Science.gov

Sample records for absolute temperature means

  1. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  2. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  3. Physics of negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  4. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  5. Negative absolute temperature for mobile particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Simon; Ronzheimer, Philipp; Schreiber, Michael; Hodgman, Sean; Bloch, Immanuel; Schneider, Ulrich

    2013-05-01

    Absolute temperature is usually bound to be strictly positive. However, negative absolute temperature states, where the occupation probability of states increases with their energy, are possible in systems with an upper energy bound. So far, such states have only been demonstrated in localized spin systems with finite, discrete spectra. We realized a negative absolute temperature state for motional degrees of freedom with ultracold bosonic 39K atoms in an optical lattice, by implementing the attractive Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. This new state strikingly revealed itself by a quasimomentum distribution that is peaked at maximum kinetic energy. The measured kinetic energy distribution and the extracted negative temperature indicate that the ensemble is close to degeneracy, with coherence over several lattice sites. The state is as stable as a corresponding positive temperature state: The negative temperature stabilizes the system against mean-field collapse driven by negative pressure. Negative temperatures open up new parameter regimes for cold atoms, enabling fundamentally new many-body states. Additionally, they give rise to several counterintuitive effects such as heat engines with above unity efficiency.

  6. Kelvin and the absolute temperature scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlichson, Herman

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the absolute temperature scale of Kelvin (William Thomson). Kelvin found that Carnot's axiom about heat being a conserved quantity had to be abandoned. Nevertheless, he found that Carnot's fundamental work on heat engines was correct. Using the concept of a Carnot engine Kelvin found that Q1/Q2 = T1/T2. Thermometers are not used to obtain absolute temperatures since they are calculated temperatures.

  7. Consistent thermostatistics forbids negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hilbert, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, a considerable number of theories and experiments have claimed the existence of negative absolute temperature in spin systems and ultracold quantum gases. This has led to speculation that ultracold gases may be dark-energy analogues and also suggests the feasibility of heat engines with efficiencies larger than one. Here, we prove that all previous negative temperature claims and their implications are invalid as they arise from the use of an entropy definition that is inconsistent both mathematically and thermodynamically. We show that the underlying conceptual deficiencies can be overcome if one adopts a microcanonical entropy functional originally derived by Gibbs. The resulting thermodynamic framework is self-consistent and implies that absolute temperature remains positive even for systems with a bounded spectrum. In addition, we propose a minimal quantum thermometer that can be implemented with available experimental techniques.

  8. Evaluation of the Absolute Regional Temperature Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Absolute Regional Temperature Potential (ARTP) is one of the few climate metrics that provides estimates of impacts at a sub-global scale. The ARTP presented here gives the time-dependent temperature response in four latitude bands (90-28degS, 28degS-28degN, 28-60degN and 60-90degN) as a function of emissions based on the forcing in those bands caused by the emissions. It is based on a large set of simulations performed with a single atmosphere-ocean climate model to derive regional forcing/response relationships. Here I evaluate the robustness of those relationships using the forcing/response portion of the ARTP to estimate regional temperature responses to the historic aerosol forcing in three independent climate models. These ARTP results are in good accord with the actual responses in those models. Nearly all ARTP estimates fall within +/-20%of the actual responses, though there are some exceptions for 90-28degS and the Arctic, and in the latter the ARTP may vary with forcing agent. However, for the tropics and the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in particular, the +/-20% range appears to be roughly consistent with the 95% confidence interval. Land areas within these two bands respond 39-45% and 9-39% more than the latitude band as a whole. The ARTP, presented here in a slightly revised form, thus appears to provide a relatively robust estimate for the responses of large-scale latitude bands and land areas within those bands to inhomogeneous radiative forcing and thus potentially to emissions as well. Hence this metric could allow rapid evaluation of the effects of emissions policies at a finer scale than global metrics without requiring use of a full climate model.

  9. Absolute Temperature Monitoring Using RF Radiometry in the MRI Scanner

    PubMed Central

    El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Sotiriadis, Paul P.; Bottomley, Paul A.; Atalar, Ergin

    2007-01-01

    Temperature detection using microwave radiometry has proven value for noninvasively measuring the absolute temperature of tissues inside the body. However, current clinical radiometers operate in the gigahertz range, which limits their depth of penetration. We have designed and built a noninvasive radiometer which operates at radio frequencies (64 MHz) with ∼100-kHz bandwidth, using an external RF loop coil as a thermal detector. The core of the radiometer is an accurate impedance measurement and automatic matching circuit of 0.05 Ω accuracy to compensate for any load variations. The radiometer permits temperature measurements with accuracy of ±0.1°K, over a tested physiological range of 28° C–40° C in saline phantoms whose electric properties match those of tissue. Because 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners also operate at 64 MHz, we demonstrate the feasibility of integrating our radiometer with an MRI scanner to monitor RF power deposition and temperature dosimetry, obtaining coarse, spatially resolved, absolute thermal maps in the physiological range. We conclude that RF radiometry offers promise as a direct, noninvasive method of monitoring tissue heating during MRI studies and thereby providing an independent means of verifying patient-safe operation. Other potential applications include titration of hyper- and hypo-therapies. PMID:18026562

  10. Passive absolute age and temperature history sensor

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex; Vianco, Paul T.

    2015-11-10

    A passive sensor for historic age and temperature sensing, including a first member formed of a first material, the first material being either a metal or a semiconductor material and a second member formed of a second material, the second material being either a metal or a semiconductor material. A surface of the second member is in contact with a surface of the first member such that, over time, the second material of the second member diffuses into the first material of the first member. The rate of diffusion for the second material to diffuse into the first material depends on a temperature of the passive sensor. One of the electrical conductance, the electrical capacitance, the electrical inductance, the optical transmission, the optical reflectance, or the crystalline structure of the passive sensor depends on the amount of the second material that has diffused into the first member.

  11. Nonexistence of equilibrium states at absolute negative temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Rochín, Víctor

    2013-08-01

    We show that states of macroscopic systems with purported absolute negative temperatures are not stable under small, yet arbitrary, perturbations. We prove the previous statement using the fact that, in equilibrium, the entropy takes its maximum value. We discuss that, while Ramsey theoretical reformulation of the second law for systems with negative temperatures is logically correct, it must be a priori assumed that those states are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Since we argue that those states cannot occur, reversible processes are impossible, and, thus, Ramsey identification of absolute negative temperatures is untenable.

  12. Generalized approach for using unbiased symmetric metrics with negative values: normalized mean bias factor and normalized mean absolute error factor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unbiased symmetric metrics provide a useful measure to quickly compare two datasets, with similar interpretations for both under and overestimations. Two examples include the normalized mean bias factor and normalized mean absolute error factor. However, the original formulations...

  13. Negative absolute temperature for motional degrees of freedom.

    PubMed

    Braun, S; Ronzheimer, J P; Schreiber, M; Hodgman, S S; Rom, T; Bloch, I; Schneider, U

    2013-01-04

    Absolute temperature is usually bound to be positive. Under special conditions, however, negative temperatures-in which high-energy states are more occupied than low-energy states-are also possible. Such states have been demonstrated in localized systems with finite, discrete spectra. Here, we prepared a negative temperature state for motional degrees of freedom. By tailoring the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian, we created an attractively interacting ensemble of ultracold bosons at negative temperature that is stable against collapse for arbitrary atom numbers. The quasimomentum distribution develops sharp peaks at the upper band edge, revealing thermal equilibrium and bosonic coherence over several lattice sites. Negative temperatures imply negative pressures and open up new parameter regimes for cold atoms, enabling fundamentally new many-body states.

  14. Generalized approach for using unbiased symmetric metrics with negative values: normalized mean bias factor and normalized mean absolute error factor

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, William I.; Yu, Shaocai

    2012-10-23

    Unbiased symmetric metrics provide a useful measure to quickly compare two datasets, with similar interpretations for both under and overestimations. Two examples include the normalized mean bias factor and normalized mean absolute error factor. However, the original formulations of these metrics are only valid for datasets with positive means. This paper presents a methodology to use and interpret the metrics with datasets that have negative means. The updated formulations give identical results compared to the original formulations for the case of positive means, so researchers are encouraged to use the updated formulations going forward without introducing ambiguity.

  15. The relationship between indoor and outdoor temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity, and absolute humidity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, J L; Schwartz, J; Dockery, D W

    2014-02-01

    Many studies report an association between outdoor ambient weather and health. Outdoor conditions may be a poor indicator of personal exposure because people spend most of their time indoors. Few studies have examined how indoor conditions relate to outdoor ambient weather. The average indoor temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity (RH), and absolute humidity (AH) measured in 16 homes in Greater Boston, Massachusetts, from May 2011 to April 2012 was compared to measurements taken at Boston Logan airport. The relationship between indoor and outdoor temperatures is nonlinear. At warmer outdoor temperatures, there is a strong correlation between indoor and outdoor temperature (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = 0.91, slope, β = 0.41), but at cooler temperatures, the association is weak (r = 0.40, β = 0.04). Results were similar for outdoor apparent temperature. The relationships were linear for RH and AH. The correlation for RH was modest (r = 0.55, β = 0.39). Absolute humidity exhibited the strongest indoor-to-outdoor correlation (r = 0.96, β = 0.69). Indoor and outdoor temperatures correlate well only at warmer outdoor temperatures. Outdoor RH is a poor indicator of indoor RH, while indoor AH has a strong correlation with outdoor AH year-round. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Crystal face temperature determination means

    DOEpatents

    Nason, D.O.; Burger, A.

    1994-11-22

    An optically transparent furnace having a detection apparatus with a pedestal enclosed in an evacuated ampule for growing a crystal thereon is disclosed. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater, a base heater and a cold finger such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material to grow the crystal. A quartz halogen lamp projects a collimated beam onto the crystal and a reflected beam is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer and the detected peak position in the reflected energy spectrum of the reflected beam is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal. 3 figs.

  17. [Practical means of temperature control].

    PubMed

    Rival, T; Mayeur, N; Minville, V; Fourcade, O

    2009-04-01

    Mild therapeutic hypothermia can provide neuroprotection in some clinical situations (postanoxic cardiac arrest, neonatal anoxia). Techniques to induce hypothermia are based on thermal exchanges, in particular conduction and convection. There are several external cooling techniques: application of ice packs, cold moistened towel, ice-cold devices, ventilation of cooled air, water- or air-cooled circulating mattresses or devices. These techniques are frequently used because of their reduced cost. Internal cooling techniques are more limited and more expensive: ice-cold perfusion, endovascular catheters, extracorporeal circulation, but they offer more efficiency (high speed to reach and to maintain the temperature target). Drugs can also induce hypothermia, either by decreasing body temperature, e.g. paracetamol and aspirin, or by blocking shivering, e.g. neuromuscular blocking agents, opioids and alpha2-agonist.

  18. Means of determining extrusion temperatures

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Robert E.; Canonico, Domenic A.

    1977-01-01

    In an extrusion process comprising the steps of fabricating a metal billet, heating said billet for a predetermined time and at a selected temperature to increase its plasticity and then forcing said heated billet through a small orifice to produce a desired extruded object, the improvement comprising the steps of randomly inserting a plurality of small metallic thermal tabs at different cross sectional depths in said billet as a part of said fabricating step, and examining said extruded object at each thermal tab location for determining the crystal structure at each extruded thermal tab thus revealing the maximum temperature reached during extrusion in each respective tab location section of the extruded object, whereby the thermal profile of said extruded object during extrusion may be determined.

  19. Crystal face temperature determination means

    DOEpatents

    Nason, Donald O.; Burger, Arnold

    1994-01-01

    An optically transparent furnace (10) having a detection apparatus (29) with a pedestal (12) enclosed in an evacuated ampule (16) for growing a crystal (14) thereon. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater (20), a base heater (24) and a cold finger (26) such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material (18) to grow the crystal (14). A quartz halogen lamp (32) projects a collimated beam (30) onto the crystal (14) and a reflected beam (34) is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer (40) and the detected peak position (48) in the reflected energy spectrum (44) of the reflected beam (34) is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal (14).

  20. The relationship between indoor and outdoor temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity, and absolute humidity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jennifer L.; Schwartz, Joel; Dockery, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Many studies report an association between outdoor ambient weather and health. Outdoor conditions may be a poor indicator of personal exposure because people spend most of their time indoors. Few studies have examined how indoor conditions relate to outdoor ambient weather. Methods and Results The average indoor temperature, apparent temperature, relative humidity (RH), and absolute humidity (AH) measured in 16 homes in Greater Boston, Massachusetts, from May 2011 - April 2012 was compared to measurements taken at Boston Logan airport. The relationship between indoor and outdoor temperatures is non-linear. At warmer outdoor temperatures, there is a strong correlation between indoor and outdoor temperature (Pearson correlation coefficient, r = 0.91, slope, β = 0.41), but at cooler temperatures, the association is weak (r = 0.40, β = 0.04). Results were similar for outdoor apparent temperature. The relationships were linear for RH and AH. The correlation for RH was modest (r = 0.55, β = 0.39). AH exhibited the strongest indoor-to-outdoor correlation (r = 0.96, β = 0.69). Conclusions Indoor and outdoor temperatures correlate well only at warmer outdoor temperatures. Outdoor RH is a poor indicator of indoor RH, while indoor AH has a strong correlation with outdoor AH year-round. PMID:23710826

  1. Articulated Multimedia Physics, Lesson 14, Gases, The Gas Laws, and Absolute Temperature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    As the fourteenth lesson of the Articulated Multimedia Physics Course, instructional materials are presented in this study guide with relation to gases, gas laws, and absolute temperature. The topics are concerned with the kinetic theory of gases, thermometric scales, Charles' law, ideal gases, Boyle's law, absolute zero, and gas pressures. The…

  2. Absolute surface profilometry of an object with large gaps by means of monochromatic laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiqiang; Uchikawa, Kiyoshi; Takeda, Mitsuo

    2011-05-01

    We propose a technique for monochromatic laser interferometry capable of absolute surface profilometry of an object with large height gaps exceeding a half wavelength. The technique does not use a broadband source, such as a low-coherence or multi-wavelength source, or a wavelength-tunable device, which causes a dispersion problem. Instead, we make use of the phase change of monochromatic light through the angular shift of illumination introduced by tilting the optical axis of the interferometer. For oblique illumination at angle θ, the phase difference between the test and reference surfaces separated by distance d is given by ΔΦ = 2kd cosθ , where k = 2π /λ is a wavenumber. In effect, the change of illumination angle θ functions as the change of wavelength λ . Therefore, while using a monochromatic laser light source, we can realize the same effect as a multi-wavelength source. From the relation between the illumination angle and the phase change, the absolute distance d between the test and reference surfaces can be determined without ambiguity of an integer multiple of a half wavelength associated with monochromatic interferometry. The large gap height can be determined also without ambiguity from the change of the absolute distance d across the boundary of the gap. Because the resolution of the absolute distance measurement by means of illumination angle change is not high enough by itself, we enhance the resolution by the following procedure. We first estimate the gap height to an integer multiple of a half wavelength by tilting the optical axis. Then the fractional portion of the phase is measured by setting the optical axis perpendicular to the test surface as in conventional interferometry. By combining the integer and the fractional portion, we can determine the absolute gap height with high accuracy and a large dynamic range exceeding a half wavelength. We present an experimental demonstration with a traditional Twyman-Green interferometer, in

  3. Electrical measurement of absolute temperature and temperature transients in a buried nanostructure under ultrafast optical heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H. F.; Hu, X. K.; Liebing, N.; Böhnert, T.; Costa, J. D.; Tarequzzaman, M.; Ferreira, R.; Sievers, S.; Bieler, M.; Schumacher, H. W.

    2017-06-01

    We report absolute temperature measurements in a buried nanostructure with a sub-nanosecond temporal resolution. For this purpose, we take advantage of the temperature dependence of the resistance of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) as detected by a fast sampling oscilloscope. After calibrating the measurement setup using steady-state electric heating, we are able to quantify temperature changes in the MTJ induced by femtosecond optical heating of the metal contact lying several 100 nm above the MTJ. We find that a femtosecond pulse train with an average power of 400 mW and a repetition rate of 76 MHz leads to a constant temperature increase of 80 K and a temporally varying temperature change of 2 K in the MTJ. The maximum temperature change in the MTJ occurs 4 ns after the femtosecond laser pulses hit the metal contact, which is supported by simulations. Our work provides a scheme to quantitatively study local temperatures in nanoscale structures and might be important for the testing of nanoscale thermal transport simulations.

  4. Electrical Noise and the Measurement of Absolute Temperature, Boltzmann's Constant and Avogadro's Number.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ericson, T. J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an apparatus capable of measuring absolute temperatures of a tungsten filament bulb up to normal running temperature and measuring Botzmann's constant to an accuracy of a few percent. Shows that electrical noise techniques are convenient to demonstrate how the concept of temperature is related to the micro- and macroscopic world. (CW)

  5. Electrical Noise and the Measurement of Absolute Temperature, Boltzmann's Constant and Avogadro's Number.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ericson, T. J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an apparatus capable of measuring absolute temperatures of a tungsten filament bulb up to normal running temperature and measuring Botzmann's constant to an accuracy of a few percent. Shows that electrical noise techniques are convenient to demonstrate how the concept of temperature is related to the micro- and macroscopic world. (CW)

  6. Fast, Computer Supported Experimental Determination of Absolute Zero Temperature at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogacz, Bogdan F.; Pedziwiatr, Antoni T.

    2014-01-01

    A simple and fast experimental method of determining absolute zero temperature is presented. Air gas thermometer coupled with pressure sensor and data acquisition system COACH is applied in a wide range of temperature. By constructing a pressure vs temperature plot for air under constant volume it is possible to obtain--by extrapolation to zero…

  7. Trends in mean and extreme temperatures over Ibadan, Southwest Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abatan, Abayomi A.; Osayomi, Tolulope; Akande, Samuel O.; Abiodun, Babatunde J.; Gutowski, William J.

    2017-01-01

    In recent times, Ibadan has been experiencing an increase in mean temperature which appears to be linked to anthropogenic global warming. Previous studies have indicated that the warming may be accompanied by changes in extreme events. This study examined trends in mean and extreme temperatures over Ibadan during 1971-2012 at annual and seasonal scales using the high-resolution atmospheric reanalysis from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) twentieth-century dataset (ERA-20C) at 15 grid points. Magnitudes of linear trends in mean and extreme temperatures and their statistical significance were calculated using ordinary least squares and Mann-Kendall rank statistic tests. The results show that Ibadan has witnessed an increase in annual and seasonal mean minimum temperatures. The annual mean maximum temperature exhibited a non-significant decline in most parts of Ibadan. While trends in cold extremes at annual scale show warming, trends in coldest night show greater warming than in coldest day. At the seasonal scale, we found that Ibadan experienced a mix of positive and negative trends in absolute extreme temperature indices. However, cold extremes show the largest trend magnitudes, with trends in coldest night showing the greatest warming. The results compare well with those obtained from a limited number of stations. This study should inform decision-makers and urban planners about the ongoing warming in Ibadan.

  8. Mean absolute error and root mean square error: which is the better metric for assessing model performance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassington, Gary

    2017-04-01

    The mean absolute error (MAE) and root mean square error (RMSE) are two metrics that are often used interchangeably as measures of ocean forecast accuracy. Recent literature has debated which of these should be preferred though their conclusions have largely been based on empirical arguments. We note that in general, RM SE2 = M AE2 + V ARk [|ɛ|] PIC PIC such that RMSE includes both the MAE as well as additional information related to the variance (biased estimator) of the errors ɛ with sample size k. The greater sensitivity of RMSE to a small number of outliers is directly attributable to the variance of absolute error. Further statistical properties for both metrics are derived and compared based on the assumption that the errors are Gaussian. For an unbiased (or bias corrected) model both MAE and RMSE are shown to estimate the total error standard deviation to within a constant coefficient such that ° -- M AE ≈ 2/πRM SE PIC . Both metrics have comparable behaviour in response to model bias and asymptote to the model bias as the bias increases. MAE is shown to be an unbiased estimator while RMSE is a biased estimator. MAE also has a lower sample variance compared with RMSE indicating MAE is the most robust choice. For real-time applications where there is a likelihood of "bad" observations we recommend ° - ° ---° - π- -1- π- π- TESD = 2 M AE ± √k- 2 - 1 2M AE PIC as an unbiased estimator of the total error standard deviation with error estimates (one standard deviation) based on the sample variance and defined as a scaling of the MAE itself. A sample size (k) on the order of 90 and 9000 provides an error scaling of 10% and 1% respectively. Nonetheless if the model performance is being analysed using a large sample of delayed-mode quality controlled observations then RMSE might be preferred where the second moment sensitivity to large model errors is important. Alternatively for model intercomparisons the information might compactly represented by a

  9. Statistical Analysis of daily mean temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    Data of daily mean temperatures recorded at the Kennedy Center during the period of 1957-1977 were analyzed to forecast daily mean temperatures and their thirty-day moving averages for a period of ten to fifteen days in a given month. Since it is found that the standard deviation is linear in the mean, a logarithmic transformation of the data is used for finding an integrated moving average process IMA by the Box-Jenkins aproach. The first differences of the transformed data seem to fit a moving average model with parameter value 2, MA(2). The consideration of seasonality factor makes the fit worse.

  10. Meaning of temperature in different thermostatistical ensembles.

    PubMed

    Hänggi, Peter; Hilbert, Stefan; Dunkel, Jörn

    2016-03-28

    Depending on the exact experimental conditions, the thermodynamic properties of physical systems can be related to one or more thermostatistical ensembles. Here, we survey the notion of thermodynamic temperature in different statistical ensembles, focusing in particular on subtleties that arise when ensembles become non-equivalent. The 'mother' of all ensembles, the microcanonical ensemble, uses entropy and internal energy (the most fundamental, dynamically conserved quantity) to derive temperature as a secondary thermodynamic variable. Over the past century, some confusion has been caused by the fact that several competing microcanonical entropy definitions are used in the literature, most commonly the volume and surface entropies introduced by Gibbs. It can be proved, however, that only the volume entropy satisfies exactly the traditional form of the laws of thermodynamics for a broad class of physical systems, including all standard classical Hamiltonian systems, regardless of their size. This mathematically rigorous fact implies that negative 'absolute' temperatures and Carnot efficiencies more than 1 are not achievable within a standard thermodynamical framework. As an important offspring of microcanonical thermostatistics, we shall briefly consider the canonical ensemble and comment on the validity of the Boltzmann weight factor. We conclude by addressing open mathematical problems that arise for systems with discrete energy spectra.

  11. Investigating the monthly mean stream temperature dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallice, Aurélien; Huwald, Hendrik; Schaefli, Bettina; Rinaldo, Andrea; Lehning, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Affecting the habitat suitability of many fish species, water temperature is a hydrological factor of great concern in the actual context of climate change. Despite more than 40 years of research on this topic, the impact of landscape on the dynamics of stream temperature is still not entirely understood. In the present study, we analyzed the monthly mean stream temperature measurements collected in 26 medium-sized catchments (3-300 km2) in Switzerland. While selecting the catchments, particular attention was given to cover a large range of different geomorphological conditions, especially regarding altitude, slope and aspect. Despite these differences, it was surprisingly found that the thermal regimes of almost all the investigated streams followed a same annual trend. Only the amplitude and the minimum value of this trend were observed to differ between the individual catchments. These two factors could be successfully related to geomorphological characteristics of the catchments using multi-linear regression. The shape of the annual trend was found to vary from one year to the other. This inter-annual variability was attributed to climate, based on the significant correlation between the annual trend and air temperature. As a result of the present study, we obtained a regression model to estimate the monthly mean stream temperature in ungauged catchments based on country-wide available geomorphological variables and the average of the monthly mean air temperature over Switzerland.

  12. Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27

    SciTech Connect

    Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1981-10-01

    This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

  13. Flux Density Absolute Measurements of Supernova Remnants Using Two-Temperature Blackbody Calibration Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugin, N. A.; Kuznetsova, I. P.; Razin, V. A.

    The two-temperature standard of noise radio emission consisted of two identical "black" disks with different temperatures is used to increase the accuracy of absolute measurements of cosmic source radio emission flux densities. A brief description is given to the construction of the measuring facility at the RAO NIRFI "Staraya Pustyn'", the measurement procedures and data processing with taking into account apparatus and methodical factors. The results are given of the absolute measurements made in 2003 of the radio emission flux densities of SNRs Cassiopeia A and Taurus A and the radio galaxy Cygnus A at frequencies 2829 and 8834 MHz.

  14. Modeling monthly mean air temperature for Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvares, Clayton Alcarde; Stape, José Luiz; Sentelhas, Paulo Cesar; de Moraes Gonçalves, José Leonardo

    2013-08-01

    Air temperature is one of the main weather variables influencing agriculture around the world. Its availability, however, is a concern, mainly in Brazil where the weather stations are more concentrated on the coastal regions of the country. Therefore, the present study had as an objective to develop models for estimating monthly and annual mean air temperature for the Brazilian territory using multiple regression and geographic information system techniques. Temperature data from 2,400 stations distributed across the Brazilian territory were used, 1,800 to develop the equations and 600 for validating them, as well as their geographical coordinates and altitude as independent variables for the models. A total of 39 models were developed, relating the dependent variables maximum, mean, and minimum air temperatures (monthly and annual) to the independent variables latitude, longitude, altitude, and their combinations. All regression models were statistically significant ( α ≤ 0.01). The monthly and annual temperature models presented determination coefficients between 0.54 and 0.96. We obtained an overall spatial correlation higher than 0.9 between the models proposed and the 16 major models already published for some Brazilian regions, considering a total of 3.67 × 108 pixels evaluated. Our national temperature models are recommended to predict air temperature in all Brazilian territories.

  15. Validation of Mean Absolute Sea Level of the North Atlantic obtained from Drifter, Altimetry and Wind Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maximenko, Nikolai A.

    2003-01-01

    Mean absolute sea level reflects the deviation of the Ocean surface from geoid due to the ocean currents and is an important characteristic of the dynamical state of the ocean. Values of its spatial variations (order of 1 m) are generally much smaller than deviations of the geoid shape from ellipsoid (order of 100 m) that makes the derivation of the absolute mean sea level a difficult task for gravity and satellite altimetry observations. Technique used by Niiler et al. for computation of the absolute mean sea level in the Kuroshio Extension was then developed into more general method and applied by Niiler et al. (2003b) to the global Ocean. The method is based on the consideration of balance of horizontal momentum.

  16. Monitoring global monthly mean surface temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trenberth, Kevin E.; Christy, John R.; Hurrell, James W.

    1992-01-01

    The accuracy of the global surface air temperature (SST) estimates for a particular month over the past decade is assessed using all of the in situ observations available today. The sources of noise in the data, the numbers of observations, and the spatial coverage are appraised for the comparison with the climate signal, and different analyzed results are compared to determine their reproducibility. The data are further evaluated by comparing anomalies of near-global monthly mean surface temperatures with those of global satellite channel 2 microwave sounding unit temperatures for 144 months from 1979 to 1990. The results indicate that the inherent noise level in an SST observation is about 1.0 C, and this is compounded when the observation is made in regions of large temperature gradient.

  17. A New Approach For Absolute Temperature Calibration: Application to the CLARREO Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, F. A.; Adler, D. P.; Ellington, S. D.; Thielman, D. J.; Revercomb, H. E.; Anderson, J. G.

    2007-12-01

    A novel scheme to provide on-orbit absolute calibration of blackbody temperature sensors (on-demand) has been demonstrated using a copy of the engineering model version of a space flight hardware blackbody design (GIFTS). The scheme uses the phase change signature of reference materials to assign an absolute temperatures scale to the blackbody sensors over a large temperature range. Uncertainties of better than 0.020 K have been demonstrated over the temperature range from 234 to 303 K. Thermal modeling has been conducted to optimize the design, and to show that accuracies comparable to those measured in the laboratory should be obtainable in the less-controlled on-orbit temperature environment. The implementation if this scheme is very attractive due to its simplicity and relatively low mass. In addition, all aspects of the electronics (control and temperature readout) needed to support this scheme have been developed and demonstrated in the as-delivered GIFTS Engineering Model blackbody calibration system developed by the University of Wisconsin. NASA's anticipated plan for a mission dedicated to Climate (CLARREO) will hinge upon the ability to fly absolute standards that can provide the basis to meet stringent requirements on measurement accuracy. For example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances will require high-emissivity calibration blackbodies having absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.020 K (3 sigma). The novel blackbody temperature calibration scheme described here is very well suited for the CLARREO mission because if its low mass, high accuracy, and ease of implementation into a demonstrated flight blackbody design.

  18. BOREAS AFM-06 Mean Temperature Profile Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994. The data set provides temperature profiles at 15 heights, containing the variables of virtual temperature, vertical velocity, the speed of sound, and w-bar. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The mean temperature profile data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  19. Monitoring global monthly mean surface temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Trenberth, K.E.; Hurrell, J.W. ); Christy, J.R. )

    1992-12-01

    An assessment is made of how well the monthly mean surface temperatures for the decade of the 1980s are known. The sources of noise in the data, the numbers of observations, and the spatial coverage are appraised for comparison with the climate signal, and different analyzed results are compared to see how reproducible they are. The data are further evaluated by comparing anomalies of near-global monthly mean surface temperatures with those of global satellite channel 2 microwave sounding unit (MSU) temperatures for 144 months from 1979 to 1990. Very distincitve patterns are seen in the correlation coefficients, which range from high (> 0.8) over the extratropical continents of the Northern Hemisphere, to moderate ([approximately] 0.5) over tropical and subtropical land areas, to very low over the southern oceans and tropical western Pacific. The physical difference between the two temperature measurements is one factor in these patterns. The correlation coefficient is a measure of the signal-to-noise ratio, and largest values are found where the climate signal is largest, but the spatial variation in the inherent noise in the surface observations over the oceans is the other major factor in accounting for the pattern. 42 refs., 12 figs., 4 tab.

  20. Persistency in monthly mean temperatures in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasol, Dubravka; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2016-04-01

    Time series from a number of weather stations in Europe have been studied in order to assess the persistency of montly mean temperatures. In most regions, the correlation between the mean temperatures of two months next to each other in time has maxima in the summer and in the winter, while there are minima in the sping and the autumn. An exception from this is in the oceanic warm climate in the southwest, where the spring minimum is missing. A plausible explanation for the positive correlation in the winter may be related to snow on the ground. The snow is associated with cold spells and increases the albedo, contributing to extension of the low temperatures. The summertime correlation may be related to the water content of the soil. A cold and rainy period results in wet soil and subsequently, relatively large part of the energy of the incoming solar radiation is consumed by evaporation, rather than sensible heating. In the spring, there is generally no snow on the ground and in the autumn, the air temperature is not as sensitive to the water content of the soil as in the summer. This may explain the low correlation in spring and autumn.

  1. Temperature-dependent Absolute Refractive Index Measurements of Synthetic Fused Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Frey, Bradley J.

    2006-01-01

    Using the Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, we have measured the absolute refractive index of five specimens taken from a very large boule of Corning 7980 fused silica from temperatures ranging from 30 to 310 K at wavelengths from 0.4 to 2.6 microns with an absolute uncertainty of plus or minus 1 x 10 (exp -5). Statistical variations in derived values of the thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) are at the plus or minus 2 x 10 (exp -8)/K level. Graphical and tabulated data for absolute refractive index, dispersion, and thermo-optic coefficient are presented for selected wavelengths and temperatures along with estimates of uncertainty in index. Coefficients for temperature-dependent Sellmeier fits of measured refractive index are also presented to allow accurate interpolation of index to other wavelengths and temperatures. We compare our results to those from an independent investigation (which used an interferometric technique for measuring index changes as a function of temperature) whose samples were prepared from the same slugs of material from which our prisms were prepared in support of the Kepler mission. We also compare our results with sparse cryogenic index data from measurements of this material from the literature.

  2. Dynamic contribution to hemispheric mean temperature trends

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, J.M.; Zhang, Y.; Renwick, J.A.

    1995-11-03

    On the basis of land station data from the Northern Hemisphere, it was determined that roughly half of the temporal variance of monthly mean hemispheric mean anomalies in surface air temperature during the period from 1900 through 1990 were linearly related to the amplitude of a distinctive spatial pattern in which the oceans are anomalously cold and the continents are anomalously warm poleward of 40 degrees north when the hemisphere is warm. Apart from an upward trend since 1975, to which El Nino has contributed, the amplitude time series associated with this pattern resembles seasonally dependent white noise. it is argued that the variability associated with this pattern is dynamically induced and is not necessarily an integral part of the fingerprint of global warming. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The absolute temperature of the sky and the temperature of the cosmic background radiation at 600 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Sironi, G.; Limon, M.; Marcellino, G.; Bonelli, G.; Bersanelli, M. CNR, Istituto di Fisica Cosmica e Tecnologie Relative, Milan )

    1990-07-01

    The absolute temperature of the sky at delta = 46.5 deg has been measured at 600 MHz (50 cm wavelength) using a differential radiometer and a cold calibrator at liquid helium temperature. To separate the cosmic background radiation (CBR) from the remaining components of the sky temperature, observations at other frequencies, now under way, are necessary. A preliminary estimate of the CBR temperature at 600 MHz made using data of T(sky) at 600 MHz and maps of the sky at 408 MHz already in the literature gives T(cbr) = (3.0 + or - 1.2) K, in good agreement with previous measurements at nearby frequencies. 45 refs.

  4. A Method to Convert MRI Images of Temperature Change Into Images of Absolute Temperature in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Ryan M.; Viglianti, Benjamin L.; Yarmolenko, Pavel; Park, Ji-Young; Stauffer, Paul; Needham, David; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose During hyperthermia (HT), the therapeutic response of tumors varies substantially within the target temperature range (39–43°C). Current thermometry methods are either invasive or measure only temperature change, which limits the ability to study tissue responses to HT. This study combines manganese-containing low-temperature sensitive liposomes (Mn-LTSL) with proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) thermometry to measure absolute temperature in tumors with high spatial and temporal resolution using MRI. Methods Liposomes were loaded with 300mM MnSO4. The phase transition temperature (Tm) of Mn-LTSL samples was measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The release of manganese from Mn-LTSL in saline was characterized with inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. A 2T GE small animal scanner was used to acquire dynamic T1-weighted images and temperature change images of Mn-LTSL in saline phantoms and fibrosarcoma-bearing Fisher 344 rats receiving hyperthermia after Mn-LTSL injection. Results The Tm of Mn-LTSL in rat blood was 42.9 ± 0.2 °C (DSC). For Mn-LTSL samples (0.06mM – 0.5mM Mn2+ in saline) heated monotonically from 30°C to 50°C, a peak in the rate of MRI signal enhancement occurred at 43.1 ± 0.3 °C. The same peak in signal enhancement rate was observed during heating of fibrosarcoma tumors (N=3) after injection of Mn-LTSL, and the peak was used to convert temperature change images into absolute temperature. Accuracies of calibrated temperature measurements were in the range 0.9 – 1.8°C. Conclusion The release of Mn2+ from Mn-LTSL affects the rate of MR signal enhancement which enables conversion of MRI-based temperature change images to absolute temperature. PMID:23957326

  5. On-Orbit Absolute Temperature Calibration for CLARREO Using Multiple Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, F. A.; Adler, D. P.; Ellington, S. D.; Thielman, D. J.; Revercomb, H. E.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2008-12-01

    NASA's anticipated plan for a mission dedicated to Climate (CLARREO) will hinge upon the ability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances will require high-emissivity calibration blackbodies that have absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (3 sigma). A novel scheme to provide absolute calibration of temperature sensors, suitable for CLARREO on-orbit operation, has been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin, and is now undergoing refinement under NASA Instrument Incubator Program funding. In this scheme, small quantities of reference materials (mercury, water, and gallium - to date) are imbedded into the blackbody cavity wall, in a manner similar to the temperature sensors to be calibrated. As the blackbody cavity is slowly heated through a reference material melt temperature, the transient temperature signature of the imbedded thermistor sensors provides a very accurate indication of the melt temperature. Using small quantities of phase change material (less than half of a percent of the mass of the cavity), melt temperature accuracies of better than 10 mK have been demonstrated for mercury, water, and gallium (providing calibration from 233K to 303K). The flight implementation of this new scheme will involve special considerations for packaging the phase change materials to ensure long-term compatibility with the containment system, and design features that help ensure that the on-orbit melt behavior in a microgravity environment is unchanged from pre-flight full gravitational conditions under which the system is characterized.

  6. Electron cyclotron emission measurements on JET: Michelson interferometer, new absolute calibration, and determination of electron temperature.

    PubMed

    Schmuck, S; Fessey, J; Gerbaud, T; Alper, B; Beurskens, M N A; de la Luna, E; Sirinelli, A; Zerbini, M

    2012-12-01

    At the fusion experiment JET, a Michelson interferometer is used to measure the spectrum of the electron cyclotron emission in the spectral range 70-500 GHz. The interferometer is absolutely calibrated using the hot/cold technique and, in consequence, the spatial profile of the plasma electron temperature is determined from the measurements. The current state of the interferometer hardware, the calibration setup, and the analysis technique for calibration and plasma operation are described. A new, full-system, absolute calibration employing continuous data acquisition has been performed recently and the calibration method and results are presented. The noise level in the measurement is very low and as a result the electron cyclotron emission spectrum and thus the spatial profile of the electron temperature are determined to within ±5% and in the most relevant region to within ±2%. The new calibration shows that the absolute response of the system has decreased by about 15% compared to that measured previously and possible reasons for this change are presented. Temperature profiles measured with the Michelson interferometer are compared with profiles measured independently using Thomson scattering diagnostics, which have also been recently refurbished and recalibrated, and agreement within experimental uncertainties is obtained.

  7. Study of absolute detection technique with the rotational Raman lidar for atmospheric temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shichun; Wei, Pengpeng; Gong, Xin; Hua, Dengxin

    2015-10-01

    The rotational Raman lidar is a valid tool to profile atmospheric temperature. But the fact that its proper operation generally needs a certain collocated device for calibration seriously restricts application in the meteorology and environment fields. We propose an absolute detection technique of atmospheric temperature with the rotational Raman lidar, which is based on the dependence of rotational Raman spectral envelope on temperature. To retrieve atmospheric temperature without calibration, six rotational Raman spectra of nitrogen molecule are chosen from the anti-Strokes branch. A temperature retrieval algorithm is presented and analyzed based on the least square principle. A two-cascade Raman spectroscopic filter is constructed by one first-order diffraction grating, one convex lens, one linear fiber array and 6 groups of fiber Bragg gratings. This lidar is configured with a 300-mJ pulse energy laser and a 250-mm clear aperture telescope. Simulation results show that it can extract the nitrogen molecules rotational Raman spectral lines, and that atmospheric temperature profile obtained through absolute retrieval algorithm can be up to 3.5 km with less than 0.5-K deviation within 17 minutes interval.

  8. Application of Mean of Absolute Deviation Method for the Selection of Best Nonlinear Component Based on Video Encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anees, Amir; Khan, Waqar Ahmad; Gondal, Muhammad Asif; Hussain, Iqtadar

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this work is to make use of the mean of absolute deviation (MAD) method for the evaluation process of substitution boxes used in the advanced encryption standard. In this paper, we use the MAD technique to analyze some popular and prevailing substitution boxes used in encryption processes. In particular, MAD is applied to advanced encryption standard (AES), affine power affine (APA), Gray, Lui J., Residue Prime, S8 AES, SKIPJACK, and Xyi substitution boxes.

  9. On Feasibility of Absolute Measurements of Ion Temperature in D-3He Fusion Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronchev, Victor T.; Nakao, Yasuyuki

    2003-05-01

    We investigate a possibility of using γ-ray-generating nuclear reactions for absolute measurements of bulk ion temperature in D-3He fusion plasma. Radiative capture processes between fuel ions and specific γ-ray modes of nuclear reactions induced by a small admixture of 6Li are examined for such an application. It is shown that ion temperature can be determined by comparative measurements of the respective γ-ray yields. An essential point of the method proposed is that any fluctuations of plasma parameters during the measurements do not affect accuracy of temperature probe. Nuclear reactions 3He(3He,γ)6Be and 6Li(3He,γp)8Be are suggested for diagnostics for the first time. Necessary data on reaction cross sections and Maxwellian rate parameters are calculated.

  10. Review of deformation behavior of tungsten at temperature less than 0.2 absolute melting temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The deformation behavior of tungsten at temperatures 0.2 T sub m is reviewed, with primary emphasis on the temperature dependence of the yield stress and the ductile-brittle transition temperature. It appears that a model based on the high Peierls stress of tungsten best accounts for the observed mechanical behavior at low temperatures. Recent research is discussed which suggests an important role of electron concentration and bonding on the mechanical behavior of tungsten. It is concluded that future research on tungsten should include studies to define more clearly the correlation between electron concentration and mechanical behavior of tungsten alloys and other transition metal alloys.

  11. Development of Gravidynamical Equations for a Weakly Gravitating Body in the Vicinity of Absolute Zero Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, Alexander M.

    2002-01-01

    the framework of this model bodies have fuzzy outlines and are represented by means of spheroidal forms. The consistency of the statistical model with the Einstein general relativity3,4,5 has been shown. In the work6, which is a continuation of the paper2, it was investigated a slowly evolving in time process of a gravitational compression (contraction) of a spheroidal body close to an unstable meñhanical equilibrium state (a low mass flow), therefore the process of the gravitational contraction appears slowly developing in time (the case of unobservable velocities of particles composing a spheroidal body). For this case in the work7 it has been shown that the strength and potential of the gravitational field of a slowly contracting spheroidal body satisfy a differential equation of the second order of the parabolic type for the case of unobservable velocities of particles. Therefore gravitational waves of a soliton type are propagated in a weakly gravitating spheroidal body if values of velocities are unobservable. body. In the connection with the above-given statements, in the present paper the following assumptions are used: 1.The spheroidal body under consideration is homogeneous in its chemical structure, i.e. it consists of identical particles with the mass m0. 2.The spheroidal body is not subjected to influence of external fields and bodies. 3.The spheroidal body is isothermal and has temperature close to the absolute zero. 4.The concentration gradient is not too large in the sense that interphase boundaries are absent inside the spheroidal body. 5. In view of low values of the temperature the heat conduction and viscosity processes are not important, which allows to describe the rotation of the spheroidal body as a whole, while movement of flows of particles inside the weakly gravitating spheroidal body is modeled by means of a motion of an ideal medium (the case of observable velocities of particles). 6.Since the process of the gravitational compression

  12. The impact of water temperature on the measurement of absolute dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Naveed Mehdi

    To standardize reference dosimetry in radiation therapy, Task Group 51 (TG 51) of American Association of Physicist's in Medicine (AAPM) recommends that dose calibration measurements be made in a water tank at a depth of 10 cm and at a reference geometry. Methodologies are provided for calculating various correction factors to be applied in calculating the absolute dose. However the protocol does not specify the water temperature to be used. In practice, the temperature of water during dosimetry may vary considerably between independent sessions and different centers. In this work the effect of water temperature on absolute dosimetry has been investigated. Density of water varies with temperature, which in turn may impact the beam attenuation and scatter properties. Furthermore, due to thermal expansion or contraction air volume inside the chamber may change. All of these effects can result in a change in the measurement. Dosimetric measurements were made using a Farmer type ion chamber on a Varian Linear Accelerator for 6 MV and 23 MV photon energies for temperatures ranging from 10 to 40 °C. A thermal insulation was designed for the water tank in order to maintain relatively stable temperature over the duration of the experiment. Dose measured at higher temperatures were found to be consistently higher by a very small magnitude. Although the differences in dose were less than the uncertainty in each measurement, a linear regression of the data suggests that the trend is statistically significant with p-values of 0.002 and 0.013 for 6 and 23 MV beams respectively. For a 10 degree difference in water phantom temperatures, which is a realistic deviation across clinics, the final calculated reference dose can differ by 0.24% or more. To address this effect, first a reference temperature (e.g.22 °C) can be set as the standard; subsequently a correction factor can be implemented for deviations from this reference. Such a correction factor is expected to be of similar

  13. Measurements of absolute absorption cross sections of ozone in the 185- to 254-nm wavelength region and the temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Freeman, D. E.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of the relative absorption cross sections of ozone at temperatures 195, 228, and 295 K have been made throughout the 185 to 254 nm wavelength region. The absolute absorption cross sections at the same temperatures have been measured at several discrete wavelengths in the 185 to 250 nm region. The absolute cross sections of ozone have been used to put the relative cross sections on a firm absolute basis throughout the 185 to 255 nm region. These recalibrated cross sections are slightly lower than those of Molina and Molina (1986), but the differences are within a few percent and would not be significant in atmospheric applications.

  14. Measurements of absolute absorption cross sections of ozone in the 185- to 254-nm wavelength region and the temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Freeman, D. E.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of the relative absorption cross sections of ozone at temperatures 195, 228, and 295 K have been made throughout the 185 to 254 nm wavelength region. The absolute absorption cross sections at the same temperatures have been measured at several discrete wavelengths in the 185 to 250 nm region. The absolute cross sections of ozone have been used to put the relative cross sections on a firm absolute basis throughout the 185 to 255 nm region. These recalibrated cross sections are slightly lower than those of Molina and Molina (1986), but the differences are within a few percent and would not be significant in atmospheric applications.

  15. Thermoelectric refrigerator having improved temperature stabilization means

    DOEpatents

    Falco, Charles M.

    1982-01-01

    A control system for thermoelectric refrigerators is disclosed. The thermoelectric refrigerator includes at least one thermoelectric element that undergoes a first order change at a predetermined critical temperature. The element functions as a thermoelectric refrigerator element above the critical temperature, but discontinuously ceases to function as a thermoelectric refrigerator element below the critical temperature. One example of such an arrangement includes thermoelectric refrigerator elements which are superconductors. The transition temperature of one of the superconductor elements is selected as the temperature control point of the refrigerator. When the refrigerator attempts to cool below the point, the metals become superconductors losing their ability to perform as a thermoelectric refrigerator. An extremely accurate, first-order control is realized.

  16. Is absolute noninvasive temperature measurement by the Pr[MOE-DO3A] complex feasible.

    PubMed

    Hentschel, M; Findeisen, M; Schmidt, W; Frenzel, T; Wlodarczyk, W; Wust, P; Felix, R

    2000-02-01

    Recently, the feasibility of the praseodymium complex of 10-(2-methoxyethyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraaza-cyclododecane-1,4,7-tr iacetate (Pr[MOE-DO3A]) for non-invasive temperature measurement via 1H spectroscopy has been demonstrated. Particularly the suitability of the complex for non-invasive temperature measurements including in vivo spectroscopy without spatial resolution as well as first spectroscopic imaging measurements at low temporal resolution (> or = 4 min) and high temporal resolution (breath hold, approximately 20 s) has been shown. As of today, calibration curves according to the particular experimental conditions are necessary. This work aims to clarify whether the Pr[MOE-DO3A] probe in conjunction with 1H-NMR spectroscopy allows non-invasive absolute temperature measurements with high accuracy. The measurement results from two different representative media, distilled water and human plasma, show a slight but significant dependence of the calibration curves on the surrounding medium. Calibration curves in water and plasma were derived for the temperature dependence of the chemical shift difference (F) between Pr[MOE-DO3A]'s OCH3 and water with F = -(27.53 +/- 0.04) + (0.125 +/- 0.001) x T and F = -(27.61 +/- 0.02) + (0.129 +/- 0.001) x T, respectively, with F in ppm and T in degrees C. However, the differences are minuscule even for the highest spectral resolution of 0.001 ppm/pt, so that they are indistinguishable under practical conditions. The estimated temperature errors are +/- 0.18 degrees C for water and +/- 0.14 degrees C for plasma and with that only slightly worse than the measurement accuracy of the fiber-optical temperature probe (+/- 0.1 degrees C). It can be concluded that the results obtained indicate the feasibility of the 1H spectroscopy method in conjunction with the Pr[MOE-DO3A] probe for absolute temperature measurements, with a maximum accuracy of +/- 0.2 degrees C.

  17. Absolute calibration of the OMEGA streaked optical pyrometer for temperature measurements of compressed materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregor, M. C.; Boni, R.; Sorce, A.; Kendrick, J.; McCoy, C. A.; Polsin, D. N.; Boehly, T. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Eggert, J. H.; Millot, M.

    2016-11-01

    Experiments in high-energy-density physics often use optical pyrometry to determine temperatures of dynamically compressed materials. In combination with simultaneous shock-velocity and optical-reflectivity measurements using velocity interferometry, these experiments provide accurate equation-of-state data at extreme pressures (P > 1 Mbar) and temperatures (T > 0.5 eV). This paper reports on the absolute calibration of the streaked optical pyrometer (SOP) at the Omega Laser Facility. The wavelength-dependent system response was determined by measuring the optical emission from a National Institute of Standards and Technology-traceable tungsten-filament lamp through various narrowband (40-nm-wide) filters. The integrated signal over the SOP's ˜250-nm operating range is then related to that of a blackbody radiator using the calibrated response. We present a simple closed-form equation for the brightness temperature as a function of streak-camera signal derived from this calibration. Error estimates indicate that brightness temperature can be inferred to a precision of <5%.

  18. Absolute calibration of the OMEGA streaked optical pyrometer for temperature measurements of compressed materials

    DOE PAGES

    Gregor, M. C.; Boni, R.; Sorce, A.; ...

    2016-11-29

    Experiments in high-energy-density physics often use optical pyrometry to determine temperatures of dynamically compressed materials. In combination with simultaneous shock-velocity and optical-reflectivity measurements using velocity interferometry, these experiments provide accurate equation-of-state data at extreme pressures (P > 1 Mbar) and temperatures (T > 0.5 eV). This paper reports on the absolute calibration of the streaked optical pyrometer (SOP) at the Omega Laser Facility. The wavelength-dependent system response was determined by measuring the optical emission from a National Institute of Standards and Technology–traceable tungsten-filament lamp through various narrowband (40 nm-wide) filters. The integrated signal over the SOP’s ~250-nm operating range ismore » then related to that of a blackbody radiator using the calibrated response. We present a simple closed-form equation for the brightness temperature as a function of streak-camera signal derived from this calibration. As a result, error estimates indicate that brightness temperature can be inferred to a precision of <5%.« less

  19. Absolute calibration of the OMEGA streaked optical pyrometer for temperature measurements of compressed materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gregor, M. C.; Boni, R.; Sorce, A.; Kendrick, J.; McCoy, C. A.; Polsin, D. N.; Boehly, T. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Eggert, J. H.; Millot, M.

    2016-11-29

    Experiments in high-energy-density physics often use optical pyrometry to determine temperatures of dynamically compressed materials. In combination with simultaneous shock-velocity and optical-reflectivity measurements using velocity interferometry, these experiments provide accurate equation-of-state data at extreme pressures (P > 1 Mbar) and temperatures (T > 0.5 eV). This paper reports on the absolute calibration of the streaked optical pyrometer (SOP) at the Omega Laser Facility. The wavelength-dependent system response was determined by measuring the optical emission from a National Institute of Standards and Technology–traceable tungsten-filament lamp through various narrowband (40 nm-wide) filters. The integrated signal over the SOP’s ~250-nm operating range is then related to that of a blackbody radiator using the calibrated response. We present a simple closed-form equation for the brightness temperature as a function of streak-camera signal derived from this calibration. As a result, error estimates indicate that brightness temperature can be inferred to a precision of <5%.

  20. Lifespan metabolic potential of the unicellular organisms expressed by Boltzmann constant, absolute temperature and proton mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, Atanas Todorov

    2016-12-01

    The unicellular organisms and phages are the first appeared fundamental living organisms on the Earth. The total metabolic energy (Els, J) of these organisms can be expressed by their lifespan metabolic potential (Als, J/kg) and body mass (M, kg): Els =Als M. In this study we found a different expression - by Boltzmann's constant (k, J/K), nucleon mass (mp+, kg) of protons (and neutrons), body mass (M, kg) of organism or mass (Ms) of biomolecules (proteins, nucleotides, polysaccharides and lipids) building organism, and the absolute temperature (T, K). The found equations are: Els= (M/mp+)kT for phages and Els=(Ms/mp+)kT for the unicellular organisms. From these equations the lifespan metabolic potential can be expressed as: Als=Els/M= (k/mp+)T for phages and Als=Els/M= (k/3.3mp+)T for unicellular organisms. The temperature-normated lifespan metabolic potential (Als/T, J/K.kg) is equals to the ratio between Boltzmann's constant and nucleon mass: Als/T=k/mp+ for phages and Als/T=k/3.3mp+ for unicellular organisms. The numerical value of the k/mp+ ratio is equals to 8.254×103 J/K.kg, and the numerical value of k/3.3mp+ ratio is equal to 2.497×103 J/K.kg. These values of temperature-normated lifespan metabolic potential could be considered fundamental for the unicellular organisms.

  1. Calculation of the absolute thermodynamic properties of association of host-guest systems from the intermolecular potential of mean force.

    PubMed

    Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2006-12-14

    The authors report calculations of the intermolecular potential of mean force (PMF) in the case of the host-guest interaction. The host-guest system is defined by a water soluble calixarene and a cation. With an organic cation such as the tetramethylammonium cation, the calixarene forms an insertion complex, whereas with the Lanthane cation, the supramolecular assembly is an outer-sphere complex. The authors apply a modified free energy perturbation method and the force constraint technique to establish the PMF profiles as a function of the separation distance between the host and guest. They use the PMF profile for the calculation of the absolute thermodynamic properties of association that they compare to the experimental values previously determined. They finish by giving some structural features of the insertion and outer-sphere complexes at the Gibbs free energy minimum.

  2. Meta-analysis of absolute mean differences from randomised trials with treatment-related clustering associated with care providers.

    PubMed

    Walwyn, Rebecca; Roberts, Chris

    2015-03-15

    Nesting of patients within care providers in trials of physical and talking therapies creates an additional level within the design. The statistical implications of this are analogous to those of cluster randomised trials, except that the clustering effect may interact with treatment and can be restricted to one or more of the arms. The statistical model that is recommended at the trial level includes a random effect for the care provider but allows the provider and patient level variances to differ across arms. Evidence suggests that, while potentially important, such within-trial clustering effects have rarely been taken into account in trials and do not appear to have been considered in meta-analyses of these trials. This paper describes summary measures and individual-patient-data methods for meta-analysing absolute mean differences from randomised trials with two-level nested clustering effects, contrasting fixed and random effects meta-analysis models. It extends methods for incorporating trials with unequal variances and homogeneous clustering to allow for between-arm and between-trial heterogeneity in intra-class correlation coefficient estimates. The work is motivated by a meta-analysis of trials of counselling in primary care, where the control is no counselling and the outcome is the Beck Depression Inventory. Assuming equal counsellor intra-class correlation coefficients across trials, the recommended random-effects heteroscedastic model gave a pooled absolute mean difference of -2.53 (95% CI -5.33 to 0.27) using summary measures and -2.51 (95% CI -5.35 to 0.33) with the individual-patient-data. Pooled estimates were consistently below a minimally important clinical difference of four to five points on the Beck Depression Inventory. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Drug Treated Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective and Bipolar Disorder Patients Evaluated by qEEG Absolute Spectral Power and Mean Frequency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wix-Ramos, Richard; Moreno, Xiomara; Capote, Eduardo; González, Gilbert; Uribe, Ezequiel

    2014-01-01

    Objective Research of electroencephalograph (EEG) power spectrum and mean frequency has shown inconsistent results in patients with schizophrenic, schizoaffective and bipolar disorders during medication when compared to normal subjects thus; the characterization of these parameters is an important task. Methods We applied quantitative EEG (qEEG) to investigate 38 control, 15 schizophrenic, 7 schizoaffective and 11 bipolar disorder subjects which remaine under the administration of psychotropic drugs (except control group). Absolute spectral power (ASP), mean frequency and hemispheric electrical asymmetry were measured by 19 derivation qEEG. Group mean values were compared with non parametrical Mann-Whitney test and spectral EEG maps with z-score method at p < 0.05. Results Most frequent drug treatments for schizophrenic patients were neuroleptic+antiepileptic (40% of cases) or 2 neuroleptics (33.3%). Schizoaffective patients received neuroleptic+benzodiazepine (71.4%) and for bipolar disorder patients neuroleptic+antiepileptic (81.8%). Schizophrenic (at all derivations except for Fp1, Fp2, F8 and T6) and schizoaffective (only at C3) show higher values of ASP (+57.7% and +86.1% respectively) compared to control group. ASP of bipolar disorder patients did not show differences against control group. The mean frequency was higher at Fp1 (+14.2%) and Fp2 (+17.4%) in bipolar disorder patients than control group, but no differences were found in frequencies between schizophrenic or schizoaffective patients against the control group. Majority of spectral differences were found at the left hemisphere in schizophrenic and schizoaffective but not in bipolar disorder subjects. Conclusion The present report contributes to characterize quantitatively the qEEG in drug treated schizophrenic, schizoaffective or bipolar disorder patients. PMID:24851121

  4. Estimation of absolute water surface temperature based on atmospherically corrected thermal infrared multispectral scanner digital data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Airborne remote sensing systems, as well as those on board Earth orbiting satellites, sample electromagnetic energy in discrete wavelength regions and convert the total energy sampled into data suitable for processing by digital computers. In general, however, the total amount of energy reaching a sensor system located at some distance from the target is composed not only of target related energy, but, in addition, contains a contribution originating from the atmosphere itself. Thus, some method must be devised for removing or at least minimizing the effects of the atmosphere. The LOWTRAN-6 Program was designed to estimate atmospheric transmittance and radiance for a given atmospheric path at moderate spectral resolution over an operational wavelength region from 0.25 to 28.5 microns. In order to compute the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) digital values which were recorded in the absence of the atmosphere, the parameters derived from LOWTRAN-6 are used in a correction equation. The TIMS data were collected at 1:00 a.m. local time on November 21, 1983, over a recirculating cooling pond for a power plant in southeastern Mississippi. The TIMS data were analyzed before and after atmospheric corrections were applied using a band ratioing model to compute the absolute surface temperature of various points on the power plant cooling pond. The summarized results clearly demonstrate the desirability of applying atmospheric corrections.

  5. Kelvin Absolute Temperature Scale Identified as Length Scale and Related to de Broglie Thermal Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrab, Siavash

    Thermodynamic equilibrium between matter and radiation leads to de Broglie wavelength λdβ = h /mβvrβ and frequency νdβ = k /mβvrβ of matter waves and stochastic definitions of Planck h =hk =mk <λrk > c and Boltzmann k =kk =mk <νrk > c constants, λrkνrk = c , that respectively relate to spatial (λ) and temporal (ν) aspects of vacuum fluctuations. Photon massmk =√{ hk /c3 } , amu =√{ hkc } = 1 /No , and universal gas constant Ro =No k =√{ k / hc } result in internal Uk = Nhνrk = Nmkc2 = 3 Nmkvmpk2 = 3 NkT and potential pV = uN\\vcirc / 3 = N\\ucirc / 3 = NkT energy of photon gas in Casimir vacuum such that H = TS = 4 NkT . Therefore, Kelvin absolute thermodynamic temperature scale [degree K] is identified as length scale [meter] and related to most probable wavelength and de Broglie thermal wavelength as Tβ =λmpβ =λdβ / 3 . Parallel to Wien displacement law obtained from Planck distribution, the displacement law λwS T =c2 /√{ 3} is obtained from Maxwell -Boltzmann distribution of speed of ``photon clusters''. The propagation speeds of sound waves in ideal gas versus light waves in photon gas are described in terms of vrβ in harmony with perceptions of Huygens. Newton formula for speed of long waves in canals √{ p / ρ } is modified to √{ gh } =√{ γp / ρ } in accordance with adiabatic theory of Laplace.

  6. Tools for Physiology Labs: An Inexpensive Means of Temperature Control

    PubMed Central

    Krans, Jacob L.; Hoy, Ronald R.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a simple means of modulating preparation temperature, which may be useful in undergraduate physiology laboratories. The device was developed in an effort to make teaching exercises that involve temperature modulation accessible at low cost. Although we were interested in using the device specifically with the larval fruit fly preparation, it is applicable to many preparations and temperature sensitive phenomena. Feedback driven thermoregulators offer superior precision in experiments requiring temperature control, but can be prohibitively expensive, require power supplies and circuitry, and often generate large switching transients (artifacts) during physiological recording. Moreover, many interesting exercises involving temperature control can be carried out with a slightly reduced level of temperature precision. PMID:23493108

  7. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  8. On the global mean temperature of the thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roble, R. G.; Emergy, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that the global mean temperature structure of the thermosphere above 120 km is primarily maintained by the absorption of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) flux at wavelengths less than 1025 A and solar ultraviolet (UV) flux. A number of previous calculations of the global mean temperature profile have determined that it is not possible to obtain agreement between the calculated global mean exospheric temperature and observed values. Since those studies, a considerable amount of new information on this problem has been obtained, including data obtained with the aid of the Atmospheric Explorer satellites. The present investigation is, therefore, concerned with a reexamination of the question whether there is enough solar UV radiation and auroral energy input to maintain the observed global mean temperature structure of the thermosphere above 120 km. It is found that for solar cycle minimum conditions there is an approximate balance between absorbed solar radiation and downward molecular thermal conduction.

  9. Evaluation of mean skin temperature formulas by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. K.; Miki, K.; Sagawa, S.; Shiraki, K.

    To study the reliabiliity of formulas for calculating mean skin temperature (Tsk), values were computed by 18 different techniques and were compared with the mean of 10,841 skin temperatures measured by infrared thermography. One hundred whole-body infrared thermograms were scanned in ten resting males while changing the air temperature from 40° C to 4° C. Local, regional average and mean skin temperatures were obtained using an image processing system. The agreement frequency, defined as the percentage of the calculated Tsk values which agreed with the corresponding infrared thermographic Tsk within +/-0.2° C, ranged for with the various formulas from 7% to 80%. In many sites, the local skin temperature did not coincide with the regional average skin temperature. When the local skin temperatures which showed the highest percentage similarity to the regional average skin temperature within +/-0.4° C were applied to the formula, the agreement frequency was markedly improved for all formulas. However, the agreement frequency was not affected by changing the weighting factors from specific constants to individually measured values of regional surface area. By applying the physiologically reliable accuracy range of +/-0.2° C in the moderate and +/-0.4° C in the cool condition, agreement frequencies of at least 95% were observed in formulas involving seven or more skin temperature measurement sites, including the hand and foot. We conclude that calculation of a reliable mean skin temperature must involve more than seven skin temperature measurement sites regardless of ambient temperature. Optimal sites for skin temperature measurement are proposed for various formulas.

  10. Spatiotemporal trends in mean temperatures and aridity index over Rwanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhire, I.; Ahmed, F.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at quantifying the trends in mean temperatures and aridity index over Rwanda for the period of 1961-1992, based on analysis of climatic data (temperatures, precipitations, and potential evapotranspiration). The analysis of magnitude and significance of trends in temperatures and aridity index show the degree of climate change and mark the level of vulnerability to extreme events (e.g., droughts) in different areas of the country. The study reveals that mean temperatures increased in most parts of the country, with a significant increase observed in the eastern lowlands and in the southwestern parts. The highlands located in the northwest and the Congo-Nile crest showed a nonsignificant increase in mean temperatures. Aridity index increased only in March, April, October, and November, corresponding with the rainy seasons. The remaining months of the year showed a decreasing trend. At an annual resolution, the highlands and the western region showed a rise in aridity index with a decreasing pattern over the eastern lowlands and the central plateau. Generally, the highlands presented a nonsignificant increase in mean temperatures and aridity index especially during the rainy seasons. The eastern lowlands showed a significant increase in mean temperatures and decreasing trends in aridity index. Therefore, these areas are bound to experience more droughts, leading to reduced water and consequent decline in agricultural production. On the other hand, the north highlands and southwest region will continue to be more productive.

  11. THERMAL COMFORT IN RELATION TO MEAN SKIN TEMPERATURE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Nude men were exposed to a range of ambient temperatures and were brought to a condition of thermal comfort by adjustment of the incident radiation...was evident that mean skin temperature, per se, was not a dependable criterion of thermal comfort . (Author)

  12. GSOD Based Daily Global Mean Surface Temperature and Mean Sea Level Air Pressure (1982-2011)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Xuan Shi, Dali Wang

    2014-05-05

    This data product contains all the gridded data set at 1/4 degree resolution in ASCII format. Both mean temperature and mean sea level air pressure data are available. It also contains the GSOD data (1982-2011) from NOAA site, contains station number, location, temperature and pressures (sea level and station level). The data package also contains information related to the data processing methods

  13. Seasonal mean temperature changes control future heat waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argüeso, Daniel; Di Luca, Alejandro; Perkins-Kirkpatrick, Sarah E.; Evans, Jason P.

    2016-07-01

    Increased temperature will result in longer, more frequent, and more intense heat waves. Changes in temperature variability have been deemed necessary to account for future heat wave characteristics. However, this has been quantified only in Europe and North America, while the rest of the globe remains unexplored. Using late century global climate projections, we show that annual mean temperature increases is the key factor defining heat wave changes in most regions. We find that commonly studied areas are an exception rather than the standard and the mean climate change signal generally outweighs any influence from variability changes. More importantly, differences in warming across seasons are responsible for most of the heat wave changes and their consideration relegates the contribution of variability to a marginal role. This reveals that accurately capturing mean seasonal changes is crucial to estimate future heat waves and reframes our interpretation of future temperature extremes.

  14. Spatial interpolation of monthly mean air temperature data for Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniskevich, Svetlana

    2016-04-01

    Temperature data with high spatial resolution are essential for appropriate and qualitative local characteristics analysis. Nowadays the surface observation station network in Latvia consists of 22 stations recording daily air temperature, thus in order to analyze very specific and local features in the spatial distribution of temperature values in the whole Latvia, a high quality spatial interpolation method is required. Until now inverse distance weighted interpolation was used for the interpolation of air temperature data at the meteorological and climatological service of the Latvian Environment, Geology and Meteorology Centre, and no additional topographical information was taken into account. This method made it almost impossible to reasonably assess the actual temperature gradient and distribution between the observation points. During this project a new interpolation method was applied and tested, considering auxiliary explanatory parameters. In order to spatially interpolate monthly mean temperature values, kriging with external drift was used over a grid of 1 km resolution, which contains parameters such as 5 km mean elevation, continentality, distance from the Gulf of Riga and the Baltic Sea, biggest lakes and rivers, population density. As the most appropriate of these parameters, based on a complex situation analysis, mean elevation and continentality was chosen. In order to validate interpolation results, several statistical indicators of the differences between predicted values and the values actually observed were used. Overall, the introduced model visually and statistically outperforms the previous interpolation method and provides a meteorologically reasonable result, taking into account factors that influence the spatial distribution of the monthly mean temperature.

  15. Structural Breaks in Mean Temperature over Agroclimatic Zones in India

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Ranjit Kumar; Birthal, P. S.; Khokhar, Ankit

    2014-01-01

    Amongst Asian countries India is one of the most vulnerable countries to climate change. During the past century, surface temperature in India has shown a significant increasing trend. In this paper, we have investigated behavior of mean monthly temperature during the period 1901–2001 over four agroclimatic zones of India and also tried to detect structural change in the temperature series. A structural break in the series has been observed at the national as well regional levels between 1970 and 1980. An analysis of trends before and after the structural break shows a significant increase in July temperature in the arid zone since 1972. PMID:25302324

  16. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  17. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  18. Extreme High-Temperature Events: Changes in their probabilities with Changes in Mean Temperature.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mearns, Linda O.; Katz, Richard W.; Schneider, Stephen H.

    1984-12-01

    Most climate impact studies rely on changes in means of meteorological variables, such as temperature, to estimate potential climate impacts, including effects on agricultural production. However, extreme meteorological events, say, a short period of abnormally high temperatures, can have a significant harmful effect on crop growth and final yield. The characteristics of daily temperature time series, specifically mean, variance and autocorrelation, are analyzed to determine possible ranges of probabilities of certain extreme temperature events [e.g., runs of consecutive daily maximum temperatures of at least 95°F (35°C)] with changes in mean temperature of the time series. The extreme temperature events considered are motivated primarily by agricultural concerns, particularly, the effects of high temperatures on corn yields in the U.S. Corn Belt. However, runs of high temperatures can also affect, for example, energy demand or morbidity and mortality of animals and humans.The relationships between changes in mean temperature and the corresponding changes in the probabilities of these extreme temperature events are quite nonlinear, with relatively small changes in mean temperature sometimes resulting in relatively large changes in event probabilities. In particular, the likelihood of occurrence of a run of five consecutive daily maximum temperatures of at least 95°F under a 3°F (1.7°C) increase in the mean (holding the variance and autocorrelation constant) is about three times greater than that under the current climate at Des Moines, Moreover, by allowing either the variance or the autocorrelation as well as the mean to change, this likelihood of a run event varies over a relatively wide range of values. These changes in the probabilities of extreme events need to be taken into consideration in order to obtain realistic estimates of the impact of climate changes such as increases in mean temperature that may arise from increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide

  19. NQR experiments on Sc-Y alloys at very low temperatures. [Absolute thermometry below 500[mu]K

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, L.; Smith, E.N.; Richardson, R.C. )

    1992-10-01

    The authors performed Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) experiments on an alloy of scandium and yttrium. They find that the characteristic resonance frequencies in zero external field are 50% larger than in pure scandium. This increase in frequency makes the Sc-Y alloy a better candidate for absolute thermometry below 500 [mu]K. However, the spin-lattice relaxation time of this alloy is more than an order of magnitude longer than in the pure scandium. In addition, an abrupt increase in the Korringa constant was observed for temperatures below 5mK.

  20. A density-functional study of the phase diagram of cementite-type (Fe,Mn)3C at absolute zero temperature.

    PubMed

    Von Appen, Jörg; Eck, Bernhard; Dronskowski, Richard

    2010-11-15

    The phase diagram of (Fe(1-x) Mn(x))(3)C has been investigated by means of density-functional theory (DFT) calculations at absolute zero temperature. The atomic distributions of the metal atoms are not random-like as previously proposed but we find three different, ordered regions within the phase range. The key role is played by the 8d metal site which forms, as a function of the composition, differing magnetic layers, and these dominate the physical properties. We calculated the magnetic moments, the volumes, the enthalpies of mixing and formation of 13 different compositions and explain the changes of the macroscopic properties with changes in the electronic and magnetic structures by means of bonding analyses using the Crystal Orbital Hamilton Population (COHP) technique.

  1. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  2. [Interpolation of daily mean temperature by using geographically weighted regression-Kriging].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-feng; Yang, Li-rong; Qu, Ming-kai; Chen, Hui-lin

    2015-05-01

    Air temperature is the input variable of numerous models in agriculture, hydrology, climate, and ecology. Currently, in study areas where the terrain is complex, methods taking into account correlation between temperature and environment variables and autocorrelation of regression residual (e.g., regression Kriging, RK) are mainly adopted to interpolate the temperature. However, such methods are based on the global ordinary least squares (OLS) regression technique, without taking into account the spatial nonstationary relationship of environment variables. Geographically weighted regression-Kriging (GWRK) is a kind of method that takes into account spatial nonstationarity relationship of environment variables and spatial autocorrelation of regression residuals of environment variables. In this study, according to the results of correlation and stepwise regression analysis, RK1 (covariates only included altitude), GWRK1 (covariates only included altitude), RK2 (covariates included latitude, altitude and closest distance to the seaside) and GWRK2 (co-variates included altitude and closest distance to the seaside) were compared to predict the spatial distribution of mean daily air temperature on Hainan Island on December 18, 2013. The prediction accuracy was assessed using the maximum positive error, maximum negative error, mean absolute error and root mean squared error based on the 80 validation sites. The results showed that GWRK1's four assessment indices were all closest to 0. The fact that RK2 and GWRK2 were worse than RK1 and GWRK1 implied that correlation among covariates reduced model performance.

  3. Radiometric absolute noise-temperature measurement system features improved accuracy and calibration ease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W.; Ewen, H.; Haroules, G.

    1970-01-01

    Radiometric receiver system, which measures noise temperatures in degrees Kelvin, does not require cryogenic noise sources for routine operation. It eliminates radiometer calibration errors associated with RF attenuation measurements. Calibrated noise source is required only for laboratory adjustment and calibration.

  4. Extreme operative temperatures are better descriptors of the thermal environment than mean temperatures.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Agustín; Trefaut Rodrigues, Miguel; Navas, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    In ecological studies of thermal biology the thermal environment is most frequently described using the mean or other measures of central tendency in environmental temperatures. However, this procedure may hide biologically relevant thermal variation for ectotherms, potentially misleading interpretations. Extremes of operative temperatures (EOT) can help with this problem by bracketing the thermal environment of focal animals. Within this paper, we quantify how mean operative temperatures relate to the range of simultaneously available operative temperatures (a measure of error). We also show how EOT: 1) detect more thermal differences among microsites than measures of central tendency, like the mean OT, 2) allow inferring on microsite use by ectothermic animals, and 3) clarify the relationships between field operative temperatures and temperatures measured at weather stations (WS). To do that, we explored operative temperatures measured at four sites of the Brazilian Caatingas and their correspondent nearest weather stations. We found that the daily mean OT can hide temperature ranges of 41 °C simultaneously available at our study sites. In addition, EOT detected more thermal differences among microsites than central quantiles. We also show how EOT allow inferring about microsite use of ectothermic animals in a given site. Finally, the daily maximum temperature and the daily temperature range measured at WSs predicted well the minimum available field OT at localities many kilometers away. Based on our results, we recommend the use of EOT, instead of mean OT, in thermal ecology studies.

  5. Effects of temperature excursions on mean kinetic temperature and shelf life.

    PubMed

    Kommanaboyina, B; Rhodes, C T

    1999-12-01

    The international acceptance of the definition of controlled room temperature (CRT) has given additional impetus to the use of mean kinetic temperature (MKT) as a method of quantifying temperatures during transport and storage and consequent possible effects on drug product stability. The present paper explores some of the implications of the MKT concept and considers the effect of temperature excursions on MKT values and hence on stability of drug products.

  6. Thermodynamic meaning of local temperature of nonequilibrium open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, LvZhou; Zheng, Xiao; Yan, YiJing; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2016-12-01

    Measuring the local temperature of nanoscale systems out of equilibrium has emerged as a new tool to study local heating effects and other local thermal properties of systems driven by external fields. Although various experimental protocols and theoretical definitions have been proposed to determine the local temperature, the thermodynamic meaning of the measured or defined quantities remains unclear. By performing analytical and numerical analysis of bias-driven quantum dot systems both in the noninteracting and strongly-correlated regimes, we elucidate the underlying physical meaning of local temperature as determined by two definitions: the zero-current condition that is widely used but not measurable and the minimal-perturbation condition that is experimentally realizable. We show that, unlike the zero-current condition, the local temperature determined by the minimal-perturbation protocol establishes a quantitative correspondence between the nonequilibrium system of interest and a reference equilibrium system, provided the probed system observable and the related electronic excitations are fully local. The quantitative correspondence thus allows the well-established thermodynamic concept to be extended to nonequilibrium situations.

  7. Temperature and pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reactions of NH2 radicals with acetylene and ethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosco, S. R.; Nava, D. F.; Brobst, W. D.; Stief, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute rate constants for the reaction between the NH2 free radical and acetylene and ethylene is measured experimentally using a flash photolysis technique. The constant is considered to be a function of temperature and pressure. At each temperature level of the experiment, the observed pseudo-first-order rate constants were assumed to be independent of flash intensity. The results of the experiment indicate that the bimolecular rate constant for the NH2 + C2H2 reaction increases with pressure at 373 K and 459 K but not at lower temperatures. Results near the pressure limit conform to an Arrhenius expression of 1.11 (+ or -) 0.36 x 10 to the -13th over the temperature range from 241 to 459 K. For the reaction NH2 + C2H4, a smaller rate of increase in the bimolecular rate constant was observed over the temperature range 250-465 K. The implications of these results for current theoretical models of NH2 + C2H2 (or H4) reactions in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are discussed.

  8. Change point analysis of mean annual air temperature in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirvani, A.

    2015-06-01

    The existence of change point in the mean of air temperature is an important indicator of climate change. In this study, Student's t parametric and Mann-Whitney nonparametric Change Point Models (CPMs) were applied to test whether a change point has occurred in the mean of annual Air Temperature Anomalies Time Series (ATATS) of 27 synoptic stations in different regions of Iran for the period 1956-2010. The Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT) was also applied to evaluate the detected change points. The ATATS of all stations except Bandar Anzali and Gorgan stations, which were serially correlated, were transformed to produce an uncorrelated pre-whitened time series as an input file for the CPMs and LRT. Both the Student's t and Mann-Whitney CPMs detected the change point in the ATATS of (a) Tehran Mehrabad, Abadan, Kermanshah, Khoramabad and Yazd in 1992, (b) Mashhad and Tabriz in 1993, (c) Bandar Anzali, Babolsar and Ramsar in 1994, (d) Kerman and Zahedan in 1996 at 5% significance level. The likelihood ratio test shows that the ATATS before and after detected change points in these 12 stations are normally distributed with different means. The Student's t and Mann-Whitney CPMs suggested different change points for individual stations in Bushehr, Bam, Shahroud, and Gorgan. However, the LRT confirmed the change points in these four stations as 1997, 1996, 1993, and 1996, respectively. No change points were detected in the remaining 11 stations.

  9. The Stumbling Block of the Gibbs Entropy: the Reality of the Negative Absolute Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghel, Dragoş-Victor

    2016-02-01

    The second Tisza-Callen postulate of equilibrium thermodynamics states that for any system there exists a function of the system extensive parameters, called entropy, defined for all equilibrium states and having the property that the values assumed by the extensive parameters in the absence of a constraint are those that maximize the entropy over the manifold of constrained equilibrium states. Based on the thermodynamic evolution of systems which (in the Boltzmann description) have positive and negative temperatures, we show that this postulate is satisfied by the Boltzmann formula for the entropy and may be violated by the Gibbs formula, therefore invalidating the later. Vice versa, if we assume, by reductio ad absurdum, that for some thermodynamic systems the equilibrium state is determined by the Gibbs' prescription and not by Boltzmann's, this implies that such systems have macroscopic fluctuations and therefore do not reach the thermodynamic equilibrium.

  10. The brightness temperature of Venus and the absolute flux-density scale at 608 MHz.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Berge, G. L.; Orton, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    The disk temperature of Venus was measured at 608 MHz near the inferior conjunction of 1972, and a value of 498 plus or minus 33 K was obtained using a nominal CKL flux-density scale. The result is consistent with earlier measurements, but has a much smaller uncertainty. Our theoretical model prediction is larger by a factor of 1.21 plus or minus 0.09. This discrepancy has been noticed previously for frequencies below 1400 MHz, but was generally disregarded because of the large observational uncertainties. No way could be found to change the model to produce agreement without causing a conflict with well-established properties of Venus. Thus it is suggested that the flux-density scale may require an upward revision, at least near this frequency, in excess of what has previously been considered likely.

  11. The brightness temperature of Venus and the absolute flux-density scale at 608 MHz.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Berge, G. L.; Orton, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    The disk temperature of Venus was measured at 608 MHz near the inferior conjunction of 1972, and a value of 498 plus or minus 33 K was obtained using a nominal CKL flux-density scale. The result is consistent with earlier measurements, but has a much smaller uncertainty. Our theoretical model prediction is larger by a factor of 1.21 plus or minus 0.09. This discrepancy has been noticed previously for frequencies below 1400 MHz, but was generally disregarded because of the large observational uncertainties. No way could be found to change the model to produce agreement without causing a conflict with well-established properties of Venus. Thus it is suggested that the flux-density scale may require an upward revision, at least near this frequency, in excess of what has previously been considered likely.

  12. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  13. Is the global mean temperature trend too low?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venema, Victor; Lindau, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    The global mean temperature trend may be biased due to similar technological and economic developments worldwide. In this study we want to present a number of recent results that suggest that the global mean temperature trend might be steeper as generally thought. In the Global Historical Climate Network version 3 (GHCNv3) the global land surface temperature is estimated to have increased by about 0.8°C between 1880 and 2012. In the raw temperature record, the increase is 0.6°C; the 0.2°C difference is due to homogenization adjustments. Given that homogenization can only reduce biases, this 0.2°C stems from a partial correction of bias errors and it seems likely that the real non-climatic trend bias will be larger. Especially in regions with sparser networks, homogenization will not be able to improve the trend much. Thus if the trend bias in these regions is similar to the bias for more dense networks (industrialized countries), one would expect the real bias to be larger. Stations in sparse networks are representative for a larger region and are given more weight in the computation of the global mean temperature. If all stations are given equal weight, the homogenization adjustments of the GHCNv3 dataset are about 0.4°C per century. In the subdaily HadISH dataset one break with mean size 0.12°C is found every 15 years for the period 1973-2013. That would be a trend bias of 0.78°C per century on a station by station basis. Unfortunately, these estimates strongly focus on Western countries having more stations. It is known from the literature that rich countries have a (statistically insignificant) stronger trend in the global datasets. Regional datasets can be better homogenized than global ones, the main reason being that global datasets do not contain all stations known to the weather services. Furthermore, global datasets use automatic homogenization methods and have less or no metadata. Thus while regional data can be biased themselves, comparing them

  14. Trends and associated uncertainty in the global mean temperature record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppick, A. N.; Moyer, E. J.; Stein, M.

    2016-12-01

    Physical models suggest that the Earth's mean temperature warms in response to changing CO2 concentrations (and hence increased radiative forcing); given physical uncertainties in this relationship, the historical temperature record is a source of empirical information about global warming. A persistent thread in many analyses of the historical temperature record, however, is the reliance on methods that appear to deemphasize both physical and statistical assumptions. Examples include regression models that treat time rather than radiative forcing as the relevant covariate, and time series methods that account for natural variability in nonparametric rather than parametric ways. We show here that methods that deemphasize assumptions can limit the scope of analysis and can lead to misleading inferences, particularly in the setting considered where the data record is relatively short and the scale of temporal correlation is relatively long. A proposed model that is simple but physically informed provides a more reliable estimate of trends and allows a broader array of questions to be addressed. In accounting for uncertainty, we also illustrate how parametric statistical models that are attuned to the important characteristics of natural variability can be more reliable than ostensibly more flexible approaches.

  15. [Physical meaning of temperature measured by spectral line intensity method].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-Hua; Tang, Huang-Zai; Shen, Yan; Shi, Yong; Hou, Ling-Yun

    2007-11-01

    The difference between electron temperature and excitation temperature is analyzed in the aspect of statistics thermodynamics. It is presented clearly that the temperature acquired by spectral line intensity method is not free electron temperature, but internal electronic excitation temperature of heavy particle. Under thermal equilibrium condition, the excitation temperature is equal to the electron temperature, while under non-thermal equilibrium condition, the excitation temperature is not equal to the electron temperature. In the study of arc jet plume in vacuum chamber, spectral line intensity method was employed to measure the apparent excitation temperature of arc jet plume, and Langmuir probe was employed to measure the electron temperature of arcjet plume. The big difference between the excitation temperature and the electron temperature proved that the temperature acquired by spectral line intensity method is not free electron temperature.

  16. Comprehensive modeling of monthly mean soil temperature using multivariate adaptive regression splines and support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdizadeh, Saeid; Behmanesh, Javad; Khalili, Keivan

    2017-07-01

    Soil temperature (T s) and its thermal regime are the most important factors in plant growth, biological activities, and water movement in soil. Due to scarcity of the T s data, estimation of soil temperature is an important issue in different fields of sciences. The main objective of the present study is to investigate the accuracy of multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) and support vector machine (SVM) methods for estimating the T s. For this aim, the monthly mean data of the T s (at depths of 5, 10, 50, and 100 cm) and meteorological parameters of 30 synoptic stations in Iran were utilized. To develop the MARS and SVM models, various combinations of minimum, maximum, and mean air temperatures (T min, T max, T); actual and maximum possible sunshine duration; sunshine duration ratio (n, N, n/N); actual, net, and extraterrestrial solar radiation data (R s, R n, R a); precipitation (P); relative humidity (RH); wind speed at 2 m height (u 2); and water vapor pressure (Vp) were used as input variables. Three error statistics including root-mean-square-error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE), and determination coefficient (R 2) were used to check the performance of MARS and SVM models. The results indicated that the MARS was superior to the SVM at different depths. In the test and validation phases, the most accurate estimations for the MARS were obtained at the depth of 10 cm for T max, T min, T inputs (RMSE = 0.71 °C, MAE = 0.54 °C, and R 2 = 0.995) and for RH, V p, P, and u 2 inputs (RMSE = 0.80 °C, MAE = 0.61 °C, and R 2 = 0.996), respectively.

  17. Differences between true mean temperatures and means calculated with four different approaches: a case study from three Croatian stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacci, Ognjen; Željković, Ivana

    2016-12-01

    Different countries use varied methods for daily mean temperature calculation. None of them assesses precisely the true daily mean temperature, which is defined as the integral of continuous temperature measurements in a day. Of special scientific as well as practical importance is to find out how temperatures calculated by different methods and approaches deviate from the true daily mean temperature. Five mean daily temperatures were calculated (T0, T1, T2, T3, T4) using five different equations. The mean of 24-h temperature observations during the calendar day is accepted to represent the true, daily mean T0. The differences Δi between T0 and four other mean daily temperatures T1, T2, T3, and T4 were calculated and analysed. In the paper, analyses were done with hourly data measured in a period from 1 January 1999 to 31 December 2014 (149,016 h, 192 months and 16 years) at three Croatian meteorological stations. The stations are situated in distinct climatological areas: Zagreb Grič in a mild climate, Zavižan in the cold mountain region and Dubrovnik in the hot Mediterranean. Influence of fog on the temperature is analysed. Special attention is given to analyses of extreme (maximum and minimum) daily differences occurred at three analysed stations. Selection of the fixed local hours, which is in use for calculation of mean daily temperature, plays a crucial role in diminishing of bias from the true daily temperature.

  18. Effects of Temperature, Relative Humidity, Absolute Humidity, and Evaporation Potential on Survival of Airborne Gumboro Vaccine Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Dijkman, Remco; Fabri, Teun; de Jong, Mart C. M.; Groot Koerkamp, Peter W. G.

    2012-01-01

    Survival of airborne virus influences the extent of disease transmission via air. How environmental factors affect viral survival is not fully understood. We investigated the survival of a vaccine strain of Gumboro virus which was aerosolized at three temperatures (10°C, 20°C, and 30°C) and two relative humidities (RHs) (40% and 70%). The response of viral survival to four metrics (temperature, RH, absolute humidity [AH], and evaporation potential [EP]) was examined. The results show a biphasic viral survival at 10°C and 20°C, i.e., a rapid initial inactivation in a short period (2.3 min) during and after aerosolization, followed by a slow secondary inactivation during a 20-min period after aerosolization. The initial decays of aerosolized virus at 10°C (1.68 to 3.03 ln % min−1) and 20°C (3.05 to 3.62 ln % min−1) were significantly lower than those at 30°C (5.67 to 5.96 ln % min−1). The secondary decays at 10°C (0.03 to 0.09 ln % min−1) tended to be higher than those at 20°C (−0.01 to 0.01 ln % min−1). The initial viral survival responded to temperature and RH and potentially to EP; the secondary viral survival responded to temperature and potentially to RH. In both phases, survival of the virus was not significantly affected by AH. These findings suggest that long-distance transmission of airborne virus is more likely to occur at 20°C than at 10°C or 30°C and that current Gumboro vaccination by wet aerosolization in poultry industry is not very effective due to the fast initial decay. PMID:22156417

  19. Estimating trends in the global mean temperature record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppick, Andrew; Moyer, Elisabeth J.; Stein, Michael L.

    2017-06-01

    Given uncertainties in physical theory and numerical climate simulations, the historical temperature record is often used as a source of empirical information about climate change. Many historical trend analyses appear to de-emphasize physical and statistical assumptions: examples include regression models that treat time rather than radiative forcing as the relevant covariate, and time series methods that account for internal variability in nonparametric rather than parametric ways. However, given a limited data record and the presence of internal variability, estimating radiatively forced temperature trends in the historical record necessarily requires some assumptions. Ostensibly empirical methods can also involve an inherent conflict in assumptions: they require data records that are short enough for naive trend models to be applicable, but long enough for long-timescale internal variability to be accounted for. In the context of global mean temperatures, empirical methods that appear to de-emphasize assumptions can therefore produce misleading inferences, because the trend over the twentieth century is complex and the scale of temporal correlation is long relative to the length of the data record. We illustrate here how a simple but physically motivated trend model can provide better-fitting and more broadly applicable trend estimates and can allow for a wider array of questions to be addressed. In particular, the model allows one to distinguish, within a single statistical framework, between uncertainties in the shorter-term vs. longer-term response to radiative forcing, with implications not only on historical trends but also on uncertainties in future projections. We also investigate the consequence on inferred uncertainties of the choice of a statistical description of internal variability. While nonparametric methods may seem to avoid making explicit assumptions, we demonstrate how even misspecified parametric statistical methods, if attuned to the

  20. CMOS temperature sensor using a resistively degenerated common-source amplifier biased by an adjustable proportional-to-absolute-temperature voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruey-Lue; Fu, Chien-Cheng; Yu, Chi; Hao, Yi-Fan; Shi, Jian-Liang; Lin, Chen-Fu; Liao, Hsin-Hao; Tsai, Hann-Huei; Juang, Ying-Zong

    2014-01-01

    A high-linearity CMOS temperature sensor with pulse output is presented. The temperature core is a resistively degenerated common-source amplifier which gate is biased by a proportional-to-absolute-temperature (PTAT) voltage generator. The source resistor is made of polysilicon which resistance has a PTAT characteristic. The current flowing through the resistor exhibits a PTAT characteristic with high linearity of 99.99% at least for a temperature range from 0 to 125 °C. The PTAT voltage generator can be adjusted by a bias voltage Vb and hence the PTAT current can also be adjusted by the Vb. The PTAT current is mirrored to an added current controlled oscillator which output pulse frequencies also exhibit a PTAT characteristic. For the chip using the 0.35 µm process, the plots of measured pulse frequencies against temperature exhibit the sensitivity of 2.30 to 2.24 kHz/°C with linearity of more than 99.99% at the Vb of 1 to 1.2 V.

  1. The implications of rebasing global mean temperature timeseries for GCM based climate projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stainforth, David; Chapman, Sandra; Watkins, Nicholas

    2017-04-01

    Global climate and earth system models are assessed by comparison with observations through a number of metrics. The InterGovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) highlights in particular their ability to reproduce "general features of the global and annual mean surface temperature changes over the historical period" [1,2] and to simulate "a trend in global-mean surface temperature from 1951 to 2012 that agrees with the observed trend" [3]. This focus on annual mean global mean temperature (hereafter GMT) change is presented as an important element in demonstrating the relevance of these models for climate projections. Any new model or new model version whose historic simulations fail to reproduce the "general features " and 20th century trends is likely therefore to undergo further tuning. Thus this focus could have implications for model development. Here we consider a formal interpretation of "general features" and discuss the implications of this approach to model assessment and intercomparison, for the interpretation of GCM projections. Following the IPCC, we interpret a major element of "general features" as being the slow timescale response to external forcings. (Shorter timescale behaviour such as the response to volcanic eruptions are also elements of "general features" but are not considered here.) Also following the IPCC, we consider only GMT anomalies i.e. changes with respect to some period. Since the models have absolute temperatures which range over about 3K (roughly observed GMT +/- 1.5K) this means their timeseries (and the observations) are rebased. We present timeseries of the slow timescale response of the CMIP5 models rebased to late-20th century temperatures and to mid-19th century temperatures. We provide a mathematical interpretation of this approach to model assessment and discuss two consequences. First is a separation of scales which limits the degree to which sub-global behaviour can feedback on the global response. Second, is an

  2. Thermometry, calorimetry, and mean body temperature during heat stress.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Glen P; Jay, Ollie

    2013-10-01

    Heat balance in humans is maintained at near constant levels through the adjustment of physiological mechanisms that attain a balance between the heat produced within the body and the heat lost to the environment. Heat balance is easily disturbed during changes in metabolic heat production due to physical activity and/or exposure to a warmer environment. Under such conditions, elevations of skin blood flow and sweating occur via a hypothalamic negative feedback loop to maintain an enhanced rate of dry and evaporative heat loss. Body heat storage and changes in core temperature are a direct result of a thermal imbalance between the rate of heat production and the rate of total heat dissipation to the surrounding environment. The derivation of the change in body heat content is of fundamental importance to the physiologist assessing the exposure of the human body to environmental conditions that result in thermal imbalance. It is generally accepted that the concurrent measurement of the total heat generated by the body and the total heat dissipated to the ambient environment is the most accurate means whereby the change in body heat content can be attained. However, in the absence of calorimetric methods, thermometry is often used to estimate the change in body heat content. This review examines heat exchange during challenges to heat balance associated with progressive elevations in environmental heat load and metabolic rate during exercise. Further, we evaluate the physiological responses associated with heat stress and discuss the thermal and nonthermal influences on the body's ability to dissipate heat from a heat balance perspective.

  3. What does global mean temperature tell us about local climate?

    PubMed

    Sutton, Rowan; Suckling, Emma; Hawkins, Ed

    2015-11-13

    The subject of climate feedbacks focuses attention on global mean surface air temperature (GMST) as the key metric of climate change. But what does knowledge of past and future GMST tell us about the climate of specific regions? In the context of the ongoing UNFCCC process, this is an important question for policy-makers as well as for scientists. The answer depends on many factors, including the mechanisms causing changes, the timescale of the changes, and the variables and regions of interest. This paper provides a review and analysis of the relationship between changes in GMST and changes in local climate, first in observational records and then in a range of climate model simulations, which are used to interpret the observations. The focus is on decadal timescales, which are of particular interest in relation to recent and near-future anthropogenic climate change. It is shown that GMST primarily provides information about forced responses, but that understanding and quantifying internal variability is essential to projecting climate and climate impacts on regional-to-local scales. The relationship between local forced responses and GMST is often linear but may be nonlinear, and can be greatly complicated by competition between different forcing factors. Climate projections are limited not only by uncertainties in the signal of climate change but also by uncertainties in the characteristics of real-world internal variability. Finally, it is shown that the relationship between GMST and local climate provides a simple approach to climate change detection, and a useful guide to attribution studies. © 2015 The Authors.

  4. What does global mean temperature tell us about local climate?

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Rowan; Suckling, Emma; Hawkins, Ed

    2015-01-01

    The subject of climate feedbacks focuses attention on global mean surface air temperature (GMST) as the key metric of climate change. But what does knowledge of past and future GMST tell us about the climate of specific regions? In the context of the ongoing UNFCCC process, this is an important question for policy-makers as well as for scientists. The answer depends on many factors, including the mechanisms causing changes, the timescale of the changes, and the variables and regions of interest. This paper provides a review and analysis of the relationship between changes in GMST and changes in local climate, first in observational records and then in a range of climate model simulations, which are used to interpret the observations. The focus is on decadal timescales, which are of particular interest in relation to recent and near-future anthropogenic climate change. It is shown that GMST primarily provides information about forced responses, but that understanding and quantifying internal variability is essential to projecting climate and climate impacts on regional-to-local scales. The relationship between local forced responses and GMST is often linear but may be nonlinear, and can be greatly complicated by competition between different forcing factors. Climate projections are limited not only by uncertainties in the signal of climate change but also by uncertainties in the characteristics of real-world internal variability. Finally, it is shown that the relationship between GMST and local climate provides a simple approach to climate change detection, and a useful guide to attribution studies. PMID:26438282

  5. Measuring absolute flux, radius and effective temperature of a benchmark T-Type free-floating planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, Philippe

    2014-03-01

    We propose to obtain a complete spectral energy distribution, from 0.6 to 4.5 micron of CFBDSIR2149-0403, a 4 to 7 Jupiter-mass free-floating planet which we recently identified in the young (< 120 Myr) AB Doradus moving group. This is matched by the youth signatures that we independently identified in the spectrum of this object. At this age, CFBDSIR2149 is a close match to the exoplanets that will be found by the direct imaging searches with extreme adaptive optics, but its being isolated rather than hidden in the glare of a very bright star makes observations much easier. We already determined a preliminary parallax distance of 58 +/-10pc, and additional measurements should soon improve this measurement. We also have at hand 10hours of VLT-Xhsooter data covering the 0.6 to 2.5 micron range with high-signal to noise data. With more than 90% of the energy flux of such a cool (~700K) object emitted between 0.6 and 5 micron, we only need 2 broad-band photometric data points from Spitzer channel 1 and 2 (covering 35 to 40% of the total flux) to nail-down a robust SED for this unique object, for less than 26 minutes total observing time. Together with its trigonometric distance, this will enable us to derive its absolute bolometric flux and hence model-independent measurements of its radius and effective temperature. With such a unique constraint on a directly imaged young planetary mass object CFBDSIR2149 will therefore become a much needed benchmark for extrasolar planets atmosphere models.

  6. The one-dimensional acoustic field in a duct with arbitrary mean axial temperature gradient and mean flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingxuan; Morgans, Aimee S.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents an analytical solution for the one-dimensional acoustic field in a duct with arbitrary mean temperature gradient and mean flow. A wave equation for the pressure perturbation is derived which relies on very few assumptions. An analytical solution for this is derived using an adapted WKB approximation. The solution is a superposition of waves travelling in either direction and thus provides physical insight. It is also very easy to calculate. The proposed solution is applied to ducts with a mean temperature profile which varies axially with (i) a linear and (ii) a partial sine wave profile: predictions are compared to those obtained by numerically solving the linearised Euler equations (LEEs). The analytical solution reproduces the acoustic field very accurately across a wide range of flow conditions which span both low and moderate-to-high subsonic Mach numbers. It always performs well when the frequency exceeds a certain value; when the mean temperature profile is linear, it also performs well to very low frequencies. This increased frequency range for linear mean temperature profiles leads to its application to more complicated profiles in a piecewise linear manner, axially segmenting the temperature profile into regions that can be approximated as linear. The acoustic field is predicted very accurately as long as enough segmentation points are used and the condition for the linear mean temperature profile is satisfied: |k0 | > | α | , where k0 is the local wave number when there is no mean flow and α is the normalised mean density gradient. The proposed solution is extensively compared to previous analytical solutions, and is found to be more accurate and reliable, especially at higher Mach numbers. The entropy wave generated by communication between the acoustic waves and the distributed mean temperature zone is calculated using the LEEs. It is found to remain very small across all operating conditions, such that both the entropy wave and

  7. Performance Demonstration of Miniature Phase Transition Cells in Microgravity as a Validation for their use in the Absolute Calibration of Temperature Sensors On-Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, C.; Adler, D. P.; Best, F. A.; Aguilar, D. M.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    The next generation of infrared remote sensing missions, including the climate benchmark missions, will require better absolute measurement accuracy than now available, and will most certainly rely on the emerging capability to fly SI traceable standards that provide irrefutable absolute measurement accuracy. As an example, instrumentation designed to measure spectrally resolved infrared radiances with an absolute brightness temperature error of better than 0.1 K will require high-emissivity (>0.999) calibration blackbodies requiring absolute temperature uncertainties of better than 0.045K (k=3). Key elements of an On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) meeting these stringent requirements have been demonstrated in the laboratory at the University of Wisconsin and are undergoing further refinement under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). In particular, the OARS has embedded thermistors that can be periodically calibrated on-orbit using the melt signatures of small quantities (<0.5g) of three reference materials - mercury, water, and gallium (providing calibration from 233K to 303K). One of the many tests to determine the readiness of this technology for on-orbit application is a demonstration of performance in microgravity. We present the details of a demonstration experiment to be conducted on the International Space Station later this year. The demonstration will use the configuration of the phase transition cells developed under our NASA IIP that has been tested extensively in the laboratory under simulated mission life cycle scenarios - these included vibration, thermal soaks, and deep cycling. The planned microgravity demonstration will compare melt signatures obtained pre-flight on the ground with those obtained on the ISS for three phase change materials (water, gallium-tin, and gallium). With a successful demonstration experiment the phase transition cells in a microgravity environment will have cleared the last hurdle before being ready for

  8. Use of the portable infrared thermometer as a means of measuring limb surface temperature in the horse

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    Evaluation was made of the portable infrared thermometer to measure limb surface temperature in 3 horses--first standing in a stall and then placed in lateral recumbency under general anesthesia. To determine the effect of pigment, black and white targets were examined with the instrument under various clinical conditions. In each horse, thermal gradient measurements were consistent along the extremities. Mean limb surface temperatures were less than rectal temperature and greater than ambient temperature. Limb surface temperatures measured in lateral recumbency under general anesthesia were uniformly higher than those obtained in the standing position in the stall. The average SD of absolute temperature measurements made under general anesthesia was +/- 0.1 C, whereas the average SD of those made in standing horses was +/- 0.2 C. For practical use, the latter deviation of +/- 0.2 C was considered more appropriate as the limit of significance for clinical measurements made with the instrument. When used indoors in the absence of direct sunlight, the influence of pigment on measurements made with the instrument was not significant. Optimal conditions for the clinical use of the portable infrared thermometer are defined and factors which affect limb surface temperature are discussed.

  9. Using Mean Absolute Relative Phase, Deviation Phase and Point-Estimation Relative Phase to Measure Postural Coordination in a Serial Reaching Task.

    PubMed

    Galgon, Anne K; Shewokis, Patricia A

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this communication are to present the methods used to calculate mean absolute relative phase (MARP), deviation phase (DP) and point estimate relative phase (PRP) and compare their utility in measuring postural coordination during the performance of a serial reaching task. MARP and DP are derived from continuous relative phase time series representing the relationship between two body segments or joints during movements. MARP is a single measure used to quantify the coordination pattern and DP measures the stability of the coordination pattern. PRP also quantifies coordination patterns by measuring the relationship between the timing of maximal or minimal angular displacements of two segments within cycles of movement. Seven young adults practiced a bilateral serial reaching task 300 times over 3 days. Relative phase measures were used to evaluate inter-joint relationships for shoulder-hip (proximal) and hip-ankle (distal) postural coordination at early and late learning. MARP, PRP and DP distinguished between proximal and distal postural coordination. There was no effect of practice on any of the relative phase measures for the group, but individual differences were seen over practice. Combined, MARP and DP estimated stability of in-phase and anti-phase postural coordination patterns, however additional qualitative movement analyses may be needed to interpret findings in a serial task. We discuss the strengths and limitations of using MARP and DP and compare MARP and DP to PRP measures in assessing coordination patterns in the context of various types of skillful tasks. Key pointsMARP, DP and PRP measures coordination between segments or joint anglesAdvantages and disadvantages of each measure should be considered in relationship to the performance taskMARP and DP may capture coordination patterns and stability of the patterns during discrete tasks or phases of movements within a taskPRP and SD or PRP may capture coordination patterns and

  10. Low Temperature Asymptotics of Spherical Mean Field Spin Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannath, Aukosh; Tobasco, Ian

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we study the low temperature limit of the spherical Crisanti-Sommers variational problem. We identify the {Γ}-limit of the Crisanti-Sommers functionals, thereby establishing a rigorous variational problem for the ground state energy of spherical mixed p-spin glasses. As an application, we compute moderate deviations of the corresponding minimizers in the low temperature limit. In particular, for a large class of models this yields moderate deviations for the overlap distribution as well as providing sharp interpolation estimates between models. We then analyze the ground state energy problem. We show that this variational problem is dual to an obstacle-type problem. This duality is at the heart of our analysis. We present the regularity theory of the optimizers of the primal and dual problems. This culminates in a simple method for constructing a finite dimensional space in which these optimizers live for any model. As a consequence of these results, we unify independent predictions of Crisanti-Leuzzi and Auffinger-Ben Arous regarding the one-step Replica Symmetry Breaking (1RSB) phase in this limit. We find that the "positive replicon eigenvalue" and "pure-like" conditions are together necessary for optimality, but that neither are themselves sufficient, answering a question of Auffinger and Ben Arous in the negative. We end by proving that these conditions completely characterize the 1RSB phase in 2 + p-spin models.

  11. Human conscious response to thermal input is adjusted to changes in mean body temperature.

    PubMed

    Flouris, A D; Cheung, S S

    2009-03-01

    To detect the dependable criteria of behavioural thermoregulation through modelling temperature fluctuations of individuals allowed to freely manipulate inlet water temperature of a liquid conditioning garment (LCG) during 130 min of passive exposure to -20 degrees C interspersed with a 10 min period of moderate exercise at the 65th minute using a double-blind experiment. Eleven volunteers (5 women; 23.40 (SD 2.09) years; BMI: 23.24 (SD 2.19)) who lacked previous experience with LCG and cold exposure experiments. Despite variations in core and skin temperatures, thermal comfort, thermal sensation, and mean body temperature did not fluctuate significantly over time. Participants were able to find a desired level of LCG inlet temperature within 25 minutes which was maintained at similar levels until the 65th minute of the cold exposure. During exercise, LCG inlet water temperature decreased significantly. Regression models demonstrated that mean skin temperature and change in mean body temperature were significantly associated with thermal comfort and thermal sensation. Subsequent models revealed that, although all temperature variables were associated with LCG inlet water temperature, the coefficient of determination mainly depended on mean skin temperature and change in mean body temperature. The involvement of skin temperature was anticipated as the liquid conditioning garment was in contact with the skin. Humans generate conscious thermoregulatory responses in resting and exercise conditions during exposures to cold environments that are aimed towards maintaining a threshold mean body temperature, rather than temperature changes in individual body regions.

  12. A Climatology of Monthly Mean Sea Surface Temperatures for the Gulf of Mexico,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    This report presents monthly mean sea surface temperatures for the Gulf of Mexico in one degree quadrangles. It also includes a short discussion of the temperature data and the ocean currents in the Gulf of Mexico .

  13. Relationship between global mean sea-level and global mean temperature in a climate simulation of the past millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storch, Hans Von; Zorita, Eduardo; González-Rouco, Jesús F.

    2008-11-01

    The possibility of using global mean near-surface temperature, its rate of change or the global mean ocean heat-flux as predictors to statistically estimate the change of global mean sea-level is explored in the context of a long climate simulation of the past millennium with the climate model ECHO-G. Such relationships have recently been proposed to by-pass the difficulty of estimating future sea-level changes based on simulations with coarse-resolution climate models. It is found that, in this simulation, a simple linear relationship between mean temperature and the rate of change of sea level does not exist. A regression parameter linking both variables, and estimated in sliding 120-year windows, varies widely along the simulation and, in some periods, even attains negative values. The ocean heat-flux and the rate-of-change of mean temperature seem to better capture the rate-of-change of sea level due to thermal expansion.

  14. Absolute Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, George

    1990-12-01

    The absolute sensitivity of the FOS will be determined in SV by observing 2 stars at 3 epochs, first in 3 apertures (1.0", 0.5", and 0.3" circular) and then in 1 aperture (1.0" circular). In cycle 1, one star, BD+28D4211 will be observed in the 1.0" aperture to establish the stability of the sensitivity and flat field characteristics and improve the accuracy obtained in SV. This star will also be observed through the paired apertures since these are not calibrated in SV. The stars will be observed in most detector/grating combinations. The data will be averaged to form the inverse sensitivity functions required by RSDP.

  15. The Effect of Bias in Divisional and State Mean Temperatures on Weather-Crop Yield Model Predictions: A Case Study in Indiana.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, R. F.; Nelson, Wm. L.; McGarrahan, J. P.

    1983-11-01

    Historical series of mean temperatures for climatological divisions and the state of Indiana contain systematic biases, the greatest being about 1.0°C in the Central Division in the 1940s. When these data are used in weather-management, crop-yield models they translate into biases in yield simulation and prediction The magnitude and distribution of the yield prediction bias depends on the mean temperature bias and the type of model. The effect of the mean temperature bias on corn (Zea mays L.) yield production was examined for two models: in the first, the historical climatological series was used to fit the regression coefficients, and in the second, a priori regression coefficients were used. For each of the two models, yield simulations and predictions were made with both the original published mean temperature and with those adjusted to the climatological network base for 1976. In the fiat model, the regression-fitting process averaged the effect of the temperature bias over the entire record. The estimates of corn yield trends attributed to management were slightly greater when the adjusted temperature were used in the regression model than when the published temperatures were used. The use of the adjusted temperatures resulted in slightly higher yield predictions but the differences were generally less than 5% of the mean absolute difference between the model predictions and the yields reported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Statistical Reporting Service. In the second model, the temperature bias was translated directly into the yield simulation, which with adjusted temperature averaged 113 kg ha1 higher than that stimulated with the original temperature date in the 1950s and 1960s. Although the yield production and simulation errors caused by the mean temperature bias is nontrivial, the temperature bias contributed a relatively small part of the total variance in the yield modeling.

  16. An Adjustment for the Effects of Observation Time on Mean Temperature and Degree-Day Computations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Gregory P.

    1985-08-01

    Biases in mean temperatures due to differing times of daily maximum and minimum temperature observation cause problems in evaluation of temporal and spatial anomalies in temperature and derived degree day values. These biases were examined using six years (1973-78) of digitized hourly temperature data taken at Oneonta, New York. An annual mean temperature difference of 2.5°F is noted between means computed with the 0600 LST and 1500 IST observation times, with individual monthly differences as high as 4.4°F. Maximum seasonal degree day biases were 743 heating degree days (HDD) (10.2%), 169 cooling degree days (CDD) (43.3%), and 299 growing degree days (GDD) (14.3%).A modified version of the Blackburn method for adjusting mean temperature data for observation time bias is presented. The modified method involves adjusting data to a `true' mean obtained by averaging all hourly temperature values for the 24-hour period ending at midnight, rather than adjusting to the midnight standard observational mean obtained by averaging the maximum and minimum values over the same period. The adjustments are applied to mean temperatures from stations with different observation times in the region around Oneonta, resulting in spatial analysis fields which are believed to be more representative than those using the published data. This suggests that application of such an adjustment scheme results in a more homogeneous climatological data set.

  17. Interaction of Mean Temperature and Daily Fluctuation Influences Dengue Incidence in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Sifat; Glass, Kathryn; Viennet, Elvina; Harley, David

    2015-01-01

    Local weather influences the transmission of the dengue virus. Most studies analyzing the relationship between dengue and climate are based on relatively coarse aggregate measures such as mean temperature. Here, we include both mean temperature and daily fluctuations in temperature in modelling dengue transmission in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. We used a negative binomial generalized linear model, adjusted for rainfall, anomalies in sea surface temperature (an index for El Niño-Southern Oscillation), population density, the number of dengue cases in the previous month, and the long term temporal trend in dengue incidence. In addition to the significant associations of mean temperature and temperature fluctuation with dengue incidence, we found interaction of mean and temperature fluctuation significantly influences disease transmission at a lag of one month. High mean temperature with low fluctuation increases dengue incidence one month later. Besides temperature, dengue incidence was also influenced by sea surface temperature anomalies in the current and previous month, presumably as a consequence of concomitant anomalies in the annual rainfall cycle. Population density exerted a significant positive influence on dengue incidence indicating increasing risk of dengue in over-populated Dhaka. Understanding these complex relationships between climate, population, and dengue incidence will help inform outbreak prediction and control.

  18. Interaction of Mean Temperature and Daily Fluctuation Influences Dengue Incidence in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Sharmin, Sifat; Glass, Kathryn; Viennet, Elvina; Harley, David

    2015-01-01

    Local weather influences the transmission of the dengue virus. Most studies analyzing the relationship between dengue and climate are based on relatively coarse aggregate measures such as mean temperature. Here, we include both mean temperature and daily fluctuations in temperature in modelling dengue transmission in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. We used a negative binomial generalized linear model, adjusted for rainfall, anomalies in sea surface temperature (an index for El Niño-Southern Oscillation), population density, the number of dengue cases in the previous month, and the long term temporal trend in dengue incidence. In addition to the significant associations of mean temperature and temperature fluctuation with dengue incidence, we found interaction of mean and temperature fluctuation significantly influences disease transmission at a lag of one month. High mean temperature with low fluctuation increases dengue incidence one month later. Besides temperature, dengue incidence was also influenced by sea surface temperature anomalies in the current and previous month, presumably as a consequence of concomitant anomalies in the annual rainfall cycle. Population density exerted a significant positive influence on dengue incidence indicating increasing risk of dengue in over-populated Dhaka. Understanding these complex relationships between climate, population, and dengue incidence will help inform outbreak prediction and control. PMID:26161895

  19. Absolute and relative blindsight.

    PubMed

    Balsdon, Tarryn; Azzopardi, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The concept of relative blindsight, referring to a difference in conscious awareness between conditions otherwise matched for performance, was introduced by Lau and Passingham (2006) as a way of identifying the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) in fMRI experiments. By analogy, absolute blindsight refers to a difference between performance and awareness regardless of whether it is possible to match performance across conditions. Here, we address the question of whether relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers can be accounted for by response bias. In our replication of Lau and Passingham's experiment, the relative blindsight effect was abolished when performance was assessed by means of a bias-free 2AFC task or when the criterion for awareness was varied. Furthermore, there was no evidence of either relative or absolute blindsight when both performance and awareness were assessed with bias-free measures derived from confidence ratings using signal detection theory. This suggests that both relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers amount to no more than variations in response bias in the assessment of performance and awareness. Consideration of the properties of psychometric functions reveals a number of ways in which relative and absolute blindsight could arise trivially and elucidates a basis for the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 blindsight.

  20. A method for evaluating the mean preheat temperature in X-ray driven ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liling; Li, Hang; Zhang, Lu; Dong, Yunsong; Zhang, Chen; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Jiyan; Kuang, Longyu; Jing, Longfei; Lin, Zhiwei; Yang, Jiamin; Jiang, Shaoen

    2015-03-15

    A novel method is proposed for evaluating the mean preheat temperature in X-ray driven ablation, based on the equation of state (EOS) of the ablator and the radiation hydrodynamic simulation. The equation of state of plastic (CH) has been discussed in detail. There are two types of planar CH in simulations, with the thick target being 10 μm thicker than the thin target. The difference between the transmission fluxes of the two types of targets can represent the energy absorbed by the last 10 μm of the thick target (or the preheated layer). This energy approximates the internal energy of the preheated layer. The mean preheat temperature of the preheated layer has also been obtained from simulations. The simulation results show that the relationship between the absorbed energy and the mean preheat temperature is similar to the EOS of CH for different conditions (e.g., different values of M-band fraction and radiation temperature) and can be written as ε=2.530×10{sup 11}T{sup ¯1.444} when the mean preheat temperature is below 12 eV. For these cases, the relationship between the surface preheat temperature T{sub S} and the mean preheat temperature T{sup ¯} was T{sub S}=0.63T{sup ¯}. This relation provides the means for demonstrating the proposed method, because the transmission fluxes and the surface preheat temperature T{sub S} can be measured experimentally.

  1. Two-photon LIF on the HIT-SI3 experiment: Absolute density and temperature measurements of deuterium neutrals

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Drew Siddiqui, Umair; Scime, Earl; Sutherland, Derek; Everson, Chris; Morgan, Kyle; Hossack, Aaron; Nelson, Brian; Jarboe, Tom

    2016-11-15

    Two-photon laser-induced fluorescence measurements were performed on the helicity injected torus (HIT-SI3) device to determine the density and temperature of the background neutral deuterium population. Measurements were taken in 2 ms long pulsed plasmas after the inductive helicity injectors were turned off. Attempts to measure neutrals during the main phase of the plasma were unsuccessful, likely due to the density of neutrals being below the detection threshold of the diagnostic. An unexpectedly low density of atomic deuterium was measured in the afterglow; roughly 100 times lower than the theoretical prediction of 10{sup 17} m{sup −3}. The neutral temperatures measured were on the order of 1 eV. Temporally and spatially resolved neutral density and temperature data are presented.

  2. Absolute dose measurements by means of a small cylindrical ionization chamber for very high dose per pulse high energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Karaj, E.; Righi, S.; Di Martino, F.

    2007-03-15

    Very high dose per pulse (3-13 cGy/pulse) high energy electron beams are currently produced by special linear accelerators (linac) dedicated to Intra Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT). The electron beams produced by such linacs are collimated by special Perspex applicators of various size and cylindrically shaped. The biggest problems from the dosimetric point of view are caused by the high dose-per-pulse values and the use of inclined applicators. In this work measurements of absolute dose for the inclined applicators were done by using a small cylindrical ionization chamber, type CC01 (Wellhofer), a parallel plane ionization chamber type Markus (PTW 23343) and radiochromic films type EBT. We show a method which allows calculating the quality correction factors for CC01 chamber with an uncertainty of 1% and the absolute dose value for the inclined applicators using CC01 with an uncertainty of 3.1% for electron beams of energy of 6 and 7 MeV produced by the linac dedicated to IORT Novac7.

  3. An evaluation of monthly mean MSU and ECMWF global atmospheric temperatures for monitoring climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurrell, James W.; Trenberth, Kevin E.

    1992-01-01

    The usefulness of global satellite sounding data for monitoring climate was assessed by comparing monthly mean brightness temperature anomalies derived from channel 2 of the microwave sounding units (MSUs) on board NOAA satellites over the past decade with both weighted and pressure-level ECMWF monthly mean temperatures for 96 months from 1982 to 1989. Results show that very good agreement exists between the MSU and the weighted ECMWF temperatures over the period considered, with grid-point correlations exceeding 0.85. Comparisons with individual pressure-level temperatures from ECMWF showed high correlations at 300 mb over most of the globe.

  4. An evaluation of monthly mean MSU and ECMWF global atmospheric temperatures for monitoring climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurrell, James W.; Trenberth, Kevin E.

    1992-01-01

    The usefulness of global satellite sounding data for monitoring climate was assessed by comparing monthly mean brightness temperature anomalies derived from channel 2 of the microwave sounding units (MSUs) on board NOAA satellites over the past decade with both weighted and pressure-level ECMWF monthly mean temperatures for 96 months from 1982 to 1989. Results show that very good agreement exists between the MSU and the weighted ECMWF temperatures over the period considered, with grid-point correlations exceeding 0.85. Comparisons with individual pressure-level temperatures from ECMWF showed high correlations at 300 mb over most of the globe.

  5. Mean state densities, temperatures and winds during the MAC/SINE and MAC/EPSILON campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebken, F.-J.; Von Zahn, U.; Manson, A.; Meek, C.; Hoppe, U.-P.; Schmidlin, F. J.

    1990-01-01

    Two field campaigns were conducted, primarily in northern Norway, in the summer and late autumn of 1987; these yielded a total of 41 in situ temperature profiles and 67 in situ wind profiles. Simultaneously, ground-based measurements were conducted of OH temperatures and sodium lidar temperatures for 85 and 104 hours, respectively. The summer campaign's mean temperature profile exhibited major deviations from the CIRA (1986) reference atmosphere; the differences between this model and the observations are less pronounced in the autumn. Both the summer and autumn mean wind profiles were in general agreement with the CIRA model.

  6. Soil and air temperatures for different habitats in Mount Rainier National Park.

    Treesearch

    Sarah E. Greene; Mark. Klopsch

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports air and soil temperature data from 10 sites in Mount Rainier National Park in Washington State for 2- to 5-year periods. Data provided are monthly summaries for day and night mean air temperatures, mean minimum and maximum air temperatures, absolute minimum and maximum air temperatures, range of air temperatures, mean soil temperature, and absolute...

  7. Hot of Not: Physiological versus Meteorological Heatwaves—Support for a Mean Temperature Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Luther, Matt; Gardiner, Fergus W.; Hansen, Claire; Caldicott, David

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a revised heat warning threshold provides an enhanced predictive tool for increases in Emergency Department heat-related presentations in Canberra, Australia. All Emergency Department triage records containing the word “heat”, as well as those diagnosing a heat related illness for the summer periods 2013/2014, 2014/2015, and 2015/2016 were searched. Then a medical record review was conducted to confirm that the patient’s presentation was related to environmental heat, which was defined by the final clinical diagnosis, presentation complaint and details of the patient’s treatment. Researchers then compared this presentation data, to a mean threshold formula. The mean threshold formula included the past three consecutive daily mean temperatures and the last measured temperature upon presentation. This formula was designed to take into account the variance of night-time lows, with concurrent daily ambient temperatures, and was used to determine whether there was a correlation between heat-related presentations and increasing mean temperatures. Heat-related presentations appeared to occur when the mean threshold temperature reached 25 °C (77 °F), with significant increases when the mean threshold reached 30 °C (86 °F). These results confirm that a mean temperature of 30 °C corresponds to a relevant local public health heat-related threat. PMID:27472348

  8. Hot of Not: Physiological versus Meteorological Heatwaves-Support for a Mean Temperature Threshold.

    PubMed

    Luther, Matt; Gardiner, Fergus W; Hansen, Claire; Caldicott, David

    2016-07-26

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a revised heat warning threshold provides an enhanced predictive tool for increases in Emergency Department heat-related presentations in Canberra, Australia. All Emergency Department triage records containing the word "heat", as well as those diagnosing a heat related illness for the summer periods 2013/2014, 2014/2015, and 2015/2016 were searched. Then a medical record review was conducted to confirm that the patient's presentation was related to environmental heat, which was defined by the final clinical diagnosis, presentation complaint and details of the patient's treatment. Researchers then compared this presentation data, to a mean threshold formula. The mean threshold formula included the past three consecutive daily mean temperatures and the last measured temperature upon presentation. This formula was designed to take into account the variance of night-time lows, with concurrent daily ambient temperatures, and was used to determine whether there was a correlation between heat-related presentations and increasing mean temperatures. Heat-related presentations appeared to occur when the mean threshold temperature reached 25 °C (77 °F), with significant increases when the mean threshold reached 30 °C (86 °F). These results confirm that a mean temperature of 30 °C corresponds to a relevant local public health heat-related threat.

  9. Measurement of absolute transition frequencies of {sup 87}Rb to nS and nD Rydberg states by means of electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Markus; Karlewski, Florian; Hattermann, Helge; Hoeckh, Simone; Jessen, Florian; Cano, Daniel; Fortagh, Jozsef

    2011-05-15

    We report the measurement of absolute excitation frequencies of {sup 87}Rb to nS and nD Rydberg states. The Rydberg transition frequencies are obtained by observing electromagnetically induced transparency on a rubidium vapor cell. The accuracy of the measurement of each state is < or approx. 1 MHz, which is achieved by frequency stabilizing the two diode lasers employed for the spectroscopy to a frequency comb and a frequency comb calibrated wavelength meter, respectively. Based on the spectroscopic data we determine the quantum defects of {sup 87}Rb, and compare it with previous measurements on {sup 85}Rb. We determine the ionization frequency from the 5S{sub 1/2}(F=1) ground state of {sup 87}Rb to 1010.029 164 6(3)THz, providing the binding energy of the ground state with an accuracy improved by two orders of magnitude.

  10. Absolute rate determinations and temperature dependences of the gas-phase reactions of O( 3P) with halogenated propenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cometto, Pablo M.; Teruel, Mariano A.; Taccone, Raúl A.; Lane, Silvia I.

    2006-01-01

    The rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of ground state oxygen atoms with CF 3CH dbnd CH 2 (1), CF 3CF dbnd CF 2 (2) and CF 3CCl dbnd CCl 2 (3) have been measured directly using a discharge flow tube employing the O( 3P) chemiluminescence titration method. The experiments were carried out under pseudo-first-order conditions with [O( 3P)] 0 ≪ [propene] 0. The temperature dependences of the reactions were studied for the first time in the range 298-363 K. The Arrhenius expressions obtained (in units of cm 3 molecule -1 s -1) were: k1 = (0.28 ± 0.09) × 10 -11 exp[-(10.4 ± 0.9) × 10 3/ RT], k2 = (1.57 ± 0.72) × 10 -11 exp[-(15.6 ± 1.3) × 10 3/ RT], k3 = (2.23 ± 1.27) × 10 -11 exp[-(16.0 ± 1.6) × 10 3/ RT]. All the rate coefficients display a positive temperature dependence which points to the importance of the irreversibility of the addition mechanism for these reactions. Halogen substitution in the alkenes is discussed in terms of reactivity with O( 3P) and its relation with the ionization potential.

  11. An improved estimation of mean body temperature using combined direct calorimetry and thermometry.

    PubMed

    Snellen, J W

    2000-06-01

    The conventional method used to estimate the change in mean body temperature (dMBT) is by taking X% of a body core temperature and (1-X)% of weighted mean skin temperature, the value of X being dependent upon ambient temperature. This technique is used widely, despite opposition from calorimetrists. In the present paper we attempt to provide a better method. Minute-by-minute changes in dMBT, as assessed using calorimetry, and 21 (20 if esophageal temperature was unavailable) various regional temperatures (dRBTs), as assessed using thermometry, including 6 subcutaneous measures, were collected from 7 young male adults at 6 calorimeter temperatures. Since a calorimeter measures only changes in heat storage, which can be converted to dMBT, all body temperatures are expressed as changes from the reasonably constant pre-exposure temperatures. The following three aspects were investigated. (1) The prediction of dMBT from the 21 (or 20) dRBTs with multi-linear regression analysis (MLR). This yields two results, model A with rectal temperature (dTre) alone, and model B with dTre and esophageal temperature (dTes). (2) The prediction of dMBT from dTre with or without dTes and 13 skin surface temperatures combined to one weighted mean skin temperature (dTsk), using MLR. This results in models C and D. Six more models (E-J) were added, representing the above two sets in various combinations with four factors. (3) The conventional method calculated with four values for X. Model A predicted better than 0.3 degree C in 70% of the cases. Model I was the best amongst the models with 13 weighted skin temperatures (better than 0.3 degree C in 60% of the cases). The conventional method was erratic.

  12. Estimation of daily mean air temperature from satellite derived radiometric data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, D.

    1976-01-01

    The Screwworm Eradication Data System (SEDS) at JSC utilizes satellite derived estimates of daily mean air temperature (DMAT) to monitor the effect of temperature on screwworm populations. The performance of the SEDS screwworm growth potential predictions depends in large part upon the accuracy of the DMAT estimates.

  13. Measurement of mean skin temperature of clothed persons in cool environments.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, R; Nielsen, B

    1984-01-01

    The precision with which mean skin temperature could be estimated from some few points on clothed persons in a cool environment was studied. The skin temperature data were obtained from experiments on 10 clothed persons who were resting and working at an environmental temperature of 10 degrees C. With these data, eleven calculation formulas in current use were compared to a "reference mean skin temperature" based on a weighting formula involving 13 local skin temperatures. It was concluded that no formula including less than seven points gave a reasonably accurate mean skin temperature in this cool environment. In addition, a stepwise correlation analysis involving linear regression was performed on the data. This gave 12 new calculation formulas, which were evaluated for accuracy in estimating mean skin temperature. Among these, a weighting formula involving only four local skin temperatures was selected to be recommended for use in field investigations: Tsk = 9.429 + 0.137 X Tforehead + 0.102 X Thand + 0.290 X Tlower back + 0.173 X Tlower leg.

  14. Analysis of weighted mean temperature of Algeria for GNSS water vapor sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, DongSeob; Boutiouta, Seddik

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric water vapour is important for the climate system and a key to understand the hydrological cycle. The hydrological cycle describes the transfer of water in solid, liquid and gaseous form through these phases as well as the physical movement of water within the ecosystem of the earth and between its atmospheres; oceans and continents. Nowadays the accuracy of water vapour estimates based on GNSS observations is comparable to radiosonde and radiometer data. On the other hand, the solution of GNSS precipitable water vapour can be quantified the radiosonde humidity errors and biases with the role of radiosonde observations in the climate studies. The weighted mean temperature in troposphere is a critical parameter in the conversion of wet zenith delay to perceptible water vapour in GNSS Meteorology. In the retrieval of integrated water vapour from GNSS zenith wet delay, effect of temperature is to be taken into account. However, effect of temperature and water vapour partial pressure are interrelated. Therefore, the vertical profiles of temperature are taken into account through a term called weighted mean temperature. In this study, we processed the radiosonde data which are provided by World Meteorological Observation network and surface temperature data at 5 stations in Algeria from 2006 to 2007 to determine weighted mean temperature equation. The coefficients a and b are of weighted mean temperature linear equation were determined by a least square regression method of the 4,944 data pairs after outlier data, which are over 3σ of differences between mean temperature in troposphere and surface temperature, were eliminated. Finally, we determined the Algerian weighted mean temperature model (AWMTM) that the relationship between mean temperature as function of surface temperature for the entire Algerian area, with the RMSE and the correlation coefficient of AWMTM are represented about 6.80 K and 0.75, respectively. The stations which are located in desert

  15. Absolute rate of the reaction of O/3-P/ with hydrogen sulfide over the temperature range 263 to 495 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whytock, D. A.; Timmons, R. B.; Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    The technique of flash photolysis coupled with time resolved detection of O via resonance fluorescence has been used to obtain rate constants for the reaction of O(3-P) with H2S at temperatures from 263 to 495 K and at pressures in the range 10-400 torr. Under conditions where secondary reactions are avoided, the measured rate constants for the primary step obey the Arrhenius equation k = (7.24 plus or minus 1.07) x 10 to the -12th exp(-3300 plus or minus 100/1.987 T) cu cm/molecules/s. Experiments with D2S show that the reaction exhibits a primary isotope effect, in support of a hydrogen abstraction mechanism.

  16. Meaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    The second world to be considered concerns Meaning. In contrast to Reality and Play, this world relates to the people, disciplines, and domains that are focused on creating a certain value. For example, if this value is about providing students knowledge about physics, it involves teachers, the learning sciences, and the domains education and physics. This level goes into the aspects and criteria that designers need to take into account from this perspective. The first aspect seems obvious when we talk of “games with a serious purpose.” They have a purpose and this needs to be elaborated on, for example in terms of what “learning objectives” it attempts to achieve. The subsequent aspect is not about what is being pursued but how. To attain a value, designers have to think about a strategy that they employ. In my case this concerned looking at the learning paradigms that have come into existence in the past century and see what they have to tell us about learning. This way, their principles can be translated into a game environment. This translation involves making the strategy concrete. Or, in other words, operationalizing the plan. This is the third aspect. In this level, I will further specifically explain how I derived requirements from each of the learning paradigms, like reflection and exploration, and how they can possibly be related to games. The fourth and final aspect is the context in which the game is going to be used. It matters who uses the game and when, where, and how the game is going to be used. When designers have looked at these aspects, they have developed a “value proposal” and the worth of it may be judged by criteria, like motivation, relevance, and transfer. But before I get to this, I first go into how we human beings are meaning creators and what role assumptions, knowledge, and ambiguity have in this. I will illustrate this with some silly jokes about doctors and Mickey Mouse, and with an illusion.

  17. Zero-Temperature, Mean-Field Theory of Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensates

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Mark; Dodd, R. J.; Clark, Charles W.; Burnett, K.

    1996-01-01

    We review the application of zero-temperature, mean-field theory to current experimental atomic Bose-Einstein condensates. We assess the validity of the approximations made by comparing the mean-field results with a variety of experimental data. PMID:27805108

  18. Sampling biases in datasets of historical mean air temperature over land.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaicun

    2014-04-10

    Global mean surface air temperature (Ta) has been reported to have risen by 0.74°C over the last 100 years. However, the definition of mean Ta is still a subject of debate. The most defensible definition might be the integral of the continuous temperature measurements over a day (Td0). However, for technological and historical reasons, mean Ta over land have been taken to be the average of the daily maximum and minimum temperature measurements (Td1). All existing principal global temperature analyses over land rely heavily on Td1. Here, I make a first quantitative assessment of the bias in the use of Td1 to estimate trends of mean Ta using hourly Ta observations at 5600 globally distributed weather stations from the 1970s to 2013. I find that the use of Td1 has a negligible impact on the global mean warming rate. However, the trend of Td1 has a substantial bias at regional and local scales, with a root mean square error of over 25% at 5° × 5° grids. Therefore, caution should be taken when using mean Ta datasets based on Td1 to examine high resolution details of warming trends.

  19. Sampling Biases in Datasets of Historical Mean Air Temperature over Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kaicun

    2014-04-01

    Global mean surface air temperature (Ta) has been reported to have risen by 0.74°C over the last 100 years. However, the definition of mean Ta is still a subject of debate. The most defensible definition might be the integral of the continuous temperature measurements over a day (Td0). However, for technological and historical reasons, mean Ta over land have been taken to be the average of the daily maximum and minimum temperature measurements (Td1). All existing principal global temperature analyses over land rely heavily on Td1. Here, I make a first quantitative assessment of the bias in the use of Td1 to estimate trends of mean Ta using hourly Ta observations at 5600 globally distributed weather stations from the 1970s to 2013. I find that the use of Td1 has a negligible impact on the global mean warming rate. However, the trend of Td1 has a substantial bias at regional and local scales, with a root mean square error of over 25% at 5° × 5° grids. Therefore, caution should be taken when using mean Ta datasets based on Td1 to examine high resolution details of warming trends.

  20. A review of progress towards understanding the transient global mean surface temperature response to radiative perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimori, Masakazu; Watanabe, Masahiro; Shiogama, Hideo; Oka, Akira; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Ohgaito, Rumi; Kamae, Youichi

    2016-12-01

    The correct understanding of the transient response to external radiative perturbation is important for the interpretation of observed climate change, the prediction of near-future climate change, and committed warming under climate stabilization scenarios, as well as the estimation of equilibrium climate sensitivity based on observation data. It has been known for some time that the radiative damping rate per unit of global mean surface temperature increase varies with time, and this inconstancy affects the transient response. Knowledge of the equilibrium response alone is insufficient, but understanding the transient response of the global mean surface temperature has made rapid progress. The recent progress accompanies the relatively new concept of the efficacies of ocean heat uptake and forcing. The ocean heat uptake efficacy associates the temperature response induced by ocean heat uptake with equilibrium temperature response, and the efficacy of forcing compares the temperature response caused by non-CO2 forcing with that by CO2 forcing.

  1. A comparison of GCM-simulated and observed mean January and July surface air temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willmott, Cort J.; Legates, David R.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of a comparison of four present-day GCM simulations (GFDL, OSU, GISS, and UKMO) of high-resolution surface air temperature climatology, with both January and July scenarios being evaluated for each GCM. Results indicate that the surface air temperature simulations are significantly affected by model representations of the topography, sea level pressure, and precipitation, with the other factors being the inclusion of the diurnal cycle and the type of ocean model. The GISS and UKMO GCMs were found to simulate well the mean January and July surface air temperatures, whereas the OSU GCM overestimated and the GFDL GCM underestimated the temperatures.

  2. New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate absolute thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Abadlia, L; Gasser, F; Khalouk, K; Mayoufi, M; Gasser, J G

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the absolute thermoelectric power, also called absolute thermopower or absolute Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the absolute thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in this paper. We measure the absolute thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very high temperatures. But resistivity and absolute thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while absolute thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.

  3. New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate absolute thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: Application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadlia, L.; Gasser, F.; Khalouk, K.; Mayoufi, M.; Gasser, J. G.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the absolute thermoelectric power, also called absolute thermopower or absolute Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the absolute thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in this paper. We measure the absolute thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very high temperatures. But resistivity and absolute thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while absolute thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.

  4. New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate absolute thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: Application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Abadlia, L.; Mayoufi, M.; Gasser, F.; Khalouk, K.; Gasser, J. G.

    2014-09-15

    In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the absolute thermoelectric power, also called absolute thermopower or absolute Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the absolute thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in this paper. We measure the absolute thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very high temperatures. But resistivity and absolute thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while absolute thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.

  5. Temperature and vegetation effects on soil organic carbon quality along a forested mean annual temperature gradient in North America

    Treesearch

    Cinzia Fissore; Christian P. Giardina; Randall K. Kolka; Carl C. Trettin; Gary M. King; Martin F. Jurgensen; Christopher D. Barton; S. Douglas McDowell

    2008-01-01

    Both climate and plant species are hypothesized to influence soil organic carbon (SOC) quality, but accurate prediction of how SOC process rates respond to global change will require an improved understanding of how SOC quality varies with mean annual temperature (MAT) and forest type. We investigated SOC quality in paired hardwood and pine stands growing in coarse...

  6. Examination of the Armagh Observatory Annual Mean Temperature Record, 1844-2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2006-01-01

    The long-term annual mean temperature record (1844-2004) of the Armagh Observatory (Armagh, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom) is examined for evidence of systematic variation, in particular, as related to solar/geomagnetic forcing and secular variation. Indeed, both are apparent in the temperature record. Moving averages for 10 years of temperature are found to highly correlate against both 10-year moving averages of the aa-geomagnetic index and sunspot number, having correlation coefficients of approx. 0.7, inferring that nearly half the variance in the 10-year moving average of temperature can be explained by solar/geomagnetic forcing. The residuals appear episodic in nature, with cooling seen in the 1880s and again near 1980. Seven of the last 10 years of the temperature record has exceeded 10 C, unprecedented in the overall record. Variation of sunspot cyclic averages and 2-cycle moving averages of temperature strongly associate with similar averages for the solar/geomagnetic cycle, with the residuals displaying an apparent 9-cycle variation and a steep rise in temperature associated with cycle 23. Hale cycle averages of temperature for even-odd pairs of sunspot cycles correlate against similar averages for the solar/geomagnetic cycle and, especially, against the length of the Hale cycle. Indications are that annual mean temperature will likely exceed 10 C over the next decade.

  7. Scaling analysis of the mean and variariance of temperature in a developing thermal boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, Clayton; Hultmark, Marcus

    2016-11-01

    A developing thermal boundary layer in a turbulent boundary layer is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. A scaling analysis of the mean temperature field and temperature variance, 1/2 θ2 , is developed by utilizing the "Asymptotic Invariance Principle" developed by George and Castillo (1997), including the possible effects of the Reynolds and Prandtl number. The derived solution for the inner and outer scaling is then used to develop a "heat transfer law" for the wall heat flux, qw. The condition of constant wall temperature is utilized, with an analysis of the temperature field treated as a passive scalar through ensuring the temperature differences remain small. Data collection is performed with a nanoscale temperature sensor, providing an improvement to performance over previous cold wire data acquisition. Supported by NSF (CBET-1510100 program manager Dimitrios Papavassiliou) and ONR (N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  8. Mean body temperature does not modulate eccrine sweat rate during upright tilt.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Thad E; Cui, Jian; Crandall, Craig G

    2005-04-01

    Conflicting reports exist about the role of baroreflexes in efferent control of eccrine sweat rate. These conflicting reports may be due to differing mean body temperatures between studies. The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that mean body temperature modulates the effect of head-up tilt on sweat rate and skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA). To address this question, mean body temperature (0.9.internal temperature + 0.1.mean skin temperature), SSNA (microneurography of peroneal nerve, n = 8), and sweat rate (from an area innervated by the peroneal nerve and from two forearm sites, one perfused with neostigmine to augment sweating at lower mean body temperatures and the second with the vehicle, n = 12) were measured in 13 subjects during multiple 30 degrees head-up tilts during whole body heating. At the end of the heat stress, mean body temperature (36.8 +/- 0.1 to 38.0 +/- 0.1 degrees C) and sweat rate at all sites were significantly elevated. No significant correlations were observed between mean body temperature and the change in SSNA during head-up tilt (r = 0.07; P = 0.62), sweating within the innervated area (r = 0.06; P = 0.56), sweating at the neostigmine treated site (r = 0.04; P = 0.69), or sweating at the control site (r = 0.01; P = 0.94). Also, for each tilt throughout the heat stress, there were no significant differences in sweat rate (final tilt sweat rates were 0.69 +/- 0.11 and 0.68 +/- 0.11 mg.cm(-2).min(-1) within the innervated area; 1.04 +/- 0.16 and 1.06 +/- 0.16 mg.cm(-2).min(-1) at the neostigmine-treated site; and 0.85 +/- 0.15 and 0.85 +/- 0.15 mg.cm(-2).min(-1) at the control site, for supine and tilt, respectively). Hence, these data indicate that mean body temperature does not modulate eccrine sweat rate during baroreceptor unloading induced via 30 degrees head-up tilt.

  9. Latitudinal variation in the response of tidepool copepods to mean and daily range in temperature.

    PubMed

    Hong, Brian C; Shurin, Jonathan B

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the evolutionary potential of organisms to adapt to a changing climate, and the fitness consequences of temperature fluctuations, are critical to forecasting the future of biodiversity. Geographic variation among populations in life history response to temperature mean and variability offers one view of the potential for local adaptation to broaden the thermal niche. We used laboratory growth experiments to examine the effects of temperatures between 13 degrees C and 30 degrees C on five life history traits and the intrinsic rate of increase for 15 Tigriopus californicus populations distributed over 17 degrees of latitude. Different life history stages showed distinct latitudinal shifts in thermal response, while the temperature of peak population growth consistently declined with increasing latitude. In addition, high-latitude populations grew faster at optimal temperatures but showed steeper fitness declines at high temperature. To test geographic population variation in response to the amplitude of daily thermal fluctuations, we grew three northern and three southern populations and manipulated nightly low and daily high temperatures. We found the lowest fitness overall in the treatment with the highest mean temperature, and the treatment with the greatest variability showed high fitness despite an 80C greater daily range. Population responses to daily thermal variability were unrelated to latitude of origin. Our results indicate that trade-offs between adaptation to high vs. low temperature, and between growth and maturation vs. survival and fecundity, govern local adaptation along the latitudinal gradient. They also indicate that, T. californicus populations can maintain fitness over a wide range of daily variability but are more sensitive to small changes in the mean temperature.

  10. Long term mean annual water temperature for stream reaches in Pacific Northwest United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2012-01-01

    Long-term mean annual water temperature (degrees Celsius) was estimated for the E2RF1 stream network (Brakebill and Terziotti, 2011) located within the Pacific Northwest region of the United States (HUC2 = 17; the Columbia River basin, the Puget Sound watershed, the coastal drainages of Washington and Oregon, and the closed basins in southern Oregon). Multiple linear regressions were used to select reach-scale watershed attributes (explanatory variables) for predicting the long-term mean annual water temperature (dependent variable) at a set of USGS water-quality monitoring stations. The results from the multiple linear regressions were used to predict the long-term mean water temperature for the Pacific Northwest reaches in the E2RF1 network.

  11. Adjusting urban bias in the regional mean surface temperature series of South Korea, 1968-99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Youngeun; Jung, Hyun-Sook; Nam, Kyung-Yeub; Kwon, Won-Tae

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to produce a higher quality regional surface temperature series by removing urban biases in South Korean surface temperatures using statistical procedures. Monthly mean temperatures for 16 stations were obtained for a period of 32 years (1968-99). Each station is defined as an urban station or a rural station. Urban (rural) stations are defined as those that have population densities greater (less) than 1000 persons per squared kilometer in 1995. Ten urban stations and six rural stations are identified. Again, urban stations are subdivided into two groups according to whether their population totals exceed one million to examine magnitude changes of urban biases with the size of urban areas. Estimates of urban bias magnitude are calculated by averaging the difference between each urban station and every rural station. Estimates of mean urban bias magnitude (u-r) are calculated by averaging the yearly urban bias estimates. Estimates of the urban trend (Tu-r) are obtained by differencing period means (by doubling the differences obtained between yearly estimates averaged over two 16 year periods, 1968-83 and 1984-99). For annual or seasonal mean temperature Ti, the adjusted temperature Ti is determined. As all estimates of u-r are greater than zero, it suggests that temperatures in urban stations are warmer than those in rural stations. Estimates of the annual mean magnitude of urban bias range from 0.35 °C for smaller urban stations to 0.50 °C for large urban stations. Also, all estimates of Tu-r are positive, indicating an increasing trend in the urban bias time series. Seasonal variations are found in u-r and Tu-r. After adjusting the urban bias, an increasing trend in surface temperature series is still evident.

  12. Temperature measurement of mineral melt by means of a high-speed camera.

    PubMed

    Bizjan, Benjamin; Širok, Brane; Drnovšek, Janko; Pušnik, Igor

    2015-09-10

    This paper presents a temperature evaluation method by means of high-speed, visible light digital camera visualization and its application to the mineral wool production process. The proposed method adequately resolves the temperature-related requirements in mineral wool production and significantly improves the spatial and temporal resolution of measured temperature fields. Additionally, it is very cost effective in comparison with other non-contact temperature field measurement methods, such as infrared thermometry. Using the proposed method for temperatures between 800°C and 1500°C, the available temperature measurement range is approximately 300 K with a single temperature calibration point and without the need for camera setting adjustments. In the case of a stationary blackbody, the proposed method is able to produce deviations of less than 5 K from the reference (thermocouple-measured) temperature in a measurement range within 100 K from the calibration temperature. The method was also tested by visualization of rotating melt film in the rock wool production process. The resulting temperature fields are characterized by a very good temporal and spatial resolution (18,700 frames per second at 128  pixels×328  pixels and 8000 frames per second at 416  pixels×298  pixels).

  13. Water color affects the stratification, surface temperature, heat content, and mean epilimnetic irradiance of small lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, J.N.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of water color on lake stratification, mean epilimnetic irradiance, and lake temperature dynamics were examined in small, north-temperate lakes that differed widely in water color (1.5-19.8 m -1). Among these lakes, colored lakes differed from clear lakes in the following ways: (i) the epilimnia were shallower and colder, and mean epilimnetic irradiance was reduced; (ii) the diel temperature cycles were more pronounced; (iii) whole-lake heat accumulation during stratification was reduced. The depth of the epilimnion ranged from 2.5 m in the clearest lake to 0.75 m in the most colored lake, and 91% of the variation in epilimnetic depth was explained by water color. Summer mean morning epilimnetic temperature was ???2??C cooler in the most colored lake compared with the clearest lake. In clear lakes, the diel temperature range (1.4 ?? 0.7??C) was significantly (p = 0.01) less than that in the most colored lake (2.1 ?? 1.0??C). Change in whole-lake heat content was negatively correlated with water color. Increasing water color decreased light penetration more than thermocline depth, leading to reduced mean epilimnetic irradiance in the colored lakes. Thus, in these small lakes, water color significantly affected temperature, thermocline depth, and light climate. ?? 2006 NRC.

  14. Coherent variations of monthly mean total ozone and lower stratospheric temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randel, William J.; Cobb, Janel B.

    1994-01-01

    Space-time patterns of correlation between total ozone and lower stratospheric temperature are documented, based on 14 years (1979-1992) of global monthly mean observations. Data are obtained from the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) and microwave sounding unit (MSU) channel 4, the latter being a weighted mean temperature of the 150- to 50-mbar layer. These data are analyzed (separately) for linear trend, solar cycle, quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variations via linear regression: significant signals are identified for each term, and the corresponding structures in ozone and temperature are found to be highly coherent. The temperature trends derived here show significant cooling of the lower stratosphere over Northern Hemisphere (NH) midlatitudes in winter-spring and over Antarctica in Southern Hemisphere (SH) spring; the overall space-time patterns are similar to those determined for ozone trends. Interestingly, temperatures do not decrease over SH midlatitudes during midwinter, in spite of large ozone losses. These data furthermore show globally coherent ozone and temperature perturbations associated with both QBO and ENSO variations; a new result here show large total ozone anomalies in middle-to-high latitudes of both hemispheres associated with ENSO events. Residuals from the ozone and temperature time series (defined as the deseasonalized total minus the regression fits) show strong positive correlation in middle-to-high latitudes but weak correlations in the trop ics. Time periods following the volcanic eruptions of El Chichon and Pinatubo are clearly identified from the coupled signatures of decreased ozone and increased temperature, opposite to the positive ozone-temperature correlations observed at other times. The ratios of ozone to temperature anomalies derived here show quantitative signatures indicating that either radiative (trend, solar, and QBO) or dynamical (ENSO and residuals) processes are

  15. Time series modelling of global mean temperature for managerial decision-making.

    PubMed

    Romilly, Peter

    2005-07-01

    Climate change has important implications for business and economic activity. Effective management of climate change impacts will depend on the availability of accurate and cost-effective forecasts. This paper uses univariate time series techniques to model the properties of a global mean temperature dataset in order to develop a parsimonious forecasting model for managerial decision-making over the short-term horizon. Although the model is estimated on global temperature data, the methodology could also be applied to temperature data at more localised levels. The statistical techniques include seasonal and non-seasonal unit root testing with and without structural breaks, as well as ARIMA and GARCH modelling. A forecasting evaluation shows that the chosen model performs well against rival models. The estimation results confirm the findings of a number of previous studies, namely that global mean temperatures increased significantly throughout the 20th century. The use of GARCH modelling also shows the presence of volatility clustering in the temperature data, and a positive association between volatility and global mean temperature.

  16. Finite temperature inelastic mean free path and quasiparticle lifetime in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiuzi; Das Sarma, S.

    2013-02-01

    We adopt the GW and random phase approximations to study finite temperature effects on the inelastic mean free path and quasiparticle lifetime by directly calculating the imaginary part of the finite temperature self-energy induced by electron-electron interaction in extrinsic and intrinsic graphene. In particular, we provide the density-dependent leading order temperature correction to the inelastic scattering rate for both single-layer and double-layer graphene systems. We find that the inelastic mean free path is strongly influenced by finite-temperature effects. We present the similarity and the difference between graphene with linear chiral band dispersion and conventional two-dimensional electron systems with parabolic band dispersion. We also compare the calculated finite temperature inelastic scattering length with the elastic scattering length due to Coulomb disorder and comment on the prospects for quantum interference effects showing up in low-density graphene transport. We also carry out inelastic scattering calculation for electron-phonon interaction, which by itself gives rather long carrier mean free paths and lifetimes since the deformation potential coupling is weak in graphene, and therefore electron-phonon interaction contributes significantly to the inelastic scattering only at relatively high temperatures.

  17. A regional neural network model for predicting mean daily river water temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Tyler; DeWeber, Jefferson Tyrell

    2014-01-01

    Water temperature is a fundamental property of river habitat and often a key aspect of river resource management, but measurements to characterize thermal regimes are not available for most streams and rivers. As such, we developed an artificial neural network (ANN) ensemble model to predict mean daily water temperature in 197,402 individual stream reaches during the warm season (May–October) throughout the native range of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in the eastern U.S. We compared four models with different groups of predictors to determine how well water temperature could be predicted by climatic, landform, and land cover attributes, and used the median prediction from an ensemble of 100 ANNs as our final prediction for each model. The final model included air temperature, landform attributes and forested land cover and predicted mean daily water temperatures with moderate accuracy as determined by root mean squared error (RMSE) at 886 training sites with data from 1980 to 2009 (RMSE = 1.91 °C). Based on validation at 96 sites (RMSE = 1.82) and separately for data from 2010 (RMSE = 1.93), a year with relatively warmer conditions, the model was able to generalize to new stream reaches and years. The most important predictors were mean daily air temperature, prior 7 day mean air temperature, and network catchment area according to sensitivity analyses. Forest land cover at both riparian and catchment extents had relatively weak but clear negative effects. Predicted daily water temperature averaged for the month of July matched expected spatial trends with cooler temperatures in headwaters and at higher elevations and latitudes. Our ANN ensemble is unique in predicting daily temperatures throughout a large region, while other regional efforts have predicted at relatively coarse time steps. The model may prove a useful tool for predicting water temperatures in sampled and unsampled rivers under current conditions and future projections of climate

  18. Critical temperature for {alpha}-particle condensation within a momentum-projected mean-field approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sogo, T.; Roepke, G.; Lazauskas, R.

    2009-05-15

    {alpha}-particle (quartet) condensation in homogeneous spin-isospin symmetric nuclear matter is investigated. The usual Thouless criterion for the critical temperature is extended to the quartet case. The in-medium four-body problem is strongly simplified by the use of a momentum-projected mean-field ansatz for the quartet. The self-consistent single-particle wave functions are shown and discussed for various values of the density at the critical temperature. Excellent agreement of the critical temperature with a numerical solution of the Faddeev-Yakubovsky equation is obtained.

  19. Mean-field phase diagram of disordered bosons in a lattice at nonzero temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutitsky, K. V.; Pelster, A.; Graham, R.

    2006-09-01

    Bosons in a periodic lattice with on-site disorder at low but nonzero temperatures are considered within a mean-field theory. The criteria used for the definition of the superfluid, Mott insulator and Bose glass are analysed. Since the compressibility never vanishes at nonzero temperatures, it cannot be used as a general criterion. We show that the phases are unambiguously distinguished by the superfluid density and the density of states of the low-energy excitations. The phase diagram of the system is calculated. It is shown that even a tiny temperature leads to a significant shift of the boundary between the Bose glass and superfluid.

  20. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  1. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  2. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Fat’yanov, O. V. Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-15

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  3. Reduction of phonon mean free path: From low-temperature physics to room temperature applications in thermoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, Olivier; Tainoff, Dimitri; Tavakoli, Adib; Liu, Yanqing; Blanc, Christophe; Boukhari, Mustapha; Barski, André; Hadji, Emmanuel

    2016-12-01

    It has been proposed for a long time now that the reduction of the thermal conductivity by reducing the phonon mean free path is one of the best way to improve the current performance of thermoelectrics. By measuring the thermal conductance and thermal conductivity of nanowires and thin films, we show different ways of increasing the phonon scattering from low-temperature up to room-temperature experiments. It is shown that playing with the geometry (constriction, periodic structures, nano-inclusions), from the ballistic to the diffusive limit, the phonon thermal transport can be severely altered in single crystalline semiconducting structures; the phonon mean free path is in consequence reduced. The diverse implications on thermoelectric properties will be eventually discussed.

  4. Daily Mean Temperature Affects Urolithiasis Presentation in Seoul: a Time-series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the overall cumulative exposure-response and the lag response relationships between daily temperature and urolithiasis presentation in Seoul. Using a time-series design and distributing lag nonlinear methods, we estimated the relative risk (RR) of urolithiasis presentation associated with mean daily temperature, including the cumulative RR for a 20 days period, and RR for individual daily lag through 20 days. We analyzed data from 14,518 patients of 4 hospitals emergency department who sought medical evaluation or treatment of urolithiasis from 2005-2013 in Seoul. RR was estimated according to sex and age. Associations between mean daily temperature and urolithiasis presentation were not monotonic. Furthermore, there was variation in the exposure-response curve shapes and the strength of association at different temperatures, although in most cases RRs increased for temperatures above the 13°C reference value. The RRs for urolothiasis at 29°C vs. 13°C were 2.54 in all patients (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.67-3.87), 2.59 in male (95% CI, 1.56-4.32), 2.42 in female (95% CI, 1.15-5.07), 3.83 in male less than 40 years old (95% CI, 1.78-8.26), and 2.47 in male between 40 and 60 years old (95% CI, 1.15-5.34). Consistent trends of increasing RR of urolithiasis presentation were observed within 5 days of high temperatures across all groups. Urolithiasis presentation increased with high temperature with higher daily mean temperatures, with the strongest associations estimated for lags of only a few days, in Seoul, a metropolitan city in Korea. PMID:27134497

  5. Daily Mean Temperature Affects Urolithiasis Presentation in Seoul: a Time-series Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, SeoYeon; Kim, Min-Su; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kwon, Jong Kyou; Chi, Byung Hoon; Kim, Jin Wook; Chang, In Ho

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the overall cumulative exposure-response and the lag response relationships between daily temperature and urolithiasis presentation in Seoul. Using a time-series design and distributing lag nonlinear methods, we estimated the relative risk (RR) of urolithiasis presentation associated with mean daily temperature, including the cumulative RR for a 20 days period, and RR for individual daily lag through 20 days. We analyzed data from 14,518 patients of 4 hospitals emergency department who sought medical evaluation or treatment of urolithiasis from 2005-2013 in Seoul. RR was estimated according to sex and age. Associations between mean daily temperature and urolithiasis presentation were not monotonic. Furthermore, there was variation in the exposure-response curve shapes and the strength of association at different temperatures, although in most cases RRs increased for temperatures above the 13°C reference value. The RRs for urolothiasis at 29°C vs. 13°C were 2.54 in all patients (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.67-3.87), 2.59 in male (95% CI, 1.56-4.32), 2.42 in female (95% CI, 1.15-5.07), 3.83 in male less than 40 years old (95% CI, 1.78-8.26), and 2.47 in male between 40 and 60 years old (95% CI, 1.15-5.34). Consistent trends of increasing RR of urolithiasis presentation were observed within 5 days of high temperatures across all groups. Urolithiasis presentation increased with high temperature with higher daily mean temperatures, with the strongest associations estimated for lags of only a few days, in Seoul, a metropolitan city in Korea.

  6. Use of ice cores from glaciers with melting for reconstructing mean summer temperature variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Fumio; Fujita, Koji

    This study examines a new method for reconstructing mean summer temperature variations by using an ice core from a wet-snow zone on a summer-accumulation-type glacier. In July 2001, a 25.1 m deep ice core was recovered from the accumulation area of Sofiyskiy glacier (49°47‧ N, 87°43‧ E; 3435 m a.s.l.), located in the southern Chuyskiy range of the Russian Altai mountains, and a 4.5 m deep pit was excavated about 50 m northwest of the drill site. The observation site has a positive balance even during summer when melting occurs. The summer balance for each year from 1990 to 2000 was estimated from Pinaceae and Artemisia pollen peaks in these samples. Pinaceae pollen marks spring, whereas Artemisia pollen marks autumn. Moreover, meltwater intrusion did not reach the previous year's accumulation. Thus, the ice between these pollen peaks in the same year was used to estimate a summer balance. The reconstructed summer balance variations were negatively correlated with mean summer temperature variations (r = -0.72, P < 0.05). This study shows that, for summer-accumulation-type glaciers such as Sofiyskiy glacier, the most important climate factor controlling the glacier's surface mass balance is mean summer temperature. Therefore, the summer layer thickness in an ice core can be used as a proxy for reconstructing mean summer temperature variations.

  7. Beyond the mean: the role of variability in predicting ecological effects of stream temperature on salmon

    Treesearch

    E. Ashley Steel; Abby Tillotson; Donald A. Larson; Aimee H. Fullerton; Keith P. Denton; Brian R. Beckman

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in variance of riverine thermal regimes have been observed and are predicted with climate change and human development. We tested whether changes in daily or seasonal thermal variability, aside from changes in mean temperature, could have biological consequences by exposing Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) eggs to eight...

  8. Soil organic carbon quality in forested mineral wetlands at different mean annual temperature.

    Treesearch

    Cinzia Fissore; Christian P. Giardina; Randall K. Kolka; Carl C. Trettin

    2009-01-01

    Forested mineral soil wetlands (FMSW) store large stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC), but little is known on: (i) whether the quality of SOC stored in these soils (proportion of active versus more resistant SOC compounds) differs from SOC in upland soils; (ii) how the quality of SOC in FMSW varies with mean annual temperature (MAT); and (iii) whether SOC decomposition...

  9. The effect of using different regions of interest on local and mean skin temperature.

    PubMed

    Maniar, Nirav; Bach, Aaron J E; Stewart, Ian B; Costello, Joseph T

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic nature of tissue temperature and the subcutaneous properties, such as blood flow, fatness, and metabolic rate, leads to variation in local skin temperature. Therefore, we investigated the effects of using multiple regions of interest when calculating weighted mean skin temperature from four local sites. Twenty-six healthy males completed a single trial in a thermonetural laboratory (mean ± SD): 24.0 (1.2)°C; 56 (8%) relative humidity; <0.1 m/s air speed). Mean skin temperature was calculated from four local sites (neck, scapula, hand and shin) in accordance with International Standards using digital infrared thermography. A 50 mm × 50 mm, defined by strips of aluminium tape, created six unique regions of interest, top left quadrant, top right quadrant, bottom left quadrant, bottom right quadrant, centre quadrant and the entire region of interest, at each of the local sites. The largest potential error in weighted mean skin temperature was calculated using a combination of a) the coolest and b) the warmest regions of interest at each of the local sites. Significant differences between the six regions interest were observed at the neck (P<0.01), scapula (P<0.001) and shin (P<0.05); but not at the hand (P = 0.482). The largest difference (± SEM) at each site was as follows: neck 0.2 (0.1)°C; scapula 0.2 (0.0)°C; shin 0.1 (0.0)°C and hand 0.1 (0.1)°C. The largest potential error (mean ± SD) in weighted mean skin temperature was 0.4 (0.1)°C (P<0.001) and the associated 95% limits of agreement for these differences was 0.2-0.5 °C. Although we observed differences in local and mean skin temperature based on the region of interest employed, these differences were minimal and are not considered physiologically meaningful. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The relative meaning of absolute numbers: the case of pain intensity scores as decision support systems for pain management of patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Lichtner, Valentina; Dowding, Dawn; Closs, S José

    2015-12-24

    Assessment and management of pain in patients with dementia is known to be challenging, due to patients' cognitive and/or communication difficulties. In the UK, pain in hospital is managed through regular assessments, with the use of pain intensity scores as triggers for action. The aim of this study was to understand current pain assessment practices, in order to later inform the development of a decision support tool designed to improve the management of pain for people with dementia in hospital. An exploratory study was conducted in four hospitals in the UK (11 wards), with observations of patients with dementia (n = 31), interviews of staff (n = 52) and patients' family members (n = 4) and documentary analysis. A thematic analysis was carried out, structured along dimensions of decision making. This paper focuses on the emergent themes related to the use of assessment tools and pain intensity scores. A variety of tools were used to record pain intensity, usually with numerical scales. None of the tools in actual use had been specifically designed for patients with cognitive impairment. With patients with more severe dementia, the patient's body language and other cues were studied to infer pain intensity and then a score entered on behalf of the patient. Information regarding the temporality of pain and changes in pain experience (rather than a score at a single point in time) seemed to be most useful to the assessment of pain. Given the inherent uncertainty of the meaning of pain scores for patients with dementia, numerical scales were used with caution. Numerical scores triggered action but their meaning was relative - to the patient, to the clinician, to the time of recording and to the purpose of documenting. There are implications for use of data and computerized decision support systems design. Decision support interventions should include personalized alerting cut-off scores for individual patients, display pain scores over time and integrate

  11. Errors of five-day mean surface wind and temperature conditions due to inadequate sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legler, David M.

    1991-01-01

    Surface meteorological reports of wind components, wind speed, air temperature, and sea-surface temperature from buoys located in equatorial and midlatitude regions are used in a simulation of random sampling to determine errors of the calculated means due to inadequate sampling. Subsampling the data with several different sample sizes leads to estimates of the accuracy of the subsampled means. The number N of random observations needed to compute mean winds with chosen accuracies of 0.5 (N sub 0.5) and 1.0 (N sub 1,0) m/s and mean air and sea surface temperatures with chosen accuracies of 0.1 (N sub 0.1) and 0.2 (N sub 0.2) C were calculated for each 5-day and 30-day period in the buoy datasets. Mean values of N for the various accuracies and datasets are given. A second-order polynomial relation is established between N and the variability of the data record. This relationship demonstrates that for the same accuracy, N increases as the variability of the data record increases. The relationship is also independent of the data source. Volunteer-observing ship data do not satisfy the recommended minimum number of observations for obtaining 0.5 m/s and 0.2 C accuracy for most locations. The effect of having remotely sensed data is discussed.

  12. Errors of five-day mean surface wind and temperature conditions due to inadequate sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legler, David M.

    1991-01-01

    Surface meteorological reports of wind components, wind speed, air temperature, and sea-surface temperature from buoys located in equatorial and midlatitude regions are used in a simulation of random sampling to determine errors of the calculated means due to inadequate sampling. Subsampling the data with several different sample sizes leads to estimates of the accuracy of the subsampled means. The number N of random observations needed to compute mean winds with chosen accuracies of 0.5 (N sub 0.5) and 1.0 (N sub 1,0) m/s and mean air and sea surface temperatures with chosen accuracies of 0.1 (N sub 0.1) and 0.2 (N sub 0.2) C were calculated for each 5-day and 30-day period in the buoy datasets. Mean values of N for the various accuracies and datasets are given. A second-order polynomial relation is established between N and the variability of the data record. This relationship demonstrates that for the same accuracy, N increases as the variability of the data record increases. The relationship is also independent of the data source. Volunteer-observing ship data do not satisfy the recommended minimum number of observations for obtaining 0.5 m/s and 0.2 C accuracy for most locations. The effect of having remotely sensed data is discussed.

  13. Fundamental limitations of noninvasive temperature imaging by means of ultrasound echo strain estimation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Naomi R; Bamber, Jeffrey C; Meaney, Paul M

    2002-10-01

    Ultrasonic estimation of temperature-induced echo strain has been suggested as a means of predicting the location of thermal lesions formed by focused ultrasound (US) surgery before treatment. Preliminary investigations of this technique have produced optimistic results because they were carried out with rubber phantoms and used room temperature, rather than body temperature, as the baseline. The objective of the present study was to determine, through modelling, the likely feasibility of using ultrasonic temperature imaging to detect and localise the focal region of the heating beam for a medium with a realistic temperature-dependence of sound speed subjected to a realistic temperature rise. We determined the minimum ultrasonic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) required to visualise the heated region for liver of varying fat content. Due to the small (0.5%) change in sound speed at the focus, the threshold SNR for normal liver (low fat content) was found to be at least 20 dB. This implies that temperature imaging in this tissue type will only be feasible if the effects of electronic noise can be minimised and if other sources of noise, such as cardiac-induced motion, do not substantially reduce the visibility of the focal region. For liver of intermediate fat content, the heated region could not be visualised even when the echo data were noise-free. Tissues with a very high fat content are likely to represent the most favourable conditions for ultrasonic temperature imaging.

  14. Assimilating continental mean temperatures to reconstruct the climate of the late pre-industrial period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsikaris, Anastasios; Widmann, Martin; Jungclaus, Johann

    2016-06-01

    An on-line, ensemble-based data assimilation (DA) method is performed to reconstruct the climate for 1750-1850 AD, and the performance is evaluated on large and small spatial scales. We use a low-resolution version of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology MPI-ESM model and assimilate the PAGES 2K continental mean temperature reconstructions for the Northern Hemisphere (NH). The ensembles are generated sequentially for sub-periods based on the analysis of previous sub-periods. The assimilation has good skill for large-scale temperatures, but there is no agreement between the DA analysis and proxy-based reconstructions for small-scale temperature patterns within Europe or with reconstructions for the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index. To explain the lack of added value in small spatial scales, a maximum covariance analysis (MCA) of links between NH temperature and sea level pressure is performed based on a control simulation with MPI-ESM. For annual values, winter and spring the Northern Annular Mode (NAM) is the pattern that is most closely linked to the NH continental temperatures, while for summer and autumn it is a wave-like pattern. This link is reproduced in the DA for winter, spring and annual means, providing potential for constraining the NAM/NAO phase and in turn regional temperature variability. It is shown that the lack of actual small-scale skill is likely due to the fact that the link might be too weak, as the NH continental mean temperatures are not the best predictors for large-scale circulation anomalies, or that the PAGES 2K temperatures include noise. Both factors can lead to circulation anomalies in the DA analysis that are substantially different from reality, leading to unrealistic representation of small-scale temperature variability. Moreover, we show that even if the true amplitudes of the leading MCA circulation patterns were known, there is still a large amount of unexplained local temperature variance. Based on these results, we

  15. Second Law Violations by Means of a Stratification of Temperature Due to Force Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trupp, Andreas

    2002-11-01

    In 1868 J.C. Maxwell proved that a perpetual motion machine of the second kind would become possible, if the equilibrium temperature in a vertical column of gas subject to gravity were a function of height. However, Maxwell had claimed that the temperature had to be the same at all points of the column. So did Boltzmann. Their opponent was Loschmidt. He claimed that the equilibrium temperature declined with height, and that a perpetual motion machine of the second kind operating by means of such column was compatible with the second law of thermodynamics. Extending the general idea behind Loschmidt's concept to other force fields, gravity can be replaced by molecular forces acting on molecules that try to escape from the surface of a liquid into the vapor space. Experiments proving the difference of temperature between the liquid and the vapor phase were conducted in the 19th century already.

  16. Open cycle traveling wave thermoacoustics: mean temperature difference at the regenerator interface.

    PubMed

    Weiland, Nathan T; Zinn, Ben T

    2003-11-01

    In an open cycle traveling wave thermoacoustic engine, the hot heat exchanger is replaced by a steady flow of hot gas into the regenerator to provide the thermal energy input to the engine. The steady-state operation of such a device requires that a potentially large mean temperature difference exist between the incoming gas and the solid material at the regenerator's hot side, due in part to isentropic gas oscillations in the open space adjacent to the regenerator. The magnitude of this temperature difference will have a significant effect on the efficiencies of these open cycle devices. To help assess the feasibility of such thermoacoustic engines, a numerical model is developed that predicts the dependence of the mean temperature difference upon the important design and operating parameters of the open cycle thermoacoustic engine, including the acoustic pressure, mean mass flow rate, acoustic phase angles, and conductive heat loss. Using this model, it is also shown that the temperature difference at the regenerator interface is approximately proportional to the sum of the acoustic power output and the conductive heat loss at this location.

  17. Increases in both temperature means and extremes likely facilitate invasive herbivore outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Rui-Ting; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Gao, Lei; Zhou, Xu-Hui; Li, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Although increases in mean temperature (MT) and extreme high temperature (EHT) can greatly affect population dynamics of insects under global warming, how concurrent changes in both MT and EHT affect invasive species is largely unknown. We used four thermal regimes to simulate the increases in summer temperature and compared their effects on the life-history traits of three geographical populations (Chongqing, Wuhan and Shanghai) of an invasive insect, Corythucha ciliata, in China. The four thermal regimes were control (i.e., natural or ambient), an increase in MT (IMT), an increase in EHT, and a combination of IMT + EHT. We found that the three warming regimes significantly increased the developmental rate but did not affect the survival, sex ratio, longevity, or fecundity of C. ciliata. Consequently, the intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm) was enhanced and the number of days required for population doubling (t) was reduced by the warming regimes. The demographic parameters did not significantly differ among the three populations. These results indicate that population size of C. ciliata may be enhanced by increases in both temperature means and extremes. The increases in summer temperature associated with climate change, therefore, would likely facilitate population outbreaks of some thermophilic invasive insects. PMID:26502826

  18. Increases in both temperature means and extremes likely facilitate invasive herbivore outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Ju, Rui-Ting; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Gao, Lei; Zhou, Xu-Hui; Li, Bo

    2015-10-27

    Although increases in mean temperature (MT) and extreme high temperature (EHT) can greatly affect population dynamics of insects under global warming, how concurrent changes in both MT and EHT affect invasive species is largely unknown. We used four thermal regimes to simulate the increases in summer temperature and compared their effects on the life-history traits of three geographical populations (Chongqing, Wuhan and Shanghai) of an invasive insect, Corythucha ciliata, in China. The four thermal regimes were control (i.e., natural or ambient), an increase in MT (IMT), an increase in EHT, and a combination of IMT + EHT. We found that the three warming regimes significantly increased the developmental rate but did not affect the survival, sex ratio, longevity, or fecundity of C. ciliata. Consequently, the intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm) was enhanced and the number of days required for population doubling (t) was reduced by the warming regimes. The demographic parameters did not significantly differ among the three populations. These results indicate that population size of C. ciliata may be enhanced by increases in both temperature means and extremes. The increases in summer temperature associated with climate change, therefore, would likely facilitate population outbreaks of some thermophilic invasive insects.

  19. Increases in both temperature means and extremes likely facilitate invasive herbivore outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Rui-Ting; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Gao, Lei; Zhou, Xu-Hui; Li, Bo

    2015-10-01

    Although increases in mean temperature (MT) and extreme high temperature (EHT) can greatly affect population dynamics of insects under global warming, how concurrent changes in both MT and EHT affect invasive species is largely unknown. We used four thermal regimes to simulate the increases in summer temperature and compared their effects on the life-history traits of three geographical populations (Chongqing, Wuhan and Shanghai) of an invasive insect, Corythucha ciliata, in China. The four thermal regimes were control (i.e., natural or ambient), an increase in MT (IMT), an increase in EHT, and a combination of IMT + EHT. We found that the three warming regimes significantly increased the developmental rate but did not affect the survival, sex ratio, longevity, or fecundity of C. ciliata. Consequently, the intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm) was enhanced and the number of days required for population doubling (t) was reduced by the warming regimes. The demographic parameters did not significantly differ among the three populations. These results indicate that population size of C. ciliata may be enhanced by increases in both temperature means and extremes. The increases in summer temperature associated with climate change, therefore, would likely facilitate population outbreaks of some thermophilic invasive insects.

  20. High temperature attack of ores by means of a liquor essentially containing a soluble bicarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Bosca, B.; Maurel, P.; Nicolas, F.

    1981-10-20

    A process for the oxidizing attack at high temperature of ores containing at least one metal belonging to the group formed by uranium, vanadium and molybdenum, by means of an aqueous liquor containing a majority of sodium bicarbonate and a minority of sodium carbonate according to a ratio by weight of sodium bicarbonate to sodium carbonate of at least 1.5, in the presence of free oxygen injected into the reaction medium, this medium being maintained at a temperature of between 160/sup 0/C and 300/sup 0/C. For at most six hours.

  1. Assimilating Continental Mean Temperatures to Reconstruct the Climate of the Late Pre-industrial Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsikaris, A.; Widmann, M.; Jungclaus, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Climate reconstructions for the pre-instrumental period are either based on climate proxy data or on numerical simulations. However, both approaches are associated with substantial uncertainties. In principle, the best state estimates can be expected by employing data assimilation (DA) techniques, which systematically combine the empirical information from proxy data with the representation of the processes that govern the climate system given by climate models. Here, an ensemble-based DA method is performed to reconstruct the climate of the period 1750-1850 AD, and the performance is evaluated on large and small spatial scales. We use a low-resolution version of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology's MPI-ESM model and assimilate the PAGES 2K continental mean temperature reconstructions for the Northern Hemisphere (NH). The ensembles are generated sequentially for sub-periods based on the analysis of previous sub-periods. The assimilation has good skill for large-scale temperatures, but there is no agreement between the DA analysis and proxy-based reconstructions for small-scale temperature variability within Europe or with reconstructions for the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index. To explain the lack of added value in the DA, a Maximum Covariance Analysis (MCA) of links between NH temperature and sea level pressure (SLP) is performed on a control run with MPI-ESM. The analysis shows that the Northern Annular Mode (NAM) is the pattern that is most closely linked to the NH continental temperatures. This link is reproduced in the assimilation run for winter, spring and annual means, providing potential for constraining the NAM/NAO phase and in turn, for regional temperature variability in the DA. It is shown that the lack of actual skill for these aspects is likely due to the fact that either the link might be too weak, as the continental mean temperatures are not the best predictors for the NAM (they are reconstructed by many proxies in locations not linked

  2. Oxygen isotope ratios in trees reflect mean annual temperature and humidity.

    PubMed

    Burk, R L; Stuiver, M

    1981-03-27

    Values of the oxygen isotope ratios (delta(18)O) in tree-ring cellulose closely reflect the delta(18)O values in atmospheric precipitation and hence mean annual temperature. The change in delta(18)O in cellulose is 0.41 per mil per degree Celsius for selected near-coastal stations. The values of delta(18)O in precipitation and cellulose also change with altitude, as demonstrated for Mount Rainier, Washington. A temperature lapse rate of 5.2 degrees +/- 0.5 degrees C per 1000 meters calculated from cellulose delta(18)O values agrees with the accepted mean annual lapse rate of 5 degrees C per 1000 meters for this region. Cellulose delta(18)O values and delta(18)O values of carbon dioxide equilibrated with leaf water differ by a fixed 16 per mil.

  3. Oxygen isotope ratios in trees reflect mean annual temperature and humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Burk, R.L.; Stuiver, M.

    1981-03-27

    Values of the oxygen isotope ratios (delta/sup 18/O) in tree-ring cellulose closely reflect the delta/sup 18/O values in atmospheric precipitation and hence mean annual temperature. The change in delta/sup 18/O in cellulose is 0.41 per mil per degree Celsius for selected near-coastal stations. The values of delta/sup 18/O in precipitation and cellulose also change with altitude, as demonstrated for Mount Rainier, Washington. A temperature lapse rate of 5.2/sup 0/ +/- 0.5/sup 0/C per 1000 meters calculated from cellulose delta/sup 18/O values agrees with the accepted mean annual lapse rate of 5/sup 0/C per 1000 meters for this region. Cellulose delta/sup 18/O values and delta/sup 18/O values of carbon dioxide equilibrated with leaf water differ by a fixed 16 per mil.

  4. Oxygen isotope ratios in trees reflect mean annual temperature and humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Burk, R.L.; Stuiver, M.

    1981-03-27

    Values of the oxygen isotope ratios (delta/sup 18/O) in tree-ring cellulose closely reflect the delta/sup 18/O values in atmospheric precipitation and hence mean annual temperature. The change in delta/sup 18/O in cellulose is 0.41 per mil per degree Celsius for selected near-coastal stations. The values of delta/sup 18/O in precipitation and cellulose also change with altitude, as demonstrated for Mount Rainier, Washington. A temperature lapse rate of 5.2/sup 0/ per 1000 meters calculated from cellulose delta/sup 18/O values agrees with the accepted mean annual lapse rate of 5/sup 0/C per 1000 meters for this region.

  5. The effect of temperature and bacterial growth phase on protein extraction by means of electroporation.

    PubMed

    Haberl-Meglič, Saša; Levičnik, Eva; Luengo, Elisa; Raso, Javier; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2016-12-01

    Different chemical and physical methods are used for extraction of proteins from bacteria, which are used in variety of fields. But on a large scale, many methods have severe drawbacks. Recently, extraction by means of electroporation showed a great potential to quickly obtain proteins from bacteria. Since many parameters are affecting the yield of extracted proteins, our aim was to investigate the effect of temperature and bacterial growth phase on the yield of extracted proteins. At the same time bacterial viability was tested. Our results showed that the temperature has a great effect on protein extraction, the best temperature post treatment being 4°C. No effect on bacterial viability was observed for all temperatures tested. Also bacterial growth phase did not affect the yield of extracted proteins or bacterial viability. Nevertheless, further experiments may need to be performed to confirm this observation, since only one incubation temperature (4°C) and one incubation time before and after electroporation (0.5 and 1h) were tested for bacterial growth phase. Based on our results we conclude that temperature is a key element for bacterial membrane to stay in a permeabilized state, so more proteins flow out of bacteria into surrounding media. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  7. Mean velocity and temperature profiles in a sheared diabatic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Katul, Gabriel G.; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2012-10-01

    In the atmospheric surface layer, modifications to the logarithmic mean velocity and air temperature profiles induced by thermal stratification or convection are accounted for via stability correction functions ϕm and ϕh, respectively, that vary with the stability parameter ς. These two stability correction functions are presumed to be universal in shape and independent of the surface characteristics. To date, there is no phenomenological theory that explains all the scaling laws in ϕh with ς, how ϕh relates to ϕm, and why ϕh ⩽ ϕm is consistently reported. To develop such a theory, the recently proposed links between the mean velocity profile and the Kolmogorov spectrum of turbulence, which were previously modified to account for the effects of buoyancy, are generalized here to include the mean air temperature profile. The resulting theory explains the observed scaling laws in ϕm and ϕh reported in many field and numerical experiments, predicts their behaviors across a wide range of atmospheric stability conditions, and elucidates why heat is transported more efficiently than momentum in certain stability regimes. In particular, it is shown that the enhancement in heat transport under unstable conditions is linked to a "scale-resonance" between turnover eddies and excursions in the instantaneous air temperature profiles. Excluding this scale-resonance results in the conventional Reynolds analogy with ϕm = ϕh across all stability conditions.

  8. Solar Cycle Variability in Mean Thermospheric Composition and Temperature Induced by Atmospheric Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M., Jr.; Forbes, J. M.; Hagan, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Vertically-propagating atmospheric thermal tides whose origins lie in Earth's lower atmosphere are now widely recognized as one of the dominant "meteorological" drivers of space weather. Many prior research efforts have focused on documenting and understanding the role that dissipating tides play in determining the longitudinal and seasonal variability associated with lower thermospheric winds, temperature, and constituent densities. However, considerably less attention has focused on understanding the potential solar cycle variability in the mean thermospheric state induced by the tides. In this paper we utilize the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM), forced with observationally-based tides at the model lower boundary from the Climatological Tidal Model of the Thermosphere (CTMT, from Oberheide et al. [2011]), to elucidate how the dissipating tides induce variations of up to 30 K in the zonal-mean thermosphere temperature between solar minimum and maximum. Numerical experiments are performed for the month of September and for solar minimum, medium, and maximum conditions in order to quantify the solar cycle variability associated with the different terms in the thermodynamic energy, major and minor neutral constituent continuity equations. Our analysis indicates that solar cycle variability in neutral temperatures results from a combination of net eddy heat transport effects and tidal modulation of net nitric oxide (NO) cooling. The chemical and dynamical pathways through which dissipating tides affect mean NO cooling differently at solar minimum and maximum are diagnosed.

  9. Regional Climate Impacts from a 0.5C Increase in Global Mean Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Scott

    2017-04-01

    Global temperature targets have become the linchpin for global climate science and policy discussions. Given the mandate in the Paris accord to limit the rise in global temperature to well below 2.0oC above pre-industrial levels and pursue efforts toward the more ambitious 1.5oC goal, there is increasing focus in the climate science community on what the relative climate impact realities may be for these two scenarios. Despite major climate modeling efforts (e.g., CMIP) which successfully target climate outcomes as the result of various future GHG projection scenarios, there is still a significant information gap as to the regional and seasonal climate impacts due to a 0.5 oC increase in global mean temperature. According to the IPCC AR5 the 1983-2012 period is likely the warmest 30-year epoch of the last 1400 years and includes an approximate 0.5 oC global mean temperature increase. As such, it can be used as a testbed to evaluate characteristic changes in regional and seasonal climate parameters for a one half degree global temperature change. Global and regional temperature and precipitation changes are probed from the perspective of over 1000 climate realizations afforded by the availability of reforecast climate model runs from the NCEP Climate Forecast System Version 2 over the 1983-2012 period. This unique approach allows for isolation of the GHG forced changes in an extremely high number of ensemble members, facilitating the analysis of regional, spatial, and seasonal climate statistics as the result of a recently observed 0.5 oC shift in global mean temperature. Additionally, new climate modeling experiments from the Half a Degree of Additional Warming, Projections, Prognosis, and Impacts Model Intercomparison Project (HAPPI-MIP) will be analyzed to understand relative climate impacts of a 1.5 oC and 2.0 oC world, which given nonlinearities, may not be similar to that of the recently observed 0.5oC temperature change.

  10. Zonal-Mean Temperature Variations Inferred from SABER Measurements on TIMED Compared with UARS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Frank T.; Mayr, Hans; Russell, James; Mlynczak, Marty; Reber, Carl A.

    2005-01-01

    In the Numerical Spectral Model (NSM, Mayr et al., 2003), small-scale gravity waves propagating in the north/south direction can generate zonal mean (m = 0) meridional wind oscillations with periods between 2 and 4 months. These oscillations tend to be confined to low latitudes and have been interpreted to be the meridional counterpart of the wave-driven Quasi Biennial Oscillation in the zonal circulation. Wave driven meridional winds across the equator should generate, due to dynamical heating and cooling, temperature oscillations with opposite phase in the two hemispheres. We have analyzed SABER temperature measurements in the altitude range between 55 and 95 km to investigate the existence such variations. Because there are also strong tidal signatures (up to approximately 20 K) in the data, our algorithm estimates both mean values and tides together from the data. Based on SABER temperature data, the intra-annual variations with periods between 2 and 4 months can have amplitudes up to 5 K or more, depending on the altitude. Their amplitudes are in qualitative agreement with those inferred Erom UARS data (from different years). The SABER temperature variations also reveal pronounced hemispherical asymmetries, which are qualitatively consistent with wave driven meridional wind oscillations across the equator. Oscillations with similar periods have been seen in the meridional winds based on UARS data (Huang and Reber, 2003).

  11. Zonal-Mean Temperature Variations Inferred from SABER Measurements on TIMED Compared with UARS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Frank T.; Mayr, Hans; Russell, James; Mlynczak, Marty; Reber, Carl A.

    2005-01-01

    In the Numerical Spectral Model (NSM, Mayr et al., 2003), small-scale gravity waves propagating in the north/south direction can generate zonal mean (m = 0) meridional wind oscillations with periods between 2 and 4 months. These oscillations tend to be confined to low latitudes and have been interpreted to be the meridional counterpart of the wave-driven Quasi Biennial Oscillation in the zonal circulation. Wave driven meridional winds across the equator should generate, due to dynamical heating and cooling, temperature oscillations with opposite phase in the two hemispheres. We have analyzed SABER temperature measurements in the altitude range between 55 and 95 km to investigate the existence such variations. Because there are also strong tidal signatures (up to approximately 20 K) in the data, our algorithm estimates both mean values and tides together from the data. Based on SABER temperature data, the intra-annual variations with periods between 2 and 4 months can have amplitudes up to 5 K or more, depending on the altitude. Their amplitudes are in qualitative agreement with those inferred Erom UARS data (from different years). The SABER temperature variations also reveal pronounced hemispherical asymmetries, which are qualitatively consistent with wave driven meridional wind oscillations across the equator. Oscillations with similar periods have been seen in the meridional winds based on UARS data (Huang and Reber, 2003).

  12. The Quantitative Relationship Between ISO 15197 Accuracy Criteria and Mean Absolute Relative Difference (MARD) in the Evaluation of Analytical Performance of Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG) Systems.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Scott; Simmons, David A

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between International Organization for Standardization (ISO) accuracy criteria and mean absolute relative difference (MARD), 2 methods for assessing the accuracy of blood glucose meters, is complex. While lower MARD values are generally better than higher MARD values, it is not possible to define a particular MARD value that ensures a blood glucose meter will satisfy the ISO accuracy criteria. The MARD value that ensures passing the ISO accuracy test can be described only as a probabilistic range. In this work, a Bayesian model is presented to represent the relationship between ISO accuracy criteria and MARD. Under the assumptions made in this work, there is nearly a 100% chance of satisfying ISO 15197:2013 accuracy requirements if the MARD value is between 3.25% and 5.25%. © 2016 Diabetes Technology Society.

  13. On Statistical Methods for Common Mean and Reference Confidence Intervals in Interlaboratory Comparisons for Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkovský, Viktor; Wimmer, Gejza; Ďuriš, Stanislav

    2015-08-01

    We consider a problem of constructing the exact and/or approximate coverage intervals for the common mean of several independent distributions. In a metrological context, this problem is closely related to evaluation of the interlaboratory comparison experiments, and in particular, to determination of the reference value (estimate) of a measurand and its uncertainty, or alternatively, to determination of the coverage interval for a measurand at a given level of confidence, based on such comparison data. We present a brief overview of some specific statistical models, methods, and algorithms useful for determination of the common mean and its uncertainty, or alternatively, the proper interval estimator. We illustrate their applicability by a simple simulation study and also by example of interlaboratory comparisons for temperature. In particular, we shall consider methods based on (i) the heteroscedastic common mean fixed effect model, assuming negligible laboratory biases, (ii) the heteroscedastic common mean random effects model with common (unknown) distribution of the laboratory biases, and (iii) the heteroscedastic common mean random effects model with possibly different (known) distributions of the laboratory biases. Finally, we consider a method, recently suggested by Singh et al., for determination of the interval estimator for a common mean based on combining information from independent sources through confidence distributions.

  14. Monthly mean global climatology of temperature, wind, geopotential height and pressure for 0-120 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Sushil; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Barnett, John J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a monthly mean climatology of zonal mean temperature, zonal wind, and geopotential height with nearly pole-to-pole coverage (80 deg S-80 deg N) for 0-120 km which can be used as a function of altitude and pressure. This climatology reproduces most of the characteristic features of the atmosphere such as the lowering and cooling of the mesopause and the lowering and warming of the stratopause during the summer months at high latitudes. A series of zonal wind profiles is also presented comparing this climatological wind with monthly mean climatological direct wind measurements in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The two data sets compare well below 80 km, with some general seasonal trend agreement observed above 80 km. The zonal wind at the equator presented here simulates the observed features of the semiannual oscillation in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere.

  15. Monthly mean global climatology of temperature, wind, geopotential height and pressure for 0-120 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, Sushil; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Barnett, John J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a monthly mean climatology of zonal mean temperature, zonal wind, and geopotential height with nearly pole-to-pole coverage (80 deg S-80 deg N) for 0-120 km which can be used as a function of altitude and pressure. This climatology reproduces most of the characteristic features of the atmosphere such as the lowering and cooling of the mesopause and the lowering and warming of the stratopause during the summer months at high latitudes. A series of zonal wind profiles is also presented comparing this climatological wind with monthly mean climatological direct wind measurements in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The two data sets compare well below 80 km, with some general seasonal trend agreement observed above 80 km. The zonal wind at the equator presented here simulates the observed features of the semiannual oscillation in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere.

  16. Room temperature screening of thermal conductivity by means of thermal transient measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Cañadas, Jorge; Cheng, Shudan; Márquez-García, Lourdes; Prest, Martin J.; Akbari-Rahimabadi, Ahmad; Min, Gao

    2016-10-01

    A proof of concept of the possibility to estimate thermal conductivity of bulk disc samples at room temperature by means of thermal decays is demonstrated. An experimental set-up was designed and fabricated, which is able to perform thermal transient measurements by using a specially designed multifunctional probe that has the ability to measure temperature at its tip. Initially, the probe is heated by a heater coil located in its interior until the tip temperature reaches a steady state. Then, the probe is contacted with a disc sample which produces a temperature decay until a new state is reached. The difference between the initial and final states temperatures shows a correlation with the thermal conductivity of the sample. Employing a calibration equation, obtained using reference materials, the thermal conductivity can be calculated. Reasonably good random and systematic errors (<13% and ~9% respectively) are obtained. Theoretical simulations performed using COMSOL show a good qualitative agreement with experimental results. This new method involves an inexpensive and simple set-up which can be especially useful for thermal conductivity screening and high-throughput measurements.

  17. Of mast and mean: differential-temperature cue makes mast seeding insensitive to climate change.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Dave; Geldenhuis, Andre; James, Alex; Penelope Holland, E; Plank, Michael J; Brockie, Robert E; Cowan, Philip E; Harper, Grant A; Lee, William G; Maitland, Matt J; Mark, Alan F; Mills, James A; Wilson, Peter R; Byrom, Andrea E

    2013-01-01

    Mast-seeding plants often produce high seed crops the year after a warm spring or summer, but the warm-temperature model has inconsistent predictive ability. Here, we show for 26 long-term data sets from five plant families that the temperature difference between the two previous summers (ΔT) better predicts seed crops. This discovery explains how masting species tailor their flowering patterns to sites across altitudinal temperature gradients; predicts that masting will be unaffected by increasing mean temperatures under climate change; improves prediction of impacts on seed consumers; demonstrates that strongly masting species are hypersensitive to climate; explains the rarity of consecutive high-seed years without invoking resource constraints; and generates hypotheses about physiological mechanisms in plants and insect seed predators. For plants, ΔT has many attributes of an ideal cue. This temperature-difference model clarifies our understanding of mast seeding under environmental change, and could also be applied to other cues, such as rainfall.

  18. Long-range persistence in the global mean surface temperature and the global warming "time bomb"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rypdal, M.; Rypdal, K.

    2012-04-01

    Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) and Maximum Likelihood Estimations (MLE) based on instrumental data over the last 160 years indicate that there is Long-Range Persistence (LRP) in Global Mean Surface Temperature (GMST) on time scales of months to decades. The persistence is much higher in sea surface temperature than in land temperatures. Power spectral analysis of multi-model, multi-ensemble runs of global climate models indicate further that this persistence may extend to centennial and maybe even millennial time-scales. We also support these conclusions by wavelet variogram analysis, DFA, and MLE of Northern hemisphere mean surface temperature reconstructions over the last two millennia. These analyses indicate that the GMST is a strongly persistent noise with Hurst exponent H>0.9 on time scales from decades up to at least 500 years. We show that such LRP can be very important for long-term climate prediction and for the establishment of a "time bomb" in the climate system due to a growing energy imbalance caused by the slow relaxation to radiative equilibrium under rising anthropogenic forcing. We do this by the construction of a multi-parameter dynamic-stochastic model for the GMST response to deterministic and stochastic forcing, where LRP is represented by a power-law response function. Reconstructed data for total forcing and GMST over the last millennium are used with this model to estimate trend coefficients and Hurst exponent for the GMST on multi-century time scale by means of MLE. Ensembles of solutions generated from the stochastic model also allow us to estimate confidence intervals for these estimates.

  19. Prediction of shivering heat production from core and mean skin temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tikuisis, P; Giesbrecht, G G

    1999-02-01

    Prediction formulae of shivering metabolism (Mshiv) are critical to the development of models of thermoregulation for cold exposure, especially when the extrapolation of survival times is required. Many such formulae, however, have been calibrated with data that are limited in their range of core temperatures (Tc), seldom involving values of less than 36 degrees C. Certain recent studies of cold-water immersion have reported Tc as low as 33.25 degrees C. These data comprise measurements of Tc (esophageal) and mean skin temperature (Ts), and metabolism from 14 males [mean (SD); age = 28 (5) years; height = 1.78 (0.06) m; body mass = 77.7 (6.9) kg; body fat (BF) = 18.4 (4.5)%] during immersion in water as cold as 8 degrees C for up to 1 h and subsequent self-rewarming via shivering under dry blanketed conditions. The data contain 3343 observations with mean (SD) Tc and Ts of 35.92 (0.93) degrees C and 23.4 (8.9) degrees C, respectively, and have been used to re-examine the prediction of Mshiv. Rates of changes of these temperatures were not used in the analysis. The best fit of the formulae, which are essentially algebraic constructs with and without setpoints, are those with a quadratic expression involving Ts. This is consistent with the findings of Benzinger (1969) who demonstrated that the thermosensitivity of skin is parabolic downwards with temperature peaking near a value of 20 degrees C. Formulae that included a multiplicative interaction term between Tc and Ts did not predict as well. The best prediction using 37 degrees C and 33 degrees C as the Tc and Ts setpoints, respectively, was found with BF as an attenuation factor: Mshiv (W x m(-2)) = [155.5 x (37- Tc) + 47.0 x (33 - Ts) - 1.57 x (33 - Ts)2]/(%BF)(0.5).

  20. Efficiencies of power plants, quasi-static models and the geometric-mean temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johal, Ramandeep S.

    2017-02-01

    Observed efficiencies of industrial power plants are often approximated by the square-root formula: 1 - √T-/T+, where T+(T-) is the highest (lowest) temperature achieved in the plant. This expression can be derived within finite-time thermodynamics, or, by entropy generation minimization, based on finite rates for the processes. In these analyses, a closely related quantity is the optimal value of the intermediate temperature for the hot stream, given by the geometric-mean value: √T+/T-. In this paper, instead of finite-time models, we propose to model the operation of plants by quasi-static work extraction models, with one reservoir (source/sink) as finite, while the other as practically infinite. No simplifying assumption is made on the nature of the finite system. This description is consistent with two model hypotheses, each yielding a specific value of the intermediate temperature, say T1 and T2. The lack of additional information on validity of the hypothesis that may be actually realized, motivates to approach the problem as an exercise in inductive inference. Thus we define an expected value of the intermediate temperature as the equally weighted mean: (T1 + T2)/2. It is shown that the expected value is very closely given by the geometric-mean value for almost all of the observed power plants.

  1. A PV view of the zonal mean distribution of temperature and wind in the extratropical troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, De-Zheng; Lindzen, Richard S.

    1994-01-01

    The dependence of the temperature and wind distribution of the zonal mean flow in the extratropical troposphere on the gradient of pontential vorticity along isentropes is examined. The extratropics here refer to the region outside the Hadley circulation. Of particular interest is whether the distribution of temperature and wind corresponding to a constant potential vorticity (PV) along isentropes resembles the observed, and the implications of PV homogenization along isentropes for the role of the tropics. With the assumption that PV is homogenized along isentropes, it is found that the temperature distribution in the extratropical troposphere may be determined by a linear, first-order partial differential equation. When the observed surface temperature distribution and tropical lapse rate are used as the boundary conditions, the solution of the equation is close to the observed temperature distribution except in the upper troposphere adjacent to the Hadley circulation, where the troposphere with no PV gradient is considerably colder. Consequently, the jet is also stronger. It is also found that the meridional distribution of the balanced zonal wind is very sensitive to the meridional distribution of the tropopause temperature. The result may suggest that the requirement of the global momentum balance has no practical role in determining the extratropical temperature distribution. The authors further investigated the sensitivity of the extratropical troposphere with constant PV along isentropes to changes in conditions at the tropical boundary (the edge of the Hadley circulation). It is found that the temperature and wind distributions in the extratropical troposphere are sensitive to the vertical distribution of PV at the tropical boundary. With a surface distribution of temperature that decreases linearly with latitude, the jet maximum occurs at the tropical boundary and moves with it. The overall pattern of wind distribution is not sensitive to the change of

  2. Statistical downscaling of monthly mean temperature for Kazakhstan in Central Asia using ordinary least squares regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, F. J.; Li, Y.; Wang, L.; Qixiang, C.; Wu, S., II

    2016-12-01

    Very few studies on the impact of climate change, to our knowledge, have been carried out in Kazakhstan, which is located in Central Asia. It is the largest landlocked country in the world and has a sensitive natural environment and a human society vulnerable to climate change. A widely-used method of obtaining future climate projections needed by regional-scale climate change impact studies is to downscale General Circulation Model (GCM) outputs, either through dynamical or statistical approaches. These approaches should be validated for the particular area, predictands, and downscaling model using reanalysis data and observational records. In this study, we evaluated a statistical model for downscaling the monthly mean temperature in the Kazakhstan area built from an ordinary least squares (OLS) regression model combined with a principal component analysis (PCA) as the preprocessing method for predictors. The 30-year monthly mean temperature record from 1960 to 1989 for 11 Kazakhstan stations collected by Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) and the corresponding large scale variables from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) monthly mean reanalysis were used in the downscaling procedure as training data for the model. The data from the next 20-year period of 1990-2009 were used as testing data for evaluating the model performance. The result shows that the OLS model was able to simulate a reasonable monthly mean temperature averaged over the Kazakhstan region as a whole, while a few disagreements with observations exist for some stations and in some months (see Figure 1). A further analysis of the results of downscaling also reveals that the monthly mean temperature in summer is easier to be downscaled accurately by this model than that in winter, with the R2 metric of 0.8 for summer being significantly larger than that for winter of 0.7. Moreover, this statistical downscaling model shows

  3. Comparison of different methods of estimating the mean radiant temperature in outdoor thermal comfort studies.

    PubMed

    Krüger, E L; Minella, F O; Matzarakis, A

    2014-10-01

    Correlations between outdoor thermal indices and the calculated or measured mean radiant temperature T(mrt) are in general of high importance because of the combined effect on human energy balance in outdoor spaces. The most accurate way to determine T(mrt) is by means of integral radiation measurements, i.e. measuring the short- and long-wave radiation from six directions using pyranometers and pyrgeometers, an expensive and not always an easily available procedure. Some studies use globe thermometers combined with air temperature and wind speed sensors. An alternative way to determine T(mrt) is based on output from the RayMan model from measured data of incoming global radiation and morphological features of the monitoring site in particular sky view factor (SVF) data. The purpose of this paper is to compare different methods to assess the mean radiant temperature T(mrt) in terms of differences to a reference condition (T(mrt) calculated from field measurements) and to resulting outdoor comfort levels expressed as PET and UTCI values. The T(mrt) obtained from field measurements is a combination of air temperature, wind speed and globe temperature data according to the forced ventilation formula of ISO 7726 for data collected in Glasgow, UK. Four different methods were used in the RayMan model for T(mrt) calculations: input data consisting exclusively of data measured at urban sites; urban data excluding solar radiation, estimated SVF data and solar radiation data measured at a rural site; urban data excluding solar radiation with SVF data for each site; urban data excluding solar radiation and including solar radiation at the rural site taking no account of SVF information. Results show that all methods overestimate T(mrt) when compared to ISO calculations. Correlations were found to be significant for the first method and lower for the other three. Results in terms of comfort (PET, UTCI) suggest that reasonable estimates could be made based on global radiation

  4. Recent trend analysis of mean air temperature in Greece based on homogenized data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamara, A.; Argiriou, A. Α.; Anadranistakis, M.

    2016-11-01

    Numerous studies analyze the temperature variations in the Mediterranean area due to the anticipated impact of climate change in this part of the world. A number of studies examined the temperature climate in Greece, but few are based on a large number of synoptic stations covering all regions and climatic zones and even fewer are based on homogenized data set series, despite the fact that climatological studies must use high-quality homogeneous data series. The present work reviews previous studies dealing with climatic changes in Greece and addresses changes of mean air temperature, based on a large set of homogenized data from 52 synoptic stations. A statistically significant negative trend during 1960-1976 and a positive one during 1977-2004 were revealed. During 1960-1976, the lowest negative annual temperature trend is observed in Crete. During 1977-2004, the northern region of Greece was characterized by prominent annual warming, whereas the north and central Aegean Sea and the semi-mountainous area were characterized by the lowest warming. All stations are characterized by high seasonal trends in summer; the most extreme trends are observed in the northern and eastern regions and in the Attica area. Positive temperature trends occur from May to October, while negative trends dominate from November to February. The most pronounced warming is recorded in June and July, and the most strongly decreasing trend occurs in November. Annual temperature trends in northern Greece follow the hemispheric pattern, and the overall summer warming in Greece is greater than the hemisphere's.

  5. Spatiotemporal Divergence of the Warming Hiatus over Land Based on Different Definitions of Mean Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chunlüe; Wang, Kaicun

    2016-08-01

    Existing studies of the recent warming hiatus over land are primarily based on the average of daily minimum and maximum temperatures (T2). This study compared regional warming rates of mean temperature based on T2 and T24 calculated from hourly observations available from 1998 to 2013. Both T2 and T24 show that the warming hiatus over land is apparent in the mid-latitudes of North America and Eurasia, especially in cold seasons, which is closely associated with the negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Arctic Oscillation (AO) and cold air propagation by the Arctic-original northerly wind anomaly into mid-latitudes. However, the warming rates of T2 and T24 are significantly different at regional and seasonal scales because T2 only samples air temperature twice daily and cannot accurately reflect land-atmosphere and incoming radiation variations in the temperature diurnal cycle. The trend has a standard deviation of 0.43 °C/decade for T2 and 0.41 °C/decade for T24, and 0.38 °C/decade for their trend difference in 5° × 5° grids. The use of T2 amplifies the regional contrasts of the warming rate, i.e., the trend underestimation in the US and overestimation at high latitudes by T2.

  6. Spatiotemporal Divergence of the Warming Hiatus over Land Based on Different Definitions of Mean Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chunlüe; Wang, Kaicun

    2016-01-01

    Existing studies of the recent warming hiatus over land are primarily based on the average of daily minimum and maximum temperatures (T2). This study compared regional warming rates of mean temperature based on T2 and T24 calculated from hourly observations available from 1998 to 2013. Both T2 and T24 show that the warming hiatus over land is apparent in the mid-latitudes of North America and Eurasia, especially in cold seasons, which is closely associated with the negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Arctic Oscillation (AO) and cold air propagation by the Arctic-original northerly wind anomaly into mid-latitudes. However, the warming rates of T2 and T24 are significantly different at regional and seasonal scales because T2 only samples air temperature twice daily and cannot accurately reflect land-atmosphere and incoming radiation variations in the temperature diurnal cycle. The trend has a standard deviation of 0.43 °C/decade for T2 and 0.41 °C/decade for T24, and 0.38 °C/decade for their trend difference in 5° × 5° grids. The use of T2 amplifies the regional contrasts of the warming rate, i.e., the trend underestimation in the US and overestimation at high latitudes by T2. PMID:27531421

  7. Spatiotemporal Divergence of the Warming Hiatus over Land Based on Different Definitions of Mean Temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunlüe; Wang, Kaicun

    2016-08-17

    Existing studies of the recent warming hiatus over land are primarily based on the average of daily minimum and maximum temperatures (T2). This study compared regional warming rates of mean temperature based on T2 and T24 calculated from hourly observations available from 1998 to 2013. Both T2 and T24 show that the warming hiatus over land is apparent in the mid-latitudes of North America and Eurasia, especially in cold seasons, which is closely associated with the negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and Arctic Oscillation (AO) and cold air propagation by the Arctic-original northerly wind anomaly into mid-latitudes. However, the warming rates of T2 and T24 are significantly different at regional and seasonal scales because T2 only samples air temperature twice daily and cannot accurately reflect land-atmosphere and incoming radiation variations in the temperature diurnal cycle. The trend has a standard deviation of 0.43 °C/decade for T2 and 0.41 °C/decade for T24, and 0.38 °C/decade for their trend difference in 5° × 5° grids. The use of T2 amplifies the regional contrasts of the warming rate, i.e., the trend underestimation in the US and overestimation at high latitudes by T2.

  8. Thermophoretic migration of vesicles depends on mean temperature and head group chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, Emma L.; Kotar, Jurij; Parolini, Lucia; di Michele, Lorenzo; Cicuta, Pietro

    2017-05-01

    A number of colloidal systems, including polymers, proteins, micelles and hard spheres, have been studied in thermal gradients to observe and characterize their driven motion. Here we show experimentally the thermophoretic behaviour of unilamellar lipid vesicles, finding that mobility depends on the mean local temperature of the suspension and on the structure of the exposed polar lipid head groups. By tuning the temperature, vesicles can be directed towards hot or cold, forming a highly concentrated region. Binary mixtures of vesicles composed of different lipids can be segregated using thermophoresis, according to their head group. Our results demonstrate that thermophoresis enables robust and chemically specific directed motion of liposomes, which can be exploited in driven processes.

  9. Beyond mean-field properties of binary dipolar Bose mixtures at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastukhov, Volodymyr

    2017-02-01

    We rigorously analyze the low-temperature properties of homogeneous three-dimensional two-component Bose mixture with dipole-dipole interaction. For such a system the effective hydrodynamic action that governs the behavior of low-energy excitations is derived. The infrared structure of the exact single-particle Green's functions is obtained in terms of macroscopic parameters, namely the inverse compressibility and the superfluid density matrices. Within the one-loop approximation we calculate some of the most relevant observable quantities and give the beyond mean-field stability condition for the binary dipolar Bose gas in the dilute limit. A brief variational derivation of the coupled equations that describe macroscopic hydrodynamics of the system in the external nonuniform potential at zero temperature is presented.

  10. Significant influences of global mean temperature and ENSO on extreme rainfall over Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villafuerte, Marcelino, II; Matsumoto, Jun

    2014-05-01

    Along with the increasing concerns on the consequences of global warming, and the accumulating records of disaster related to heavy rainfall events in Southeast Asia, this study investigates whether a direct link can be detected between the rising global mean temperature, as well as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and extreme rainfall over the region. The maximum likelihood modeling that allows incorporating covariates on the location parameter of the generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution is employed. The GEV model is fitted to annual and seasonal rainfall extremes, which were taken from a high-resolution gauge-based gridded daily precipitation data covering a span of 57 years (1951-2007). Nonstationarities in extreme rainfall are detected over the central parts of Indochina Peninsula, eastern coasts of central Vietnam, northwest of the Sumatra Island, inland portions of Borneo Island, and on the northeastern and southwestern coasts of the Philippines. These nonstationarities in extreme rainfall are directly linked to near-surface global mean temperature and ENSO. In particular, the study reveals that a kelvin increase in global mean temperature anomaly can lead to an increase of 30% to even greater than 45% in annual maximum 1-day rainfall, which were observed pronouncedly over central Vietnam, southern coast of Myanmar, northwestern sections of Thailand, northwestern tip of Sumatra, central portions of Malaysia, and the Visayas island in central Philippines. Furthermore, a pronounced ENSO influence manifested on the seasonal maximum 1-day rainfall; a northward progression of 10%-15% drier condition over Southeast Asia as the El Niño develops from summer to winter is revealed. It is important therefore, to consider the results obtained here for water resources management as well as for adaptation planning to minimize the potential adverse impact of global warming, particularly on extreme rainfall and its associated flood risk over the region

  11. Thermocline Temperature Variability Reveals Shifts in the Tropical Pacific Mean State across Marine Isotope Stage 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, J. E.; Schmidt, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    The eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) is one of the most dynamic oceanographic regions, making it a critical area for understanding past climate change. Despite this, there remains uncertainty on the climatic evolution of the EEP through the last glacial period. According to the ocean dynamical thermostat theory, warming (cooling) of the tropical Pacific Ocean may lead to a more La Niña (El Niño)-like mean state due to zonally asymmetric heating and subsequent easterly (westerly) wind anomalies at the equator (Clement and Cane, 1999). Attempts to understand these feedbacks on millennial timescales across Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3) have proven to be fruitful in the western equatorial Pacific (WEP) (Stott et al., 2002), yet complimentary, high-resolution records from the EEP are lacking. To provide a more complete understanding of the feedback mechanisms of the dynamical thermostat across periods of abrupt climate change, we reconstruct thermocline temperature variability across MIS 3 from a sediment core located in the EEP, directly within the equatorial cold tongue upwelling region (core MV1014-02-17JC). Temperature anomalies in thermocline waters of the EEP are integrally linked to the ENSO system, with large positive and negative anomalies recorded during El Niño and La Niña events, respectively. Mg/Ca ratios in the thermocline-dwelling planktonic foraminifera Neogloboquadrina dutertrei were measured at 2 cm intervals, resulting in a temporal resolution of <200 years. Preliminary results across Interstadials 5-7 reveal warmer thermocline temperatures (an increase in Mg/Ca of .25 ± .02 mmol/mol) during periods of cooling following peak Interstadial warmth over Greenland, as seen from the NGRIP δ18O record. Thus, periods of cooling over Greenland appear to correspond to an El Niño-like mean state in the tropical Pacific, in line with predictions of an ocean dynamical thermostat. Interestingly, Heinrich Event 3 corresponds to cooler thermocline

  12. Climate reconstructions of the NH mean temperature: Can underestimation of trends and variability be avoided?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Bo

    2010-05-01

    Knowledge about the climate in the period before instrumental records are available is based on climate proxies obtained from tree-rings, sediments, ice-cores etc. Reconstructing the climate from such proxies is therefore necessary for studies of climate variability and for placing recent climate change into a longer term perspective. More than a decade ago pioneering attempts at using a multi-proxy dataset to reconstruct the Northern Hemisphere (NH) mean temperature resulted in the much published "hockey-stick"; a NH mean temperature that did not vary much before the rapid increase in the last century. Subsequent reconstructions show some differences but the overall "hockey-stick" structure seems to be a persistent feature However, there has been an increasing awareness of the fact that the applied reconstruction methods underestimate the low-frequency variability and trends. The recognition of the inadequacies of the reconstruction methods has to a large degree originated from pseudo-proxy studies, i.e., from long climate model experiments where artificial proxies have been generated and reconstructions based on these have been compared to the known model climate. It has also been found that reconstructions contain a large element of stochasticity which is revealed as broad distributions of skills. This means that it is very difficult to draw conclusions from a single or a few realizations. Climate reconstruction methods are based on variants of linear regression models relating temperatures and proxies. In this contribution we review some of the theory of linear regression and error-in-variables models to identify the sources of the underestimation of variability. Based on the gained insight we formulate a reconstruction method supposed to minimize this underestimation. The method is tested by applying it to an ensemble of surrogate temperature fields based on two climate simulations covering the last 500 and 1000 years. Compared to the RegEM TTLS method and a

  13. Estimating daily minimum, maximum, and mean near surface air temperature using hybrid satellite models across Israel.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Adar; Dorman, Michael; Schwartz, Joel; Novack, Victor; Just, Allan C; Kloog, Itai

    2017-08-21

    Meteorological stations measure air temperature (Ta) accurately with high temporal resolution, but usually suffer from limited spatial resolution due to their sparse distribution across rural, undeveloped or less populated areas. Remote sensing satellite-based measurements provide daily surface temperature (Ts) data in high spatial and temporal resolution and can improve the estimation of daily Ta. In this study we developed spatiotemporally resolved models which allow us to predict three daily parameters: Ta Max (day time), 24h mean, and Ta Min (night time) on a fine 1km grid across the state of Israel. We used and compared both the Aqua and Terra MODIS satellites. We used linear mixed effect models, IDW (inverse distance weighted) interpolations and thin plate splines (using a smooth nonparametric function of longitude and latitude) to first calibrate between Ts and Ta in those locations where we have available data for both and used that calibration to fill in neighboring cells without surface monitors or missing Ts. Out-of-sample ten-fold cross validation (CV) was used to quantify the accuracy of our predictions. Our model performance was excellent for both days with and without available Ts observations for both Aqua and Terra (CV Aqua R(2) results for min 0.966, mean 0.986, and max 0.967; CV Terra R(2) results for min 0.965, mean 0.987, and max 0.968). Our research shows that daily min, mean and max Ta can be reliably predicted using daily MODIS Ts data even across Israel, with high accuracy even for days without Ta or Ts data. These predictions can be used as three separate Ta exposures in epidemiology studies for better diurnal exposure assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Absolutely classical spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

  15. Behavior of zonal mean aerosol extinction ratio and its relationship with zonal mean temperature during the winter 1978-1979 stratospheric warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, P.-H.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of the zonal mean aerosol extinction ratio in the lower stratosphere near 75 deg N and its relationship with the zonal mean temperature during the January-February 1979 stratospheric sudden warming have been investigated based on the satellite sensor SAM II (Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement) and auxiliary meteorological measurements. The results indicate that distinct changes in the zonal mean aerosol extinction ratio occurred during this stratospheric sudden warming. It is also found that horizontal eddy transport due to planetary waves may have played a significant role in determining the distribution of the zonal mean aerosol extinction ratio.

  16. Analytical solution for the effect of increasing CO2 on global mean temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigley, T. M. L.; Schlesinger, M. E.

    1985-06-01

    The effect on global mean temperature of forcing by a step function change in CO2 concentration and by a steady CO2 increase is analyzed. The former case involves a response time which is strongly dependent on both the effective diffusivity of the ocean below the upper mixed layer, or kappa, and the climate sensitivity, or dT(2x). In the latter case the damped response means that, at any given time, the climate system may be quite far removed from its equilibrium with the prevailing CO2 level. In earlier work this equilibrium was expressed as lag time, but this is shown to be misleading because of the sensitivity of the lag to the history of past CO2 variations. Since both the lag and the degree of disequilibrium are strongly dependent on kappa and dT(2x), and because of uncertainties in the preindustrial CO2 level, the observed global warming over the past 100 years can be shown to be compatible with a wide range of CO2-doubling temperature changes.

  17. 'Downward control' of the mean meridional circulation and temperature distribution of the polar winter stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Rolando R.; Boville, Byron A.

    1994-01-01

    According to the 'downward control' principle, the extratropical mean vertical velocity on a given pressure level is approximately proportional to the meridional gradient of the vertically integrated zonal force per unit mass exerted by waves above that level. In this paper, a simple numerical model that includes parameterizations of both planetary and gravity wave breaking is used to explore the influence of gravity wave breaking in the mesosphere on the mean meridional circulation and temperature distribution at lower levels in the polar winter stratosphere. The results of these calculations suggest that gravity wave drag in the mesosphere can affect the state of the polar winter stratosphere down to altitudes below 30 km. The effect is most important when planetary wave driving is relatively weak: that is, during southern winter and in early northern winter. In southern winter, downwelling weakens by a factor of 2 near the stratospause and by 20% at 30 km when gravity wave drag is not included in the calculations. As a consequence, temperatures decrease considerably throughout the polar winter stratosphere (over 20 K above 40 km and as much as 8 K at 30 km, where the effect is enhanced by the long radiative relaxation timescale). The polar winter states obtained when gravity wave drag is omitted in this simple model resemble the results of simulations with some general circulation models and suggest that some of the shortcomings of the latter may be due to a deficit in mesospheric momentum deposition by small-scale gravity waves.

  18. Monthly mean global climatology of temperature, wind, geopotential height, and pressure for 0 - 120 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Eric L.; Chandra, Sushil; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Barnett, John J.

    1988-01-01

    A monthly mean climatology is presented of temperature, wind, and geopotential height with nearly pole-to-pole coverage (80 S to 80 N) for 0 to 210 km, which can be used as a function of altitude and pressure. The purpose is to provide a reference for various atmospheric research and analysis activities. Data sources and methods of computation are described; in general, hydrostatic and thermal wind balance are maintained at all levels and latitudes. As observed in a series of cross-sectional plots, this climatology accurately reproduces most of the characteristic features of the atmosphere such as equatorial wind and the general structure of the tropopause, stratopause, and mesopause. A series of zonal wind profiles is also represented comparing this climatological wind with monthly mean climatological direct wind measurements in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The temperature and zonal wind climatology at stratospheric levels is compared with corresponding data from the National Meteorological Center, and general agreement is observed between the two data sets. Tables of the climatological values as a function of latitude and height for each month are contained in Appendix B, and are also available in floppy disk.

  19. Cenozoic mean greenhouse gases and temperature changes with reference to the Anthropocene.

    PubMed

    Glikson, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    Cenozoic greenhouse gases (GHG) variations and warming periods underscore the extreme rates of current climate change, with major implications for the adaptability and survivability of terrestrial and marine habitats. Current rise rate of greenhouse gases, reaching 3.3 ppm CO2 per year during March 2015-2016, is the fastest recorded since the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Event (PETM) when carbon release to the atmosphere was about an order of magnitude less than at present. The ice core evidence of concentration of (GHG) and temperatures in the atmosphere/ocean/cryosphere system over the last 740 kyr suggests that the rate of rise in GHG over the last ~260 years, CO2 rates rising from 0.94 ppm yr(-1) in 1959 (315.97 ppm) to 1.62 ppm yr(-1) in 2000 (369.52 ppm) to 3.05 ppm yr(-1) in 2015 (400.83 ppm), constitutes a unique spike in the history of the atmosphere. The reliance of pre-740 kyr paleoclimate estimates on multiple proxies, including benthic and plankton fossils, fossil plants, residual organic matter, major and trace elements in fossils, sediments and soils, place limits on the resolution of pre-upper Pleistocene paleoclimate estimates, rendering it likely recorded mean Cenozoic paleoclimate trends may conceal abrupt short-term climate fluctuations. However, as exemplified by the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) and earlier GHG and temperature spikes associated with major volcanic and asteroid impact events, the long-term residence time of CO2 in the atmosphere extends the signatures of abrupt warming events to within detection limits of multiple paleoproxies. The mean post-1750 temperature rise rate (approximately ~0.0034 °C per yr, or ~0.008 °C per yr where temperature is not masked by sulfur aerosols) exceeds those of the PETM (approximately ~0.0008-0.0015 °C per yr) by an order of magnitude and mean glacial termination warming rates (last glacial termination [LGT] ~ 0.00039; Eemian ~0.0004 °C per yr) by near to an order of magnitude

  20. Estimation of offshore humidity fluxes from sonic and mean temperature profile data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, R. J.; Emeis, S. M.

    2009-09-01

    A new simple method is employed to estimate the virtual potential temperature flux in marine conditions in the absence of any reliable hygrometry measurements. The estimate is made from a combination of sonic and cup anemometer measurements. Since the measurement of temperature by a sonic is humidity dependent, it overestimates the heat flux by a magnitude of 0.51?w?q?, where ? is the potential temperature in Kelvin and w?q? is the humidity flux. However, the quantity of interest for many applications is the virtual potential temperature flux w???v, which itself overestimates the heat flux by a magnitude of 0.61?w?q?. The virtual potential temperature flux is thus estimated by w-???v = w???s + 0.1?w?q?, (1) where w???s is the measured sonic anemometer heat flux. To properly estimate w?q?, fast response hygrometers are required, but in their absence, mean measurements can be used. While we have access to standard hygrometers, there are reasons to question the validity of results from these. Therefore, we propose that w???v be estimated by equating the stability parameter z?L, where z is the height and L the Obukhov length (which contains w???v and hence eq. (1)) with the bulk Richardson number and solving for w?q?, giving ( 3 --?? ) w-?q? = - 10 u*Rb-+ w-?-s . kzg ?v (2) Upon substituting eq. (2) into (1), and comparing terms on the right hand side of eq. (1), it is found that the contribution of the moisture term is an order of magnitude greater than that of the sonic measurement. This result is broadly consistent with previously published measurements, for example by Sempreviva and Gryning (1996) and Edson et al. (2004), of humidity fluxes using fast-response hygrometers in marine environments. We conclude that moisture effects are the chief determinant of instability in the marine surface layer. Consequently, the not unusual neglect of humidity effects in analytical and modelling efforts will result in a poor estimation of such quantities as the Obukhov length

  1. Conductive and evaporative precooling lowers mean skin temperature and improves time trial performance in the heat.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, S H; Hupperets, M; Hodder, S G; Havenith, G

    2015-06-01

    Self-paced endurance performance is compromised by moderate-to-high ambient temperatures that are evident in many competitive settings. It has become common place to implement precooling prior to competition in an attempt to alleviate perceived thermal load and performance decline. The present study aimed to investigate precooling incorporating different cooling avenues via either evaporative cooling alone or in combination with conductive cooling on cycling time trial performance. Ten trained male cyclists completed a time trial on three occasions in hot (35 °C) ambient conditions with the cooling garment prepared by (a) immersion in water (COOL, evaporative); (b) immersion in water and frozen (COLD, evaporative and conductive); or (c) no precooling (CONT). COLD improved time trial performance by 5.8% and 2.6% vs CONT and COOL, respectively (both P < 0.05). Power output was 4.5% higher for COLD vs CONT (P < 0.05). Mean skin temperature was lower at the onset of the time trial following COLD compared with COOL and CONT (both P < 0.05) and lasted for the first 20% of the time trial. Thermal sensation was perceived cooler following COOL and COLD. The combination of evaporative and conductive cooling (COLD) had the greatest benefit to performance, which is suggested to be driven by reduced skin temperature following cooling.

  2. Numerical study of heterogeneous mean temperature and shock wave in a resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Takeru

    2015-10-28

    When a frequency of gas oscillation in an acoustic resonator is sufficiently close to one of resonant frequencies of the resonator, the amplitude of gas oscillation becomes large and hence the nonlinear effect manifests itself. Then, if the dissipation effects due to viscosity and thermal conductivity of the gas are sufficiently small, the gas oscillation may evolve into the acoustic shock wave, in the so-called consonant resonators. At the shock front, the kinetic energy of gas oscillation is converted into heat by the dissipation process inside the shock layer, and therefore the temperature of the gas in the resonator rises. Since the acoustic shock wave travels in the resonator repeatedly over and over again, the temperature rise becomes noticeable in due course of time even if the shock wave is weak. We numerically study the gas oscillation with shock wave in a resonator of square cross section by solving the initial and boundary value problem of the system of three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with a finite difference method. In this case, the heat conduction across the boundary layer on the wall of resonator causes a spatially heterogeneous distribution of mean (time-averaged) gas temperature.

  3. Numerical study of heterogeneous mean temperature and shock wave in a resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Takeru

    2015-10-01

    When a frequency of gas oscillation in an acoustic resonator is sufficiently close to one of resonant frequencies of the resonator, the amplitude of gas oscillation becomes large and hence the nonlinear effect manifests itself. Then, if the dissipation effects due to viscosity and thermal conductivity of the gas are sufficiently small, the gas oscillation may evolve into the acoustic shock wave, in the so-called consonant resonators. At the shock front, the kinetic energy of gas oscillation is converted into heat by the dissipation process inside the shock layer, and therefore the temperature of the gas in the resonator rises. Since the acoustic shock wave travels in the resonator repeatedly over and over again, the temperature rise becomes noticeable in due course of time even if the shock wave is weak. We numerically study the gas oscillation with shock wave in a resonator of square cross section by solving the initial and boundary value problem of the system of three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with a finite difference method. In this case, the heat conduction across the boundary layer on the wall of resonator causes a spatially heterogeneous distribution of mean (time-averaged) gas temperature.

  4. Mid-Piacensian mean annual sea surface temperature: an analysis for data-model comparisons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, Harry J.; Robinson, Marci M.; Foley, Kevin M.; Stoll, Danielle K.

    2010-01-01

    Numerical models of the global climate system are the primary tools used to understand and project climate disruptions in the form of future global warming. The Pliocene has been identified as the closest, albeit imperfect, analog to climate conditions expected for the end of this century, making an independent data set of Pliocene conditions necessary for ground truthing model results. Because most climate model output is produced in the form ofmean annual conditions, we present a derivative of the USGS PRISM3 Global Climate Reconstruction which integrates multiple proxies of sea surface temperature (SST) into single surface temperature anomalies. We analyze temperature estimates from faunal and floral assemblage data,Mg/Ca values and alkenone unsaturation indices to arrive at a single mean annual SST anomaly (Pliocene minus modern) best describing each PRISM site, understanding that multiple proxies should not necessarily show concordance. The power of themultiple proxy approach lies within its diversity, as no two proxies measure the same environmental variable. This data set can be used to verify climate model output, to serve as a starting point for model inter-comparisons, and for quantifying uncertainty in Pliocene model prediction in perturbed physics ensembles.

  5. Bias correction in Global Mean Temperature comparisons between Global Climate Models and implications for the deterministic and stochastic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Sandra; Stainforth, David; Watkins, Nicholas

    2017-04-01

    Global mean temperature (GMT) provides a simple means of benchmarking a broad ensemble of global climate models (GCMs) against past observed GMT which in turn provide headline assessments of the consequences of possible future forcing scenarios. The slow variations of past changes in GMT seen in different GCMs track each other [1] and the observed GMT reasonably closely. However, the different GCMs tend to generate GMT time-series which have absolute values that are offset with respect to each other [2]. Subtracting these offsets is an integral part of comparisons between ensembles of GCMs and observed past GMT. We will discuss how this constrains how the GCMs are related to each other. The GMT of a given GCM is a macroscopic reduced variable that tracks a subset of the full information contained in the time evolving solution of that GCM. If the GMT slow timescale dynamics of different GCMs is to a good approximation the same, subject to a linear translation, then the phenomenology captured by this dynamics is essentially linear; any feedback is to leading order linear in GMT. It then follows that a linear energy balance evolution equation for GMT is sufficient to reproduce the slow timescale GMT dynamics, provided that the appropriate effective heat capacity and feedback parameters are known. As a consequence, the GCM's GMT timeseries may underestimate the impact of, and uncertainty in, the outcomes of future forcing scenarios. The offset subtraction procedure identifies a slow time-scale dynamics in model generated GMT. Fluctuations on much faster timescales do not typically track each other from one GCM to another, with the exception of major forcing events such as volcanic eruptions. This suggests that the GMT time-series can be decomposed into a slow and fast timescale which naturally leads to stochastic reduced energy balance models for GMT. [1] IPCC Chapter 9 P743 and fig 9.8,IPCC TS.1 [2] see e.g. [Mauritsen et al., Tuning the Climate of a Global Model

  6. Leaf litter decomposition rates increase with rising mean annual temperature in Hawaiian tropical montane wet forests.

    PubMed

    Bothwell, Lori D; Selmants, Paul C; Giardina, Christian P; Litton, Creighton M

    2014-01-01

    Decomposing litter in forest ecosystems supplies nutrients to plants, carbon to heterotrophic soil microorganisms and is a large source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Despite its essential role in carbon and nutrient cycling, the temperature sensitivity of leaf litter decay in tropical forest ecosystems remains poorly resolved, especially in tropical montane wet forests where the warming trend may be amplified compared to tropical wet forests at lower elevations. We quantified leaf litter decomposition rates along a highly constrained 5.2 °C mean annual temperature (MAT) gradient in tropical montane wet forests on the Island of Hawaii. Dominant vegetation, substrate type and age, soil moisture, and disturbance history are all nearly constant across this gradient, allowing us to isolate the effect of rising MAT on leaf litter decomposition and nutrient release. Leaf litter decomposition rates were a positive linear function of MAT, causing the residence time of leaf litter on the forest floor to decline by ∼31 days for each 1 °C increase in MAT. Our estimate of the Q 10 temperature coefficient for leaf litter decomposition was 2.17, within the commonly reported range for heterotrophic organic matter decomposition (1.5-2.5) across a broad range of ecosystems. The percentage of leaf litter nitrogen (N) remaining after six months declined linearly with increasing MAT from ∼88% of initial N at the coolest site to ∼74% at the warmest site. The lack of net N immobilization during all three litter collection periods at all MAT plots indicates that N was not limiting to leaf litter decomposition, regardless of temperature. These results suggest that leaf litter decay in tropical montane wet forests may be more sensitive to rising MAT than in tropical lowland wet forests, and that increased rates of N release from decomposing litter could delay or prevent progressive N limitation to net primary productivity with climate warming.

  7. Database applicaton for absolute spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, Valery V.; Shumko, Sergiy

    2002-12-01

    32-bit database application with multidocument interface for Windows has been developed to calculate absolute energy distributions of observed spectra. The original database contains wavelength calibrated observed spectra which had been already passed through apparatus reductions such as flatfielding, background and apparatus noise subtracting. Absolute energy distributions of observed spectra are defined in unique scale by means of registering them simultaneously with artificial intensity standard. Observations of sequence of spectrophotometric standards are used to define absolute energy of the artificial standard. Observations of spectrophotometric standards are used to define optical extinction in selected moments. FFT algorithm implemented in the application allows performing convolution (deconvolution) spectra with user-defined PSF. The object-oriented interface has been created using facilities of C++ libraries. Client/server model with Windows Socket functionality based on TCP/IP protocol is used to develop the application. It supports Dynamic Data Exchange conversation in server mode and uses Microsoft Exchange communication facilities.

  8. 46 CFR 154.1836 - Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... temperature control. 154.1836 Section 154.1836 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1836 Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature... cargo pressure and temperature control system under §§ 154.701 through 154.709 is operating and that...

  9. 46 CFR 154.1836 - Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... temperature control. 154.1836 Section 154.1836 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1836 Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature... cargo pressure and temperature control system under §§ 154.701 through 154.709 is operating and that...

  10. 46 CFR 154.1836 - Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... temperature control. 154.1836 Section 154.1836 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1836 Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature... cargo pressure and temperature control system under §§ 154.701 through 154.709 is operating and that...

  11. 46 CFR 154.1836 - Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... temperature control. 154.1836 Section 154.1836 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1836 Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature... cargo pressure and temperature control system under §§ 154.701 through 154.709 is operating and that...

  12. 46 CFR 154.1836 - Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... temperature control. 154.1836 Section 154.1836 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1836 Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature... cargo pressure and temperature control system under §§ 154.701 through 154.709 is operating and that...

  13. Absolute Bioavailability of Tasimelteon.

    PubMed

    Torres, Rosarelis; Dressman, Marlene A; Kramer, William G; Baroldi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Tasimelteon is a novel dual melatonin receptor agonist and is the first treatment approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Disorder. This study was conducted to assess the absolute bioavailability of tasimelteon and to further assess the single-dose pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of oral and intravenous (IV) routes of administration of the drug. This study was an open-label, single-dose, randomized, 2-period, 2-treatment, 2-sequence, crossover study in which 14 healthy volunteers were randomly administered tasimelteon as either a 20-mg capsule or IV administration of 2 mg infused over 30 minutes. Each subject received both treatments in a random order, separated by a washout period of 5 ± 2 days. The total clearance and volume of distribution of tasimelteon, from the IV treatment, were 505 mL per minute and 42.7 L, respectively. Based on the statistical comparison of dose-corrected area under the curve to infinity, the absolute bioavailability was 38%, with a 90% confidence interval of 27%-54%. The mean elimination half-life was the same for the oral and IV routes. The exposure ratios, oral-to-IV, for metabolites M9, M11, M12, and M13, were 133.27%, 118.28%, 138.76%, and 112.36%, respectively, suggesting presystemic or first-pass metabolism. Three (21.4%) subjects experienced a treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAE) during the study. All TEAEs were mild, considered related to study medication, and consistent with what has been seen in other studies. There were no deaths, serious adverse events, or discontinuations due to TEAEs. Both tasimelteon treatments were well tolerated during the study.

  14. Projected Changes in Seasonal Mean Temperature and Rainfall (2011-2040) in Cagayan Valley, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basconcillo, J. Q.; Lucero, A. J. R.; Solis, A. S.; Kanamaru, H.; Sandoval, R. S.; Bautista, E. U.

    2014-12-01

    Among Filipinos, a meal is most often considered incomplete without rice. There is a high regard for rice in the entire archipelago that in 2012, the country's rice production was accounted to more than 18 million tons with an equivalent harvested area of 4.7 million hectares. This means that from the 5.4 million hectares of arable land in the Philippines, 11 percent are found and being utilized for rice production in Cagayan Valley (CV). In the same year, more than 13 percent of the country's total annual rice production was produced in CV. Rice production also provides employment to 844,000 persons (out of 1.4 million persons) which suggest that occupation and livelihood in Cagayan Valley are strongly anchored in rice production. These figures outline the imaginable vulnerability of rice production in CV amidst varying issues such as land conversion, urbanization, increase in population, retention of farming households, and climate change. While all these issues are of equal importance, this paper is directed towards the understanding the projected changes in seasonal rainfall and mean temperature (2011-2040). It is envisioned by this study that a successful climate change adaptation starts with the provision of climate projections hence this paper's objective to investigate on the changes in climate patterns and extreme events. Projected changes are zonally limited to the Provinces of Cagayan, Isabela, Nueva Vizcaya, and Quirino based on the statistical downscaling of three global climate models (BCM2, CNCM3, and MPEH5) and two emission scenarios (A1B and A2). With the idea that rainfall and temperature varies with topography, the AURELHY technique was utilized in interpolating climate projections. Results obtained from the statistical downscaling showed that there will be significant climate changes from 2011-2040 in terms of rainfall and mean temperature. There are also indications of increasing frequency of extreme 24-hour rainfall and number of dry days

  15. Estimating changes in volume-weighted mean body temperature using thermometry with an individualized correction factor.

    PubMed

    Jay, Ollie; DuCharme, Michel B; Webb, Paul; Reardon, Francis D; Kenny, Glen P

    2010-08-01

    This study investigated whether the estimation error of volume-weighted mean body temperature (DeltaT(b)) using changes in core and skin temperature can be accounted for using personal and environmental parameters. Whole body calorimetry was used to directly measure DeltaT(b) in an Experimental group (EG) of 36 participants (24 males, 12 females) and a Validation group (VG) of 20 (9 males, 11 females) throughout 90 min of cycle ergometry at 40 degrees C, 30% relative humidity (RH) (n = 9 EG, 5 VG); 30 degrees C, 30% RH (n = 9 EG, 5 VG); 30 degrees C, 60% RH (n = 9 EG, 5 VG); and 24 degrees C, 30% RH (n = 9 EG, 5 VG). The core of the two-compartment thermometry model was represented by rectal temperature and the shell by a 12-point mean skin temperature (DeltaT(sk)). The estimation error (X(0)) between DeltaT(b) from calorimetry and DeltaT(b) from thermometry using core/shell weightings of 0.66/0.34, 0.79/0.21, and 0.90/0.10 was calculated after 30, 60, and 90 min of exercise, respectively. The association between X(0) and the individual variation in metabolic heat production (M - W), body surface area (BSA), body fat percentage (%fat), and body surface area-to-mass ratio (BSA/BM) as well as differences in environmental conditions (Oxford index) in the EG data were assessed using stepwise linear regression. At all time points and with all core/shell weightings tested, M - W, BSA, and Oxford index independently correlated significantly with the residual variance in X(0), but %fat and BSA/BM did not. The subsequent regression models were used to predict the thermometric estimation error (X(0_pred)) for each individual in the VG. The value estimated for X(0_pred) was then added to the DeltaT(b) estimated using the two-compartment thermometry models yielding an adjusted estimation (DeltaT(b)_(adj)) for the individuals in the VG. When comparing DeltaT(b)_(adj) to the DeltaT(b) derived from calorimetry in the VG, the best performing model used a core/shell weighting of 0

  16. The effect of radiation screens on Nordic time series of mean temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordli, P. Ø.; Alexandersson, H.; Frich, P.; Førland, E. J.; Heino, R.; Jónsson, T.; Tuomenvirta, H.; Tveito, O. E.

    1997-12-01

    A short survey of the historical development of temperature radiation screens is given based upon research in the archives of the Nordic meteorological institutes. In the middle of the nineteenth century most thermometer stands were open shelters, free-standing or fastened to a window or wall. Most of these were soon replaced by wall or window screens, i.e. small wooden or metal cages. Large free-standing screens were also introduced in the nineteenth century, but it took to the 1980s before they had replaced the wall screens completely in all Nordic countries. During recent years, small cylindrical screens suitable for automatic weather stations have been introduced. At some stations they have replaced the ordinary free-standing screen as part of a gradual move towards automation.The first free-standing screens used in the Nordic countries were single louvred. They were later improved by double louvres. Compared with observations from ventilated thermometers the monthly mean temperatures in the single louvred screens were 0.2-0.4°C higher during May-August, whereas in the double louvred screens the temperatures were unbiased. Unless the series are adjusted, this improvement may lead to inhomogeneities in long climatic time series.The change from wall screen to free-standing screen also involved a relocation from the microclimatic influence of a house to a location free from obstacles. Tests to evaluate the effect of relocation by parallel measurements yielded variable results. However, the bulk of the tests showed no effect of the relocation in winter, whereas in summer the wall screen tended to be slightly warmer (0.0-0.3°C) than the double louvred screen. At two Norwegian sites situated on steep valley slopes, the wall screen was ca. 0.5°C colder in midwinter.The free-standing Swedish shelter, which was used at some stations up to 1960, seems to have been overheated in spring and summer (maximum overheating of about 0.4°C in early summer). The new screen for

  17. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  18. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  19. NAO implicated as a predictor of Northern Hemisphere mean temperature multidecadal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianping; Sun, Cheng; Jin, Fei-Fei

    2013-10-01

    twentieth century Northern Hemisphere mean surface temperature (NHT) is characterized by a multidecadal warming-cooling-warming pattern followed by a flat trend since about 2000 (recent warming hiatus). Here we demonstrate that the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is implicated as a useful predictor of NHT multidecadal variability. Observational analysis shows that the NAO leads both the detrended NHT and oceanic Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) by 15-20 years. Theoretical analysis illuminates that the NAO precedes NHT multidecadal variability through its delayed effect on the AMO due to the large thermal inertia associated with slow oceanic processes. An NAO-based linear model is therefore established to predict the NHT, which gives an excellent hindcast for NHT in 1971-2011 with the recent flat trend well predicted. NHT in 2012-2027 is predicted to fall slightly over the next decades, due to the recent NAO decadal weakening that temporarily offsets the anthropogenically induced warming.

  20. A variable temperature EPR study of Mn(2+)-doped NH(4)Cl(0.9)I(0.1) single crystal at 170 GHz: zero-field splitting parameter and its absolute sign.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sushil K; Andronenko, Serguei I; Chand, Prem; Earle, Keith A; Paschenko, Sergei V; Freed, Jack H

    2005-06-01

    EPR measurements have been carried out on a single crystal of Mn(2+)-doped NH(4)Cl(0.9)I(0.1) at 170-GHz in the temperature range of 312-4.2K. The spectra have been analyzed (i) to estimate the spin-Hamiltonian parameters; (ii) to study the temperature variation of the zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameter; (iii) to confirm the negative absolute sign of the ZFS parameter unequivocally from the temperature-dependent relative intensities of hyperfine sextets at temperatures below 10K; and (iv) to detect the occurrence of a structural phase transition at 4.35K from the change in the structure of the EPR lines with temperature below 10K.

  1. Quantifying the impact of early 21st century volcanic eruptions on global-mean surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monerie, Paul-Arthur; Moine, Marie-Pierre; Terray, Laurent; Valcke, Sophie

    2017-05-01

    Despite a continuous increase in well-mixed greenhouse gases, the global-mean surface temperature has shown a quasi-stabilization since 1998. This muted warming has been linked to the combined effects of internal climate variability and external forcing. The latter includes the impact of recent increase in the volcanic activity and of solar irradiance changes. Here we used a high-resolution coupled ocean-atmosphere climate model to assess the impact of the recent volcanic eruptions on the Earth's temperature, compared with the low volcanic activity of the early 2000s. Two sets of simulations are performed, one with realistic aerosol optical depth values, and the other with a fixed value of aerosol optical depth corresponding to a period of weak volcanic activity (1998-2002). We conclude that the observed recent increase in the volcanic activity led to a reduced warming trend (from 2003 to 2012) of 0.08 °C in ten years. The induced cooling is stronger during the last five-year period (2008-2012), with an annual global mean cooling of 0.04 °C (+/- 0.04 °C). The cooling is similar in summer (0.05 °C +/- 0.04 °C cooling) than in winter (0.03 °C +/- 0.04 °C cooling), but stronger in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere. Although equatorial and Arctic precipitation decreases in summer, the change in precipitation does not indicate robust changes at a local scale. Global heat content variations are found not to be impacted by the recent increase in volcanic activity.

  2. Present and projected future mean radiant temperature for three European cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsson, Sofia; Rayner, David; Lindberg, Fredrik; Monteiro, Ana; Katzschner, Lutz; Lau, Kevin Ka-Lun; Campe, Sabrina; Katzschner, Antje; Konarska, Janina; Onomura, Shiho; Velho, Sara; Holmer, Björn

    2017-04-01

    Present-day and projected future changes in mean radiant temperature, T mrt in one northern, one mid-, and one southern European city (represented by Gothenburg, Frankfurt, and Porto), are presented, and the concept of hot spots is adopted. Air temperature, T a , increased in all cities by 2100, but changes in solar radiation due to changes in cloudiness counterbalanced or exacerbated the effects on T mrt. The number of days with high T mrt in Gothenburg was relatively unchanged at the end of the century (+1 day), whereas it more than doubled in Frankfurt and tripled in Porto. The use of street trees to reduce daytime radiant heat load was analyzed using hot spots to identify where trees could be most beneficial. Hot spots, although varying in intensity and frequency, were generally confined to near sunlit southeast-southwest facing walls, in northeast corner of courtyards, and in open spaces in all three cities. By adding trees in these spaces, the radiant heat load can be reduced, especially in spaces with no or few trees. A set of design principles for reducing the radiant heat load is outlined based on these findings and existing literature.

  3. A study of radiometric surface temperatures: Their fluctuations, distribution and meaning. [Voves, France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrier, A.; Itier, B.; Boissard, P. (Principal Investigator); Goillot, C.; Belluomo, P.; Valery, P.

    1980-01-01

    A consecutive night and day flight and measurements on the ground, were made in the region of Voves, south of Chartres. The statistical analysis of the thermal scanner data permitted the establishment of criteria for the homogeneity of surfaces. These criteria were used in defining the surface temperature values which are most representative for use in an energy balance approach to evapotranspiration (day) and heat balance (night). For a number of maize fields that airborne thermal scanner data permitted a detailed energy analysis of different fields of a same crop to be carried out. Such a detailed analysis was not necessary for a calculation of crop evapotranspiration which could be evaluated from the mean temperature of the crop surface. A differential analysis day night is of interest for enhancing the contrast between types of surfaces, as well as for a better definition of the daily energy balance. It should be stressed that, for a homogeneous region, a study such as the present one, could be carried out on a relatively small part of the total surface, as the results for a surface of 2.5 x 2 sq km were not significantly different from those obtained from a surface three times larger.

  4. Soil respiration at mean annual temperature predicts annual total across vegetation types and biomes

    PubMed Central

    Bahn, M.; Reichstein, M.; Davidson, E. A.; Grünzweig, J.; Jung, M.; Carbone, M. S.; Epron, D.; Misson, L.; Nouvellon, Y.; Roupsard, O.; Savage, K.; Trumbore, S. E.; Gimeno, C.; Yuste, J. Curiel; Tang, J.; Vargas, R.; Janssens, I. A.

    2011-01-01

    Soil respiration (SR) constitutes the largest flux of CO2 from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere. However, there still exist considerable uncertainties as to its actual magnitude, as well as its spatial and interannual variability. Based on a reanalysis and synthesis of 80 site-years for 57 forests, plantations, savannas, shrublands and grasslands from boreal to tropical climates we present evidence that total annual SR is closely related to SR at mean annual soil temperature (SRMAT), irrespective of the type of ecosystem and biome. This is theoretically expected for non water-limited ecosystems within most of the globally occurring range of annual temperature variability and sensitivity (Q10). We further show that for seasonally dry sites where annual precipitation (P) is lower than potential evapotranspiration (PET), annual SR can be predicted from wet season SRMAT corrected for a factor related to P/PET. Our finding indicates that it can be sufficient to measure SRMAT for obtaining a well constrained estimate of its annual total. This should substantially increase our capacity for assessing the spatial distribution of soil CO2 emissions across ecosystems, landscapes and regions, and thereby contribute to improving the spatial resolution of a major component of the global carbon cycle. PMID:23293656

  5. Influence of ground surface characteristics on the mean radiant temperature in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, Fredrik; Onomura, Shiho; Grimmond, C. S. B.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of variations in land cover on mean radiant temperature ( T mrt ) is explored through a simple scheme developed within the radiation model SOLWEIG. Outgoing longwave radiation is parameterised using surface temperature observations on a grass and an asphalt surface, whereas outgoing shortwave radiation is modelled through variations in albedo for the different surfaces. The influence of ground surface materials on T mrt is small compared to the effects of shadowing. Nevertheless, altering ground surface materials could contribute to a reduction in T mrt to reduce the radiant load during heat-wave episodes in locations where shadowing is not an option. Evaluation of the new scheme suggests that despite its simplicity it can simulate the outgoing fluxes well, especially during sunny conditions. However, it underestimates at night and in shadowed locations. One grass surface used to develop the parameterisation, with very different characteristics compared to an evaluation grass site, caused T mrt to be underestimated. The implications of using high temporal resolution (e.g. 15 minutes) meteorological forcing data under partly cloudy conditions are demonstrated even for fairly proximal sites.

  6. Regions of significant influence on unforced global mean surface air temperature variability in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Patrick T.; Li, Wenhong; Xie, Shang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    We document the geographic regions where local variability is most associated with unforced global mean surface air temperature (GMT) variability in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 coupled global climate models (GCMs) at both the subdecadal and interdecadal timescales. For this purpose, Regions of Significant Influence on GMT are defined as locations that have a statistically significant correlation between local surface air temperature (SAT) and GMT (with a regression slope greater than 1), and where local SAT variation leads GMT variation in time. In both GCMs and observations, subdecadal timescale GMT variability is most associated with SAT variation over the eastern equatorial Pacific. At the interdecadal timescale, GMT variability is also linked with SAT variation over the Pacific in many GCMs, but the particular spatial patterns are GCM dependent, and several GCMs indicate a primary association between GMT and SAT over the Southern Ocean. We find that it is difficult to validate GCM behavior at the interdecadal timescale because the pattern derived from observations is highly depended on the method used to remove the forced variability from the record. The magnitude of observed GMT variability is near the ensemble median at the subdecadal timescale but well above the median at the interdecadal timescale. GCMs with a stronger subdecadal relationship between GMT and SAT over the Pacific tend to have more variable subdecadal GMT while GCMs with a stronger interdecadal relationship between GMT and SAT over parts of the Southern Ocean tend to have more variable GMT.

  7. Thermodynamic properties of rhodium at high temperature and pressure by using mean field potential approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Priyank; Bhatt, Nisarg K.; Vyas, Pulastya R.; Gohel, Vinod B.

    2016-10-01

    The thermophysical properties of rhodium are studied up to melting temperature by incorporating anharmonic effects due to lattice ions and thermally excited electrons. In order to account anharmonic effects due to lattice vibrations, we have employed mean field potential (MFP) approach and for thermally excited electrons Mermin functional. The local form of the pseudopotential with only one effective adjustable parameter rc is used to construct MFP and hence vibrational free energy due to ions - Fion. We have studied equation of state at 300 K and further, to access the applicability of present conjunction scheme, we have also estimated shock-Hugoniot and temperature along principle Hugoniot. We have carried out the study of temperature variation of several thermophysical properties like thermal expansion (βP), enthalpy (EH), specific heats at constant pressure and volume (CP and CV), specific heats due to lattice ions and thermally excited electrons ( and , isothermal and adiabatic bulk moduli (BT and Bs) and thermodynamic Gruneisen parameter (γth) in order to examine the inclusion of anharmonic effects in the present study. The computed results are compared with available experimental results measured by using different methods and previously obtained theoretical results using different theoretical philosophy. Our computed results are in good agreement with experimental findings and for some physical quantities better or comparable with other theoretical results. We conclude that local form of the pseudopotential used accounts s-p-d hybridization properly and found to be transferable at extreme environment without changing the values of the parameter. Thus, even the behavior of transition metals having complexity in electronic structure can be well understood with local pseudopotential without any modification in the potential at extreme environment. Looking to the success of present scheme (MFP + pseudopotential) we would like to extend it further for the

  8. Relative fragmentation in ternary systems within the temperature-dependent relativistic mean-field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, M. T. Senthil; Kumar, Bharat; Balasubramaniam, M.; Agrawal, B. K.; Patra, S. K.

    2017-06-01

    For the first time, we apply the temperature-dependent relativistic mean-field (TRMF) model to study the ternary fragmentation of heavy nuclei using the level density approach. The relative fragmentation probability of a particular fragment is obtained by evaluating the convolution integrals that employ the excitation energy and the level density parameter for a given temperature calculated within the TRMF formalism. To illustrate, we have considered the ternary fragmentations in 252Cf, 242Pu, and 236U with a fixed third fragment A3=48Ca , 20O, and 16O, respectively. The relative fragmentation probabilities are studied for the temperatures T =1 , 2, and 3 MeV. For the comparison, the relative fragmentation probabilities are also calculated from the single-particle energies of the finite range droplet model (FRDM). In general, the larger phase space for the ternary fragmentation is observed indicating that such fragmentations are most probable ones. For T =2 and 3 MeV, Sn +Ni +Ca is the most probable combination for the nucleus 252Cf. However, for the nuclei 242Pu and 236U, the maximum fragmentation probabilities at T =2 MeV differ from those at T =3 MeV. For T =3 MeV, the closed shell (Z =8 ) light-mass fragment with its corresponding partners has larger scission point probabilities. But, at T =2 MeV, Si, P, and S are favorable fragments with the corresponding partners. It is noticed that the symmetric binary fragmentation along with the fixed third fragment for 242Pu and 236U is also favored at T =1 MeV.

  9. Updating temperature and salinity mean values and trends in the Western Mediterranean: The RADMED project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Yáñez, M.; García-Martínez, M. C.; Moya, F.; Balbín, R.; López-Jurado, J. L.; Serra, M.; Zunino, P.; Pascual, J.; Salat, J.

    2017-09-01

    The RADMED project is devoted to the implementation and maintenance of a multidisciplinary monitoring system around the Spanish Mediterranean waters. This observing system is based on periodic multidisciplinary cruises covering the coastal waters, continental shelf and slope waters and some deep stations (>2000 m) from the Westernmost Alboran Sea to Barcelona in the Catalan Sea, including the Balearic Islands. This project was launched in 2007 unifying and extending some previous monitoring projects which had a more reduced geographical coverage. Some of the time series currently available extend from 1992, while the more recent ones were initiated in 2007. The present work updates the available time series up to 2015 (included) and shows the capability of these time series for two main purposes: the calculation of mean values for the properties of main water masses around the Spanish Mediterranean, and the study of the interannual and decadal variability of such properties. The data set provided by the RADMED project has been merged with historical data from the MEDAR/MEDATLAS data base for the calculation of temperature and salinity trends from 1900 to 2015. The analysis of these time series shows that the intermediate and deep layers of the Western Mediterranean have increased their temperature and salinity with an acceleration of the warming and salting trends from 1943. Trends for the heat absorbed by the water column for the 1943-2015 period, range between 0.2 and 0.6 W/m2 depending on the used methodology. The temperature and salinity trends for the same period and for the intermediate layer are 0.002 °C/yr and 0.001 yr-1 respectively. Deep layers warmed and increased their salinity at a rate of 0.004 °C/yr and 0.001 yr-1.

  10. Gravity Wave Variance in LIMS Temperatures. Part II: Comparison with the Zonal-Mean Momentum Balance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Gille, John C.

    1996-02-01

    Zonal-mean gravity wave variance in the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) temperature data is seen to correlate strongly with the residual term in the LIMS zonal-mean momentum budget throughout much of the observed mesosphere. This momentum residual is attributed to gravity wave momentum transport at scales that cannot be directly sampled by the LIMS instrument Correlation is highest in the vicinity of the fall and winter mesospheric jets, where both gravity wave variance and momentum residual reach their largest values. Correlation is also high in the Southern Hemisphere subtropical mesophere, where gravity wave variance and the momentum residual have broad temporal maxima during the easterly acceleration of the stratopause semi-annual oscillation (SAO). This subtropical correlation has important implications for the SAO eastward acceleration, which several studies suggest is forced by gravity wave momentum flux divergence. Correlation between gravity wave variance and inferred gravity wave momentum flux divergence is unexpected because variance is dominated by large scales and long periods (inertio-gravity waves), while both theoretical arguments and ground-based observations indicate that momentum transport is dominated by periods under 1 h. The results of this study suggest a broadband gravity wave field experiencing forcing and loss processes, which are largely independent of frequency.

  11. Iron overload detection in rats by means of a susceptometer operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinelli, M.; Gianesin, B.; Avignolo, C.; Minganti, V.; Parodi, S.

    2008-12-01

    Biosusceptometry is a non-invasive procedure for determination of iron overload in a human body; it is essentially an assessment of the diamagnetic (water) and paramagnetic (iron) properties of tissues. We measured in vivo iron overload in the liver region of 12 rats by a room temperature susceptometer. The rats had been injected with sub-toxic doses of iron dextran. A quantitative relationship has been observed between the measurements and the number of treatments. The assessment of iron overload requires evaluating the magnetic signal corresponding to the same rat ideally without the overload. This background value was extrapolated on the basis of the signal measured in control rats versus body weight (R2 = 0.73). The mean iron overload values for the treated rats, obtained after each iron injection, were significantly different from the means of the corresponding control rats (p < 0.01). The in vivo measurements have been complemented by chemical analysis on excised livers and other organs (R2 = 0.89). The magnetic moment of iron atoms in liver tissues was measured to be 3.6 Bohr magneton. Evaluation of the background signal is the limit to the measure; the error corresponds to about 30 mg (1 SD) of iron while the instrument sensitivity is more than a factor of 10 better.

  12. Particle-number projection in the finite-temperature mean-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanto, P.; Alhassid, Y.; Bertsch, G. F.

    2017-07-01

    Finite-temperature mean-field theories, such as the Hartree-Fock (HF) and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) theories, are formulated in the grand-canonical ensemble, and their applications to the calculation of statistical properties of nuclei such as level densities require a reduction to the canonical ensemble. In a previous publication [Y. Alhassid et al., Phys. Rev. C 93, 044320 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevC.93.044320], it was found that ensemble-reduction methods based on the saddle-point approximation are not reliable in cases in which rotational symmetry or particle-number conservation is broken. In particular, the calculated HFB canonical entropy can be unphysical as a result of the inherent violation of particle-number conservation. In this work, we derive a general formula for exact particle-number projection after variation in the HFB approximation, assuming that the HFB Hamiltonian preserves time-reversal symmetry. This formula reduces to simpler known expressions in the HF and Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) limits of the HFB. We apply this formula to calculate the thermodynamic quantities needed for level densities in the heavy nuclei 162Dy, 148Sm, and 150Sm. We find that the exact particle-number projection gives better physical results and is significantly more computationally efficient than the saddle-point methods. However, the fundamental limitations caused by broken symmetries in the mean-field approximation are still present.

  13. Are recent global mean temperature trends anomalous relative to the CMIP5 ensemble?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M.; Huybers, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have described a slow-down in the rise in global mean temperature over the past 15 years, noting that these trends are anomalous with respect to the trends predicted by the CMIP5 ensemble. This result has been shown to be sensitive to the choice of starting year when assessing the hiatus with a simple linear regression. It is also sensitive to assumptions about the independence of CMIP5 ensemble members when estimating distributions of the CMIP5 ensemble. We address these interdependences of ensemble members by exploring two end-member scenarios of the CMIP5 ensemble: one in which each ensemble member is assumed independent and a second in which modeling centers are assumed independent. A more stable metric of trend, the δ-slope, is employed to measure the recent divergence of a temperature time-series from the average CMIP5 projection. When treating each CMIP5 ensemble member as independent, we find that observed recent trends are anomalous for all hiatus periods starting after 1997 at the 95% confidence level. However, for the scenario assuming modeling centers to be independent, we find that observed recent trends are consistent with the CMIP5 ensemble at the 95% confidence level. This result holds across all plausible hiatus starting years tested (1990-2005). Using the Ansari-Bradley rank-sum test, seven modeling centers comprising 58 ensemble members are each shown to have lower spread in δ-slope values than the distribution of δ slope values of CMIP5 ensemble members outside each modeling center at the 95% confidence level. This supports the end-member scenario that treats each modeling center as independent. In addition, examination of spatial patterns of δ-slope in each CMIP5 ensemble member reveals that the simulation that is closest to observations in global mean temperature δ-slope value also has one of the highest δ-slope spatial pattern correlations with observations. This pattern reflects a strong negative phase of the Pacific

  14. Temperature and bath size in exact diagonalization dynamical mean field theory.

    PubMed

    Liebsch, Ansgar; Ishida, Hiroshi

    2012-02-08

    Dynamical mean field theory (DMFT), combined with finite-temperature exact diagonalization, is one of the methods used to describe electronic properties of strongly correlated materials. Because of the rapid growth of the Hilbert space, the size of the finite bath used to represent the infinite lattice is severely limited. In view of the increasing interest in the effect of multi-orbital and multi-site Coulomb correlations in transition metal oxides, high-T(c) cuprates, iron-based pnictides, organic crystals, etc, it is appropriate to explore the range of temperatures and bath sizes in which exact diagonalization provides accurate results for various system properties. On the one hand, the bath must be large enough to achieve a sufficiently dense level spacing, so that useful spectral information can be derived, especially close to the Fermi level. On the other hand, for an adequate projection of the lattice Green's function onto a finite bath, the choice of the temperature is crucial. The role of these two key ingredients in exact diagonalization DMFT is discussed for a wide variety of systems in order to establish the domain of applicability of this approach. Three criteria are used to illustrate the accuracy of the results: (i) the convergence of the self-energy with the bath size, (ii) the quality of the discretization of the bath Green's function, and (iii) comparisons with complementary results obtained via continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo DMFT. The materials comprise a variety of three-orbital and five-orbital systems, as well as single-band Hubbard models for two-dimensional triangular, square and honeycomb lattices, where non-local Coulomb correlations are important. The main conclusion from these examples is that a larger number of correlated orbitals or sites requires a smaller number of bath levels. Down to temperatures of 5-10 meV (for typical bandwidths W ≈ 2 eV) two bath levels per correlated impurity orbital or site are usually adequate.

  15. Electron cyclotron emission spectra in X- and O-mode polarisation at JET: Martin-Puplett interferometer, absolute calibration, revised uncertainties, inboard/outboard temperature profile, and wall properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmuck, S.; Fessey, J.; Boom, J. E.; Meneses, L.; Abreu, P.; Belonohy, E.; Lupelli, I.

    2016-09-01

    At the tokamak Joint European Torus (JET), the electron cyclotron emission spectra in O-mode and X-mode polarisations are diagnosed simultaneous in absolute terms for several harmonics with two Martin-Puplett interferometers. From the second harmonic range in X-mode polarisation, the electron temperature profile can be deduced for the outboard side (low magnetic field strength) of JET but only for some parts of the inboard side (high magnetic field strength). This spatial restriction can be bypassed, if a cutoff is not present inside the plasma for O-mode waves in the first harmonic range. Then, from this spectral domain, the profile on the entire inboard side is accessible. The profile determination relies on the new absolute and independent calibration for both interferometers. During the calibration procedure, the antenna pattern was investigated as well, and, potentially, an increase in the diagnostic responsivity of about 5% was found for the domain 100-300 GHz. This increase and other uncertainty sources are taken into account in the thorough revision of the uncertainty for the diagnostic absolute calibration. The uncertainty deduced and the convolution inherent for Fourier spectroscopy diagnostics have implications for the temperature profile inferred. Having probed the electron cyclotron emission spectra in orthogonal polarisation directions for the first harmonic range, a condition is derived for the reflection and polarisation-scrambling coefficients of the first wall on the outboard side of JET.

  16. Temperature dependence for the absolute rate constant for the reaction CH/sub 2/OH + O/sub 2/. -->. HO/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/CO from 215 to 300 K

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, F.L.; Payne, W.A.; Stief, L.J.

    1988-07-14

    The absolute rate constant for the reaction CH/sub 2/OH + O/sub 2/ ..-->.. HO/sub 2/ + H/sub 2/CO has been determined from 215 to 300 K in a discharge flow system at 1-Torr pressure. The decay of CH/sub 2/OH was monitored in excess O/sub 2/ by collision-free sampling mass spectrometry. The temperature dependence observed is quite different from the usual Arrhenius form. For the 215-250 K interval, an activation energy of 3.4 kcal/mol is obtained. Above 250 K, the rate constant increases at a slower rate; previous high-temperature studies (1000-2000 K) again show a faster increase in the rate constant. A possible explanation for these observations is that the reaction mechanism changes from addition at low temperature to direct abstraction at high temperatures.

  17. Ecosystem carbon storage does not vary with mean annual temperature in Hawaiian tropical montane wet forests.

    PubMed

    Selmants, Paul C; Litton, Creighton M; Giardina, Christian P; Asner, Gregory P

    2014-09-01

    Theory and experiment agree that climate warming will increase carbon fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The effect of this increased exchange on terrestrial carbon storage is less predictable, with important implications for potential feedbacks to the climate system. We quantified how increased mean annual temperature (MAT) affects ecosystem carbon storage in above- and belowground live biomass and detritus across a well-constrained 5.2 °C MAT gradient in tropical montane wet forests on the Island of Hawaii. This gradient does not systematically vary in biotic or abiotic factors other than MAT (i.e. dominant vegetation, substrate type and age, soil water balance, and disturbance history), allowing us to isolate the impact of MAT on ecosystem carbon storage. Live biomass carbon did not vary predictably as a function of MAT, while detrital carbon declined by ~14 Mg of carbon ha(-1) for each 1 °C rise in temperature - a trend driven entirely by coarse woody debris and litter. The largest detrital pool, soil organic carbon, was the most stable with MAT and averaged 48% of total ecosystem carbon across the MAT gradient. Total ecosystem carbon did not vary significantly with MAT, and the distribution of ecosystem carbon between live biomass and detritus remained relatively constant across the MAT gradient at ~44% and ~56%, respectively. These findings suggest that in the absence of alterations to precipitation or disturbance regimes, the size and distribution of carbon pools in tropical montane wet forests will be less sensitive to rising MAT than predicted by ecosystem models. This article also provides needed detail on how individual carbon pools and ecosystem-level carbon storage will respond to future warming. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Validation of the mean radiant temperature simulated by the RayMan software in urban environments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunjung; Mayer, Helmut

    2016-11-01

    The RayMan software is worldwide applied in investigations on different issues in human-biometeorology. However, only the simulated mean radiant temperature (T mrt) has been validated so far in a few case studies. They are based on T mrt values, which were experimentally determined in urban environments by use of a globe thermometer or applying the six-directional method. This study analyses previous T mrt validations in a comparative manner. Their results are extended by a recent validation of T mrt in an urban micro-environment in Freiburg (southwest Germany), which can be regarded as relatively heterogeneous due to different shading intensities by tree crowns. In addition, a validation of the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) simulated by RayMan is conducted for the first time. The validations are based on experimentally determined T mrt and PET values, which were calculated from measured meteorological variables in the daytime of a clear-sky summer day. In total, the validation results show that RayMan is capable of simulating T mrt satisfactorily under relatively homogeneous site conditions. However, the inaccuracy of simulated T mrt is increasing with lower sun elevation and growing heterogeneity of the simulation site. As T mrt represents the meteorological variable that mostly governs PET in the daytime of clear-sky summer days, the accuracy of simulated T mrt is mainly responsible for the accuracy of simulated PET. The T mrt validations result in some recommendations, which concern an update of physical principles applied in the RayMan software to simulate the short- and long-wave radiant flux densities, especially from vertical building walls and tree crowns.

  19. Validation of the mean radiant temperature simulated by the RayMan software in urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunjung; Mayer, Helmut

    2016-11-01

    The RayMan software is worldwide applied in investigations on different issues in human-biometeorology. However, only the simulated mean radiant temperature ( T mrt) has been validated so far in a few case studies. They are based on T mrt values, which were experimentally determined in urban environments by use of a globe thermometer or applying the six-directional method. This study analyses previous T mrt validations in a comparative manner. Their results are extended by a recent validation of T mrt in an urban micro-environment in Freiburg (southwest Germany), which can be regarded as relatively heterogeneous due to different shading intensities by tree crowns. In addition, a validation of the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) simulated by RayMan is conducted for the first time. The validations are based on experimentally determined T mrt and PET values, which were calculated from measured meteorological variables in the daytime of a clear-sky summer day. In total, the validation results show that RayMan is capable of simulating T mrt satisfactorily under relatively homogeneous site conditions. However, the inaccuracy of simulated T mrt is increasing with lower sun elevation and growing heterogeneity of the simulation site. As T mrt represents the meteorological variable that mostly governs PET in the daytime of clear-sky summer days, the accuracy of simulated T mrt is mainly responsible for the accuracy of simulated PET. The T mrt validations result in some recommendations, which concern an update of physical principles applied in the RayMan software to simulate the short- and long-wave radiant flux densities, especially from vertical building walls and tree crowns.

  20. Association between mean and interannual equatorial Indian Ocean subsurface temperature bias in a coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, G.; Chowdary, Jasti S.; Gnanaseelan, C.; Prasad, K. V. S. R.; Karmakar, Ananya; Parekh, Anant

    2017-05-01

    In the present study the association between mean and interannual subsurface temperature bias over the equatorial Indian Ocean (EIO) is investigated during boreal summer (June through September; JJAS) in the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System (CFSv2) hindcast. Anomalously high subsurface warm bias (greater than 3 °C) over the eastern EIO (EEIO) region is noted in CFSv2 during summer, which is higher compared to other parts of the tropical Indian Ocean. Prominent eastward current bias in the upper 100 m over the EIO region induced by anomalous westerly winds is primarily responsible for subsurface temperature bias. The eastward currents transport warm water to the EEIO and is pushed down to subsurface due to downwelling. Thus biases in both horizontal and vertical currents over the EIO region support subsurface warm bias. The evolution of systematic subsurface warm bias in the model shows strong interannual variability. These maximum subsurface warming episodes over the EEIO are mainly associated with La Niña like forcing. Strong convergence of low level winds over the EEIO and Maritime continent enhanced the westerly wind bias over the EIO during maximum warming years. This low level convergence of wind is induced by the bias in the gradient in the mean sea level pressure with positive bias over western EIO and negative bias over EEIO and parts of western Pacific. Consequently, changes in the atmospheric circulation associated with La Niña like conditions affected the ocean dynamics by modulating the current bias thereby enhancing the subsurface warm bias over the EEIO. It is identified that EEIO subsurface warming is stronger when La Niña co-occurred with negative Indian Ocean Dipole events as compared to La Niña only years in the model. Ocean general circulation model (OGCM) experiments forced with CFSv2 winds clearly support our hypothesis that ocean dynamics influenced by westerly winds bias is primarily

  1. Intercomparison of prediction skills of ensemble methods using monthly mean temperature simulated by CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Min-Gyu; Suh, Myoung-Seok; Kim, Chansoo

    2017-08-01

    This study focuses on an objective comparison of eight ensemble methods using the same data, training period, training method, and validation period. The eight ensemble methods are: BMA (Bayesian Model Averaging), HMR (Homogeneous Multiple Regression), EMOS (Ensemble Model Output Statistics), HMR+ with positive coefficients, EMOS+ with positive coefficients, PEA_ROC (Performance-based Ensemble Averaging using ROot mean square error and temporal Correlation coefficient), WEA_Tay (Weighted Ensemble Averaging based on Taylor's skill score), and MME (Multi-Model Ensemble). Forty-five years (1961-2005) of data from 14 CMIP5 models and APHRODITE (Asian Precipitation- Highly-Resolved Observational Data Integration Towards Evaluation of Water Resources) data were used to compare the performance of the eight ensemble methods. Although some models underestimated the variability of monthly mean temperature (MMT), most of the models effectively simulated the spatial distribution of MMT. Regardless of training periods and the number of ensemble members, the prediction skills of BMA and the four multiple linear regressions (MLR) were superior to the other ensemble methods (PEA_ROC, WEA_Tay, MME) in terms of deterministic prediction. In terms of probabilistic prediction, the four MLRs showed better prediction skills than BMA. However, the differences among the four MLRs and BMA were not significant. This resulted from the similarity of BMA weights and regression coefficients. Furthermore, prediction skills of the four MLRs were very similar. Overall, the four MLRs showed the best prediction skills among the eight ensemble methods. However, more comprehensive work is needed to select the best ensemble method among the numerous ensemble methods.

  2. The observed sensitivity of high clouds to mean surface temperature anomalies in the tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelinka, Mark D.; Hartmann, Dennis L.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud feedback represents the source of largest diversity in projections of future warming. Observational constraints on both the sign and magnitude of the feedback are limited, since it is unclear how the natural variability that can be observed is related to secular climate change, and analyses have rarely been focused on testable physical theories for how clouds should respond to climate change. In this study we use observations from a suite of satellite instruments to assess the sensitivity of tropical high clouds to interannual tropical mean surface temperature anomalies. We relate cloud changes to a physical governing mechanism that is sensitive to the vertical structure of warming. Specifically, we demonstrate that the mean and interannual variability in both the altitude and fractional coverage of tropical high clouds as measured by CloudSat, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, and the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project are well diagnosed by upper tropospheric convergence computed from the mass and energy budget of the clear-sky atmosphere. Observed high clouds rise approximately isothermally in accordance with theory and exhibit an overall reduction in coverage when the tropics warms, similar to their behavior in global warming simulations. Such cloud changes cause absorbed solar radiation to increase more than does outgoing longwave radiation, resulting in a positive but statistically insignificant net high cloud feedback in response to El Niño-Southern Oscillation. The results suggest that the convergence metric based on simple mass and energy budget constraints may be a powerful tool for understanding observed and modeled high cloud behavior and for evaluating the realism of modeled high cloud changes in response to a variety of forcings.

  3. Base flow-driven shifts in tropical stream temperature regimes across a mean annual rainfall gradient

    Treesearch

    Ayron M. Strauch; Richard A. MacKenzie; Ralph W. Tingley

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is expected to affect air temperature and watershed hydrology, but the degree to which these concurrent changes affect stream temperature is not well documented in the tropics. How stream temperature varies over time under changing hydrologic conditions is difficult to isolate from seasonal changes in air temperature. Groundwater and bank storage...

  4. Absolute Standards for Climate Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, J.

    2016-10-01

    In a world of changing climate, political uncertainty, and ever-changing budgets, the benefit of measurements traceable to SI standards increases by the day. To truly resolve climate change trends on a decadal time scale, on-orbit measurements need to be referenced to something that is both absolute and unchanging. One such mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to definitively quantify climate change. In the CLARREO mission, we will utilize phase change cells in which a material is melted to calibrate the temperature of a blackbody that can then be observed by a spectrometer. A material's melting point is an unchanging physical constant that, through a series of transfers, can ultimately calibrate a spectrometer on an absolute scale. CLARREO consists of two primary instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer and a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy to calibrate other space-based instrumentation and thus transferring the absolute traceability. The status of various mission options will be presented.

  5. On the Trend of the Annual Mean, Maximum, and Minimum Temperature and the Diurnal Temperature Range in the Armagh Observatory, Northern Ireland, Dataset, 1844 -2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Examined are the annual averages, 10-year moving averages, decadal averages, and sunspot cycle (SC) length averages of the mean, maximum, and minimum surface air temperatures and the diurnal temperature range (DTR) for the Armagh Observatory, Northern Ireland, during the interval 1844-2012. Strong upward trends are apparent in the Armagh surface-air temperatures (ASAT), while a strong downward trend is apparent in the DTR, especially when the ASAT data are averaged by decade or over individual SC lengths. The long-term decrease in the decadaland SC-averaged annual DTR occurs because the annual minimum temperatures have risen more quickly than the annual maximum temperatures. Estimates are given for the Armagh annual mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures and the DTR for the current decade (2010-2019) and SC24.

  6. The contribution of greenhouse gases to the recent slowdown in global-mean temperature trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checa-Garcia, R.; Shine, K. P.; Hegglin, M. I.

    2016-09-01

    The recent slowdown in the rate of increase in global-mean surface temperature (GMST) has generated extensive discussion, but little attention has been given to the contribution of time-varying trends in greenhouse gas concentrations. We use a simple model approach to quantify this contribution. Between 1985 and 2003, greenhouse gases (including well-mixed greenhouse gases, tropospheric and stratospheric ozone, and stratospheric water vapour from methane oxidation) caused a reduction in GMST trend of around 0.03-0.05 K decade-1 which is around 18%-25% of the observed trend over that period. The main contributors to this reduction are the rapid change in the growth rates of ozone-depleting gases (with this contribution slightly opposed by stratospheric ozone depletion itself) and the weakening in growth rates of methane and tropospheric ozone radiative forcing. Although CO2 is the dominant greenhouse gas contributor to GMST trends, the continued increase in CO2 concentrations offsets only about 30% of the simulated trend reduction due to these other contributors. These results emphasize that trends in non-CO2 greenhouse gas concentrations can make significant positive and negative contributions to changes in the rate of warming, and that they need to be considered more closely in analyses of the causes of such variations.

  7. R-vine models for spatial time series with an application to daily mean temperature.

    PubMed

    Erhardt, Tobias Michael; Czado, Claudia; Schepsmeier, Ulf

    2015-06-01

    We introduce an extension of R-vine copula models to allow for spatial dependencies and model based prediction at unobserved locations. The proposed spatial R-vine model combines the flexibility of vine copulas with the classical geostatistical idea of modeling spatial dependencies using the distances between the variable locations. In particular, the model is able to capture non-Gaussian spatial dependencies. To develop and illustrate our approach, we consider daily mean temperature data observed at 54 monitoring stations in Germany. We identify relationships between the vine copula parameters and the station distances and exploit these in order to reduce the huge number of parameters needed to parametrize a 54-dimensional R-vine model fitted to the data. The new distance based model parametrization results in a distinct reduction in the number of parameters and makes parameter estimation and prediction at unobserved locations feasible. The prediction capabilities are validated using adequate scoring techniques, showing a better performance of the spatial R-vine copula model compared to a Gaussian spatial model.

  8. Daily Mean Temperature and Clinical Kidney Stone Presentation in Five U.S. Metropolitan Areas: A Time-Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Jose E.; Gasparrini, Antonio; Saigal, Christopher S.; Horton, Benjamin P.; Landis, J. Richard; Madison, Rodger; Keren, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Background: High ambient temperatures are a risk factor for nephrolithiasis, but the precise relationship between temperature and kidney stone presentation is unknown. Objectives: Our objective was to estimate associations between mean daily temperature and kidney stone presentation according to lag time and temperatures. Methods: Using a time-series design and distributed lag nonlinear models, we estimated the relative risk (RR) of kidney stone presentation associated with mean daily temperatures, including cumulative RR for a 20-day period, and RR for individual daily lags through 20 days. Our analysis used data from the MarketScan Commercial Claims database for 60,433 patients who sought medical evaluation or treatment of kidney stones from 2005–2011 in the U.S. cities of Atlanta, Georgia; Chicago, Illinois; Dallas, Texas; Los Angeles, California; and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Results: Associations between mean daily temperature and kidney stone presentation were not monotonic, and there was variation in the exposure–response curve shapes and the strength of associations at different temperatures. However, in most cases RRs increased for temperatures above the reference value of 10°C. The cumulative RR for a daily mean temperature of 30°C versus 10°C was 1.38 in Atlanta (95% CI: 1.07, 1.79), 1.37 in Chicago (95% CI: 1.07, 1.76), 1.36 in Dallas (95% CI: 1.10, 1.69), 1.11 in Los Angeles (95% CI: 0.73, 1.68), and 1.47 in Philadelphia (95% CI: 1.00, 2.17). Kidney stone presentations also were positively associated with temperatures < 2°C in Atlanta, and < 10°C in Chicago and Philadelphia. In four cities, the strongest association between kidney stone presentation and a daily mean temperature of 30°C versus 10°C was estimated for lags of ≤ 3 days. Conclusions: In general, kidney stone presentations increased with higher daily mean temperatures, with the strongest associations estimated for lags of only a few days. These findings further support an

  9. The role of Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation in the global mean temperature variability

    DOE PAGES

    Chylek, Petr; Klett, James D.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; ...

    2016-11-01

    We simulated the global mean 1900–2015 warming by 42 Coupled Models Inter-comparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP5) climate models varies between 0.58 and 1.70 °C. The observed warming according to the NASA GISS temperature analysis is 0.95 °C with a 1200 km smoothing radius, or 0.86 °C with a 250 km smoothing radius. The projection of the future 2015–2100 global warming under a moderate increase of anthropogenic radiative forcing (RCP4.5 scenario) by individual models is between 0.7 and 2.3 °C. The CMIP5 climate models agree that the future climate will be warmer; however, there is little consensus as to how largemore » the warming will be (reflected by an uncertainty of over a factor of three). Moreover, a parsimonious statistical regression model with just three explanatory variables [anthropogenic radiative forcing due to greenhouse gases and aerosols (GHGA), solar variability, and the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO) index] accounts for over 95 % of the observed 1900–2015 temperature variance. This statistical regression model reproduces very accurately the past warming (0.96 °C compared to the observed 0.95 °C) and projects the future 2015–2100 warming to be around 0.95 °C (with the IPCC 2013 suggested RCP4.5 radiative forcing and an assumed cyclic AMO behavior). The AMO contribution to the 1970–2005 warming was between 0.13 and 0.20 °C (depending on which AMO index is used) compared to the GHGA contribution of 0.49–0.58 °C. During the twenty-first century AMO cycle the AMO contribution is projected to remain the same (0.13–0.20 °C), while the GHGA contribution is expected to decrease to 0.21–0.25 °C due to the levelling off of the GHGA radiative forcing that is assumed according to the RCP4.5 scenario. Therefore, the anthropogenic contribution and natural variability are expected to contribute about equally to the anticipated global warming during the second half of the twenty-first century for the RCP4.5 trajectory.« less

  10. The role of Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation in the global mean temperature variability

    SciTech Connect

    Chylek, Petr; Klett, James D.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Hengartner, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    We simulated the global mean 1900–2015 warming by 42 Coupled Models Inter-comparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP5) climate models varies between 0.58 and 1.70 °C. The observed warming according to the NASA GISS temperature analysis is 0.95 °C with a 1200 km smoothing radius, or 0.86 °C with a 250 km smoothing radius. The projection of the future 2015–2100 global warming under a moderate increase of anthropogenic radiative forcing (RCP4.5 scenario) by individual models is between 0.7 and 2.3 °C. The CMIP5 climate models agree that the future climate will be warmer; however, there is little consensus as to how large the warming will be (reflected by an uncertainty of over a factor of three). Moreover, a parsimonious statistical regression model with just three explanatory variables [anthropogenic radiative forcing due to greenhouse gases and aerosols (GHGA), solar variability, and the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO) index] accounts for over 95 % of the observed 1900–2015 temperature variance. This statistical regression model reproduces very accurately the past warming (0.96 °C compared to the observed 0.95 °C) and projects the future 2015–2100 warming to be around 0.95 °C (with the IPCC 2013 suggested RCP4.5 radiative forcing and an assumed cyclic AMO behavior). The AMO contribution to the 1970–2005 warming was between 0.13 and 0.20 °C (depending on which AMO index is used) compared to the GHGA contribution of 0.49–0.58 °C. During the twenty-first century AMO cycle the AMO contribution is projected to remain the same (0.13–0.20 °C), while the GHGA contribution is expected to decrease to 0.21–0.25 °C due to the levelling off of the GHGA radiative forcing that is assumed according to the RCP4.5 scenario. Therefore, the anthropogenic contribution and natural variability are expected to contribute about equally to the anticipated global warming during the second half of the twenty-first century for the RCP4.5 trajectory.

  11. The role of Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation in the global mean temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chylek, Petr; Klett, James D.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Hengartner, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    The global mean 1900-2015 warming simulated by 42 Coupled Models Inter-comparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP5) climate models varies between 0.58 and 1.70 °C. The observed warming according to the NASA GISS temperature analysis is 0.95 °C with a 1200 km smoothing radius, or 0.86 °C with a 250 km smoothing radius. The projection of the future 2015-2100 global warming under a moderate increase of anthropogenic radiative forcing (RCP4.5 scenario) by individual models is between 0.7 and 2.3 °C. The CMIP5 climate models agree that the future climate will be warmer; however, there is little consensus as to how large the warming will be (reflected by an uncertainty of over a factor of three). A parsimonious statistical regression model with just three explanatory variables [anthropogenic radiative forcing due to greenhouse gases and aerosols (GHGA), solar variability, and the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO) index] accounts for over 95 % of the observed 1900-2015 temperature variance. This statistical regression model reproduces very accurately the past warming (0.96 °C compared to the observed 0.95 °C) and projects the future 2015-2100 warming to be around 0.95 °C (with the IPCC 2013 suggested RCP4.5 radiative forcing and an assumed cyclic AMO behavior). The AMO contribution to the 1970-2005 warming was between 0.13 and 0.20 °C (depending on which AMO index is used) compared to the GHGA contribution of 0.49-0.58 °C. During the twenty-first century AMO cycle the AMO contribution is projected to remain the same (0.13-0.20 °C), while the GHGA contribution is expected to decrease to 0.21-0.25 °C due to the levelling off of the GHGA radiative forcing that is assumed according to the RCP4.5 scenario. Thus the anthropogenic contribution and natural variability are expected to contribute about equally to the anticipated global warming during the second half of the twenty-first century for the RCP4.5 trajectory.

  12. System for controlling absolute humidity in a work area

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, P.K.; Oliver, P.S.

    1987-05-05

    A system is described for controlling absolute humidity of air which is removed from an area, passed through an air washer and returned through a duct to the area. The system comprises: a first sensor located within the area for generating a first signal representative of the absolute humidity of air within the area; a second sensor located in a discharge air plenum portion of the washer for generating a second signal representative of the dry bulb temperature of air discharged from the washer; and control means responsive to the first and second signals for producing a third signal which is applied to the washer to control the dry bulb temperature of air discharged from the washer.

  13. Determination of the 1%, 2.5%, and 5% occurrences of extreme dew-point temperatures and mean coincident dry-bulb temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Colliver, D.G.; Zhang, H.; Gates, R.; Priddy, T.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of ASHRAE Research Project RP-754 was to find the outdoor design occurrences of extreme dew-point temperature and the corresponding mean coincident dry-bulb temperature for a large number of locations in North America. Thirty years of data (1961--1990) were used for 239 US locations, and the last 30 years of hourly data available (typically 1960--1989) were used for 143 Canadian locations. Tables are given that present the 1%, 2.5%, and 5% extreme summertime occurrences of dew-point temperatures and corresponding values of humidity ratios and the mean coincident dry-bulb (MCDB) temperature for the period of record. A map that shows the general geographical trends for the spatial distribution of the design dew-point values is also presented. Comparisons are provided between interpolation techniques to fill missing data, different weather data sets, and methods of calculating different definitions of extreme design and mean coincident data. Results are also reported of a comparison to evaluate the difference in humidity ratios between that calculated from the extreme design dry-bulb temperature and mean coincident wet-bulb temperature, versus that calculated from the extreme design dew-point temperature and the MCDB. It was found that the method of extreme dew point with MCDB had a higher humidity ratio that was on the average (for the 1% case and the 239 US locations) 0.00564 lb/lb larger than the humidity ratio found with the other method.

  14. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  15. Effect of mean annual temperature on nutrient return via litterfall in Hawaiian tropical montane wet forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litton, C. M.; Freeman, K. R.; Giardina, C. P.; Selmants, P.

    2012-12-01

    Rising temperatures are predicted to influence nutrient cycling and availability in terrestrial ecosystems. Changes in nutrient availability, in turn, have important implications for terrestrial ecosystem C cycling and storage. However, the magnitude and direction of temperature-induced changes in nutrient availability, as well as variations across important micro- and macronutrients, remain poorly constrained, particularly in tropical forests which play a disproportionately large role in global C cycling. The return of nutrients to soil via aboveground litterfall is a sensitive, integrated index of stand-level biogeochemical process rates. As a result, quantifying the response of nutrient return via litterfall to increases in mean annual temperature (MAT) can yield valuable insights into how whole ecosystems will respond to future warming. We examined the effects of MAT on nutrient return via litterfall over one year for nine nutrients (N, P, Ca, Mg, K, Mn, Cu, Zn and Fe) in tropical montane wet forests located across a highly constrained MAT gradient where N and P are believed to co-limit stand-level productivity. Specifically, we analyzed stand-level patterns of litterfall mass, nutrient return via litterfall, and nutrient use efficiencies across nine permanent plots spanning a 5.2°C MAT gradient (13.0 to 18.2°C; corresponding to 1,600 to 800 m a.s.l) on the Island of Hawaii. Litterfall mass increased linearly and positively with MAT, indicating that stand-level productivity increases with MAT. The return of N, K, Mg and Zn via litterfall also increased linearly with MAT, while the return of Cu via litterfall decreased linearly with MAT. Nutrient use efficiencies increased linearly with MAT for Cu and Mn, and decreased linearly with MAT for K, Mg and Zn. No patterns in P cycling were evident, despite that it is believed to co-limit productivity in these forests based on prior fertilization experiments. These data suggest that increasing MAT will increase the

  16. A new mean-extreme vector for the trends of temperature and precipitation over China during 1960-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Zhu, Zhiwei; Dong, Wenjie

    2017-06-01

    A mean-extreme (M-E) vector is defined to combine the changes of climate means and extremes. The direction of the vertical axis represents changes in means, whereas the direction of the horizontal axis represents changes in extremes. Therefore, the M-E vector can clearly reflect both the amplitude and direction of changes in climate means and extremes. Nine types of M-E vectors are defined. They are named as MuEu, MuEd, MuEz, MdEu, MdEd, MdEz, MzEu, MzEd, and MzEz. Here M and E stand for climate means and extremes, respectively, whereas u, d, and z indicate an upward, downward trend and no trend, respectively. Both temperature mean and extremely high temperature days are consistently increased (MuEu) in nearly whole China throughout four seasons. However, the MuEd-type vector dominates in some regions. The MuEd-type vector appears over the Huang Huai river basin in spring, summer and winter. For the M-E vector of temperature mean and extremely low temperature days, the MuEd-type spreads the entire China for all seasons. The M-E vector for precipitation mean and the extreme precipitation days possesses identical trends (MuEu or MdEd) despite of seasons. The MuEu-type dominates in northeastern China and west of 105°E in spring, northwestern and central/southern China in summer, west of 100°E and northeastern China in autumn, and nearly whole China in winter. Precipitation mean and extreme precipitation days are all decreased (MdEd) in the rest of China for all reasons. The trends relationship in means and extremes over China presented herein could provide a scientific foundation to predict change of extremes using change of mean as the predictor.

  17. Daily mean temperature and clinical kidney stone presentation in five U.S. metropolitan areas: a time-series analysis.

    PubMed

    Tasian, Gregory E; Pulido, Jose E; Gasparrini, Antonio; Saigal, Christopher S; Horton, Benjamin P; Landis, J Richard; Madison, Rodger; Keren, Ron

    2014-10-01

    High ambient temperatures are a risk factor for nephrolithiasis, but the precise relationship between temperature and kidney stone presentation is unknown. Our objective was to estimate associations between mean daily temperature and kidney stone presentation according to lag time and temperatures. Using a time-series design and distributed lag nonlinear models, we estimated the relative risk (RR) of kidney stone presentation associated with mean daily temperatures, including cumulative RR for a 20-day period, and RR for individual daily lags through 20 days. Our analysis used data from the MarketScan Commercial Claims database for 60,433 patients who sought medical evaluation or treatment of kidney stones from 2005-2011 in the U.S. cities of Atlanta, Georgia; Chicago, Illinois; Dallas, Texas; Los Angeles, California; and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Associations between mean daily temperature and kidney stone presentation were not monotonic, and there was variation in the exposure-response curve shapes and the strength of associations at different temperatures. However, in most cases RRs increased for temperatures above the reference value of 10°C. The cumulative RR for a daily mean temperature of 30°C versus 10°C was 1.38 in Atlanta (95% CI: 1.07, 1.79), 1.37 in Chicago (95% CI: 1.07, 1.76), 1.36 in Dallas (95% CI: 1.10, 1.69), 1.11 in Los Angeles (95% CI: 0.73, 1.68), and 1.47 in Philadelphia (95% CI: 1.00, 2.17). Kidney stone presentations also were positively associated with temperatures < 2°C in Atlanta, and < 10°C in Chicago and Philadelphia. In four cities, the strongest association between kidney stone presentation and a daily mean temperature of 30°C versus 10°C was estimated for lags of ≤ 3 days. In general, kidney stone presentations increased with higher daily mean temperatures, with the strongest associations estimated for lags of only a few days. These findings further support an adverse effect of high temperatures on nephrolithiasis.

  18. Intrinsic optimum temperature of the diamondback moth and its ecological meaning.

    PubMed

    Shi, Peijian; Li, Bai-Lian; Ge, Feng

    2012-06-01

    Temperature can notably affect development rate and intrinsic rate of increase of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella L. The intrinsic rate of increase is usually regarded as a good measure of fitness in insects, and the constant temperature at which the intrinsic rate of increase reaches its maximum is defined as the "optimal" temperature for an insect species to survive. The estimates of optimal temperature for some insects and mites are ~30°C. However, the Sharpe-Schoolfield-Ikemoto model provides an estimate about the intrinsic optimum temperature at which the probability of an enzyme being in the active state is maximal. The intrinsic optimum temperature is considered to be the most suitable temperature for an insect species to survive. The estimates of intrinsic optimum temperature for some insects and mites are ~20°C. The optimal temperature and the intrinsic optimum temperature of the diamondback moth were estimated in the current study. The former estimate is 28.4 (95% CI: 26.2-28.8°C), whereas the latter estimate is 19.4°C (95% CI: 17.9-20.5°C). Considering the daily average air temperatures during the peaks of the diamondback moth in China, the intrinsic optimum temperature of 19.4°C might represent the most suitable temperature for this insect to survive. We also discussed whether it is sounded to use the intrinsic rate of increase as the fitness. Because the intrinsic rate of increase cannot reflect the density-dependence of population and the trade-off between individual body mass and population size, it is inappropriate to equate these two concepts.

  19. Absolute CF2 density and gas temperature measurements by absorption spectroscopy in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF4/Ar plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Yao; Xu, Yong; Liu, Yong-Xin; Peng, Fei; Gong, Fa-Ping; Li, Xiao-Song; Zhu, Ai-Min; Wang, You-Nian

    2014-10-01

    Broadband ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the CF2 radical density in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF4/Ar plasmas, using the CF2 A ˜ 1 B 1 ← X ˜ 1 A 1 system of absorption spectrum. The rotational temperature of ground state CF2 and excited state CF was also estimated by using A ˜ 1 B 1 ← X ˜ 1 A 1 system and B 2 Δ - X 2 Π system, respectively. The translational gas temperature was deduced from the Doppler width of the Ar*(3P2) and Ar*(3P0) metastable atoms absorption line by using the tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The rotational temperatures of the excited state CF are about 100 K higher than those of ground state CF2, and about 200 K higher than the translational gas temperatures. The dependences of the radical CF2 density, electron density, electron temperature, rotational temperature, and gas temperature on the high frequency power and pressure have been analyzed. Furthermore, the production and loss mechanisms of CF2 radical and the gas heating mechanisms have also been discussed.

  20. Absolute CF{sub 2} density and gas temperature measurements by absorption spectroscopy in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF{sub 4}/Ar plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wen-Yao; Xu, Yong Peng, Fei; Gong, Fa-Ping; Li, Xiao-Song; Zhu, Ai-Min; Liu, Yong-Xin; Wang, You-Nian

    2014-10-15

    Broadband ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the CF{sub 2} radical density in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF{sub 4}/Ar plasmas, using the CF{sub 2} A{sup ~1}B{sub 1}←X{sup ~1}A{sub 1} system of absorption spectrum. The rotational temperature of ground state CF{sub 2} and excited state CF was also estimated by using A{sup ~1}B{sub 1}←X{sup ~1}A{sub 1} system and B{sup 2}Δ−X{sup 2}Π system, respectively. The translational gas temperature was deduced from the Doppler width of the Ar{sup *}({sup 3}P{sub 2}) and Ar{sup *}({sup 3}P{sub 0}) metastable atoms absorption line by using the tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The rotational temperatures of the excited state CF are about 100 K higher than those of ground state CF{sub 2}, and about 200 K higher than the translational gas temperatures. The dependences of the radical CF{sub 2} density, electron density, electron temperature, rotational temperature, and gas temperature on the high frequency power and pressure have been analyzed. Furthermore, the production and loss mechanisms of CF{sub 2} radical and the gas heating mechanisms have also been discussed.

  1. Considerations for the measurement of core, skin and mean body temperatures.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nigel A S; Tipton, Michael J; Kenny, Glen P

    2014-12-01

    Despite previous reviews and commentaries, significant misconceptions remain concerning deep-body (core) and skin temperature measurement in humans. Therefore, the authors have assembled the pertinent Laws of Thermodynamics and other first principles that govern physical and physiological heat exchanges. The resulting review is aimed at providing theoretical and empirical justifications for collecting and interpreting these data. The primary emphasis is upon deep-body temperatures, with discussions of intramuscular, subcutaneous, transcutaneous and skin temperatures included. These are all turnover indices resulting from variations in local metabolism, tissue conduction and blood flow. Consequently, inter-site differences and similarities may have no mechanistic relationship unless those sites have similar metabolic rates, are in close proximity and are perfused by the same blood vessels. Therefore, it is proposed that a gold standard deep-body temperature does not exist. Instead, the validity of each measurement must be evaluated relative to one's research objectives, whilst satisfying equilibration and positioning requirements. When using thermometric computations of heat storage, the establishment of steady-state conditions is essential, but for clinically relevant states, targeted temperature monitoring becomes paramount. However, when investigating temperature regulation, the response characteristics of each temperature measurement must match the forcing function applied during experimentation. Thus, during dynamic phases, deep-body temperatures must be measured from sites that track temperature changes in the central blood volume. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Plasticity of preferred body temperatures as means of coping with climate change?

    PubMed

    Gvozdík, Lumír

    2012-04-23

    Thermoregulatory behaviour represents an important component of ectotherm non-genetic adaptive capacity that mitigates the impact of ongoing climate change. The buffering role of behavioural thermoregulation has been attributed solely to the ability to maintain near optimal body temperature for sufficiently extended periods under altered thermal conditions. The widespread occurrence of plastic modification of target temperatures that an ectotherm aims to achieve (preferred body temperatures) has been largely overlooked. I argue that plasticity of target temperatures may significantly contribute to an ectotherm's adaptive capacity. Its contribution to population persistence depends on both the effectiveness of acute thermoregulatory adjustments (reactivity) in buffering selection pressures in a changing thermal environment, and the total costs of thermoregulation (i.e. reactivity and plasticity) in a given environment. The direction and magnitude of plastic shifts in preferred body temperatures can be incorporated into mechanistic models, to improve predictions of the impact of global climate change on ectotherm populations.

  3. Study on a mean radiant temperature measure tool based on an almost spherical array of radiometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, L.

    2012-11-01

    Mean radiant temperature has significant influence on indoor thermal comfort conditions. It has gained greater importance with the wider application of heating and cooling systems based on the use of large surfaces with a temperature slightly higher or lower than the indoor temperature (hot/cold floors or ceilings), because these systems operate through the radiant temperature control. The most used tool to measure radiant temperature, the globe thermometer, still has large margins of error, most of all due to the uncertainty in the evaluation of the convection heat exchanges between the globe surface and the indoor air. The feasibility of a device to measure mean radiant temperature in indoor condition, alternative to the globe-thermometer (obtained placing radiometric sensors (thermopiles) on the sides of different geometric regular solids), is proposed. The behavior has been investigated for different regular solids, such as the residual error and its dependence on walls average temperature, non-uniformity magnitude, orientation and position of the solid in the enclosure, room shape, non-uniformity temperature distribution. Icosahedron shape shows an excellent behavior, with errors lower than 0.1 K in all the examined conditions.

  4. Study on a mean radiant temperature measure tool based on an almost spherical array of radiometric sensors.

    PubMed

    Fontana, L

    2012-11-01

    Mean radiant temperature has significant influence on indoor thermal comfort conditions. It has gained greater importance with the wider application of heating and cooling systems based on the use of large surfaces with a temperature slightly higher or lower than the indoor temperature (hot/cold floors or ceilings), because these systems operate through the radiant temperature control. The most used tool to measure radiant temperature, the globe thermometer, still has large margins of error, most of all due to the uncertainty in the evaluation of the convection heat exchanges between the globe surface and the indoor air. The feasibility of a device to measure mean radiant temperature in indoor condition, alternative to the globe-thermometer (obtained placing radiometric sensors (thermopiles) on the sides of different geometric regular solids), is proposed. The behavior has been investigated for different regular solids, such as the residual error and its dependence on walls average temperature, non-uniformity magnitude, orientation and position of the solid in the enclosure, room shape, non-uniformity temperature distribution. Icosahedron shape shows an excellent behavior, with errors lower than 0.1 K in all the examined conditions.

  5. Absolute neutrino mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Silvia; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2013-04-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments firmly established non-vanishing neutrino masses, a result that can be regarded as a strong motivation to extend the Standard Model. In spite of being the lightest massive particles, neutrinos likely represent an important bridge to new physics at very high energies and offer new opportunities to address some of the current cosmological puzzles, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter. In this context, the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale is a key issue within modern High Energy Physics. The talks in this parallel session well describe the current exciting experimental activity aiming to determining the absolute neutrino mass scale and offer an overview of a few models beyond the Standard Model that have been proposed in order to explain the neutrino masses giving a prediction for the absolute neutrino mass scale and solving the cosmological puzzles.

  6. Inference of Global Mean Temperature Trend and Climate Change from MSU and AMSU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, Cuddapah; Iacovazzi, R. A., Jr.; Yoo, J.-M.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced MSU (AMSU) radiometers flown on the NOAA operational satellite series are potentially valuable as global temperature monitoring devices. Spencer and Christy pioneered the analysis of mid-tropospheric temperature, given by MSU Channel 2 (Ch 2) at 53.74 GHz, to derive the global temperature trend. Also, in addition to monitoring global temperature, these microwave radiometers have the potential to reveal interannual climate signals in tropics. We have analyzed the data of MSU Ch 2 and AMSU Ch 5 (53.6 GHz) from the NOAA operational satellites for the period 1980 to 2000, utilizing the NOAA calibration procedure. The data are corrected for the satellite orbital drift based on the temporal changes of the on-board warm blackbody temperature. From our analysis, we find that the global temperature increased at a rate of 0.13 +/- 0.05 Kdecade(sup -1) during 1980 to 2000. From an Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis of the MSU global data, we find that the mid-tropospheric temperature in middle and high latitudes responds to the ENSO forcing during the Northern Hemisphere Winter in a distinct manner. This mid-latitude response is opposite in phase to that in the tropics. This result is in accord with simulations performed with an ECMWF global spectral model. This study shows a potential use of the satellite observations for climatic change.

  7. Stratospheric dynamical effects of solar ultraviolet variations: Evidence from zonal mean ozone and temperature data

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, L.L.; Jirikowic, J.L. )

    1991-04-20

    Cross-spectral analysis of low-altitude average Nimbus 7 stratospheric and mesospheric sounder (SAMS) temperature deviations versus Nimbus 7 solar backscattered ultraviolet (SBUV) solar 205 nm flux measurements in the 1-3 mbar pressure range yields significant coherence at periods near 27 and 13 days. This supports earlier correlative evidence that the ozone response to solar ultraviolet variations is supplemented by a coupled temperature response in the upper stratosphere. Comparisons of improved one-dimensional radiative photochemical model calculations with ozone and temperature response measurements at low latitudes yields agreement only in the case of ozone at levels below 3 mbar. An additional, presumably dynamical, component of the upper stratospheric response is suggested. Cross-spectral analysis of low-latitude average SAMS temperature deviations versus higher-latitude temperature fluctuations of opposite sign in the winter hemisphere also yields significant coherency at periods near 27 and 13 days. Latitudinal temperature oscillations of this type result from interference between stationary and traveling wave components at stratospheric heights. It is therefore hypothesized that solar ultraviolet variations may force or modulate traveling waves with periods near 27 and 13 days in the upper stratosphere. The existence of such waves with higher amplitude near solar maximum than near solar minimum may help to explain observed solar cycle variations of zonally averaged winds and temperature in the upper stratosphere.

  8. Inference of Global Mean Temperature Trend and Climate Change from MSU and AMSU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, Cuddapah; Iacovazzi, R. A., Jr.; Yoo, J.-M.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) and Advanced MSU (AMSU) radiometers flown on the NOAA operational satellite series are potentially valuable as global temperature monitoring devices. Spencer and Christy pioneered the analysis of mid-tropospheric temperature, given by MSU Channel 2 (Ch 2) at 53.74 GHz, to derive the global temperature trend. Also, in addition to monitoring global temperature, these microwave radiometers have the potential to reveal interannual climate signals in tropics. We have analyzed the data of MSU Ch 2 and AMSU Ch 5 (53.6 GHz) from the NOAA operational satellites for the period 1980 to 2000, utilizing the NOAA calibration procedure. The data are corrected for the satellite orbital drift based on the temporal changes of the on-board warm blackbody temperature. From our analysis, we find that the global temperature increased at a rate of 0.13 +/- 0.05 Kdecade(sup -1) during 1980 to 2000. From an Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis of the MSU global data, we find that the mid-tropospheric temperature in middle and high latitudes responds to the ENSO forcing during the Northern Hemisphere Winter in a distinct manner. This mid-latitude response is opposite in phase to that in the tropics. This result is in accord with simulations performed with an ECMWF global spectral model. This study shows a potential use of the satellite observations for climatic change.

  9. Toward absolute chemical composition distribution measurement of polyolefins by high-temperature liquid chromatography hyphenated with infrared absorbance and light scattering detectors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dean; Shan, Colin Li Pi; Meunier, David M; Lyons, John W; Cong, Rongjuan; deGroot, A Willem

    2014-09-02

    Chemical composition distribution (CCD) is a fundamental metric for representing molecular structures of copolymers in addition to molecular weight distribution (MWD). Solvent gradient interaction chromatography (SGIC) is commonly used to separate copolymers by chemical composition in order to obtain CCD. The separation of polymer in SGIC is, however, not only affected by chemical composition but also by molecular weight and architecture. The ability to measure composition and MW simultaneously after separation would be beneficial for understanding the impact of different factors and deriving true CCD. In this study, comprehensive two-dimensional chromatography (2D) was coupled with infrared absorbance (IR5) and light scattering (LS) detectors for characterization of ethylene-propylene copolymers. Polymers were first separated by SGIC as the first dimension chromatography (D1). The separated fractions were then characterized by the second dimension (D2) size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with IR5 and LS detectors. The concentrations and compositions of the separated fractions were measured online using the IR5 detector. The MWs of the fractions were measured by the ratio of LS to IR5 signals. A metric was derived from online concentration and composition data to represent CCD breadth. The metric was shown to be independent of separation gradients for an "absolute" measurement of CCD breadth. By combining online composition and MW data, the relationship of MW as a function of chemical composition was obtained. This relationship was qualitatively consistent with the results by SEC coupled to IR5, which measures chemical composition as a function of logMW. The simultaneous measurements of composition and MW give the opportunity to study the SGIC separation mechanism and derive chain architectural characteristics of polymer chains.

  10. Changes in mean and extreme temperature and precipitation over the arid region of northwestern China: Observation and projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yujie; Zhou, Botao; Qin, Dahe; Wu, Jia; Gao, Rong; Song, Lianchun

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports a comprehensive study on the observed and projected spatiotemporal changes in mean and extreme climate over the arid region of northwestern China, based on gridded observation data and CMIP5 simulations under the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios. The observational results reveal an increase in annual mean temperature since 1961, largely attributable to the increase in minimum temperature. The annual mean precipitation also exhibits a significant increasing tendency. The precipitation amount in the most recent decade was greater than in any preceding decade since 1961. Seasonally, the greatest increase in temperature and precipitation appears in winter and in summer, respectively. Widespread significant changes in temperature-related extremes are consistent with warming, with decreases in cold extremes and increases in warm extremes. The warming of the coldest night is greater than that of the warmest day, and changes in cold and warm nights are more evident than for cold and warm days. Extreme precipitation and wet days exhibit an increasing trend, and the maximum number of consecutive dry days shows a tendency toward shorter duration. Multi-model ensemble mean projections indicate an overall continual increase in temperature and precipitation during the 21st century. Decreases in cold extremes, increases in warm extremes, intensification of extreme precipitation, increases in wet days, and decreases in consecutive dry days, are expected under both emissions scenarios, with larger changes corresponding to stronger radiative forcing.

  11. Absolute radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, John E.

    1996-11-01

    An absolute radiation detector (a cryogenic radiometer) is being developed to replace the existing UK primary national standard cryogenic radiometer with an improved uncertainty. The cryogenic radiometer will be capable of measuring black body radiation and laser radiation with an uncertainty approaching 10 ppm. From these measurements it will be possible to determine the fundamental constant, the Stefan Boltzmann constant, confirming the radiometer as an absolute detector, and link this determination to the SI unit of luminous intensity, the candela. Thus detector and source based scales/standards will be tied to an invariant physical quantity ensuring their long-term stability.

  12. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  13. Analysis of trait mean and variability versus temperature in trematode cercariae: is there scope for adaptation to global warming?

    PubMed

    Studer, A; Poulin, R

    2014-05-01

    The potential of species for evolutionary adaptation in the context of global climate change has recently come under scrutiny. Estimates of phenotypic variation in biological traits may prove valuable for identifying species, or groups of species, with greater or lower potential for evolutionary adaptation, as this variation, when heritable, represents the basis for natural selection. Assuming that measures of trait variability reflect the evolutionary potential of these traits, we conducted an analysis across trematode species to determine the potential of these parasites as a group to adapt to increasing temperatures. Firstly, we assessed how the mean number of infective stages (cercariae) emerging from infected snail hosts as well as the survival and infectivity of cercariae are related to temperature. Secondly and importantly in the context of evolutionary potential, we assessed how coefficients of variation for these traits are related to temperature, in both cases controlling for other factors such as habitat, acclimatisation, latitude and type of target host. With increasing temperature, an optimum curve was found for mean output and mean infectivity, and a linear decrease for survival of cercariae. For coefficients of variation, temperature was only an important predictor in the case of cercarial output, where results indicated that there is, however, no evidence for limited trait variation at the higher temperature range. No directional trend was found for either variation of survival or infectivity. These results, characterising general patterns among trematodes, suggest that all three traits considered may have potential to change through adaptive evolution.

  14. On the meaning of peak temperatures profiles in inverted metamorphic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duprat-Oualid, Sylvia; Yamato, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Inverted metamorphic sequences (IMS) exhibit an upwards continuous increase of peak temperatures and are common features of main thrust systems on Earth. They constitute evidence of the strong relationship existing between thermal field evolution and tectonic processes. Heat advection and shear heating are known to allow the formation of such metamorphic signatures while heat diffusion also plays an important role on temperatures distribution on both sides of the thrust. Furthermore, other advective processes such as erosion or accretion can also be responsible for local inversion of peak temperatures. However, despite of the crucial importance of all these processes for interpretating inverted peak temperatures signatures, their respective influences were never quantified and compared. In order to address this issue, we here propose an innovative coupled approach: (i) We perform 2-D numerical models of various thrust systems by taking into account different kinematic settings (convergence, erosion, accretion), thermal properties, mechanical strength and heat sources. (ii) We quantify the relative contributions of each thermal process (i.e., diffusion, advection, shear heating) to the thermal budget evolution by using dimensionless numbers. Erosion and accretion are compared apart. (iii) We analytically examine peak temperatures recorded in our numerical experiments, along profiles perpendicular to the thrust zone. Each peak temperatures profile presenting an inversion is then characterised by a function of approximation involving six meaningful parameters: the location μFF and width σFF of the peak temperature inversion, the characteristic peak temperature Tcte and gradient GLB beneath the inversion zone, the inversion related contrasts of peak temperature ∆T and gradient ∆G. This multi-approach allows in fine to quantitatively interpret any IMS in terms of involved processes. Its application to intra-continental thrust systems demonstrates that shear

  15. Measurement of strains at high temperatures by means of electro-optics holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sciammarella, Cesar A.; Bhat, G.; Vaitekunas, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    Electro-optics holographic-moire interferometry is used to measure strains at temperatures up to 1000 C. A description of the instrumentation developed to carry out the measurements is given. The data processing technique is also explained. Main problems encountered in recording patterns at high temperatures are analyzed and possible solutions are outlined. Optical results are compared with strain gage values obtained with instrumented specimens and with theoretical results. Very good agreement is found between optical, strain gage and theoretical results.

  16. Mean surface temperature prediction models for broiler chickens—a study of sensible heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Sheila Tavares; da Silva, Iran José Oliveira; Maia, Alex Sandro Campos; de Castro, Ariane Cristina; Vieira, Frederico Marcio Corrêa

    2014-03-01

    Body surface temperature can be used to evaluate thermal equilibrium in animals. The bodies of broiler chickens, like those of all birds, are partially covered by feathers. Thus, the heat flow at the boundary layer between broilers' bodies and the environment differs between feathered and featherless areas. The aim of this investigation was to use linear regression models incorporating environmental parameters and age to predict the surface temperatures of the feathered and featherless areas of broiler chickens. The trial was conducted in a climate chamber, and 576 broilers were distributed in two groups. In the first trial, 288 broilers were monitored after exposure to comfortable or stressful conditions during a 6-week rearing period. Another 288 broilers were measured under the same conditions to test the predictive power of the models. Sensible heat flow was calculated, and for the regions covered by feathers, sensible heat flow was predicted based on the estimated surface temperatures. The surface temperatures of the feathered and featherless areas can be predicted based on air, black globe or operative temperatures. According to the sensible heat flow model, the broilers' ability to maintain thermal equilibrium by convection and radiation decreased during the rearing period. Sensible heat flow estimated based on estimated surface temperatures can be used to predict animal responses to comfortable and stressful conditions.

  17. Study on the Absolute Density and Translational Temperature of Si Atoms in Very High Frequency Capacitively Coupled SiH4 Plasma with Ar, N2, and H2 Dilution Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Takayuki; Hori, Masaru; Ishida, Tetsuro; Goto, Toshio; Ito, Masafumi; Kawakami, Satoru

    2004-09-01

    The absolute densities and translational temperatures of Si atoms in very high frequency capacitively coupled SiH4 plasmas diluted with Ar, N2, and H2 gases were investigated by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with a ring dye laser and a hollow cathode lamp. It was found that the absolute density of Si atoms was of the order of 109-1010 cm-3 and the translational temperature of Si atoms ranged from 620 to 1130 K at a total pressure of 11 Pa, a dilution gas flow rate of 100 sccm, and a SiH4 flow rate of 0-15 sccm. The absolute densities and temperatures of Si atoms in plasma at an excitation frequency of 27 MHz were larger than those at 60 MHz under the conditions at the same electron density. Si atom heating was due to the energy of Si atoms released from the electron impact dissociation of SiHx (x=1--4). The translational temperatures of Si atoms in SiH4/Ar, SiH4/N2, and SiH4/H2 plasmas were evaluated to be 970, 1030, and 1130 K, respectively, at a frequency of 27 MHz, a SiH4 flow rate of 10 sccm, and a VHF power of 1500 W. The effect of Si atoms and SiH3 radicals on film deposition was investigated for SiH4/N2 in 27 MHz and 60 MHz plasmas. From the measurement using Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, the peak of the Si-H bond decreased and that of the N-H bond increased with increasing excitation frequency. Therefore, the film deposited at 60 MHz indicated a nitride-rich composition in comparison with that at 27 MHz. The contribution ratio of Si atoms to SiH3 radicals for film deposition in 27 MHz plasma was larger than that in 60 MHz plasma. These results are very important from the viewpoint of understanding neutral radical chemistries in the plasma and their related processing.

  18. A new method for the estimation of high temperature radiant heat emittance by means of aero-acoustic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greffrath, Fabian; Prieler, Robert; Telle, Rainer

    2014-11-01

    A new method for the experimental estimation of radiant heat emittance at high temperatures has been developed which involves aero-acoustic levitation of samples, laser heating and contactless temperature measurement. Radiant heat emittance values are determined from the time dependent development of the sample temperature which requires analysis of both the radiant and convective heat transfer towards the surroundings by means of fluid dynamics calculations. First results for the emittance of a corundum sample obtained with this method are presented in this article and found in good agreement with literature values.

  19. Evidence of Non-Mean-Field-Like Low-Temperature Behavior in the Edwards-Anderson Spin-Glass Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucesoy, B.; Katzgraber, Helmut G.; Machta, J.

    2012-10-01

    The three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson and mean-field Sherrington-Kirkpatrick Ising spin glasses are studied via large-scale Monte Carlo simulations at low temperatures, deep within the spin-glass phase. Performing a careful statistical analysis of several thousand independent disorder realizations and using an observable that detects peaks in the overlap distribution, we show that the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick and Edwards-Anderson models have a distinctly different low-temperature behavior. The structure of the spin-glass overlap distribution for the Edwards-Anderson model suggests that its low-temperature phase has only a single pair of pure states.

  20. Multi-Species Temperature and Proxy Reconstructions of the Tropical Pacific Mean State across Marine Isotope Stage 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, J. E.; Schmidt, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    The current climatic mean state of the Pacific is characterized by trade wind induced upwelling of cold water in the east and accumulation of warm surface waters in the west, resulting in a strong E-W sea surface temperature (SST) gradient. The initiation and propagation of ENSO events are due to perturbations in this system. Changes in the mean state have the potential to alter ENSO-related processes, feedbacks, and properties. However, it remains unclear how ENSO feedbacks interact as the mean state changes - an increasingly important question as current climate warms, potentially altering the mean state. Here, we use the abrupt climate warming events of Marine Isotope Stage 3 from 32-64 kyr as a natural experiment for understanding how the tropical Pacific mean state varied across past periods of rapid climate warming. We measured Mg/Ca ratios in the thermocline dwelling planktonic foraminifera N. dutertrei as a proxy for thermocline temperature variability from Eastern Pacific sediment core MV1014-17JC (0°10.8'S, 85°52.0'W). Reconstructing subsurface temperatures removes the seasonal cycle imprint on SSTs, and instead, thermocline temperatures vary with ENSO conditions. Our record reveals that interstadial warming events are characterized by a more El Niño-like mean state, characterized by increased thermocline temperatures up to 6°C. Thermocline warming events are more pronounced from 64-44 kyr when overall global climate was in a warmer state. Moving from 44-32 kyr, our record shows cooler thermocline temperatures, suggesting a shift to a more La Niña-like mean state, as climate began transitioning into the Glacial Maximum. We also measured Mg/Ca ratios in the surface dwelling planktonic foraminifera G. ruber. Our G. ruber SST record displays the same cooling trend as the N. dutertrei record from 64-32 kyr. SSTs cool 1-1.5°C while thermocline temperatures cool 2.5-3°C. Preliminary comparison with a SST record from the Western Pacific suggests a

  1. Multi-Species Temperature and Proxy Reconstructions of the Tropical Pacific Mean State across Marine Isotope Stage 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, K. R.; Pike, J.; McManus, J. F.; Robinson, L. F.

    2014-12-01

    The current climatic mean state of the Pacific is characterized by trade wind induced upwelling of cold water in the east and accumulation of warm surface waters in the west, resulting in a strong E-W sea surface temperature (SST) gradient. The initiation and propagation of ENSO events are due to perturbations in this system. Changes in the mean state have the potential to alter ENSO-related processes, feedbacks, and properties. However, it remains unclear how ENSO feedbacks interact as the mean state changes - an increasingly important question as current climate warms, potentially altering the mean state. Here, we use the abrupt climate warming events of Marine Isotope Stage 3 from 32-64 kyr as a natural experiment for understanding how the tropical Pacific mean state varied across past periods of rapid climate warming. We measured Mg/Ca ratios in the thermocline dwelling planktonic foraminifera N. dutertrei as a proxy for thermocline temperature variability from Eastern Pacific sediment core MV1014-17JC (0°10.8'S, 85°52.0'W). Reconstructing subsurface temperatures removes the seasonal cycle imprint on SSTs, and instead, thermocline temperatures vary with ENSO conditions. Our record reveals that interstadial warming events are characterized by a more El Niño-like mean state, characterized by increased thermocline temperatures up to 6°C. Thermocline warming events are more pronounced from 64-44 kyr when overall global climate was in a warmer state. Moving from 44-32 kyr, our record shows cooler thermocline temperatures, suggesting a shift to a more La Niña-like mean state, as climate began transitioning into the Glacial Maximum. We also measured Mg/Ca ratios in the surface dwelling planktonic foraminifera G. ruber. Our G. ruber SST record displays the same cooling trend as the N. dutertrei record from 64-32 kyr. SSTs cool 1-1.5°C while thermocline temperatures cool 2.5-3°C. Preliminary comparison with a SST record from the Western Pacific suggests a

  2. About the physical meaning of the critical temperature for catastrophic optical damage in high power quantum well laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souto, J.; Pura, J. L.; Jiménez, J.

    2016-02-01

    It is usually assumed that the catastrophic optical damage of high power laser diodes is launched when a critical local temperature (T c) is reached; temperatures ranging from 120 °C to 200 °C were experimentally reported. However, the physical meaning of T c in the degradation process is still unclear. In this work we show that, in the presence of a local heat source in the active region, the temperature of the laser structure, calculated using finite element methods, is widely inhomogeneously distributed among the different layers forming the device. This is due to the impact that the low dimensionality and the thermal boundary resistances have on the thermal transport across the laser structure. When these key factors are explicitly considered, the quantum well (QW) temperature can be several hundred degrees higher than the temperature of the guides and cladding layers. Due to the size of the experimental probes, the measured critical temperature is a weighted average over the QW, guides, and claddings. We show the existence of a large difference between the calculated average temperature, equivalent to the experimentally measured temperature, and the peak temperature localized in the QW. A parallel study on double heterostructure lasers is also included for comparison.

  3. Temperature measurement of supercooled droplet in icing phenomenon by means of dual-luminescent imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, M.; Morita, K.; Mamori, H.; Fukushima, N.; Yamamoto, M.

    2017-08-01

    The collision of a supercooled water droplet with a surface result an object creates ice accretion on the surface. The icing problem in any cold environments leads to severe damages on aircrafts, and a lot of studies on prevention and prediction techniques for icing have been conducted so far. Therefore, it is very important to know the detail of freezing mechanism of supercooled water droplets to improve the anti-and de-icing devices and icing simulation codes. The icing mechanism of a single supercooled water droplet impacting on an object surface would give us great insights for the purpose. In the present study, we develop a dual-luminescent imaging technique to measure the time-resolved temperature of a supercooled water droplet impacting on the surface under different temperature conditions. We apply this technique to measure the exact temperature of a water droplet, and to discuss the detail of the freezing process.

  4. Nuclear matter properties in the relativistic mean-field theory at finite temperature with interaction between sigma-omega mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, R. S.; Duarte, S. B.; Oliveira, J. C. T.; Chiapparini, M.

    2010-05-21

    We study the nuclear matter properties in the regime of high temperatures using a relativistic mean-field theory. Contrasting with the usual linear Walecka model, we include the sigma-omega meson coupling in order to investigate the role of this interaction in the nucleon effective mass behavior. Some numerical results are presented and discussed.

  5. Ecosystem carbon storage does not vary with increasing mean annual temperature in Hawaiian tropical montane wet forests

    Treesearch

    Paul Selmants; Creighton Litton; Christian P. Giardina; Greg P. Asner

    2014-01-01

    Theory and experiment agree that climate warming will increase carbon fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The effect of this increased exchange on terrestrial carbon storage is less predictable, with important implications for potential feedbacks to the climate system. We quantified how increased mean annual temperature (MAT) affects ecosystem...

  6. On the meaning of peak temperature profiles in inverted metamorphic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duprat-Oualid, Sylvia; Yamato, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    Inverted metamorphic sequences (IMS) are common features of main thrust systems on Earth. They exhibit an upwards continuous increase in peak temperature conditions and thereby constitute evidence of the close relationship between the thermal field evolution and tectonic processes. Heat advection and shear heating are known to allow the formation of such metamorphic signatures. Heat diffusion also plays an important role in temperature distribution on both sides of the thrust. Other advection processes such as erosion or accretion may also cause a local peak temperature inversion. Each one of these processes therefore affects the thermal field around the thrust. However, despite the crucial importance of all these processes for the interpretation of the inverted peak temperature signatures, their respective influences have never been quantified and compared all together. To address this issue, we propose an innovative coupled approach. (i) We use two-dimensional numerical models that simulate various thrust systems, allowing for a wide diversity of setups. To illustrate this study, we focus on intracontinental thrust systems for which all processes listed are likely to play a key role in the thermal evolution. We perform a parametric study including kinematic settings (i.e. convergence, erosion and accretion), thermal properties, mechanical strength and heat sources. (ii) Dimensionless numbers based on parameters are used to quantify the relative contributions of each process to the thermal budget evolution. Hence, the three thermal processes (i.e. heat diffusion, heat advection and shear heating) are compared with each other via three dimensionless combinations of the Peclet and Brinkman numbers: RDif, RAdv and RPro, respectively. Erosion and accretion are compared separately, based on a fourth dimensionless number Rea. (iii) We analytically examine the inverted peak temperature recorded along profiles that are perpendicular to the thrust zone defined in our

  7. Analysis of Annular Thermoelectric Couples with Nonuniform Temperature Distribution by Means of 3-D Multiphysics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauknecht, Andreas; Steinert, Torsten; Spengler, Carsten; Suck, Gerrit

    2013-07-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) modules with annular geometry are very attractive for waste heat recovery within the automotive world, especially when integrated as stacks into tubular heat exchangers. The required temperature difference is built up between the coolant, which flows inside an inner tube, and the exhaust gas, which flows around an outer tube. The flow pattern of the exhaust gas can be axial or circumferential, which can lead to higher heat transfer coefficients on the outer surface of the tube. However, this multidimensional construction in combination with a complex flow pattern can lead to a nonuniform heat flux. Additionally, the system experiences a nonuniform temperature distribution which consequently leads to complex conditions regarding the electrical potential. The relevant effects are investigated using a three-dimensional (3-D) numerical model implemented in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation environment Star-CCM+. The model supports temperature-dependent characteristics of the materials, contact resistances, and parasitic effects in the TE module. Furthermore, it involves techniques to quickly find the exact maximum power point of the TE module with the given boundary conditions. Using the validated model the influence of the nonuniform temperature distribution is investigated with emphasis on the electrical output and TE efficiency.

  8. Inactivation of dried bacteria and bacterial spores by means of gamma irradiation at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Emborg, C

    1974-05-01

    Dried preparations with Streptococcus faecium, strain A(2)1, and spores of Bacillus sphaericus, strain C(I)A, normally used for control of the microbiological efficiency of radiation sterilization plants and preparations with spores of Bacillus subtilis, normally used for control of sterilization by dry heat, formalin, and ethylene oxide, as well as similar preparations with Micrococcus radiodurans, strain R(1), and spores of Bacillus globigii (B. subtilis, var. niger) were gamma irradiated with dose rates from 16 to 70 krad/h at temperatures from 60 to 100 C. At 80 C the radiation response of the spore preparations was the same as at room temperature, whereas the radiation resistance of the preparations with the two vegetative strains was reduced. At 100 C the radiation response of preparations with spores of B. subtilis was unaffected by the high temperature, whereas at 16 and and 25 krad/h the radiation resistance of the radiation-resistant sporeformer B. sphaericus, strain C(I)A, was reduced to the level of radiation resistance of preparations with spores of B. subtilis. It is concluded that combinations of heat and gamma irradiation at the temperatures and dose rates tested may have very few practical applications in sterilization of medical equipment.

  9. Ammonia oxidizer populations vary with nitrogen cycling across a tropical montane mean annual temperature gradient

    Treesearch

    S. Pierre; I. Hewson; J. P. Sparks; C. M. Litton; C. Giardina; P. M. Groffman; T. J. Fahey

    2017-01-01

    Functional gene approaches have been used to better understand the roles of microbes in driving forest soil nitrogen (N) cycling rates and bioavailability. Ammonia oxidation is a rate limiting step in nitrification, and is a key area for understanding environmental constraints on N availability in forests. We studied how increasing temperature affects the role of...

  10. Leaf litter decomposition rates increase with rising mean annual temperature in Hawaiian tropical montane wet forests

    Treesearch

    Lori D. Bothwell; Paul C. Selmants; Christian P. Giardina; Creighton M. Litton

    2014-01-01

    Decomposing litter in forest ecosystems supplies nutrients to plants, carbon to heterotrophic soil microorganisms and is a large source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Despite its essential role in carbon and nutrient cycling, the temperature sensitivityof leaf litter decay in tropical forest ecosystems remains poorly resolved, especially in tropical...

  11. Monthly Mean Time Series of Temperature and Salinity in Monterey Bay, 1951-1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    series, themal conditions, water mass, seasonal changes 19 ABSTRACT (continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) Temperature and...STUDIES ........ ............... 1 B. PURPOSE ........... .................... 2 C. GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF STUDY AREA .... ....... 3 D. CALFORNIA CURRENT...SYSTEM ...... ........... 5 E. SEASONAL CHANGES IN MONTEREY BAY .... ....... 8 1. The Davidson Current Period .... ........ 8 2. The Upwelling Period

  12. Detecting and adjusting temporal inhomogeneity in Chinese mean surface air temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingxiang; Liu, Xiaoning; Zhang, Hongzheng; Thomas C., Peterson; David R., Easterling

    2004-04-01

    Adopting the Easterling-Peterson (EP) techniques and considering the reality of Chinese meteorological observations, this paper designed several tests and tested for inhomogeneities in all Chinese historical surface air temperature series from 1951 to 2001. The result shows that the time series have been widely impacted by inhomogeneities resulting from the relocation of stations and changes in local environment such as urbanization or some other factors. Among these factors, station relocations caused the largest magnitude of abrupt changes in the time series, and other factors also resulted in inhomogeneities to some extent. According to the amplitude of change of the difference series and the monthly distribution features of surface air temperatures, discontinuities identified by applying both the E-P technique and supported by China’s station history records, or by comparison with other approaches, have been adjusted. Based on the above processing, the most significant temporal inhomogeneities were eliminated, and China’s most homogeneous surface air temperature series has thus been created. Results show that the inhomogeneity testing captured well the most important change of the stations, and the adjusted dataset is more reliable than ever. This suggests that the adjusted temperature dataset has great value of decreasing the uncertaities in the study of observed climate change in China.

  13. Covariant mean-field calculations of finite-temperature nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Furnstahl; Brian D. Serot

    1990-01-01

    Hot nuclear matter is studied in the framework of quantum hadrodynamics. General principles of covariant thermodynamics and thermodynamic consistency are discussed, and these principles are illustrated by computing nuclear matter properties in an arbitrary reference frame, using the mean-field approximation to the Walecka model. The results are shown to be Lorentz covariant, and thermodynamic consistency is demonstrated by proving the equality of the ‘‘thermodynamic’’ and ‘‘hydrostatic’’ pressures. The mean-field results are used in a simple hydrodynamic picture to discuss the phenomenology of heavy-ion collisions and astrophysical systems, with an emphasis on new features that arise in a covariant approach.

  14. Hadronic matter at finite temperature and density within an effective relativistic mean-field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavagno, A.

    2012-10-01

    We study hot and dense hadronic matter by means of an effective relativistic mean-field model with the inclusion of the full octet of baryons, the Δ-isobar degrees of freedom and the lightest pseudoscalar and vector mesons. These last particles are considered by taking into account an effective chemical potential and an effective mass depending on the self-consistent interaction between baryons. The analysis is performed by requiring the Gibbs conditions on the global conservation of baryon number, electric charge fraction and zero net strangeness.

  15. Scale-dependency of the global mean surface temperature trend and its implication for the recent hiatus of global warming.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong; Franzke, Christian L E

    2015-08-11

    Studies of the global mean surface temperature trend are typically conducted at a single (usually annual or decadal) time scale. The used scale does not necessarily correspond to the intrinsic scales of the natural temperature variability. This scale mismatch complicates the separation of externally forced temperature trends from natural temperature fluctuations. The hiatus of global warming since 1999 has been claimed to show that human activities play only a minor role in global warming. Most likely this claim is wrong due to the inadequate consideration of the scale-dependency in the global surface temperature (GST) evolution. Here we show that the variability and trend of the global mean surface temperature anomalies (GSTA) from January 1850 to December 2013, which incorporate both land and sea surface data, is scale-dependent and that the recent hiatus of global warming is mainly related to natural long-term oscillations. These results provide a possible explanation of the recent hiatus of global warming and suggest that the hiatus is only temporary.

  16. Scale-dependency of the global mean surface temperature trend and its implication for the recent hiatus of global warming

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yong; Franzke, Christian L. E.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the global mean surface temperature trend are typically conducted at a single (usually annual or decadal) time scale. The used scale does not necessarily correspond to the intrinsic scales of the natural temperature variability. This scale mismatch complicates the separation of externally forced temperature trends from natural temperature fluctuations. The hiatus of global warming since 1999 has been claimed to show that human activities play only a minor role in global warming. Most likely this claim is wrong due to the inadequate consideration of the scale-dependency in the global surface temperature (GST) evolution. Here we show that the variability and trend of the global mean surface temperature anomalies (GSTA) from January 1850 to December 2013, which incorporate both land and sea surface data, is scale-dependent and that the recent hiatus of global warming is mainly related to natural long-term oscillations. These results provide a possible explanation of the recent hiatus of global warming and suggest that the hiatus is only temporary. PMID:26259555

  17. Intraseasonal Variations in Tropical Deep Convection, Tropospheric Mean Temperature and Cloud-Induced Radiative Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, Holly S.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2009-01-01

    Intraseasonal variability of deep convection represents a fundamental mode of variability in the organization of tropical convection. While most studies of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) have focused on the spatial propagation and dynamics of convectively coupled circulations, we examine the projection of ISOs on the tropically-averaged temperature and energy budget. The area of interest is the global oceans between 20oN/S. Our analysis then focuses on these questions: (i) How is tropospheric temperature related to tropical deep convection and the associated ice cloud fractional amount (ICF) and ice water path (IWP)? (ii) What is the source of moisture sustaining the convection and what role does deep convection play in mediating the PBL - free atmospheric temperature equilibration? (iii) What affect do convectively generated upper-tropospheric clouds have on the TOA radiation budget? Our methodology is similar to that of Spencer et al., (2007) with some modifications and some additional diagnostics of both clouds and boundary layer thermodynamics. A composite ISO time series of cloud, precipitation and radiation quantities built from nearly 40 events during a six-year period is referenced to the atmospheric temperature signal. The increase of convective precipitation cannot be sustained by evaporation within the domain, implying strong moisture transports into the tropical ocean area. While there is a decrease in net TOA radiation that develops after the peak in deep convective rainfall, there seems little evidence that an "Infrared Iris"- like mechanism is dominant. Rather, the cloud-induced OLR increase seems largely produced by weakened convection with warmer cloud tops. Tropical ISO events offer an accessible target for studying ISOs not just in terms of propagation mechanisms, but on their global signals of heat, moisture and radiative flux feedback processes.

  18. Intraseasonal Variations in Tropical Deep Convection, Tropospheric Mean Temperature and Cloud-Induced Radiative Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, Holly S.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2009-01-01

    Intraseasonal variability of deep convection represents a fundamental mode of variability in the organization of tropical convection. While most studies of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) have focused on the spatial propagation and dynamics of convectively coupled circulations, we examine the projection of ISOs on the tropically-averaged temperature and energy budget. The area of interest is the global oceans between 20oN/S. Our analysis then focuses on these questions: (i) How is tropospheric temperature related to tropical deep convection and the associated ice cloud fractional amount (ICF) and ice water path (IWP)? (ii) What is the source of moisture sustaining the convection and what role does deep convection play in mediating the PBL - free atmospheric temperature equilibration? (iii) What affect do convectively generated upper-tropospheric clouds have on the TOA radiation budget? Our methodology is similar to that of Spencer et al., (2007) with some modifications and some additional diagnostics of both clouds and boundary layer thermodynamics. A composite ISO time series of cloud, precipitation and radiation quantities built from nearly 40 events during a six-year period is referenced to the atmospheric temperature signal. The increase of convective precipitation cannot be sustained by evaporation within the domain, implying strong moisture transports into the tropical ocean area. While there is a decrease in net TOA radiation that develops after the peak in deep convective rainfall, there seems little evidence that an "Infrared Iris"- like mechanism is dominant. Rather, the cloud-induced OLR increase seems largely produced by weakened convection with warmer cloud tops. Tropical ISO events offer an accessible target for studying ISOs not just in terms of propagation mechanisms, but on their global signals of heat, moisture and radiative flux feedback processes.

  19. Selective determination of methyl mercury in biological samples by means of programmed temperature gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, R A; Carro, A; Rubí, E; Casais, C; Cela, R

    1993-01-01

    A programmed temperature gas chromatographic method is presented by which it is possible to carry out routine analysis of methyl mercury in biological samples prepared according to the AOAC official first action recommendations without the need for preliminary treatment of the columns. This method greatly extends the life of the columns as well as the useful time for analysis; it has good linearity and repeatability. With the proposed method a total of 36 samples can be analyzed daily.

  20. Assignment of vibrational spectral bands of kidney tissue by means of low temperature SERS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velicka, M.; Radzvilaite, M.; Ceponkus, J.; Urboniene, V.; Pucetaite, M.; Jankevicius, F.; Steiner, G.; Sablinskas, V.

    2017-02-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy is a useful method for detection of trace amounts of molecules. It has already been successfully implemented for detection of explosives, food additives, biomarkers in blood or urine, etc. In the last decade, SERS spectroscopy was introduced into the field of health sciences and has been especially focused on early disease detection. In the recent years, application of SERS spectroscopy for detection of various types of human cancerous tissues emerged. Furthermore, SERS spectroscopy of extracellular fluid shows great potential for the differentiation of normal and cancerous tissues; however, due to high variety of molecules present in such biological samples, the experimental spectrum is a combination of many different overlapping vibrational spectral bands. Thus, precise assignment of these bands to the corresponding molecular vibrations is a difficult task. In most cases, researchers try to avoid this task satisfying just with tentative assignment. In this study, low temperature SERS measurements of extracellular fluid of cancerous and healthy kidney tissue samples were carried out in order to get a deeper understanding of the nature of vibrational spectral bands present in the experimental spectrum. The SERS spectra were measured in temperature range from 300 K down to 100 K. SERS method was implemented using silver nanoparticle colloidal solution. The results of the low temperature SERS experiment were analysed and compared with the results of theoretical calculations. The analysis showed that the SERS spectrum of extracellular fluid of kidney tissue is highly influenced by the vibrational bands of adenine and Lcystine molecules.

  1. Changes in the vertical profiles of mean temperature and humidity in the Hawaiian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Henry F.; Giambelluca, Thomas W.; Eischeid, Jon K.

    2011-05-01

    Recent drought and warmer than normal temperatures affecting the Hawaiian Islands have raised concern among natural resource managers that impacts associated with global warming are becoming manifest in the region. A number of studies published over the past few decades have documented changes in the climate of Hawai'i that are generally consistent with expectations from climate change projections, such as those found in the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment report (IPCC, 2007). In this study we examine a suite of climate variables that are important from the point of view of ecosystem impacts, but that also relate to societal concerns such Island water resources. Our results are consistent with previous studies in showing a significant warming trend, especially evident at higher elevations. In particular, we document a decrease in the frequency of occurrence of freezing temperatures in the upper slopes of the higher terrain on Maui and the Big Island and a concomitant rise in the freezing level surface in the region that is in good agreement with analogous studies done for other mountainous areas of the world. Temperatures at standard reference surfaces in the free atmosphere have warmed throughout the troposphere, with a maximum near the 850 mb level. The warming peak at this level could be associated with an increased frequency of occurrence and/or lowering of the trade wind inversion layer.

  2. Ratios of Record High to Record Low Temperatures in Europe Show an Accelerating Trend Since 2000 Despite a Slowdown in Mean Temperature Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniston, M.

    2014-12-01

    The present study has examined the behavior of extreme high and low temperatures in Euirope since the mid-20th century, in terms of the ratio of number of days per year with record Tmax and record Tmin. The investigations have shown that there has been a clear and massive increase in the number of high Tmax: low Tmin ratios in the most recent decade of the 1951-2013 temperature record for 30 selected observation stations in Europe. This sharp increase is seen to occur despite an apparent hiatus - or at least a reduction in the rate of warming - since the early 2000s, as observed not only in Europe but on a hemispheric basis too. The «explosion» of record high:record low temperature ratios since 2000, despite relatively small increases in mean temperatures in the last 10-15 years of the observational record, can be explained by a non-linear (quadratic) relation between mean temperatures and the Tmax:Tmin record ratios. It is suggested here that the increases are probably a consequence of increasing dryness during the summer in the Mediterranean region (where today there are on average 30 more dry days than in the 1950s), and a reduction in the cold season conducive to snow days in Arctic summers and Northern European springs (with up to 40 days less freezing days than 60 years previously). Both effects can serve to amplify positive temperature feedbacks in the lower atmosphere that result in strong increases in the number of Tmax record high temperatures and correspondingly strong reductions in the number of Tmin record low temperatures.

  3. Documentation of a daily mean stream temperature module—An enhancement to the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanders, Michael J.; Markstrom, Steven L.; Regan, R. Steven; Atkinson, R. Dwight

    2017-09-15

    A module for simulation of daily mean water temperature in a network of stream segments has been developed as an enhancement to the U.S. Geological Survey Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS). This new module is based on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Stream Network Temperature model, a mechanistic, one-dimensional heat transport model. The new module is integrated in PRMS. Stream-water temperature simulation is activated by selection of the appropriate input flags in the PRMS Control File and by providing the necessary additional inputs in standard PRMS input files.This report includes a comprehensive discussion of the methods relevant to the stream temperature calculations and detailed instructions for model input preparation.

  4. The link between the solar dynamo and climate - The evidence from a long mean air temperature series from Northern Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, C. J.; Johnston, D. J.

    1994-09-01

    It has been shown by Friis-Christensen and Lassen (1991) that there is a close correspondence in the behavior of the mean northern hemisphere air temperature and the length of the sunspot cycle, over the period 1861-1990. This result would appear to be of considerable importance for studies of both past and future climate and suggests that as the solar dynamo speeds up it causes, by some process as yet unknown, an increase in the temperature of the Earth's troposphere. In this paper we extend the comparison between sunspot cycle length and temperature back to the late 18th century using data accumulated at Armagh Observatory since 1795. Our data strongly support the contention that solar variability has been the principal cause of temperature changes over the past two centuries.

  5. Absolute rate constant for the reaction of atomic chlorine with hydrogen peroxide vapor over the temperature range 265-400 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Whytock, D. A.; Lee, J. H.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction of atomic chlorine with hydrogen peroxide were measured from 265-400 K using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. Analytical techniques were developed to measure H2O2 under reaction conditions. Due to ambiguity in the interpretation of the analytical results, the data combine to give two equally acceptable representations of the temperature dependence. The results are compared to previous work at 298 K and are theoretically discussed in terms of the mechanism of the reaction. Additional experiments on the H + H2O2 reaction at 298 and 359 K are compared with earlier results from this laboratory and give a slightly revised bimolecular rate constant.

  6. Cryogenic temperature control by means of energy storage materials. [for long space voyages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.; Picklesimer, E. A.; Connor, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the concept of thermal control by means of physical or chemical reaction heats for applications involving the storage of cryogens during long-term space voyages. The investigation included some preliminary experimental tests of energy storage material (ESM) effectiveness. The materials considered can store and liberate large amounts of thermal energy by means of mechanisms such as sensible heat, heat of fusion, and physical or chemical reaction heat. A differential thermal analysis was utilized in the laboratory tests. Attention is given to the evaluation of cryogenic ESM thermal control concepts, the experimental determination of phase change materials characteristics, and adsorption ESMs. It is found that an ESM shield surrounded by multiple layer insulation provides the best protection for a cryogen store.

  7. Cryogenic temperature control by means of energy storage materials. [for long space voyages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodzka, P. G.; Picklesimer, E. A.; Connor, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the concept of thermal control by means of physical or chemical reaction heats for applications involving the storage of cryogens during long-term space voyages. The investigation included some preliminary experimental tests of energy storage material (ESM) effectiveness. The materials considered can store and liberate large amounts of thermal energy by means of mechanisms such as sensible heat, heat of fusion, and physical or chemical reaction heat. A differential thermal analysis was utilized in the laboratory tests. Attention is given to the evaluation of cryogenic ESM thermal control concepts, the experimental determination of phase change materials characteristics, and adsorption ESMs. It is found that an ESM shield surrounded by multiple layer insulation provides the best protection for a cryogen store.

  8. Diagnostics of Rotational Temperature and Mean Electron Energy Distribution of DC Glow Discharge Using Spectral Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Daisuke; Sasamoto, Ryo; Matsumoto, Takao; Izawa, Yasuji; Nishijima, Kiyoto

    2014-10-01

    The non-thermal plasma has been used in various application fields of manufacturing industry such as surface reforming, plasma etching, deposited film forming. The gas temperature and electron energy in non-thermal plasma play a key role of production of active species. Therefore, it is essential to understand the properties of non-thermal plasma for effective plasma applications. In this study, the two-dimensional rotational temperature and mean electron energy distribution of DC glow discharge plasma under various air pressures were observed using spectral image processing. Rotational temperature distribution was estimated from the emission intensity ratio of head and tail of 2nd positive system band of N2 (0, 2). On the other hand, mean electron energy was estimated from the emission intensity ratio of 2nd positive system band of N2 (0, 2) and 1st negative system band of N2+ (0, 0). The each spectral images were taken by an ICCD camera with narrow band-path filters respectively. As a result, the dependences of rotational temperature and mean electron energy distribution in DC glow discharge on ambient air pressure were clearly observed using spectral image processing.

  9. Trends of mean and extreme temperature indices since 1874 at low-elevation sites in the southern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnara, Yuri; Auchmann, Renate; Brönnimann, Stefan; Bozzo, Alessio; Berro, Daniele Cat; Mercalli, Luca

    2016-04-01

    We describe the recovery of three daily meteorological records for the southern Alps (Domodossola, Riva del Garda, and Rovereto), all starting in the second half of the nineteenth century. We use these new data, along with additional records, to study regional changes in the mean temperature and extreme indices of heat waves and cold spells frequency and duration over the period 1874-2015. The records are homogenized using subdaily cloud cover observations as a constraint for the statistical model, an approach that has never been applied before in the literature. A case study based on a record of parallel observations between a traditional meteorological window and a modern screen shows that the use of cloud cover can reduce the root-mean-square error of the homogenization by up to 30% in comparison to an unaided statistical correction. We find that mean temperature in the southern Alps has increased by 1.4°C per century over the analyzed period, with larger increases in daily minimum temperatures than maximum temperatures. The number of hot days in summer has more than tripled, and a similar increase is observed in duration of heat waves. Cold days in winter have dropped at a similar rate. These trends are mainly caused by climate change over the last few decades.

  10. Millimeter wave radiometry as a means of determining cometary surface and subsurface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, R. W.; Brandt, J. C.; Maran, S. P.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal emission spectra for a variety of cometary nucleus models were evaluated by a radiative transfer technique adapted from modeling of terrestrial ice and snow fields. It appears that millimeter wave sensing from an interplanetary spacecraft is the most effective available means for distinguishing between alternate models of the nucleus and for evaluating the thermal state of the layer which is below the instantaneous surface where modern theories of the nucleus indicate that sublimation of the cometary volatiles actually occurs.

  11. GASEOUS MEAN OPACITIES FOR GIANT PLANET AND ULTRACOOL DWARF ATMOSPHERES OVER A RANGE OF METALLICITIES AND TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Richard S.; Lustig-Yaeger, Jacob; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Lupu, Roxana E.; Marley, Mark S.; Lodders, Katharina

    2014-10-01

    We present new calculations of Rosseland and Planck gaseous mean opacities relevant to the atmospheres of giant planets and ultracool dwarfs. Such calculations are used in modeling the atmospheres, interiors, formation, and evolution of these objects. Our calculations are an expansion of those presented in Freedman et al. to include lower pressures, finer temperature resolution, and also the higher metallicities most relevant for giant planet atmospheres. Calculations span 1 μbar to 300 bar, and 75-4000 K, in a nearly square grid. Opacities at metallicities from solar to 50 times solar abundances are calculated. We also provide an analytic fit to the Rosseland mean opacities over the grid in pressure, temperature, and metallicity. In addition to computing mean opacities at these local temperatures, we also calculate them with weighting functions up to 7000 K, to simulate the mean opacities for incident stellar intensities, rather than locally thermally emitted intensities. The chemical equilibrium calculations account for the settling of condensates in a gravitational field and are applicable to cloud-free giant planet and ultracool dwarf atmospheres, but not circumstellar disks. We provide our extensive opacity tables for public use.

  12. An improved empirical dynamic control system model of global mean sea level rise and surface temperature change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing; Luu, Quang-Hung; Tkalich, Pavel; Chen, Ge

    2017-03-01

    Having great impacts on human lives, global warming and associated sea level rise are believed to be strongly linked to anthropogenic causes. Statistical approach offers a simple and yet conceptually verifiable combination of remotely connected climate variables and indices, including sea level and surface temperature. We propose an improved statistical reconstruction model based on the empirical dynamic control system by taking into account the climate variability and deriving parameters from Monte Carlo cross-validation random experiments. For the historic data from 1880 to 2001, we yielded higher correlation results compared to those from other dynamic empirical models. The averaged root mean square errors are reduced in both reconstructed fields, namely, the global mean surface temperature (by 24-37%) and the global mean sea level (by 5-25%). Our model is also more robust as it notably diminished the unstable problem associated with varying initial values. Such results suggest that the model not only enhances significantly the global mean reconstructions of temperature and sea level but also may have a potential to improve future projections.

  13. Gaseous Mean Opacities for Giant Planet and Ultracool Dwarf Atmospheres over a Range of Metallicities and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Richard S.; Lustig-Yaeger, Jacob; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Lupu, Roxana E.; Marley, Mark S.; Lodders, Katharina

    2014-10-01

    We present new calculations of Rosseland and Planck gaseous mean opacities relevant to the atmospheres of giant planets and ultracool dwarfs. Such calculations are used in modeling the atmospheres, interiors, formation, and evolution of these objects. Our calculations are an expansion of those presented in Freedman et al. to include lower pressures, finer temperature resolution, and also the higher metallicities most relevant for giant planet atmospheres. Calculations span 1 μbar to 300 bar, and 75-4000 K, in a nearly square grid. Opacities at metallicities from solar to 50 times solar abundances are calculated. We also provide an analytic fit to the Rosseland mean opacities over the grid in pressure, temperature, and metallicity. In addition to computing mean opacities at these local temperatures, we also calculate them with weighting functions up to 7000 K, to simulate the mean opacities for incident stellar intensities, rather than locally thermally emitted intensities. The chemical equilibrium calculations account for the settling of condensates in a gravitational field and are applicable to cloud-free giant planet and ultracool dwarf atmospheres, but not circumstellar disks. We provide our extensive opacity tables for public use.

  14. Estimating changes in mean body temperature for humans during exercise using core and skin temperatures is inaccurate even with a correction factor.

    PubMed

    Jay, Ollie; Reardon, Francis D; Webb, Paul; Ducharme, Michel B; Ramsay, Tim; Nettlefold, Lindsay; Kenny, Glen P

    2007-08-01

    Changes in mean body temperature (DeltaT(b)) estimated by the traditional two-compartment model of "core" and "shell" temperatures and an adjusted two-compartment model incorporating a correction factor were compared with values derived by whole body calorimetry. Sixty participants (31 men, 29 women) cycled at 40% of peak O(2) consumption for 60 or 90 min in the Snellen calorimeter at 24 or 30 degrees C. The core compartment was represented by esophageal, rectal (T(re)), and aural canal temperature, and the shell compartment was represented by a 12-point mean skin temperature (T(sk)). Using T(re) and conventional core-to-shell weightings (X) of 0.66, 0.79, and 0.90, mean DeltaT(b) estimation error (with 95% confidence interval limits in parentheses) for the traditional model was -95.2% (-83.0, -107.3) to -76.6% (-72.8, -80.5) after 10 min and -47.2% (-40.9, -53.5) to -22.6% (-14.5, -30.7) after 90 min. Using T(re), X = 0.80, and a correction factor (X(0)) of 0.40, mean DeltaT(b) estimation error for the adjusted model was +9.5% (+16.9, +2.1) to -0.3% (+11.9, -12.5) after 10 min and +15.0% (+27.2, +2.8) to -13.7% (-4.2, -23.3) after 90 min. Quadratic analyses of calorimetry DeltaT(b) data was subsequently used to derive best-fitting values of X for both models and X(0) for the adjusted model for each measure of core temperature. The most accurate model at any time point or condition only accounted for 20% of the variation observed in DeltaT(b) for the traditional model and 56% for the adjusted model. In conclusion, throughout exercise the estimation of DeltaT(b) using any measure of core temperature together with mean skin temperature irrespective of weighting is inaccurate even with a correction factor customized for the specific conditions.

  15. Three-dimensional interactions of mean body and local skin temperatures in the control of hand and foot blood flows.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Joanne N; Matsuda-Nakamura, Mayumi; Taylor, Nigel A S

    2014-08-01

    Much is known about the control of blood flow, yet gaps remain concerning the interactions of deep-body and peripheral thermal feedback. In this experiment, changes in the vascular tone of the hands and feet were mapped to demonstrate the separate and combined influences of mean body and local skin temperature changes. Eight males participated in three trials. Three pre-experimental conditions were established via water immersion (oesophageal temperatures: 36.1, 37.0, 38.5 °C), with core and mean skin temperatures then clamped (water-perfusion garment) whilst five thermal treatments were applied to the right hand and left foot (5, 15, 25, 33, 40 °C). This yielded 15 thermal combinations under which hand and foot blood flows were measured (displacement plethysmography). Lower volume-specific blood flows were observed at the foot for almost all temperature combinations. When thermoneutral and moderately hyperthermic, the cutaneous thermosensitivity of the hand was significantly greater: thermoneutral: 0.2 vs. 0.1 (foot) mL 100 mL(-1) min(-1) °C(-1) (P < 0.05); moderate hyperthermia: 0.4 vs. 0.2 (foot) mL 100 mL(-1) min(-1) °C(-1) (P < 0.05). The hand was 13 times more responsive to core temperature elevations than an equivalent local skin temperature change. For the foot, this thermosensitivity differed by a factor of 26. These observations identified the hands as heat radiators, with the feet resisting heat loss, and reinforce the dominance of central thermal feedback, particularly in controlling foot blood flow. However, thermosensitivity to local skin temperature changes was highly plastic, site-specific and dictated by thermal and regional variations in vaso- and venoconstrictor tone.

  16. Estimation of the postmortem interval by means of ¹H MRS of decomposing brain tissue: influence of ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Ith, Michael; Scheurer, Eva; Kreis, Roland; Thali, Michael; Dirnhofer, Richard; Boesch, Chris

    2011-08-01

    Standard methods for the estimation of the postmortem interval (PMI, time since death), based on the cooling of the corpse, are limited to about 48 h after death. As an alternative, noninvasive postmortem observation of alterations of brain metabolites by means of (1)H MRS has been suggested for an estimation of the PMI at room temperature, so far without including the effect of other ambient temperatures. In order to study the temperature effect, localized (1)H MRS was used to follow brain decomposition in a sheep brain model at four different temperatures between 4 and 26°C with repeated measurements up to 2100 h postmortem. The simultaneous determination of 25 different biochemical compounds at each measurement allowed the time courses of concentration changes to be followed. A sudden and almost simultaneous change of the concentrations of seven compounds was observed after a time span that decreased exponentially from 700 h at 4°C to 30 h at 26°C ambient temperature. As this represents, most probably, the onset of highly variable bacterial decomposition, and thus defines the upper limit for a reliable PMI estimation, data were analyzed only up to this start of bacterial decomposition. As 13 compounds showed unequivocal, reproducible concentration changes during this period while eight showed a linear increase with a slope that was unambiguously related to ambient temperature. Therefore, a single analytical function with PMI and temperature as variables can describe the time courses of metabolite concentrations. Using the inverse of this function, metabolite concentrations determined from a single MR spectrum can be used, together with known ambient temperatures, to calculate the PMI of a corpse. It is concluded that the effect of ambient temperature can be reliably included in the PMI determination by (1)H MRS. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Climate-change impact on the 20th-century relationship between the Southern Annular Mode and global mean temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guojian; Cai, Wenju

    2013-01-01

    The positive phase of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) increases global mean temperature, and contributes to a negative phase of the Southern Annular Mode (SAM), the dominant mode of climate variability in the Southern Hemisphere. This interannual relationship of a high global mean temperature associated with a negative SAM, however, is opposite to the relationship between their trends under greenhouse warming. We show that over much of the 20th century this relationship undergoes multidecadal fluctuations depending on the intensity of ENSO. During the period 1925–1955, subdued ENSO activities weakened the relationship. However, a similar weakening has occurred since the late 1970s despite the strong ENSO. We demonstrate that this recent weakening is induced by climate change in the Southern Hemisphere. Our result highlights a rare situation in which climate change signals emerge against an opposing property of interannual variability, underscoring the robustness of the recent climate change. PMID:23784087

  18. Intra-seasonal Oscillations (ISO) of Zonal-Mean Meridional Winds and Temperatures as Measured by UARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Frank T.; Mayr, Hans G.; Reber, Carl A.

    2004-01-01

    Based on an empirical analysis of measurements with the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on the UARS spacecraft in the upper mesosphere (95 km), persistent and regular intra-seasonal oscillations (ISO) with periods of about 2 to 4 months have recently been reported in the zonal-mean meridional winds. Similar oscillations have also been discussed independently in a modeling study, and they were attributed to wave-mean-flow interactions. The observed and modeled meridional wind ISOs were largely confined to low latitudes. We report here an analysis of concurrent temperature measurements on UARS, which produces oscillations similar to those seen in the meridional winds. Although the temperature oscillations are observed at lower altitudes (55 km), their phase variations with latitude are qualitatively consistent with the inferred properties seen in the meridional winds and thus provide independent evidence for the existence of ISOs in the mesosphere.

  19. A chironomid-based mean July temperature inference model from the south-east margin of the Tibetan Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Enlou; Chang, Jie; Cao, Yanmin; Tang, Hongqu; Langdon, Pete; Shulmeister, James; Wang, Rong; Yang, Xiangdong; Shen, Ji

    2017-03-01

    A chironomid-based calibration training set comprised of 100 lakes from south-western China was established. Multivariate ordination analyses were used to investigate the relationship between the distribution and abundance of chironomid species and 18 environmental variables from these lakes. Canonical correspondence analyses (CCAs) and partial CCAs showed that mean July temperature is one of the independent and significant variables explaining the second-largest amount of variance after potassium ions (K+) in 100 south-western Chinese lakes. Quantitative transfer functions were created using the chironomid assemblages for this calibration data set. The second component of the weighted-average partial least squares (WA-PLS) model produced a coefficient of determination (r2bootstrap) of 0.63, maximum bias (bootstrap) of 5.16 and root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 2.31 °C. We applied the transfer functions to a 150-year chironomid record from Tiancai Lake (26°38'3.8 N, 99°43' E; 3898 m a.s.l.), Yunnan, China, to obtain mean July temperature inferences. We validated these results by applying several reconstruction diagnostics and comparing them to a 50-year instrumental record from the nearest weather station (26°51'29.22'' N, 100°14'2.34'' E; 2390 m a.s.l.). The transfer function performs well in this comparison. We argue that this 100-lake large training set is suitable for reconstruction work despite the low explanatory power of mean July temperature because it contains a complete range of modern temperature and environmental data for the chironomid taxa observed and is therefore robust.

  20. Evidence of Non-Mean-Field-Like Low-Temperature Behavior in the Edwards-Anderson Spin-Glass Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucesoy, Burcu; Katzgraber, Helmut G.; Machta, Jonathan

    2013-03-01

    The three and four-dimensional Edwards-Anderson and mean-field Sherrington-Kirkpatrick Ising spin glasses are studied via large-scale Monte Carlo simulations at low temperatures, deep within the spin-glass phase. Performing a careful statistical analysis of several thousand independent disorder realizations and using an observable that detects peaks in the overlap distribution, we show that the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick and Edwards-Anderson models have a distinctly different low-temperature behavior. The structure of the spin-glass overlap distribution for the Edwards-Anderson model suggests that its low-temperature phase has only a single pair of pure states. J. M. and B. Y. are supported in part by the NSF (Grant No. DMR-0907235 and DMR-1208046).

  1. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  2. Investigating high mortality during the cold season: mapping mean weather patterns of temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Michael J.; Lee, Cameron C.

    2014-11-01

    Due to a number of complicating factors, cold-related mortality has long been understudied. Through a synoptic climatological, environment-to-circulation perspective, this research takes a unique approach in examining anomalous surface temperature and pressure map patterns associated with the days leading up to high-mortality, spike days for Chicago, Illinois during the cold season. Atmospheric conditions leading to spike days during the cold season were evaluated through both seasonal anomaly and 1-day anomaly maps. Results indicate that high-mortality days are typically preceded by unseasonably cold weather situated over the region from 2 to 5 days beforehand, with significantly higher than average pressure 1 to 2 days before a mortality spike. As this system moves eastward, a significant 1-day warming trend accompanying a significant drop in sea level pressure follows—occurring on the day of the mortality spike or 1 day prior. Both scenarios—cold, high pressure air exposure and the rapid change in weather—are consistent with previous literature connecting them as factors contributing to cold-related mortality increases, with this sequence possibly playing a key role in yielding mortality levels anomalous enough to meet the threshold for a spike.

  3. Absolute-structure reports.

    PubMed

    Flack, Howard D

    2013-08-01

    All the 139 noncentrosymmetric crystal structures published in Acta Crystallographica Section C between January 2011 and November 2012 inclusive have been used as the basis of a detailed study of the reporting of absolute structure. These structure determinations cover a wide range of space groups, chemical composition and resonant-scattering contribution. Defining A and D as the average and difference of the intensities of Friedel opposites, their level of fit has been examined using 2AD and selected-D plots. It was found, regardless of the expected resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, that the Friedel-difference intensities are often dominated by random uncertainty and systematic error. An analysis of data collection strategy is provided. It is found that crystal-structure determinations resulting in a Flack parameter close to 0.5 may not necessarily be from crystals twinned by inversion. Friedifstat is shown to be a robust estimator of the resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, very little affected by the particular space group of a structure nor by the occupation of special positions. There is considerable confusion in the text of papers presenting achiral noncentrosymmetric crystal structures. Recommendations are provided for the optimal way of treating noncentrosymmetric crystal structures for which the experimenter has no interest in determining the absolute structure.

  4. A Dynamic Approach to Addressing Observation-Minus-Forecast Mean Differences in a Land Surface Skin Temperature Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, Clara; Reichle, Rolf; De Lannoy, Gabrielle; Scarino, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    In land data assimilation, bias in the observation-minus-forecast (O-F) residuals is typically removed from the observations prior to assimilation by rescaling the observations to have the same long-term mean (and higher-order moments) as the corresponding model forecasts. Such observation rescaling approaches require a long record of observed and forecast estimates, and an assumption that the O-F mean differences are stationary. A two-stage observation bias and state estimation filter is presented, as an alternative to observation rescaling that does not require a long data record or assume stationary O-F mean differences. The two-stage filter removes dynamic (nonstationary) estimates of the seasonal scale O-F mean difference from the assimilated observations, allowing the assimilation to correct the model for synoptic-scale errors without adverse effects from observation biases. The two-stage filter is demonstrated by assimilating geostationary skin temperature (Tsk) observations into the Catchment land surface model. Global maps of the O-F mean differences are presented, and the two-stage filter is evaluated for one year over the Americas. The two-stage filter effectively removed the Tsk O-F mean differences, for example the GOES-West O-F mean difference at 21:00 UTC was reduced from 5.1 K for a bias-blind assimilation to 0.3 K. Compared to independent in situ and remotely sensed Tsk observations, the two-stage assimilation reduced the unbiased Root Mean Square Difference (ubRMSD) of the modeled Tsk by 10 of the open-loop values.

  5. Robust scaling with global mean temperature of future heat stress projections within CMIP5 and CESM LENS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzan, J. R.; Huber, M.

    2016-12-01

    Heat stress is of global concern because it threatens human and animal health and productivity. Here we use the HumanIndexMod to calculate 3 moist thermodynamic quantities and 9 commonly and operationally used heat stress metrics (Buzan et al., 2015). We drive the HumanIndexMod with output from CMIP5 and the Community Earth System Model Large Ensemble (LENS) using the greenhouse gasses forcing, representative concentration pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5). We limit our analysis to models that provide 4x daily output of surface pressure, reference height temperature and moisture, and use lowest model level winds where available, 18 CMIP5 and 40 LENS simulations. We show three novel results: Comparing time slices (2081-2100 and 2026-2045 for CMIP5, and 2071-2080 and 2026-2035 for LENS), we note that each individual heat stress metric extreme, within the multi-model mean, has spatial patterns that are highly correlated (>0.99). Moist thermodynamics and heat stress extremes are intrinsically linked to the thermodynamics of the climate, and scales simply with global mean surface temperature (GMT) changes. For example, large swaths of land surface area from 30°N to 30°S, excluding the Sahel, the Arabian Peninsula, and Himalayan Plateau, show the response of wet bulb temperature to be 0.85°C/°C GMT (standard deviation <0.25) for CMIP5 and 0.85°C/°C GMT (standard deviation <0.2) for LENS in agreement with prior work by Sherwood and Huber (2010). Many heat stress metrics, after being normalized by global mean surface temperature changes, are highly spatially correlated with each other, and may reduce the necessity of numerous metrics to properly quantify total heat stress. The three results establish that different climate models, with various underlying assumptions (CMIP5) and ranges of internal variability (LENS), show similar responses in heat stress with respect to global mean temperature changes. Thus, we find the uncertainty of heat stress extremes, even changes at the fine

  6. Global-mean temperature change from shipping toward 2050: improved representation of the indirect aerosol effect in simple climate models.

    PubMed

    Lund, Marianne Tronstad; Eyring, Veronika; Fuglestvedt, Jan; Hendricks, Johannes; Lauer, Axel; Lee, David; Righi, Mattia

    2012-08-21

    We utilize a range of emission scenarios for shipping to determine the induced global-mean radiative forcing and temperature change. Ship emission scenarios consistent with the new regulations on nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) and sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) from the International Maritime Organization and two of the Representative Concentration Pathways are used as input to a simple climate model (SCM). Based on a complex aerosol-climate model we develop and test new parametrizations of the indirect aerosol effect (IAE) in the SCM that account for nonlinearities in radiative forcing of ship-induced IAE. We find that shipping causes a net global cooling impact throughout the period 1900-2050 across all parametrizations and scenarios. However, calculated total net global-mean temperature change in 2050 ranges from -0.03[-0.07,-0.002]°C to -0.3[-0.6,-0.2]°C in the A1B scenario. This wide range across parametrizations emphasizes the importance of properly representing the IAE in SCMs and to reflect the uncertainties from complex global models. Furthermore, our calculations show that the future ship-induced temperature response is likely a continued cooling if SO(2) and NO(x) emissions continue to increase due to a strong increase in activity, despite current emission regulations. However, such cooling does not negate the need for continued efforts to reduce CO(2) emissions, since residual warming from CO(2) is long-lived.

  7. Bias correction of global and regional simulated daily precipitation and surface mean temperature over Southeast Asia using quantile mapping method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, Sheau Tieh; Tangang, Fredolin; Juneng, Liew

    2017-02-01

    A trend preserving quantile mapping (QM) method was applied to adjust the biases of the global and regional climate models (GCM and RCMs) simulated daily precipitation and surface mean temperature over Southeast Asia regions based on APHRODITE dataset. Output from four different RCMs as well as their driving GCM in CORDEX-EA archive were corrected to examine the added value of RCMs dynamical downscaling in the context of bias adjustment. The result shows that the RCM biases are comparable to that of the GCM biases. In some instances, RCMs amplified the GCM biases. Generally, QM method substantially improves the biases for both precipitation and temperature. However, the bias adjustment method works better for surface mean temperature and less so for daily precipitation. The large inter-models variability is reduced remarkably after bias adjustment. Overall, study indicates no strong evident that RCMs downscaling as an immediate step before bias correction provides additional improvement to the sub-regional climate compared to the correction directly carried out on their forcing GCM.

  8. Absolute Radiation Thermometry in the NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünger, L.; Taubert, R. D.; Gutschwager, B.; Anhalt, K.; Briaudeau, S.; Sadli, M.

    2017-04-01

    A near infrared (NIR) radiation thermometer (RT) for temperature measurements in the range from 773 K up to 1235 K was characterized and calibrated in terms of the "Mise en Pratique for the definition of the Kelvin" (MeP-K) by measuring its absolute spectral radiance responsivity. Using Planck's law of thermal radiation allows the direct measurement of the thermodynamic temperature independently of any ITS-90 fixed-point. To determine the absolute spectral radiance responsivity of the radiation thermometer in the NIR spectral region, an existing PTB monochromator-based calibration setup was upgraded with a supercontinuum laser system (0.45 μm to 2.4 μm) resulting in a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio. The RT was characterized with respect to its nonlinearity, size-of-source effect, distance effect, and the consistency of its individual temperature measuring ranges. To further improve the calibration setup, a new tool for the aperture alignment and distance measurement was developed. Furthermore, the diffraction correction as well as the impedance correction of the current-to-voltage converter is considered. The calibration scheme and the corresponding uncertainty budget of the absolute spectral responsivity are presented. A relative standard uncertainty of 0.1 % (k=1) for the absolute spectral radiance responsivity was achieved. The absolute radiometric calibration was validated at four temperature values with respect to the ITS-90 via a variable temperature heatpipe blackbody (773 K ...1235 K) and at a gold fixed-point blackbody radiator (1337.33 K).

  9. Comparative analysis of insect succession data from Victoria (Australia) using summary statistics versus preceding mean ambient temperature models.

    PubMed

    Archer, Mel

    2014-03-01

    Minimum postmortem interval (mPMI) can be estimated with preceding mean ambient temperature models that predict carrion taxon pre-appearance interval. But accuracy has not been compared with using summary statistics (mean ± SD of taxon arrival/departure day, range, 95% CI). This study collected succession data from ten experimental and five control (infrequently sampled) pig carcasses over two summers (n = 2 experimental, n = 1 control per placement date). Linear and exponential preceding mean ambient temperature models for appearance and departure times were constructed for 17 taxa/developmental stages. There was minimal difference in linear or exponential model success, although arrival models were more often significant: 65% of linear arrival (r2 = 0.09–0.79) and exponential arrival models (r2 = 0.05–81.0) were significant, and 35% of linear departure (r2 = 0.0–0.71) and exponential departure models (r2 = 0.0–0.72) were significant. Performance of models and summary statistics for estimating mPMI was compared in two forensic cases. Only summary statistics produced accurate mPMI estimates.

  10. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  11. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m-1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  12. Comparison of Variability of the Monthly Mean Temperature of the ECMWF and NCEP Reanalyses and CCM3 and DSM Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, J.S.

    2000-02-16

    The low frequency variation in the three dimensional air temperature fields of two reanalyses and two model simulations are described. The data sets used are the monthly mean temperature fields for the NCAR Climate Simulation Model (CSM, Boville and Gent, 1998) 300 year run, a NCAR Community Climate Model version 3 (CCM3, Kiehl et al., 1998) AMIP type simulation, and the NCEPLNCAR and ECMWF (ERA) reanalysis data sets. The variances and correlations are computed for the anomalies from the annual cycle for each data set. In general the reanalyses and models agree fairly well on the structure of the temperature variance. The models tend to have too much variance at the surface compared to the reanalyses. The CSM's poor simulation of the SST in the eastern Pacific leads to a much reduced variance in the Nino3 region. The enhanced variability over land appears to affect the midlatitude simulation of the CSM in that the higher surface variability extends off the east coast of continents. This is not evident in CCM3 and reanalyses where the SSTs are prescribed. At 200 hPa the CCM3 and reanalyses all evince the dumb bell pattern straddling the Equator in the eastern Pacific attributed by Yulaeva and Wallace (1994) to ENS0 variations. The CSM shows no such pattern. A CCM3 integration using climatological SSTs displays more variance that the CSM in this region, apparently the CSM suppresses variability in this locale. The correlations of the temperature fields with the surface air temperature show that the regions of subtropical subsidence are virtually uncorrelated to the surface at the 700 hPa level. The regions of the cold water off the west coast of continents evince decoupling with the surface at 850 hPa. In the region from 30s to 30N the zonal mean correlation falls to about 0.7 below 800 hPa, with this value extending up to about 600 hPa in mid and upper latitudes. These characteristics are consistent across all the data sets. Thus, the variations of vertically

  13. Comparison of Variability of the Monthly Mean Temperature of the ECMWF and NCEP Reanalyses and CCM3 and CSM Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, J.

    2000-03-01

    The low frequency variation in the three dimensional air temperature fields of two reanalyses and two model simulations are described. The data sets used are the monthly mean temperature fields for the NCAR Climate Simulation Model (CSM, Boville and Gent, 1998) 300 year run, a NCAR Community Climate Model version 3 (CCM3, Kiehl et al., 1998) AMIP type simulation, and the NCEP/NCAR and ECMWF (ERA) reanalysis data sets. The variances and correlations are computed for the anomalies from the annual cycle for each data set. In general the reanalyses and models agree fairly well on the structure of the temperature variance. The models tend to have too much variance at the surface compared to the reanalyses. The CSMs poor simulation of the SST in the eastern Pacific leads to a much reduced variance in the Nino3 region. The enhanced variability over land appears to affect the midlatitude simulation of the CSM in that the higher surface variability extends off the east coast of continents. This is not evident in CCM3 and reanalyses where the SSTs are prescribed. At 200 hPa the CCM3 and reanalyses all evince the dumb bell pattern straddling the Equator in the eastern Pacific attributed by Yulaeva and Wallace (1994) to ENSO variations. The CSM shows no such pattern. A CCM3 integration using climatological SSTs displays more variance that the CSM in this region. Apparently the coupling to an ocean in the CSM suppresses the atmospheric model's variability in this locale. The correlations of the temperature fields with the surface air temperature show that the regions of subtropical subsidence are virtually uncorrelated to the surface at the 700 hPa level. The regions of the cold water off the west coast of continents evince decoupling with the surface at 850 hPa. In the region from 30S to 30N the zonal mean correlation falls to about 0.7 below 800 hPa, with this value extending up to about 600 hPa in mid and upper latitudes. These characteristics are consistent across all the

  14. Radiative analysis of global mean temperature trends in the middle atmosphere: Effects of non-locality and secondary absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomichev, V. I.; Jonsson, A. I.; Ward, W. E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we provide a refined and extended assignment of past and future temperature changes relative to previous analyses and describe and evaluate the relevance of vertical coupling and non-linear and secondary radiative mechanisms for the interpretation of climatic temperature variations in the middle atmosphere. Because of their nature, the latter mechanisms are not adequately accounted for in most regression analyses of temperature trends as a function of local constituent variations. These mechanisms are examined using (1) globally averaged profiles from transient simulations with the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) forced by changes in greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances and (2) a one-dimensional radiative-equilibrium model forced using the diagnosed global mean changes in radiatively active constituents as derived from the CMAM model runs. The conditions during the periods 1975 to 1995 and 2010 to 2040 (during which the rates of change in ozone and CO2 differ) provide a suitable contrast for the role of the non-linear and non-local mechanisms being evaluated in this paper to be clearly differentiated and evaluated. Vertical coupling of radiative transfer effects and the influence of secondary absorption bands are important enough to render the results of multiple linear regression analyses between the temperature response and constituent changes misleading. These effects are evaluated in detail using the 1D radiative-equilibrium model using profiles from the CMAM runs as inputs. In order to explain the differences in the CMAM temperature trends prior to and after 2000 these other radiative effects must be considered in addition to local changes in the radiatively active species. The middle atmosphere temperature cools in response to CO2 and water vapor increases, but past and future trends are modulated by ozone changes.

  15. Low ambient temperature elevates plasma triiodothyronine concentrations while reducing digesta mean retention time and methane yield in sheep.

    PubMed

    Barnett, M C; McFarlane, J R; Hegarty, R S

    2015-06-01

    Ruminant methane yield (MY) is positively correlated with mean retention time (MRT) of digesta. The hormone triiodothyronine (T3 ), which is negatively correlated with ambient temperature, is known to influence MRT. It was hypothesised that exposing sheep to low ambient temperatures would increase plasma T3 concentration and decrease MRT of digesta within the rumen of sheep, resulting in a reduction of MY. To test this hypothesis, six Merino sheep were exposed to two different ambient temperatures (cold treatment, 9 ± 1 °C; warm control 26 ± 1 °C). The effects on MY, digesta MRT, plasma T3 concentration, CO2 production, DM intake, DM digestibility, change in body weight (BW), rumen volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations, estimated microbial protein output, protozoa abundance, wool growth, water intake, urine output and rectal temperature were studied. Cold treatment resulted in a reduction in MY (p < 0.01); digesta MRT in rumen (p < 0.01), hindgut (p = 0.01) and total digestive tract (p < 0.01); protozoa abundance (p < 0.05); and water intake (p < 0.001). Exposure to cold temperature increased plasma T3 concentration (p < 0.05), CO2 production (p = 0.01), total VFA concentrations (p = 0.03) and estimated microbial output from the rumen (p = 0.03). The rate of wool growth increased (p < 0.01) due to cold treatment, but DM intake, DM digestibility and BW change were not affected. The results suggest that exposure of sheep to cold ambient temperatures reduces digesta retention time in the gastrointestinal tract, leading to a reduction in enteric methane yield. Further research is warranted to determine whether T3 could be used as an indirect selection tool for genetic selection of low enteric methane-producing ruminants. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. TX model: a quantitative heat-loss analysis of district heating pipes by means of IR surface-temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinko, Heimo; Perers, Bengt

    1995-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the possibility of analyzing the temperature profile at the ground surface above buried district heating pipes in such a way that enables the quantitative determination of heat loss from the pair of pipes. In practical applications, it is supposed that this temperature profile is generated by means of thermography. For this purpose, the principle of the TX-model has been developed, implementing that the heat losses from pipes buried in the ground has a temperature signature on the ground surface. A qualitative analysis of this temperature signature is very well known and in practical use for detecting leaks from pipes. These techniques mostly makes use of relative changes of the temperature pattern along the pipe. In the quantitative heat loss analysis, however, it is presumed that the temperature profile across the pipes is related to the pipe heat loss in Watt/m. The basic idea is that the integral of the temperature variation across the pipe, called TX, is a function of the heat loss, but affected by some other parameters such as depth, heat diffusivity and so on. In order to analyze the parameters influencing the TX-factor, a simulation model for the energy balance at the ground surface has been developed. This model includes the heat flow from the pipe to the surface and the heat exchange at the surface with the environment due to convection, latent heat change, solar and long wave radiation. The simulation gives the surprising result that the TX factor is relatively unaffected during the course of a day even when the sun is shining, as long as other climate conditions are relatively stable (low wind, no rain, no shadows). The results from the simulations were verified at a testfield in Studsvik, Sweden, with electrically controlled pipe heat losses and long term monitoring of the surface temperature profile and TX factor with temperature sensors at the ground surface. The quantitative TX model for heat loss

  17. Statistical downscaling of sub-daily (6-hour) temperature in Romania, by means of artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birsan, Marius-Victor; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Cǎrbunaru, Felicia

    2016-04-01

    The role of statistical downscaling is to model the relationship between large-scale atmospheric circulation and climatic variables on a regional and sub-regional scale, making use of the predictions of future circulation generated by General Circulation Models (GCMs) in order to capture the effects of climate change on smaller areas. The study presents a statistical downscaling model based on a neural network-based approach, by means of multi-layer perceptron networks. Sub-daily temperature data series from 81 meteorological stations over Romania, with full data records are used as predictands. As large-scale predictor, the NCEP/NCAD air temperature data at 850 hPa over the domain 20-30E / 40-50N was used, at a spatial resolution of 2.5×2.5 degrees. The period 1961-1990 was used for calibration, while the validation was realized over the 1991-2010 interval. Further, in order to estimate future changes in air temperature for 2021-2050 and 2071-2100, air temperature data at 850 hPa corresponding to the IPCC A1B scenario was extracted from the CNCM33 model (Meteo-France) and used as predictor. This work has been realized within the research project "Changes in climate extremes and associated impact in hydrological events in Romania" (CLIMHYDEX), code PN II-ID-2011-2-0073, financed by the Romanian Executive Agency for Higher Education Research, Development and Innovation Funding (UEFISCDI).

  18. Intercomparison of planetary-scale diagnostics derived from separate satellite and radiosonde time-mean temperature fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, T.; Chapman, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    The planetary-scale components of the extratropical Northern Hemisphere troposphere-stratosphere 1973-74 winter circulation are diagnosed using separate time-mean temperature fields based on radiosonde and satellite observations. Meridional cross-sections of zonal wind together with, for zonal wavenumbers 1, 2 and 3, the streamfunction amplitude, phase and Eliassen-Palm flux are displayed, with the relative accuracy of the satellite-derived diagnostics assessed through comparison with the 'ground-truth' radiosonde information. The satellite and radiosonde diagnostics compare most favourably in terms of zonal wind speed and shear, direction of wave propagation and meridional wave structure - all of which are closely related to the differential properties of the atmospheric temperature field. The intensity of the satellite-derived patterns of tropospheric wave propagation is underestimated due to the effects of spatial smoothing and residual cloud contamination present in the satellite radiance measurements.

  19. Intercomparison of planetary-scale diagnostics derived from separate satellite and radiosonde time-mean temperature fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, T.; Chapman, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    The planetary-scale components of the extratropical Northern Hemisphere troposphere-stratosphere 1973-74 winter circulation are diagnosed using separate time-mean temperature fields based on radiosonde and satellite observations. Meridional cross-sections of zonal wind together with, for zonal wavenumbers 1, 2 and 3, the streamfunction amplitude, phase and Eliassen-Palm flux are displayed, with the relative accuracy of the satellite-derived diagnostics assessed through comparison with the 'ground-truth' radiosonde information. The satellite and radiosonde diagnostics compare most favourably in terms of zonal wind speed and shear, direction of wave propagation and meridional wave structure - all of which are closely related to the differential properties of the atmospheric temperature field. The intensity of the satellite-derived patterns of tropospheric wave propagation is underestimated due to the effects of spatial smoothing and residual cloud contamination present in the satellite radiance measurements.

  20. Boundary layer fluctuations and their effects on mean and variance temperature profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; He, Xiaozhou; Tong, Penger

    2016-12-01

    We report simultaneous measurements of the mean temperature profile θ (z ) and temperature variance profile η (z ) near the lower conducting plate of a specially designed quasi-two-dimensional cell for turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The measured θ (z ) is found to have a universal scaling form θ (z /δ ) with varying thermal boundary layer (BL) thickness δ , and its functional form agrees well with the recently derived BL equation by Shishkina et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 114302 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.114302]. The measured η (z ) , on the other hand, is found to have a scaling form η (z /δ ) only in the near-wall region with z /δ ≲2 . Based on the experimental findings, we derive a BL equation for η (z /δ ) , which is in good agreement with the experimental results. These BL equations thus provide a common framework for understanding the effect of BL fluctuations.

  1. Large-scale climate variability and its effects on mean temperature and flowering time of Prunus and Betula in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormsen, A. K.; Hense, A.; Toldam-Andersen, T. B.; Braun, P.

    2005-08-01

    Large-scale climate variability largely affects average climatic conditions and therefore is likely to influence the phenology of plants. In NW-Europe, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) particularly influences winter climate and, through climate interactions on plants, flowering time of all tree species. In Denmark, like in many other NW-European countries, flowering of most tree species has become earlier since the end of the 1980’s. To quantify a possible relation between NAO and flowering time of tree species, two sources of phenological information from the Copenhagen area (Denmark) were analysed, i.e. pollen counts of the genus Betula and observed first bloom dates of Prunus avium. The Winter NAO explained 29 and 37% of the variation of monthly mean temperature for February and March, respectively. The influence of temperature on flowering time was up to 56% to 60% for the February April mean. A direct correlation of Winter NAO-index and flowering time also revealed a clear relation but the time of influence was earlier (December to February). This was shown to be the likely result of a combination of direct and time-lagged effects of the NAO on air and sea surface temperature. The NAO signal is apparently stored in the North Sea and then influences temperature east up to the Baltic States. It is shown that Denmark is right in the centre of direct and time-lagged effects of the NAO. This offers the possibility of using the NAO-index for predicting flowering time of Prunus avium. The beginning of pollen flow appears to be influenced too much by short-term perturbations of the climate system decreasing the value of the NAO-index for prediction. However, it indicates a close relationship between natural climate variability, measured by the NAO index, and flowering time of tree species for Denmark.

  2. Measurement of Absolute Magnetic Moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shull, R. D.; Swartzendruber, L. J.

    1998-03-01

    In the past NIST has issued a number of magnetic moment and magnetic susceptibility standards. One of the most popular has been the Ni magnetic moment standard in the form a 2.38 mm diameter sphere of annealed, high-purity nickel, issued in 1978. However, the supply of all the magnetic standards has been exhausted for several years now and the equipment used for their certification no longer exists. Currently, NIST is assembling a precision absolute magnetometer closely resembling the force-based system used earlier by Candela and Mundy (G.A. Candela and R.E. Mundy, Rev. Sci. Instr. 32, 1056 (1959).), but which will have improved accuracy. This magnetometer will be used to certify a new series of magnetic standards, the first of which will be a replacement nickel sphere. A sphere has the advantage that it has uniform magnetization and a known demagnetizing factor, and approximates a point dipole. Nickel has the advantage of saturation at low field, a small temperature dependence at room temperature, and a relatively small field dependence. Other standards with smaller moments and other geometries are also being considered. These, and the current state of the equipment development will be described.

  3. Modeling of mean radiant temperature based on comparison of airborne remote sensing data with surface measured data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Chih-Yu; Matzarakis, Andreas; Liu, Jin-King; Lin, Tzu-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Assessment of outdoor thermal comfort is becoming increasingly important due to the urban heat island effect, which strongly affects the urban thermal environment. The mean radiant temperature (Tmrt) quantifies the effect of the radiation environment on humans, but it can only be estimated based on influencing parameters and factors. Knowledge of Tmrt is important for quantifying the heat load on human beings, especially during heat waves. This study estimates Tmrt using several methods, which are based on climatic data from a traditional weather station, microscale ground surface measurements, land surface temperature (LST) and light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data measured using airborne devices. Analytical results reveal that the best means of estimating Tmrt combines information about LST and surface elevation information with meteorological data from the closest weather station. The application in this method can eliminate the inconvenience of executing a wide range ground surface measurement, the insufficient resolution of satellite data and the incomplete data of current urban built environments. This method can be used to map a whole city to identify hot spots, and can be contributed to understanding human biometeorological conditions quickly and accurately.

  4. Prediction of mean skin temperature for use as a heat strain scale by introducing an equation for sweating efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, H.; Kuwabara, K.; Hamada, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The present paper made the heat balance equation (HBE) for nude or minimally clad subjects a linear function of mean skin temperature ( t sk) by applying new equations for sweating efficiency ( η sw) and thermoregulatory sweat rate ( S wR). As the solution of the HBE, the equation predicting t sk was derived and used for a heat strain scale of subjects. The η sw was proportional to the reciprocal of S w/ E max ( S w, sweat rate; E max maximum evaporative capacity) and the S wR was proportional to t sk with a parameter of the sweating capacity of the subject. The errors of predicted t sk from observations due to the approximation of η sw were examined based on experimental data conducted on eight young male subjects. The value of errors of t sk was -0.10 ± 0.42 °C (mean ± sample standard deviation (SSD)). We aim to apply the predicted t sk of a subject at a level of sweating capacity as a heat strain scale of a function of four environmental factors (dry- and wet-bulb temperatures, radiation, and air velocity) and three human factors (metabolic rate, sweating capacity, and clothing (≤0.2clo)).

  5. Effects of the 7-8-year cycle in daily mean air temperature as a cross-scale information transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajcay, Nikola; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Paluš, Milan

    2015-04-01

    Using a novel nonlinear time-series analysis method, an information transfer from larger to smaller scales of the air temperature variability has been observed in daily mean surface air temperature (SAT) data from European stations as the influence of the phase of slow oscillatory phenomena with periods around 6-11 years on amplitudes of the variability characterized by smaller temporal scales from a few months to 4-5 years [1]. The strongest effect is exerted by an oscillatory mode with the period close to 8 years and its influence can be seen in 1-2 °C differences of the conditional SAT means taken conditionally on the phase of the 8-year cycle. The size of this effect, however, changes in space and time. The changes in time are studied using sliding window technique, showing that the effect evolves in time, and during the last decades the effect is stronger and significant. Sliding window technique was used along with seasonal division of the data, and it has been found that the cycle is most pronounced in the winter season. Different types of surrogate data are applied in order to establish statistical significance and distinguish the effect of the 7-8-yr cycle from climate variability on shorter time scales. [1] M. Palus, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112 078702 (2014) This study is supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic within the Program KONTAKT II, Project No. LH14001.

  6. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  7. Regional Contrasts of the Warming Rate over Land Significantly Depend on the Calculation Methods of Mean Air Temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaicun; Zhou, Chunlüe

    2015-07-22

    Global analyses of surface mean air temperature (T(m)) are key datasets for climate change studies and provide fundamental evidences for global warming. However, the causes of regional contrasts in the warming rate revealed by such datasets, i.e., enhanced warming rates over the northern high latitudes and the "warming hole" over the central U.S., are still under debate. Here we show these regional contrasts depend on the calculation methods of T(m). Existing global analyses calculate T(m) from daily minimum and maximum temperatures (T2). We found that T2 has a significant standard deviation error of 0.23 °C/decade in depicting the regional warming rate from 2000 to 2013 but can be reduced by two-thirds using T(m) calculated from observations at four specific times (T4), which samples diurnal cycle of land surface air temperature more often. From 1973 to 1997, compared with T4, T2 significantly underestimated the warming rate over the central U.S. and overestimated the warming rate over the northern high latitudes. The ratio of the warming rate over China to that over the U.S. reduces from 2.3 by T2 to 1.4 by T4. This study shows that the studies of regional warming can be substantially improved by T4 instead of T2.

  8. Regional Contrasts of the Warming Rate over Land Significantly Depend on the Calculation Methods of Mean Air Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kaicun; Zhou, Chunlüe

    2016-04-01

    Global analyses of surface mean air temperature (Tm) are key datasets for climate change studies and provide fundamental evidences for global warming. However, the causes of regional contrasts in the warming rate revealed by such datasets, i.e., enhanced warming rates over the northern high latitudes and the "warming hole" over the central U.S., are still under debate. Here we show these regional contrasts depends on the calculation methods of Tm. Existing global analyses calculated Tm from daily minimum and maximum temperatures (T2). We found that T2 has a significant standard deviation error of 0.23 °C/decade in depicting the regional warming rate from 2000 to 2013 but can be reduced by two-thirds using Tm calculated from observations at four specific times (T4), which samples diurnal cycle of land surface air temperature more often. From 1973 to 1997, compared with T4, T2 significantly underestimated the warming rate over the central U.S. and overestimated the warming rate over the northern high latitudes. The ratio of the warming rate over China to that over the U.S. reduces from 2.3 by T2 to 1.4 by T4. This study shows that the studies of regional warming can be substantially improved by T4 instead of T2.

  9. Temperature dependence of three-body hydrophobic interactions: potential of mean force, enthalpy, entropy, heat capacity, and nonadditivity.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Maria Sabaye; Shimizu, Seishi; Chan, Hue Sun

    2005-01-12

    Temperature-dependent three-body hydrophobic interactions are investigated by extensive constant-pressure simulations of methane-like nonpolar solutes in TIP4P model water at six temperatures. A multiple-body hydrophobic interaction is considered to be (i) additive, (ii) cooperative, or (iii) anti-cooperative if its potential of mean force (PMF) is (i) equal to, (ii) smaller than, or (iii) larger than the corresponding pairwise sum of two-methane PMFs. We found that three-methane hydrophobic interactions at the desolvation barrier are anti-cooperative at low to intermediate T, and vary from essentially additive to slightly cooperative at high T. Interactions at the contact minimum are slightly anti-cooperative over a wider temperature range. Enthalpy, entropy, and heat capacity are estimated from the computed PMFs. Contrary to the common expectation that burial of solvent-accessible nonpolar surface area always leads to a decrease in heat capacity, the present results show that the change in heat capacity upon three-methane association is significantly positive at the desolvation barrier and slightly positive at the contact minimum. This suggests that the heat capacity signature of a hydrophobic polymer need not vary uniformly nor monotonically with conformational compactness. Ramifications for protein folding are discussed.

  10. Global and Regional Variations in Mean Temperature and Warm Extremes in Large-Member Historical AGCM Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamae, Y.; Shiogama, H.; Imada, Y.; Mori, M.; Arakawa, O.; Mizuta, R.; Yoshida, K.; Ishii, M.; Watanabe, M.; Kimoto, M.; Ueda, H.

    2015-12-01

    Frequency of heat extremes during the summer season has increased continuously since the late 20th century despite the global warming hiatus. In previous studies, anthropogenic influences, natural variation in sea surface temperature (SST), and internal atmospheric variabilities are suggested to be factors contributing to the increase in the frequency of warm extremes. Here 100-member ensemble historical simulations were performed (called "database for Probabilistic Description of Future climate"; d4PDF) to examine physical mechanisms responsible for the increasing hot summers and attribute to the anthropogenic influences or natural climate variability. 60km resolution MRI-AGCM ensemble simulations can reproduce historical variations in the mean temperature and warm extremes. Natural SST variability in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans contribute to the decadal variation in the frequency of hot summers in the Northern Hemisphere middle latitude. For example, the surface temperature over western North America, including California, is largely influenced by anomalous atmospheric circulation pattern associated with Pacific SST variability. Future projections based on anomalous SST patterns derived from coupled climate model simulations will also be introduced.

  11. Daily estimates of the migrating tide and zonal mean temperature in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere derived from SABER data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortland, David A.

    2017-04-01

    Satellites provide a global view of the structure in the fields that they measure. In the mesosphere and lower thermosphere, the dominant features in these fields at low zonal wave number are contained in the zonal mean, quasi-stationary planetary waves, and tide components. Due to the nature of the satellite sampling pattern, stationary, diurnal, and semidiurnal components are aliased and spectral methods are typically unable to separate the aliased waves over short time periods. This paper presents a data processing scheme that is able to recover the daily structure of these waves and the zonal mean state. The method is validated by using simulated data constructed from a mechanistic model, and then applied to Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) temperature measurements. The migrating diurnal tide extracted from SABER temperatures for 2009 has a seasonal variability with peak amplitude (20 K at 95 km) in February and March and minimum amplitude (less than 5 K at 95 km) in early June and early December. Higher frequency variability includes a change in vertical structure and amplitude during the major stratospheric warming in January. The migrating semidiurnal tide extracted from SABER has variability on a monthly time scale during January through March, minimum amplitude in April, and largest steady amplitudes from May through September. Modeling experiments were performed that show that much of the variability on seasonal time scales in the migrating tides is due to changes in the mean flow structure and the superposition of the tidal responses to water vapor heating in the troposphere and ozone heating in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere.

  12. A SOLAR SPECTROSCOPIC ABSOLUTE ABUNDANCE OF ARGON FROM RESIK

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, J.; Sylwester, B.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Kuznetsov, V. D. E-mail: kjhp@mssl.ucl.ac.u

    2010-09-10

    Observations of He-like and H-like Ar (Ar XVII and Ar XVIII) lines at 3.949 A and 3.733 A, respectively, with the RESIK X-ray spectrometer on the CORONAS-F spacecraft, together with temperatures and emission measures from the two channels of GOES, have been analyzed to obtain the abundance of Ar in flare plasmas in the solar corona. The line fluxes per unit emission measure show a temperature dependence like that predicted from theory and lead to spectroscopically determined values for the absolute Ar abundance, A(Ar) = 6.44 {+-} 0.07 (Ar XVII) and 6.49 {+-} 0.16 (Ar XVIII), which are in agreement to within uncertainties. The weighted mean is 6.45 {+-} 0.06, which is between two recent compilations of the solar Ar abundance and suggests that the photospheric and coronal abundances of Ar are very similar.

  13. Determination of Absolute Zero Using a Computer-Based Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple computer-based laboratory experiment for evaluating absolute zero in degrees Celsius, which can be performed in college and undergraduate physical sciences laboratory courses. With a computer, absolute zero apparatus can help demonstrators or students to observe the relationship between temperature and pressure and use…

  14. Determination of Absolute Zero Using a Computer-Based Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple computer-based laboratory experiment for evaluating absolute zero in degrees Celsius, which can be performed in college and undergraduate physical sciences laboratory courses. With a computer, absolute zero apparatus can help demonstrators or students to observe the relationship between temperature and pressure and use…

  15. Response of the annual and zonal mean winds and temperatures to variations in the heat and momentum sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, E. K.

    1984-01-01

    Comparisons are made among solutions to zonal-mean equations obtained with parameterized friction and radiative cooling and those forced from specified heat and momentum sources. Budget equations are defined for zonally averaged steady state responses in a thin spherically rotating atmosphere. The heat sources and sinks and mean meridional circulation that maintain observed annual and zonal mean temperatures are identified with a diagnostic calculation. Estimates are made of the surface sensible heating, atmospheric latent heating and vertical flux eddy divergences. The heat and moisture sources and sinks are varied to obtain the steady state responses. The Hadley circulation is fairly insensitive to changes in the strength of the eddy momentum flux when sufficient internal friction is present. Varying the width of the total precipitation of the intertropical convergence zone with fixed eddy fluxes and extratropical heat sources yields conditions similar to El Nino. Finally, a minimum speed is found for the jet stream after varying the horizontal eddy momentum fixing latent and eddy heat sources.

  16. Eosinophil count - absolute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal Results Mean A high number of eosinophils (eosinophilia) are often linked to a variety of disorders. ... Accessed March 29, 2017. Klion AD, Weller PF. Eosinophilia and eosinophil-related disorders. In: Adkinson NF, Bochner ...

  17. Pairwise comparisons to reconstruct mean temperature in the Arctic Atlantic Region over the last 2,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanhijärvi, Sami; Tingley, Martin P.; Korhola, Atte

    2013-10-01

    Existing multi-proxy climate reconstruction methods assume the suitably transformed proxy time series are linearly related to the target climate variable, which is likely a simplifying assumption for many proxy records. Furthermore, with a single exception, these methods face problems with varying temporal resolutions of the proxy data. Here we introduce a new reconstruction method that uses the ordering of all pairs of proxy observations within each record to arrive at a consensus time series that best agrees with all proxy records. The resulting unitless composite time series is subsequently calibrated to the instrumental record to provide an estimate of past climate. By considering only pairwise comparisons, this method, which we call PaiCo, facilitates the inclusion of records with differing temporal resolutions, and relaxes the assumption of linearity to the more general assumption of a monotonically increasing relationship between each proxy series and the target climate variable. We apply PaiCo to a newly assembled collection of high-quality proxy data to reconstruct the mean temperature of the Northernmost Atlantic region, which we call Arctic Atlantic, over the last 2,000 years. The Arctic Atlantic is a dynamically important region known to feature substantial temperature variability over recent millennia, and PaiCo allows for a more thorough investigation of the Arctic Atlantic regional climate as we include a diverse array of terrestrial and marine proxies with annual to multidecadal temporal resolutions. Comparisons of the PaiCo reconstruction to recent reconstructions covering larger areas indicate greater climatic variability in the Arctic Atlantic than for the Arctic as a whole. The Arctic Atlantic reconstruction features temperatures during the Roman Warm Period and Medieval Climate Anomaly that are comparable or even warmer than those of the twentieth century, and coldest temperatures in the middle of the nineteenth century, just prior to the onset

  18. Mean ocean temperature change over the last glacial transition based on atmospheric changes in heavy noble mixing ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereiter, Bernhard; Severinghaus, Jeff; Shackleton, Sarah; Baggenstos, Daniel; Kawamura, Kenji

    2016-04-01

    On paleo-climatic timescales heavy noble gases (Krypton and Xenon) are passively cycled through the atmosphere-ocean system without seeing any significant sink or source. Since the solubility in water of each gas species is characterized by a specific temperature dependency, mixing ratios in the atmosphere change with changing ocean temperatures. In this study, we use this fact to reconstruct mean global ocean temperatures (MOT) over the course of the last glacial transition based on measurements of trapped air in the WAIS Divide ice core. We analyzed 70 ice samples with a recently developed method which determines the isotopic ratios of N2, Ar, Kr (and in some cases also of Xe, though with less precision) and the elemental ratios of Kr/N2, Xe/N2 and Xe/Kr. We use the isotope ratios to correct the elemental ratios for gravitational enrichment in the firn column. The corrected elemental ratios are then used in a simple box model to reconstruct MOT. The three elemental ratio pairs are first interpreted as independent measures of MOT and then combined to a single "best-estimate" MOT record with an average uncertainty of 0.27°C. We find a clear link to Antarctic temperatures and a LGM-Holocene change in MOT of 2.4°C. This value is in good agreement with results from marine sediment cores (which, however, have an uncertainty of 1°C). Our record provides an unprecedented constrain on ocean heat uptake over the last glacial transition and therefore gives new insights in the mechanisms underlying long term ocean heat fluxes. To our knowledge, this is the first time that MOT has been reconstructed in such great detail.

  19. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency) by removing the source spectrum (moment-rate spectrum) from

  20. Absolute cavity pyrgeometer

    DOEpatents

    Reda, Ibrahim

    2013-10-29

    Implementations of the present disclosure involve an apparatus and method to measure the long-wave irradiance of the atmosphere or long-wave source. The apparatus may involve a thermopile, a concentrator and temperature controller. The incoming long-wave irradiance may be reflected from the concentrator to a thermopile receiver located at the bottom of the concentrator to receive the reflected long-wave irradiance. In addition, the thermopile may be thermally connected to a temperature controller to control the device temperature. Through use of the apparatus, the long-wave irradiance of the atmosphere may be calculated from several measurements provided by the apparatus. In addition, the apparatus may provide an international standard of pyrgeometers' calibration that is traceable back to the International System of Units (SI) rather than to a blackbody atmospheric simulator.

  1. High Spatial Resolution Forecasting of Long-Term Monthly Precipitation and Mean Temperature Trends in Data Scarce Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosier, T. M.; Hill, D. F.; Sharp, K. V.

    2013-12-01

    High spatial resolution time-series data are critical for many hydrological and earth science studies. Multiple groups have developed historical and forecast datasets of high-resolution monthly time-series for regions of the world such as the United States (e.g. PRISM for hindcast data and MACA for long-term forecasts); however, analogous datasets have not been available for most data scarce regions. The current work fills this data need by producing and freely distributing hindcast and forecast time-series datasets of monthly precipitation and mean temperature for all global land surfaces, gridded at a 30 arc-second resolution. The hindcast data are constructed through a Delta downscaling method, using as inputs 0.5 degree monthly time-series and 30 arc-second climatology global weather datasets developed by Willmott & Matsuura and WorldClim, respectively. The forecast data are formulated using a similar downscaling method, but with an additional step to remove bias from the climate variable's probability distribution over each region of interest. The downscaling package is designed to be compatible with a number of general circulation models (GCM) (e.g. with GCMs developed for the IPCC AR4 report and CMIP5), and is presently implemented using time-series data from the NCAR CESM1 model in conjunction with 30 arc-second future decadal climatologies distributed by the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research. The resulting downscaled datasets are 30 arc-second time-series forecasts of monthly precipitation and mean temperature available for all global land areas. As an example of these data, historical and forecast 30 arc-second monthly time-series from 1950 through 2070 are created and analyzed for the region encompassing Pakistan. For this case study, forecast datasets corresponding to the future representative concentration pathways 45 and 85 scenarios developed by the IPCC are presented and compared. This exercise highlights a range of potential

  2. Temperature-dependent solubilities and mean ionic activity coefficients of alkali halides in water from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Mester, Zoltan; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2015-07-28

    The mean ionic activity coefficients of aqueous KCl, NaF, NaI, and NaCl solutions of varying concentrations have been obtained from molecular dynamics simulations following a recently developed methodology based on gradual insertions of salt molecules [Z. Mester and A. Z. Panagiotopoulos, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 044507 (2015)]. The non-polarizable ion models of Weerasinghe and Smith [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11342 (2003)], Gee et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 1369 (2011)], Reiser et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044504 (2014)], and Joung and Cheatham [J. Phys. Chem. B 112, 9020 (2008)] were used along with the extended simple point charge (SPC/E) water model [Berendsen et al., J. Phys. Chem. 91, 6269 (1987)] in the simulations. In addition to the chemical potentials in solution used to obtain the activity coefficients, we also calculated the chemical potentials of salt crystals and used them to obtain the solubility of these alkali halide models in SPC/E water. The models of Weerasinghe and Smith [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11342 (2003)] and Gee et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 7, 1369 (2011)] provide excellent predictions of the mean ionic activity coefficients at 298.15 K and 1 bar, but significantly underpredict or overpredict the solubilities. The other two models generally predicted the mean ionic activity coefficients only qualitatively. With the exception of NaF for which the solubility is significantly overpredicted, the model of Joung and Cheatham predicts salt solubilities that are approximately 40%-60% of the experimental values. The models of Reiser et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044504 (2014)] make good predictions for the NaCl and NaI solubilities, but significantly underpredict the solubilities for KCl and NaF. We also tested the transferability of the models to temperatures much higher than were used to parametrize them by performing simulations for NaCl at 373.15 K and 1 bar, and at 473.15 K and 15.5 bar. All models overpredict the drop in the values of mean ionic

  3. The prediction of sea-surface temperature variations by means of an advective mixed-layer ocean model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    An advective mixed layer ocean model was developed by eliminating the assumption of horizontal homogeneity in an already existing mixed layer model, and then superimposing a mean and anomalous wind driven current field. This model is based on the principle of conservation of heat and mechanical energy and utilizes a box grid for the advective part of the calculation. Three phases of experiments were conducted: evaluation of the model's ability to account for climatological sea surface temperature (SST) variations in the cooling and heating seasons, sensitivity tests in which the effect of hypothetical anomalous winds was evaluated, and a thirty-day synoptic calculation using the model. For the case studied, the accuracy of the predictions was improved by the inclusion of advection, although nonadvective effects appear to have dominated.

  4. Stochastic models and spectra of interannual variability of mean annual sea surface temperature in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privalsky, V. E.

    1988-10-01

    Estimates of one- and two-variate autoregressive models of mean annual sea surface temperature (SST) in five Smed squares in the North Atlantic are obtained by analysing time series of SST, 1881-1970. Year-to-year variations of SST are shown to follow the AR model of order one with a regression parameter of 0.5 so that their generalized spectrum decreases monotonically and relatively fast with frequency while the limits of statistical predictability amount up to two years. Two-variate models of SST reveal frequency-dependent time lags up to three years and possess slightly better statistical predictability. A feedback in the system of warm and cold currents is found with a characteristic time scale of about six years, which plays an important role in the system's energy budget.

  5. Mean ocean temperature change over the last glacial transition based on heavy noble gases in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bereiter, Bernhard; Severinghaus, Jeff; Shackleton, Sarah; Baggenstos, Daniel; Kawamura, Kenji

    2017-04-01

    On paleo-climatic timescales heavy noble gases (krypton and xenon) are conserved in the atmosphere-ocean system and are passively cycled through this system without interaction with any biogeochemical process. Due to the characteristic temperature dependency of the gas solubility factors in sea water, the atmospheric noble gas content is unambiguously linked to mean global ocean temperature (MOT). Here we use this proxy to reconstruct MOT over the course of the last glacial transition based on measurements of trapped air in the WAIS Divide ice core. We analyzed 78 ice samples with a recently developed method that yields the isotopic ratios of N2, Ar, Kr and the elemental ratios of Kr/N2, Xe/N2 and Xe/Kr in the trapped air with the required precision. Based on the isotopic ratios we correct the elemental ratios for the fractionation processes in the firn column to obtain the true atmospheric values. On the basis of a 4-box model that incorporates effects of sea-level change, different saturation states of the water and different temperature distributions in the global ocean, we infer MOT based on the three elemental ratio pairs and assess its uncertainty. On average, the uncertainty of our MOT record is +/- 0.27°C, which is a significant improvement to earlier studies that reached about +/- 1°C uncertainty. This allows an unprecedented assessment of the glacial-interglacial MOT difference, as well as a direct comparison between MOT and climate change for the first time. We find a LGM-Holocene difference of 2.6°C, which is on the lower end of what earlier studies have suggested (3 +/- 1°C) and provides a new constraint on ocean heat uptake over the last glacial transition. Furthermore, we find a very close relation between MOT and Antarctic temperatures which shows for the first time the effect of Atlantic overturning circulation changes on global ocean heat uptake. Finally, our record shows a MOT warming rate during the Younger Dryas that is almost double to

  6. SOLWEIG 1.0--modelling spatial variations of 3D radiant fluxes and mean radiant temperature in complex urban settings.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Fredrik; Holmer, Björn; Thorsson, Sofia

    2008-09-01

    The mean radiant temperature, T(mrt), which sums up all shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes (both direct and reflected) to which the human body is exposed is one of the key meteorological parameters governing human energy balance and the thermal comfort of man. In this paper, a new radiation model (SOLWEIG 1.0), which simulates spatial variations of 3D radiation fluxes and T(mrt) in complex urban settings, is presented. The T(mrt) is derived by modelling shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes in six directions (upward, downward and from the four cardinal points) and angular factors. The model requires a limited number of inputs, such as direct, diffuse and global shortwave radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, urban geometry and geographical information (latitude, longitude and elevation). The model was evaluated using 7 days of integral radiation measurements at two sites with different building geometries--a large square and a small courtyard in Göteborg, Sweden (57 degrees N)--across different seasons and in various weather conditions. The evaluation reveals good agreement between modelled and measured values of T(mrt), with an overall good correspondence of R (2) = 0.94, (p < 0.01, RMSE = 4.8 K). SOLWEIG 1.0 is still under development. Future work will incorporate a vegetation scheme, as well as an improvement of the estimation of fluxes from the four cardinal points.

  7. Boundary layer fluctuations and their effects on mean and variance temperature profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; He, Xiaozhou; Tong, Penger

    2016-11-01

    We report simultaneous measurements of the mean temperature profile θ (z) and temperature variance profile η (z) near the lower conducting plate of a specially designed quasi-two-dimensional cell for turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The measured θ (z) is found to have a universal scaling form θ (z / δ) with varying thermal boundary layer (BL) thickness δ, and its functional form agrees well with the recently derived BL equation by Shishkina et al. The measured η (z) , on the other hand, is found to have a scaling form η (z / δ) only in the near-wall region with z / δ < 2 . Based on the experimental findings, we derive a new BL equation for η (z / δ) , which is in good agreement with the experimental results. The new BL equations thus provide a common framework for understanding the effect of BL fluctuations. This work was supported by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong SAR and by the China Thousand Young Talents Program.

  8. Absolute Identification by Relative Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Neil; Brown, Gordon D. A.; Chater, Nick

    2005-01-01

    In unidimensional absolute identification tasks, participants identify stimuli that vary along a single dimension. Performance is surprisingly poor compared with discrimination of the same stimuli. Existing models assume that identification is achieved using long-term representations of absolute magnitudes. The authors propose an alternative…

  9. The effect of gravity waves on the global mean temperature and composition structure of the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavrilov, Nikolai M.; Roble, Raymond G.

    1994-01-01

    Formulas are presented that parameterize the heating rate and coefficient of turbulent heat conduction produced by saturated internal gravity waves (IGW) in the upper atmosphere. Estimates of these values are made using observational data. The parameterization of IGW influences are introduced into a one-dimensional model of global mean thermal and composition balances of the upper atmosphere. Computations are performed for different values of IGW energy fluxes entering into the upper atmosphere from below. It is shown that realistic vertical profiles of the global mean temperature can be obtained using different values of IGW energy flux into the upper atmosphere. Increasing the IGW intensity leads not only to an increase of the heating rate due to wave enery dissipation, but also to an increase of the heating rate due to wave energy dissipation, but also to an increase in the coefficient of turbulent heat conduction and cooling rate produced by turbulence generated by the wave. So, near an altitude of 100 km the main part of solar heating is compensated by infrared cooling on one hand, and the main part of wave dissipation heating is compensated by turbulent cooling on the other hand. These quasi-balances generally hold for different values of IGW intensity.

  10. A new voxel-based model for the determination of atmospheric weighted mean temperature in GPS atmospheric sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Changyong; Wu, Suqin; Wang, Xiaoming; Hu, Andong; Wang, Qianxin; Zhang, Kefei

    2017-06-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a powerful atmospheric observing system for determining precipitable water vapour (PWV). In the detection of PWV using GPS, the atmospheric weighted mean temperature (Tm) is a crucial parameter for the conversion of zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) to PWV since the quality of PWV is affected by the accuracy of Tm. In this study, an improved voxel-based Tm model, named GWMT-D, was developed using global reanalysis data over a 4-year period from 2010 to 2013 provided by the United States National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The performance of GWMT-D was assessed against three existing empirical Tm models - GTm-III, GWMT-IV, and GTmN - using different data sources in 2014 - the NCEP reanalysis data, surface Tm data provided by Global Geodetic Observing System and radiosonde measurements. The results show that the new GWMT-D model outperforms all the other three models with a root-mean-square error of less than 5.0 K at different altitudes over the globe. The new GWMT-D model can provide a practical alternative Tm determination method in real-time GPS-PWV remote sensing systems.

  11. Increased carbon flux with rising mean annual temperature does not alter ecosystem carbon storage in a tropical montane wet forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmants, P.; Litton, C. M.; Giardina, C. P.

    2013-12-01

    Ecological theory and existing studies agree that climate warming will increase carbon fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere in the absence of water and nutrient limitations. However, it remains unclear how increased carbon input to and loss from terrestrial ecosystems will affect overall ecosystem carbon storage, which has important implications for potential feedbacks to climate change. Here we use a well-constrained model ecological gradient to quantify how increased mean annual temperature (MAT) affects carbon fluxes and ecosystem carbon storage in above- and belowground live biomass and detritus across nine permanent plots representing a 5.2ο C MAT gradient in tropical montane wet forests on the Island of Hawaii. Aboveground net primary productivity increased by 1 Mg ha-1 y-1 and the residence time of carbon in the forest floor declined by ~3 months for each 1ο C rise in MAT across the gradient, indicating a substantial increase in both carbon input and output with rising MAT. Despite these large increases in carbon flux, ecosystem carbon storage showed minimal sensitivity to MAT. Live biomass carbon did not vary predictably as a function of temperature. Detrital carbon declined by ~14 Mg ha-1 for each 1ο C rise in temperature, but this decline was driven entirely by coarse woody debris and litter, which together make up < 10% on average of total ecosystem C across the MAT gradient. The largest detrital pool, soil carbon, did not vary with MAT, averaging 48% of total ecosystem carbon across the gradient. Overall, total ecosystem carbon storage did not vary with MAT, averaging ~550 Mg ha-1 across the gradient. In addition, the distribution of ecosystem carbon in live biomass vs. detritus remained relatively constant at ~44% and ~56%, respectively. Because our MAT gradient does not vary with respect to factors other than temperature (i.e., dominant vegetation, substrate type and age, soil water balance, and disturbance history), these

  12. Comparison of two homogenized datasets of daily maximum/mean/minimum temperature in China during 1960-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Cao, Lijuan; Zhu, Yani; Yan, Zhongwei

    2016-02-01

    Two homogenized datasets of daily maximum temperature (Tmax), mean temperature (Tm), and minimum temperature (Tmin) series in China have recently been developed. One is CHTM3.0, based on the Multiple Analysis of Series for Homogenization (MASH) method, and includes 753 stations for the period 1960-2013. The other is CHHTD1.0, based on the Relative Homogenization test (RHtest), and includes 2419 stations over the period 1951-2011. The daily Tmax/Tm/Tmin series at 751 stations, which are in both datasets, are chosen and compared against the raw dataset, with regard to the number of breakpoints, long-term climate trends, and their geographical patterns. The results indicate that some robust break points associated with relocations can be detected, the inhomogeneities are removed by both the MASH and RHtest method, and the data quality is improved in both homogenized datasets. However, the differences between CHTM3.0 and CHHTD1.0 are notable. By and large, in CHHTD1.0, the break points detected are fewer, but the adjustments for inhomogeneities and the resultant changes of linear trend estimates are larger. In contrast, CHTM3.0 provides more reasonable geographical patterns of long-term climate trends over the region. The reasons for the differences between the datasets include: (1) different algorithms for creating reference series for adjusting the candidate series—more neighboring stations used in MASH and hence larger-scale regional signals retained; (2) different algorithms for calculating the adjustments—larger adjustments in RHtest in general, partly due to the individual local reference information used; and (3) different rules for judging inhomogeneity—all detected break points are adjusted in CHTM3.0, based on MASH, while a number of break points detected via RHtest but without supporting metadata are overlooked in CHHTD1.0. The present results suggest that CHTM3.0 is more suitable for analyses of large-scale climate change in China, while CHHTD1

  13. Experimental Insight into the Thermodynamics of the Dissolution of Electrolytes in Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids: From the Mass Action Law to the Absolute Standard Chemical Potential of a Proton

    DOE PAGES

    Matsubara, Yasuo; Grills, David C.; Koide, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-28

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) are a class of nonaqueous solvents that have expanded the realm of modern chemistry, drawing increasing interest over the last few decades, not only in terms of their own unique physical chemistry but also in many applications including organic synthesis, electrochemistry, and biological systems, wherein charged solutes (i.e., electrolytes) often play vital roles. But, our fundamental understanding of the dissolution of an electrolyte in an IL is still rather limited. For example, the activity of a charged species has frequently been assumed to be unity without a clear experimental basis. In this study, we have discussedmore » a standard component-based scheme for the dissolution of an electrolyte in an IL, supported by our observation of ideal Nernstian responses for the reduction of silver and ferrocenium salts in a representative IL, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([emim+][NTf2-] or [emim+][TFSI-]). Using this scheme, which was also supported by temperature-dependent measurements with ILs having longer alkyl chains in the imidazolium ring, and the solubility of the IL in water, we established the concept of Gibbs transfer energies of “pseudo-single ions” from the IL to conventional neutral molecular solvents (water, acetonitrile, and methanol). This concept, which bridges component- and constituent-based energetics, utilizes an extrathermodynamic assumption, which itself was justified by experimental observations. Furthermore, these energies enable us to eliminate inner potential differences between the IL and molecular solvents (solvent-solvent interactions), that is, on a practical level, conditional liquid junction potential differences, so that we can discuss ion-solvent interactions independently. Specifically, we have examined the standard electrode potential of the ferrocenium/ferrocene redox couple, Fc+/Fc, and the absolute intrinsic standard chemical potential of a proton in

  14. Unified Absolute Spectrophotometry for Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, R. J.

    2007-04-01

    Uniform, dereddened, absolute, flux density versus frequency, low-resolution spectra were constructed for stars in star clusters. Photometric and spectrophotometric observations were extracted from printed papers, catalogues, and on-line databases, for ten stars selected, on the basis of their positions, proper motion components and photometry, as members of the young open cluster IC2391. The units of measurement used in the original publication were converted, where necessary, to apparent flux densities in Janskys and frequencies in Hertz. Given measured values for interstellar extinction and distances to the stars, absolute flux densities at the standard 10pc distance were readily computed from the apparent values. Plots were prepared for each of the member stars showing the mean frequency, the bandwidth, the absolute monochromatic flux density and a total error estimation, where possible, for each observed passband. Absolute spectrophotometry for Vega from Hubble Space Telescope observations is also shown on each plot to serve as a reference. The difficulties experienced in producing the plots are discussed and ways in which these may be ameliorated are suggested.

  15. Daytime relapse of the mean radiant temperature based on the six-directional method under unobstructed solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Kántor, Noémi; Lin, Tzu-Ping; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    This study contributes to the knowledge about the capabilities of the popular "six-directional method" describing the radiation fields outdoors. In Taiwan, measurements were carried out with three orthogonally placed net radiometers to determine the mean radiant temperature (T(mrt)). The short- and long-wave radiation flux densities from the six perpendicular directions were recorded in the daylight hours of 12 days. During unobstructed direct irradiation, a specific daytime relapse was found in the temporal course of the T(mrt) values referring to the reference shapes of a standing man and also of a sphere. This relapse can be related to the short-wave fluxes reaching the body from the lateral directions. Through deeper analysis, an instrumental shortcoming of the six-directional technique was discovered. The pyranometer pairs of the same net radiometer have a 10-15-min long "blind spot" when the sun beams are nearly perpendicular to them. The blind-spot period is supposed to be shorter with steeper solar azimuth curve on the daylight period. This means that the locations with lower geographical latitude, and the summertime measurements, are affected less by this instrumental problem. A methodological shortcoming of the six-directional technique was also demonstrated. Namely, the sum of the short-wave flux densities from the lateral directions is sensitive to the orientation of the radiometers, and therefore by deviating from the original directions, the T(mrt) decrease on clear sunny days will occur in different times and will be different in extent.

  16. Mars atmosphere dynamics: seasonal evolution of mean meridional temperature cross section and zonal wind derived from PFS-MEX.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amore, M.; Grassi, D.; Formisano, V.

    2008-09-01

    A big amount of data acquired by the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer (PFS) on board of Mars Express mission (MEX) has been analyzed, resulting in a higher level data, namely calculated atmospheric temperatures field, thanks to the operational range of PFS long wavelength channel falling in the Thermal Infrared region. Singles temperature profile has been obtained by the BDM algorithm, developed in IFSI and described in great detail in [1]. Starting from these data, thanks also to spacecraft polar orbit, we are able to derive mean meridional cross section of thermal structure, using the geostrophic or higher-order approximations [3], and to compute the related zonal wind in the range from 5 to about 50 km. Also the annual evolution atmospheric temperature and zonal winds can be seen from the analysis, thanks to the large time spanned by data set, namely solar longitude 330°-360° for the first observation year, until 210° of solar longitude from the second year, or, in other words, from the end of the north hemisphere winter to the middle autumn, highlighting the residual Hadley circulation. As from previous results performed on Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), presence of asymmetric Hadley circulation is clearly shown: during the solstice there should be only one cell (Fig.1) starting from a near equatorial region ascending branch and ending in a polar descending branch in northern hemisphere at the beginning of the northern winter and in southern hemisphere at the end of the northern summer [2]. An attempt to compare our results with model and other instruments' result is made, showing both the agreement whit the European Mars Climate Database and with zonal wind derived from TES, on board the Mars Global Surveyor. The latter dataset present significative difference due to different observational parameters, first of all a different orbit, even if there is a good agreement between results from the two instruments. References [1] Grassi D. , et al (2005) PSS

  17. Absolute parameters of young stars: QZ Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, W. S. G.; Blackford, M.; Butland, R.; Budding, E.

    2017-09-01

    New high-resolution spectroscopy and BVR photometry together with literature data on the complex massive quaternary star QZ Car are collected and analysed. Absolute parameters are found as follows. System A: M1 = 43 (±3), M2 = 19 (+3 -7), R1 = 28 (±2), R2 = 6 (±2), (⊙); T1 ∼ 28 000, T2 ∼ 33 000 K; System B: M1 = 30 (±3), M2 = 20 (±3), R1 = 10 (±0.5), R2 = 20 (±1), (⊙); T1 ∼ 36 000, T2 ∼ 30 000 K (model dependent temperatures). The wide system AB: Period = 49.5 (±1) yr, Epochs, conjunction = 1984.8 (±1), periastron = 2005.3 (±3) yr, mean separation = 65 (±3), (au); orbital inclination = 85 (+5 -15) deg, photometric distance ∼2700 (±300) pc, age = 4 (±1) Myr. Other new contributions concern: (a) analysis of the timing of minima differences (O - C)s for the eclipsing binary (System B); (b) the width of the eclipses, pointing to relatively large effects of radiation pressure; (c) inferences from the rotational widths of lines for both Systems A and B; and (d) implications for theoretical models of early-type stars. While feeling greater confidence on the quaternary's general parametrization, observational complications arising from strong wind interactions or other, unclear, causes still inhibit precision and call for continued multiwavelength observations. Our high-inclination value for the AB system helps to explain failures to resolve the wide binary in the previous years. The derived young age independently confirms membership of QZ Car to the open cluster Collinder 228.

  18. Small-pore, big opportunity: searching for novel applications of small-pore zeolites by means of pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, J.; Lee, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Pressure-induced structural and chemical changes observed in small-pore zeolite natrolites are especially encouraging in terms of finding appropriate applications as they occur in the industrially-achievable low-pressure regime, i.e., as low as a few kilobars. After identifying the systematics of structural and chemical behaviors of natrolites in relation to the composition of pressure media, we have developed a procedure to exchange and sequestrate both Cs cation and I anion under intermediate pressure and temperature conditions. This result points towards the possibility of designing novel storage means for important radionuclides. Another avenue to utilize the unique pressure-induced chemistry of small-pore zeolite natrolite is to trap nominally non-adsorbable gas molecules via auxetic expansion under pressure. We have recently succeeded in pressure-induced insertion of Xe into silver-natrolite. Intriguingly, Xe adsorption occurs concomitant with charge disproportionation of silver cations to form silver nano-blobs on the surface of natrolite crystals. We will also present here various usages of laboratory-based high-pressure devices and characterization tools, which play important roles to confirm the synchrotron-based high-pressure experiments involving synthesis of new materials.

  19. Soil nitrogen cycling and availability are linked to ammonia oxidizer abundance across a tropical mean annual temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, S.; Litton, C. M.; Giardina, C. P.; Sparks, J. P.; Groffman, P.; Hewson, I.; Fahey, T.

    2016-12-01

    Interactions among environmental variables can obfuscate the primary drivers linking soil microbial community function to ecosystem biogeochemistry. These connections are important to understand in order to predict ecosystem responses to global climate change. In particular, the role of mean annual temperature (MAT) in regulating carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling via microbial communities remains unclear. To study these dynamics in situ, we used a a natural elevation gradient of tropical wet montane forest on Mauna Kea, Hawai'i with established permanent plots. Across the gradient, environmental variables besides MAT remain constant. We studied the abundance and activity of the amoA gene, which regulates the rate-limiting step of nitrification, in ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) with relation to N availability and cycling across increasing MAT. Our results show that the abundance of amoA is positively correlated with MAT (p<0.05; r2=0.34) and that MAT and amoA abundance are the primary predictors of nitrate (NO3-) bioavailability (p<0.05). We also found that the relative expression of amoA (cDNA/DNA) is not correlated with MAT or potential net nitrification rate. Our results indicate the direct role of MAT in ammonia oxidizer community structure and demonstrate feedbacks to nutrient availability in forest systems. These findings suggest that forest primary production and carbon cycling may be affected by AOA and AOB responses to rising MAT.

  20. The role of external forcing and internal variability in regulating global mean surface temperatures on decadal timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lu; McPhaden, Michael J.

    2017-03-01

    Global mean surface temperature (GMST) shows considerable decadal variations superimposed on a pronounced warming trend, with rapid warming during 1920–1945 and 1977–2000 and warming hiatuses during 1946–1976 and 2001–2013. The prevailing view is that internally generated variations associated with the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) dominate decadal variations in GMST, while external forcing from greenhouse gases and anthropogenic aerosols dominate the long-term trend in GMST over the last hundred years. Here we show evidence from observations and climate models that external forcing largely governs decadal GMST variations in the historical record with internally generated variations playing a secondary role, except during those periods of IPO extremes. In particular, the warming hiatus during 1946–1976 started from a negative IPO but was later dominated by the eruption of Mount Agung in 1963, while the subsequent accelerated warming during 1977–2000 was due primarily to increased greenhouse gas forcing. The most recent warming hiatus apparent in observations occurred largely through cooling from a negative IPO extreme that overwhelmed the warming from external forcing. An important implication of this work is that when the phase of the IPO turns positive, as it did in 2014, the combination of external forcing and internal variability should lead to accelerated global warming. This accelerated warming appears to be underway, with record high GMST in 2014, 2015, and 2016.

  1. Absolute measurement of optical attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetsel, Grover C., Jr.; Stotts, Steven A.

    1983-06-01

    We have discovered that laser beam deflection spectroscopy can be used for the absolute measurement of wave or particle beam attenuation in condensed matter. The concept has been experimentally evaluated by successfully measuring the absolute optical attenuation in a crystal of U3+:CaF2 at 514 nm. A theoretical model that explains the experiment and characterizes the range of applicability of the method has been developed.

  2. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  3. Prospective Teachers' Procedural and Conceptual Knowledge of Mean Absolute Deviation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groth, Randall E.

    2014-01-01

    The recommendation to study statistical variation has become prevalent in recent curriculum documents. At the same time, research on teachers' knowledge of variation is in its beginning stages. This study investigated prospective teachers' knowledge in regard to a specific measure of statistical variation that is new to many curriculum documents:…

  4. Optical cryostat realizations at absolut System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trollier, T.; Ravex, A.; Tanchon, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes two kinds of optical cryostats designed and manufactured at Absolut System. The first one makes use of pressurized LN2 for temperature control of a sample holder in the 80 K - 470 K temperature range. An optical window is implemented above the sample holder to allow for rugosity and 3D distortion of heterogeneous semicon sample assemblies on a wafer. The second one makes use of CRYOMECH remote motor type pulse tube cryocoolers for temperature control of the sample holder in the 3 K - 300 K temperature range. In this type of cryostats, particular attention has been paid to reduce the vibrations exported by the cooler. These 4 K ultra low vibration cryostats are used for characterization of samples via optical windows. Both designs will be presented and the performance reported.

  5. The effect of urban geometry on mean radiant temperature under future climate change: a study of three European cities.

    PubMed

    Lau, Kevin Ka-Lun; Lindberg, Fredrik; Rayner, David; Thorsson, Sofia

    2015-07-01

    Future anthropogenic climate change is likely to increase the air temperature (T(a)) across Europe and increase the frequency, duration and magnitude of severe heat stress events. Heat stress events are generally associated with clear-sky conditions and high T(a), which give rise to high radiant heat load, i.e. mean radiant temperature (T(mrt)). In urban environments, T mrt is strongly influenced by urban geometry. The present study examines the effect of urban geometry on daytime heat stress in three European cities (Gothenburg in Sweden, Frankfurt in Germany and Porto in Portugal) under present and future climates, using T(mrt) as an indicator of heat stress. It is found that severe heat stress occurs in all three cities. Similar maximum daytime T(mrt) is found in open areas in all three cities despite of the latitudinal differences in average daytime T(mrt). In contrast, dense urban structures like narrow street canyons are able to mitigate heat stress in the summer, without causing substantial changes in T(mrt) in the winter. Although the T(mrt) averages are similar for the north-south and east-west street canyons in each city, the number of hours when T(mrt) exceeds the threshold values of 55.5 and 59.4 °C-used as indicators of moderate and severe heat stress-in the north-south canyons is much higher than that in the east-west canyons. Using statistically downscaled data from a regional climate model, it is found that the study sites were generally warmer in the future scenario, especially Porto, which would further exacerbate heat stress in urban areas. However, a decrease in solar radiation in Gothenburg and Frankfurt reduces T(mrt) in the spring, while the reduction in T(mrt) is somewhat offset by increasing T(a) in other seasons. It suggests that changes in the T(mrt) under the future scenario are dominated by variations in T(a). Nonetheless, the intra-urban differences remain relatively stable in the future. These findings suggest that dense urban

  6. Molecular composition of soil organic matter with land-use change along a bi-continental mean annual temperature gradient.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Oliva; Haddix, Michelle L; Conant, Richard T; Paul, Eldor A; Simpson, Myrna J

    2016-12-15

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is critical for maintaining soil fertility and long-term agricultural sustainability. The molecular composition of SOM is likely altered due to global climate and land-use change; but rarely are these two aspects studied in tandem. Here we used molecular-level techniques to examine SOM composition along a bi-continental (from North to South America) mean annual temperature (MAT) gradient from seven native grassland/forest and cultivated/pasture sites. Biomarker methods included solvent extraction, base hydrolysis and cupric (II) oxide oxidation for the analysis of free lipids of plant and microbial origin, ester-bound lipids from cutin and suberin, and lignin-derived phenols, respectively. Solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to examine the overall composition of SOM. Soil cultivation was found to increase the amount of microbial-derived compounds at warmer temperatures (up to 17% increase). The cultivated soils were characterized by much lower contributions of plant-derived SOM components compared to the native soils (up to 64% lower at the coldest site). In addition, cultivation caused an increase in lignin and cutin degradation (up to 68 and 15% increase, respectively), and an increase in the amount of suberin-derived inputs (up to 54% increase). Clear differences in the molecular composition of SOM due to soil cultivation were observed in soils of varying mineral composition and were attributed to disturbance, different vegetation inputs, soil aggregate destruction and MAT. A high organic allophanic tropical soil was characterized by its protection of carbohydrates and nitrogen-containing compounds. The conversion of native to cultivated land shows significant shifts in the degradation stage of SOM. In particular, cutin-derived compounds which are believed to be part of the stable SOM pool may undergo enhanced degradation with long-term cultivation and disruption of soil aggregates. On a per year basis, the total

  7. Method and apparatus for two-dimensional absolute optical encoding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    This invention presents a two-dimensional absolute optical encoder and a method for determining position of an object in accordance with information from the encoder. The encoder of the present invention comprises a scale having a pattern being predetermined to indicate an absolute location on the scale, means for illuminating the scale, means for forming an image of the pattern; and detector means for outputting signals derived from the portion of the image of the pattern which lies within a field of view of the detector means, the field of view defining an image reference coordinate system, and analyzing means, receiving the signals from the detector means, for determining the absolute location of the object. There are two types of scale patterns presented in this invention: grid type and starfield type.

  8. Absolute-magnitude distributions of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Dean; Wright, John; Jenkins III, Robert L.; Maddox, Larry

    2014-05-01

    The absolute-magnitude distributions of seven supernova (SN) types are presented. The data used here were primarily taken from the Asiago Supernova Catalogue, but were supplemented with additional data. We accounted for both foreground and host-galaxy extinction. A bootstrap method is used to correct the samples for Malmquist bias. Separately, we generate volume-limited samples, restricted to events within 100 Mpc. We find that the superluminous events (M{sub B} < –21) make up only about 0.1% of all SNe in the bias-corrected sample. The subluminous events (M{sub B} > –15) make up about 3%. The normal Ia distribution was the brightest with a mean absolute blue magnitude of –19.25. The IIP distribution was the dimmest at –16.75.

  9. Absolute magnitudes and kinematic properties of Cepheids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, T. D.; Jefferys, W. H.; Barnes, T. G., III; Hawley, S. L.

    A maximum-likelihood statistical parallax analysis of classical Cepheids has been performed to determine the relative solar motion, Oort constants, velocity ellipsoid parameters, and zero points of the PL and PLC relations. The analysis is based upon 90 proper motions drawn from the list of Karimova and Pavlovskaya 1981 and upon the analytical approach of Hawley et al. 1986. The authors' results give a best estimate for the mean absolute magnitude of Cepheids at log P = 0.8 of = -3.46±0.33 mag. This estimate for the Cepheid absolute magnitude zero point is highly stable against refinements in the mathematical technique and against additional Cepheid proper motion data of quality similar to the existing proper motions. Improvement in this value will likely come only from a marked improvement in the quality of the Cepheid proper motions.

  10. [Absolute bioavailability of chlorpromazine, promazine and promethazine].

    PubMed

    Koytchev, R; Alken, R G; Kirkov, V; Neshev, G; Vagaday, M; Kunter, U

    1994-02-01

    The absolute bioavailability of the three phenothiazine neuroleptics, promazine (Sinophenin, CAS 58-40-2), chlorpromazine (Propaphenin, CAS 50-53-3) and promethazine (Prothazin, CAS 60-87-7) was tested in three single-dose cross-over studies. In each trial 12 to 14 healthy volunteers were enrolled. The single doses for promazine, promethazine and chlorpromazine were 100, 75 and 150 mg (orally) and 20, 50 and 50 mg (intravenously), resp. The serum concentrations of the three neuroleptics were measured by means of a selective HPLC-method. the distribution-free confidence intervals for the absolute bioavailability of the three phenothiazines were within 10.5 to 24.7% for chlorpromazine, 7.8 to 24.9% for promazine and 12.3 to 40% for promethazine. Promazine and chlorpromazine are pharmacokinetically very similar and differ substantially from promethazine.

  11. Quantifying the temperature-independent effect of stratospheric aerosol geoengineering on global-mean precipitation in a multi-model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Angus J.; Griffiths, Hannah G.

    2016-03-01

    The reduction in global-mean precipitation when stratospheric aerosol geoengineering is used to counterbalance global warming from increasing carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations has been mainly attributed to the temperature-independent effect of CO2 on atmospheric radiative cooling. We demonstrate here that stratospheric sulphate aerosol itself also acts to reduce global-mean precipitation independent of its effects on temperature. The temperature-independent effect of stratospheric aerosol geoenginering on global-mean precipitation is calculated by removing temperature-dependent effects from climate model simulations of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). When sulphate aerosol is injected into the stratosphere at a rate of 5 Tg SO2 per year the aerosol reduces global-mean precipitation by approximately 0.2 %, though multiple ensemble members are required to separate this effect from internal variability. For comparison, the precipitation reduction from the temperature-independent effect of increasing CO2 concentrations under the RCP4.5 scenario of the future is approximately 0.5 %. The temperature-independent effect of stratospheric sulphate aerosol arises from the aerosol’s effect on tropospheric radiative cooling. Radiative transfer calculations show this is mainly due to increasing downward emission of infrared radiation by the aerosol, but there is also a contribution from the stratospheric warming the aerosol causes. Our results suggest climate model simulations of solar dimming can capture the main features of the global-mean precipitation response to stratospheric aerosol geoengineering.

  12. Characteristics of the mean radiant temperature in high latitude cities--implications for sensitive climate planning applications.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Fredrik; Holmer, Björn; Thorsson, Sofia; Rayner, David

    2014-07-01

    Knowledge of how the mean radiant temperature (T mrt ) is affected by factors such as location, climate and urban setting contributes to the practice of climate sensitive planning. This paper examines how T mrt varies within an urban setting and how it is influenced by cloudiness. In addition, variations of T mrt in three high latitude cities are investigated in order to analyse the impact of geographical context and climate conditions. Results showed large spatial variations between sunlit and shaded areas during clear weather conditions, with the highest values of T mrt close to sunlit walls and the lowest values in the areas shaded by buildings and vegetation. As cloudiness increases, the spatial pattern is altered and the differences are reduced. The highest T mrt under cloudy conditions is instead found in open areas where the proportion of shortwave diffuse radiation from the sky vault is high. A regional comparison between three Swedish coastal cities showed that T mrt during summer is similar regardless of latitudinal location. On the other hand, large differences in T mrt during winter were found. Shadows, both from buildings and vegetation are the most effective measure to reduce extreme values of T mrt. However, extensive areas of shadow are usually not desired within outdoor urban environments at high latitude cities. One solution is to create diverse outdoor urban spaces in terms of shadow and also ventilation. This would provide individuals with access to a choice of thermal environments which they can use to assist their thermal regulation, based on personal needs and desires.

  13. Regionalization of Europe based on a K-Means Cluster Analysis of the climate change of temperatures and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, M. J.; Melo-Gonçalves, P.; Teixeira, J. C.; Rocha, A.

    2016-08-01

    In order to study climate change on a regional scale using Earth System Models, it is useful to partition the spatial domain into regions according to their climate changes. The aim of this work is to divide the European domain into regions of similar projected climate changes using a simulation of daily total precipitation, minimum and maximum temperatures for the recent-past (1986-2005) and long-term future (2081-2100) provided by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). The difference between the long-term future and recent-past daily climatologies of these three variables is determined. Aiming to objectively identify the grid points with coherent climate changes, a K-Mean Cluster Analysis is applied to these differences. This method is performed for each variable independently (univariate version) and for the aggregation of the three variables (multivariate version). A mathematical approach to determine the optimal number of clusters is pursued. However, due to the method characteristics, a sensitivity test to the number of clusters is performed by analysing the consistency of the results. This is a novel method, allowing for the determination of regions based on the climate change of multiple variables. Results from the univariate application of this method are in accordance with results found in the literature, showing overall similar regions of changes. The regions obtained for the multivariate version are mainly defined by latitude over European land, with some features of land-sea interaction. Furthermore, all regions have statistically different distributions of at least one of the variables, providing confidence to the regions obtained.

  14. Absolute test for cylindrical surfaces using the conjugate differential method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya; Ma, Jun; Yuan, Caojin; Pruss, Christof; Sun, Weiyuan; Liu, Mincai; Zhu, Rihong; Gao, Zhishan; Osten, Wolfgang

    2016-11-01

    An absolute testing method for cylindrical surfaces is presented in a null test setup with a computer-generated hologram. The absolute test exploits the symmetry of cylinders, which allows us to introduce a certain shift of the test surface both parallel to and rotated about the centerline while the null test condition is still maintained. With two shifts of the cylindrical surface, four measurements belonging to two groups in conjugate positions can be accomplished to obtain the absolute differential map with the interferometer and null optics errors removed. The absolute surface can be obtained by wavefront reconstruction from local differential data. A simulation of the method is presented to estimate the error propagation. Experimental absolute test results of a concave cylindrical surface with 100-mm radius are given. The measured profiles are compared with those obtained from a commercial profiler, showing a difference of less than 15 nm (root-mean-square).

  15. May–June Maximum Temperature Reconstruction from Mean Earlywood Density in North Central China and Its Linkages to the Summer Monsoon Activities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Yuan, Yujiang

    2014-01-01

    Cores of Pinus tabulaformis from Tianshui were subjected to densitometric analysis to obtain mean earlywood density data. Climate response analysis indicates that May–June maximum temperature is the main factor limiting the mean earlywood density (EWD) of Chinese pine trees in the Shimen Mountains. Based on the EWD chronology, we have reconstructed May–June maximum temperature 1666 to 2008 for Tianshui, north central China. The reconstruction explains 40.1% of the actual temperature variance during the common period 1953–2008. The temperature reconstruction is representative of temperature conditions over a large area to the southeast and northwest of the sampling site. Preliminary analysis of links between large-scale climatic variation and the temperature reconstruction shows that there is a relationship between extremes in spring temperature and anomalous atmospheric circulation in the region. It is thus revealed that the mean earlywood density chronology of Pinus tabulaformis has enough potential to reconstruct the temperature variability further into the past. PMID:25207554

  16. Preliminary results of a determination of temperatures of flames by means of K-band microwave attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudlin, Leonard

    1951-01-01

    The temperature effects on the attenuation of K-band microwaves, at a frequency of 26,500 plus or minus 30 megacycles per second, through natural-gas and propane flames containing added alkali halide salts, were investigated over a temperature range from 1900 to 2500 K. The preliminary data of this investigation indicated that the attenuation varies appreciably with the sodium-line-reversal temperatures of the flames and is independent of the particular hydrocarbon fuels that were used for temperature sources and of the particular halide components of the compounds used in the concentrations employed to produce easily measurable attenuation. A reproducibility of plus or minus 25 K was obtainable.

  17. Lidar observations of seasonal variation of diurnal mean temperature in the mesopause region over Fort Collins, Colorado (41°N, 105°W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Hu, Zhilin; White, M. A.; Chen, H.; Krueger, D. A.; She, C. Y.

    2000-05-01

    Two campaigns from February 1997 to January 1999 have resulted in 18 sets of continuous temperature measurements in the mesopause region over Fort Collins, Colorado (41°N, 105°W), each covering a complete diurnal cycle, reasonably well distributed throughout the year. It is shown that the winter-summer transitions, based on diurnal means, are abrupt and clear, further strengthening the concept of two-level mesopause, and demonstrate the robustness of this picture. Similar to data taken at Urbana, Illinois, our data at Fort Collins also demonstrate the need to observe over a complete diurnal cycle to deduce the uncontaminated mean temperature structure and seasonal variations in the mesopause region. The difference between annual diurnal, nighttime, and daytime means may be ascribed to a temperature wave propagating with a downward phase speed of ˜0.8 km/h. Our data show that the nighttime annual mean is colder than the diurnal annual mean by no more than 2 K below 88 km and warmer by no more than 3 K above 88 km where the three means are nearly the same. As in the Urbana data, we also observed the altitude of a secondary temperature minimum in the summer to be ˜96 km, which without strong dynamical cooling in the summer would have been the summer mesopause altitude.

  18. Majorana dynamical mean-field study of spin dynamics at finite temperatures in the honeycomb Kitaev model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitake, Junki; Nasu, Joji; Kato, Yasuyuki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2017-07-01

    A prominent feature of quantum spin liquids is fractionalization of the spin degree of freedom. Fractionalized excitations have their own dynamics in different energy scales, and hence, affect finite-temperature (T ) properties in a peculiar manner even in the paramagnetic state harboring the quantum spin liquid state. We here present a comprehensive theoretical study of the spin dynamics in a wide T range for the Kitaev model on a honeycomb lattice, whose ground state is a quantum spin liquid. In this model, the fractionalization occurs to break up quantum spins into itinerant matter fermions and localized Z2 fluxes, which results in two crossovers at very different T scales. Extending the previous study for the isotropic coupling case [J. Yoshitake, J. Nasu, and Y. Motome, Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 157203 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.157203], we calculate the dynamical spin structure factor S (q ,ω ) , the NMR relaxation rate 1 /T1 , and the magnetic susceptibility χ while changing the anisotropy in the exchange coupling constants, by using the dynamical mean-field theory based on a Majorana fermion representation. We describe the details of the methodology including the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo method for computing dynamical spin correlations and the maximum entropy method for analytic continuation. We confirm that the combined method provides accurate results in a wide T range including the region where the spins are fractionalized. We find that also in the anisotropic cases the system exhibits peculiar behaviors below the high-T crossover whose temperature is comparable to the average of the exchange constants: S (q ,ω ) shows an inelastic response at the energy scale of the averaged exchange constant, 1 /T1 continues to grow even though the equal-time spin correlations are saturated and almost T independent, and χ deviates from the Curie-Weiss behavior. In particular, when the exchange interaction in one direction is stronger than the other two

  19. Absolute classification with unsupervised clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An absolute classification algorithm is proposed in which the class definition through training samples or otherwise is required only for a particular class of interest. The absolute classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering when one cluster is known initially. The definitions and statistics of the other classes are automatically developed through the weighted unsupervised clustering procedure, which is developed to keep the cluster corresponding to the class of interest from losing its identity as the class of interest. Once all the classes are developed, a conventional relative classifier such as the maximum-likelihood classifier is used in the classification.

  20. Absolute brightness of fluorescent microspheres.

    PubMed

    Finger, Isaac; Phillips, Scott; Mobley, Elizabeth; Tucker, Robert; Hess, Henry

    2009-02-07

    The absolute brightness of fluorescent particles, such as dye-containing nano- and microspheres or quantum dots, is a critical design parameter for many applications relying on fluorescence detection. The absolute brightness, defined as the ratio of radiant intensity of emission to illumination intensity of excitation, of nile-red fluorescent microspheres with a 1 micrometre diameter is measured to be 4.2 +/- 1 x 10(-16) m(2)/sr, and the implications for the design of kinesin motor protein-powered "smart dust" devices and the remote detection of fluorescence are discussed.

  1. Absolute classification with unsupervised clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An absolute classification algorithm is proposed in which the class definition through training samples or otherwise is required only for a particular class of interest. The absolute classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering when one cluster is known initially. The definitions and statistics of the other classes are automatically developed through the weighted unsupervised clustering procedure, which is developed to keep the cluster corresponding to the class of interest from losing its identity as the class of interest. Once all the classes are developed, a conventional relative classifier such as the maximum-likelihood classifier is used in the classification.

  2. Effects of elevated mean and extremely high temperatures on the physio-ecological characteristics of geographically distinctive populations of Cunninghamia lanceolata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ting; Jia, Xiaorong; Liao, Huixuan; Peng, Shijia; Peng, Shaolin

    2016-12-01

    Conventional models for predicting species distribution under global warming scenarios often treat one species as a homogeneous whole. In the present study, we selected Cunninghamia lanceolata (C. lanceolata), a widely distributed species in China, to investigate the physio-ecological responses of five populations under different temperature regimes. The results demonstrate that increased mean temperatures induce increased growth performance among northern populations, which exhibited the greatest germination capacity and largest increase in the overlap between the growth curve and the monthly average temperature. However,tolerance of the southern population to extremely high temperatures was stronger than among the population from the northern region,shown by the best growth and the most stable photosynthetic system of the southern population under extremely high temperature. This result indicates that the growth advantage among northern populations due to increased mean temperatures may be weakened by lower tolerance to extremely high temperatures. This finding is antithetical to the predicted results. The theoretical coupling model constructed here illustrates that the difference in growth between populations at high and low latitudes and altitudes under global warming will decrease because of the frequent occurrence of extremely high temperatures.

  3. Effects of elevated mean and extremely high temperatures on the physio-ecological characteristics of geographically distinctive populations of Cunninghamia lanceolata

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ting; Jia, Xiaorong; Liao, Huixuan; Peng, Shijia; Peng, Shaolin

    2016-01-01

    Conventional models for predicting species distribution under global warming scenarios often treat one species as a homogeneous whole. In the present study, we selected Cunninghamia lanceolata (C. lanceolata), a widely distributed species in China, to investigate the physio-ecological responses of five populations under different temperature regimes. The results demonstrate that increased mean temperatures induce increased growth performance among northern populations, which exhibited the greatest germination capacity and largest increase in the overlap between the growth curve and the monthly average temperature. However,tolerance of the southern population to extremely high temperatures was stronger than among the population from the northern region,shown by the best growth and the most stable photosynthetic system of the southern population under extremely high temperature. This result indicates that the growth advantage among northern populations due to increased mean temperatures may be weakened by lower tolerance to extremely high temperatures. This finding is antithetical to the predicted results. The theoretical coupling model constructed here illustrates that the difference in growth between populations at high and low latitudes and altitudes under global warming will decrease because of the frequent occurrence of extremely high temperatures. PMID:28004775

  4. Assessment of Projected Changes in Temperature and Precipitation Climatology over the CORDEX-Region 9 via Multi-Model Ensemble Mean of CMIP5 Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turp, M. Tufan; Ozturk, Tugba; Kurnaz, M. Levent

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we conduct a multi-model ensemble mean approach in order to investigate of projected changes in fundamental climate variables (i.e. mean air temperature, minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and precipitation total) over the CORDEX-Australasia domain based on the outputs of various coupled global climate models (GCMs) participating in the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). In this respect, in order to analyze projected future changes in temperature and precipitation climatology, seasonal averages, and inter-annual variability over the Australasia (known as Region 9) domain, where is one of fourteen domains of the Coordinated Regional Climate Downscaling Experiment (CORDEX), we focus on historical, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 experiments of the GCMs for reference- (1981 - 2000), near- (2016 - 2035), mid- (2046 - 2065), and long-term (2081 - 2100), respectively. This research has been supported by Boǧaziçi University Research Fund Grant Number 10421.

  5. Effect of visual restitution training on absolute homonymous scotomas.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, A; Vonthein, R; Reinhard, J; Trauzettel-Klosinski, S; Connert, C; Schiefer, U

    2006-07-11

    The authors examined 16 patients with stable homonymous visual field defects (HVFDs) with static automated perimetry (SAP). Training effect E was defined as difference of the proportions of absolutely defective locations in all test locations, before and after visual restitution training (VRT). E was 0.05 +/- 0.05 (mean +/- SD). The authors observed a relevant training effect (E >or= 0.12) in two subjects, but only monocularly. VRT has little effect on absolute HVFDs in SAP.

  6. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  7. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  8. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  9. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  10. Arbitrary segments of absolute negative mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruyin; Nie, Linru; Chen, Chongyang; Wang, Chaojie

    2017-01-01

    In previous research work, investigators have reported only one or two segments of absolute negative mobility (ANM) in a periodic potential. In fact, many segments of ANM also occur in the system considered here. We investigate transport of an inertial particle in a gating ratchet periodic potential subjected to a constant bias force. Our numerical results show that its mean velocity can decrease with the bias force increasing, i.e. ANM phenomenon. Furthermore, the ANM can take place arbitrary segments, even up to more than thirty. Intrinsic physical mechanism and conditions for arbitrary segments of ANM to occur are discussed in detail.

  11. Direct control of the temperature rise in parallel transmission by means of temperature virtual observation points: Simulations at 10.5 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Boulant, Nicolas; Wu, Xiaoping; Adriany, Gregor; Schmitter, Sebastian; Uğurbil, Kamil; Van de Moortele, Pierre-François

    2016-01-01

    A method using parallel transmission to mitigate B1+ inhomogeneity while explicitly constraining the temperature rise is reported and compared with a more traditional SAR-constrained pulse design. Finite difference time domain simulations are performed on a numerical human head model and for a 16-channel coil at 10.5 Tesla. Based on a set of presimulations, a virtual observation point compression model for the temperature rise is derived. This compact representation is then used in a nonlinear programming algorithm for pulse design under explicit temperature rise constraints. In the example of a time-of-flight sequence, radiofrequency pulse performance in some cases is increased by a factor of two compared with SAR-constrained pulses, while temperature rise is directly and efficiently controlled. Pulse performance can be gained by relaxing the SAR constraints, but at the expense of a loss of direct control on temperature. Given the importance of accurate safety control at ultrahigh field and the lack of direct correspondence between SAR and temperature, this work motivates the need for thorough thermal studies in normal in vivo conditions. The tools presented here will possibly contribute to safer and more efficient MR exams. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The Effect of Harp Music on Heart Rate, Mean Blood Pressure, Respiratory Rate, and Body Temperature in the African Green Monkey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    harp music on heart rate, mean blood pressure, respiratory rate, and body temperature in the African green monkey. Journal of Medical Primatology 36:95...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Background: The effectiveness of recorded harp music as a tool for relaxation for nonhuman primates (NHP) is...Chlorocebus aethiops). After post-surgical recovery, animals were exposed to recorded harp music . Telemetry data were collected on heart rate, mean

  13. Measurement of the high-temperature Seebeck coefficient of thin films by means of an epitaxially regrown thermometric reference material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramu, Ashok T.; Mages, Phillip; Zhang, Chong; Imamura, Jeffrey T.; Bowers, John E.

    2012-09-01

    The Seebeck coefficient of a typical thermoelectric material, silicon-doped InGaAs lattice-matched to InP, is measured over a temperature range from 300 K to 550 K. By depositing and patterning a thermometric reference bar of silicon-doped InP adjacent to a bar of the material under test, temperature differences are measured directly. This is in contrast to conventional two-thermocouple techniques that subtract two large temperatures to yield a small temperature difference, a procedure prone to errors. The proposed technique retains the simple instrumentation of two-thermocouple techniques while eliminating the critical dependence of the latter on good thermal contact. The repeatability of the proposed technique is demonstrated to be ±2.6% over three temperature sweeps, while the repeatability of two-thermocouple measurements is about ±5%. The improved repeatability is significant for reliable reporting of the ZT figure of merit, which is proportional to the square of the Seebeck coefficient. The accuracy of the proposed technique depends on the accuracy with which the high-temperature Seebeck coefficient of the reference material may be computed or measured. In this work, the Seebeck coefficient of the reference material, n+ InP, is computed by rigorous solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed technique can be systematically improved by scaling, and the method is easily extensible to other material systems currently being investigated for high thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency.

  14. Constructing new satellite-only time series of global mean, sea surface temperature data for climate from ATSR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veal, Karen; Remedios, John; Ghent, Darren

    2013-04-01

    The Along Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSRs) have provided a near-continuous record of sea surface temperature (SST) data for climate from the launch of ATSR-1 in 1991 to the loss of the Advanced ATSR (AATSR) in April 2012. The intention was always to provide an SST record, independent of in situ data, to corroborate and improve climate data records in recent times. We show that the ATSR record provides a very suitable data set with which to study the recent climate record, particularly during the ATSR-2 and AATSR periods (1995 to 2012) in three major respects. First, ATSR climate time series achieve anomaly accuracies of better than 0.05 K (and high stability). Second, the overlap between instruments allows for excellent determination and removal of biases; between ATSR-2 and AATSR, these are less than 0.05 K for the highest accuracy SST data. Finally, uncertainties on global monthly mean data are less than 0.02 K and hence comparable to those achieved by in situ analyses such as HadSST3. A particular hallmark of the ATSR instruments was their exceptional design for accuracy incorporating high accuracy radiometric calibration, dual-view of the Earth's surface and the use of three thermal emission channels; additional channels are included for cloud clearing in this context. The use of dual-view and multiple thermnal wavelengths allows a number of combinations for retrievals of SST, the most accurate being the dual-view, three-channel retrieval (D3) at nighttime. This restriction is due to the use of the 3.7 micron channel which is sensitive to solar radiation during the day. Extensive work has resulted in a major advances recently resulting in both an operational V2.0 SST product and a further improved ATSR Re-analysis for Climate (ARC) product, a particular feature of the latter being the development of a depth SST product in addition to the skin SST directly determined from satellite data. We will discuss the characteristics of these data sets in terms of

  15. Changes in Non-Marine Vertebrate Assemblages from the Late Cretaceous of Southern Alberta, Canada and their Relationship to Changes in Mean Annual Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkman, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    A series of five vertebrate assemblages from southern Alberta, Canada, (paleolatitude of 58oN) ranging from late Santonian to late Maastrichtian in age together with contemporaneous assemblages from more southern localities provide a basis for interpreting how continental biotas responded to major climate events during this time. A decrease in abundance and diversity of ectothermic mesoreptiles (turtles, crocodiles, and champsosaurs) in southern Alberta that is documented by three successive assemblages of late Campanian and early Maastrichtian age is interpreted as the result of a southern shift of a latitudinal diversity gradient associated with a climatic cooling. The higher diversity of ectothermic mesoreptiles in this region during the late Maastrichtian is interpreted as a northern shift of the diversity gradient resulting from an increase in mean annual temperatures. Latitudinal changes in the distribution or abundance some taxa of fish, turtles, and dinosaurs can also be related to changes in mean annual temperature. The fish Melvius and the turtle Compsemys, which are typical of southern assemblages, occur at higher paleolatitudes during times of high mean annual temperature. The dinosaur Troodon, which has been considered to be more northern in its distribution, is more abundant in southern Alberta during times of lower mean annual temperature. The patterns of distribution of vertebrates in the Campanian and Maastrichtian support the interpretation that the occurrence of ectothermic mesoreptiles in a high-latitude locality of late Turonian-Coniacian age on Axel Heiberg Island (paleolatitude of 71o) is associated with high temperature at that time. These patterns also suggest that faunal changes documented by vertebrate microfossil localities of Cenomanian and Turonian age in southern Utah may also be related in part to an increase in mean annual temperatures during this time.

  16. A Proposed Methodology to Control Body Temperature in Patients at Risk of Hypothermia by means of Active Rewarming Systems

    PubMed Central

    Costanzo, Silvia; Cusumano, Alessia; Giaconia, Carlo; Mazzacane, Sante

    2014-01-01

    Hypothermia is a common complication in patients undergoing surgery under general anesthesia. It has been noted that, during the first hour of surgery, the patient's internal temperature (T core) decreases by 0.5–1.5°C due to the vasodilatory effect of anesthetic gases, which affect the body's thermoregulatory system by inhibiting vasoconstriction. Thus a continuous check on patient temperature must be carried out. The currently most used methods to avoid hypothermia are based on passive systems (such as blankets reducing body heat loss) and on active ones (thermal blankets, electric or hot-water mattresses, forced hot air, warming lamps, etc.). Within a broader research upon the environmental conditions, pollution, heat stress, and hypothermia risk in operating theatres, the authors set up an experimental investigation by using a warming blanket chosen from several types on sale. Their aim was to identify times and ways the human body reacts to the heat flowing from the blanket and the blanket's effect on the average temperature T skin and, as a consequence, on T core temperature of the patient. The here proposed methodology could allow surgeons to fix in advance the thermal power to supply through a warming blanket for reaching, in a prescribed time, the desired body temperature starting from a given state of hypothermia. PMID:25485278

  17. A proposed methodology to control body temperature in patients at risk of hypothermia by means of active rewarming systems.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Silvia; Cusumano, Alessia; Giaconia, Carlo; Mazzacane, Sante

    2014-01-01

    Hypothermia is a common complication in patients undergoing surgery under general anesthesia. It has been noted that, during the first hour of surgery, the patient's internal temperature (Tcore) decreases by 0.5-1.5°C due to the vasodilatory effect of anesthetic gases, which affect the body's thermoregulatory system by inhibiting vasoconstriction. Thus a continuous check on patient temperature must be carried out. The currently most used methods to avoid hypothermia are based on passive systems (such as blankets reducing body heat loss) and on active ones (thermal blankets, electric or hot-water mattresses, forced hot air, warming lamps, etc.). Within a broader research upon the environmental conditions, pollution, heat stress, and hypothermia risk in operating theatres, the authors set up an experimental investigation by using a warming blanket chosen from several types on sale. Their aim was to identify times and ways the human body reacts to the heat flowing from the blanket and the blanket's effect on the average temperature Tskin and, as a consequence, on Tcore temperature of the patient. The here proposed methodology could allow surgeons to fix in advance the thermal power to supply through a warming blanket for reaching, in a prescribed time, the desired body temperature starting from a given state of hypothermia.

  18. An atlas of monthly mean distributions of GEOSAT sea surface height, SSMI surface wind speed, AVHRR/2 sea surface temperature, and ECMWF surface wind components during 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, D.; Zlotnicki, V.; Newman, J.; Brown, O.; Wentz, F.

    1991-01-01

    Monthly mean global distributions for 1988 are presented with a common color scale and geographical map. Distributions are included for sea surface height variation estimated from GEOSAT; surface wind speed estimated from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program spacecraft; sea surface temperature estimated from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on NOAA spacecrafts; and the Cartesian components of the 10m height wind vector computed by the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasting. Charts of monthly mean value, sampling distribution, and standard deviation value are displayed. Annual mean distributions are displayed.

  19. An Analysis of Simulated and Observed Global Mean Near-Surface Air Temperature Anomalies from 1979 to 1999: Trends and Attribution of Causes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, R. M.; Ko, M. K. W.

    2001-01-01

    The 1979 - 1999 response of the climate system to variations in solar spectral irradiance is estimated by comparing the global averaged surface temperature anomalies simulated by a 2D (two dimensional) energy balance climate model to observed temperature anomalies. We perform a multiple regression of southern oscillation index and the individual model responses to solar irradiance variations, stratospheric and tropospheric aerosol loading, stratospheric ozone trends, and greenhouse gases onto each of five near-surface temperature anomaly data sets. We estimate the observed difference in global mean near surface air temperature attributable to the solar irradiance difference between solar maximum and solar minimum to be between 0.06 and 0.11 K, and that 1.1 - 3.8% of the total variance in monthly mean near-surface air temperature data is attributable to nations in solar spectral irradiance. For the five temperature data sets used in our analysis, the trends in raw monthly mean temperature anomaly data have a large range, spanning a factor of 3 from 0.06 to 0.17 K/decade. However. our analysis suggests that trends in monthly temperature anomalies attributable to the combination of greenhouse gas, stratospheric ozone, and tropospheric sulfate aerosol variations are much more consistent among data sets, ranging from 0.16 to 0.24 K/decade. Our model results suggest that roughly half of the warming from greenhouse gases is cancelled by the cooling from changes in stratospheric ozone. Tropospheric sulfate aerosol loading in the present day atmospheric contributes significantly to the net radiative forcing of the present day climate system. However, because the change in magnitude and latitudinal distribution of tropospheric sulfate aerosol has been small over the past 20 years, the change in the direct radiative forcing attributable to changes in aerosol loading over this time is also small.

  20. An Analysis of Simulated and Observed Global Mean Near-Surface Air Temperature Anomalies from 1979 to 1999: Trends and Attribution of Causes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, R. M.; Ko, M. K. W.

    2001-01-01

    The 1979 - 1999 response of the climate system to variations in solar spectral irradiance is estimated by comparing the global averaged surface temperature anomalies simulated by a 2D (two dimensional) energy balance climate model to observed temperature anomalies. We perform a multiple regression of southern oscillation index and the individual model responses to solar irradiance variations, stratospheric and tropospheric aerosol loading, stratospheric ozone trends, and greenhouse gases onto each of five near-surface temperature anomaly data sets. We estimate the observed difference in global mean near surface air temperature attributable to the solar irradiance difference between solar maximum and solar minimum to be between 0.06 and 0.11 K, and that 1.1 - 3.8% of the total variance in monthly mean near-surface air temperature data is attributable to nations in solar spectral irradiance. For the five temperature data sets used in our analysis, the trends in raw monthly mean temperature anomaly data have a large range, spanning a factor of 3 from 0.06 to 0.17 K/decade. However. our analysis suggests that trends in monthly temperature anomalies attributable to the combination of greenhouse gas, stratospheric ozone, and tropospheric sulfate aerosol variations are much more consistent among data sets, ranging from 0.16 to 0.24 K/decade. Our model results suggest that roughly half of the warming from greenhouse gases is cancelled by the cooling from changes in stratospheric ozone. Tropospheric sulfate aerosol loading in the present day atmospheric contributes significantly to the net radiative forcing of the present day climate system. However, because the change in magnitude and latitudinal distribution of tropospheric sulfate aerosol has been small over the past 20 years, the change in the direct radiative forcing attributable to changes in aerosol loading over this time is also small.

  1. The simultaneous measurement of temperature and mean strain based on the distorted spectra of half-encapsulated fiber Bragg gratings using improved particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng-fang; Wang, Jing; Sui, Qing-mei; Jia, Lei

    2017-06-01

    A half-encapsulated FBG is capable of simultaneously measuring temperature and strain. However, spectrum distortion, which may be induced by overlapping or non-uniform strains, may hinder the adoption of this technique. In order to resolve this issue, an improved particle swarm optimization (IPSO) based spectra reconstructing method has been adopted in this study to estimate the temperature and mean strain according to the distorted spectrum. Also, a dynamic adaptive inertia weight adjusting strategy based on the swarm success rate has been adopted to improve the algorithm. To validate the method, a total of 48 scenarios of distorted spectra have been simulated, and the temperature and mean strain estimated by IPSO have been compared with the genetic algorithm and linearly-declined PSO. The simulation results indicated that the IPSO based reconstructing method provided a higher accuracy. Additionally, the feasibility of the proposed method has been experimentally verified using a strain tunable apparatus within a measurable temperature environment. The experimental results demonstrated that the half-encapsulated FBG with an IPSO based spectra reconstructing method was applicable for the simultaneous measurement of temperature and mean strain, even when the spectrum was distorted.

  2. Monochromator-Based Absolute Calibration of Radiation Thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keawprasert, T.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, D. R.; Hartmann, J.

    2011-08-01

    A monochromator integrating-sphere-based spectral comparator facility has been developed to calibrate standard radiation thermometers in terms of the absolute spectral radiance responsivity, traceable to the PTB cryogenic radiometer. The absolute responsivity calibration has been improved using a 75 W xenon lamp with a reflective mirror and imaging optics to a relative standard uncertainty at the peak wavelength of approximately 0.17 % ( k = 1). Via a relative measurement of the out-of-band responsivity, the spectral responsivity of radiation thermometers can be fully characterized. To verify the calibration accuracy, the absolutely calibrated radiation thermometer is used to measure Au and Cu freezing-point temperatures and then to compare the obtained results with the values obtained by absolute methods, resulting in T - T 90 values of +52 mK and -50 mK for the gold and copper fixed points, respectively.

  3. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    SciTech Connect

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  4. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  5. A mean body temperature of 37°C for incubated preterm infants is associated with lower energy costs in the first 11 days of life.

    PubMed

    Degorre, C; Décima, P; Dégrugilliers, L; Ghyselen, L; Bach, V; Libert, J P; Tourneux, P

    2015-06-01

    This randomised trial compared the energy costs of providing incubated preterm infants born before 32 weeks of gestation with homeothermia using either air temperature control (ATC) or skin servocontrol (SSC). We studied 38 incubated preterm infants for the first 11 days of life, calculating the frequency of hypothermia (<36.0°C), hyperthermia (>37.5°C) and thermal challenge, together with energy costs, based on a change in incubator air temperature of 2°C above or below thermoneutrality. The daily mean incubator air temperature was higher in ATC than SSC (p < 0.05) for the first 6 days, and the mean body temperature was higher in ATC (37.0 ± 0.03°C) than SSC (36.8 ± 0.02; p < 0.01) over the whole study period. The frequency of moderate hyperthermia was higher in ATC (p < 0.001), whereas warm and cold thermal challenges were higher in SSC (p < 0.001). The two groups did not differ in terms of energy costs. The time to recover birthweight was shorter in ATC (p < 0.05). In incubators using ATC, a body temperature of 37°C was associated with lower energy costs and greater weight gain at 11 days of life for preterm infants. Future studies should test SSC shielded abdominal skin temperature set to 37°C. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Least Absolute Relative Error Estimation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kani; Guo, Shaojun; Lin, Yuanyuan; Ying, Zhiliang

    2010-01-01

    Multiplicative regression model or accelerated failure time model, which becomes linear regression model after logarithmic transformation, is useful in analyzing data with positive responses, such as stock prices or life times, that are particularly common in economic/financial or biomedical studies. Least squares or least absolute deviation are among the most widely used criterions in statistical estimation for linear regression model. However, in many practical applications, especially in treating, for example, stock price data, the size of relative error, rather than that of error itself, is the central concern of the practitioners. This paper offers an alternative to the traditional estimation methods by considering minimizing the least absolute relative errors for multiplicative regression models. We prove consistency and asymptotic normality and provide an inference approach via random weighting. We also specify the error distribution, with which the proposed least absolute relative errors estimation is efficient. Supportive evidence is shown in simulation studies. Application is illustrated in an analysis of stock returns in Hong Kong Stock Exchange.

  7. Using Limited Time Periods as a Means to Elucidate Microwave Sounding Unit Derived Tropospheric Temperature Trend Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    atmosphere is paramount to our understanding of climate change . The Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) derived atmospheric temperature trends are used in...that must continue to be addressed as they are used for climate change studies [Mears and Wentz, 2005]. Additionally, the accuracy of methods that...a thorough examination of these data and methods using these data is necessary to insure long-term stability as required for climate change studies

  8. Relationships Between Tropical Deep Convection, Tropospheric Mean Temperature and Cloud-Induced Radiative Fluxes on Intraseasonal Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, Holly S.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2010-01-01

    Intraseasonal variability of deep convection represents a fundamental mode of variability in the organization of tropical convection. While most studies of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) have focused on the spatial propagation and dynamics of convectively coupled circulations, we examine the projection of ISOs on the tropically-averaged temperature and energy budget. The area of interest is the global oceans between 20degN/S. Our analysis then focuses on these questions: (i) How is tropospheric temperature related to tropical deep convection and the associated ice cloud fractional amount (ICF) and ice water path (IWP)? (ii) What is the source of moisture sustaining the convection and what role does deep convection play in mediating the PBL - free atmospheric temperature equilibration? (iii) What affect do convectively generated upper-tropospheric clouds have on the TOA radiation budget? Our methodology is similar to that of Spencer et al., (2007) with some modifications and some additional diagnostics of both clouds and boundary layer thermodynamics. A composite ISO time series of cloud, precipitation and radiation quantities built from nearly 40 events during a six-year period is referenced to the atmospheric temperature signal. The increase of convective precipitation cannot be sustained by evaporation within the domain, implying strong moisture transports into the tropical ocean area. While there is a decrease in net TOA radiation that develops after the peak in deep convective rainfall, there seems little evidence that an "Infrared Iris"- like mechanism is dominant. Rather, the cloud-induced OLR increase seems largely produced by weakened convection with warmer cloud tops. Tropical ISO events offer an accessible target for studying ISOs not just in terms of propagation mechanisms, but on their global signals of heat, moisture and radiative flux feedback processes.

  9. Relationships Between Tropical Deep Convection, Tropospheric Mean Temperature and Cloud-Induced Radiative Fluxes on Intraseasonal Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, Holly S.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2009-01-01

    Intraseasonal variability of deep convection represents a fundamental mode of variability in the organization of tropical convection. While most studies of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) have focused on the spatial propagation and dynamics of convectively coupled circulations, we examine the projection of ISOs on the tropically-averaged temperature and energy budget. The area of interest is the global oceans between 20oN/S. Our analysis then focuses on these questions: (i) How is tropospheric temperature related to tropical deep convection and the associated ice cloud fractional amount (ICF) and ice water path (IWP)? (ii) What is the source of moisture sustaining the convection and what role does deep convection play in mediating the PBL - free atmospheric temperature equilibration? (iii) What affect do convectively generated upper-tropospheric clouds have on the TOA radiation budget? Our methodology is similar to that of Spencer et al., (2007) with some modifications and some additional diagnostics of both clouds and boundary layer thermodynamics. A composite ISO time series of cloud, precipitation and radiation quantities built from nearly 40 events during a six-year period is referenced to the atmospheric temperature signal. The increase of convective precipitation cannot be sustained by evaporation within the domain, implying strong moisture transports into the tropical ocean area. While there is a decrease in net TOA radiation that develops after the peak in deep convective rainfall, there seems little evidence that an "Infrared Iris"- like mechanism is dominant. Rather, the cloud-induced OLR increase seems largely produced by weakened convection with warmer cloud tops. Tropical ISO events offer an accessible target for studying ISOs not just in terms of propagation mechanisms, but on their global signals of heat, moisture and radiative flux feedback processes.

  10. Relationships Between Tropical Deep Convection, Tropospheric Mean Temperature and Cloud-Induced Radiative Fluxes on Intraseasonal Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, Holly S.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2010-01-01

    Intraseasonal variability of deep convection represents a fundamental mode of variability in the organization of tropical convection. While most studies of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) have focused on the spatial propagation and dynamics of convectively coupled circulations, we examine the projection of ISOs on the tropically-averaged temperature and energy budget. The area of interest is the global oceans between 20degN/S. Our analysis then focuses on these questions: (i) How is tropospheric temperature related to tropical deep convection and the associated ice cloud fractional amount (ICF) and ice water path (IWP)? (ii) What is the source of moisture sustaining the convection and what role does deep convection play in mediating the PBL - free atmospheric temperature equilibration? (iii) What affect do convectively generated upper-tropospheric clouds have on the TOA radiation budget? Our methodology is similar to that of Spencer et al., (2007) with some modifications and some additional diagnostics of both clouds and boundary layer thermodynamics. A composite ISO time series of cloud, precipitation and radiation quantities built from nearly 40 events during a six-year period is referenced to the atmospheric temperature signal. The increase of convective precipitation cannot be sustained by evaporation within the domain, implying strong moisture transports into the tropical ocean area. While there is a decrease in net TOA radiation that develops after the peak in deep convective rainfall, there seems little evidence that an "Infrared Iris"- like mechanism is dominant. Rather, the cloud-induced OLR increase seems largely produced by weakened convection with warmer cloud tops. Tropical ISO events offer an accessible target for studying ISOs not just in terms of propagation mechanisms, but on their global signals of heat, moisture and radiative flux feedback processes.

  11. Relationships Between Tropical Deep Convection, Tropospheric Mean Temperature and Cloud-Induced Radiative Fluxes on Intraseasonal Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, Holly S.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2009-01-01

    Intraseasonal variability of deep convection represents a fundamental mode of variability in the organization of tropical convection. While most studies of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) have focused on the spatial propagation and dynamics of convectively coupled circulations, we examine the projection of ISOs on the tropically-averaged temperature and energy budget. The area of interest is the global oceans between 20oN/S. Our analysis then focuses on these questions: (i) How is tropospheric temperature related to tropical deep convection and the associated ice cloud fractional amount (ICF) and ice water path (IWP)? (ii) What is the source of moisture sustaining the convection and what role does deep convection play in mediating the PBL - free atmospheric temperature equilibration? (iii) What affect do convectively generated upper-tropospheric clouds have on the TOA radiation budget? Our methodology is similar to that of Spencer et al., (2007) with some modifications and some additional diagnostics of both clouds and boundary layer thermodynamics. A composite ISO time series of cloud, precipitation and radiation quantities built from nearly 40 events during a six-year period is referenced to the atmospheric temperature signal. The increase of convective precipitation cannot be sustained by evaporation within the domain, implying strong moisture transports into the tropical ocean area. While there is a decrease in net TOA radiation that develops after the peak in deep convective rainfall, there seems little evidence that an "Infrared Iris"- like mechanism is dominant. Rather, the cloud-induced OLR increase seems largely produced by weakened convection with warmer cloud tops. Tropical ISO events offer an accessible target for studying ISOs not just in terms of propagation mechanisms, but on their global signals of heat, moisture and radiative flux feedback processes.

  12. Relationships Between Tropical Deep Convection, Tropospheric Mean Temperature and Cloud-Induced Radiative Fluxes on Intraseasonal Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramey, H. S.; Robertson, F. R.

    2009-12-01

    Intraseasonal variability of deep convection represents a fundamental mode of variability in the organization of tropical convection. While most studies of intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs) have focused on the spatial propagation and dynamics of convectively coupled circulations, we examine the projection of ISOs on the tropically-averaged temperature and energy budget. The area of interest is the global oceans between 20oN/S. Our analysis then focuses on these questions: (i) How is tropospheric temperature related to tropical deep convection and the associated ice cloud fractional amount (ICF) and ice water path (IWP)? (ii) What is the source of moisture sustaining the convection and what role does deep convection play in mediating the PBL - free atmospheric temperature equilibration? (iii) What affect do convectively generated upper-tropospheric clouds have on the TOA radiation budget? Our methodology is similar to that of Spencer et al., (2007) with some modifications and some additional diagnostics of both clouds and boundary layer thermodynamics. A composite ISO time series of cloud, precipitation and radiation quantities built from nearly 40 events during a six-year period is referenced to the atmospheric temperature signal. The increase of convective precipitation cannot be sustained by evaporation within the domain, implying strong moisture transports into the tropical ocean area. While there is a decrease in net TOA radiation that develops after the peak in deep convective rainfall, there seems little evidence that an “Infrared Iris”-like mechanism is dominant. Rather, the cloud-induced OLR increase seems largely produced by weakened convection with warmer cloud tops. Tropical ISO events offer an accessible target for studying ISOs not just in terms of propagation mechanisms, but on their global signals of heat, moisture and radiative flux feedback processes.

  13. THE REDSHIFT EVOLUTION OF THE MEAN TEMPERATURE, PRESSURE, AND ENTROPY PROFILES IN 80 SPT-SELECTED GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.; Benson, B. A.; Vikhlinin, A.; Aird, K. A.; Allen, S. W.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Bleem, L. E.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Foley, R. J.; Forman, W. R.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Mantz, A.; Marrone, D. P.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, E. D.; Mocanu, L.; Mohr, J. J.; Murray, S. S.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Saro, A.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Stanford, S. A.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K. T.; Stubbs, C. W.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2014-09-24

    We present the results of an X-ray analysis of 80 galaxy clusters selected in the 2500 deg(2) South Pole Telescope survey and observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We divide the full sample into subsamples of ~20 clusters based on redshift and central density, performing a joint X-ray spectral fit to all clusters in a subsample simultaneously, assuming self-similarity of the temperature profile. This approach allows us to constrain the shape of the temperature profile over 0 < r < 1.5R (500), which would be impossible on a per-cluster basis, since the observations of individual clusters have, on average, 2000 X-ray counts. The results presented here represent the first constraints on the evolution of the average temperature profile from z = 0 to z = 1.2. We find that high-z (0.6 < z < 1.2) clusters are slightly (~30%) cooler both in the inner (r < 0.1R (500)) and outer (r > R (500)) regions than their low-z (0.3 < z < 0.6) counterparts. Combining the average temperature profile with measured gas density profiles from our earlier work, we infer the average pressure and entropy profiles for each subsample. Confirming earlier results from this data set, we find an absence of strong cool cores at high z, manifested in this analysis as a significantly lower observed pressure in the central 0.1R (500) of the high-z cool-core subset of clusters compared to the low-z cool-core subset. Overall, our observed pressure profiles agree well with earlier lower-redshift measurements, suggesting minimal redshift evolution in the pressure profile outside of the core. We find no measurable redshift evolution in the entropy profile at r lsim 0.7R (500)—this may reflect a long-standing balance between cooling and feedback over long timescales and large physical scales. We observe a slight flattening of the entropy profile at r gsim R (500) in our high-z subsample. This flattening is consistent with a temperature bias due to the enhanced (~3×) rate at which group-mass (~2

  14. The redshift evolution of the mean temperature, pressure, and entropy profiles in 80 SPT-selected galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Vikhlinin, A.; Bayliss, M.; Forman, W. R.; Aird, K. A.; Allen, S. W.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Foley, R. J.; and others

    2014-10-10

    We present the results of an X-ray analysis of 80 galaxy clusters selected in the 2500 deg{sup 2} South Pole Telescope survey and observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We divide the full sample into subsamples of ∼20 clusters based on redshift and central density, performing a joint X-ray spectral fit to all clusters in a subsample simultaneously, assuming self-similarity of the temperature profile. This approach allows us to constrain the shape of the temperature profile over 0 < r < 1.5R {sub 500}, which would be impossible on a per-cluster basis, since the observations of individual clusters have, on average, 2000 X-ray counts. The results presented here represent the first constraints on the evolution of the average temperature profile from z = 0 to z = 1.2. We find that high-z (0.6 < z < 1.2) clusters are slightly (∼30%) cooler both in the inner (r < 0.1R {sub 500}) and outer (r > R {sub 500}) regions than their low-z (0.3 < z < 0.6) counterparts. Combining the average temperature profile with measured gas density profiles from our earlier work, we infer the average pressure and entropy profiles for each subsample. Confirming earlier results from this data set, we find an absence of strong cool cores at high z, manifested in this analysis as a significantly lower observed pressure in the central 0.1R {sub 500} of the high-z cool-core subset of clusters compared to the low-z cool-core subset. Overall, our observed pressure profiles agree well with earlier lower-redshift measurements, suggesting minimal redshift evolution in the pressure profile outside of the core. We find no measurable redshift evolution in the entropy profile at r ≲ 0.7R {sub 500}—this may reflect a long-standing balance between cooling and feedback over long timescales and large physical scales. We observe a slight flattening of the entropy profile at r ≳ R {sub 500} in our high-z subsample. This flattening is consistent with a temperature bias due to the enhanced (∼3

  15. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  16. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  17. Observations of accumulation mode aerosol composition and soot carbon concentrations by means of a high-temperature volatility technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael H.; O'Dowd, Colin D.

    1996-08-01

    A high-temperature volatility system has been deployed for the measurement of the composition and concentration of the accumulation mode aerosol (0.05 μm < r < 1 μm) within the atmospheric boundary layer. This instrumentation comprises a volatility system based around a Particle Measuring Systems ASASP-X optical particle counter, which was operated together with an aethalometer for the direct observation of soot carbon concentrations. By cycling the heater tube through a range of temperatures from near ambient to over 1000°C, size-differentiated information upon aerosol composition may be obtained. Furthermore, by careful selection of analysis temperatures, discrimination is possible between elemental carbon and the more volatile fractions of the soot carbon aerosol. Observations made over the North Sea near the Dutch coast and in the central United Kingdom are presented for differing environmental conditions with soot carbon concentrations ranging from about 100 to over 6000 ng m-3. For polluted conditions over the North Sea the volatility technique clearly showed the dominance of soot carbon particles over other aerosol components with a narrow carbon particle distribution of mode radius around 0.06 μm accounting for about 80% of all particles with radii below 0.1 μm. Under polluted conditions, only about 25% of the total soot carbon aerosol comprised elemental carbon (with the remainder consisting of more volatile material), whereas this proportion rose to around 50% in the lower carbon loadings found in a cleaner maritime air mass. The use of soot carbon loadings as a tracer of anthropogenic aerosol inputs to oceanic regions is explored on the basis of measurements from a NE Atlantic cruise.

  18. Mid-infrared spectroscopy of Uranus from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrometer: 1. Determination of the mean temperature structure of the upper troposphere and stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Glenn S.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Moses, Julianne I.; Mainzer, Amy K.; Hines, Dean; Hammel, Heidi B.; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Burgdorf, Martin; Merlet, Cecile; Line, Michael R.

    2014-11-01

    On 2007 December 16-17, spectra were acquired of the disk of Uranus by the Spitzer Infrared Spectrometer (IRS), ten days after the planet's equinox, when its equator was close to the sub-Earth point. This spectrum provides the highest-resolution broad-band spectrum ever obtained for Uranus from space, allowing a determination of the disk-averaged temperature and molecule composition to a greater degree of accuracy than ever before. The temperature profiles derived from the Voyager radio occultation experiment by Lindal et al. (Lindal, G.F., Lyons, J.R., Sweetnam, D.N., Eshleman, V.R., Hinson, D.P. [1987]. J. Geophys. Res. 92, 14987-15001) and revisions suggested by Sromovsky et al. (Sromovsky, L.A., Fry, P.A., Kim, J.H. [2011]. Icarus 215, 292-312) that match these data best are those that assume a high abundance of methane in the deep atmosphere. However, none of these model profiles provides a satisfactory fit over the full spectral range sampled. This result could be the result of spatial differences between global and low-latitudinal regions, changes in time, missing continuum opacity sources such as stratospheric hazes or unknown tropospheric constituents, or undiagnosed systematic problems with either the Voyager radio-occultation or the Spitzer IRS data sets. The spectrum is compatible with the stratospheric temperatures derived from the Voyager ultraviolet occultations measurements by Herbert et al. (Herbert, F. et al. [1987]. J. Geophys. Res. 92, 15093-15109), but it is incompatible with the hot stratospheric temperatures derived from the same data by Stevens et al. (Stevens, M.H., Strobel, D.F., Herbert, F.H. [1993]. Icarus 101, 45-63). Thermospheric temperatures determined from the analysis of the observed H2 quadrupole emission features are colder than those derived by Herbert et al. at pressures less than ∼1 μbar. Extrapolation of the nominal model spectrum to far-infrared through millimeter wavelengths shows that the spectrum arising solely from H2

  19. The mean ozone profile and its temperature sensitivity in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere - An analysis of LIMS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froidevaux, Lucien; Allen, Mark; Berman, Stanley; Daughton, Alan

    1989-05-01

    Multiple simultaneous LIMS (Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere) observations of both O3 and temperature T in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere are analyzed to derive O3-T correlations for comparisons with model calculations. The zonally averaged O3 profile is compared with results from a simplified photochemical model that assumes O3 to be in a photochemical steady state. The model profile is systematically lower than the observed profile. Key parameters are identified in which changes can systematically increase the O3 profile in both the stratosphere and the mesosphere. The LIMS-derived values for the sensitivity of O3 to changes in T are compared with equilibrium model calculations which include the T-driven opacity feedback effect on photodissociation rate constants. The theoretical O3 response to temperature perturbations is investigated. It is shown how the O3-T sensitivity coefficient is affected by zonal and vertical advection terms as well as by the photochemical coupling between O3 and T.

  20. Mean field analysis of the high temperature magnetic properties of terbium iron garnet in strong DC fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahoubi, Mahieddine; Wang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    This paper is devoted to the description of the magnetic phase diagrams (MPD) together with a special interest to the determination of more precise values of some reliable parameters at the compensation point, Tcomp=243.5±0.5 K of the terbium iron garnet, Tb3Fe5O12 or TbIG. Using isothermal magnetizations performed on single crystal in strong DC magnetic fields up to 200 kOe applied along the <111>, <110> and <100> directions within the temperature range 128-295 K, field-induced phase transitions between collinear and canted phases are observed in the vicinity of Tcomp at critical fields, Hc2. In comparison with the measurement at zero external magnetic field, the specific heat, Cp(T) at 80 kOe along <111> shows an excess around Tcomp characterized by an anomaly which has a width in the boundaries of the canted phase and a maximum at 252 K, the more accurate value of the critical temperature, TC* of the MPD in the (Hc2-T) plane. Better determinations of the molecular field coefficients which represent the magnetic interactions on the Tb sublattice are obtained by an improved molecular field model based on the saturation effects of the Tb sublattice and the differential susceptibility contribution due to the Fe sublattices to the total magnetic susceptibility of TbIG. The results are discussed in terms of the previous theoretical studies of the MPD predicted for weakly anisotropic ferrimagnets.

  1. Species and temperature measurement in H2/O2 rocket flow fields by means of Raman scattering diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroot, Wim A.; Weiss, Jonathan M.

    1992-01-01

    Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes developed for prediction and evaluation of rocket performance is hampered by a lack of experimental data. Non-intrusive laser based diagnostics are needed to provide spatially and temporally resolved gas dynamic and fluid dynamic measurements. This paper reports the first non-intrusive temperature and species measurements in the plume of a 110 N gaseous hydrogen/oxygen thruster at and below ambient pressures, obtained with spontaneous Raman spectroscopy. Measurements at 10 mm downstream of the exit plane are compared with predictions from a numerical solution of the axisymmetric Navier-Stokes and species transport equations with chemical kinetics, which fully model the combustor-nozzle-plume flowfield. The experimentally determined oxygen number density at the centerline at 10 mm downstream of the exit plane is four times that predicted by the model. The experimental number density data fall between those numerically predicted for the exit and 10 mm downstream planes in both magnitude and radial gradient. The predicted temperature levels are within 10 to 15 percent of measured values. Some of the discrepancies between experimental data and predictions result from not modeling the three dimensional core flow injection mixing process, facility back pressure effects, and possible diffuser-thruster interactions.

  2. Species and temperature measurement in H2/O2 rocket flow fields by means of Raman scattering diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Groot, Wim A.; Weiss, Jonathan M.

    1992-01-01

    Validation of CFD codes developed for prediction and evaluation of rocket performance is hampered by a lack of experimental data. Nonintrusive laser based diagnostics are needed to provide spatially and temporally resolved gas dynamic and fluid dynamic measurements. This paper reports the first nonintrusive temperature and species measurements in the plume of a 110 N gaseous hydrogen/oxygen thruster at and below ambient pressures, obtained with spontaneous Raman spectroscopy. Measurements at 10 mm downstream of the exit plane are compared with predictions from a numerical solution of the axisymmetric Navier-Stokes and species transport equations with chemical kinetics, which fully model the combustor-nozzle-plume flowfield. The experimentally determined oxygen number density at the centerline at 10 mm downstream of the exit plane is four times that predicted by the model. The experimental number density data fall between those numerically predicted for the exit and 10 mm downstream planes in both magnitude and radial gradient. The predicted temperature levels are within 10 to 15 percent of measured values.

  3. Absolute calibration of optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Viana, N.B.; Mazolli, A.; Maia Neto, P.A.; Nussenzveig, H.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Mesquita, O.N.

    2006-03-27

    As a step toward absolute calibration of optical tweezers, a first-principles theory of trapping forces with no adjustable parameters, corrected for spherical aberration, is experimentally tested. Employing two very different setups, we find generally very good agreement for the transverse trap stiffness as a function of microsphere radius for a broad range of radii, including the values employed in practice, and at different sample chamber depths. The domain of validity of the WKB ('geometrical optics') approximation to the theory is verified. Theoretical predictions for the trapping threshold, peak position, depth variation, multiple equilibria, and 'jump' effects are also confirmed.

  4. Temperature dependence of mean square displacement by IN13: a comparison between trehalose and sucrose water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magazù, S.; Migliardo, F.; Mondelli, C.; Romeo, G.

    2003-08-01

    An analysis in terms of elastic scans of the neutron intensity in mixtures of homologues disaccharides (i.e., trehalose and sucrose)/D 2O as a function of temperature has been carried out. The study provides an effective way for characterizing the dynamical behavior, furnishing a set of parameters characterizing the "flexibility" and the "rigidity" that justifies the better cryptobiotic effect of trehalose in respect to sucrose. Elastic scans make evident a non-Gaussian behavior of the intensity profiles which is more marked for sucrose, with a dynamical transition at T˜253 K and T˜250 K for trehalose/D 2O and sucrose/D 2O mixtures, respectively.

  5. The effect of harp music on heart rate, mean blood pressure, respiratory rate, and body temperature in the African green monkey.

    PubMed

    Hinds, Sarah Bro; Raimond, Susan; Purcell, Bret K

    2007-04-01

    The effectiveness of recorded harp music as a tool for relaxation for non-human primates is explored in this study. Konigsberg Instruments Model T27F-1B cardiovascular telemetry devices were implanted into nine African green monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops). After post-surgical recovery, animals were exposed to recorded harp music. Telemetry data were collected on heart rate, mean blood pressure, respiratory rate, and body temperature for a 30-minute baseline period before music exposure; a 90-minute period of music exposure; and a 90-minute post-exposure period, where no music was played. No statistical differences were noted in heart rate, mean blood pressure, respiratory rate, and body temperature between pre-exposure, exposure, and post-exposure periods. The lack of response in these African green monkeys may be attributable to their generally calm demeanor in captivity; experiments with a more excitable species such as the rhesus macaque might demonstrate a significant relaxation response to music.

  6. Dynamical mean-field theoretical approach to explore the temperature-dependent magnetization in Ta-doped TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, M. A.; Umar, A. S.; Rusydi, A.

    2017-04-01

    TiO2 has, in recent years, become a hot subject as it holds a promise for spintronic application. Recent experimental study on anatase Ti1-x Ta x O2 (x ~ 0.05) thin films shows that the system changes from non-magnetic to ferromagnetic due to Ti vacancies that are formed when a small percentage of Ti atoms are substituted by Ta. Motivated by those results that reveal the ferromagnetic phase at room temperature, we conduct a theoretical study on the temperature-dependent magnetization and the Currie temperature of that system. We hypothesize that when several Ti vacancies are formed in the system, each of them induces a local magnetic moment, then such moments couple each other through Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction, forming a ferromagnetic order. To study the temperature dependence of the magnetization and predict the Curie temperature, we construct a tight-binding based Hamiltonian for this system and use the method of dynamical mean-field theory to perform calculations for various temperatures. Our work is still preliminary. The model and method may need further improvement to be consistent with known existing facts. We present our preliminary results to show how the present model works.

  7. Copping with Uncertainties in Mapping Extreme and Mean Temperatures at the Regional Level for Risk Management in Agriculture: A Case Study in Galicia, NW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirás Avalos, J. M.; Vidal Vázquez, E.; Sande Fouz, P.; Paz González, A.

    2012-04-01

    Temperature is one of the main factors regulating crop growth and duration of crop cycle. Climate risk can be identified by characteristics such us geographic area (areal extent), time of year it is most likely to occur and its severity. Knowledge of the geographic coverage of mean, maxima and minima temperatures as well as the spatial distribution of this variable above or below a given threshold is fundamental for designing viable practices in the agriculture sector. Thus, managing temperature effects in agriculture needs reliable regional maps from which information can be obtained by downscaling at the farm scale. Several techniques are currently employed to create discretized, continuous surfaces from point data through a set of spatial interpolation techniques. Geostatistics, based in the random function theory is commonly used in the assessment of uncertainty associated with a spatially correlated variable, such as most climatic parameters, including temperature. The aim of this study was to provide a comparative analysis of various methods used for mapping monthly maximum, minimum and mean air temperatures in Galicia, northwest Spain over a 0.5 x 0.5 km grid size. The air temperature datasets involved more than 140 meteorological stations irregularly distributed in the region. Methods, included statistical and of spatial dependence analysis and mapping by inverse distance weighting (IDW) and several kriging techniques, including residual kriging (RK), collocated cokriging (COK) and kriging with an external drift (KED). There was a significant relationship between temperature and altitude for the study data sets. Interpolated monthly air temperature maps, produced by IDW indicate that the general pattern of values varied from one month to another, and therefore it can not be assessed based on previous records. Mean maxima and minima temperatures showed spatial dependence, which was described by spherical and gaussian variograms. First, IDW was used to

  8. Spatial downscaling and mapping of daily precipitation and air temperature using daily station data and monthly mean maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, A. L.; Flint, L. E.; Stern, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate maps of daily weather variables are an essential component of hydrologic and ecologic modeling. Here we present a four-step method that uses daily station data and transient monthly maps of precipitation and air temperature. This method uses the monthly maps to help interpolate between stations for more accurate production of daily maps at any spatial resolution. The first step analyzes the quality of the each station's data using a discrepancy analysis that compares statistics derived from a statistical jack-knifing approach with a time-series evaluation of discrepancies generated for each station. Although several methods could be used for the second step of producing initial maps, such as kriging, splines, etc., we used a gradient plus inverse distance squared method that was developed to produce accurate climate maps for sparse data regions with widely separated and few climate stations, far fewer than would be needed for techniques such as kriging. The gradient plus inverse distance squared method uses local gradients in the climate parameters, easting, northing, and elevation, to adjust the inverse distance squared estimates for local gradients such as lapse rates, inversions, or rain shadows at scales of 10's of meters to kilometers. The third step is to downscale World Wide Web (web) based transient monthly data, such as Precipitation-Elevation Regression on Independent Slope Method (PRISM) for the US (4 km or 800 m maps) or Climate Research Unit (CRU 3.1) data sets (40 km for global applications) to the scale of the daily data's digital elevation model. In the final step the downscaled transient monthly maps are used to adjust the daily time-series mapped data (~30 maps/month) for each month. These adjustments are used to scale daily maps so that summing them for precipitation or averaging them for temperature would more accurately reproduce the variability in selected monthly maps. This method allows for individual days to have maxima or minima

  9. Effects of the Substrate Temperature in AuN Thin Films by Means of X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Devia, A.; Benavides, V.; Castillo, H. A.; Quintero, J.

    2006-12-04

    Gold is used in electronic industry like electric conductor for products such as computers, mobiles phones, etc; with the drawback that it is one of the most expensive metals in the market. Gold Nitride is a new material, having excellent physics properties like high hardness, high melting point, high electric conductivity, chemical inertia and good thermodynamic stabily among others. At the moment its study is more about electronics, optics, mechanical properties and growth of the films. AuN thin films were produced by the PAPVD (Plasma assisted Physics Vapor Deposition) method, using the pulsed arc technique in a mono-vaporizer system. These films were created with an Au target of 99% purity and deposited on stainless steel 304. It was observed that heating the substrate produces small stoichiometric changes in the film, which makes small changes in the diffraction patterns to appear, like widening in the Au orientation, since the composicional gradient is varying according to the substrate temperature. Au 4f and N1s narrow spectra were analyzed using XPS (X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy), in order to observe stoichiometry in the films.

  10. Effects of the Substrate Temperature in AuN Thin Films by Means of X-Ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devia, A.; Benavides, V.; Castillo, H. A.; Quintero, J.

    2006-12-01

    Gold is used in electronic industry like electric conductor for products such as computers, mobiles phones, etc; with the drawback that it is one of the most expensive metals in the market. Gold Nitride is a new material, having excellent physics properties like high hardness, high melting point, high electric conductivity, chemical inertia and good thermodynamic stabily among others. At the moment its study is more about electronics, optics, mechanical properties and growth of the films. AuN thin films were produced by the PAPVD (Plasma assisted Physics Vapor Deposition) method, using the pulsed arc technique in a mono-vaporizer system. These films were created with an Au target of 99% purity and deposited on stainless steel 304. It was observed that heating the substrate produces small stoichiometric changes in the film, which makes small changes in the diffraction patterns to appear, like widening in the Au orientation, since the composicional gradient is varying according to the substrate temperature. Au 4f and N1s narrow spectra were analyzed using XPS (X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy), in order to observe stoichiometry in the films.

  11. Is There Enough Solar EUV to Maintain the Global Mean Thermospheric Temperature? Revisiting a 37-year-old Problem (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    Since 1973, when Roble and Dickinson first attempted to reconcile measurements of the solar extreme-ultraviolet spectrum with thermospheric temperatures [R. G. Roble and R. E. Dickinson, J. Geophys. Res., 78, 249, 1973], investigators have struggled to understand thermosphere, ionosphere, photoelectron, and airglow observations in the context of our evolving understanding of solar energetic photons. Despite a rich history of observations by satellite and rocket instruments, spanning the spectral range from soft X-rays through the extreme-ultraviolet to the far ultraviolet, and covering most of four solar cycles, uncertainties in the magnitude and variability of the solar spectrum have persisted, particularly at the shortest wavelengths. A recurring theme of these issues has been an ongoing desire of modelers for more photons, especially energetic ones. Now, with simultaneous solar observations by the SEE instrument on the TIMED satellite, the SEM instrument on the SOHO spacecraft, the EVE instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and calibration rocket flights, we should at last be able to close this chapter in aeronomy. However, new challenges continue to materialize, including the anomalously low levels of solar EUV during the 2008-2009 solar minimum, and the surprisingly rapid cooling of the thermosphere due to increasing levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. This presentation reviews the history of solar measurements and their interplay with modeling efforts, assesses the current state of knowledge, identifies key remaining uncertainties, and suggests the need for revision of thermospheric cooling rates.

  12. Analysis of the total solar irradiance composite and their contribution to global mean air surface temperature rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.

    2008-12-01

    Herein I discuss and propose updated satellite composites of the total solar irradiance covering the period 1978-2008. The composites are compiled from measurements made with the three ACRIM experiments. Measurements from the NIMBUS7/ERB, the ERBS/ERBE satellite experiments and a total solar irradiance proxy reconstruction are used to fill the gap from June 1989 to October 1991 between ACRIM1 and ACRIM2 experiments. The result of the analysis does suggests that the total solar irradiance did increase from 1980 to 2002. The climate implications of the alternative satellite composites are discussed by using a phenomenological climate model which depends on two characteristics time response at tau1 =0.4 year and tau2=8-12 years, as determined phenomenologically [Scafetta, JGR 2008]. Reconstructions of total solar irradiance signature on climate during the last four centuries are discussed. The solar variability appears to have significantly contributed to climate change during the last four centuries, including the last century. Indirectly, the model suggests that the preindustrial climate experienced a large variability which is incompatible with an Hockey Stick temperature graph.

  13. On the problems related to natural wet bulb temperature indirect evaluation for the assessment of hot thermal environments by means of WBGT.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio Alfano, Francesca Romana; Palella, Boris Igor; Riccio, Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    This paper deals with the indirect evaluation of the natural wet bulb temperature, t (nw), one of the two quantities forming the basis of the well-known wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index, considered worldwide to be a suitable and user-friendly tool for the preliminary assessment of hot thermal environments. This quantity can be measured by a wet bulb thermometer (a temperature sensor covered with a wetted wick naturally ventilated) or, if this is not available, calculated from other microclimatic parameters (i.e. the air temperature, the globe temperature, the air velocity, and the humidity) using a quite trivial energy balance equation. Because of the strong non-linear structure of such an equation, the risk of a multiplicity of steady state solutions could result in the failure to obtain a reliable index evaluation. To dispel all doubts, this work carries out an in-depth analysis of the heat balance equation to be solved for the indirect evaluation of the natural wet bulb temperature. A preliminary investigation of each heat flow term involved in the heat balance on the sensor has been carried out; in a second phase a special continuation method has been implemented, highlighting the effect of microclimatic parameters on the multiplicity of solutions. Results show that under free convection the evaluation produces a single solution only under uniform conditions, whereas in the presence of even slight differences between the air temperature and the mean radiant temperature, there can be as many as three solutions. This phenomenon, if confirmed by a further experimental investigation, could become a difficult matter since a sensor, in principle, has to read a unique value of the quantity measured. In any case, from a numerical point of view, the presence of many values of tnw greatly reduces the possibility of an indirect WBGT calculation from the other involved physical quantities; as a consequence, the indirect evaluation of WBGT should be clearly avoided

  14. Use of mean residence time of water, flowrate, and equilibrium temperature indicated by water geothermometers to rank geothermal resources. Application to the thermal water circuits of Northern Calabria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollaro, Carmine; Vespasiano, Giovanni; Muto, Francesco; De Rosa, Rosanna; Barca, Donatella; Marini, Luigi

    2016-12-01

    A new hydro-geochemical survey was carried out on the thermal sites of Northern Calabria. By use of new and historical data, it was possible to improve the knowledge on the deep systems of interest. First, thermal waters were characterized by means of a classical approach, including water classifications, use of the triangular diagram of Cl-Li-B, and geothermometry through suitably selected functions. Then, the tritium-based mean residence time and flowrate of the thermal waters of Northern Calabria were used to evaluate the volume of the geothermal reservoir and its component terms. Based on these results, the heat stored in the geothermal reservoir was computed by means of the volume method. Their natural heat discharge was also calculated. These parameters as well as the reservoir temperature indicated by water g