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Sample records for absolute spectral radiance

  1. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  2. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Fat’yanov, O. V. Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-15

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  3. Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a mission, led and developed by NASA, that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to quantify and attribute climate change. CLARREO consists of three separate instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer, a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer, and a radio occultation (RO) instrument. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy, including on orbit verification, to calibrate other space-based instrumentation, increasing their respective accuracy by as much as an order of magnitude. The IR spectrometer is a Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) working in the 5 to 50 microns wavelength region with a goal of 0.1 K (k = 3) accuracy. The FTS will achieve this accuracy using phase change cells to verify thermistor accuracy and heated halos to verify blackbody emissivity, both on orbit. The RS spectrometer will measure the reflectance of the atmosphere in the 0.32 to 2.3 microns wavelength region with an accuracy of 0.3% (k = 2). The status of the instrumentation packages and potential mission options will be presented.

  4. Spectral Dimensionality and Scale of Urban Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Small, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    Characterization of urban radiance and reflectance is important for understanding the effects of solar energy flux on the urban environment as well as for satellite mapping of urban settlement patterns. Spectral mixture analyses of Landsat and Ikonos imagery suggest that the urban radiance field can very often be described with combinations of three or four spectral endmembers. Dimensionality estimates of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) radiance measurements of urban areas reveal the existence of 30 to 60 spectral dimensions. The extent to which broadband imagery collected by operational satellites can represent the higher dimensional mixing space is a function of both the spatial and spectral resolution of the sensor. AVIRIS imagery offers the spatial and spectral resolution necessary to investigate the scale dependence of the spectral dimensionality. Dimensionality estimates derived from Minimum Noise Fraction (MNF) eigenvalue distributions show a distinct scale dependence for AVIRIS radiance measurements of Milpitas, California. Apparent dimensionality diminishes from almost 40 to less than 10 spectral dimensions between scales of 8000 m and 300 m. The 10 to 30 m scale of most features in urban mosaics results in substantial spectral mixing at the 20 m scale of high altitude AVIRIS pixels. Much of the variance at pixel scales is therefore likely to result from actual differences in surface reflectance at pixel scales. Spatial smoothing and spectral subsampling of AVIRIS spectra both result in substantial loss of information and reduction of apparent dimensionality, but the primary spectral endmembers in all cases are analogous to those found in global analyses of Landsat and Ikonos imagery of other urban areas.

  5. Validation of spectral radiance assignments to integrating sphere radiance standards for the Advanced Baseline Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Maxwell, Stephen; Shirley, Eric; Slack, Kim; Graham, Gary D.

    2014-09-01

    The Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) is the next-generation imaging sensor for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) operational meteorological satellites in geostationary orbit. One pathway for traceability to reference standards of the visible and near-infrared radiometric response for ABI is to a 1.65 m diameter integrating sphere source standard of spectral radiance. This source illuminates the full entrance pupil via the ABI Earth-view port, thus determining the absolute spectral radiance responsivity in the visible and shortwave infrared. The spectral radiance values of the large sphere are assigned by Exelis using a double monochromator and a 15.24 cm diameter integrating sphere source standard that is calibrated by NIST. As part of the ABI program, Exelis was required by NASA to have the spectral radiance values assigned by Exelis to the large sphere be validated by NIST. Here we report the results of that activity, which took place in April, 2013. During the week of April 8, Exelis calibrated the 1.65 m diameter sphere at all 24 levels that correspond to the ABI calibration protocol. During the week of April 15, the NIST validation exercise for five selected levels took place. NIST deployed a portable spectral radiance source, a filter radiometer restricted to the visible and near-infrared, and two spectroradiometers that covered from 350 nm to 2500 nm. The NIST sphere source served as the validation standard. The comparison results, which are reported at the ABI bands, agreed to within the combined uncertainties. We describe the methodology, results, and uncertainty estimates related to this effort.

  6. Cloud altitude determination from infrared spectral radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William L.; Frey, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The CO2 slicing method is generally recognized as the most accurate means of inferring cloud altitude from passive infrared radiance observations. The method is applicable to semi-transparent and broken clouds. During the cirrus FIRE and COHMEX field experiments, CO2 channel radiance data suitable for cloud altitude specification were achieved from moderate spectral resolution satellite sounders (NOAA-TOVS and GOES-VAS) and from a High spectral resolution Interferometer Spectrometer (HIS) flown on the NASA U2/ER2 aircraft. Also aboard the ER2 was a down-looking active lidar unit capable of providing cloud top pressure verifications with high accuracy. A third instrument, the Multispectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS) provided 50 meter resolution infrared window data which is used wtih radiosonde data to verify the heights of middle and low level clouds. Comparisons of lidar and MAMS/radiosonde ground truth cloud heights are made with those determined from: high resolution (0.5/cm) HIS spectra, HIS spectra degraded to the moderate resolution (15/cm) of the VAS/TOVS instruments, and spectrally averaged HIS radiances for individual pairs of VAS spectral channels. The results show that the best results are achieved from high resolution spectra; the RMS difference with the ground truth is 23 mb. The RMS differences between the infrared radiance determination and ground truth increase by 35 percent when the spectral resolution is degraded to the moderate spectral resolution of the VAS/TOVS instruments and by 52 to 183 percent, depending upon channel combinations, when only two spectral channels at VAS/TOVS spectral resolution are used.

  7. Xenon arc lamp spectral radiance modelling for satellite instrument calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolt, Stephen; Clark, Paul; Schmoll, Jürgen; Shaw, Benjamin J. R.

    2016-07-01

    Precise radiometric measurements play a central role in many areas of astronomical and terrestrial observation. We focus on the use of continuum light sources in the absolute radiometric calibration of detectors in an imaging spectrometer for space applications. The application, in this instance, revolves around the ground based calibration of the Sentinel-4/UVN instrument. This imaging spectrometer instrument is expected to be deployed in 2019 and will make spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric chemistry. The instrument, which operates across the UV/VIS and NIR spectrum from 305-775 nm, is designed to measure the absolute spectral radiance of the Earth and compare it with the absolute spectral irradiance of the Sun. Of key importance to the fidelity of these absolute measurements is the ground based calibration campaign. Continuum lamp sources that are temporally stable and are spatially well defined are central to this process. Xenon short arc lamps provide highly intense and efficient continuum illumination in a range extending from the ultra-violet to the infra-red and their spectrum is well matched to this specific application. Despite their widespread commercial use, certain aspects of their performance are not well documented in the literature. One of the important requirements in this calibration application is the delivery of highly uniform, collimated illumination at high radiance. In this process, it cannot be assumed that the xenon arc is a point source; the spatial distribution of the radiance must be characterised accurately. We present here careful measurements that thoroughly characterise the spatial distribution of the spectral radiance of a 1000W xenon lamp. A mathematical model is presented describing the spatial distribution. Temporal stability is another exceptionally important requirement in the calibration process. As such, the paper also describes strategies to re-inforce the temporal stability of the lamp output by

  8. Establishing the moon as a spectral radiance standard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, H.H.; Wildey, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    A new automated observatory dedicated to the radiometry of the moon has been constructed to provide new radiance information for calibration of earth-orbiting imaging instruments, particularly Earth Observing System instruments. Instrumentation includes an imaging photometer with 4.5-in. resolution on a fully digital mount and a full-aperture radiance calibration source. Interference filters within 0.35-0.95 ??m correspond to standard stellar magnitude systems, accommodate wavelengths of lunar spectral contrast, and approximate some band-passes of planned earth-orbiting instruments (ASTER, Landsat-7 ETM, MISR, MODIS, and SeaWIFS). The same equipment is used for lunar and stellar observations, with the use of an aperture stop in lunar imaging to comply with Nyquist's theorem and lengthen exposure times to avoid scintillation effects. A typical robotic night run involves observation of about 60 photometric standard stars and the moon; about 10 of the standard stars are observed repeatedly to determine atmospheric extinction, and the moon is observed several times. Observations are to be made on every photometric night during the bright half of the month for at least 4.5 years to adequately cover phase and libration variation. Each lunar image is reduced to absolute exoatmospheric radiance and reprojected to a fixed selenographic grid system. The collection of these images at various librations and phase angles will be reduced to photometric models for each of the approximately 120 000 points in the lunar grid for each filter. Radiance models of the moon can then be produced for the precise geometry of an orbiting instrument observation. Expected errors are under 1% relative and 2.5% absolute. A second telescope operating from 1.0 to 2.5 ??m is planned.

  9. Spectrally resolved infrared radiances from AIRS observation and GCM simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2007-12-01

    Global multi-year spectrally resolved infrared radiances observed by the Atmospheric Infrared Sound (AIRS) satellite instrument and simulated from the General Circulation Models (GCMs) of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab (GFDL) are processed to obtain long-term global and regional means as well as the associated spatial and temporal variability. The accumulated radiance data comprise a host of phenomena that are still largely unrecognized but reveal important physical processes. For instance, the correlation between the radiances and the Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs) discloses the roles of water vapor in both upper (via its v2 band) and lower (via the continuum in the window region) troposphere, and that of clouds regarding the so called "super greenhouse effect" in Tropics. A comparison between observed and simulated radiances demonstrates that radiance affords a stricter and more insightful metric than the broadband flux. A seemingly good agreement of OLR flux may arise from cancellation of errors of opposite signs in different spectral regions; radiance biases are indicative of physical causes because the radiances at each frequency are sensitive to factor(s) at different levels. Model validation at the radiance level thus provides a complementary and integrative perspective to that obtained using meteorological variables. It is demonstrated that the radiance discrepancies between the GFDL model and the observation are consistent with the model biases in temperature, water vapor and clouds.

  10. Calibration of the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; Barnes, Robert; Baize, Rosemary; O'Connell, Joseph; Hair, Jason

    2010-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) plans to observe climate change trends over decadal time scales to determine the accuracy of climate projections. The project relies on spaceborne earth observations of SI-traceable variables sensitive to key decadal change parameters. The mission includes a reflected solar instrument retrieving at-sensor reflectance over the 320 to 2300 nm spectral range with 500-m spatial resolution and 100-km swath. Reflectance is obtained from the ratio of measurements of the earth s surface to those while viewing the sun relying on a calibration approach that retrieves reflectance with uncertainties less than 0.3%. The calibration is predicated on heritage hardware, reduction of sensor complexity, adherence to detector-based calibration standards, and an ability to simulate in the laboratory on-orbit sources in both size and brightness to provide the basis of a transfer to orbit of the laboratory calibration including a link to absolute solar irradiance measurements.

  11. Theory of spectral radiance of pollutants at sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Remote measurement of soluble pollutants that change the color of the water in the sea is reported. The sensor is a spectral radiometer that flies over the polluted area and compares its spectral radiance to that of surrounding clean seawater. A quantitative analysis of the concentration of pollutants using the measured radiance of the sea compared to laboratory measurements of reflection and transmission spectra of the pollutants is presented. The quantities involved are defined and means for measuring them are described. The equations for remote sensing with a low-flying aircraft, in which case the absorption and radiance of intervening air is negligible are derived. High-flying aircraft and satellites, in which case the radiance of intervening air is the major problem are applied.

  12. Theory of spectral radiance of pollutants at sea, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Remote measurement of pollutants dumped in the sea, not oil slicks, but soluble pollutants that change the color of the water, is addressed. The sensor is a spectral radiometer that flies over the polluted area and compares its spectral radiance (color) to that of surrounding clean seawater. The goal is to infer the concentration of pollutants using the measured radiance of the sea compared to laboratory measurements of reflection and transmission spectra of the pollutants. The subject is treated in three steps: (1) the quantities involved are defined and means for measuring them are described; (2) the equations for remote sensing with a low-flying aircraft are derived, in which wase the absorption and radiance of intervening air is negligible; and (3) high-flying aircraft and satellites are applied, in which case the radiance of intervening air is the major problem.

  13. Demonstrating the error budget for the climate absolute radiance and refractivity observatory through solar irradiance measurements (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, Kurtis J.; McCorkel, Joel; Angal, Amit

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission is to provide high-accuracy data for evaluation of long-term climate change trends. Essential to the CLARREO project is demonstration of SI-traceable, reflected measurements that are a factor of 10 more accurate than current state-of-the-art sensors. The CLARREO approach relies on accurate, monochromatic absolute radiance calibration in the laboratory transferred to orbit via solar irradiance knowledge. The current work describes the results of field measurements with the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) that is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. Recent measurements of absolute spectral solar irradiance using SOLARIS are presented. The ground-based SOLARIS data are corrected to top-of-atmosphere values using AERONET data collected within 5 km of the SOLARIS operation. The SOLARIS data are converted to absolute irradiance using laboratory calibrations based on the Goddard Laser for Absolute Measurement of Radiance (GLAMR). Results are compared to accepted solar irradiance models to demonstrate accuracy values giving confidence in the error budget for the CLARREO reflectance retrieval.

  14. Preliminary error budget for the reflected solar instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, K.; Gubbels, T.; Barnes, R.

    2011-10-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as the most critical method to determine the accuracy of climate change. The CLARREO Project will implement a spaceborne earth observation mission designed to provide rigorous SI-traceable observations (i.e., radiance, reflectance, and refractivity) that are sensitive to a wide range of key decadal change variables. The instrument suite includes emitted infrared spectrometers, global navigation receivers for radio occultation, and reflected solar spectrometers. The measurements will be acquired for a period of five years and will enable follow-on missions to extend the climate record over the decades needed to understand climate change. This work describes a preliminary error budget for the RS sensor. The RS sensor will retrieve at-sensor reflectance over the spectral range from 320 to 2300 nm with 500-m GIFOV and a 100-km swath width. The current design is based on an Offner spectrometer with two separate focal planes each with its own entrance aperture and grating covering spectral ranges of 320-640, 600-2300 nm. Reflectance is obtained from the ratio of measurements of radiance while viewing the earth's surface to measurements of irradiance while viewing the sun. The requirement for the RS instrument is that the reflectance must be traceable to SI standards at an absolute uncertainty <0.3%. The calibration approach to achieve the ambitious 0.3% absolute calibration uncertainty is predicated on a reliance on heritage hardware, reduction of sensor complexity, and adherence to detector-based calibration standards. The design above has been used to develop a preliminary error budget that meets the 0.3% absolute requirement. Key components in the error budget are geometry differences between the solar and earth views, knowledge of attenuator behavior when viewing the sun, and

  15. Spectral reflectance and radiance characteristics of water pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wezernak, C. T.; Turner, R. E.; Lyzenga, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    Spectral reflectance characteristics of water pollutants and water bodies were compiled using the existing literature. Radiance calculations were performed at satellite altitude for selected illumination angles and atmospheric conditions. The work described in this report was limited to the reflective portion of the spectrum between 0.40 micrometer to 1.0 micrometer.

  16. Cloud optical properties and phase discrimination using transmitted spectral radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, S. E.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, S.; Coddington, O.

    2013-12-01

    Cloud optical thickness, effective radius, and thermodynamic phase are commonly retrieved from satellite measurements of reflected light. Reflected light is influenced most strongly by droplets and ice crystals near cloud top, whereas transmitted light has interacted with cloud particles throughout the entire layer. This transmitted spectral radiance is used in a new method to retrieve cloud thermodynamic phase, cloud optical thickness, and effective radius. The method uses 15 regions of the shortwave transmittance spectrum that are modulated by the spectral absorption and scattering by liquid water droplets and ice particles. Spectral features in these regions are characterized by their slope, normalized magnitude, spectral derivatives, spectral curvature, and second derivatives. We use an optimal estimation method to find the most likely set of cloud optical thickness, effective radius, and thermodynamic phase that produces the observed spectral features in transmitted radiance spectra. This retrieval's performance is evaluated using the GEneralized Nonlinear Retrieval Analysis (GENRA) with the Shannon information content. Results showed that the normalized Shannon information content for retrieved ice cloud properties was larger on average (84%) than for liquid water cloud properties (78%) in addition to having a smaller bias. The retrieval was applied to zenith spectral radiance measured with the ground-based Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) located at Boulder, Colorado for 10 cases that occurred between May 2012 and January 2013. Retrieved cloud optical thickness, effective radius, and their uncertainties are compared to those retrieved using two other methods. By using several spectral characterizations in a large number of spectral bands, the average uncertainty in retrieved optical thickness and effective radius is reduced below that of any other retrieval method based on cloud transmittance.

  17. Surface Emissivity Effects on Thermodynamic Retrieval of IR Spectral Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Smith, William L.; Liu, Xu

    2006-01-01

    The surface emissivity effect on the thermodynamic parameters (e.g., the surface skin temperature, atmospheric temperature, and moisture) retrieved from satellite infrared (IR) spectral radiance is studied. Simulation analysis demonstrates that surface emissivity plays an important role in retrieval of surface skin temperature and terrestrial boundary layer (TBL) moisture. NAST-I ultraspectral data collected during the CLAMS field campaign are used to retrieve thermodynamic properties of the atmosphere and surface. The retrievals are then validated by coincident in-situ measurements, such as sea surface temperature, radiosonde temperature and moisture profiles. Retrieved surface emissivity is also validated by that computed from the observed radiance and calculated emissions based on the retrievals of surface temperature and atmospheric profiles. In addition, retrieved surface skin temperature and emissivity are validated together by radiance comparison between the observation and retrieval-based calculation in the window region where atmospheric contribution is minimized. Both simulation and validation results have lead to the conclusion that variable surface emissivity in the inversion process is needed to obtain accurate retrievals from satellite IR spectral radiance measurements. Retrieval examples are presented to reveal that surface emissivity plays a significant role in retrieving accurate surface skin temperature and TBL thermodynamic parameters.

  18. Quantitative Spectral Radiance Measurements in the HYMETS Arc Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Hires, Drew V.; Johansen, Craig T.; Bathel, Brett F.; Jones, Stephen B.; Gragg, Jeffrey G.; Splinter, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    Calibrated spectral radiance measurements of gaseous emission spectra have been obtained from the HYMETS (Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System) 400 kW arc-heated wind tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. A fiber-optic coupled spectrometer collected natural luminosity from the flow. Spectral radiance measurements are reported between 340 and 1000 nm. Both Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) samples were placed in the flow. Test gases studied included a mostly-N2 atmosphere (95% nitrogen, 5% argon), a simulated Earth Air atmosphere (75% nitrogen, 20% oxygen, 5% argon) and a simulated Martian atmosphere (71% carbon dioxide, 24% nitrogen, 5% argon). The bulk enthalpy of the flow was varied as was the location of the measurement. For the intermediate flow enthalpy tested (20 MJ/kg), emission from the Mars simulant gas was about 10 times higher than the Air flow and 15 times higher than the mostly-N2 atmosphere. Shock standoff distances were estimated from the spectral radiance measurements. Within-run, run-to-run and day-to-day repeatability of the emission were studied, with significant variations (15-100%) noted.

  19. Preliminary Error Budget for the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; Gubbels, Timothy; Barnes, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) plans to observe climate change trends over decadal time scales to determine the accuracy of climate projections. The project relies on spaceborne earth observations of SI-traceable variables sensitive to key decadal change parameters. The mission includes a reflected solar instrument retrieving at-sensor reflectance over the 320 to 2300 nm spectral range with 500-m spatial resolution and 100-km swath. Reflectance is obtained from the ratio of measurements of the earth s surface to those while viewing the sun relying on a calibration approach that retrieves reflectance with uncertainties less than 0.3%. The calibration is predicated on heritage hardware, reduction of sensor complexity, adherence to detector-based calibration standards, and an ability to simulate in the laboratory on-orbit sources in both size and brightness to provide the basis of a transfer to orbit of the laboratory calibration including a link to absolute solar irradiance measurements. The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe high-accuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as the most critical method to determine the accuracy of climate change projections such as those in the IPCC Report. A rigorously known accuracy of both decadal change observations as well as climate projections is critical in order to enable sound policy decisions. The CLARREO Project will implement a spaceborne earth observation mission designed to provide rigorous SI traceable observations (i.e., radiance, reflectance, and refractivity) that are sensitive to a wide range of key decadal change variables, including: 1) Surface temperature and atmospheric temperature profile 2) Atmospheric water vapor profile 3) Far infrared water vapor greenhouse 4) Aerosol properties and anthropogenic aerosol direct radiative forcing 5) Total and spectral solar

  20. The University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center Absolute Radiance Interferometer (ARI): instrument overview and radiometric performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Joseph K.; Revercomb, Henry E.; Best, Fred A.; Gero, P. Jonathan; Genest, Jerome; Buijs, Henry; Grandmont, Frederic J.; Tobin, David C.; Knuteson, Robert O.

    2014-11-01

    Spectrally resolved infrared (IR) and far infrared (FIR) radiances measured from orbit with extremely high absolute accuracy are a critical observation for future climate benchmark missions. For the infrared radiance spectra, it has been determined that a measurement accuracy, expressed as an equivalent brightness temperature error, of 0.1 K (k = 3) confirmed on orbit is required for signal detection above natural variability for decadal climate signatures [1, 2]. The challenge in the sensor development for a climate benchmark measurement mission is to achieve ultra-high accuracy with a design that can be flight qualified, has long design life, and is reasonably small, simple, and affordable. The required simplicity is achievable due to the large differences in the sampling and noise requirements for the benchmark climate measurement from those of the typical remote sensing infrared sounders for weather research or operational weather prediction. The University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center, with funding from the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), developed the Absolute Radiance Interferometer (ARI), which is designed to meet the uncertainty requirements needed to establish spectrally resolved thermal infrared climate benchmark measurements from space. The ARI is a prototype instrument designed to have a short upgrade path to a spaceflight instrument. Recent vacuum testing of the ARI, conducted under funding from the NASA Earth Science Technology Office, has demonstrated the capability to meet the 0.1 K (k = 3) uncertainty requirement on-orbit. An overview of the instrument design and summary of the radiometric performance verification of the UW-SSEC ARI will be presented.

  1. Infrared Spectral Radiance Intercomparisons With Satellite and Aircraft Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement system validation is critical for advanced satellite sounders to reach their full potential of improving observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface for enabling enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Experimental field campaigns, focusing on satellite under-flights with well-calibrated FTS sensors aboard high-altitude aircraft, are an essential part of the validation task. Airborne FTS systems can enable an independent, SI-traceable measurement system validation by directly measuring the same level-1 parameters spatially and temporally coincident with the satellite sensor of interest. Continuation of aircraft under-flights for multiple satellites during multiple field campaigns enables long-term monitoring of system performance and inter-satellite cross-validation. The NASA / NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed - Interferometer (NAST-I) has been a significant contributor in this area by providing coincident high spectral/spatial resolution observations of infrared spectral radiances along with independently-retrieved geophysical products for comparison with like products from satellite sensors being validated. This presentation gives an overview of benefits achieved using airborne sensors such as NAST-I utilizing examples from recent field campaigns. The methodology implemented is not only beneficial to new sensors such as the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) flying aboard the Suomi NPP and future JPSS satellites but also of significant benefit to sensors of longer flight heritage such as the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the AQUA and METOP-A platforms, respectively, to ensure data quality continuity important for climate and other applications. Infrared spectral radiance inter-comparisons are discussed with a particular focus on usage of NAST-I data for enabling inter-platform cross-validation.

  2. Instrumentation and First Results of the Reflected Solar Demonstration System for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, Joel; Thome, Kurtis; Hair, Jason; McAndrew, Brendan; Jennings, Don; Rabin, Douglas; Daw, Adrian; Lundsford, Allen

    2012-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission key goals include enabling observation of high accuracy long-term climate change trends, use of these observations to test and improve climate forecasts, and calibration of operational and research sensors. The spaceborne instrument suites include a reflected solar spectroradiometer, emitted infrared spectroradiometer, and radio occultation receivers. The requirement for the RS instrument is that derived reflectance must be traceable to Sl standards with an absolute uncertainty of <0.3% and the error budget that achieves this requirement is described in previo1L5 work. This work describes the Solar/Lunar Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS), a calibration demonstration system for RS instrument, and presents initial calibration and characterization methods and results. SOLARIS is an Offner spectrometer with two separate focal planes each with its own entrance aperture and grating covering spectral ranges of 320-640, 600-2300 nm over a full field-of-view of 10 degrees with 0.27 milliradian sampling. Results from laboratory measurements including use of integrating spheres, transfer radiometers and spectral standards combined with field-based solar and lunar acquisitions are presented. These results will be used to assess the accuracy and repeatability of the radiometric and spectral characteristics of SOLARIS, which will be presented against the sensor-level requirements addressed in the CLARREO RS instrument error budget.

  3. Geophysical Information from Advanced Sounder Infrared Spectral Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced satellite sensors are tasked with improving global observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface to enable enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. Satisfying this type of improvement for inferred geophysical information from these observations requires optimal usage of data from current systems as well as enhancements to future sensors. This presentation addresses the information content present in infrared spectral radiance from advanced atmospheric sounders with an emphasis on knowledge of thermodynamic state and trace species. Results of trade-off studies conducted to evaluate the impact of spectral resolution, spectral coverage, instrument noise, and a priori knowledge on remote sensing system information content will be discussed. A focus is placed on information achievable from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA EOS Aqua satellite in orbit since 2002, the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) aboard MetOp-A since 2006, and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instrument aboard the NPP and JPSS series of satellites which began 28 October 2011.

  4. Comparison of spectral radiance responsivity calibration techniques used for backscatter ultraviolet satellite instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, M. G.; Janz, S. J.

    2015-02-01

    Methods of absolute radiometric calibration of backscatter ultraviolet (BUV) satellite instruments are compared as part of an effort to minimize pre-launch calibration uncertainties. An internally illuminated integrating sphere source has been used for the Shuttle Solar BUV, Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, Ozone Mapping Instrument, and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 using standardized procedures traceable to national standards. These sphere-based spectral responsivities agree to within the derived combined standard uncertainty of 1.87% relative to calibrations performed using an external diffuser illuminated by standard irradiance sources, the customary spectral radiance responsivity calibration method for BUV instruments. The combined standard uncertainty for these calibration techniques as implemented at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s Radiometric Calibration and Development Laboratory is shown to less than 2% at 250 nm when using a single traceable calibration standard.

  5. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohsing, K.; Schrempf, M.; Riechelmann, S.; Seckmeyer, G.

    2014-01-01

    Spectral sky radiance (380-760 nm) is derived from measurements with a Hemispherical Sky Imager (HSI) system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device) camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated by spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80°. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelength 380 nm to 760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less then 20% for all sky conditions.

  6. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohsing, K.; Schrempf, M.; Riechelmann, S.; Seckmeyer, G.

    2014-07-01

    Spectral sky radiance (380-760 nm) is derived from measurements with a hemispherical sky imager (HSI) system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device) camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images, non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated using spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80°. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelengths 380-760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less than 20% for all sky conditions.

  7. Estimation of spectral distribution of sky radiance using a commercial digital camera.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masanori; Iwabuchi, Hironobu; Murata, Isao

    2016-01-10

    Methods for estimating spectral distribution of sky radiance from images captured by a digital camera and for accurately estimating spectral responses of the camera are proposed. Spectral distribution of sky radiance is represented as a polynomial of the wavelength, with coefficients obtained from digital RGB counts by linear transformation. The spectral distribution of radiance as measured is consistent with that obtained by spectrometer and radiative transfer simulation for wavelengths of 430-680 nm, with standard deviation below 1%. Preliminary applications suggest this method is useful for detecting clouds and studying the relation between irradiance at the ground and cloud distribution.

  8. A New Measurement of the Absolute Spectral Reflectance of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, S. J.; Lau, E.; Steutel, D.; Stopar, J. D.; Wilcox, B. B.; Lucey, P. G.

    2003-01-01

    The spectral reflectance of the Moon is an important property for studies of lunar geology, quantitative physical modeling of the moon, and in-flight calibration of spacecraft sensors. Previous studies have claimed that telescopic absolute reflectance values for the Moon are greater than laboratory reflectance measurements by a factor of two. In order to confirm these results, we performed ground-based observations of the lunar surface using a visible/near-infrared spectroradiometer and compared the measured lunar surface radiance to solar radiance corrected for atmospheric scattering and absorption. These data were compared to previously obtained laboratory reflectance measurements from Apollo soil samples.

  9. Demonstrating the Error Budget for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory Through Solar Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; McAndrew, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as a method to determine the accuracy of climate change. A CLARREO objective is to improve the accuracy of SI-traceable, absolute calibration at infrared and reflected solar wavelengths to reach on-orbit accuracies required to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps and observe climate change at the limit of natural variability. Such an effort will also demonstrate National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) approaches for use in future spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the results of laboratory and field measurements with the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. SOLARIS allows testing and evaluation of calibration approaches, alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. Results of laboratory calibration measurements are provided to demonstrate key assumptions about instrument behavior that are needed to achieve CLARREO's climate measurement requirements. Absolute radiometric response is determined using laser-based calibration sources and applied to direct solar views for comparison with accepted solar irradiance models to demonstrate accuracy values giving confidence in the error budget for the CLARREO reflectance retrieval.

  10. Spectral radiance measurements of exhaust plumes from scale model rocket engines.

    PubMed

    McCaa, D J

    1968-05-01

    A short duration experimental technique for investigating radiative properties of rocket exhaust plumes at high altitudes is described. Experimental measurements of the spectral radiance of two interacting exhaust plumes generated by 1/45 scale F-l engines burning gaseous ethylene and oxygen are presented. In addition, the spectral radiance characteristics of several Saturn auxiliary solid propellant rocket motors have also been measured and these results are included. The measurements were obtained with a rapid scanning ir spectrometer.

  11. New PTB Setup for the Absolute Calibration of the Spectral Responsivity of Radiation Thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anhalt, K.; Zelenjuk, A.; Taubert, D. R.; Keawprasert, T.; Hartmann, J.

    2009-02-01

    The paper describes the new experimental setup assembled at the PTB for the absolute spectral responsivity measurement of radiation thermometers. The concept of this setup is to measure the relative spectral responsivity of the radiation thermometer using the conventional monochromator-based spectral comparator facility also used for the calibration of filter radiometers. The absolute spectral responsivity is subsequently measured at one wavelength, supplied by the radiation of a diode laser, using the new setup. The radiation of the diode laser is guided with an optical fiber into an integrating sphere source that is equipped with an aperture of absolutely known area. The spectral radiance of this integrating sphere source is determined via the spectral irradiance measured by a trap detector with an absolutely calibrated spectral responsivity traceable to the primary detector standard of the PTB, the cryogenic radiometer. First results of the spectral responsivity calibration of the radiation thermometer LP3 are presented, and a provisional uncertainty budget of the absolute spectral responsivity is given.

  12. Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed by ARM SWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2009-01-01

    The ARM Shortwave Spectrometer (SWS) measures zenith radiance at 418 wavelengths between 350 and 2170 nm. Because of its 1-sec sampling resolution, the SWS provides a unique capability to study the transition zone between cloudy and clear sky areas. A spectral invariant behavior is found between ratios of zenith radiance spectra during the transition from cloudy to cloud-free. This behavior suggests that the spectral signature of the transition zone is a linear mixture between the two extremes (definitely cloudy and definitely clear). The weighting function of the linear mixture is a wavelength-independent characteristic of the transition zone. It is shown that the transition zone spectrum is fully determined by this function and zenith radiance spectra of clear and cloudy regions. An important result of these discoveries is that high temporal resolution radiance measurements in the clear-to-cloud transition zone can be well approximated by lower temporal resolution measurements plus linear interpolation.

  13. Spectral radiance calibrations between 165-300 nm - An interlaboratory comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, J. M.; Ott, W. R.; Pitz, E.; Schulz, A.; Einfeld, D.; Stuck, D.

    1977-01-01

    The spectral radiance of deuterium lamps calibrated by the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie (MPI), by the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS), and by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) are compared to check the agreement of UV radiometric scales. The NBS group used the optically thin continuum radiation from a wall-stabilized hydrogen arc as its fundamental radiometric standard, while the MPI and PTB groups used the synchrotron radiation facility in DESY. It is found that the spectral radiance scales based upon the DESY synchrotron and the NBS hydrogen arc are consistent, at least for one wavelength relative to another.

  14. Rayleigh radiance computations for satellite remote sensing: accounting for the effect of sensor spectral response function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Menghua

    2016-05-30

    To understand and assess the effect of the sensor spectral response function (SRF) on the accuracy of the top of the atmosphere (TOA) Rayleigh-scattering radiance computation, new TOA Rayleigh radiance lookup tables (LUTs) over global oceans and inland waters have been generated. The new Rayleigh LUTs include spectral coverage of 335-2555 nm, all possible solar-sensor geometries, and surface wind speeds of 0-30 m/s. Using the new Rayleigh LUTs, the sensor SRF effect on the accuracy of the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation has been evaluated for spectral bands of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite and the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS)-1, showing some important uncertainties for VIIRS-SNPP particularly for large solar- and/or sensor-zenith angles as well as for large Rayleigh optical thicknesses (i.e., short wavelengths) and bands with broad spectral bandwidths. To accurately account for the sensor SRF effect, a new correction algorithm has been developed for VIIRS spectral bands, which improves the TOA Rayleigh radiance accuracy to ~0.01% even for the large solar-zenith angles of 70°-80°, compared with the error of ~0.7% without applying the correction for the VIIRS-SNPP 410 nm band. The same methodology that accounts for the sensor SRF effect on the Rayleigh radiance computation can be used for other satellite sensors. In addition, with the new Rayleigh LUTs, the effect of surface atmospheric pressure variation on the TOA Rayleigh radiance computation can be calculated precisely, and no specific atmospheric pressure correction algorithm is needed. There are some other important applications and advantages to using the new Rayleigh LUTs for satellite remote sensing, including an efficient and accurate TOA Rayleigh radiance computation for hyperspectral satellite remote sensing, detector-based TOA Rayleigh radiance computation, Rayleigh radiance calculations for high altitude

  15. Initial analyses of surface spectral radiance between observations and Line-By-Line calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.D.; Clough, S.A.; Miller, N.E.; Shippert, T.R.; Turner, D.D.

    1996-04-01

    The evaluation an improvement of radiative transfer calculations are essential to attain improved performance of general circulation models (GCMs) for climate change applications. A Quality Measurement Experiment (QME) is being conducted to analyze the spectral residuals between the downwelling longwave radiance measured by the University of Wisconsin Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and spectral radiance calculated by the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM). The three critical components of this study are (1) the assessment of the quality of the high resolution AERI measurements, (2) the assessment of the ability to define the atmospheric state in the radiating column, and (3) the evaluation of the capability of LBLRTM. Validations have been performed on spectral radiance data, obtained from April 1994 through July 1994, through the analysis of the spectral interval and physical process. The results are archived as a function of time, enabling the retrieval of specific data and facilitating investigations and diurnal effects, seasonal effects, and longer-term trends. While the initial focus is restricted to clear-sky analyses, efforts are under way to include the effects of clouds and aerosols. Plans are well formulated for the extension of the current approach to the shortwave. An overview of the concept of the QME is described by Miller et al. (1994), and a detailed description of this study is provided by Clough et al. (1994).

  16. Spectral radiance measurements and calculated soot concentrations along the length of an experimental combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgren, C. T.; Ingebo, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    Radiometric data were obtained over a range of parametric test conditions at three positions along the length of an experimental combustor segment corresponding to the primary, intermediate, and dilution zones. The concentration of soot entrained in the combustion gases was calculated by a technique using spectral radiance measurements. Tests were conducted primarily with Jet A fuel, although limited data were taken with two fuels having higher aromatic content, diesel oil number 2 and a blend of 40 percent tetralin in Jet A fuel. Radiometric observation of the combustion gases indicated that the maximum total radiance peaked at the intermediate zone, which was located immediately upstream of the dilution holes. Soot concentrations calculated from optical measurements in the dilution zone compared favorably with those obtained by in situ gas sampling at the exhaust. The total radiance increased with the higher aromatic content fuels.

  17. Lunar Spectral Irradiance and Radiance (LUSI): New Instrumentation to Characterize the Moon as a Space-Based Radiometric Standard.

    PubMed

    Smith, Allan W; Lorentz, Steven R; Stone, Thomas C; Datla, Raju V

    2012-01-01

    The need to understand and monitor climate change has led to proposed radiometric accuracy requirements for space-based remote sensing instruments that are very stringent and currently outside the capabilities of many Earth orbiting instruments. A major problem is quantifying changes in sensor performance that occur from launch and during the mission. To address this problem on-orbit calibrators and monitors have been developed, but they too can suffer changes from launch and the harsh space environment. One solution is to use the Moon as a calibration reference source. Already the Moon has been used to remove post-launch drift and to cross-calibrate different instruments, but further work is needed to develop a new model with low absolute uncertainties capable of climate-quality absolute calibration of Earth observing instruments on orbit. To this end, we are proposing an Earth-based instrument suite to measure the absolute lunar spectral irradiance to an uncertainty(1) of 0.5 % (k=1) over the spectral range from 320 nm to 2500 nm with a spectral resolution of approximately 0.3 %. Absolute measurements of lunar radiance will also be acquired to facilitate calibration of high spatial resolution sensors. The instruments will be deployed at high elevation astronomical observatories and flown on high-altitude balloons in order to mitigate the effects of the Earth's atmosphere on the lunar observations. Periodic calibrations using instrumentation and techniques available from NIST will ensure traceability to the International System of Units (SI) and low absolute radiometric uncertainties.

  18. Lunar Spectral Irradiance and Radiance (LUSI): New Instrumentation to Characterize the Moon as a Space-Based Radiometric Standard

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Allan W.; Lorentz, Steven R.; Stone, Thomas C.; Datla, Raju V.

    2012-01-01

    The need to understand and monitor climate change has led to proposed radiometric accuracy requirements for space-based remote sensing instruments that are very stringent and currently outside the capabilities of many Earth orbiting instruments. A major problem is quantifying changes in sensor performance that occur from launch and during the mission. To address this problem on-orbit calibrators and monitors have been developed, but they too can suffer changes from launch and the harsh space environment. One solution is to use the Moon as a calibration reference source. Already the Moon has been used to remove post-launch drift and to cross-calibrate different instruments, but further work is needed to develop a new model with low absolute uncertainties capable of climate-quality absolute calibration of Earth observing instruments on orbit. To this end, we are proposing an Earth-based instrument suite to measure the absolute lunar spectral irradiance to an uncertainty1 of 0.5 % (k=1) over the spectral range from 320 nm to 2500 nm with a spectral resolution of approximately 0.3 %. Absolute measurements of lunar radiance will also be acquired to facilitate calibration of high spatial resolution sensors. The instruments will be deployed at high elevation astronomical observatories and flown on high-altitude balloons in order to mitigate the effects of the Earth’s atmosphere on the lunar observations. Periodic calibrations using instrumentation and techniques available from NIST will ensure traceability to the International System of Units (SI) and low absolute radiometric uncertainties. PMID:26900523

  19. Spectral and Spatial UV Sky Radiance Measurements at a Seaside Resort Under Clear Sky and Slightly Overcast Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sandmann, Henner; Stick, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Spatial measurements of the diffusely scattered sky radiance at a seaside resort under clear sky and slightly overcast conditions have been used to calculate the sky radiance distribution across the upper hemisphere. The measurements were done in the summer season when solar UV radiation is highest. The selected wavelengths were 307, 350 and 550 nm representing the UVB, UVA and VIS band. Absolute values of radiance differ considerably between the wavelengths. Normalizing the measured values by use of direct solar radiance made the spatial distributions of unequal sky radiance comparable. The results convey a spatial impression of the different distributions of the radiance at the three wavelengths. Relative scattered radiance intensity is one order of magnitude greater in UVB than in VIS, whereas in UVA lies roughly in between. Under slightly overcast conditions scattered radiance is increased at all three wavelengths by about one order of magnitude. These measurements taken at the seaside underline the importance of diffuse scattered radiance. The effect of shading parts of the sky can be estimated from the distribution of sky radiance. This knowledge might be useful for sun seekers and in the treatment of people staying at the seaside for therapeutic purposes.

  20. Stratospheric Temperature Trends in the 11 Years of AIRS Spectral Radiance Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, F.; Huang, X.; Chen, X.; Guo, H.

    2014-12-01

    The AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) level-1b radiances have been shown to be well calibrated (~0.3K or higher) and have little secular drift (~4mK/year) since its operation started in 2002. Given the rich information contained in the spectral radiances, such impressive instrument performances make AIRS radiances a valuable data set in the study of stratospheric climate. We compile 11 years (Sep 2002- Aug 2013) of AIRS radiances at channels in the CO2 v2 band with weighting functions peaked in the stratosphere. Using a state-of-the-art fast and accurate radiance simulator based on the PCRTM (Principle Component-based Radiative Transfer Model), we also simulate synthetic AIRS radiances at these channels based on two types of inputs: one is simulations by a free-running GFDL AM3 model and the other is ECMWF ERA-interim reanalysis. AIRS lower-stratospheric channels indicate a cooling trend of no more than 0.23 K/decade while its middle-stratospheric channels show a statistically significant cooling trend as large as 0.58 K/decade. Compared with AIRS observations, GFDL AM3 simulations underestimate the cooling trends in the middle-stratospheric channels while overestimate in the lower-stratospheric channels. Further simulations with separately varying CO2 and SST suggest that the change of CO2 alone is responsible for majority of the cooling trend in the middle-stratospheric channels, but the contributions of time-varying CO2 and SST are comparable in the lower-stratospheric channels. In contrast, the synthetic radiances based on ERA-interim reanalysis show statistically significant positive trends in virtually all stratospheric channels. We also compare the zonal-mean trends estimated from observed and synthetic AIRS spectral radiances and climate data records based on multi-decade SSU (Stratospheric Sounding Unit) measurements. Though discrepancies exist in terms of magnitude and seasonality of the cooling, they all show that most cooling occurs in the tropics

  1. A rapid retrieval methodology based on the spectrally integrated Voigt function for space observation spectral radiance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quine, Brendan M.; Abrarov, Sanjar M.; Jagpal, Raj K.

    2014-06-01

    In our recent publication, we proposed the application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function (SIVF) to a line-by-line (LBL) radiative transfer modelling1. We applied the GENSPECT LBL radiative transfer model that utilizes the HITRAN database to generate synthetic spectral data due to thermal or solar radiation of the Earth or planetary atmosphere2. It has been shown that the SIVF methodology enables the computation of a LBL radiative transfer at reduced spectral resolution model without loss in accuracy. In contrast to the traditional method of computation, the SIVF implementation accounts for the area under the Voigt function between adjacent grid points resulting in well-preserved shape of a spectral radiance even at low spectral resolution. This significant advantage of the SIVF methodology can be applied in the rapid retrieval of the space observation data, required for real-time control and decision making in future generation of the Argus3 remote-sensing microspectrometers. The spectrally integrated methodology can be generalized to other linebroadening profiles, such as Galatry, Rautian-Sobelman or speed dependent profiles, to prevent underestimation of the spectral radiance that always occurs at reduced spectral resolution1 in any LBL radiative transfer model using a traditional method of computation.

  2. Absolute, Extreme-Ultraviolet, Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor (AESSIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Martin C. E.; Smith, Peter L.; Parkinson, W. H.; Kuehne, M.; Kock, M.

    1988-01-01

    AESSIM, the Absolute, Extreme-Ultraviolet, Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor, is designed to measure the absolute solar spectral irradiance at extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths. The data are required for studies of the processes that occur in the earth's upper atmosphere and for predictions of atmospheric drag on space vehicles. AESSIM is comprised of sun-pointed spectrometers and newly-developed, secondary standards of spectral irradiance for the EUV. Use of the in-orbit standard sources will eliminate the uncertainties caused by changes in spectrometer efficiency that have plagued all previous measurements of the solar spectral EUV flux.

  3. Nimbus 7 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) spectral scan solar irradiance and Earth radiance product user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlesinger, Barry M.; Cebula, Richard P.; Heath, Donald F.; Fleig, Albert J.

    1988-01-01

    The archived tape products from the spectral scan mode measurements of solar irradiance (SUNC tapes) and Earth radiance (EARTH tapes) by the Solar Backscatter UV (SBUV) instrument aboard Nimbus 7 are described. Incoming radiation from 160 to 400 nm is measured at intervals of 0.2 nm. The scan-to-scan repeatability of the solar irradiance measurements ranges from approximately 0.5 to 1 percent longward of 280 nm, to 2 percent around 210 nm and 4 percent near 175 nm. The repeatability of the Earth radiance values ranges from 2 to 3 percent at longer wavelengths and low zenith angles to 10 percent at shorter wavelengths and high zenith angles. The tape formats are described in detail, including file structure and contents of each type of record. Catalogs of the tapes and the time period covered are provided, along with lists of the days lacking solar irradiance measurements and the days dedicated to Earth radiance measurements. The method for production of the tapes is outlined and quality control measures are described. How radiances and irradiances are derived from the raw counts, the corrections for changes in instrument sensitivity, and related uncertainties are discussed.

  4. [Study on the absolute spectral irradiation calibration method for far ultraviolet spectrometer in remote sensing].

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Lin, Guan-Yu; Chen, Bin

    2013-01-01

    The present paper studied spectral irradiation responsivities calibration method which can be applied to the far ultraviolet spectrometer for upper atmosphere remote sensing. It is difficult to realize the calibration for far ultraviolet spectrometer for many reasons. Standard instruments for far ultraviolet waveband calibration are few, the degree of the vacuum experiment system is required to be high, the stabilities of the experiment are hardly maintained, and the limitation of the far ultraviolet waveband makes traditional diffuser and the integrating sphere radiance calibration method difficult to be used. To solve these problems, a new absolute spectral irradiance calibration method was studied, which can be applied to the far ultraviolet calibration. We build a corresponding special vacuum experiment system to verify the calibration method. The light source system consists of a calibrated deuterium lamp, a vacuum ultraviolet monochromater and a collimating system. We used the calibrated detector to obtain the irradiance responsivities of it. The three instruments compose the calibration irradiance source. We used the "calibration irradiance source" to illuminate the spectrometer prototype and obtained the spectral irradiance responsivities. It realized the absolute spectral irradiance calibration for the far ultraviolet spectrometer utilizing the calibrated detector. The absolute uncertainty of the calibration is 7.7%. The method is significant for the ground irradiation calibration of the far ultraviolet spectrometer in upper atmosphere remote sensing.

  5. Cloud discrimination and spectral radiance estimation from a digital sky images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, M.; Iwabuchi, H.; Murata, I.

    2015-12-01

    Clouds cover more than 60% of the globe with high impacts on incoming solar irradiance on the ground as well as the radiative energy transfer in the Earth-atmosphere system. Several method for detecting clouds from sky images have been developed, and digital signals available from the JPEG image have nonlinear relationship with the corresponding spectral radiances, which may lead to cloud misclassifications. In this work, a method for cloud discrimination from sky images in RAW format taken from a commercial digital camera is developed. The method uses the clear sky index (CSI). In order to take into account the spectral response in red-green-blue (RGB) channels of the camera as well as lens characteristics, these characteristics are first inferred very accurately with a laboratory experiment. Spectral radiance is represented in a simple form with spectra of incoming solar radiation at the top of atmosphere and ozone transmittance and a polynominal with three coefficients that include the intensity index, the molecular index (MI) and the small particle index (SPI). These coefficients can be obtained from the digital RGB RAW counts by linear transformation. The MI and the SPI can be converted to the CSI, which takes different value from that at clear sky and cloudy pixels. Simultaneous observations with the lidar and the digital camera at Tohoku University show that the CSI can discriminate cloud and clear sky at every pixel with correct discrimination rate more than 90%. Furthermore, spectral distribution of sky radiance can also be estimated at every pixel, and estimated ones are consistent with those from spectrometer and those from radiative transfer simulations under various sky conditions in a wavelength range of 430-680 nm with mean biases lower than 3% and bias standard deviations smaller than 1%.

  6. Instrument development for atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM): Status of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer - extended Resolution (AERI-X), the Solar Radiance Transmission Interferometer (SORTI), and the Absolute Solar Transmission Inferometer (ASTI)

    SciTech Connect

    Murcray, F.; Stephen, T.; Kosters, J.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes three instruments currently under developemnt for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program at the University of Denver: the AERI-X (Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer-Extended Resolution) and the SORTI (Solar R adiance Transmission Interferometer), and ASTI (Absolute Solar transmission Interferometer).

  7. The delta-Sobolev approach for modeling solar spectral irradiance and radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xuwu

    The development and evaluation of a solar radiation model is reported, which gives irradiance and radiance results at the bottom and top of an atmosphere of specified optical depth for each of 145 spectral intervals from 0.29 to 4.05 microns. Absorption by water vapor, aerosols, ozone, and uniformly mixed gases; scattering by molecules and aerosols; and non-Lambertian surface reflectance are included in the model. For solving the radiative transfer equation, an innovative delta-Sobolev method is developed. It applies a delta-function modification to the conventional Sobolev solutions in a way analogous to the delta-Eddington method. The irradiance solution by the delta-Sobolev method turns out to be mathematically identical to the delta-Eddington approximation. The radiance solution by the delta-Sobolov method provides a convenient way to obtain the directional distribution pattern of the radiation transfer field, a feature unable to be obtained by most commonly used approximation methods. Such radiance solutions are also especially useful in models for satellite remote sensing. The model is tested against the rigorous Dave model, which solves the radiation transfer problem by the spherical harmonic method, an accurate but very time consuming process. Good agreement between the current model results and those of Dave's model are observed. The advantages of the delta-Sobolev model are simplicity, reasonable accuracy and capability for implementation on a minicomputer or microcomputer.

  8. The Delta-Sobolev Approach for Modeling Solar Spectral Irradiance and Radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xuwu

    This dissertation reports the development and evaluation of a solar radiation model, which gives irradiance and radiance results at the bottom and top of an atmosphere of specified optical depth for each of 145 spectral intervals from 0.29 to 4.05 mum. Absorption by water vapor, aerosols, ozone and uniformly mixed gases; scattering by molecules and aerosols; and non-Lambertian surface reflectance are included in the model. For solving the radiative transfer equation, an innovative delta-Sobolev method is developed. It applies a delta-function modification to the conventional Sobolev solutions in a way analogous to the delta-Eddington method. The irradiance solution by the delta-Sobolev method turns out to be mathematically identical to the delta-Eddington approximation. The radiance solution by the delta-Sobolev method provides a convenient way to obtain the directional distribution pattern of the radiation transfer field, a feature unable to be obtained by most commonly used approximate methods. Such radiance solutions are also especially useful in models for satellite remote sensing. The model is tested against the rigorous Dave model, which solves the radiative transfer problem by the Spherical Harmonic method, an accurate but very time consuming process. Good agreement between the current model results and those of Dave's model are observed. The advantages of the delta-Sobolev model are simplicity, reasonable accuracy and capability for implementation on a minicomputer or microcomputer.

  9. The spectral amplification effect of clouds to the night sky radiance in Madrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubé, M.; Kocifaj, M.; Zamorano, J.; Solano Lamphar, H. A.; Sanchez de Miguel, A.

    2016-09-01

    Artificial Light at Night (ALAN) may have various environmental impacts ranging from compromising the visibility of astronomical objects to the perturbation of circadian cycles in animals and humans. In the past much research has been carried out to study the impact of ALAN on the radiance of the night sky during clear sky conditions. This was mainly justified by the need for a better understanding of the behavior of ALAN propagation into the environment in order to protect world-class astronomical facilities. More recently, alongside to the threat to the natural starry sky, many issues have emerged from the biological science community. It has been shown that, nearby or inside cities, the presence of cloud cover generally acts as an amplifier for artificial sky radiance while clouds behave as attenuators for remote observers. In this paper we show the spectral behavior of the zenith sky radiance amplification factor exerted by clouds inside a city. We compare in-situ measurements made with the spectrometer SAND-4 with a numerical model applied to the specific geographical context of the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in Spain.

  10. Error Budget for a Calibration Demonstration System for the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; McAndrew, Brendan

    2013-01-01

    A goal of the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission is to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends over decadal time scales. The key to such a goal is to improving the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration across infrared and reflected solar wavelengths allowing climate change to be separated from the limit of natural variability. The advances required to reach on-orbit absolute accuracy to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps exist at NIST in the laboratory, but still need demonstration that the advances can move successfully from to NASA and/or instrument vendor capabilities for spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the radiometric calibration error budget for the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. The goal of the CDS is to allow the testing and evaluation of calibration approaches, alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. The resulting SI-traceable error budget for reflectance retrieval using solar irradiance as a reference and methods for laboratory-based, absolute calibration suitable for climatequality data collections is given. Key components in the error budget are geometry differences between the solar and earth views, knowledge of attenuator behavior when viewing the sun, and sensor behavior such as detector linearity and noise behavior. Methods for demonstrating this error budget are also presented.

  11. Test Plan for a Calibration Demonstration System for the Reflected Solar Instrument for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; Hair, Jason; McAndrew, Brendan; Daw, Adrian; Jennings, Donald; Rabin, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe high-accuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as the most critical method to determine the accuracy of climate change. One of the major objectives of CLARREO is to advance the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration at infrared and reflected solar wavelengths. This advance is required to reach the on-orbit absolute accuracy required to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps while remaining sufficiently accurate to observe climate change to within the uncertainty of the limit of natural variability. While these capabilities exist at NIST in the laboratory, there is a need to demonstrate that it can move successfully from NIST to NASA and/or instrument vendor capabilities for future spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the test plan for the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. The goal of the CDS is to allow the testing and evaluation of calibration approaches , alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. The end result of efforts with the SOLARIS CDS will be an SI-traceable error budget for reflectance retrieval using solar irradiance as a reference and methods for laboratory-based, absolute calibration suitable for climate-quality data collections. The CLARREO mission addresses the need to observe high-accuracy, long-term climate change trends and advance the accuracy of SI traceable absolute calibration. The current work describes the test plan for the SOLARIS which is the calibration demonstration

  12. Comparison of Spectral Radiance Calibration Techniques Used for Backscatter Ultraviolet Satellite Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalewski, Matthew G.; Janz, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Methods for determining the absolute radiometric calibration sensitivities of backscatter ultraviolet (BUV) satellite instruments are compared as part of an effort to minimize pre-launch calibration errors. An internally illuminated integrating sphere source has been used for the Shuttle Solar BUV (SSBUV), Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), Ozone Mapping Instrument (OMI), and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2) using standardized procedures traceable to national standards. These sphere-based sensitivities agree to within three percent [k equals 2] relative to calibrations performed using an external diffuser illuminated by standard irradiance sources, the customary radiance calibration method for BUV instruments. The uncertainty for these calibration techniques as implemented at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Centers Radiometric Calibration and Development Laboratory is shown to be 4 percent at 250nm [k equals 2] when using a single traceable calibration standard. Significant reduction in the uncertainty of nearly 1 percent is demonstrated when multiple calibration standards are used.

  13. From Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, S. R.; Lindler, D.

    2016-05-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R˜1000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.03 μ. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsl/. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We have therefore developed an observing procedure, data-reduction procedure, and correction algorithms that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1%.

  14. Realization of a spectral radiance scale in the 40-250 nm spectral region based on a TROLL-type synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anevsky, Sergey I.; Vernyi, Alexander E.; Khromchenko, Vladimir B.; Panasyuk, Vadim S.; Sapritsky, Victor I.

    1994-08-01

    An air and vacuum ultraviolet spectral radiance scale based on specialized table-top synchrotron radiation sources of the TROLL-type is described. The scale can be used to calibrate secondary-standard sources and receivers in a wide ultraviolet spectral range.

  15. Accurate modeling of spectral fine-structure in Earth radiance spectra measured with the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment.

    PubMed

    van Deelen, Rutger; Hasekamp, Otto P; Landgraf, Jochen

    2007-01-10

    We present what we believe to be a novel approach to simulating the spectral fine structure (<1 nm) in measurements of spectrometers such as the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME). GOME measures the Earth's radiance spectra and daily solar irradiance spectra from which a reflectivity spectrum is commonly extracted. The high-frequency structures contained in such a spectrum are, apart from atmospheric absorption, caused by Raman scattering and by a shift between the solar irradiance and the Earth's radiance spectrum. Normally, an a priori high-resolution solar spectrum is used to simulate these structures. We present an alternative method in which all the required information on the solar spectrum is retrieved from the GOME measurements. We investigate two approaches for the spectral range of 390-400 nm. First, a solar spectrum is reconstructed on a fine spectral grid from the GOME solar measurement. This approach leads to undersampling errors of up to 0.5% in the modeling of the Earth's radiance spectra. Second, a combination of the solar measurement and one of the Earth's radiance measurement is used to retrieve a solar spectrum. This approach effectively removes the undersampling error and results in residuals close to the GOME measurement noise of 0.1%.

  16. Water heat pipe blackbody as a reference spectral radiance source between 50°C and 250°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorma, M.; Mekhontsev, S.; Khromchenko, V.; Litorja, M.; Cagran, C.; Zeng, J.; Hanssen, L.

    2006-04-01

    Realization of a radiometric temperature scale for near ambient temperatures with accuracy at the 20 to 50 mK level is crucial for a number of demanding military and commercial applications. In support of such measurements, radiation sources with high stability and spatial uniformity must be developed as reference and working standards. Traditionally, the temperature scale, maintained at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), relies on water bath and oil bath blackbodies in this temperature range. Recently, a water heat pipe blackbody was used at NIST as a spectral radiance source in a spectral emissivity measurement facility. Now a new, more versatile high emissivity water heat pipe blackbody was designed and characterized to be used as a reference radiance source for the radiometric temperature scale realization between 50 °C and 250 °C. Furthermore, it will serve as a reference source for the infrared spectral radiance measurements between 2.5 μm and 20 μm. The calculated spectral emissivity of the painted copper alloy cavity was verified by reflectance measurements using a CO II laser at 10.6 μm wavelength. The spatial thermal uniformity and stability of the blackbody were characterized. Two independent realizations of the radiometric temperature scale were compared in order to verify the accuracy of the scale. Radiance temperature, calculated from the cavity temperature measured with a calibrated PRT contact thermometer and from the emissivity of the cavity, was compared to the radiance temperature, directly measured with a reference pyrometer, which was calibrated with a set of fixed point blackbodies. The difference was found to be within measurement uncertainties.

  17. Characterization of the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) ability to serve as an infrared satellite intercalibration reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, David; Holz, Robert; Nagle, Fred; Revercomb, Henry

    2016-04-01

    Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a future mission employing an infrared spectrometer with unprecedented calibration accuracy and the ability to assess its calibration on-orbit using a novel verification system. Utilizing this capability for satellite intercalibration is a primary objective of the mission. This paper presents a new infrared intercalibration methodology that minimizes the intercalibration uncertainties and provides uncertainty estimates resulting from the scene variability and instrument noise. Results of a simulation study to characterize realistic spatial and temporal matching differences for simultaneous nadir overpasses (SNOs) of CLARREO and existing hyperspectral sounders are presented. This study, along with experience with intercalibration of real data, finds that intercalibration uncertainties are minimized when the SNOs are not screened for sky conditions but instead weighted based on the observed scene variability. Intercalibration performance is investigated for a 90° polar orbit mission and for a Pathfinder mission on the International Space Station, for various potential CLARREO footprint sizes, and as a function of mission length, scene brightness temperature, and wavelength. The results are encouraging and suggest that biases between CLARREO and sounder observations can be determined with low uncertainty and with high time frequency during a CLARREO mission. For example, the simulations suggest that a CLARREO footprint of 50 to 100 km in diameter is optimal for intercalibration, and that the 3 sigma intercalibration uncertainty is less than 0.1 K for channels at infrared window wavelengths using 2 months of accumulated SNOs, and for more absorbing channels with less scene variability the uncertainties are less than 50 mK.

  18. Deriving clear-sky longwave spectral flux from spaceborne hyperspectral radiance measurements: a case study with AIRS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiuhong; Huang, Xianglei

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that longwave (LW) spectral fluxes have unique merit in climate studies. Using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances as a case study, this study presents an algorithm to derive the entire LW clear-sky spectral fluxes from spaceborne hyperspectral observations. No other auxiliary observations are needed in the algorithm. A clear-sky scene is identified using a three-step detection method. The identified clear-sky scenes are then categorized into different sub-scene types using information about precipitable water, lapse rate and surface temperature inferred from the AIRS radiances at six selected channels. A previously established algorithm is then used to invert AIRS radiances to spectral fluxes over the entire LW spectrum at 10 cm-1 spectral interval. Accuracy of the algorithms is evaluated against collocated Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) observations. For nadir-view observations, the mean difference between outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) derived by this algorithm and the collocated CERES OLR is 1.52 Wm-2 with a standard deviation of 2.46 Wm-2. When the algorithm is extended for viewing zenith angle up to 45°, the performance is comparable to that for nadir-view results.

  19. Spectral radiance errors in remote sensing ground studies due to nearby objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Kirchner, J. A.; Newcomb, W. W.

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to the error that can occur in all radiometric measurements owing to the presence of nearby objects. When a researcher positions himself on the side of a target point opposite the sun, his body gives rise to two erroneous effects. First, it blocks a portion of the incoming diffuse sky radiance to the target point, and second, it reflects incoming diffuse and direct solar irradiance and ground exitance onto the target point. It is noted that the same phenomenon occurs for any nearby object, whether it be a field truck, a building structure, or a row of trees. This error deriving from nearby objects is often not recognized by researchers or is considered insignificant with no knowledge of its magnitude. The approach taken here is to mathematically model the radiant transfers that take place between the global irradiance, panel, or scene and the object and to report the magnitude of this error for various solar zenith angles, wavelengths, size and distances of objects (steradian blockage), and spectral reflectances of the scene and object. The scene, object, and panel are assumed to be Lambertian, and the object is always located on the side of the target point opposite the sun.

  20. Oceanic radiance model development and validation: application of airborne active-passive ocean color spectral measurements.

    PubMed

    Hoge, F E; Swift, R; Yungel, J

    1995-06-20

    It is shown that airborne active-passive (laser-solar) ocean color data can be used to develop and validate oceanic radiance models. The two principal inputs to the oceanic radiance model, chlorophyll pigment and incident solar irradiance, are obtained from a nadir-viewing laser-induced fluorescence spectrometer and a zenith-viewing radiometer, respectively. The computed water-leaving radiances are validated by comparison with the calibrated output of a separate nadir-viewing radiometer subsystem. In the North Atlantic Ocean, the calculated and the observed airborne radiances are found to compare very favorably for the 443-, 520-, and 550-nm wavelengths over an ∼ 170-km flight track east of St. John's, Newfoundland. The results further suggest that the semianalytical radiance model of ocean color, the airborne active (laser) fluorescence spectrometer, and the passive (solar) radiometric instrumentation are all remarkably precise.

  1. Remote measurement of water color in coastal waters. [spectral radiance data used to obtain quantitative values for chlorophyll and turbidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weldon, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to develop procedure to obtain quantitative values for chlorophyll and turbidity in coastal waters by observing the changes in spectral radiance of the backscattered spectrum. The technique under consideration consists of Examining Exotech model 20-D spectral radiometer data and determining which radiance ratios best correlated with chlorophyll and turbidity measurements as obtained from analyses of water samples and sechi visibility readings. Preliminary results indicate that there is a correlation between backscattered light and chlorophyll concentration and secchi visibility. The tests were conducted with the spectrometer mounted in a light aircraft over the Mississippi Sound at altitudes of 2.5K, 2.8K and 10K feet.

  2. Observed Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance in the Transition Zone Between Cloud-Free and Cloudy Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, C.; Wiscombe, W.

    2010-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's (ARM) new Shortwave Spectrometer (SWS) looks straight up and measures zenith radiance at 418 wavelengths between 350 and 2200 nm. Because of its 1-sec sampling resolution, the SWS provides a unique capability to study the transition zone between cloudy and clear sky areas. A surprising spectral invariant behavior is found between ratios of zenith radiance spectra during the transition from cloudy to cloud-free atmosphere. This behavior suggests that the spectral signature of the transition zone is a linear mixture between the two extremes (definitely cloudy and definitely clear). The weighting function of the linear mixture is found to be a wavelength-independent characteristic of the transition zone. It is shown that the transition zone spectrum is fully determined by this function and zenith radiance spectra of clear and cloudy regions. This new finding may help us to better understand and quantify such physical phenomena as humidification of aerosols in the relatively moist cloud environment and evaporation and activation of cloud droplets.

  3. Interferometer for ground-based observations of emitted spectral radiance from the troposphere: evaluation and retrieval performance.

    PubMed

    Serio, Carmine; Esposito, Francesco; Masiello, Guido; Pavese, Giulia; Calvello, Maria R; Grieco, Giuseppe; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Buijs, Henry L; Roy, Claude B

    2008-07-20

    We evaluate the spectral quality, radiometric noise, and retrieval performance of a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, which has been developed for recording spectrally resolved observations in a region of the spectrum which is important both for the science of Earth's climate and applications, such as the remote sensing of temperature and atmospheric gas species. This spectral region extends from 100 to 1600 cm(-1) and encompasses the two fundamental, rotation and vibration, absorption bands of water vapor. The instrument is a customized version of a Bomem AERI (Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer) spectrometer, whose spectral coverage has been extended in the far infrared with the use of uncooled pyroelectric detectors. Retrieval examples for water vapor and temperature profiles are shown, which also allow us to intercompare the retrieval performance of both H(2)O vibration and rotation bands.

  4. Absolute spectral response measurements of different photodiodes useful for applications in the UV spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelizzo, Maria G.; Ceccherini, Paolo; Garoli, Denis; Masut, Pietro; Nicolosi, Piergiorgio

    2004-09-01

    Long UV radiation exposure can result in damages of biological tissues, as burns, skin aging, erythema and even melanoma cancer. In the past years an increase of melanoma cancer has been observed and associated to the atmospheric ozone deployment. Attendance of sun tanning unit centers has become a huge social phenomena, and the maximum UV radiation dose that a human being can receive is regulated by law. On the other side, UV radiation is largely used for therapeutic and germicidal purposes. In all these areas, spectroradiometer and radiomenter are needed for monitoring UVA (315-400 nm), UVB (280-315 nm) and UVC (100-280 nm) irradiance. We have selected some commercial photodiodes which can be used as solid state detectors in these instruments. We have characterized them by measuring their absolute spectral response in the 200 - 400 nm spectral range.

  5. Pan-spectral observing system simulation experiments of shortwave reflectance and long-wave radiance for climate model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, D. R.; Collins, W. D.; Paige, J. L.

    2015-07-01

    Top-of-atmosphere (TOA) spectrally resolved shortwave reflectances and long-wave radiances describe the response of the Earth's surface and atmosphere to feedback processes and human-induced forcings. In order to evaluate proposed long-duration spectral measurements, we have projected 21st Century changes from the Community Climate System Model (CCSM3.0) conducted for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) A2 Emissions Scenario onto shortwave reflectance spectra from 300 to 2500 nm and long-wave radiance spectra from 2000 to 200 cm-1 at 8 nm and 1 cm-1 resolution, respectively. The radiative transfer calculations have been rigorously validated against published standards and produce complementary signals describing the climate system forcings and feedbacks. Additional demonstration experiments were performed with the Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate (MIROC5) and Hadley Centre Global Environment Model version 2 Earth System (HadGEM2-ES) models for the Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5) scenario. The calculations contain readily distinguishable signatures of low clouds, snow/ice, aerosols, temperature gradients, and water vapour distributions. The goal of this effort is to understand both how climate change alters reflected solar and emitted infrared spectra of the Earth and determine whether spectral measurements enhance our detection and attribution of climate change. This effort also presents a path forward to understand the characteristics of hyperspectral observational records needed to confront models and inline instrument simulation. Such simulation will enable a diverse set of comparisons between model results from coupled model intercomparisons and existing and proposed satellite instrument measurement systems.

  6. Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium limb radiance from O3 and CO2 in the 9-11 micrometer spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David P.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Mlynczak, Martin G.

    1994-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing of mesospheric and thermospheric O3 abundance in the terrestrial atmosphere often uses 9-11 micrometer thermal emission. In this paper, we apply a line-by-line non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) radiance model to this spectral region and investigate the conditions of LTE breakdown and the effect that this has on the limb radiance measured by an i.r. sounder. Monochromatic and band-integrated radiance calculations have been performed for limb view tangent heights between 55 and 105 km under daytime and nighttime conditions. Non-LTE emission from both O3 and CO2 are shown to be important with the divergence of radiance from LTE values and the diurnal variation being band dependent. We have shown that the contribution of the CO2 bands to the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere O3 channel is significant for daytime conditions at tangent heights above about 60 km. A study has been made to choose O3 sounding channel spectral passbands for the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder. High resolution calculations are required to determine those spectral intervals that will filter radiance from selected bands and characterize their non-LTE behavior. This will allow for improved O3 retrievals above 70 km and non-LTE studies.

  7. Aerosol Profile Retrievals from Integrated Dual Wavelengths Space Lidar ESSP3-CENA and Spectral Radiance MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram; Mattoo, Shana; Tanre, Didier; Kleidman, Richard; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The ESSP3-CENA space mission (formally PICASSO-CENA) will provide continues global observations with a two wavelength lidar. The attenuated backscattering coefficients measured by the lidar, have valuable information about the vertical distribution of aerosol particles and their sizes. However the information cannot be mapped into unique aerosol physical properties. Infinite number of physical solutions with different attenuations through the atmosphere can reconstruct the same two wavelength backscattered profile measured from space. Spectral radiance measured by MODIS simultaneously with the ESSP3 data can constrain the problem and resolve this ambiguity to a large extent. Sensitivity study shows that inversion of the integrated MODIS+ESSP3 data can derive the vertical profiles of the fine and coarse modes mixed in the same atmospheric column in the presence of moderate calibration uncertainties and electronic noise (approx. 10%). We shall present the sensitivity study and results from application of the technique to measurements in the SAFARI-2000 and SHADE experiments.

  8. Spectral radiance estimates of leaf area and leaf phytomass of small grains and native vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aase, J. K.; Brown, B. S.; Millard, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    Similarities and/or dissimilarities in radiance characteristics were studied among barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), oats (Avena fatua L.), spring and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and short-grass prairie vegetation. The site was a Williams loam soil (fine-loamy mixed, Typic Argiborolls) near Sidney, Montana. Radiances were measured with a truck-mounted radiometer. The radiometer was equipped with four wavelength bands: 0.45 to 0.52, 0.52 to 0.60, 0.63 to 0.69, and 0.76 to 0.90 micron. Airborne scanner measurements were made at an altitude of 600 m four times during the season under clear sky conditions. The airborne scanner was equipped with the same four bands as the truck-mounted radiometer plus the following: 1.00 to 1.30, 1.55 to 1.75, 2.08 to 2.35, and 10.4 to 12.5 microns. Comparisons using individual wave bands, the near IR/red, (0.76 to 0.90 micron)/(0.63 to 0.69 micron) ratio and the normalized difference vegetation index, ND = (IR - red)/(IR + red), showed that only during limited times during the growing season were some of the small grains distinguishable from one another and from native rangeland vegetation. There was a common relation for all small grains between leaf area index and green leaf phytomass and between leaf area index or green leaf phytomass and the IR/red ratio.

  9. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J; Dedecker, R

    2005-01-01

    The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) measures the absolute infrared (IR) spectral radiance (watts per square meter per steradian per wavenumber) of the sky directly above the instrument. The spectral measurement range of the instrument is 3300 to 520 wavenumbers (cm-1) or 3-19.2 microns for the normal-range instruments and 3300 to 400 cm-1 or 3-25 microns, for the extended-range polar instruments. Spectral resolution is 1.0 cm-1. Instrument field-of-view is 1.3 degrees. A calibrated sky radiance spectrum is produced every 8 minutes in normal mode and every minute in rapid sampling mode. The actual sample scan time is 20-30 sec in rapid sampling mode with periodic gaps when the instrument is looking at the blackbodies. Rapid sampling will become available in all AERIs. Rapid sampling time will eventually be reduced to data every 20 seconds. The AERI data can be used for 1) evaluating line-by-line radiative transport codes, 2) detecting/quantifying cloud effects on ground-based measurements of infrared spectral radiance (and hence is valuable for cloud property retrievals), and 3) calculating vertical atmospheric profiles of temperature and water vapor and the detection of trace gases.

  10. High Altitude Measurements of Radiance at High Spectral and Spatial Resolution for SIMBIOS Sensor Calibration, Validation, and Intercomparisons. Chapter 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Pavri, Betina; Chrien, Thomas G.

    2001-01-01

    The successful combination of data from different ocean color sensors depends on the correct interpretation of signal from each of these sensors. Ideally, the sensor measured signals are calibrated to geophysical units of spectral radiance, and sensor artifacts are removed and corrected. The calibration process resamples the signal into a common radiometric data space so that subsequent ocean color algorithms that are applied to the data are based on physical processes and are inherently sensor independent. The objective of this project is to calibrate and validate the on-orbit radiometric characteristics of Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) with underflights of NASA's calibrated Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). This objective is feasible because AVIRIS measures the same spectral range as SeaWIFS at higher spectral resolution. In addition to satellite sensor underflights, the AVIRIS project has supported comparison and analysis of the radiometric calibration standards used for AVIRIS and SeaWIFS. To date, both the OCTS and SeaWIFS satellite sensors have been underflown by AVIRIS with matching spectral, spatial, geometric, radiometric, and temporal domains. The calibration and validation objective of this project is pursued for the following reasons: (1) Calibration is essential for the quantitative use of SeaWIFS and other SIMBIOS (Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies) sensor data; (2) Calibration in the laboratory of spaceborne sensors is challenging; (3) Satellite sensors are subjected aging on the ground and to trauma during launch; (4) The Earth orbit environment is significantly different than the laboratory calibration environment; (5) Through years of effort AVIRIS has been demonstrated to be well calibrated; and (6) AVIRIS can match the spectral and spatial observation characteristics near the top of the atmosphere at the time of SeaWIFS measurements.

  11. LADAR Performance Simulations with a High Spectral Resolution Atmospheric Transmittance and Radiance Model-LEEDR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    wavelengths of 1.064, 1.56 and 2.039 µm at a number of locations worldwide. Signal attenuation and background noise are characterized using LEEDR...presented primarily in the form of worldwide plots of notional signal to noise ratios, show a significant climate dependence, but large variances...between climatological and standard atmosphere assessments. An overall average absolute mean difference ratio of 1.03 is found when climatological signal

  12. Algal Accessory Pigment Detection Using AVIRIS Image-Derived Spectral Radiance Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Ambrosia, Vincent G.

    1996-01-01

    Visual and derivative analyses of AVIRIS spectral data can be used to detect algal accessory pigments in aquatic communities. This capability extends the use of remote sensing for the study of aquatic ecosystems by allowing detection of taxonomically significant pigment signatures which yield information about the type of algae present. Such information allows remote sensing-based assessment of aquatic ecosystem health, as in the detection of nuisance blooms of cyanobacteria or toxic blooms of dinoflagellates. Remote sensing of aquatic systems has traditionally focused on quantification of chlorophyll a, a photoreactive (and light-harvesting) pigment which is common to all algae as well as cyanobacteria (bluegreen algae). Due to the ubiquitousness of this pigment within algae, chl a is routinely measured to estimate algal biomass both during ground-truthing and using various airborne or satellite based sensors, including AVIRIS. Within the remote sensing and aquatic sciences communities, ongoing research has been performed to detect algal accessory pigments for assessment of algal population composition. This research is based on the fact that many algal accessory pigments are taxonomically significant, and all are spectrally unique. Aquatic scientists have been refining pigment analysis techniques, primarily high performance liquid chromatography, or HPLC, to detect specific pigments as a time-saving alternative to individual algal cell identifications and counts. Remote sensing scientists are investigating the use of pigment signatures to construct pigment libraries analogous to mineral spectral libraries used in geological remote sensing applications. The accessory pigment approach has been used successfully in remote sensing using data from the Thematic Mapper, low-altitude, multiple channel scanners, field spectroradiometers and the AVIRIS hyperspectral scanner. Due to spectral and spatial resolution capabilities, AVIRIS is the sensor of choice for such

  13. Using the solar elevation angle and radiance conversion to normalize forest spectral signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, E. M.; Lu, Y.-C.

    1984-01-01

    A number of spectral signals associated with forest cover were selected in order to test the usefulness of adjustments to Landsat MSS digital count values. The signatures were taken from 26 independent regional land cover inventories in the northeastern US. A regression analysis was conducted which revealed a significant relationship between digital count values and variation in the solar elevation angles in MSS bands four, six, and seven for deciduous forests and in all MSS bands for conifers. When signatures were adjusted for solar elevation angles and MSS sensor calibration differences, the dependence on solar elevation angle was reduced. The adjustments also significantly reduced the variance with Level II forest categories among scenes.

  14. Establishing a New NIST Facility for the Primary Realization of both Spectral Radiance and Reflectance in the Mid-and Far-Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhontsev, S.; Khromchenko, V.; Prokhorov, A.; Wilthan, B.; Hanssen, L.

    2009-12-01

    In the framework of the research initiative “Climate Change: Measurements & Standards”, a new primary standard facility is being established for realization of both spectral radiance and reflectance in the mid-and far-infrared. The objective of the CBS3 (which stands for Controlled Background Spectroradiometry and Spectrophotometry System) is to develop an advanced primary standard with proven accuracy and based on fundamental and reproducible physical standards to assure SI traceability. Derivation of the infrared spectral directional-hemispherical reflectance scale for materials and cavities is achieved using active control of radiation background directional-hemispherical reflectance. The measurements of diffuse reflectance will be supported for the wavelengths up to 50 micrometers, incidence angles up to 85 degrees, and temperatures from 200 K to 350 K. Derivation of spectral radiance and radiance temperature scale is based on use of primary blackbody sources, whose emissivity is defined via reflectometry as mentioned above, and temperature is defined by fundamental and reproducible properties of phase change processes of pure substances, including mercury, water and gallium. Along with derivation and dissemination of spectral radiance and reflectance scales, the facility will support additional tests for user sources, sensors and components, as well as continue support of NIST TXR radiometer. Controlled radiation background feature will also be used for prediction of performance of NIST transfer standards and user payloads at different environmental conditions. Specialized instrumentation will be developed, including primary blackbody sources, a test chamber, a far IR reflectometer, and a spectral comparator, as well as transfer standards to ensure dissemination of radiometric and spectrophotometric scales and their validation via international comparisons. A demonstration study and the conceptual design of core components of the facility have been

  15. Dispersive white-light spectral interferometry with absolute phase retrieval to measure thin film.

    PubMed

    Hlubina, P; Ciprian, D; Lunácek, J; Lesnák, M

    2006-08-21

    We present a white-light spectral interferometric technique for measuring the absolute spectral optical path difference (OPD) between the beams in a slightly dispersive Michelson interferometer with a thin-film structure as a mirror. We record two spectral interferograms to obtain the spectral interference signal and retrieve from it the spectral phase, which includes the effect of a cube beam splitter and the phase change on reflection from the thin-film structure. Knowing the effective thickness and dispersion of the beam splitter made of BK7 optical glass, we use a simple procedure to determine both the absolute spectral phase difference and OPD. The spectral OPD is measured for a uniform SiO(2) thin film on a silicon wafer and is fitted to the theoretical spectral OPD to obtain the thin-film thickness. The theoretical spectral OPD is determined provided that the optical constants of the thin-film structure are known. We measure also the nonlinear-like spectral phase and fit it to the theoretical values in order to obtain the thin-film thickness.

  16. High-spectral-radiance, red-emitting tapered diode lasers with monolithically integrated distributed Bragg reflector surface gratings.

    PubMed

    Feise, David; John, Wilfred; Bugge, Frank; Fiebig, Christian; Blume, Gunnar; Paschke, Katrin

    2012-10-08

    A red-emitting tapered diode laser with a monolithically integrated distributed Bragg reflector grating is presented. The device is able to emit up to 1 W of spectrally stabilized optical output power at 5°C. Depending on the period of the tenth order surface grating the emission wavelengths of these devices from the same gain material are 635 nm, 637 nm, and 639 nm. The emission is as narrow as 9 pm (FWHM) at 637.6 nm. The lateral beam quality is M(2)(1/e(2)) = 1.2. Therefore, these devices simplify techniques such as wavelength multiplexing and fiber coupling dedicating them as light sources for µ-Raman spectroscopy, absolute distance interferometry, and holographic imaging.

  17. Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Marshak; Warren Wiscombe; Yuri Knyazikhin; Christine Chiu

    2011-05-24

    We proposed a variety of tasks centered on the following question: what can we learn about 3D cloud-radiation processes and aerosol-cloud interaction from rapid-sampling ARM measurements of spectral zenith radiance? These ARM measurements offer spectacular new and largely unexploited capabilities in both the temporal and spectral domains. Unlike most other ARM instruments, which average over many seconds or take samples many seconds apart, the new spectral zenith radiance measurements are fast enough to resolve natural time scales of cloud change and cloud boundaries as well as the transition zone between cloudy and clear areas. In the case of the shortwave spectrometer, the measurements offer high time resolution and high spectral resolution, allowing new discovery-oriented science which we intend to pursue vigorously. Research objectives are, for convenience, grouped under three themes: • Understand radiative signature of the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy areas using data from ARM shortwave radiometers, which has major climatic consequences in both aerosol direct and indirect effect studies. • Provide cloud property retrievals from the ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility for studies of aerosol-cloud interactions. • Assess impact of 3D cloud structures on aerosol properties using passive and active remote sensing techniques from both ARM and satellite measurements.

  18. Absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The distinction between the uses of relative and absolute spectroradiometric calibration of remote sensing systems is discussed. The advantages of detector-based absolute calibration are described, and the categories of relative and absolute system calibrations are listed. The limitations and problems associated with three common methods used for the absolute calibration of remote sensing systems are addressed. Two methods are proposed for the in-flight absolute calibration of advanced multispectral linear array systems. One makes use of a sun-illuminated panel in front of the sensor, the radiance of which is monitored by a spectrally flat pyroelectric radiometer. The other uses a large, uniform, high-radiance reference ground surface. The ground and atmospheric measurements required as input to a radiative transfer program to predict the radiance level at the entrance pupil of the orbital sensor are discussed, and the ground instrumentation is described.

  19. One year of downwelling spectral radiance measurements from 100 to 1400 cm-1 at Dome Concordia: Results in clear conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, R.; Arosio, C.; Maestri, T.; Palchetti, L.; Bianchini, G.; Del Guasta, M.

    2016-09-01

    The present work examines downwelling radiance spectra measured at the ground during 2013 by a Far Infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer at Dome C, Antarctica. A tropospheric backscatter and depolarization lidar is also deployed at same site, and a radiosonde system is routinely operative. The measurements allow characterization of the water vapor and clouds infrared properties in Antarctica under all sky conditions. In this paper we specifically discuss cloud detection and the analysis in clear sky condition, required for the discussion of the results obtained in cloudy conditions. First, the paper discusses the procedures adopted for the quality control of spectra acquired automatically. Then it describes the classification procedure used to discriminate spectra measured in clear sky from cloudy conditions. Finally a selection is performed and 66 clear cases, spanning the whole year, are compared to simulations. The computation of layer molecular optical depth is performed with line-by-line techniques and a convolution to simulate the Radiation Explorer in the Far InfraRed-Prototype for Applications and Development (REFIR-PAD) measurements; the downwelling radiance for selected clear cases is computed with a state-of-the-art adding-doubling code. The mean difference over all selected cases between simulated and measured radiance is within experimental error for all the selected microwindows except for the negative residuals found for all microwindows in the range 200 to 400 cm-1, with largest values around 295.1 cm-1. The paper discusses possible reasons for the discrepancy and identifies the incorrect magnitude of the water vapor total absorption coefficient as the cause of such large negative radiance bias below 400 cm-1.

  20. Absolute Power Spectral Density Changes in the Magnetoencephalographic Activity During the Transition from Childhood to Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Carlos M; Rodríguez-Martínez, Elena I; Fernández, Alberto; Maestú, Fernando; Poza, Jesús; Gómez, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the pattern of reduction in absolute power spectral density (PSD) of magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals throughout development. Specifically, we wanted to explore whether the human skull's high permeability for electromagnetic fields would allow us to question whether the pattern of absolute PSD reduction observed in the human electroencephalogram is due to an increase in the skull's resistive properties with age. Furthermore, the topography of the MEG signals during maturation was explored, providing additional insights about the areas and brain rhythms related to late maturation in the human brain. To attain these goals, spontaneous MEG activity was recorded from 148 sensors in a sample of 59 subjects divided into three age groups: children/adolescents (7-14 years), young adults (17-20 years) and adults (21-26 years). Statistical testing was carried out by means of an analysis of variance (ANOVA), with "age group" as between-subject factor and "sensor group" as within-subject factor. Additionally, correlations of absolute PSD with age were computed to assess the influence of age on the spectral content of MEG signals. Results showed a broadband PSD decrease in frontal areas, which suggests the late maturation of this region, but also a mild increase in high frequency PSD with age in posterior areas. These findings suggest that the intensity of the neural sources during spontaneous brain activity decreases with age, which may be related to synaptic pruning.

  1. Experimental feasibility of the airborne measurement of absolute oil fluorescence spectral conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne lidar oil spill experiments carried out to determine the practicability of the AOFSCE (absolute oil fluorescence spectral conversion efficiency) computational model are described. The results reveal that the model is suitable over a considerable range of oil film thicknesses provided the fluorescence efficiency of the oil does not approach the minimum detection sensitivity limitations of the lidar system. Separate airborne lidar experiments to demonstrate measurement of the water column Raman conversion efficiency are also conducted to ascertain the ultimate feasibility of converting such relative oil fluorescence to absolute values. Whereas the AOFSCE model is seen as highly promising, further airborne water column Raman conversion efficiency experiments with improved temporal or depth-resolved waveform calibration and software deconvolution techniques are thought necessary for a final determination of suitability.

  2. Solar radius determination from SODISM/PICARD and HMI/SDO observations of the decrease of the spectral solar radiance during the 2012 June Venus transit

    SciTech Connect

    Hauchecorne, A.; Meftah, M.; Irbah, A.; Hochedez, J.-F.

    2014-03-10

    On 2012 June 5-6, the transit of Venus provided a rare opportunity to determine the radius of the Sun using solar imagers observing a well-defined object, namely, the planet and its atmosphere, partially occulting the Sun. A new method has been developed to estimate the solar radius during a planetary transit. It is based on the estimation of the spectral solar radiance decrease in a region around the contact between the planet and the Sun at the beginning of the ingress and at the end of the egress. The extrapolation to zero of the radiance decrease versus the Sun-to-Venus apparent angular distance allows estimation of the solar radius at the time of first and fourth contacts. This method presents the advantage of being almost independent on the plate scale, the distortion, the refraction by the planetary atmosphere, and on the point-spread function of the imager. It has been applied to two space solar visible imagers, SODISM/PICARD and HMI/SDO. The found results are mutually consistent, despite their different error budgets: 959.''85 ± 0.''19 (1σ) for SODISM at 607.1 nm and 959.''90 ± 0.''06 (1σ) for HMI at 617.3 nm.

  3. Absolute Radiation Thermometry in the NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünger, L.; Taubert, R. D.; Gutschwager, B.; Anhalt, K.; Briaudeau, S.; Sadli, M.

    2017-04-01

    A near infrared (NIR) radiation thermometer (RT) for temperature measurements in the range from 773 K up to 1235 K was characterized and calibrated in terms of the "Mise en Pratique for the definition of the Kelvin" (MeP-K) by measuring its absolute spectral radiance responsivity. Using Planck's law of thermal radiation allows the direct measurement of the thermodynamic temperature independently of any ITS-90 fixed-point. To determine the absolute spectral radiance responsivity of the radiation thermometer in the NIR spectral region, an existing PTB monochromator-based calibration setup was upgraded with a supercontinuum laser system (0.45 μm to 2.4 μm) resulting in a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio. The RT was characterized with respect to its nonlinearity, size-of-source effect, distance effect, and the consistency of its individual temperature measuring ranges. To further improve the calibration setup, a new tool for the aperture alignment and distance measurement was developed. Furthermore, the diffraction correction as well as the impedance correction of the current-to-voltage converter is considered. The calibration scheme and the corresponding uncertainty budget of the absolute spectral responsivity are presented. A relative standard uncertainty of 0.1 % (k=1) for the absolute spectral radiance responsivity was achieved. The absolute radiometric calibration was validated at four temperature values with respect to the ITS-90 via a variable temperature heatpipe blackbody (773 K ...1235 K) and at a gold fixed-point blackbody radiator (1337.33 K).

  4. Effects of inelastic radiative processes on the determination of water-leaving spectral radiance from extrapolation of underwater near-surface measurements.

    PubMed

    Li, Linhai; Stramski, Dariusz; Reynolds, Rick A

    2016-09-01

    Extrapolation of near-surface underwater measurements is the most common method to estimate the water-leaving spectral radiance, Lw(λ) (where λ is the light wavelength in vacuum), and remote-sensing reflectance, Rrs(λ), for validation and vicarious calibration of satellite sensors, as well as for ocean color algorithm development. However, uncertainties in Lw(λ) arising from the extrapolation process have not been investigated in detail with regards to the potential influence of inelastic radiative processes, such as Raman scattering by water molecules and fluorescence by colored dissolved organic matter and chlorophyll-a. Using radiative transfer simulations, we examine high-depth resolution vertical profiles of the upwelling radiance, Lu(λ), and its diffuse attenuation coefficient, KLu (λ), within the top 10 m of the ocean surface layer and assess the uncertainties in extrapolated values of Lw(λ). The inelastic processes generally increase Lu and decrease KLu in the red and near-infrared (NIR) portion of the spectrum. Unlike KLu in the blue and green spectral bands, KLu in the red and NIR is strongly variable within the near-surface layer even in a perfectly homogeneous water column. The assumption of a constant KLu with depth that is typically employed in the extrapolation method can lead to significant errors in the estimate of Lw. These errors approach ∼100% at 900 nm, and the desired threshold of 5% accuracy or less cannot be achieved at wavelengths greater than 650 nm for underwater radiometric systems that typically take measurements at depths below 1 m. These errors can be reduced by measuring Lu within a much shallower surface layer of tens of centimeters thick or even less at near-infrared wavelengths longer than 800 nm, which suggests a

  5. Radiance calibration of spherical integrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, James T.; Guenther, Bruce W.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques for improving the knowledge of the radiance of large area spherical and hemispherical integrating energy sources have been investigated. Such sources are used to calibrate numerous aircraft and spacecraft remote sensing instruments. Comparisons are made between using a standard source based calibration method and a quantum efficient detector (QED) based calibration method. The uncertainty involved in transferring the calibrated values of the point source standard lamp to the extended source is estimated to be 5 to 10 percent. The use of the QED allows an improvement in the uncertainty to 1 to 2 percent for the measurement of absolute radiance from a spherical integrator source.

  6. Applications of CrIS Full Spectral Resolution Data in NWP Models to Improve the Quality Control of IR Radiance Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, X.

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Technology of Microwave Sounder (ATMS) and the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on board Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite provide data for profiling atmospheric temperature and moisture under all weather conditions and supporting continuing advances in data assimilation and NWP modeling. As of today, both ATMS and CrIS radiances are well calibrated and the SDR data have reached a validated level for user applications. This study will present the assimilation of ATMS and CrIS data in the Hurricane Weather Research and Forecast Model (HWRF) Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system and the impacts from uses of new satellite data on hurricane track and intensity forecasts in the Western Pacific. A new quality control (QC) approach is developed based on CrIS longwave and shortwave CO2 channels to detect the clouds at different altitudes. The double CO2 bands allow for retrieving the optically thin clouds due to their differential absorption and scattering properties. The cloud masks derived from CrIS double CO2 bands are compared with the current GSI baseline QC algorithm in different cloud regimes. Impacts of an improved QC on the prediction of hurricane and typhoon track and intensity are demonstrated with the 2014 Typhoon cases. Since November 2011, NOAA has begun generating the CrIS full resolution data. The improvements in the quality control from using CrIS full spectral resolution data are expected since an increase in CrIS shortwave channel resolution that is consistent with CrIS longwave resolution can lead to more and better matches in the weighting function heights of those paired CO2 bands and thus more detailed vertical structures of detected clouds. The potential impacts from the CrIS full spectral resolution QC on tropical cyclone forecasts are also assessed.

  7. Improvements in Nimbus 7 limb infrared monitor of the stratosphere ozone profiles as obtained with updated spectral line parameters and radiance algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remsberg, Ellis; Burton, John; Gordley, Larry; Marshall, Benjamin T.; Bhatt, Praful; Miles, Thomas

    1995-08-01

    Ozone distributions from the Nimbus 7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment of 1978-1979 are generally in good agreement with other concurrent ozone measurements in the middle and upper stratosphere, but not at lower altitudes. LIMS ozone is too large below about the 15-hPa (or millibar) level, particularly at lower latitudes. A new LIMS ozone distribution is presented for 1 day of profiles, May 5, 1979, obtained with an improved forward radiance algorithm and using the spectral line parameters for the 9- to 10-μm region in the HITRAN 92 compilation. However, we also divided our single day of retrieved ozone mixing ratio profiles by a suggested factor of 1.051, which makes them compatible with the ozone distributions from several of the UARS experiments. Our revised distribution still agrees with the archived LIMS ozone to better than ±5% above about the 15-hPa level, but there is a significant decrease for the revised ozone in the lower stratosphere. That decrease approaches 25% at 50 hPa in the tropics. In general, the revised LIMS ozone is now in accord with the comparison data sets for the stratosphere, except for the lowest levels (Umkehr layer 3 or 63-127 hPa), where the effects of interfering species and small biases in LIMS temperatures are most pronounced. It is concluded that the current 9- to 10-μm ozone line list is adequate for obtaining good quality ozone mixing ratio profiles from satellite broadband limb-infrared measurements.

  8. Monochromator-Based Absolute Calibration of Radiation Thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keawprasert, T.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, D. R.; Hartmann, J.

    2011-08-01

    A monochromator integrating-sphere-based spectral comparator facility has been developed to calibrate standard radiation thermometers in terms of the absolute spectral radiance responsivity, traceable to the PTB cryogenic radiometer. The absolute responsivity calibration has been improved using a 75 W xenon lamp with a reflective mirror and imaging optics to a relative standard uncertainty at the peak wavelength of approximately 0.17 % ( k = 1). Via a relative measurement of the out-of-band responsivity, the spectral responsivity of radiation thermometers can be fully characterized. To verify the calibration accuracy, the absolutely calibrated radiation thermometer is used to measure Au and Cu freezing-point temperatures and then to compare the obtained results with the values obtained by absolute methods, resulting in T - T 90 values of +52 mK and -50 mK for the gold and copper fixed points, respectively.

  9. Thermodynamic Temperature Measurement to the Indium Point Based on Radiance Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2017-04-01

    A multi-national project (the EMRP InK project) was completed recently, which successfully determined the thermodynamic temperatures of several of the high-temperature fixed points above the copper point. The National Metrology Institute of Japan contributed to this project with its newly established absolute spectral radiance calibration capability. In the current study, we have extended the range of thermodynamic temperature measurement to below the copper point and measured the thermodynamic temperatures of the indium point (T_{90} = 429.748 5 K), tin point (505.078 K), zinc point (692.677 K), aluminum point (933.473 K) and the silver point (1 234.93 K) by radiance comparison against the copper point, with a set of radiation thermometers having center wavelengths ranging from 0.65 μm to 1.6 μm. The copper-point temperature was measured by the absolute radiation thermometer which was calibrated by radiance method traceable to the electrical substitution cryogenic radiometer. The radiance of the fixed-point blackbodies was measured by standard radiation thermometers whose spectral responsivity and nonlinearity are precisely evaluated, and then the thermodynamic temperatures were determined from radiance ratios to the copper point. The values of T-T_{90} for the silver-, aluminum-, zinc-, tin- and indium-point cells were determined as -4 mK (U = 104 mK, k=2), -99 mK (88 mK), -76 mK (76 mK), -68 mK (163 mK) and -42 mK (279 mK), respectively.

  10. Absolute irradiance of the Moon for on-orbit calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.; Kieffer, H.H.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The recognized need for on-orbit calibration of remote sensing imaging instruments drives the ROLO project effort to characterize the Moon for use as an absolute radiance source. For over 5 years the ground-based ROLO telescopes have acquired spatially-resolved lunar images in 23 VNIR (Moon diameter ???500 pixels) and 9 SWIR (???250 pixels) passbands at phase angles within ??90 degrees. A numerical model for lunar irradiance has been developed which fits hundreds of ROLO images in each band, corrected for atmospheric extinction and calibrated to absolute radiance, then integrated to irradiance. The band-coupled extinction algorithm uses absorption spectra of several gases and aerosols derived from MODTRAN to fit time-dependent component abundances to nightly observations of standard stars. The absolute radiance scale is based upon independent telescopic measurements of the star Vega. The fitting process yields uncertainties in lunar relative irradiance over small ranges of phase angle and the full range of lunar libration well under 0.5%. A larger source of uncertainty enters in the absolute solar spectral irradiance, especially in the SWIR, where solar models disagree by up to 6%. Results of ROLO model direct comparisons to spacecraft observations demonstrate the ability of the technique to track sensor responsivity drifts to sub-percent precision. Intercomparisons among instruments provide key insights into both calibration issues and the absolute scale for lunar irradiance.

  11. New Measurements of the Absolute Spectral Energy Distribution of Solar Radiation in the Range Double Lambda 650-1070 NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlov-Vasilev, K. A.; Vasileva, I. E.; Matveev, Yu. B.

    1996-01-01

    Spectral measurements of the solar disk centre intensity for the near-IR region have been made at he Terskol High-Altitude Station in 1992. These measurements are the continuation of the program for the solar absolute spectral energy distribution investigation. Data published earlier are extended to the longwave spectral region up to 1070 nm. The special-purpose solar telescope SEF-1 was used. We compared the disk centre brightness with brightness of the calibrated region of the standard ribbon tungsten lamp. The atmospheric extinction was taken into account by the Bouguer method with simultaneous control of the atmosphere stability. The 1-nm integrals of the disk centre intensity in the range double lamda 650-1070 nm based on 5-day measurements in March-October 1992 are given. The uncertainty of these values is 2%. In regions with strong telluric absorption by oxygen and water-vapour bands, the reductions are made, using synthetic atmospheric absorption spectra computed on the basis of molecular parameter atlas HITRAN and the standard model atmosphere. By the use of the solar limb darkening coefficients the values of the solar flux at 1 A.U. were derived. Our measurements show the best agreement with the data of Makarova, Kharitonov, and Kazachevskaya as well as with the common data from Shaw and Frohlich. For lambda greater than 850 nm our data are systematically lower than the data by Neckel and Labs.

  12. Absolute spectral gaps for infrared light and hypersound in three-dimensional metallodielectric phoxonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolaou, N.; Psarobas, I. E.; Stefanou, N.

    2010-06-01

    By means of full electrodynamic and elastodynamic multiple-scattering calculations we study the optical and acoustic properties of three-dimensional lattices of metallic nanospheres implanted in a dielectric host. Our results show that such structures exhibit omnidirectional spectral gaps for both telecom infrared light and hypersound, with relatively low absorptive losses. This class of dual (phoxonic) band-gap materials is an essential step toward the hypersonic modulation of light and could lead to the development of efficient acousto-optical devices.

  13. POLRADS: polarization radiance distribution measurement system.

    PubMed

    Voss, Kenneth J; Souaidia, Nordine

    2010-09-13

    While the upwelling radiance distribution in the ocean can be highly polarized, there are few measurements of this parameter in the open ocean. To obtain the polarized in-water upwelling spectral radiance distribution data we have developed the POLRADS instrument. This instrument is based on the NuRADS radiance distribution camera systems in which linear polarizer's have been installed. By combining simultaneous images from three NuRADS instruments, three Stokes parameters (I, Q, U) for the water leaving radiance can be obtained for all upwelling angles simultaneously. This system measures the Stokes parameters Q/I and U/I with a 0.05-0.06 uncertainty and I with a 7-10% uncertainty.

  14. The NBS scale of radiance temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, William R.; Walker, James H.; Hattenburg, Albert T.

    1988-01-01

    The measurement methods and instrumentation used in the realization and transfer of the International Practical Temperature Scale (IPTS-68) above the temperature of freezing gold are described. The determination of the ratios of spectral radiance of tungsten-strip lamps to a gold-point blackbody at a wavelength of 654.6 nm is detailed. The response linearity, spectral responsivity, scattering error, and polarization properties of the instrumentation are described. The analysis of the sources of error and estimates of uncertainty are presented. The assigned uncertainties (three standard deviations) in radiance temperature range from + or - 2 K at 2573 K to + or - 0.5 K at 1073 K.

  15. Using absolute x-ray spectral measurements to infer stagnation conditions in ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Pravesh; Benedetti, L. R.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Hurricane, O. A.; Izumi, N.; Jarrott, L. C.; Khan, S.; Kritcher, A. L.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A. G.; Landen, O.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of the continuum x-ray spectrum emitted from the hot-spot of an ICF implosion can be used to infer a number thermodynamic properties at stagnation including temperature, pressure, and hot-spot mix. In deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) we field a number of x-ray diagnostics that provide spatial, temporal, and spectrally-resolved measurements of the radiated x-ray emission. We report on analysis of these measurements using a 1-D hot-spot model to infer thermodynamic properties at stagnation. We compare these to similar properties that can be derived from DT fusion neutron measurements. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Absolute standardization of 241Pu by the TDCR technique and effect of the beta spectral shape.

    PubMed

    van Wyngaardt, W M; Simpson, B R S; van Staden, M J; Lubbe, J

    2012-09-01

    The NMISA participated in the 2010 international key comparison of (241)Pu, standardizing the inter-comparison solution by the TDCR efficiency calculation technique. Special attention was paid to ensure accurate efficiency calculation for this low-energy, pure beta-emitter: in particular the effect of low-energy stopping powers on the calculation of ionization quenching was assessed and an optimal value for the quench parameter, kB, was determined. In addition, phototube efficiency mismatch was accounted for by a software minimization technique. The effect of the beta spectral shape on the activity extracted from data analysis was assessed and found to be significant. Based on the results of this work we propose a new value for the average beta-particle energy.

  17. Supramolecular spectrally encoded microgels with double strand probes for absolute and direct miRNA fluorescence detection at high sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Causa, Filippo; Aliberti, Anna; Cusano, Angela M; Battista, Edmondo; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-02-11

    We present novel microgels as a particle-based suspension array for direct and absolute microRNA (miRNA) detection. The microgels feature a flexible molecular architecture, antifouling properties, and enhanced sensitivity with a large dynamic range of detection. Specifically, they possess a core-shell molecular architecture with two different fluorescent dyes for multiplex spectral analyses and are endowed with a fluorescent probe for miRNA detection. Encoding and detection fluorescence signals are distinguishable by nonoverlapping emission spectra. Tunable fluorescence probe conjugation and emission confinement on single microgels allow for ultrasensitive miRNA detection. Indeed, the suspension array has high selectivity and sensitivity with absolute quantification, a detection limit of 10(-15) M, a dynamic range from 10(-9) to 10(-15) M, and higher accuracy than qRT-PCR. The antifouling properties of the microgels also permit the direct measurement of miRNAs in serum, without sample pretreatment or target amplification. A multiplexed assay has been tested for a set of miRNAs chosen as cancer biomarkers.

  18. Absolute spectral characterization of silicon barrier diode: Application to soft X-ray fusion diagnostics at Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezinet, D.; Mazon, D.; Malard, P.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents an experimental protocol for absolute calibration of photo-detectors. Spectral characterization is achieved by a methodology that unlike the usual line emissions-based method, hinges on the Bremsstrahlung radiation of a Soft X-Ray (SXR) tube only. Although the proposed methodology can be applied virtually to any detector, the application presented in this paper is based on Tore Supra's SXR diagnostics, which uses Silicon Surface Barrier Diodes. The spectral response of these n-p junctions had previously been estimated on a purely empirical basis. This time, a series of second-order effects, like the spatial distribution of the source radiated power or multi-channel analyser non linearity, are taken into account to achieve accurate measurements. Consequently, a parameterised physical model is fitted to experimental results and the existence of an unexpected dead layer (at least 5 μm thick) is evidenced. This contribution also echoes a more general on-going effort in favour of long-term quality of passive radiation measurements on Tokamaks.

  19. Absolute realization of low BRDF value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zilong; Liao, Ningfang; Li, Ping; Wang, Yu

    2010-10-01

    Low BRDF value is widespread used in many critical domains such as space and military fairs. These values below 0.1 Sr-1 . So the Absolute realization of these value is the most critical issue in the absolute measurement of BRDF. To develop the Absolute value realization theory of BRDF , defining an arithmetic operators of BRDF , achieving an absolute measurement Eq. of BRDF based on radiance. This is a new theory method to solve the realization problem of low BRDF value. This theory method is realized on a self-designed common double orientation structure in space. By designing an adding structure to extend the range of the measurement system and a control and processing software, Absolute realization of low BRDF value is achieved. A material of low BRDF value is measured in this measurement system and the spectral BRDF value are showed within different angles allover the space. All these values are below 0.4 Sr-1 . This process is a representative procedure about the measurement of low BRDF value. A corresponding uncertainty analysis of this measurement data is given depend on the new theory of absolute realization and the performance of the measurement system. The relative expand uncertainty of the measurement data is 0.078. This uncertainty analysis is suitable for all measurements using the new theory of absolute realization and the corresponding measurement system.

  20. Assimilation of SAPHIR radiance: impact on hyperspectral radiances in 4D-VAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indira Rani, S.; Doherty, Amy; Atkinson, Nigel; Bell, William; Newman, Stuart; Renshaw, Richard; George, John P.; Rajagopal, E. N.

    2016-04-01

    Assimilation of a new observation dataset in an NWP system may affect the quality of an existing observation data set against the model background (short forecast), which in-turn influence the use of an existing observation in the NWP system. Effect of the use of one data set on the use of another data set can be quantified as positive, negative or neutral. Impact of the addition of new dataset is defined as positive if the number of assimilated observations of an existing type of observation increases, and bias and standard deviation decreases compared to the control (without the new dataset) experiment. Recently a new dataset, Megha Tropiques SAPHIR radiances, which provides atmospheric humidity information, is added in the Unified Model 4D-VAR assimilation system. In this paper we discuss the impact of SAPHIR on the assimilation of hyper-spectral radiances like AIRS, IASI and CrIS. Though SAPHIR is a Microwave instrument, its impact can be clearly seen in the use of hyper-spectral radiances in the 4D-VAR data assimilation systems in addition to other Microwave and InfraRed observation. SAPHIR assimilation decreased the standard deviation of the spectral channels of wave number from 650 -1600 cm-1 in all the three hyperspectral radiances. Similar impact on the hyperspectral radiances can be seen due to the assimilation of other Microwave radiances like from AMSR2 and SSMIS Imager.

  1. Drug Treated Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective and Bipolar Disorder Patients Evaluated by qEEG Absolute Spectral Power and Mean Frequency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wix-Ramos, Richard; Moreno, Xiomara; Capote, Eduardo; González, Gilbert; Uribe, Ezequiel

    2014-01-01

    Objective Research of electroencephalograph (EEG) power spectrum and mean frequency has shown inconsistent results in patients with schizophrenic, schizoaffective and bipolar disorders during medication when compared to normal subjects thus; the characterization of these parameters is an important task. Methods We applied quantitative EEG (qEEG) to investigate 38 control, 15 schizophrenic, 7 schizoaffective and 11 bipolar disorder subjects which remaine under the administration of psychotropic drugs (except control group). Absolute spectral power (ASP), mean frequency and hemispheric electrical asymmetry were measured by 19 derivation qEEG. Group mean values were compared with non parametrical Mann-Whitney test and spectral EEG maps with z-score method at p < 0.05. Results Most frequent drug treatments for schizophrenic patients were neuroleptic+antiepileptic (40% of cases) or 2 neuroleptics (33.3%). Schizoaffective patients received neuroleptic+benzodiazepine (71.4%) and for bipolar disorder patients neuroleptic+antiepileptic (81.8%). Schizophrenic (at all derivations except for Fp1, Fp2, F8 and T6) and schizoaffective (only at C3) show higher values of ASP (+57.7% and +86.1% respectively) compared to control group. ASP of bipolar disorder patients did not show differences against control group. The mean frequency was higher at Fp1 (+14.2%) and Fp2 (+17.4%) in bipolar disorder patients than control group, but no differences were found in frequencies between schizophrenic or schizoaffective patients against the control group. Majority of spectral differences were found at the left hemisphere in schizophrenic and schizoaffective but not in bipolar disorder subjects. Conclusion The present report contributes to characterize quantitatively the qEEG in drug treated schizophrenic, schizoaffective or bipolar disorder patients. PMID:24851121

  2. Modeling and Assimilating Ocean Color Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson

    2012-01-01

    Radiances are the source of information from ocean color sensors to produce estimates of biological and geochemical constituents. They potentially provide information on various other aspects of global biological and chemical systems, and there is considerable work involved in deriving new information from these signals. Each derived product, however, contains errors that are derived from the application of the radiances, above and beyond the radiance errors. A global biogeochemical model with an explicit spectral radiative transfer model is used to investigate the potential of assimilating radiances. The results indicate gaps in our understanding of radiative processes in the oceans and their relationships with biogeochemical variables. Most important, detritus optical properties are not well characterized and produce important effects of the simulated radiances. Specifically, there does not appear to be a relationship between detrital biomass and its optical properties, as there is for chlorophyll. Approximations are necessary to get beyond this problem. In this reprt we will discuss the challenges in modeling and assimilation water-leaving radiances and the prospects for improving our understanding of biogeochemical process by utilizing these signals.

  3. Earth Limb Radiance Transformation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-02

    AD-A097 523 AEROSPACE CORP EL SEGUNDO CA CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS LAB F/G 4/1 EARTH LIMB RADIANCE TRANSFORMATION (U) MAR AI S 4 YOUNG F0701-80 -C-0081... Earth Limb Radiance Trafisformation Prepared by S. J. YOUNG Chemistr and Physics Laboratory Laboratory Operations The Aerospace Corporation S.El...ITLEK (and Subtitle) TYPE OF REPORT & P53100 COVERED Earth Limb Radiance Transformation. ( Interim ./ / /TR-OJ081(697j7-g4)-l-- i7.Step hen J. Young

  4. Relationship of red and photographic infrared spectral radiances to alfalfa biomass, forage water content, percentage canopy cover, and severity of drought stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.; Elgin, J. H., Jr.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1979-01-01

    Red and photographic infrared spectral data were collected using a handheld radiometer for two cuttings of alfalfa. Significant linear and non-linear correlation coefficients were found between the spectral variables and plant height, biomass, forage water content, and estimated canopy cover for the earlier alfalfa cutting. The alfalfa of later cutting experienced a period of severe drought stress which limited growth. The spectral variables were found to be highly correlated with the estimated drought scores for this alfalfa cutting.

  5. Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST) Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, Connor J.

    2016-03-01

    The Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology (ASSIST) measures the absolute infrared (IR) spectral radiance (watts per square meter per steradian per wavenumber) of the sky directly above the instrument. More information about the instrument can be found through the manufacturer’s website. The spectral measurement range of the instrument is 3300 to 520 wavenumbers (cm-1) or 3-19.2 microns for the normal-range instruments and 3300 to 400 cm-1 or 3-25 microns, for the extended-range polar instruments. Spectral resolution is 1.0 cm-1. Instrument field-of-view is 1.3 degrees. Calibrated sky radiance spectra are produced on cycle of about 141 seconds with a group of 6 radiance spectra zenith having dwell times of about 14 seconds each interspersed with 55 seconds of calibration and mirror motion. The ASSIST data is comparable to the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data and can be used for 1) evaluating line-by-line radiative transport codes, 2) detecting/quantifying cloud effects on ground-based measurements of infrared spectral radiance (and hence is valuable for cloud property retrievals), and 3) calculating vertical atmospheric profiles of temperature and water vapor and the detection of trace gases.

  6. Use of the ARM Measurement of Spectral Zenith Radiance For Better Understanding Of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan

    2010-10-19

    Our proposal focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general 3D cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. We also focus on zenith radiance measurements, both active and passive. The proposal has three main parts. Part One exploits the "solar-background" mode of ARM lidars to allow them to retrieve cloud optical depth not just for thin clouds but for all clouds. This also enables the study of aerosol cloud interactions with a single instrument. Part Two exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by ARM's zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), especially during CLASIC, to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also propose to take advantage of the SWS's 1 Hz sampling to study the "twilight zone" around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part Three involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM's 2NFOV instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the AMF-COPS/CLOWD deployment, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM's operational data processing.

  7. SOLSPEC investigation on board the International Space Station: The Absolute Solar Spectral Irradiance in the Infrared Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, Gérard; Harder, Jerry; Shapiro, Alexander; Woods, Thomas; Perrin, Jean-Marie; Snow, Marty; Sukhodolov, Timofei; Schmutz, Werner

    2015-04-01

    Onboard the SOLAR payload of the International Space Station (ISS), the SOLSPEC spectrometer measures the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) from 16 to 2900 nm. This instrument uses lamps to monitor its behavior in orbit. In particular, it employs two tungsten ribbon lamps in the IR domain (1000-2900 nm). Initially, the infrared absolute irradiance scale was determined from the preflight laboratory calibration coefficients and the in-flight measurements gathered at first light in April 2008. Subsequent publications suggest a systematic discrepancy between SOLAR-ISS measurements and the ATLAS 3 spectrum obtained from SOLSPEC observations onboard the shuttle-ATLAS missions with the discrepancy reaching 10 % at 1800 nm. We show that such a discrepancy has strong implications for the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and the brightness temperature of the lower solar photosphere. Furthermore, comparisons with independent spectra either obtained on ground and in space will be also shown and commented. The origin of the ATLAS 3 to SOLSPEC differences have been extensively analyzed; the onboard lamp and solar data time series indicates that the IR spectrometer did not reach a permanent regime until after several months of operation. The solar measurements at first light and in permanent regime show a difference, which provides an effective wavelength dependent correction factor for the first light spectrum. The SOLSPEC-ISS spectrum obtained in this permanent regime is consistent with the ATLAS 3 spectrum within their combined uncertainties and will be identified in the literature as SOLAR 2rev. We present analysis of this SOLAR 2rev spectrum in terms of its contribution to TSI, the lower photospheric temperature, and comparisons with independently measured IR spectra from ground-based and on-orbit platforms.

  8. Portable PVS-02 spectrometer for transfer of the spectral radiance scale in the 0.4-2.5 μm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Yu. V.; Rogovets, A. V.; Khomitsevich, A. D.; Tsikman, I. M.

    2010-11-01

    We describe selection of an optical layout and calculation of the spectral sensitivity and measurement uncertainty in a portable spectrometer. The spectrometer is used for transfer of the brightness scale in the 0.4-2.5 μm range from one brightness reference standard to another.

  9. The mixture problem in computer mapping of terrain: Improved techniques for establishing spectral signature, atmospheric path radiance, and transmittance. [in Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smedes, H. W.; Hulstrom, R. L.; Ranson, K. J.

    1975-01-01

    The results of LANDSAT and Skylab research programs on the effects of the atmosphere on computer mapping of terrain include: (1) the concept of a ground truth map needs to be drastically revised; (2) the concept of training areas and test areas is not as simple as generally thought because of the problem of pixels that represent a mixture of terrain classes; (3) this mixture problem needs to be more widely recognized and dealt with by techniques of calculating spectral signatures of mixed classes, or by other methods; (4) atmospheric effects should be considered in computer mapping of terrain and in monitoring changes; and (5) terrain features may be used as calibration panels on the ground, from which atmospheric conditions can be determined and monitored. Results are presented of a test area in mountainous terrain of south-central Colorado for which an initial classification was made using simulated mixture-class spectral signatures and actual LANDSAT-1-MSS data.

  10. 'Florida Radiance' strawberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Florida Radiance' strawberry (Fragaria xananassa Duch.) is a new strawberry cultivar released by the University of Florida. It appears to be a good cultivar to complement the current commercial cultivar 'Strawberry Festival' during the early part of the production season as its yields are higher wh...

  11. Radiance Measurement for Low Density Mars Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2012-01-01

    We report measurements of radiance behind a shock wave in Martian simulant (96% CO2, 4% N2) atmosphere at conditions relevant for aerodynamic decelerators. Shock waves are generated in the NASA Ames Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility at velocities from 6-8 km/s and freestream densities from 1.2-5.9 x 10(exp -4) kilograms per cubic meter (0.05-0.25 Torr, corresponding to 35-50 km altitude). Absolute radiance is measured as a function of wavelength and position in the shock. Radiance measurements extend from the vacuum ultraviolet to near infrared (120-1650 nm). As at higher density/velocity, radiation is dominate by CO 4th positive radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet, though CN contribution is also significant. At most low density conditions, the shock does not relax to equilibrium over several centimeters. A small number of measurements in the mid-infrared were performed to quantify radiation from the fundamental vibrational transition in CO, and this is found to be a minor contributor to the overall radiance at these speeds. Efforts to extend test time and reliability in the 60 cm (24) shock tube will be discussed in the full paper.

  12. Solar radiance models for determination of ERBE scanner filter factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arduini, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    Shortwave spectral radiance models for use in the spectral correction algorithms for the ERBE Scanner Instrument are provided. The required data base was delivered to the ERBe Data Reduction Group in October 1984. It consisted of two sets of data files: (1) the spectral bidirectional angular models and (2) the spectral flux modes. The bidirectional models employ the angular characteristics of reflection by the Earth-atmosphere system and were derived from detailed radiance calculations using a finite difference model of the radiative transfer process. The spectral flux models were created through the use of a delta-Eddington model to economically simulate the effects of atmospheric variability. By combining these data sets, a wide range of radiances may be approximated for a number of scene types.

  13. Simultaneous retrieval of water vapour, temperature and cirrus clouds properties from measurements of far infrared spectral radiance over the Antarctic Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Natale, Gianluca; Palchetti, Luca; Bianchini, Giovanni; Del Guasta, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    The possibility separating the contributions of the atmospheric state and ice clouds by using spectral infrared measurements is a fundamental step to quantifying the cloud effect in climate models. A simultaneous retrieval of cloud and atmospheric parameters from infrared wideband spectra will allow the disentanglement of the spectral interference between these variables. In this paper, we describe the development of a code for the simultaneous retrieval of atmospheric state and ice cloud parameters, and its application to the analysis of the spectral measurements acquired by the Radiation Explorer in the Far Infrared - Prototype for Applications and Development (REFIR-PAD) spectroradiometer, which has been in operation at Concordia Station on the Antarctic Plateau since 2012. The code performs the retrieval with a computational time that is comparable with the instrument acquisition time. Water vapour and temperature profiles and the cloud optical and microphysical properties, such as the generalised effective diameter and the ice water path, are retrieved by exploiting the 230-980 cm-1 spectral band. To simulate atmospheric radiative transfer, the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) has been integrated with a specifically developed subroutine based on the δ-Eddington two-stream approximation, whereas the single-scattering properties of cirrus clouds have been derived from a database for hexagonal column habits. In order to detect ice clouds, a backscattering and depolarisation lidar, co-located with REFIR-PAD has been used, allowing us to infer the position and the cloud thickness to be used in the retrieval. A climatology of the vertical profiles of water vapour and temperature has been performed by using the daily radiosounding available at the station at 12:00 UTC. The climatology has been used to build an a priori profile correlation to constrain the fitting procedure. An optimal estimation method with the Levenberg-Marquardt approach has been

  14. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  15. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of Narrow-Swath Imaging Sensors with Reference to Non-Coincident Wide-Swath Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, Joel; Thome, Kurtis; Lockwood, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    An inter-calibration method is developed to provide absolute radiometric calibration of narrow-swath imaging sensors with reference to non-coincident wide-swath sensors. The method predicts at-sensor radiance using non-coincident imagery from the reference sensor and knowledge of spectral reflectance of the test site. The imagery of the reference sensor is restricted to acquisitions that provide similar view and solar illumination geometry to reduce uncertainties due to directional reflectance effects. Spectral reflectance of the test site is found with a simple iterative radiative transfer method using radiance values of a well-understood wide-swath sensor and spectral shape information based on historical ground-based measurements. At-sensor radiance is calculated for the narrow-swath sensor using this spectral reflectance and atmospheric parameters that are also based on historical in situ measurements. Results of the inter-calibration method show agreement on the 2 5 percent level in most spectral regions with the vicarious calibration technique relying on coincident ground-based measurements referred to as the reflectance-based approach. While the variability of the inter-calibration method based on non-coincident image pairs is significantly larger, results are consistent with techniques relying on in situ measurements. The method is also insensitive to spectral differences between the sensors by transferring to surface spectral reflectance prior to prediction of at-sensor radiance. The utility of this inter-calibration method is made clear by its flexibility to utilize image pairings with acquisition dates differing in excess of 30 days allowing frequent absolute calibration comparisons between wide- and narrow-swath sensors.

  16. Absolute measurement of subnanometer scale vibration of cochlear partition of an excised guinea pig cochlea using spectral-domain phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Choudhury, Niloy; Jacques, Steven L.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Chen, Fangyi; Zha, Dingjun; Nuttall, Alfred L.

    2012-01-01

    Direct measurement of absolute vibration parameters from different locations within the mammalian organ of Corti is crucial for understanding the hearing mechanics such as how sound propagates through the cochlea and how sound stimulates the vibration of various structures of the cochlea, namely, basilar membrane (BM), recticular lamina, outer hair cells and tectorial membrane (TM). In this study we demonstrate the feasibility a modified phase-sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography system to provide subnanometer scale vibration information from multiple angles within the imaging beam. The system has the potential to provide depth resolved absolute vibration measurement of tissue microstructures from each of the delay-encoded vibration images with a noise floor of ~0.3nm at 200Hz.

  17. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Handbook

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gero, Jonathan; Hackel, Denny; Garcia, Raymond

    2005-01-01

    The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) is a ground-based instrument that measures the downwelling infrared radiance from the Earth's atmosphere. The observations have broad spectral content and sufficient spectral resolution to discriminate among gaseous emitters (e.g., carbon dioxide and water vapor) and suspended matter (e.g., aerosols, water droplets, and ice crystals). These upward-looking surface observations can be used to obtain vertical profiles of tropospheric temperature and water vapor, as well as measurements of trace gases (e.g., ozone, carbon monoxide, and methane) and downwelling infrared spectral signatures of clouds and aerosols.The AERI is a passive remote sounding instrument, employing a Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the spectral range 3.3-19.2 μm (520-3020 cm-1) at an unapodized resolution of 0.5 cm-1 (max optical path difference of 1 cm). The extended-range AERI (ER-AERI) deployed in dry climates, like in Alaska, have a spectral range of 3.3-25.0 μm (400-3020 cm-1) that allow measurements in the far-infrared region. Typically, the AERI averages views of the sky over a 16-second interval and operates continuously.

  18. Automatic gonio-spectrophotometer for the absolute measurement of the spectral BRDF at in- and out-of-plane and retroreflection geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabal, A. M.; Ferrero, A.; Campos, J.; Fontecha, J. L.; Pons, A.; Rubiño, A. M.; Corróns, A.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the description and the characterization of the gonio-spectrophotometer GEFE (the acronym for 'Gonio-EspectroFotómetro Español'). This device has been designed and built for the low-uncertainty absolute measurement of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF). It comprises a fixed, collimated and uniform light source, a six-axis robot-arm to rotate the sample and a spectroradiometer that may revolve around the sample to be able to vary the source-to-detector angular separation. This gonio-spectrophotometer makes it possible to perform spectral measurements in the visible range, both inside and outside the incidence plane, as well as measurements in retroreflection conditions. This fully automated system is able to measure autonomously a sample's complete spectral BRDF (comprising around 1000 different angular configurations) in less than 4 h.

  19. Directional radiance measurements: Challenges in the sampling of landscapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deering, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    Most earth surfaces, particularly those supporting natural vegetation ecosystems, constitute structurally and spectrally complex surfaces that are distinctly non-Lambertian reflectors. Obtaining meaningful measurements of the directional radiances of landscapes and obtaining estimates of the complete bidirectional reflectance distribution functions of ground targets with complex and variable landscape and radiometric features are challenging tasks. Reasons for the increased interest in directional radiance measurements are presented, and the issues that must be addressed when trying to acquire directional radiances for vegetated land surfaces from different types of remote sensing platforms are discussed. Priority research emphases are suggested, concerning field measurements of directional surface radiances and reflectances for future research. Primarily, emphasis must be given to the acquisition of more complete and directly associated radiometric and biometric parameter data sets that will empower the exploitation of the 'angular dimension' in remote sensing of vegetation through enabling the further development and rigorous validation of state of the art plant canopy models.

  20. Release Path Temperatures of Shock-Compressed Tin from Dynamic Reflectance and Radiance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    La Lone, B. M.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Iverson, A. J.; Hixson, R. S.; Veeser, L. R.

    2013-08-01

    Dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements were conducted for tin samples shock compressed to 35 GPa and released to 15 GPa using high explosives. We determined the reflectance of the tin samples glued to lithium fluoride windows using an integrating sphere with an internal xenon flashlamp as an illumination source. The dynamic reflectance (R) was determined at near normal incidence in four spectral bands with coverage in visible and near-infrared spectra. Uncertainties in R/R0 are < 2%, and uncertainties in absolute reflectance are < 5%. In complementary experiments, thermal radiance from the tin/glue/lithium fluoride interface was recorded with similar shock stress and spectral coverage as the reflectance measurements. The two sets of experiments were combined to obtain the temperature history of the tin surface with an uncertainty of < 2%. The stress at the interface was determined from photonic Doppler velocimetry and combined with the temperatures to obtain temperature-stress release paths for tin. We discuss the relationship between the experimental release paths and release isentropes that begin on the principal shock Hugoniot.

  1. Release path temperatures of shock-compressed tin from dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    La Lone, B. M. Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Iverson, A. J.; Hixson, R. S.; Veeser, L. R.

    2013-08-14

    Dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements were conducted for tin samples shock compressed to 35 GPa and released to 15 GPa using high explosives. We determined the reflectance of the tin samples glued to lithium fluoride windows using an integrating sphere with an internal xenon flashlamp as an illumination source. The dynamic reflectance (R) was determined at near normal incidence in four spectral bands with coverage in visible and near-infrared spectra. Uncertainties in R/R{sub 0} are <2%, and uncertainties in absolute reflectance are <5%. In complementary experiments, thermal radiance from the tin/glue/lithium fluoride interface was recorded with similar shock stress and spectral coverage as the reflectance measurements. The two sets of experiments were combined to obtain the temperature history of the tin surface with an uncertainty of <2%. The stress at the interface was determined from photonic Doppler velocimetry and combined with the temperatures to obtain temperature-stress release paths for tin. We discuss the relationship between the experimental release paths and release isentropes that begin on the principal shock Hugoniot.

  2. Separation of temperature and emittance in remotely sensed radiance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, Anne B.; Alley, Ronald E.

    1992-01-01

    The remote determination of surface temperature and surface spectral emittance by use of airborne or satellite-borne thermal infrared instruments is not straightforward. The radiance measured is a function of surface temperature, the unknown surface spectral emittance, and absorption and emission in the intervening atmosphere. With a single measurement, the solution for temperature and spectral emittance is undedetermined. This article reviews two of the early approximate methods which have been fairly widely used to approach this problem.

  3. Spectral Measurements of Reflectance, Radiance, and Emissivity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    radiation relevant for camouflage was - visible light, with the human eye being the sensor to defeat. However, . man-made sensors have become...the field, it is not a field spectroradiometer. The instrument works best in air-conditioned surroundings. In hot, dry desert environments as well as...421-430. Richmond, J. C. 1980. "Reflectance Errors in Infrared Thermography ," Appl. Optics, Vol 19, pp 834-836. U * Richter, W. 1980. "Vermessung von IR

  4. In-flow real-time detection of spectrally encoded microgels for miRNA absolute quantification

    PubMed Central

    Dannhauser, David; Causa, Filippo; Cusano, Angela M.; Rossi, Domenico; Netti, Paolo A.

    2016-01-01

    We present an in-flow ultrasensitive fluorescence detection of microRNAs (miRNAs) using spectrally encoded microgels. We researched and employed a viscoelastic fluid to achieve an optimal alignment of microgels in a straight measurement channel and applied a simple and inexpensive microfluidic layout, allowing continuous fluorescence signal acquisitions with several emission wavelengths. In particular, we chose microgels endowed with fluorescent emitting molecules designed for multiplex spectral analysis of specific miRNA types. We analysed in a quasi-real-time manner circa 80 microgel particles a minute at sample volumes down to a few microliters, achieving a miRNA detection limit of 202 fM in microfluidic flow conditions. Such performance opens up new routes for biosensing applications of particles within microfluidic devices. PMID:27990216

  5. In-flow real-time detection of spectrally encoded microgels for miRNA absolute quantification.

    PubMed

    Dannhauser, David; Causa, Filippo; Battista, Edmondo; Cusano, Angela M; Rossi, Domenico; Netti, Paolo A

    2016-11-01

    We present an in-flow ultrasensitive fluorescence detection of microRNAs (miRNAs) using spectrally encoded microgels. We researched and employed a viscoelastic fluid to achieve an optimal alignment of microgels in a straight measurement channel and applied a simple and inexpensive microfluidic layout, allowing continuous fluorescence signal acquisitions with several emission wavelengths. In particular, we chose microgels endowed with fluorescent emitting molecules designed for multiplex spectral analysis of specific miRNA types. We analysed in a quasi-real-time manner circa 80 microgel particles a minute at sample volumes down to a few microliters, achieving a miRNA detection limit of 202 fM in microfluidic flow conditions. Such performance opens up new routes for biosensing applications of particles within microfluidic devices.

  6. Compact, robust, and spectrally pure diode-laser system with a filtered output and a tunable copy for absolute referencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilov, E.; Mark, M. J.; Segl, M.; Nägerl, H.-C.

    2015-05-01

    We report on a design of a compact laser system composed of an extended-cavity diode laser with high passive stability and a pre-filter Fabry-Perot cavity. The laser is frequency-stabilized relative to the cavity using a serrodyne technique with a correction bandwidth of ≥6 MHz and a dynamic range of ≥700 MHz. The free-running laser system has a power spectral density (PSD) ≤100 Hz2/Hz centered mainly in the acoustic frequency range. A highly tunable, 0.5-1.3 GHz copy of the spectrally pure output beam is provided, which can be used for further stabilization of the laser system to an ultra-stable reference. We demonstrate a simple one-channel lock to such a reference that brings down the PSD to the sub-Hz level. The tuning, frequency stabilization, and sideband imprinting are achieved by a minimum number of key elements comprising a fibered electro-optic modulator, acousto-optic modulator, and a nonlinear transmission line. The system is easy to operate, scalable, and highly applicable to atomic/molecular experiments demanding high spectral purity, long-term stability, and robustness.

  7. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  8. CrIS High Resolution Hyperspectral Radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepplewhite, C. L.; Strow, L. L.; Motteler, H.; Desouza-Machado, S. G.; Tobin, D. C.; Martin, G.; Gumley, L.

    2014-12-01

    The CrIS hyperspectral sounder flying on Suomi-NPPpresently has reduced spectral resolution in the mid-wave andshort-wave spectral bands due to truncation of the interferograms inorbit. CrIS has occasionally downlinked full interferograms for thesebands (0.8 cm max path, or 0.625 cm-1 point spacing) for a feworbits up to a full day. Starting Oct.1, 2014 CrIS will be commandedto download full interferograms continuously for the remainder of themission, although NOAA will not immediately produce high-spectralresolution Sensor Data Records (SDRs). Although the originalmotivation for operating in high-resolution mode was improved spectralcalibration, these new data will also improve (1) vertical sensitivityto water vapor, and (2) greatly increase the CrIS sensitivity tocarbon monoxide. This should improve (1) NWP data assimilation ofwater vapor and (2) provide long-term continuity of carbon monoxideretrievals begun with MOPITT on EOS-TERRA and AIRS on EOS-AQUA. Wehave developed a SDR algorithm to produce calibrated high-spectralresolution radiances which includes several improvements to theexisting CrIS SDR algorithm, and will present validation of thesehigh-spectral resolution radiances using a variety of techniques,including bias evaluation versus NWP model data and inter-comparisonsto AIRS and IASI using simultaneous nadir overpasses (SNOs). Theauthors are presently working to implement this algorithm for NASASuomi NPP Program production of Earth System Data Records.

  9. NIST traceable measurements of radiance and luminance levels of night-vision-goggle test-instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppeldauer, G. P.; Podobedov, V. B.

    2014-05-01

    In order to perform radiance and luminance level measurements of night-vision-goggle (NVG) test instruments, NIST developed new-generation transfer-standard radiometers (TR). The new TRs can perform low-level radiance and luminance measurements with SI traceability and low uncertainty. The TRs were calibrated against NIST detector/radiometer standards holding the NIST photometric and radiometric scales. An 815 nm diode laser was used at NIST for the radiance responsivity calibrations. A spectrally flat (constant) filter correction was made for the TRs to correct the spectral responsivity change of the built-in Si photodiode for LEDs peaking at different wavelengths in the different test sets. The radiance responsivity transfer to the test instruments (test-sets) is discussed. The radiance values of the test instruments were measured with the TRs. The TRs propagate the traceablity to the NIST detector-based reference scales. The radiance uncertainty obtained from three TR measurements was 4.6 % (𝑘=2) at a luminance of 3.43 x 10-4 cd/m2. The output radiance of the previously used IR sphere source and the radiance responsivity of a previously used secondary standard detector unit, which was originally calibrated against an IR sphere source, were also measured with the TRs. The performances of the NVG test instruments were evaluated and the manufacturer produced radiance and luminance levels were calibrated with SI/NIST traceability.

  10. RADIANCE AND PHOTON NOISE: Imaging in geometrical optics, physical optics, quantum optics and radiology.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Harrison H; Myers, Kyle J; Caucci, Luca

    2014-08-17

    A fundamental way of describing a photon-limited imaging system is in terms of a Poisson random process in spatial, angular and wavelength variables. The mean of this random process is the spectral radiance. The principle of conservation of radiance then allows a full characterization of the noise in the image (conditional on viewing a specified object). To elucidate these connections, we first review the definitions and basic properties of radiance as defined in terms of geometrical optics, radiology, physical optics and quantum optics. The propagation and conservation laws for radiance in each of these domains are reviewed. Then we distinguish four categories of imaging detectors that all respond in some way to the incident radiance, including the new category of photon-processing detectors. The relation between the radiance and the statistical properties of the detector output is discussed and related to task-based measures of image quality and the information content of a single detected photon.

  11. Absolute radiant power measurement for the Au M lines of laser-plasma using a calibrated broadband soft X-ray spectrometer with flat-spectral response.

    PubMed

    Troussel, Ph; Villette, B; Emprin, B; Oudot, G; Tassin, V; Bridou, F; Delmotte, F; Krumrey, M

    2014-01-01

    CEA implemented an absolutely calibrated broadband soft X-ray spectrometer called DMX on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) in 1999 to measure radiant power and spectral distribution of the radiation of the Au plasma. The DMX spectrometer is composed of 20 channels covering the spectral range from 50 eV to 20 keV. The channels for energies below 1.5 keV combine a mirror and a filter with a coaxial photo-emissive detector. For the channels above 5 keV the photoemissive detector is replaced by a conductive detector. The intermediate energy channels (1.5 keV < photon energy < 5 keV) use only a filter and a coaxial detector. A further improvement of DMX consists in flat-response X-ray channels for a precise absolute measurement of the photon flux in the photon energy range from 0.1 keV to 6 keV. Such channels are equipped with a filter, a Multilayer Mirror (MLM), and a coaxial detector. We present as an example the development of channel for the gold M emission lines in the photon energy range from 2 keV to 4 keV which has been successfully used on the OMEGA laser facility. The results of the radiant power measurements with the new MLM channel and with the usual channel composed of a thin titanium filter and a coaxial detector (without mirror) are compared. All elements of the channel have been calibrated in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's National Metrology Institute, at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin using dedicated well established and validated methods.

  12. Absolute radiant power measurement for the Au M lines of laser-plasma using a calibrated broadband soft X-ray spectrometer with flat-spectral response

    SciTech Connect

    Troussel, Ph.; Villette, B.; Oudot, G.; Tassin, V.; Bridou, F.; Delmotte, F.; Krumrey, M.

    2014-01-15

    CEA implemented an absolutely calibrated broadband soft X-ray spectrometer called DMX on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) in 1999 to measure radiant power and spectral distribution of the radiation of the Au plasma. The DMX spectrometer is composed of 20 channels covering the spectral range from 50 eV to 20 keV. The channels for energies below 1.5 keV combine a mirror and a filter with a coaxial photo-emissive detector. For the channels above 5 keV the photoemissive detector is replaced by a conductive detector. The intermediate energy channels (1.5 keV < photon energy < 5 keV) use only a filter and a coaxial detector. A further improvement of DMX consists in flat-response X-ray channels for a precise absolute measurement of the photon flux in the photon energy range from 0.1 keV to 6 keV. Such channels are equipped with a filter, a Multilayer Mirror (MLM), and a coaxial detector. We present as an example the development of channel for the gold M emission lines in the photon energy range from 2 keV to 4 keV which has been successfully used on the OMEGA laser facility. The results of the radiant power measurements with the new MLM channel and with the usual channel composed of a thin titanium filter and a coaxial detector (without mirror) are compared. All elements of the channel have been calibrated in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's National Metrology Institute, at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin using dedicated well established and validated methods.

  13. Absolute radiant power measurement for the Au M lines of laser-plasma using a calibrated broadband soft X-ray spectrometer with flat-spectral response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troussel, Ph.; Villette, B.; Emprin, B.; Oudot, G.; Tassin, V.; Bridou, F.; Delmotte, F.; Krumrey, M.

    2014-01-01

    CEA implemented an absolutely calibrated broadband soft X-ray spectrometer called DMX on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) in 1999 to measure radiant power and spectral distribution of the radiation of the Au plasma. The DMX spectrometer is composed of 20 channels covering the spectral range from 50 eV to 20 keV. The channels for energies below 1.5 keV combine a mirror and a filter with a coaxial photo-emissive detector. For the channels above 5 keV the photoemissive detector is replaced by a conductive detector. The intermediate energy channels (1.5 keV < photon energy < 5 keV) use only a filter and a coaxial detector. A further improvement of DMX consists in flat-response X-ray channels for a precise absolute measurement of the photon flux in the photon energy range from 0.1 keV to 6 keV. Such channels are equipped with a filter, a Multilayer Mirror (MLM), and a coaxial detector. We present as an example the development of channel for the gold M emission lines in the photon energy range from 2 keV to 4 keV which has been successfully used on the OMEGA laser facility. The results of the radiant power measurements with the new MLM channel and with the usual channel composed of a thin titanium filter and a coaxial detector (without mirror) are compared. All elements of the channel have been calibrated in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's National Metrology Institute, at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin using dedicated well established and validated methods.

  14. Asteroid 951 Gaspra Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer Radiance Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Five radiance spectra of asteroid 951 Gaspra have been archived in the Small Bodies Node of the NASA Planetary Data System [Granahan, 2014]. The radiance spectra were created from uncalibrated Galileo spacecraft Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer files archived in the Imaging Node of the NASA Planetary Data System. The NASA Galileo spacecraft observed asteroid 951 Gaspra on October 29, 1991 with the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) at wavelengths ranging from 0.7 - 5.2 micrometers [Carlson et al., 1992]. The five radiance spectra consist of two 17, two 100, and one 329 spectral channel data sets. They record data that was acquired by NIMS at ranges between 27232.6 to 14723.8 kilometers from asteroid 951 Gaspra. The uncalibrated NIMS data were converted into radiance spectra using calibration coefficients obtained during the Galileo mission's first Earth encounter on December 8, 1990. The archived radiance spectral data is located at the URL (Universal Record Locator): http://sbn.psi.edu/pds/resource/gaspraspec.html and contains radiance, solar, incidence over flux, and data documentation. This archived data set contains a variety of spectral signatures. These signatures include absorptions near 1.0, 2.0, 2.8, 3.4, and 4.5 micrometers. The 1.0 and 2.0 micrometer features are indicators of olivine and pyroxene on the asteroid surface. The 2.8 micrometer feature has a shape similar to the combined spectra of multiple iron bearing phyllosilicates. The 3.4 micrometer feature is in the same location as absorptions created by a carbon-hydrogen bond. The 4.5 micrometer feature, present only in the 329 channel data set, corresponds in position to absorptions detected in sulfate minerals. Carlson, R. W., et al. (1992) Bull. of the A.A.S., 24, 932. Granahan, J. C. (2014), GO-A-NIMS-3-GASPRASPEC-V1.0, NASA Planetary Data System.

  15. The Pathfinder Mission for Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, R. R.; Boyer, C.; Cageao, R.; Currey, C.; Fleming, G. A.; Jackson, T.; Johnson, D. G.; Leckey, J.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; McCorkel, J.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Shea, Y.; Thome, K. J.; Wielicki, B. A.; Sun, W.

    2016-01-01

    Warming of the climate system is unequivocal, and since the 1950s, many of the observed changes are unprecedented over decades to millennia. The atmosphere and ocean have warmed, the amounts of snow and ice have diminished, and sea level has risen.

  16. Cross-calibration of Imaging Sensors using Model-based, SI-traceable Predictions of At-sensor Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Many inter-consistency efforts force empirical agreement between sensors viewing a source nearly coincident in time and geometry that ensures consistency between sensors rather than obtain an SI-traceable calibration with documented error budgets. The method described here provides interconsistency via absolute radiometric calibration with defensible error budget avoiding systematic errors through prediction of at-sensor radiance for a site viewed by multiple sensors but not necessarily viewed at coincident times. The method predicts spectral radiance over a given surface site for arbitrary view and illumination angles and for any date dominated by clear-sky conditions. The foundation is a model-based, SI-traceable prediction of at-sensor radiance over selected sites based on physical understanding of the surface and atmosphere. The calibration of the ground site will include spatial, spectral, and sunview geometric effects based on satellite and ground-based data. The result is an interconsistency of hyperspectral and multispectral sensors spanning spatial resolutions from meters to kilometers all relative to the surface site rather than a single sensor. The source-centric philosophy of calibrating the site inherently accounts for footprint size mismatch, spectral band mismatch, and temporal and spatial sampling effects. The method for characterizing the test site allows its use for SI-traceable calibration of any sensor that can view the calibrated test site. Interconsistency is obtained through the traceability and error budget rather than coincident views. Such an approach to inter-consistency provides better understanding of biases between sensors as well producing more accurate results with documented SI-traceability that reduces the need for overlapping data sets.

  17. Advances in simulating radiance signatures for dynamic air/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, Adam A.; Brown, Scott D.; Gerace, Aaron

    2015-05-01

    The air-water interface poses a number of problems for both collecting and simulating imagery. At the surface, the magnitude of observed radiance can change by multiple orders of magnitude at high spatiotemporal frequency due to glinting effects. In the volume, similarly high frequency focusing of photons by a dynamic wave surface significantly changes the reflected radiance of in-water objects and the scattered return of the volume itself. These phenomena are often manifest as saturated pixels and artifacts in collected imagery (often enhanced by time delays between neighboring pixels or interpolation between adjacent filters) and as noise and greater required computation times in simulated imagery. This paper describes recent advances made to the Digital Image and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model to address the simulation issues to better facilitate an understanding of a multi/hyper-spectral collection. Glint effects are simulated using a dynamic height field that can be driven by wave frequency models and generates a sea state at arbitrary time scales. The volume scattering problem is handled by coupling the geometry representing the surface (facetization by the height field) with the single scattering contribution at any point in the water. The problem is constrained somewhat by assuming that contributions come from a Snell's window above the scattering point and by assuming a direct source (sun). Diffuse single scattered and multiple scattered energy contributions are handled by Monte Carlo techniques employed previously. The model is compared to existing radiative transfer codes where possible, with the objective of providing a robust movel of time-dependent absolute radiance at many wavelengths.

  18. Final Scientific/Technical Report Grant title: Use of ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction This is a collaborative project with the NASA GSFC project of Dr. A. Marshak and W. Wiscombe (PIs). This report covers BU activities from February 2011 to June 2011 and BU "no-cost extension" activities from June 2011 to June 2012. This report summarizes results that complement a final technical report submitted by the PIs in 2011.

    SciTech Connect

    Knyazikhin, Y

    2012-09-10

    Main results are summarized for work in these areas: spectrally-invariant approximation within atmospheric radiative transfer; spectral invariance of single scattering albedo for water droplets and ice crystals at weakly absorbing wavelengths; seasonal changes in leaf area of Amazon forests from leaf flushing and abscission; and Cloud droplet size and liquid water path retrievals from zenith radiance measurements.

  19. A comparison of absolute calibrations of a radiation thermometer based on a monochromator and a tunable source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keawprasert, T.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, D. R.; Sperling, A.; Schuster, M.; Nevas, S.

    2013-09-01

    An LP3 radiation thermometer was absolutely calibrated at a newly developed monochromator-based set-up and the TUneable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility of PTB in the wavelength range from 400 nm to 1100 nm. At both facilities, the spectral radiation of the respective sources irradiates an integrating sphere, thus generating uniform radiance across its precision aperture. The spectral irradiance of the integrating sphere is determined via an effective area of a precision aperture and a Si trap detector, traceable to the primary cryogenic radiometer of PTB. Due to the limited output power from the monochromator, the absolute calibration was performed with the measurement uncertainty of 0.17 % (k = 1), while the respective uncertainty at the TULIP facility is 0.14 %. Calibration results obtained by the two facilities were compared in terms of spectral radiance responsivity, effective wavelength and integral responsivity. It was found that the measurement results in integral responsivity at the both facilities are in agreement within the expanded uncertainty (k = 2). To verify the calibration accuracy, the absolutely calibrated radiation thermometer was used to measure the thermodynamic freezing temperatures of the PTB gold fixed-point blackbody.

  20. A comparison of absolute calibrations of a radiation thermometer based on a monochromator and a tunable source

    SciTech Connect

    Keawprasert, T.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, D. R.; Sperling, A.; Schuster, M.; Nevas, S.

    2013-09-11

    An LP3 radiation thermometer was absolutely calibrated at a newly developed monochromator-based set-up and the TUneable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility of PTB in the wavelength range from 400 nm to 1100 nm. At both facilities, the spectral radiation of the respective sources irradiates an integrating sphere, thus generating uniform radiance across its precision aperture. The spectral irradiance of the integrating sphere is determined via an effective area of a precision aperture and a Si trap detector, traceable to the primary cryogenic radiometer of PTB. Due to the limited output power from the monochromator, the absolute calibration was performed with the measurement uncertainty of 0.17 % (k= 1), while the respective uncertainty at the TULIP facility is 0.14 %. Calibration results obtained by the two facilities were compared in terms of spectral radiance responsivity, effective wavelength and integral responsivity. It was found that the measurement results in integral responsivity at the both facilities are in agreement within the expanded uncertainty (k= 2). To verify the calibration accuracy, the absolutely calibrated radiation thermometer was used to measure the thermodynamic freezing temperatures of the PTB gold fixed-point blackbody.

  1. MISR Level 3 Radiance Versioning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-11-04

    ... Data Product Specification Rev K  (PDF). Update to work with new format of the input PGE 1 files.   F02_0007 ... public release. Includes only all-radiance field at this time, which does contain clouds. Baseline ancillary files: ...

  2. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  3. Physical Retrieval of Surface Emissivity Spectrum from Hyperspectral Infrared Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Weisz, Elisabeth; Zhou, Daniel K.

    2007-01-01

    Retrieval of temperature, moisture profiles and surface skin temperature from hyperspectral infrared (IR) radiances requires spectral information about the surface emissivity. Using constant or inaccurate surface emissivities typically results in large retrieval errors, particularly over semi-arid or arid areas where the variation in emissivity spectrum is large both spectrally and spatially. In this study, a physically based algorithm has been developed to retrieve a hyperspectral IR emissivity spectrum simultaneously with the temperature and moisture profiles, as well as the surface skin temperature. To make the solution stable and efficient, the hyperspectral emissivity spectrum is represented by eigenvectors, derived from the laboratory measured hyperspectral emissivity database, in the retrieval process. Experience with AIRS (Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder) radiances shows that a simultaneous retrieval of the emissivity spectrum and the sounding improves the surface skin temperature as well as temperature and moisture profiles, particularly in the near surface layer.

  4. Comprehensive Understanding for Vegetated Scene Radiance Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Deering, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    Directional reflectance distributions spanning the entire existent hemisphere were measured in two field studies; one using a Mark III 3-band radiometer and one using the rapid scanning bidirectional field instrument called PARABOLA. Surfaces measured included corn, soybeans, bare soils, grass lawn, orchard grass, alfalfa, cotton row crops, plowed field, annual grassland, stipa grass, hard wheat, salt plain shrubland, and irrigated wheat. Analysis of field data showed unique reflectance distributions ranging from bare soil to complete vegetation canopies. Physical mechanisms causing these trends were proposed. A 3-D model was developed and is unique in that it predicts: (1) the directional spectral reflectance factors as a function of the sensor's azimuth and zenith angles and the sensor's position above the canopy; (2) the spectral absorption as a function of location within the scene; and (3) the directional spectral radiance as a function of the sensor's location within the scene. Initial verification of the model as applied to a soybean row crop showed that the simulated directional data corresponded relatively well in gross trends to the measured data. The model was expanded to include the anisotropic scattering properties of leaves as a function of the leaf orientation distribution in both the zenith and azimuth angle modes.

  5. Correction for reflected sky radiance in low-altitude coastal hyperspectral images.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsu; Park, Joong Yong; Kopilevich, Yuri; Tuell, Grady; Philpot, William

    2013-11-10

    Low-altitude coastal hyperspectral imagery is sensitive to reflections of sky radiance at the water surface. Even in the absence of sun glint, and for a calm water surface, the wide range of viewing angles may result in pronounced, low-frequency variations of the reflected sky radiance across the scan line depending on the solar position. The variation in reflected sky radiance can be obscured by strong high-spatial-frequency sun glint and at high altitude by path radiance. However, at low altitudes, the low-spatial-frequency sky radiance effect is frequently significant and is not removed effectively by the typical corrections for sun glint. The reflected sky radiance from the water surface observed by a low-altitude sensor can be modeled in the first approximation as the sum of multiple-scattered Rayleigh path radiance and the single-scattered direct-solar-beam radiance by the aerosol in the lower atmosphere. The path radiance from zenith to the half field of view (FOV) of a typical airborne spectroradiometer has relatively minimal variation and its reflected radiance to detector array results in a flat base. Therefore the along-track variation is mostly contributed by the forward single-scattered solar-beam radiance. The scattered solar-beam radiances arrive at the water surface with different incident angles. Thus the reflected radiance received at the detector array corresponds to a certain scattering angle, and its variation is most effectively parameterized using the downward scattering angle (DSA) of the solar beam. Computation of the DSA must account for the roll, pitch, and heading of the platform and the viewing geometry of the sensor along with the solar ephemeris. Once the DSA image is calculated, the near-infrared (NIR) radiance from selected water scan lines are compared, and a relationship between DSA and NIR radiance is derived. We then apply the relationship to the entire DSA image to create an NIR reference image. Using the NIR reference image

  6. Monochromator-Based Absolute Calibration of a Standard Radiation Thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantilla, J. M.; Hernanz, M. L.; Campos, J.; Martín, M. J.; Pons, A.; del Campo, D.

    2014-04-01

    Centro Español de Metrología (CEM) is disseminating the International Temperature Scale (ITS-90), at high temperatures, by using the fixed points of Ag and Cu and a standard radiation thermometer. However, the future mise-en-pratique for the definition of the kelvin ( MeP-K) will include the dissemination of the kelvin by primary methods and by indirect approximations capable of exceptionally low uncertainties or increased reliability. Primary radiometry is, at present, able to achieve uncertainties competitive with the ITS-90 above the silver point with one of the possible techniques the calibration for radiance responsivity of an imaging radiometer (radiance method). In order to carry out this calibration, IO-CSIC (Spanish Designated Institute for luminous intensity and luminous flux) has collaborated with CEM, allowing traceability to its cryogenic radiometer. A monochromator integrating sphere-based spectral comparator facility has been used to calibrate one of the CEM standard radiation thermometers. The absolute calibrated standard radiation thermometer has been used to determine the temperatures of the fixed points of Cu, Co-C, Pt-C, and Re-C. The results obtained are 1357.80 K, 1597.10 K, 2011.66 K, and 2747.64 K, respectively, with uncertainties ranging from 0.4 K to 1.1 K.

  7. Radiance-ratio algorithm wavelengths for remote oceanic chlorophyll determination.

    PubMed

    Hoge, F E; Wright, C W; Swift, R N

    1987-06-01

    Two-band radiance-ratio in-water algorithms in the visible spectrum have been evaluated for remote oceanic chlorophyll determination. Airborne active-passive (laser-solar) data from coastal, shelf-slope, and bluewater regions were used to generate 2-D chlorophyll-fluorescence and radiance-ratio statistical correlation matrices containing all possible two-band ratio combinations from the thirty-two available contiguous 11.25-nm passive bands. The principal finding was that closely spaced radiance-ratio bands yield chlorophyll estimates which are highly correlated with laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence within several distinct regions of the ocean color spectrum. Band combinations in the yellow (~565/575-nm), orange-red (~675/685-nm), and red (~695/705-nm) spectral regions showed considerable promise for satisfactory chlorophyll pigment estimation in near-coastal Case II waters. Based on very limited data, pigment recovery in Case I waters was best accomplished using blue-green radiance ratios in the ~490/500-nm region.

  8. Estimation of upward radiances and reflectances at the surface of the sea from above-surface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiv, Ø.; Folkestad, A.; Høkedal, J.; Sørensen, K.; Aas, E.

    2015-10-01

    During 4 field days in the years 2009-2011, 22 data sets of measurements were collected in the inner Oslofjord, Norway. The data consist of recordings of spectral nadir radiances in air and water as well as spectral downward irradiance in air. The studied wavelengths are 351, 400, 413, 443, 490, 510, 560, 620, 665, 681, 709 and 754 nm. The water-leaving radiance and the reflected radiance at the sea surface have been obtained from the measured nadir radiances in air and water, where the latter radiance has been extrapolated upwards to the surface. For comparison we present a simpler and much faster method that determines the water-leaving and reflected radiances solely from above-surface measurements of upward nadir radiance and downward irradiance. This new method is based on an assumption about similarity in spectral shape of the radiance reflected at the surface, and it makes use of the small ratio between water-leaving and reflected radiances at 351 and 754 nm in the Oslofjord. A comparison between the quantities determined by the two mentioned methods shows that the average relative deviations between their results are less than or equal to 15 % for the reflected radiance, at the studied wavelengths. The average relative deviation of the water-leaving radiance at 560 nm is 24 %. These results are obtained for a cloudiness range of 1-8 oktas (12.5-100 %) and solar zenith angles between 37 and 51°. We consider these to be acceptable uncertainties for a first check of satellite products in the inner Oslofjord.

  9. Principal component and sensitivity analysis of cirrus clouds using high-resolution IR radiance spectra: simulations and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldering, A.; Braverman, A.; Fetzer, E. J.

    2003-01-01

    A set of simulated and observed nadir-oriented high-resolution infrared emission spectra of synthetic cirrus clouds is analyzed to assess the spectrally dependent variability of radiance from the adjustment of some microphysical and bulk cirrus cloud properties.

  10. ScaRaB: first results of absolute and cross calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trémas, Thierry L.; Aznay, Ouahid; Chomette, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    ScaRaB (SCAnner for RAdiation Budget) is the name of three radiometers whose two first flight models have been launched in 1994 and 1997. The instruments were mounted on-board Russian satellites, METEOR and RESURS. On October 12th 2011, a last model has been launched from the Indian site of Sriharikota. ScaRaB is a passenger of MEGHA-TROPIQUES, an Indo-French joint Satellite Mission for studying the water cycle and energy exchanges in the tropics. ScaRaB is composed of four parallel and independent channels. Channel-2 and channel-3 are considered as the main ones. Channel-1 is dedicated to measure solar radiance (0.5 to 0.7 μm) while channel-4 (10 to 13 μm) is an infrared window. The absolute calibration of ScaRab is assured by internal calibration sources (black bodies and a lamp for channel-1). However, during the commissioning phase, the lamp used for the absolute calibration of channel-1 revealed to be inaccurate. We propose here an alternative calibration method based on terrestrial targets. Due to the spectral range of channel-1, only calibration over desert sites (temporal monitoring) and clouds (cross band) is suitable. Desert sites have been widely used for sensor calibration since they have a stable spectral response over time. Because of their high reflectances, the atmospheric effect on the upward radiance is relatively minimal. In addition, they are spatially uniform. Their temporal instability without atmospheric correction has been determined to be less than 1-2% over a year. Very-high-altitude (10 km) bright clouds are good validation targets in the visible and near-infrared spectra because of their high spectrally consistent reflectance. If the clouds are very high, there is no need to correct aerosol scattering and water vapor absorption as both aerosol and water vapor are distributed near the surface. Only Rayleigh scattering and ozone absorption need to be considered. This method has been found to give a 4% uncertainty. Radiometric cross

  11. Modeling of TOA radiance measured by CERES and SCIAMACHY over the East Antarctic Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radkevich, A.; Kato, S.; Lukashin, C.

    2015-12-01

    CERES and SCIAMACHY are satellite borne remote sensing instruments measuring solar-reflected and Earth-emitted radiation at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA). CERES instruments are designed to monitor the Earth's radiation budget by measuring radiation in 3 broad bands. SCIAMACHY sensor measured earth reflected radiation in the spectral range 0.24 to 2.38 um with fine spectral and coarse spatial resolutions. In this work we evaluate CERES shortwave (SW) TOA radiance over permanent clear sky snow in the East Antarctic Plateau to test consistency between modeled and observed radiances. We use SCIAMACHY observations to validate spectral performance of our radiative transfer (RT) model. We revisiting the issue reported by Hudson et al (2010) with another radiative transfer model and using instantaneous atmospheric profiles. That paper reported some overestimation of TOA albedo by their model in comparison with CERES observed SW radiances. As pointed out by Hudson et al., that comparison involves some uncertainties including errors in the modeled surface albedo and atmospheric properties. We use RT model based on DISORT coupled with a k-distribution approach (Kato et al 1999). We use the same approach for the lower boundary condition as in Hudson et al. (2010) with a modification related to modeling surface albedo. In this work we create atmospheric profiles for the individual CERES and SCIAMACHY observations from GEOS-4 reanalysis. A comparison between modeling and actual observations was performed for data from the CERES sensors onboard EOS Terra and Aqua, and Suomi-NPP. Similar to the study by Hudson et al. (2010), the model overestimates the TOA radiance. Modeled radiances are greater than observed ones from the CERES Single Satellite Footprint data by 4.6% for FM-1, 2, and FM-4, and by 3.6% for FM-5. Modeled and observed radiance correlates well: coefficient of determination R2 > 0.999. We compare modeled radiances SCIAMACHY radiances by spectrally integrating over the

  12. Tree canopy radiance measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, William; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1989-01-01

    A system is described for obtaining both an estimate of the spatial mean bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) for a tree canopy (displaying a horizontally heterogeneous foliage distribution) and the statistical significance of that estimate. The system includes a manlift supporting a horizontal beam 7 m long on which are mounted four radiometers. These radiometers may be pointed, and radiance data acquired, in any of 11 view directions in the principal plane of the sun. A total of 80 data points, acquired in 3 min, were used to estimate the BRF of a walnut orchard 5 m tall and detect true differences of 12 percent of the mean approximately 90 percent of the time.

  13. Tree canopy radiance measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, William; Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1989-11-01

    A system is described for obtaining both an estimate of the spatial mean bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) for a tree canopy (displaying a horizontally heterogeneous foliage distribution) and the statistical significance of that estimate. The system includes a manlift supporting a horizontal beam 7 m long on which are mounted four radiometers. These radiometers may be pointed, and radiance data acquired, in any of 11 view directions in the principal plane of the sun. A total of 80 data points, acquired in 3 min, were used to estimate the BRF of a walnut orchard 5 m tall and detect true differences of 12 percent of the mean approximately 90 percent of the time.

  14. Development of a Fast and Accurate PCRTM Radiative Transfer Model in the Solar Spectral Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Yang, Qiguang; Li, Hui; Jin, Zhonghai; Wu, Wan; Kizer, Susan; Zhou, Daniel K.; Yang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    A fast and accurate principal component-based radiative transfer model in the solar spectral region (PCRTMSOLAR) has been developed. The algorithm is capable of simulating reflected solar spectra in both clear sky and cloudy atmospheric conditions. Multiple scattering of the solar beam by the multilayer clouds and aerosols are calculated using a discrete ordinate radiative transfer scheme. The PCRTM-SOLAR model can be trained to simulate top-of-atmosphere radiance or reflectance spectra with spectral resolution ranging from 1 cm(exp -1) resolution to a few nanometers. Broadband radiances or reflectance can also be calculated if desired. The current version of the PCRTM-SOLAR covers a spectral range from 300 to 2500 nm. The model is valid for solar zenith angles ranging from 0 to 80 deg, the instrument view zenith angles ranging from 0 to 70 deg, and the relative azimuthal angles ranging from 0 to 360 deg. Depending on the number of spectral channels, the speed of the current version of PCRTM-SOLAR is a few hundred to over one thousand times faster than the medium speed correlated-k option MODTRAN5. The absolute RMS error in channel radiance is smaller than 10(exp -3) mW/cm)exp 2)/sr/cm(exp -1) and the relative error is typically less than 0.2%.

  15. Development of a fast and accurate PCRTM radiative transfer model in the solar spectral region.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Yang, Qiguang; Li, Hui; Jin, Zhonghai; Wu, Wan; Kizer, Susan; Zhou, Daniel K; Yang, Ping

    2016-10-10

    A fast and accurate principal component-based radiative transfer model in the solar spectral region (PCRTM-SOLAR) has been developed. The algorithm is capable of simulating reflected solar spectra in both clear sky and cloudy atmospheric conditions. Multiple scattering of the solar beam by the multilayer clouds and aerosols are calculated using a discrete ordinate radiative transfer scheme. The PCRTM-SOLAR model can be trained to simulate top-of-atmosphere radiance or reflectance spectra with spectral resolution ranging from 1  cm-1 resolution to a few nanometers. Broadband radiances or reflectance can also be calculated if desired. The current version of the PCRTM-SOLAR covers a spectral range from 300 to 2500 nm. The model is valid for solar zenith angles ranging from 0 to 80 deg, the instrument view zenith angles ranging from 0 to 70 deg, and the relative azimuthal angles ranging from 0 to 360 deg. Depending on the number of spectral channels, the speed of the current version of PCRTM-SOLAR is a few hundred to over one thousand times faster than the medium speed correlated-k option MODTRAN5. The absolute RMS error in channel radiance is smaller than 10-3  mW/cm2/sr/cm-1 and the relative error is typically less than 0.2%.

  16. Assimilation of hyperspectral radiances in the NCMRWF global forecast system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sanjeev K.; Prasad, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    The availability of high resolution temperature and water vapor data is important for the study of mesoscale scale weather phenomena. As, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and European Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) provide high resolution atmospheric profiles by measuring radiations in many thousands of different channels. The AIRS, on the EOS-Aqua polar-orbiting satellite, was the first of a new generation of meteorological advanced sounders able to provide hyper- spectral data for operational and research use. The CrIS is a Fourier Transform Michelson interferometer instrument launched on board the Suomi National Polar- Orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite on 28 October 2011. CrIS is a major step forward in the U.S. operational infrared (IR) sounding capability previously provided by the High-resolution Infrared Spectrometer (HIRS). The IASI is the most advanced instrument carried on the MetOp satellite on 19 October 2006. As a result, demonstration of the benefit of hyper-spectral data on Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) has been a high priority. This work focuses on the assessment of the potential values of satellite hyper-spectral radiance data in the NGFS (National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting-Global Forecast System). An Observing System Experiments (OSEs) has been conducted to examine the impact of hyper-spectral radiances and detail results are presented.

  17. Absolute distance measurement method without a non-measurable range and directional ambiguity based on the spectral-domain interferometer using the optical comb of the femtosecond pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Jin, J.; Kim, J.-A.; Kim, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    With the help of the optical comb of a femtosecond pulse laser, a spectral-domain interferometer has been utilized for measuring absolute distances. Even if the technique can measure distances at a high speed and with good precision, it has two fundamental problems: non-measurable range and directional ambiguity. First, the non-measurable range arises due to the sampling limit of the interference spectra at very short distances or the integer multiple of a double non-ambiguity range. Second, the peak corresponding to the desired distance in the Fourier domain has a directional ambiguity owing to the repeated property of the optical comb. Therefore, due to these two fundamental problems, most previous works never measure the absolute distances by itself in a single operation. In this letter, an interferometric method for measuring arbitrary absolute distances based on a spectral-domain interferometer operating with two reference mirrors is proposed and demonstrated. The two reference mirrors generate two distinguishable signals, primary and secondary, with a predetermined offset, thus solving these fundamental problems clearly. More importantly, as a practical advantage, the simple layout of the proposed method makes it readily applicable to most previous studies.

  18. Modeling the Radiance of the Moon for On-orbit Calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.; Kieffer, H.H.; Becker, K.J.; ,

    2003-01-01

    The RObotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) project has developed radiometric models of the Moon for disk-integrated irradiance and spatially resolved radiance. Although the brightness of the Moon varies spatially and with complex dependencies upon illumination and viewing geometry, the surface photometric properties are extremely stable, and therefore potentially knowable to high accuracy. The ROLO project has acquired 5+ years of spatially resolved lunar images in 23 VNIR and 9 SWIR filter bands at phase angles up to 90??. These images are calibrated to exoatmospheric radiance using nightly stellar observations in a band-coupled extinction algorithm and a radiometric scale based upon observations of the star Vega. An effort is currently underway to establish an absolute scale with direct traceability to NIST radiometric standards. The ROLO radiance model performs linear fitting of the spatially resolved lunar image data on an individual pixel basis. The results are radiance images directly comparable to spacecraft observations of the Moon. Model-generated radiance images have been produced for the ASTER lunar view conducted on 14 April 2003. The radiance model is still experimental - simplified photometric functions have been used, and initial results show evidence of computational instabilities, particularly at the lunar poles. The ROLO lunar image dataset is unique and extensive and presents opportunities for development of novel approaches to lunar photometric modeling.

  19. Comparison measurements of 0:45 radiance factor and goniometrically determined diffuse reflectance

    SciTech Connect

    Holopainen, Silja; Manoocheri, Farshid; Ikonen, Erkki; Hauer, Kai-Olaf; Hoepe, Andreas

    2009-05-20

    A comparison between the absolute gonioreflectometric scales at the Helsinki University of Technology (TKK) and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has been accomplished. Six different reflection standards were measured for their 0:45 spectral radiance factor between 250 and 1650 nm in 10 nm intervals. Also, the 0:d reflectance factor between 400 and 1600 nm in 100 nm intervals was determined from goniometric reflectance measurements over polar angles with subsequent integration within the hemisphere above the sample. Goniometric comparisons covering such an extensive wavelength range and also several different sample materials are rarely implemented. For all but one sample, the difference between the results obtained at the TKK and the PTB was, with the exception of a couple of measurement points, within the expanded uncertainty (k=2) of the comparison at least up to a wavelength of 1400 nm. All differences between the measurement results can be understood, except for one translucent sample in the visible wavelength range. The effect of sample translucency was found to be significant in the NIR wavelength region. Also, a general tendency of an increase of the TKK values relative to the PTB values in the UV region was observed. Possible causes for this phenomenon are discussed.

  20. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  1. Radiance Data Products at the GES DAAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savtchenko, A.; Ouzounov, D.; Acker, J.; Johnson, J.; Leptoukh, G.; Qin, J.; Rui, H.; Smith, P.; Teng, W.

    2004-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Center (GES DAAC) has been archiving and distributing Radiance data, and serving science and application users of these data, for over 10 years now. The user-focused stewardship of the Radiance data from the AIRS, AVHRR, MODIS, SeaWiFS, SORCE, TOMS, TOVS, TRMM, and UARS instruments exemplifies the GES DAAC tradition and experience. Radiance data include raw radiance counts, onboard calibration data, geolocation products, radiometric calibrated and geolocated-calibrated radiance/reflectance. The number of science products archived at the GES DAAC is steadily increasing, as a result of more sophisticated sensors and new science algorithms. Thus, the main challenge for the GES DAAC is to guide users through the variety of Radiance data sets, provide tools to visualize and reduce the volume of the data, and provide uninterrupted access to the data. This presentation will describe the effort at the GES DAAC to build a bridge between multi-sensor data and the effective scientific use of the data, with an emphasis on the heritage of the science products. The intent is to inform users of the existence of this large collection of Radiance data; suggest starting points for cross-platform science projects and data mining activities; provide data services and tools information; and to give expert help in the science data formats and applications.

  2. Nonuniformity correction of infrared cameras by reading radiance temperatures with a spatially nonhomogeneous radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutschwager, Berndt; Hollandt, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel method of nonuniformity correction (NUC) of infrared cameras and focal plane arrays (FPA) in a wide optical spectral range by reading radiance temperatures and by applying a radiation source with an unknown and spatially nonhomogeneous radiance temperature distribution. The benefit of this novel method is that it works with the display and the calculation of radiance temperatures, it can be applied to radiation sources of arbitrary spatial radiance temperature distribution, and it only requires sufficient temporal stability of this distribution during the measurement process. In contrast to this method, an initially presented method described the calculation of NUC correction with the reading of monitored radiance values. Both methods are based on the recording of several (at least three) images of a radiation source and a purposeful row- and line-shift of these sequent images in relation to the first primary image. The mathematical procedure is explained in detail. Its numerical verification with a source of a predefined nonhomogeneous radiance temperature distribution and a thermal imager of a predefined nonuniform FPA responsivity is presented.

  3. Absolute Standards for Climate Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, J.

    2016-10-01

    In a world of changing climate, political uncertainty, and ever-changing budgets, the benefit of measurements traceable to SI standards increases by the day. To truly resolve climate change trends on a decadal time scale, on-orbit measurements need to be referenced to something that is both absolute and unchanging. One such mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to definitively quantify climate change. In the CLARREO mission, we will utilize phase change cells in which a material is melted to calibrate the temperature of a blackbody that can then be observed by a spectrometer. A material's melting point is an unchanging physical constant that, through a series of transfers, can ultimately calibrate a spectrometer on an absolute scale. CLARREO consists of two primary instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer and a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy to calibrate other space-based instrumentation and thus transferring the absolute traceability. The status of various mission options will be presented.

  4. A comparison of measured radiances from AIRS and HIRS across different cloud types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, M. M.; Kahn, B. H.; Staten, P.

    2015-12-01

    The observation of Earth's atmosphere with passive remote sensing instruments is ongoing for decades and resulting in a long-term global dataset. Two prominent examples are operational satellite platforms from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) or research platforms like NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). The observed spectral ranges of these observations are often similar among the different platforms, but have large differences when it comes to resolution, accuracy and quality control. Our approach is to combine different kinds of instruments at the pixel-scale to improve the characterization of infrared radiances. We focus on data from the High-resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) and compare the observations to radiances from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on Aqua. The high spectral resolution of AIRS is used to characterize and possibly recalibrate the observed radiances from HIRS. Our approach is unique in that we use additional information from other passive instruments on the same platforms including the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We will present comparisons of radiances from HIRS and AIRS within different types of clouds that are determined from the imagers. In this way, we can analyze and select the most homogeneous conditions for radiance comparisons and a possible re-calibration of HIRS. We hope to achieve a cloud-type-dependent calibration and quality control for HIRS, which can be extrapolated into the past via inter-calibration of the different HIRS instruments beyond the time of AIRS.

  5. The Intercalibration of Geostationary Visible Imagers Using Operational Hyperspectral SCIAMACHY Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doelling, David R.; Scarino, Benjamin R.; Morstad, Daniel; Gopalan, Arun; Bhatt, Rajendra; Lukashin, Constantine; Minnis, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Spectral band differences between sensors can complicate the process of intercalibration of a visible sensor against a reference sensor. This can be best addressed by using a hyperspectral reference sensor whenever possible because they can be used to accurately mitigate the band differences. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of using operational Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY) large-footprint hyperspectral radiances to calibrate geostationary Earth-observing (GEO) sensors. Near simultaneous nadir overpass measurements were used to compare the temporal calibration of SCIAMACHY with Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer band radiances, which were found to be consistent to within 0.44% over seven years. An operational SCIAMACHY/GEO ray-matching technique was presented, along with enhancements to improve radiance pair sampling. These enhancements did not bias the underlying intercalibration and provided enough sampling to allow up to monthly monitoring of the GEO sensor degradation. The results of the SCIAMACHY/GEO intercalibration were compared with other operational four-year Meteosat-9 0.65-µm calibration coefficients and were found to be within 1% of the gain, and more importantly, it had one of the lowest temporal standard errors of all the methods. This is more than likely that the GEO spectral response function could be directly applied to the SCIAMACHY radiances, whereas the other operational methods inferred a spectral correction factor. This method allows the validation of the spectral corrections required by other methods.

  6. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  7. Evaluation of daytime evaporative fraction from MODIS TOA radiances using FLUXNET observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jian; Loew, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The LST/NDVI (Land Surface Temperature/Vegetation Index) feature space has been widely used to estimate ET (Evapotranspiration) or EF (Evaporative Fraction, defined as the ratio of latent heat flux to surface available energy) in recent decades. Traditionally, it is essential to pre-process satellite TOA (top of atmosphere) radiances to obtain LST and NDVI before estimating EF. However, pre-processing TOA radiances is a cumbersome task including corrections for atmospheric, adjacency and directional effects. Based on the contextual relationship between LST and NDVI, some studies proposed the direct use of TOA radiances instead of satellite products to estimate EF, and found that use of TOA radiances is applicable in some regional studies. The purpose of the present study is to test the robustness of the TOA radiances based EF estimation scheme over different climatic and surface conditions. Flux measurements from 16 FLUXNET (a global network of eddy covariance towers) sites were used to validate the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro radiometer) TOA radiances estimated daytime EF. It is found that the EF estimates perform well across a wide variety of climate and biome types - grasslands, crops, cropland/natural vegetation mosaic, closed shrublands, mixed forest, deciduous broadleaf forest, and savannas. The overall BIAS (mean bias error), MAD (mean absolute difference), RMSD (root mean square difference) and R (correlation coefficient) values for all the sites are 0.018, 0.147, 0.178 and 0.590, respectively, which are comparable with published results in the literature. We conclude that the direct use of measured TOA radiances to estimate daytime EF is feasible and applicable, and would facilitate the relevant applications where minimum pre-processing is important.

  8. Absolute Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, George

    1990-12-01

    The absolute sensitivity of the FOS will be determined in SV by observing 2 stars at 3 epochs, first in 3 apertures (1.0", 0.5", and 0.3" circular) and then in 1 aperture (1.0" circular). In cycle 1, one star, BD+28D4211 will be observed in the 1.0" aperture to establish the stability of the sensitivity and flat field characteristics and improve the accuracy obtained in SV. This star will also be observed through the paired apertures since these are not calibrated in SV. The stars will be observed in most detector/grating combinations. The data will be averaged to form the inverse sensitivity functions required by RSDP.

  9. Ocean color spectrum calculations. [theoretical models relating oceanographic parameters to upwelling radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluney, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    The development is considered of procedures for measuring a number of subsurface oceanographic parameters using remotely sensed ocean color data. It is proposed that the first step in this effort should be the development of adequate theoretical models relating the desired oceanographic parameters to the upwelling radiances to be observed. A portion of a contributory theoretical model is shown to be described by a modified single scattering approach based upon a simple treatment of multiple scattering. The resulting quasi-single scattering model can be used to predict the upwelling distribution of spectral radiance emerging from the sea. The shape of the radiance spectrum predicted by this model for clear ocean water shows encouraging agreement with measurments made at the edge of the Sargasso Sea off Cape Hatteras.

  10. Radiative and microphysical properties of Arctic stratus clouds from multiangle downwelling infrared radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathke, Carsten; Neshyba, Steven; Shupe, Matthew D.; Rowe, Penny; Rivers, Aaron

    2002-12-01

    The information content of multiangle downwelling infrared radiance spectra of stratus clouds is investigated. As an example, 76 sets of spectra were measured at angles of 0, 15, 30 and 45° from zenith, using an interferometer based at the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) drifting ice camp. Exploiting the angular variation of radiance in infrared microwindows, a "geometric" algorithm is used to determine cloud temperature and optical depth without auxiliary information. For comparison, a spectral method allows us to infer cloud microphysical properties for each angle; each multiangle set therefore constitutes a microphysical characterization of horizontal inhomogeneity of the cloudy scene. We show that cloud temperatures determined with both approaches agree with temperatures obtained from lidar/radiosonde data. The multiangle radiance observations can also be used to calculate the longwave flux reaching the surface. We find that up to 14 W m-2 of the overcast fluxes can be attributed to horizontal variations in cloud microphysical properties.

  11. Absolute kinematics of radio-source components in the complete S5 polar cap sample. IV. Proper motions of the radio cores over a decade and spectral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martí-Vidal, I.; Abellán, F. J.; Marcaide, J. M.; Guirado, J. C.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Ros, E.

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out a high-precision astrometric analysis of two very-long-baseline-interferometry (VLBI) epochs of observation of the 13 extragalactic radio sources in the complete S5 polar cap sample. The VLBI epochs span a time baseline of ten years and enable us to achieve precisions in the proper motions of the source cores up to a few micro-arcseconds per year. The observations were performed at 14.4 GHz and 43.1 GHz, and enable us to estimate the frequency core-shifts in a subset of sources, for which the spectral-index distributions can be computed. We study the source-position stability by analysing the changes in the relative positions of fiducial source points (the jet cores) over a decade. We find motions of 0.1-0.9 mas among close-by sources between the two epochs, which imply drifts in the jet cores of approximately a few tens of μas per year. These results have implications for the standard Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) jet model (where the core locations are supposed to be stable in time). For one of our sources, 0615+820, the morphological and spectral properties in year 2010, as well as the relative astrometry between years 2000 and 2010, suggest the possibility of either a strong parsec-scale interaction of the AGN jet with the ISM, a gravitational lens with 1 mas diameter, or a resolved massive binary black hole. Reduced images as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A27

  12. Atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI): Status and the aerosol explanation for extra window region emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Revercomb, H.E.; Knuteson, R.O.; Best, F.A.; Dirkx, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    High spectral resolution observations of downwelling emission from 3 to 19 microns have been made by the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Prototype at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiative Testbed (CART) site for over two years. The spectral data set from AERI provides a basis for improving clear sky radiative transfer; determining the radiative impact of clouds, including the derivation of cloud radiative properties; defining the influences of aerosols in the window regions; and retrieving boundary layer state properties, including temperature, water vapor, and other trace gases. The data stream of radiometrically and spectrally calibrated radiances is routinely provided by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to those science teams requesting it, and further information on the instrument and data characteristics is available in the ARM Science Team proceedings for 1993 and 1994 and in several conference publications. This paper describes the AERI status, calibration, field experiment wit a new AERI-01 and schedule, window region emissions, and future AERI plans.

  13. [In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of UAV hyperspectral camera and its validation analysis].

    PubMed

    Gou, Zhi-yang; Yan, Lei; Chen, Wei; Jing, Xin; Yin, Zhong-yi; Duan, Yi-ni

    2012-02-01

    With the data in Urad Front Banner, Inner Mongolia on November 14th, 2010, hyper-spectral camera on UAV was calibrated adopting reflectance-based method. During the in-flight absolute radiometric calibration, 6 hyper-spectral radiometric gray-scale targets were arranged in the validation field. These targets' reflectances are 4.5%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50% and 60% separately. To validate the calibration result, four extra hyper-spectral targets with sharp-edge spectrum were arranged to simulate the reflection and absorption peaks in natural objectives. With these peaks, the apparent radiance calculated by radiation transfer model and that calculated through calibration coefficients are much different. The result shows that in the first 15 bands (blue bands), errors are somewhat huge due to the noises of equipment. In the rest bands with quite even spectrum, the errors are small, most of which are less than 10%. For those bands with sharp changes in spectral curves, the errors are quite considerable, varying from 10% to 25%.

  14. Radiance calibration of the High Altitude Observatory white-light coronagraph on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poland, A. I.; Macqueen, R. M.; Munro, R. H.; Gosling, J. T.

    1977-01-01

    The processing of over 35,000 photographs of the solar corona obtained by the white-light coronograph on Skylab is described. Calibration of the vast amount of data was complicated by temporal effects of radiation fog and latent image loss. These effects were compensated by imaging a calibration step wedge on each data frame. Absolute calibration of the wedge was accomplished through comparison with a set of previously calibrated glass opal filters. Analysis employed average characteristic curves derived from measurements of step wedges from many frames within a given camera half-load. The net absolute accuracy of a given radiance measurement is estimated to be 20%.

  15. Quantyfing the global lightning activity in absolute unints using Schumann resonance spectral decomposition method and the data from the World ELF Radiolocation Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrda, M.; Kulak, A.; Mlynarczyk, J.; Ostrowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    we derived the possible locations of the storm center on the African continent and hence we construct the 2D thunderstorms activity maps. Moreover, we calculated the thunderstorm intensities in absolute units C2 m2 s-1 and compared them with our previous findings [Dyrda et al., 2014].

  16. Far-infrared sensor for cirrus (FIRSC): an aircraft-based Fourier-transform spectrometer to measure cloud radiance.

    PubMed

    Vanek, M D; Nolt, I G; Tappan, N D; Ade, P A; Gannaway, F C; Hamilton, P A; Lee, C; Davis, J E; Predko, S

    2001-05-01

    We describe an aircraft-based Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS) designed to measure the Earth outgoing radiance spectrum in the far-infrared-submillimeter spectral range. The instrument features include a rapid-scan FTS to obtain high spatial resolution from a moving aircraft platform, a sensitive two-channel detector, and a CCD camera for recording the nadir cloud scene with each scan record. Such measurements demonstrate the sensitivity of Earth radiance to high clouds and provide spectral data for improving techniques for remote sensing and retrieval of atmospheric and cloud properties.

  17. FASCODE - Fast Atmospheric Signature Code (Spectral Transmittance and Radiance)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-16

    3?IS61§&V#Ol *3316396o.Olo .3319e39F*44, .3445269140, 00# O.".1v C 6M~ tG %?9#V*0g *3614113t.314 .367391U*00, *3OrelE.0,0se3 t .*Oa122969016 .364192f...TEST*1 12.. 866 196 CONTIWIJE 0160 Oh. Go To 60 bo 210 R~ hWC KFILE C16A9, C ~01 6900 f61 CALL. SfCONOM𔃻HE) 01691c PRINT ?P&3,TXII.jTH 016930 RETURN C1...qSTCANTPAVE*T6Vt NOLIO(M pool 7), 60$clos i 1wwf’If,Im1,NM0L),OWY1,W*2 B6(0,20 BUMPPE CJTI’(PILt,) iX~f1(1 ,NL4YFR$SOS 140 Tg IS ?JqZ IS BW2 q1LALI Ty

  18. An Infrared Spectral Radiance Code for the Auroral Thermosphere (AARC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-24

    Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, Massachusetts, pp. 12-1 to 12-42. 2. Stair, AT., Jr., Ulwick, J.C., Baker, K.D., and Baker, DJ. ( 1975 ) Rooketborne observations of...Vallance Jones, A. ( 1975 ) A model for the excitation of optical aurora and some of its applications, Can. J. Phys. 53: 2267- 84. 3 determine the...pay special notice to the ARCTIC2 0 and OPTAUR/QCARC21 codes, which were applied to the analysis of the ICECAP’ data. 16. Rees, M.H. ( 1975 ) Processes

  19. Effect of volcanic aerosols on stratospheric radiance at wavelengths between 8 and 13 microm.

    PubMed

    Halperin, B; Murcray, D G

    1987-06-01

    A set of stratospheric aerosol optical models is employed in a radiative-transfer computation to study the effects of postvolcanic particle size distributions and compositions on the spectral radiance in the 8-13-microm window region. The models are based on direct measurements of post El Chichon aerosol size distributions and vertical profiles. They represent various maturity states of aerosols composed of sulfuric acid aqueous solutions, formed and evolved in the stratosphere following a massive volcanic eruption. Comparisons are made with concurrent radiance observations obtained on balloon flights 6 months after the eruption and 1 yr later. Most of the calculations are done using the LOWTRAN-6 code (either alone or combined with a multiple scattering calculation), revised so as to include the appropriate aerosol optical models. A better quantitative agreement is found between the calculated and observed spectral radiances when the aerosol loading is relatively high, indicating that additional minor radiance sources of a yet unresolved nature should be incorporated in the present version of the calculation.

  20. Use of near infrared/red radiance ratios for estimating vegetation biomass and physiological status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    The application of photographic infrared/red (ir/red) reflectance or radiance ratios for the estimation of vegetation biomass and physiological status were investigated by analyzing in situ spectral reflectance data from experimental grass plots. Canopy biological samples were taken for total wet biomass, total dry biomass, leaf water content, dry green biomass, dry brown biomass, and total chlorophyll content at each sampling date. Integrated red and photographic infrared radiances were regressed against the various canopy or plot variables to determine the relative significance between the red, photographic infrared, and the ir/red ratio and the canopy variables. The ir/red ratio is sensitive to the photosynthetically active or green biomass, the rate of primary production, and actually measures the interaction between the green biomass and the rate of primary production within a given species type. The ir/red ratio resulted in improved regression significance over the red or the ir/radiances taken separately. Only slight differences were found between ir/red ratio, the ir-red difference, the vegetation index, and the transformed vegetation index. The asymptotic spectral radiance properties of the ir, red, ir/red ratio, and the various transformations were evaluated.

  1. Determining index of refraction from polarimetric hyperspectral radiance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jacob A.; Gross, Kevin C.

    2015-09-01

    Polarimetric hyperspectral imaging (P-HSI) combines two of the most common remote sensing modalities. This work leverages the combination of these techniques to improve material classification. Classifying and identifying materials requires parameters which are invariant to changing viewing conditions, and most often a material's reflectivity or emissivity is used. Measuring these most often requires assumptions be made about the material and atmospheric conditions. Combining both polarimetric and hyperspectral imaging, we propose a method to remotely estimate the index of refraction of a material. In general, this is an underdetermined problem because both the real and imaginary components of index of refraction are unknown at every spectral point. By modeling the spectral variation of the index of refraction using a few parameters, however, the problem can be made overdetermined. A number of different functions can be used to describe this spectral variation, and some are discussed here. Reducing the number of spectral parameters to fit allows us to add parameters which estimate atmospheric downwelling radiance and transmittance. Additionally, the object temperature is added as a fit parameter. The set of these parameters that best replicate the measured data is then found using a bounded Nelder-Mead simplex search algorithm. Other search algorithms are also examined and discussed. Results show that this technique has promise but also some limitations, which are the subject of ongoing work.

  2. Interpretation of absorption bands in airborne hyperspectral radiance data.

    PubMed

    Szekielda, Karl H; Bowles, Jeffrey H; Gillis, David B; Miller, W David

    2009-01-01

    It is demonstrated that hyperspectral imagery can be used, without atmospheric correction, to determine the presence of accessory phytoplankton pigments in coastal waters using derivative techniques. However, care must be taken not to confuse other absorptions for those caused by the presence of pigments. Atmospheric correction, usually the first step to making products from hyperspectral data, may not completely remove Fraunhofer lines and atmospheric absorption bands and these absorptions may interfere with identification of phytoplankton accessory pigments. Furthermore, the ability to resolve absorption bands depends on the spectral resolution of the spectrometer, which for a fixed spectral range also determines the number of observed bands. Based on this information, a study was undertaken to determine under what circumstances a hyperspectral sensor may determine the presence of pigments. As part of the study a hyperspectral imager was used to take high spectral resolution data over two different water masses. In order to avoid the problems associated with atmospheric correction this data was analyzed as radiance data without atmospheric correction. Here, the purpose was to identify spectral regions that might be diagnostic for photosynthetic pigments. Two well proven techniques were used to aid in absorption band recognition, the continuum removal of the spectra and the fourth derivative. The findings in this study suggest that interpretation of absorption bands in remote sensing data, whether atmospherically corrected or not, have to be carefully reviewed when they are interpreted in terms of photosynthetic pigments.

  3. Interpretation of Absorption Bands in Airborne Hyperspectral Radiance Data

    PubMed Central

    Szekielda, Karl H.; Bowles, Jeffrey H.; Gillis, David B.; Miller, W. David

    2009-01-01

    It is demonstrated that hyperspectral imagery can be used, without atmospheric correction, to determine the presence of accessory phytoplankton pigments in coastal waters using derivative techniques. However, care must be taken not to confuse other absorptions for those caused by the presence of pigments. Atmospheric correction, usually the first step to making products from hyperspectral data, may not completely remove Fraunhofer lines and atmospheric absorption bands and these absorptions may interfere with identification of phytoplankton accessory pigments. Furthermore, the ability to resolve absorption bands depends on the spectral resolution of the spectrometer, which for a fixed spectral range also determines the number of observed bands. Based on this information, a study was undertaken to determine under what circumstances a hyperspectral sensor may determine the presence of pigments. As part of the study a hyperspectral imager was used to take high spectral resolution data over two different water masses. In order to avoid the problems associated with atmospheric correction this data was analyzed as radiance data without atmospheric correction. Here, the purpose was to identify spectral regions that might be diagnostic for photosynthetic pigments. Two well proven techniques were used to aid in absorption band recognition, the continuum removal of the spectra and the fourth derivative. The findings in this study suggest that interpretation of absorption bands in remote sensing data, whether atmospherically corrected or not, have to be carefully reviewed when they are interpreted in terms of photosynthetic pigments. PMID:22574053

  4. Elimination of environmental effects from Landsat radiance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S. T.; Smith, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    A critical problem involved in quantitative multi-temporal sensing of the physical processes with Landsat is the fact that variations in the spectral signatures for a given target of interest result from a combined effect of target properties and the environmental factors such as sun angles, atmospheric conditions, etc. at the time of an overpass. In an attempt to solve the problem, a transformation procedure is developed to remove the environmental effects from the MSS radiance data. Mathematical derivation of the transformation procedure is elaborated and an example of testing the procedure is illustrated using suspended sediments reflectance data obtained by Landsat MSS during four different overpasses over the lower Mississippi River valley.

  5. Assimilation of the Microwave Limb Sounder Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargan, K.; Read, W.; Livesey, N.; Wagner, P.; Nguyen. H.; Pawson, S.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the assimilation of limb-sounder data can significantly improve the representation of ozone in NASA's GEOS Data Assimilation Systems (GEOS-DAS), particularly in the stratosphere. The studies conducted so far utilized retrieved data from the MIPAS, POAM, ILAS and EOS Microwave Limb Sounder (EOS MLS) instruments. Direct assimilation of the radiance data can be seen as the natural next step to those studies. The motivation behind working with radiances is twofold. First, retrieval algorithms use a priori data which are either climatological or are obtained from previous analyses. This introduces additional uncertainty and, in some cases, may lead to "self-contamination"- when the a priori is taken from the same assimilation system in which subsequently ingests the retrieved observations. Second, radiances can be available in near real time thus providing an opportunity for operational assimilation, which could help improve the use of infrared radiance instruments from operational satellite instruments. In this presentation we summarize our ongoing work on an implementation of the assimilation of EOS MLS radiances into the GEOS-5 DAS. This work focuses on assimilation of band 7 brightness temperatures which are sensitive to ozone. Our implementation uses the MLS Callable Forward Model developed by the MLS team at NASA JPL as the observation operator. We will describe our approach and recent results which are not yet final. In particular, we will demonstrate that this approach has a potential to improve the vertical structure of ozone in the lower tropical stratosphere as compared with the retrieved MLS product. We will discuss the computational efficiency of this implementation.

  6. Modeling and experimental validation of angular radiance and distance-dependent radiance in a turbid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lingling; Li, Chenxi; Zhao, Huijuan; Yi, Xi; Gao, Feng; Meng, Wei; Lu, Yiming

    2014-03-01

    Radiance is sensitive to the variations of tissue optical parameters, such as absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs, and anisotropy factor g. Therefore, similar to fluence, radiance can be used for tissue characterization. Compared with fluence, radiance has the advantage of offering the direction information of light intensity. Taking such advantage, the optical parameters can be determined by rotating the detector through 360 deg with only a single optode pair. Instead of the translation mode used in the fluence-based technologies, the Rotation mode has less invasiveness in the clinical diagnosis. This paper explores a new method to obtain the optical properties by measuring the distribution of light intensity in liquid phantom with only a single optode pair and the detector rotation through 360 deg. The angular radiance and distance-dependent radiance are verified by comparing experimental measurement data with Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for the short source-detector separations and diffusion approximation for the large source-detector separations. Detecting angular radiance with only a single optode pair under a certain source-detection separation will present a way for prostate diagnose and light dose calculation during the photon dynamic therapy (PDT).

  7. Validation of the dissemination of spectral irradiance values using FEL lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Graham, Gary D.; Saunders, Robert D.; Yoon, Howard W.; Shirley, Eric L.

    2012-09-01

    Scales of spectral irradiance are disseminated by NIST using assignment of values to FEL lamp standards for defined conditions. These lamp standards can be used for absolute calibrations of irradiance radiometers, or more typically, be used in conjunction with a diffuse reflectance standard to establish a scale of spectral radiance and for subsequent absolute calibrations of radiance radiometers. The NIST FEL standards are valuable artifacts requiring special care. Many users optimize resources by in-house transfer of their primary standard to working standards. There are a number of sources of uncertainty in utilizing FEL lamps, e.g., lamp current, alignment, distance setting, instrument aperture size, drift, scattered light, and interpolation in the wavelength grid for the specified irradiance values. In this work, we validated the transfer activity by ITT of their primary, NIST-traceable FEL lamp standards. A portable irradiance bench that had kinematic mounts for an FEL lamp, on-axis baffle, and three different irradiance radiometers was built, tested, and deployed to ITT in Rochester, NY. We report the results of this comparison activity. An uncertainty budget was developed and it was found that the results agreed well within the combined uncertainties of 1.5% to 1.6% (k = 2).

  8. Laboratory measurements of upwelled radiance and reflectance spectra of Calvert, Ball, Jordan, and Feldspar soil sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Usry, J. W.; Witte, W. G.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    An effort to investigate the potential of remote sensing for monitoring nonpoint source pollution was conducted. Spectral reflectance characteristics for four types of soil sediments were measured for mixture concentrations between 4 and 173 ppm. For measurements at a spectral resolution of 32 mm, the spectral reflectances of Calvert, Ball, Jordan, and Feldspar soil sediments were distinctly different over the wavelength range from 400 to 980 nm at each concentration tested. At high concentrations, spectral differences between the various sediments could be detected by measurements with a spectral resolution of 160 nm. At a low concentration, only small differences were observed between the various sediments when measurements were made with 160 nm spectral resolution. Radiance levels generally varied in a nonlinear manner with sediment concentration; linearity occurred in special cases, depending on sediment type, concentration range, and wavelength.

  9. BOREAS RSS-2 Level-1B ASAS Image Data: At-Sensor Radiance in BSQ Format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Dabney, P. W.; Kovalick, W.; Graham, D.; Bur, Michael; Irons, James R.; Tierney, M.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-2 team used the ASAS instrument, mounted on the NASA C-130 aircraft, to create at-sensor radiance images of various sites as a function of spectral wavelength, view geometry (combinations of view zenith angle, view azimuth angle, solar zenith angle, and solar azimuth angle), and altitude. The level-1b ASAS images of the BOREAS study areas were collected from April to September 1994 and March to July 1996.

  10. Using CLARREO for spectral calibration of NOAA operational satellite sensors: Lessons learned from studies with AIRS and IASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Cao, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) Mission will provide the spectrally resolved thermal IR and reflected solar measurements with high absolute accuracy. These SI traceable measurements will provide the basis for absolute calibration for a wide range of visible and infrared (IR) Earth observing sensors. In particular, CLARREO can potentially reduce the spectral uncertainties of NOAA’s operational satellite sensors. This study explores the potential of using CLARREO measurements for on-orbit spectral calibration for future NOAA operational sensors on both polar-orbiting and geostationary platforms. Lessons learned from the on-orbit spectral calibration of current systems will be reviewed based on our studies using Atmospheric Infrared Sounders (AIRS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) as quasi on-orbit standards in assessing Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), GOES Imagers and Sounders, and High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS). The on-going effort of spectral cross-check between AIRS and IASI with simultaneous nadir observations (SNOs) will be discussed. This method will also be used to verify the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) using CLARREO measurements. Similar work is planned to verify GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) using CLARREO based on studies between IASI/AIRS and GOES Imager as proxy.

  11. Inter-Comparison of Suomi NPP CrIS Radiances with AIRS and IASI toward Infrared Hyperspectral Benchmark Radiance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Han, Y.; Chen, Y.; Jin, X.; Tremblay, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) on the newly-launched Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) and future Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) is a Fourier transform spectrometer that provides soundings of the atmosphere with 1305 spectral channels, over 3 wavelength ranges: LWIR (9.14 - 15.38 μm); MWIR (5.71 - 8.26 μm); and SWIR (3.92 - 4.64 μm). The SNPP CrIS, combined with the existed Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA Aqua and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on Metop-A and -B, will accumulate decades of hyperspectral spectral infrared measurements with high accuracy, which have potentials for climate monitoring and model assessments. In this presentation, we will 1) evaluate radiance consistency among AIRS, IASI, and CrIS, and 2) thus demonstrate that the CrIS SDR data from SNPP and JPSS can serve as a long-term reference benchmark for inter-calibration and climate-related study just like AIRS and IASI. In the first part of presentation, we will brief major postlaunch calibration and validation activities for SNPP CrIS performed by the NOAA STAR CrIS sensor data record (SDR) team, including the calibration parameter updates, instrument stability monitoring, and data processing quality assurance. Comprehensive assessments of the radiometric, spectral, geometric calibration of CrIS SDR will be presented. In addition, the preparation of CrIS SDR re-processing toward consistent Climate Data Records (CDRs) will be discussed. The purpose of this part is to provide a comprehensive overview of CrIS SDR data quality to the user community. In the second part, we will compare CrIS hyperspectral radiance measurements with the AIRS and IASI on Metop-A and -B to examine spectral and radiometric consistence and differences among three hyperspectral IR sounders. The SNPP CrIS, combined with AIRS and IASI, provide the first-ever inter-calibration opportunity because three hyperspectral IR sounders can observe the Earth and

  12. Validation of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) over the Antarctic Plateau: Low Radiance, Low Humidity, and Thin Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, David C.

    2005-01-01

    The main goal of the project has been to use specialized measurements collected at the Antarctic Plateau to provide validation of the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) spectral radiances and some AIRS Level 2 products. As proposed, efforts conducted at the University of Wisconsin are focused on providing technical information, data, and software in support of the validation studies.

  13. Extraction of Profile Information from Cloud Contaminated Radiances. Appendixes 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Zhou, D. K.; Huang, H.-L.; Li, Jun; Liu, X.; Larar, A. M.

    2003-01-01

    Clouds act to reduce the signal level and may produce noise dependence on the complexity of the cloud properties and the manner in which they are treated in the profile retrieval process. There are essentially three ways to extract profile information from cloud contaminated radiances: (1) cloud-clearing using spatially adjacent cloud contaminated radiance measurements, (2) retrieval based upon the assumption of opaque cloud conditions, and (3) retrieval or radiance assimilation using a physically correct cloud radiative transfer model which accounts for the absorption and scattering of the radiance observed. Cloud clearing extracts the radiance arising from the clear air portion of partly clouded fields of view permitting soundings to the surface or the assimilation of radiances as in the clear field of view case. However, the accuracy of the clear air radiance signal depends upon the cloud height and optical property uniformity across the two fields of view used in the cloud clearing process. The assumption of opaque clouds within the field of view permits relatively accurate profiles to be retrieved down to near cloud top levels, the accuracy near the cloud top level being dependent upon the actual microphysical properties of the cloud. The use of a physically correct cloud radiative transfer model enables accurate retrievals down to cloud top levels and below semi-transparent cloud layers (e.g., cirrus). It should also be possible to assimilate cloudy radiances directly into the model given a physically correct cloud radiative transfer model using geometric and microphysical cloud parameters retrieved from the radiance spectra as initial cloud variables in the radiance assimilation process. This presentation reviews the above three ways to extract profile information from cloud contaminated radiances. NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer radiance spectra and Aqua satellite AIRS radiance spectra are used to illustrate how cloudy radiances can be used

  14. Remote Sensing of Cloud Properties using Ground-based Measurements of Zenith Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, J. Christine; Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Barker, Howard W.; Barnard, James C.; Luo, Yi

    2006-01-01

    An extensive verification of cloud property retrievals has been conducted for two algorithms using zenith radiances measured by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program ground-based passive two-channel (673 and 870 nm) Narrow Field-Of-View Radiometer. The underlying principle of these algorithms is that clouds have nearly identical optical properties at these wavelengths, but corresponding spectral surface reflectances (for vegetated surfaces) differ significantly. The first algorithm, the RED vs. NIR, works for a fully three-dimensional cloud situation. It retrieves not only cloud optical depth, but also an effective radiative cloud fraction. Importantly, due to one-second time resolution of radiance measurements, we are able, for the first time, to capture detailed changes in cloud structure at the natural time scale of cloud evolution. The cloud optical depths tau retrieved by this algorithm are comparable to those inferred from both downward fluxes in overcast situations and microwave brightness temperatures for broken clouds. Moreover, it can retrieve tau for thin patchy clouds, where flux and microwave observations fail to detect them. The second algorithm, referred to as COUPLED, couples zenith radiances with simultaneous fluxes to infer 2. In general, the COUPLED and RED vs. NIR algorithms retrieve consistent values of tau. However, the COUPLED algorithm is more sensitive to the accuracies of measured radiance, flux, and surface reflectance than the RED vs. NIR algorithm. This is especially true for thick overcast clouds where it may substantially overestimate z.

  15. Platform and Environmental Effects on Above- and In-Water Determinations of Water-Leaving Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B.; Morel, Andre; McClain, Charles R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A comparison of above- and in-water spectral measurements in Case-1 conditions showed the uncertainty in above-water determinations of water-leaving radiances depended on the pointing angle of the above-water instruments with respect to the side of the ship. Two above-water methods were used to create a diagnostic variable to quantify the presence of superstructure reflections which degraded the above-water intracomparisons of water-leaving radiances by 10.9-33.4% (for far-to-near viewing distances, respectively). The primary conclusions of the above- and in-water intercomparison of water-leaving radiances were as follows: a) the SeaWiFS 5% radiometric objective was achieved with the above-water approach, but reliably with only one method and only for about half the data; b) a decrease in water-leaving radiance values was seen in the presence of swell, although, wave crests were radiometrically brighter than the troughs; and c) standard band ratios used in ocean color algorithms remained severely affected, because of the relatively low signal and, thus, proportionally significant contamination at the 555nm wavelength.

  16. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  17. Modelling TOVS radiances of synoptic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, Thomas Eddy

    1992-01-01

    Two operational analysis models, produced by ECMWF and NMC, are compared against observed satellite radiances by converting the analyzed variables into synthetic radiances using a radiative transfer model (RTM). Observed TOVS satellite radiances are used as a ground truth, since they are the only source of continuous, synoptic-scale resolution observations available over the data-sparse tropical Pacific Ocean. It is assumed that if the analysis models correctly simulate atmospheric conditions, the observed and modelled radiance fields will have similar patterns and magnitudes. In each of seven TOVS channels examined, the mean temperature difference between the models was small, but the differences between the models and the observations were large. The mean temperature difference within each channel was larger than the standard deviation in most cases. The moisture channels of the RTM were sensitive to changes in moisture content, but none of the channels were significantly affected by changes in temperature. Single-day modelled radiance analyses contain synoptic information similar to the satellite observations. ECMWF is often too noisy, producing features not verified by the satellite; NMC is often too smooth. NMC more closely resembles the TOVS contours. Modelled water vapor channel analyses resemble observed monthly and composited observations well, but do not accurately reproduce the highly-variable single-day fields. ECMWF generally has more accurate gradients. Neither model simulates the tropics well. The water vapor channels, especially channel eleven (weighted at 700 mb), most closely resembled the tropical plume composite described by McGuirk and Ulsh. The only plume evidence found in the thermal or microwave channels, in either the observations or the models, was a composite trough situated in the correct location, extending from the mid-latitudes into the subtropics. This feature was not readily discernable until the definition and mature stages

  18. Pilot Comparison of Radiance Temperature Scale Realization Between NIMT and NMIJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keawprasert, T.; Yamada, Y.; Ishii, J.

    2015-03-01

    A pilot comparison of radiance temperature scale realizations between the National Institute of Metrology Thailand (NIMT) and the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) was conducted. At the two national metrology institutes (NMIs), a 900 nm radiation thermometer, used as the transfer artifact, was calibrated by a means of a multiple fixed-point method using the fixed-point blackbody of Zn, Al, Ag, and Cu points, and by means of relative spectral responsivity measurements according to the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) definition. The Sakuma-Hattori equation is used for interpolating the radiance temperature scale between the four fixed points and also for extrapolating the ITS-90 temperature scale to 2000 C. This paper compares the calibration results in terms of fixed-point measurements, relative spectral responsivity, and finally the radiance temperature scale. Good agreement for the fixed-point measurements was found in case a correction for the change of the internal temperature of the artifact was applied using the temperature coefficient measured at the NMIJ. For the realized radiance temperature range from 400 C to 1100 C, the resulting scale differences between the two NMIs are well within the combined scale comparison uncertainty of 0.12 C (). The resulting spectral responsivity measured at the NIMT has a comparable curve to that measured at the NMIJ especially in the out-of-band region, yielding a ITS-90 scale difference within 1.0 C from the Cu point to 2000 C, whereas the realization comparison uncertainty of NIMT and NMIJ combined is 1.2 C () at 2000 C.

  19. Four Years of Absolutely Calibrated Hyperspectral Data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the Eos Aqua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, Hartmut H.; Broberg, Steve; Elliott, Denis; Gregorich, Dave

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews four years of absolute calibration of hyperspectral data from the AIRS instrument located on the EOS AQUA spacecraft. The following topics are discussed: 1) A quick overview of AIRS; 2) What absolute calibration accuracy and stability are required for climate applications?; 3) Validating of radiance accuracy and stability: Results from four years of AIRS data; and 4) Conclusions.

  20. Retrieving Temperature and Moisture Profiles from AERI Radiance Observations: AERIPROF Value-Added Product Technical Description Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    WF Feltz; HB Howell; RO Knuteson; JM Comstock; R Mahon; DD Turner; WL Smith; HM Woolf; C Sivaraman; TD Halter

    2007-04-30

    This document explains the procedure to retrieve temperature and moisture profiles from high-spectral resolution infrared radiance data measured by the U.S. Department Of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation (ARM) Program’s atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) instrument. The technique has been named the AERIPROF thermodynamic retrieval algorithm. The software has been developed over the last decade at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has matured into an ARM Value-Added Procedure. This document will describe the AERIPROF retrieval procedure, outline the algorithm routines, discuss the software heritage, and, finally, provide references with further documentation.

  1. Relationships between chlorophyll density and ocean radiance as measured by U2/OCS: Algorithms, examples and comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. H.; Hart, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    An ocean atmosphere radiative transfer process computation method which is suitable for determining lower boundary ocean albedo and other radiation components from spectral measurements of upwelling radiance taken from a high altitude platform is described. The method was applied to a set of color scanner data taken from slope water of the South Atlantic Bight to determine the influence of cholorophyll-a pigments in the sea on the ratio of upwelling radiance to down welling irradiance as a function of wavelength. The resulting chlorophyll concentrations are compared with measurements made by ships stationed along the flight path.

  2. Climate Quality Broadband and Narrowband Solar Reflected Radiance Calibration Between Sensors in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Doelling, David R.; Young, David F.; Loeb, Norman G.; Garber, Donald P.; MacDonnell, David G.

    2008-01-01

    vAs the potential impacts of global climate change become more clear [1], the need to determine the accuracy of climate prediction over decade-to-century time scales has become an urgent and critical challenge. The most critical tests of climate model predictions will occur using observations of decadal changes in climate forcing, response, and feedback variables. Many of these key climate variables are observed by remotely sensing the global distribution of reflected solar spectral and broadband radiance. These "reflected solar" variables include aerosols, clouds, radiative fluxes, snow, ice, vegetation, ocean color, and land cover. Achieving sufficient satellite instrument accuracy, stability, and overlap to rigorously observe decadal change signals has proven very difficult in most cases and has not yet been achieved in others [2]. One of the earliest efforts to make climate quality observations was for Earth Radiation Budget: Nimbus 6/7 in the late 1970s, ERBE in the 1980s/90s, and CERES in 2000s are examples of the most complete global records. The recent CERES data products have carried out the most extensive intercomparisons because if the need to merge data from up to 11 instruments (CERES, MODIS, geostationary imagers) on 7 spacecraft (Terra, Aqua, and 5 geostationary) for any given month. In order to achieve climate calibration for cloud feedbacks, the radiative effect of clear-sky, all-sky, and cloud radiative effect must all be made with very high stability and accuracy. For shortwave solar reflected flux, even the 1% CERES broadband absolute accuracy (1-sigma confidence bound) is not sufficient to allow gaps in the radiation record for decadal climate change. Typical absolute accuracy for the best narrowband sensors like SeaWiFS, MISR, and MODIS range from 2 to 4% (1-sigma). IPCC greenhouse gas radiative forcing is approx. 0.6 W/sq m per decade or 0.6% of the global mean shortwave reflected flux, so that a 50% cloud feedback would change the global

  3. Study on inverse estimation of radiative properties from directional radiances by using statistical RPSO algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kuk-Il; Kim, Do-Hwi; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Kim, Tae-Kuk; Shin, Jong-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Infrared signals are widely used to discriminate objects against the background. Prediction of infrared signal from an object surface is essential in evaluating the detectability of the object. Appropriate and easy method of procurement of the radiative properties such as the surface emissivity, bidirectional reflectivity is important in estimating infrared signals. Direct measurement can be a good choice but a costly and time consuming way of obtaining the radiative properties for surfaces coated with many different newly developed paints. Especially measurement of the bidirectional reflectivity usually expressed by the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is the most costly job. In this paper we are presenting an inverse estimation method of the radiative properties by using the directional radiances from the surface of concern. The inverse estimation method used in this study is the statistical repulsive particle swarm optimization (RPSO) algorithm which uses the randomly picked directional radiance data emitted and reflected from the surface. In this paper, we test the proposed inverse method by considering the radiation from a steel plate surface coated with different paints at a clear sunny day condition. For convenience, the directional radiance data from the steel plate within a spectral band of concern are obtained from the simulation using the commercial software, RadthermIR, instead of the field measurement. A widely used BRDF model called as the Sandford-Robertson(S-R) model is considered and the RPSO process is then used to find the best fitted model parameters for the S-R model. The results obtained from this study show an excellent agreement with the reference property data used for the simulation for directional radiances. The proposed process can be a useful way of obtaining the radiative properties from field measured directional radiance data for surfaces coated with or without various kinds of paints of unknown radiative

  4. Laboratory measurements of radiance and reflectance spectra of dilute secondary-treated sewage sludge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G.; Usry, J. W.; Whitlock, C. H.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), conducted a research program to evaluate the feasibility of remotely monitoring ocean dumping of waste products such as acid and sewage sludge. One aspect of the research program involved the measurements of upwelled spectral signatures for sewage-sludge mixtures of different concentrations in an 11600-liter tank. This paper describes the laboratory arrangement and presents radiance and reflectance spectra in the visible and near-infrared ranges for concentrations ranging from 9.7 to 180 ppm of secondary-treated sewage sludge mixed with two types of base water. Results indicate that upwelled radiance varies in a near-linear manner with concentration and that the sludge has a practically flat signal response between 420 and 970 nm. Reflectance spectra were obtained for the sewage-sludge mixtures at all wavelengths and concentrations.

  5. Cross Calibration of TOMS, SBUV/2 and Sciamachy Radiances from Ground Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillsenrath, Ernest; Ahmad, Ziauddin; Bhartia, Pawan K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Verification of a stratospheric ozone recovery remains a high priority for environmental research and policy definition. Models predict an ozone recovery at a much lower rate than the measured depletion rate observed to date. Therefore improved precision of the satellite and ground ozone observing systems are required over the long term to verify recovery. We have shown that validation of radiances is the most effective means for correcting absolute accuracy and long term drifts of backscatter type satellite measurements. This method by-passes the algorithms used for both satellite and ground based measurements which are normally used to validate and correct the satellite data. Validation of radiances will also improve all higher level data products derived from the satellite observations. Backscatter algorithms suffer from several errors such as unrepresentative a-priori data and air mass factor corrections. Radiance comparisons employ forward models but are inherently more accurate and than inverse (retrieval) algorithms. A new method for satellite validation is planned which will compliment measurements from the existing ground-based networks. This method will employ very accurate comparisons between ground based zenith sky radiances and satellite nadir radiances. These comparisons will rely heavily on the experience derived from the Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV) program which provided a reference standard of radiance measurements for SBUV/2, TOMS, and GOME. This new measurement program, called "Skyrad", employs two well established capabilities at the Goddard Space Flight Center, 1) the SSBUV calibration facilities and 2) the radiative transfer codes used for the TOMS and SBUV/2 algorithms and their subsequent refinements. Radiative transfer calculations show that ground based zenith sky and satellite nadir backscatter ultraviolet comparisons can be made very accurately under certain viewing conditions. The Skyrad instruments (SSBUV, Brewer spectrophotometers, and

  6. Observations of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles Using Simultaneously Measured UV and IR Radiances from OMI and TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, D.; Worden, J.; Kulawik, S.; Bowman, K. W.; Sander, S. P.; Liu, X.

    2011-12-01

    Ozone is a radiativelly and chemically important trace gas in the atmosphere. Accurate monitoring of ozone vertical distributions is crucial for a better understanding of air quality and climate change. The Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) mission, an Earth Science Decadal Survey mission that has been recommended for launch in the 2013-2016 time frame by National Research Council, will measure tropospheric ozone and its precursors relating to air quality over the Americas. To improve current capability of tropospheric ozone sounding in terms of spatial and temporal resolution, GEO-CAPE mission calls for an instrument(s) that is sensitive over multiple spectral regions. Prior to the launch of GEO-CAPE satellite, using simultaneous measurements of multiple sensors of an ongoing satellite mission provide an alternative way to improve tropospheric ozone sounding and help in the evaluations of suitable spectral regions for the GEO-CAPE mission. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) are both on the Earth Observing System Aura satellite in orbit. They are providing ozone concentration profiles measurements respectively. OMI is a nadir-viewing pushbroom ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) imaging spectrograph that measures backscattered radiances covering the 270-500 nm wavelength range. TES is a Fourier transform spectrometer that measures the thermal infrared (TIR) light radiances emitted by Earth's surface and by gases and particles in spectral range 650 - 3050 cm-1. We present an approach to combine simultaneously measured OMI UV and TES TIR radiances to improve the tropospheric ozone sounding. The results from combination of these measurements are presented and discussed. The improvements on tropospheric ozone profiles from the UV+TIR joint retrievals, as compared with either spectral region alone, are charterized using the ozonesonde measurements.

  7. Evaluation of ISCCP multisatellite radiance calibration for geostationary imager visible channels using the moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Thomas C.; William B. Rossow,; Joseph Ferrier,; Laura M. Hinkelman,

    2013-01-01

    Since 1983, the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) has collected Earth radiance data from the succession of geostationary and polar-orbiting meteorological satellites operated by weather agencies worldwide. Meeting the ISCCP goals of global coverage and decade-length time scales requires consistent and stable calibration of the participating satellites. For the geostationary imager visible channels, ISCCP calibration provides regular periodic updates from regressions of radiances measured from coincident and collocated observations taken by Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer instruments. As an independent check of the temporal stability and intersatellite consistency of ISCCP calibrations, we have applied lunar calibration techniques to geostationary imager visible channels using images of the Moon found in the ISCCP data archive. Lunar calibration enables using the reflected light from the Moon as a stable and consistent radiometric reference. Although the technique has general applicability, limitations of the archived image data have restricted the current study to Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite and Geostationary Meteorological Satellite series. The results of this lunar analysis confirm that ISCCP calibration exhibits negligible temporal trends in sensor response but have revealed apparent relative biases between the satellites at various levels. However, these biases amount to differences of only a few percent in measured absolute reflectances. Since the lunar analysis examines only the lower end of the radiance range, the results suggest that the ISCCP calibration regression approach does not precisely determine the intercept or the zero-radiance response level. We discuss the impact of these findings on the development of consistent calibration for multisatellite global data sets.

  8. Cross Calibration of TOMS, SBUV/2 and SCIAMACHY Radiances from Ground Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, Ernest; Bhartia, P. K.; Bojkov, B.; Kowaleski, M.; Labow, G.; Ahmad, Z.

    2002-01-01

    We have shown that validation of radiances is a very effective means for correcting absolute accuracy and long term drifts of backscatter type satellite measurements. This method by-passes the algorithms used for both satellite and ground based measurements which are normally used to validate and correct the satellite data. A new method for satellite validation is planned which will compliment measurements from the existing ground-based networks. This method will employ very accurate comparisons between ground based zenith sky radiances and satellite nadir radiances. These comparisons will rely heavily on the experience derived from the Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV) program which provided a reference standard of radiance measurements for SBUV/2, TOMS, and GOME. This new measurement program, called 'Skyrad', employs two well established capabilities at the Goddard Space Flight Center, 1) the SSBUV calibration facilities and 2) the radiative transfer codes used for the TOMS and SBUV/2 algorithms and their subsequent refinements. Radiative transfer calculations show that ground based zenith sky and satellite nadir backscatter ultraviolet comparisons can be made very accurately under certain viewing conditions. The Skyrad instruments (SSBUV, Brewer spectrophotometers, and possibly others) will be calibrated and maintained to a precision of a few tenths of a percent. Skyrad data will then enable long term calibration of upcoming satellite instruments such as QuickTOMS, SBUV/2s and SCIAMACHY with a high degree of precision. This technique can be further employed to monitor the performance of future instruments such as GOMEZ, OMI, and OMPS. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  9. Absolutely classical spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

  10. Spectral measurements of ocean-dumped wastes tested in the marine upwelled spectral signature laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G.; Usry, J. W.; Whitlock, C. H.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1979-01-01

    Transmission and inherent upwelled radiance measurements were made of various mixtures of three ocean-dumped industrial plant wastes in artificial seawater. Laboratory analyses were made of the physical and chemical properties of the various mixtures. These results and the laboratory measurements of beam attenuation and inherent upwelled radiance indicate a variety of chemical and spectral responses when industrial wastes are added to artificial seawater. In particular, increased levels of turbidity did not always cause increased levels of inherent reflectance.

  11. Transmittance and Radiance Computations for Rocket Engine Plume Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejwani, Gopal D.

    2003-01-01

    Emission and absorption characteristics of several atmospheric and combustion species have been studied and are presented with reference to rocket engine plume environments. The effects of clous, rain, and fog on plume radiance/transmittance has also been studied.Preliminary results for the radiance from the exhaust plume of the space shuttle main engine are shown and discussed.

  12. Application of oxygen A-band equivalent width to disambiguate downwelling radiances for cloud optical depth measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niple, Edward R.; Scott, Herman E.; Conant, John A.; Jones, Stephen H.; Iannarilli, Frank J.; Pereira, Wellesley E.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the three-waveband spectrally agile technique (TWST) for measuring cloud optical depth (COD). TWST is a portable field-proven sensor and retrieval method offering a unique combination of fast (1 Hz) cloud-resolving (0.5° field of view) real-time-reported COD measurements. It entails ground-based measurement of visible and near-infrared (VNIR) zenith spectral radiances much like the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) cloud-mode sensors. What is novel in our approach is that we employ absorption in the oxygen A-band as a means of resolving the COD ambiguity inherent in using up-looking spectral radiances. We describe the TWST sensor and algorithm, and assess their merits by comparison to AERONET cloud-mode measurements collected during the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Spectral radiance agreement was better than 1 %, while a linear fit of COD yielded a slope of 0.905 (TWST reporting higher COD) and offset of -2.1.

  13. Assimilation of SBUV Version 8 Radiances into the GEOS Ozone DAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Martin D.; Stajner, Ivanka; Bhartia, Pawan K.

    2004-01-01

    In operational weather forecasting, the assimilation of brightness temperatures from satellite sounders, instead of assimilation of 1D-retrievals has become increasingly common practice over the last two decades. Compared to these systems, assimilation of trace gases is still at a relatively early stage of development, and efforts to directly assimilate radiances instead of retrieved products have just begun a few years ago, partially because it requires much more computation power due to the employment of a radiative transport forward model (FM). This paper will focus on a method to assimilate SBUV/2 radiances (albedos) into the Global Earth Observation System Ozone Data Assimilation Scheme (GEOS-03DAS). While SBUV-type instruments cannot compete with newer sensors in terms of spectral and horizontal resolution, they feature a continuous data record back to 1978, which makes them very valuable for trend studies. Assimilation can help spreading their ground coverage over the whole globe, as has been previously demonstrated with the GEOS-03DAS using SBUV Version 6 ozone profiles. Now, the DAS has been updated to use the newly released SBUV Version 8 data. We will compare pre]lmlnarv results of SBUV radiance assimilation with the assimilation of retrieved ozone profiles, discuss methods to deal with the increased computational load, and try to assess the error characteristics and future potential of the new approach.

  14. An Investigation of the Characterization of Cloud Contamination in Hyperspectral Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarty, William; Jedlovec, Gary J.; LeMarshall, John

    2007-01-01

    In regions lacking direct observations, the assimilation of radiances from infrared and microwave sounders is the primary method for characterizing the atmosphere in the analysis process. In recent years, technological advances have led to the launching of more advanced sounders, particularly in the thermal infrared spectrum. With the advent of these hyperspectral sounders, the amount of data available for the analysis process has and will continue to be dramatically increased. However, the utilization of infrared radiances in variational assimilation can be problematic in the presence of clouds; specifically the assessment of the presence of clouds in an instantaneous field of view (IFOV) and the contamination in the individual channels within the IFOV. Various techniques have been developed to determine if a channel is contaminated by clouds. The work presented in this paper and subsequent presentation will investigate traditional techniques and compare them to a new technique, the C02 sorting technique, which utilizes the high spectral resolution of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) within the framework of the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) 3DVAR system. Ultimately, this work is done in preparation for the assessment of short-term forecast impacts with the regional assimilation of AIRS radiances within the analysis fields of the Weather Research and Forecast Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model (WRF-NMM) at the NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPORT) Center.

  15. Detection of localized inclusions of gold nanoparticles in Intralipid-1% by point-radiance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grabtchak, Serge; Palmer, Tyler J; Whelan, William M

    2011-07-01

    Interstitial fiber-optic-based approaches used in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications rely on localized light-tissue interactions. We present an optical technique to identify spectrally and spatially specific exogenous chromophores in highly scattering turbid media. Point radiance spectroscopy is based on directional light collection at a single point with a side-firing fiber that can be rotated up to 360 deg. A side firing fiber accepts light within a well-defined, solid angle, thus potentially providing an improved spatial resolution. Measurements were performed using an 800-μm diameter isotropic spherical diffuser coupled to a halogen light source and a 600 μm, ∼43 deg cleaved fiber (i.e., radiance detector). The background liquid-based scattering phantom was fabricated using 1% Intralipid. Light was collected with 1 deg increments through 360 deg-segment. Gold nanoparticles , placed into a 3.5-mm diameter capillary tube were used as localized scatterers and absorbers introduced into the liquid phantom both on- and off-axis between source and detector. The localized optical inhomogeneity was detectable as an angular-resolved variation in the radiance polar plots. This technique is being investigated as a potential noninvasive optical modality for prostate cancer monitoring.

  16. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  17. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  18. Model calculations for the retrieval of aerosols from satellite and aircraft radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, George D.; Souders, C.; Shettle, Eric P.; Duggin, Michael J.; Sweet, J. A.

    1993-09-01

    Model calculations of upwelling spectral radiances at aircraft and satellite altitudes have been made to assess the capability of different current and planned sensors to extract information on the atmospheric aerosols. The visible and near infrared channels on the AVHRR, CZCS, and SeaWiFS satellite sensors were used, as well as hypothetical multichannel instruments covering 400 - 1000 nm with bandwidths of 100, 20, or 10 nm. The sensitivity to the aerosol and environmental properties increased as the bandwidth of the channel decreased.

  19. A Novel Method of Measuring Upwelling Radiance in the Hydrographic Sub-Hull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüssmeier, N.; Zielinski, O.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we present a new method useful in collecting upwelling radiance (Lu) from a platform submerged in a hydrographic sub-hull or moon pool of a research vessel. The information analyzed here was obtained during a field campaign in the Northwestern European shelf seas aboard the new research vessel SONNE. As the platform was located at the center of the ship, there is minimal effect from pitch and roll which is known to influence upwelling radiance observations. A comparison of the measurements from this platform with a free falling hyperspectral profiler was performed to determine the degree of uncertainty that results from ship shadow. For given Lu(λ) in situ data we observed ±33% intensity deviations compared to profiling measurements that can be attributed to instrument shading during moon pool installation and environmental perturbations. Furthermore Lu(λ) in situ spectra variations were observed at lower wavelengths, therefore a form fitting algorithm was adapted to receive corresponding depths with identical spectral form from Lu(z, λ) profiler casts. During an east to west transect in North Sea with a schedule speed up to 12 knots in situ radiance reflectance rrs(7, λ) measurements at 7 meter depth were performed with this novel radiometer setup. In spite of any restrictions originating from the sub-hull installation, water masses mixing zone from CDOM dominated coastal waters in the Skagerrak Strait towards the open North Sea were successfully derived thus offering an underway applicable upwelling radiance sensing not suffering from sun glint or other typical restrictions of above water radiometer installations.

  20. A New Marine Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (M-AERI) for Shipboard Atmospheric and Oceanic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gero, P. J.; Knuteson, R. O.; Hackel, D.; Best, F. A.; Garcia, R.; Phillips, C.; Revercomb, H. E.; Smith, W. L.; Verret, E.; Lantagne, S. M.; Roy, C. B.

    2014-12-01

    A new ship-based Fourier transform spectrometer has been developed to measure the atmospheric downwelling and reflected infrared radiance spectrum at the Earth's surface with high absolute accuracy. This instrument was designed and built by ABB (Québec, Canada) based on the heritage of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) designed by the University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center (UW-SSEC) for the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Prior versions of the M-AERI have been operated by the University of Miami for over a decade on research ships transiting the Atlantic and Pacific in support of NASA and NOAA satellite validation. The M-AERI measures infrared radiance between 520-3020 cm-1 (3.3-19 μm), at a resolution of 1 cm-1, using two detectors cooled to cryogenic temperatures with a Stirling cycle cooler. A gold-coated rotating scene mirror allows the M-AERI to selectively view the atmospheric scene at zenith, and ocean/atmospheric scenes over a range of +/- 45° from the horizon. The AERI uses two high-emissivity blackbodies for radiometric calibration, which in conjunction with the instrument design and a suite of rigorous laboratory diagnostics, ensures the radiometric accuracy to be better than 1% (3σ) of the ambient radiance. The M-AERI radiance spectra can be used to retrieve profiles of temperature and water vapor in the troposphere, as well as measurements of trace gases, cloud properties, and ocean skin temperature. The M-AERI measurement of ocean skin temperature has a demonstrated accuracy of better than 0.1 K. The first marine deployment of the new M-AERI will be as part of the second ARM mobile facility (AMF-2) during the ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) on board the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown in early 2015, occurring jointly with the NOAA CalWater 2 experiment. This field campaign aims to improve understanding and modeling of large-scale dynamics and cloud

  1. Aerosol properties derived from airborne sky radiance and direct beam measurements in recent NASA and DoE field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Russell, P. B.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Schmidt, S.; Pilewskie, P.; Song, S.

    2014-12-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions. The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS [Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys] experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE [Department of Energy]-sponsored TCAP [Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013] experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new 4STAR capabilities, with an emphasis on 26 high-quality sky radiance measurements carried out by 4STAR in SEAC4RS. We compare collocated 4STAR and AERONET sky radiances, as well as their retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties for a subset of the available case studies. We summarize the particle property and airmass characterization studies made possible by the combined 4STAR direct beam and sky radiance observations.

  2. Aerosol Properties Derived from Airborne Sky Radiance and Direct Beam Measurements in Recent NASA and DoE Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Russell, P. B.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; LeBlanc, S.; Schmidt, S.; Pilewskie, P.; Song, S.

    2014-01-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions.The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE (Department of Energy)-sponsored TCAP (Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013) experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new 4STAR capabilities, with an emphasis on 26 high-quality sky radiance measurements carried out by 4STAR in SEAC4RS. We compare collocated 4STAR and AERONET sky radiances, as well as their retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties for a subset of the available case studies. We summarize the particle property and air-mass characterization studies made possible by the combined 4STAR direct beam and sky radiance

  3. Absolute calibration method for nanosecond-resolved, time-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Oliver, Bryan V.; Droemer, Darryl W.; Frogget, Brent; Crain, Marlon D.; Maron, Yitzhak

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes a convenient and accurate method to calibrate fast (<1 ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such systems are inherently difficult to calibrate due to the lack of sufficiently intense, calibrated light sources. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA) at Sandia National Laboratories. On RITS, plasma light is collected through a small diameter (200 μm) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of a 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator. For this paper, a 300 W xenon short arc lamp (Oriel Model 6258) was used as the calibration source. Since the radiance of the xenon arc varies from cathode to anode, just the area around the tip of the cathode ("hotspot") was imaged onto the fiber, to produce the highest intensity output. To compensate for chromatic aberrations, the signal was optimized at each wavelength measured. Output power was measured using 10 nm bandpass interference filters and a calibrated photodetector. These measurements give power at discrete wavelengths across the spectrum, and when linearly interpolated, provide a calibration curve for the lamp. The shape of the spectrum is determined by the collective response of the optics, monochromator, and streak tube across the spectral region of interest. The ratio of the spectral curve to the measured bandpass filter curve at each wavelength produces a correction factor (Q) curve. This curve is then applied to the experimental data and the resultant spectra are given in absolute intensity units (photons/sec/cm2/steradian/nm). Error analysis shows this method to be accurate to within +/- 20%, which represents a high level of accuracy for this type of measurement.

  4. Absolute calibration method for nanosecond-resolved, time-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Mark D; Oliver, Bryan V; Droemer, Darryl W; Frogget, Brent; Crain, Marlon D; Maron, Yitzhak

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes a convenient and accurate method to calibrate fast (<1 ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such systems are inherently difficult to calibrate due to the lack of sufficiently intense, calibrated light sources. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA) at Sandia National Laboratories. On RITS, plasma light is collected through a small diameter (200 μm) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of a 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator. For this paper, a 300 W xenon short arc lamp (Oriel Model 6258) was used as the calibration source. Since the radiance of the xenon arc varies from cathode to anode, just the area around the tip of the cathode ("hotspot") was imaged onto the fiber, to produce the highest intensity output. To compensate for chromatic aberrations, the signal was optimized at each wavelength measured. Output power was measured using 10 nm bandpass interference filters and a calibrated photodetector. These measurements give power at discrete wavelengths across the spectrum, and when linearly interpolated, provide a calibration curve for the lamp. The shape of the spectrum is determined by the collective response of the optics, monochromator, and streak tube across the spectral region of interest. The ratio of the spectral curve to the measured bandpass filter curve at each wavelength produces a correction factor (Q) curve. This curve is then applied to the experimental data and the resultant spectra are given in absolute intensity units (photons/sec/cm(2)/steradian/nm). Error analysis shows this method to be accurate to within +∕- 20%, which represents a high level of accuracy for this type of measurement.

  5. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency) by removing the source spectrum (moment-rate spectrum) from

  6. ISCCP reduced resolution satellite radiance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, W.

    1986-01-01

    The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) is the first active project of the World Climate Research Program. It is a multinational data collection project focused on collecting a data set that will improve the ability to predict and/or simulate the radiative effects of clouds on climate. For specified cloud parameters, the goals are to archieve values for 3-hour periods over the whole globe for 5 years at 30 km resolution. The task of collecting and processing radiance data from both geosynchronous and polar orbiting satellites began in July 1983. A diagram was shown illustrating the flow of data from the transmitting satellites to the various receiving institutions that handle it. The various stages of processing were then explained in detail, emphasizing Level B3-normalized, reformatted, reduced raw satellite data. The reduction of data by sampling is an essential step in the flow. By the time the ISCCP data reaches the Global Processing Center at Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), the volume has been reduced by a factor of 1000. The Pilot Climate Data System (PLDS) will provide access to the ISCCP data set. It should prove to be one of the cleanest satellite data sets because it will have been through three filters--that of the operational agency, the Global Processing Center, and the PCDS. The ISCCP data set also includes other correlative data sets delivered in compatible format.

  7. Wheat signature modeling and analysis for improved training statistics: Supplement. Simulated LANDSAT wheat radiances and radiance components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A.; Cicone, R. C.; Gleason, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Simulated scanner system data values generated in support of LACIE (Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment) research and development efforts are presented. Synthetic inband (LANDSAT) wheat radiances and radiance components were computed and are presented for various wheat canopy and atmospheric conditions and scanner view geometries. Values include: (1) inband bidirectional reflectances for seven stages of wheat crop growth; (2) inband atmospheric features; and (3) inband radiances corresponding to the various combinations of wheat canopy and atmospheric conditions. Analyses of these data values are presented in the main report.

  8. The spectral irradiance of the moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, H.H.; Stone, T.C.

    2005-01-01

    Images of the Moon at 32 wavelengths from 350 to 2450 nm have been obtained from a dedicated observatory during the bright half of each month over a period of several years. The ultimate goal is to develop a spectral radiance model of the Moon with an angular resolution and radiometric accuracy appropriate for calibration of Earth-orbiting spacecraft. An empirical model of irradiance has been developed that treats phase and libration explicitly, with absolute scale founded on the spectra of the star Vega and returned Apollo samples. A selected set of 190 standard stars are observed regularly to provide nightly extinction correction and long-term calibration of the observations. The extinction model is wavelength-coupled and based on the absorption coefficients of a number of gases and aerosols. The empirical irradiance model has the same form at each wavelength, with 18 coefficients, eight of which are constant across wavelength, for a total of 328 coefficients. Over 1000 lunar observations are fitted at each wavelength; the average residual is less than 1%. The irradiance model is actively being used in lunar calibration of several spacecraft instruments and can track sensor response changes at the 0.1% level. ?? 2005. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Estimation of absolute water surface temperature based on atmospherically corrected thermal infrared multispectral scanner digital data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Airborne remote sensing systems, as well as those on board Earth orbiting satellites, sample electromagnetic energy in discrete wavelength regions and convert the total energy sampled into data suitable for processing by digital computers. In general, however, the total amount of energy reaching a sensor system located at some distance from the target is composed not only of target related energy, but, in addition, contains a contribution originating from the atmosphere itself. Thus, some method must be devised for removing or at least minimizing the effects of the atmosphere. The LOWTRAN-6 Program was designed to estimate atmospheric transmittance and radiance for a given atmospheric path at moderate spectral resolution over an operational wavelength region from 0.25 to 28.5 microns. In order to compute the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) digital values which were recorded in the absence of the atmosphere, the parameters derived from LOWTRAN-6 are used in a correction equation. The TIMS data were collected at 1:00 a.m. local time on November 21, 1983, over a recirculating cooling pond for a power plant in southeastern Mississippi. The TIMS data were analyzed before and after atmospheric corrections were applied using a band ratioing model to compute the absolute surface temperature of various points on the power plant cooling pond. The summarized results clearly demonstrate the desirability of applying atmospheric corrections.

  10. Plane parallel radiance transport for global illumination in vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Mobley, C.; Keating, B.; Wu, E.H.

    1997-01-05

    This paper applies plane parallel radiance transport techniques to scattering from vegetation. The leaves, stems, and branches are represented as a volume density of scattering surfaces, depending only on height and the vertical component of the surface normal. Ordinary differential equations are written for the multiply scattered radiance as a function of the height above the ground, with the sky radiance and ground reflectance as boundary conditions. They are solved using a two-pass integration scheme to unify the two-point boundary conditions, and Fourier series for the dependence on the azimuthal angle. The resulting radiance distribution is used to precompute diffuse and specular `ambient` shading tables, as a function of height and surface normal, to be used in rendering, together with a z-buffer shadow algorithm for direct solar illumination.

  11. Geophysical trends from 12+ years of AIRS radiance trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desouza-Machado, S. G.; Strow, L. L.; Tangborn, A.; Hepplewhite, C.; Motteler, H.

    2014-12-01

    AIRS has been providing low noise, stable top-of-the atmospherehyperspectral radiances since 2002. In this presentation we use tworadiance subsets; (1) clear-sky scenes over ocean and (2) all-skyscenes along the nadir track. The linear trends of the AIRS spectralradiances are used to retrieve a variety of geophysical trends usingan optimal estimation approach. These retrieved clear sky trendscompare favorably with ERA and MERRA re-analysis trends, and in-situtrends for the minor gases. Preliminary analysis of all-sky trends(using radiance time derivatives) agree better with ERA than eitherMERRA or the AIRS Level-2 retrievals. Trends in cloud radiativeforcing are also examined using probability distribution functions(pdfs) of the AIRS radiances for regional subsets. These are comparedto ERA simulated radiances. These radiance and radiance PDF trendsprovide highly accurate measurements of atmospheric variability witheasily understood error characteristics, unlike Level 2 retrievals.These analysis approaches should provide highly accurate measurementsof a variety of climate trends (temperature and humidity profiles,land surface temperature, cloud radiative forcing) as the AIRS (orAIRS + JPSS/CrIS) instrument time-series soon extends to 15+ years.

  12. Satellite radiance data assimilation for rainfall prediction in Java Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagita, Novvria; Hidayati, Rini; Hidayat, Rahmat; Gustari, Indra

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the influence of satellite radiance data assimilation for predicting two days of heavy rainfall in the Java region. The first case occurred from 22 to 23 on January 2015 while the second case occurred from 1 to 2 on February 2015. The analysis examined before and after data assimilation in the two cases study. The Global Forecast System (GFS) data were used as initial condition which was assimilated with several data such as surface observation data, radiance data from AMSUA sensor, radiance data from HIRS sensor, and radiance data from MHS sensor. Weather Research and Forecasting Data Assimilation (WRFDA) is a tool which is used in this study for assimilating process with Three Dimensional Variation (3D-Var) method. The Quantitative Precipitation Forecast (QPF) skill was used to evaluate influence data assimilation for rainfall prediction. The result of the study obtained different rainfall prediction with different data assimilation. In general, the surface observation data assimilation has lower QPF skill than the satellite radiance data assimilation. Even thought radiance data assimilation has slightly contribution on rainfall prediction, but it gave better accuracy on rainfall prediction for two heavy rainfall cases.

  13. Modeling forest defoliation using simulated BRDF and assessing its effect on reflectance and sensor reaching radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengarajan, Rajagopalan; Schott, John R.

    2016-09-01

    Remote sensing techniques such as change detection are widely used for mapping and monitoring forest cover to detect the declining health and vigor of forests. These techniques rely on the assumption that the biophysical variation in the forest introduces a corresponding variation in its reflectance. The biophysical variations are assessed by foresters, but these assessment techniques are expensive and cannot be performed frequently to identify a specific level of change in the forest, for example, infection due to gypsy moths that results in forest defoliation. Further, the interaction of atmosphere, sensor characteristics, and phenology that are inherent in the remotely sensed images makes it difficult to separate biophysical changes from observational effects. We have addressed these limitations by developing a method to model the spectral reflectance properties of forests with varying degrees of defoliation using the Digital Image and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) tool. This paper discusses the in-canopy radiative approach and the impact of defoliation on the reflectance and radiance observed by sensors such as Landsat. The results indicate that the relative variation in forest reflectance between a non-defoliated and a 30% defoliated deciduous forest can be as high as 10% in the NIR spectral band. A function can be fit to predict the level of defoliation from the relative variation in radiance. The modeling and analysis techniques can be extended to assess the impact of atmospheric factors and sensor characteristics relative to the biophysical changes as well as for assessing other biophysical variables in forests.

  14. Evaluation of Long-Term Calibrations of the AVHRR Visible Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, William B.; Ferrier, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Two systematic calibrations have been compiled for the visible radiances measured by the series of AVHRR instruments flown on the NOAA operational polar weather satellites: one by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), anchored on NASA ER-2 underflights in the 1980s and early 1990s and covering the period 1981-2009, and one by the PATMOS-x project, anchored on comparisons to the MODIS instruments on the Aqua and Terra satellites in the 2000s and covering the period 1979-2010 (this result also includes calibration for the near-IR channels). Both methods have had to extend their anchor calibrations over a long series of instruments using different vicarious approaches, so a comparison provides an opportunity to evaluate how well this extension works by cross-checking the results at the anchor points. The basic result of this comparison is that for the ''afternoon'' series of AVHRRs, the calibrations agree to within their mutual uncertainties. However, this retrospective evaluation also shows that the representation of the time variations can be simplified. The ISCCP procedure had much more difficulty extending the calibration to the ''morning'' series of AVHRRs with the calibrations for NOAA-15 and NOAA-17 exceeding the estimated uncertainties. Given the general agreement, a new calibration for all AVHRR visible radiances (except TIROS-N, NOAA-6, NOAA-19, and MetOp-A) is proposed that is based on the average of the best linear fits to the two time records. The estimated uncertainty of these calibrations is 63% absolute (scaled radiance units).

  15. Aerosol, Cloud and Trace Gas Observations Derived from Airborne Hyperspectral Radiance and Direct Beam Measurements in Recent Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; LeBlanc, S.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.

    2014-01-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions. The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. Dunagan et al. [2013] present results establishing the performance of the instrument, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and preliminary scientific field data. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS [Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys] experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE [Department of Energy]-sponsored TCAP [Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013] experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft (Shinozuka et al., 2013), and acquired a wealth of data in support of mission objectives on all SEAC4RS and TCAP research flights. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2; Segal-Rosenheimer et al., 2014), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In addition, 4STAR measured zenith radiances underneath cloud decks for retrievals of cloud optical depth and effective diameter. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new

  16. Equivalent Sensor Radiance Generation and Remote Sensing from Model Parameters. Part 1; Equivalent Sensor Radiance Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wind, Galina; DaSilva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.; Platnick, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a general procedure for calculating equivalent sensor radiances from variables output from a global atmospheric forecast model. In order to take proper account of the discrepancies between model resolution and sensor footprint the algorithm takes explicit account of the model subgrid variability, in particular its description of the probably density function of total water (vapor and cloud condensate.) The equivalent sensor radiances are then substituted into an operational remote sensing algorithm processing chain to produce a variety of remote sensing products that would normally be produced from actual sensor output. This output can then be used for a wide variety of purposes such as model parameter verification, remote sensing algorithm validation, testing of new retrieval methods and future sensor studies. We show a specific implementation using the GEOS-5 model, the MODIS instrument and the MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS) Data Collection 5.1 operational remote sensing cloud algorithm processing chain (including the cloud mask, cloud top properties and cloud optical and microphysical properties products.) We focus on clouds and cloud/aerosol interactions, because they are very important to model development and improvement.

  17. Urban, Forest, and Agricultural AIS Data: Fine Spectral Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1985-01-01

    Spectra acquired by the Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) near Lafayette, IN, Ely, MN, and over the Stanford University campus, CA were analyzed for fine spectral structure using two techniques: the ratio of radiance of a ground target to the radiance of a standard and also the correlation coefficient of radiances at adjacent wavelengths. The results show ramp like features in the ratios. These features are due to the biochemical composition of the leaf and to the optical scattering properties of its cuticle. The size and shape of the ramps vary with ground cover.

  18. Cloud and aerosol optics by polarized micro pulse Lidar and ground based measurements of zenith radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgadillo, Rodrigo

    Clouds impact Earth's climate through cloud transmission and reflection properties. Clouds reflect approximately 15 percent of the incoming solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. A key cloud radiative variable is cloud optical depth, which gives information about how much light is transmitted through a cloud. Historically, remote measurements of cloud optical depth have been limited to uniform overcast conditions and had low temporal and spatial resolution. We present a novel method to measure cloud optical depth for coastal regions from spectral zenith radiance measurements for optically thin clouds, which removes some of these limitations. Our measurement site is part of South Florida's Cloud-Aerosol-Rain Observatory (CAROb), located on Virginia Key, FL (6 km from Miami). This work is based on Marshak et al.'s method for finding cloud optical depth from vegetative sites that provide a strong spectral contrast between red and near infrared surface albedo. However, given the unique nature of our site, which contains water, vegetation, beach, and urban surface types, we found no such spectral contrast at those wavelength pairs. We measured albedo, with hyperspectral resolution, for different surface types around our measurement site to estimate the effective spectral albedo for the area centered on the site with a 5km radius. From this analysis, we found the best possible albedo contrast (573.9 and 673.1 nm) for our site. We tested the derived cloud optical depth from zenith radiance at these two wavelengths against a concurrently running polarized micro pulse LIDAR (MPL) and found good agreement.

  19. A New Instrument for Measurement of the Solar Aureole Radiance Distribution from Unstable Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, Joseph M.; Voss, Kenneth J.

    1999-01-01

    A novel imaging solar aureole radiometer, which can obtain absolute radiometric measurements of the solar aureole when operated on an unstable platform is described. A CCD array is used to image the aureole, while a neutral density occulter on a long pole blocks the direct solar radiation. This ensures accurate direction registration as the sun appears in acquired images, and the total circumsolar region is measured simultaneously. The imaging nature of this instrument along with a special triggering device permit acquisition of the circumsolar sky radiance within 7.5 degrees of the center of the solar disk, and within 1 degree of the edge of the solar disk. This innovation makes possible for the first time, reliable and accurate radiometric measurements of the solar aureole from unstable mobile platforms such as ships. This allows determination small angle atmospheric scattering. The instrument has been used in field studies of atmospheric aerosols and will be used in satellite validation and calibration campaigns.

  20. Absolute and relative blindsight.

    PubMed

    Balsdon, Tarryn; Azzopardi, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The concept of relative blindsight, referring to a difference in conscious awareness between conditions otherwise matched for performance, was introduced by Lau and Passingham (2006) as a way of identifying the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) in fMRI experiments. By analogy, absolute blindsight refers to a difference between performance and awareness regardless of whether it is possible to match performance across conditions. Here, we address the question of whether relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers can be accounted for by response bias. In our replication of Lau and Passingham's experiment, the relative blindsight effect was abolished when performance was assessed by means of a bias-free 2AFC task or when the criterion for awareness was varied. Furthermore, there was no evidence of either relative or absolute blindsight when both performance and awareness were assessed with bias-free measures derived from confidence ratings using signal detection theory. This suggests that both relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers amount to no more than variations in response bias in the assessment of performance and awareness. Consideration of the properties of psychometric functions reveals a number of ways in which relative and absolute blindsight could arise trivially and elucidates a basis for the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 blindsight.

  1. Validation of a weather forecast model at radiance level against satellite observations allowing quantification of temperature, humidity, and cloud-related biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bani Shahabadi, Maziar; Huang, Yi; Garand, Louis; Heilliette, Sylvain; Yang, Ping

    2016-09-01

    An established radiative transfer model (RTM) is adapted for simulating all-sky infrared radiance spectra from the Canadian Global Environmental Multiscale (GEM) model in order to validate its forecasts at the radiance level against Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) observations. Synthetic spectra are generated for 2 months from short-term (3-9 h) GEM forecasts. The RTM uses a monthly climatological land surface emissivity/reflectivity atlas. An updated ice particle optical property library was introduced for cloudy radiance calculations. Forward model brightness temperature (BT) biases are assessed to be of the order of ˜1 K for both clear-sky and overcast conditions. To quantify GEM forecast meteorological variables biases, spectral sensitivity kernels are generated and used to attribute radiance biases to surface and atmospheric temperatures, atmospheric humidity, and clouds biases. The kernel method, supplemented with retrieved profiles based on AIRS observations in collocation with a microwave sounder, achieves good closure in explaining clear-sky radiance biases, which are attributed mostly to surface temperature and upper tropospheric water vapor biases. Cloudy-sky radiance biases are dominated by cloud-induced radiance biases. Prominent GEM biases are identified as: (1) too low surface temperature over land, causing about -5 K bias in the atmospheric window region; (2) too high upper tropospheric water vapor, inducing about -3 K bias in the water vapor absorption band; (3) too few high clouds in the convective regions, generating about +10 K bias in window band and about +6 K bias in the water vapor band.

  2. Characterization and Compensation of the Atmosphere for the Inversion of AVIRIS Calibrated Radiance to Apparent Surface Reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green Robert O.; Roberts, Dar A.; Conel, James E.

    1996-01-01

    Calibrated radiance spectra measured remotely record the integrated effects of the solar source, the atmosphere, and the surface. To pursue scientific research and applications, based on the molecular absorptions and constituent scattering properties of the surface, the solar source and atmosphere must be characterized and compensated in the spectra. This paper describes a set of radiative transfer spectral fitting algorithms that characterize the absorbing and scattering constituents of the atmosphere from calibrated AVIRIS spectra. These atmospheric characteristics were used in conjunction with the illumination and observation geometries to invert the AVIRIS calibrated radiance spectra to apparent surface reflectance. A validation of the algorithm was performed with in-situ reflectance spectra acquired at the time of the AVIRIS overflight over Pasadena, California, in 1994.

  3. Absolute neutrino mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Silvia; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2013-04-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments firmly established non-vanishing neutrino masses, a result that can be regarded as a strong motivation to extend the Standard Model. In spite of being the lightest massive particles, neutrinos likely represent an important bridge to new physics at very high energies and offer new opportunities to address some of the current cosmological puzzles, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter. In this context, the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale is a key issue within modern High Energy Physics. The talks in this parallel session well describe the current exciting experimental activity aiming to determining the absolute neutrino mass scale and offer an overview of a few models beyond the Standard Model that have been proposed in order to explain the neutrino masses giving a prediction for the absolute neutrino mass scale and solving the cosmological puzzles.

  4. A Systematic Error Correction Method for TOVS Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Rokke, Laurie; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Treatment of systematic errors is crucial for the successful use of satellite data in a data assimilation system. Systematic errors in TOVS radiance measurements and radiative transfer calculations can be as large or larger than random instrument errors. The usual assumption in data assimilation is that observational errors are unbiased. If biases are not effectively removed prior to assimilation, the impact of satellite data will be lessened and can even be detrimental. Treatment of systematic errors is important for short-term forecast skill as well as the creation of climate data sets. A systematic error correction algorithm has been developed as part of a 1D radiance assimilation. This scheme corrects for spectroscopic errors, errors in the instrument response function, and other biases in the forward radiance calculation for TOVS. Such algorithms are often referred to as tuning of the radiances. The scheme is able to account for the complex, air-mass dependent biases that are seen in the differences between TOVS radiance observations and forward model calculations. We will show results of systematic error correction applied to the NOAA 15 Advanced TOVS as well as its predecessors. We will also discuss the ramifications of inter-instrument bias with a focus on stratospheric measurements.

  5. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  6. The importance and attainment of accurate absolute radiometric calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of accurate absolute radiometric calibration is discussed by reference to the needs of those wishing to validate or use models describing the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with the atmosphere and earth surface features. The in-flight calibration methods used for the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and the Systeme Probatoire d'Observation de la Terre, Haute Resolution visible (SPOT/HRV) systems are described and their limitations discussed. The questionable stability of in-flight absolute calibration methods suggests the use of a radiative transfer program to predict the apparent radiance, at the entrance pupil of the sensor, of a ground site of measured reflectance imaged through a well characterized atmosphere. The uncertainties of such a method are discussed.

  7. Evaluation of upwelling infrared radiance from earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, S. K.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1975-01-01

    Basic equations for calculating the upwelling atmospheric radiation are presented which account for various sources of radiation coming out at the top of the atmosphere. The theoretical formulation of the transmittance models (line-by-line and quasi-random band model) and the computational procedures used for the evaluation of the transmittance and radiance are discussed in detail. By employing the Lorentz line-by-line and quasi-random computer programs, model calculations were made to determine the upwelling radiance and signal change in the wave number interval of CO fundamental band. These results are useful in determining the effects of different interfering molecules, water vapor profiles, ground temperatures, and ground emittances on the upwelling radiance and signal change. This information is of vital importance in establishing the feasibility of measuring the concentrations of pollutants in the atmosphere from a gas filter correlation instrument flown on an aircraft or mounted on a satellite.

  8. Modeling directional thermal radiance from a forest canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, M. J.; Balick, L. K.; Smith, J. A.; Hutchison, B. A.

    1989-01-01

    The thermal vegetation canopy radiance model of Smith et al. (1981) is extended to account for the geometrically rough structure of a forest canopy. Fourier series expansion of a canopy height profile is used to calculate improved view facts which partially account for directional variations in canopy thermal radiance transfers. Predictions from the Smith model and the modified model are compared with experimental data obtained over a deciduous forest site in Tennessee. The results show that thermal radiance from a forest canopy depends on sensor viewing angle, solar position, and the degree of geometric roughness of the canopy surface. The maximum off-nadir angle variation in the original model was 1.6 deg C, compared with 4.4 C for the modified model.

  9. Effects of Raman scattering on the water-leaving radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, Kirk J.

    1995-01-01

    The contribution of Raman scattering to the water-leaving radiance is examined using Monte Carlo simulations. Exit angle information is retained, allowing a comparison of different satellite viewing directions. Chlorophyll values of 0.0, 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mg Chl/cu m are simulated. Little directional variability is found, with the exception of the direct solar backscatter direction. The wavelength variability is greatest for low chlorophyll concentrations and is negligible for 1.0 mg Chl/cu m. At 550 nm the Raman contribution ranges from approximately 18% of the total water-leaving radiance for pure water to 3% for 1.0 mg Chl/cu m. At 440 nm the range is from 6% to 2%, indicating that Raman scattering will impact radiance ratios for ocean color satellite algorithms.

  10. Impact of radiance variations on satellite sensor calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggin, Michael J.

    1987-04-01

    The intercalibration of digital data from different sensors depends on systematic and random variations in factors controlling recorded radiance. Theoretical expressions are presented which describe the impact of random variations in those factors which control radiance incident on the sensor. Means of measuring or estimating the impact of random variations on intercalibration factors are discussed. Means of detecting and calibrating for systematic effects are also discussed. The optical-reflective, middle-infrared, and thermal infrared regions of the spectrum are considered. An example is presented whereby NOAA-7 and NOAA-8 advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) radiance data, obtained over the same test fields, are shown to depend on the differences in view angles used by the two satellites.

  11. The Effect of Clouds Upon Limb Scattered Radiances and the Retrieval of Ozone Profiles Using These Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flittner, D. E.; McPeters, R. D.; Hilsenrath, E.; Janz, S. J.; Herman, B. M.; Loughman, R. P.

    1998-01-01

    The use of limb scattered radiance profiles to retrieve ozone profiles is currently being investigated. The goal is to produce ozone profiles with better vertical resolution than is available with the Backscattered Ultraviolet (BUV) technique and with much greater spatial and temporal coverage than with the solar occultation method (i.e. SAGE II). This method, which uses UV and visible light scattered from the earth's limb, has recently been proven to work for clear sky cases with data from the STS-87 flight of the Shuttle Ozone Sounding Limb Experiment/Limb Ozone Retrieval Experiment (SOLSE/LORE). As to be expected, clouds have a substantial impact upon the limb radiance (increasing the radiance as much as 80-100% is some cases). Here we use a variety of radiative transfer models and limited SOLSE/LORE data to investigate the effect of clouds upon the limb radiance at wavelengths used in the ozone retrieval (approximately 600 nm). Though the presence of clouds can greatly increase the limb radiance, they have a minimal effect upon the retrieved ozone profile, since the retrieval uses a differential absorption technique.

  12. Radiance limits of ceramic phosphors under high excitation fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenef, Alan; Kelso, John; Zheng, Yi; Tchoul, Maxim

    2013-09-01

    Ceramic phosphors, excited by high radiance pump sources, offer considerable potential for high radiance conversion. Interestingly, thermodynamic arguments suggest that the radiance of the luminescent spot can even exceed that of the incoming light source. In practice, however, thermal quenching and (non-thermal) optical saturation limit the maximum attainable radiance of the luminescent source. We present experimental data for Ce:YAG and Ce:GdYAG ceramics in which these limits have been investigated. High excitation fluxes are achieved using laser pumping. Optical pumping intensities exceeding 100W/mm2 have been shown to produce only modest efficiency depreciation at low overall pump powers because of the short Ce3+ lifetime, although additional limitations exist. When pump powers are higher, heat-transfer bottlenecks within the ceramic and heat-sink interfaces limit maximum pump intensities. We find that surface temperatures of these laser-pumped ceramics can reach well over 150°C, causing thermal-quenching losses. We also find that in some cases, the loss of quantum efficiency with increasing temperature can cause a thermal run-away effect, resulting in a rapid loss in converted light, possibly over-heating the sample or surrounding structures. While one can still obtain radiances on the order of many W/mm2/sr, temperature quenching effects ultimately limit converted light radiance. Finally, we use the diffusion-approximation radiation transport models and rate equation models to simulate some of these nonlinear optical pumping and heating effects in high-scattering ceramics.

  13. A method for retrieving clouds with satellite infrared radiances using the particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dongmei; Auligné, Thomas; Descombes, Gaël; Snyder, Chris

    2016-11-01

    Ensemble-based techniques have been widely utilized in estimating uncertainties in various problems of interest in geophysical applications. A new cloud retrieval method is proposed based on the particle filter (PF) by using ensembles of cloud information in the framework of Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system. The PF cloud retrieval method is compared with the Multivariate Minimum Residual (MMR) method that was previously established and verified. Cloud retrieval experiments involving a variety of cloudy types are conducted with the PF and MMR methods with measurements of infrared radiances on multi-sensors onboard both geostationary and polar satellites, respectively. It is found that the retrieved cloud masks with both methods are consistent with other independent cloud products. MMR is prone to producing ambiguous small-fraction clouds, while PF detects clearer cloud signals, yielding closer heights of cloud top and cloud base to other references. More collections of small-fraction particles are able to effectively estimate the semi-transparent high clouds. It is found that radiances with high spectral resolutions contribute to quantitative cloud top and cloud base retrievals. In addition, a different way of resolving the filtering problem over each model grid is tested to better aggregate the weights with all available sensors considered, which is proven to be less constrained by the ordering of sensors. Compared to the MMR method, the PF method is overall more computationally efficient, and the cost of the model grid-based PF method scales more directly with the number of computing nodes.

  14. Thermal radiance observations of an active lava flow during the June 1984 eruption of Mount Etna

    SciTech Connect

    Pieri, D.C.; Glaze, L.S.; Abrams, M.J. )

    1990-10-01

    The thermal budget of an active lava flow observed on 20 June 1984 from the Southeast crater of Mount Etna, Sicily, Italy, was analyzed from data taken by the Landsat Thematic Mapper. The Thematic Mapper images constitute one of the few satellite data sets of sufficient spatial and spectral resolution to allow calibrated measurements on the distribution and intensity of thermal radiation from active lava flows. Using radiance data from two reflective infrared channels, we can estimate the temperature and areas of the hottest parts of the active flow, which correspond to hot (>500{degree}C) fractures or zones at the flow surface. Using this techniques, we estimate that only 10%-20% of the total radiated thermal power output is emitted by hot zones or fractures, which constitute less than 1% of the observed surface area. Generally, it seems that only where hot fractures or zones constitute greater than about 1% of the surface area of the flow will losses from such features significantly reduce internal flow temperatures. Using our radiance observations as boundary conditions for a multicomponent thermal model of flow interior temperature, we infer that, for the parts of this flow subject to analysis, the boundary layer and flow thickness effects dominate over radiant zones in controlling the depression of core temperature.

  15. EPIC Radiance Simulator for Deep Space Climate ObserVatoRy (DSCOVR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, Alexei; Marshak, Alexander; Wang, Yujie; Korkin, Sergey; Herman, Jay

    2011-01-01

    The Deep Space Climate ObserVatoRy (DSCOVR) is a planned space weather mission for the Sun and Earth observations from the Lagrangian L1 point. Onboard of DSCOVR is a multispectral imager EPIC designed for unique observations of the full illuminated disk of the Earth with high temporal and 10 km spatial resolution. Depending on latitude, EPIC will observe the same Earth surface area during the course of the day in a wide range of solar and view zenith angles in the backscattering view geometry with the scattering angle of 164-172 . To understand the information content of EPIC data for analysis of the Earth clouds, aerosols and surface properties, an EPIC radiance Simulator was developed covering the UV -VIS-NIR range including the oxygen A and B-bands (A=340, 388, 443, 555, 680, 779.5, 687.7, 763.3 nm). The Simulator uses ancillary data (surface pressure/height, NCEP wind speed) as well as MODIS-based geophysical fields such as spectral surface bidirectional reflectance, column water vapor, and properties of aerosols and clouds including optical depth, effective radius, phase and cloud top height. The original simulations are conducted at 1 km resolution using the look-up table approach and then are averaged to 10 km EPIC radiances. This talk will give an overview of the EPIC Simulator with analysis of results over the continental USA and northern Atlantic.

  16. GIFTS SM EDU Radiometric and Spectral Calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, J.; Reisse, R. a.; Johnson, D. G.; Gazarik, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    The Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Sensor Module (SM) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) is a high resolution spectral imager designed to measure infrared (IR) radiance using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The GIFTS instrument gathers measurements across the long-wave IR (LWIR), short/mid-wave IR (SMWIR), and visible spectral bands. The raw interferogram measurements are radiometrically and spectrally calibrated to produce radiance spectra, which are further processed to obtain atmospheric profiles via retrieval algorithms. This paper describes the processing algorithms involved in the calibration. The calibration procedures can be subdivided into three categories: the pre-calibration stage, the calibration stage, and finally, the post-calibration stage. Detailed derivations for each stage are presented in this paper.

  17. Vertical Covariance Localization for Satellite Radiances in Ensemble Kalman Filters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Vertical Covariance Localization for Satellite Radiances in Ensemble Kalman Filters WILLIAM F. CAMPBELL, CRAIG H. BISHOP, AND DANIEL HODYSS Naval...being used in the operational data assimila- tion system at Environment Canada for their ensemble Corresponding author address: Dr. William F...here. Acknowledgments. The authors thank Jeff Whitaker, Peter Houtekamer, Herschel Mitchell, and our anony- mous reviewer for their valuable comments. We

  18. Geophysical trends from 12+ years of AIRS radiance trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSouza-Machado, Sergio; Strow, Larrabee; Tangborn, Andrew; Hepplewhite, Chris; Motteler, Howard; Schou, Paul; Buczkowski, Steve

    2015-04-01

    NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder has daily been providing low noise, stable top-of-the atmosphere hyperspectral radiances since 2002. Here we present analysis from 12 year linear radiance trends obtained from two AIRS radiance subsets : (1) clear-sky scenes over ocean and (2) all-sky scenes along the nadir track, which are used to retrieve a geophysical trends using an optimal estimation approach. The retrieved clear sky trends compare favorably with ERA and MERRA re-analysis trends, and in-situ trends for the minor gases. Analysis of all-sky trends show they agree better with ERA than either MERRA or the AIRS Level-2 retrievals. The radiance trends provide highly accurate measurements of atmospheric variability with easily understood error characteristics, unlike typical Level 2 retrievals. These approaches should provide highly accurate measurements of a variety of climate trends (temperature and humidity profiles, land surface temperature, cloud radiative forcing) as the AIRS (or AIRS + JPSS/CrIS + IASI) instrument time-series extends to 15+ years.

  19. Joint aerosol and water-leaving radiance retrieval from Airborne Multi-angle SpectroPolarimeter Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, F.; Dubovik, O.; Zhai, P.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Diner, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) [1] has been flying aboard the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft since October 2010. In step-and-stare operation mode, AirMSPI typically acquires observations of a target area at 9 view angles between ±67° off the nadir. Its spectral channels are centered at 355, 380, 445, 470*, 555, 660*, and 865* nm, where the asterisk denotes the polarimetric bands. In order to retrieve information from the AirMSPI observations, we developed a efficient and flexible retrieval code that can jointly retrieve aerosol and water leaving radiance simultaneously. The forward model employs a coupled Markov Chain (MC) [2] and adding/doubling [3] radiative transfer method which is fully linearized and integrated with a multi-patch retrieval algorithm to obtain aerosol and water leaving radiance/Chl-a information. Various constraints are imposed to improve convergence and retrieval stability. We tested the aerosol and water leaving radiance retrievals using the AirMSPI radiance and polarization measurements by comparing to the retrieved aerosol concentration, size distribution, water-leaving radiance, and chlorophyll concentration to the values reported by the USC SeaPRISM AERONET-OC site off the coast of Southern California. In addition, the MC-based retrievals of aerosol properties were compared with GRASP ([4-5]) retrievals for selected cases. The MC-based retrieval approach was then used to systematically explore the benefits of AirMSPI's ultraviolet and polarimetric channels, the use of multiple view angles, and constraints provided by inclusion of bio-optical models of the water-leaving radiance. References [1]. D. J. Diner, et al. Atmos. Meas. Tech. 6, 1717 (2013). [2]. F. Xu et al. Opt. Lett. 36, 2083 (2011). [3]. J. E. Hansen and L.D. Travis. Space Sci. Rev. 16, 527 (1974). [4]. O. Dubovik et al. Atmos. Meas. Tech., 4, 975 (2011). [5]. O. Dubovik et al. SPIE: Newsroom, DOI:10.1117/2.1201408.005558 (2014).

  20. Laboratory measurements of radiance and reflectance spectra of dilute primary-treated sewage sludge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usry, J. W.; Witte, W. G.; Whitlock, C. H.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of remotely monitoring ocean dumping of waste products such as acid and sewage sludge is evaluated. The laboratory arrangement, solar simulator, and test results from three experiments conducted in the laboratory are described. Radiance and reflectance spectra are presented for primary-treated sewage sludge mixed with two types of base water. Results indicate that upwelled reflectance varies in a near-linear manner with concentration and that the sludge has a practically flat signal response between 420 and 970 nm. Well-defined upwelled reflectance spectra were obtained for the sewage-sludge mixtures at all wavelengths and concentrations. The spectral-reflectance values appeared to be influenced by the type of base water, but this influence was small, especially for the mixtures with low concentrations of sewage sludge.

  1. Method and program product for determining a radiance field in an optical environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinersman, Phillip N. (Inventor); Carder, Kendall L. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A hybrid method is presented by which Monte Carlo techniques are combined with iterative relaxation techniques to solve the Radiative Transfer Equation in arbitrary one-, two- or three-dimensional optical environments. The optical environments are first divided into contiguous regions, or elements, with Monte Carlo techniques then being employed to determine the optical response function of each type of element. The elements are combined, and the iterative relaxation techniques are used to determine simultaneously the radiance field on the boundary and throughout the interior of the modeled environment. This hybrid model is capable of providing estimates of the under-water light field needed to expedite inspection of ship hulls and port facilities. It is also capable of providing estimates of the subaerial light field for structured, absorbing or non-absorbing environments such as shadows of mountain ranges within and without absorption spectral bands such as water vapor or CO.sub.2 bands.

  2. Inter-Calibration and Concatenation of Climate Quality Infrared Cloudy Radiances from Multiple Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrangi, Ali; Aumann, Hartmut H.

    2013-01-01

    A change in climate is not likely captured from any single instrument, since no single instrument can span decades of time. Therefore, to detect signals of global climate change, observations from many instruments on different platforms have to be concatenated. This requires careful and detailed consideration of instrumental differences such as footprint size, diurnal cycle of observations, and relative biases in the spectral brightness temperatures. Furthermore, a common basic assumption is that the data quality is independent of the observed scene and therefore can be determined using clear scene data. However, as will be demonstrated, this is not necessarily a valid assumption as the globe is mostly cloudy. In this study we highlight challenges in inter-calibration and concatenation of infrared radiances from multiple instruments by focusing on the analysis of deep convective or anvil clouds. TRMM/VIRS is potentially useful instrument to make correction for observational differences in the local time and foot print sizes, and thus could be applied retroactively to vintage instruments such as AIRS, IASI, IRIS, AVHRR, and HIRS. As the first step, in this study, we investigate and discuss to what extent AIRS and VIRS agree in capturing deep cloudy radiances at the same local time. The analysis also includes comparisons with one year observations from CrIS. It was found that the instruments show calibration differences of about 1K under deep cloudy scenes that can vary as a function of land type and local time of observation. The sensitivity of footprint size, view angle, and spectral band-pass differences cannot fully explain the observed differences. The observed discrepancies can be considered as a measure of the magnitude of issues which will arise in the comparison of legacy data with current data.

  3. Radiometric Cross-Calibration of the HJ-1B IRS in the Thermal Infrared Spectral Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, K.

    2012-12-01

    The natural calamities occur continually, environment pollution and destruction in a severe position on the earth presently, which restricts societal and economic development. The satellite remote sensing technology has an important effect on improving surveillance ability of environment pollution and natural calamities. The radiometric calibration is precondition of quantitative remote sensing; which accuracy decides quality of the retrieval parameters. Since the China Environment Satellite (HJ-1A/B) has been launched successfully on September 6th, 2008, it has made an important role in the economic development of China. The satellite has four infrared bands; and one of it is thermal infrared. With application fields of quantitative remote sensing in china, finding appropriate calibration method becomes more and more important. Many kinds of independent methods can be used to do the absolute radiometric calibration. In this paper, according to the characteristic of thermal infrared channel of HJ-1B thermal infrared multi-spectral camera, the thermal infrared spectral band of HJ-1B IRS was calibrated using cross-calibration methods based on MODIS data. Firstly, the corresponding bands of the two sensors were obtained. Secondly, the MONDTRAN was run to analyze the influences of different spectral response, satellite view zenith angle, atmosphere condition and temperature on the match factor. In the end, their band match factor was calculated in different temperature, considering the dissimilar band response of the match bands. Seven images of Lake Qinghai in different time were chosen as the calibration data. On the basis of radiance of MODIS and match factor, the IRS radiance was calculated. And then the calibration coefficients were obtained by linearly regressing the radiance and the DN value. We compared the result of this cross-calibration with that of the onboard blackbody calibration, which consistency was good.The maximum difference of brightness temperature

  4. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  5. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  6. Laboratory measurements of radiance and reflectance spectra of a dilute biosolid industrial waste product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usry, J. W.; Witte, W. G.; Whitlock, C. H.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental measurements were made of upwelled spectral signatures of various concentrations of industrial waste products mixed with water in a large water tank. Radiance and reflectance spectra for a biosolid waste product (sludge) mixed with conditioned tap water and natural river water are reported. Results of these experiments indicate that reflectance increases with increasing concentration of the sludge at practically all wavelengths for concentration of total suspended solids up to 117 ppm in conditioned tap water and 171 ppm in natural river water. Significant variations in the spectra were observed and may be useful in defining spectral characteristics for this waste product. No significant spectral differences were apparent in the reflectance spectra of the two experiments, especially for wavelengths greater than 540 nm. Reflectance values, however, were generally greater in natural river water for wavelengths greater than 540 nm. Reflectance may be considered to increase linearly with concentration of total suspended solids from 5 to 171 ppm at all wavelengths without introducing errors larger than 10 percent.

  7. Absolute-structure reports.

    PubMed

    Flack, Howard D

    2013-08-01

    All the 139 noncentrosymmetric crystal structures published in Acta Crystallographica Section C between January 2011 and November 2012 inclusive have been used as the basis of a detailed study of the reporting of absolute structure. These structure determinations cover a wide range of space groups, chemical composition and resonant-scattering contribution. Defining A and D as the average and difference of the intensities of Friedel opposites, their level of fit has been examined using 2AD and selected-D plots. It was found, regardless of the expected resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, that the Friedel-difference intensities are often dominated by random uncertainty and systematic error. An analysis of data collection strategy is provided. It is found that crystal-structure determinations resulting in a Flack parameter close to 0.5 may not necessarily be from crystals twinned by inversion. Friedifstat is shown to be a robust estimator of the resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, very little affected by the particular space group of a structure nor by the occupation of special positions. There is considerable confusion in the text of papers presenting achiral noncentrosymmetric crystal structures. Recommendations are provided for the optimal way of treating noncentrosymmetric crystal structures for which the experimenter has no interest in determining the absolute structure.

  8. A Physical Model of Cirrus 8-13-micro Infrared Radiance.

    PubMed

    Hall, F F

    1968-11-01

    A simplified physical model of cirrus cloud 8-13-micro radiance is derived, in an attempt to explain measured cloud radiance characteristics. Thermal emission and scattering of irradiance from the earth are considered separately. The scattering diagram for a 50-micro radius ice sphere, which is opaque at these wavelengths, is computed from diffraction theory and specular surface reflection. Thermal emission is found to exceed scattered radiance significantly for all zenith angles, and computed radiance values are found to match measured cloud radiance closely.

  9. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  10. Determination of Unfiltered Radiances from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, N. G.; Priestley, K. J.; Kratz, D. P.; Geier, E. B.; Green, R. N.; Wielicki, B. A.; Hinton, P. OR.; Nolan, S. K.

    2001-01-01

    A new method for determining unfiltered shortwave (SW), longwave (LW) and window (W) radiances from filtered radiances measured by the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) satellite instrument is presented. The method uses theoretically derived regression coefficients between filtered and unfiltered radiances that are a function of viewing geometry, geotype and whether or not cloud is present. Relative errors in insta.ntaneous unfiltered radiances from this method are generally well below 1% for SW radiances (approx. 0.4% 1(sigma) or approx.l W/sq m equivalent flux), < 0.2% for LW radiances (approx. 0.1% 1(sigma) or approx.0.3 W/sq m equivalent flux) and < 0.2% (approx. 0.1% 1(sigma) for window channel radiances.

  11. Assimilation of hyperspectral satellite radiance observations within tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Haidao

    The availability of high resolution temperature and water vapor data is critical for the study of mesoscale scale weather phenomena (e.g., convective initiations, and tropical cyclones). As hyperspectral infrared sounders, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) could provide high resolution atmospheric profiles by measuring radiations in many thousands of different channels. This work focuses on the assessment of the potential values of satellite hyperspectral radiance data on the study of convective initiations (CI) and the assimilation of AIRS radiance observations within tropical storms. First, the potential capability of hyperspectral infrared measurements (GIFTS) to provide convective precipitation forecasts has been studied and assessed. Using both the observed and the model-predicted profiles as input to the GIFTS radiative transfer model (RTM), it is shown that the simulated GIFTS radiance could capture the high vertical and temporal variability of the real and modeled atmosphere prior to a convective initiation, as well as the differences between observations and model forecasts. This study suggests the potential for hyperspectral infrared radiance data to make an important contribution to the improvement of the forecast skill of convective precipitation. Second, as the first step toward applying AIRS data to tropical cyclone (TC) prediction, a set of dropsonde profiles during Hurricane Rita (2005) is used to simulate AIRS radiance data and to assess the ability of AIRS data in capturing the vertical variability within TCs through one-dimensional variational (1D-Var) twin experiments. The AIRS observation errors and background errors are first estimated. Five sets of 1D-Var twin experiments are then performed using different combinations of AIRS channels. Finally, results from these 1D-Var experiments are analyzed. Major findings are: (1) AIRS radiance data contain useful information about

  12. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  13. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m‑1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  14. Radiance Research Particle Soot/Absorption Photometer Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Springston, S. R.

    2016-03-01

    Radiance Research PSAPs as described in this Handbook are deployed in the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) Aerosol Observing System (AOS), the third ARM Mobile Facility (AMF3) AOS, ENA AOS and Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS)-A. An earlier version of the PSAP is currently operated in the ARM Aerial Facility and at SGP. The older SGP instrument is covered in a separate Handbook.

  15. Predicting Upwelling Radiance on the West Florida Shelf

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    5 to 10 day time horizon will require a numerical simulation that accurately forecasts the physical, ecological , and optical environment. Critical...to the ecological and optical forecast is the ability to directly compare the water-leaving radiance field to those being collected by aircraft and...satellite platforms. Our goal is to develop the ecological and optical models and computer codes to initialize, validate, and predict the IOPs and Lw

  16. Satellite Atmospheric Radiance Measurements in the Vacuum Ultraviolet.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-05

    night , as expected. In addition , the f igures demonstrate different relationships to the solar zenith angle among the filters. The tropical, or...spectrum is dominated by the com- bined effects of Rayleigh scattering of sunlight and absorption of the backscattered solar radiation by atmospheric ozone...1493 A NI line and solar scatter. The 1550 A filtcr global response curve shown in Figure 8 has the smallest day maximum and night minimum radiance

  17. Direct Comparisons of Radiances Measured by Independent Contemporary ERB Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haeffelin, Martial; Wielicki, Bruce; Priestley, Kory; Duvel, Jean Philippe; Viollier, Michel

    2001-01-01

    Comparisons of radiance measurements from overlapping independent Earth and cloud radiation budget (ERB) missions are an important contribution to the validation process of the these missions and are essential to the construction of a consistent long-term record of ERB observations. Measurements from the CERES instrument on TRMM are compared to ScaRaB on Resurs (Jan-Mar 1999) and CERES on Terra (Mar-Apr 2000).

  18. A Microwave Radiance Assimilation Study for a Tundra Snowpack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward; Durand, Michael; Margulis, Steve; England, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have begun exploring the assimilation of microwave radiances for the modeling and retrieval of snow properties. At a point scale, and for short durations (i week), radiance assimilation (RA) results are encouraging. However, in order to determine how practical RA might be for snow retrievals when applied over longer durations, larger spatial scales, and/or different snow types, we must expand the scope of the tests. In this paper we use coincident microwave radiance measurements and station data from a tundra site on the North Slope of Alaska. The field data are from the 3rd Radio-brightness Energy Balance Experiment (REBEX-3) carried out in 1994-95 by the University of Michigan. This dataset will provide a test of RA over months instead of one week, and for a very different type of snow than previous snow RA studies. We will address the following questions: flow well can a snowpack physical model (SM), forced with local weather, match measured conditions for a tundra snowpack?; How well can a microwave emission model, driven by the snowpack model, match measured microwave brightnesses for a tundra snowpack?; How well does RA increase or decrease the fidelity of estimates of snow depth and temperatures for a tundra snowpack?

  19. Infrared transfer radiometer for broadband and spectral calibration of space chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Timothy M.; Carter, Adriaan C.; Woods, Solomon I.; Kaplan, Simon G.; Datla, Raju U.

    2010-04-01

    The Low-Background Infrared (LBIR) facility at NIST has recently completed construction of an infrared transfer radiometer with an integrated cryogenic Fourier transform spectrometer (Cryo-FTS). This mobile system can be deployed to customer sites for broadband and spectral calibrations of space chambers and low-background HWIL testbeds. The Missile Defense Transfer Radiometer (MDXR) has many of the capabilities of a complete IR calibration facility and will replace our existing filter-based transfer radiometer (BXR) as the NIST standard detector deployed to MDA facilities. The MDXR features numerous improvements over the BXR, including: a cryogenic Fourier transform spectrometer, an on-board absolute cryogenic radiometer (ACR), an internal blackbody reference, and an integrated collimator. The Cryo-FTS can be used to measure high resolution spectra from 4 to 20 micrometers, using a Si:As blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detector. The on-board ACR can be used for self-calibration of the MDXR BIB as well as for absolute measurements of infrared sources. A set of filter wheels and a rotating polarizer within the MDXR allow for filter-based and polarization-sensitive measurements. The optical design of the MDXR makes both radiance and irradiance measurements possible and enables calibration of both divergent and collimated sources. Details of the various MDXR components will be presented as well as initial testing data on their performance.

  20. Assessment of Mars Atmospheric Temperature Retrievals from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Matthew J.; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Weisenstein, Deborah; Uymin, Gennady; Moncet, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the needs of Mars data assimilation. particularly quantification of measurement errors and generation of averaging kernels. we have evaluated atmospheric temperature retrievals from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) radiances. Multiple sets of retrievals have been considered in this study; (1) retrievals available from the Planetary Data System (PDS), (2) retrievals based on variants of the retrieval algorithm used to generate the PDS retrievals, and (3) retrievals produced using the Mars 1-Dimensional Retrieval (M1R) algorithm based on the Optimal Spectral Sampling (OSS ) forward model. The retrieved temperature profiles are compared to the MGS Radio Science (RS) temperature profiles. For the samples tested, the M1R temperature profiles can be made to agree within 2 K with the RS temperature profiles, but only after tuning the prior and error statistics. Use of a global prior that does not take into account the seasonal dependence leads errors of up 6 K. In polar samples. errors relative to the RS temperature profiles are even larger. In these samples, the PDS temperature profiles also exhibit a poor fit with RS temperatures. This fit is worse than reported in previous studies, indicating that the lack of fit is due to a bias correction to TES radiances implemented after 2004. To explain the differences between the PDS and Ml R temperatures, the algorithms are compared directly, with the OSS forward model inserted into the PDS algorithm. Factors such as the filtering parameter, the use of linear versus nonlinear constrained inversion, and the choice of the forward model, are found to contribute heavily to the differences in the temperature profiles retrieved in the polar regions, resulting in uncertainties of up to 6 K. Even outside the poles, changes in the a priori statistics result in different profile shapes which all fit the radiances within the specified error. The importance of the a priori statistics prevents

  1. Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Archived Data at the University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The AERI instrument is an advanced version of the high spectral resolution interferometer sounder (HIS) designed and fabricated at the University of Wisconsin (Revercomb et al. 1988) to measure upwelling infrared radiances from an aircraft. The AERI is a fully automated ground-based passive infrared interferometer that measures downwelling atmospheric radiance from 3.3 - 18.2 mm (550 - 3000 cm-1) at less than 10-minute temporal resolution with a spectral resolution of one wavenumber. It has been used in DOEÆs Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Much of the data available here at the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS), an institute within the University of Wisconsin’s Space Science and Engineering Center, may also be available in the ARM Archive. On this website, data and images from six different field experiments are available, along with AERIPLUS realtime data for the Madison, Wisconsin location. Realtime data includes temperature and water vapor time-height cross sections, SKEWT diagrams, convective stability indices, and displays from a rooftop Lidar instrument. The field experiments took place in Oaklahoma and Wisconsin with the AERI prototype.

  2. Consistency of dimensional distributions and refractive indices of desert dust measured over Lampedusa with IASI radiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzi, Giuliano; Masiello, Guido; Serio, Carmine; Meloni, Daniela; Di Biagio, Claudia; Formenti, Paola

    2017-02-01

    In the context of the ChArMEx campaign, we present here some results concerning the quantitative comparison between simulated and observed radiances in the presence of atmospheric desert dust, between June and July 2013 in the southern Mediterranean Basin, in the air mass above the island of Lampedusa. In particular, comparisons have been performed between radiances as observed by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI) and those simulated using the σ-IASI-as radiative transfer model, which takes into account aerosol extinction effect through a set of fast parameterizations. Simulations have been carried out using different sets of input complex refractive indices, which take into account the parent soils of the aerosols. Their accuracy also relies on the quality of the characterization of desert dust microphysical properties, achieved through direct measurements in the ChArMEx experiment. On the one hand, the fact that the model can ingest such a variable input proves its feasibility. On the other hand, this work goes through a direct validation of different refractive index sets for desert dust in the thermal infrared, and pursues an assessment of the sensitivity of IASI data with respect to the dimensional distribution of desert dust particles. Results show a good consistency between calculations and observations, especially in the spectral interval 800-1000 cm-1; further, the comparison between calculations and observations suggests that further efforts are needed to better characterize desert dust optical properties in the shortwave (above 2000 cm-1). Whatever the case, we show that it is necessary to properly tune the refractive indices according to the geographical origin of the observed aerosol.

  3. Downwelling Far-Infrared Radiance Spectra Measured by FIRST at Cerro Toco, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, J. C.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Cageao, R.; Kratz, D. P.; Latvakoski, H.; Johnson, D. G.; Mlawer, E. J.; Turner, D. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Far-Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) instrument is a Fourier transform spectrometer developed by NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with the Space Dynamics Laboratory and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. FIRST was initially developed for measuring the far-infrared portion of Earth's longwave spectrum as a balloon borne instrument and later was reconfigured to operate as a ground-based instrument. In its current ground-based configuration FIRST was deployed at 17500 ft on Cerro Toco, a mountain in the Atacama Desert of Chile, from August to October, 2009. There the integrated precipitable water (IPW) was as low as 0.02 cm. FIRST measurements from days with IPW between 0.024 and 0.035 cm during the campaign are presented here between 200 cm-1 and 800 cm-1. Significant spectral development in the far-IR is observed over the entire 200 cm-1 to 800 cm-1 band. Water vapor and temperature profiles from radiosonde and GVRP measurements are used as inputs to the AER Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) utilizing the AER v3.2 line parameter database. Uncertainties in both the measured and modeled radiances are accounted for in this study. The residual LBLRTM - FIRST is calculated to assess agreement between the measured and modeled spectra. Measured and model radiances generally agree to within the combined uncertainties for wavenumbers greater than 360 cm-1. At wavenumbers less than 360 cm-1 persistent troughs in the residual are present outside of the combined uncertainties. These features are present on different days and at different water vapor amounts. Possible solutions for these features are discussed.

  4. Airborne observations of far-infrared upwelling radiance in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libois, Quentin; Ivanescu, Liviu; Blanchet, Jean-Pierre; Schulz, Hannes; Bozem, Heiko; Leaitch, W. Richard; Burkart, Julia; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Herber, Andreas B.; Aliabadi, Amir A.; Girard, Éric

    2016-12-01

    The first airborne measurements of the Far-InfraRed Radiometer (FIRR) were performed in April 2015 during the panarctic NETCARE campaign. Vertical profiles of spectral upwelling radiance in the range 8-50 µm were measured in clear and cloudy conditions from the surface up to 6 km. The clear sky profiles highlight the strong dependence of radiative fluxes to the temperature inversion typical of the Arctic. Measurements acquired for total column water vapour from 1.5 to 10.5 mm also underline the sensitivity of the far-infrared greenhouse effect to specific humidity. The cloudy cases show that optically thin ice clouds increase the cooling rate of the atmosphere, making them important pieces of the Arctic energy balance. One such cloud exhibited a very complex spatial structure, characterized by large horizontal heterogeneities at the kilometre scale. This emphasizes the difficulty of obtaining representative cloud observations with airborne measurements but also points out how challenging it is to model polar clouds radiative effects. These radiance measurements were successfully compared to simulations, suggesting that state-of-the-art radiative transfer models are suited to study the cold and dry Arctic atmosphere. Although FIRR in situ performances compare well to its laboratory performances, complementary simulations show that upgrading the FIRR radiometric resolution would greatly increase its sensitivity to atmospheric and cloud properties. Improved instrument temperature stability in flight and expected technological progress should help meet this objective. The campaign overall highlights the potential for airborne far-infrared radiometry and constitutes a relevant reference for future similar studies dedicated to the Arctic and for the development of spaceborne instruments.

  5. Infrared calibration for climate: a perspective on present and future high-spectral resolution instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revercomb, Henry E.; Anderson, James G.; Best, Fred A.; Tobin, David C.; Knuteson, Robert O.; LaPorte, Daniel D.; Taylor, Joe K.

    2006-12-01

    The new era of high spectral resolution infrared instruments for atmospheric sounding offers great opportunities for climate change applications. A major issue with most of our existing IR observations from space is spectral sampling uncertainty and the lack of standardization in spectral sampling. The new ultra resolution observing capabilities from the AIRS grating spectrometer on the NASA Aqua platform and from new operational FTS instruments (IASI on Metop, CrIS for NPP/NPOESS, and the GIFTS for a GOES demonstration) will go a long way toward improving this situation. These new observations offer the following improvements: 1. Absolute accuracy, moving from issues of order 1 K to <0.2-0.4 K brightness temperature, 2. More complete spectral coverage, with Nyquist sampling for scale standardization, and 3. Capabilities for unifying IR calibration among different instruments and platforms. However, more needs to be done to meet the immediate needs for climate and to effectively leverage these new operational weather systems, including 1. Place special emphasis on making new instruments as accurate as they can be to realize the potential of technological investments already made, 2. Maintain a careful validation program for establishing the best possible direct radiance check of long-term accuracy--specifically, continuing to use aircraft-or balloon-borne instruments that are periodically checked directly with NIST, and 3. Commit to a simple, new IR mission that will provide an ongoing backbone for the climate observing system. The new mission would make use of Fourier Transform Spectrometer measurements to fill in spectral and diurnal sampling gaps of the operational systems and provide a benchmark with better than 0.1K 3-sigma accuracy based on standards that are verifiable in-flight.

  6. Downwelling and upwelling radiance distributions sampled under cloudless conditions in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Raul R; Damiani, Alessandro; Ferrer, Jorge; Rayas, Juan; Jorquera, Jose; Tobar, Mario; Labbe, Fernando; Laroze, David

    2013-09-01

    We have sampled both the downwelling and upwelling radiance distributions at a camp located in the southern Ellsworth Mountains on the broad expanse of Union Glacier (700 m altitude, 79° 46' S, 82° 52' W). The measurements (at 320-440 nm wavelength range) were carried out under cloudless conditions by using a sky scanner system, during a campaign (in December, 2012) meant to assess the effects of the high albedo on the radiance distribution. The angular variations observed in both the downwelling and upwelling radiance distributions increase with the wavelength. However, these variations were considerably greater in the case of the downwelling radiance than in the case of the upwelling radiance. Indeed, we found that downwelling radiance tends to be less isotropic than the corresponding upwelling radiance. Regardless of the solar zenith angle and the wavelength, the minima of the downwelling and the upwelling radiance distributions were measured close to the zenith and to the nadir, respectively. The downwelling (upwelling) radiance increased nearly monotonically toward the horizon and peaked at zenith (nadir) angles that ranged from 75° to 90°. Comparisons with the UVSPEC radiative transfer model were used to weight up the response of the downwelling radiance distribution to changes in the albedo.

  7. Experimental and Theoretical Basis for a Closed-Form Spectral BRDF Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-17

    SPECTRAL BRDF MODEL DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air University Air...of Engineering and Management AFIT-ENP-DS-15-S-021 Abstract The microfacet class of BRDF models is frequently used to calculate optical scatter from...Lpath Path radiance xx Ls Scattered radiance ↔ M Mueller matrix P Pre-factor term Q Polarization factor Rd Relative difference S Scaling relationship

  8. Quality assessment and assimilation of Megha-Tropiques SAPHIR radiances into WRF assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Randhir; Ojha, Satya P.; Kishtawal, C. M.; Pal, P. K.

    2013-07-01

    This study presents an initial assessment of the quality of radiances measured from SAPHIR (Sounder for Probing Vertical Profiles of Humidity) on board Megha-Tropiques (Indo-French joint satellite), launched by the Indian Space Research Organisation on 12 October 2011. The radiances measured from SAPHIR are compared with those simulated by the radiative transfer model (RTM) using radiosondes measurements, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder retrievals, and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) analyzed fields over the Indian subcontinent, during January to November 2012. The radiances from SAPHIR are also compared with the similar measurements available from Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) on board MetOp-A and NOAA-18/19 satellites, during January to November 2012. A limited comparison is also carried out between SAPHIR measured and the RTM computed radiances using European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analyzed fields, during May and November 2012. The comparison of SAPHIR measured radiances with RTM simulated and MHS observed radiances reveals that SAPHIR observations are of good quality. After the initial assessment of the quality of the SAPHIR radiances, these radiances have been assimilated within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) three-dimensional variational data assimilation system. Analysis/forecast cycling experiments with and without SAPHIR radiances are performed over the Indian region during the entire month of May 2012. The assimilation of SAPHIR radiances shows considerable improvements (with moisture analysis error reduction up to 30%) in the tropospheric analyses and forecast of moisture, temperature, and winds when compared to NCEP analyses and radiances measurement obtained from MHS, Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A, and High Resolution Infrared Sounder. Assimilation of SAPHIR radiances also resulted in substantial improvement in the precipitation forecast skill when compared with satellite-derived rain. Overall

  9. New format presentation for infrared spectral emittance data. Infrared spectrometry studies, phase 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, R. J. P.; Green, A. A.

    1972-01-01

    Methods for infrared radiance measurements from geological materials were studied for airborne use over terrains with minimal vegetation. The tasks of the investigation were: (1) calculation of emittance ratios, (2) comparison of IR spectral emittance data with K-band scatterometer data over Pisgah Crater, and (3) standard infrared spectral file. Published papers reporting the research are included.

  10. System for absolute measurements by interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Douglas A.

    1993-03-01

    The most common problem of interferometric sensors is their inability to measure absolute path imbalance. Presented in this paper is a signal processing system that gives absolute, unambiguous reading of optical path difference for almost any style of interferometric sensor. Key components are a wide band (incoherent) optical source, a polychromator, and FFT electronics. Advantages include no moving parts in the signal processor, no active components at the sensor location, and the use of standard single mode fiber for sensor illumination and signal transmission. Actual absolute path imbalance of the interferometer is determined without using fringe counting or other inferential techniques. The polychromator extracts the interference information that occurs at each discrete wavelength within the spectral band of the optical source. The signal processing consists of analog and digital filtering, Fast Fourier analysis, and a peak detection and interpolation algorithm. This system was originally designed for use in a remote pressure sensing application that employed a totally passive fiber optic interferometer. A performance qualification was made using a Fabry-Perot interferometer and a commercially available laser interferometer to measure the reference displacement.

  11. Spectral emission properties of a laser-produced plasma light source in the sub-200 nm range for wafer inspection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambino, Nadia; Rollinger, Bob; Hudgins, Duane; Abhari, Reza S.

    2015-07-01

    The spectral emission properties of a droplet-based laser-produced plasma are investigated in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) range. Measurements are performed with a spectrograph that operates from 30 to 180 nm with a spectral resolution of 0.1 nm. The emission spectra are recorded for different metal droplet targets, namely tin, indium, and gallium. Measurements were performed at different pressure levels of the background gas. Several characteristic emission lines are observed. The spectra are also calibrated in intensity in terms of spectral radiance to allow absolute emission power estimations from the light source in the VUV region. The presented experimental results are relevant for alternative light sources that would be needed for future wafer inspection tools. In addition, the experimental results help to determine the out-of-band radiation emission of a tin-based extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source. By tuning the type of fuel, the laser energies, and the background gas, the laser-produced plasma light source shows good capabilities to be operated as a light source that covers a spectral emission range from the EUV to the sub-200 nm range.

  12. Calibration chain design based on integrating sphere transfer radiometer for SI-traceable on-orbit spectral radiometric calibration and its uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei-Ning; Fang, Wei; Sun, Li-Wei; Cui, Li-Hong; Wang, Yu-Peng

    2016-09-01

    In order to satisfy the requirement of SI-traceable on-orbit absolute radiation calibration transfer with high accuracy for satellite remote sensors, a transfer chain consisting of a fiber coupling monochromator (FBM) and an integrating sphere transfer radiometer (ISTR) was designed in this paper. Depending on the Sun, this chain based on detectors provides precise spectral radiometric calibration and measurement to spectrometers in the reflective solar band (RSB) covering 300-2500 nm with a spectral bandwidth of 0.5-6 nm. It shortens the traditional chain based on lamp source and reduces the calibration uncertainty from 5% to 0.5% by using the cryogenic radiometer in space as a radiometric benchmark and trap detectors as secondary standard. This paper also gives a detailed uncertainty budget with reasonable distribution of each impact factor, including the weak spectral signal measurement with uncertainty of 0.28%. According to the peculiar design and comprehensive uncertainty analysis, it illustrates that the spectral radiance measurement uncertainty of the ISTR system can reach to 0.48%. The result satisfies the requirements of SI-traceable on-orbit calibration and has wider significance for expanding the application of the remote sensing data with high-quality. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41474161) and the National High-Technology Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA123703).

  13. Characterization of the oceanic light field within the photic zone: Fluctuations of downward irradiance and asymmetry of horizontal radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassmann, Ewa

    Two distinctive features of underwater light field in the upper ocean were examined: the wave-induced high-frequency light fluctuations within the near-surface layer under sunny skies, and the asymmetry of horizontal radiance within the photic layer of the ocean. To characterize the spatiotemporal statistical properties of the wave-induced light fluctuations, measurements of downward plane irradiance were made with novel instrumentation within the top 10 m layer of the ocean at depths as shallow as 10 cm under sunny skies, different solar zenith angles, and weak to moderate wind speeds. It was found that the maximum intensity of light fluctuations occurs at depths as shallow as 20 cm under the most favorable conditions for wave focusing, which correspond to high sun in a clear sky with weak wind. The strong frequency dependence of light fluctuations at shallow near-surface depths indicates dominant frequency range of 1 -- 3 Hz under favorable conditions that shifts toward lower frequencies with increasing depth. The light fluctuations were found to be spatially correlated over horizontal distances varying from few up to 10 -- 20 cm at temporal scales of 0.3 -- 1 sec (at the dominant frequency of 1 -- 3 Hz). The distance of correlation showed a tendency to increase with increasing depth, solar zenith angle, and wind speed. The observed variations in spatiotemporal statistical properties of underwater light fluctuations with depth and environmental conditions are driven largely by weakening of sunlight focusing which is associated with light scattering within the water column, in the atmosphere and at the air-sea interface. To investigate the underwater horizontal radiance field, measurements of horizontal spectral radiance in two opposite directions (solar and anti-solar azimuths) within the solar principal plane were made within the photic layer of the open ocean. The ratio of these two horizontal radiances represents the asymmetry of horizontal radiance field. In

  14. Stratospheric thickness determined directly from satellite radiance measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.; Gelman, M. E.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the use of satellite radiance data for determining the thickness of deep stratospheric layers. Empirical regression equations are shown to provide better estimates of stratospheric thickness than do mean weighted temperatures obtained from the Planck equation. The best regression equations were found for thick layers emitting a substantial portion of the CO2-band infrared radiation measured by satellites. By adding the layer thickness to the observed height field for the lower boundary, it is possible to construct constant-pressure maps at very high altitudes.

  15. Spectral ratio method for measuring emissivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.

    1992-01-01

    The spectral ratio method is based on the concept that although the spectral radiances are very sensitive to small changes in temperature the ratios are not. Only an approximate estimate of temperature is required thus, for example, we can determine the emissivity ratio to an accuracy of 1% with a temperature estimate that is only accurate to 12.5 K. Selecting the maximum value of the channel brightness temperatures is an unbiased estimate. Laboratory and field spectral data are easily converted into spectral ratio plots. The ratio method is limited by system signal:noise and spectral band-width. The images can appear quite noisy because ratios enhance high frequencies and may require spatial filtering. Atmospheric effects tend to rescale the ratios and require using an atmospheric model or a calibration site. ?? 1992.

  16. Absolute, Extreme-Ultraviolet Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor (AESSIM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    4 SUN SUN (xO.2) Neon Argon Lexan Tin 0.5 0 Helium Krypton Aluminum Inoium C Carbon 0.5 0 E Helium Xenon Titanium Indium -0.5 0 Neon Nitric Oxide Tin...required, and some concepts for solar EUV monitoring missions. 3. ACTIVITIES 3.1 Low-Power AESSIM Calibration lamp A portable secondary ’standard’ of...the Harvard College Observatory (HCO) and then tested at PTB and HCO. We tested the lamp in laboratory optical systems that had been modified to allow

  17. Analytical Green's function of the radiative transfer radiance for the infinite medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2011-03-01

    An analytical solution of the radiative transfer equation for the radiance caused by an isotropic source which is located in an infinitely extended medium was derived using the PN method. The results were compared with Monte Carlo simulations and excellent agreement was found. In addition, the radiance of the SPN approximation for the same geometry was derived. Comparison with Monte Carlo simulations showed that the SPN radiance, although being more exact than the radiance derived from diffusion theory, has relatively large errors in many relevant cases.

  18. The Effect of Cirrus Clouds on 8-13-micro Infrared Sky Radiance.

    PubMed

    Hall, F F

    1968-05-01

    An experimental investigation of ir sky radiance and radiance fluctuations in the 8-13-micro atmospheric window is reported. Measurements were made with ground-based, filtered bolometer detector radiometers under clear sky and cirrus overcast conditions. Sky radiance was measured very close to the limb of the sun to permit detection of the solar aureole caused by forward scattering by cirrus ice crystals. Polarized sky radiance was found at large zenith angles and is attributed to scattering by cirrus of thermal emission from the earth. The radiance due to tropospheric water vapor is predicted by means of a radiation chart. Measurements of clear sky radiance exceeded that predicted by the chart in all but one case. The radiance of visible cirrus greatly exceeds the radiation chart prediction. Diffraction about cirrus cloud particles leads to a prediction of a solar aureole of a size that corresponds to the measured aureole. It is concluded that even a cirrus haze, which is quite difficult for an unaided, observer to detect, can cause an excess zenith radiance of 0.1 mW cm(-2)sr(-1), which increases to twice this value at a zenith angle of 60 degrees . Even thin but visible cirrus clouds can easily produce an excess zenith radiance of 1 mW cm(-2)sr(-1), which increases by a factor 1.4 at a zenith angle of 60 degrees .

  19. Monte Carlo modelling of angular radiance in tissue phantoms and human prostate: PDT light dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Barajas, O; Ballangrud, A M; Miller, G G; Moore, R B; Tulip, J

    1997-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising technique for destroying tumours. Photosensitizing drugs presently available are not sufficiently tumour specific; hence, light dosimetry is required in order to control light exposure and thereby restrict cell kill to the target tissue to avoid damage to healthy tissue. Current light dosimetry methods rely on tissue optical characterization by fluence measurements at several points. Fluence-based tissue characterization is impractical for tumours in organs such as prostate where access by optical probes is limited and the tumours are highly optically inhomogeneous. This paper explores the potential of radiance-based light dosimetry as an alternative. Correlation is found between Monte Carlo simulation of radiance in a tissue phantom and radiance measurements made using a new radiance probe. Radiance is sensitive to variations in the tissue optical parameters, absorption coefficient mu(a), scattering coefficient mu(s), and anisotropy factor g, and therefore is potentially useful for tissue characterization. Radiance measurements have several advantages over fluence measurements. Radiance measurements provide more information from a single location, better spatial resolution of the tissue optical parameters, and higher sensitivity in discriminating between different media. However, the Monte Carlo method is too slow to be of practical value for tissue characterization by correlation of measured and simulated radiance. An analytical solution to the transport equation for radiance would be desirable as this would facilitate and increase the speed of tissue characterization.

  20. P161 Improved Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Radiance Assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Chou, Shih-Hung; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    For over 6 years, AIRS radiances have been assimilated operationally into National (e.g. Environmental Modeling Center (EMC)) and International (e.g. European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF)), operational centers; assimilated in the North American Mesoscale (NAM) since 2008. Due partly to data latency and operational constraints, hyperspectral radiance assimilation has had less impact on the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system used in the NAM and GFS. Objective of this project is to use AIRS retrieved profiles as a proxy for the AIRS radiances in situations where AIRS radiances are unable to be assimilated in the current operational system by evaluating location and magnitude of analysis increments.

  1. An Emerging ESDR: Multi-Platform Hyperspectral Infrared Radiances fromEOS-AIRS, S-NPP/JPSS CrIS, and METOP IASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strow, L. L.; Desouza-Machado, S. G.; Motteler, H.; Hepplewhite, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Space-based measurements of high-spectral resolution infrared (IR) radiances of the earth began in Sept. 2002 with the NASA EOS-AQUA AIRS instrument. The CrIS instrument on NASA's Suomi-NPP platform supplements this record in the 1:30 polar orbit, starting in 2012, and may continue for 15 years under the NOAA/NASA JPSS Program. The first of three IASI hyperspectral sounders on EUMETSAT's METOP platforms (9:30 orbit) started operation in July 2007, followed by the 2nd IASI on METOP-2 in early 2013. Development of a follow-on instrument (IASI-NG) for post METOP-3 is well underway. These instruments are sensitive to the atmospheric temperature and humidity profile, surface temperature and emissivity, and minor gases (CO2, O3, CO, CH4, N2O, CFCs, HNO3, etc.) They also have high sensitivity to clouds, especially long-wave cloud radiative forcing. The National Research Council has recommended the development of a hyperspectral IR radiance climate data set as a climate benchmark. We present here evidence that supports the use of the existing hyperspectral sounders for generation of these ESDRs and eventually CDRs. The large spatial and temporal overlap between these sensors has provided a rich data-set for inter-calibration studies that are used to characterize the accuracy of a combined ESDR radiance product. We will discuss the stability of each instrument, and inter-calibration differences (with error estimates). In addition, we have developed robust, non-statistical approaches for converting the AIRS spectral radiances into equivalent CrIS radiances, a key step in development of a long-term consistent radiance record. Finally, several examples of robust decadal changes in the earth's atmosphere using AIRS will be discussed and compared to ERA and MERRA re-analysis products (temperature, water vapor, cloud forcing). Finally, we will review the challenges involved in creating an ESDR from 3 different instruments and institutions/countries.

  2. Effects of salinity, temperature, and polarization on top of atmosphere and water leaving radiances for case 1 waters.

    PubMed

    Hollstein, André; Fischer, Jürgen

    2012-11-20

    The effects of polarization, sea water salinity, and temperature on top of atmosphere radiances and water leaving radiances (WLRs) are discussed using radiative transfer simulations for MEdium resolution imaging spectrometer (MERIS) channels from 412 to 900 nm. A coupled system of an aerosol-free atmosphere and an ocean bulk containing chlorophyll and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) (case 1 waters) was simulated. A simple, but realistic, bio-optical model was set up to relate chlorophyll concentration and wavelength to scattering matrices and absorption coefficients for chlorophyll and colored CDOM. The model of the optical properties of the sea water accounts for the salinity, temperature, and wavelength dependence of the relative refractive index, as well as the absorption and the bulk scattering coefficient. The results show that the relative difference of WLRs at zenith for a salinity of 5 practical salinity units (PSUs) and 35 PSU can reach values of 16% in the 412 nm channel, decreasing to 4% in the 900 nm channel. For the more realistic case of 25 PSU compared to 35 PSU, the effect is reduced to 5% for the 412 nm channel and decreasing to 2% for the 900 nm channel. The effect on radiance caused by changing sea water temperature is dominated by changes of sea water absorption and shows strong spectral features. For WLRs, a change of 10°C can cause relative changes of above 3%. The effects of neglecting polarization in the radiative transfer depends strongly on direction and wavelength, and can reach values of ±8% for the 412 nm channel. The effect is discussed for MERIS channels, viewing geometry, and chlorophyll content.

  3. Glue Film Thickness Measurements by Spectral Reflectance

    SciTech Connect

    B. R. Marshall

    2010-09-20

    Spectral reflectance was used to determine the thickness of thin glue layers in a study of the effect of the glue on radiance and reflectance measurements of shocked-tin substrates attached to lithium fluoride windows. Measurements based on profilometry of the components were found to be inaccurate due to flatness variations and deformation of the tin substrate under pressure during the gluing process. The accuracy of the spectral reflectance measurements were estimated to be ±0.5 μm, which was sufficient to demonstrate a convincing correlation between glue thickness and shock-generated light.

  4. High spectral resolution measurements for the ARM Program

    SciTech Connect

    Revercomb, H.E.

    1992-05-22

    This report focuses on the design and fabrication of high spectral resolution FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) instrumentation for the CART sites of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The ultimate objective of this grant is to develop three different types of instruments, named the AERI, AERI-X, and SORT. The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) is the simplest. It will be available for early deployment at the first ARM site and will be deployable at several locations in the extended network to give horizontal coverage. The AERI will be an 0.5 cm{sup {minus}1} resolution instrument, which measures accurately calibrated radiance spectra for radiation studies and for remote sensing of atmospheric state variables. The AERI-X and the SORTI are higher spectral resolution instruments for obtaining the highest practical resolution for spectroscopy at the ARM central sites. The AERI-X, like the AERI will measure atmospheric emitted radiance, but with resolutions as high as 0.1 cm{sup {minus}1}. The Solar Radiance Transmission Interferometer will measure the total transmission of the atmosphere by tracking the sun through changes in atmospheric air mass. The large solar signal makes it practical for this instrument to offer the ultimate in spectral resolution, about 0.002 cm{sup {minus}1}.

  5. Remote Determination of Cloud Temperature and Transmittance from Spectral Radiance Measurements: Method and Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    atmospherics temperatura and humidity profiles. Validation tests performed on experimental spectra demonstrate the occuracy of the method with typical...indicated as with the title.) Passive Remota Sensing Infrared Spectra Cloud Temperatura Cloud Transmittance FTIR Spectrometer Icing Hazard Detection (DCD03E.IFO - 95.02.22) UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF FORM

  6. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY INITIATIVE: CHEMICAL-FREE CLEANING OF SEMICONDUCTORS BY THE RADIANCE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Radiance Process is a patented dry process for removing contaminants from surfaces. It uses light, usually from a pulsed laser and a gas inert to the surface, to entrain released contaminants. The focus of this effort is to assess the applicability of the Radiance Process t...

  8. The effect of variations in relative spectral response on the retrieval of land surface parameters from multiple sources of remotely sensed imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyer, D.J.; Chander, G.

    2008-01-01

    Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) images , collected over Sioux Falls, South Dakota, were used to quantify the effect of spectral response on different surface materials and to develop spectral "figures-of-merit" for spectral responses covering similar, but not identical spectral bands. In this simulation, AVIRIS images were converted to radiance, then spectrally resampled to six wavelength bands commonly used for terrestrial observation. Preliminary results indicate that differences between the simulations can be attributed to variations in surface reflectance within spectral bands, and suggest influences due to water vapor absorption. Radiance simulated from the spectrally narrow Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Relative Spectral Responses (RSR) was generally higher than that using the broader Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) RSRs over most targets encountered over the test area. This is consistent with many MODIS bands being biased toward shorter wavelengths compared to corresponding ETM+ bands when viewing targets whose radiance decreases with wavelength. In some cases the higher radiance values appeared to occur where the MODIS RSR is better situated over peak reflected wavelengths. Simulation differences between MODIS & ETM+ bands in the near-infrared indicated higher MODIS radiance values that suggest the influence of water vapor absorption at 820 nanometers. This result agreed with water vapor values retrieved from the AVIRIS images themselves at around 2.7 cm precipitable water, and measurements made at a nearby AERONET node at around 2.8cm during the AVIRIS overflight ?? 2007 IEEE.

  9. Simulation of GOES-R ABI aerosol radiances using WRF-CMAQ: a case study approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, S. A.

    2014-04-01

    In anticipation of the upcoming GOES-R launch we simulate visible and near-infrared reflectances of the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) for cases of high aerosol loading containing regional haze and smoke over the eastern United States. The simulations are performed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF), Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE), and Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) models. Geostationary, satellite-derived, biomass-burning emissions are also included as an input to CMAQ. Using the CMAQ aerosol concentrations and Mie calculations, radiance is computed from the discrete ordinate atmospheric radiative transfer model. We present detailed methods for deriving aerosol extinction from WRF and CMAQ outputs. Our results show that the model simulations create a realistic set of reflectances in various aerosol scenarios. The simulated reflectances provide distinct spectral features of aerosols which are then compared to data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We also present a simple technique to synthesize green band reflectance (which will not be available on the ABI), using the model-simulated blue and red band reflectance. This study is an example of the use of air quality modeling in improving products and techniques for Earth-observing missions.

  10. Simulation of GOES-R ABI aerosol radiances using WRF-CMAQ: a case study approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, S. A.

    2013-07-01

    The primary focus of this paper is to simulate visible and near-infrared reflectances of the GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) for cases of high aerosol loading containing regional haze and smoke over the eastern United States. The simulations are performed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF), Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE), and Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) models. Geostationary satellite-derived biomass burning emissions are also included as an input to CMAQ. Using the CMAQ aerosol concentrations and Mie calculations, radiance is computed from the discrete ordinate atmospheric radiative transfer model. We present detailed methods for deriving aerosol extinction from WRF and CMAQ outputs. Our results show that the model simulations create a realistic set of reflectance in various aerosol scenarios. The simulated reflectance provides distinct spectral features of aerosols which is then compared to data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We also present a simple technique to synthesize green band reflectance (which will not be available on the ABI), using the model-simulated blue and red band reflectance. This study is an example of the use of air quality modeling in improving products and techniques for Earth observing missions.

  11. Airborne field experiments and select radiance analysis focused on SNPP validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Smith, William L.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Tian, Jialin

    2017-02-01

    The Suomi NPP (SNPP) satellite began a critical first step in building the next-generation Earth observing satellite system for the US, continuing key environmental data records that are essential for weather forecasting and climate change science. Since its launch in late 2011, two airborne field campaigns have been conducted with a primary focus on SNPP instrument and data product calibration / validation: 1) mid-latitude flights based out of Palmdale, CA during May 2013 (SNPP-1), and 2) flights over Greenland during March 2015 while based out of Keflavik, Iceland (SNPP-2). In addition to under-flying SNPP, aircraft flight profiles were defined to also obtain coincident observations with the NASA A-train (i.e. AQUA), MetOP-A, and MetOP-B advanced sounder satellites (i.e. AIRS, IASI, and CrIS), along with radiosonde and ground truth sites. The NASA LaRC National Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I) was one of the key payload sensors aboard the ER-2 aircraft during these campaigns. This presentation gives an overview of the SNPP field campaigns and shows example infrared spectral radiance inter-comparisons involving NAST-I and other measurement assets.

  12. Feasibility of quasi-random band model in evaluating atmospheric radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Mirakhur, N.

    1980-01-01

    The use of the quasi-random band model in evaluating upwelling atmospheric radiation is investigated. The spectral transmittance and total band adsorptance are evaluated for selected molecular bands by using the line by line model, quasi-random band model, exponential sum fit method, and empirical correlations, and these are compared with the available experimental results. The atmospheric transmittance and upwelling radiance were calculated by using the line by line and quasi random band models and were compared with the results of an existing program called LOWTRAN. The results obtained by the exponential sum fit and empirical relations were not in good agreement with experimental results and their use cannot be justified for atmospheric studies. The line by line model was found to be the best model for atmospheric applications, but it is not practical because of high computational costs. The results of the quasi random band model compare well with the line by line and experimental results. The use of the quasi random band model is recommended for evaluation of the atmospheric radiation.

  13. Model Calculations of Solar Spectral Irradiance in the 3.7 Micron Band for Earth Remote Sensing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven; Fontenla, Juan M.

    2006-01-01

    Since the launch of the first Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument aboard TIROS-N, measurements in the 3.7 micron atmospheric window have been exploited for use in cloud detection and screening, cloud thermodynamic phase and surface snow/ice discrimination, and quantitative cloud particle size retrievals. The utility of the band has led to the incorporation of similar channels on a number of existing satellite imagers and future operational imagers. Daytime observations in the band include both reflected solar and thermal emission energy. Since 3.7 micron channels are calibrated to a radiance scale (via onboard blackbodies), knowledge of the top-of-atmosphere solar irradiance in the spectral region is required to infer reflectance. Despite the ubiquity of 3.7 micron channels, absolute solar spectral irradiance data comes from either a single measurement campaign (Thekaekara et al. 1969) or synthetic spectra. In this study, we compare historical 3.7 micron band spectral irradiance data sets with the recent semi-empirical solar model of the quiet-Sun by Fontenla et al. (2006). The model has expected uncertainties of about 2 % in the 3.7 pm spectral region. We find that channel-averaged spectral irradiances using the observations reported by Thekaekara et al. are 3.2-4.1% greater than those derived from the Fontenla et al. model for MODIS and AVHRR instrument bandpasses; the Kurucz spectrum (1995) as included in the MODTRAN4 distribution, gives channel-averaged irradiances 1.2-1.5 % smaller than the Fontenla model. For the MODIS instrument, these solar irradiance uncertainties result in cloud microphysical retrievals uncertainties comparable with other fundamental reflectance error sources.

  14. Direct determination of the thickness of stratospheric layers from single-channel satellite radiance measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.; Gelman, M. E.

    1972-01-01

    The direct use of measured radiances for determining the thickness of stratospheric layers is investigated. Layers based at 100-10 mb, with upper boundaries at 10-0.5 mb, are investigated using a carefully selected family of stratospheric temperature profiles and computed radiances. On the basis of physical reasoning, a high correlation of thickness with radiance is anticipated for deep layers, such as the 100- to 2-mb layer (from about 15 to 43 km), that emit a substantial part of the infrared energy reaching a satellite radiometer in a particular channel. Empirical regression curves relating thickness and radiance are developed and are compared with blackbody curves obtained by substituting the blackbody temperature in the hydrostatic equation. Maximum thickness-radiance correlation is found, for each infrared channel, for the layer having the best agreement of empirical and blackbody curves.

  15. Determination of the in-flight spectral calibration of AVIRIS using atmospheric absorption features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Robert O.

    1995-01-01

    Spectral calibration of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) as data are acquired in flight is essential to quantitative analysis of the measured upwelling spectral radiance. In each spectrum measured by AVIRIS in flight, there are numerous atmospheric gas absorption bands that drive this requirement for accurate spectral calibration. If the surface and atmospheric properties are measured independently, these atmospheric absorption bands may be used to deduce the in-flight spectral calibration of an imaging spectrometer. Both the surface and atmospheric characteristics were measured for a calibration target during an in-flight calibration experiment held at Lunar Lake, Nevada on April 5, 1994. This paper uses upwelling spectral radiance predicted for the calibration target with the MODTRAN radiative transfer code to validate the spectral calibration of AVIRIS in flight.

  16. The Spectral Signature of Cloud Spatial Structure in Shortwave Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shi

    In this thesis, we aim to systematically understand the relationship between cloud spatial structure and its radiation imprints, i.e., three-dimensional (3D) cloud effects, with the ultimate goal of deriving accurate radiative energy budget estimates from space, aircraft, or ground-based observations under spatially inhomogeneous conditions. By studying the full spectral information in the measured and modeled shortwave radiation fields of heterogeneous cloud scenes sampled during aircraft field experiments, we find evidence that cloud spatial structure reveals itself through spectral signatures in the associated irradiance and radiance fields in the near-ultraviolet and visible spectral range. The spectral signature of 3D cloud effects in irradiances is apparent as a domain- wide, consistent correlation between the magnitude and spectral dependence of net horizontal photon transport. The physical mechanism of this phenomenon is molecular scattering in conjunction with cloud heterogeneity. A simple parameterization with a single parameter epsilon is developed, which holds for individual pixels and the domain as a whole. We then investigate the impact of scene parameters on the discovered correlation and find that it is upheld for a wide range of scene conditions, although the value of epsilon varies from scene to scene. The spectral signature of 3D cloud effects in radiances manifests itself as a distinct relationship between the magnitude and spectral dependence of reflectance, which cannot be reproduced in the one-dimensional (1D) radiative transfer framework. Using the spectral signature in radiances and irradiances, it is possible to infer information on net horizontal photon transport from spectral radiance perturbations on the basis of pixel populations in sub-domains of a cloud scene. We show that two different biases need to be considered when attempting radiative closure between measured and modeled irradiance fields below inhomogeneous cloud fields: the

  17. Angular dependence models for radiance to flux conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Richard N.; Suttles, John T.; Wielicki, Bruce A.

    1990-01-01

    Angular dependence models (ADM) used for converting the measured radiance to flux at the top of the atmosphere are reviewed, and emphasis is placed on the measure of their effectiveness and the implications of requiring the ADMs to satisfy reciprocity. The overall significance of the ADMs is figured out by analyzing the same satellite data with a single Lambertian model, single mean model, and the 12 Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) ADMs. It is shown that the Lambertian ADM is inadequate, while the mean ADM results in nearly unbiased fluxes but creates substantial differences for individual pixel fluxes. The standard ERBE ADM works well except for a 10-pct to 15-pct albedo growth across the scan; a modified ADM based on the standard ERBE ADM but forced to satisfy the principle of reciprocity increases the limb brightening and reduces the albedo growth but does not improve the scanner and nonscanner intercomparison.

  18. NIMS Radiance Point Spectra of Gaspra V1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.

    2014-10-01

    This data volume contains radiometrically corrected point spectra of asteroid 951 as acquired by the Galileo spacecraft Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) on October 29, 1991. They record the spectra collected as the Galileo spacecraft approached the target asteroid. These data are products of the calibration of the raw data number files gap015tn.qub, gap035tn.qub, gap036tn.qub, gap037tn.qub, and gap038tn.qub (DATA SET ID ='GO-A-NIMS-3 TUBE-V1.0') with calibration factors acquired during the first Earth/Moon encounter of the Galileo mission. These raw data .qub files are archived in the Imaging Node of the NASA Planetary Data System (PDS). The calibrated spectra consist of radiance measurements for wavelengths between 0.7 - 5.2 micrometers.

  19. Satellite microwave radiances correlated with radar rain rates over land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R. W.; Martin, D. W.; Hinton, B. B.; Weinman, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics of upwelling microwave radiation from raindrops as measured by satellite sensors are examined. The scanning multichannel microwave radiometers on board the Nimbus 7 and Seasat satellites have the capability of quantifying the perpendicularly polarized antenna temperatures at 37, 21, 18, 10.7, and 6.6 GHz. The instruments scan the earth at a constant 50 deg angle to the surface with a footprint that varies from 20-70 km. Radar rainfall measurements have an accuracy of within 60 percent, whereas a series of test measurements using SMMR data in comparison with radar data for rainfall in the same areas showed that the microwave data depicted rainfall rates with less than 1.55 mm/h error. Details of the rainfall rate algorithms used to treat the satellite microwave data are provided, noting that the identification of rainfall rates is dependent on quantifying the amount the upwelling radiance is reduced due to rainfall.

  20. Effect of forest canopy closure on incoming solar radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dottavio, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    In order to better understand the physical processes involved in defoliation assessment from remotely sensed data, a field study was designed to investigate the effect of forest canopy closure and other environmental variables on incoming solar radiation. Diffuse radiation measurements were recorded in red, infrared, and middle infrared wavelengths using the Mark 2 three band field radiometer. Results to date indicate that the percent canopy closure is the single most important variable affecting incoming solar radiation. In the visible and near infrared regions, interaction between time of day and date (defined later as solar zenith angle) also affect radiometric response. Aspect has only limited influence on radiance response. These same variables do not influence middle infrared response, however. Uniformity of the forest canopy appears to be more important. These results are compared to LANDSAT MSS classification results of gypsy moth defoliation.

  1. Effect of forest canopy closure on incoming solar radiance

    SciTech Connect

    Dottavio, C.L.

    1981-04-01

    In order to better understand the physical processes involved in defoliation assessment from remotely sensed data, a field study was designed to investigate the effect of forest canopy closure and other environmental variables on incoming solar radiation. Diffuse radiation measurements were recorded in red, infrared, and middle infrared wavelengths using the Mark 2 three band field radiometer. Results to date indicate that the percent canopy closure is the single most important variable affecting incoming solar radiation. In the visible and near infrared regions, interaction between time of day and date (defined later as solar zenith angle) also affect radiometric response. Aspect has only limited influence on radiance response. These same variables do not influence middle infrared response, however. Uniformity of the forest canopy appears to be more important. These results are compared to LANDSAT MSS classification results of gypsy moth defoliation.

  2. Remote sounding of stratospheric temperatures using high resolution radiance measurements from the IRIS-D. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallery, W. O.

    1974-01-01

    Remote sounding of stratospheric temperatures up to 3.2 millibars is attempted using high resolution (unapodized) radiance measurements in the 15 micron CO2 band from the Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer on Nimbus 4. Inversions are performed using the Chahine relaxation technique. Radiance data and simultaneous in situ temperature profiles are obtained from the Rocket/Nimbus Sounder Comparison. Numerical tests with synthetic radiance data show that the uncertainty in the retrieved temperatures due to random instrument noise is about 1.1 K when averaged over layers about 10 km thick. However, comparison of the measured radiances with the radiances calculated from the in situ profiles show the calculated radiances to be systematically higher than the measured radiances. The evidence indicates that systematic errors exist in both the radiance and the in situ measurements.

  3. Gravity Wave Variances and Propagation Derived from AIRS Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Jie; Wu, Dong L.; Eckermann, S. D.

    2012-01-01

    As the first gravity wave (GW) climatology study using nadir-viewing infrared sounders, 50 Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiance channels are selected to estimate GW variances at pressure levels between 2-100 hPa. The GW variance for each scan in the cross-track direction is derived from radiance perturbations in the scan, independently of adjacent scans along the orbit. Since the scanning swaths are perpendicular to the satellite orbits, which are inclined meridionally at most latitudes, the zonal component of GW propagation can be inferred by differencing the variances derived between the westmost and the eastmost viewing angles. Consistent with previous GW studies using various satellite instruments, monthly mean AIRS variance shows large enhancements over meridionally oriented mountain ranges as well as some islands at winter hemisphere high latitudes. Enhanced wave activities are also found above tropical deep convective regions. GWs prefer to propagate westward above mountain ranges, and eastward above deep convection. AIRS 90 field-of-views (FOVs), ranging from +48 deg. to -48 deg. off nadir, can detect large-amplitude GWs with a phase velocity propagating preferentially at steep angles (e.g., those from orographic and convective sources). The annual cycle dominates the GW variances and the preferred propagation directions for all latitudes. Indication of a weak two-year variation in the tropics is found, which is presumably related to the Quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). AIRS geometry makes its out-tracks capable of detecting GWs with vertical wavelengths substantially shorter than the thickness of instrument weighting functions. The novel discovery of AIRS capability of observing shallow inertia GWs will expand the potential of satellite GW remote sensing and provide further constraints on the GW drag parameterization schemes in the general circulation models (GCMs).

  4. An estimate of global absolute dynamic topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, C.-K.; Wunsch, C.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute dynamic topography of the world ocean is estimated from the largest scales to a short-wavelength cutoff of about 6700 km for the period July through September, 1978. The data base consisted of the time-averaged sea-surface topography determined by Seasat and geoid estimates made at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The issues are those of accuracy and resolution. Use of the altimetric surface as a geoid estimate beyond the short-wavelength cutoff reduces the spectral leakage in the estimated dynamic topography from erroneous small-scale geoid estimates without contaminating the low wavenumbers. Comparison of the result with a similarly filtered version of Levitus' (1982) historical average dynamic topography shows good qualitative agreement. There is quantitative disagreement, but it is within the estimated errors of both methods of calculation.

  5. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  6. A Sphere-Scanning Radiometer for Rapid Directional Measurements of Sky and Ground Radiance: the PARABOLA Field Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deering, D. W.; Leone, P.

    1984-01-01

    A unique field instrument, called the PARABOLA, a collapsable support boom, which is self contained and easily transportable to remote sites to enable the acquisition of radiance data for almost the complete (4 pi) sky and ground-looking hemispheres in only 11 seconds was designed. The PARABOLA samples in 15 deg instantaneous field of view sectors in three narrow bandpass spectral channels simultaneously. Field measurement on a variety of earth surface cover types using a truck boom, a specially designed pickup truck mounting system, and a hot air balloon were studied. The PARABOLA instrument has potential for climatological and other studies which require characterization of the distribution of diffuse solar radiation within the sky hemisphere.

  7. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  8. Absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A and alterporriols.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Saki; Honma, Miho; Murakami, Takanori; Tsushima, Taro; Kudo, Shinji; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Nihei, Ken-Ichi; Nehira, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Masaru

    2012-02-01

    The absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A (1) was established by observing a positive exciton couplet in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of the C3,C4-O-bis(2-naphthoyl) derivative 10 and by chemical correlations with known compound 8. Before the discussion, the relative stereochemistry of 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The shielding effect at C7'-OMe group by C1-O-benzoylation established the relative stereochemical relationship between the C8-C8' axial bonding and the C1-C4/C1'-C4' polyol moieties of alterporriols E (3), an atropisomer of the C8-C8' dimer of 1. As 3 could be obtained by dimerization of 1 in vitro, the absolute configuration of its central chirality elements (C1-C4) must be identical to those of 1. Spectral comparison between the experimental and theoretical CD spectra supported the above conclusion. Axial stereochemistry of novel C4-O-deoxy dimeric derivatives, alterporriols F (4) and G (5), were also revealed by comparison of their CD spectra to those of 2 and 3.

  9. Remotely sensed and laboratory spectral signatures of an ocean-dumped acid waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Collins, V. G.

    1977-01-01

    An ocean-dumped acid waste plume was studied by using a rapid scanning spectrometer to remotely measure ocean radiance from a helicopter. The results of these studies are presented and compared with results from sea truth samples and laboratory experiments. An ocean spectral reflectance signature and a laboratory spectral transmission signature were established for the iron-acid waste pollutant. The spectrally and chemically significant component of the acid waste pollutant was determined to be ferric iron.

  10. Refinement of the ice absorption spectrum in the visible using radiance profile measurements in Antarctic snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Ghislain; Libois, Quentin; Arnaud, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    Ice is a highly transparent material in the visible. According to the most widely used database (IA2008; Warren and Brandt, 2008), the ice absorption coefficient reaches values lower than 10-3 m-1 around 400 nm. These values were obtained from a vertical profile of spectral radiance measured in a single snow layer at Dome C in Antarctica. We reproduced this experiment using an optical fiber inserted in the snow to record 56 profiles from which 70 homogeneous layers were identified. Applying the same estimation method on every layer yields 70 ice absorption spectra. They present a significant variability but absorption coefficients are overall larger than IA2008 by 1 order of magnitude at 400-450 nm. We devised another estimation method based on Bayesian inference that treats all the profiles simultaneously. It reduces the statistical variability and confirms the higher absorption, around 2 × 10-2 m-1 near the minimum at 440 nm. We explore potential instrumental artifacts by developing a 3-D radiative transfer model able to explicitly account for the presence of the fiber in the snow. The simulation shows that the radiance profile is indeed perturbed by the fiber intrusion, but the error on the ice absorption estimate is not larger than a factor of 2. This is insufficient to explain the difference between our new estimate and IA2008. The same conclusion applies regarding the plausible contamination by black carbon or dust, concentrations reported in the literature are insufficient. Considering the large number of profiles acquired for this study and other estimates from the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA), we nevertheless estimate that ice absorption values around 10-2 m-1 at the minimum are more likely than under 10-3 m-1. A new estimate in the range 400-600 nm is provided for future modeling of snow, cloud, and sea-ice optical properties. Most importantly, we recommend that modeling studies take into account the large uncertainty of the ice

  11. "Albedo dome": a method for measuring spectral flux-reflectance in a laboratory for media with long optical paths.

    PubMed

    Light, Bonnie; Carns, Regina C; Warren, Stephen G

    2015-06-10

    A method is presented for accurate measurement of spectral flux-reflectance (albedo) in a laboratory, for media with long optical path lengths, such as snow and ice. The approach uses an acrylic hemispheric dome, which, when placed over the surface being studied, serves two functions: (i) it creates an overcast "sky" to illuminate the target surface from all directions within a hemisphere, and (ii) serves as a platform for measuring incident and backscattered spectral radiances, which can be integrated to obtain fluxes. The fluxes are relative measurements and because their ratio is used to determine flux-reflectance, no absolute radiometric calibrations are required. The dome and surface must meet minimum size requirements based on the scattering properties of the surface. This technique is suited for media with long photon path lengths since the backscattered illumination is collected over a large enough area to include photons that reemerge from the domain far from their point of entry because of multiple scattering and small absorption. Comparison between field and laboratory albedo of a portable test surface demonstrates the viability of this method.

  12. Comparative study of spectral diffuse-only and diffuse-specular radiative transfer models and field-collected data in the LWIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Dimitar M.; Marciniak, Michael A.; Meola, Joseph

    2015-09-01

    The sensitivity of hyper-spectral remote sensing to the directional reflectance of surfaces was studied using both laboratory and field measurements. Namely, the effects of the specular- and diffuse-reflectance properties of a set of eight samples, ranging from high to low in both total reflectance and specularity, on diffuse-only and diffusespecular radiative transfer models in the long-wave infrared (LWIR, 7-14-μm wavelength) were studied. The samples were measured in the field as a set of eight panels, each in two orientations, with surface normal pointing toward zenith and tipped at 45° from zenith. The field-collected data also included down-welling spectral sky radiance at several angles from zenith to the horizon, ground spectral radiance, panel spectral radiances in both orientations, Infragold® spectral radiances in both orientations near each panel location, and panel temperatures. Laboratory measurements included spectral hemispherical, specular and diffuse directional reflectance (HDR, SDR and DDR) for each sample for several reflectance angles with respect to the surface normal. The diffuse-only radiative transfer model used the HDR data, while the diffuse-specular model used the SDR and DDR data. Both calculated spectral reflected and self-emitted radiances for each panel, using the field-collected sky radiance data to avoid uncertainties associated with atmospheric models. The modeled spectral radiances were then compared to the field-collected values to quantify differences in moving from an HDR-based model to an SDR/DDR model in the LWIR for a variety of surface-reflectance types.

  13. Database applicaton for absolute spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, Valery V.; Shumko, Sergiy

    2002-12-01

    32-bit database application with multidocument interface for Windows has been developed to calculate absolute energy distributions of observed spectra. The original database contains wavelength calibrated observed spectra which had been already passed through apparatus reductions such as flatfielding, background and apparatus noise subtracting. Absolute energy distributions of observed spectra are defined in unique scale by means of registering them simultaneously with artificial intensity standard. Observations of sequence of spectrophotometric standards are used to define absolute energy of the artificial standard. Observations of spectrophotometric standards are used to define optical extinction in selected moments. FFT algorithm implemented in the application allows performing convolution (deconvolution) spectra with user-defined PSF. The object-oriented interface has been created using facilities of C++ libraries. Client/server model with Windows Socket functionality based on TCP/IP protocol is used to develop the application. It supports Dynamic Data Exchange conversation in server mode and uses Microsoft Exchange communication facilities.

  14. Constrained adaptive bias correction for satellite radiances assimilation in the ECMWF 4D-Var

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei; Bormann, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Satellite radiance observations are typically affected by biases that arise from uncertainties in the absolute calibration, the radiative transfer modeling, or other aspects. These biases have to be removed for the successful assimilation of the data in NWP systems. Two key problems have been identified in bias correction: Firstly, bias corrections can drift towards unrealistic values in regions where there is strong model error and relatively few "anchor" observations, ie, observations that have little systematic error and therefore allow the separation between model and observation bias. Examples where this has been particularly problematic are channels sensitive to ozone or stratospheric temperature. Secondly, there is undesired interaction between the quality control and bias correction for observations where bias-corrected observation departures are used for quality control and where these departures show skewed distributions (e.g., in case of cloud detection). In the study, we investigated potential solutions to these problems by providing further constraints using potential available information, such as constraints on the size of the bias correction and innovative bias correction metrics using uncertainty estimation from calibration and radiative transfer. This has been studied in the full ECMWF global 4D-Var system, using data from microwave sounders which are sensitive to stratospheric temperature. The resulting enhanced bias corrections was assessed in the context of other assimilated observations (in particular radiosondes and GPS radio occultation measurements), and through comparisons of MLS temperature retrieval data in stratosphere and mesosphere. The constrained adaptive bias correction of AMSU-A stratospheric sounding channels reduces the biases in stratosphere and improves the medium range forecasts in both stratosphere and troposphere.

  15. Absolute classification with unsupervised clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An absolute classification algorithm is proposed in which the class definition through training samples or otherwise is required only for a particular class of interest. The absolute classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering when one cluster is known initially. The definitions and statistics of the other classes are automatically developed through the weighted unsupervised clustering procedure, which is developed to keep the cluster corresponding to the class of interest from losing its identity as the class of interest. Once all the classes are developed, a conventional relative classifier such as the maximum-likelihood classifier is used in the classification.

  16. Impact of AIRS radiance in the NCUM 4D-VAR assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Desamsetti; Indira Rani, S.; Mallick, Swapan; George, John P.; Sharma, Priti

    2016-04-01

    The hyperspectral radiances from Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS), on board NASA-AQUA satellite, have been processed through the Observation Processing System (OPS) and assimilated in the Variational Assimilation (VAR) System of NCMRWF Unified Model (NCUM). Numerical experiments are conducted in order to study the impact of the AIRS radiance in the NCUM analysis and forecast system. NCMRWF receives AIRS radiance from EUMETCAST through MOSDAC. AIRS is a grating spectrometer having 2378 channels covering the thermal infrared spectrum between 3 and 15 μm. Out of 2378 channels, 324 channels are selected for assimilation according to the peaking of weighting function and meteorological importance. According to the surface type and day-night conditions, some of the channels are not assimilated in the VAR. Observation Simulation Experiments (OSEs) are conducted for a period of 15 days to see the impact of AIRS radiances in NCUM. Statistical parameters like bias and RMSE are calculated to see the real impact of AIRS radiances in the assimilation system. Assimilation of AIRS in the NCUM system reduced the bias and RMSE in the radiances from instruments onboard other satellites. The impact of AIRS is clearly seen in the hyperspectral radiances like IASI and CrIS and also in infrared (HIRS) and microwave (AMSU, ATMS, etc.) sensors.

  17. Localizing the impact of satellite radiance observations using a global group ensemble filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Lili; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Whitaker, Jeffrey S.

    2016-06-01

    Assimilation of satellite radiances has been proven to have positive impacts on the forecast skill, especially for regions with sparse conventional observations. Localization is an essential component to effectively assimilate satellite radiances in ensemble Kalman filters with affordable ensemble sizes. However, localizing the impact of radiance observations is not straightforward, since their location and separation from grid point model variables are not well defined. A global group filter (GGF) is applied here to provide a theoretical estimate of vertical localization functions for radiance observations being assimilated for global numerical weather prediction. As an extension of the hierarchical ensemble filter, the GGF uses groups of climatological ensembles to provide an estimated localization function that reduces the erroneous increments due to ensemble correlation sampling error. Results from an idealized simulation with known background error covariances show that the GGF localization function is superior to the optimal Gaspari and Cohn (GC) localization function. When the GGF is applied to the AMSU-A radiances, it can provide different localization functions for different channels, which indicates the complexity and large computational cost of tuning the localization scales for radiance observations. The GC, GGF, and fitted GGF (FGGF) localization functions are compared using experiments with the NCEP GFS and the NOAA operational EnKF. Verifications relative to the conventional observations, AMSU-A radiances, and the ECMWF analyses show that the GGF and FGGF have smaller errors than GC except in the tropics, and the advantages of the GGF and FGGF persist through 120 h forecast lead time.

  18. SeaWiFS technical report series. Volume 23: SeaWiFS prelaunch radiometric calibration and spectral characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Robert A.; Holmes, Alan W.; Barnes, William L.; Esaias, Wayne E.; Mcclain, Charles R.; Svitek, Tomas; Hooker, Stanford B.; Firestone, Elaine R.; Acker, James G.

    1994-01-01

    Based on the operating characteristics of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), calibration equations have been developed that allow conversion of the counts from the radiometer into Earth-existing radiances. These radiances are the geophysical properties the instrument has been designed to measure. SeaWiFS uses bilinear gains to allow high sensitivity measurements of ocean-leaving radiances and low sensitivity measurements of radiances from clouds, which are much brighter than the ocean. The calculation of these bilinear gains is central to the calibration equations. Several other factors within these equations are also included. Among these are the spectral responses of the eight SeaWiFS bands. A band's spectral response includes the ability of the band to isolate a portion of the electromagnetic spectrum and the amount of light that lies outside of that region. The latter is termed out-of-band response. In the calibration procedure, some of the counts from the instrument are produced by radiance in the out-of-band region. The number of those counts for each band is a function of the spectral shape of the source. For the SeaWiFS calibration equations, the out-of-band responses are converted from those for the laboratory source into those for a source with the spectral shape of solar flux. The solar flux, unlike the laboratory calibration, approximates the spectral shape of the Earth-existing radiance from the oceans. This conversion modifies the results from the laboratory radiometric calibration by 1-4 percent, depending on the band. These and other factors in the SeaWiFS calibration equations are presented here, both for users of the SeaWiFS data set and for researchers making ground-based radiance measurements in support of Sea WiFS.

  19. Electroacoustical imaging technique for encoding incoherent radiance fields as Gabor elementary signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fales, C. L.; Huck, F. O.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is presented for directly encoding incoherent radiance fields as Gabor elementary signals. This technique uses an electro-acoustic sensor to modulate the electronic charges induced by the incident radiance field with the electric fields generated by Gaussian modulated sinusoidal acoustic waves. The resultant signal carries the amplitude and phase information required for localizing spatial frequencies of the radiance field. These localized spatial frequency representations provide a link between the either geometric or Fourier transform representations currently used in computer vision and pattern recognition.

  20. Factors limiting the discrimination and quantification of terrestrial features using remotely sensed radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duggin, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, factors controlling the radiance incident on a remote-sensing device and the interaction of the sensor with upwelling radiance are considered. Attention is also given to systematic and random radiance variations across an image: while the former may be corrected for (to an extent) the latter may not, so that it is necessary to be aware of the impact of random variations on target identification, discrimination and quantification. Both the optical reflective and the thermal-infrared parts of the spectrum are considered. Equations are presented to concisely illustrate the processes involved.

  1. Absolute intensity of radiation emitted by uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.; Lee, J. H.; Mcfarland, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    The absolute intensity of radiation emitted by fissioning and nonfissioning uranium plasmas in the spectral range from 350 nm to 1000 nm was measured. The plasma was produced in a plasma-focus apparatus and the plasma properties are simular to those anticipated for plasma-core nuclear reactors. The results are expected to contribute to the establishment of design criteria for the development of plasma-core reactors.

  2. Absolute configuration of novel bioactive flavonoids from Tephrosia purpurea.

    PubMed

    Chang, L C; Chávez, D; Song, L L; Farnsworth, N R; Pezzuto, J M; Kinghorn, A D

    2000-02-24

    [structure: see text] Three novel flavonoids, (+)-tephrorins A (1) and B (2) and (+)-tephrosone (3), were isolated from Tephrosia purpurea. Their structures were elucidated by NMR spectral analysis, and their absolute configurations were determined by Mosher ester methodology. Compounds 1 and 2 are flavanones containing an unusual tetrahydrofuran moiety. Compounds 1-3 were evaluated for their potential cancer chemopreventive properties using a cell-based quinone reductase induction assay.

  3. Observational constraints on atmospheric radiaitve feedbacks: absolute accuracy and next-generation observing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykema, J. A.; Hanssen, L. M.; Mekhontsev, S.; Anderson, J.

    2012-12-01

    The central role of atmospheric radiative feedbacks to understanding and projecting climate change calls for a robust observational system. Recent studies have shown the value of space-based measurements for putting quantitative constraints on a range of radiative feedback processes through a fingerprinting method applied to long-term observational records. More recent work has suggested the value of demonstrably accurate measurements to disentangle model error from observational uncertainties within reanalysis systems, potentially yielding improved representations of feedback processes within just a few years. Both of these methods rely on space-based measurements that can be objectively tested for accuracy on-orbit. A new class of mission has been proposed that incorporates the same type of empirical tests for accuracy as used in the laboratory into a space-based sensor. One example of such a mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO), a new mission suggested by the 2006 National Research Council Decadal Survey. CLARREO includes three sensor types: thermal infrared, microwave, and reflected shortwave. This paper presents a laboratory demonstration of prototype systems for testing the on-orbit accuracy of a thermal infrared sensor for CLARREO. These systems utilize infrared lasers to provide monochromatic light sources to quantitatively determine the optical properties of materials. These infrared optical properties are major determinants of the on-orbit radiometric performance of a thermal infrared sensor. For this reason, reliable quantitative information (including uncertainty) that tracks any changes in relevant infrared materials over the mission lifetime is essential to objective assessment of instrument accuracy. The practicality of mid-infrared lasers for these applications is due to the availability and continued evolution of compact, high-efficiency Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs). These lasers can provide over 100 m

  4. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  5. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  6. Vicarious absolute radiometric calibration of GF-2 PMS2 sensor using permanent artificial targets in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaokai; Li, Chuanrong; Ma, Lingling; Wang, Ning; Qian, Yonggang; Tang, Lingli

    2016-10-01

    GF-2, launched on August 19 2014, is one of the high-resolution land resource observing satellite of the China GF series satellites plan. The radiometric performance evaluation of the onboard optical pan and multispectral (PMS2) sensor of GF-2 satellite is very important for the further application of the data. And, the vicarious absolute radiometric calibration approach is one of the most useful way to monitor the radiometric performance of the onboard optical sensors. In this study, the traditional reflectance-based method is used to vicarious radiometrically calibrate the onboard PMS2 sensor of GF-2 satellite using three black, gray and white reflected permanent artificial targets located in the AOE Baotou site in China. Vicarious field calibration campaign were carried out in the AOE-Baotou calibration site on 22 April 2016. And, the absolute radiometric calibration coefficients were determined with in situ measured atmospheric parameters and surface reflectance of the permanent artificial calibration targets. The predicted TOA radiance of a selected desert area with our determined calibrated coefficients were compared with the official distributed calibration coefficients. Comparison results show a good consistent and the mean relative difference of the multispectral channels is less than 5%. Uncertainty analysis was also carried out and a total uncertainty with 3.87% is determined of the TOA radiance.

  7. Relationship of crop radiance to alfalfa agronomic values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.; Elgin, J. H., Jr.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III

    1980-01-01

    Red and photographic infrared spectral data of alfalfa were collected at the time of the third and fourth cuttings using a hand-held radiometer for the earlier alfalfa cutting. Significant linear and non-linear correlation coefficients were found between the spectral variables and plant height, biomass, forage water content, and estimated canopy cover. For the alfalfa of the later cutting, which had experienced a period of severe drought stress which limited growth, the spectral variables were found to be highly correlated with the estimated drought scores.

  8. A fast radiative transfer model for the assimilation of water vapor radiances from the Kalpana very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Randhir; Rayer, Peter; Saunders, Roger; Migliorini, Stefano; Brugge, Roger; O'Neill, Alan

    2009-04-01

    A fast radiative transfer model (RTM) to compute emitted infrared radiances for a very high resolution radiometer (VHRR), onboard the operational Indian geostationary satellite Kalpana has been developed and verified. This work is a step towards the assimilation of Kalpana water vapor (WV) radiances into numerical weather prediction models. The fast RTM uses a regression-based approach to parameterize channel-specific convolved level to space transmittances. A comparison between the fast RTM and the line-by-line RTM demonstrated that the fast RTM can simulate line-by-line radiances for the Kalpana WV channel to an accuracy better than the instrument noise, while offering more rapid radiance calculations. A comparison of clear sky radiances of the Kalpana WV channel with the ECMWF model first guess radiances is also presented, aiming to demonstrate the fast RTM performance with the real observations. In order to assimilate the radiances from Kalpana, a simple scheme for bias correction has been suggested.

  9. Determination and error analysis of emittance and spectral emittance measurements by remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Kumar, R.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. From the theory of remote sensing of surface temperatures, an equation of the upper bound of absolute error of emittance was determined. It showed that the absolute error decreased with an increase in contact temperature, whereas, it increased with an increase in environmental integrated radiant flux density. Change in emittance had little effect on the absolute error. A plot of the difference between temperature and band radiance temperature vs. emittance was provided for the wavelength intervals: 4.5 to 5.5 microns, 8 to 13.5 microns, and 10.2 to 12.5 microns.

  10. Aerosol retrieval in hazy atmosphere by using polarization and radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, S.; Sano, I.; Nakata, M.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol retrieval is achieved by radiative transfer simulation in the Earth atmosphere model. This work intends to propose an algorithm for multiple light scattering simulations in the hazy polarized radiation field. We have already solved the scalar radiative transfer problem in the case of haze episodes with dense concentrations of atmospheric aerosols by the method of successive order of scattering, which is named scalar-MSOS. The term "scalar" indicates radiance alone in the treatment of radiative transfer problem against "vector" involving polarized radiation field. The satellite polarimetric sensor POLDER-1, 2, 3 has shown that the spectro-photopolarimetry of terrestrial atmosphere is very useful for observation of the Earth, especially for aerosols. JAXA has been developing the new Earth observing system, GCOM satellite. GCOM-C will board the polarimetric sensor SGLI in 2017. It is highly likely that large-scale aerosol episodes will continue to occur, because the air pollution becomes to be severe due to both the increasing emissions of the anthropogenic aerosols and the complicated behavior of natural aerosols. Then many potential applications for the kind of radiation simulation by MSOS considering the polarization information denoted by Stokes parameters (I, Q, U, V), named vector-MSOS, are desired. It is shown here that dense aerosol episodes can be well simulated by a semi-infinite radiation model composed of the proposed aerosol models. In addition our vector-MSOS is examined in practice by combination use of PARASOL/POLDER, GOSAT/CAI and Aqua/MODIS data.

  11. Infrared radiance analysis from the SNPP airborne field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larar, Allen M.; Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Smith, William L.

    2014-11-01

    Experimental field campaigns, including satellite under-flights with well-calibrated FTS sensors aboard high-altitude aircraft, are an essential part of the satellite measurement system validation task aimed at improving observations of the Earth's atmosphere, clouds, and surface for enabling enhancements in weather prediction, climate monitoring capability, and environmental change detection. The Suomi NPP (SNPP) airborne field campaign was conducted during the 6 - 31 May, 2013 timeframe based out of Palmdale, CA, and focused on under-flights of the SNPP satellite with the NASA ER-2 aircraft in order to perform cal/val of the satellite instruments and their corresponding data products. Aircraft flight profiles were designed to under-fly multiple satellites within a single sortie, when feasible, to address satellite sensor validation and cross-validation; specifically, in addition to under-flying SNPP, flight profiles were defined to also obtain data coincident with the NASA A-train (i.e. AQUA), MetOP-A, and MetOP-B satellites to enable intercomparisons with instruments aboard those platforms (i.e. AIRS, IASI, and CrIS). This presentation focuses on radiance analysis from the SNPP airborne field campaign with a particular emphasis on NAST-I intercomparisons with the Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CrIS).

  12. Multi-Spectral Cloud Property Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Barbara E.; Lynch, R

    1999-01-01

    Despite numerous studies to retrieve cloud properties using infrared measurements the information content of the data has not yet been fully exploited. In an effort to more fully utilize the information content of infrared measurements, we have developed a multi-spectral technique for retrieving effective cloud particle size, optical depth and effective cloud temperature. While applicable to all cloud types, we begin by validating our retrieval technique through analysis of MS spectral radiances obtained during the SUCCESS field campaign over the ARM SGP CART facility, and compare our retrieval product with lidar and MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) measurement results. The technique is then applied to the Nimbus-4 MS infrared spectral measurements to obtain global cloud information.

  13. Market analysis, energy savings potential, and future development requirements for Radiance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy (CE), Building Equipment Division has funded the development of a sophisticated computer rendering program called Radiance at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL). The project review study included: (1) Surveys of the lighting profession to determine how designers would use an improved, user-friendly Radiance, (2) Elucidation of features, including how Radiance could be used to save energy, which could be incorporated into Radiance to facilitate its more widespread use, (3) Outline of a development plan and determination of what costs the DOE might incur if it were to proceed with the development of an improved version, and (4) Weighing the anticipated development costs against anticipated energy-saving benefits.

  14. Effect of aerosol variation on radiance in the earth's atmosphere-ocean system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plass, G. N.; Kattawar, G. W.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the radiance at the top and bottom of the atmosphere with a realistic model of both the atmosphere and ocean. It is found that the upward flux at the top of the atmosphere, as well as the angular distribution of the radiation, changes appreciably as the aerosol amount increases from normal to ten times normal. At the same time, the upward and downward radiance just above the ocean surface undergoes important changes. The radiance does not change appreciably with variations in the aerosol distribution with height so long as the total aerosol amount remains constant. Similarly, changes in the ozone amount cause only small changes in the radiance at the wavelengths considered (0.7, 0.9, and 1.67 micron). Very little radiation returns to the atmosphere from the ocean at 0.9 and 1.67 micron because of the high absorption of water at these wavelengths.

  15. HYTHIRM Radiance Modeling and Image Analyses in Support of STS-119, STS-125 and STS-128 Space Shuttle Hypersonic Re-entries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, David M.; Spisz, Thomas S.; Taylor, Jeff C.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Tomek, Deborah M.; Tietjen, Alan B.; Tack, Steve; Bush, Brett C.

    2010-01-01

    We provide the first geometrically accurate (i.e., 3-D) temperature maps of the entire windward surface of the Space Shuttle during hypersonic reentry. To accomplish this task we began with estimated surface temperatures derived from CFD models at integral high Mach numbers and used them, the Shuttle's surface properties and reasonable estimates of the sensor-to-target geometry to predict the emitted spectral radiance from the surface (in units of W sr-1 m-2 nm-1). These data were converted to sensor counts using properties of the sensor (e.g. aperture, spectral band, and various efficiencies), the expected background, and the atmosphere transmission to inform the optimal settings for the near-infrared and midwave IR cameras on the Cast Glance aircraft. Once these data were collected, calibrated, edited, registered and co-added we formed both 2-D maps of the scene in the above units and 3-D maps of the bottom surface in temperature that could be compared with not only the initial inputs but also thermocouple data from the Shuttle itself. The 3-D temperature mapping process was based on the initial radiance modeling process. Here temperatures were guessed for each node in a well-resolved 3-D framework, a radiance model was produced and compared to the processed imagery, and corrections to the temperature were estimated until the iterative process converged. This process did very well in characterizing the temperature structure of the large asymmetric boundary layer transition the covered much of the starboard bottom surface of STS-119 Discovery. Both internally estimated accuracies and differences with CFD models and thermocouple measurements are at most a few percent. The technique did less well characterizing the temperature structure of the turbulent wedge behind the trip due to limitations in understanding the true sensor resolution. (Note: Those less inclined to read the entire paper are encouraged to read an Executive Summary provided at the end.)

  16. Assessment of the first radiances received from the VSSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chesters, D.; Uccellini, L. W.; Montgomery, H.; Mostek, A.; Robinson, W.

    1981-01-01

    The first orderly, calibrated radiances from the VAS-D instrument on the GOES-4 satellite are examined for: image quality, radiometric precision, radiation transfer verification at clear air radiosonde sites, regression retrieval accuracy, and mesoscale analysis features. Postlaunch problems involving calibration and data processing irregularities of scientific or operational significance are included. The radiances provide good visual and relative radiometric data for empirically conditioned retrievals of mesoscale temperature and moisture fields in clear air.

  17. Horizon Brightness Revisited: Measurements and a Model of Clear-Sky Radiances

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-20

    Clear daytime skies persistently display a subtle local maximum of radiance near the astronomical horizon. Spectroradiometry and digital image analysis confirm this maximum’s reality, and they show that its angular width and elevation vary with solar elevation, azimuth relative to the Sun, and aerosol optical depth. Many existing models of atmospheric scattering do not generate this near-horizon radiance maximum, but a simple second-order scattering model does, and it reproduces many of the maximum’s details.

  18. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  19. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  20. Physics of negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  1. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  2. Spectral and Spread Spectral Teleportation

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S

    2010-01-01

    We report how quantum information encoded into the spectral degree of freedom of a single-photon state is teleported using a finite spectrally entangled biphoton state. We further demonstrate how the bandwidth of a teleported waveform can be controllably and coherently dilated using a spread spectral variant of teleportation. We present analytical fidelities for spectral and spread spectral teleportation when complex-valued Gaussian states are prepared using a proposed experimental approach, and we discuss the utility of these techniques for integrating broad-bandwidth photonic qubits with narrow-bandwidth receivers in quantum communication systems.

  3. CONTINUATION OF DATA ANALYSIS SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT FOR THE ATMOSPHERIC EMITTED RADIANCE INTER- FEROMETER (AERI)

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Knuteson; Wayne Feltz; Shepard Clough

    2005-09-30

    Data from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) has been analyzed under the ARM Fourier Transform Data Analysis Tools science team project. A portion of the effort was accomplished through a subcontract to S. A. Clough of Atmospheric Environmental Research (AER), Inc. This section of the proposal highlights a few important accomplishments obtained during the past grant period. Specific accomplishments include: 1) The AERIplus temperature and moisture retrieval algorithm (Feltz et al. 2003, 2005) has now implemented a new fast model based upon LBLRTM. The fast model provides a doubling of vertical resolution within the first 100 hPa of atmosphere (surface to 900 hPa) from 10 hPa spacing to 5 hPa. This algorithm has been implemented at Pacific Northwest National Laboratories to upgrade previous AERI retrieval software. A peer reviewed paper has been published with regard to this work along with Value Added Product (VAP) technical document available through ARM web site. 2) Developed an objective methodology to detect planetary boundary layer (PBL) height using the AERI derived potential temperature field. AERI temperature and moisture data are also used to correlate the perturbation temperature and moisture in time within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) to view the structure of PBL turbulence and convection. 3) The temporal resolution of the DOE ARM AERI systems is now being increased to less than 20 seconds (currently ~ 8 minutes depending on system). The University of Wisconsin mobile AERI system was deployed three times (Texas 2002 at SGP, CRYSTAL-FACE in southern Florida, and AWEX 2003 at SGP) collecting data at 40 second temporal resolution. The DOE ARM science team has requested that all DOE ARM AERI systems be upgraded to run in rapid sampling mode (including the ARM Mobile Facility AERI) to provide improved sampling of changing cloud characteristics using high spectral resolution infrared data. This grant has facilitated in the

  4. IASI hyperspectral radiances in the NCMRWF 4D-VAR assimilation system: OSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Priti; Indira Rani, S.; Mallick, Swapan; Srinivas, D.; George, John P.; Dasgupta, Munmun

    2016-04-01

    Accuracy of global NWP depends more on the contribution of satellite data than the surface based observations. This is achieved through the better usage of satellite data within the data assimilation system. Efforts are going on at NCMRWF to add more and more satellite data in the assimilation system both from Indian and international satellites in geostationary and polar orbits. Impact of the new dataset is assessed through Observation System Experiments (OSEs), through which the impact of the data is evaluated comparing the forecast output with that of a control run. This paper discusses one such OSEs with Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI) onboard MetOp-A and B. IASI is the main payload instrument for the purpose of supporting NWP. IASI provides information on the vertical structure of the atmospheric temperature and humidity with an accuracy of 1K and a vertical resolution of 1 km, which is necessary to improve NWP. IASI measures the radiance emitted from the Earth in 8641 channels, covering the spectral interval 645-2760 cm-1. The high volume data resulting from IASI presents many challenges, particularly in the area of assimilation. Out of these 8641 channels, 314 channels are selected depending on the relevance of information in each channel to assimilate in the NCMRWF 4D-VAR assimilation system. Studies show that the use of IASI data in NWP accounts for 40% of the impact of all satellite observations in the NWP forecasts, especially microwave and hyperspectral infrared sounding techniques are found to give the largest impacts

  5. Implementation and application of an interactive user-friendly validation software for RADIANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Anand; Boonn, William W.; Kim, Woojin; Cook, Tessa S.

    2012-02-01

    RADIANCE extracts CT dose parameters from dose sheets using optical character recognition and stores the data in a relational database. To facilitate validation of RADIANCE's performance, a simple user interface was initially implemented and about 300 records were evaluated. Here, we extend this interface to achieve a wider variety of functions and perform a larger-scale validation. The validator uses some data from the RADIANCE database to prepopulate quality-testing fields, such as correspondence between calculated and reported total dose-length product. The interface also displays relevant parameters from the DICOM headers. A total of 5,098 dose sheets were used to test the performance accuracy of RADIANCE in dose data extraction. Several search criteria were implemented. All records were searchable by accession number, study date, or dose parameters beyond chosen thresholds. Validated records were searchable according to additional criteria from validation inputs. An error rate of 0.303% was demonstrated in the validation. Dose monitoring is increasingly important and RADIANCE provides an open-source solution with a high level of accuracy. The RADIANCE validator has been updated to enable users to test the integrity of their installation and verify that their dose monitoring is accurate and effective.

  6. A Fast Radiative Transfer Parameterization Under Cloudy Condition in Solar Spectral Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Liu, X.; Yang, P.; Wang, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) system, which is proposed and developed by NASA, will directly measure the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (IR), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (RS), and radio occultation (RO). IR, RS, and RO measurements provide information on the most critical but least understood climate forcings, responses, and feedbacks associated with the vertical distribution of atmospheric temperature and water vapor, broadband reflected and emitted radiative fluxes, cloud properties, surface albedo, and surface skin temperature. To perform Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE) for long term climate observations, accurate and fast radiative transfer models are needed. The principal component-based radiative transfer model (PCRTM) is one of the efforts devoted to the development of fast radiative transfer models for simulating radiances and reflecatance observed by various hyperspectral instruments. Retrieval algorithm based on PCRTM forward model has been developed for AIRS, NAST, IASI, and CrIS. It is very fast and very accurate relative to the training radiative transfer model. In this work, we are extending PCRTM to UV-VIS-near IR spectral region. To implement faster cloudy radiative transfer calculations, we carefully investigated the radiative transfer process under cloud condition. The cloud bidirectional reflectance was parameterized based on off-line 36-stream multiple scattering calculations while few other lookup tables were generated to describe the effective transmittance and reflectance of the cloud-clear-sky coupling system in solar spectral region. The bidirectional reflectance or the irradiance measured by satellite may be calculated using a simple fast radiative transfer model providing the type of cloud (ice or water), optical depth of the cloud, optical depth of both atmospheric trace gases above and below clouds, particle size of the cloud, as well

  7. Validity Assessment of Pixel Linear Spectral Mixing Through Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasheri, M. R.; Dehnavi, S.; Maghsoudi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In order to understand the characteristics of the data collected by hyperspectral imaging systems, it is important to discuss the physics behind the scene radiance field incident on the imaging system. A dominant effect in hyperspectral remote sensing is the mixing of radiant energies contributed from different materials present in a given pixel. The basic assumption of mixture modelling is that within a given scene, the surface is covered by a small number of distinct materials that have relatively constant spectral properties. It is most common to assume that the radiance reflected by different materials in a pixel can spectrally combine in a linear additive manner to produce the pixel radiance/reflectance, even when that might not be the case e.g. where the mixing process leads to nonlinear combinations of the radiance and where the linear assumption fails to hold. This can occur where there is significant relative three-dimensional structure within a given pixel. Without detailed knowledge of the dimensional structure, it can be very difficult to correctly ``un-mix'' the contributions of the various materials. This work aims to evaluate the correctness of the linear assumption in the mixture modelling using some laboratory measurements. Study was conducted using some sheets made of cellulose materials of different colours in 400-800 nm spectral range. Experimental results have shown that a correction term must be applied to the gains and offsets in the linear model. The obtained results can be extended to satellite sensors that acquire images in the above mentioned spectral range.

  8. Influence of Humidity on the Aerosol Scattering Coefficient and Its Effect on the Upwelling Radiance During ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, B. S.; Hegg, D. A.; Covert, D. S.; Collins, D.; Noone, K.; Oestroem, E.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Durkee, P. A.; Jonsson, H.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol scattering coefficients (sigma(sub sp)) have been measured over the ocean at different relative humidities (RH) as a function of attitude in the region surrounding the Canary Islands during the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June and July 1997. The data were collected by the University of Washington passive humidigraph (UWPH) mounted on the Pelican research aircraft. Concurrently, particle size distributions absorption coefficients and aerosol optical depth were measured throughout 17 flights. A parameterization of sigma(sub sp) as a function of RH was utilized to assess the impact of aerosol hydration on the upwelling radiance (normalized to the solar constant and cosine of zenith angle). The top of the atmosphere radiance signal was simulated at wavelengths corresponding to visible and near-infrared bands or the EOS-AM ("Terra") detectors, MODIS and MISR. The UWPH measured (sigma(sub sp)) at 2 RHs, one below and the other above ambient conditions. Ambient (sigma(sub sp)) was obtained by interpolation of these 2 measurements. The data were stratified in terms of 3 types of aerosols: Saharan dust, clean marine (marine boundary layer background) and polluted marine aerosols (i.e., 2- or 1-day old polluted aerosols advected from Europe). An empirical relation for the dependence of (sigma(sub sp)) on RH, defined by (sigma(sub sp))(RH) = k. ((1 - RH/100)(exp -gamma), was used with the hygroscopic exponent gamma derived from the data. The following gamma values were obtained for the 3 aerosol types: gamma(dust) = 0.23 +/- 0.05, gamma(clean marine) = 0.69 +/- 0.06 and gamma(polluted marine) = 0.57 + 0.06. Based on the measured (gamma)(s), the above equation was utilized to derive aerosol models with different hygroscopicities. The satellite simulation signal code 6S was used to compute the upwelling radiance corresponding to each of those aerosol models at several ambient humidities. For the pre-launch estimated precision of the sensors and

  9. Influence of Humidity On the Aerosol Scattering Coefficient and Its Effect on the Upwelling Radiance During ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, S.; Hegg, D. A.; Covert, D. S.; Collins, D.; Noone, K. J.; Oestroem, E.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Durkee, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol scattering coefficients (sigma(sub sp)) have been measured over the ocean at different relative humidities (RH) as a function of altitude in the region surrounding the Canary Islands during the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June and July 1997. The data were collected by the University of Washington passive humidigraph (UWPH) mounted on the Pelican research aircraft. Concurrently, particle size distributions, absorption coefficients and aerosol optical depth were measured throughout 17 flights. A parameterization of sigma(sub sp) as a function of RH was utilized to assess the impact of aerosol hydration on the upwelling radiance (normalized to the solar constant and cosine of zenith angle). The top of the atmosphere radiance signal was simulated at wavelengths corresponding to visible and near-infrared bands of the EOS (Earth Observing System) AM-1 (Terra) detectors, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and MISR (Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer). The UWPH measured sigma(sub sp) at two RHs, one below and the other above ambient conditions. Ambient sigma(sub sp) was obtained by interpolation of these two measurements. The data were stratified in terms of three types of aerosols: Saharan dust, clean marine (marine boundary layer background) and polluted marine aerosols (i.e., two- or one-day old polluted aerosols advected from Europe). An empirical relation for the dependence of sigma(sub sp) on RH, defined by sigma(sub sp)(RH) = k.(1 - RH/100)(sup gamma), was used with the hygroscopic exponent gamma derived from the data. The following gamma values were obtained for the 3 aerosol types: gamma(dust) = 0.23 +/- 0.05, gamma(clean marine) = 0.69 +/- 0.06 and gamma(polluted marine) = 0.57 +/- 0.06. Based on the measured gammas, the above equation was utilized to derive aerosol models with different hygroscopicities. The satellite simulation signal code 6S was used to compute the upwelling radiance corresponding to each

  10. Joint retrieval of aerosol and water-leaving radiance from multispectral, multiangular and polarimetric measurements over ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng; Dubovik, Oleg; Zhai, Peng-Wang; Diner, David J.; Kalashnikova, Olga V.; Seidel, Felix C.; Litvinov, Pavel; Bovchaliuk, Andrii; Garay, Michael J.; van Harten, Gerard; Davis, Anthony B.

    2016-07-01

    An optimization approach has been developed for simultaneous retrieval of aerosol properties and normalized water-leaving radiance (nLw) from multispectral, multiangular, and polarimetric observations over ocean. The main features of the method are (1) use of a simplified bio-optical model to estimate nLw, followed by an empirical refinement within a specified range to improve its accuracy; (2) improved algorithm convergence and stability by applying constraints on the spatial smoothness of aerosol loading and Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration across neighboring image patches and spectral constraints on aerosol optical properties and nLw across relevant bands; and (3) enhanced Jacobian calculation by modeling and storing the radiative transfer (RT) in aerosol/Rayleigh mixed layer, pure Rayleigh-scattering layers, and ocean medium separately, then coupling them to calculate the field at the sensor. This approach avoids unnecessary and time-consuming recalculations of RT in unperturbed layers in Jacobian evaluations. The Markov chain method is used to model RT in the aerosol/Rayleigh mixed layer and the doubling method is used for the uniform layers of the atmosphere-ocean system. Our optimization approach has been tested using radiance and polarization measurements acquired by the Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) over the AERONET USC_SeaPRISM ocean site (6 February 2013) and near the AERONET La Jolla site (14 January 2013), which, respectively, reported relatively high and low aerosol loadings. Validation of the results is achieved through comparisons to AERONET aerosol and ocean color products. For comparison, the USC_SeaPRISM retrieval is also performed by use of the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties algorithm (Dubovik et al., 2011). Uncertainties of aerosol and nLw retrievals due to random and systematic instrument errors are analyzed by truth-in/truth-out tests with three Chl a concentrations, five aerosol loadings

  11. Assessment of a Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Correction of Above-Water and Satellite Water-Leaving Radiance in Coastal Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlaing, Soe; Gilerson, Alexander; Harmal, Tristan; Tonizzo, Alberto; Weidemann, Alan; Arnone, Robert; Ahmed, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Water-leaving radiances, retrieved from in situ or satellite measurements, need to be corrected for the bidirectional properties of the measured light in order to standardize the data and make them comparable with each other. The current operational algorithm for the correction of bidirectional effects from the satellite ocean color data is optimized for typical oceanic waters. However, versions of bidirectional reflectance correction algorithms specifically tuned for typical coastal waters and other case 2 conditions are particularly needed to improve the overall quality of those data. In order to analyze the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of case 2 waters, a dataset of typical remote sensing reflectances was generated through radiative transfer simulations for a large range of viewing and illumination geometries. Based on this simulated dataset, a case 2 water focused remote sensing reflectance model is proposed to correct above-water and satellite water-leaving radiance data for bidirectional effects. The proposed model is first validated with a one year time series of in situ above-water measurements acquired by collocated multispectral and hyperspectral radiometers, which have different viewing geometries installed at the Long Island Sound Coastal Observatory (LISCO). Match-ups and intercomparisons performed on these concurrent measurements show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the algorithm currently in use at all wavelengths, with average improvement of 2.4% over the spectral range. LISCO's time series data have also been used to evaluate improvements in match-up comparisons of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite data when the proposed BRDF correction is used in lieu of the current algorithm. It is shown that the discrepancies between coincident in-situ sea-based and satellite data decreased by 3.15% with the use of the proposed algorithm.

  12. TES Level 1 Algorithms: Interferogram Processing, Geolocation, Radiometric, and Spectral Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worden, Helen; Beer, Reinhard; Bowman, Kevin W.; Fisher, Brendan; Luo, Mingzhao; Rider, David; Sarkissian, Edwin; Tremblay, Denis; Zong, Jia

    2006-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura satellite measures the infrared radiance emitted by the Earth's surface and atmosphere using Fourier transform spectrometry. The measured interferograms are converted into geolocated, calibrated radiance spectra by the L1 (Level 1) processing, and are the inputs to L2 (Level 2) retrievals of atmospheric parameters, such as vertical profiles of trace gas abundance. We describe the algorithmic components of TES Level 1 processing, giving examples of the intermediate results and diagnostics that are necessary for creating TES L1 products. An assessment of noise-equivalent spectral radiance levels and current systematic errors is provided. As an initial validation of our spectral radiances, TES data are compared to the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) (on EOS Aqua), after accounting for spectral resolution differences by applying the AIRS spectral response function to the TES spectra. For the TES L1 nadir data products currently available, the agreement with AIRS is 1 K or better.

  13. Multi-RTM-based Radiance Assimilation to Improve Snow Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Y.; Zhao, L.; Hoar, T. J.; Yang, Z. L.; Toure, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Data assimilation of microwave brightness temperature (TB) observations (i.e., radiance assimilation (RA)) has been proven to improve snowpack characterization at relatively small scales. However, large-scale applications of RA require a considerable amount of further efforts. Our objective in this study is to explore global-scale snow RA. In a RA scheme, a radiative transfer model (RTM) is an observational operator predicting TB; therefore, the quality of the assimilation results may strongly depend upon the RTM used as well as the land surface model (LSM). Several existing RTMs show different sensitivities to snowpack properties and thus they simulate significantly different TB. At the global scale, snow physical properties vary widely with local climate conditions. No single RTM has been shown to be able to accurately reproduce the observed TB for such a wide range of snow conditions. In this study, therefore, we hypothesize that snow estimates using a microwave RA scheme can be improved through the use of multiple RTMs (i.e., multi-RTM-based approaches). As a first step, here we use two snowpack RTMs, i.e., the Dense Media Radiative Transfer-Multi Layers model (DMRT-ML) and the Microwave Emission Model for Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS). The Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) is used to simulate snow dynamics. The assimilation process is conducted by the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART), which is a community facility developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) for ensemble-based data assimilation studies. In the RA experiments, the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) TB at 18.7 and 36.5 GHz vertical polarization channels are assimilated into the RA system using the ensemble adjustment Kalman filter. The results are evaluated using the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) daily snow depth, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow cover fraction, and in-situ snowpack and river

  14. Interpreting millimeter-wave radiances over tropical convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Z. S.; Sawaya, R. C.; Kacimi, S.; Sy, O. O.; Turk, F. J.; Steward, J.

    2017-02-01

    Attempts to interpret the measurements of millimeter-wave radiometers over tropical storms must overcome the difficulty of modeling the scattering signatures of hydrometeors at these frequencies. Most approaches to date try to retrieve surface precipitation, to which the observations are not directly sensitive. In fact, millimeter wavelengths are most sensitive to the scattering from solid hydrometeors within the upper levels of the cloud. Millimeter-wavelength radiometers have a definite advantage over the lower frequency radiometers in that they have finer spatial resolution to resolve deep convection. Preliminary analyses summarized here indicate that the measurements are indeed sensitive to the depth and intensity of convection. The challenge is to derive a robust approach to make quantitative estimates of the characteristics of the convection directly from the observations, and conversely to derive a robust forward representation of the dependence of the radiances on the underlying moisture fields, to enable effective data assimilation. This is accomplished using a two-step semiempirical approach: first, nearly simultaneous coincident observations by millimeter-wave radiometers and orbiting atmospheric profiling radars are used to enforce unbiased consistency between modeled brightness temperatures and radar and radiometer observations; second, the departure from the first-step mean empirical relations are explained in terms of the moisture variables, using cloud-resolving simulations with different microphysical schemes, including an original microphysical representation that proves to be more consistent with remote sensing observations than existing schemes. The results are a retrieval approach and a forward representation that are unbiased by construction, with uncertainties quantified by the corresponding conditional variances.

  15. Atmospheric effect on spectral signature - Measurements and corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the atmospheric effect on the spectral signature of surface cover were conducted during hazy conditions over the Chesapeake Bay and its eastern shore. In the experiment the upward radiance was measured by an airborne scanning radiometer in nine spectral bands between 465 and 773 nm, above and below the haze layer. Simultaneous measurements of the aerosol optical thickness and its vertical distribution were conducted. The results of the measurements are used to study the spectral dependence of the atmospheric effect on remote sensing of water bodies and vegetated fields (forest, corn field, and pasture), and to verify theoretical predictions. It is suggested that the radiances over dark areas (e.g., water in the near IR and forest in the visible) can be used to derive the aerosol optical thickness as is done over oceans with the CZCS satellite images. Combined with climatological information, the derived optical thickness can be used to perform corrections of the atmospheric effect. Examples of the derivation of the aerosol optical thickness and correction of the upward radiances are given.

  16. Effects of Nighttime Light Radiance on the Sleep of the General Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohayon, Maurice M.; Milesi, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study is to verify if the exposure to greater nighttime radiance is associated with changes in the sleep/wake schedule and with greater sleep disturbances. Methods: The target population was the adults (18 years and older) living in California, USA. This represents 24 million of inhabitants. A total of 3,104 subjects participated in the survey (participation rate 85.6%). The participants were interviewed by telephone using the Sleep-EVAL system. The interviews covered several topics including sleeping habits, sleep quality, sleep disturbances, physical symptoms related to menopause. Chronic insomnia was defined as difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep for at least 3 months. Global nighttime light emissions have been collected by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) sensors. We extracted the radiance calibrated nighttime lights corresponding to the date of the interviews for a three by three window centered on each coordinate corresponding to an interview address. Results: Dissatisfaction with sleep quantity and/or quality was associated with an increased nighttime radiance (p=0.02). Similarly, excessive sleepiness accompanied with impaired functioning was significantly associated with an increased nighttime radiance (p (is) less than 0.0001). The association remained significant after controlling for age, gender and use of a night lamp in the bedroom. Confusional arousals were also significantly associated with an increased nighttime radiance (p (is) less than 0.0001). Bedtime hour was linearly increasing with the intensity of nighttime radiance: the later the bedtime, the greater the nighttime radiance (p (is) less than 0.0001). Similarly, wakeup time became progressively later as the nighttime radiance increased (p (is) less than 0.0001). Both associations remained significant after controlling for age, gender and use of a night lamp in the bedroom. Circadian Rhythm Disorders were the

  17. Assimilation of AIRS radiances for short term regional forecasts using community models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Agnes Huei Ni

    With the hyperspectral sounder's capability of providing information about temperature and humidity of the atmosphere at increased vertical resolution, the assimilation of these radiances has proven to improve numerical weather prediction in global models. The current two hyperspectral infrared sounders in orbit, AIRS and IASI, each contributed to a 12% error reduction in the ECMWF global forecasts, emerging as the single space-borne sensor to contribute the largest forecast improvement in global models (Cardinali, 2009). In this study, regional assimilation of clear sky AIRS radiances was carried out using a community available data assimilation system GSI coupled with the WRF forecast model. As the systems used were not optimized, tuning was necessary prior to carrying out the assimilation. Components of the assimilation system that required tuning included the background error covariance matrix, the satellite radiance bias correction and quality control procedures for AIRS radiances. In addition, the forecast model vertical resolution had been increased with more levels included in the stratosphere. Adopting procedures used by NCEP's operational regional data assimilation, experiments with and without AIRS radiances were carried out for a period of 16 days to access the impact of including AIRS radiances. Diagnostics from the assimilation system showed that analyses had larger temperature biases for experiments ending at 06 and 18 UTC. In addition, biases were still significant after assimilation for satellite channels that were sensitive to surface properties and water vapor. Forecasts were verified with a wide range of datasets ranging from model analyses, radiosondes, observed satellite radiances and 24 hour accumulated precipitation. With assimilation of clear sky AIRS radiances, largest improvement in bias was observed when forecasts were verified with radiosondes and satellite observations. The 00 and 12 UTC forecast were typically of better quality than

  18. Sensor-based clear and cloud radiance calculations in the community radiative transfer model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quanhua; Xue, Y; Li, C

    2013-07-10

    The community radiative transfer model (CRTM) has been implemented for clear and cloudy satellite radiance simulations in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation data assimilation system for global and regional forecasting as well as reanalysis for climate studies. Clear-sky satellite radiances are successfully assimilated, while cloudy radiances need to be assimilated for improving precipitation and severe weather forecasting. However, cloud radiance calculations are much slower than the calculations for clear-sky radiance, and exceed our computational capacity for weather forecasting. In order to make cloud radiance assimilation affordable, cloud optical parameters at the band central wavelength are used in the CRTM (OPTRAN-CRTM) where the optical transmittance (OPTRAN) band model is applied. The approximation implies that only one radiative transfer solution for each band (i.e., channel) is needed, instead of typically more than 10,000 solutions that are required for a detailed line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM). This paper investigated the accuracy of the approximation and helps us to understand the error source. Two NOAA operational sensors, High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder/3 (HIRS/3) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), have been chosen for this investigation with both clear and cloudy cases. By comparing the CRTM cloud radiance calculations with the LBLRTM simulations, we found that the CRTM cloud radiance model can achieve accuracy better than 0.4 K for the IR sensor and 0.1 K for the microwave sensor. The results suggest that the CRTM cloud radiance calculations may be adequate to the operational satellite radiance assimilation for numerical forecast model. The accuracy using OPTRAN is much better than using the scaling method (SCALING-CRTM). In clear-sky applications, the scaling of the optical depth derived at nadir

  19. Broadband Spectral-Polarimetric BRDF Scan System and Data for Spacecraft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, D.; Wellems, L.; Duggin, M.; Glass, W.; Vaughn, L.

    2011-09-01

    A broadband spectral-polarimetric Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) measurement system from 350nm to 2500nm with 1nm wavelength resolution is providing data for satellite radiance modeling and specifically for Michigan Tech’s OCULUS-ASR space mission. The satellite has four deployable panels, which are covered with solar cells on one side, and are brightly colored on the other. BRDF data for the colored panels show interesting spectral features, including wavelength variability of first surface scatter, volumetric scatter and second surface scatter. Additional surface scatter data for other spacecraft materials including anodized aluminum, multilayer insulation (MLI) and solar cells is presented. The continuum nature of the data indicates that either dedicated BRDF models or a method for incorporating complex wavelength data into simulations will be needed for passive spectral radiance modeling and accurate spectral correlations.

  20. Absolute calibration of optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Viana, N.B.; Mazolli, A.; Maia Neto, P.A.; Nussenzveig, H.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Mesquita, O.N.

    2006-03-27

    As a step toward absolute calibration of optical tweezers, a first-principles theory of trapping forces with no adjustable parameters, corrected for spherical aberration, is experimentally tested. Employing two very different setups, we find generally very good agreement for the transverse trap stiffness as a function of microsphere radius for a broad range of radii, including the values employed in practice, and at different sample chamber depths. The domain of validity of the WKB ('geometrical optics') approximation to the theory is verified. Theoretical predictions for the trapping threshold, peak position, depth variation, multiple equilibria, and 'jump' effects are also confirmed.

  1. Improved Impact of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Radiance Assimilation in Numerical Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Chou, Shih-Hung; Jedlovec, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Improvements to global and regional numerical weather prediction (NWP) have been demonstrated through assimilation of data from NASA s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Current operational data assimilation systems use AIRS radiances, but impact on regional forecasts has been much smaller than for global forecasts. Retrieved profiles from AIRS contain much of the information that is contained in the radiances and may be able to reveal reasons for this reduced impact. Assimilating AIRS retrieved profiles in an identical analysis configuration to the radiances, tracking the quantity and quality of the assimilated data in each technique, and examining analysis increments and forecast impact from each data type can yield clues as to the reasons for the reduced impact. By doing this with regional scale models individual synoptic features (and the impact of AIRS on these features) can be more easily tracked. This project examines the assimilation of hyperspectral sounder data used in operational numerical weather prediction by comparing operational techniques used for AIRS radiances and research techniques used for AIRS retrieved profiles. Parallel versions of a configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) that mimics the analysis methodology, domain, and observational datasets for the regional North American Mesoscale (NAM) model run at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) are run to examine the impact of each type of AIRS data set. The first configuration will assimilate the AIRS radiance data along with other conventional and satellite data using techniques implemented within the operational system; the second configuration will assimilate AIRS retrieved profiles instead of AIRS radiances in the same manner. Preliminary results of this study will be presented and focus on the analysis impact of the radiances and profiles for selected cases.

  2. The impact of target luminance and radiance on night vision device visual performance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marasco, Peter L.; Task, H. Lee

    2003-09-01

    Visual performance through night-vision devices (NVDs) is a function of many parameters such as target contrast, objective and eyepiece lens focus, signal/noise of the image intensifier tube, quality of the image intensifier, night-vision goggle (NVG) gain, and NVG output luminance to the eye. The NVG output luminance depends on the NVG sensitive radiance emitted (or reflected) from the visual acuity target (usually a vision testing chart). The primary topic of this paper is the standardization (or lack thereof) of the radiance levels used for NVG visual acuity testing. The visual acuity chart light level might be determined in either photometric (luminance) units or radiometric (radiance) units. The light levels are often described as "starlight," "quarter moon," or "optimum" light levels and may not actually provide any quantitative photometric or radiometric information. While these terms may be useful to pilots and the users of night-vision devices, they are inadequate for accurate visual performance testing. This is because there is no widely accepted agreement in the night vision community as to the radiance or luminance level of the target that corresponds to the various named light levels. This paper examines the range of values for "starlight," "quarter moon," and "optimum" light commonly used by the night vision community and referenced in the literature. The impact on performance testing of variations in target luminance/radiance levels is also examined. Arguments for standardizing on NVG-weighted radiometric units for testing night-vision devices instead of photometric units are presented. In addition, the differences between theoretical weighted radiance and actual weighted radiance are also discussed.

  3. The spectral emissivity of prairie and pasture grasses at Konza Prairie, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palluconi, Frank; Kahle, Anne B.; Hoover, Gordon; Conel, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Field measurements of spectral radiances are used to determine precise values of the spectral emissivity of grass-thatch-soil complexes to facilitate remote temperature determinations. The emissivity variation with wavelength is very small, emissivity is close to unity, and emissivity is fairly constant in terms of emission angle, land practice, and season. The prairie surface is therefore similar to a grey body and a quasiideal emitter, although determinations of the kinetic temperature are required to confirm the results.

  4. Spectral measurements of light sources with a goniophotometer with and without mirror arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas Santos Gomes, Juliana; Antônio Ázara de Oliveira, Ivo; da Silva Sardinha, André; Viana, Domingos David; Rezende Vieira, Rafaela; Barbosa, Amanda Hang; Dornelles de Alvarenga, Ana Paula

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of the relative spectral radiance measurements of incandescent and LED light sources performed in two different setups with a rotating-mirror-goniophotometer. In one configuration the light is reflected by the goniophotometer mirror, while in the other the mirror is not used. This study permits to determine a spectral correction factor at each measured wavelength in order to obtain a more precise value for the Correlated Color Temperature (CCT)

  5. Assimilation of hyperspectral infrared sounder radiances under cloudy skies in a regional NWP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei

    Satellite measurements are an important source of global observations in support of numerical weather prediction (NWP). The assimilation of satellite radiances under clear skies has greatly improved NWP forecast scores. Since most of the data assimilation models are used for the clear radiances assimilation, an important step for satellite radiances assimilation is the clear location detection. Good clear detection could effectively remove the cloud contamination and keep the clear observations for assimilation. In this dissertation, a new detection method uses collocated high spatial resolution imager data onboard the same platform as the satellite sounders to help IR sounders subpixel cloud detection, such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). The MODIS cloud mask provides a level of confidence for the observed skies to help AIRS Field-of-View (FOVs) cloud detection. By reducing the cloud contamination, a cold bias in the temperature field and a wet bias in the moisture field are corrected for the atmospheric analysis fields. These less cloud affected analysis fields further improve hurricane track and intensity forecast. The availability of satellite observations that can be assimilated in the model is limited if only the clear radiances are assimilation. An effective way to use the thermodynamic information under partially cloudy regions is to assimilate the "cloud-cleared" radiances (CCRs); CCRs are also called clear equivalent radiances. Because the CCRs are the equivalent clear radiances from the partially cloudy FOVs, they can be directly assimilated into the current data assimilation models without modifications. The AIRS CCRs are assimilated and compared with the AIRS using stand-alone cloud detection and collocated cloud detection. The assimilation of AIRS cloud-cleared radiances directly affects

  6. Advanced infrared sounder subpixel cloud detection with imagers and its impact on radiance assimilation in NWP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei; Li, Jun; Li, Jinlong; Li, Zhenglong; Schmit, Timothy J.; Bai, Wenguang

    2014-03-01

    Accurate cloud detection is very important for infrared (IR) radiance assimilation; improved cloud detection could reduce cloud contamination and hence improve the assimilation. Although operational numerical weather prediction (NWP) centers are using IR sounder radiance data for cloud detection, collocated high spatial resolution imager data could help sounder subpixel cloud detection and characterization. IR sounder radiances with improved cloud detection using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were assimilated for Hurricane Sandy (2012). Forecast experiments were run with Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) as the forecast model and the Three-Dimensional Variational Assimilation (3DVAR)-based Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) as the analysis system. Results indicate that forecasts of both hurricane track and intensity are substantially improved when the collocated high spatial resolution MODIS cloud mask is used for AIRS subpixel cloud detection for assimilating radiances. This methodology can be applied to process Crosstrack Infrared Sounder (CRIS)/Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard Suomi-NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP)/Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)/Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard the Metop series for improved radiance assimilation in NWP.

  7. Use of MODIS Cloud Top Pressure to Improve Assimilation Yields of AIRS Radiances in GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Radiances from hyperspectral sounders such as the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) are routinely assimilated both globally and regionally in operational numerical weather prediction (NWP) systems using the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) data assimilation system. However, only thinned, cloud-free radiances from a 281-channel subset are used, so the overall percentage of these observations that are assimilated is somewhere on the order of 5%. Cloud checks are performed within GSI to determine which channels peak above cloud top; inaccuracies may lead to less assimilated radiances or introduction of biases from cloud-contaminated radiances.Relatively large footprint from AIRS may not optimally represent small-scale cloud features that might be better resolved by higher-resolution imagers like the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Objective of this project is to "swap" the MODIS-derived cloud top pressure (CTP) for that designated by the AIRS-only quality control within GSI to test the hypothesis that better representation of cloud features will result in higher assimilated radiance yields and improved forecasts.

  8. Interstitial optical parameter quantification of turbid medium based on CW radiance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lingling; Zhang, Limin; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan

    2016-10-01

    CW radiance measurements examine the light intensity at a single source-detector location from different detection directions to recover absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient of the turbid medium which is important in treatment planning of minimally invasive laser therapies. In this paper, P9 approximation for radiance is used as the forward model for fitting by considering the balance between computational time and the correctness of the forward model at low albedo and small source detector separation (SDS). By fitting P9 approximation for radiance to the angular radiance Monte Carlo (MC) simulations used as the angular radiance measurements, optical parameters are recovered over a wide range of reduced albedo between 0.69 and 0.99 at small SDS 2mm. The recovery errors of absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient are less than 11.96% and 2.63%, respectively. The effects of the maximum angle used for fitting on optical parameter recovery have been further studied. The results show that the recovery errors of absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient are less than 12% and 3% respectively when the maximum angle is greater than 70 degree.

  9. Evaluation of the Impact of AIRS Radiance and Profile Data Assimilation in Partly Cloudy Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Jedlovec, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Improvements to global and regional numerical weather prediction have been demonstrated through assimilation of data from NASA s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Current operational data assimilation systems use AIRS radiances, but impact on regional forecasts has been much smaller than for global forecasts. Retrieved profiles from AIRS contain much of the information that is contained in the radiances and may be able to reveal reasons for this reduced impact. Assimilating AIRS retrieved profiles in an identical analysis configuration to the radiances, tracking the quantity and quality of the assimilated data in each technique, and examining analysis increments and forecast impact from each data type can yield clues as to the reasons for the reduced impact. By doing this with regional scale models individual synoptic features (and the impact of AIRS on these features) can be more easily tracked. This project examines the assimilation of hyperspectral sounder data used in operational numerical weather prediction by comparing operational techniques used for AIRS radiances and research techniques used for AIRS retrieved profiles. Parallel versions of a configuration of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) are run to examine the impact AIRS radiances and retrieved profiles. Statistical evaluation of a long-term series of forecast runs will be compared along with preliminary results of in-depth investigations for select case comparing the analysis increments in partly cloudy regions and short-term forecast impacts.

  10. Adjusting the tasseled cap brightness and greenness factors for atmospheric path radiance and absorption on a pixel by pixel basis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D.; Slater, P. N.; Pinter, P. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    A radiative transfer model was used to convert ground measured reflectances into the radiance at the top of the atmosphere, for several levels of atmospheric path radiance. The radiance in MSS7 (0.8 to 1.1 m) was multiplied by the transmission fraction for atmospheres having different levels of precipitable water. The radiance values were converted to simulated LANDSAT digital counts for four path radiance levels and four levels of precipitable water. These values were used to calculate the Kauth-Thomas brightness, greenness, yellowness, and nonsuch factors. Brightness was affected by surface conditions and path radiance. Greenness was affected by surface conditions, path radiance, and precipitable water. Yellowness was affected by path radiance and nonsuch by precipitable water, and both factors changed only slightly with surface conditions. Yellowness and nonsuch were used to adjust brightness and greenness to produce factors that were affected only by surface conditions such as soils and vegetation, and not by path radiance and precipitable water.

  11. Description of SHARC: The Strategic High-Altitude Radiance Code.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-16

    for Paths from 60 to 300 km altitude in he 2-40 _.m spectral region. It models r-adiation due to NLTE (Non-Local Thermodynamic quilibrium) molecular...2 HIGH-ALTITUDE INFRARED RADIATION CONCEPTS ... ....... 4 2.1 Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium .... ........ 4 2.2 Vibrational Temperature...Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium) populations of higher vibrational states are included in the calculation. The equivalent-width, line-by-line LBL

  12. Absolute calibration of vacuum ultraviolet spectrograph system for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, M.; Kubota, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Saito, M.; Numada, N.; Nakashima, Y.; Cho, T.; Koguchi, H.; Yagi, Y.; Yamaguchi, N.

    2004-10-01

    A space- and time-resolving vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectrograph system has been applied to diagnose impurity ions behavior in plasmas produced in the tandem mirror GAMMA 10 and the reversed field pinch TPE-RX. We have carried out ray tracing calculations for obtaining the characteristics of the VUV spectrograph and calibration experiments to measure the absolute sensitivities of the VUV spectrograph system for the wavelength range from 100 to 1100 A. By changing the incident angle, 50.6 deg. -51.4 deg., to the spectrograph whose nominal incident angle is 51 deg., we can change the observing spectral range of the VUV spectrograph. In this article, we show the ray tracing calculation results and absolute sensitivities when the angle of incidence into the VUV spectrograph is changed, and the results of VUV spectroscopic measurement in both GAMMA 10 and TPE-RX plasmas.

  13. Consistent set of nuclear parameters values for absolute INAA

    SciTech Connect

    Heft, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Gamma spectral analysis of irradiated material can be used to determine absolute disintegration rates for specific radionuclides. These data, together with measured values for the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes, and irradiation, cooling and counting time values, are all the experimental information required to do absolute Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. The calculations required to go from product photon emission rate to target nuclide amount depend upon values used for the thermal neutron capture cross-section, the resonance absorption integral, the half-life and photon branching ratios. Values for these parameters were determined by irradiating and analyzing a series of elemental standards. The results of these measurements were combined with values reported by other workers to arrive at a set of recommended values for the constants. Values for 114 nuclides are listed.

  14. Optical absorption and scattering properties of bulk porcine muscle phantoms from interstitial radiance measurements in 650-900 nm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabtchak, Serge; Montgomery, Logan G.; Whelan, William M.

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrated the application of relative radiance-based continuous wave (cw) measurements for recovering absorption and scattering properties (the effective attenuation coefficient, the diffusion coefficient, the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient) of bulk porcine muscle phantoms in the 650-900 nm spectral range. Both the side-firing fiber (the detector) and the fiber with a spherical diffuser at the end (the source) were inserted interstitially at predetermined locations in the phantom. The porcine phantoms were prostate-shaped with ˜4 cm in diameter and ˜3 cm thickness and made from porcine loin or tenderloin muscles. The described method was previously validated using the diffusion approximation on simulated and experimental radiance data obtained for homogenous Intralipid-1% liquid phantom. The approach required performing measurements in two locations in the tissue with different distances to the source. Measurements were performed on 21 porcine phantoms. Spectral dependences of the effective attenuation and absorption coefficients for the loin phantom deviated from corresponding dependences for the tenderloin phantom for wavelengths <750 nm. The diffusion constant and the reduced scattering coefficient were very close for both phantom types. To quantify chromophore presence, the plot for the absorption coefficient was matched with a synthetic absorption spectrum constructed from deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin and water. The closest match for the porcine loin spectrum was obtained with the following concentrations: 15.5 µM (±30% s.d.) Hb, 21 µM (±30% s.d.) HbO2 and 0.3 (±30% s.d.) fractional volume of water. The tenderloin absorption spectrum was best described by 30 µM Hb (±30% s.d), 19 µM (±30% s.d.) HbO2 and 0.3 (±30% s.d.) fractional volume of water. The higher concentration of Hb in tenderloin was consistent with a dark-red appearance of the tenderloin phantom. The method can be applied to a number of biological

  15. The 2003 edition of geisa: a spectroscopic database system for the second generation vertical sounders radiance simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquinet-Husson, N.; Lmd Team

    The GEISA (Gestion et Etude des Informations Spectroscopiques Atmosphériques: Management and Study of Atmospheric Spectroscopic Information) computer accessible database system, in its former 1997 and 2001 versions, has been updated in 2003 (GEISA-03). It is developed by the ARA (Atmospheric Radiation Analysis) group at LMD (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique, France) since 1974. This early effort implemented the so-called `` line-by-line and layer-by-layer '' approach for forward radiative transfer modelling action. The GEISA 2003 system comprises three databases with their associated management softwares: a database of spectroscopic parameters required to describe adequately the individual spectral lines belonging to 42 molecules (96 isotopic species) and located in a spectral range from the microwave to the limit of the visible. The featured molecules are of interest in studies of the terrestrial as well as the other planetary atmospheres, especially those of the Giant Planets. a database of absorption cross-sections of molecules such as chlorofluorocarbons which exhibit unresolvable spectra. a database of refractive indices of basic atmospheric aerosol components. Illustrations will be given of GEISA-03, data archiving method, contents, management softwares and Web access facilities at: http://ara.lmd.polytechnique.fr The performance of instruments like AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder; http://www-airs.jpl.nasa.gov) in the USA, and IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer; http://smsc.cnes.fr/IASI/index.htm) in Europe, which have a better vertical resolution and accuracy, compared to the presently existing satellite infrared vertical sounders, is directly related to the quality of the spectroscopic parameters of the optically active gases, since these are essential input in the forward models used to simulate recorded radiance spectra. For these upcoming atmospheric sounders, the so-called GEISA/IASI sub-database system has been elaborated

  16. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  17. Effects of detector threshold, location of the sun, and flight altitude upon spectral variations in remote sensing over water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressette, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    Photographic flights with Hasselblad cameras were flown on August 28, 1975, at altitudes from 2.66 and 5.3 kilometers over an ocean acid waste dump site while acid dumping was in progress. Repeated flights resulted in broadband spectral radiance data between the wavelengths of 500 to 900 nanometers for sun elevation angles that varied from 26 to 48 degrees, and at all sun azimuth angles over the range of off-nadir angles from 0 to 35 degrees. From film densitometer data, it is shown that before spectral variations in remotely sensed data can be used to quantify substances in water, the longer wavelength data must be above the detection level of the detector, radiance data between + or - 45 degrees in the direction of the sun must be avoided, and off-nadir camera correction factors must be applied to the observed radiance data.

  18. Hyper-spectral Atmospheric Sounding. Appendixes 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Zhou, D. K.; Revercomb, H. E.; Huang, H. L.; Antonelli, P.; Mango, S. A.

    2002-01-01

    The Geosynchronous Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) is the first hyper-spectral remote sounding system to be orbited aboard a geosynchronous satellite. The GETS is designed to obtain revolutionary observations of the four dimensional atmospheric temperature, moisture, and wind structure as well as the distribution of the atmospheric trace gases, CO and O3. Although GIFTS will not be orbited until 2006-2008, a glimpse at the its measurement capabilities has been obtained by analyzing data from the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Airborne Sounder Test-bed-Interferometer (NAST-I) and Aqua satellite Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). In this paper we review the GIFTS experiment and empirically assess measurement expectations based on meteorological profiles retrieved from the NAST aircraft and Aqua satellite AIRS spectral radiances.

  19. Experimental validation of the MODTRAN 5.3 sea surface radiance model using MIRAMER campaign measurements.

    PubMed

    Ross, Vincent; Dion, Denis; St-Germain, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    Radiometric images taken in mid-wave and long-wave infrared bands are used as a basis for validating a sea surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) being implemented into MODTRAN 5 (Berk et al. [Proc. SPIE5806, 662 (2005)]). The images were obtained during the MIRAMER campaign that took place in May 2008 in the Mediterranean Sea near Toulon, France. When atmosphere radiances are matched at the horizon to remove possible calibration offsets, the implementation of the BRDF in MODTRAN produces good sea surface radiance agreement, usually within 2% and at worst 4% from off-glint azimuthally averaged measurements. Simulations also compare quite favorably to glint measurements. The observed sea radiance deviations between model and measurements are not systematic, and are well within expected experimental uncertainties. This is largely attributed to proper radiative coupling between the surface and the atmosphere implemented using the DISORT multiple scattering algorithm.

  20. The effects of seasonal and latitudinal earth infrared radiance variations on ERBS attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phenneger, M. C.; Dehen, J.; Foch, D.; Harvie, E.; Virdy, M.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis performed in the Flight Dynamics Facility by the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) Attitude Determination Support team illustrates the pitch attitude control motion and roll attitude errors induced by Earth infrared (IR) horizon radiance variations. IR scanner and inertial reference unit (IRU) pitch and roll flight data spanning 4 years of the ERBS mission are analyzed to illustrate the changes in the magnitude of the errors on time scales of the orbital period, months, and seasons. The analysis represents a unique opportunity to compare prelaunch estimates of radiance-induced attitude errors with flight measurements. As a consequence of this work the following additional information is obtained: an assessment of an average model of these errors and its standard deviation, a measurement to determine and verify previously proposed corrections to the current Earth IR radiance data base, and the possibility of a mean motion model derived from flight data in place of IRU data for ERBS fine attitude determination.

  1. A Study of Global Cirrus Cloud Morphology with AIRS Cloud-clear Radiances (CCRs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.; Gong, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Version 6 (V6) AIRS cloud-clear radiances (CCR) are used to derive cloud-induced radiance (Tcir=Tb-CCR) at the infrared frequencies of weighting functions peaked in the middle troposphere. The significantly improved V 6 CCR product allows a more accurate estimation of the expected clear-sky radiance as if clouds are absent. In the case where strong cloud scattering is present, the CCR becomes unreliable, which is reflected by its estimated uncertainty, and interpolation is employed to replace this CCR value. We find that Tcir derived from this CCR method are much better than other methods and detect more clouds in the upper and lower troposphere as well as in the polar regions where cloud detection is particularly challenging. The cloud morphology derived from the V6 test month, as well as some artifacts, will be shown.

  2. The proper weighting function for retrieving temperatures from satellite measured radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arking, A.

    1976-01-01

    One class of methods for converting satellite measured radiances into atmospheric temperature profiles, involves a linearization of the radiative transfer equation: delta r = the sum of (W sub i) (delta T sub i) where (i=1...s) and where delta T sub i is the deviation of the temperature in layer i from that of a reference atmosphere, delta R is the difference in the radiance at satellite altitude from the corresponding radiance for the reference atmosphere, and W sub i is the discrete (or vector) form of the T-weighting (i.e., temperature weighting) function W(P), where P is pressure. The top layer of the atmosphere corresponds to i = 1, the bottom layer to i = s - 1, and i = s refers to the surface. Linearization in temperature (or some function of temperature) is at the heart of all linear or matrix methods. The weighting function that should be used is developed.

  3. New spectral methods in cloud and aerosol remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, K. Sebastian; McBride, Patrick; Pilewskie, Peter; Feingold, Graham; Jiang, Hongli

    2010-05-01

    We present new remote sensing techniques that rely on spectral observations of clouds and aerosols in the solar wavelength range. As a first example, we show how the effects of heterogeneous clouds, aerosols of changing optical properties, and the surface within one pixel can be distinguished by means of their spectral signatures. This example is based on data from the Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS, Houston, Texas, 2006), Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of polluted boundary layer clouds, and 3-dimensional radiative transfer calculations. In a second example, we show that the uncertainty of cloud retrievals can be improved considerably by exploiting the spectral information around liquid water absorption features in the near-infrared wavelength range. This is illustrated with spectral transmittance data from the NOAA International Chemistry Experiment in the Arctic LOwer Troposphere (ICEALOT, 2008). In contrast to reflected radiance, transmitted radiance is only weakly sensitive to cloud effective drop radius, and only cloud optical thickness can be obtained from the standard dual-channel technique. We show that effective radius and liquid water path can also be retrieved with the new spectral approach, and validate our results with microwave liquid water path measurements.

  4. Remote application for spectral collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cone, Shelli R.; Steele, R. J.; Tzeng, Nigel H.; Firpi, Alexer H.; Rodriguez, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    In the area of collecting field spectral data using a spectrometer, it is common to have the instrument over the material of interest. In certain instances it is beneficial to have the ability to remotely control the spectrometer. While several systems have the ability to use a form of connectivity to capture the measurement it is essential to have the ability to control the settings. Additionally, capturing reference information (metadata) about the setup, system configuration, collection, location, atmospheric conditions, and sample information is necessary for future analysis leading towards material discrimination and identification. This has the potential to lead to cumbersome field collection and a lack of necessary information for post processing and analysis. The method presented in this paper describes a capability to merge all parts of spectral collection from logging reference information to initial analysis as well as importing information into a web-hosted spectral database. This allows the simplification of collecting, processing, analyzing and storing field spectra for future analysis and comparisons. This concept is developed for field collection of thermal data using the Designs and Prototypes (D&P) Hand Portable FT-IR Spectrometer (Model 102). The remote control of the spectrometer is done with a customized Android application allowing the ability to capture reference information, process the collected data from radiance to emissivity using a temperature emissivity separation algorithm and store the data into a custom web-based service. The presented system of systems allows field collected spectra to be used for various applications by spectral analysts in the future.

  5. Absolute spectrophotometry of Neptune - 3390 to 7800 A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstralh, J. T.; Neff, J. S.

    1983-07-01

    Absolute spectrophotometry of Neptune from 3390 to 7800 Å, with spectral resolution of 10 Å in the interval 3390 - 6055 and 20 Å in the interval 6055 - 7800 Å, is reported. The results are compared with filter photometry (Appleby, 1973; Wamsteker, 1973; Savage et al., 1980) and with synthetic spectra computed on the basis of a parameterization proposed by Podolak and Danielson (1977) for aerosol scattering and absorption. A CH4/H2 ratio is derived for the convectively mixed part of Neptune's atmosphere, and constrains optical properties of hypothetical aerosol layers.

  6. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2008-10-21

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  7. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-03

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  8. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-10-02

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  9. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    SciTech Connect

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2009-09-01

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  10. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-17

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  11. Upwelling radiance at 976 nm measured from space using the OPALS CCD camera on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Oaida, Bogdan V.; Abrahamson, Matthew; Wright, Malcolm W.

    2015-03-01

    The Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) Flight System on-board the International Space Station uses a charge coupled device (CCD) camera to detect a beacon laser from Earth. Relative measurements of the background contributed by upwelling radiance under diverse illumination conditions and varying surface terrain is presented. In some cases clouds in the field-of-view allowed a comparison of terrestrial and cloud-top upwelling radiance. In this paper we will report these measurements and examine the extent of agreement with atmospheric model predictions.

  12. Retrieving Temperature and Moisture Profiles from AERI Radiance Observations. AERIPROF Value-Added Product Technical Description

    SciTech Connect

    Feltz, W. F.; Howell, H. B.; Comstock, J.; Mahon, R.; Turner, D. D.; Smith, W. L.; Woolf, H. M.; Halter, T.

    2007-04-01

    One of the goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to collect a long-term series of radiative and atmospheric state observations to improve the parameterization of these processes in global climate models. The ARM Program intended to move away from the traditional approach of directly measuring profiles of temperature and moisture using radiosondes, which is expensive in terms of expendables and manpower, and develop methods to retrieve these profiles with ground-based remote sensors. The atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI), whose radiance data contains information on the vertical distribution of water vapor and temperature, is an integral part of the ARM profiling plan.

  13. Predicting top-of-atmosphere radiance for arbitrary viewing geometries from the visible to thermal infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cota, Steve A.; Kalman, Linda S.

    2010-08-01

    In an earlier paper [Cota et al., Proc. SPIE 7087, 1-31 (2008)] we described how The Aerospace Corporation's Parameterized Image Chain Analysis & Simulation SOftware (PICASSO) may be used with a reflectance calibrated input scene, in conjunction with a limited number of runs of AFRL's MODTRAN4 radiative transfer code, to quickly predict the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance received by an earth viewing sensor, for any arbitrary combination of solar and sensor elevation angles. In the present paper, we extend the method to the short and midwave IR, where reflected solar and emitted thermal radiation both contribute to the TOA radiance received by a downlooking sensor.

  14. The Goddard Snow Radiance Assimilation Project: An Integrated Snow Radiance and Snow Physics Modeling Framework for Snow/cold Land Surface Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, E.; Tedesco, M.; Reichle, R.; Choudhury, B.; Peters-Lidard C.; Foster, J.; Hall, D.; Riggs, G.

    2006-01-01

    Microwave-based retrievals of snow parameters from satellite observations have a long heritage and have so far been generated primarily by regression-based empirical "inversion" methods based on snapshots in time. Direct assimilation of microwave radiance into physical land surface models can be used to avoid errors associated with such retrieval/inversion methods, instead utilizing more straightforward forward models and temporal information. This approach has been used for years for atmospheric parameters by the operational weather forecasting community with great success. Recent developments in forward radiative transfer modeling, physical land surface modeling, and land data assimilation are converging to allow the assembly of an integrated framework for snow/cold lands modeling and radiance assimilation. The objective of the Goddard snow radiance assimilation project is to develop such a framework and explore its capabilities. The key elements of this framework include: a forward radiative transfer model (FRTM) for snow, a snowpack physical model, a land surface water/energy cycle model, and a data assimilation scheme. In fact, multiple models are available for each element enabling optimization to match the needs of a particular study. Together these form a modular and flexible framework for self-consistent, physically-based remote sensing and water/energy cycle studies. In this paper we will describe the elements and the integration plan. All modules will operate within the framework of the Land Information System (LIS), a land surface modeling framework with data assimilation capabilities running on a parallel-node computing cluster. Capabilities for assimilation of snow retrieval products are already under development for LIS. We will describe plans to add radiance-based assimilation capabilities. Plans for validation activities using field measurements will also be discussed.

  15. Modeling hyperspectral observations of vegetation fluorescence from photosystem level to top-of-atmosphere radiance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoef, W.

    2011-12-01

    In support of the candidate ESA mission FLEX, models have been developed to simulate vegetation chlorophyll fluorescence and its observation on the level of single leaves, the canopy and from space. The Fluspect model is based on the PROSPECT leaf model and includes an additional module which calculates the excitation-fluorescence matrix for both sides of the leaf by means of an efficient doubling algorithm. Fluorescence spectra for white incident light, and of course the spectra of reflectance and transmittance, are computed as well. The FluorSAIL model is a numerical variant of SAIL which calculates top-of-canopy fluorescent radiance in the direction of viewing for given incident radiation spectra from the sun and the sky, obtained from the MODTRAN radiative transfer code. In a recent version called FluorSAIL3, high spectral resolution data (0.1 nm) from MODTRAN5 (beta) are used by the model to simulate observations by the candidate FLEX mission. The model computes the directional canopy reflectance with and without fluorescence for the given incident radiation spectra obtained from MODTRAN and the results have been used to evaluate several algorithms for the retrieval of fluorescence from the apparent reflectance signal. In this contribution emphasis will be on the detection of the fluorescence signal, the dependence of fluorescence observations on leaf chlorophyll content and other PROSPECT parameters, canopy structure, and observational conditions, including the properties of the atmosphere. In addition, some attention is paid to the definition of fluorescence quantum efficiencies at photosystem level, leaf level, and canopy level. This is important for the study of the relation between canopy fluorescence and actual photosynthesis. From the simulations it can be concluded that the interpretation of the fluorescence signal is complex, and probably the comparison of actual observations of spectra of fluorescence and reflectance with spectra simulated by a

  16. Feasibility of interstitial near-infrared radiance spectroscopy platform for ex vivo canine prostate studies: optical properties extraction, hemoglobin and water concentration, and gold nanoparticles detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabtchak, Serge; Montgomery, Logan G.; Whelan, William M.

    2014-05-01

    The canine prostate is a close match for the human prostate and is used in research of prostate cancers. Determining accurately optical absorption and scattering properties of the gland in a wide spectral range (preferably in a minimally invasive way), linking optical properties to concentrations of major endogenous chromophores, and detecting the presence of localized optical inhomogeneities like inclusions of gold nanoparticles for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes, are among the major challenges for researchers. The goal of the article is to demonstrate a feasibility of the multifunctional radiance spectroscopy platform in providing the required information. For ex vivo canine prostate, extraction of the effective attenuation and diffusion coefficients using relative cw radiance measurements was demonstrated in the 650- to 900-nm range. The derived absorption coefficient was decomposed to contributions from 9.0 μM HbO2, 29.6 μM Hb, and 0.47 fractional volume of H2O. Detection of a localized inclusion containing ˜1.5.1010 gold nanorods (0.8 μg Au) at 10 mm distance from the urethra was achieved with the detector in the urethra and the light source in a virtual rectum position. The platform offers the framework for a systematic study of various chromophores in the prostate that can be used as comprehensive diagnostic markers.

  17. Pre-Launch Absolute Calibration of CCD/CBERS-2B Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Ponzoni, Flávio Jorge; Albuquerque, Bráulio Fonseca Carneiro

    2008-01-01

    Pre-launch absolute calibration coefficients for the CCD/CBERS-2B sensor have been calculated from radiometric measurements performed in a satellite integration and test hall in the Chinese Academy of Space Technology (CAST) headquarters, located in Beijing, China. An illuminated integrating sphere was positioned in the test hall facilities to allow the CCD/CBERS-2B imagery of the entire sphere aperture. Calibration images were recorded and a relative calibration procedure adopted exclusively in Brazil was applied to equalize the detectors responses. Averages of digital numbers (DN) from these images were determined and correlated to their respective radiance levels in order to calculate the absolute calibration coefficients. It has been the first time these pre-launch absolute calibration coefficients have been calculated considering the Brazilian image processing criteria. Now it will be possible to compare them to those that will be calculated from vicarious calibration campaigns. This comparison will permit the CCD/CBERS-2B monitoring and the frequently data updating to the user community. PMID:27873886

  18. Pre-Launch Absolute Calibration of CCD/CBERS-2B Sensor.

    PubMed

    Ponzoni, Flávio Jorge; Albuquerque, Bráulio Fonseca Carneiro

    2008-10-23

    Pre-launch absolute calibration coefficients for the CCD/CBERS-2B sensor have been calculated from radiometric measurements performed in a satellite integration and test hall in the Chinese Academy of Space Technology (CAST) headquarters, located in Beijing, China. An illuminated integrating sphere was positioned in the test hall facilities to allow the CCD/CBERS-2B imagery of the entire sphere aperture. Calibration images were recorded and a relative calibration procedure adopted exclusively in Brazil was applied to equalize the detectors responses. Averages of digital numbers (DN) from these images were determined and correlated to their respective radiance levels in order to calculate the absolute calibration coefficients. It has been the first time these pre-launch absolute calibration coefficients have been calculated considering the Brazilian image processing criteria. Now it will be possible to compare them to those that will be calculated from vicarious calibration campaigns. This comparison will permit the CCD/CBERS-2B monitoring and the frequently data updating to the user community.

  19. Tropospheric Ozone Near-Nadir-Viewing IR Spectral Sensitivity and Ozone Measurements from NAST-I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Smith, William L.; Larar, Allen M.

    2001-01-01

    Infrared ozone spectra from near nadir observations have provided atmospheric ozone information from the sensor to the Earth's surface. Simulations of the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I) from the NASA ER-2 aircraft (approximately 20 km altitude) with a spectral resolution of 0.25/cm were used for sensitivity analysis. The spectral sensitivity of ozone retrievals to uncertainties in atmospheric temperature and water vapor is assessed in order to understand the relationship between the IR emissions and the atmospheric state. In addition, ozone spectral radiance sensitivity to its ozone layer densities and radiance weighting functions reveals the limit of the ozone profile retrieval accuracy from NAST-I measurements. Statistical retrievals of ozone with temperature and moisture retrievals from NAST-I spectra have been investigated and the preliminary results from NAST-I field campaigns are presented.

  20. Calibration and deployment of a new NIST transfer radiometer for broadband and spectral calibration of space chambers (MDXR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Timothy M.; Carter, Adriaan C.; Woods, Solomon I.; Kaplan, Simon G.

    2011-06-01

    The Low-Background Infrared (LBIR) facility at NIST has performed on-site calibration and initial off-site deployments of a new infrared transfer radiometer with an integrated cryogenic Fourier transform spectrometer (Cryo- FTS). This mobile radiometer can be deployed to customer sites for broadband and spectral calibrations of space chambers and low-background hardware-in-the-loop testbeds. The Missile Defense Transfer Radiometer (MDXR) has many of the capabilities of a complete IR calibration facility and replaces our existing filter-based transfer radiometer (BXR) as the NIST standard detector deployed to customer facilities. The MDXR features numerous improvements over the BXR, including: a cryogenic Fourier transform spectrometer, an on-board absolute cryogenic radiometer (ACR) and an internal blackbody reference source with an integrated collimator. The Cryo-FTS can be used to measure high resolution spectra from 3 to 28 micrometers, using a Si:As blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detector. The on-board ACR can be used for self-calibration of the MDXR BIB as well as for absolute measurements of external infrared sources. A set of filter wheels and a rotating polarizer within the MDXR allow for filter-based and polarization-sensitive measurements. The optical design of the MDXR makes both radiance and irradiance measurements possible and enables calibration of both divergent and collimated sources. Results of on-site calibration of the MDXR using its internal blackbody source and an external reference source will be discussed, as well as the performance of the new radiometer in its initial deployments to customer sites.

  1. Absolute vicarious calibration of Landsat-8 OLI and Resourcesat-2 AWiFS sensors over Rann of Kutch site in Gujarat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shweta; Sridhar, V. N.; Prajapati, R. P.; Rao, K. M.; Mathur, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, vicarious calibration coefficients for all the four bands (green, red, NIR and SWIR) of Resourcesat-2 AWiFS sensor for four dates during Dec 2013-Nov 2014 and for seven bands (blue, green, red, NIR, SWIR1, SWIR2 and PAN) of OLI sensor onboard Landsat-8 for six dates during Dec 2013-Feb 2015 were estimated using field measured reflectance and measured atmospheric parameters during sensor image acquisition over Rann of Kutch site in Gujarat. The top of atmosphere (TOA) at-satellite radiances for all the bands were simulated using 6S radiative transfer code with field measured reflectance, synchronous atmospheric measurements and respective sensor's spectral response functions as an input. These predicted spectral radiances were compared with the radiances from the respective sensor's image in the respective band over the calibration site. Cross-calibration between the sensors AWiFS and OLI was also attempted using near-simultaneous same day image acquisition. Effect of spectral band adjustment factor was also studied with OLI sensor taken as reference sensor. Results show that the variation in average estimated radiance ratio for the AWiFS sensor was found to be within 10% for all the bands, whereas, for OLI sensor, the variation was found to be within 6% for all the bands except green and SWIR2 for which the variation was 8% and 11% respectively higher than the 5% uncertainty of the OLI sensor specification for TOA spectral radiance. At the 1σ level, red, NIR, SWIR1 and Panchromatic bands of OLI sensor showed close agreement between sensor-measured and vicarious TOA radiance resulting no change in calibration coefficient and hence indicating no sensor degradation. Two sets of near-simultaneous SBAFs were derived from respective ground measured target reflectance profiles and applied to the AWiFS and it was observed that overall, SBAF compensation provides a significant improvement in sensor agreement. The reduction in the difference between AWiFS and

  2. Remote sensing cloud properties from high spectral resolution infrared observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William L.; Ma, Xia L.; Ackerman, Steven A.; Revercomb, H. E.; Knuteson, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    A technique for estimating cloud radiative properties (spectral emissivity and reflectivity) in the IR is developed based on observations at a spectral resolution of approximately 0.5/cm. The algorithm uses spectral radiance observations and theoretical calculations of the IR spectra for clear and cloudy conditions along with lidar-determined cloud-base and cloud-top pressure. An advantage of the high spectral resolution observations is that the absorption effects of atmospheric gases are minimized by analyzing between gaseous absorption lines. The technique is applicable to both ground-based and aircraft-based platforms and derives the effective particle size and associated cloud water content required to satisfy, theoretically, the observed cloud IR spectra. The algorithm is tested using theoretical simulations and applied to observations made with the University of Wisconsin's ground-based and NASA ER-2 aircraft High-Resolution Infrared Spectrometer instruments.

  3. Aerosol Properties From Combined Oxygen A Band Radiances and Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, Dave; Zhai, Peng-Wang; Hu, Yongxiang

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new aerosol retrieval technique based on combing high-resolution A band spectra with lidar profiles. Our goal is the development of a technique to retrieve aerosol absorption, one of the critical parameters affecting the global radiation budget and one which is currently poorly constrained by satellite measurements. Our approach relies on two key factors: 1) the use of high spectral resolution (17,000:1) measurements which resolve the A-band line structure, and 2) the use of co-located lidar profile measurements to constrain the vertical distribution of scatterers in the forward model. The algorithm has been developed to be applied to observations from the CALIPSO and OCO-2 satellites, flying in formation as part of the A-train constellation. We describe the approach and present simulated retrievals to illustrate performance potential.

  4. Oceanographic mapping of structure and dynamics of the northern Gulf of California by the use of spectral modeling and ERTS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepley, L. K.; Calderon, G.; Hendrickson, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Distribution and flow of water masses at four depth intervals were determined by analyzing ERTS imagery through the use of optical models of classes of vertical oceanographic profiles. Data used for these models was obtained from shipboard measurements including surface spectral radiance, and optical and more conventional oceanographic depth profiles. The spectral models obtained were applied to radiance-contoured ERTS imagery in band 4, 5, 6, and 7. Features mapped by direct photointerpretation of ERTS imagery include submerged shoals, current streamlines, and location of possible upwellings, downwellings and submarine springs.

  5. Interpretation of the Arcade 2 Absolute Sky Brightness Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiffert, M.; Fixsen, D. J.; Kogut, A.; Levin, S. M.; Limon, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Mirel, P.; Singal, J.; Villela, T.; Wollack, E.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    We use absolutely calibrated data between 3 and 90 GHz from the 2006 balloon flight of the ARCADE 2 instrument, along with previous measurements at other frequencies to constrain models of extragalactic emission. Such emission is a combination of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) monopole, Galactic foreground emission, the integrated contribution of radio emission from external galaxies, any spectral distortions present in the CMB, and any other extragalactic source. After removal of estimates of foreground emission from our own Galaxy, and an estimated contribution of external galaxies, we present fits to a combination of the flat-spectrum CMB and potential spectral distortions in the CMB. We find 217 upper limits to CMB spectral distortions of u < 6x10(exp -4) and [Y(sub ff)] < 1x10(exp -4). We also find a significant detection of a residual signal beyond that, which can be explained by the CMB plus the integrated radio emission from galaxies estimated from existing surveys. This residual signal may be due to an underestimated galactic foreground contribution, an unaccounted for contribution of a background of radio sources, or some combination of both. The residual signal is consistent with emission in the form of a power law with amplitUde 18.4 +/- 2.1 K at 0.31 GHz and a spectral index of -2.57 +/- 0.05.

  6. Sun glitter radiance and radar cross-section modulations of the sea bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennings, Ingo; Matthews, John; Metzner, Margitta

    1994-08-01

    Aircraft and satellite-borne multispectral sensors such as ocean color scanners, spectrometers, and scanning Lidar's have proved to be effective in detecting submarine shallow-water bottom topography in clear coastal waters. For such studies the blue-green band of the visible electromagnetic spectrum (wavelength between 400 and 580 nm) is used, because natural light in this range has the deepest penetration into the water column. However, if the water becomes turbid, the reflection from the submarine sea bed disappears. In this case the only possible mechanism available in the optical range of the electromagnetic spectrum for detecting surface signatures of shallow water bottom topography is through the observation of direct sunlight specularly reflected from a roughened sea surface, known as sun glitter radiance. As the tidal flow over irregularities on the submarine sea bed creates surface roughness variations, sun glitter imagery can be used to detect such features. In this paper a first-order theory of the sun glitter imaging mechanism of submerged sand waves is presented. The results of sun glitter radiance modulations are compared with simulations of P band radar cross-section modulations and with experimental data. Calculations of both the constant background sun glitter radiance and the sun glitter radiance modulation show that these parameters are very sensitive to wind speed, to view angle with respect to acquisition time, and to observation geometry as a whole.

  7. -30° C to 960° C Variable Temperature Blackbody (VTBB) Radiance Temperature Calibration Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Z.; Wang, J.; Hao, X.; Wang, T.; Dong, W.

    2015-12-01

    A blackbody radiance temperature calibration facility (RTCF) has recently been established at the National Institute of Metrology, China, offering calibration and verification services for variable temperature blackbody (VTBB) radiation sources. The RTCF includes reference VTBBs in the range of -30° C to 960° C and consists of a stirred liquid bath blackbody of -30° C to 80° C and water, cesium, and sodium heat-pipe blackbodies spanning 50° C to 960° C. In addition, the facility is equipped with a set of radiation thermometers with different working wavelengths (or wavebands); these thermometers are used to transfer radiance temperatures from the reference to customers' VTBBs. Cavities with V-notch grooves in the inner surface have an estimated emissivity from 0.99986 to 0.99994. The temperature control stability and temperature uniformity of VTBBs are characterized. Furthermore, we test the difference between a cavity and thermometer well temperatures and compare the radiance temperatures of the Cs and Na heat-pipe blackbodies. The expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of VTBBs' radiance temperatures at 10 \\upmu m (8 \\upmu m to 14 \\upmu m) is evaluated from 0.016° C to 0.23° C. The facility has been used to calibrate and characterize customers' VTBBs.

  8. Using sky radiances measured by ground based AERONET Sun-Radiometers for cirrus cloud detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinyuk, A.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Slutsker, I.; Lewis, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Screening of cirrus clouds using observations of optical depth (OD) only has proven to be a difficult task due mostly to some clouds having temporally and spatially stable OD. On the other hand, the sky radiances measurements which in AERONET protocol are taken throughout the day may contain additional cloud information. In this work the potential of using sky radiances for cirrus cloud detection is investigated. The detection is based on differences in the angular shape of sky radiances due to cirrus clouds and aerosol (see Figure). The range of scattering angles from 3 to 6 degrees was selected due to two primary reasons: high sensitivity to cirrus clouds presence, and close proximity to the Sun. The angular shape of sky radiances was parametrized by its curvature, which is a parameter defined as a combination of the first and second derivatives as a function of scattering angle. We demonstrate that a slope of the logarithm of curvature versus logarithm of scattering angle in this selected range of scattering angles is sensitive to cirrus cloud presence. We also demonstrate that restricting the values of the slope below some threshold value can be used for cirrus cloud screening. The threshold value of the slope was estimated using collocated measurements of AERONET data and MPLNET lidars.

  9. Bidirectional reflectance of oceanic waters: A comparison of modeled and measured upward radiance fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morel, Andre; Voss, Kenneth J.; Gentili, Bernard

    1995-01-01

    The bidirectional reflectance of oceanic waters is conveniently described in a normalized way by forming the ratio of the upwelling irradiance E(sub u) to any upwelling radiance L(sub u)(theta prime, phi). This ratio, Q (theta prime, theta(sub 0), (phi(sub 0) - phi), where theta prime, phi are the nadir and azimuth angles for the upward radiance and theta(sub 0), phi(sub 0) are the zenith and azimuth angles of the Sun, has been determined from measurements at sea and computed via Monte Carlo simulations using the inherent optical properties measured in the field and appropriate boundary conditions (clear sky, no wind, varying Sun angle). Experimental ad computed Q values are in excellent agreement. This successful comparison confirms the importance of the bidirectional character of ocean reflectance, already pointed out from a purely numerical approach without field validation, and corroborates the extended range of the Q variations. The later point is of importance when interpreting the marine signals detected by an ocean color satellite-borne sensor. The validation is extended by considering the historical data for the radiance distributions in Lake Pend Oreille determined at various depths. The closure issue in ocean optics is examined by solving the direct problem of radiative transfer and through a model-data comparison in terms of radiance field.

  10. Interior radiances in optically deep absorbing media. 3: Scattering from Haze L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattawar, G. W.; Plass, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    The interior radiances are calculated within an optically deep absorbing medium scattering according to the Haze L phase function. The dependence on the solar zenith angle, the single scattering albedo, and the optical depth within the medium is calculated by the matrix operator method. The development of the asymptotic angular distribution of the radiance in the diffusion region is illustrated through a number of examples; it depends only on the single scattering albedo and on the phase function for single scattering. The exact values of the radiance in the diffusion region are compared with values calculated from the approximate equations proposed by Van de Hulst. The variation of the radiance near the lower boundary of an optically thick medium is illustrated with examples. The attenuation length is calculated for various single scattering albedos and compared with the corresponding values for Rayleigh scattering. The ratio of the upward to the downward flux is found to be remarkably constant within the medium. The heating rate is calculated and found to have a maximum value at an optical depth of two within a Haze L layer when the sun is at the zenith.

  11. Radiance and atmosphere propagation-based method for the target range estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hoonkyung; Chun, Joohwan

    2012-06-01

    Target range estimation is traditionally based on radar and active sonar systems in modern combat system. However, the performance of such active sensor devices is degraded tremendously by jamming signal from the enemy. This paper proposes a simple range estimation method between the target and the sensor. Passive IR sensors measures infrared (IR) light radiance radiating from objects in dierent wavelength and this method shows robustness against electromagnetic jamming. The measured target radiance of each wavelength at the IR sensor depends on the emissive properties of target material and is attenuated by various factors, in particular the distance between the sensor and the target and atmosphere environment. MODTRAN is a tool that models atmospheric propagation of electromagnetic radiation. Based on the result from MODTRAN and measured radiance, the target range is estimated. To statistically analyze the performance of proposed method, we use maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) and evaluate the Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB) via the probability density function of measured radiance. And we also compare CRLB and the variance of and ML estimation using Monte-Carlo.

  12. Deriving a relationship between the radiative power and the SWIR radiance for Gas Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caseiro, Alexandre; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Heil, Angelika; Rücker, Gernot; Tiemann, Joachim; Leimbach, David

    2016-04-01

    Flaring occurs in many regions and is a source of black carbon (BC) globally, among other pollutants. At higher latitudes, flaring is the main source of BC which, upon deposition on snow, lowers its albedo. Therefore, knowing the location and emissions of flares would be a valuable input to climate models. The main goal of this work is to derive a working relationship between Shortwave Infrared at 1.6 μm (SWIR) radiance and Radiative Power (RP). Such a relationship will be helpful in the processing chain use to determine the emissions from gas flares for upcoming instruments, such as the SLSTR on Sentinel-3. In order to derive the relationship between RP and SWIR, RP assigned to Gas Flares (GFs) observed by the small German satellite BIRD is related to the SWIR radiance time series as observed by AATSR at that location in a temporal window of ± 2 months around the BIRD observation. The SWIR signal was retrieved from the AATSR pixel where the GF was identified by BIRD. For each observation, the signal is considered as being above the detection limit if its value is above three times the background standard deviation. The background is a window of approximately 10 × 10 km2 around the GF location pixel. The reported SWIR radiance value is the radiance signal minus the background average. The SWIR radiance signal thus retrieved shows a large variation throughout the time window considered. Such a variation evidences temporal variation in the flaring intensity, possibly GFs are either inactive or active, with varying levels of intensity, throughout time. In a subsequent step, it is also determined whether the radiance at the GF location pixel is a local maximum (after excluding other possible GF locations within the surroundings). Then, a new average and standard deviation for each GF may be constructed, more representative of when the GF is actually on. Those figures are then compared to a normalized RP. The normalization is necessary because the BIRD fire processor

  13. An absolute sensitivity calibration of the JET VUV SPRED spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, K. D.; Coffey, I. H.; Zacks, J.; Stamp, M. F.; contributors, JET-EFDA

    2009-04-01

    The determination of a good relative and absolute sensitivity calibration for wideband VUV spectrometers is challenging. On JET, the possible T and Be contamination of the VUV spectrometer precludes its removal to a synchrotron source and, consequently, a range of alternative in situ techniques have been investigated in depth. This has resulted in a reliable calibration for the complete spectral range, the relative calibration at short wavelengths being particularly accurate. At these wavelengths, a novel approach is used, in which the calibration is extended using a number of Na- and Li-like metal doublets. At longer wavelengths, the Li-like doublets of Ar and Ne have been used in conjunction with CII, CIII and CIV line intensity ratios. Unexplained discrepancies between the measured and modelled C results have meant that the exceptional short wavelength accuracy has not be repeated at these longer wavelengths. The absolute sensitivity has been determined from branching ratios to an absolutely calibrated visible spectrometer. The long term stability of the calibration is discussed.

  14. Sub-femtosecond absolute timing jitter with a 10 GHz hybrid photonic-microwave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortier, T. M.; Nelson, C. W.; Hati, A.; Quinlan, F.; Taylor, J.; Jiang, H.; Chou, C. W.; Rosenband, T.; Lemke, N.; Ludlow, A.; Howe, D.; Oates, C. W.; Diddams, S. A.

    2012-06-01

    We present an optical-electronic approach to generating microwave signals with high spectral purity. By circumventing shot noise and operating near fundamental thermal limits, we demonstrate 10 GHz signals with an absolute timing jitter for a single hybrid oscillator of 420 attoseconds (1 Hz-5 GHz).

  15. Vertical Structure and Optical Properties of Titans Aerosols from Radiance Measurements Made Inside and Outside the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doose, Lyn R.; Karkoschka, Erich; Tomasko, Martin G.; Anderson, Carrie M.

    2017-01-01

    Prompted by the detection of stratospheric cloud layers by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS; see Anderson, C.M., Samuelson, R.E. [2011]. Icarus 212, 762-778), we have re-examined the observations made by the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR) in the atmosphere of Titan together with two constraints from measurements made outside the atmosphere. No evidence of thin layers (<1 km) in the DISR image data sets is seen beyond the three previously reported layers at 21 km, 11 km, and 7 km by Karkoschka and Tomasko (Karkoschka, E., Tomasko, M.G. [2009]. Icarus 199, 442-448). On the other hand, there is evidence of a thicker layer centered at about 55 km. A rise in radiance gradients in the Downward-Looking Visible Spectrometer (DLVS) data below 55 km indicates an increase in the volume extinction coefficient near this altitude. To fit the geometric albedo measured from outside the atmosphere the decrease in the single scattering albedo of Titan's aerosols at high altitudes, noted in earlier studies of DISR data, must continue to much higher altitudes. The altitude of Titan's limb as a function of wavelength requires that the scale height of the aerosols decrease with altitude from the 65 km value seen in the DISR observations below 140 km to the 45 km value at higher altitudes. We compared the variation of radiance with nadir angle observed in the DISR images to improve our aerosol model. Our new aerosol model fits the altitude and wavelength variations of the observations at small and intermediate nadir angles but not for large nadir angles, indicating an effect that is not reproduced by our radiative transfer model. The volume extinction profiles are modeled by continuous functions except near the enhancement level near 55 km altitude. The wavelength dependence of the extinction optical depth is similar to earlier results at wavelengths from 500 to 700 nm, but is smaller at shorter wavelengths and larger toward longer wavelengths. A Hapke

  16. View-angle-dependent AIRS Cloudiness and Radiance Variance: Analysis and Interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Jie; Wu, Dong L.

    2013-01-01

    Upper tropospheric clouds play an important role in the global energy budget and hydrological cycle. Significant view-angle asymmetry has been observed in upper-level tropical clouds derived from eight years of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) 15 um radiances. Here, we find that the asymmetry also exists in the extra-tropics. It is larger during day than that during night, more prominent near elevated terrain, and closely associated with deep convection and wind shear. The cloud radiance variance, a proxy for cloud inhomogeneity, has consistent characteristics of the asymmetry to those in the AIRS cloudiness. The leading causes of the view-dependent cloudiness asymmetry are the local time difference and small-scale organized cloud structures. The local time difference (1-1.5 hr) of upper-level (UL) clouds between two AIRS outermost views can create parts of the observed asymmetry. On the other hand, small-scale tilted and banded structures of the UL clouds can induce about half of the observed view-angle dependent differences in the AIRS cloud radiances and their variances. This estimate is inferred from analogous study using Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) radiances observed during the period of time when there were simultaneous measurements at two different view-angles from NOAA-18 and -19 satellites. The existence of tilted cloud structures and asymmetric 15 um and 6.7 um cloud radiances implies that cloud statistics would be view-angle dependent, and should be taken into account in radiative transfer calculations, measurement uncertainty evaluations and cloud climatology investigations. In addition, the momentum forcing in the upper troposphere from tilted clouds is also likely asymmetric, which can affect atmospheric circulation anisotropically.

  17. Statistical model for atmospheric limb radiance structure: application to airborne infrared surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang, Carine; Dalaudier, Francis; Roblin, Antoine; Rialland, Valérie; Chervet, Patrick

    2008-10-01

    Infrared (IR) detectors can be used as airborne limb-viewing surveillance systems for missile detection. These systems' performances are impacted by the atmospheric inhomogeneous background. In fact, the probability of target detection can be heavily affected. Consequently, the knowledge of these radiance small-scale fluctuations and their statistical properties is required to assess these systems' detection capability. A model of two-dimensional radiance spatial fluctuations autocorrelation function (ACF) is developed. This model is dedicated to airborne limb-viewing conditions in the thermal IR. In the stratosphere and in clear-sky conditions, the structured background is mainly due to internal-gravity-wave-induced temperature and density spatial fluctuations. Moreover, in the particular case of water vapour absorption bands, the mass fraction fluctuations play a non negligible role on the radiative field. Thereby, considering the temperature field and the water vapour field as stochastic processes, the radiance ACF can be expressed as a function of the temperature ACF and the water vapor mass fraction ACF. A local thermodynamic equilibrium model is sufficient for stratospheric conditions and sunlight scattering is neglected in the thermal IR. In addition, determination of the radiance fluctuations ACF requires the knowledge of the absorption coefficient and its first derivatives with respect to the temperature and water vapour mass fraction. Thus, a line-by-line model specific to water vapor absorption bands has been developed. This model is used to precalculate the absorption coefficients and their derivatives. This look-up table method allows circumventing the computational cost of a line-by-line calculation. A detailed description of the radiance fluctuations ACF model is presented and first results are discussed.

  18. Simultaneous spectral/spatial detection of edges for hyperspectral imagery: the HySPADE algorithm revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resmini, Ronald G.

    2012-06-01

    The hyperspectral/spatial detection of edges (HySPADE) algorithm, originally published in 2004 [1], has been modified and applied to a wider diversity of hyperspectral imagery (HSI) data. As originally described in [1], HySPADE operates by converting the naturally two-dimensional edge detection process based on traditional image analysis methods into a series of one-dimensional edge detections based on spectral angle. The HySPADE algorithm: i) utilizes spectral signature information to identify edges; ii) requires only the spectral information of the HSI scene data and does not require a spectral library nor spectral matching against a library; iii) facilitates simultaneous use of all spectral information; iv) does not require endmember or training data selection; v) generates multiple, independent data points for statistical analysis of detected edges; vi) is robust in the presence of noise; and vii) may be applied to radiance, reflectance, and emissivity data--though it is applied to radiance and reflectance spectra (and their principal components transformation) in this report. HySPADE has recently been modified to use Euclidean distance values as an alternative to spectral angle. It has also been modified to use an N x N-pixel sliding window in contrast to the 2004 version which operated only on spatial subset image chips. HySPADE results are compared to those obtained using traditional (Roberts and Sobel) edge-detection methods. Spectral angle and Euclidean distance HySPADE results are superior to those obtained using the traditional edge detection methods; the best results are obtained by applying HySPADE to the first few, information-containing bands of principal components transformed data (both radiance and reflectance). However, in practice, both the Euclidean distance and spectral angle versions of HySPADE should be applied and their results compared. HySPADE results are shown; extensions of the HySPADE concept are discussed as are applications for Hy

  19. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  20. ON A SUFFICIENT CONDITION FOR ABSOLUTE CONTINUITY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The formulation of a condition which yields absolute continuity when combined with continuity and bounded variation is the problem considered in the...Briefly, the formulation is achieved through a discussion which develops a proof by contradiction of a sufficiently theorem for absolute continuity which uses in its hypothesis the condition of continuity and bounded variation .

  1. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  2. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  3. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  4. THE ABSOLUTE MAGNITUDES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE IN THE ULTRAVIOLET

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Peter J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Hoversten, Erik A.; Pritchard, Tyler; Milne, Peter; Bufano, Filomena; Mazzali, Paolo; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Li Weidong; Foley, Ryan J.; Hicken, Malcolm; Kirshner, Robert P.; Gehrels, Neil; Holland, Stephen T.; Immler, Stefan; Phillips, Mark M.; Still, Martin

    2010-10-01

    We examine the absolute magnitudes and light-curve shapes of 14 nearby (redshift z = 0.004-0.027) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed in the ultraviolet (UV) with the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. Colors and absolute magnitudes are calculated using both a standard Milky Way extinction law and one for the Large Magellanic Cloud that has been modified by circumstellar scattering. We find very different behavior in the near-UV filters (uvw1{sub rc} covering {approx}2600-3300 A after removing optical light, and u {approx} 3000-4000 A) compared to a mid-UV filter (uvm2 {approx}2000-2400 A). The uvw1{sub rc} - b colors show a scatter of {approx}0.3 mag while uvm2-b scatters by nearly 0.9 mag. Similarly, while the scatter in colors between neighboring filters is small in the optical and somewhat larger in the near-UV, the large scatter in the uvm2 - uvw1 colors implies significantly larger spectral variability below 2600 A. We find that in the near-UV the absolute magnitudes at peak brightness of normal SNe Ia in our sample are correlated with the optical decay rate with a scatter of 0.4 mag, comparable to that found for the optical in our sample. However, in the mid-UV the scatter is larger, {approx}1 mag, possibly indicating differences in metallicity. We find no strong correlation between either the UV light-curve shapes or the UV colors and the UV absolute magnitudes. With larger samples, the UV luminosity might be useful as an additional constraint to help determine distance, extinction, and metallicity in order to improve the utility of SNe Ia as standardized candles.

  5. Spectral Predictors

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarria, L; Lindstrom, P; Rossignac, J

    2006-11-17

    Many scientific, imaging, and geospatial applications produce large high-precision scalar fields sampled on a regular grid. Lossless compression of such data is commonly done using predictive coding, in which weighted combinations of previously coded samples known to both encoder and decoder are used to predict subsequent nearby samples. In hierarchical, incremental, or selective transmission, the spatial pattern of the known neighbors is often irregular and varies from one sample to the next, which precludes prediction based on a single stencil and fixed set of weights. To handle such situations and make the best use of available neighboring samples, we propose a local spectral predictor that offers optimal prediction by tailoring the weights to each configuration of known nearby samples. These weights may be precomputed and stored in a small lookup table. We show that predictive coding using our spectral predictor improves compression for various sources of high-precision data.

  6. Application of the spectrally integrated Voigt function to line-by-line radiative transfer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quine, B. M.; Abrarov, S. M.

    2013-09-01

    We show that a new approach based on the spectrally integrated Voigt function (SIVF) enables the computation of line-by-line (LBL) radiative transfer at reduced spectral resolution without loss of accuracy. The algorithm provides rapid and accurate computation of area under the Voigt function in a way that preserves spectral radiance and, consequently, radiant intensity. The error analysis we provide shows the high-accuracy of the proposed SIVF approximations. A comparison of the performance of the method with that of the traditional LBL approach is presented. Motivations for the use and advantage of the SIVF as a replacement for conventional line function computations in radiative transfer are discussed.

  7. Prospects for the Moon as an SI-Traceable Absolute Spectroradiometric Standard for Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, C. E.; Stone, T. C.; Lykke, K.; Woodward, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's Moon has many physical properties that make it suitable for use as a reference light source for radiometric calibration of remote sensing satellite instruments. Lunar calibration has been successfully applied to many imagers in orbit, including both MODIS instruments and NPP-VIIRS, using the USGS ROLO model to predict the reference exoatmospheric lunar irradiance. Sensor response trending was developed for SeaWIFS with a relative accuracy better than 0.1 % per year with lunar calibration techniques. However, the Moon rarely is used as an absolute reference for on-orbit calibration, primarily due to uncertainties in the ROLO model absolute scale of 5%-10%. But this limitation lies only with the models - the Moon itself is radiometrically stable, and development of a high-accuracy absolute lunar reference is inherently feasible. A program has been undertaken by NIST to collect absolute measurements of the lunar spectral irradiance with absolute accuracy <1 % (k=2), traceable to SI radiometric units. Initial Moon observations were acquired from the Whipple Observatory on Mt. Hopkins, Arizona, elevation 2367 meters, with continuous spectral coverage from 380 nm to 1040 nm at ~3 nm resolution. The lunar spectrometer acquired calibration measurements several times each observing night by pointing to a calibrated integrating sphere source. The lunar spectral irradiance at the top of the atmosphere was derived from a time series of ground-based measurements by a Langley analysis that incorporated measured atmospheric conditions and ROLO model predictions for the change in irradiance resulting from the changing Sun-Moon-Observer geometry throughout each night. Two nights were selected for further study. An extensive error analysis, which includes instrument calibration and atmospheric correction terms, shows a combined standard uncertainty under 1 % over most of the spectral range. Comparison of these two nights' spectral irradiance measurements with predictions

  8. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM

  9. Vacuum ultraviolet spectral emission properties of Ga, In and Sn droplet-based laser produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambino, Nadia; Rollinger, Bob; Brandstätter, Markus; Abhari, Reza S.

    2016-08-01

    The Emission Spectra of gallium, indium and tin droplet-based laser produced plasmas are presented in the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) emission range from 30 nm to 160 nm. The Ga ion transitions are investigated in detail as a function of background pressure level and laser irradiance. Different wavelength emission regions were detected according to the level of background gas. At short wavelengths (i.e. 30-50 nm) the line emission from the higher charge states is reduced with increasing pressure, while at longer wavelengths (i.e. 100-160 nm) the trend is inverted, as the plasma emission intensity of the lower charge states increases with higher background gas pressure level. The emitted lines are fitted with Voigt profiles to determine the electron density. The electron temperature is obtained from a fit based on the Planck distribution. These estimations are then used to identify the relevant processes that lead to the different charge state emissions as a function of background gas. Langmuir Probe measurements are also reported for evaluating the ion kinetic energy as a function of background gas. The gallium spectra are calibrated in units of spectral radiance, together with spectra from indium and tin. This calibration allows absolute power estimations from the light source in the VUV region. The presented experimental results are relevant as fundamental plasma emission spectroscopic measurements in an almost unexplored wavelength region as well as for applications such as Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography to determine the so-called Out-of-Band (OoB) radiation emission and for metrology applications for future inspection tools.

  10. Absolute sensitivity calibration of an extreme ultraviolet spectrometer for tokamak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirlet, R.; Schwob, J. L.; Meyer, O.; Vartanian, S.

    2017-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet spectrometer installed on the Tore Supra tokamak has been calibrated in absolute units of brightness in the range 10-340 Å. This has been performed by means of a combination of techniques. The range 10-113 Å was absolutely calibrated by using an ultrasoft-X ray source emitting six spectral lines in this range. The calibration transfer to the range 113-182 Å was performed using the spectral line intensity branching ratio method. The range 182-340 Å was calibrated thanks to radiative-collisional modelling of spectral line intensity ratios. The maximum sensitivity of the spectrometer was found to lie around 100 Å. Around this wavelength, the sensitivity is fairly flat in a 80 Å wide interval. The spatial variations of sensitivity along the detector assembly were also measured. The observed trend is related to the quantum efficiency decrease as the angle of the incoming photon trajectories becomes more grazing.

  11. High spectral resolution measurements for the ARM Program. Year two technical progress report, March 15, 1991--March 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Revercomb, H.E.

    1992-05-22

    This report focuses on the design and fabrication of high spectral resolution FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) instrumentation for the CART sites of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The ultimate objective of this grant is to develop three different types of instruments, named the AERI, AERI-X, and SORT. The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) is the simplest. It will be available for early deployment at the first ARM site and will be deployable at several locations in the extended network to give horizontal coverage. The AERI will be an 0.5 cm{sup {minus}1} resolution instrument, which measures accurately calibrated radiance spectra for radiation studies and for remote sensing of atmospheric state variables. The AERI-X and the SORTI are higher spectral resolution instruments for obtaining the highest practical resolution for spectroscopy at the ARM central sites. The AERI-X, like the AERI will measure atmospheric emitted radiance, but with resolutions as high as 0.1 cm{sup {minus}1}. The Solar Radiance Transmission Interferometer will measure the total transmission of the atmosphere by tracking the sun through changes in atmospheric air mass. The large solar signal makes it practical for this instrument to offer the ultimate in spectral resolution, about 0.002 cm{sup {minus}1}.

  12. Quantum Efficient Detectors for Use in Absolute Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faust, Jessica; Eastwood, Michael; Pavri, Betina; Raney, James

    1998-01-01

    The trap or quantum efficient detector has a quantum efficiency of greater than 0.98 for the region from 450 to 900 nm. The region of flattest response is from 600 to 900 nm. The QED consists of three windowless Hamamatsu silicon detectors. The QED was mounted below AVIRIS to monitor the Spectralon panel for changes in radiance during radiometric calibration. The next step is to permanently mount the detector to AVIRIS and monitor the overall radiance of scenes along with calibration.

  13. Mars 1064-nm Spectral Radiance Measurements from the Receiver Noise Response of the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Neumann, Gregory A.; Abshire, James B.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter not only provides surface topography from the laser pulse time-of-flight, but also two radiometric measurements, the active measurement of transmitted and reflected laser pulse energy, and the passive measurement of reflected solar illumination. The passive radiometry measurement is accomplished in a novel fashion by monitoring the noise density at the output of the photodetector and solving for the amount of background light. The passive radiometry measurements provide images of Mars at 1064-nm wavelength over a 2 nm bandwidth with sub-km spatial resolution and with 2% or better precision under full illumination. We describe in this paper the principle of operation, the receiver mathematical model, its calibration, and performance assessment from sample measurement data.

  14. Multi-sensor Cloud Retrieval Simulator and Remote Sensing from Model Parameters . Pt. 1; Synthetic Sensor Radiance Formulation; [Synthetic Sensor Radiance Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wind, G.; DaSilva, A. M.; Norris, P. M.; Platnick, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a general procedure for calculating synthetic sensor radiances from variable output from a global atmospheric forecast model. In order to take proper account of the discrepancies between model resolution and sensor footprint, the algorithm takes explicit account of the model subgrid variability, in particular its description of the probability density function of total water (vapor and cloud condensate.) The simulated sensor radiances are then substituted into an operational remote sensing algorithm processing chain to produce a variety of remote sensing products that would normally be produced from actual sensor output. This output can then be used for a wide variety of purposes such as model parameter verification, remote sensing algorithm validation, testing of new retrieval methods and future sensor studies.We show a specific implementation using the GEOS-5 model, the MODIS instrument and the MODIS Adaptive Processing System (MODAPS) Data Collection 5.1 operational remote sensing cloud algorithm processing chain (including the cloud mask, cloud top properties and cloud optical and microphysical properties products). We focus on clouds because they are very important to model development and improvement.

  15. Thermal lensing characterization of a high-radiance 946nm planar waveguide laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, S. P.; Mackenzie, J. I.

    2012-06-01

    We present the characterization of the in-plane thermal lens in a quasi-four-level Nd:YAG planar waveguide (PW) laser configured for high-radiance operation with an external stable-cavity. Our approach utilises the measurement of the laser's output irradiance distribution at the near- and far-field positions concurrently in order to obtain the "real time" beam propagation parameter and thus beam quality factor, M2. Coupled with the knowledge of the intra-cavity-thermal-lens- dependent beam sizes at an intra-cavity beam waist, the power dependent effective thermal lens focal length was characterized. A thermal lens focal length of >450 mm was obtained at all incident pump powers up to the maximum level of 87 W. This characterization enabled the build of a 29 W 946 nm PW laser with a record output radiance of 4.3 TWm-2sr-1.

  16. Power and radiance scaling of a 946 nm Nd:YAG planar waveguide laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, S. P.; Mackenzie, J. I.

    2012-03-01

    We present a diode-end-pumped Nd:YAG planar waveguide laser operating on neodymium's quasi-four-level transition at a wavelength of 946 nm. Two modes of operation are described: a high-power multi-mode monolithic cavity generating 105 for 210 W of incident pump power with a slope efficiency of ˜54%, and secondly, a high-radiance configuration employing an external stable resonator producing a maximum output power of 29.2 for 86.5 W of incident pump-power, with a slope efficiency of 33%. The output beam quality values of the external cavity were M2 of 3.2 by 2.4, leading to a maximum radiance of 0.43 GW cm-2 sr-1.

  17. ISCCP global radiance data set - A new resource for climate research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffer, R. A.; Rossow, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    The operational data-collection phase of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) began in July 1983 as an element of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP). Since then, raw images from an international network of operational geostationary and polar-orbiting meteorological satellites have been routinely processed to develop a global data set of calibrated radiances and derived cloud parameters for climate research. This report outlines the key steps involved in producing the basic ISCCP reduced-resolution global radiance (B3) data set, describes the main features of the data set, and indicates the principal point of contact for obtaining copies of the data tapes. A future paper will focus on the derived cloud properties and their utilization.

  18. Process of preparing metal parts to be heated by means of infrared radiance

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Howard Robinson; Blue, Craig A.

    2009-06-09

    A method for preparing metal for heating by infrared radiance to enable uniform and consistent heating. The surface of one or more metal parts, such as aluminum or aluminum alloy parts, is treated to alter the surface finish to affect the reflectivity of the surface. The surface reflectivity is evaluated, such as by taking measurements at one or more points on the surface, to determine if a desired reflectivity has been achieved. The treating and measuring are performed until the measuring indicates that the desired reflectivity has been achieved. Once the treating has altered the surface finish to achieve the desired reflectivity, the metal part may then be exposed to infrared radiance to heat the metal part to a desired temperature, and that heating will be substantially consistent throughout by virtue of the desired reflectivity.

  19. Interior radiances in optically deep absorbing media. 1: Exact solutions for one-dimensional model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattawar, G. W.; Plass, G. N.

    1973-01-01

    The exact solutions are obtained for a one dimensional model of a scattering and absorbing medium. The results are given for both the reflected and transmitted radiance for any arbitrary surface albedo as well as for the interior radiance. These same quantities are calculated by the matrix operator method. The relative error of the solutions is obtained by comparison with the exact solutions as well as by an error analysis of the equations. The importance of an accurate starting value for the reflection and transmission operators is shown. A fourth order Runge-Kutta method can be used to solve the differential equations satisfied by these operators in order to obtain such accurate starting values.

  20. Laboratory upwelled radiance and reflectance spectra of Kerr reservoir sediment waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G.; Whitlock, C. H.; Morris, W. D.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    Reflectance, chromaticity, and several other physical and chemical properties were measured for various water mixtures of bottom sediments taken from two sites at Kerr Reservoir, Virginia. Mixture concentrations ranged from 5 to 1000 ppm by weight of total suspended solids (TSS) in filtered deionized tap water. The two sets of radiance and reflectance spectra obtained were similar in shape and magnitude for comparable values of TSS. Upwelled reflectance was observed to be a nonlinear function of TSS with the degree of curvature a function of wavelength. Sediment from the downstream site contained a greater amount of particulate organic carbon than from the upstream site. No strong conclusions can be made regarding the effects of this difference on the radiance and reflectance spectra. Near-infrared wavelengths appear useful for measuring highly turbid water with concentrations up to 1000 ppm or more. Chromaticity characteristics do not appear useful for monitoring sediment loads above 150 ppm.

  1. Time-cumulated visible and infrared radiance histograms used as descriptors of surface and cloud variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seze, Genevieve; Rossow, William B.

    1991-01-01

    The spatial and temporal stability of the distributions of satellite-measured visible and infrared radiances, caused by variations in clouds and surfaces, are investigated using bidimensional and monodimensional histograms and time-composite images. Similar analysis of the histograms of the original and time-composite images provides separation of the contributions of the space and time variations to the total variations. The variability of both the surfaces and clouds is found to be larger at scales much larger than the minimum resolved by satellite imagery. This study shows that the shapes of these histograms are distinctive characteristics of the different climate regimes and that particular attributes of these histograms can be related to several general, though not universal, properties of clouds and surface variations at regional and synoptic scales. There are also significant exceptions to these relationships in particular climate regimes. The characteristics of these radiance histograms provide a stable well defined descriptor of the cloud and surface properties.

  2. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  3. Magnifying absolute instruments for optically homogeneous regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tyc, Tomas

    2011-09-15

    We propose a class of magnifying absolute optical instruments with a positive isotropic refractive index. They create magnified stigmatic images, either virtual or real, of optically homogeneous three-dimensional spatial regions within geometrical optics.

  4. The Simplicity Argument and Absolute Morality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the author has maintained that there is a similarity of thought to be found in the writings of Cudworth, Emerson, and Husserl in his investigation of an absolute system of morality. (Author/RK)

  5. Design Studies for a Far Infrared Absolute Spectrometer for the Cosmic Background Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, N. J. E.

    1980-01-01

    Unrelenting symmetry of design is required to assure the thermal balance of a cryogenically cooled, rapid scan interferometer spectrometer to be mounted in vacuum with the Cosmic Background Explorer liquid helium dewar. The instrument receives inputs from Winston cone optical flux collectors, one open to space and a second coupled to a black body reference source. A differential instrument, the spectrometer produces outputs corresponding to the Fourier transform of the spectral radiance difference between the two inputs. The two outputs are sensed by four detectors, two optimized for shorter wavelength response, and two optimized for longer wavelengths. The optical design, detector and signal channel, system sensitivity, mechanics, thermal control and cryogenics, electronics and power systems, command and control, calibration, system test requirements, and the instrument interface are discussed. Recommendations for continued work are indicated for the superconducting reflective horns, the motor bearing and drive, and design detail.

  6. A climate index derived from satellite measured spectral infrared radiation. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, M. D.; Fox, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    The vertical infrared radiative emitting structure (VIRES) climate index, based on radiative transfer theory and derived from the spectral radiances typically used to retrieve temperature profiles, is introduced. It is assumed that clouds and climate are closely related and a change in one will result in a change in the other. The index is a function of the cloud, temperature, and moisture distributions. It is more accurately retrieved from satellite data than is cloudiness per se. The VIRES index is based upon the shape and relative magnitude of the broadband weighting function of the infrared radiative transfer equation. The broadband weighting curves are retrieved from simulated satellite infrared sounder data (spectral radiances). The retrieval procedure is described and the error error sensitivities of the method investigated. Index measuring options and possible applications of the VIRES index are proposed.

  7. An imaging spectro-polarimeter for measuring hemispherical spectrally resolved down-welling sky polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenault, David B.; Pezzaniti, J. L.; Roche, Michael; Hyatt, Brian

    2016-05-01

    A full sky imaging spectro-polarimeter has been developed that measures spectrally resolved (~2.5 nm resolution) radiance and polarization (𝑠0, 𝑠1, 𝑠2 Stokes Elements) of natural sky down-welling over approximately 2π sr between 400nm and 1000nm. The sensor is based on a scanning push broom hyperspectral imager configured with a continuously rotating polarizer (sequential measurement in time polarimeter). Sensor control and processing software (based on Polaris Sensor Technologies Grave' camera control software) has a straight-forward and intuitive user interface that provides real-time updated sky down-welling spectral radiance/polarization maps and statistical analysis tools.

  8. Optically-Thin Cirrus Cloud Radiance Bias in Satellite Radiometric Sea Surface Temperature Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquis, J. W.; Bogdanoff, A.; Campbell, J. R.; Cummings, J. A.; Westphal, D. L.; Smith, N. J.; Zhang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite-based retrievals of sea surface temperature (SST) are highly sensitive to the optical properties of the atmosphere, including clouds. Cloudy pixels, in particular, are screened in order to avoid potential retrieval contamination in their presence. Due to the lack of continuous in-situ observations across the global oceans, though, SSTs calculated from satellite radiances are often the most practical way to obtain a sufficient global estimate. Cloud clearing techniques struggle to flag cloudy retrievals from passive radiometers with cloud optical depths less than 0.3. These optically-thin clouds are almost exclusively cirrus. Corresponding radiance biases associated with unscreened cirrus can be significant due to their inherently cold cloud top temperatures. To investigate frequency of such cloud contamination, 1-km SST observations over tropical oceans (±30° latitude) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard NASA's Aqua satellite (AQUA-MODIS) are collocated with cloud profiles from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument aboard NASA's CALIPSO satellite. Potential SST biases based on radiance retrievals for MODIS, AVHRR and VIIRS are solved using a radiative transfer model (RTM) with integrated cirrus cloud properties of varying cloud top height and optical depth. Frequencies of occurrence for each cloud top height and optical depth from the collocated CALIOP/AQUA-MODIS data are superimposed upon the conceptual cloud SST radiance bias models to estimate potential net bias. Using the CALIPSO-MODIS collocations, clouds of all types are found to be present in the best quality AQUA-MODIS Level-2 data at a frequency of 25%, with over 90% of those clouds being cirrus. The RTM simulations suggest that when cirrus are present, the mean SST bias due only to cloud is over 0.6°C over the tropical oceans.

  9. Simultaneous measurement of irradiance and reflected radiance in field determination of spectra reflectance

    SciTech Connect

    Duggin, M.J.

    1981-11-15

    The effects of irradiation fluctuations on measured reflectance values have been determined to evaluate whether data collected in sunny or partly cloudy conditions are sufficiently in agreement that they may be used for remote or satellite sensing data collection (e.g. op discuss quantification). Simultaneous measurements were obtained of irradiance and reflected radiance using two Exotech GTR 100 mode Landsat ground-truth radiometers. (AIP)

  10. An integrated radiance throughput model for hypersonic interceptor seeker performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, Charles L.; Andrzejewski, Joseph; Calhoun, Ronnie

    1992-05-01

    The integrated radiance throughput model is discussed that encompasses the trajectory dynamics and the atmospheric interactions involved in hypersonic endoatmospheric interceptors for strategic and theater missile defenses. The model is intended for medium fidelity performance analysis to enable overall systems performance evaluations and trades. The model is implemented to provide rapid results for numerous mission scenarios and geometries using various emerging window and seeker technologies.

  11. Absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, O. A.

    1993-11-01

    The program SEEF is a Fortran IV computer code for the extraction of absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions. When the evaporation residue is fed by its parents, only cumulative cross sections will be obtained from off-line gamma ray measurements. But, if one has the parent excitation function (experimental or calculated), this code will make it possible to determine absolute cross sections of any exit channel.

  12. Kelvin and the absolute temperature scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlichson, Herman

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the absolute temperature scale of Kelvin (William Thomson). Kelvin found that Carnot's axiom about heat being a conserved quantity had to be abandoned. Nevertheless, he found that Carnot's fundamental work on heat engines was correct. Using the concept of a Carnot engine Kelvin found that Q1/Q2 = T1/T2. Thermometers are not used to obtain absolute temperatures since they are calculated temperatures.

  13. Basis for spectral curvature algorithms in remote sensing of chlorophyll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W.; Esaias, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    A simple, empirically derived algorithm for estimating oceanic chlorophyll concentrations from spectral radiances measured by a low-flying spectroradiometer has proved highly successful in field experiments in 1980-82. The sensor used was the Multichannel Ocean Color Sensor, and the originator of the algorithm was Grew (1981). This paper presents an explanation for the algorithm based on the optical properties of waters containing chlorophyll and other phytoplankton pigments and the radiative transfer equations governing the remotely sensed signal. The effects of varying solar zenith, atmospheric transmittance, and interfering substances in the water on the chlorophyll algorithm are characterized, and applicability of the algorithm is discussed.

  14. Use of MODIS Cloud Top Pressure to Improve Assimilation Yields of AIRS Radiances in GSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Improvements to global and regional numerical weather prediction have been demonstrated through assimilation of data from NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). Current operational data assimilation systems use AIRS radiances, but impact on regional forecasts has been much smaller than for global forecasts. Previously, it has been shown that cloud top designation associated with quality control procedures within the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system used operationally by a number of Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA) partners may not provide the best representation of cloud top pressure (CTP). Because this designated CTP determines which channels are cloud-free and, thus, available for assimilation, ensuring the most accurate representation of this value is imperative to obtaining the greatest impact from satellite radiances. This paper examines the assimilation of hyperspectral sounder data used in operational numerical weather prediction by comparing analysis increments and numerical forecasts generated using operational techniques with a research technique that swaps CTP from the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for the value of CTP calculated from the radiances within GSI.

  15. Impact of horizontal and vertical localization scales on microwave sounder SAPHIR radiance assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, C.; Balaji, C.

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, the effect of horizontal and vertical localization scales on the assimilation of direct SAPHIR radiances is studied. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) has been used as a surrogate for the forward radiative calculations. The training input dataset for ANN consists of vertical layers of atmospheric pressure, temperature, relative humidity and other hydrometeor profiles with 6 channel Brightness Temperatures (BTs) as output. The best neural network architecture has been arrived at, by a neuron independence study. Since vertical localization of radiance data requires weighting functions, a ANN has been trained for this purpose. The radiances were ingested into the NWP using the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) technique. The horizontal localization has been taken care of, by using a Gaussian localization function centered around the observed coordinates. Similarly, the vertical localization is accomplished by assuming a function which depends on the weighting function of the channel to be assimilated. The effect of both horizontal and vertical localizations has been studied in terms of ensemble spread in the precipitation. Aditionally, improvements in 24 hr forecast from assimilation are also reported.

  16. Preliminary Research on Radiance Fog Detection based on time series MTSAT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, X.; Li, Z.; Zhang, S.; Shen, S.; Hu, D.; Xiao, X.

    2015-04-01

    Fog is a kind of disastrous weather phenomenon. In this paper, the geostationary satellite MTSAT imagery is selected as the main data source to radiance fog detection. According to the unique feature of radiance fog from its generation to dissipation, especially considering the difference between clouds and fog during their lifecycle, the characteristics in frequency domain was constructed to discriminate fog from clouds, The time series MTSAT images were register with a modified Gauss Newton optimization method firstly, then, the Savitzky-Golay smoothing filter was applied to the time series remote sensing imageries to process the noises in the original signal, after that the non-orthogonal Haar wavelets was applied to convert the signal from time domain into frequency domain. The coefficient of high frequency component, including the properties: "max", "min", "the location of the min", "the interval length between the max and min", "the coefficient of linear fit for the high frequency", these properties are selected as the characteristic parameters to distinguish fog from clouds. The experiment shows that using the algorithm proposed in this paper, the radiance fog could be monitored effectively, and it is found that although it is difficult to calculate the thickness of the fog directly, while the duration of fog could be obtained by using the frequency feature.

  17. RADIANCE: An automated, enterprise-wide solution for archiving and reporting CT radiation dose estimates.

    PubMed

    Cook, Tessa S; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Steingall, Scott R; Maidment, Andrew D A; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in the ability to monitor, track, and report exposure to radiation from medical imaging. Historically, however, dose information has been stored on an image-based dose sheet, an arrangement that precludes widespread indexing. Although scanner manufacturers are beginning to include dose-related parameters in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) headers of imaging studies, there remains a vast repository of retrospective computed tomographic (CT) data with image-based dose sheets. Consequently, it is difficult for imaging centers to monitor their dose estimates or participate in the American College of Radiology (ACR) Dose Index Registry. An automated extraction software pipeline known as Radiation Dose Intelligent Analytics for CT Examinations (RADIANCE) has been designed that quickly and accurately parses CT dose sheets to extract and archive dose-related parameters. Optical character recognition of information in the dose sheet leads to creation of a text file, which along with the DICOM study header is parsed to extract dose-related data. The data are then stored in a relational database that can be queried for dose monitoring and report creation. RADIANCE allows efficient dose analysis of CT examinations and more effective education of technologists, radiologists, and referring physicians regarding patient exposure to radiation at CT. RADIANCE also allows compliance with the ACR's dose reporting guidelines and greater awareness of patient radiation dose, ultimately resulting in improved patient care and treatment.

  18. Generalized Eddington analytical model for azimuthally dependent radiance simulation in stratified media.

    PubMed

    Marzano, Frank S; Ferrauto, Giancarlo

    2005-10-01

    A fast analytical radiative transfer model to account for propagation of unpolarized monochromatic radiation in random media with a plane-parallel geometry is presented. The model employs an Eddington-like approach combined with the delta phase-function transformation technique. The Eddington approximation is extended in a form that allows us to unfold the azimuthal dependence of the radiance field. A first-order scattering correction to the azimuth-dependent Eddington radiative model solution is also performed to improve the model accuracy for low-scattering media and flexibility with respect to use of explicit arbitrary phase functions. The first-order scattering-corrected solution, called the generalized Eddington radiative model (GERM), is systematically tested against a numerical multistream discrete ordinate model for backscattered radiance at the top of the medium. The typical mean accuracy of the GERM solution is generally better than 10% with a standard deviation of 20% for radiance calculations over a wide range of independent input optical parameters and observation angles. GERM errors are shown to be comparable with the errors due to an input parameter uncertainty of precise numerical models. The proposed model can be applied in a quite arbitrary random medium, and the results are appealing in all cases where speed, accuracy, and/or closed-form solutions are requested. Its potentials, limitations, and further extensions are discussed.

  19. Estimating Expressed Temperature and Fractional Area of Hot Lava at the Kilauea Vent with AVIRIS Spectral Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.

    2001-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy offers a framework based in physics and chemistry for scientific investigation of a wide range of phenomena of interest in the Earth environment. In the scientific discipline of volcanology knowledge of lava temperature and distribution at the surface provides insight into the volcano status and subsurface processes. A remote sensing strategy to measure surface lava temperatures and distribution would support volcanology research. Hot targets such as molten lava emit spectral radiance as a function of temperature. A figure shows a series of Planck functions calculated radiance spectra for hot targets at different temperatures. A maximum Lambertian solar reflected radiance spectrum is shown as well. While similar in form, each hot target spectrum has a unique spectral shape and is distinct from the solar reflected radiance spectrum. Based on this temperature-dependent signature, imaging spectroscopy provides an innovative approach for the remote-sensing-based measurement of lava temperature. A natural site for investigation of the measurement of lava temperature is the Big Island of Hawaii where molten lava from the Kilauea vent is present at the surface. In the past, Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data sets have been used for the analysis of hot volcanic targets and hot burning fires. The research presented here builds upon and extends this earlier work. The year 2000 Hawaii AVIRIS data set has been analyzed to derive lava temperatures taking into account factors of fractional fill, solar reflected radiance, and atmospheric attenuation of the surface emitted radiance. The measurements, analyses, and current results for this research are presented here.

  20. Retrieving Cloud Fraction in the Field-of-View of a High-Spectral Resolution Infrared Radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David D.; Holz, R. E.

    2005-07-01

    The combination of radiance from both clear and cloudy regions of sky adds significant uncertainty to retrievals of atmospheric state profiles and cloud microphysical properties from infrared radiometers. In this article, we use observations of radiance from both the 8-13 μm and 3-5 μm bands to retrieve estimates of the cloud fraction in the field-of-view, as well as microphysical cloud The combination of radiance from both clear and cloudy regions of sky adds significant uncertainty to retrievals of atmospheric state profiles and cloud microphysical properties from infrared radiometers. In this article, we use observations of radiance from both the 8-13 μm and 3-5 μm bands to retrieve estimates of the cloud fraction in the field-of-view, as well as microphysical cloud properties, from high-spectral-resolution infrared radiometers. Cloud fraction derived from imagers as well as high-time-resolution observations show good agreement and high correlation with our derived cloud fraction values. This is shown for both ground-based and aircraft based observations. We also demonstrate that the use of the addition information in the 3-5 μm band extends the dynamic range and accuracy of microphysical properties that can be retrieved from infrared radiance data.

  1. Analysis of Unresolved Spectral Infrared Signature for the Extraction of Invariant Features

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    satellite is illuminated continuously and is operating under steady-state conditions, its solar panel and body reach a thermal equilibrium with its...environment such that the thermal energy emitted by the solar panel and the body remain constant . Thus the signature is a function of entities that...remain constant (or, are invariant) and entities that are varying. The invariant entities are the spectral radiance values (i.e., the thermal energy

  2. Sensitivity study on the spectral calibration of a hyper-spectral imaging spectrometer for the GEO-KOMPSAT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M.; Ahn, M.

    2013-12-01

    The next generation of geostationary earth observing satellite program of Korea (GEO-KOMPSAT-2A&B) is under development. While the GEO-KOMPSAT-2A is dedicated for the operational weather mission and planed to be launched in 2017, the second one will have ocean and environmental mission with planed launch of 2018. For the environmental mission, a hyperspectral spectrometer named the Global Environment Measuring Spectrometer (GEMS) designed to monitor the important trace gases such as O3, SO2, NO2, HCHO and aerosols which affect directly and indirectly the air quality will be onboard the second satellite with a ocean color imager. Based on the preliminary design concept, the GEMS instrument utilizes a reflecting telescope with the Offner spectrometer which uses the grating and 2D CCD (1 for spatial and another for spectral). Due to the nature of instrumentations, there is always possibility of wavelength shift and squeeze at the measured raw radiance from the CCD. Thus, it is important to have a proper algorithm for the accurate spectral calibration. Currently, we plan to have a two-step process for an accurate spectral calibration. First step is done by the application of spectral calibration process provided by instrument manufacturer which will be applied to whole observation wavelength band. The second step which will be applied for each wavelength bands used for the retrieval will be using the high resolution solar spectrum for the reference spectrum used for fitting the measured radiances and irradiances. For the application of second step, there are several important pre-requisite information which could be obtained through the ground test of the instrument or through the actual measurement data or through assumptions. Here we investigate the sensitivity of the spectral calibration accuracy to the important parameters such as the spectral response function of each band, band width, undersampling correction, and so on, The simulated sensitivity tests will be

  3. A radiance-based method for estimating uncertainties in the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) land surface temperature product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulley, Glynn C.; Hook, Simon J.

    2012-10-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) has been identified by NASA and other international organizations as an important Earth System Data Record (ESDR). An ESDR is defined as a long-term, well calibrated and validated data set. Identifying uncertainties in LST products with coarse spatial resolutions (>10 km) such as those from hyperspectral infrared sounders is notoriously difficult due to the challenges of making reliable in situ measurements representative of the spatial scales of the output products. In this study we utilize a Radiance-based (R-based) LST method for estimating uncertainties in the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) v5 LST product. The R-based method provides estimates of the true LST using a radiative closure simulation without the need for in situ measurements, and requires input air temperature, relative humidity profiles and emissivity data. The R-based method was employed at three validation sites over the Namib Desert, Gran Desierto, and Redwood National Park for all AIRS observations from 2002 to 2010. Results showed daytime LST root-mean square errors (RMSE) of 2-3 K at the Namib and Desierto sites, and 1.5 K at the Redwood site. Nighttime LST RMSEs at the two desert sites were a factor of two less when compared to daytime results. Positive daytime LST biases were found at each site due to an underestimation of the daytime AIRS v5 longwave spectral emissivity, while the reverse occurred at nighttime. In the AIRS v6 product (release 2012), LST biases and RMSEs will be reduced significantly due to improved methodologies for the surface retrieval and emissivity first guess.

  4. High-radiance LDP source: clean, reliable, and stable EUV source for mask inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramoto, Yusuke; Santos, Bárbara; Mertens, Guido; Kops, Ralf; Kops, Margarete; von Wezyk, Alexander; Bergmann, Klaus; Yabuta, Hironobu; Nagano, Akihisa; Ashizawa, Noritaka; Taniguchi, Yuta; Shirai, Takahiro; Nakamura, Kiyotada; Aoki, Kazuya; Kasama, Kunihiko

    2016-03-01

    High-throughput and -resolution actinic mask inspection tools are needed as EUVL begins to enter into volume production phase. To realize such inspection tools, a high-radiance EUV source is necessary. Ushio's laser-assisted discharge-produced plasma (LDP) source is able to meet industry's requirements in radiance, cleanliness, stability and reliability. Ushio's LDP source has shown the peak radiance at plasma of 180 W/mm2/sr and the area-averaged radiance in a 200-μm-diameter circle behind the debris mitigation system of 120 W/mm2/sr. A new version of the debris mitigation system is in testing phase. Its optical transmission was confirmed to be 73 %, which is 4 % lower than that of the previous version and therefore will be improved. Cleanliness of the system is evaluated by exposing Ru mirrors placed behind the debris mitigation system. Ru sputter rate was proven to be sufficiently low as 3~5 nm/Gpulse at 7 kHz, whereas frequency-dependent sputter rate was 1~3 nm/Gpulse at 5~9 kHz as previously reported. Sn deposition remained very low (< 0.05 nm) and did not grow over time. A new technique to suppress debris was tested and preliminary results were promising. Time-of-flight signal of fast ions was completely suppressed and Ru sputter rate of exposed mirrors at 3 kHz was approximately 1.3 nm/Gpulse, whereas the conventional mitigation system (new version) resulted in Ru sputter rate of 0.7 nm/Gpulse. This new technique also allows increasing the radiance efficiency by 30 %. Stability tests were done at several different discharge frequencies. Pulse energy stability was approximately 10 %. Dose energy stability dropped from approximately 2 % to 0.1 % when feedback control was activated. EUV emission position stability was studied at 3 kHz. Deviation of the plasma center of gravity was 6 μm, which is 3 % of plasma diameter and therefore considered to be negligible. Reliability tests were performed on both R and D and prototype machines and up to 200 hours of non

  5. Clinical effects of an oral supplement rich in antioxidants on skin radiance in women

    PubMed Central

    Dumoulin, Marion; Gaudout, David; Lemaire, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Background Environmental factors impact the skin aging resulting in decrease of skin radiance. Nutrition and particularly antioxidants could help to fight against skin degradation. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an oral supplement rich in specific antioxidants, SkinAx2TM, on the improvement of the skin radiance in women. Methods The open-label clinical study enrolled 35 women, aged 40–70, with facial dull complexion. Subjects were supplemented orally with a daily dosage of 150 mg of an antioxidant-rich formulation containing superoxide dismutase-rich melon concentrate, grape seed extract rich in monomers of flavanols, vitamin C, and zinc for 8 weeks. Each subject served as her own control. The C.L.B.T.™ test has been used to evaluate facial skin coloring (C), luminosity (L), brightness (B), and transparency (T) involved in skin radiance. Facial skin imperfections have been assessed by clinical assessment. Firmness has been evaluated by clinical assessment and cutometer measurement. Finally, an auto-questionnaire has been carried out in order to evaluate the satisfaction of the subjects concerning different parameters involved in skin radiance and the global efficacy of the supplement. Results Skin “red pink” and “olive” colors were significantly improved after supplementation (P<0.0001). Luminosity was increased by 25.9% (P<0.0001) whereas brightness and transparency were not affected by the supplementation. Facial skin imperfections were significantly reduced after the antioxidant-rich formulation intake (global reduction: −18.0%; P<0.0001). Indeed, dark circles, redness, and spots significantly diminished after oral treatment. Firmness and elasticity have been shown to be improved. Subjects were globally satisfied by the product (82.4%) and have found improvements on their facial skin. Furthermore, 64.7% reported to look better at the end of the supplementation. Conclusion The oral supplement containing the

  6. Absolute measurement of undulator radiation in the extreme ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maezawa, H.; Mitani, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Kanamori, H.; Tamamushi, S.; Mikuni, A.; Kitamura, H.; Sasaki, T.

    1983-04-01

    The spectral brightness of undulator radiation emitted by the model PMU-1 incorporated in the SOR-RING, the dedicated synchrotron radiation source in Tokyo, has been studied in the extreme ultraviolet region from 21.6 to 72.9 eV as a function of the electron energy γ, the field parameter K, and the angle of observation ϴ in the absolute scale. A series of measurements covering the first and the second harmonic component of undulator radiation was compared with the fundamental formula λ n= {λ 0}/{2nγ 2}( {1+K 2}/{2}+γϴ 2 and the effects of finite emittance were studied. The brightness at the first peak was smaller than the theoretical value, while an enhanced second harmonic component was observed.

  7. Absolute Radiation Measurements in Earth and Mars Entry Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the measurement of radiative heating for shock heated flows which simulate conditions for Mars and Earth entries. Radiation measurements are made in NASA Ames' Electric Arc Shock Tube at velocities from 3-15 km/s in mixtures of N2/O2 and CO2/N2/Ar. The technique and limitations of the measurement are summarized in some detail. The absolute measurements will be discussed in regards to spectral features, radiative magnitude and spatiotemporal trends. Via analysis of spectra it is possible to extract properties such as electron density, and rotational, vibrational and electronic temperatures. Relaxation behind the shock is analyzed to determine how these properties relax to equilibrium and are used to validate and refine kinetic models. It is found that, for some conditions, some of these values diverge from non-equilibrium indicating a lack of similarity between the shock tube and free flight conditions. Possible reasons for this are discussed.

  8. Exploring a Black Body Source as an Absolute Radiometric Calibration Standard and Comparison with a NIST Traced Lamp Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Chrien, Thomas; Sarture, Chuck

    2001-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) is required for the scientific research and application objectives pursued with the spectroscopic measurements. Specifically calibration is required for: inter-comparison of AVIRIS data measured at different locations and at different times; analysis of AVIRIS data with data measured by other instruments; and analysis of AVIRIS data in conjunction with computer models. The primary effect of radiometric calibration is conversion of AVIRIS instrument response values (digitized numbers, or DN) to units of absolute radiance. For example, a figure shows the instrument response spectrum measured by AVIRIS over a portion of Rogers Dry Lake, California, and another figure shows the same spectrum calibrated to radiance. Only the calibrated spectrum may be quantitatively analyzed for science research and application objectives. Since the initial development of the AVIRIS instrument-radiometric calibration has been based upon a 1000-W irradiance lamp with a calibration traced to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). There are several advantages to this irradiance-lamp calibration approach. First, the considerable effort of NIST backs up the calibration. Second, by changing the distance to the lamp, the output can closely span the radiance levels measured by AVIRIS. Third, this type of standard is widely used. Fourth, these calibrated lamps are comparatively inexpensive. Conversely, there are several disadvantages to this approach as well. First, the lamp is not a primary standard. Second, the lamp output characteristics may change in an unknown manner through time. Third, it is difficult to assess, constrain, or improve the calibration uncertainty delivered with the lamp. In an attempt to explore the effect and potentially address some of these disadvantages a set of analyses and measurements comparing an irradiance lamp with a black-body source have been completed

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SUMER Spectral Atlas of Solar Disk Features (Curdt+, 2001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curdt, W.; Brekke, P.; Feldman, U.; Wilhelm, K.; Dwivedi, B. N.; Schuhle, U.; Lemaire, P.

    2001-05-01

    List of spectral lines in the wavelength range from 668Å to 1611Å identified in SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation, spectrograph on the spacecraft SOHO) spectra of the average quiet Sun (QS), a coronal hole (CH) and a sunspot on disk (SS). Spectral lines observed in second order of diffraction which are also given here, extend the lower wavelength limit to below 500Å. For each entry we give the observed wavelengths in angstrom, the identification, the transition, the peak of spectral radiance, Lpeak, in mW/(sr*m2*Å) (incl. background), and a cross-reference to other line lists available in the literature (cf., Sect. 5.1). For second-order lines radiance entries are generally not provided, since the background separation in both orders of diffraction is a non-trivial task, which can not be automated. Only a few radiance values of strong second-order lines with negligible first-order contribution are given, which are marked by an asterisk (*). (1 data file).

  10. Using dark current data to estimate AVIRIS noise covariance and improve spectral analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boardman, Joseph W.

    1995-01-01

    Starting in 1994, all AVIRIS data distributions include a new product useful for quantification and modeling of the noise in the reported radiance data. The 'postcal' file contains approximately 100 lines of dark current data collected at the end of each data acquisition run. In essence this is a regular spectral-image cube, with 614 samples, 100 lines and 224 channels, collected with a closed shutter. Since there is no incident radiance signal, the recorded DN measure only the DC signal level and the noise in the system. Similar dark current measurements, made at the end of each line are used, with a 100 line moving average, to remove the DC signal offset. Therefore, the pixel-by-pixel fluctuations about the mean of this dark current image provide an excellent model for the additive noise that is present in AVIRIS reported radiance data. The 61,400 dark current spectra can be used to calculate the noise levels in each channel and the noise covariance matrix. Both of these noise parameters should be used to improve spectral processing techniques. Some processing techniques, such as spectral curve fitting, will benefit from a robust estimate of the channel-dependent noise levels. Other techniques, such as automated unmixing and classification, will be improved by the stable and scene-independence noise covariance estimate. Future imaging spectrometry systems should have a similar ability to record dark current data, permitting this noise characterization and modeling.

  11. Status of MODIS spatial and spectral characterization and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Dan; Wang, Zhipeng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2016-05-01

    Since launch, both Terra and Aqua MODIS instruments have continued to operate and make measurements of the earth's top of atmospheric (TOA) radiances and reflectance. MODIS collects data in 36 spectral bands covering wavelengths from 0.41 to 14.4 μm. These spectral bands and detectors are located on four focal plane assemblies (FPAs). MODIS on-board calibrators (OBC) include a spectro-radiometric calibration assembly (SRCA), which was designed to characterize and monitor sensor spatial and spectral performance, such as on-orbit changes in the band-to-band registration (BBR), modulation transfer function (MTF), spectral band center wavelengths (CW) and bandwidths (BW). In this paper, we provide a status update of MODIS spatial and spectral characterization and performance, following a brief description of SRCA functions and on-orbit calibration activities. Sensor spatial and spectral performance parameters derived from SRCA measurements are introduced and discussed. Results show that on-orbit spatial performance has been very stable for both Terra and Aqua MODIS instruments. The large BBR shifts in Aqua MODIS, an issue identified pre-launch, have remained the same over its entire mission. On-orbit changes in CW and BW are less than 0.5 nm and 1 nm, respectively, for most VIS/NIR spectral bands of both instruments.

  12. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed.

  13. Accurate spectral color measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltunen, Jouni; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Timo; Parkkinen, Jussi P. S.

    1999-08-01

    Surface color measurement is of importance in a very wide range of industrial applications including paint, paper, printing, photography, textiles, plastics and so on. For a demanding color measurements spectral approach is often needed. One can measure a color spectrum with a spectrophotometer using calibrated standard samples as a reference. Because it is impossible to define absolute color values of a sample, we always work with approximations. The human eye can perceive color difference as small as 0.5 CIELAB units and thus distinguish millions of colors. This 0.5 unit difference should be a goal for the precise color measurements. This limit is not a problem if we only want to measure the color difference of two samples, but if we want to know in a same time exact color coordinate values accuracy problems arise. The values of two instruments can be astonishingly different. The accuracy of the instrument used in color measurement may depend on various errors such as photometric non-linearity, wavelength error, integrating sphere dark level error, integrating sphere error in both specular included and specular excluded modes. Thus the correction formulas should be used to get more accurate results. Another question is how many channels i.e. wavelengths we are using to measure a spectrum. It is obvious that the sampling interval should be short to get more precise results. Furthermore, the result we get is always compromise of measuring time, conditions and cost. Sometimes we have to use portable syste or the shape and the size of samples makes it impossible to use sensitive equipment. In this study a small set of calibrated color tiles measured with the Perkin Elmer Lamda 18 and the Minolta CM-2002 spectrophotometers are compared. In the paper we explain the typical error sources of spectral color measurements, and show which are the accuracy demands a good colorimeter should have.

  14. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  15. Remote sensing of ocean color: a methodology for dealing with broad spectral bands and significant out-of-band response.

    PubMed

    Gordon, H R

    1995-12-20

    A methodology for delineating the influence of finite spectral bandwidths and significant out-of-band response of sensors for remote sensing of ocean color is developed and applied to the Sea-viewing Wide-Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). The basis of the method is the application of the sensor's spectral-response functions to the individual components of the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) radiance rather than the TOA radiance itself. For engineering purposes, this approach allows one to assess easily (and quantitatively) the potential of a particular sensor design for meeting the system-sensor plus algorithms-performance requirements. In the case of the SeaWiFS, two significant conclusions are reached. First, it is found that the out-of-band effects on the water-leaving radiance component of the TOA radiance are of the order of a few percent compared with a sensor with narrow spectral response. This implies that verification that the SeaWiFS system-sensor plus algorithms-meets the goal of providing the water-leaving radiance in the blue in clear ocean water to within 5% will require measurements of the water-leaving radiance over the entire visible spectrum as opposed to just narrow-band (10-20-nm) measurements in the blue. Second, it is found that the atmospheric correction of the SeaWiFS can be degraded by the influence of water-vapor absorption in the shoulders of the atmospheric-correction bands in the near infrared. This absorption causes an apparent spectral variation of the aerosol component between these two bands that will be uncharacteristic of the actual aerosol present, leading to an error in correction. This effect is dependent on the water-vapor content of the atmosphere. At typical water-vapor concentrations the error is larger for aerosols with a weak spectral variation in reflectance than for those that display a strong spectral variation. If the water-vapor content is known, a simple procedure is provided to remove the degradation of the atmospheric

  16. Quantitative standards for absolute linguistic universals.