  4. Absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The distinction between the uses of relative and absolute spectroradiometric calibration of remote sensing systems is discussed. The advantages of detector-based absolute calibration are described, and the categories of relative and absolute system calibrations are listed. The limitations and problems associated with three common methods used for the absolute calibration of remote sensing systems are addressed. Two methods are proposed for the in-flight absolute calibration of advanced multispectral linear array systems. One makes use of a sun-illuminated panel in front of the sensor, the radiance of which is monitored by a spectrally flat pyroelectric radiometer. The other uses a large, uniform, high-radiance reference ground surface. The ground and atmospheric measurements required as input to a radiative transfer program to predict the radiance level at the entrance pupil of the orbital sensor are discussed, and the ground instrumentation is described.

  5. Implants as absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Kan, Joseph Y K; Caruso, Joseph M

    2005-11-01

    Anchorage control is essential for successful orthodontic treatment. Each tooth has its own anchorage potential as well as propensity to move when force is applied. When teeth are used as anchorage, the untoward movements of the anchoring units may result in the prolonged treatment time, and unpredictable or less-than-ideal outcome. To maximize tooth-related anchorage, techniques such as differential torque, placing roots into the cortex of the bone, the use of various intraoral devices and/or extraoral appliances have been implemented. Implants, as they are in direct contact with bone, do not possess a periodontal ligament. As a result, they do not move when orthodontic/orthopedic force is applied, and therefore can be used as "absolute anchorage." This article describes different types of implants that have been used as orthodontic anchorage. Their clinical applications and limitations are also discussed. PMID:16463910

  6. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  7. SSBUV and NOAA-11 SBUV/2 Solar Variability Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLand, Matthew T.; Cebula, Richard P.; Hilsenrath, Ernest

    1998-01-01

    The Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV) and NOAA-11 SBUV/2 instruments measured solar spectral UV irradiance during the maximum and declining phase of solar cycle 22. The SSB UV data accurately represent the absolute solar UV irradiance between 200-405 nm, and also show the long-term variations during eight flights between October 1989 and January 1996. These data have been used to correct long-term sensitivity changes in the NOAA-11 SBUV/2 data, which provide a near-daily record of solar UV variations over the 170-400 nm region between December 1988 and October 1994. The NOAA-11 data demonstrate the evolution of short-term solar UV activity during solar cycle 22.

  8. Systematic Charge-to-Mass-Dependence of Heavy Ion Spectral Breaks in Large Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Mihir; Mason, Glenn; Ebert, Robert; Dayeh, Maher; McComas, David; Li, Gang; Mewaldt, Richard; Cohen, Christina; Schwadron, Nathan; Snith, Charles

    2016-04-01

    We fit the ˜0.1-500 MeV nucleon‑1 H-Fe spectra in 46 large SEP events surveyed by Desai et al. (2015) with the double power-law Band function to obtain a normalization constant, low- and high-energy Band parameters γaand γb; and spectral break energy EB. We also calculate the low-energy power-law spectral slope γ1. Our results are: 1) γa, γ1, andγb are species-independent and the spectra steepen with increasing energy; 2) the low-energy power-law spectral slopes γ1are consistent with diffusive acceleration at shocks with compression ratios between ˜2 - 4 as predicted by Schwadron et al. (2015); 3) the spectral breaks EB's are well ordered by Q/M ratio, and decrease systematically with decreasing Q/M, scaling as (Q/M)α with α in most events varying between ˜0.2-2, as predicted by Li et al (2009); 4) α is well correlated with Fe/O at ˜0.16-0.23 MeV nucleon‑1, but not with the ˜15-21 MeV nucleon‑1 Fe/O and the ˜0.5-2.0 MeV nucleon‑1 3He/4He ratios; 5) In most events: α <1.4, the spectra steepen significantly at higher energy with γb-γa >3, and O EB increases with γb-γa; and 6) Many extreme events (associated with faster CMEs and GLEs) are Fe-rich and 3He-rich, have large α ≥1.4, flatter spectra at low and high energies with γb-γa <3, and EB that anti-correlates with γb-γa. In most events, the Q/M-dependence of EB is consistent with the equal diffusion coefficient condition, while the event-to-event variations in α may be driven by differences in the near-shock wave intensity spectra, which are flatter than the Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum but weaker when compared to extreme events. We interpret these results as being due to weaker turbulence that allows the SEPs to easily escape, resulting in weaker Q/M-dependence of EB, lower α values, and spectral steepening at higher energies. In contrast for extreme events, the stronger Q/M-dependence of EB, larger α values, and harder spectra at high and low energy occur because enhanced

  9. Spectral calibration analysis of the airborne oceanographic lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousey, Carlton E.

    1989-01-01

    Efforts were concentrated on the spectral resolution of the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL). This year's work was targeted towards the analysis of calibration techniques to enable the AOL to measure absolute radiances of both passive and active modes of operation. Absolute spectral calibration of the AOL is necessary in order to fully understand and monitor the sensitivity and stability of the total system. Calibration is also needed to obtain valid surface truth data, with which to improve the accuracy of satellite-borne oceanic color scanners. In particular, accurate measurements of oceanic chlorophyll concentrations rests upon reliable irradiance calibrations of both laser induced and solar induced chlorophyll fluoresence. An analysis was performed on the spectral calibration methods used by the AOL. The optical path of the instrumentation was examined to study how the radiance from a calibration sphere was influenced. Ray tracing analysis was performed, including the Cassegrain-telescope optics. It was determined that the calibration radiance was significantly effected by optical-defocusing, due to close positioning of the calibration sphere with respect to the telescope. Since the multi-mode usages of the AOL require varying altitudes and trajectories, a computational algorithm was developed to compensate for image distortions of the telescope optics. Secondary mirror blockage, secondary vignetting, and beam divergence was determined, in order to account for the actual amount of calibrated flux received at the spectral sensors.

  10. ON SPECTRAL BREAKS IN THE POWER SPECTRA OF MAGNETIC FLUCTUATIONS IN FAST SOLAR WIND BETWEEN 0.3 AND 0.9 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Bourouaine, S.; Marsch, E.; Alexandrova, O.; Maksimovic, M.

    2012-04-20

    We analyze the radial variation of the power spectra of the magnetic field from 0.3 to about 0.9 AU, using Helios 2 spacecraft measurements in the fast solar wind. The time resolution of the magnetic field data allows us to study the power spectra up to 2 Hz. Generally, the corresponding spectral break frequency f{sub b} and the Doppler-shifted frequencies, which are related to the proton gyroradius and inertial scales, are close to a frequency f of about 0.5 Hz at a distance of 1 AU from the Sun. However, studying the radial evolution of the power spectra offers us the possibility to distinguish between those scales. Recent Ulysses observations show that, while the proton scales vary, f{sub b} stays nearly constant with the heliocentric distance R. In our study we confirm that f{sub b} varies within a small interval of [0.2, 0.4] Hz only, as R varies from 0.3 to 0.9 AU. Moreover, if we assume parallel propagating fluctuations (with respect to the solar wind flow or background magnetic field), we can show that none of the proton scales are coincident with the break scale. If, however, we take into account the two-dimensional nature of the turbulent fluctuations, then we can show that the spatial scale corresponding to f{sub b} (R) does follow the proton inertial scale, {lambda}{sub p}(R), but not the proton gyroradius scale, {rho}{sub p}(R), as a function of heliocentric distance. These observations indicate that the spectral break at the proton inertial scale might be related to the Hall effect, or be controlled by the ion-cyclotron damping of obliquely propagating fluctuations or the formation of current sheets scaling like {lambda}{sub p}, which could be responsible for ion heating through magnetic reconnection.

  11. SUMO: solar ultraviolet monitor and ozone nanosatellite for spectral irradiance, ozone and Earth radiative budget simultaneous evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damé, Luc

    SUMO is an innovative proof-of-concept nano-satellite which aims to measure on the same platform the different components of the Earth radiation budget, the solar energy input and the energy reemitted at the top of the Earth atmosphere, with a particular focus on the UV part of the spectrum and on the ozone layer, which are the most sensitive to the solar variability. The far UV (FUV) is the only wavelength band with energy absorbed in the high atmosphere (stratosphere), in the ozone (Herzberg continuum, 200-220 nm) and oxygen bands, and its high variability is most probably at the origin of a climate influence (UV affects stratospheric dynamics and temperatures, altering interplanetary waves and weather patterns both poleward and downward to the lower stratosphere and tropopause regions). Recent measurements at the time of the last solar minimum suggest that variations in the UV may be larger than previously assumed what implies a very different response in both stratospheric ozone and temperature. A simultaneous observation of the incoming FUV and of the ozone (O _{3}) production, would bring an invaluable information on this process of solar-climat forcing. Space instruments have already measured the different components of the Earth radiative budget but this is, to our knowledge, the first time that all instruments are operated on the same platform. This characteristic guarantees by itself obtaining original scientific results. SUMO is a 10x10x30 cm (3) nanosatellite (``3U"), the payload occupying ``1U", i.e. a cube of 10x10x10 cm (3) for 1 kg and 1 W of power. Orbit is polar since a further challenge in understanding the relation between solar UV variability and stratospheric ozone on arctic and antarctic regions. SUMO definition has been completed (platform and payload assembly integration and tests are possible in 24 months) and it is now intended to be proposed to CNES for a flight in 2017. Mission is expected to last up to 1 year. Follow-up is 2 fold: on

  12. Experimental and Model Study of Changes in Spectral Solar Irradiance in the Atmosphere of Large City due to Tropospheric NO2 Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubarova, N. Ye.; Larin, I. K.; Lebedev, V. V.; Partola, V. S.; Lezina, Ye. A.; Rublev, A. N.

    2009-03-01

    An experimental and model approach has been used to study the NO2 vertical profiles and its effect on solar irradiance. The profiles of NO2 were obtained using gas analyzers, which had been installed at different levels at the Moscow State University (MSU) located at the south-western part of Moscow and at the Ostankino tower located at the north of Moscow up to the height of 350 m. Using these data diurnal and spatial variability of the NO2 content in the most polluted part of planetary boundary layer (PBL) has been analyzed within the large megalopolis. On the base of photochemical modeling we have simulated the diurnal cycle of NO2 vertical profiles for summer and winter conditions and have compared the results with the experimental ones. Using the RT modeling with input gaseous and aerosol parameters of the atmosphere obtained from the MSU Meteorological Observatory we have estimated the attenuation of spectral solar irradiance in UV and visible region of spectrum due to the NO2 content in the polluted atmosphere for different seasons.

  13. Experimental and Model Study of Changes in Spectral Solar Irradiance in the Atmosphere of Large City due to Tropospheric NO{sub 2} Content

    SciTech Connect

    Chubarova, N. Ye.; Lebedev, V. V.; Partola, V. S.; Larin, I. K.; Lezina, Ye. A.; Rublev, A. N.

    2009-03-11

    An experimental and model approach has been used to study the NO{sub 2} vertical profiles and its effect on solar irradiance. The profiles of NO{sub 2} were obtained using gas analyzers, which had been installed at different levels at the Moscow State University (MSU) located at the south-western part of Moscow and at the Ostankino tower located at the north of Moscow up to the height of 350 m. Using these data diurnal and spatial variability of the NO{sub 2} content in the most polluted part of planetary boundary layer (PBL) has been analyzed within the large megalopolis. On the base of photochemical modeling we have simulated the diurnal cycle of NO{sub 2} vertical profiles for summer and winter conditions and have compared the results with the experimental ones. Using the RT modeling with input gaseous and aerosol parameters of the atmosphere obtained from the MSU Meteorological Observatory we have estimated the attenuation of spectral solar irradiance in UV and visible region of spectrum due to the NO{sub 2} content in the polluted atmosphere for different seasons.

  14. European UV DataBase (EUVDB) as a repository and quality analyser for solar spectral UV irradiance monitored in Sodankylä

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkilä, Anu; Kaurola, Jussi; Lakkala, Kaisa; Matti Karhu, Juha; Kyrö, Esko; Koskela, Tapani; Engelsen, Ola; Slaper, Harry; Seckmeyer, Gunther

    2016-08-01

    Databases gathering atmospheric data have great potential not only as data storages but also in serving as platforms for coherent quality assurance (QA). We report on the flagging system and QA tools designed for and implemented in the European UV DataBase (EUVDB; http://uv.fmi.fi/uvdb/) for measured data on solar spectral UV irradiance. We confine the study on the data measured by Brewer #037 MkII spectroradiometer in Sodankylä (67.37° N, 26.63° E) in 1990-2014. The quality indicators associated with the UV irradiance spectra uploaded into the database are retrieved from the database and subjected to a statistical analysis. The study demonstrates the performance of the QA tools of the EUVDB. In addition, it yields an overall view of the availability and quality of the solar UV spectra recorded in Sodankylä over a quarter of a century. Over 90 % of the four main quality indicators are flagged as GREEN, indicating the highest achievable quality. For the BLACK flags, denoting data not meeting the pre-defined requirements, the percentages for all the indicators remain below 0.12 %.

  15. Spectral analysis of ionospheric disturbances in the phase delay and radio signal amplitude at limb paths according to the COSMIC data in periods of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmakov, A. V.; Gorbunov, M. E.

    2016-07-01

    Based on more than 4500 sessions of radio transillumination of Earth's atmosphere along the satellite-atmosphere-satellite path obtained in the COSMIC experiment, the distribution along latitude and over local time of the spatial spectra of variations in the ionospheric phase delay and signal amplitude has been analyzed. The spatial spectra have been calculated for two height ranges, i.e., 60-80 and 80-100 km. In the phase signal spectrum within the height range 80-100 km, the second maximum in the vicinity of a frequency of 7-8 rad/km is clearly seen. Its diurnal and latitudinal behavior and its decrease towards high latitudes in both hemispheres can also be seen. In the height range of 60-80 km, this maximum is hardly observed. Although solar flares can lead to substantial local changes in the electron concentration, no substantial difference in the behavior of the spectral densities of the amplitude and phase delay at long limb paths was observed within these two height ranges on days of active and quiet sun. The latter fact makes it possible to develop a united algorithm of optimal ionospheric correction of the radio occultation data independent of solar activity.

  16. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-01

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2β) searches, single β-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy. Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium β-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope (137Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R&D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2β decay and single β-decay.

  17. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Joachim

    2011-10-06

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  18. Systematic Charge-to-Mass-Dependence of Heavy Ion Spectral Breaks in Large Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Mihir; Mason, Glenn; McComas, David; Cohen, Christina; Smith, Charles; Ebert, Robert; Schwadron, Nathan; Li, Gang; Mewaldt, Richard; Dayeh, Maher A.

    2016-07-01

    We fit the ˜0.1-500 MeV/nucleon H-Fe spectra in 46 large SEP events surveyed by Desai et al. (2015) with the double power-law Band function to obtain a normalization constant, low- and high-energy Band parameters γ_a and γ_b; and spectral break energy E_B. We also calculate the low-energy power-law spectral slope γ_1. Our results are: 1) γ_a, γ_1, and γ_b are species-independent and the spectra steepen with increasing energy; 2) the low-energy power-law spectral slopes γ_1 are consistent with diffusive acceleration at shocks with compression ratios between ˜2-4 as predicted by Schwadron et al. (2015); 3) the spectral breaks E_B's are well ordered by Q/M ratio, and decrease systematically with decreasing Q/M, scaling as (Q/M)^α with α in most events varying between ˜0.2-2, as predicted by Li et al (2009); 4) α is well correlated with Fe/O at ˜0.16-0.23 MeV/nucleon, but not with the ˜15-21 MeV/nucleon Fe/O and the ˜0.5-2.0 MeV/nucleon ^3He/^4He ratios; 5) In most events: α<1.4, the spectra steepen significantly at higher energy with γ_b - γ_a >3, and O E_B increases with γ_b - γ_a; and 6) Many extreme events (associated with faster CMEs and GLEs) are Fe-rich and ^3He-rich, have α≳1.4, flatter spectra at low and high energies with γ_b - γ_a <3, and E_B that anti-correlates with γ_b - γ_a. In most events, the Q/M-dependence of E_B is consistent with the equal diffusion coefficient condition, while the event-to-event variations in α may be driven by differences in the near-shock wave intensity spectra, which are flatter than the Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum but weaker when than extreme events. We interpret these results as being due to weaker turbulence that allows the SEPs to easily escape, resulting in weaker Q/M-dependence of E_B, lower α values, and spectral steepening at higher energies. In contrast for extreme events, the stronger Q/M-dependence of E_B, larger α values, and harder spectra at high and low energy occur because

  19. Spectrally selective glazings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    Spectrally selective glazing is window glass that permits some portions of the solar spectrum to enter a building while blocking others. This high-performance glazing admits as much daylight as possible while preventing transmission of as much solar heat as possible. By controlling solar heat gains in summer, preventing loss of interior heat in winter, and allowing occupants to reduce electric lighting use by making maximum use of daylight, spectrally selective glazing significantly reduces building energy consumption and peak demand. Because new spectrally selective glazings can have a virtually clear appearance, they admit more daylight and permit much brighter, more open views to the outside while still providing the solar control of the dark, reflective energy-efficient glass of the past. This Federal Technology Alert provides detailed information and procedures for Federal energy managers to consider spectrally selective glazings. The principle of spectrally selective glazings is explained. Benefits related to energy efficiency and other architectural criteria are delineated. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application of spectrally selective glazing, and step-by-step instructions are given for estimating energy savings. Case studies are also presented to illustrate actual costs and energy savings. Current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are included for users who have questions not fully addressed here.

  20. Comparative Studies of Hard X-Ray Spectral Evolution in Solar Flares with High-Energy Proton Events Observed at Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiplinger, Alan L.

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents the results of two extensive studies of hard X-ray spectral evolution in solar flares and their associations with energetic interplanetary proton events. The focus of this work is to establish the degree to which events that display progressively hardening hard X-ray spectra, at any time and over all observable timescales, are associated with high-energy interplanetary proton events. The first study examined a sample of 152 hard X-ray flares well observed with the HXRBS instrument on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). The study showed that 22 events revealed a progressive spectral hardening either over flux peaks (i.e., a soft-hard- harder spectral evolution) or during flux decays and that 18 of these 22 events (82%) had associated 10 MeV proton events or enhancements. Conversely, the absence of spectral hardening is associated with the absence of interplanetary protons with 124 of the 130 remaining flares (95.4%). Since the hard X-ray counting rate threshold of the first study was sufficiently high (5000 counts s-1) to exclude many flares (more than 36%) associated with the largest interplanetary proton events, a second study was conducted using 193 less intense HXRBS events (a one out of three sample) and their associations with only large proton events. This study also identifies events with progressive spectral hardening. It also employs selection criteria suggested by the results of the first study to "predict" which flares would or would not have associated large proton events. This prescription for "predicting" proton events did so correctly for four large (SESC qualified) proton events, missed none, and produced only one "false alarm" in which the criteria were met but only a small proton event was seen at earth. Thus, a correct "prediction" was made for all but one of the 193 events. The results of the first study are then combined with the weighted results of the one out of three study, using the same selection criteria, to project

  1. Absolute dosimetry for extreme-ultraviolet lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Kurt W.; Campiotti, Richard H.

    2000-06-01

    The accurate measurement of an exposure dose reaching the wafer on an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithographic system has been a technical challenge directly applicable to the evaluation of candidate EUV resist materials and calculating lithography system throughputs. We have developed a dose monitoring sensor system that can directly measure EUV intensities at the wafer plane of a prototype EUV lithographic system. This sensor system, located on the wafer stage adjacent to the electrostatic chuck used to grip wafers, operates by translating the sensor into the aerial image, typically illuminating an 'open' (unpatterned) area on the reticle. The absolute signal strength can be related to energy density at the wafer, and thus used to determine resist sensitivity, and the signal as a function of position can be used to determine illumination uniformity at the wafer plane. Spectral filtering to enhance the detection of 13.4 nm radiation was incorporated into the sensor. Other critical design parameters include the packaging and amplification technologies required to place this device into the space and vacuum constraints of a EUV lithography environment. We describe two approaches used to determine the absolute calibration of this sensor. The first conventional approach requires separate characterization of each element of the sensor. A second novel approach uses x-ray emission from a mildly radioactive iron source to calibrate the absolute response of the entire sensor system (detector and electronics) in a single measurement.

  2. Comparison of the solar spectral ultraviolet irradiance in motor vehicles with windows in an open and closed position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimlin, M. G.; Parisi, A. V.; Carter, B. D.; Turnbull, D.

    2002-06-01

    The solar ultraviolet (UV) spectrum was measured by a spectroradiometer located inside two common Australian vehicles: a family wagon and a four-wheel-drive vehicle. The entrance optics of the spectroradiometer was orientated, in turn, on a horizontal plane, towards the driver and passenger windows and towards the windshield. UV spectra were recorded when the vehicles' windows were in an open and closed position. For a typical Australian family wagon, on a horizontal plane inside the vehicle, closing the windows decreased, the total UV irradiance by a factor of 3.2, whilst in a four-wheel drive the irradiance decreased by a factor of 2.1. In order to reduce the likelihood of developing of UV-related eye and skin disorders, drivers should use appropriate UV protection whilst driving a vehicle with the windows in an open position. Results gained from this research provide new findings on the exposure of humans to UV in a vehicle.

  3. Absolute Identification by Relative Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Neil; Brown, Gordon D. A.; Chater, Nick

    2005-01-01

    In unidimensional absolute identification tasks, participants identify stimuli that vary along a single dimension. Performance is surprisingly poor compared with discrimination of the same stimuli. Existing models assume that identification is achieved using long-term representations of absolute magnitudes. The authors propose an alternative…

  4. Be Resolute about Absolute Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Margaret L.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how conceptualization of absolute value can start long before it is introduced. The manner in which absolute value is introduced to students in middle school has far-reaching consequences for their future mathematical understanding. It begins to lay the foundation for students' understanding of algebra, which can change…

  5. Solar Variability from 240 to 1750 nm in Terms of Faculae Brightening and Sunspot Darkening from SCIAMACHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagaran, J.; Weber, M.; Burrows, J.

    2009-08-01

    The change of spectral decomposition of the total radiative output on various timescales of solar magnetic activity is of large interest to terrestrial and solar-stellar atmosphere studies. Starting in 2002, SCIAMACHY was the first satellite instrument to observe daily solar spectral irradiance (SSI) continuously from 230 nm (UV) to 1750 nm (near-infrared; near-IR). In order to address the question of how much UV, visible (vis), and IR spectral regions change on 27 day and 11 year timescales, we parameterize short-term SSI variations in terms of faculae brightening (Mg II index) and sunspot darkening (photometric sunspot index) proxies. Although spectral variations above 300 nm are below 1% and, therefore, well below the accuracy of absolute radiometric calibration, relative accuracy for short-term changes is shown to be in the per mill range. This enables us to derive short-term spectral irradiance variations from the UV to the near-IR. During Halloween solar storm in 2003 with a record high sunspot area, we observe a reduction of 0.3% in the near-IR to 0.5% in the vis and near-UV. This is consistent with a 0.4% reduction in total solar irradiance (TSI). Over an entire 11 year solar cycle, SSI variability covering simultaneously the UV, vis, and IR spectral regions have not been directly observed so far. Using variations of solar proxies over solar cycle 23, solar cycle spectral variations have been estimated using scaling factors that best matched short-term variations of SCIAMACHY. In the 300-400 nm region, which strongly contributes to TSI solar cycle change, a contribution of 34% is derived from SCIAMACHY observations, which is lower than the reported values from SUSIM satellite data and the empirical SATIRE model. The total UV contribution (below 400 nm) to TSI solar cycle variations is estimated to be 55%.

  6. SOLAR VARIABILITY FROM 240 TO 1750 nm IN TERMS OF FACULAE BRIGHTENING AND SUNSPOT DARKENING FROM SCIAMACHY

    SciTech Connect

    Pagaran, J.; Weber, M.; Burrows, J.

    2009-08-01

    The change of spectral decomposition of the total radiative output on various timescales of solar magnetic activity is of large interest to terrestrial and solar-stellar atmosphere studies. Starting in 2002, SCIAMACHY was the first satellite instrument to observe daily solar spectral irradiance (SSI) continuously from 230 nm (UV) to 1750 nm (near-infrared; near-IR). In order to address the question of how much UV, visible (vis), and IR spectral regions change on 27 day and 11 year timescales, we parameterize short-term SSI variations in terms of faculae brightening (Mg II index) and sunspot darkening (photometric sunspot index) proxies. Although spectral variations above 300 nm are below 1% and, therefore, well below the accuracy of absolute radiometric calibration, relative accuracy for short-term changes is shown to be in the per mill range. This enables us to derive short-term spectral irradiance variations from the UV to the near-IR. During Halloween solar storm in 2003 with a record high sunspot area, we observe a reduction of 0.3% in the near-IR to 0.5% in the vis and near-UV. This is consistent with a 0.4% reduction in total solar irradiance (TSI). Over an entire 11 year solar cycle, SSI variability covering simultaneously the UV, vis, and IR spectral regions have not been directly observed so far. Using variations of solar proxies over solar cycle 23, solar cycle spectral variations have been estimated using scaling factors that best matched short-term variations of SCIAMACHY. In the 300-400 nm region, which strongly contributes to TSI solar cycle change, a contribution of 34% is derived from SCIAMACHY observations, which is lower than the reported values from SUSIM satellite data and the empirical SATIRE model. The total UV contribution (below 400 nm) to TSI solar cycle variations is estimated to be 55%.

  7. NOTE: Comparison of biologically damaging spectral solar ultraviolet radiation at a southern hemisphere sub-tropical site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, A. V.; Sabburg, J.; Kimlin, M. G.

    2003-04-01

    The first dataset of a complete year of biologically damaging spectral UV at a sub-tropical latitude in the southern hemisphere has been presented. The new data provides a baseline dataset against which comparisons can be made in the future to establish if there have been any long term trends in the biologically damaging UV. The general shape of the variation of the daily biologically damaging exposures through the year depends on the relative response of the various action spectra at the different wavelengths. The ratio of the daily erythemal to actinic exposures drops by approximately 20 to 25% from winter to summer. The ratio of the erythemal to DNA exposures drops by approximately 50% over the same period. In contrast, the ratio of the erythemal to plant damage exposures is higher in summer compared to winter. This is due to the changes in the relative proportion of UVA to UVB wavebands and relative responses of the different action spectra. The relative changes for the different action spectra show that the erythemal action spectrum cannot be used as a proxy for other biologically damaging responses.

  8. Spectral analysis of luni-solar signal in daily meteorological data at Prague-Klementinum 1775 to 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejkrlík, L.

    2012-04-01

    Linkages between lunar synodic cycle and select types of meteorological parameters have been suggested in previous studies. In important papers it was demonstrated that extreme precipitation events occur more frequently on the third to fifth day after syzygies. The effect is sometimes called Bowen's signal and similar lunar or semi-lunar modulation was later found also in ozone concentrations, sunshine, thunderstorm frequencies and in global temperatures observed by polar orbiting satellites. In our earlier papers we tried to analyse the possibility that the effect is transient in relation to solar activity. We confirmed the long-term quasi-periodical nearly-parallel changes in expression of lunar signal in 14 century-long daily precipitation series across Europe. The prevailing periods seemed to be similar to 22-year Hale solar magnetic cycle but there was no clear evidence and other similar celestial cycles could not be excluded. A unique set of uninterrupted daily precipitation data from Prague-Klementinum since 1804, published by the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute, was available. In this study we also made use of a related dataset of daily mean cloudiness that dates back as far as 1775. The cloud cover has been observed in a subjective way but we think its reliability is relatively good. In the case of precipitation we also examined the series of days with daily amount exceeding 10 mm. The data were divided into epochs of synodic months and superposed for 5 or 11 years with a step of one year. We get six sets of mean 29-day synodic signals containing 198-204 records for precipitation and 227-233 records for cloudiness. The temporal occurrence of lunar variation was defined as correlation coefficient ψ between semi-lunar cosine function (period 4π/29.53), emulating the Bowen's signal, and the mean signals. The coefficients ψ drawn against time created quasi-periodical charts ranging over more than two centuries. The impression of the ever

  9. Analysis of bias voltage dependent spectral response in Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P/Ga{sub 0.99}In{sub 0.01}As/Ge triple junction solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Sogabe, Tomah Ogura, Akio; Okada, Yoshitaka

    2014-02-21

    Spectral response measurement plays great role in characterizing solar cell device because it directly reflects the efficiency by which the device converts the sunlight into an electrical current. Based on the spectral response results, the short circuit current of each subcell can be quantitatively determined. Although spectral response dependence on wavelength, i.e., the well-known external quantum efficiency (EQE), has been widely used in characterizing multijunction solar cell and has been well interpreted, detailed analysis of spectral response dependence on bias voltage (SR −V{sub bias}) has not been reported so far. In this work, we have performed experimental and numerical studies on the SR −V{sub bias} for Ga{sub 0.51}In{sub 0.49}P/Ga{sub 0.99}In{sub 0.01}As/Ge triple junction solar cell. Phenomenological description was given to clarify the mechanism of operation matching point variation in SR −V{sub bias} measurements. The profile of SR−V{sub bias} curve was explained in detail by solving the coupled two-diode current-voltage characteristic transcend formula for each subcell.

  10. Optical properties of thin gold films applied to Schottky barrier solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    YEH Y. M.

    1974-01-01

    The Schottky barrier solar cell is considered a possible candidate for converting solar to electrical energy both for space and terrestrial applications. Knowledge of the optical constants of the ultrathin metal film used in the cell is essential for analyzing and designing higher efficiency Schottky barrier cells. The optical constants of 7.5 -nm (75-A) gold films on gallium arsenide have been obtained. In addition, the absolute collection efficiency of Schottky barrier solar cells has been determined from measured spectral response and optical constants of the gold film.

  11. Lyman alpha SMM/UVSP absolute calibration and geocoronal correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, Juan M.; Reichmann, Edwin J.

    1987-01-01

    Lyman alpha observations from the Ultraviolet Spectrometer Polarimeter (UVSP) instrument of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft were analyzed and provide instrumental calibration details. Specific values of the instrument quantum efficiency, Lyman alpha absolute intensity, and correction for geocoronal absorption are presented.

  12. New Sub-nanometer Spectral Estimates of the 0-5 nm Solar Soft X-Ray Irradiance at Mars Using the Extreme UltraViolet Monitor (EUVM) Onboard MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemann, E.; Eparvier, F. G.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, T. N.; Peterson, W. K.; Mitchell, D. L.; Xu, S.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    characterize the effectiveness of this technique, we compare Mars atmospheric photoelectron spectral measurements made by MAVEN's Solar Wind Electron Analyzer (SWEA) against modeled photoelectron spectra which use the EUVM derived 0-5 nm solar spectrum as an input.

  13. On the dependence of solar flare X-ray spectral line intensity ratios of highly ionized sulfur, calcium, and iron on electron temperature, differential emission measure, and atomic physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Fludra, A.; Bentley, R. D.; Lang, J.; Phillips, K. J. H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper focuses on what can be learned about the emission measure distribution and certain atomic physics parameters from spectral lines of highly ionized ions of sulfur, calcium, and iron that appear in solar flare spectra. The particular lines chosen for analysis allow the electron temperature to be determined independently of the assumption of ionization equilibrium. An attempt is made to find emission measure models based on selected functional dependences of emission measure on temperature that reproduce the observed temperatures deduced from spectral line ratios as well as the relative intensities of resonance lines of different elements.

  14. The influence of the opening between the heads of the two closest pyramids in textured surface for solar cells and its application on the spectral response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, A.

    2014-05-01

    The work presented in this study is concerned the development of a new solar cell prototype in order to improve photovoltaic efficiency In this model we show that the material can have five and more successive incident ray absorptions instead of three currently, where we changed the direction of the reflected ray, by varying the angle between the two neighbouring pyramids, the incidence angle, the opening between the heads of the two closest pyramids and their height. Thus, with an angle between the two neighbouring pyramid varying between 24° and 12° and for angle of incidence varying between 78° and 84°. For these values of the angle between the two neighbouring pyramids and incidence angle, the opening between the heads of the two closest pyramids varied respectively from 4.25 to 2.10 μm for a pyramid height of 10 μm. This lead to a substantial increase of the spectral response and the photovoltaic efficiency.