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Sample records for absolute total cross

  1. Absolute electron-impact total ionization cross sections of chlorofluoromethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Roberto; Sierra, Borja; Redondo, Carolina; Rayo, María N. Sánchez; Castaño, Fernando

    2004-12-01

    An experimental study is reported on the electron-impact total ionization cross sections (TICSs) of CCl4, CCl3F, CCl2F2, and CClF3 molecules. The kinetic energy of the colliding electrons was in the 10-85 eV range. TICSs were obtained as the sum of the partial ionization cross sections of all fragment ions, measured and identified in a linear double focusing time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The resulting TICS profiles—as a function of the electron-impact energy—have been compared both with those computed by ab initio and (semi)empirical methods and with the available experimental data. The computational methods used include the binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) modified to include atoms with principal quantum numbers n⩾3, the Deutsch and Märk (DM) formalism, and the modified additivity rule (MAR). It is concluded that both modified BEB and DM methods fit the experimental TICS for (CF4), CClF3, CCl2F2, CCl3F, and CCl4 to a high accuracy, in contrast with the poor accord of the MAR method. A discussion on the factors influencing the discrepancies of the fittings is presented.

  2. Measurements of absolute total and partial cross sections for the electron ionization of tungsten hexafluoride (WF6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basner, R.; Schmidt, M.; Becker, K.

    2004-04-01

    We measured absolute partial cross sections for the formation of positive ions followed by electron impact on tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) from threshold to 900 eV using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). Dissociative ionization processes resulting in seven different singly charged ions (F+, W+, WFx+, x=1-5) and five doubly charged ions (W2+, WFx2+, x=1-4) were found to be the dominant ionization channels. The ion spectrum at all impact energies is dominated by WF5+ fragment ions. At 120 eV impact energy, the partial WF5+ ionization cross section has a maximum value of 3.92×10-16 cm2 that corresponds to 43% of the total ion yield. The cross section values of all the other singly charged fragment ions at 120 eV range between 0.39×10-16 and 0.73×10-16 cm2. The ionization cross sections of the doubly charged ions are more than one order of magnitude lower than the cross section of WF5+. Double ionization processes account for 21% of the total ion yield at 120 eV. The absolute total ionization cross section of WF6 was obtained as the sum of all measured partial ionization cross sections and is compared with available calculated cross sections.

  3. Absolute total and partial cross sections for ionization of nucleobases by proton impact in the Bragg peak velocity range

    SciTech Connect

    Tabet, J.; Eden, S.; Feil, S.; Abdoul-Carime, H.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.; Ouaskit, S.; Maerk, T. D.

    2010-08-15

    We present experimental results for proton ionization of nucleobases (adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil) based on an event-by-event analysis of the different ions produced combined with an absolute target density determination. We are able to disentangle in detail the various proton ionization channels from mass-analyzed product ion signals in coincidence with the charge-analyzed projectile. In addition we are able to determine a complete set of cross sections for the ionization of these molecular targets by 20-150 keV protons including the total and partial cross sections and the direct-ionization and electron-capture cross sections.

  4. The recent absolute total np and pp cross section determinations: quality of data description and prediction of experimental observables

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, Alexander B; Haight, Robert C; Arndt, Richard A; Briscoe, William J; Paris, Mark W; Strakovsky, Igor I; Workman, Ron L

    2010-01-01

    The absolute total cross sections for np and pp scattering below 1000 MeV are determined based on partial-wave analyses (PWAs) of nucleon-nucleon scattering data. These cross sections are compared with the most recent ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-3.3 data files, and the Nijmegen PWA. Systematic deviations from the ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-3.3 evaluations are found to exist in the low-energy region. Comparison of the np evaluation with the result of most recent np total and differential cross section measurements will be discussed. Results of those measurements were not used in the evaluation database. A comparison was done to check a quality of evaluation and its capabilities to predict experimental observables. Excellent agreement was found between the new experimental data and our PWA predictions.

  5. Absolute Total Photoionization Cross Section of C60 in the Range of 25-120 eV: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafle, Bhim P.; Katayanagi, Hideki; Prodhan, Md. Serajul I.; Yagi, Hajime; Huang, Chaoqun; Mitsuke, Koichiro

    2008-01-01

    The absolute total photoionization cross section σabs,I of gaseous C60 is measured in the photon energy hν range from 25 to 120 eV by photoionization mass spectrometry with synchrotron radiation. The absolute detection efficiencies of photoions in different charge states are evaluated. The present σabs,I curve is combined with the photoabsorption cross section curves of C60 at hν=3.5--26 eV in the literature, after appropriate alterations of the vapor pressure are taken into account. The oscillator strengths are computed from the composite curve to be 178.5 and 230.5 for the hν ranges from 3.5 to 40.8 eV and from 3.5 to 119 eV, respectively. These oscillator strengths agree well with those expected from the Thomas-Kuhn-Reiche sum rule and 60 times the photoabsorption cross section of a carbon atom. Moreover, the present σabs,I curve behaves similarly to the relative photoionization cross section curve reported by Reinköster et al.

  6. Absolute total electron scattering cross sections for N/sub 2/ between 0. 5 and 50 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Kennerly, R.E.

    1980-06-01

    Absolute total electron scattering cross sections for N/sub 2/ from 0.5 to 50 eV have been measured with an estimated uncertainty of +- 3% using a transmission time-of-flight method previously described. The results are compared to previous experimental results and to recent calculations. The positions of the /sup 2/Pi/sub g/ resonance peaks were determined with much greater accuracy ( +- 15 meV) than in previous transmission measurements. The structure reported by Golden (1966) below the /sup 2/Pi/sub g/ resonance was clearly not present, indicating that, if real, these features are not a property of the N/sub 2/ ground vibronic state. The shape resonance predicted at 11 eV by Dill and Dehmer (1977) was not seen, perhaps because it was too weakly manifested in the total cross section. A weak broad band centered at 25 eV may be interpreted as being due to a sigma/sub u/ shape resonance as predicted by Dehmer, Siegel, Welch, and Dill.

  7. Absolute Total Cross Section Measurements for Electron Scattering on GeH4 and SiH4 Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zejko, Pawel. Mo.; Kasperski, Grzegorz; Szmytkowski, Czeslaw

    1996-10-01

    We have measured absolute grand total electron--scattering cross section for GeH4 and SiH4 molecules in the energy range of 0.75--250 eV and 0.6--250 eV, respectively, using the linear transmission experimental setup(A.M. Krzysztofowicz and Cz. Szmytkowski 1995 J. Phys. B 28) 1593. The general character of both obtained total cross section (TCS) functions is similar. For germane TCS dramatically increases from 12× 10-20 m^2 at 0.8 eV up to nearly 59× 10-20 m^2 at the 3.8 eV maximum. For silane the maximum (57× 10-20 m^2) is localized near 2.9 eV. These structures are partly attributable to the existence of short-lived negative-ion resonant states. From 10 eV to the highest applied energy TCS' decrease monotonically with increasing impact energy E, and above 50 eV the total cross sections change like E-0.5. None low-energy e^--GeH4 experiment is available for comparison. Above 75 eV our results are in good agreement with the recent intermediate-energy TCS measurements of Karwasz(G.P. Karwasz 1995 J. Phys. B 28) 1301 and with calculations of Baluja et al(K.L. Baluja et al) 1992 Europhys. Lett. 17 139. There is also reasonably agreement of present e^--SiH4 data with available experimental results.

  8. Absolute partial and total electron-impact-ionization cross sections for CF4 from threshold up to 500 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ce; Bruce, M. R.; Bonham, R. A.

    1991-09-01

    Electron-impact dissociative ionization of tetrafluoromethane (CF4) was studied with the use of a pulsed electron beam time-of-flight apparatus. The absolute partial ionization cross sections of CF+3, CF+2, CF2+3, CF+, CF2+2, F+, and C+ were measured from threshold up to 500 eV. The total ionization cross section was obtained by charge weighted summing of all the observed partial ionization cross sections. A total cross section for dissociation into neutral fragments was inferred from our total ionization cross section and the total dissociation cross section of Winters and Inokuti [Phys. Rev. A 25, 1420 (1982)]. The present results for the partial ionization cross sections are as much as 9% (CF+3) to 81% (F+) higher than the previously published absolute measurements of Stephan, Deutsch, and Märk [J. Chem. Phys. 83, 5712 (1985)] at 80 eV, but are in agreement with their recently revised estimates for the singly charged ions. We also found that dissociative ionization was a dominant process for electron-impact energies above 30 eV, accounting for 85% of the total dissociation cross section at 80 eV.

  9. Electron scattering from hexafluoride molecules: WF6 and C2F6. Absolute total cross section measurements from 1 to 250 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmytkowski, Czeslaw; Mozejko, Pawel; Kasperski, Grzegorz; Ptasinska-Denga, Elzbieta

    2000-01-01

    Electron-scattering absolute total cross sections for tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) and hexafluorethane (C2F6) molecules have been measured in a linear transmission electron-beam experiment within the impact energy range from about 1 to 250 eV. For electron scattering from WF6 the cross section shows a prominent resonant-like peak centred at 3 eV and a very broad enhancement in the energy range between 20 and 70 eV overlaid with some much less pronounced features. The cross section for C2F6 has two resonant structures at 5 and 9 eV, respectively, and a very broad hump ranging from 20 to 60 eV with a distinct shoulder near 20 eV. Comparison of the e--C2F6 total cross section with available low-energy data from other experiments is made. The effect of fluorination is indicated.

  10. Chlorine atom spin orbit branching ratios and total absolute reaction cross-sections for the H+DCl→HD+Cl reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanf, Alexander; Läuter, Almuth; Suresh, Dhanya; Volpp, Hans-Robert; Wolfrum, Jürgen

    2001-05-01

    Chlorine atom spin-orbit product branching ratios and total absolute reaction cross-sections have been measured for the H+DCl→HD+Cl gas-phase reaction for collision energies of E col=1.0, 1.4 and 1.7 eV. The measured Cl*( 2P1/2) atom spin-orbit product branching ratios φ Cl*(1.0 eV)=[ Cl*]/[ Cl+ Cl*]=(0.06±0.02) , φ Cl*(1.4 eV)=(0.07±0.01) , and φ Cl*(1.7 eV)=(0.16±0.01) revealed the increasing importance of a non-adiabatic reaction channel H+DCl→HD+Cl * with increasing collision energy. The measured total absolute reaction cross-sections allow for comparison with results from recent quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations [F.J. Aoiz et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 104 (2000) 10452].

  11. Absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, O. A.

    1993-11-01

    The program SEEF is a Fortran IV computer code for the extraction of absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions. When the evaporation residue is fed by its parents, only cumulative cross sections will be obtained from off-line gamma ray measurements. But, if one has the parent excitation function (experimental or calculated), this code will make it possible to determine absolute cross sections of any exit channel.

  12. Absolute state-selected total cross sections for the ion-molecule reactions O + (4S,2D,2P)+H2(D2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Huang, Y.-L.; Flesch, G. D.; Ng, C. Y.

    1997-01-01

    Absolute total cross sections for the state-selected reactions of O+(4S,2D,2P)+H2 (D2) have been measured in the center-of-mass collision energy (Ec.m.) range of 0.02-12 eV. The cross sections for OH+ (OD+) from O+(2D)+H2 (D2) are slightly higher than those from O+(4S)+H2 (D2), whereas the OH+ (OD+) cross sections from O+ (2P)+H2 (D2) are ≈40% lower than those from O+(4S)+H2 (D2) and O+ (2D)+H2 (D2). At Ec.m.<0.5 eV, the total cross sections for OH+ (OD+) from O+ (4S)+H2 (D2) and O+(2D)+H2 (D2) are in accord with those predicted by the Langevin-Gioumousis-Stevenson model. Significantly higher cross sections are observed for H+ (D+) and H2+ (D2+) from O+(2D)+H2 (D2) and O+(2P)+H2 (D2), as compared to those from O+(4S)+H2 (D2). The exothermic nature of the O+(2D,2P)+H2 (D2) charge transfer collisions accounts for the high cross sections observed for H2+ (D2+). While the H+ (D+) ions observed in the O+(4S)+H2 (D2) reaction are identified with the H+ (D+)+O+H channel, the H+ (D+) ions from the reactions involving O+(2D) and O+(2P) are associated mostly with the H+ (D+)+OH (OD) channel, the formation of which obeys the spin-conservation rule. The comparison of the sum (σT) of cross sections for OH+ (OD+), H2+ (D2+), and H+ (D+) from O+(4S)+H2 (D2) to those from O+(2D)+H2 (D2) and O+(2P)+H2 (D2) shows that the σTs for O+(4S)+H2 (D2), O+(2D)+H2 (D2), and O+(2P)+H2 (D2) at Ec.m.<0.5 eV are comparable. At Ec.m.>0.5 eV, the σTs for O+(2P)+H2 (D2) are greater than those for O+(2D)+H2 (D2), which in turn are greater than those for O+(4S)+H2 (D2). This observation is attributed to the increase in the number of accessible product channels for reactions involving the excited O+(2D) and O+(2P) reactant ions.

  13. Experimental Studies of Electron Impact Phenomena: (i) Absolute Elastic Differential Cross Section Measurements of Carbon-Monoxide Nitrogen Molecule, and Carbon-Dioxide Using a Refined Relative Flow Technique, (ii) Differential Cross Section Measurements for Excitation of Electronic Levels of Carbon-Monoxide by Electron Impact, (iii) Absolute Total Scattering Cross Section Measurements for Electron Impact on Krypton, Oxygen Molecule, and Carbon-Monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanik, Isik

    1988-12-01

    Absolute elastic differential scattering cross sections (DCS) for electron impact on CO, N_2 , and CO_2 in the energy range 20-100 eV and angular range 20^circ -120^circ were measured. A crossed beam scattering geometry was employed and the results were obtained using a relative flow technique in which the DCS of CO and CO_2 were compared directly to the DCS of helium at each angle and energy and the DCS of N_2 was compared directly to the DCS of CO. The results of the elastic DCS of neon are also presented as a check on the experimental procedure. Differential cross section measurements for excitation of the electronic features (a^3Pi , a^'^3Sigma ^+, d^3Delta, and A^1Pi) of CO by electron impact have been carried out by JPL group (Peter Zetner and Sandor Trajmar). These data have been analyzed and differential cross sections were obtained for the impact energies 12.5 eV and 15.0 eV by using a computer unfolding program that employes flux corrected Franck-Condon factors and calibration scheme developed jointly with the JPL group. Details of the routine for extracting the DCS are presented. Absolute total scattering cross section measurements were carried out for electron impact on Kr, O_2 , and CO. The results were obtained using a linear attenuation technique in the 5-300 eV incident energy range. The present results have an assigned error of 3% and generally found to be in good agreement with other experimental data.

  14. Absolute photoneutron cross sections of Sm isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Gheorghe, I.; Glodariu, T.; Utsunomiya, H.; Filipescu, D.; Nyhus, H.-T.; Renstrom, T.; Tesileanu, O.; Shima, T.; Takahisa, K.; Miyamoto, S.

    2015-02-24

    Photoneutron cross sections for seven samarium isotopes, {sup 144}Sm, {sup 147}Sm, {sup 148}Sm, {sup 149}Sm, {sup 150}Sm, {sup 152}Sm and {sup 154}Sm, have been investigated near neutron emission threshold using quasimonochromatic laser-Compton scattering γ-rays produced at the synchrotron radiation facility NewSUBARU. The results are important for nuclear astrophysics calculations and also for probing γ-ray strength functions in the vicinity of neutron threshold. Here we describe the neutron detection system and we discuss the related data analysis and the necessary method improvements for adapting the current experimental method to the working parameters of the future Gamma Beam System of Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics facility.

  15. Absolute cross-section measurements for ionization of He Rydberg atoms in collisions with K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, F.; Renwick, S.; Martínez, H.; Morgan, T. J.

    1995-11-01

    Absolute cross sections for ionization of 1.5-10.0 keV/amu Rydberg helium atoms in principal quantum states 12<=n<=15 due to collisions with potassium have been measured. The data are compared with the free-electron cross section at equal velocity. Our results for the collisional ionization cross sections (σi) agree both in shape and absolute magnitude with the data available for the total electron-scattering cross sections (σe) and support recent theoretical models for ionization of Rydberg atoms with neutral perturbers.

  16. Absolute Photoionization Cross Sections of Two Cyclic Ketones: Cyclopentanone & Cyclohexanone.

    PubMed

    Price, Chelsea; Fathi, Yasmin; Meloni, Giovanni

    2017-02-23

    Absolute photoionization cross sections for cyclopentanone and cyclohexanone, as well as partial ionization cross sections for the dissociative ionized fragments, are presented in this investigation. Experiments are performed via a multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometer utilizing VUV synchrotron radiation supplied by the Advanced Light Source of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. These results allow the quantification of these species that is relevant to investigate the kinetics and combustion reactions of potential biofuels. The CBS-QB3 calculated values for the adiabatic ionization energies agree well with the experimental values and the identification of possible dissociative fragments is discussed for both systems.

  17. Experimental absolute cross section for photoionization of Xe^7+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schippers, S.; Müller, A.; Esteves, D.; Habibi, M.; Aguilar, A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.

    2010-03-01

    Collision processes with highly charged xenon ions are of interest for UV-radiation generation in plasma discharges, for fusion research and for space craft propulsion. Here we report results for the photoionization of Xe^7+ ionsootnotetextS. Schippers et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. (in print) which were measured at the photon-ion end station of ALS beamline 10.0.1. As compared with the only previous experimental studyootnotetextJ. M. Bizau et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 435 (2000) of this reaction, the present cross sections were obtained at higher energy resolution (50--80 meV vs. 200--500 meV) and on an absolute cross section scale. In the experimental photon energy range of 95--145 eV the cross section is dominated by resonances associated with 4d->5f excitation and subsequent autoionization. The most prominent feature in the measured spectrum is the 4d^9,s,f, resonance at 121.14±0.02 eV which reaches a peak cross section of 1.2 Gb at 50 meV photon energy spread. The experimental resonance strength of 160 Mb eV (corresponding to an absorption oscillator strength of 1.46) is in fair agreement with the theoretical result^2.

  18. Photoproduction total cross section and shower development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, F.; García Canal, C. A.; Grau, A.; Pancheri, G.; Sciutto, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The total photoproduction cross section at ultrahigh energies is obtained using a model based on QCD minijets and soft-gluon resummation and the ansatz that infrared gluons limit the rise of total cross sections. This cross section is introduced into the Monte Carlo system AIRES to simulate extended air showers initiated by cosmic ray photons. The impact of the new photoproduction cross section on common shower observables, especially those related to muon production, is compared with previous results.

  19. Positron interactions with water–total elastic, total inelastic, and elastic differential cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tattersall, Wade; Chiari, Luca; Machacek, J. R.; Anderson, Emma; Sullivan, James P.; White, Ron D.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, Stephen J.; Garcia, Gustavo; Blanco, Francisco

    2014-01-28

    Utilising a high-resolution, trap-based positron beam, we have measured both elastic and inelastic scattering of positrons from water vapour. The measurements comprise differential elastic, total elastic, and total inelastic (not including positronium formation) absolute cross sections. The energy range investigated is from 1 eV to 60 eV. Comparison with theory is made with both R-Matrix and distorted wave calculations, and with our own application of the Independent Atom Model for positron interactions.

  20. Near-threshold absolute photoionization cross-sections of some reaction intermediates in combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Yang, Bin; Cool, Terrill A.; Hansen, Nils; Kasper, Tina

    2008-02-01

    The use of photoionization mass spectrometry for the development of quantitative kinetic models for the complex combustion chemistry of both conventional hydrocarbon fuels and oxygenated biofuels requires near-threshold measurements of absolute photoionization cross-sections for numerous reaction intermediates. Near-threshold absolute cross-sections for molecular and dissociative photoionization for 20 stable reaction intermediates (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, cyclopropane, methylcyclopentane, 1-butene, cis-2-butene, isobutene, 1-pentene, cyclohexene, 3,3-dimethyl-1-butene, 1,3-hexadiene, 1,3-cyclohexadiene, methyl acetate, ethyl acetate, tetrahydrofuran, propanal, 1-butyne, 2-butyne) are presented. Previously measured total photoionization cross-sections for 9 of these molecules are in good agreement with the present results. The measurements are performed with photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) using a monochromated VUV synchrotron light source with an energy resolution of 40 meV (fwhm) comparable to that used for flame-sampling molecular beam PIMS studies of flame chemistry and reaction kinetics.

  1. Asymmetric total synthesis of (-)-lundurine B and determination of its absolute stereochemistry.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Masaya; Arai, Shigeru; Nishida, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    A total synthesis of the Kopsia tenuis alkaloid (-)-lundurine B has been achieved. A quaternary chiral carbon has been created by an asymmetric deprotonation using a symmetric spiro cyclohexanone intermediate with a chiral lithium amide. The hexacyclic skeleton was sequentially constructed through metal-mediated reactions. The absolute stereochemistry of intermediate 5 has been unambiguously established by X-ray crystallographic analysis. This is the first description of the absolute stereochemistry of Kopsia tenuis alkaloids based on chemical synthesis.

  2. Nucleon-Nucleon Total Cross Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    2008-01-01

    The total proton-proton and neutron-proton cross sections currently used in the transport code HZETRN show significant disagreement with experiment in the GeV and EeV energy ranges. The GeV range is near the region of maximum cosmic ray intensity. It is therefore important to correct these cross sections, so that predictions of space radiation environments will be accurate. Parameterizations of nucleon-nucleon total cross sections are developed which are accurate over the entire energy range of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  3. Absolute cross-section normalization of magnetic neutron scattering data.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guangyong; Xu, Zhijun; Tranquada, J M

    2013-08-01

    We discuss various methods to obtain the resolution volume for neutron scattering experiments, in order to perform absolute normalization on inelastic magnetic neutron scattering data. Examples from previous experiments are given. We also try to provide clear definitions of a number of physical quantities which are commonly used to describe neutron magnetic scattering results, including the dynamic spin correlation function and the imaginary part of the dynamic susceptibility. Formulas that can be used for general purposes are provided and the advantages of the different normalization processes are discussed.

  4. Absolute cross-section normalization of magnetic neutron scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guangyong; Xu, Zhijun; Tranquada, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    We discuss various methods to obtain the resolution volume for neutron scattering experiments, in order to perform absolute normalization on inelastic magnetic neutron scattering data. Examples from previous experiments are given. We also try to provide clear definitions of a number of physical quantities which are commonly used to describe neutron magnetic scattering results, including the dynamic spin correlation function and the imaginary part of the dynamic susceptibility. Formulas that can be used for general purposes are provided and the advantages of the different normalization processes are discussed.

  5. Total Synthesis and Absolute Stereochemistry of the Proteasome Inhibitors Cystargolides A and B

    PubMed Central

    Tello-Aburto, Rodolfo; Hallada, Liam P.; Niroula, Doleshwar; Rogelj, Snezna

    2015-01-01

    The absolute stereochemistry of the cystargolides was determined by total synthesis. Evaluation of synthetic cystargolides and derivatives showed that the natural (2S,3R) stereochemistry is essential for activity. Moreover, benzyl esters (−)-10 and (−)-15 were found to be about 100 times more potent, and to selectively kill MCF-7 cancerous cells. PMID:26400369

  6. Total synthesis and absolute stereochemistry of the proteasome inhibitors cystargolides A and B.

    PubMed

    Tello-Aburto, Rodolfo; Hallada, Liam P; Niroula, Doleshwar; Rogelj, Snezna

    2015-10-28

    The absolute stereochemistry of the cystargolides was determined by total synthesis. Evaluation of synthetic cystargolides and derivatives showed that the natural (2S,3R) stereochemistry is essential for activity. Moreover, benzyl esters (-)-10 and (-)-15 were found to be about 100 times more potent, and to selectively kill MCF-7 cancerous cells.

  7. Absolute Differential Scattering Cross-Sections of Electrons from Neon, Nitrogen and Methyl Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xueying

    The relative flow technique is used to obtain absolute DCS in a crossed-beam experiment. A novel gas handling system was designed to facilitate these measurements. The absolute DCS of electrons scattered from neon have been measured from 7 eV down to 0.25 eV. At energies of 2 eV and lower, our results are in excellent agreement with MERT and recent ab initio calculation. At energies higher than 2 eV, our results are in excellent agreement with those of Williams. Thus we propose that neon can be used as a benchmark to test the overall performance of the electron spectrometer at low energies. The angular dependence of absolute vibrationally -elastic DCS of electrons scattered from N_2 have been measured at 0.55 eV, 1.50 eV, and ~2.22 eV, the second elastic peak of the ^2Pi_{rm g} resonance. Our results at these two lower energies are much larger than the previous experimental results, but in close agreement with theoretical calculations by Morrison. By extrapolating our curves to 0^ circ and 180^circ using Morrison's curves as a guide, integration gave the total vibrationally-elastic cross sections at these two energies. Our results are within 2-4% of the experimentally measured total cross sections. Methyl Chloride is the simplest saturated hydrocarbon with a single chlorine atom substitution. Two resonances have been assigned in CH_3Cl, the a_1(C-Cl,sigma^*) resonance at 3.45 eV and the e(C-H,sigma ^*) resonance at 5.5 eV. In the elastic channel, the measurements show that dipole scattering dominates at low energies and in the forward direction. In inelastic channels, the C-Cl stretch mode nu_3(a _1) is strongly excited by the sigma ^*(C-Cl) shape resonance, and the C-H stretch mode nu_4(e) is the strongest one excited by the e resonance. The angular dependences for excitation of these two modes are relatively flat. The shapes cannot be explained solely by a few leading terms in the angular momentum expansion arising from the resonance. This suggests that non

  8. Absolute UV absorption cross sections of dimethyl substituted Criegee intermediate (CH3)2COO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yuan-Pin; Chang, Chun-Hung; Takahashi, Kaito; Lin, Jim-Min, Jr.

    2016-06-01

    The absolute absorption cross sections of (CH3)2COO under a jet-cooled condition were measured via laser depletion to be (1.32 ± 0.10) × 10-17 cm2 molecule-1 at 308 nm and (9.6 ± 0.8) × 10-18 cm2 molecule-1 at 352 nm. The peak UV cross section is estimated to be (1.75 ± 0.14) × 10-17 cm2 molecule-1 at 330 nm, according to the UV spectrum of (CH3)2COO (Huang et al., 2015) scaled to the absolute cross section at 308 nm.

  9. Reduction Methods for Total Reaction Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, P. R. S.; Mendes Junior, D. R.; Canto, L. F.; Lubian, J.; de Faria, P. N.

    2016-03-01

    The most frequently used methods to reduce fusion and total reaction excitation functions were investigated in a very recent paper Canto et al. (Phys Rev C 92:014626, 2015). These methods are widely used to eliminate the influence of masses and charges in comparisons of cross sections for weakly bound and tightly bound systems. This study reached two main conclusions. The first is that the fusion function method is the most successful procedure to reduce fusion cross sections. Applying this method to theoretical cross sections of single channel calculations, one obtains a system independent curve (the fusion function), that can be used as a benchmark to fusion data. The second conclusion was that none of the reduction methods available in the literature is able to provide a universal curve for total reaction cross sections. The reduced single channel cross sections keep a strong dependence of the atomic and mass numbers of the collision partners, except for systems in the same mass range. In the present work we pursue this problem further, applying the reduction methods to systems within a limited mass range. We show that, under these circumstances, the reduction of reaction data may be very useful.

  10. Total cross sections for +/-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gien, T. T.

    1987-03-01

    The total cross sections for electron and positron scatterings by lithium, sodium, and potassium in the intermediate energy range from 40 to 1000 eV are calculated using the modified Glauber and second Born approximations. A model potential approach is developed to enable an exact inclusion of the core-interaction effects. Within this approach, the positron cross sections are predicted to be somewhat smaller than those of electron scattering. Calculations have also been performed with the consideration of the inert-core and frozen-core assumption and the use of the Clementi wave function to represent the target electrons. Comparison to existing experimental data is made.

  11. Determination of the Absolute Configuration of Gliomasolide D through Total Syntheses of the C-17 Epimers.

    PubMed

    Seetharamsingh, B; Ganesh, Routholla; Reddy, D Srinivasa

    2017-02-24

    The absolute configuration at C-17, the carbon bearing the distal hydroxy group of the 14-membered natural product gliomasolide D, was assigned as R by comparison of (13)C NMR shifts and specific rotation values of the epimers at C-17. The first total synthesis of gliomasolide D along with its C-17 epimer, regioselective macrocyclization (18 membered vs 14 membered), and regioselective Wacker oxidation are highlights of the present work.

  12. Absolute cross sections for dissociative electron attachment to NH3 and CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Prashant; Prabhudesai, Vaibhav S.; Rahman, M. A.; Ram, N. Bhargava; Krishnakumar, E.

    2008-11-01

    Dissociative electron attachment (DEA) cross sections for NH3 and CH4 are measured in a crossed beam apparatus with special care to eliminate discrimination due to kinetic energy and angular distribution of the fragment ions. The cross sections are put on absolute scale using the relative flow technique. The absolute cross sections for the formation of H- and NH2- from ammonia and H- and CH2- from methane are compared with available data from literature. It is seen that the present results are considerably different 6rom what has been reported before. We also compare the cross sections of the H- channel from these molecules along with that from H2O to those from organic molecules containing alkyl, amino and hydroxyl groups to examine the extent to which the recently observed functional group dependence in the DEA contributes.

  13. Absolute cross sections for dissociative electron attachment to H2O and D2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Prashant; Prabhudesai, Vaibhav S.; Aravind, G.; Rahman, M. A.; Krishnakumar, E.

    2007-12-01

    The dissociative electron attachment (DEA) process to water (H2O) and heavy water (D2O) has been studied in the gas phase in a cross beam experiment for electron energies up to 20 eV. The apparatus used eliminates discrimination due to the kinetic energy and angular distribution of the ions. The cross sections are normalized to absolute values using the cross section for production of O- from O2 (Rapp and Briglia 1965 J. Chem. Phys. 43 1480). These are the first exhaustive measurements of absolute cross sections for both the H- and O- from H2O and D- and O- from D2O at all the three resonances. The results are compared with the scarce data available in the literature. Isotope effect is observed at the 12 eV resonance in the H- channel and at all the three resonances in the O- channel.

  14. CCKT Calculation of e-H Total Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Aaron K.; Schneider, B. I.; Temkin, A.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We are in the process of carrying out calculations of e-H total cross sections using the 'complex-correlation Kohn-T' (CCKT) method. In a later paper, we described the methodology more completely, but confined calculations to the elastic scattering region, with definitive, precision results for S-wave phase shifts. Here we extend the calculations to the (low) continuum (1 much less than k(exp 2) much less than 3) using a Green's function formulation. This avoids having to solve integro-differential equations; rather we evaluate indefinite integrals involving appropriate Green's functions and the (complex) optical potential to find the scattering function u(r). From the asymptotic form of u(r) we extract a T(sub L) which is a complex number. From T(sub L), elastic sigma(sub L)(elastic) = 4pi(2L+1)((absolute value of T(sub L))(exp 2)), and total sigma (sub L)(total) = 4pi/k(2L+1)Im(T(sub L)) cross sections follow.

  15. Studies Culminating in the Total Synthesis and Determination of the Absolute Configuration of (-)-Saudin

    PubMed Central

    Boeckman, Robert K.; del Rosario Ferreira, Maria Rico; Mitchell, Lorna H.; Shao, Pengcheng; Neeb, Michael J.; Fang, Yue

    2011-01-01

    A full account of studies that culminated in the total synthesis of both antipodes and the assignment of its absolute configuration of Saudin, a hypoglycemic natural product. Two approaches are described, the first proceeding though bicyclic lactone intermediates and related second monocyclic esters. The former was obtained via asymmetric Diels-Alder cycloaddition and the latter by an asymmetric annulation protocol. Both approaches employ a Lewis acid promoted Claisen rearrangement, with the successful approach taking advantage of bidentate chelation to control the facial selectivity of the key Claisen rearrangement PMID:22523435

  16. Absolute differential cross sections for electron capture and loss by kilo-electron-volt hydrogen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. J.; Johnson, L. K.; Gao, R. S.; Smith, K. A.; Stebbings, R. F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports measurements of absolute differential cross sections for electron capture and loss for fast hydrogen atoms incident on H2, N2, O2, Ar, and He. Cross sections have been determined in the 2.0- to 5.0-keV energy range over the laboratory angular range 0.02-2 deg, with an angular, resolution of 0.02 deg. The high angular resolution allows observation of the structure at small angles in some of the cross sections. Comparison of the present results with those of other authors generally shows very good agreement.

  17. Total Synthesis, Assignment of the Relative and Absolute Stereochemistry, and Structural Reassignment of Phostriecin (aka Sultriecin)

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Christopher P.; Haq, Nadia; Boger, Dale L.

    2010-01-01

    A total synthesis of phostriecin (2) previously known as sultriecin (1), its structural reassignment as a phosphate versus sulfate monoester, and the assignment of its relative and absolute stereochemistry are disclosed herein. Key elements of the work, which provided first the originally assigned sulfate monoester 1 and then the reassigned and renamed phosphate monoester 2, relied on diagnostic 1H NMR spectroscopic properties of the natural product for the assignment of relative and absolute stereochemistry as well as the subsequent structural reassignment, and a convergent asymmetric total synthesis to provide the unequivocal authentic materials. Key steps of the synthetic approach include a Brown allylation for diastereoselective introduction of the C9 stereochemistry, an asymmetric CBS reduction to establish the lactone C5-stereochemistry, diastereoselective oxidative ring expansion of an α-hydroxyfuran to access the pyran lactone precursor, and single-step installation of the sensitive Z,Z,E-triene unit through a chelation-controlled cuprate addition with installation of the C11 stereochemistry. The approach allows ready access to analogues that can now be used to probe important structural features required for PP2A inhibition, the mechanism of action defined herein. PMID:20108904

  18. Total synthesis, assignment of the relative and absolute stereochemistry, and structural reassignment of phostriecin (aka Sultriecin).

    PubMed

    Burke, Christopher P; Haq, Nadia; Boger, Dale L

    2010-02-24

    A total synthesis of phostriecin (2), previously known as sultriecin (1), its structural reassignment as a phosphate versus sulfate monoester, and the assignment of its relative and absolute stereochemistry are disclosed herein. Key elements of the work, which provided first the originally assigned sulfate monoester 1 and then the reassigned and renamed phosphate monoester 2, relied on diagnostic (1)H NMR spectroscopic properties of the natural product for the assignment of relative and absolute stereochemistry as well as the subsequent structural reassignment, and a convergent asymmetric total synthesis to provide the unequivocal authentic materials. Key steps of the synthetic approach include a Brown allylation for diastereoselective introduction of the C9 stereochemistry, an asymmetric CBS reduction to establish the lactone C5-stereochemistry, diastereoselective oxidative ring expansion of an alpha-hydroxyfuran to access the pyran lactone precursor, and single-step installation of the sensitive Z,Z,E-triene unit through a chelation-controlled cuprate addition with installation of the C11 stereochemistry. The approach allows ready access to analogues that can now be used to probe important structural features required for protein phosphatase 2A inhibition, the mechanism of action defined herein.

  19. Measurements of absolute absorption cross sections of ozone in the 185- to 254-nm wavelength region and the temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Freeman, D. E.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of the relative absorption cross sections of ozone at temperatures 195, 228, and 295 K have been made throughout the 185 to 254 nm wavelength region. The absolute absorption cross sections at the same temperatures have been measured at several discrete wavelengths in the 185 to 250 nm region. The absolute cross sections of ozone have been used to put the relative cross sections on a firm absolute basis throughout the 185 to 255 nm region. These recalibrated cross sections are slightly lower than those of Molina and Molina (1986), but the differences are within a few percent and would not be significant in atmospheric applications.

  20. Total Syntheses of (+)-Grandilodine C and (+)-Lapidilectine B and Determination of their Absolute Stereochemistry.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Masaya; Arai, Shigeru; Nishida, Atsushi

    2016-03-01

    Enantioselective total syntheses of the Kopsia alkaloids (+)-grandilodine C and (+)-lapidilectine B were accomplished. A key intermediate, spirodiketone, was synthesized in 3 steps and converted into the chiral enone by enantioselective deprotonation followed by oxidation with up to 76 % ee. Lactone formation was achieved through stereoselective vinylation followed by allylation and ozonolysis. The total synthesis of (+)-grandilodine C was achieved by palladium-catalyzed intramolecular allylic amination and ring-closing metathesis to give 8- and 5-membered heterocycles, respectively. Selective reduction of a lactam carbonyl gave (+)-lapidilectine B. The absolute stereochemistry of both natural products was thereby confirmed. These syntheses enable the scalable preparation of the above alkaloids for biological studies.

  1. ScaRaB: first results of absolute and cross calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trémas, Thierry L.; Aznay, Ouahid; Chomette, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    ScaRaB (SCAnner for RAdiation Budget) is the name of three radiometers whose two first flight models have been launched in 1994 and 1997. The instruments were mounted on-board Russian satellites, METEOR and RESURS. On October 12th 2011, a last model has been launched from the Indian site of Sriharikota. ScaRaB is a passenger of MEGHA-TROPIQUES, an Indo-French joint Satellite Mission for studying the water cycle and energy exchanges in the tropics. ScaRaB is composed of four parallel and independent channels. Channel-2 and channel-3 are considered as the main ones. Channel-1 is dedicated to measure solar radiance (0.5 to 0.7 μm) while channel-4 (10 to 13 μm) is an infrared window. The absolute calibration of ScaRab is assured by internal calibration sources (black bodies and a lamp for channel-1). However, during the commissioning phase, the lamp used for the absolute calibration of channel-1 revealed to be inaccurate. We propose here an alternative calibration method based on terrestrial targets. Due to the spectral range of channel-1, only calibration over desert sites (temporal monitoring) and clouds (cross band) is suitable. Desert sites have been widely used for sensor calibration since they have a stable spectral response over time. Because of their high reflectances, the atmospheric effect on the upward radiance is relatively minimal. In addition, they are spatially uniform. Their temporal instability without atmospheric correction has been determined to be less than 1-2% over a year. Very-high-altitude (10 km) bright clouds are good validation targets in the visible and near-infrared spectra because of their high spectrally consistent reflectance. If the clouds are very high, there is no need to correct aerosol scattering and water vapor absorption as both aerosol and water vapor are distributed near the surface. Only Rayleigh scattering and ozone absorption need to be considered. This method has been found to give a 4% uncertainty. Radiometric cross

  2. Absolute determination of cross sections for resonant Raman scattering on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Matthias; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Ulm, Gerhard; Kanngießer, Birgit

    2006-07-01

    We studied the resonant Raman scattering of x rays in the vicinity of the K absorption edge of silicon. The investigation was carried out at the plane grating monochromator beamline for undulator radiation of the PTB laboratory at BESSY II in Berlin. Cross sections were determined absolutely for a wide energy range of incident photons with small relative uncertainties employing calibrated instrumentation avoiding any reference samples. The experimentally determined values differ clearly from the theoretical ones found in the literature.

  3. APPARATUS FOR MEASURING TOTAL NEUTRON CROSS SECTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Cranberg, L.

    1959-10-13

    An apparatus is described for measuring high-resolution total neutron cross sections at high counting rate in the range above 50-kev neutron energy. The pulsed-beam time-of-flight technique is used to identify the neutrons of interest which are produced in the target of an electrostatic accelerator. Energy modulation of the accelerator . makes it possible to make observations at 100 energy points simultaneously. 761O An apparatus is described for monitoring the proton resonance of a liquid which is particulariy useful in the continuous purity analysis of heavy water. A hollow shell with parallel sides defines a meander chamber positioned within a uniform magnetic fieid. The liquid passes through an inlet at the outer edge of the chamber and through a spiral channel to the central region of the chamber where an outlet tube extends into the chamber perpendicular to the magnetic field. The radiofrequency energy for the monitor is coupled to a coil positioned coaxially with the outlet tube at its entrance point within the chamber. The improvement lies in the compact mechanical arrangement of the monitor unit whereby the liquid under analysis is subjected to the same magnetic field in the storage and sensing areas, and the entire unit is shielded from external electrostatic influences.

  4. Total and ionization cross sections of electron scattering by fluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antony, B. K.; Joshipura, K. N.; Mason, N. J.

    2005-02-01

    Electron impact total cross sections (50-2000 eV) and total ionization cross sections (threshold to 2000 eV) are calculated for typical plasma etching molecules CF4, C2F4, C2F6, C3F8 and CF3I and the CFx (x = 1-3) radicals. The total elastic and inelastic cross sections are determined in the spherical complex potential formalism. The sum of the two gives the total cross section and the total inelastic cross section is used to calculate the total ionization cross sections. The present total and ionization cross sections are found to be consistent with other theories and experimental measurements, where they exist. Our total cross section results for CFx (x = 1-3) radicals presented here are first estimates on these species.

  5. Absolute X-ray emission cross section measurements of Fe K transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, Natalie; Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Boyce, Kevin R.; Grinberg, Victoria; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Porter, Frederick Scott; Wilms, Jörn

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the absolute X-ray emission cross sections of K-shell transitions in highly charged L- and K-shell Fe ions using the LLNL EBIT-I electron beam ion trap and the NASA GSFC EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS). The cross sections are determined by using the ECS to simultaneously record the spectrum of the bound-bound K-shell transitions and the emission from radiative recombination from trapped Fe ions. The measured spectrum is then brought to an absolute scale by normalizing the measured flux in the radiative recombination features to their theoretical cross sections, which are well known. Once the spectrum is brought to an absolute scale, the cross sections of the K-shell transitions are determined. These measurements are made possible by the ECS, which consists of a 32 channel array, with 14 channels optimized for detecting high energy photons (hν > 10 keV) and 18 channels optimized for detecting low energy photons (hν < 10 keV). The ECS has a large collection area, relatively high energy resolution, and a large bandpass; all properties necessary for this measurement technique to be successful. These data will be used to benchmark cross sections in the atomic reference data bases underlying the plasma modeling codes used to analyze astrophysical spectra, especially those measured by the Soft X-ray Spectrometer calorimeter instrument recently launched on the Hitomi X-ray Observatory.This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and supported by NASA grants to LLNL and NASA/GSFC and by ESA under contract No. 4000114313/15/NL/CB.

  6. Absolute measurement of the 242Pu neutron-capture cross section

    DOE PAGES

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; ...

    2016-04-21

    Here, the absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. The first direct measurement of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section was made over the incident neutron energy range from thermal to ≈ 6 keV, and the absolute scale of the (n,γ) cross section was set according to the known 239Pu(n,f) resonance at En,R = 7.83 eV. This was accomplished by adding a small quantity of 239Pu to the 242Pu sample. The relative scale of the crossmore » section, with a range of four orders of magnitude, was determined for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈ 40 keV. Our data, in general, are in agreement with previous measurements and those reported in ENDF/B-VII.1; the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section at the En,R = 2.68 eV resonance is within 2.4% of the evaluated value. However, discrepancies exist at higher energies; our data are ≈30% lower than the evaluated data at En ≈ 1 keV and are approximately 2σ away from the previous measurement at En ≈ 20 keV.« less

  7. Absolute single-photoionization cross sections of Se2 +: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macaluso, D. A.; Aguilar, A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Red, E. C.; Bilodeau, R. C.; Phaneuf, R. A.; Sterling, N. C.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    Absolute single-photoionization cross-section measurements for Se2 + ions were performed at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using the merged-beams photo-ion technique. Measurements were made at a photon energy resolution of 24 ±3 meV in the photon energy range 23.5-42.5 eV, spanning the ground state and low-lying metastable state ionization thresholds. To clearly resolve the resonant structure near the ground-state threshold, high-resolution measurements were made from 30.0 to 31.9 eV at a photon energy resolution of 6.7 ±0.7 meV. Numerous resonance features observed in the experimental spectra are assigned and their energies and quantum defects tabulated. The high-resolution cross-section measurements are compared with large-scale, state-of-the-art theoretical cross-section calculations obtained from the Dirac Coulomb R -matrix method. Suitable agreement is obtained over the entire photon energy range investigated. These results are an experimental determination of the absolute photoionization cross section of doubly ionized selenium and include a detailed analysis of the photoionization resonance spectrum of this ion.

  8. Absolute np and pp cross section determinations aimed at improving the standard for cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, Alexander B; Haight, Robert C; Tovesson, Fredrik; Arndt, Richard A; Briscoe, William J; Paris, Mark W; Strakovsky, Igor I; Workman, Ron L

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of present research is a keeping improvement of the standard for cross section measurements of neutron-induced reactions. The cross sections for np and pp scattering below 1000 MeV are determined based on partial-wave analyses (PW As) of nucleon-nucleon scattering data. These cross sections are compared with the most recent ENDF/B-V11.0 and JENDL-4.0 data files, and the Nijmegen PWA. Also a comparison of evaluated data with recent experimental data was made to check a quality of evaluation. Excellent agreement was found between the new experimental data and our PWA predictions.

  9. Absolute np and pp Cross Section Determinations Aimed At Improving The Standard For Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, A. B.; Haight, R. C.; Tovesson, F.; Arndt, R. A.; Briscoe, W. J.; Paris, M. W.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Workman, R. L.

    2011-06-01

    Purpose of present research is a keeping improvement of the standard for cross section measurements of neutron-induced reactions. The cross sections for np and pp scattering below 1 GeV are determined based on partial-wave analyses (PWAs) of nucleon-nucleon scattering data. These cross sections are compared with the most recent ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-4.0 data files, and the Nijmegen PWA. Also a comparison of evaluated data with recent experimental data was made to check a quality of evaluation. Excellent agreement was found between the new experimental data and our PWA predictions.

  10. Absolute differential cross sections for elastic scattering of electrons from pyrimidine

    SciTech Connect

    Maljkovic, J. B.; Milosavljevic, A. R.; Sevic, D.; Marinkovic, B. P.; Blanco, F.

    2009-05-15

    Differential cross sections (DCSs) for elastic scattering of electrons from pyrimidine (C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}) are presented for incident energies from 50 to 300 eV. The measurements were performed using a cross beam technique, for scattering angles from 20 deg. to 110 deg. The relative DCSs were measured as a function of both the angle and incident energy and the absolute DCSs were determined using the relative flow method. The calculations of electron interaction cross sections are based on a corrected form of the independent-atom method, known as the screen corrected additivity rule procedure and using an improved quasifree absorption model. Calculated results agree very well with the experiment.

  11. Dissociative Recombination and Excitation of CH+5: Absolute Cross Sections and Branching Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semaniak, J.; Larson, Å.; Le Padellec, A.; Strömholm, C.; Larsson, M.; Rosén, S.; Peverall, R.; Danared, H.; Djuric, N.; Dunn, G. H.; Datz, S.

    1998-05-01

    The heavy-ion storage ring CRYRING was used to measure the absolute dissociative recombination and dissociative excitation cross sections for collision energies below 50 eV. Deduced thermal rates coefficients are consistent with previous beams data but are lower by a factor of 3 than the rates measured by means of the flowing afterglow Langmuir probe technique. A resonant structure in dissociative recombination cross section was found at 9 eV. We have determined the branching fractions in DR of CH+5 below 0.2 eV. The branching is dominated by three-body CH3 + H + H and CH2 + H2 + H dissociation channels, which occur with branching ratios of ~0.7 and ~0.2, respectively; thus methane is a minor species among dissociation products. Both the measured absolute cross sections and branching in dissociative recombination of CH+5 can have important implications for the models of dense interstellar clouds and abundance of CH2, CH3 and CH4 in these media.

  12. Absolute vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption cross section studies of atomic and molecular species: Techniques and observational data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, D. L.; Wu, C. Y. R.

    1990-01-01

    Absorption of a high energy photon (greater than 6 eV) by an isolated molecule results in the formation of highly excited quasi-discrete or continuum states which evolve through a wide range of direct and indirect photochemical processes. These are: photoionization and autoionization, photodissociation and predissociation, and fluorescence. The ultimate goal is to understand the dynamics of the excitation and decay processes and to quantitatively measure the absolute partial cross sections for all processes which occur in photoabsorption. Typical experimental techniques and the status of observational results of particular interest to solar system observations are presented.

  13. Absolute differential cross sections for elastic electron scattering from small biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maljković, Jelena

    2014-12-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of electrons colliding with a set of biomolecules that are assumed to be analogues of the building blocks of DNA (furan, 3- hydroxytetrahydrofuran and pyrimidine) and proteins (formamide, N-methylformamide) are presented. Absolute differential cross sections at medium incident electron energies 40 eV- 300 eV are presented and compared for these different targets. The experimental results are also compared with available calculations, based on the corrected form of independent atom model and show good agreement over the energy range studied.

  14. Absolute measurement of the 242Pu neutron-capture cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2016-04-21

    Here, the absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. The first direct measurement of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section was made over the incident neutron energy range from thermal to ≈ 6 keV, and the absolute scale of the (n,γ) cross section was set according to the known 239Pu(n,f) resonance at En,R = 7.83 eV. This was accomplished by adding a small quantity of 239Pu to the 242Pu sample. The relative scale of the cross section, with a range of four orders of magnitude, was determined for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈ 40 keV. Our data, in general, are in agreement with previous measurements and those reported in ENDF/B-VII.1; the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section at the En,R = 2.68 eV resonance is within 2.4% of the evaluated value. However, discrepancies exist at higher energies; our data are ≈30% lower than the evaluated data at En ≈ 1 keV and are approximately 2σ away from the previous measurement at En ≈ 20 keV.

  15. Effect of Wall Suction on Cross-Flow Absolute Instability of a Rotating Disk Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Joanna; Corke, Thomas; Matlis, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The effect of uniform suction on the absolute instability of Type I cross-flow modes on a rotating disk is examined. Specifically it investigates if wall suction transforms the absolute instability into a global mode as postulated in the numerical simulations of Davies and Carpenter (2003). The experiment is designed so that a suction parameter of a =W0 /(νω) 1 / 2 = 0 . 2 locates the absolute instability critical Reynolds number, Rca = 650 , on the disk. Uniform wall suction is applied from R = 317 to 696. The design for wall suction follows that of Gregory and Walker (1950), where an array of holes through the disk communicate between the measurement side of the disk and the underside of the disk in an enclosure that is maintained at a slight vacuum. The measurement surface is covered by a 20 micron pore size Polyethylene sheet. Temporal disturbances are introduced using the method of Othman and Corke (2006), and the evolution of the resulting wave packets are documented. The present results indicate a rapid transition to turbulence near Rca.

  16. Absolute cross-sections for DNA strand breaks and crosslinks induced by low energy electrons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenzhuang; Chen, Shiliang; Dong, Yanfang; Cloutier, Pierre; Zheng, Yi; Sanche, Léon

    2016-12-07

    Absolute cross sections (CSs) for the interaction of low energy electrons with condensed macromolecules are essential parameters to accurately model ionizing radiation induced reactions. To determine CSs for various conformational DNA damage induced by 2-20 eV electrons, we investigated the influence of the attenuation length (AL) and penetration factor (f) using a mathematical model. Solid films of supercoiled plasmid DNA with thicknesses of 10, 15 and 20 nm were irradiated with 4.6, 5.6, 9.6 and 14.6 eV electrons. DNA conformational changes were quantified by gel electrophoresis, and the respective yields were extrapolated from exposure-response curves. The absolute CS, AL and f values were generated by applying the model developed by Rezaee et al. The values of AL were found to lie between 11 and 16 nm with the maximum at 14.6 eV. The absolute CSs for the loss of the supercoiled (LS) configuration and production of crosslinks (CL), single strand breaks (SSB) and double strand breaks (DSB) induced by 4.6, 5.6, 9.6 and 14.6 eV electrons are obtained. The CSs for SSB are smaller, but similar to those for LS, indicating that SSB are the main conformational damage. The CSs for DSB and CL are about one order of magnitude smaller than those of LS and SSB. The value of f is found to be independent of electron energy, which allows extending the absolute CSs for these types of damage within the range 2-20 eV, from previous measurements of effective CSs. When comparison is possible, the absolute CSs are found to be in good agreement with those obtained from previous similar studies with double-stranded DNA. The high values of the absolute CSs of 4.6 and 9.6 eV provide quantitative evidence for the high efficiency of low energy electrons to induce DNA damage via the formation of transient anions.

  17. Absolute photoionization cross sections of furanic fuels: 2-ethylfuran, 2-acetylfuran and furfural.

    PubMed

    Smith, Audrey R; Meloni, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Absolute photoionization cross sections of the molecules 2-ethylfuran, 2-acetylfuran and furfural, including partial ionization cross sections for the dissociative ionized fragments, are measured for the first time. These measurements are important because they allow fuel quantification via photoionization mass spectrometry and the development of quantitative kinetic modeling for the complex combustion of potential fuels. The experiments are carried out using synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry with an orthogonal time-of-flight spectrometer used for mass analysis at the Advanced Light Source of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The CBS-QB3 calculations of adiabatic ionization energies and appearance energies agree well with the experimental results. Several bond dissociation energies are also derived and presented.

  18. Measurement of the absolute vμ-CCQE cross section at the SciBooNE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aunion, Jose Luis Alcaraz

    2010-07-01

    This thesis presents the measurement of the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) neutrino-nucleon cross section at neutrino energies around 1 GeV. This measurement has two main physical motivations. On one hand, the neutrino-nucleon interactions at few GeV is a region where existing old data are sparse and with low statistics. The current measurement populates low energy regions with higher statistics and precision than previous experiments. On the other hand, the CCQE interaction is the most useful interaction in neutrino oscillation experiments. The CCQE channel is used to measure the initial and final neutrino fluxes in order to determine the neutrino fraction that disappeared. The neutrino oscillation experiments work at low neutrino energies, so precise measurement of CCQE interactions are essential for flux measurements. The main goal of this thesis is to measure the CCQE absolute neutrino cross section from the SciBooNE data. The SciBar Booster Neutrino Experiment (SciBooNE) is a neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering off experiment. The neutrino energy spectrum works at energies around 1 GeV. SciBooNE was running from June 8th 2007 to August 18th 2008. In that period, the experiment collected a total of 2.65 x 1020 protons on target (POT). This thesis has used full data collection in neutrino mode 0.99 x 1020 POT. A CCQE selection cut has been performed, achieving around 70% pure CCQE sample. A fit method has been exclusively developed to determine the absolute CCQE cross section, presenting results in a neutrino energy range from 0.2 to 2 GeV. The results are compatible with the NEUT predictions. The SciBooNE measurement has been compared with both Carbon (MiniBoonE) and deuterium (ANL and BNL) target experiments, showing a good agreement in both cases.

  19. Absolute cross sections for ethylene-dication production by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigaud, L.; Montenegro, E. C.

    2017-01-01

    This work reports absolute cross-section measurements for the production of ethylene dications by electron impact, with the energy ranging between 25 and 800 eV. Separation of the entangled C2H42 + and CH2+ fragments with the same mass-to-charge ratio, in the time-of-flight spectrum, is properly carried out using the DETOF technique. This separation shows that stable C2H42 + can be produced either by two primary vacancies or by a single primary vacancy in an inner valence shell, with its subsequent de-excitation through Auger-like decay. Our findings show that the latter process can be an important player in dication formation, prevailing in the case of ethylene at projectile energies above 500 eV.

  20. Absolute angle-differential vibrational excitation cross sections for electron collisions with diacetylene

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.; May, O.; Fedor, J.; Ibanescu, B. C.; Andric, L.

    2011-05-15

    Absolute vibrational excitation cross sections were measured for diacetylene (1,3-butadiyne). The selectivity of vibrational excitation reveals detailed information about the shape resonances. Excitation of the C{identical_to}C stretch and of double quanta of the C-H bend vibrations reveals a {sup 2}{Pi}{sub u} resonance at 1 eV (autodetachment width {approx}30 meV) and a {sup 2}{Pi}{sub g} resonance at 6.2 eV (autodetachment width 1-2 eV). There is a strong preference for excitation of even quanta of the bending vibration. Excitation of the C-H stretch vibration reveals {sigma}* resonances at 4.3, 6.8, and 9.8 eV, with autodetachment widths of {approx}2 eV. Detailed information about resonances permits conclusions about the mechanism of the dissociative electron attachment.

  1. Absolute single photoionization cross-section measurements of Rb2+ ions: experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macaluso, D. A.; Bogolub, K.; Johnson, A.; Aguilar, A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Bilodeau, R. C.; Bautista, M.; Kerlin, A. B.; Sterling, N. C.

    2016-12-01

    Absolute single photoionization cross-section measurements of Rb2+ ions were performed using synchrotron radiation and the photo-ion, merged-beams technique at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Measurements were made at a photon energy resolution of 13.5 ± 2.5 meV from 37.31 to 44.08 eV spanning the 2P{}3/2o ground state and 2P{}1/2o metastable state ionization thresholds. Multiple autoionizing resonance series arising from each initial state are identified using quantum defect theory. The measurements are compared to Breit-Pauli R-matrix calculations with excellent agreement between theory and experiment.

  2. Total and partial photoneutron cross sections for Pb isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, T.; Utsunomiya, H.; Goriely, S.; Daoutidis, I.; Iwamoto, C.; Akimune, H.; Okamoto, A.; Yamagata, T.; Kamata, M.; Itoh, O.; Toyokawa, H.; Lui, Y.-W.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A. J.

    2012-07-01

    Using quasimonochromatic laser-Compton scattering γ rays, total photoneutron cross sections were measured for 206,207,208Pb near neutron threshold with a high-efficiency 4π neutron detector. Partial E1 and M1 photoneutron cross sections along with total cross sections were determined for 207,208Pb at four energies near threshold by measuring anisotropies in photoneutron emission with linearly polarized γ rays. The E1 strength dominates over the M1 strength in the neutron channel where E1 photoneutron cross sections show extra strength of the pygmy dipole resonance in 207,208Pb near the neutron threshold corresponding to 0.32%-0.42% of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule. Several μN2 units of B(M1)↑ strength were observed in 207,208Pb just above neutron threshold, which correspond to an M1 cross section less than 10% of the total photoneutron cross section.

  3. Systematic determination of absolute absorption cross-section of individual carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaihui; Hong, Xiaoping; Choi, Sangkook; Jin, Chenhao; Capaz, Rodrigo B; Kim, Jihoon; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong; Louie, Steven G; Wang, Enge; Wang, Feng

    2014-05-27

    Optical absorption is the most fundamental optical property characterizing light-matter interactions in materials and can be most readily compared with theoretical predictions. However, determination of optical absorption cross-section of individual nanostructures is experimentally challenging due to the small extinction signal using conventional transmission measurements. Recently, dramatic increase of optical contrast from individual carbon nanotubes has been successfully achieved with a polarization-based homodyne microscope, where the scattered light wave from the nanostructure interferes with the optimized reference signal (the reflected/transmitted light). Here we demonstrate high-sensitivity absorption spectroscopy for individual single-walled carbon nanotubes by combining the polarization-based homodyne technique with broadband supercontinuum excitation in transmission configuration. To our knowledge, this is the first time that high-throughput and quantitative determination of nanotube absorption cross-section over broad spectral range at the single-tube level was performed for more than 50 individual chirality-defined single-walled nanotubes. Our data reveal chirality-dependent behaviors of exciton resonances in carbon nanotubes, where the exciton oscillator strength exhibits a universal scaling law with the nanotube diameter and the transition order. The exciton linewidth (characterizing the exciton lifetime) varies strongly in different nanotubes, and on average it increases linearly with the transition energy. In addition, we establish an empirical formula by extrapolating our data to predict the absorption cross-section spectrum for any given nanotube. The quantitative information of absorption cross-section in a broad spectral range and all nanotube species not only provides new insight into the unique photophysics in one-dimensional carbon nanotubes, but also enables absolute determination of optical quantum efficiencies in important

  4. Total cross sections for positrons scattered elastically from helium based on new measurements of total ionization cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diana, L. M.; Chaplin, R. L.; Brooks, D. L.; Adams, J. T.; Reyna, L. K.

    1990-01-01

    An improved technique is presented for employing the 2.3m spectrometer to measure total ionization cross sections, Q sub ion, for positrons incident on He. The new ionization cross section agree with the values reported earlier. Estimates are also presented of total elastic scattering cross section, Q sub el, obtained by subtracting from total scattering cross sections, Q sub tot, reported in the literature, the Q sub ion and Q sub Ps (total positronium formation cross sections) and total excitation cross sections, Q sub ex, published by another researcher. The Q sub ion and Q sub el measured with the 3m high resolution time-of-flight spectrometer for 54.9eV positrons are in accord with the results from the 2.3m spectrometer. The ionization cross sections are in fair agreement with theory tending for the most part to be higher, especially at 76.3 and 88.5eV. The elastic cross section agree quite well with theory to the vicinity of 50eV, but at 60eV and above the experimental elastic cross sections climb to and remain at about 0.30 pi a sub o sq while the theoretical values steadily decrease.

  5. Photoproduction models for total cross section and shower development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, Fernando; Garcia Canal, Carlos; Grau, Agnes; Pancheri, Giulia; Sciutto, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    A model for the total photoproduction cross section, based on the ansatz that resummation of infrared gluons limits the rise induced by QCD minijets in all the total cross-sections, is used to simulate extended air showers initiated by cosmic rays with the AIRES simulation program. The impact on common shower observables, especially those related with muon production, is analysed and compared with the corresponding results obtained with previous photoproduction models.

  6. Absolute elastic differential electron scattering cross sections for He - A proposed calibration standard from 5 to 200 eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Register, D. F.; Trajmar, S.; Srivastava, S. K.

    1980-01-01

    Absolute differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections for electrons elastically scattered from helium are reported for the impact energy range of 5 to 200 eV. Angular distributions for elastically scattered electrons are measured in a crossed-beam geometry using a collimated, differentially pumped atomic-beam source which requires no effective-path-length correction. Below the first inelastic threshold the angular distributions were placed on an absolute scale by use of a phase-shift analysis. Above this threshold, the angular distributions from 10 to 140 deg were fitted using the phase-shift technique, and the resulting integral cross sections were normalized to a semiempirically derived integral elastic cross section. Depending on the impact energy, the data are estimated to be accurate to within 5 to 9%.

  7. Absolute cross sections for dissociative electron attachment to HCN and DCN

    SciTech Connect

    May, O.; Kubala, D.; Allan, M.

    2010-07-15

    Absolute partial cross sections for the formation of CN{sup -} in dissociative electron attachment to HCN and DCN have been measured using a time-of-flight ion spectrometer combined with a trochoidal electron monochromator to be 940pm{sup 2} for CN{sup -}/HCN and 340pm{sup 2} for CN{sup -}/DCN at peaks of the bands due to the {sup 2{Pi}}-shape resonance. The dissociative electron attachment bands were then recorded under higher resolution, 60 meV, with a trochoidal monochromator plus quadrupole mass filter combination and found to have a nearly vertical onset at the threshold energy and to peak at 1.85 eV. Broad structure was observed on the bands, assigned to formation of vibrationally excited CN{sup -}, from which the branching ratios could be determined to be 1,0.49, and 0.22 for the formation of CN{sup -} in the v=0,1, and 2 states, respectively. The results are compared to the recent multidimensional ab initio calculations of Chourou and Orel [Phys. Rev. A 80, 032709 (2009)].

  8. Supplementary absolute differential cross sections for the excitation of atomic hydrogen's n=3 and 4 levels by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Christopher J.; Shyn, Tong W.; Grafe, Alan

    2004-05-01

    We have conducted measurements of absolute differential cross sections for the excitation of hydrogen atoms to their n=3(3S+3P+3D) and 4(4S+4P+4D+4F) levels. A modulated, crossed-beam method was employed, and the impact energies were 40 and 60 eV. Comparison of our results with those of others is quite favorable.

  9. Calculation of the total and total ionization cross sections for positron scattering on atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, I. ); Stelbovics, A.T. )

    1994-04-01

    The total and total ionization cross sections for positron scattering on atomic hydrogen are calculated by applying the convergent-close-coupling method to the model where positronium-formation channels are omitted. This model accurately describes the physics of the scattering whenever the positronium formation cross section is negligible, in particular, above 100 eV for this system. The total ionization cross section results in this energy region are in excellent agreement with the recent measurements of Jones [ital et] [ital al]. [J. Phys. B 26, L483 (1993)], and so lie below the earlier measurements of Spicher [Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 1019 (1990)], and the recent calculations of Acacia [ital et] [ital al]. [Phys. Rev. Lett. (to be published)]. The total cross section is in very good agreement with the recent measurements of Zhou [ital et] [ital al]. (unpublished) down to 30 eV.

  10. Near Infrared Absolute Photometry of Saturn's Satellites at Ring Plane Crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momary, T. W.; Baines, K. H.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.; Buratti, B. J.; Lebofsky, L. A.

    1999-09-01

    Absolutely-calibrated multispectral photometry of nine Saturnian satellites, including the leading side of Enceladus, are presented for canonical near-infrared filters. The satellites were observed during Ring Plane Crossing in August/September 1995 with the NSFCAM instrument at the NASA/IRTF. Observations were contemporaneous with those of the Uranian system, acquired by Baines et al. (Icarus 132, 266-284, 1998), using the same instrument and filters. Results are reported for J, H, and K filters near 1.27, 1.62, and 2.20 microns, and two filters centerd at 1.73 and 2.27 microns. We find that the spectrum and absolute brightness of Enceladus is consistent with fresh water ice, relatively uncontaminated by the kinds of low albedo, spectrally neutral materials found in the Uranian system. The satellite's peak brightness is at 1.27 microns with a geometric albedo of 0.904 +/- 0.063, in contrast to the Uranian satellites Miranda, Ariel, and Titania, which are one third as bright at this wavelength. The J-H band depth of Enceladus is about 30% contrasting with the darker Uranian satellites' J-H band depth of less than 10%. Enceladus shows a large near-infrared opposition surge of 0.0817 mag /degree between 3.51 deg and 0.39 deg solar phase, perhaps consistent with a surface coated with highly backscattering fresh water-ice frost. Dione, Janus, and Epimetheus have brighter leading sides than trailing. The opposite is true for Enceladus, consistent with 0.89 micron measurements of Buratti et al. (Icarus, 136, 223-231, 1998) and with the suggestion by Showalter et al. (Icarus, 94, 451-473, 1991) that negatively charged E-ring particles would preferentially impact Enceladus' trailing side. Finally, our 2.27 micron albedos for Prometheus, Janus, Epimetheus, Mimas, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, and Hyperion, as well as Enceladus, are comparable to the visible albedos reported by Buratti and Veverka (Icarus, 58, 254-264, 1984).

  11. Total cross sections for ultracold neutrons scattered from gases

    DOE PAGES

    Seestrom, Susan Joyce; Adamek, Evan R.; Barlow, Dave; ...

    2017-01-30

    Here, we have followed up on our previous measurements of upscattering of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) from a series of gases by making measurements of total cross sections on the following gases hydrogen, ethane, methane, isobutene, n-butane, ethylene, water vapor, propane, neopentane, isopropyl alcohol, and 3He. The values of these cross sections are important for estimating the loss rate of trapped neutrons due to residual gas and are relevant to neutron lifetime measurements using UCNs. The effects of the UCN velocity and path-length distributions were accounted for in the analysis using a Monte Carlo transport code. Results are compared to ourmore » previous measurements and with the known absorption cross section for 3He scaled to our UCN energy. We find that the total cross sections for the hydrocarbon gases are reasonably described by a function linear in the number of hydrogen atoms in the molecule.« less

  12. Total cross sections for ultracold neutrons scattered from gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seestrom, S. J.; Adamek, E. R.; Barlow, D.; Blatnik, M.; Broussard, L. J.; Callahan, N. B.; Clayton, S. M.; Cude-Woods, C.; Currie, S.; Dees, E. B.; Fox, W.; Hoffbauer, M.; Hickerson, K. P.; Holley, A. T.; Liu, C.-Y.; Makela, M.; Medina, J.; Morley, D. J.; Morris, C. L.; Pattie, R. W.; Ramsey, J.; Roberts, A.; Salvat, D. J.; Saunders, A.; Sharapov, E. I.; Sjue, S. K. L.; Slaughter, B. A.; Walstrom, P. L.; Wang, Z.; Wexler, J.; Womack, T. L.; Young, A. R.; Vanderwerp, J.; Zeck, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    We have followed up on our previous measurements of upscattering of ultracold neutrons (UCNs) from a series of gases by making measurements of total cross sections on the following gases hydrogen, ethane, methane, isobutene, n -butane, ethylene, water vapor, propane, neopentane, isopropyl alcohol, and 3He . The values of these cross sections are important for estimating the loss rate of trapped neutrons due to residual gas and are relevant to neutron lifetime measurements using UCNs. The effects of the UCN velocity and path-length distributions were accounted for in the analysis using a Monte Carlo transport code. Results are compared to our previous measurements and with the known absorption cross section for 3He scaled to our UCN energy. We find that the total cross sections for the hydrocarbon gases are reasonably described by a function linear in the number of hydrogen atoms in the molecule.

  13. Electron-Impact Total Ionization Cross Sections of Hydrocarbon Ions

    PubMed Central

    Irikura, Karl K.; Kim, Yong-Ki; Ali, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    The Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model for electron-impact total ionization cross sections has been applied to CH2+, CH3+, CH4+, C2H2+, C2H4+, C2H6+ and H3O+. The cross sections for the hydrocarbon ions are needed for modeling cool plasmas in fusion devices. No experimental data are available for direct comparison. Molecular constants to generate total ionization cross sections at arbitrary incident electron energies using the BEB formula are presented. A recent experimental result on the ionization of H3O+ is found to be almost 1/20 of the present theory at the cross section peak. PMID:27446718

  14. Absolute Rayleigh scattering cross sections of gases and freons of stratospheric interest in the visible and ultraviolet regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SHARDANAND; Rao, A. D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The laboratory measurements of absolute Rayleigh scattering cross sections as a function wavelength are reported for gas molecules He, Ne, Ar, N2, H2, O2, CO2, CH4 and for vapors of most commonly used freons CCl2F2, CBrF3, CF4, and CHClf2. These cross sections are determined from the measurements of photon scattering at an angle of 54 deg 44 min which yield the absolute values independent of the value of normal depolarization ratios. The present results show that in the spectral range 6943-3638A deg, the values of the Rayleigh scattering cross section can be extrapolated from one wavelength to the other using 1/lambda (4) law without knowing the values of the polarizabilities. However, such an extrapolation can not be done in the region of shorter wavelengths.

  15. Phenomenological barrier parameters for total reaction cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phookan, C. K.; Kalita, K.

    2016-01-01

    A phenomenological formula for total reaction cross section is introduced for reactions induced by three types of projectiles. The formula is based on Wong's formula in which, the barrier parameters are calculated from the Bass, Aage Winther and the Akyuz Winther potentials. For the reactions studied, we find that a uniform correction of the barrier parameters can account for the total reaction cross section satisfactorily. An unusually large deviation of the barrier parameters is noticed for the reaction {}8{B} + {}^{58}{Ni}. Arguments are given that most likely the radius of the proton halo nucleus {}8{B} is not well accounted by the above potentials and hence, an increase in the effective radius of {}^8{B} is proposed. Analysis is also presented for the reaction {}^{11}{Li} + {}^{208}{Pb} by making the assumption that its reduced total reaction cross section lies on the same trajectory as that for other halo reactions.

  16. Measurement of the absolute Raman cross section of the optical phonon in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, R. L.; Farrar, L. W.; Saikin, S. K.; Aspuru-Guzik, A.; Stopa, M.; Polla, D. L.

    2011-04-01

    The absolute Raman cross section σ of the first-order 519 cm -1 optical phonon in silicon was measured using a small temperature-controlled blackbody for the signal calibration of the Raman system. Measurements were made with a 25-mil thick (001) silicon sample located in the focal plane of a 20-mm effective focal length (EFL) lens using 785-, 1064-, and 1535-nm CW pump lasers for the excitation of Raman scattering. The pump beam was polarized along the [100] axis of the silicon sample. Values of 1.0±0.2×10 -27, 3.6±0.7×10 -28, and 1.1±0.2×10 -29 cm 2 were determined for σ for 785-, 1064-, and 1535-nm excitation, respectively. The corresponding values of the Raman scattering efficiency S are 4.0±0.8×10 -6, 1.4±0.3×10 -6, and 4.4±0.8×10 -8 cm -1 sr -1.The values of the Raman polarizability |d| for 785-, 1064-, and 1535-nm excitation are 4.4±0.4×10 -15, 5.1±0.5×10 -15, and 1.9±0.2×10 -15 cm 2, respectively. The values of 4.4±0.4×10 -15 and 5.1±0.5×10 -15 cm 2 for |d| for 785- and 1064-nm excitation, respectively, are 1.3 and 2.0 times larger than the values of 3.5×10 -15 and 2.5×10 -15 cm 2 calculated by Wendel. The Raman polarizability |d| computed using the density functional theory in the long-wavelength limit is consistent with the general trend of the measured data and Wendel's model.

  17. Total cross section of electron scattering by fluorocarbon molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.; Ushiroda, S.; Kondo, Y.

    2008-12-01

    A compact linear electron transmission apparatus was used for the measurement of the total electron scattering cross section at 4-500 eV. Total cross sections of chlorofluorocarbon (CCl2F2), hydrochlorofluorocarbon (CHClF2), perfluoropropane (C3F8), perfluoro-n-pentane (C5F12), perfluoro-n-hexane (C6F14) and perfluoro-n-octane (C8F18) were obtained experimentally and compared with the values obtained from a theoretical calculation and semi-empirical model calculation.

  18. Optimal utilization of total elastic scattering cross section data for the determination of interatomic potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, R. B.; Labudde, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of inversion is considered in relation to absolute total cross sections Q(v) for atom-atom collisions and their velocity dependence, and the glory undulations and the transition to high velocity behavior. There is a limit to the amount of information available from Q(v) even when observations of good accuracy (e.g., + or - 0.25%) are in hand over an extended energy range (from thermal energies upward by a factor of greater than 1000 in relative kinetic energy). Methods were developed for data utilization, which take full advantage of the accuracy of the experimental Q(v) measurements.

  19. Forward pd elastic scattering and total spin-dependent pd cross sections at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Uzikov, Yu. N.; Haidenbauer, J.

    2009-02-15

    Spin-dependent total pd cross sections are considered using the optical theorem. For this aim the full spin dependence of the forward pd elastic scattering amplitude is considered in a model independent way. The single-scattering approximation is used to relate this amplitude to the elementary amplitudes of pp and pn scattering and the deuteron form factor. A formalism allowing to take into account Coulomb-nuclear interference effects in polarized pd cross sections is developed. Numerical calculations for the polarized total pd cross sections are performed at beam energies 20-300 MeV using the NN interaction models developed by the Juelich group. Double-scattering effects are estimated within the Glauber approach and found to be in the order of 10-20%. Existing experimental data on differential pd cross sections are in good agreement with the performed Glauber calculations. It is found that for the used NN models the total longitudinal and transversal pd cross sections are comparable in absolute value to those for pp scattering.

  20. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of condensed tetrahydrofuran (THF) by 11-16 eV electrons.

    PubMed

    Lemelin, V; Bass, A D; Cloutier, P; Sanche, L

    2016-11-07

    Absolute cross section (CS) data on the interaction of low energy electrons with DNA and its molecular constituents are required as input parameters in Monte-Carlo type simulations, for several radiobiological applications. Previously [V. Lemelin et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 074701 (2016)], we measured absolute vibrational CSs for low-energy electron scattering from condensed tetrahydrofuran, a convenient surrogate for the deoxyribose. Here we report absolute electronic CSs for energy losses of between 6 and 11.5 eV, by electrons with energies between 11 and 16 eV. The variation of these CSs with incident electron energy shows no evidence of transient anion states, consistent with theoretical and other experimental results, indicating that initial electron capture leading to DNA strand breaks occurs primarily on DNA bases or the phosphate group.

  1. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of condensed tetrahydrofuran (THF) by 11-16 eV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemelin, V.; Bass, A. D.; Cloutier, P.; Sanche, L.

    2016-11-01

    Absolute cross section (CS) data on the interaction of low energy electrons with DNA and its molecular constituents are required as input parameters in Monte-Carlo type simulations, for several radiobiological applications. Previously [V. Lemelin et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 074701 (2016)], we measured absolute vibrational CSs for low-energy electron scattering from condensed tetrahydrofuran, a convenient surrogate for the deoxyribose. Here we report absolute electronic CSs for energy losses of between 6 and 11.5 eV, by electrons with energies between 11 and 16 eV. The variation of these CSs with incident electron energy shows no evidence of transient anion states, consistent with theoretical and other experimental results, indicating that initial electron capture leading to DNA strand breaks occurs primarily on DNA bases or the phosphate group.

  2. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of condensed tetrahydrofuran (THF) by 11–16 eV electrons

    PubMed Central

    Lemelin, V.; Bass, A. D.; Cloutier, P.; Sanche, L.

    2016-01-01

    Absolute cross section (CS) data on the interaction of low energy electrons with DNA and its molecular constituents are required as input parameters in Monte-Carlo type simulations, for several radiobiological applications. Previously [V. Lemelin et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 074701 (2016)], we measured absolute vibrational CSs for low-energy electron scattering from condensed tetrahydrofuran, a convenient surrogate for the deoxyribose. Here we report absolute electronic CSs for energy losses of between 6 and 11.5 eV, by electrons with energies between 11 and 16 eV. The variation of these CSs with incident electron energy shows no evidence of transient anion states, consistent with theoretical and other experimental results, indicating that initial electron capture leading to DNA strand breaks occurs primarily on DNA bases or the phosphate group. PMID:27825202

  3. Progress on FP13 Total Cross Section Measurements Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, John Leonard; Couture, Aaron Joseph; Koehler, Paul E.; Mocko, Michal; Mosby, Shea Morgan; Wender, Stephen Arthur

    2016-09-26

    An accurate knowledge of the neutron capture cross section is important for many applications. Experimental measurements are important since theoretical calculations of capture have been notoriously difficult, with the ratio of measured to calculated cross sections often a factor of 2 or more in the 10 keV to 1 MeV region. However, a direct measurement of capture cannot be made on many interesting radioactive nuclides because of their short half-life or backgrounds caused by their nuclear decay. On the other hand, neutron transmission measurements of the total cross section are feasible for a wide range of radioactive nuclides since the detectors are far from the sample, and often are less sensitive to decay radiation. The parameters extracted from a total cross section measurement, which include the average resonance spacing, the neutron strength function, and the average total radiation width, (Γγ), provide tight constraints on the calculation of the capture cross section, and when applied produce much more accurate results. These measurements can be made using the intense epithermal neutron flux at the Lujan Center on relatively small quantities of target material. It was the purpose of this project to investigate and develop the capability to make these measurements. A great deal of progress was made towards establishing this capability during 2016, including setting up the flight path and obtaining preliminary results, but more work remains to be done.

  4. The total neutron cross section of liquid para-hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, M.; Rhodes, N.; Soper, A. K.; Zoppi, M.

    1999-12-01

    We have measured, using the pulsed neutron source ISIS, the total neutron cross section of liquid para-hydrogen in the vicinity of the triple point. The experimental results compare only qualitatively with the results of the Young and Koppel theory. However, a much better agreement is found once modifications are included in the model which effectively take into account the intermolecular interactions.

  5. Complex Correlation Calculation of e-H Total Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Temkin, Aaron; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Calculation of e - H total and elastic partial wave cross sections is being carried out using the complex correlation variational T-matrix method. In this preliminary study, elastic partial wave phase shifts are calculated with the correlation functions which are confined to be real. In that case the method reduces to the conventional optical potential approach with projection operators.

  6. Absolute and relative surrogate measurements of the uranium-236(n,f) cross section as a probe of angular momentum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyles, Bethany Faye

    absolute surrogate technique and SRM were found to be sensitive to the Jpi-population distributions in the compound nuclei at low energy. That is, the Weisskopf-Ewing approximation was violated and the fission probabilities were found to be dependent upon the total angular momentum, J, and parity, pi, of the populated states. The Surrogate Method is an important tool for extracting cross sections that cannot be measured directly and this work illuminates the limitations of this method when the Weisskopf-Ewing limit is assumed. This marks the first experimentally observed deviation from the Weisskopf-Ewing limit and highlights the need for a comprehensive study of this phenomenon.

  7. Absolute measurement of the differential cross section for the reaction sup 4 He(. gamma. , p ) sup 3 H from 63 to 71 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.T.; Jenkins, D.A. ); Debevec, P.T.; Harty, P.D.; Knott, J.E. )

    1991-05-01

    Results are presented from a {sup 4}He photodisintegration experiment performed with quasimonochromatic photons using a large solid-angle detector. The tagged-bremsstrahlung technique gave a reliable absolute normalization. In addition, an unambiguous separation of the proton-triton channel from other photodisintegration channels was achieved. A total cross section of 218{plus minus}8 {mu}b was measured at a mean energy of 67{plus minus}4 MeV and Legendre coefficients up to {ital a}{sub 5} were extracted from the angular distributions.

  8. Measurements of absolute M-subshell X-ray production cross sections of Th by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, A.; Merlet, C.; Dugne, O.

    2014-08-01

    Measurements of absolute M-subshell X-ray production cross sections for element Th were made by electron impact for energies ranging from the ionization threshold up to 38 keV. Experimental data were obtained by measuring the X-ray intensity emitted from ultrathin Th films deposited onto self-supporting C backing films. The measurements were conducted with an electron microprobe using high-resolution wavelength dispersive spectrometers. Recorded intensities were converted into absolute X-ray production cross sections by means of atomic data and estimation of the number of primary electrons, target thickness, and detector efficiency. Our experimental X-ray production cross sections, the first to be reported for the M subshells of Th, are compared with X-ray production cross sections calculated with the mean of ionization cross sections obtained from the distorted-wave Born approximation. The Mα X-ray production cross section calculated is in excellent agreement with the measurements, allowing future use for standardless quantification in electron probe microanalysis.

  9. Absolute Charge Exchange Cross Sections for ^3He^2+ Collisions with ^4He and H_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawhorter, R. J.; Greenwood, J.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2002-05-01

    The JPL charge exchange beam-line(J.B. Greenwood, et al., Phys. Rev A 63), 062707 (2001) was modified to increase the forward acceptance angle and enable the measurement of total charge-exchange cross sections for slow, light, highly-charged ion collisions with neutral targets(R. E. Olson and M. Kimura, J. Phys. B 15), 4231 (1982). Data are presented for single charge exchange cross sections for ^3He^2+ nuclei scattered by ^4He and H2 in the energy range 0.33-4.67 keV/amu. For both targets there is good agreement with Kusakabe, et al.(T. Kusakabe, et al., J. Phys. Soc. Japan 59), 1218 (1990). Angular collection is studied by a comparison with differential measurements(D. Bordenave-Montesquieu and R. Dagnac, J. Phys. B 27), 543 (1994), as well as with earlier JPL results(J.B. Greenwood, et al., Ap. J. 533), L175 (2000), ibid. 529, 605 (2000) using heavier projectiles and targets. This work was carried out at JPL/Caltech, and was supported through contract with NASA. RJM thanks the NRC for a Senior Associateship at JPL.

  10. Integral elastic, electronic-state, ionization, and total cross sections for electron scattering with furfural

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. B.; da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Brunger, M. J.

    2016-04-01

    We report absolute experimental integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of bands of electronic-states in furfural, for incident electron energies in the range 20-250 eV. Wherever possible, those results are compared to corresponding excitation cross sections in the structurally similar species furan, as previously reported by da Costa et al. [Phys. Rev. A 85, 062706 (2012)] and Regeta and Allan [Phys. Rev. A 91, 012707 (2015)]. Generally, very good agreement is found. In addition, ICSs calculated with our independent atom model (IAM) with screening corrected additivity rule (SCAR) formalism, extended to account for interference (I) terms that arise due to the multi-centre nature of the scattering problem, are also reported. The sum of those ICSs gives the IAM-SCAR+I total cross section for electron-furfural scattering. Where possible, those calculated IAM-SCAR+I ICS results are compared against corresponding results from the present measurements with an acceptable level of accord being obtained. Similarly, but only for the band I and band II excited electronic states, we also present results from our Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials calculations. Those results are found to be in good qualitative accord with the present experimental ICSs. Finally, with a view to assembling a complete cross section data base for furfural, some binary-encounter-Bethe-level total ionization cross sections for this collision system are presented.

  11. Durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total hip and total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dion, Neil T; Bragdon, Charles; Muratoglu, Orhun; Freiberg, Andrew A

    2015-07-01

    This article reviews the history of the development of highly cross-linked polyethylene and provides an in-depth review of the clinical results regarding the durability of highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The use of polyethylene as a bearing surface has contributed to the success of THA and TKA; however, polyethylene wear and osteolysis can lead to failure. Ongoing clinical and retrieval studies are required to analyze outcomes at longer-term follow-up.

  12. Absolute measurement of the differential cross section for deuteron photodisintegration from 63 to 71 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Debevec, P.T.; Harty, P.D.; Knott, J.E. ); Jenkins, D.A.; Jones, R.T. )

    1992-03-01

    The absolute differential cross section for the {sup 2}H({gamma},{ital p}){ital n} reaction has been measured using a large solid angle detector, with a tagged photon beam of mean energy 67 MeV. The data have been compared with nine different theoretical calculations of the cross section, which account for the data to varying degrees. Best agreement is obtained for models utilizing the nonrelativistic impulse approximation with a realistic nuclear potential, meson-exchange currents, and relativistic corrections.

  13. Pion Total Cross Section in Nucleon - Nucleon Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Total cross section parameterizations for neutral and charged pion production in nucleon - nucleon collisions are compared to experimental data over the projectile momentum range from threshold to 300 GeV. Both proton - proton and proton - neutron reactions are considered. Overall excellent agreement between parameterizations and experiment is found, except for notable disagreements near threshold. In addition, the hypothesis that the neutral pion production cross section can be obtained from the average charged pion cross section is checked. The theoretical formulas presented in the paper obey this hypothesis for projectile momenta below 500 GeV. The results presented provide a test of engineering tools used to calculate the pion component of space radiation.

  14. Fission, total and neutron capture cross section measurements at ORELA

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, K.H.; Spencer, R.R.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, D.C.; Dos Santos, G.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.

    1998-08-01

    In support of the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program established in response to the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 93-2, time-of-flight (TOF) measurements of the fission cross sections of {sup 233}U in the neutron energy range from 0.36 eV to several hundred keV have been initiated at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). Also total and capture cross sections of Al, Cl, and K in the energy range from about 100 eV to several hundred keV have been measured or are under way. The goal is to derive accurate cross section representations for the materials involved in criticality calculations of fuel storage, transportation, etc., configurations. Additional high-resolution measurements of the total cross sections of {sup 233}U below a few keV neutron energy are being planned for 1998, as well as for the other involved material. Evaluated data files in ENDF-6 format will be processed into formats for use in criticality analysis and utilized in benchmark data testing. Finally the data will be submitted for inclusion in ENDF/B.

  15. Total electron scattering cross sections. I - He, Ne, Ar, Xe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickel, J. C.; Imre, K.; Register, D. F.; Trajmar, S.

    1985-01-01

    The apparatus and experimental procedures used to obtain total electron scattering cross sections are described, and results are presented for He, Ne, Ar and Xe in the 4-300 eV incident energy range, together with statistical errors. The results are generally found to be in good agreement with previous data except at low impact energies. Serious discrepancies remain in Xe below 20 eV impact energy.

  16. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitations of cytosine by low energy electron impact

    PubMed Central

    Bazin, M.; Michaud, M.; Sanche, L.

    2013-01-01

    The absolute cross sections (CS) for electronic excitations of cytosine by electron impact between 5 and 18 eV were measured by electron-energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy of the molecule deposited at low coverage on an inert Ar substrate. The lowest EEL features found at 3.55 and 4.02 eV are ascribed to transitions from the ground state to the two lowest triplet 1 3A′(π→π*) and 2 3A′(π→π*) valence states of the molecule. Their energy dependent CS exhibit essentially a common maximum at about 6 eV with a value of 1.84 × 10−17 cm2 for the former and 4.94 × 10−17 cm2 for the latter. In contrast, the CS for the next EEL feature at 4.65 eV, which is ascribed to the optically allowed transition to the 2 1A′(π→π*) valence state, shows only a steep rise to about 1.04 × 10−16 cm2 followed by a monotonous decrease with the incident electron energy. The higher EEL features at 5.39, 6.18, 6.83, and 7.55 eV are assigned to the excitations of the 3 3, 1A′(π→π*), 4 1A′(π→π*), 5 1A′(π→π*), and 6 1A′(π→π*) valence states, respectively. The CS for the 3 3, 1A′ and 4 1A′ states exhibit a common enhancement at about 10 eV superimposed on a more or less a steep rise, reaching respectively a maximum of 1.27 and 1.79 × 10−16 cm2, followed by a monotonous decrease. This latter enhancement and the maximum seen at about 6 eV in the lowest triplet states correspond to the core-excited electron resonances that have been found by dissociative electron attachment experiments with cytosine in the gas phase. The weak EEL feature found at 5.01 eV with a maximum CS of 3.8 × 10−18 cm2 near its excitation threshold is attributed to transitions from the ground state to the 1 3, 1A″(n→π*) states. The monotonous rise of the EEL signal above 8 eV is attributed to the ionization of the molecule. It is partitioned into four excitation energy regions at about 8.55, 9.21, 9.83, and 11.53 eV, which correspond closely to the ionization energies of

  17. Absolute fragmentation cross sections in atom-molecule collisions: Scaling laws for non-statistical fragmentation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Stockett, M. H.; Alexander, J. D.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H.; Zettergren, H.; Zhang, Y.; Rousseau, P.; Maclot, S.; Delaunay, R.; Adoui, L.; Domaracka, A.; Huber, B. A.

    2014-06-14

    We present scaling laws for absolute cross sections for non-statistical fragmentation in collisions between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH/PAH{sup +}) and hydrogen or helium atoms with kinetic energies ranging from 50 eV to 10 keV. Further, we calculate the total fragmentation cross sections (including statistical fragmentation) for 110 eV PAH/PAH{sup +} + He collisions, and show that they compare well with experimental results. We demonstrate that non-statistical fragmentation becomes dominant for large PAHs and that it yields highly reactive fragments forming strong covalent bonds with atoms (H and N) and molecules (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}). Thus nonstatistical fragmentation may be an effective initial step in the formation of, e.g., Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles (PANHs). This relates to recent discussions on the evolution of PAHNs in space and the reactivities of defect graphene structures.

  18. Total photoionization cross sections of atomic oxygen from threshold to 44.3A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, G. C.; Samson, James A. R.

    1987-01-01

    The relative cross section of atomic oxygen for the production of singly charged ions has been remeasured in more detail and extended to cover the wavelength range 44.3 to 910.5 A by the use of synchrotron radiation. In addition, the contribution of multiple ionization to the cross sections has been measured allowing total photoionization cross sections to be obtained below 250 A. The results have been made absolute by normalization to previously measured data. The use of synchrotron radiation has enabled measurements of the continuum cross section to be made between the numerous autoionizing resonances that occur near the ionization thresholds. This in turn has allowed a more critical comparison of the various theoretical estimates of the cross section to be made. The series of autoionizing resonances leading to the 4-P state of the oxygen ion have been observed for the first time in an ionization type experiment and their positions compared with both theory and previous photographic recordings.

  19. Absolute elastic differential electron scattering cross sections in the intermediate energy region. III - SF6 and UF6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S. K.; Trajmar, S.; Chutjian, A.; Williams, W.

    1976-01-01

    A recently developed technique has been used to measure the ratios of elastic differential electron scattering cross sections (DCS) for SF6 and UF6 to those of He at electron impact energies of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 75 eV and at scattering angles of 20 to 135 deg. In order to obtain the absolute values of DCS from these ratios, He DCS of McConkey and Preston have been employed in the 20 to 90 deg range. At angles in the 90 to 135 deg range the recently determined cross sections of Srivastava and Trajmar have been utilized. From these DCS, elastic integral and momentum transfer cross sections have been obtained.

  20. Total Electron Scattering Cross Sections for Simple Perfluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Nishimura, Fumio; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Okuda, Keisuke

    2003-05-01

    Total electron scattering cross sections for CF4, C2F6 and C3F8 have been measured in the energy range between 1.25 eV and 3000 eV using a compact linear transmission apparatus. Electrons scattered into a narrow forward angular range that should be counted in the scattered one were estimated utilizing measured quantities. The present results for CF4 agree well with available data at low and high energies, while some discrepancies were seen at intermediate energies. Measured results for C2F6 and C3F8 were shown at high energies for the first time. Upper bound of the elastic cross sections for these molecules were estimated at electron energies higher than 20 eV.

  1. Dissociative Recombination and Excitation of CH{sup {plus}} {sub 5} : Absolute Cross Sections and Branching Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Semaniak, J.; Larson, A.; Le Padellec, A.; Stroemholm, C.; Larsson, M.; Rosen, S.; Peverall, R.; Danared, H.; Djuric, N.; Dunn, G.H.; Datz, S.

    1998-05-01

    The heavy-ion storage ring CRYRING was used to measure the absolute dissociative recombination and dissociative excitation cross sections for collision energies below 50 eV. Deduced thermal rates coefficients are consistent with previous beams data but are lower by a factor of 3 than the rates measured by means of the flowing afterglow Langmuir probe technique. A resonant structure in dissociative recombination cross section was found at 9 eV. We have determined the branching fractions in DR of CH{sup {plus}} {sub 5} below 0.2 eV. The branching is dominated by three-body CH{sub 3} + H + H and CH{sub 2} + H{sub 2} + H dissociation channels, which occur with branching ratios of {approx}0.7 and {approx}0.2, respectively; thus methane is a minor species among dissociation products. Both the measured absolute cross sections and branching in dissociative recombination of CH{sup {plus}} {sub 5} can have important implications for the models of dense interstellar clouds and abundance of CH{sub 2}, CH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} in these media. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  2. Conventional Versus Cross-Linked Polyethylene for Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Surace, Michele F; Monestier, Luca; Vulcano, Ettore; Harwin, Steven F; Cherubino, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    The clinical and radiographic outcomes of 88 patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty with either conventional polyethylene or cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) from the same manufacturer were compared. There were no significant differences between the 2 subpopulations regarding average age, gender, side affected, or prosthetic stem and cup size. The average follow-up was 104 months (range, 55 to 131 months). To the authors' knowledge, this is the longest follow-up for this particular insert. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and then annually. Results showed that XLPE has a significantly greater wear reduction than that of standard polyethylene in primary total hip arthroplasty. At the longest available follow-up for these specific inserts, XLPE proved to be effective in reducing wear.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Effect of Wall Suction on Cross-Flow Absolute Instability in a Rotating Disk Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Joanna; Corke, Thomas; Matlis, Eric

    2013-11-01

    The research is intended to investigate the effect of uniform suction on the absolute instability of Type I cross-flow modes on a rotating disk. Specifically it is designed to investigate if wall suction will transform the absolute instability into a global mode as postulated in the numerical simulations of Davies and Carpenter (2003). The disk is designed so that with a suction parameter of a = w /(νω) 1 / 2 = 0 . 4 , the radial location of the absolute instability critical Reynolds number, RCa = 803 , occurs on the disk. Uniform wall suction is applied from R = 449 to 919. The design for wall suction follows that of Gregory and Walker (1950), where an array of holes through the disk communicate between the measurement side of the disk and the underside of the disk in an enclosure that is maintained at a slight vacuum. The holes in the measurement surface are covered by a stretched silk cloth that provides a smooth, finely porous surface. A companion numerical simulation was performed to investigate the effect of the size and vacuum pressure of the underside enclosure on the uniformity of the measurement surface suction. Temporal disturbances are introduced using the method of Othman and Corke (2006), and the evolution of the resulting wave packets is documented.

  4. Complex Correlation Calculation of e(-) - H Total Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Temkin, A.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Calculation of e(-) - H total and elastic partial wave cross sections is being carried out using the complex correlation variational T-matrix method. In this preliminary study, elastic partial wave phase shifts are calculated with the correlation functions which are confined to be real. In that case the method reduces to the conventional optical potential approach with 2 projection operators. The number of terms in the Hylleraas-type wave function for the S-1 phase shifts is 95 while for the S-3 it is 56, except for k = 0.8 where it is 84. Our results, which are rigorous lower bounds, are seen to be in general agreement with those of Schwartz, but they are of greater accuracy and outside of his error limits for k = 0.3 and 0.4 for S-1. The main aim of this approach is the application to higher energy scattering. By virtue of the complex correlation functions, the T-matrix is not unitary so that elastic and total scattering cross sections are independent of each other. Our results will be compared specifically with those of Bray and Stelbovics.

  5. Complex Correlation Calculation of e-H Total Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Temkin, A.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Calculation of e-H total and elastic partial wave cross sections is being carried out using the complex correlation variational T-matrix method. In this preliminary study, elastic partial wave phase shifts are calculated with the correlation functions which are confined to be real. In that case the method reduces to the conventional optical potential approach with projection operators. The number of terms in the Hylleraas-type wave function for the S phase shifts is 95 while for the S it is 56, except for k=0.8 where it is 84. Our results, which are rigorous lower bounds, are given. They are seen to be in general agreement with those of Schwartz, but they are of 0 greater accuracy and outside of his error limits for k=0.3 and 0.4 for S. The main aim of this approach' is the application to higher energy scattering. By virtue of the complex correlation functions, the T matrix is not unitary so that elastic and total scattering cross sections are independent of each other. Our results will be compared specifically with those of Bray and Stelbovics.

  6. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of pyrimidine by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Allan, Michael; Mašín, Zdeněk; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D.

    2016-01-14

    We measured differential cross sections for electron-impact electronic excitation of pyrimidine, both as a function of electron energy up to 18 eV, and of scattering angle up to 180°. The emphasis of the present work is on recording detailed excitation functions revealing resonances in the excitation process. The differential cross sections were summed to obtain integral cross sections. These are compared to results of R-matrix calculations, which successfully reproduce both the magnitude of the cross section and the major resonant features. Comparison of the experiment to the calculated contributions of different symmetries to the integral cross section permitted assignment of several features to specific core-excited resonances. Comparison of the resonant structure of pyrimidine with that of benzene revealed pronounced similarities and thus a dominant role of π–π{sup ∗} excited states and resonances. Electron energy loss spectra were measured as a preparation for the cross section measurements and vibrational structure was observed for some of the triplet states. A detailed analysis of the electronic excited states of pyrimidine is also presented.

  7. Absolute Charge Transfer and Fragmentation Cross Sections in He{sup 2+}-C{sub 60} Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rentenier, A.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Ruiz, L. F.; Diaz-Tendero, S.; Alcami, M.; Martin, F.; Zarour, B.; Hanssen, J.; Hervieux, P.-A.; Politis, M. F.

    2008-05-09

    We have determined absolute charge transfer and fragmentation cross sections in He{sup 2+}+C{sub 60} collisions in the impact-energy range 0.1-250 keV by using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. We have found that the cross sections for the formation of He{sup +} and He{sup 0} are comparable in magnitude, which cannot be explained by the sole contribution of pure single and double electron capture but also by contribution of transfer-ionization processes that are important even at low impact energies. The results show that multifragmentation is important only at impact energies larger than 40 keV; at lower energies, sequential C{sub 2} evaporation is the dominant process.

  8. Progress in obtaining an absolute calibration of a total deuterium-tritium neutron yield diagnostic based on copper activation.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, C L; Chandler, G A; Cooper, G W; Fehl, D L; Hahn, K D; Leeper, R J; McWatters, B R; Nelson, A J; Smelser, R M; Snow, C S; Torres, J A

    2012-10-01

    The 350-keV Cockroft-Walton accelerator at Sandia National laboratory's Ion Beam facility is being used to calibrate absolutely a total DT neutron yield diagnostic based on the (63)Cu(n,2n)(62)Cu(β+) reaction. These investigations have led to first-order uncertainties approaching 5% or better. The experiments employ the associated-particle technique. Deuterons at 175 keV impinge a 2.6 μm thick erbium tritide target producing 14.1 MeV neutrons from the T(d,n)(4)He reaction. The alpha particles emitted are measured at two angles relative to the beam direction and used to infer the neutron flux on a copper sample. The induced (62)Cu activity is then measured and related to the neutron flux. This method is known as the F-factor technique. Description of the associated-particle method, copper sample geometries employed, and the present estimates of the uncertainties to the F-factor obtained are given.

  9. Cross-sensory mapping of feature values in the size-brightness correspondence can be more relative than absolute.

    PubMed

    Walker, Laura; Walker, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A role for conceptual representations in cross-sensory correspondences has been linked to the relative (context-sensitive) mapping of feature values, whereas a role for sensory-perceptual representations has been linked to their absolute (context-insensitive) mapping. Demonstrating the relative nature of the automatic mapping underlying a cross-sensory correspondence therefore offers one way of confirming its conceptual basis. After identifying several prerequisites for relative and absolute mappings, we provide the first compelling demonstration that an automatically induced congruity effect based on a cross-sensory correspondence (i.e., that between haptic size and visual brightness) can be largely contingent on the relative mapping of the 2 features, thereby implying a conceptual basis for the correspondence. Participants in a speeded classification task were faster to classify a visual stimulus as brighter or darker when this required them to press a hidden response key that, incidentally, was relatively small or big, respectively. Importantly, the same levels of brightness (Experiment 1) and key size (Experiment 2) at different times corresponded to contrasting levels of the other feature depending on the context provided by the alternative stimuli with which they appeared. For example, the same medium key was congruent with a brighter stimulus when paired with a bigger key, but was congruent with a darker stimulus when paired with a smaller key. Reflecting on the broader implications of this finding, it is noted that the involvement of cross-sensory correspondences in some forms of sound symbolism in language also requires the relative coding of stimulus features.

  10. Absolute Cross Sections for Proton Induced Reactions on 147,149Sm Below the Coulomb Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghe, I.; Filipescu, D.; Glodariu, T.; Bucurescu, D.; Cata-Danil, I.; Cata-Danil, G.; Deleanu, D.; Ghita, D.; Ivascu, M.; Lica, R.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Mihai, C.; Negret, A.; Sava, T.; Stroe, L.; Toma, S.; Sima, O.; Sin, M.

    2014-05-01

    Cross sections for 147,149Sm(p,n)147,149Eu and 147,149Sm(p, γ)148,150Eu were measured using the activation method. The results are compared to the predictions of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. Different γ-ray strength functions have been tested against the experimental values. In the case of 150Eu, in order to reproduce the experimental isomeric population cross sections, various scenarios for unknown branching ratios of certain discrete states have been discussed. The results provide constraints for the optical model parameters dedicated to this insufficiently known area of isotopes. Such cross sections for (p, γ) reactions at energies below the Coulomb barrier are valuable for p-process nucleosynthesis calculations.

  11. Total nucleon-nucleon cross sections in large Nc QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Thomas D.; Gelman, Boris A.

    2012-02-01

    We use contracted spin-flavor symmetry which emerges in the large Nc limit of QCD to obtain relations between proton-proton and proton-neutron total cross sections for both polarized and unpolarized scattering. The formalism used is valid in the semiclassical regime in which the relative momentum of the incident nucleons is much larger than the inverse size of the nucleon, provided that certain technical assumptions are met. The relations should be phenomenologically useful provided that Nc=3 is sufficiently large so that the large Nc results have at least semiquantitative predictive power. The relations are model independent in the sense that they depend on properties of large Nc QCD only and not on any particular model-dependent details of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. We compare these model-independent results to the experimental data. We find the relation for spin-unpolarized scattering works well empirically. For the case of polarized scattering, the data are consistent with the relations, but the cross sections are too small to make sharp predictions.

  12. Measurement of the absolute differential cross section of proton–proton elastic scattering at small angles

    DOE PAGES

    Mchedlishvili, D.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; ...

    2016-02-03

    The differential cross section for proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured at a beam kinetic energy of 1.0 GeV and in 200 MeV steps from 1.6 to 2.8 GeV for centre-of-mass angles in the range from 12°-16° to 25°-30°, depending on the energy. A precision in the overall normalisation of typically 3% was achieved by studying the energy losses of the circulating beam of the COSY storage ring as it passed repeatedly through the windowless hydrogen target of the ANKE magnetic spectrometer. It is shown that the data have a significant impact upon the results of a partial wave analysis.more » Furthermore, after extrapolating the differential cross sections to the forward direction, the results are broadly compatible with the predictions of forward dispersion relations.« less

  13. Measurement of the absolute differential cross section of proton–proton elastic scattering at small angles

    SciTech Connect

    Mchedlishvili, D.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; Bagdasarian, Z.; Barsov, S.; Gebel, R.; Gou, B.; Hartmann, M.; Kacharava, A.; Keshelashvili, I.; Khoukaz, A.; Kulessa, P.; Kulikov, A.; Lehrach, A.; Lomidze, N.; Lorentz, B.; Maier, R.; Macharashvili, G.; Merzliakov, S.; Mikirtychyants, S.; Nioradze, M.; Ohm, H.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Serdyuk, V.; Schroer, D.; Shmakova, V.; Stassen, R.; Stein, H. J.; Stockhorst, H.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Stroher, H.; Tabidze, M.; Taschner, A.; Trusov, S.; Tsirkov, D.; Uzikov, Yu.; Valdau, Yu.; Wilkin, C.; Workman, R. L.; Wustner, P.

    2016-02-03

    The differential cross section for proton-proton elastic scattering has been measured at a beam kinetic energy of 1.0 GeV and in 200 MeV steps from 1.6 to 2.8 GeV for centre-of-mass angles in the range from 12°-16° to 25°-30°, depending on the energy. A precision in the overall normalisation of typically 3% was achieved by studying the energy losses of the circulating beam of the COSY storage ring as it passed repeatedly through the windowless hydrogen target of the ANKE magnetic spectrometer. It is shown that the data have a significant impact upon the results of a partial wave analysis. Furthermore, after extrapolating the differential cross sections to the forward direction, the results are broadly compatible with the predictions of forward dispersion relations.

  14. Absolute differential cross sections for the elastic scattering of electrons from atomic hydrogen at low incident energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Kenneth; Leonard, Linda; Proctor, Stephanie; Childers, J. G.; Khakoo, Murtadha A.

    2003-05-01

    Absolute differential cross sections for electrons elastically scattered from atomic hydrogen have been measured at low incident energies. The measurements were facilitated by the moveable nozzle source recently developed in our lab. Data taken at the incident energies of 20 eV, 40 eV, and 100 eV, and spanning the angular range of 10^rc to 120^rc will be presented. The results will be compared to the earlier measurements of Williams(Joseph Callaway and J. F. Williams, Phys. Rev. A) 12, 2312 (1975), J. F. Williams, J. Phys. B 8, 2191 (1975) and Shyn(T. W. Shyn and S. Y. Cho, Phys. Rev. A) 40, 1315 (1989), T. W. Shyn and Alan Grafe, Phys. Rev. A 46, 2949 (1992), and the theoretical calculations of Bray(Igor Bray, Phys. Rev. A) 46, 6995 (1992). Funded by the National Science Foundation under Grant # NSF-RUI-PHY-0096808.

  15. Using DNA origami nanostructures to determine absolute cross sections for UV photon-induced DNA strand breakage.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Stefanie; Rackwitz, Jenny; Schürman, Robin; Prinz, Julia; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Giuliani, Alexandre; Bald, Ilko

    2015-11-19

    We have characterized ultraviolet (UV) photon-induced DNA strand break processes by determination of absolute cross sections for photoabsorption and for sequence-specific DNA single strand breakage induced by photons in an energy range from 6.50 to 8.94 eV. These represent the lowest-energy photons able to induce DNA strand breaks. Oligonucleotide targets are immobilized on a UV transparent substrate in controlled quantities through attachment to DNA origami templates. Photon-induced dissociation of single DNA strands is visualized and quantified using atomic force microscopy. The obtained quantum yields for strand breakage vary between 0.06 and 0.5, indicating highly efficient DNA strand breakage by UV photons, which is clearly dependent on the photon energy. Above the ionization threshold strand breakage becomes clearly the dominant form of DNA radiation damage, which is then also dependent on the nucleotide sequence.

  16. Absolute vibrational cross sections for 1-19 eV electron scattering from condensed tetrahydrofuran (THF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemelin, V.; Bass, A. D.; Cloutier, P.; Sanche, L.

    2016-02-01

    Absolute cross sections (CSs) for vibrational excitation by 1-19 eV electrons impacting on condensed tetrahydrofuran (THF) were measured with a high-resolution electron energy loss spectrometer. Experiments were performed under ultra-high vacuum (3 × 10-11 Torr) at a temperature of about 20 K. The magnitudes of the vibrational CSs lie within the 10-17 cm2 range. Features observed near 4.5, 9.5, and 12.5 eV in the incident energy dependence of the CSs were compared to the results of theoretical calculations and other experiments on gas and solid-phase THF. These three resonances are attributed to the formation of shape or core-excited shape resonances. Another maximum observed around 2.5 eV is not found in the calculations but has been observed in gas-phase studies; it is attributed to the formation of a shape resonance.

  17. Measurement of absolute charge-exchange cross sections for He{sup 2+} collisions with He and H{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Mawhorter, R. J.; Greenwood, J. B.; Chutjian, A.; Simcic, J.; Haley, T.; Mitescu, C. D.

    2011-11-15

    Reported are total, absolute charge-exchange cross sections for collisions of {sup 3}He{sup 2+} ions with He and H{sub 2}. Measurements are reported at fixed energies between 0.33 and 4.67 keV/amu. Both the present results and earlier results of others are analyzed in terms of available experimental small-angle differential cross sections as a function of collision energy, and hence the geometry of the exit aperture of the gas-collision cells used by the various experimental groups. In addition, the effective length of gas-collision cells is studied using fluid dynamic and molecular flow simulations to address the density patterns near the cell entrance and exit apertures. When small acceptance-angle corrections were applied, the results of present and previous measurements for the single electron capture in these systems were brought into good accord in the relevant energy ranges. Taken in their entirety, the present data for {sup 3}He{sup 2+} with He and H{sub 2} lend themselves to new theoretical calculations of the multichannel charge-exchange cross sections.

  18. Measurement of Total Cross Sections at Pohang Neutron Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Guinyun; Meaze, A.K.M.M.H.; Ahmed, Hossain; Son, Dongchul; Lee, Young Seok; Kang, Hengsik; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Ko, In Soo; Namkung, Won; Ro, Tae-Ik.; Chung, Won-Chung; Kim, Young Ae; Yoo, Kun Joong; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2005-05-24

    The Pohang Neutron Facility, which consists of an electron linear accelerator, a water-cooled Ta target with a water moderator, and a time-of-flight path with an 11 m length has been operated since 2000. We report the status activities on the neutron total cross-section measurements in the neutron energy region from 0.01 eV to 100 eV by the neutron time-of-flight method at Pohang Neutron Facility. A 6Li-ZnS(Ag) scintillator with a diameter of 12.5 cm and a thickness of 1.5 cm has been used as a neutron detector. The background level has been determined by using notch-filters of Co, In, and Cd sheets. In order to reduce the gamma rays from Bremsstrahlung and that from neutron capture, we have employed a neutron-gamma separation system based on their different pulse shape. The present measurements for Ag, Hf, and Ta samples are compared with the previous ones and the evaluated data in ENDF/B-VI. The resonance parameters for Ag and Hf samples have been extracted from the transmission data by using the SAMMY code.

  19. Photoionization of Ne Atoms and Ne+ Ions Near the K Edge: Precision Spectroscopy and Absolute Cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Alfred; Bernhardt, Dietrich; Borovik, Alexander, Jr.; Buhr, Ticia; Hellhund, Jonas; Holste, Kristof; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Klumpp, Stephan; Martins, Michael; Ricz, Sandor; Seltmann, Jörn; Viefhaus, Jens; Schippers, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Single, double, and triple photoionization of Ne+ ions by single photons have been investigated at the synchrotron radiation source PETRA III in Hamburg, Germany. Absolute cross-sections were measured by employing the photon–ion merged-beams technique. Photon energies were between about 840 and 930 eV, covering the range from the lowest-energy resonances associated with the excitation of one single K-shell electron up to double excitations involving one K- and one L-shell electron, well beyond the K-shell ionization threshold. Also, photoionization of neutral Ne was investigated just below the K edge. The chosen photon energy bandwidths were between 32 and 500 meV, facilitating the determination of natural line widths. The uncertainty of the energy scale is estimated to be 0.2 eV. For comparison with existing theoretical calculations, astrophysically relevant photoabsorption cross-sections were inferred by summing the measured partial ionization channels. Discussion of the observed resonances in the different final ionization channels reveals the presence of complex Auger-decay mechanisms. The ejection of three electrons from the lowest K-shell-excited Ne+(1s2{s}22{p}6{}2{{{S}}}1/2) level, for example, requires cooperative interaction of at least four electrons.

  20. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  1. Accurate treatment of total photoabsorption cross sections by an ab initio time-dependent method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daud, Mohammad Noh

    2014-09-01

    A detailed discussion of parallel and perpendicular transitions required for the photoabsorption of a molecule is presented within a time-dependent view. Total photoabsorption cross sections for the first two ultraviolet absorption bands of the N2O molecule corresponding to transitions from the X1 A' state to the 21 A' and 11 A'' states are calculated to test the reliability of the method. By fully considering the property of the electric field polarization vector of the incident light, the method treats the coupling of angular momentum and the parity differently for two kinds of transitions depending on the direction of the vector whether it is: (a) situated parallel in a molecular plane for an electronic transition between states with the same symmetry; (b) situated perpendicular to a molecular plane for an electronic transition between states with different symmetry. Through this, for those transitions, we are able to offer an insightful picture of the dynamics involved and to characterize some new aspects in the photoabsorption process of N2O. Our calculations predicted that the parallel transition to the 21 A' state is the major dissociation pathway which is in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. Most importantly, a significant improvement in the absolute value of the total cross section over previous theoretical results [R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 064313 (2011), M.N. Daud, G.G. Balint-Kurti, A. Brown, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 054305 (2005), S. Nanbu, M.S. Johnson, J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 8905 (2004)] was obtained.

  2. Accurate treatment of total photoabsorption cross sections by an ab initio time-dependent method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh Daud, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    A detailed discussion of parallel and perpendicular transitions required for the photoabsorption of a molecule is presented within a time-dependent view. Total photoabsorption cross sections for the first two ultraviolet absorption bands of the N2O molecule corresponding to transitions from the X1A' state to the 21A' and 11A'' states are calculated to test the reliability of the method. By fully considering the property of the electric field polarization vector of the incident light, the method treats the coupling of angular momentum and the parity differently for two kinds of transitions depending on the direction of the vector whether it is: (a) situated parallel in a molecular plane for an electronic transition between states with the same symmetry; (b) situated perpendicular to a molecular plane for an electronic transition between states with different symmetry. Through this, for those transitions, we are able to offer an insightful picture of the dynamics involved and to characterize some new aspects in the photoabsorption process of N2O. Our calculations predicted that the parallel transition to the 21A' state is the major dissociation pathway which is in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. Most importantly, a significant improvement in the absolute value of the total cross section over previous theoretical results [R. Schinke, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 064313 (2011), M.N. Daud, G.G. Balint-Kurti, A. Brown, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 054305 (2005), S. Nanbu, M.S. Johnson, J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 8905 (2004)] was obtained.

  3. Absolute absorption cross sections of ozone at 300 K, 228 K and 195 K in the wavelength region 185-240 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Parkinson, W. H.; Freeman, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of progress of work on absorption cross section measurements of ozone at 300 K, 228 K and 195 K in the wavelength region 185-240 nm. In this wavelength region, the penetration of solar radiation into the Earth's atmosphere is controlled by O2 and O3. The transmitted radiation is available to dissociate trace species such as halocarbons and nitrous oxide. We have recently measured absolute absorption cross sections of O3 in the wavelength region 240-350 nm (Freeman et al., 1985; Yoshino et al., 1988). We apply these proven techniques to the determination of the absorption cross section of O3 at 300 K, 228 K and 195 K throughout the wavelength region 185-240 nm. A paper titled 'Absolute Absorption Cross Section Measurements of Ozone in the Wavelength Region 185-254 nm and the Temperature Dependence' has been submitted for publication in the Journal of Geophysical Research.

  4. Measurement of Absolute Excitation Cross Sections in Highly-Charged Ions Using Electron Energy Loss and Merged Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Smith, Steven J.; Lozano, J.

    2002-01-01

    There is increasing emphasis during this decade on understanding energy balance and phenomena observed in high electron temperature plasmas. The UV spectral return from FUSE, the X-ray spectral return from the HETG on Chandra and the LETGS 011 XMM-Newton are just beginning. Line emissions are almost entirely from highly-charged ions (HCIs) of C, N, 0, Ne, Mg, S, Si, Ca, and Fe. The Constellation-X mission will provide X-ray spectroscopy up to photon energies of 0.12 nm (10 keV) where primary line emitters will be HCIs. A variety of atomic parameters are required to model the stellar and solar plasma. These include cross sections for excitation, ionization, charge-exchange, X-ray emission, direct and indirect recombination, lifetimes and branching ratios, and dependences on l, m mixing by external E and B fields. In almost all cases the atomic quantities are calculated, and few comparisons to experiment have been carried out. Collision strengths and Einstein A-values are required to convert the observed spectral intensities to electron temperatures and densities in the stellar plasma. The JPL electron energy-loss and merged beam approach has been used to measure absolute collision strengths in a number of ions, with critical comparison made to the best available theories.

  5. Absolute doubly differential cross sections for ionization of adenine by 1.0-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Iriki, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Imai, M.; Itoh, A.

    2011-09-15

    Double-differential ionization cross sections of adenine (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sub 5}) by 1.0-MeV protons have been measured using a vapor-phase adenine target. Ejected electrons were analyzed by a 45 deg. parallel-plate electrostatic spectrometer in an electron energy range from 1 to 1000 eV at electron emission angles from 15 deg. to 165 deg. The effective target thickness of adenine was determined by a Rutherford forward scattering method and a vapor deposition method. Present data are in good agreement with recent calculations. Comparisons were made with other data on various hydrocarbon molecules. It was found that the ionization cross sections of these molecules can be scaled fairly well in terms of the total number of valence electrons.

  6. Calculation of total and ionization cross sections for electron scattering by primary benzene compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Suvam; Naghma, Rahla; Kaur, Jaspreet; Antony, Bobby

    2016-07-01

    The total and ionization cross sections for electron scattering by benzene, halobenzenes, toluene, aniline, and phenol are reported over a wide energy domain. The multi-scattering centre spherical complex optical potential method has been employed to find the total elastic and inelastic cross sections. The total ionization cross section is estimated from total inelastic cross section using the complex scattering potential-ionization contribution method. In the present article, the first theoretical calculations for electron impact total and ionization cross section have been performed for most of the targets having numerous practical applications. A reasonable agreement is obtained compared to existing experimental observations for all the targets reported here, especially for the total cross section.

  7. A novel setup for the determination of absolute cross sections for low-energy electron induced strand breaks in oligonucleotides - The effect of the radiosensitizer 5-fluorouracil*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rackwitz, Jenny; Ranković, Miloš Lj.; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.; Bald, Ilko

    2017-02-01

    Low-energy electrons (LEEs) play an important role in DNA radiation damage. Here we present a method to quantify LEE induced strand breakage in well-defined oligonucleotide single strands in terms of absolute cross sections. An LEE irradiation setup covering electron energies <500 eV is constructed and optimized to irradiate DNA origami triangles carrying well-defined oligonucleotide target strands. Measurements are presented for 10.0 and 5.5 eV for different oligonucleotide targets. The determination of absolute strand break cross sections is performed by atomic force microscopy analysis. An accurate fluence determination ensures small margins of error of the determined absolute single strand break cross sections σ SSB . In this way, the influence of sequence modification with the radiosensitive 5-Fluorouracil (5FU) is studied using an absolute and relative data analysis. We demonstrate an increase in the strand break yields of 5FU containing oligonucleotides by a factor of 1.5 to 1.6 compared with non-modified oligonucleotide sequences when irradiated with 10 eV electrons.

  8. The use of J-coupling as a sole criterion to assign the total absolute stereochemistry of new pyrrolidinone class synthetic analogs, derived from S-pyroglutamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellici, Tahsin F.; Ntountaniotis, Dimitrios; Vanioti, Marianna; Golic Grdadolnik, Simona; Simcic, Mihael; Michas, Georgios; Moutevelis-Minakakis, Panagiota; Mavromoustakos, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    During the synthesis of new pyrrolidinone analogs possessing biological activity it is intriguing to assign their absolute stereochemistry as it is well known that drug potency is influenced by the stereochemistry. The combination of J-coupling information with theoretical results was used in order to establish their total stereochemistry when the chiral center of the starting material has known absolute stereochemistry. The J-coupling can be used as a sole criterion for novel synthetic analogs to identify the right stereochemistry. This approach is extremely useful especially in the case of analogs whose 2D NOESY spectra cannot provide this information. Few synthetic examples are given to prove the significance of this approach.

  9. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used in the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.

  10. Absolutely classical spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

  11. Absolute cross sections for binary-encounter electron ejection by 95-MeV/u {sup 36}Ar{sup 18+} penetrating carbon foils

    SciTech Connect

    De Filippo, E.; Lanzano, G.; Aiello, S.; Arena, N.; Geraci, M.; Pagano, A.; Rothard, H.; Volant, C.; Anzalone, A.; Giustolisi, F.

    2003-08-01

    Doubly differential electron velocity spectra induced by 95-MeV/u {sup 36}Ar{sup 18+} from thin carbon foils were measured at GANIL (Caen, France) by means of the ARGOS multidetector and the time-of-flight technique. The spectra allow us to determine absolute singly differential cross sections as a function of the emission angle. Absolute doubly differential cross sections for binary encounter electron ejection from C targets are compared to a transport theory, which is based on the relativistic electron impact approximation for electron production and which accounts for angular deflection, energy loss, and also energy straggling of the transmitted electrons. For the thinnest targets, the measured peak width is in good agreement with experimental data obtained with a different detection technique. The theory underestimates the peak width but provides (within a factor of 2) the correct peak intensity. For the thickest target, even the peak shape is well reproduced by theory.

  12. Absolute K-shell ionization cross sections and L{alpha} and L{beta}{sub 1} x-ray production cross sections of Ga and As by 1.5-39-keV electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Merlet, C.; Llovet, X.; Fernandez-Varea, J. M.

    2006-06-15

    Absolute K-shell ionization and L{alpha} and L{beta}{sub 1} x-ray production cross sections for Ga and As have been measured for incident electrons in the energy range from 1.5 to 39 keV. The cross sections were deduced from K{alpha}, L{alpha}, and L{beta}{sub 1} x-ray intensities emitted from ultrathin GaAs samples deposited onto self-supporting carbon films. The x-ray intensities were measured on an electron microprobe equipped with several wavelength-dispersive spectrometers and were converted into absolute cross sections by using estimated values of the target thickness, spectrometer efficiency, and number of incident electrons. Experimental results are compared with cross sections calculated from the plane-wave and distorted-wave Born approximations, the relativistic binary-encounter-Bethe model, the results of two widely used simple analytical formulas, and, whenever possible, experimental data from the literature.

  13. Absolute cascade-free cross-sections for the 2S to 2P transition in Zn(+) using electron-energy-loss and merged-beams methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Man, K.-F.; Chutjian, A.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Williams, I. D.

    1991-01-01

    Absolute cascade-free excitation cross-sections in an ion have been measured for the resonance 2S to 2P transition in Zn(+) using electron-energy-loss and merged electron-ion beams methods. Measurements were carried out at electron energies of below threshold to 6 times threshold. Comparisons are made with 2-, 5-, and 15-state close-coupling and distorted-wave theories. There is good agreement between experiment and the 15-state close-coupling cross-sections over the energy range of the calculations.

  14. Elastic and total cross sections for simple biomolecules in the intermediate energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Naghma, Rahla; Antony, Bobby

    2015-09-01

    The elastic and total cross sections for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, 2-butanone and formamide are calculated using the spherical complex optical potential formalism in the intermediate energy range from 50 eV to 10 keV. These cross sections find application to various fields like radiation damage and biological sciences. The present results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data and are found to give excellent agreement. The elastic cross sections reported for most of the targets in the present energy range are done for the first time. The energy dependence of the contribution of ionization and elastic cross section with respect to the total cross section and the correlation of total cross section with polarizability of the molecules are also studied.

  15. Nucleon-nucleus interaction data base: Total nuclear and absorption cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Buck, W. W.; Chun, S. Y.; Hong, B. S.; Lamkin, S. L.

    1988-08-01

    Neutron total cross sections are represented for Li to Pu targets at energies above 0.1 MeV and less than 100 MeV using a modified nuclear Ramsauer formalism. The formalism is derived for energies above 100 MeV by fitting theoretical cross sections. Neutron absorption cross sections are represented by analytic expressions of similar form, but shape resonance phenomena of the Ramsauer effect is not present. Elastic differential cross sections are given as a renormalized impulse approximation. These cross section data bases are useful for nucleon transport applications.

  16. Nucleon-nucleus interaction data base: Total nuclear and absorption cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Buck, W. W.; Chun, S. Y.; Hong, B. S.; Lamkin, S. L.

    1988-01-01

    Neutron total cross sections are represented for Li to Pu targets at energies above 0.1 MeV and less than 100 MeV using a modified nuclear Ramsauer formalism. The formalism is derived for energies above 100 MeV by fitting theoretical cross sections. Neutron absorption cross sections are represented by analytic expressions of similar form, but shape resonance phenomena of the Ramsauer effect is not present. Elastic differential cross sections are given as a renormalized impulse approximation. These cross section data bases are useful for nucleon transport applications.

  17. Total reaction cross sections for 8Li + 90Zr at near-barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakou, A.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Mazzocco, M.; Acosta, L.; Aslanoglou, X.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Grebosz, J.; Keeley, N.; La Commara, M.; Manea, C.; Marquinez-Duran, G.; Martel, I.; Parascandolo, C.; Rusek, K.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Sgouros, O.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Soukeras, V.; Stiliaris, E.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Trzcinska, A.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2015-05-01

    Total reaction cross sections for the radioactive nucleus 8Li on 90Zr are reported at the near-barrier energies of 18.5 and 21.5MeV, derived from quasi-elastic scattering measurements. An analysis of the quasi-elastic scattering results is performed within an optical model framework using the BDM3Y1 interaction and total reaction cross sections are deduced. These quantities, appropriately reduced, are compared with previous data obtained in elastic scattering measurements with well and weakly bound projectiles on various targets and a formula for predicting total reaction cross sections with an uncertainty of % is obtained. Further on, the ratios of direct to total reaction cross sections are estimated for 6,8Li on various targets and are compared with CDCC or CRC calculations. The energy dependence of the optical potential is also discussed.

  18. Improved calculation of total cross section for pair production by relativistic heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eby, P. B.

    1989-01-01

    A calculation of the total cross section for direct electron-positron pair production by heavy ions is described. It combines the use of the Weizsaecker-Williams method for low-energy transfers and existing calculations for high-energy transfers. Higher-order corrections to the total cross section are calculated based on the Weizsaecher-Williams method and existing results for pair production by photons.

  19. A Concise and Highly Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (+)-anti- and (-)-syn-Mefloquine Hydrochloride: Definitive Absolute Stereochemical Assignment of the Mefloquines.

    PubMed

    Rastelli, Ettore J; Coltart, Don M

    2015-11-16

    A concise asymmetric (>99:1 e.r.) total synthesis of (+)-anti- and (-)-syn-mefloquine hydrochloride from a common intermediate is described. The key asymmetric transformation is a Sharpless dihydroxylation of an olefin that is accessed in three steps from commercially available materials. The Sharpless-derived diol is converted into either a trans or cis epoxide, and these are subsequently converted into (+)-anti- and (-)-syn-mefloquine, respectively. The synthetic (+)-anti- and (-)-syn-mefloquine samples were derivatized with (S)-(+)-mandelic acid tert-butyldimethylsilyl ether, and a crystal structure of each derivative was obtained. These are the first X-ray structures for mefloquine derivatives that were obtained by coupling to a known chiral, nonracemic compound, and provide definitive confirmation of the absolute stereochemistry of (+)-anti- as well as (-)-syn-mefloquine.

  20. Initial clinical experience of CrossBoss catheter for in-stent chronic total occlusion lesions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Li, Long-Bo; Wang, Zhi-Hui; Shi, Yong-Feng; Wu, Jun-Duo; Zhang, Ji-Chang; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The CrossBoss coronary chronic total occlusion (CTO) crossing catheter has been demonstrated to have greatly improved the success rate of crossing CTO lesions, but there are no published data on its application for in-stent CTO lesions. Methods: In the current study, we retrospectively reviewed the clinical data of 8 patients with in-stent CTO lesions that were managed with the CrossBoss catheter and herein we report the efficacy and safety of the CrossBoss crossing and re-entry system for this clinically challenging condition. Results: The CrossBoss catheter was used for 8 patients with in-stent CTO lesions, which resulted in success in 6 cases and failure in 2 cases, with a 75% success rate. Of the 6 patients with successful treatment, 5 cases had the occlusive lesions crossed with the CrossBoss catheter through a proximal lumen-to-distal lumen approach, whereas the remaining case had his occlusive lesions penetrated by the CrossBoss catheter and the guidewire. Two cases failed in treatment as the CrossBoss catheter could not cross the occlusive lesions. The 6 cases with successful treatment included 3 cases with occlusive lesions in the left anterior descending artery, 1 case with occlusive lesions in the obtuse marginal branches, and 2 cases with occlusive lesions in the right coronary artery, and the 2 cases with failure in treatment had their occlusive lesions in the right coronary artery. In addition, patients with a higher Japan chronic total occlusion score were found to have a lower success rate of crossing the occlusive lesions. None of the patients developed complications. Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that the CrossBoss catheter has a high success rate and is safe for in-stent CTOs and can be recommended for this rather clinically challenging condition. PMID:27749568

  1. Benchmark experiment for electron-impact ionization of argon: Absolute triple-differential cross sections via three-dimensional electron emission images

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Xueguang; Senftleben, Arne; Pflueger, Thomas; Dorn, Alexander; Ullrich, Joachim; Bartschat, Klaus

    2011-05-15

    Single ionization of argon by 195-eV electron impact is studied in an experiment, where the absolute triple-differential cross sections are presented as three-dimensional electron emission images for a series of kinematic conditions. Thereby a comprehensive set of experimental data for electron-impact ionization of a many-electron system is produced to provide a benchmark for comparison with theoretical predictions. Theoretical models using a hybrid first-order and second-order distorted-wave Born plus R-matrix approach are employed to compare their predictions with the experimental data. While the relative shape of the calculated cross section is generally in reasonable agreement with experiment, the magnitude appears to be the most significant problem with the theoretical treatment for the conditions studied in the present work. This suggests that the most significant challenge in the further development of theory for this process may lie in the reproduction of the absolute scale rather than the angular dependence of the cross section.

  2. Tracing multiple scattering patterns in absolute (e,2e) cross sections for H{sub 2} and He over a 4{pi} solid angle

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X.; Senftleben, A.; Pflueger, T.; Dorn, A.; Ullrich, J.; Colgan, J.; Pindzola, M. S.; Al-Hagan, O.; Madison, D. H.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D. V.

    2010-09-15

    Absolutely normalized (e,2e) measurements for H{sub 2} and He covering the full solid angle of one ejected electron are presented for 16 eV sum energy of both final state continuum electrons. For both targets rich cross-section structures in addition to the binary and recoil lobes are identified and studied as a function of the fixed electron's emission angle and the energy sharing among both electrons. For H{sub 2} their behavior is consistent with multiple scattering of the projectile as discussed before [Al-Hagan et al., Nature Phys. 5, 59 (2009)]. For He the binary and recoil lobes are significantly larger than for H{sub 2} and partly cover the multiple scattering structures. To highlight these patterns we propose a alternative representation of the triply differential cross section. Nonperturbative calculations are in good agreement with the He results and show discrepancies for H{sub 2} in the recoil peak region. For H{sub 2} a perturbative approach reasonably reproduces the cross-section shape but deviates in absolute magnitude.

  3. Tracing multiple scattering patterns in absolute (e,2e) cross sections for H2 and He over a 4π solid angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X.; Senftleben, A.; Pflüger, T.; Dorn, A.; Colgan, J.; Pindzola, M. S.; Al-Hagan, O.; Madison, D. H.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D. V.; Ullrich, J.

    2010-09-01

    Absolutely normalized (e,2e) measurements for H2 and He covering the full solid angle of one ejected electron are presented for 16 eV sum energy of both final state continuum electrons. For both targets rich cross-section structures in addition to the binary and recoil lobes are identified and studied as a function of the fixed electron’s emission angle and the energy sharing among both electrons. For H2 their behavior is consistent with multiple scattering of the projectile as discussed before [Al-Hagan , Nature Phys.PLRAAN1745-247310.1038/nphys1135 5, 59 (2009)]. For He the binary and recoil lobes are significantly larger than for H2 and partly cover the multiple scattering structures. To highlight these patterns we propose a alternative representation of the triply differential cross section. Nonperturbative calculations are in good agreement with the He results and show discrepancies for H2 in the recoil peak region. For H2 a perturbative approach reasonably reproduces the cross-section shape but deviates in absolute magnitude.

  4. Target correlation effects on neutron-nucleus total, absorption, and abrasion cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Second order optical model solutions to the elastic scattering amplitude were used to evaluate total, absorption, and abrasion cross sections for neutron nucleus scattering. Improved agreement with experimental data for total and absorption cross sections is found when compared with first order (coherent approximation) solutions, especially below several hundred MeV. At higher energies, the first and second order solutions are similar. There are also large differences in abrasion cross section calculations; these differences indicate a crucial role for cluster knockout in the abrasion step.

  5. Angle dependent interaction potentials for NOAr, NOKr and NOXe derived from various total collision cross section data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuis, H. H. W.; Stolte, S.; Reuss, J.; Van Den Biesen, J. J. H.; Van Den Meijdenberg, C. J. N.

    1980-10-01

    Three independent sources of information are used to analyze the angle dependent potential for NOAr: (a) the glory structure of the total collision cross section; (b) the relative difference in the total collision cross section for two different orientations of NO in the 2Π 3/2 state; (c) the absolute value of the total collision cross section. The sudden approximation employed for the calculation of the various properties is discussed. For NOAr a fit to the total collision cross section data is obtained on the basis of an extended Maitland—Smith potential containing a Pt anisotropy in the repulsion and a P2 anisotropy in the repulsion and attraction. A comparison is made with the theoretical potential for NOAr recently by Nielson et al. and the extended Lennard-Jones potential employed in the earlier analysis. For NOKr and NOXe similar Maitland—Smith potentials are obtained by assuming the Pt anisotropy parameter for these systems to be equal to that for NOAr. In a separate appendix is analyzed which intermolecular distances are probed through measurements of the anisotropy in the total collision cross section.

  6. Electron-Impact Total Ionization Cross Sections of CH and C2H2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Ki; Ali, M. Asgar; Rudd, M. Eugene

    1997-01-01

    Electron-impact total ionization cross sections for the CH radical and C2H2 (acetylene) have been calculated using the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model. The BEB model combines the Mott cross section and the asymptotic form of the Bethe theory, and has been shown to generate reliable ionization cross sections for a large variety of molecules. The BEB cross sections for CH and C2H2 are in good agreement with the available experimental data from ionization thresholds to hundreds of eV in incident energies. PMID:27805116

  7. The use of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lachiewicz, Paul F; Geyer, Mark R

    2011-03-01

    Polyethylene wear, with resultant particle-induced osteolysis, is a cause of late failure of total knee arthroplasty. The causes of both wear and osteolysis are multifactorial; still, improvements in the polyethylene liner have been investigated. Available highly cross-linked polyethylene tibial liners and patellar prostheses differ greatly in the amount and method of irradiation, thermal treatments, and sterilization techniques they undergo. Several varieties of highly cross-linked polyethylene reduce the gravimetric and volumetric wear of tibial liners in knee simulator studies. However, reduced fracture toughness and the generation of smaller and possibly more reactive particles also have been reported with some varieties of polyethylene. Clinical studies of the use of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total knee arthroplasty are limited. Two nonrandomized trials of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total knee arthroplasty have reported a nonsignificant decrease in radiolucent lines at 2 and 5 years, respectively. The risks of using highly cross-linked polyethylene include fracture of the liner or of a posterior-stabilized tibial post, liner dislodgement or locking mechanism disruption, and possibly more osteolysis. Highly cross-linked polyethylene tibial liners may be considered for younger, more active patients. However, until additional clinical results are available, a cautious approach is warranted to the widespread use of highly cross-linked polyethylene in total knee arthroplasty.

  8. Wear of moderately cross-linked polyethylene in fixed-bearing total knee replacements.

    PubMed

    Brockett, Claire L; Jennings, Louise M; Hardaker, Catherine; Fisher, John

    2012-07-01

    Cross-linked polyethylene has been introduced into total joint replacement to improve wear resistance. Although the performance of highly cross-linked polyethylene is well documented clinically and experimentally for total hip replacements, the reduction in mechanical properties with increasing irradiation is of concern for application to total knee replacement. The aim of this study was to investigate the wear performance of a moderately cross-linked polyethylene material in a fixed-bearing total knee replacement. The study was conducted using two femoral geometries, a conventional cruciate-retaining femoral and a high-flexion femoral geometry. The femoral geometry appeared to have no effect on the wear of the knee replacement under standard gait conditions. A significant reduction in wear volume was measured with the moderately cross-linked polyethylene compared with the conventional polyethylene over a six-million-cycle wear study. This study indicates the use of a moderately cross-linked polyethylene in a fixed-bearing total knee replacement may provide a low wearing option for total knee replacement.

  9. The prognostic utility and the association of serum light chains (free and total) and absolute lymphocyte count in patients with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaohong; Wang, Jianfei; Zhang, Ningning; Yao, Jiarui; Feng, Yun; Li, Dan; Liu, Peng; Yang, Jianliang; Zhou, Shengyu; Qin, Yan; Yang, Sheng; Gui, Lin; He, Xiaohui; Shi, Yuankai

    2014-11-01

    In this study, serum free and total light chains (sFLC/sTLC) were measured in 108 serum samples of therapy-naïve patients with DLBCL. Clinicopathologic data and survival outcomes were analyzed according to the results of sFLC/sTLC measurements. Moreover, the association of sFLC/sTLC with absolute monocyte count (AMC) and absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) was evaluated. Elevated sFLC and abnormal κ/λ ratio was present in 42.6% (51/108) and 4.6% (5/108) of patients, respectively. sTLC was successfully measured in 107 serum samples, abnormal sTLC and abnormal κ/λ ratio was found in 28.0% (30/107) and 26.2% (28/107) of patients, respectively. Patients with elevated sFLC more frequently displayed adverse clinical characteristics, including age (P=0.001), B symptoms (P=0.022), low ALC (P=0.024) and hyperglobulinemia (P=0.012). Patients with elevated sFLC had an inferior overall survival (OS) (P=0.012) and tended to have shorter progression-free survival (PFS) (P=0.061) compared to patients with normal sFLC. Abnormal sTLC or abnormal sTLC ratio showed no significant association with clinical outcomes, with exception of abnormal concurrent κ and λ. Only association of sFLC and ALC with survival remained significant after adjusting for the International Prognostic Index (IPI). The measurement of sFLC and ALC at diagnosis might be useful for the prognostic stratification of patients and sTLC measurement was of little prognostic utility in DLBCL.

  10. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (∼ 50 MeV to ∼ 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used in the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are available now. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results. Our current results indicate this is, in fact, the case.

  11. Shape optimization of the total scattering cross section for cylindrical scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsson, Per; Rylander, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    We propose and test a gradient-based shape optimization algorithm for the total scattering cross section of infinitely long cylinders, by means of changing the shape of the cylinder's cross section. On the basis of the optical theorem, we derive sensitivity expressions for both dielectric and metal cylinders given an incident plane wave, where the wave vector is perpendicular to the cylinder axis. Both the transverse electric (TE) case and the transverse magnetic case are considered. The sensitivity expressions are based on the continuum form of Maxwell's equations, and they provide the sensitivity with respect to an arbitrary number of shape parameters in terms of the field solution of the original scattering problem and an adjoint scattering problem. These results are used to construct a gradient-based optimization algorithm that we exploit for the reduction of the total scattering cross section in the TE case for metal cylinders, e.g., struts used in reflector antennas. We present optimized cross sections that are oblong in the direction of the incident wave vector, and some of these designs feature corrugations that are parallel to the cylinder axis. We show designs with asymmetric cross sections that yield a low monostatic scattering cross section for certain directions in combination with a low total scattering cross section, which can be used to reduce the noise temperature contributions from the upper strut in an inverted Y tripod reflector antenna.

  12. Total reaction cross sections in CEM and MCNP6 at intermediate energies

    DOE PAGES

    Kerby, Leslie M.; Mashnik, Stepan G.

    2015-05-14

    Accurate total reaction cross section models are important to achieving reliable predictions from spallation and transport codes. The latest version of the Cascade Exciton Model (CEM) as incorporated in the code CEM03.03, and the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP6), both developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), each use such cross sections. Having accurate total reaction cross section models in the intermediate energy region (50 MeV to 5 GeV) is very important for different applications, including analysis of space environments, use in medical physics, and accelerator design, to name just a few. The current inverse cross sections used inmore » the preequilibrium and evaporation stages of CEM are based on the Dostrovsky et al. model, published in 1959. Better cross section models are now available. Implementing better cross section models in CEM and MCNP6 should yield improved predictions for particle spectra and total production cross sections, among other results.« less

  13. Average Neutron Total Cross Sections in the Unresolved Energy Range From ORELA High Resolutio Transmission Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H

    2004-05-27

    Average values of the neutron total cross sections of {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu have been obtained in the unresolved resonance energy range from high-resolution transmission measurements performed at ORELA in the past two decades. The cross sections were generated by correcting the effective total cross sections for the self-shielding effects due to the resonance structure of the data. The self-shielding factors were found by calculating the effective and true cross sections with the computer code SAMMY for the same Doppler and resolution conditions as for the transmission measurements, using an appropriate set of resonance parameters. Our results are compared to results of previous measurements and to the current ENDF/B-VI data.

  14. Total Electron-Impact Ionization Cross-Sections of CFx and NFx (x = 1 - 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Tarnovsky, Vladimir; Becker, Kurt H.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The discrepancy between experimental and theoretical total electron-impact ionization cross sections for a group of fluorides, CFx, and NFx, (x = 1 - 3), is attributed to the inadequacies in previous theoretical models. Cross-sections calculated using a recently developed siBED (simulation Binary-Encounter-Dipole) model that takes into account the shielding of the long-range dipole potential between the scattering electron and target are in agreement with experimentation. The present study also carefully reanalyzed the previously reported experimental data to account for the possibility of incomplete collection of fragment ions and the presence of ion-pair formation channels. For NF3, our experimental and theoretical cross-sections compare well with the total ionization cross-sections recently reported by Haaland et al. in the region below dication formation.

  15. Total pion-proton cross section from the new LHCf data on leading neutrons spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryutin, R. A.

    2017-02-01

    In the light of the latest data by the LHCf collaboration of the LHC on leading neutrons spectra it is possible to obtain total pion-proton cross sections in the TeV energy region. In this work the exact extraction procedure is shown. Final results for the pion-proton cross section are collected at several different values of the colliding energy and compared with some popular theoretical predictions. The errors of the results are estimated.

  16. Absorbing-sphere model for calculating ion-ion recombination total cross sections.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    An 'absorbing-sphere' model based on the Landau-Zener method is set up for calculating the upper limit thermal energy (300 K) reaction rate and the energy dependence of the total cross sections. The crucial parameter needed for the calculation is the electron detachment energy for the outer electron on the anion. It is found that the cross sections increase with decreasing electron detachment energy.

  17. Medium modified two-body scattering amplitude from proton-nucleus total cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-02-01

    Recently (R.K. Tripathi, J.W. Wilson, F.A. Cucinotta, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 145 (1998) 277; R.K. Tripathi, F.A. Cucinotta, J.W. Wilson, NASA-TP-1998-208438), we have extracted nucleon-nucleon (N-N) cross-sections in the medium directly from experiment. The in-medium N-N cross-sections form the basic ingredients of several heavy-ion scattering approaches including the coupled-channel approach developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Here, we investigate the ratio of real to imaginary part of the two-body scattering amplitude in the medium. These ratios are used in combination with the in-medium N-N cross-sections to calculate total proton-nucleus cross-sections. The agreement is excellent with the available experimental data. These cross-sections are needed for the radiation risk assessment of space missions.

  18. Proton-Nucleus Total Cross Sections in Coupled-Channel Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, nucleon-nucleon (N-N) cross sections in the medium have been extracted directly from experiment. The in-medium N-N cross sections form the basic ingredients of several heavy-ion scattering approaches including the coupled-channel approach developed at the Langley Research Center. In the present study the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the two-body scattering amplitude in the medium was investigated. These ratios are used in combination with the in-medium N-N cross sections to calculate total proton-nucleus cross sections. The agreement is excellent with the available experimental data. These cross sections are needed for the radiation risk assessment of space missions.

  19. Electron impact total cross section calculations for CH3SH (methanethiol) from threshold to 5 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limbachiya, Chetan; Vinodkumar, Minaxi; Swadia, Mohit; Barot, Avani

    2014-01-01

    We report calculated total elastic cross sections Qel, total ionisation cross sections, Qion, summed total excitation cross sections ∑Qexc and total cross sections QT for CH3SH upon electron impact for energies from ionisation threshold to 5 keV. We have employed Spherical Complex Optical Potential (SCOP) formalism to calculate total elastic cross section Qel, and total inelastic cross section Qinel and used Complex Scattering Potential - the ionisation contribution (CSP-ic) method to extract the ionisation cross sections, Qion, from the calculated Qinel. The calculated total cross sections are examined as functions of incident electron energy and are compared with available data wherever possible and overall good agreement is observed. In this work Qel, Qion, and ∑Qexc are reported for the first time for CH3SH in this energy range.

  20. Investigation of interface roughness cross-correlation properties of optical thin films from total scattering losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yongqiang; Wu, Zhensen; Hang, Lingxia

    2010-03-01

    The interface roughness and interface roughness cross-correlation properties affect the scattering losses of high-quality optical thin films. In this paper, the theoretical models of light scattering induced by surface and interface roughness of optical thin films are concisely presented. Furthermore, influence of interface roughness cross-correlation properties to light scattering is analyzed by total scattering losses. Moreover, single-layer TiO 2 thin film thickness, substrate roughness of K9 glass and ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) technique effect on interface roughness cross-correlation properties are studied by experiments, respectively. A 17-layer dielectric quarter-wave high reflection multilayer is analyzed by total scattering losses. The results show that the interface roughness cross-correlation properties depend on TiO 2 thin film thickness, substrate roughness and deposition technique. The interface roughness cross-correlation properties decrease with the increase of film thickness or the decrease of substrates roughness. Furthermore, ion beam assisted deposition technique can increase the interface roughness cross-correlation properties of optical thin films. The measured total scattering losses of 17-layer dielectric quarter-wave high reflection multilayer deposited with IBAD indicate that completely correlated interface model can be observed, when substrate roughness is about 2.84 nm.

  1. Measured Total Cross Sections of Slow Neutrons Scattered by Gaseous and Liquid 2H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchison, F.; van den Brandt, B.; Bryś, T.; Daum, M.; Fierlinger, P.; Hautle, P.; Henneck, R.; Kirch, K.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Kühne, G.; Konter, J. A.; Pichlmaier, A.; Wokaun, A.; Bodek, K.; Kasprzak, M.; Kuźniak, M.; Geltenbort, P.; Giersch, M.; Zmeskal, J.; Hino, M.; Utsuro, M.

    2005-06-01

    The total scattering cross sections for slow neutrons with energies E in the range 300 neV to 3 meV for gaseous and liquid ortho-2H2 have been measured. The cross sections for 2H2 gas are found to be in excellent agreement with both the Hamermesh and Schwinger and the Young and Koppel models. For liquid 2H2, we confirm the existing experimental data in the cold neutron range and the discrepancy with the gas models. We find a clear 1/√(E') dependence at low energies for both states. A simple explanation for the liquid 2H2 cross section is offered.

  2. The total, elastic and inelastic scattering fast neutron cross sections of natural chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, P.T.; Smith, J.F.; Whalen, A.B.

    1982-12-01

    The present experimental results comprise a comprehensive intermediate resolution neutron total and scattering cross-section data base for elemental chromium over the energy range from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV. Nonetheless, due to the fluctuating nature of the cross sections involved, the definition of energy-averaged cross sections is uncertain. The consequences of these energy-dependent fluctuations and attendant complications influence the data analysis and interpretation. All finite sample total crosssection measurements result in effective cross sections that have to be corrected to yield the true energyaveraged cross sections. This was accomplished by concurrent multiple sample thickness measurements the results of which were then linearly extrapolated to the zero thickness cross section. It was noted that the resulting sample thickness correction showed marked local fluctuations necessitating an energy by energy treatment. Furthermore, the cross sections, even after averaging over wide energy intervals, retained undulations that complicated comparisons with model calculations. Quantitative comparisons of the present elastic and inelastic scattering results with those obtained at isolated energies by other authors were difficult, if not deceptive, due to persistent fluctuations.

  3. A comparative study on two characteristic parametrizations for high energy pp and overlinepp total cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, A.; Velasco, J.

    1996-02-01

    Available high energy data for both pp and overlinepp total cross sections ( f GeV < s < 1.8 TeV ) are described by means of two well-known distinct parametrizations, characteristic of theoretical (“Regge-like” expression) and experimental (“Froissart-Martin-like” expression) practices, respectively. Both are compared from the statistical point of view. For the whole set of present data statistical analysis ( χ2/d.o.f.) seems to favour a “Froissart-like” ((ln s) γ≈2 ) rise of the total cross section rather than a “Regge-like” ( sɛ) one.

  4. The γ{sup *}γ{sup *} total cross section in NLA BFKL

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Dmitry Yu.; Murdaca, Beatrice; Papa, Alessandro

    2015-04-10

    We study the γ{sup *}γ{sup *} total cross section in the NLA BFKL approach. We have extracted the NLO corrections to the photon impact factor from two recent papers of Balitsky and Chirilli and Chirilli and Kovchegov and used them to build several representations of the total cross section, equivalent within the NLA. We have combined these different representations with two among the most common methods for the optimization of a perturbative series, namely PMS and BLM, and compared their behavior with the energy with the only available experimental data, those from the LEP2 collider.

  5. Energy dependence of the 4He(π+,π-) total cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräter, J.; Bilger, R.; Clement, H.; Meier, R.; Wagner, G. J.; Friedman, E.; Schepkin, M.; Amaudruz, P. A.; Felawka, L.; Ottewell, D.; Smith, G. R.; Ambardar, A.; Hofman, G. J.; Kermani, M.; Tagliente, G.; Bonutti, F.; Camerini, P.; Grion, N.; Rui, R.; Hong, P.; Mathie, E. L.; Tacik, R.; Clark, J.; Sevior, M. E.; Patarakin, O.

    1998-09-01

    The total cross section of the 4He(π+,π-) reaction was measured for π+ kinetic energies ranging from 70 to 130 MeV using the CHAOS spectrometer at TRIUMF and a liquid 4He target. Around Tπ=90 MeV, total cross sections exceed conventional model predictions by a factor of 3, whereas at Tπ=70 MeV and for Tπ>130 MeV the data are consistent with these calculations. An attempt is made to understand this behavior by assuming the production of the hypothetical d' dibaryon.

  6. Absolute excited-state absorption cross section and fluorescence quantum efficiency of Cr/sup 3 +/: gadolinium scandium gallium garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Seelert, W.; Strauss, E.

    1987-10-01

    Excited-state properties of the laser material Cr/sup 3 +/:Gd/sub 3/Sc/sub 2/(GaO/sub 4/)/sub 3/ were determined by a photocaloric technique. The excited-state absorption cross section at 650 nm is (3.6 +- 0.6)10/sup -20/ cm/sup 2/, and the fluorescence quantum efficiency at ambient temperature is (91 +- 1)%.

  7. Total and partial cross sections of the 112Sn(α ,γ ) 116Te reaction measured via in-beam γ -ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netterdon, L.; Mayer, J.; Scholz, P.; Zilges, A.

    2015-03-01

    Background: The nucleosynthesis of the neutron-deficient p nuclei remains an open question in nuclear astrophysics. Beside uncertainties on the astrophysical side, the nuclear-physics input parameters entering Hauser-Feshbach calculations for the nucleosynthesis of the p nuclei must be put on a firm basis. Purpose: An extended database of experimental data is needed to address uncertainties of the nuclear-physics input parameters for Hauser-Feshbach calculations. Especially α + nucleus optical model potentials at low energies are not well known. The in-beam technique with an array of high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors was successfully applied to the measurement of absolute cross sections of an (α ,γ ) reaction on a heavy nucleus at sub-Coulomb energies. Method: The total and partial cross-section values were measured by means of in-beam γ -ray spectroscopy. For this purpose, the absolute reaction yield was measured using the HPGe detector array HORUS at the FN tandem accelerator at the University of Cologne. Total and partial cross sections were measured at four different α -particle energies from Eα=10.5 MeV to Eα=12 MeV . Results: The measured total cross-section values are in excellent agreement with previous results obtained with the activation technique, which proves the validity of the applied method. With the present measurement, the discrepancy between two older data sets is removed. The experimental data was compared to Hauser-Feshbach calculations using the nuclear reaction code talys. With a modification of the semi-microscopic α + nucleus optical model potential OMP 3, the measured cross-section values are reproduced well. Moreover, partial cross sections could be measured for the first time for an (α ,γ ) reaction. Conclusions: A modified version of the semimicroscopic α + nucleus optical model potential OMP3, as well as modified proton and γ widths, are needed in order to obtain a good agreement between experimental data and theory. It

  8. Failure of Stadard Optical Models to Reproduce Neutron Total Cross Section Difference in the W Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J D; Bauer, R W; Dietrich, F S; Grimes, S M; Finlay, R W; Abfalterer, W P; Bateman, F B; Haight, R C; Morgan, G L; Bauge, E; Delaroche, J P; Romain, P

    2001-11-01

    Recently cross section differences among the isotopes{sup 182,184,186}W have been measured as part of a study of total cross sections in the 5-560 MeV energy range. These measurements show oscillations up to 150 mb between 5 and 100 MeV. Spherical and deformed phenomenological optical potentials with typical radial and isospin dependences show very small oscillations, in disagreement with the data. In a simple Ramsauer model, this discrepancy can be traced to a cancellation between radial and isospin effects. Understanding this problem requires a more detailed model that incorporates a realistic description of the neutron and proton density distributions. This has been done with results of Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov calculations using the Gogny force, together with a microscopic folding model employing a modification of the JLM potential as an effective interaction. This treatment yields a satisfactory interpretation of the observed total cross section differences.

  9. A New Scaling Law of Resonance in Total Scattering Cross Section in Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Gorur Govinda

    2009-10-01

    Electrical discharges in gases continue to be an active area of research because of industrial applications such as power systems, environmental clean up, laser technology, semiconductor fabrication etc. A fundamental knowledge of electron-gas neutral interaction is indispensable and, the total scattering cross section is one of the quantities that have been measured extensively. The energy dependence of the total cross sections shows peaks or resonance processes that are operative in the collision process. These peaks and the energies at which they occur are shown to satisfy a broad relationship involving the polarizability and the dipole moment of the target particle. Data on 62 target particles belonging to the following species are analyzed. (Eq 1) Rare gas atoms (Eq 2) Di-atomic molecules with combinations of polar, non-polar, attaching, and non-attaching properties Poly-atomic molecules with combinations of polar, non-polar, attaching, and non-attaching properties. Methods of improving the newly identified scaling law and possible application have been identified. 1 INTRODUCTION: Data on electron-neutral interactions are one of the most fundamental in the study of gaseous electronics and an immense literature, both experimental and theoretical, has become available since about the year 1920. [1-5]. In view of the central role which these data play in all facets of gas discharges and plasma science, it is felt that a critical review of available data is timely, mainly for the community of high voltage engineers and industries connected with plasma science in general. The electron-neutral interaction, often referred to as scattering in the scientific literature, is quantified by using the quantity called the total scattering cross section (QT, m^2). In the literature on cross section, total cross section and total scattering cross section are terms used synonymously and we follow the same practice. A definition may be found in reference [1]. This paper concerns

  10. Diffractive and total pp cross sections at the LHC and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2011-07-15

    Results on factorization breaking in soft and hard hadron-hadron collisions, photo-production and deep inelastic scattering exhibit a universal behavior in a renormalization model where diffraction is mediated by a saturated colorless exchange with vacuum quantum numbers. Using this model, diffractive and total cross sections are predicted for LHC energies.

  11. A study of the valence shell absolute photoabsorption, photoionisation and photodissociation cross sections and the photoionisation quantum efficiency of carbonyl sulphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, D. M. P.; Shaw, D. A.

    2016-11-01

    The absolute photoabsorption, photoionisation and photodissociation cross sections and the photoionisation quantum efficiency of carbonyl sulphide have been measured using a double ion chamber and synchrotron radiation in the energy range from the ionisation threshold to 24 eV. In addition to the absorption bands associated with well established Rydberg series, some previously unassigned features have been tentatively attributed to an f-type Rydberg series converging onto the B ˜ 2Σ+ state ionisation threshold. Structure appearing in the photodissociation spectrum has been correlated with that observed in earlier fluorescence yields for emission, due mainly to the CS photofragment, occurring between 160 and 300 nm. The photoionisation quantum efficiency reaches a plateau value close to unity for energies above ∼16 eV. The predissociation of Rydberg states into neutral fragments does not appear to affect the photoionisation quantum efficiency of carbonyl sulphide to the extent that is commonly observed in other small molecules. A sum rule analysis has been carried out by combining the present absolute photoabsorption measurements with similar data covering the remaining energy regions.

  12. Measurement of absolute hadronic branching fractions of D mesons and e+e- -->DD cross sections at Ec.m.=3773 MeV.

    PubMed

    He, Q; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Park, W; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Dambasuren, E; Dorjkhaidav, O; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nandakumar, R; Randrianarivony, K; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, K; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Chen, J; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Crede, V; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Phillips, E A; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shi, X; Shepherd, M R; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Urner, D; Weaver, K M; Wilksen, T; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Patel, R; Potlia, V; Stoeck, H; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G D; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Williams, J; Wiss, J; Edwards, K W; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Li, S Z; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Zweber, P; Ernst, J; Mahmood, A H; Severini, H; Asner, D M; Dytman, S A; Love, W; Mehrabyan, S; Mueller, J A; Savinov, V; Li, Z; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Adams, G S; Chasse, M; Cravey, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J

    2005-09-16

    Using 55.8 pb(-1) of e+e- collisions recorded at the psi(3770) resonance with the CLEO-c detector at CESR, we determine absolute hadronic branching fractions of charged and neutral D mesons using a double tag technique. Among measurements for three D0 and six D+ modes, we obtain reference branching fractions B(D0-->K-pi+)=(3.91+/-0.08+/-0.09)% and B(D+-->K-pi+pi+)=(9.5+/-0.2+/-0.3)%, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. Final state radiation is included in these branching fractions by allowing for additional, unobserved, photons in the final state. Using a determination of the integrated luminosity, we also extract the cross sections sigma(e+e- -->D0D0)=(3.60+/-0.07(+0.07)(-0.05)) nb and sigma(e+e- -->D+D-)=(2.79+/-0.07(+0.10)(-0.04)) nb.

  13. Absolute cross section measurements of neutron-induced fission of 242Pu from 1 to 2.5 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, C.; Belloni, F.; Heyse, J.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Thomas, D. J.

    2017-02-01

    The absolute neutron-induced fission cross section of 242Pu was measured at five energies between 1 and 2.5 MeV at the low-scatter neutron measurement facility of the National Physical Laboratory, UK. The measurements are part of an effort to reduce uncertainties of nuclear data related to fast spectrum reactors. The neutron-induced fission results are in good agreement with the Evaluated Nuclear Data File/B-VII.1 but disagree with several recent measurements near the resonance-like structure around 1.1 MeV. Within the same experimental campaign, the spontaneous fission half-life of 242Pu was measured and it is in good agreement with previous results.

  14. Total and Capture Cross Sections of Dysprosium Isotopes up to 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.D.; Oh, S.Y.; Chang, J.H.

    2005-11-15

    Neutron data for total and capture cross sections were evaluated on {sup 160}Dy, {sup 161}Dy, {sup 162}Dy, {sup 163}Dy, and {sup 164}Dy up to 20 MeV. The resolved resonance parameters were adopted from the Mughabghab compilation, but one bound level resonance for each isotope except {sup 162}Dy was invoked to reproduce the reference thermal cross sections. The average resonance parameters for s-wave neutrons were obtained from the analysis of the statistical behavior of resolved resonance parameters. Recent measurements of the capture cross sections were taken into account in adjusting the average resonance parameters for p- and d-waves. From the first excited energy to 20 MeV, the optical model, Hauser-Feshbach model, and quantum mechanical models were used to produce total, elastic scattering, and capture cross sections. The energy-dependent optical model potential was decided based on the recent experimental data. The calculated cross sections were in good agreement with the experimental data. The present evaluation resulted in improvement over the ENDF/B-VI.7 code.

  15. Near-Threshold Total Dissociation Electron Impact Cross Sections for C2F6, C3F8, and CHF3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaherty, David; Kasper, Michael; Graves, David; Winters, Harold

    2004-09-01

    Absolute total dissociation electron impact cross sections, σ _TD, are reported near threshold (8-30eV) for C_2F_6, C_3F_8, and CHF3 using the technique described by Winters and Inokuti [1]. Total neutral dissociation cross sections, σ _ND, are obtained by subtraction using total ionization cross sections, e.g. [2]. σ _ND for C_2F6 and C_3F8 are compared with values inferred from swarm data and to reported partial dissociation cross sections for production of CF3 and C_2F5 over the range of electron energies measured [3,4]. Work supported in part by the NSF/SRC ERC for Environmentally Benign Semiconductor Manufacturing. [1] H. Winters and M. Inokuti, Phys. Rev. A 25, 1420 (1982). [2] L. Christophorou and J. Olthoff, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 28, 131, (1999) [3] S. Motlagh and J. Moore, J. Chem. Phys., Vol. 109 (2), 432, (1998) [4] Hayashi and Niwa, Gaseous Dielectrics V, Pergamon, New York, p. 27, (1987).

  16. High-Resolution Measurements of e++H2O Total Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loreti, A.; Kadokura, R.; Fayer, S. E.; Kövér, Á.; Laricchia, G.

    2016-12-01

    Using a purely electrostatic positron beam, the total cross section of positrons scattering from H2O has been measured for the first time with a high angular discrimination (≃1 ° ) against forward scattered projectiles. Results are presented in the energy range (10-300) eV. Significant deviations from previous measurements are found which are, if ascribed entirely to the angular acceptances of various experimental systems, in quantitative accord with ab initio theoretical predictions of the differential elastic scattering cross section.

  17. Determination of lithium ion--rare gas potentials from total cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Polak-Dingels, P.; Rajan, M.S.; Gislason, E.A.

    1982-10-15

    Total cross sections have been measured for Li/sup +/ ions scattered by He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in the range Etheta/sub R/ = 5--1000 eV deg. Here E is the laboratory energy of the Li/sup +/ beam, and theta/sub R/ is the resolution angle of the apparatus. The cross sections have been inverted to obtain accurate estimates of the potential V(R) over a wide range of R including the attractive well region. The results are compared with other theoretical and experimental work on these systems.

  18. Nucleon and heavy-ion total and absorption cross section for selected nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Costner, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    Approximate solutions of the coupled-channel equations for high-energy composite particle scattering are obtained and are applied to the nuclear scattering problem. Relationships between several approximation procedures are established and discussed. The eikonal formalism is used with a small-angle approximation to calculate the coherent elastic scattered amplitude from which total and absorption cross sections are derived. Detailed comparisons with nucleon-nucleus experiments show agreement within 5 percent except at lower energies where the eikonal approximation is of questionable accuracy. Even at these lower energies, agreement is within 15 percent. Tables of cross sections required for cosmic heavy-ion transport and shielding studies are presented.

  19. Total reaction cross sections of 50 and 65 MeV pions on nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meirav, O.; Friedman, E.; Altman, A.; Hanna, M.; Johnson, R. R.; Gill, D. R.

    1987-09-01

    Total reaction cross sections have been measured for 50 and 65 MeV π+/- on C, O, 18O, S, Ca, and Zr. The motivation for this experiment is to obtain cross sections to act as constraints in optical model fits to elastic scattering data. Measurements using the ``poor geometry'' transmission method were made for exceptionally small angles with the aim of improving the accuracy of the extrapolation to zero solid angle. At these small solid angles the muon cone from pion decay contributes significantly and its effects were explicitly included. The accuracies of the elastic correction are evaluated by using error matrix techniques and an additional systematic error is included.

  20. The Spin Contribution to the pp-TOTAL Cross-Section at High Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, E. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.; Nurushev, S. B.

    The experimental data on the pp-total cross-sections including the spin-dependent parts are analyzed with the goal to determine the contribution of spin interactions at high energies. Based on the Regge model with cuts, the energy dependencies of such contributions are estimated for two spin-dependent terms: (1) the total spin dependent term, σ1 and (2) the spin projection dependent term, σ2. The estimates show that their contributions to the unpolarized total cross section, σ0, decrease with energy from several % around 2 GeV/c to 10-2% around 200 GeV/c. The assumption σ1= -σ2 does not seem to be correct, while the hypothesis 3 σ1=-σ2 is more preferable, especially in the measured energy interval 2-6 GeV. There is a clear indication that the spin effects are sensitive to the pomeron intercept at - t=0 (GeV/c)2. In order to pin down such effects the spin dependent total cross-sections must be measured with precisions better than 10 μb at 200 GeV/c.

  1. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of sup 58 Ni and nuclear models

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F. ); Chiba, S. . Tokai Research Establishment)

    1991-07-01

    The neutron total cross sections of {sup 58}Ni were measured from {approx} 1 to > 10 MeV using white-source techniques. Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from {approx} 4.5 to 10 MeV at {approx} 0.5 MeV intervals with {ge} 75 differential values per distribution. Differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured, corresponding to fourteen levels with excitations up to 4.8 MeV. The measured results, combined with relevant values available in the literature, were interpreted in terms of optical-statistical and coupled-channels model using both vibrational and rotational coupling schemes. The physical implications of the experimental results nd their interpretation are discussed in the contexts of optical-statistical, dispersive-optical, and coupled-channels models. 61 refs.

  2. A measurement of the p p total cross section at radical s = 1800 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    White, S. )

    1991-10-01

    The {bar p}p differential elastic scattering cross section was measured at {radical}{bar s} = 1800 GeV, using an improved accelerator luminosity determination and CDF small angle data in the range of 0.05 {le} t {le} 0.2(GeV/c){sup 2}. By extrapolating the differential cross sections to t=0 and using the optical theorem we obtain a total cross section of {sigma}{sub tot}({bar p}p) = 72.0 {plus minus} 3.6 mb. This result is preliminary in the sense that we expect to further reduce the systematic error on the optical point. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Interactions in hydrogen of relativistic neon to nickel projectiles: Total charge-changing cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.-X.; Albergo, S.; Caccia, Z.; Costa, S.; Crawford, H. J.; Cronqvist, M.; Engelage, J.; Ferrando, P.; Fonte, R.; Greiner, L.; Guzik, T. G.; Insolia, A.; Jones, F. C.; Knott, C. N.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Mitchell, J. W.; Potenza, R.; Romanski, J.; Russo, G. V.; Soutoul, A.; Testard, O.; Tull, C. E.; Tuvé, C.; Waddington, C. J.; Webber, W. R.; Wefel, J. P.; Zhang, X.

    1994-06-01

    A liquid hydrogen target was used to study the nuclear fragmentation of beams of relativistic heavy ions, 22Ne to 58Ni, over an energy range 400 to 900 MeV/nucleon. The experiments were carried out at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac HISS facility, using the charge-velocity-rigidity method to identify the charged fragments. Here we describe the general concept of the experiment and present total charge-changing cross sections obtained from 17 separate runs. These new measured cross sections display an energy dependence which follows semiempirical model predictions. The mass dependence of the cross sections behaves as predicted by optical models, but within the experimental energy range, the optical model parameters display a clear energy dependence. The isospin of the projectile nuclei also appears to be an important factor in the interaction process.

  4. Interactions in hydrogen of relativistic neon to nickel projectiles: Total charge-changing cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Albergo, S.; Caccia, Z.; Costa, S.; Crawford, H.J.; Cronqvist, M.; Engelage, J.; Ferrando, P.; Fonte, R.; Greiner, L.; Guzik, T.G.; Insolia, A.; Jones, F.C.; Knott, C.N.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Mitchell, J.W.; Potenza, R.; Romanski, J.; Russo, G.V.; Soutoul, A.; Testard, O.; Tull, C.E.; Tuve, C.; Waddington, C.J.; Webber, W.R.; Wefel, J.P.; Zhang, X. Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 Service d'Astrophysique, Centre d'Etudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, Cedex Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Catania, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania, Corso Italia 57, I 95129-Catania NASA

    1994-06-01

    A liquid hydrogen target was used to study the nuclear fragmentation of beams of relativistic heavy ions, [sup 22]Ne to [sup 58]Ni, over an energy range 400 to 900 MeV/nucleon. The experiments were carried out at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac HISS facility, using the charge-velocity-rigidity method to identify the charged fragments. Here we describe the general concept of the experiment and present total charge-changing cross sections obtained from 17 separate runs. These new measured cross sections display an energy dependence which follows semiempirical model predictions. The mass dependence of the cross sections behaves as predicted by optical models, but within the experimental energy range, the optical model parameters display a clear energy dependence. The isospin of the projectile nuclei also appears to be an important factor in the interaction process.

  5. Total electron scattering cross-sections and negative ion states of halogenated methanes

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood-Lemons, T.; Winkler, D.C.; Moore, J.H.; Tossell, J.A.

    1993-12-01

    The interaction of low energy electrons with halogenated methanes plays an important role in both their atmospheric and plasma processing chemistry. In this work, the total electron scattering cross-sections of mixed fluorohalomethanes (CF{sub n}X{sub 4-n}) were measured for incident electrons in the energy range of 0.2-12 eV using electron transmission spectroscopy. Resonances in the scattering cross-sections may be interpreted as the capture of low energy electrons into unoccupied molecular orbitals. To aid in the assignments of the resulting negative ion states, the authors performed quantum mechanical calculations of the electron attachment energies and measured the dissociative attachment cross-sections. The effect of halogen substitution on the orbitals participating in electron capture are examined.

  6. Experiment to measure total cross sections, differential cross sections and polarization effects in pp elastic scattering at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Guryn, W.

    1998-02-01

    The authors are describing an experiment to study proton-proton (pp) elastic scattering experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Using both polarized and unpolarized beams, the experiment will study pp elastic scattering from {radical}s = 50 GeV to {radical}s = 500 GeV in two kinematical regions. In the Coulomb Nuclear Interference (CNI) region, 0.0005 < {vert_bar}t{vert_bar} < 0.12 (GeV/c){sup 2}, they will measure and study the s dependence of the total and elastic cross sections, {sigma}{sub tot} and {sigma}{sub el}; the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, {rho}; and the nuclear slope parameter of the pp elastic scattering, b. In the medium {vert_bar}t{vert_bar}-region, {vert_bar}t{vert_bar} < 1.5 (GeV/c){sup 2}, they plan to study the evolution of the dip structure with s, as observed at ISR in the differential elastic cross section, d{sigma}{sub el}/dt, and the s and {vert_bar}t{vert_bar} dependence of b. With the polarized beams the following can be measured: the difference in the total cross sections as function of initial transverse spin states {Delta}{sigma}{sub T}, the analyzing power, A{sub N}, and the transverse spin correlation parameter A{sub NN}. The behavior of the analyzing power A{sub N} at RHIC energies in the dip region of d{sigma}{sub el}/dt, where a pronounced structure was found at fixed-target experiments will be studied. The relation of pp elastic scattering to the beam polarization measurement at RHIC is also discussed.

  7. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  8. Measurement of the elastic, total and diffraction cross sections at tevatron energies

    SciTech Connect

    Belforte, S.; CDF Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    The CDF collaboration has measured the differential elastic cross section d{sigma}{sub el}/dt, the single diffraction dissociation double differential cross section d{sup 2}{sigma}{sub sd}/dM{sup 2}dt and the total inelastic cross section for antiproton-proton collisions at center of mass energies {radical}s = 546 and 1,800 GeV. Data for this measurement have been collected in short dedicated runs during the 1988--1989 data taking period of CDF. The elastic scattering slope is 15.28 {+-} 0.58 (16.98 {+-} 0.25) GeV{sup {minus}2} at {radical}s = 546 (1,800) GeV. Using the luminosity independent method (1 + {rho}{sup 2}){sigma}{sub T} is measured to be 62.64 {+-} 0.95 (81.83 {+-} 2.29) mb at {radical}s = 546 (1,800) GeV. Assuming {rho} = 0.15 the elastic, total and single diffraction cross sections are {sigma}{sub el} = 12.87 {+-} 0.30, {sigma}{sub T} = 61.26 {+-} 0.93 and {sigma}{sub sd} = 7.89 {+-} 0.33 mb ({sigma}{sub el} = 19.70 {+-} 0.85, {sigma}{sub T} = 80.03 {+-} 2.24 and {sigma}{sub sd} = 9.46 {+-} 0.44 mb) at {radical}s = 546 (1,800) GeV.

  9. Measurement of the elastic, total and single diffraction cross sections at Tevatron energies

    SciTech Connect

    Belforte, S.; CDF Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    CDF collaboration has measured the differential elastic cross section d{sigma}{sub el}/dt, the single diffraction dissociation double differential cross section d{sup 2}{sigma}{sub sd}/dM{sup 2}dt and the total inelastic cross section in antiproton-proton collisions at center of mass energies {radical}s=546 and 1800 GeV. The elastic scattering slope is 15.28{plus_minus}0.58 (16.98{plus_minus}0.25) GeV{sup {minus}2} at {radical}s = 546 (1800) GeV. Using the luminosity independent method, (1 + {rho}{sup 2}){sigma}{sub T} is measured to be 62.64{plus_minus}0.95 (81.83{plus_minus}2.29) mb at {radical}s = 546 (1800) GeV. Assuming {rho} = 0.15, the elastic, total and signal diffraction cross sections are {sigma}{sub el} = 12.87{plus_minus}0.30, {sigma}{sub T} = 61.26{plus_minus}0.93 and {sigma}{sub sd} = 7.89{plus_minus}0.33 mb ({sigma}{sub el} = 19.70{plus_minus}0.85, {sigma}{sub T} = 80.03{plus_minus}2.24 and {sigma}{sub sd} = 9.46{plus_minus}0.44 mb) at 546 (1800) GeV.

  10. Helicity dependence of the total inclusive cross section on the deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gdh; A2 Collaborations; Ahrens, J.; Altieri, S.; Annand, J. R. M.; Arends, H.-J.; Beck, R.; Blackston, M. A.; Braghieri, A.; D'Hose, N.; Dutz, H.; Heid, E.; Jahn, O.; Klein, F.; Kondratiev, R.; Lang, M.; Lisin, V.; Martinez Fabregate, M.; McGeorge, J. C.; Meyer, W.; Panzeri, A.; Pedroni, P.; Pinelli, T.; Protopopescu, D.; Reichertz, G.; Rohlof, Ch.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Schwamb, M.; Tamas, G.; Thomas, A.; Weller, H. R.

    2009-03-01

    A measurement of the helicity dependence of the total inclusive photoabsorption cross section on the deuteron was carried out at MAMI (Mainz) in the energy range 200

  11. Automatic regularization parameter selection by generalized cross-validation for total variational Poisson noise removal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiongjun; Javidi, Bahram; Ng, Michael K

    2017-03-20

    In this paper, we propose an alternating minimization algorithm with an automatic selection of the regularization parameter for image reconstruction of photon-counted images. By using the generalized cross-validation technique, the regularization parameter can be updated in the iterations of the alternating minimization algorithm. Experimental results show that our proposed algorithm outperforms the two existing methods, the maximum likelihood expectation maximization estimator with total variation regularization and the primal dual method, where the parameters must be set in advance.

  12. Review of total cross sections and forward scattering parameters at ultra-high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Block, M.M.; White, A.R.

    1991-10-01

    We review the field of the elastic scattering of pp and {bar p}p at the ultra-high energies. The recent total cross section, {sigma}{sub tot}, and {rho}-value results from the Fermilab Tevatron Collider experiments presented at the 4th `Blois` Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering (Elba, Italy, in May, 1991), allow us a comprehensive overview of the field. 24 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Review of total cross sections and forward scattering parameters at ultra-high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Block, M.M. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); White, A.R. . High Energy Physics Div.)

    1991-10-01

    We review the field of the elastic scattering of pp and {bar p}p at the ultra-high energies. The recent total cross section, {sigma}{sub tot}, and {rho}-value results from the Fermilab Tevatron Collider experiments presented at the 4th Blois' Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering (Elba, Italy, in May, 1991), allow us a comprehensive overview of the field. 24 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Elastic scattering and total reaction cross section of {sup 6}He+{sup 120}Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, P. N. de; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Pires, K. C. C.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Mendes, D. R. Jr.; Barioni, A.; Morcelle, V.; Morais, M. C.; Camargo, O. Jr.; Alcantara Nunez, J.; Moro, A. M.; Arazi, A.; Rodriguez-Gallardo, M.; Assuncao, M.

    2010-04-15

    The elastic scattering of {sup 6}He on {sup 120}Sn has been measured at four energies above the Coulomb barrier using the {sup 6}He beam produced at the RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brasil) facility. The elastic angular distributions have been analyzed with the optical model and three- and four-body continuum-discretized coupled-channels calculations. The total reaction cross sections have been derived and compared with other systems of similar masses.

  15. Total electron scattering cross section of Fluorocarbons at intermediate electron energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palihawadana, Prasanga; Villela, Gilberto; Ariyasinghe, Wickramasinghe

    2008-10-01

    Total electron scattering cross sections (TCS) of Tetrafluoromethane (CF4), Trifluoromethane (CHF3), Hexafluoroethane (C2F6) and Octafluorocyclobutane (C4F8) have been measured using the linear transmission technique for impact energies 0.10 -- 4.00 keV. These TCS are compared to existing experimental and theoretical TCS in the literature. Based on the present measurements, an empirical formula is developed to predict the TCS of fluorocarbons as a function of incident electron energy.

  16. Total Cross Section Parameterizations for Pion Production in Nucleon-Nucleon Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.

    2008-01-01

    Total cross section parameterizations for neutral and charged pion production in nucleon-nuelcon collisions are compared to an extensive set of experimental data over the projectile momentum range from threshold to 300 GeV. Both proton-proton and proton-neutron reactions are considered. Good agreement between parameterizations and experiment is found, and therefore the parameterizations will be useful for applications, such as transport codes.

  17. Medium modified two-body scattering amplitude from proton-nucleus total cross-sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2001-01-01

    Recently (R.K. Tripathi, J.W. Wilson, F.A. Cucinotta, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 145 (1998) 277; R.K. Tripathi, F.A. Cucinotta, J.W. Wilson, NASA-TP-1998-208438), we have extracted nucleon-nucleon (N-N) cross-sections in the medium directly from experiment. The in-medium N-N cross-sections form the basic ingredients of several heavy-ion scattering approaches including the coupled-channel approach developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Here, we investigate the ratio of real to imaginary part of the two-body scattering amplitude in the medium. These ratios are used in combination with the in-medium N-N cross-sections to calculate total proton-nucleus cross-sections. The agreement is excellent with the available experimental data. These cross-sections are needed for the radiation risk assessment of space missions. c2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Estimating total fusion cross sections by using a coupled-channel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ki-Seok; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kim, K. S.; Kim, T. H.; So, W. Y.

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the total fusion cross sections for the 6He + 209Bi, 6Li + 209Bi,9Be + 208Pb, 10Be + 209Bi, and 11Li + 208Pb systems by using a coupled-channel (CC) method and compare the results with the experimental data. In the CC approach for the total fusion cross sections, we exploit a globally determined Wood-Saxon potential with Akyüz-Winther parameters and couplings of the ground state to the low-lying excited states in the projectile and the target nuclei. The total fusion cross sections obtained with the CC are compared with those obtained without the CC couplings. The latter approach is tantamount to a one-dimensional barrier penetration model. Finally, our approach is applied to understand new data for the 11Li+208Pb system. Possible ambiguities inherent in those approaches are discussed in detail for further applications to the fusion system of halo and/or neutron-rich nuclei.

  19. Absorption spectrum and absolute absorption cross sections of CH3O2 radicals and CH3I molecules in the wavelength range 7473-7497 cm(-1).

    PubMed

    Faragó, Eszter P; Viskolcz, Bela; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa

    2013-12-05

    The absorption spectrum of CH3O2 radicals and CH3I molecules has been measured in the range 7473-7497 cm(-1). CH3O2 radicals have been generated by 248 nm laser photolysis of CH3I in the presence of O2, and the relative absorption has been measured by time-resolved continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS). Calibration of the relative absorption spectrum has been carried out on three distinct wavelengths by carefully measuring CH3O2 decays under different experimental conditions and extracting the initial radical concentration (and with this the absolute absorption cross sections) by using the well-known rate constant for the CH3O2 self-reaction. The following, pressure-independent absorption cross sections were determined: 3.41 × 10(-20), 3.40 × 10(-20), and 2.11 × 10(-20) cm(2) at 7748.18, 7489.16, and 7493.33 cm(-1). These values are 2-3 times higher than previous determinations ( Pushkarsky, M. B.; Zalyubovsky, S. J.; Miller, T. A. J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 112 (24), 10695 - 10698 and Atkinson, D. B.; Spillman, J. L. J. Phys. Chem. A 2002, 106 (38), 8891 - 8902). The absorption spectrum of the stable precursor CH3I has also been determined and three characteristic sharp absorption lines with absorption cross sections up to 2 × 10(-21) cm(2) have been observed in this wavelength range.

  20. Total Cross Section Measurements and Velocity Distributions of Hyperthermal Charge Transfer in Xe2+ + N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hause, Michael; Prince, Benjamin; Bemish, Raymond

    Guided-ion beam measurements of the charge exchange (CEX) cross section for Xe2+ + N2 are reported for collision energies ranging from 0.3 to 100 eV in the center-of-mass frame. Measured total XS decrease from 69.5 +/-0.3 Angstroms2 (Angs.) at the lowest collision energies to 40 Angs.2at 100 eV. The product N2+CEX cross section is similar to the total CEX cross section while those of the dissociative product, N+, are less than 1Angs.2 for collision energies above 9 eV. The product N2+CEXcross section measured here are much larger than the total optical emission-excitation cross sections for the N2+(A) and (B) state products determined previously in the chemiluminescence study of Prince and Chiu suggesting that most of the N2+products are in the X state. Time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of both the Xe+ and N2+products suggest two different CEX product channels. The first leaves highly-vibrationally excited N2+products with forward scattered Xe+ (LAB frame) and releases between 0.35 to 0.6 eV translational energy for collisions below 17.6 eV. The second component decreases with collisional energy and leaves backscattered Xe+ and low-vibrational states of N2+.At collision energies above 17.6 eV, only charge exchange involving minimal momentum exchange remains in the TOF spectra. AFOSR 13RV07COR.

  1. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  2. Carotenoids and related polyenes, part 12. First total synthesis and absolute configuration of 3'-deoxycapsanthin and 3,4-didehydroxy-3'-deoxycapsanthin.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Yumiko; Chary, Mahankhali Venu; Wada, Akimori

    2010-10-01

    The synthesis of 3'-deoxycapsanthin (1) and 3,4-didehydroxy-3'-deoxycapsanthin (2), carotenoids of paprika, has been achieved by employing Lewis acid-promoted regio- and stereoselective rearrangement of the C(15)-epoxy dienal 5a. The absolute stereochemistry of the newly formed C-5 chiral center of rearrangement product 6a was determined to be (R) from its alternative synthesis derived from (+)-(R)-camphonanic acid (11).

  3. Wear Analysis of Second-generation Highly Cross-Linked Polyethylene in Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Samujh, Christopher; Bhimani, Samrath; Smith, Langan; Malkani, Arthur L

    2016-11-01

    A major limiting factor in the longevity of total hip replacement is the wear rate of the hip bearing. As manufacturing technology has improved during the past several decades, much attention has been focused on developing newer generations of polyethylene that have lower rates of wear while minimizing free radical formation and subsequent osteolysis. The turning point for the manufacture of polyethylene was moving from gamma irradiation in air to irradiation in a low oxygen environment, which reduced free radical formation while increasing the wear resistance. New polyethylene manufacturing methods, including multiple cycles of irradiation and annealing, have resulted in greater wear resistance. Wear analysis studies are essential to determine if these new liners actually show a benefit from prior generations of polyethylene and, more importantly, if they are safe to use. This study involved a single center retrospective review of 60 patients with a mean follow-up of 5.5 years who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty with a second-generation highly cross-linked polyethylene manufactured by 3 cycles of sequential irradiation and annealing. Linear and volumetric wear rates were determined from digitized radiographs using contemporary wear analysis software. The mean linear wear rate for the entire group was 0.025 millimeters per year (mm/y). This value represents a linear wear rate 2.7 times less than that of a first-generation highly cross-linked polyethylene and 4.2 times less than that of a conventional polyethylene. At an average of 5 years, compared with a first-generation highly cross-linked polyethylene, a second-generation highly cross-linked polyethylene appears to show significant improvement regarding wear. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1178-e1182.].

  4. High resolution absolute absorption cross sections of the B ̃(1)A'-X ̃(1)A' transition of the CH2OO biradical.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Elizabeth S; Kapnas, Kara M; Jou, YiTien; Kalinowski, Jarosław; Feng, David; Gerber, R Benny; Murray, Craig

    2015-12-28

    Carbonyl oxides, or Criegee intermediates, are formed from the gas phase ozonolysis of alkenes and play a pivotal role in night-time and urban area atmospheric chemistry. Significant discrepancies exist among measurements of the strong B ̃(1)A'-X ̃(1)A' electronic transition of the simplest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO in the visible/near-UV. We report room temperature spectra of the B ̃(1)A'-X ̃(1)A' electronic absorption band of CH2OO acquired at higher resolution using both single-pass broadband absorption and cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The new absorption spectra confirm the vibrational structure on the red edge of the band that is absent from ionization depletion measurements. The absolute absorption cross sections over the 362-470 nm range are in good agreement with those reported by Ting et al. Broadband absorption spectra recorded over the temperature range of 276-357 K were identical within their mutual uncertainties, confirming that the vibrational structure is not due to hot bands.

  5. Absolute Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, George

    1990-12-01

    The absolute sensitivity of the FOS will be determined in SV by observing 2 stars at 3 epochs, first in 3 apertures (1.0", 0.5", and 0.3" circular) and then in 1 aperture (1.0" circular). In cycle 1, one star, BD+28D4211 will be observed in the 1.0" aperture to establish the stability of the sensitivity and flat field characteristics and improve the accuracy obtained in SV. This star will also be observed through the paired apertures since these are not calibrated in SV. The stars will be observed in most detector/grating combinations. The data will be averaged to form the inverse sensitivity functions required by RSDP.

  6. Endovascular Treatment of Totally Occluded Superior Mesenteric Artery by Retrograde Crossing via the Villemin Arcade

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Seitun, Sara; Bovio, Giulio; Fornaro, Rosario

    2013-06-15

    Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) is a rare disorder that is commonly caused by progressive atherosclerotic stenosis or occlusion of one or more mesenteric arteries. Endovascular treatment for symptomatic CMI represents a viable option, especially in high-operative risk patients. We report a case of acute symptomatic CMI with chronic totally occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) associated with significant stenosis of celiac trunk (CT) and inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) that underwent endovascular treatment of all the three mesenteric arteries: stenting of CT and IMA stenosis, and recanalization of the SMA occlusion by retrograde crossing via the Villemin arcade.

  7. Scaling law for total electron-impact ionization cross sections of Li-like ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ancarani, L.U.; Hervieux, P.-A.

    2005-09-15

    Experimental total cross sections for direct electron-impact ionization of the valence electron of several Li-like ions are seen to follow a new ab initio scaling law which is inspired by a Coulomb-Born model and the frozen-core Hartree-Fock approximation. The predictive character of this scaling law should be very useful to experimentalists and can be used to complete data tables needed for plasma or astrophysical studies. A single-parameter fit of the best available experimental data, once scaled, provides us with a single formula, for moderately charged Li-like ions, which is more accurate than Lotz semiempirical formula.

  8. Measurement of Neutron Total Cross Sections in Support of the APT Program

    SciTech Connect

    Abfalterer, W.P.; Haight, R.C.; Morgan, G.L.; Bateman, F.B.; Dietrich, F.S.; Finlay, R.W.

    1998-11-04

    The authors have completed a new set of total cross section measurements of 37 samples spanning the periodic table. The authors employed the same technique as in a previous measurement, with refinements intended to allow measurements on separated isotopes, and with improved systematic error control. The goal of the new measurement was 1% statistical accuracy in 1% energy bins with systematic errors less than 1%. This was achieved for all but the smallest samples, for which the statistical accuracy was as large as 2% in 1% bins.

  9. Measurement of the energy dependence of the total photon-proton cross section at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZEUS Collaboration; Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boutle, S. K.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; Del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; de Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Fourletov, S.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Iacobucci, G.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kamaluddin, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kulinski, P.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Loizides, J. H.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Łużniak, P.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nicholass, D.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Ron, E.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Whyte, J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Zulkapli, Z.

    2011-03-01

    The energy dependence of the photon-proton total cross section, σtotγp, was determined from e+p scattering data collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three values of the center-of-mass energy, W, of the γp system in the range 194

  10. Measurement of the energy dependence of the total photon-proton cross section at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boutle, S. K.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Fourletov, S.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Hüttmann, A.; Iacobucci, G.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kamaluddin, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kulinski, P.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Loizides, J. H.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Łużniak, P.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nicholass, D.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Ron, E.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Whyte, J.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhou, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Zulkapli, Z.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    The energy dependence of the photon-proton total cross section, σtotγp, was determined from ep scattering data collected with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three values of the center-of-mass energy, W, of the γp system in the range 194

  11. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of {sup 58}Ni and nuclear models

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.; Lawson, R.D.; Chiba, S.

    1991-12-31

    An extensive experimental and theoretical study of the fast-neutron interaction with {sup 58}Ni was undertaken. The neutron total cross sections of {sup 58}Ni were measured from {approx} 1 to > 10 MeV using white source techniques. Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from {approx} 4.5 to 10 MeV at {approx} 0.5 Mev intervals with {ge} 75 differential values per distribution. Differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured, corresponding to fourteen levels with excitations up to {approx} 4.8 Mev. The measured results, combined with lower-energy values previously obtained at this laboratory and with relevant values available in the literature, were interpreted in terms of optical-statistical, dispersive-optical and coupled-channels models using both vibrational and rotational coupling schemes. The physical implications of the experimental results and their interpretation are discussed. The considerations are being extended to collective vibrational nuclei generally, exploring the potential for utilizing electro-magnetic matrix elements, deduced from experiment or predicted by the shell model, to determine the strengths of the neutron interaction. Detailed aspects of this work are given in the Laboratory Report, ANL/NDM-120 (in press). 9 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Fast-neutron total and scattering cross sections of sup 58 Ni and nuclear models

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.; Whalen, J.F.; Lawson, R.D.; Chiba, S.

    1991-01-01

    An extensive experimental and theoretical study of the fast-neutron interaction with {sup 58}Ni was undertaken. The neutron total cross sections of {sup 58}Ni were measured from {approx} 1 to > 10 MeV using white source techniques. Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections were measured from {approx} 4.5 to 10 MeV at {approx} 0.5 Mev intervals with {ge} 75 differential values per distribution. Differential neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections were measured, corresponding to fourteen levels with excitations up to {approx} 4.8 Mev. The measured results, combined with lower-energy values previously obtained at this laboratory and with relevant values available in the literature, were interpreted in terms of optical-statistical, dispersive-optical and coupled-channels models using both vibrational and rotational coupling schemes. The physical implications of the experimental results and their interpretation are discussed. The considerations are being extended to collective vibrational nuclei generally, exploring the potential for utilizing electro-magnetic matrix elements, deduced from experiment or predicted by the shell model, to determine the strengths of the neutron interaction. Detailed aspects of this work are given in the Laboratory Report, ANL/NDM-120 (in press). 9 refs., 10 figs.

  13. Model for neutron total cross-section at low energies for nuclear grade graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galván Josa, V. M.; Dawidowski, J.; Santisteban, J. R.; Malamud, F.; Oliveira, R. G.

    2015-04-01

    At subthermal neutron energies, polycrystalline graphite shows a large total cross-section due to small angle scattering processes. In this work, a new methodology to determine pore size distributions through the neutron transmission technique at subthermal energies is proposed and its sensitivity is compared with standard techniques. A simple model based on the form factor for spherical particles, normally used in the Small Angle Neutron Scattering technique, is employed to calculate the contribution of small angle effect to the total scattering cross-section, with the width and center of the radii distributions as free parameters in the model. Small Angle X-ray Scattering experiments were performed to compare results as a means to validate the method. The good agreement reached reveals that the neutron transmission technique is a useful tool to explore small angle scattering effects. This fact can be exploited in situations where large samples must be scanned and it is difficult to investigate them with conventional methods. It also opens the possibility to apply this method in energy-resolved neutron imaging. Also, since subthermal neutron transmission experiments are perfectly feasible in small neutron sources, the present findings open new possibilities to the work done in such kind of facilities.

  14. Total molecular photoionization cross-sections by algebraic diagrammatic construction-Stieltjes-Lanczos method: Benchmark calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberti, M.; Yun, R.; Gokhberg, K.; Kopelke, S.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Tarantelli, F.; Averbukh, V.

    2013-10-01

    In [K. Gokhberg, V. Vysotskiy, L. S. Cederbaum, L. Storchi, F. Tarantelli, and V. Averbukh, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 064104 (2009)] we introduced a new {L}2ab initio method for the calculation of total molecular photoionization cross-sections. The method is based on the ab initio description of discretized photoionized molecular states within the many-electron Green's function approach, known as algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC), and on the application of Stieltjes-Chebyshev moment theory to Lanczos pseudospectra of the ADC electronic Hamiltonian. Here we establish the accuracy of the new technique by comparing the ADC-Lanczos-Stieltjes cross-sections in the valence ionization region to the experimental ones for a series of eight molecules of first row elements: HF, NH3, H2O, CO2, H2CO, CH4, C2H2, and C2H4. We find that the use of the second-order ADC technique [ADC(2)] that includes double electronic excitations leads to a substantial systematic improvement over the first-order method [ADC(1)] and to a good agreement with experiment for photon energies below 80 eV. The use of extended second-order ADC theory [ADC(2)x] leads to a smaller further improvement. Above 80 eV photon energy all three methods lead to significant deviations from the experimental values which we attribute to the use of Gaussian single-electron bases. Our calculations show that the ADC(2)-Lanczos-Stieltjes technique is a reliable and efficient ab initio tool for theoretical prediction of total molecular photo-ionization cross-sections in the valence region.

  15. Total molecular photoionization cross-sections by algebraic diagrammatic construction-Stieltjes-Lanczos method: benchmark calculations.

    PubMed

    Ruberti, M; Yun, R; Gokhberg, K; Kopelke, S; Cederbaum, L S; Tarantelli, F; Averbukh, V

    2013-10-14

    In [K. Gokhberg, V. Vysotskiy, L. S. Cederbaum, L. Storchi, F. Tarantelli, and V. Averbukh, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 064104 (2009)] we introduced a new L(2) ab initio method for the calculation of total molecular photoionization cross-sections. The method is based on the ab initio description of discretized photoionized molecular states within the many-electron Green's function approach, known as algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC), and on the application of Stieltjes-Chebyshev moment theory to Lanczos pseudospectra of the ADC electronic Hamiltonian. Here we establish the accuracy of the new technique by comparing the ADC-Lanczos-Stieltjes cross-sections in the valence ionization region to the experimental ones for a series of eight molecules of first row elements: HF, NH3, H2O, CO2, H2CO, CH4, C2H2, and C2H4. We find that the use of the second-order ADC technique [ADC(2)] that includes double electronic excitations leads to a substantial systematic improvement over the first-order method [ADC(1)] and to a good agreement with experiment for photon energies below 80 eV. The use of extended second-order ADC theory [ADC(2)x] leads to a smaller further improvement. Above 80 eV photon energy all three methods lead to significant deviations from the experimental values which we attribute to the use of Gaussian single-electron bases. Our calculations show that the ADC(2)-Lanczos-Stieltjes technique is a reliable and efficient ab initio tool for theoretical prediction of total molecular photo-ionization cross-sections in the valence region.

  16. The association between total leukocyte count and longevity: Evidence from longitudinal and cross-sectional data.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Piotr Paweł; Borysławski, Krzysztof; Chmielowiec, Krzysztof; Chmielowiec, Jolanta; Strzelec, Bartłomiej

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between age-dependent changes in total leukocyte count (TLC) and certain selected differential counts expressed as frequencies (granulocytes, band cells, eosinophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes) and longevity in physically healthy men and women aged 45+. Longitudinal data on cell counts from 142 subjects (68 men and 74 women; all aged 45-70 and examined for 25 years) were compared with cross-sectional data from 225 subjects (113 men and 112 women; this group was divided into four categories of average lifespan; i.e.: 53, 63, 68, and 76+ years of age). ANOVA, t-test, and regression analysis were employed. Secular changes in leukocyte count were controlled. Men had continuously higher TLC compared with women. Moreover, sex differences in patterns of changes with age were found. The longitudinal assessment revealed a U-shaped pattern of changes in TLC in men (y=0.0026x(2)-0.2866x+14.4374; R(2)=0.852) and women (y=0.0048x(2)-0.5386x+20.922; R(2)=0.938), whereas the cross-sectional comparison showed an inverted U-shaped pattern in men (y=-0.0021x(2)+0.2421x; R(2)=0.417) and women (y=-0.0017x(2)+0.2061x; R(2)=0.888). In general, the comparison of longitudinal and cross-sectional data on changes with age in TLC indicates that longevity favors individuals with lower yet normal TLC and this correlation is more pronounced in men. In conclusion, our findings are in line with previous longitudinal studies of aging and suggest that lower TLC within the normal range (4.0-10.0 × 10(3)μL(-1)) can be a useful predictor of longevity in physically healthy individuals.

  17. Probing Neutron-Skin Thickness of Unstable Nuclei with Total Reaction Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Wataru; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Inakura, Tsunenori

    We present our recent analysis of the total reaction cross sections, σR, of unstable nuclei and discuss their sensitivity to the neutron-skin thickness. The σR is calculated with the Glauber model using projectile densities obtained with the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock method on the three-dimensional coordinate space. We cover 91 nuclei of O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, and Ni isotopes. Defining a reaction radius, aR = √{σ R/π } , to characterize the nuclear size and target (proton or 12C) dependence, we see the 12C target probes the matter radius while the proton target is sensitive to the skin-thickness. We find an empirical formula for expressing aR with the point matter radius and the skin thickness, which can be used to determine the skin thickness.

  18. DATA REVIEW: A compilation of data on hadronic total cross sections in e+e- interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, M. R.

    2003-12-01

    A comprehensive compilation of experimental data on total hadronic cross sections, and R ratios, in e+e- interactions is presented. Published data from the Novosibirsk, Orsay, Frascati, SLAC, CORNELL, DESY, KEK and CERN e+e- colliders on both exclusive and inclusive final particle states are included from threshold energies to the highest LEP energies. The data are presented in tabular form supplemented by compilation plots of different exclusive final particle states and of different energy regions. All the data in this review, together with data on a wide variety of other reactions, can be found in, and retrieved from, the Durham HEP Databases on the World Wide Web http://durpdg.dur.ac.uk/HEPDATA.

  19. K+ nucleus reaction and total cross sections: New analysis of transmission experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.; Weiss, R.; Aclander, J.; Alster, J.; Mardor, I.; Mardor, Y.; May-Tal Beck, S.; Piasetzky, E.; Yavin, A. I.; Bart, S.; Chrien, R. E.; Pile, P. H.; Sawafta, R.; Sutter, R. J.; Barakat, M.; Johnston, K.; Krauss, R. A.; Seyfarth, H.; Stearns, R. L.

    1997-03-01

    The attenuation cross sections measured in transmission experiments at the alternating-gradient synchrotron for K+ on 6Li, C, Si, and Ca at pL = 488, 531, 656, and 714 MeV/c are reanalyzed in order to derive total (σT) and reaction (σR) cross sections. The effect of plural (Molière) scattering is properly accounted for, leading to revised values of σT. We demonstrate the model dependence of these values, primarily due to the choice of K+ nuclear optical potential used to generate the necessary Coulomb-nuclear and nuclear elastic corrections. Values of σR are also derived, for the first time, from the same data and exhibit a remarkable degree of model independence. The derived values of σT and σR exceed those calculated by the first-order tρ optical potential for C, Si, and Ca, but not for 6Li, particularly at 656 and 714 MeV/c where the excess is 10-25%. Relative to 6Li, this excess is found to be nearly energy independent and its magnitude of 15-25% is not reproduced by any nuclear medium effect studied so far.

  20. Sensitivity analysis of neutron total and absorption cross sections within the optical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigni, M. T.; Herman, M.; Obložinský, P.; Dietrich, F. S.

    2011-02-01

    Distinct maxima and minima in neutron total and absorption cross-section uncertainties when optical-model parameters are varied have been observed in large-scale covariance calculations. These features were seen over a wide mass range (20-210) and for energies up to 20 MeV. Here we investigate the physical origin of the observed patterns over an extended energy range (1 keV to 200 MeV). We have calculated the sensitivity of the cross sections for a specific nucleus (Fe56) to variations of the 15 parameters of a standard global optical potential parametrization, and have also carried out calculations for alternative global optical potentials over the original wide mass and energy ranges. We find that simple physical descriptions can be found in two energy ranges. Below approximately 100 keV, the patterns arise from the interplay of the s- and p-wave single-particle resonances. Above approximately 4 MeV, a single-phase-shift approximation (the Ramsauer model) describes the observed behavior. We discuss the potential importance of such sensitivity studies for further development of optical potentials.

  1. Total Synthesis of Piericidin A1. Application of a Modified Negishi Carboalumination-Nickel-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Lipshutz, Bruce H.; Amorelli, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    A total synthesis of the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor piericidin A1 is described. It features a unique strategy for the key disconnection, highlighting a modified Negishi carboalumination/Ni-catalyzed cross-coupling on a polyenyne precursor. PMID:19138148

  2. All-loop calculations of total, elastic and single diffractive cross sections in RFT via the stochastic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kolevatov, R. S.; Boreskov, K. G.

    2013-04-15

    We apply the stochastic approach to the calculation of the Reggeon Field Theory (RFT) elastic amplitude and its single diffractive cut. The results for the total, elastic and single difractive cross sections with account of all Pomeron loops are obtained.

  3. Time-dependent quantum mechanical calculations on H+O2 for total angular momentum J>0. III. Total cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfield, Evelyn M.; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.

    2000-12-01

    The H+O2→OH+O reaction has been studied with a time-dependent wave packet method for total angular momentum J=15, 20, 25, 35. This work is a continuation of previous studies for J⩽10. The calculations were performed combining a real wave packet method with the Coriolis coupled method on parallel computers. We find that for most energies there is a monotonic decrease of reaction probability with increasing J. Nevertheless, due to the 2J+1 degeneracy, higher angular momentum states contribute significantly to the total reaction cross section. A smoothing/interpolation/extrapolation scheme is employed to compute total reaction cross sections. These cross sections are compared with quasiclassical results on the same potential energy surface, and the most recent experimental cross sections. Comparisons with quasiclassical results show the significance of zero-point energy constraints. The quantum mechanical theoretical cross sections are smaller than the experimental ones everywhere, suggesting that a more accurate potential energy surface is required. There is also some possibility that nonadiabatic effects play a role in this reaction.

  4. Neutron Capture and Neutron Total Cross Sections Measurements for {sup 27}Al at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, K.H.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Koehler, P.E.; Leal, L.C.; Sayer, R.O.; Spencer, R.R.; Wright, R.Q.

    1999-08-30

    We have used the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to measure neutron total and capture cross sections of {sup 27}Al in the energy range from 100 eV to {approximately}400 keV. We report the resonance parameters as well as the Maxwellian average capture cross sections.

  5. Extracting nuclear sizes of medium to heavy nuclei from total reaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, W.; Hatakeyama, S.; Ebata, S.; Suzuki, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Background: Proton and neutron radii are fundamental quantities of atomic nuclei. To study the sizes of short-lived unstable nuclei, there is a need for an alternative to electron scattering. Purpose: The recent paper by Horiuchi et al. [Phys. Rev. C 89, 011601(R) (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevC.89.011601 proposed a possible way of extracting the matter and neutron-skin thickness of light- to medium-mass nuclei using total reaction cross section, σR. The analysis is extended to medium to heavy nuclei up to lead isotopes with due attention to Coulomb breakup contributions as well as density distributions improved by paring correlation. Methods: We formulate a quantitative calculation of σR based on the Glauber model including the Coulomb breakup. To substantiate the treatment of the Coulomb breakup, we also evaluate the Coulomb breakup cross section due to the electric dipole field in a canonical-basis-time-dependent-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory in the three-dimensional coordinate space. Results: We analyze σR's of 103 nuclei with Z =20 , 28, 40, 50, 70, and 82 incident on light targets, H,21, 4He, and 12C. Three kinds of Skyrme interactions are tested to generate those wave functions. To discuss possible uncertainty due to the Coulomb breakup, we examine its dependence on the target, the incident energy, and the Skyrme interaction. The proton is a most promising target for extracting the nuclear sizes as the Coulomb excitation can safely be neglected. We find that the so-called reaction radius, aR=√{σR/π } , for the proton target is very well approximated by a linear function of two variables, the matter radius and the skin thickness, in which three constants depend only on the incident energy. We quantify the accuracy of σR measurements needed to extract the nuclear sizes. Conclusions: The proton is the best target because, once the incident energy is set, its aR is very accurately determined by only the matter radius and neutron-skin thickness. If σR's at

  6. Low energy positron interactions with uracil—Total scattering, positronium formation, and differential elastic scattering cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E. K.; Boadle, R. A.; Machacek, J. R.; Makochekanwa, C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Chiari, L.; Buckman, S. J.; Brunger, M. J.; Garcia, G.; Blanco, F.; Ingolfsson, O.

    2014-07-21

    Measurements of the grand total and total positronium formation cross sections for positron scattering from uracil have been performed for energies between 1 and 180 eV, using a trap-based beam apparatus. Angular, quasi-elastic differential cross section measurements at 1, 3, 5, 10, and 20 eV are also presented and discussed. These measurements are compared to existing experimental results and theoretical calculations, including our own calculations using a variant of the independent atom approach.

  7. Measured Total Cross Sections of Slow Neutrons Scattered by Solid Deuterium and Implications for Ultracold Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Atchison, F.; Blau, B.; Brandt, B. van den; Brys, T.; Daum, M.; Fierlinger, P.; Hautle, P.; Henneck, R.; Heule, S.; Kirch, K.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Kuehne, G.; Konter, J.A.; Pichlmaier, A.; Wokaun, A.; Bodek, K.; Kasprzak, M.; Kuzniak, M.; Geltenbort, P.; Zmeskal, J.

    2005-10-28

    The total scattering cross sections for slow neutrons with energies in the range 100 neV to 3 meV for solid ortho-{sup 2}H{sub 2} at 18 and 5 K, frozen from the liquid, have been measured. The 18 K cross sections are found to be in excellent agreement with theoretical expectations and for ultracold neutrons dominated by thermal up scattering. At 5 K the total scattering cross sections are found to be dominated by the crystal defects originating in temperature induced stress but not deteriorated by temperature cycles between 5 and 10 K.

  8. Fission, total and neutron capture cross section measurements at ORELA for {sup 233}U, {sup 27}Al and natural chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, K.H.; Spencer, R.R.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, D.C.; Santos, G. Dos; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.

    1998-08-01

    The authors have made use of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to measure the fission cross section of {sup 233}U in the neutron energy range of 0.36 eV to {approximately} 700 keV. This paper reports integral data and average cross sections. In addition they measured the total neutron cross section of {sup 27}Al and natural chlorine, as well as the capture cross section of Al over an energy range from 100 eV up to about 400 keV.

  9. Introduction to the physics of the total cross section at LHC. A review of data and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancheri, Giulia; Srivastava, Yogendra N.

    2017-03-01

    This review describes the development of the physics of hadronic cross sections up to recent LHC results and cosmic ray experiments. We present here a comprehensive review - written with a historical perspective - about total cross sections from medium to the highest energies explored experimentally and studied through a variety of methods and theoretical models for over 60 years. We begin by recalling the analytic properties of the elastic amplitude and the theorems about the asymptotic behavior of the total cross section. A discussion of how proton-proton cross sections are extracted from cosmic rays at higher than accelerator energies and help the study of these asymptotic limits, is presented. This is followed by a description of the advent of particle colliders, through which high energies and unmatched experimental precisions have been attained. Thus the measured hadronic elastic and total cross sections have become crucial instruments to probe the so called soft part of QCD physics, where quarks and gluons are confined, and have led to test and refine Regge behavior and a number of diffractive models. As the c.m. energy increases, the total cross section also probes the transition into hard scattering describable with perturbative QCD, the so-called mini-jet region. Further tests are provided by cross section measurements of γ p, γ ^* p and γ ^* γ ^* for models based on vector meson dominance, scaling limits of virtual photons at high Q^2 and the BFKL formalism. Models interpolating from virtual to real photons are also tested.

  10. Neutron total and scattering cross sections of /sup 6/Li in the few MeV region

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.; Guenther, P.; Whalen, J.

    1980-02-01

    Neutron total cross sections of /sup 6/Li are measured from approx. 0.5 to approx. 4.8 MeV at intervals of approx.< 10 keV. Neutron differential elastic-scattering cross sections are measured from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV at approx.> 10 scattering angles and at incident-neutron intervals of approx.< 100 keV. Neutron differential inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured in the incident-energy range 3.5 to 4.0 MeV. The experimental results are extended to lower energies using measured neutron total cross sections recently reported elsewhere by the authors. The composite experimental data (total cross sections from 0.1 to 4.8 MeV and scattering cross sections from 0.22 to 4.0 MeV) are interpreted in terms of a simple two-level R-matrix model which describes the observed cross sections and implies the reaction cross section in unobserved channels; notably the (n;..cap alpha..)t reaction (Q = 4.783 MeV). The experimental and calculational results are compared with previously reported results as summarized in the ENDF/B-V evaluated nuclear data file.

  11. Total and differential cross sections of C3H8 and C3F8 by electron and positron impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueoka, Osamu; Kitajima, Masashi; Sakamoto, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Samukawa, S.; Sueoka, Osamu; Hamada, Akira; Kimura, Mineo

    1998-10-01

    Total and differential elastic cross sections in e-/e+ + C3H8 and C3F8 scattering have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. The differential cross section measurement by electron impact has been carried out from 2 eV to 100 eV, while the total cross section measurement by electron and positron has been for 0.7 eV to 600 eV. The theoretical study has been performed by using the continuum multiple-scattering method. The present total cross sections are found to agree reasonably well with those by Wayne State Univ. group, and theoretical rationale for origins of shape resonances are provided.

  12. Calculation of total electron excitation cross-sections and partial electron ionization cross-sections for the elements. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    Computer programs were used to calculate the total electron excitation cross-section for atoms and the partial ionization cross-section. The approximations to the scattering amplitude used are as follows: (1) Born, Bethe, and Modified Bethe for non-exchange excitation; (2) Ochkur for exchange excitation; and (3) Coulomb-Born of non-exchange ionization. The amplitudes are related to the differential cross-sections which are integrated to give the total excitation (or partial ionization) cross-section for the collision. The atomic wave functions used are Hartree-Fock-Slater functions for bound states and the coulomb wave function for the continuum. The programs are presented and the results are examined.

  13. Influence of physical and chemical properties of HTSXT-FTIR samples on the quality of prediction models developed to determine absolute concentrations of total proteins, carbohydrates and triglycerides: a preliminary study on the determination of their absolute concentrations in fresh microalgal biomass.

    PubMed

    Serrano León, Esteban; Coat, Rémy; Moutel, Benjamin; Pruvost, Jérémy; Legrand, Jack; Gonçalves, Olivier

    2014-11-01

    Absolute concentrations of total macromolecules (triglycerides, proteins and carbohydrates) in microorganisms can be rapidly measured by FTIR spectroscopy, but caution is needed to avoid non-specific experimental bias. Here, we assess the limits within which this approach can be used on model solutions of macromolecules of interest. We used the Bruker HTSXT-FTIR system. Our results show that the solid deposits obtained after the sampling procedure present physical and chemical properties that influence the quality of the absolute concentration prediction models (univariate and multivariate). The accuracy of the models was degraded by a factor of 2 or 3 outside the recommended concentration interval of 0.5-35 µg spot(-1). Change occurred notably in the sample hydrogen bond network, which could, however, be controlled using an internal probe (pseudohalide anion). We also demonstrate that for aqueous solutions, accurate prediction of total carbohydrate quantities (in glucose equivalent) could not be made unless a constant amount of protein was added to the model solution (BSA). The results of the prediction model for more complex solutions, here with two components: glucose and BSA, were very encouraging, suggesting that this FTIR approach could be used as a rapid quantification method for mixtures of molecules of interest, provided the limits of use of the HTSXT-FTIR method are precisely known and respected. This last finding opens the way to direct quantification of total molecules of interest in more complex matrices.

  14. Setting the scale of the pp and pp total cross sections using AdS/QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Domokos, Sophia K.; Harvey, Jeffrey A.; Mann, Nelia

    2010-11-15

    This paper is an addendum to earlier work where we computed the Pomeron contribution to pp and pp scattering in AdS/QCD. Our model for pp scattering in the Regge regime depends on four parameters: the slope and intercept of the Pomeron trajectory {alpha}{sub c}{sup '}, {alpha}{sub c}(0), a mass scale M{sub d}, which determines a form factor entering into matrix elements of the energy-momentum tensor, and a coupling {lambda}{sub P} between the lightest spin-two glueball and the proton, which sets the overall scale of the total cross section. Here we perform a more detailed computation of {lambda}{sub P} in the Sakai-Sugimoto model by using the construction of nucleons as instantons of the dual 5D gauge theory and an effective 5D fermion description of these nucleons which has been successfully used to compute a variety of nucleon-meson couplings. We find {lambda}{sub P,SS{approx_equal}}6.38 GeV{sup -1}, which is in reasonable agreement with the value {lambda}{sub P,fit}=8.28 GeV{sup -1} determined by fitting single Pomeron exchange to data.

  15. Measurement of the Total Cross Section and Energy - Correlations for Electron-Positron Annihilation Into Hadrons at 29 GEV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heltsley, Brian Keith

    This work describes measurements of the total cross section and the energy-energy correlation cross section for hadronic events produced in electron-positron annihilation at a center-of-mass energy of 29 GeV. The performance of the MAC detector at PEP, featuring total absorption calorimetry and charged particle tracking over nearly the full solid angle, is examined and found to meet the original design requirements. The unique and optimal features of MAC are fully exploited to reduce the systematics involved in both measurements, resulting in significant quantitative tests of the theory of quantum chromodynamics. Special attention is focussed on radiative corrections to the total cross section, which constitute a critical component of the acceptance determination, and for the first time the effects of higher order than (alpha)('3) QED processes are included. The total cross section measurement yields R = 3.91 with a total error of (+OR-)2.7%, an accuracy not previously attained by other experiments. For the energy-energy correlation cross section, the consequences of combining pure quantum chromodynamics with contrasting fragmentation models are explored and compared with the data, and result in different values for the strong coupling constant, (alpha)(,s) (TURNEQ) 0.13 (+OR-) 0.02 for incoherent jet formation and 0.24 (+OR-) 0.04 in the string model.

  16. Electron-impact total ionization cross sections of CF4, C2F6, and C3F8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, H.; Huo, Winifred M.; Ali, M. A.; Kim, Yong-Ki

    1999-02-01

    Both theoretical and experimental electron-impact total ionization cross sections of CF4, C2F6, and C3F8 are presented. The experimental cross sections have been measured as a function of incident electron energy T from threshold to 3 keV. A parallel plate condenser type apparatus was used. The molecular polarizability for C3F8 was empirically estimated to be α=10.6 Å3±0.8 Å3. Theoretical cross sections calculated from the binary-encounter-Bethe (BEB) method, which combines a modified form of the Mott cross section and the Bethe cross section, are compared with the experimental cross sections. The BEB cross sections calculated from correlated molecular wave functions with theoretical estimates for multiple ionization are about 10% higher than the experimental data at the peak for CF4, while they are in excellent agreement with the experimental data for C2F6 and C3F8. Our analysis shows that the BEB theory implicitly includes part of neutral dissociation, such as CF4→CF3+F, and hence tends to be an upper limit to the total ionization cross section. We found that the difference between our best theory for CF4 and the present experimental cross section exhibits a remarkable similarity to the shape of the recently measured cross section for neutral dissociation, though there is no a priori reason for the similarity. Owing to the large number of bound electrons, the correlation included in our wave functions for C2F6 and C3F8 is more limited than for CF4. Hence, we believe that for these two molecules the calculated cross sections are lower than the true BEB values, in spite of the apparent excellent agreement between the theory and the experiment.

  17. Electron impact total ionization cross sections for simple bio-molecules (H2CO, HCOOH and CH3COOH) using ICSP-ic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhutadia, Harshad; Vinodkumar, Minaxi; Antony, Bobby

    2012-11-01

    In the present work we compute total ionization cross sections for simple bio-molecules viz. formaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid on electron impact. The total ionization cross sections are extracted from total inelastic cross section using Improved Complex Scattering Potential-ionization contribution method.

  18. Total fission cross section of {sup 181}Ta and {sup 208}Pb induced by protons at relativistic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Casarejos, E.; Schmidt, K. H.; Jurado, B.; Pol, H. A.; Ricciardi, M. V.; Pleskac, R.; Enqvist, T.; Rejmund, F.; Giot, L.; Henzl, V.; Lukic, S.; Ngoc, S. N.; Boudard, A.; Leray, S.; Kurtukian, T.; Schmitt, C.; Henzlova, D.; Paradela, C.; Bacquias, A.; Loureiro, D. P.; Foehr, V.; Tarrio, D.; Kezzar, K.

    2011-07-01

    Total fission cross section induced by protons in {sup 181}Ta and {sup 208}Pb at energies in the range of 300 to 1000 A MeV have been measured at GSI (Germany) using the inverse kinematics technique. A dedicated setup with high efficiency made it possible to determine these cross sections with high accuracy. The new data seed light in the controversial results obtained so far and contribute to the understanding of the fission process at high excitation energies. (authors)

  19. Total elastic cross section for H-bar-H scattering at thermal energies

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Prabal K.; Chaudhuri, Puspitapallab; Ghosh, A. S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the elastic scattering cross sections for a few low-lying partial waves and also the converged elastic cross sections with added partial waves in the energy range 10{sup -10}-10{sup -2} a.u. for the H-bar-H system using atomic orbital techniques. The present s-wave predictions are in good agreement with the other existing theoretical estimates. Nonzero low-order partial-wave elastic cross sections show dips like for s-wave scattering. The converged elastic cross section shows structurelike behavior in the energy range 4.2x10{sup -4}-10{sup -2} a.u.

  20. Evaluation of the computational methods for electron-impact total ionization cross sections: Fluoromethanes as benchmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, I.; Martínez, R.; Sánchez Rayo, M. N.; Castaño, F.

    2001-09-01

    The experimental electron-impact total ionization cross sections (TICSs, ICSs) of CF4, CHF3, CH2F2, and CH3F fluoromethanes reported so far and a new set of data obtained with a linear double focusing time-of-flight mass spectrometer have been compared with the ab initio and (semi)empirical based ICS available methods. TICSs computational methods include: two approximations of the binary-encounter dipole (BED) referred to hereafter as Kim (Kim-BEB) and Khare (Khare-BEB) methods, the Deutsch and Märk (DM) formalism, also requiring atomic and molecular ab initio information, the modified additivity rule (MAR), and the Harland and Vallance (HV) methods, both based on semiempirical or empirical correlations. The molecular ab initio information required by the Kim, Khare, and DM methods has been computed at a variety of quantum chemistry levels, with and without electron correlation and a comprehensive series of basis sets. The general conclusions are summarized as follows: the Kim method yields TICS in excellent agreement with the experimental method; the Khare method provides TICS very close to that of Kim at low electron-impact energies (<100 eV), but their Mott and Bethe contributions are noticeably different; in the Kim and Khare approximations the electron correlation methods improve the fittings to the experimental profiles in contrast with the large basis sets, that leads to poorer results; the DM formalism yields TICS profiles with shapes similar to the experimental and the BEB methods, but consistently lower and with the profiles maxima shifted towards lower incident electron energies; the MAR method supplies very good ICS profiles, between those of BEB and DM methods; finally, the empirical HV method provides rather poor fittings concomitant with the simplicity and the few empirical parameters used.

  1. Recanalization of a Heavily Calcified Chronic Total Occlusion in a Femoropopliteal Artery Using a Wingman Crossing Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Naoto; Tanaka, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    We present a 77-year-old female with heavily calcified chronic total occlusions (CTO) in a superficial femoral artery treated by endovascular therapy using a Wingman crossing catheter, which is an over-the-wire catheter with a metallic blade, controlled manually. The blade could probe and track the calcified cap of CTO, wherein any hydrophilic guidewires or looped wires could not penetrate. Moreover, the Wingman could proceed through the occlusion and introduce a guidewire into distal intramedial lumen as a support catheter. Finally, wire crossing was achieved using a bi-directional approach. The Wingman can be a simple solution for crossing calcified peripheral CTO. PMID:27375810

  2. Assessment of experimental d-PIGE γ-ray production cross sections for 12C, 14N and 16O and comparison with absolute thick target yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csedreki, L.; Halász, Z.; Kiss, Á. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Measured differential cross sections for deuteron induced γ-ray emission from the reactions 12C(d,pγ)13C, (Eγ = 3089 keV), 14N(d,pγ)15N (Eγ = 8310 keV) and 16O(d,pγ)17O (Eγ = 871 keV) available in the literature were assessed. In order to cross check the assessed γ-ray production cross section data, thick target γ-yields calculated from the differential cross sections were compared with available measured thick target yields. Recommended differential cross section data for each reaction were deduced for particle induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) applications.

  3. High Precision, Absolute Total Column Ozone Measurements from the Pandora Spectrometer System: Comparisons with Data from a Brewer Double Monochromator and Aura OMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzortziou, Maria A.; Herman, Jay R.; Cede, Alexander; Abuhassan, Nader

    2012-01-01

    We present new, high precision, high temporal resolution measurements of total column ozone (TCO) amounts derived from ground-based direct-sun irradiance measurements using our recently deployed Pandora single-grating spectrometers. Pandora's small size and portability allow deployment at multiple sites within an urban air-shed and development of a ground-based monitoring network for studying small-scale atmospheric dynamics, spatial heterogeneities in trace gas distribution, local pollution conditions, photochemical processes and interdependencies of ozone and its major precursors. Results are shown for four mid- to high-latitude sites where different Pandora instruments were used. Comparisons with a well calibrated double-grating Brewer spectrometer over a period of more than a year in Greenbelt MD showed excellent agreement and a small bias of approximately 2 DU (or, 0.6%). This was constant with slant column ozone amount over the full range of observed solar zenith angles (15-80), indicating adequate Pandora stray light correction. A small (1-2%) seasonal difference was found, consistent with sensitivity studies showing that the Pandora spectral fitting TCO retrieval has a temperature dependence of 1% per 3K, with an underestimation in temperature (e.g., during summer) resulting in an underestimation of TCO. Pandora agreed well with Aura-OMI (Ozone Measuring Instrument) satellite data, with average residuals of <1% at the different sites when the OMI view was within 50 km from the Pandora location and OMI-measured cloud fraction was <0.2. The frequent and continuous measurements by Pandora revealed significant short-term (hourly) temporal changes in TCO, not possible to capture by sun-synchronous satellites, such as OMI, alone.

  4. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  5. Electron-impact total ionization cross sections of DNA sugar-phosphate backbone and an additivity principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2005-01-01

    The improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model [W.M. Huo, Phys. Rev. A64, 042719-1 (2001)l is used to study the total ionization cross sections of the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone by electron impact. Calculations using neutral fragments found that the total ionization cross sections of C3' - and C5', -deoxyribose-phospate, two conformers of the sugar-phosphate backbone, are close to each other. Furthermore, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3' - and C5" -deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 10%. The result implies that certain properties of the-DNA, like the total singly ionization cross section, are localized properties and a building-up or additivity principle may apply. This allows us to obtain accurate properties of larger molecular systems built up from the results of smaller subsystem fragments. Calculations are underway using a negatively charged sugar-phosphate backbone with a metal counter-ion.

  6. The extraction of Φ–N total cross section from d(γ,pK+K-)n

    DOE PAGES

    Qian, X.; Chen, W.; Gao, H.; ...

    2009-10-01

    We report on the first measurement of the differential cross section ofmore » $$\\phi$$-meson photoproduction for the $$d(\\gamma,pK^{+}K^{-})n$$ exclusive reaction channel. The experiment was performed using a \\textcolor{black}{tagged-photon} beam and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. A combined analysis using data from the $$d(\\gamma,pK^{+}K^{-})n$$ channel and those from a previous publication on coherent $$\\phi$$ production on the deuteron has been carried out to extract the $$\\phi-N$$ total cross section, $$\\sigma_{\\phi N}$$. The extracted $$\\phi-N$$ total cross section favors a value above 20 mb. This value is larger than the value extracted using vector-meson dominance models for $$\\phi$$ photoproduction on the proton.« less

  7. Total Hadron Cross Section, New Particles, and Muon Electron Events in e{sup +}e{sup -} Annihilation at SPEAR

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Richter, B.

    1976-01-01

    The review of total hadron electroproduction cross sections, the new states, and the muon--electron events includes large amount of information on hadron structure, nine states with width ranging from 10's of keV to many MeV, the principal decay modes and quantum numbers of some of the states, and limits on charm particle production. 13 references. (JFP)

  8. Total reaction cross sections for 20-30 MeV pions and the anomaly of pionic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, E.; Goldring, A.; Johnson, R. R.; Meirav, O.; Vetterli, D.; Weber, P.; Altman, A.

    1991-03-01

    Total reaction cross sections of 20 MeV π- and 30 MeV π+ and π- have been measured for carbon and nickel targets. The experimental results are in very good agreement with calculations based on commonly accepted pion-nucleus potentials but disagree with calculations based on the potentials associated with the so-called pionic atom anomaly.

  9. The relation between momentum transfer and capture and total scattering cross sections for ion-dipole collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, J. V., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Numerical values of momentum transfer cross sections sigma sub m for ion-dipole collisions are compared with the corresponding capture cross sections sigma sub c as a function of ion velocity and rotational temperature. For values of dipole moment mu from 1 to 4 Debyes the sigma sub m/sigma sub c ratio is in the range 1.2 to 2.0 (roughly). This is in contrast to the simple relation for Langevin collisions where sigma sub m/sigma sub c is equal to or approximately 1.10 independent of polarizability of the target atom. At low temperatures, the momentum transfer cross sections can be as large as 2000 A squared but they are only about 15 to 30 percent of the total scattering cross sections sigma sub S.

  10. Total Born approximation cross sections for single electron loss by atoms and ions colliding with atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    The first born approximation (FBA) is applied to the calculation of single electron loss cross sections for various ions and atoms containing from one to seven electrons. Screened hydrogenic wave functions were used for the states of the electron ejected from the projectile, and Hartree-Fock elastic and incoherent scattering factors were used to describe the target. The effect of the target atom on the scaling of projectile ionization cross sections with respect to the projectile nuclear charge was explored in the case of hydrogen-like ions. Scaling of the cross section with respect to the target nuclear charge for electron loss by Fe (+25) in collision with neutral atoms ranging from H to Fe is also examined. These results were compared to those of the binary encounter approximation and to the FBA for the case of ionization by completely stripped target ions.

  11. Observation of parity nonconservation in the total cross section and in the cross section for the radiative capture of polarized thermal neutrons in /sup 79,81/Br

    SciTech Connect

    Vesna, V.A.; Kolomenskii, E.A.; Lobashev, V.M.; Pirozhkov, A.N.; Smotritskii, L.M.; Titov, N.A.

    1982-04-20

    Parity (P) nonconservation effects have been measured in the total and radiative cross sections in /sup 79,81/Br: (sigma/sup +//sub tot/-sigma/sup -//sub tot/)/(sigma/sup +//sub tot/+sigma/sup -//sub tot/) = (9.8 +- 1.0) x 10/sup -6/sigma/sub tot/) = 15.5 b and (sigma/sup +//sub ..gamma../-sigma/sup -//sub ..gamma../)/(sigma/sup +//sub ..gamma../+sigma/sup -//sub ..gamma../) = (15.5 +- 1.5) x 10/sup -6/sigma/sub ..gamma../ = 9.8 b, where the +- correspond to opposite neutron helicities. It follows from the results that the P-odd effect in the total cross section is determined by radiative capture, within the experimental error.

  12. Deformation effect on total reaction cross sections for neutron-rich Ne isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Minomo, Kosho; Sumi, Takenori; Ogata, Kazuyuki; Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.; Yahiro, Masanobu; Kimura, Masaaki

    2011-09-15

    The isotope dependence of measured reaction cross sections in the scattering of {sup 28-32}Ne isotopes from a {sup 12}C target at 240 MeV/nucleon is analyzed by the double-folding model with the Melbourne g matrix. The density of the projectile is calculated by the mean-field model with the deformed Woods-Saxon potential. The deformation is evaluated by antisymmetrized molecular dynamics. The deformation of the projectile enhances calculated reaction cross sections to the measured values.

  13. Electron loss of fast many-electron ions colliding with neutral atoms: possible scaling rules for the total cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevelko, V. P.; Litsarev, M. S.; Song, M.-Y.; Tawara, H.; Yoon, J.-S.

    2009-03-01

    General features of the total electron-loss (projectile ionization) cross sections, σtot, for fast many-electron ions colliding with neutral atoms are investigated. Two independent scaling laws for σtot are obtained: one follows from the experimental data and another one from the classical calculations based on the n-particle classical trajectory Monte Carlo (nCTMC) and semi-classical treatments. The semi-classical method has recently been developed based upon the energy deposition model and the statistical ionization probabilities. Both scaling relations are expressed in terms of the projectile velocity v, its first ionization potential I1 and the nuclear charge ZA of the target atom. The accuracy of the scaling relations suggested is a factor of 2-3. At the high-velocity region (v2 Gt I1), experimental data are found to decrease approximately as σtot ~ v-2, i.e., close to the Born ionization cross section. At low energies, the σtot values are better described by the classical approximation which accounts for multi-electron-loss processes. These scaling laws obtained are compared with a known scaling law for the Ar target and are used for the prediction of the total electron-loss cross sections in a wide range of the collision parameters. The predicted cross sections σtot can be approximately evaluated as a minimum cross section obtained from two scaling formulae.

  14. The use of FAMACHA in estimation of gastrointestinal nematodes and total worm burden in Damara and Barbados Blackbelly cross sheep.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Konto; Abba, Yusuf; Ramli, Nur Syairah Binti; Marimuthu, Murugaiyah; Omar, Mohammed Ariff; Abdullah, Faez Firdaus Jesse; Sadiq, Muhammad Abubakar; Tijjani, Abdulnasir; Chung, Eric Lim Teik; Lila, Mohammed Azmi Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes and total worm burden of Damara and Barbados Blackbelly cross sheep was investigated among smallholder farms in Salak Tinggi district of Selangor, Malaysia. A total of 50 sheep raised in smallholder farms comprising of 27 Damara cross and 23 Barbados Blackbelly cross were categorized based on their age into young and adults. Fecal samples were collected and examined for strongyle egg count by using modified McMaster technique. Severity of infection was categorized into mild, moderate, and heavy, based on egg per gram (EPG). Five sheep were randomly selected and slaughtered to examine the presence of adult gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes through total worm count (TWC). Faffa Malan Chart (FAMACHA) score was used for investigation of worm load based on the degree of anemia. The study revealed an overall EPG prevalence of 88 %, of which 84.1 % had mild infection. There was a significant difference (p = 0.002) in EPG among the two breeds. Based on age, significant difference (p = 0. 004) in EPG was observed among Barbados Blackbelly cross, but not for Damara cross (p = 0.941). The correlation between severity of infection and the FAMACHA score was significant (r = 0.289; p = 0.042). Haemonchus spp. were the most predominant nematode found in the gastrointestinal tract, followed by Trichostrongylus and Oesophagostomum spps. EPG and TWC for Haemonchus were positively correlated, but not significant (r = 0.85, p = 0.066). From regression analysis, 73 % of the variability in TWC for Haemonchus could be explained by EPG. Thus, it can be concluded that FAMACHA score correlates well with severity of infection of a nematode and can be used to assess the strongyle nematode burden in the different sheep crosses.

  15. Asymmetric Total Syntheses of Two 3-Acyl-5,6- dihydro-2H-pyrones: (R)-Podoblastin-S and (R)- Lachnelluloic Acid with Verification of the Absolute Configuration of (-)-Lachnelluloic Acid.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Tetsuya; Tsutsumi, Takeshi; Nakata, Kohei; Nakatsuji, Hidefumi; Tanabe, Yoo

    2017-01-01

    Expedient asymmetric total syntheses of both (R)-podoblastin-S and (R)-lachnelluloic acid, representative of natural 3-acyl-5,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-2-ones, were performed. Compared with the reported total synthesis of (R)-podoblastin-S (14 steps, overall 5% yield), the present study was achieved in only five steps in an overall 40% yield and with 98% ee (HPLC analysis). In a similar strategy, the first asymmetric total synthesis of the relevant (R)-lachnelluloic acid was achieved in an overall 40% yield with 98% ee (HPLC analysis). The crucial step utilized readily accessible and reliable Soriente and Scettri's Ti(OiPr)₄/(S)-BINOL‒catalyzed asymmetric Mukaiyama aldol addition of 1,3-bis(trimethylsiloxy)diene, derived from ethyl acetoacetate with n-butanal for (R)- podoblastin-S and n-pentanal for (R)-lachnelluloic acid. With the comparison of the specific rotation values between the natural product and the synthetic specimen, the hitherto unknown absolute configuration at the C(6) position of (-)-lachnelluloic acid was unambiguously elucidated as 6R.

  16. Absolute quantification of the total and antidrug antibody-bound concentrations of recombinant human α-glucosidase in human plasma using protein G extraction and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Bronsema, Kees J; Bischoff, Rainer; Pijnappel, W W M Pim; van der Ploeg, Ans T; van de Merbel, Nico C

    2015-04-21

    The administration of protein-based pharmaceuticals can cause the in vivo formation of antidrug antibodies (ADAs), which may reduce the efficacy of the therapy by binding to the protein drug. An accurate determination of the total and ADA-bound concentrations of the drug gives information on the extent of this immune response and its consequences and may help develop improved therapeutic regimens. We present an absolute quantitative method to differentiate between total, free, and ADA-bound drug for recombinant human alpha acid glucosidase (rhGAA) in plasma from patients suffering from Pompe's disease. LC-MS/MS quantification of a signature peptide after trypsin digestion of plasma samples before and after an extraction of the total IgG content of plasma with protein G coated beads was used to determine the total and the ADA-bound fractions of rhGAA in samples from Pompe patients after enzyme infusion. The methods for total and ADA-bound rhGAA allow quantitation of the drug in the range of 0.5 to 500 μg/mL using 20 μL of plasma and met the regular bioanalytical validation requirements, both in the absence and presence of high levels of anti-rhGAA antibodies. This demonstrates that the ADA-bound rhGAA fraction can be accurately and precisely determined and is not influenced by sample dilution, repeated freezing and thawing, or extended benchtop or frozen storage. In samples from a patient with a reduced response to therapy due to ADAs, high ADA-bound concentrations of rhGAA were found, while in the samples from a patient lacking ADAs, no significant ADA-bound concentrations were found. Since protein G captures the complete IgG content of plasma, including all antidrug antibodies, the described extraction approach is universally applicable for the quantification of ADA-bound concentrations of all non-IgG-based biopharmaceuticals.

  17. Measured Total Cross Sections of Slow Neutrons Scattered by Gaseous and Liquid {sup 2}H{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Atchison, F.; Brandt, B. van den; Brys, T.; Daum, M.; Fierlinger, P.; Hautle, P.; Henneck, R.; Kirch, K.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Kuehne, G.; Konter, J.A.; Pichlmaier, A.; Wokaun, A.; Bodek, K.; Kasprzak, M.; Kuzniak, M.; Geltenbort, P.; Giersch, M.; Zmeskal, J.; Hino, M.

    2005-06-03

    The total scattering cross sections for slow neutrons with energies E in the range 300 neV to 3 meV for gaseous and liquid ortho-{sup 2}H{sub 2} have been measured. The cross sections for {sup 2}H{sub 2} gas are found to be in excellent agreement with both the Hamermesh and Schwinger and the Young and Koppel models. For liquid {sup 2}H{sub 2}, we confirm the existing experimental data in the cold neutron range and the discrepancy with the gas models. We find a clear 1/{radical}(E{sup '}) dependence at low energies for both states. A simple explanation for the liquid {sup 2}H{sub 2} cross section is offered.

  18. New data on cross sections for partial and total photoneutron reactions on the isotopes {sup 91,94}Zr

    SciTech Connect

    Varlamov, V. V.; Makarov, M. A.; Peskov, N. N.; Stepanov, M. E.

    2015-07-15

    Experimental data on {sup 91,94}Zr photodisintegration that were obtained in a beam of quasimonoenergetic annihilation photons by the method of neutron multiplicity sorting are analyzed. It is found that the cross sections for the (γ, 1n), (γ, 2n), and (γ, 3n) reactions on both isotopes do not meet the objective data-reliability criteria formulated earlier. Within the experimental–theoretical method for evaluating partial-reaction cross sections that satisfy these criteria, new data on the cross sections for the aforementioned partial reactions, as well as for the (γ, sn) = (γ, 1n) + (γ, 2n) + (γ, 3n) +... total photoneutron reaction, are obtained for the isotopes {sup 91,94}Zr.

  19. The total neutron cross-section of an ortho-para mixture of gaseous hydrogen at 75K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradi, G.; Celli, M.; Rhodes, N.; Soper, A. K.; Zoppi, M.

    2004-07-01

    From the data of a transmission experiment we have extracted the total neutron cross-section of a sample of gaseous hydrogen (T=75.03K, p=84.8bar, n=8.42nm-3) with a thermodynamic equilibrium ortho-para content (48% ortho, 52% para). The experiment was carried out on the PEARL instrument operating at the ISIS pulsed neutron source. After an accurate data reduction, the neutron spectra have been analyzed in the framework of the Modified Young and Koppel (MYK) theory, which is a successful extension to interacting fluids of the original Young and Koppel model valid for a dilute gas of hydrogen molecules. The total cross-section calculated with MYK theory, whose unique unknown parameter-the mean kinetic energy of the molecular centre of mass-was obtained through an independent path integral Monte Carlo simulation, shows a satisfactory agreement with the experimental results.

  20. A comparative study of total electron scattering cross sections of plasma processing gasses at intermediate electron energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palihawadana, Prasanga; Villela, Gilberto; Ariyasinghe, Wickramasinghe

    2008-11-01

    A comparison is made between the total electron cross sections (TCS) of Tetrafluoromethane (CF4), Trifluoromethane (CHF3), Hexafluoroethane (C2F6), and Octafluorocyclobutane (C4F8) available in the literature and those recently measured in this laboratory using the linear transmission technique. The present measurements are about 0-20% higher than those in the literature. An empirical formula developed to predict the TCS of plasma processing gases, as a function of incident electron energy, will be presented.

  1. FORTRAN 4 programs for the extraction of potential well parameters from the energy dependence of total elastic scattering cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labudde, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt has been made to keep the programs as subroutine oriented as possible. Usually only the main programs are directly concerned with the problem of total cross sections. In particular the subroutines POLFIT, BILINR, GASS59/MAXLIK, SYMOR, MATIN, STUDNT, DNTERP, DIFTAB, FORDIF, EPSALG, REGFAL and ADSIMP are completely general, and are concerned only with the problems of numerical analysis and statistics. Each subroutine is independently documented.

  2. High-precision gamma-ray total cross-section measurements between 3.45 and 12 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Frankle, Christen M.; Moss, Calvin E.

    2008-12-01

    A Compton-backscatter capability has recently become available at the Duke University Free Electron Laser Laboratory. This capability allows one to produce high fluxes of tunable, nearly monoenergetic gamma rays. Using these gamma-ray beams, we have made high-precision (~0.5%) measurements of the gamma-ray total cross section at 3.45, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, and 12 MeV. The nuclei measured were Be, C, Cu, Ta, W, Pb, and U

  3. Prediction of maize single cross hybrids using the total effects of associated markers approach assessed by cross-validation and regional trials.

    PubMed

    Melo, Wagner Mateus Costa; Pinho, Renzo Garcia Von; Balestre, Marcio

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to predict the performance of maize hybrids and assess whether the total effects of associated markers (TEAM) method can correctly predict hybrids using cross-validation and regional trials. The training was performed in 7 locations of Southern Brazil during the 2010/11 harvest. The regional assays were conducted in 6 different South Brazilian locations during the 2011/12 harvest. In the training trial, 51 lines from different backgrounds were used to create 58 single cross hybrids. Seventy-nine microsatellite markers were used to genotype these 51 lines. In the cross-validation method the predictive accuracy ranged from 0.10 to 0.96, depending on the sample size. Furthermore, the accuracy was 0.30 when the values of hybrids that were not used in the training population (119) were predicted for the regional assays. Regarding selective loss, the TEAM method correctly predicted 50% of the hybrids selected in the regional assays. There was also loss in only 33% of cases; that is, only 33% of the materials predicted to be good in training trial were considered to be bad in regional assays. Our results show that the predictive validation of different crop conditions is possible, and the cross-validation results strikingly represented the field performance.

  4. A Procedure to Quantify Contributions to the Total Cross Section by Mechanisms Competing to the Direct Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, C. M. Romo

    2009-03-01

    Experimental quantitative analysis by PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission) is highly dependent on the composition of the substrate. It is known that highly ionized projectiles change the effective ionization in a collision with a specific atom. Particularly, 2P vacancies on the projectile ion can be produced within the sample and these vacancies will eventually be shared with the target atoms in the substrate, modifying the X-ray yield of the target. Therefore, it is of uttermost importance to account for these second order effects in the X-ray cross section to obtain an accurate result for a PIXE analysis. In this paper, it is proposed a new procedure to estimate quantitatively the contribution to the total ionization cross section of each effect: the direct and enhancement ionizations. Following Verma et al. (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B245 56-60, 2006), it is modeled the total ionization cross section in a substrate by an exponentially decaying term that represents the enhancement ionization contribution, and a linearly growing term that represents the induced ionization contribution. Estimation of the parameters in the model can be obtained directly from irradiation of targets with different thickness.

  5. Differential and total cross sections of mutual neutralization in low-energy collisions of isotopes of H++H-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkambule, Sifiso M.; Elander, Nils; Larson, Åsa; Lecointre, Julien; Urbain, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Mutual neutralization in the collisions of H+ and H- is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The quantum-mechanical ab initio model includes covalent states associated with the H (1 )+H (n ≤3 ) limits and the collision energy ranges from 1 meV to 100 eV. The reaction is theoretically studied for collisions between different isotopes of the hydrogen ions. From the partial wave scattering amplitude, the differential and total cross sections are computed. The differential cross section is analyzed in terms of forward- and backward-scattering events, showing a dominance of backward scattering which can be understood by examining the phase of the scattering amplitudes for the gerade and ungerade set of states. The isotope dependence of the total cross section is compared with the one obtained using a semiclassical multistate Landau-Zener model. The final state distribution analysis emphasizes the dominance of the n =3 channel for collisions below 10 eV, while at higher collision energies, the n =2 channel starts to become important. For collisions of ions forming a molecular system with a larger reduced mass, the n =2 channel starts to dominate at lower energies. Using a merged ion-beam apparatus, the branching ratios for mutual neutralization in H+ and H- collisions in the energy range from 11 to 185 eV are measured with position- and time-sensitive particle detectors. The measured and calculated branching ratios satisfactorily agree with respect to state contributions.

  6. Chemiluminescence from the Ca*(/sup 3/P) + SF/sub 6/ reaction: absolute cross section, photon yields, and electronic branching

    SciTech Connect

    Verdasco, E.; Rabanos, V.S.; Aoiz, F.J.; Urena, A.G.

    1987-04-09

    A study of the chemiluminescence under single-collision conditions of the reaction of the metastable Ca(4s4p /sup 3/P/sup 0/) of atomic calcium with SF/sup 6/ is presented. Chemiluminescence cross sections and photon yields for production of various CaF (A,B) band systems are also reported. The observed electronic branching ratio sigma/sub A//sigma/sub B/ is 4.77, and a comparison with several statistical model calculations is also discussed.

  7. The power of cross-functional teams in driving total quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, Tim M.; Mcmaster, Tom J.

    1992-01-01

    Garrett Canada, a Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Canada, has been a member of the Canadian aerospace industry for 40 years. Although Garrett Canada has always been a profitable division with a solid market share, the changing and turbulent business environment and globalization of the aerospace industry has created new demands and challenges. The marketplace is demanding faster introduction of new products, as well as shorter leadtimes for repairs and spares. It was recognized that reducing cycle times for new products and for ongoing production would not only satisfy our customers, it would also enhance our business performance through reduced inventories, lower past due, and more responsiveness to change. It was evident that drastic function changes were required if we were to maintain our position as a premier aerospace supplier. The challenge was to convert a stable, somewhat slow-paced work environment with strong functional boundaries into a boundaryless world class team functioning in a total quality environment and focused on customer satisfaction. Complete and uncompromised customer satisfaction has become our driving force, with Total Quality being our engine to continuously improve our processes and increase our speed. The way in which this transition has been brought about is the subject of this presentation.

  8. Absolute cross section for loss of supercoiled topology induced by 10 eV electrons in highly uniform /DNA/1,3-diaminopropane films deposited on highly ordered pyrolitic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanouar, Omar; Fromm, Michel; Bass, Andrew D.; Cloutier, Pierre; Sanche, Léon

    2013-08-01

    It was recently shown that the affinity of doubly charged, 1-3 diaminopropane (Dap2+) for DNA permits the growth on highly ordered pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) substrates, of plasmid DNA films, of known uniform thickness [O. Boulanouar, A. Khatyr, G. Herlem, F. Palmino, L. Sanche, and M. Fromm, J. Phys. Chem. C 115, 21291-21298 (2011)]. Post-irradiation analysis by electrophoresis of such targets confirms that electron impact at 10 eV produces a maximum in the yield of single strand breaks that can be associated with the formation of a DNA- transient anion. Using a well-adapted deterministic survival model for the variation of electron damage with fluence and film thickness, we have determined an absolute cross section for strand-break damage by 10 eV electrons and inelastic scattering attenuation length in DNA-Dap complex films.

  9. Absolute cross section for loss of supercoiled topology induced by 10 eV electrons in highly uniform /DNA/1,3-diaminopropane films deposited on highly ordered pyrolitic graphite.

    PubMed

    Boulanouar, Omar; Fromm, Michel; Bass, Andrew D; Cloutier, Pierre; Sanche, Léon

    2013-08-07

    It was recently shown that the affinity of doubly charged, 1-3 diaminopropane (Dap(2+)) for DNA permits the growth on highly ordered pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) substrates, of plasmid DNA films, of known uniform thickness [O. Boulanouar, A. Khatyr, G. Herlem, F. Palmino, L. Sanche, and M. Fromm, J. Phys. Chem. C 115, 21291-21298 (2011)]. Post-irradiation analysis by electrophoresis of such targets confirms that electron impact at 10 eV produces a maximum in the yield of single strand breaks that can be associated with the formation of a DNA(-) transient anion. Using a well-adapted deterministic survival model for the variation of electron damage with fluence and film thickness, we have determined an absolute cross section for strand-break damage by 10 eV electrons and inelastic scattering attenuation length in DNA-Dap complex films.

  10. Absolute cross section for loss of supercoiled topology induced by 10 eV electrons in highly uniform /DNA/1,3-diaminopropane films deposited on highly ordered pyrolitic graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Boulanouar, Omar; Fromm, Michel; Bass, Andrew D.; Cloutier, Pierre; Sanche, Léon

    2013-08-07

    It was recently shown that the affinity of doubly charged, 1-3 diaminopropane (Dap{sup 2+}) for DNA permits the growth on highly ordered pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) substrates, of plasmid DNA films, of known uniform thickness [O. Boulanouar, A. Khatyr, G. Herlem, F. Palmino, L. Sanche, and M. Fromm, J. Phys. Chem. C 115, 21291–21298 (2011)]. Post-irradiation analysis by electrophoresis of such targets confirms that electron impact at 10 eV produces a maximum in the yield of single strand breaks that can be associated with the formation of a DNA{sup −} transient anion. Using a well-adapted deterministic survival model for the variation of electron damage with fluence and film thickness, we have determined an absolute cross section for strand-break damage by 10 eV electrons and inelastic scattering attenuation length in DNA-Dap complex films.

  11. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  12. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  13. Investigation of the noise-like structures of the total scattering cross-section of random media.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Snow; Taflove, Allen; Maitland, Duncan; Backman, Vadim; Walsh, Joseph

    2005-08-08

    The pseudospectral time-domain (PSTD) algorithm is implemented to numerically solve Maxwell's equations to obtain the optical properties of millimeter-scale random media consisting of hundreds of micron-scale dielectric scatterers. Our methodology accounts for near-field interactions and coherent interference effects that are not easily modeled using other techniques. In this paper, we show that the total scattering cross-section (TSCS) of a cluster of closely packed scatterers exhibits a high-frequency oscillation structure, similar to noise. Furthermore, the characteristics and origin of such noise-like oscillation structure have been analyzed and determined based on first-principles.

  14. [Content detemination of total tannin in Smilax glabra with reddish brown and off-white colored cross section].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Dong, Li-Sha; Chen, Hu-Biao; He, Xi-Cheng; Ge, Xiang-Qian; Zhang, Xi-Gui; Zhou, Ying-Ying

    2013-03-01

    There are two types of decoction of Smilax glabra due to its reddish brown or off-white colored cross section. These two kinds of decoction were found that they have large difference in anti-inflammatory effects and chemical constituents in the preliminary experiments. Comparing and analyzing the content of total tannin in these two kinds of decoction of S. glabra from 28 areas by UV-Vis spectrophotometry were first used to provide some experimental and theoretical development and utilization of this medicinal resource and quality control. Also, the sample recovery test required in Chinese Pharmacopoeia was improved by adding tannic acid instead of gallic acid to samples.

  15. Absolute Differential Cross-Sections for Elastic PION(+/-)/PROTON Scattering at 30 Less than or Equal to T(pion) Less than or Equal to 140 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brack, Jeffrey Thomas

    Differential cross sections for elastic pi^{+/-}p scattering have been measured at TRIUMF for 10 incident pion energies in three separate experiments at 66.8 <= T_{pi} <= 138.8 MeV, Tpi = 66.8 MeV (pi^+p only), and 30 <= T_{pi} <= 66.8 MeV, using three independent techniques. Typical statistical accuracies are 1-3% and normalization uncertainties are 1.2-3.0%. Extensive experimental checks were employed to minimize systematic errors. Incident pion beam rates were varied by a factor of 5, target thickness was varied by a factor of 10, different target compositions were used (CH_2 and CH_{1.1 }), and derangements of the detector geometry tested the reproducibility of the cross sections under widely varying conditions. Three separate Monte Carlo routines were used. All measurements used solid targets. Thin scintillators and time-of-flight (TOF) techniques were used to count and identify particles incident on the targets and to detect the scattered pions. Recoil protons were detected in coincidence with the scattered pions in two of the three experiments. At the upper range of incident pion energies (66.8 to 138 MeV), a two-arm coincidence technique was used in which proton detection was similar to pion detection (TOF). At the three lowest incident pion energies, an active target technique was used in which the recoil particles were detected by means of the light generated within the CH_ {1.1} scintillator-target. These are the only elastic pip coincidence measurements by any experimental group below 140 MeV incident pion energy. At 66.8 MeV, a third technique was used in which no recoil particles were detected. At incident pion energies of 100 MeV and above, all pi^{+/-}p results from these three measurements are in good agreement with previous measurements, as are the pi ^-p results at all energies. However, while the pi^{+/-}p results of these three experiments are consistent within experimental error at the overlapping energy of 66.8 MeV, they are 10-25% lower than

  16. The total neutron cross sections of /sup 249/Bk and /sup 249/Cf below 100 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, R.W.; Carlton, R.F.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Pandey, M.S.

    1983-11-01

    The neutron total cross sections of /sup 249/Bk and /sup 249/Cf have been measured from 0.03 to 100 eV using the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator as a source of pulsed neutrons. The 1.6-mm-diam cylindrical transmission samples initially contained up to 5.3 mg of 98% /sup 249/Bk and 2% /sup 249/Cf; 4.5 yr later, when the final measurements were made, the composition of the samples had become 2.5% /sup 249/Bk, 96.9% /sup 249/Cf, and 0.6% /sup 245/Cm. Samples were cooled with liquid nitrogen to reduce Doppler broadening. Thirty-nine resonances were identified in /sup 249/Bk and analyzed using a single-level Breit-Wigner formalism. Fifty-five resonances were identified in /sup 249/Cf and analyzed using an R-matrix multilevel formalism. The resonance parameters obtained have been used to determine the average level spacings and the s-wave neutron and fission strength functions. Where possible, bound-level parameters were derived to fit the thermal neutron total cross-section data.

  17. Results of total cross section measurements for 197Au in the neutron energy region from 4 to 108 keV at GELINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirakov, I.; Becker, B.; Capote, R.; Dupont, E.; Kopecky, S.; Massimi, C.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    2013-11-01

    Transmission measurements have been performed to determine the total cross section for neutron-induced reactions with 197Au in the energy region from 4keV to 108keV. The experiments were carried out at a 50m measurement station of the time-of-flight facility GELINA using a 6Li glass scintillator. The average total cross section as a function of neutron energy was derived after correcting the observed average transmission for cross section fluctuations due to resonance structures. The results have been compared with literature data and with the total cross section resulting from a dispersive coupled-channel optical model potential. The neutron strength function for s -wave neutrons and an orbital-independent scattering radius, together with their covariance matrix, have been derived in the neutron energy region between 4keV and 108keV through a parameterization of the total cross section based on a nuclear reaction theory.

  18. Use of an intravenous microdose of 14C-labeled drug and accelerator mass spectrometry to measure absolute oral bioavailability in dogs; cross-comparison of assay methods by accelerator mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Yoshihiro; Ishizuka, Tomoko; Kawai, Kenji; Hamabe, Yoshimi; Miyaoka, Teiji; Oh-hara, Toshinari; Ikeda, Toshihiko; Kurihara, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    A technique utilizing simultaneous intravenous microdosing of (14)C-labeled drug with oral dosing of non-labeled drug for measurement of absolute bioavailability was evaluated using R-142086 in male dogs. Plasma concentrations of R-142086 were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and those of (14)C-R-142086 were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The absence of metabolites in the plasma and urine was confirmed by a single radioactive peak of the parent compound in the chromatogram after intravenous microdosing of (14)C-R-142086 (1.5 microg/kg). Although plasma concentrations of R-142086 determined by LC-MS/MS were approximately 20% higher than those of (14)C-R-142086 as determined by AMS, there was excellent correlation (r=0.994) between both concentrations after intravenous dosing of (14)C-R-142086 (0.3 mg/kg). The oral bioavailability of R-142086 at 1 mg/kg obtained by simultaneous intravenous microdosing of (14)C-R-142086 was 16.1%, this being slightly higher than the value (12.5%) obtained by separate intravenous dosing of R-142086 (0.3 mg/kg). In conclusion, on utilizing simultaneous intravenous microdosing of (14)C-labeled drug in conjunction with AMS analysis, absolute bioavailability could be approximately measured in dogs, but without total accuracy. Bioavailability in humans may possibly be approximately measured at an earlier stage and at a lower cost.

  19. Clinical trade-offs in cross-linked ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene used in total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Lisa A; Ansari, Farzana; Kury, Matt; Mehdizah, Amir; Patten, Elias W; Huddlestein, James; Mickelson, Dayne; Chang, Jennifer; Hubert, Kim; Ries, Michael D

    2013-04-01

    Highly cross-linked formulations of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (XLPE) offer exceptional wear resistance for total joint arthroplasty but are offset with a reduction in postyield and fatigue fracture properties in comparison to conventional ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Oxidation resistance is also an important property for the longevity of total joint replacements (TJRs) as formulations of UHMWPE or XLPE utilizing radiation methods are susceptible to free radical generation and subsequent embrittlement. The balance of oxidation, wear, and fracture properties is an enduring concern for orthopedic polymers used as the bearing surface in total joint arthroplasty. Optimization of material properties is further challenged in designs that make use of locking mechanisms, notches, or other stress concentrations that can render the polymer susceptible to fracture due to elevated local stresses. Clinical complications involving impingements, dislocations, or other biomechanical overloads can exacerbate stresses and negate benefits of improved wear resistance provided by XLPE. This work examines trade-offs that factor into the use of XLPE in TJR implants.

  20. Dose effects of cross-linking polyethylene for total knee arthroplasty on wear performance and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Asano, Taiyo; Akagi, Masao; Clarke, Ian C; Masuda, Shingo; Ishii, Tsunehiro; Nakamura, Takashi

    2007-11-01

    Wear performance and mechanical properties of cross-linking polyethylene (XLPE) tibial inserts were investigated using a knee simulator, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and a small punch test (SPT). Ultrahigh molecular weight PE made from GUR1050 resin was irradiated at doses ranging from 0 to 200 kGy and then machined into tibial inserts followed by annealing. The knee simulator was run for up to four million cycles. As the radiation dose increased from 0 to 100 kGy, the wear rate decreased dramatically, yielding 95% wear reduction at 100 kGy. The microwear features observed by SEM supported the dose-dependent wear reduction. The SPT for XLPE after the simulation test showed that, as the radiation dose increased from 0 to 200 kGy, the ultimate displacement decreased dose-dependently, while the ultimate load increased from 0 to 75 kGy and decreased from 75 to 200 kGy. The resulting toughness of the PE increased to its maximum at a dose of 50 kGy and then decreased with higher doses up to 200 kGy. PE cross-linked with radiation doses from 25 to 75 kGy had greater toughness than virgin, nonirradiated PE. However, PE irradiated with 100 kGy or more had lower toughness than virgin PE. These data suggest that a certain amount of irradiation enhances both wear performance and toughness of PE tibial inserts. Although a certain amount of cross-linking would be effective for clinical application of PE tibial inserts, an optimal radiation dose should be much smaller than that used in current XLPE in total hip arthroplasty.

  1. Mechanisms of plastic deformation in highly cross-linked UHMWPE for total hip components--the molecular physics viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhito; Shishido, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Kengo; Masaoka, Toshinori; Kubo, Kosuke; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    Plastic deformation is an unavoidable event in biomedical polymeric implants for load-bearing application during long-term in-vivo service life, which involves a mass transfer process, irreversible chain motion, and molecular reorganization. Deformation-induced microstructural alterations greatly affect mechanical properties and durability of implant devices. The present research focused on evaluating, from a molecular physics viewpoint, the impact of externally applied strain (or stress) in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) prostheses, subjected to radiation cross-linking and subsequent remelting for application in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Two different types of commercial acetabular liners, which belong to the first-generation highly cross-linked UHMWPE (HXLPE), were investigated by means of confocal/polarized Raman microprobe spectroscopy. The amount of crystalline region and the spatial distribution of molecular chain orientation were quantitatively analyzed according to a combined theory including Raman selection rules for the polyethylene orthorhombic structure and the orientation distribution function (ODF) statistical approach. The structurally important finding was that pronounced recrystallization and molecular reorientation increasingly appeared in the near-surface regions of HXLPE liners with increasing the amount of plastic (compressive) deformation stored in the microstructure. Such molecular rearrangements, occurred in response to external strains, locally increase surface cross-shear (CS) stresses, which in turn trigger microscopic wear processes in HXLPE acetabular liners. Thus, on the basis of the results obtained at the molecular scale, we emphasize here the importance of minimizing the development of irrecoverable deformation strain in order to retain the pristine and intrinsically high wear performance of HXLPE components.

  2. Total and partial capture cross sections in reactions with deformed nuclei at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzyakin, R. A. Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2013-06-15

    Within the quantum diffusion approach, the capture of a projectile nucleus by a target nucleus is studied at bombarding energies above and below the Coulomb barrier. The effects of deformation of interacting nuclei and neutron transfer between them on the total and partial capture cross sections and the mean angular momentum of the captured system are studied. The results obtained for the {sup 16}O + {sup 112}Cd, {sup 152}Sm, and {sup 184}W; {sup 19}F +{sup 175}Lu; {sup 28}Si +{sup 94,100}Mo and {sup 154}Sm; {sup 40}Ca +{sup 96}Zr; {sup 48}Ca+ {sup 90}Zr; and {sup 64}Ni +{sup 58,64}Ni, {sup 92,96}Zr, and {sup 100}Mo reactions are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  3. {sup 7,9,10}Be elastic scattering and total reaction cross sections on a {sup 12}C target

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora, J. C.; Guimaraes, V.; Barioni, A.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Faria, P. N. de; Mendes, D. R. Jr.; Gasques, L. R.; Scarduelli, V.; Pires, K. C. C.; Morcelle, V.; Leistenschneider, E.; Condori, R. P.; Zagatto, V. A.; Morais, M. C.; Crema, E.; Shorto, J. M. B.

    2011-09-15

    Elastic scattering angular distributions for {sup 7}Be, {sup 9}Be, and {sup 10}Be isotopes on {sup 12}C target were measured at laboratory energies of 18.8, 26.0, and 23.2 MeV, respectively. The analysis was performed in terms of optical model potentials using Woods-Saxon and double-folding form factors. Also, continuum discretized coupled-channels calculations were performed for {sup 7}Be and {sup 9}Be + {sup 12}C systems to infer the role of breakup in the elastic scattering. For the {sup 10}Be + {sup 12}C system, bound states coupled-channels calculations were considered. Moreover, total reaction cross sections were deduced from the elastic scattering analysis and compared with published data on other weakly and tightly bound projectiles elastically scattered on the {sup 12}C target, as a function of energy.

  4. Highly Cross-Linked Polyethylene in Total Hip and Knee Replacement: Spatial Distribution of Molecular Orientation and Shape Recovery Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Masaoka, Toshinori; Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Shishido, Takaaki; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Kubo, Kosuke

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated effects of processing procedures on morphology of highly cross-linked and re-melted UHMWPE (XLPE) in total hip and knee arthroplasty (THA, TKA). The shape recovery behavior was also monitored via uniaxial compression test at room temperature after non-destructive characterizations of the in-depth microstructure by confocal/polarized Raman spectroscopy. The goal of this study was to relate the manufacturing-induced morphology to the in vivo micromechanical performance, and ultimately to explore an optimal structure in each alternative joint bearing. It was clearly confirmed that the investigated XLPE hip and knee implants, which were produced from different orthopaedic grade resins (GUR 1050 and GUR 1020), consisted of two structural regions in the as-received states: the near-surface transitional anisotropic layer (≈100 μm thickness) and the bulk isotropic structural region. These XLPEs exhibited a different crystalline anisotropy and molecular texture within the near-surface layers. In addition, the knee insert showed a slightly higher efficiency of shape recovery against the applied strain over the hip liner owing to a markedly higher percentage of the bulk amorphous phase with intermolecular cross-linking. The quantitative data presented in this study might contribute to construct manufacturing strategies for further rationalized structures as alternative bearings in THA and TKA. PMID:25243183

  5. Reduction of total knee replacement wear with vitamin E blended highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, C; Alvarez, E; Vinciguerra, J; Bruce, D A; DesJardins, J D

    2011-01-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a common bearing component in total knee replacement (TKR) implants, and its susceptibility to wear continues to be the long-term limiting factor in the life of these implants. This study hypothesized that in TKR systems, a highly cross-linked (HXL) UHMWPE blended with vitamin E will result in reduced wear as compared to a direct compression-moulded (DCM) UHMWPE. A wear simulation study was conducted using an asymmetric lateral pivoting '3D Knee' design to compare the two inserts. The highly cross-linked UHMWPE was aged prior to the testing and force-controlled wear testing was carried out for 5 million cycles using a load-controlled ISO-14243 standard at a frequency of 1 Hz on both groups. Gravimetric measurements of DCM UHMWPE (4.4 +/- 3.0 mg/million cycles) and HXL UHMWPE with vitamin E (1.9 +/- 1.9 mg/million cycles) showed significant statistical differences (p < 0.01) between the wear rates. Wear modes and surface roughness for both groups revealed no significant dissimilarities.

  6. On the scale variation of the total cross section for Higgs production at the LHC and at the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafarella, A.; Corianò, C.; Guzzi, M.; Smith, J.

    2006-09-01

    We present a detailed study of the total pp cross section for scalar Higgs production to next-to-next-to-leading order in αs at LHC energies, and of the pp¯ cross section at the Tevatron, combining an implementation of the solutions of the parton evolution equations at the three-loop order with the corresponding hard scatterings, evaluated at the same perturbative order. Our solutions of the DGLAP equations are implemented directly in x-space and allow for the study of the dependence of the results on the factorization (μF) and renormalization scales (μR) typical of a given process, together with the stability of the perturbative expansion. The input sets for the parton evolutions are those given by Martin, Roberts, Stirling and Thorne and by Alekhin. Results for K-factors are also presented. The NNLO corrections can be quite sizeable at typical collider energies. The stability region of the perturbative expansion is found when μR>mH˜μF.

  7. Highly cross-linked polyethylene in total hip and knee replacement: spatial distribution of molecular orientation and shape recovery behavior.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhito; Masaoka, Toshinori; Pezzotti, Giuseppe; Shishido, Takaaki; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Kubo, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated effects of processing procedures on morphology of highly cross-linked and re-melted UHMWPE (XLPE) in total hip and knee arthroplasty (THA, TKA). The shape recovery behavior was also monitored via uniaxial compression test at room temperature after non-destructive characterizations of the in-depth microstructure by confocal/polarized Raman spectroscopy. The goal of this study was to relate the manufacturing-induced morphology to the in vivo micromechanical performance, and ultimately to explore an optimal structure in each alternative joint bearing. It was clearly confirmed that the investigated XLPE hip and knee implants, which were produced from different orthopaedic grade resins (GUR 1050 and GUR 1020), consisted of two structural regions in the as-received states: the near-surface transitional anisotropic layer (≈100 μm thickness) and the bulk isotropic structural region. These XLPEs exhibited a different crystalline anisotropy and molecular texture within the near-surface layers. In addition, the knee insert showed a slightly higher efficiency of shape recovery against the applied strain over the hip liner owing to a markedly higher percentage of the bulk amorphous phase with intermolecular cross-linking. The quantitative data presented in this study might contribute to construct manufacturing strategies for further rationalized structures as alternative bearings in THA and TKA.

  8. Concurrent Application of ANC and THM to assess the 13C(α, n)16O Absolute Cross Section at Astrophysical Energies and Possible Consequences for Neutron Production in Low-mass AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippella, O.; La Cognata, M.

    2017-03-01

    The {}13{{C}}{(α ,n)}16{{O}} reaction is considered to be the main neutron source responsible for the production of heavy nuclides (from {Sr} to {Bi}) through slow n-capture nucleosynthesis (s-process) at low temperatures during the asymptotic giant branch phase of low-mass stars (≲ 3{--}4 {M}ȯ , or LMSs). In recent years, several direct and indirect measurements have been carried out to determine the cross section at the energies of astrophysical interest (around 190+/- 40 {keV}). However, they yield inconsistent results that cause a highly uncertain reaction rate and affect the neutron release in LMSs. In this work we have combined two indirect approaches, the asymptotic normalization coefficient and the Trojan horse method, to unambiguously determine the absolute value of the {}13{{C}}{(α ,n)}16{{O}} astrophysical factor. With these, we have determined a very accurate reaction rate to be introduced into astrophysical models of s-process nucleosynthesis in LMSs. Calculations using this recommended rate have shown limited variations in the production of those neutron-rich nuclei (with 86≤slant A≤slant 209) that receive contribution only by slow neutron captures.

  9. A Method for Selecting between Fisher's Linear Classification Functions and Least Absolute Deviation in Predictive Discriminant Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meshbane, Alice; Morris, John D.

    A method for comparing the cross-validated classification accuracy of Fisher's linear classification functions (FLCFs) and the least absolute deviation is presented under varying data conditions for the two-group classification problem. With this method, separate-group as well as total-sample proportions of current classifications can be compared…

  10. Absolute quantum cutting efficiency of Tb3+-Yb3+ co-doped glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Qianqian; Qin, Feng; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2013-12-01

    The absolute quantum cutting efficiency of Tb3+-Yb3+ co-doped glass was quantitatively measured by an integrating sphere detection system, which is independent of the excitation power. As the Yb3+ concentration increases, the near infrared quantum efficiency exhibited an exponential growth with an upper limit of 13.5%, but the visible light efficiency was reduced rapidly. As a result, the total quantum efficiency monotonically decreases rather than increases as theory predicted. In fact, the absolute quantum efficiency was far less than the theoretical value due to the low radiative efficiency of Tb3+ (<61%) and significant cross-relaxation nonradiative loss between Yb3+ ions.

  11. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency) by removing the source spectrum (moment-rate spectrum) from

  12. Absolute and relative blindsight.

    PubMed

    Balsdon, Tarryn; Azzopardi, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The concept of relative blindsight, referring to a difference in conscious awareness between conditions otherwise matched for performance, was introduced by Lau and Passingham (2006) as a way of identifying the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) in fMRI experiments. By analogy, absolute blindsight refers to a difference between performance and awareness regardless of whether it is possible to match performance across conditions. Here, we address the question of whether relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers can be accounted for by response bias. In our replication of Lau and Passingham's experiment, the relative blindsight effect was abolished when performance was assessed by means of a bias-free 2AFC task or when the criterion for awareness was varied. Furthermore, there was no evidence of either relative or absolute blindsight when both performance and awareness were assessed with bias-free measures derived from confidence ratings using signal detection theory. This suggests that both relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers amount to no more than variations in response bias in the assessment of performance and awareness. Consideration of the properties of psychometric functions reveals a number of ways in which relative and absolute blindsight could arise trivially and elucidates a basis for the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 blindsight.

  13. Total photoionization cross-sections of excited electronic states by the algebraic diagrammatic construction-Stieltjes-Lanczos method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberti, M.; Yun, R.; Gokhberg, K.; Kopelke, S.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Tarantelli, F.; Averbukh, V.

    2014-05-01

    Here, we extend the L2 ab initio method for molecular photoionization cross-sections introduced in Gokhberg et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 064104 (2009)] and benchmarked in Ruberti et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 144107 (2013)] to the calculation of total photoionization cross-sections of molecules in electronically excited states. The method is based on the ab initio description of molecular electronic states within the many-electron Green's function approach, known as algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC), and on the application of Stieltjes-Chebyshev moment theory to Lanczos pseudospectra of the ADC electronic Hamiltonian. The intermediate state representation of the dipole operator in the ADC basis is used to compute the transition moments between the excited states of the molecule. We compare the results obtained using different levels of the many-body theory, i.e., ADC(1), ADC(2), and ADC(2)x for the first two excited states of CO, N2, and H2O both at the ground state and the excited state equilibrium or saddle point geometries. We find that the single excitation ADC(1) method is not adequate even at the qualitative level and that the inclusion of double electronic excitations for description of excited state photoionization is essential. Moreover, we show that the use of the extended ADC(2)x method leads to a substantial systematic difference from the strictly second-order ADC(2). Our calculations demonstrate that a theoretical modelling of photoionization of excited states requires an intrinsically double excitation theory with respect to the ground state and cannot be achieved by the standard single excitation methods with the ground state as a reference.

  14. Total photoionization cross-sections of excited electronic states by the algebraic diagrammatic construction-Stieltjes-Lanczos method.

    PubMed

    Ruberti, M; Yun, R; Gokhberg, K; Kopelke, S; Cederbaum, L S; Tarantelli, F; Averbukh, V

    2014-05-14

    Here, we extend the L2 ab initio method for molecular photoionization cross-sections introduced in Gokhberg et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 064104 (2009)] and benchmarked in Ruberti et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 144107 (2013)] to the calculation of total photoionization cross-sections of molecules in electronically excited states. The method is based on the ab initio description of molecular electronic states within the many-electron Green's function approach, known as algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC), and on the application of Stieltjes-Chebyshev moment theory to Lanczos pseudospectra of the ADC electronic Hamiltonian. The intermediate state representation of the dipole operator in the ADC basis is used to compute the transition moments between the excited states of the molecule. We compare the results obtained using different levels of the many-body theory, i.e., ADC(1), ADC(2), and ADC(2)x for the first two excited states of CO, N2, and H2O both at the ground state and the excited state equilibrium or saddle point geometries. We find that the single excitation ADC(1) method is not adequate even at the qualitative level and that the inclusion of double electronic excitations for description of excited state photoionization is essential. Moreover, we show that the use of the extended ADC(2)x method leads to a substantial systematic difference from the strictly second-order ADC(2). Our calculations demonstrate that a theoretical modelling of photoionization of excited states requires an intrinsically double excitation theory with respect to the ground state and cannot be achieved by the standard single excitation methods with the ground state as a reference.

  15. Absolute neutrino mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Silvia; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2013-04-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments firmly established non-vanishing neutrino masses, a result that can be regarded as a strong motivation to extend the Standard Model. In spite of being the lightest massive particles, neutrinos likely represent an important bridge to new physics at very high energies and offer new opportunities to address some of the current cosmological puzzles, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter. In this context, the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale is a key issue within modern High Energy Physics. The talks in this parallel session well describe the current exciting experimental activity aiming to determining the absolute neutrino mass scale and offer an overview of a few models beyond the Standard Model that have been proposed in order to explain the neutrino masses giving a prediction for the absolute neutrino mass scale and solving the cosmological puzzles.

  16. Quantitative standards for absolute linguistic universals.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Steven T; Gibson, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Absolute linguistic universals are often justified by cross-linguistic analysis: If all observed languages exhibit a property, the property is taken to be a likely universal, perhaps specified in the cognitive or linguistic systems of language learners and users. In many cases, these patterns are then taken to motivate linguistic theory. Here, we show that cross-linguistic analysis will very rarely be able to statistically justify absolute, inviolable patterns in language. We formalize two statistical methods--frequentist and Bayesian--and show that in both it is possible to find strict linguistic universals, but that the numbers of independent languages necessary to do so is generally unachievable. This suggests that methods other than typological statistics are necessary to establish absolute properties of human language, and thus that many of the purported universals in linguistics have not received sufficient empirical justification.

  17. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  18. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    -site-independent peptides in the total cellular protein and their peptide yields. The PTM occupancy determination is achieved by measuring the absolute amounts of both PTM and non-PTM peptides from the highly purified protein sample expressed in transgenic organisms or directly isolated from an organism using affinity purification. The absolute amount of each PTM isoform in the total cellular protein extract is finally calculated from these two variables. Following this approach, the ion intensities given by mass spectrometers are used to calculated the peptide amounts, from which the amounts of protein isoforms are then deduced. In this chapter, we describe the principles underlying the experimental design and procedures used in AQUIP method. This quantitation method basically employs stable isotope-labeled peptide standards and affinity purification from a tagged recombinant protein of interest. Other quantitation strategies and purification techniques related to this method are also discussed.

  19. Clinical results of the wear performance of cross-linked polyethylene in total hip arthroplasty: prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Ise, Kentaro; Kawanabe, Keiichi; Tamura, Jiro; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Goto, Koji; Nakamura, Takashi

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the clinical results of cross-linked polyethylene (CLPE) and to compare the CLPE wear against zirconia and stainless steel heads, we studied the radiographic wear after a minimum 3-year follow-up in total hip arthroplasty (THA). Ninety-four hips were randomly implanted with a 22.225-mm head cemented THA-the group of non-CLPE against zirconia and CLPE against 2 different zirconias and stainless steel. The linear wear rate was significantly lower in the group of CLPE against zirconia (0.067, 0.059 mm/y) and against stainless steel (0.068 mm/y) compared with non-CLPE against zirconia (0.170 mm/y). In the short-term results, the wear performance of CLPE against zirconia was superior to that of non-CLPE; however, it did not show a better wear rate than CLPE against stainless steel. Furthermore, long-term investigations will be necessary for understanding CLPE wear in vivo.

  20. Improving total field geomagnetic secular variation modeling from a new set of cross-over marine data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavón-Carrasco, F. Javier; Torta, J. Miquel; Catalán, Manuel; Talarn, Àngela; Ishihara, Takemi

    2013-03-01

    A new set of cross-over marine data has been used to generate a regional model for the secular variation of the total geomagnetic field, showing the potential of the suggested approach for gaining a better knowledge of the field over oceanic regions. The model, which is valid for the Northern Atlantic region during the temporal interval 1960-2000, was obtained using spherical cap harmonic analysis (SCHA) in space and penalized splines in time. The maximum spatial expansion is equivalent to degree 9 in ordinary spherical harmonic analysis. Annual mean intensity data from different geomagnetic observatories have been used to improve the spatial and temporal resolution of the original dataset. Results indicate that the regional model improves, in terms of the root mean square error, the prediction given by the 11th generation of IGRF and CM4 global models, especially for the geomagnetic observatories considered. We also provide the uncertainty of the model coefficients and the secular variation prediction given by a bootstrap algorithm. The model is available in the EarthRef. org Digital Archive at http://earthref.org/ERDA/1728/.

  1. Complex Correlation Kohn-T Method of Calculating Total and Elastic Cross Sections. Part 1; Electron-Hydrogen Elastic Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, A. K.; Temkin, A.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report on the first part of a study of electron-hydrogen scattering, using a method which allows for the ab initio calculation of total and elastic cross sections at higher energies. In its general form the method uses complex 'radial' correlation functions, in a (Kohn) T-matrix formalism. The titled method, abbreviated Complex Correlation Kohn T (CCKT) method, is reviewed, in the context of electron-hydrogen scattering, including the derivation of the equation for the (complex) scattering function, and the extraction of the scattering information from the latter. The calculation reported here is restricted to S-waves in the elastic region, where the correlation functions can be taken, without loss of generality, to be real. Phase shifts are calculated using Hylleraas-type correlation functions with up to 95 terms. Results are rigorous lower bounds; they are in general agreement with those of Schwartz, but they are more accurate and outside his error bounds at a couple of energies,

  2. Measurements of the total cross section for the scattering of polarized neutrons from polarized {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, C.D.; Gould, C.R.; Haase, D.G.; Seely, M.L.; Huffman, P.R.; Roberson, N.R.; Tornow, W.; Wilburn, W.S.

    1996-08-01

    Measurements of polarized-neutron{endash}polarized-{sup 3}He scattering are reported. The target consisted of cryogenically polarized solid {sup 3}He, with thickness 0.04 atom/b and polarization {approximately}0.4. Polarized neutrons were produced via the {sup 3}H({ital p}{searrow},{ital n}{searrow}){sup 3}He or {sup 2}H({ital d}{searrow},{ital n}{searrow}){sup 3}He polarization-transfer reactions. The longitudinal and transverse total cross-section differences {Delta}{sigma}{sub {ital L}} and {Delta}{sigma}{sub {ital T}} were measured for incident neutron energies 2{endash}8 MeV. The results are compared to phase-shift predictions based on four different analyses of {ital n}-{sup 3}He scattering. The best agreement is obtained with a recent {ital R}-matrix analysis of {ital A}=4 scattering and reaction data, lending strong support to the {sup 4}He level scheme obtained in that analysis. Discrepancies with other phase-shift parametrizations of {ital n}-{sup 3}He scattering exist, attributable in most instances to one or two particular partial waves. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Electron collisions with phenol: Total, integral, differential, and momentum transfer cross sections and the role of multichannel coupling effects on the elastic channel.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Romarly F; de Oliveira, Eliane M; Bettega, Márcio H F; Varella, Márcio T do N; Jones, Darryl B; Brunger, Michael J; Blanco, Francisco; Colmenares, Rafael; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; García, Gustavo; Lima, Marco A P

    2015-03-14

    We report theoretical and experimental total cross sections for electron scattering by phenol (C6H5OH). The experimental data were obtained with an apparatus based in Madrid and the calculated cross sections with two different methodologies, the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR), and the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP). The SMCPP method in the Nopen-channel coupling scheme, at the static-exchange-plus-polarization approximation, is employed to calculate the scattering amplitudes at impact energies ranging from 5.0 eV to 50 eV. We discuss the multichannel coupling effects in the calculated cross sections, in particular how the number of excited states included in the open-channel space impacts upon the convergence of the elastic cross sections at higher collision energies. The IAM-SCAR approach was also used to obtain the elastic differential cross sections (DCSs) and for correcting the experimental total cross sections for the so-called forward angle scattering effect. We found a very good agreement between our SMCPP theoretical differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections and experimental data for benzene (a molecule differing from phenol by replacing a hydrogen atom in benzene with a hydroxyl group). Although some discrepancies were found for lower energies, the agreement between the SMCPP data and the DCSs obtained with the IAM-SCAR method improves, as expected, as the impact energy increases. We also have a good agreement among the present SMCPP calculated total cross section (which includes elastic, 32 inelastic electronic excitation processes and ionization contributions, the latter estimated with the binary-encounter-Bethe model), the IAM-SCAR total cross section, and the experimental data when the latter is corrected for the forward angle scattering effect [Fuss et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 042702 (2013)].

  4. Does vitamin E-stabilized ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene address concerns of cross-linked polyethylene in total knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Haider, Hani; Weisenburger, Joel N; Kurtz, Steven M; Rimnac, Clare M; Freedman, Jordan; Schroeder, David W; Garvin, Kevin L

    2012-03-01

    Concerns about reduced strength, fatigue resistance, and oxidative stability of highly cross-linked and remelted ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) have limited its clinical acceptance for total knee arthroplasty. We hypothesized that a highly cross-linked UHMWPE stabilized with vitamin E would have less oxidation and loss of mechanical properties. We compared the oxidation, in vitro strength, fatigue-crack propagation resistance, and wear of highly cross-linked UHMWPE doped with vitamin E to γ-inert-sterilized direct compression-molded UHMWPE (control). After accelerated aging, the control material showed elevated oxidation, loss of small-punch mechanical properties, and loss of fatigue-crack propagation resistance. In contrast, the vitamin E-stabilized material had minimal changes and exhibited 73% to 86% reduction in wear for both cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty designs. Highly cross-linked vitamin E-stabilized UHMWPE performed well in vitro.

  5. Measurement of the total cross section from elastic scattering in pp collisions at √{ s} = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckingham, R. M.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bundock, A. C.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, B.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Byszewski, M.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chance, S.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Cirkovic, P.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Coggeshall, J.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Colon, G.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M. C.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuciuc, C.-M.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Daniells, A. C.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, A. R.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dechenaux, B.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Do Valle Wemans, A.; Dobos, D.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Dube, S.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Dwuznik, M.; Dyndal, M.; Ebke, J.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Engelmann, R.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Florez Bustos, A. C.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, C.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Gemmell, A.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Glonti, G. L.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goeringer, C.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L. S.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M. P.; Goussiou, A. G.; Goy, C.; Gozpinar, S.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Grebenyuk, O. G.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guicheney, C.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guttman, N.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Haguenauer, M.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harper, D.; Harrington, R. D.; Harris, O. M.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Heller, C.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hensel, C.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holmes, T. R.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. 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F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, T.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sartisohn, G.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savard, P.; Savu, D. O.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scott, W. G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Sellers, G.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M. J.; Short, D.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simoniello, R.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skovpen, K. Yu.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosebee, M.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urbaniec, D.; Urquijo, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, A.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Waller, P.; Walsh, B.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weigell, P.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Weng, Z.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wijeratne, P. A.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M. A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Will, J. Z.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittig, T.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wright, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wulf, E.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xiao, M.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zevi della Porta, G.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zutshi, V.; Zwalinski, L.

    2014-12-01

    A measurement of the total pp cross section at the LHC at √{ s} = 7 TeV is presented. In a special run with high-β⋆ beam optics, an integrated luminosity of 80 μb-1 was accumulated in order to measure the differential elastic cross section as a function of the Mandelstam momentum transfer variable t. The measurement is performed with the ALFA sub-detector of ATLAS. Using a fit to the differential elastic cross section in the | t | range from 0.01 GeV2 to 0.1 GeV2 to extrapolate to | t | → 0, the total cross section, σtot (pp → X), is measured via the optical theorem to be:

  6. Measurement of the total cross section from elastic scattering in pp collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. 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L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. 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M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, K. J. 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A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-10-01

    A measurement of the total pp cross section at the LHC at √{ s} = 8 TeV is presented. An integrated luminosity of 500 μb-1 was accumulated in a special run with high-β⋆ beam optics to measure the differential elastic cross section as a function of the Mandelstam momentum transfer variable t. The measurement is performed with the ALFA sub-detector of ATLAS. Using a fit to the differential elastic cross section in the -t range from 0.014 GeV2 to 0.1 GeV2 to extrapolate t → 0, the total cross section, σtot (pp → X), is measured via the optical theorem to be

  7. Absolute cross sections of electron attachment to molecular clusters. Part II: Formation of (H2O) N - , (N2O) N - , and (N2) N -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vostrikov, A. A.; Dubov, D. Yu.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute cross sections σ-( E, N) of electron attachment to clusters (H2O) N , (N2O) N , and (N2) N for varying electron energy E and cluster size N are measured by using crossed electron and cluster beams in a vacuum. Continua of σ-( E) are found that correlate well with the functions of electron impact excitation of molecules’ internal degrees of freedom. The electron is attached through its solvation in a cluster. In the formation of (H2O){/N -}, (N2O){/N -}, and (N2){/N -}, the curves σ-( N) have a well-defined threshold because of a rise in the electron thermalization and solvation probability with N. For (H2O)900, (N2O)350, and (N2)260 clusters at E = 0.2 eV, the energy losses by the slow electron in the cluster are estimated as 3.0 × 107, 2.7 × 107, and 6.0 × 105 eV/m, respectively. It is found that the growth of σ- with N is the fastest for (H2O) N and (N2) N clusters at E → 0 as a result of polarization capture of the s-electron. Specifically, at E = 0.1 eV and N = 260, σ- = 3.0 × 10-13 cm2 for H2O clusters, 8.0 × 10-14 cm2 for N2O clusters, and 1.4 × 10-15 cm2 for N2 clusters; at E = 11 eV, σ- = 9.0 × 10-16 cm2 for (H2O)200 clusters, 2.4 × 10-14 cm2 for (N2O)350 clusters, and 5.0 × 10-17 cm2 for (N2)260 clusters; finally, at E = 30 eV, σ- = 3.6 × 10-17 cm2 for (N2O)10 clusters and 3.0 × 10-17 cm2 for (N2)125 clusters.

  8. Total electron-scattering cross sections for CHF3, C2F6, C3F8, and c-C4F8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanabia, Jason E.; Cooper, Gregory D.; Tossell, John A.; Moore, John H.

    1998-01-01

    The total electron-scattering cross section has been measured for 0-20 eV electrons incident upon CHF3, C2F6, C3F8, and cyclo-C4F8. The cross sections all have a broad maximum for electron energies near 9 eV, with more or less sharper peaks attributed to temporary-negative ion resonances at lower energies. For the linear molecules a resonance in the 3-6 eV range is associated with electron capture into the lowest unoccupied orbital. The shape of the cross section for the cyclic compound implies a stable ground-state negative ion.

  9. Knee Pain during Strength Training Shortly following Fast-Track Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Bandholm, Thomas; Thorborg, Kristian; Lunn, Troels Haxholdt; Kehlet, Henrik; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding

    2014-01-01

    Background Loading and contraction failure (muscular exhaustion) are strength training variables known to influence neural activation of the exercising muscle in healthy subjects, which may help reduce neural inhibition of the quadriceps muscle following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). It is unknown how these exercise variables influence knee pain after TKA. Objective To investigate the effect of loading and contraction failure on knee pain during strength training, shortly following TKA. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Consecutive sample of patients from the Copenhagen area, Denmark, receiving a TKA, between November 2012 and April 2013. Participants Seventeen patients, no more than 3 weeks after their TKA. Main outcome measures: In a randomized order, the patients performed 1 set of 4 standardized knee extensions, using relative loads of 8, 14, and 20 repetition maximum (RM), and ended with 1 single set to contraction failure (14 RM load). The individual loadings (kilograms) were determined during a familiarization session >72 hours prior. The patients rated their knee pain during each repetition, using a numerical rating scale (0–10). Results Two patients were lost to follow up. Knee pain increased with increasing load (20 RM: 3.1±2.0 points, 14 RM: 3.5±1.8 points, 8 RM: 4.3±2.5 points, P = 0.006), and repetitions to contraction failure (10% failure: 3.2±1.9 points, 100% failure: 5.4±1.6 points, P<0.001). Resting knee pain 60 seconds after the final repetition (2.7±2.4 points) was not different from that recorded before strength training (2.7±1.8 points, P = 0.88). Conclusion Both loading and repetitions performed to contraction failure during knee- extension strength-training, increased post-operative knee pain during strength training implemented shortly following TKA. However, only the increase in pain during repetitions to contraction failure exceeded that defined as clinically relevant, and was very short-lived. Trial Registration

  10. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  11. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  12. Absolute-structure reports.

    PubMed

    Flack, Howard D

    2013-08-01

    All the 139 noncentrosymmetric crystal structures published in Acta Crystallographica Section C between January 2011 and November 2012 inclusive have been used as the basis of a detailed study of the reporting of absolute structure. These structure determinations cover a wide range of space groups, chemical composition and resonant-scattering contribution. Defining A and D as the average and difference of the intensities of Friedel opposites, their level of fit has been examined using 2AD and selected-D plots. It was found, regardless of the expected resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, that the Friedel-difference intensities are often dominated by random uncertainty and systematic error. An analysis of data collection strategy is provided. It is found that crystal-structure determinations resulting in a Flack parameter close to 0.5 may not necessarily be from crystals twinned by inversion. Friedifstat is shown to be a robust estimator of the resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, very little affected by the particular space group of a structure nor by the occupation of special positions. There is considerable confusion in the text of papers presenting achiral noncentrosymmetric crystal structures. Recommendations are provided for the optimal way of treating noncentrosymmetric crystal structures for which the experimenter has no interest in determining the absolute structure.

  13. Differential, total, and transport cross sections for elastic scattering of low energy positrons by neutral atoms (Z = 1--92, E = 500--4000 eV)

    SciTech Connect

    Dapor, M. |; Miotello, A. |

    1998-05-01

    The authors present tables of the differential, total, and transport cross sections for the elastic scattering of 500--4000 eV positrons by neutral atoms in the atomic number range Z = 1--92. The cross sections were computed by numerically solving the Dirac equation for a central electrostatic field up to a large radius where the atomic potential becomes negligible. The atomic potential used was Hartree-Fock for Z = 1--18 and Dirac-Hartree-Fock-Slater for Z = 19--92.

  14. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  15. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m‑1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  16. New Opportunity for Improved Nuclear Forensics, Radiochemical Diagnostics, and Nuclear Astrophysics: Need for a Total-Cross-Section Apparatus at the LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Paul E.; Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna C.; Bredeweg, Todd Allen; Couture, Aaron J.; Engle, Jonathan; Keksis, August L.; Nortier, Francois M.; Ullmann, John L.

    2014-03-12

    Total-cross-section measurements are feasible on a much wider range of radioactive samples than (n,γ) cross-section measurements, and information extracted from the former can be used to set tight constraints on the latter. There are many (n,γ) cross sections of great interest to radiochemical diagnostics, nuclear forensics, and nuclear astrophysics which are beyond the reach of current direct measurement, that could be obtained in this way. Our simulations indicate that measurements can be made at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for samples as small as 10μg. There are at least 40 high-interest nuclides which should be measurable, including 88Y,167,168,170,171Tm, 173,174Lu, and189,190,192Ir.

  17. Total cross sections of electron and positron collisions with C3F8 and C3H8 molecules and differential elastic and vibrational excitation cross sections by electron impact on these molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tachibana, Yoshio; Kitajima, Masashi; Sueoka, Osamu; Takaki, Hideki; Hamada, Akira; Kimura, Mineo

    1999-03-01

    Total cross sections for electron (e-) and positron (e+) scattering from C3H8 and C3F8 have been measured from 0.8 to 600 eV and 0.7 to 600 eV, respectively. We have also investigated differential elastic cross sections by electron impact from 2.0 to 200 eV, and compared them with the present theoretical results. For e- scattering from C3H8, the cross sections are found to be larger by a factor of 2 than those of e+ scattering below 20-30 eV. They show a large peak at 8 eV due to a shape resonance and a shoulderlike structure in the region of 20-40 eV. For e- scattering from C3F8, the cross sections are again larger by at least a factor of 2 than those of e+ scattering below 50 eV, and they have two peaks at 4 and 8 eV, followed by a broad peak in the region of 20-40 eV. Some small structures overlie the broad hump. Both e- and e+ impact cross sections for C3H8 and C3F8 quickly approach each other beyond 200 eV. From the differential cross section study, we have been able to provide more detailed information on shape resonances, and also we have carried out some analysis of resonances in vibrational excitation results. In general, the total and integrated elastic cross sections are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement.

  18. Total electron scattering cross sections of molecules containing H, C, N, O and F in the energy range 0.2-6.0 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurung, Meera Devi; Ariyasinghe, W. M.

    2017-03-01

    Based on the effective atomic total electron scattering cross sections (EATCS) of atoms in a molecular environment, a simple model is proposed to predict the total electron scattering cross sections (TCS) of H, C, N, O, and F containing molecules. The EATCS for these five atoms are reported for 0.2-6.0 keV energies. The predicted TCS by this model are compared with experimental TCS in the literature. The experimental TCS of CHF3, C2F4, C2F2H2, C4F6, and c-C4F8 have been obtained for 0.2-4.5 keV electrons by measuring the attenuation of the electron beam through a gas cell.

  19. Measurement of the helicity-dependent total cross-section for the γn rightarrow p π-_{} π0_{} reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, J.; Altieri, S.; Annand, J. R. M.; Arends, H.-J.; Beck, R.; Blackston, M. A.; Bradtke, C.; Braghieri, A.; d'Hose, N.; Dutz, H.; Fix, A.; Heid, E.; Jahn, O.; Klein, F.; Kondratiev, R.; Lang, M.; Lisin, V.; Martinez-Fabregate, M.; McGeorge, J. C.; Meyer, W.; Panzeri, A.; Pedroni, P.; Pinelli, T.; Protopopescu, D.; Reicherz, G.; Rohlof, Ch.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Tamas, G.; Thomas, A.; Weller, H. R.

    2011-03-01

    The helicity dependence of the total cross-section for the γ n rightarrow p π-_{} π0_{} reaction has been measured for the first time at incident photon energies from 450 to 800MeV. The measurement was performed with the large-acceptance detector DAPHNE at the tagged photon beam facility of the MAMI accelerator in Mainz. Both the measured unpolarized and the helicity-dependent observables are not well described by the existing theoretical models.

  20. P-parity nonconservation in the total cross section for the interaction of thermal neutrons with /sup 233/U

    SciTech Connect

    Vesna, V.A.; Kolomenskii, A.; Okunev, I.S.; Pirozhkov, A.N.; Smotritskii, L.M.; Shul'gina, E.V.; Kornyushkin, A.F.; Titov, N.A.; Solov'ev, S.M.; Lobashev, V.M.

    1983-04-20

    An upper limit is found on the difference between the cross sections for the interactions of thermal neutrons with opposite helicities with /sup 233/U: P = (sigma/sup +//sub t/-sigma/sup -//sub t/)/(sigma/sup +//sub t/ +sigma/sup -//sub t/)<1.5 x 10/sup -6/ (at a 90% confidence level). This result contradicts the value P = 10/sup -4/--10/sup -5/ estimated under the assumption that the 0.17-eV level is a p-wave level.

  1. Total Quality Management (Team Building and Cross Training): From Business to Academe and Back Again to Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southard, Sherry

    Many of the theories about communicating effectively in corporate structures as well as the accompanying pedagogy do not pertain to changes in corporate structure and communication brought about by Total Quality Management (TQM). TQM creates a work environment in which employees need problem-solving skills and interpersonal skills that allow them…

  2. Pulmonary rehabilitation after total laryngectomy: a randomized cross-over clinical trial comparing two different heat and moisture exchangers (HMEs).

    PubMed

    Herranz, Jesús; Espiño, María Alvarez; Morado, Carolina Ogen

    2013-09-01

    Post-laryngectomy heat and moisture exchanger (HME) use is known to have a beneficial effect on tracheal climate, pulmonary symptoms and related aspects. This study aims to investigate differences in clinical effects between the first and second generation Provox HMEs. The second generation (Provox XtraHME) has better humidification properties than the first generation (Provox HME), and has been shown to further improve tracheal climate. Forty-five laryngectomized patients, who were already using an HME, participated in a prospective, randomized cross-over clinical study in which each HME was used for 6 weeks. Results showed that for most parameters studied, the second generation HME performed equally well or better than the first generation HME. The improvement in tracheal climate translated into patients reporting significantly less tracheal dryness with the second generation than with the first generation (p = 0.039). Using an HME with better humidification properties is related to a reduction in tracheal dryness in our study population.

  3. COMMENT: Comment on `Asymptotic behaviour of the total cross section for double ionization of helium-like ions by electrons'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, B. G.; Rejoub, R.; Stebbings, R. F.

    2002-04-01

    Defrance et al (Defrance P, Kereselidze T M, Noselidze I L and Tzulukidze M F 2001b J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 34 4957-68; Defrance P, Kereselidze T, Noselidze I and Tzulukidze M 2001a 22nd Int. Conf. on Photonic, Electronic, and Atomic Collisions (Santa Fe, CA) (abstracts of contributed papers) p 315) have reported calculations of the electron-impact double-ionization cross section for helium that display a markedly different high-energy behaviour than do most of the published experimental data and they contend that new precise measurements are needed. The results presented here confirm the correctness of the more recent experimental data and indicate that revision of the theory is required.

  4. Theoretical spectral distributions and total cross sections for neutral subthreshold pion production in carbon-carbon collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Deutchman, P. A.; Townsend, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    A coherent isobar formalism is employed to model subthreshold production of neutral pions in carbon-carbon collisions at energies below 100 MeV/nucleon. No arbitrary scale factors or adjustable free parameters are used in calculation of the Lorentz-invariant cross sections for pion production in the projectile, which produces an excited state that goes to M1 resonance in the target by conservation of spin and isospin. Pion production is also modeled for the projectile, which also reaches M1 resonance. The overall pion spectral distribution in the center of mass system is then integrated over the energy range 35-84 MeV/nucleon. The results expose an energy loss in the incident ions, as observed experimentally, and indicate that an isobar mechanism is responsible for higher energy pion production. Lower energy pions are a result of thermal processes.

  5. Comparison of steady state femoral head penetration rates between two highly cross-linked polyethylenes in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, John-Paul; Charron, Kory D; McCalden, Richard W; Macdonald, Steven J; Bourne, Robert B

    2010-08-01

    Given that the manufacture of highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) is not standardized, the behavior of these materials may vary. Our study compares minimum 5-year steady state femoral head penetration rates using the Martell method, in 2 HXPLEs produced by different manufacturers. Patients received a primary hip arthroplasty using an uncemented acetabular component with an HXLPE liner and a 28-mm femoral head. Forty-seven patients in group A received an HXLPE liner (Reflection XLPE, Smith and Nephew Inc, Memphis, Tenn), and 36 patients in group B received a different HXLPE liner (Longevity, Zimmer Inc, Warsaw, Ind). Average follow-up was 6.42 years in group A and 7.64 years in group B. The steady state head penetration rates were not significantly (P > .05) different between the HXPLE groups over the midterm with 0.026 mm/y and 0.025 mm/y in groups A and B, respectively.

  6. Cross sections for H(-) and Cl(-) production from HCl by dissociative electron attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orient, O. J.; Srivastava, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    A crossed target beam-electron beam collision geometry and a quadrupole mass spectrometer have been used to conduct dissociative electron attachment cross section measurements for the case of H(-) and Cl(-) production from HCl. The relative flow technique is used to determine the absolute values of cross sections. A tabulation is given of the attachment energies corresponding to various cross section maxima. Error sources contributing to total errors are also estimated.

  7. Diffractive, inelastic and total cross sections in high energy pp, pA and γ*A reactions with the dipole formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Ster, Andras

    2015-04-10

    The Lund Monte Carlo model DIPSY has recently been extended to ions to study elastic, inelastic and diffractive processes in high energy collisions between electrons, protons and nuclei. In this BFKL-based dipole formalism of parton interactions fluctuations are naturally included and adding them to the pomeron ladder substantially determine the diffractive excitation cross sections of the processes. Starting from √(s{sub NN})=200 GeV and √(s{sub γ*N})=100 GeV we provide results for pp, pA and γ*A total, inelastic and diffractive cross sections that are shown and discussed in case of pp, pO, pCu, pPb and γ*Au reactions. We find good agreement with pp and pPb data. We find that the diffractive cross sections are relatively small compared to the total ones but with increasing collision energies they grow faster than the elastic or the inelastic ones. We make a comparison to calculations obtained by the more conventional method of the Glauber Model MC, too.

  8. Cross-sectional neck response of a total human body FE model during simulated frontal and side automobile impacts.

    PubMed

    White, Nicholas A; Moreno, Daniel P; Gayzik, F Scott; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    Human body finite element (FE) models are beginning to play a more prevalent role in the advancement of automotive safety. A methodology has been developed to evaluate neck response at multiple levels in a human body FE model during simulated automotive impacts. Three different impact scenarios were simulated: a frontal impact of a belted driver with airbag deployment, a frontal impact of a belted passenger without airbag deployment and an unbelted side impact sled test. Cross sections were created at each vertebral level of the cervical spine to calculate the force and moment contributions of different anatomical components of the neck. Adjacent level axial force ratios varied between 0.74 and 1.11 and adjacent level bending moment ratios between 0.55 and 1.15. The present technique is ideal for comparing neck forces and moments to existing injury threshold values, calculating injury criteria and for better understanding the biomechanical mechanisms of neck injury and load sharing during sub-injurious and injurious loading.

  9. Cross sections for ultra-low-energy electron scattering from atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, M.; Shigemura, K.; Hosaka, K.; Odagiri, T.; Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, H.

    2016-12-01

    Absolute total cross sections for electron scattering from He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe at very low electron energies obtained using the technique employing the threshold-photoelectron source are presented. Comparison of the measured cross section for noble gas atoms with those of theoretical results are made.

  10. Highly Cross-Linked Versus Conventional Polyethylene in Posterior-Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty at a Mean 5-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, R Michael; Lovro, Luke R; Smits, Shelly A; Ireland, Philip H

    2015-10-01

    Concerns of highly cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) exist regarding fatigue resistance and oxidation, particularly in posterior-stabilized (PS) designs. A prospective cohort study of 114 consecutive PS TKAs utilized conventional polyethylene in 50 knees and second-generation annealed XLPE in 64 TKAs. Clinical (Short-Form 36, Knee Society Scores, and LEAS) and radiographic outcomes were evaluated at a mean of 5 years in 103 TKAs. Mean KSS scores were 12 points higher (P=0.01) and SF-36 physical function subset 14 points higher (P=0.005) in the XLPE group. There was no radiographic osteolysis or mechanical failure related to the tibial polyethylene in either group. At 5-year follow-up, no deleterious effects related to highly cross-linked posterior stabilized tibial polyethylene inserts were observed.

  11. Microscopic model analysis of the 6He, 6Li+28Si total reaction cross sections at the energy range 5-50 A MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lukyanov, K. V.; Kukhtina, I. N.; Lukyanov, V. K.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.

    2007-05-22

    The existing and some preliminary experimental data on the total cross sections of the 4,6He, 6,7Li+28Si reactions at energies E=5-50 A MeV are demonstrated. The data on 6Li,6He+28Si are analyzed in the framework of the microscopic optical potential with real and imaginary parts obtained with a help of the double-folding procedure and by using the current models of densities of the projectile nuclei. Besides, the microscopic double-folding Coulomb potential is calculated and its effect on cross sections is compared with that when one applies the traditional Coulomb potential of the uniform charge distribution. The semi-microscopic potentials are constructed from both the renormalized microscopic potentials and their derivatives to take into account collective motion effect and to improve an agreement with experimental data.

  12. The 4He Total Photo-Absorption Cross Section With Two- Plus Three-Nucleon Interactions From Chiral Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P

    2007-03-09

    The total photo-absorption cross section of {sup 4}He is evaluated microscopically using two- (NN) and three-nucleon (NNN) interactions based upon chiral effective field theory ({chi}EFT). The calculation is performed using the Lorentz integral transform method along with the ab initio no-core shell model approach. An important feature of the present study is the consistency of the NN and NNN interactions and also, through the Siegert theorem, of the two- and three-body current operators. This is due to the application of the {chi}EFT framework. The inclusion of the NNN interaction produces a suppression of the peak height and enhancement of the tail of the cross section. We compare to calculations obtained using other interactions and to representative experiments. The rather confused experimental situation in the giant resonance region prevents discrimination among different interaction models.

  13. Simple explanation of the theory of the total magnetic flux method for the measurement of ferromagnetic cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, R.K. )

    1995-01-01

    In a previous paper (Kirkwood and Stanley, 1992), the authors have outlined the total magnetic flux (TMF) method for the inspection of elongated ferromagnetic product, such as tubing, drill pipe, sucker rods, wire rope, and piping in refineries and chemical plants. This paper is presented to provide the scientific background to this nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method, which has not previously been presented, and to provide a list of references in which the technique is known to be used. Because the method detects wall loss in ferromagnetic steel parts, and is often used in conjunction with other NDE methods such as magnetic flux leakage (MFL), it represents yet another technique for rapid volumetric scanning of such parts.

  14. Radiostereometric Analysis Study of Tantalum Compared with Titanium Acetabular Cups and Highly Cross-Linked Compared with Conventional Liners in Young Patients Undergoing Total Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, David C.; Greene, Meridith; Snyder, Benjamin; Aubin, Michelle; Drew, Jacob; Bragdon, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Background: Radiostereometric analysis provides highly precise measurements of component micromotion relative to the bone that is otherwise undetectable by routine radiographs. This study compared, at a minimum of five years following surgery, the micromotion of tantalum and titanium acetabular cups and femoral head penetration in highly cross-linked polyethylene liners and conventional (ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene) liners in active patients who had undergone total hip replacement. Methods: This institutional review board-approved prospective, randomized, blinded study involved forty-six patients. Patients were randomized into one of four cohorts according to both acetabular cup and polyethylene liner. Patients received either a cementless cup with a titanium mesh surface or a tantalum trabecular surface and either a highly cross-linked polyethylene liner or an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene liner. Radiostereometric analysis examinations and Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) activity, and Harris hip scores were obtained preoperatively, postoperatively, at six months, and annually thereafter. Results: All patients had significant improvement (p < 0.05) in Short Form-36 Physical Component Summary, WOMAC, UCLA activity, and Harris hip scores postoperatively. On radiostereometric analysis examination, highly cross-linked polyethylene liners showed significantly less median femoral head penetration at five years (p < 0.05). Steady-state wear rates from one year to five years were 0.04 mm per year for ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene liners and 0.004 mm per year for highly cross-linked polyethylene liners. At the five-year follow-up, the median migration (and standard error) was 0.05 ± 0.20 mm proximally for titanium cups and 0.21 ± 0.05 mm for tantalum cups. Conclusions: In this young population who had undergone

  15. Total integral reactive cross sections for F + H2 yielding HF + H - Comparison of converged quantum, quasiclassical trajectory and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Judson, Richard S.; Jaffe, Richard L.; Baer, Michael; Kouri, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    The paper reports converged quantum total integral reactive cross sections for the reaction F + H2 yielding HF + H, for initial rotational states j sub i = 0 and 1, using a time-dependent method. The results are compared to classical results and to the experimental results of Neumark et al. (1985). Strong quantum effects are found in the threshold region for both initial states (i.e., in the dependence of the reaction on initial state for low energies). The classical results agree better with experiment than do the quantum results; this appears to be due to errors in the potential used.

  16. Total Synthesis of (−)-Mandelalide A Exploiting Anion Relay Chemistry (ARC): Identification of a Type II ARC/CuCN Cross-Coupling Protocol

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Anion relay chemistry (ARC), an effective, multicomponent union tactic, was successfully employed for the total synthesis of the highly cytotoxic marine macrolide (−)-mandelalide A (1). The northern hemisphere was constructed via a new type II ARC/CuCN cross-coupling tactic, while the southern hemisphere was secured via a highly efficient four-component type I ARC union. Importantly, the synthesis of 1 showcases ARC as a rapid, scalable coupling strategy for the union of simple readily available building blocks to access diverse complex molecular fragments with excellent stereochemical control. PMID:26954306

  17. Determination of the spherically symmetric potential components for Li sup + --N sub 2 and Li sup + --CO from total cross section measurements (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Gislason, E.A.; Polak-Dingels, P.; Rajan, M.S. )

    1990-08-15

    Total cross sections have been measured for Li{sup +} ions scattered by N{sub 2} and CO in the range {ital E}{Theta}{sub {ital R}}=5--1000 eV deg. Here {ital E} is the lab energy of the Li{sup +} beam, and {Theta}{sub {ital R}} is the resolution angle of the apparatus. From the data the spherically symmetric parts of the intermolecular potentials have been determined over a wide range of Li{sup +}-molecule distances including the attractive well region. The results are compared with other theoretical and experimental work on these systems.

  18. Total Synthesis of (-)-Mandelalide A Exploiting Anion Relay Chemistry (ARC): Identification of a Type II ARC/CuCN Cross-Coupling Protocol.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh H; Imanishi, Masashi; Kurogi, Taichi; Smith, Amos B

    2016-03-23

    Anion relay chemistry (ARC), an effective, multicomponent union tactic, was successfully employed for the total synthesis of the highly cytotoxic marine macrolide (-)-mandelalide A (1). The northern hemisphere was constructed via a new type II ARC/CuCN cross-coupling tactic, while the southern hemisphere was secured via a highly efficient four-component type I ARC union. Importantly, the synthesis of 1 showcases ARC as a rapid, scalable coupling strategy for the union of simple readily available building blocks to access diverse complex molecular fragments with excellent stereochemical control.

  19. Measurements of Total and Partial Charge-changing Cross Sections for 200-400 MeV/nucleon 12C in Water and Polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Toshito, T.; Kodama, K.; Sihver, L.; Yusa, K.; Ozaki, M.; Amako, K.; Kameoka, S.; Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Aoki, S.; Ban, T.; Fukuda, T.; Komatsu, M.; Kubota, H.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Takahashi, S.; Yoshida, J.; /Nagoya U. /Naruto U. of Education /NIRS, Chiba /SLAC /Toho U.

    2011-11-10

    We have studied charged nuclear fragments produced by 200 - 400 MeV/nucleon carbon ions, interacting with water and polycarbonate, using a newly developed emulsion detector. Total and partial charge-changing cross sections for the production of B, Be, and Li fragments were measured and compared with both previously published measurements, and model predictions. This study is of importance for validating and improving carbon ion therapy treatment planning systems, and for estimating the radiological risks for personnel on space missions, since carbon is a significant component of the Galactic Cosmic Rays.

  20. Redetermining CEBAF's Absolute Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Tong; Jlab Marathon Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    With the upgrade of the Jefferson Lab accelerator (CEBAF) from 6 GeV max energy to 12 GeV, all the dipole magnets in the machine were refurbished. Most of them were switched from open c-shaped to closed h-shaped by adding extra iron. With these upgraded magnets, the energy calibration of the accelerator needed to be redetermined. We will show how an extra external dipole, which is run in series with those in the machine, helps us cross check the current in the magnets as well as precisely map out the integral field for any machine setting. Using knowledge of the relative performance of the dipoles as well as the bend angle into the Hall, has allowed us to already determine a 4th pass 7 GeV beam to better than 7 MeV. In the future, we will use g-2 spin precession as a second independent energy determination. This work is supported by Kent State University, NSF Grant PHY-1405814, and DOE Contract DE-AC05-06OR23177 (JLab).

  1. Measurement of the ratios of the Z/gamma* + >= n jet production cross sections to the total inclusive Z/gamma* cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2006-08-01

    We present a study of events with Z bosons and jets produced at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data sample consists of nearly 14,000 Z/{gamma}* {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} candidates corresponding to the integrated luminosity of 340 pb{sup -1} collected using the D0 detector. Ratios of the Z/{gamma}* + {ge} n jet cross sections to the total inclusive Z/{gamma}* cross section have been measured for n = 1 to 4 jet events. Our measurements are found to be in good agreement with a next-to-leading order QCD calculation and with a tree-level QCD prediction with parton shower simulation and hadronization.

  2. Drawing enhances cross-modal memory plasticity in the human brain: a case study in a totally blind adult

    PubMed Central

    Likova, Lora T.

    2012-01-01

    In a memory-guided drawing task under blindfolded conditions, we have recently used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to demonstrate that the primary visual cortex (V1) may operate as the visuo-spatial buffer, or “sketchpad,” for working memory. The results implied, however, a modality-independent or amodal form of its operation. In the present study, to validate the role of V1 in non-visual memory, we eliminated not only the visual input but all levels of visual processing by replicating the paradigm in a congenitally blind individual. Our novel Cognitive-Kinesthetic method was used to train this totally blind subject to draw complex images guided solely by tactile memory. Control tasks of tactile exploration and memorization of the image to be drawn, and memory-free scribbling were also included. FMRI was run before training and after training. Remarkably, V1 of this congenitally blind individual, which before training exhibited noisy, immature, and non-specific responses, after training produced full-fledged response time-courses specific to the tactile-memory drawing task. The results reveal the operation of a rapid training-based plasticity mechanism that recruits the resources of V1 in the process of learning to draw. The learning paradigm allowed us to investigate for the first time the evolution of plastic re-assignment in V1 in a congenitally blind subject. These findings are consistent with a non-visual memory involvement of V1, and specifically imply that the observed cortical reorganization can be empowered by the process of learning to draw. PMID:22593738

  3. Association of pulse wave velocity with total lung capacity: A cross-sectional analysis of the BOLD London study

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, André F.S.; Patel, Jaymini; Gnatiuc, Louisa; Jones, Meinir; Burney, Peter G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Low lung function, measured using spirometry, has been associated with mortality from cardiovascular disease, but whether this is explained by airflow obstruction or restriction is a question that remains unanswered. Objectives To assess the association of total lung capacity (TLC), forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) with several cardio-metabolic and inflammatory markers. Methods In the follow up of the Burden of Lung Disease (BOLD) study in London, acceptable post-bronchodilator spirometric, pulse rate, pulse wave velocity and blood pressure data were obtained from 108 participants. Blood samples for measurement of cardio-metabolic and inflammatory markers were also collected from these participants. Association of lung function and volume with the different biomarkers was examined in multivariable linear regression models adjusted for potential confounders. Results Following adjustment for age, sex, height, and ethnicity, TLC (adjusted coefficient = −1.53; 95% CI: −2.57, −0.49) and FVC (adjusted coefficient = −2.66; 95% CI: −4.98, −0.34) were inversely associated with pulse wave velocity, and further adjustment for smoking status, pack-years and body mass index (BMI) did not materially change these results. FEV1 was inversely associated with systolic blood pressure, and adjustment for smoking status, pack-years and BMI made this association stronger (adjusted coefficient = −9.47; 95% CI: −15.62, −3.32). Conclusion The inverse association of pulse wave velocity, which is a marker of cardiovascular disease, with TLC suggests that the association of the former with low FVC is independent of airflow obstruction. The association between FEV1 with systolic blood pressure after adjustment for FVC suggests an association with airflow obstruction rather than with restricted spirometry. PMID:26553156

  4. Detection of sputtered and evaporated carbon aggregates: relative and absolute electron ionization fragmentation yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, C.; Deutsch, H.; Becker, K.; Märk, T. D.; Vietzke, E.

    2001-03-01

    The present study is a first attempt to determine electron impact ionization efficiencies for C 2 and C 3. A novel method has been applied to obtain the partial cross-section values for the reactions C 2+e→C +,C 2+e→C 2+ and C 3+e→C +,C 3+e→C 2+ and C 3+e→C 3+. The neutral target consisting of C, C 2 and C 3 is produced by thermal evaporation from a heated graphite sample and the neutral precursors in the subsequent ionization process can be distinguished by their different flight-time distributions acquired in the evaporation process. The partial ionization cross-section ratios obtained in this experiment have been calibrated with calculated absolute total ionization cross section curves of C 2 and C 3 using the Deutsch-Märk (DM) formalism.

  5. Wear resistant performance of highly cross-linked and annealed ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene against ceramic heads in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Sato, Taishi; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Akiyama, Mio; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Mawatari, Taro; Itokawa, Takashi; Ohishi, Masanobu; Motomura, Goro; Hirata, Masanobu; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of ceramic femoral head material, size, and implantation periods on the wear of annealed, cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) (XLPE) in total hip arthroplasty compared to non-cross-linked conventional UHMWPE (CPE). XLPE was fabricated by cross-linking with 60 kGy irradiation and annealing. Femoral heads made from zirconia and alumina ceramics and cobalt-chrome (CoCr) of 22 or 26 mm diameter were used. In this retrospective cohort study, the femoral head penetration into the cup was measured digitally on radiographs of 367 hips with XLPE and 64 hips with CPE. The average follow-up periods were 6.3 and 11.9 years, respectively. Both XLPE creep and wear rates were significantly lower than those of CPE (0.19 mm vs. 0.44 mm, 0.0001 mm/year vs. 0.09 mm/year, respectively). Zirconia displayed increased wear rates compared to alumina in CPE; however, there was no difference among head materials in XLPE (0.0008, 0.00007, and -0.009 mm/year for zirconia, alumina, and CoCr, respectively). Neither head size or implantation period impacted XLPE wear. In contrast to CPE, XLPE displayed low wear rates surpassing the effects of varying femoral head material, size, implantation period, and patient demographics. Further follow-up is required to determine the long-term clinical performance of the annealed XLPE.

  6. a Measurement of the Total Photon-Proton Cross Section in the Center of Mass Energy Range 167 TO 194 GEV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burow, Burkhard Dietrich

    The thesis is a complete presentation of a total photon-proton (gamma p) cross section measurement using the ZEUS detector at the recently commissioned HERA electron-proton (ep) collider. A measurement of gamma p interactions using the exchanged virtual photon of ep collisions is shown to be justified and the correct flux of photons is determined. HERA and ZEUS are introduced, with an emphasis on the components used in the measurement. The data was collected during the fall of 1992 for which the experimental conditions are described, including the determination of the 13 nb ^{-1} of integrated ep luminosity which provided the event sample. The treatment of background events is described, as are event losses due to inefficiencies in their identification by the trigger and in their subsequent analysis. The observed number of events is corrected for the acceptance of the experiment using Monte Carlo simulations of gamma p interactions tuned to match characteristics of the observed events. Radiative corrections to the measurement are shown to be small and the calculation is corroborated by a measurement of the number of radiative events. In the gamma p center of mass energy range 167 < W < 194 GeV, the total gamma p cross section is sigma _sp{rm tot}{gamma p} = 143 +/- 3 (stat.) +/- 18 (syst.) mub.

  7. Hadronic Total Cross Sections (R) in E+E- Interactions: Data from DOE laboratory experiments as compiled in data reviews by the Durham High Energy Physics Database Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    Whalley, M. R.

    A comprehensive compilation of experimental data on total hadronic cross sections, and R ratios, in e+e- interactions is presented. Published data from the Novosibirsk, Orsay, Frascati, SLAC, CORNELL, DESY, KEK and CERN e+e- colliders on both exclusive and inclusive final particle states are included from threshold energies to the highest LEP energies. The data are presented in tabular form supplemented by compilation plots of different exclusive final particle states and of different energy regions. (Taken from abstract of paper, A Compilation of Data on Hadronic Total Cross Sections in E+E- Interactions, M.R. Whalley, Journal of Physics G (Nuclear and Particle Physics), Volume 29, Number 12A, 2003). The Durham High Energy Physics (HEP) Database Group makes these data, extracted from papers and data reviews, available in one place in an easy-to-access format. The data are also included in the Durham HEP Reaction Data Database, which can be searched at http://hepdata.cedar.ac.uk/reaction

  8. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  9. Ratios of dijet production cross sections as a function of the absolute difference in rapidity between jets in proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hoch, M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Teischinger, F.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Benucci, L.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hammad, G. H.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wickens, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Ceard, L.; De Favereau De Jeneret, J.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Grégoire, G.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Silva Do Amaral, S. M.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Karadzhinova, A.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, S.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Cabrera, A.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Hektor, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Czellar, S.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Sillou, D.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Elgammal, S.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Thiebaux, C.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Baty, C.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bedjidian, M.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Boumediene, D.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Falkiewicz, A.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Le Grand, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.

    2012-11-01

    A study of dijet production in proton-proton collisions was performed at sqrt{s}=7 TeV for jets with p T>35 GeV and | y|<4.7 using data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC in 2010. Events with at least one pair of jets are denoted as "inclusive". Events with exactly one pair of jets are called "exclusive". The ratio of the cross section of all pairwise combinations of jets to the exclusive dijet cross section as a function of the rapidity difference between jets |Δ y| is measured for the first time up to |Δ y|=9.2. The ratio of the cross section for the pair consisting of the most forward and the most backward jet from the inclusive sample to the exclusive dijet cross section is also presented. The predictions of the Monte Carlo event generators pythia6 and pythia8 agree with the measurements. In both ratios the herwig++ generator exhibits a more pronounced rise versus |Δ y| than observed in the data. The BFKL-motivated generators cascade and hej+ariadne predict for these ratios a significantly stronger rise than observed.

  10. Absolute cross section for the reaction /sup 3/H(p,. gamma. /sub 0/)/sup 4/He and a review of /sup 4/He(. gamma. , p/sub 0/)/sup 3/H measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Calarco, J.R.; Hanna, S.S.; Chang, C.C.; Diener, E.M.; Kuhlmann, E.; Fisher, G.A.

    1983-08-01

    Accurate differential cross sections have been measured at 90/sup 0/ for the reaction /sup 3/H(p,..gamma..)/sup 4/He at E/sub p/ = 8.34 and 13.6 MeV. Previously published results for both /sup 3/H(p,..gamma..)/sup 4/He and /sup 4/He(..gamma..,p)/sup 3/H are reviewed and compared with the present data. The theoretical implications of the results are briefly discussed.

  11. Measurements of the total neutron cross-sections of Be, Ni and Cu at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures in the energy range from 2. 2 eV to 2. 2 meV

    SciTech Connect

    Adib, M.; Abdel-Kawy, A.; Maayouf, R.M.A.; Eid, Y.; Shuriet, G.; Hamouda, I.

    1980-09-01

    The total neutron cross-sections of Be, Ni, and Cu are measured using two time-of-flight spectrometers installed in front of two of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor. The measurements were carried out in the energy range from 2.2 eV to 2.2 meV at room temperature and at liquid nitrogen temperature for neutron energies below 5 meV. The coherent scattering cross-sections of these elements were determined from the Bragg cut-offs observed in the behavior of the total cross-sections at cold neutron energies. The incoherent cross-sections of Be, Ni and Cu were obtained from the analysis of the total neutron cross-section data beyond the Bragg cut-off. The one phonon annihilation process was estimated at long neutron wavelengths and was found to be in reasonable agreement with the results of calculations.

  12. Excitation and Charge Exchange Phenomena in Astronomical Objects: Measurement of Cross Sections and Lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara; Smith, S.; Lozano, J.; Cadez, I.; Greewnood, J.; Mawhovter, R.; Williams, I.; Niimura, M.

    2003-01-01

    This document addresses extreme ultraviolet radiation and X-ray emissions from comets, planets and heliospheric gases focusing on the measurement of charge-exchange cross sections and radiative lifetimes. Highly-charged heavy ions present in the solar wind, and their abundance relative to the total oxygen-ion abundance are detailed. The plan for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory high-charge ion facility is outlined detailing its ability to measure absolute collisional excitation cross sections, absolute charge-exchange cross sections, lifetimes of metastable ion levels, and X-ray emission spectra following charge changes.

  13. Probing the weakly-bound neutron orbit of {sup 31}Ne with total reaction and one-neutron removal cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Horiuchi, W.; Suzuki, Y.; Capel, P.; Baye, D.

    2010-02-15

    A candidate of a neutron-halo nucleus, {sup 31}Ne, contains a single neutron in the pf shell. Within the Glauber and eikonal models, we analyze reactions used to study {sup 31}Ne. We show in a {sup 30}Ne+n model that the magnitudes of the total reaction and above all of the one-neutron removal cross sections of {sup 31}Ne on {sup 12}C and {sup 208}Pb targets strongly depend on the orbital angular momentum of the neutron, thereby providing us with efficient ways to determine both the spin-parity and structure of the ground state of {sup 31}Ne. Besides these inclusive observables, we also calculate energy and parallel-momentum distributions for the breakup of {sup 31}Ne and show their strong dependence on the orbital of the valence neutron in the bound state of {sup 31}Ne.

  14. Measurement of the total and differential inclusive $\\mathrm{B}^{+}$ hadron cross sections in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = $ = 13 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2016-09-03

    The total and differential cross sections for inclusive production of $\\mathrm{B}^{+}$ hadrons are measured as a function of the $\\mathrm{B}^{+}$ transverse momentum $p_{\\mathrm{T}}^\\mathrm{B}$ and rapidity $y^\\mathrm{B}$ in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, using data collected by the CMS experiment that correspond to an integrated luminosity of 49.4 pb$^{-1}$. The measurement uses the exclusive decay channel $\\mathrm{B}^{+} \\to \\mathrm{J}/\\psi \\mathrm{K}^{+}$, with $\\mathrm{J}/\\psi$ mesons that decay to a pair of muons. The results show a reasonable agreement with theoretical calculations within the uncertainties.

  15. Precision measurement of the total cross section for e+e--->hadrons at a center-of-mass energy of 29 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, E.; Ford, W. T.; Qi, N.; Read, A. L.; Smith, J. G.; Camporesi, T.; de Sangro, R.; Marini, A.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Ronga, F.; Blume, H. T.; Hurst, R. B.; Sleeman, J. C.; Venuti, J. P.; Wald, H. B.; Weinstein, Roy; Band, H. R.; Gettner, M. W.; Goderre, G. P.; Gottschalk, B.; Meyer, O. A.; Moromisato, J. H.; Shambroom, W. D.; von Goeler, E.; Ash, W. W.; Chadwick, G. B.; Clearwater, S. H.; Coombes, R. W.; Kaye, H. S.; Lau, K. H.; Leedy, R. E.; Lynch, H. L.; Messner, R. L.; Michalowski, S. J.; Muller, F.; Moss, L. J.; Nelson, H. N.; Rich, K.; Ritson, D. M.; Rosenberg, L. J.; Wiser, D. E.; Zdarko, R. W.; Groom, D. E.; Lee, Hoyun; Loh, E. C.; Delfino, M. C.; Heltsley, B. K.; Johnson, J. R.; Lavine, T. L.; Maruyama, T.; Prepost, R.

    1985-04-01

    We report a high-precision measurement of the ratio R of the total cross section for e+e--->hadrons to that for e+e--->μ+μ-, at a center-of-mass energy of 29.0 GeV using the MAC detector. The result is R=3.96+/-0.09. This value of R is used to determine a value of the strong coupling constant αs of 0.23+/-0.06, nearly independent of fragmentation models. Two different analysis methods having quite different event-selection criteria have been used and the results are in agreement. Particular attention has been given to the study of systematic errors. New higher-order QED calculations are used for the luminosity determination and the acceptance for hadrons.

  16. Poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-grafted highly cross-linked polyethylene liner in primary total hip replacement: one-year results of a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Yoshio; Moro, Toru; Kamogawa, Morihide; Oda, Hiromi; Morimoto, Shuhei; Umeyama, Takashige; Minami, Manabu; Sugimoto, Hideharu; Nakamura, Shigeru; Karita, Tatsuro; Kim, Juntaku; Koyama, Yurie; Ito, Hideya; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kozo

    2013-06-01

    To control particle-induced osteolysis in total hip replacement (THR), we developed a new technique to graft poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) onto the surface of polyethylene liners. A prospective cohort study was conducted to investigate the clinical safety of this novel bearing surface. Between April 2007 and September 2008, we recruited a prospective consecutive series of 80 patients in five participating hospitals. These patients received a cementless THR; a 26-mm-diameter cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy ball and a poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-grafted cross-linked polyethylene liner were used for the bearing couplings. These individuals were followed a year postoperatively. An evaluation of clinical performance was conducted through an assessment of hip joint function based on the evaluation chart authorized by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association. No patients were lost to follow-up. No adverse events were found to be correlated with the implanted liners. The average hip joint function score improved from 43.2 preoperatively to 91.7 postoperatively at 1 year. There was no implant migration nor periprosthetic osteolysis detected on radiographic analysis. On the basis of our results, we conclude that poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-grafted cross-linked polyethylene liners are a safe implant option for hip replacement surgery for short-term clinical use.

  17. Database applicaton for absolute spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, Valery V.; Shumko, Sergiy

    2002-12-01

    32-bit database application with multidocument interface for Windows has been developed to calculate absolute energy distributions of observed spectra. The original database contains wavelength calibrated observed spectra which had been already passed through apparatus reductions such as flatfielding, background and apparatus noise subtracting. Absolute energy distributions of observed spectra are defined in unique scale by means of registering them simultaneously with artificial intensity standard. Observations of sequence of spectrophotometric standards are used to define absolute energy of the artificial standard. Observations of spectrophotometric standards are used to define optical extinction in selected moments. FFT algorithm implemented in the application allows performing convolution (deconvolution) spectra with user-defined PSF. The object-oriented interface has been created using facilities of C++ libraries. Client/server model with Windows Socket functionality based on TCP/IP protocol is used to develop the application. It supports Dynamic Data Exchange conversation in server mode and uses Microsoft Exchange communication facilities.

  18. System for absolute measurements by interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Douglas A.

    1993-03-01

    The most common problem of interferometric sensors is their inability to measure absolute path imbalance. Presented in this paper is a signal processing system that gives absolute, unambiguous reading of optical path difference for almost any style of interferometric sensor. Key components are a wide band (incoherent) optical source, a polychromator, and FFT electronics. Advantages include no moving parts in the signal processor, no active components at the sensor location, and the use of standard single mode fiber for sensor illumination and signal transmission. Actual absolute path imbalance of the interferometer is determined without using fringe counting or other inferential techniques. The polychromator extracts the interference information that occurs at each discrete wavelength within the spectral band of the optical source. The signal processing consists of analog and digital filtering, Fast Fourier analysis, and a peak detection and interpolation algorithm. This system was originally designed for use in a remote pressure sensing application that employed a totally passive fiber optic interferometer. A performance qualification was made using a Fabry-Perot interferometer and a commercially available laser interferometer to measure the reference displacement.

  19. Constrained Least Absolute Deviation Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhishun; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that least absolute deviation (LAD) criterion or L1-norm used for estimation of parameters is characterized by robustness, i.e., the estimated parameters are totally resistant (insensitive) to large changes in the sampled data. This is an extremely useful feature, especially, when the sampled data are known to be contaminated by occasionally occurring outliers or by spiky noise. In our previous works, we have proposed the least absolute deviation neural network (LADNN) to solve unconstrained LAD problems. The theoretical proofs and numerical simulations have shown that the LADNN is Lyapunov-stable and it can globally converge to the exact solution to a given unconstrained LAD problem. We have also demonstrated its excellent application value in time-delay estimation. More generally, a practical LAD application problem may contain some linear constraints, such as a set of equalities and/or inequalities, which is called constrained LAD problem, whereas the unconstrained LAD can be considered as a special form of the constrained LAD. In this paper, we present a new neural network called constrained least absolute deviation neural network (CLADNN) to solve general constrained LAD problems. Theoretical proofs and numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed CLADNN is Lyapunov stable and globally converges to the exact solution to a given constrained LAD problem, independent of initial values. The numerical simulations have also illustrated that the proposed CLADNN can be used to robustly estimate parameters for nonlinear curve fitting, which is extensively used in signal and image processing. PMID:18269958

  20. Absolute classification with unsupervised clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An absolute classification algorithm is proposed in which the class definition through training samples or otherwise is required only for a particular class of interest. The absolute classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering when one cluster is known initially. The definitions and statistics of the other classes are automatically developed through the weighted unsupervised clustering procedure, which is developed to keep the cluster corresponding to the class of interest from losing its identity as the class of interest. Once all the classes are developed, a conventional relative classifier such as the maximum-likelihood classifier is used in the classification.

  1. Can Sequentially-irradiated and Annealed Highly Cross-linked Polyethylene Inserts Thinner than Eight-millimeters Be Utilized in Total Knee Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Sayeed, Siraj A; Jauregui, Julio J; Korduba, Laryssa A; Essner, Aaron; Harwin, Steven F; Delanois, Ronald E; Mont, Michael A

    2015-05-01

    The routine use of highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has remained controversial secondary to the possibility of decreased material properties when compared to conventional UHMWPE. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if thin, sequentially-irradiated, and annealed highly cross-linked UHMWPE tibial inserts would have improved wear properties, while maintaining mechanical integrity, compared to conventional UHMWPE during biomechanical testing under aligned and malaligned conditions. Polyethylene inserts (4.27 and 6.27 mm) manufactured from GUR 1020-UHMWPE were cyclically loaded to analyze for wear. All wear scars were visually examined after loading using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Volume loss was plotted versus cycle count with linear regression analysis yielding wear rates. There was no statistical difference in wear between both thicknesses for all testing conditions. During aligned condition testing, the volumetric wear rate for sequentially-irradiated and annealed polyethylene thicknesses of 4.27 and 6.27 mm was 4.0 and 4.4 mm3/million cycles; and during malaligned conditions, it was 13.9 and 15.1 mm3/million cycles. For conventional polyethylene during aligned conditions, the volumetric wear rate was 33.0 and 22.8 mm3/million cycles; and during malaligned conditions it was 50.0 and 50.8 mm3/million cycles. By SEM evaluation, condylar wear surfaces for conventional and sequentially-irradiated and annealed polyethylene displayed surface ripples typical of adhesive wear. There were no observed visible differences between the wear scars for conventional compared to sequentially-irradiated and annealed polyethylene with no evidence of fatigue failure. This study demonstrated no differences between polyethylenes with thicknesses of 4.27 and 6.27 mm. This strengthens the conclusion that sequentially-irradiated and annealed highly cross-linked UHMWPE can be utilized in total knee arthroplasty. The successful wear

  2. Simultaneous evaluation of interrelated cross sections by generalized least-squares and related data file requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Poenitz, W.P.

    1984-10-25

    Though several cross sections have been designated as standards, they are not basic units and are interrelated by ratio measurements. Moreover, as such interactions as /sup 6/Li + n and /sup 10/B + n involve only two and three cross sections respectively, total cross section data become useful for the evaluation process. The problem can be resolved by a simultaneous evaluation of the available absolute and shape data for cross sections, ratios, sums, and average cross sections by generalized least-squares. A data file is required for such evaluation which contains the originally measured quantities and their uncertainty components. Establishing such a file is a substantial task because data were frequently reported as absolute cross sections where ratios were measured without sufficient information on which reference cross section and which normalization were utilized. Reporting of uncertainties is often missing or incomplete. The requirements for data reporting will be discussed.

  3. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  4. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  5. Absolute Standards for Climate Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, J.

    2016-10-01

    In a world of changing climate, political uncertainty, and ever-changing budgets, the benefit of measurements traceable to SI standards increases by the day. To truly resolve climate change trends on a decadal time scale, on-orbit measurements need to be referenced to something that is both absolute and unchanging. One such mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to definitively quantify climate change. In the CLARREO mission, we will utilize phase change cells in which a material is melted to calibrate the temperature of a blackbody that can then be observed by a spectrometer. A material's melting point is an unchanging physical constant that, through a series of transfers, can ultimately calibrate a spectrometer on an absolute scale. CLARREO consists of two primary instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer and a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy to calibrate other space-based instrumentation and thus transferring the absolute traceability. The status of various mission options will be presented.

  6. Evaluation of specific humoral immune response and cross reactivity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens induced in mice immunized with liposomes composed of total lipids extracted from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The development of a new tuberculosis (TB) vaccine has become one of the main objectives of the scientific community. Protein antigens have been widely explored as subunit TB vaccines, however lipid antigens could be equally important to be used or included in such a vaccine. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the potential of a liposome formulation composed of an extract of lipids from Mycobacterium smegmatis (Ms) as a TB vaccine candidate. We evaluated the immunogenicity of this formulation as well as the cross reactive response against antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) in BALB/c mice. We determined the anti-liposome IgG response in sera from TB patients and from healthy subjects who displayed a positive (PPD+) or negative (PPD-) tuberculin skin test. A significant increase in anti-liposome IgG (p<0.05) was detected in animals immunized with Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) compared with all groups, and in the group immunized with liposomes from Ms (LMs) compared to animals immunized with either LMs adjuvanted with aluminium (LMs-A) or the negative control group (phosphate buffered saline, PBS) respectively. With respect to the cross reactive response against a cocktail of cell wall antigens (CWA) from MTb, significantly higher IgG levels were observed in animals immunized with BCG and LMs compared to negative controls and either, aluminium-adjuvanted liposomes (LMs-A) or montanide (LMs-M) (p<0.05). Furthermore, the anti-liposome IgG response was significantly superior in sera from pulmonary TB patients compared to PPD+ and PPD- healthy subjects (p<0.001) suggesting the expression of these antigens in vivo during active MTb infection. The results obtained provide some evidence for the potential use of liposomes containing total lipid extracts of Ms as a TB vaccine candidate. PMID:23458421

  7. SU-E-T-236: Deconvolution of the Total Nuclear Cross-Sections of Therapeutic Protons and the Characterization of the Reaction Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, W.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The knowledge of the total nuclear cross-section Qtot(E) of therapeutic protons Qtot(E) provides important information in advanced radiotherapy with protons, such as the decrease of fluence of primary protons, the release of secondary particles (neutrons, protons, deuterons, etc.), and the production of nuclear fragments (heavy recoils), which usually undergo β+/− decay by emission of γ-quanta. Therefore determination of Qtot(E) is an important tool for sophisticated calculation algorithms of dose distributions. This cross-section can be determined by a linear combination of shifted Gaussian kernels and an error-function. The resonances resulting from deconvolutions in the energy space can be associated with typical nuclear reactions. Methods: The described method of the determination of Qtot(E) results from an extension of the Breit-Wigner formula and a rather extended version of the nuclear shell theory to include nuclear correlation effects, clusters and highly excited/virtually excited nuclear states. The elastic energy transfer of protons to nucleons (the quantum numbers of the target nucleus remain constant) can be removed by the mentioned deconvolution. Results: The deconvolution of the term related to the error-function of the type cerf*er((E-ETh)/σerf] is the main contribution to obtain various nuclear reactions as resonances, since the elastic part of energy transfer is removed. The nuclear products of various elements of therapeutic interest like oxygen, calcium are classified and calculated. Conclusions: The release of neutrons is completely underrated, in particular, for low-energy protons. The transport of seconary particles, e.g. cluster formation by deuterium, tritium and α-particles, show an essential contribution to secondary particles, and the heavy recoils, which create γ-quanta by decay reactions, lead to broadening of the scatter profiles. These contributions cannot be accounted for by one single Gaussian kernel for the

  8. RAPID KNEE-EXTENSIONS TO INCREASE QUADRICEPS MUSCLE ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: A RANDOMIZED CROSS-OVER STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Wilquin, Lousia; Jakobsen, Thomas Linding; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Bandholm, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background Inhibition of the quadriceps muscle and reduced knee-extension strength is common shortly following total knee arthroplasty (weeks to months), due to reduced voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle. In healthy subjects, strength training with heavy loads is known to increase agonist muscle activity, especially if the exercise is conducted using rapid muscle contractions. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine if patients with total knee arthroplasty could perform rapid knee-extensions using a 10 RM load four to eight weeks after surgery, and the degree to which rapid knee-extensions were associated with greater voluntary quadriceps muscle activity during an experimental strength training session, compared to that elicited using slow knee-extensions. Study Design A randomized cross-over study. Methods Twenty-four patients (age 66.5) 4-8 weeks post total knee arthroplasty randomly performed one set of five rapid, and one set of five slow knee-extensions with the operated leg, using a load of their 10 repetition maximum, while surface electromyography recordings were obtained from the vastus medialis and lateralis of the quadriceps muscle. Results Data from 23 of the 24 included patients were analyzed. Muscle activity was significantly higher during rapid knee-extensions (120.2% [10th-90th percentile: 98.3-149.1]) compared to slow knee-extensions (106.0% [88.8-140.8]) for the vastus lateralis (p<0.01), but not for the vastus medialis (120.8% [90.4-134.0]) and (121.8% [93.0-133.0]) (p = 0.17), respectively. Slow and rapid knee-extensions were performed at a median angular velocity of 19.7 degrees/sec (13.7-24.4) and 51.4 degrees/sec (28.9-63.1), respectively Conclusion Four to eight weeks after their total knee arthroplasty, the patients in the present study were able to conduct rapid knee-extensions according to the experimental protocol with an approximately doubled angular velocity compared to slow knee-extensions. This was associated with

  9. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  10. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  11. Physics of negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  12. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  13. Slow neutron total cross-section, transmission and reflection calculation for poly- and mono-NaCl and PbF2 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansy, Muhammad S.; Adib, M.; Habib, N.; Bashter, I. I.; Morcos, H. N.; El-Mesiry, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    A detailed study about the calculation of total neutron cross-section, transmission and reflection from crystalline materials was performed. The developed computer code is approved to be sufficient for the required calculations, also an excellent agreement has been shown when comparing the code results with the other calculated and measured values. The optimal monochromator and filter parameters were discussed in terms of crystal orientation, mosaic spread, and thickness. Calculations show that 30 cm thick of PbF2 poly-crystal is an excellent cold neutron filter producing neutron wavelengths longer than 0.66 nm needed for the investigation of magnetic structure experiments. While mono-crystal filter PbF2 cut along its (1 1 1), having mosaic spread (η = 0.5°) and thickness 10 cm can only transmit thermal neutrons of the desired wavelengths and suppress epithermal and γ-rays forming unwanted background, when it is cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature. NaCl (2 0 0) and PbF2 (1 1 1) monochromator crystals having mosaic spread (η = 0.5°) and thickness 10 mm shows high neutron reflectivity for neutron wavelengths (λ = 0.114 nm and λ = 0.43 nm) when they used as a thermal and cold neutron monochromators respectively with very low contamination from higher order reflections.

  14. High-Resolution Neutron Capture and Total Cross-Section Measurements, and the Astrophysical 95Mo(n,gamma) Reaction Rate at s-process Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Paul Edward; Guber, Klaus H; Harvey, John A; Wiarda, Dorothea

    2008-01-01

    Abundances of Mo isotopes predicted by stellar models of the s process are, except for {sup 95}Mo, in good agreement with data from single grains of mainstream presolar SiC. Because the meteorite data seemed sound and no reasonable modification to stellar theory resulted in good agreement for {sup 95}Mo, it has been suggested that the recommended neutron capture reaction rate for this nuclide is 30% too low. Therefore, we have made a new determination of the {sup 95}Mo(n,{gamma}) reaction rate via high-resolution measurements of the neutron-capture and total cross sections of {sup 95}Mo at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. These data were analyzed with the R-matrix code SAMMY to obtain parameters for resonances up to E{sub n} = 10 keV. Also, a small change to our capture apparatus allowed us to employ a new technique to vastly improve resonance spin and parity assignments. These new resonance parameters, together with our data in the unresolved range, were used to calculate the {sup 95}Mo(n,{gamma}) reaction rate at s-process temperatures. We compare the currently recommended rate to our new results and discuss their astrophysical impact.

  15. Determination of the muonic branching ratio of the W boson and its total width via cross-section measurements at the Tevatron and LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarda, Stefano; Cuth, Jakub; Schott, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    The total W-boson decay width Γ _W is an important observable which allows testing of the standard model. The current world average value is based on direct measurements of final state kinematic properties of W-boson decays, and has a relative uncertainty of 2%. The indirect determination of Γ _W via the cross-section measurements of vector-boson production can lead to a similar accuracy. The same methodology leads also to a determination of the leptonic branching ratio. This approach has been successfully pursued by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron collider, as well as by the CMS collaboration at the LHC. In this paper we present for the first time a combination of the available measurements at hadron colliders, accounting for the correlations of the associated systematic uncertainties. Our combination leads to values of BR(W→ μ ν )=(10.72 ± 0.16)% and Γ _W = 2113 ± 31 MeV, respectively, both compatible with the current world averages.

  16. Measurements of the Total and Differential Higgs Boson Production Cross Sections Combining the H→γγ and H→ZZ^{*}→4ℓ Decay Channels at sqrt[s]=8  TeV with the ATLAS Detector.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Affolder, A A; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Agustoni, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Alimonti, G; Alio, L; Alison, J; Alkire, S P; Allbrooke, B M M; Allport, P P; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Álvarez Piqueras, D; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amram, N; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Arabidze, G; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Arce, A T H; Arduh, F A; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnal, V; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Axen, B; Ayoub, M K; Azuelos, G; Baak, M A; Baas, A E; Bacci, C; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Badescu, E; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Balek, P; Balestri, T; Balli, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Baranov, S P; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnes, S L; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartos, P; Bassalat, A; Basye, A; Bates, R L; Batista, S J; Batley, J R; Battaglia, M; Bauce, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beacham, J B; Beattie, M D; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, M; Becker, S; Beckingham, M; Becot, C; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Beermann, T A; Begel, M; Behr, J K; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bender, M; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez Garcia, J A; Benjamin, D P; Bensinger, J R; Bentvelsen, S; Beresford, L; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Beringer, J; Bernard, C; Bernard, N R; Bernius, C; Bernlochner, F U; Berry, T; Berta, P; Bertella, C; Bertoli, G; Bertolucci, F; Bertsche, C; Bertsche, D; Besana, M I; Besjes, G J; Bessidskaia Bylund, O; Bessner, M; Besson, N; Betancourt, C; Bethke, S; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianchini, L; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieniek, S P; Biglietti, M; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Black, C W; Black, J E; Black, K M; Blackburn, D; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blanco, J E; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Bock, C; Boehler, M; Bogaerts, J A; Bogdanchikov, A G; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Boldyrev, A S; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borroni, S; Bortfeldt, J; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boudreau, J; Bouffard, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brazzale, S F; Brendlinger, K; Brennan, A J; Brenner, L; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Bristow, K; Bristow, T M; Britton, D; Britzger, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Bronner, J; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, T; Brooks, W K; Brosamer, J; Brost, E; Brown, J; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Bryngemark, L; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Buchholz, P; Buckley, A G; Buda, S I; Budagov, I A; Buehrer, F; Bugge, L; Bugge, M K; Bulekov, O; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burghgrave, B; Burke, S; Burmeister, I; Busato, E; Büscher, D; Büscher, V; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Butt, A I; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Butti, P; Buttinger, W; Buzatu, A; Buzykaev, R; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calandri, A; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Caloba, L P; Calvet, D; Calvet, S; Camacho Toro, R; Camarda, S; Cameron, D; Caminada, L M; Caminal Armadans, R; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Campoverde, A; Canale, V; Canepa, A

    2015-08-28

    Measurements of the total and differential cross sections of Higgs boson production are performed using 20.3  fb^{-1} of pp collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt[s]=8  TeV and recorded by the ATLAS detector. Cross sections are obtained from measured H→γγ and H→ZZ^{*}→4ℓ event yields, which are combined accounting for detector efficiencies, fiducial acceptances, and branching fractions. Differential cross sections are reported as a function of Higgs boson transverse momentum, Higgs boson rapidity, number of jets in the event, and transverse momentum of the leading jet. The total production cross section is determined to be σ_{pp→H}=33.0±5.3 (stat)±1.6 (syst)  pb. The measurements are compared to state-of-the-art predictions.

  17. Absolute Integral Cross Sections for the State-selected Ion-Molecule Reaction N2+(X2Σg+ v+ = 0-2) + C2H2 in the Collision Energy Range of 0.03-10.00 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuntao; Xiong, Bo; Chung Chang, Yih; Ng, C. Y.

    2016-08-01

    Using the vacuum ultraviolet laser pulsed field ionization-photoion source, together with the double-quadrupole-double-octopole mass spectrometer developed in our laboratory, we have investigated the state-selected ion-molecule reaction {{{{N}}}2}+({X}2{{{{Σ }}}{{g}}}+; v + = 0-2, N+ = 0-9) + C2H2, achieving high internal-state selectivity and high kinetic energy resolution for reactant {{{{N}}}2}+ ions. The charge transfer (CT) and hydrogen-atom transfer (HT) channels, which lead to the respective formation of product {{{C}}}2{{{{H}}}2}+ and N2H+ ions, are observed. The vibrationally selected absolute integral cross sections for the CT [σ CT(v +)] and HT [[σ HT(v +)] channels obtained in the center-of-mass collision energy (E cm) range of 0.03-10.00 eV reveal opposite E cm dependences. The σ CT(v +) is found to increase as E cm is decreased, and is consistent with the long-range exothermic CT mechanism, whereas the E cm enhancement observed for the σ HT(v +) suggests effective coupling of kinetic energy to internal energy, enhancing the formation of N2H+. The σ HT(v +) curve exhibits a step at E cm = 0.70-1.00 eV, suggesting the involvement of the excited {{{C}}}2{{{{H}}}2}+({A}2{{{{Σ }}}{{g}}}+) state in the HT reaction. Contrary to the strong E cm dependences for σ CT(v +) and σ HT(v +), the effect of vibrational excitation of {{{{N}}}2}+ on both the CT and HT channels is marginal. The branching ratios and cross sections for the CT and HT channels determined in the present study are useful for modeling the atmospheric compositions of Saturn's largest moon, Titan. These cross sections and branching ratios are also valuable for benchmarking theoretical calculations on chemical dynamics of the titled reaction.

  18. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometers Burst Mode Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, P.; Vigneron, P.; Hulot, G.; Crespo Grau, R.; Brocco, L.; Lalanne, X.; Sirol, O.; Leger, J. M.; Jager, T.; Bertrand, F.; Boness, A.; Fratter, I.

    2014-12-01

    Each of the three Swarm satellites embarks an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) to provide absolute scalar measurements of the magnetic field with high accuracy and stability. Nominal data acquisition of these ASMs is 1 Hz. But they can also run in a so-called "burst mode" and provide data at 250 Hz. During the commissioning phase of the mission, seven burst mode acquisition campaigns have been run simultaneously for all satellites, obtaining a total of ten days of burs-mode data. These campaigns allowed the identification of issues related to the operations of the piezo-electric motor and the heaters connected to the ASM, that do not impact the nominal 1 Hz scalar data. We analyze the burst mode data to identify high frequency geomagnetic signals, focusing the analysis in two regions: the low latitudes, where we seek signatures of ionospheric irregularities, and the high latitudes, to identify high frequency signals related to polar region currents. Since these campaigns have been conducted during the initial months of the mission, the three satellites where still close to each other, allowing to analyze the spatial coherency of the signals. Wavelet analysis have revealed 31 Hz signals appearing in the night-side in the equatorial region.

  19. Absolute calibration of optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Viana, N.B.; Mazolli, A.; Maia Neto, P.A.; Nussenzveig, H.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Mesquita, O.N.

    2006-03-27

    As a step toward absolute calibration of optical tweezers, a first-principles theory of trapping forces with no adjustable parameters, corrected for spherical aberration, is experimentally tested. Employing two very different setups, we find generally very good agreement for the transverse trap stiffness as a function of microsphere radius for a broad range of radii, including the values employed in practice, and at different sample chamber depths. The domain of validity of the WKB ('geometrical optics') approximation to the theory is verified. Theoretical predictions for the trapping threshold, peak position, depth variation, multiple equilibria, and 'jump' effects are also confirmed.

  20. Vitamin-E blended and infused highly cross-linked polyethylene for total hip arthroplasty: a comparison of three-dimensional crystalline morphology and strain recovery behavior.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yasuhito; Masaoka, Toshinori; Yamamoto, Kengo; Shishido, Takaaki; Tateiwa, Toshiyuki; Kubo, Kosuke; Pezzotti, Giuseppe

    2014-08-01

    Vitamin-E (α-tocopherol) is now recognized worldwide as one of the most promising antioxidant agents for highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE) used in total joint replacements. In the contemporary manufacturing processes, two alternative methods are currently accepted to incorporate this antioxidant into polyethylene microstructure: (i) blending vitamin-E before consolidation and radiation crosslinking; (ii) infusing vitamin-E via a homogenizing heat treatment after radiation crosslinking. However, the effects of these technological differences on crystalline morphology and mechanical behavior of polyethylene remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of this paper is to quantitatively evaluate the microstructural differences of commercially available vitamin-E blended and infused HXLPE liner (referred to as Liner BL and IF, respectively). For this purpose, confocal/polarized Raman spectroscopy was used to systematically examine the three-phase percentages (amorphous (αa), crystalline (αc), and intermediate third phase (αt)), preferential molecular orientation (θp), and degree of crystalline anisotropy (〈P2(cosβ)〉). Additionally, we compared the time-dependent deformation of Liner BL and IF as obtained by uniaxial stress relaxation tests followed by strain recovery. Distinctive features of the near-surface αc, θp, and〈P2(cosβ)〉 were clearly observed within the first 35μm in the two studied liners. Despite the equivalent level of the bulk αc and 〈P2(cosβ)〉, higher restoring force against a uniaxial strain was observed in Liner IF, which reflects a higher crosslink density in its amorphous phase. On the other hands, a higher degree of surface orientational randomness was detected in Liner BL, which is structurally more beneficial for minimizing the in-vivo occurrence of strain-softening-assisted wear.

  1. The Association Between Self-Rated Mental Health Status and Total Health Care Expenditure: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of a Nationally Representative Sample.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Muoi T; Chan, Winnie Y; Keeler, Courtney

    2015-09-01

    Both clinical diagnoses and self-rated measures of mental illness are associated with a variety of outcomes, including physical well-being, health utilization, and expenditure. However, much of current literature primarily utilizes clinically diagnosed data.This cross-sectional study explores the impact of mental illness and health care expenditure using 2 self-rated measures: self-rated measured of perceived mental health status (SRMH) and Kessler Screening Scale for Psychological Distress (K6).Data from the 2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Household Component, a nationally representative sample of noninstitutionalized individuals (n = 18,295), were analyzed using bivariate χ tests and a 2-part model (logistics regression and generalized linear model regression for the first and second stages, respectively).Although predictive of any health expenditure, SRMH alone was not highly predictive of the dollar value of that health expenditure conditional on any spending. By comparison, the K6 measure was significantly and positively associated with the probability of any health expenditure as well as the dollar value of that spending. Taken together, both the K6 and SRMH measures suggest a positive relationship between poor mental health and the probability of any health expenditure and total expenditure conditional on any spending, even when adjusting for other confounding factors such as race/ethnicity, sex, age, educational attainment, insurance status, and some regional characteristics.Our results suggest that psychological distress and SRMH may represent potential pathways linking poor mental health to increased health care expenditure. Further research exploring the nuances of these relationships may aid researchers, practitioners, and policy makers in addressing issues of inflated health care expenditure in populations at risk for poor mental health.

  2. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium.

    PubMed

    Roshan, M V; Springham, S V; Rawat, R S; Lee, P; Krishnan, M

    2010-08-01

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f(n) approximately 4.1x10(-4) with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10(8) neutrons per discharge.

  3. Absolute bioavailability of quinine formulations in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Babalola, C P; Bolaji, O O; Ogunbona, F A; Ezeomah, E

    2004-09-01

    This study compared the absolute bioavailability of quinine sulphate as capsule and as tablet against the intravenous (i.v.) infusion of the drug in twelve male volunteers. Six of the volunteers received intravenous infusion over 4 h as well as the capsule formulation of the drug in a cross-over manner, while the other six received the tablet formulation. Blood samples were taken at predetermined time intervals and plasma analysed for quinine (QN) using reversed-phase HPLC method. QN was rapidly absorbed after the two oral formulations with average t(max) of 2.67 h for both capsule and tablet. The mean elimination half-life of QN from the i.v. and oral dosage forms varied between 10 and 13.5 hr and were not statistically different (P > 0.05). On the contrary, the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and area under the curve (AUC) from capsule were comparable to those from i.v. (P > 0.05), while these values were markedly higher than values from tablet formulation (P < 0.05). The therapeutic QN plasma levels were not achieved with the tablet formulation. The absolute bioavailability (F) were 73% (C.l., 53.3 - 92.4%) and 39 % (C.I., 21.7 - 56.6%) for the capsule and tablet respectively and the difference was significant (P < 0.05). The subtherapeutic levels obtained from the tablet form used in this study may cause treatment failure during malaria and caution should be taken when predictions are made from results obtained from different formulations of QN.

  4. A measurement of. Delta. sigma. sub L (np), the difference between neutron-proton total cross sections in pure longitudinal spin states

    SciTech Connect

    Beddo, M.E.

    1990-10-01

    A measurement off {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(np), the difference between neutron-proton total cross sections in pure longitudinal spin states, is described. The results will help determine the isospin-zero (I = 0) scattering amplitudes, which are not well known above laboratory energies of 500 MeV, whereas the isospin-one (I = 1) amplitudes are fairly well-determined to 1 GeV. Data points were taken at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) at Los Alamos, New Mexico, for five neutron beam energies: 484, 568, 634,720 and 788 MeV; they are the first in this energy range. Polarized neutrons were produced by charge-exchange of polarized protons on a liquid deuterium target (LD{sub 2}). Large-volume neutron counters detected the neutrons that passed through a polarized proton target. The counters subtended a range of solid angles large enough to allow extrapolation of the scattered neutrons to 0{degree}. Two modifications to the LAMPF accelerator system which were made for this work are described. They included a beam buncher,'' which modified the normal rf-time structure of the proton beam and allowed for the selection of peak-energy neutrons by time-of-flight means, and a computerized beam steering program, which reduced systematic effects due to beam motion at the LD{sub 2} target. The experimental values of {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(np) are found to be consistent with other np data, including preliminary data from SIN and Saclay, but not with some results from Argonne which used a polarized proton beam and a polarized deuteron target. The I = 0 component was extracted from {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(np) using existing pp data (I = 1), with the unexpected result that {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(I = 0) was found to be essentially identical in shape to {Delta}{sigma}{sub L}(I = 1). The significance of this is not yet understood.

  5. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  6. Neutron activation analysis of certified samples by the absolute method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadem, F.; Belouadah, N.; Idiri, Z.

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear reactions analysis technique is mainly based on the relative method or the use of activation cross sections. In order to validate nuclear data for the calculated cross section evaluated from systematic studies, we used the neutron activation analysis technique (NAA) to determine the various constituent concentrations of certified samples for animal blood, milk and hay. In this analysis, the absolute method is used. The neutron activation technique involves irradiating the sample and subsequently performing a measurement of the activity of the sample. The fundamental equation of the activation connects several physical parameters including the cross section that is essential for the quantitative determination of the different elements composing the sample without resorting to the use of standard sample. Called the absolute method, it allows a measurement as accurate as the relative method. The results obtained by the absolute method showed that the values are as precise as the relative method requiring the use of standard sample for each element to be quantified.

  7. Absolute integrated intensity for the nu-1 sulfur dioxide band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilon, P. J.; Young, C.

    1976-01-01

    The absolute integrated intensity of the IR vibration-rotation nu-1 SO2 band was measured using the linear portion of the curve of growth. Infrared spectroscopic-absorption cell measurements were performed on sulfur dioxide at partial pressures less than 0.15 torr with nitrogen added to give a total pressure of 705 torr, the path length being 4 mm. The absolute integrated intensity was determined to be 112.0 plus or minus 2.6/cm/sq (atm cm) at 296 K at the 95% confidence level.

  8. Direct measurement of {sup 12}C+{sup 4}He→{sup 16}O+γ total cross section at E{sub cm}=1.2 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, H.; Sagara, K.; Fujita, K.; Kodama, D.; Narikiyo, Y.; Hamamoto, K.; Ban, T.; Tao, N.; Teranishi, T.

    2014-05-02

    A fusion reaction of {sup 12}C+{sup 4}He→{sup 16}O+γ is one of the main reactions in He-burning of stars and important for nucleosynthesis. The fusion cross section at stellar energy of E{sub cm}=0.3 MeV has not been determined precisely yet in spite of efforts for about 40 years. We plan to measure directly the total fusion cross section down to 0.7 MeV at Kyushu University Tandem accelerator Laboratory and to estimate the cross section at 0.3MeV by extrapolation. We have already measured the cross sections at 2.4 MeV and 1.5 MeV. The measurement at E{sub cm}=1.2 MeV is in progress.

  9. Photon scattering cross sections of H2 and He measured with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ice, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    Total (elastic + inelastic) differential photon scattering cross sections have been measured for H2 gas and He, using an X-ray beam. Absolute measured cross sections agree with theory within the probable errors. Relative cross sections (normalized to theory at large S) agree to better than one percent with theoretical values calculated from wave functions that include the effect of electron-electron Coulomb correlation, but the data deviate significantly from theoretical independent-particle (e.g., Hartree-Fock) results. The ratios of measured absolute He cross sections to those of H2, at any given S, also agree to better than one percent with theoretical He-to-H2 cross-section ratios computed from correlated wave functions. It appears that photon scattering constitutes a very promising tool for probing electron correlation in light atoms and molecules.

  10. The absolute absorption cross section of crystalline αg and βg HNO33H2O (NAT) and HNO32H2O (NAD) in the range 180 - 200 K in the mid-IR (4000 to 600 cm-1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Michel J.; Iannarelli, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    Heterogeneous processing in the polar atmosphere requires the presence of polar stratospheric cloud particles (PSC's) that are the seat of interfacial chlorine and NOx chemistry. A subgroup of PSC's, namely PSC Ia, are known to consist of hydrates of nitric acid, mostly nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) as two polymorphs, α- and β-HNO33H2O occurring in the range 185 to 200 K under prevailing stratospheric partial pressure conditions of 10 ppb HNO3 or so. Despite the fact that reference IR spectra in the mid-IR range have been obtained some time ago (Ritzhaupt and Devlin (1991), Koehler et al. (1992)), no absolute absorption cross section of these important ice particles exist to date except a study of its refractive indices (Middlebrook et al. (1994), Berland et al. (1994)). Knowledge of optical cross sections would enable remote sensing of PSC's in the IR region using satellite and/or LIDAR platforms. We have embarked on a multidiagnostic research program aiming at studying the kinetics, thermodynamics and spectroscopy of PSC's using a stirred flow reactor equipped with FTIR absorption spectroscopy in transmission. The gas phase was monitored using electron-impact residual gas mass spectroscopy together with pulsed and steady-state gas admission and thorough characterization of the adsorption of HNO3, H2O and HCl onto the stainless-steel vessel walls under mass balance conditions using measured Langmuir adsorption isotherms. We have grown α- and β-NAT by doping thin (1 μm thick) ice films with metered amounts of HNO3. According to known phase diagrams we have obtained mixtures of pure ice with NAT whose IR spectrum was obtained after spectral subtraction of the pure ice phase. The concentration of HNO3 deposited on the ice film was determined by measuring the inflow and taking into account adsorption of HNO3 on the reactor walls as well as effusive loss out the reactor. We also independently checked the H2O concentration of α-NAT from the decrease of the pure H2O

  11. Influence of the static deformation of /sup 7/Li on the /sup 7/Li-/sup 51/V total reaction cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Moebius, K.; Boettger, R.; Egelhof, P.; Moroz, Z.; Steffens, E.; Tungate, G.; Dreves, W.; Koenig, I.; Fick, D.

    1981-04-20

    The energy dependence of the reaction cross section and the corresponding tensor analyzing power has been measured for the system /sup 7/Li-/sup 51/V by two different methods. The tensor analyzing powers observed can be interpreted in a sharp cutoff model as caused entirely by the static deformation of the /sup 7/Li projectiles.

  12. Absolute instability from linear conversion of counter-propagating positive and negative energy waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, A.N.; Brizard, A.J.; Morehead, J.J.; Tracy, E.R.

    1997-12-31

    The resonant interaction of a negative-energy wave with a positive-energy wave gives rise to a linear instability. Whereas a single crossing of rays in a nonuniform medium leads to a convectively saturated instability, we show that a double crossing can yield an absolute instability.

  13. Total Synthesis of (-)-Conolutinine.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiangyang; Jiang, Guangde; Xia, Zilei; Hu, Jiadong; Wan, Xiaolong; Gao, Jin-Ming; Lai, Yisheng; Xie, Weiqing

    2015-09-18

    The first enantioselective synthesis of (-)-conolutinine was achieved in 10 steps. The synthesis featured a catalytic asymmetric bromocyclization of tryptamine to forge the tricycle intermediate. Hydration of an alkene catalyzed by Co(acac)2 was also employed as a key step to diastereoselectively introduce the tertiary alcohol moiety. The absolute configuration of (-)-conolutinine was established to be (2S,5aS,8aS,13aR) based on this asymmetric total synthesis.

  14. Toxicokinetic study and absolute oral bioavailability of deoxynivalenol, T-2 toxin and zearalenone in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Osselaere, Ann; Devreese, Mathias; Goossens, Joline; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; De Baere, Siegrid; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2013-01-01

    Mycotoxins lead to economic losses in animal production. A way to counteract mycotoxicosis is the use of detoxifiers. The European Food Safety Authority stated that the efficacy of detoxifiers should be investigated based on toxicokinetic studies. Little information is available on the absolute oral bioavailability and the toxicokinetic parameters of deoxynivalenol, T-2 and zearalenone in broilers. Toxins were administered intravenously and orally in a two-way cross-over design. For deoxynivalenol a bolus of 0.75mg/kg BW was administered, for T-2 toxin 0.02mg/kg BW and for zearalenone 0.3mg/kg BW. Blood was collected at several time points. Plasma levels of the mycotoxins and their metabolite(s) were quantified using LC-MS/MS methods and toxicokinetic parameters were analyzed. Deoxynivalenol has a low absolute oral bioavailability (19.3%). For zearalenone and T-2 no plasma levels above the limit of quantification were observed after an oral bolus. Volumes of distribution were recorded, i.e. 4.99, 0.14 and 22.26L/kg for deoxynivalenol, T-2 toxin and zearalenone, respectively. Total body clearance was 0.12, 0.03 and 0.48L/minkg for deoxynivalenol, T-2 toxin and zearalenone, respectively. After IV administration, T-2 toxin had the shortest elimination half-life (3.9min), followed by deoxynivalenol (27.9min) and zearalenone (31.8min).

  15. Direct total cross section measurement of the 16O(α,γ)20Ne reaction at Ec.m.=2.26 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, U.; Brown, J. R.; Buchmann, L.; Carmona-Gallardo, M.; Erikson, L.; Fallis, J.; Greife, U.; Hutcheon, D.; Ottewell, D.; Ruiz, C.; Sjue, S.; Vockenhuber, C.

    2011-08-01

    In stellar helium burning, 16O represents the endpoint of the helium-burning sequence due to the low rate of 16O(α,γ)20Ne. We present a new direct measurement of the total capture reaction rate of 16O(α,γ)20Ne at Ec.m.=2.26MeV employing the DRAGON recoil separator. For the first time, the total S factor and its contributing direct capture transitions could be determined in one experiment.

  16. Consistent set of nuclear parameters values for absolute INAA

    SciTech Connect

    Heft, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Gamma spectral analysis of irradiated material can be used to determine absolute disintegration rates for specific radionuclides. These data, together with measured values for the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes, and irradiation, cooling and counting time values, are all the experimental information required to do absolute Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. The calculations required to go from product photon emission rate to target nuclide amount depend upon values used for the thermal neutron capture cross-section, the resonance absorption integral, the half-life and photon branching ratios. Values for these parameters were determined by irradiating and analyzing a series of elemental standards. The results of these measurements were combined with values reported by other workers to arrive at a set of recommended values for the constants. Values for 114 nuclides are listed.

  17. Measurements of the Total Reaction Cross Sections for 6,8He and 8,9Li Nuclei with Energies of (25-45)A Mev on natAl, natTa and natPb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdemchimeg, B.; Artukh, A. G.; Klygin, S. A.; Kononenko, G. A.; Kyslukha, D. A.; Sereda, Yu. M.; Vorontzov, A. N.; Lukyanov, S. M.; Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Davaa, S.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.; Borcea, C.; Rotaru, F.; Stanoiu, M.; Martina, L.; Saillant, F.; Raine, B.

    2015-06-01

    The total nuclear reaction cross sections (σR) measurements have long been of interest since they tell us about the radii and transparency of these nuclei and give clues to understanding of their structure. For studies of unstable nuclei, in particular the physical properties of halo nuclei and the neutron skin thickness, it is valuable to know not only the root-mean-square radii (rms) but it is important to know the details of nucleusnucleus potentials. Our goal was to study total reaction cross sections (σR) by a direct measurement technique (the so-called beam attenuation or transmission method) which allows to extract model independent information. The interaction radii for 6He, 8,9Li were extracted, which are in agreement with the previous measurement at the similar energies (about a few tens of AMeV) Our results show a tendency of increasing radii as function of mass of the secondary targets.

  18. Measurement of the W and Z Cross Sections in the Electron Channel for p¯p Collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV and Extraction of the W Total Width from the Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, John Michael

    2005-10-01

    This dissertation presents measurements of the inclusive production cross sections for W and Z gauge bosons decaying through the electron channel with p¯p collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The ratio of these cross sections is then used to extract the W total width. The Standard Model (SM) of electroweak and strong interactions is a collection of theories which together encompass what is currently known about the elementary particles that make up matter and the forces through which they interact. Experimentalists are constantly searching for violations of the Standard Model by making precision measurements of predicted interactions. The decay of the W boson is one such interaction. The rate of its decay is reflected in its width which is predicted to high precision using Standard Model-based calculations. Therefore, a high precision experimental width measurement would be very sensitive to any such violation. In principle the W and Z boson production cross sections could also be good Standard Model tests. However, a precise knowledge of integrated luminosity is required which is unfortunately difficult to obtain at the Tevatron. In fact, the W and Z cross section results can be used to obtain a more precise luminosity measurement. The data set consists of a total integrated luminosity of 177 pb-1 collected from September 2002 to September 2003 using the DØ detector at Fermilab.

  19. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  20. ON A SUFFICIENT CONDITION FOR ABSOLUTE CONTINUITY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The formulation of a condition which yields absolute continuity when combined with continuity and bounded variation is the problem considered in the...Briefly, the formulation is achieved through a discussion which develops a proof by contradiction of a sufficiently theorem for absolute continuity which uses in its hypothesis the condition of continuity and bounded variation .

  1. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  2. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  3. A new absolute extreme ultraviolet image system designed for studying the radiated power of the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Zhuang, G.; Wang, Z. J.; Ding, Y. H.; Zhang, X. Q.; Tang, Y. J.

    2010-07-15

    A bolometer imaging system mounted on different toroidal and poloidal locations used for radiation observation has been developed in the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT tokamak). Three miniature pinhole AXUV16ELG (16 elements absolute extreme ultraviolet silicon photodiodes) array cameras, which are settled down in the same toroidal position but in three different poloidal places, can provide a broad viewing angle that covers the whole plasma cross-section, and hence can measure the total radiated power and provide the radiated emissive profile, while nine AXUV10EL (10 elements absolute extreme ultraviolet silicon photodiodes) array cameras are divided into three groups and will be mounted on different toroidal locations to observe the toroidal radiated power distribution. Among these detectors, one element of the AXUV16ELG array is absolutely calibrated by the synchrotron radiation source to verify the system reliability. Although there are some discrepancies between the typical responsivity given by IRD Co. and the calibrated results, it is confirmed that the discrepancies have no major effect on the final result after the simulation. The details of the system as well as observations are presented in the paper.

  4. A new absolute extreme ultraviolet image system designed for studying the radiated power of the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak discharges.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Zhuang, G; Wang, Z J; Ding, Y H; Zhang, X Q; Tang, Y J

    2010-07-01

    A bolometer imaging system mounted on different toroidal and poloidal locations used for radiation observation has been developed in the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT tokamak). Three miniature pinhole AXUV16ELG (16 elements absolute extreme ultraviolet silicon photodiodes) array cameras, which are settled down in the same toroidal position but in three different poloidal places, can provide a broad viewing angle that covers the whole plasma cross-section, and hence can measure the total radiated power and provide the radiated emissive profile, while nine AXUV10EL (10 elements absolute extreme ultraviolet silicon photodiodes) array cameras are divided into three groups and will be mounted on different toroidal locations to observe the toroidal radiated power distribution. Among these detectors, one element of the AXUV16ELG array is absolutely calibrated by the synchrotron radiation source to verify the system reliability. Although there are some discrepancies between the typical responsivity given by IRD Co. and the calibrated results, it is confirmed that the discrepancies have no major effect on the final result after the simulation. The details of the system as well as observations are presented in the paper.

  5. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  6. Measurement of fiducial and total cross section for Higgs boson production in the four-lepton decay channel in pp collisions at √{ s} = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herde, Hannah; Atlas Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Fully characterizing the Higgs boson provides a key portal to stringently examine the Standard Model and search for tantalizing hints of new physics. We will present the measurement of the cross section for Higgs boson production in the four lepton (electron or muon) decay channel in a fiducial region within the detector acceptance, defined in terms of lepton traverse momenta and pseudo-rapidity. The extrapolation to the total cross section, covering the full phase-space, is also presented. The measurements are performed using 2015-2016 pp collision data at √{ s} = 13 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector. We will also present the measurements of the fiducial cross section as a function of the final state as well as a confrontation of the cross section for same flavor and opposite flavor final states. The inclusive fiducial cross section is compared with the Next-to-Next-to-Next to Leading Order theoretical calculation for the gluon-gluon fusion production mode, and Next-to-Next-to Leading Order calculations for production via vector boson fusion and associated production modes in the fiducial phase-space.

  7. Total cross sections of electron scattering by several sulfur-containing molecules OCS, SO2, SF4, SF6, SF5CF3, SO2Cl2 and SO2ClF at 30-5000 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, D. H.; Sun, J. F.; Liu, Y. F.; Zhu, Z. L.; Ma, H.

    2009-07-01

    Total cross sections of electron scattering by several sulfur-containing molecules OCS, SO{2}, SF{4}, SF{6}, SF{5}CF{3}, SO{2}Cl{2} and SO{2}ClF are calculated at the Hartree-Fork level employing the modified additivity rule approach. The modified additivity rule approach, which was proposed by Shi et al. [Eur. Phys. J. D 45, 253 (2007); Nucl. Instrum. Meth. B 254, 205 (2007)], takes into consideration that the contributions of the geometric shielding effect vary as the energy of incident electrons, the target's molecular dimension and the atomic and electronic numbers in the molecule. The present investigations cover the impact energies ranging from 30 to 5000 eV. The quantitative total cross sections are compared with those obtained by experiments and other theories. Good agreement is observed even at energies of several tens of eV. It shows that the modified additivity rule approach is applicable to carry out the total cross section calculations of electron scattering by these sulfur-containing molecules at intermediate and high energies, especially over the energy range above 100 eV or so. In the present calculations, the atoms are still represented by the spherical complex optical potential, which is composed of static, exchange, polarization and absorption terms.

  8. Cross-sex hormone therapy in transgender persons affects total body weight, body fat and lean body mass: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Klaver, M; Dekker, M J H J; de Mutsert, R; Twisk, J W R; den Heijer, M

    2016-08-29

    Weight gain and body fat increase the risk of cardiometabolic disease. Cross-sex hormone therapy in transgender persons leads to changes in body weight and body composition, but it is unclear to what extent. We performed a meta-analysis to investigate the changes in body weight, body fat and lean body mass during cross-sex hormone therapy in transgender persons. We searched the PubMed database for eligible studies until November 2015. Ten studies reporting changes in body weight, body fat or lean mass in hormone naive transgender persons were included, examining 171 male-to-female and 354 female-to-male transgender people. Pooled effect estimates in the male-to-female group were +1.8 kg (95% CI: 0.2;3.4) for body weight, +3.0 kg (2.0;3.9) for body fat and -2.4 kg (-2.8; -2.1) for lean body mass. In the female-to-male group, body weight changed with +1.7 kg (0.7;2.7), body fat with -2.6 kg (-3.9; -1.4) and lean body mass with +3.9 kg (3.2;4.5). Cross-sex hormone therapy increases body weight in both sexes. In the male-to-female group, a gain in body fat and a decline in lean body mass are observed, while the opposite effects are seen in the female-to-male group. Possibly, these changes increase the risk of cardiometabolic disease in the male-to-female group.

  9. NEUTRON TOTAL CROSS SECTIONS OF 235U FROM TRANSMISSION MEASUREMENTS IN THE ENERGY RANGE 2 keV to 300 keV AND STATISTICAL MODEL ANALYSIS OF THE DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.

    2000-05-22

    The average {sup 235}U neutron total cross sections were obtained in the energy range 2 keV to 330 keV from high-resolution transmission measurements of a 0.033 atom/b sample. The experimental data were corrected for the contribution of isotope impurities and for resonance self-shielding effects in the sample. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data of Poenitz et al. in the energy range 40 keV to 330 keV and are the only available accurate experimental data in the energy range 2 keV to 40 keV. ENDF/B-VI evaluated data are 1.7% larger. The SAMMY/FITACS code was used for a statistical model analysis of the total cross section, selected fission cross sections and {alpha} data in the energy range 2 keV to 200 keV. SAMMY/FITACS is an extended version of SAMMY which allows consistent analysis of the experimental data in the resolved and unresolved resonance region. The Reich-Moore resonance parameters were obtained from a SAMMY Bayesian fits of high resolution experimental neutron transmission and partial cross section data below 2.25 keV, and the corresponding average parameters and covariance data were used in the present work as input for the statistical model analysis of the high energy range of the experimental data. The result of the analysis shows that the average resonance parameters obtained from the analysis of the unresolved resonance region are consistent with those obtained in the resolved energy region. Another important result is that ENDF/B-VI capture cross section could be too small by more than 10% in the energy range 10 keV to 200 keV.

  10. Neutron Total Cross Sections of {sup 235}U From Transmission Measurements in the Energy Range 2 keV to 300 keV and Statistical Model Analysis of the Data

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Harvey, J.A.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.; Wright, R.Q.

    2000-05-01

    The average {sup 235}U neutron total cross sections were obtained in the energy range 2 keV to 330 keV from high-resolution transmission measurements of a 0.033 atom/b sample.1 The experimental data were corrected for the contribution of isotope impurities and for resonance self-shielding effects in the sample. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data of Poenitz et al.4 in the energy range 40 keV to 330 keV and are the only available accurate experimental data in the energy range 2 keV to 40 keV. ENDF/B-VI evaluated data are 1.7% larger. The SAMMY/FITACS code 2 was used for a statistical model analysis of the total cross section, selected fission cross sections and data in the energy range 2 keV to 200 keV. SAMMY/FITACS is an extended version of SAMMY which allows consistent analysis of the experimental data in the resolved and unresolved resonance region. The Reich-Moore resonance parameters were obtained 3 from a SAMMY Bayesian fits of high resolution experimental neutron transmission and partial cross section data below 2.25 keV, and the corresponding average parameters and covariance data were used in the present work as input for the statistical model analysis of the high energy range of the experimental data. The result of the analysis shows that the average resonance parameters obtained from the analysis of the unresolved resonance region are consistent with those obtained in the resolved energy region. Another important result is that ENDF/B-VI capture cross section could be too small by more than 10% in the energy range 10 keV to 200 keV.

  11. Absolute realization of low BRDF value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zilong; Liao, Ningfang; Li, Ping; Wang, Yu

    2010-10-01

    Low BRDF value is widespread used in many critical domains such as space and military fairs. These values below 0.1 Sr-1 . So the Absolute realization of these value is the most critical issue in the absolute measurement of BRDF. To develop the Absolute value realization theory of BRDF , defining an arithmetic operators of BRDF , achieving an absolute measurement Eq. of BRDF based on radiance. This is a new theory method to solve the realization problem of low BRDF value. This theory method is realized on a self-designed common double orientation structure in space. By designing an adding structure to extend the range of the measurement system and a control and processing software, Absolute realization of low BRDF value is achieved. A material of low BRDF value is measured in this measurement system and the spectral BRDF value are showed within different angles allover the space. All these values are below 0.4 Sr-1 . This process is a representative procedure about the measurement of low BRDF value. A corresponding uncertainty analysis of this measurement data is given depend on the new theory of absolute realization and the performance of the measurement system. The relative expand uncertainty of the measurement data is 0.078. This uncertainty analysis is suitable for all measurements using the new theory of absolute realization and the corresponding measurement system.

  12. Strategy for the absolute neutron emission measurement on ITER.

    PubMed

    Sasao, M; Bertalot, L; Ishikawa, M; Popovichev, S

    2010-10-01

    Accuracy of 10% is demanded to the absolute fusion measurement on ITER. To achieve this accuracy, a functional combination of several types of neutron measurement subsystem, cross calibration among them, and in situ calibration are needed. Neutron transport calculation shows the suitable calibration source is a DT/DD neutron generator of source strength higher than 10(10) n/s (neutron/second) for DT and 10(8) n/s for DD. It will take eight weeks at the minimum with this source to calibrate flux monitors, profile monitors, and the activation system.

  13. Establishing ion ratio thresholds based on absolute peak area for absolute protein quantification using protein cleavage isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Loziuk, Philip L; Sederoff, Ronald R; Chiang, Vincent L; Muddiman, David C

    2014-11-07

    Quantitative mass spectrometry has become central to the field of proteomics and metabolomics. Selected reaction monitoring is a widely used method for the absolute quantification of proteins and metabolites. This method renders high specificity using several product ions measured simultaneously. With growing interest in quantification of molecular species in complex biological samples, confident identification and quantitation has been of particular concern. A method to confirm purity or contamination of product ion spectra has become necessary for achieving accurate and precise quantification. Ion abundance ratio assessments were introduced to alleviate some of these issues. Ion abundance ratios are based on the consistent relative abundance (RA) of specific product ions with respect to the total abundance of all product ions. To date, no standardized method of implementing ion abundance ratios has been established. Thresholds by which product ion contamination is confirmed vary widely and are often arbitrary. This study sought to establish criteria by which the relative abundance of product ions can be evaluated in an absolute quantification experiment. These findings suggest that evaluation of the absolute ion abundance for any given transition is necessary in order to effectively implement RA thresholds. Overall, the variation of the RA value was observed to be relatively constant beyond an absolute threshold ion abundance. Finally, these RA values were observed to fluctuate significantly over a 3 year period, suggesting that these values should be assessed as close as possible to the time at which data is collected for quantification.

  14. Cross sections for electron collisions with dimethyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugohara, R. T.; Homem, M. G. P.; Iga, I.; de Souza, G. L. C.; Machado, L. E.; Ferraz, J. R.; dos Santos, A. S.; Brescansin, L. M.; Lucchese, R. R.; Lee, M. T.

    2013-08-01

    We report a joint theoretical-experimental investigation of electron collision with dimethyl ether (DME) in the low- and intermediate-energy ranges. Experimental absolute differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections for elastic e--DME scattering are reported in the 100-1000 eV energy range. Our measurements were performed using a crossed electron-beam-molecular-beam geometry. The angular distribution of the scattered electrons was converted to absolute cross section using the relative flow technique. Theoretically, elastic differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections, as well as the grand-total and total absorption cross sections for electron collision with DME are calculated in the 1-1000 eV energy range. A single-center-expansion technique combined with the Padé approximant method is used in our calculations. A comparison between the present experimental and theoretical data shows very good agreement. Moreover, comparison with theoretical and experimental data for e--ethanol (an isomer of DME) scattering shows interesting isomeric effects.

  15. Absolute Gravity Datum in the Age of Cold Atom Gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, V. A.; Eckl, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The international gravity datum is defined today by the International Gravity Standardization Net of 1971 (IGSN-71). The data supporting this network was measured in the 1950s and 60s using pendulum and spring-based gravimeter ties (plus some new ballistic absolute meters) to replace the prior protocol of referencing all gravity values to the earlier Potsdam value. Since this time, gravimeter technology has advanced significantly with the development and refinement of the FG-5 (the current standard of the industry) and again with the soon-to-be-available cold atom interferometric absolute gravimeters. This latest development is anticipated to provide improvement in the range of two orders of magnitude as compared to the measurement accuracy of technology utilized to develop ISGN-71. In this presentation, we will explore how the IGSN-71 might best be "modernized" given today's requirements and available instruments and resources. The National Geodetic Survey (NGS), along with other relevant US Government agencies, is concerned about establishing gravity control to establish and maintain high order geodetic networks as part of the nation's essential infrastructure. The need to modernize the nation's geodetic infrastructure was highlighted in "Precise Geodetic Infrastructure, National Requirements for a Shared Resource" National Academy of Science, 2010. The NGS mission, as dictated by Congress, is to establish and maintain the National Spatial Reference System, which includes gravity measurements. Absolute gravimeters measure the total gravity field directly and do not involve ties to other measurements. Periodic "intercomparisons" of multiple absolute gravimeters at reference gravity sites are used to constrain the behavior of the instruments to ensure that each would yield reasonably similar measurements of the same location (i.e. yield a sufficiently consistent datum when measured in disparate locales). New atomic interferometric gravimeters promise a significant

  16. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  17. Magnifying absolute instruments for optically homogeneous regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tyc, Tomas

    2011-09-15

    We propose a class of magnifying absolute optical instruments with a positive isotropic refractive index. They create magnified stigmatic images, either virtual or real, of optically homogeneous three-dimensional spatial regions within geometrical optics.

  18. The Simplicity Argument and Absolute Morality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the author has maintained that there is a similarity of thought to be found in the writings of Cudworth, Emerson, and Husserl in his investigation of an absolute system of morality. (Author/RK)

  19. Kelvin and the absolute temperature scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlichson, Herman

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the absolute temperature scale of Kelvin (William Thomson). Kelvin found that Carnot's axiom about heat being a conserved quantity had to be abandoned. Nevertheless, he found that Carnot's fundamental work on heat engines was correct. Using the concept of a Carnot engine Kelvin found that Q1/Q2 = T1/T2. Thermometers are not used to obtain absolute temperatures since they are calculated temperatures.

  20. Novel totally implantable trans-ventricular and cross-valvular cannular pump with rolling bearings and purge system for recovery therapy.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Wang, D F; Topaz, S; Ru, W M; Zeng, P; Yuan, H Y; Zwischenberg, J B

    2007-01-01

    In the early 1990s, Yamazaki et al. developed a partly intra-ventricular pump, which was inserted into the left ventricle via the apex and then into the aorta through the aortic valve. The pump delivered blood flow directly from the left ventricle to the aorta, like a natural heart, and needed no inflow and outflow connecting tubes; it could be weaned off after the left ventricle had been recovered. The shortcomings were that the driving DC motor remained outside of the ventricle, causing an anatomic space problem, and the sealing and bearing were not appropriate for a durable device. Recently, a totally implantable trans-ventricular pump has been developed in the authors' laboratory. The device has a motor and a pump entirely contained within one cannula. The motor has a motor coil with iron core and a rotor with four-pole magnet; the pump has an impeller and an outflow guide vane. The motor part is 60 mm in length and 13 mm in diameter; the pump part is 55 mm in length and 11 mm in diameter. The total length of the device is therefore 115 mm. The total weight of the device is 53 g. The motor uses rolling bearing with eight needles on each side of the rotor magnets. A special purge system is devised for the infusion of saline mixed with heparin through bearing to the pump inlet (30 - 50 cc per hour). Thus neither mechanical wear nor thrombus formation along the bearing will occur. In haemodynamic testing, the pump can produce a flow of 4 l min-1 with 60 mmHg pressure increase, at a pump rotating speed of 12,500 rpm. At zero flow rate, corresponding to the diastolic period of the heart, the pump can maintain aortic blood pressure over 80 mmHg at the same rotating speed. This novel pump can be quickly inserted in an emergency and easily removed after recovery of natural heart. It will be useful for patients with acute left ventricular failure.

  1. Absolute measurement of the extreme UV solar flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Ogawa, H. S.; Judge, D. L.; Phillips, E.

    1984-01-01

    A windowless rare-gas ionization chamber has been developed to measure the absolute value of the solar extreme UV flux in the 50-575-A region. Successful results were obtained on a solar-pointing sounding rocket. The ionization chamber, operated in total absorption, is an inherently stable absolute detector of ionizing UV radiation and was designed to be independent of effects from secondary ionization and gas effusion. The net error of the measurement is + or - 7.3 percent, which is primarily due to residual outgassing in the instrument, other errors such as multiple ionization, photoelectron collection, and extrapolation to the zero atmospheric optical depth being small in comparison. For the day of the flight, Aug. 10, 1982, the solar irradiance (50-575 A), normalized to unit solar distance, was found to be 5.71 + or - 0.42 x 10 to the 10th photons per sq cm sec.

  2. An energy dissipation and cross shear time dependent computational wear model for the analysis of polyethylene wear in total knee replacements.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Sean T; Bohm, Eric R; Petrak, Martin J; Wyss, Urs P; Brandt, Jan-M

    2014-03-21

    The cost and time efficiency of computational polyethylene wear simulations may enable the optimization of total knee replacements for the reduction of polyethylene wear. The present study proposes an energy dissipation wear model for polyethylene which considers the time dependent molecular behavior of polyethylene, aspects of tractive rolling and contact pressure. This time dependent - energy dissipation wear model was evaluated, along with several other wear models, by comparison to pin-on-disk results, knee simulator wear test results under various kinematic conditions and knee simulator wear test results that were performed following the ISO 14243-3 standard. The proposed time dependent - energy dissipation wear model resulted in improved accuracy for the prediction of pin-on-disk and knee simulator wear test results compared with several previously published wear models.

  3. Total synthesis of the anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid mediator MaR1n-3 DPA utilizing an sp(3) -sp(3) Negishi cross-coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Tungen, Jørn Eivind; Aursnes, Marius; Dalli, Jesmond; Arnardottir, Hildur; Serhan, Charles Nicholas; Hansen, Trond Vidar

    2014-11-03

    The first total synthesis of the lipid mediator MaR1n-3 DPA (5) has been achieved in 12 % overall yield over 11 steps. The stereoselective preparation of 5 was based on a Pd-catalyzed sp(3) -sp(3) Negishi cross-coupling reaction and a stereocontrolled Evans-Nagao acetate aldol reaction. LC-MS/MS results with synthetic material matched the biologically produced 5. This novel lipid mediator displayed potent pro-resolving properties stimulating macrophage efferocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils.

  4. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Influence of the total gas flow rate on high rate growth microcrystalline silicon films and solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao-Yan; Hou, Guo-Fu; Zhang, Xiao-Dan; Wei, Chang-Chun; Li, Gui-Jun; Zhang, De-Kun; Chen, Xin-Liang; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Zhao, Ying; Geng, Xin-Hua

    2009-08-01

    This paper reports that high-rate-deposition of microcrystalline silicon solar cells was performed by very-high-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. These solar cells, whose intrinsic μc-Si:H layers were prepared by using a different total gas flow rate (Ftotal), behave much differently in performance, although their intrinsic layers have similar crystalline volume fraction, opto-electronic properties and a deposition rate of ~ 1.0 nm/s. The influence of Ftotal on the micro-structural properties was analyzed by Raman and Fourier transformed infrared measurements. The results showed that the vertical uniformity and the compact degree of μc-Si:H thin films were improved with increasing Ftotal. The variation of the microstructure was regarded as the main reason for the difference of the J-V parameters. Combined with optical emission spectroscopy, we found that the gas temperature plays an important role in determining the microstructure of thin films. With Ftotal of 300 sccm, a conversion efficiency of 8.11% has been obtained for the intrinsic layer deposited at 8.5 Å/s (1 Å = 0.1 nm).

  5. Distributed Analysis of Hip Implants Using Six National and Regional Registries: Comparing Metal-on-Metal with Metal-on-Highly Cross-Linked Polyethylene Bearings in Cementless Total Hip Arthroplasty in Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Furnes, Ove; Paxton, Elizabeth; Cafri, Guy; Graves, Stephen; Bordini, Barbara; Comfort, Thomas; Rivas, Moises Coll; Banerjee, Samprit; Sedrakyan, Art

    2014-01-01

    Background: The regulation of medical devices has attracted controversy recently because of problems related to metal-on-metal hip implants. There is growing evidence that metal-on-metal implants fail early and cause local and systemic complications. However, the failure associated with metal-on-metal head size is not consistently documented and needs to be communicated to patients and surgeons. The purpose of this study is to compare implant survival of metal on metal with that of metal on highly cross-linked polyethylene. Methods: Using a distributed health data network, primary total hip arthroplasties were identified from six national and regional total joint arthroplasty registries (2001 to 2010). Inclusion criteria were patient age of forty-five to sixty-four years, cementless total hip arthroplasties, primary osteoarthritis diagnosis, and exclusion of the well-known outlier implant ASR (articular surface replacement). The primary outcome was revision for any reason. A meta-analysis of survival probabilities was performed with use of a fixed-effects model. Metal-on-metal implants with a large head size of >36 mm were compared with metal-on-highly cross-linked polyethylene implants. Results: Metal-on-metal implants with a large head size of >36 mm were used in 5172 hips and metal-on-highly cross-linked polyethylene implants were used in 14,372 hips. Metal-on-metal total hip replacements with a large head size of >36 mm had an increased risk of revision compared with metal-on-highly cross-linked polyethylene total hip replacements with more than two years of follow-up, with no difference during the first two years after implantation. The results of the hazard ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) from the multivariable model at various durations of follow-up were 0.95 (0.74 to 1.23) at zero to two years (p = 0.698), 1.42 (1.16 to 1.75) at more than two years to four years (p = 0.001), 1.78 (1.45 to 2.19) at more than four years to six years (p < 0.001), and 2

  6. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed.

  7. Modelling strategic interventions in a population with a total fertility rate of 8.3: a cross-sectional study of Idjwi Island, DRC

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Idjwi, an island of approximately 220,000 people, is located in eastern DRC and functions semi-autonomously under the governance of two kings (mwamis). At more than 8 live births per woman, Idjwi has one of the highest total fertility rates (TFRs) in the world. Rapid population growth has led to widespread environmental degradation and food insecurity. Meanwhile family planning services are largely unavailable. Methods At the invitation of local leaders, we conducted a representative survey of 2,078 households in accordance with MEASURE DHS protocols, and performed ethnographic interviews and focus groups with key informants and vulnerable subpopulations. Modelling proximate determinates of fertility, we evaluated how the introduction of contraceptives and/or extended periods of breastfeeding could reduce the TFR. Results Over half of all women reported an unmet need for spacing or limiting births, and nearly 70% named a specific modern method of contraception they would prefer to use; pills (25.4%) and injectables (26.5%) were most desired. We predicted that an increased length of breastfeeding (from 10 to 21 months) or an increase in contraceptive prevalence (from 1% to 30%), or a combination of both could reduce TFR on Idjwi to 6, the average desired number of children. Increasing contraceptive prevalence to 15% could reduce unmet need for contraception by 8%. Conclusions To meet women’s need and desire for fertility control, we recommend adding family planning services at health centers with NGO support, pursuing a community health worker program, promoting extended breastfeeding, and implementing programs to end sexual- and gender-based violence toward women. PMID:23137304

  8. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  9. Measurement of the total cross section of heavy water in the 0.1 meV-1 eV energy range at 20 and 50 ° C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez Damián, J. I.; Granada, J. R.; Baxter, D. V.; Parnell, S. R.; Evans, D. C.

    2016-11-01

    Despite the importance of heavy water as a neutron moderator, there are few measurements of its total neutron cross section for cold and thermal energies, and none of them covers the range of temperature (40-70 ° C) used in moderator and reflector tanks in research reactors, and in CANDU nuclear power plants. To cover this deficit, we measured the total cross section of liquid heavy water at 20 ° C and 50 ° C using the SANS beamline at the LENS facility at Indiana University. The time-of-flight technique was used, in a sample-in/sample-out measurement. The use of the solid methane cold neutron source at LENS allowed measuring in a broad range in energy, from 0.1meV to 1eV. In this paper we present details of the measurement and processing of the data, and comparison with previous experimental measurements and calculation models. This work is included in the Action Plan of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project "Advanced Moderators for Intense Cold Neutron Beams in Materials Research".

  10. Measurement of total and differential W+W– production cross sections in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV with the ATLAS detector and limits on anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2016-09-06

    The production of W boson pairs in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV is studied using data corresponding to 20.3 fb–1 of integrated luminosity collected by the ATLAS detector during 2012 at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The W bosons are reconstructed using their leptonic decays into electrons or muons and neutrinos. Events with reconstructed jets are not included in the candidate event sample. A total of 6636 WW candidate events are observed. Measurements are performed in fiducial regions closely approximating the detector acceptance. The integrated measurement is corrected for all acceptance effects and for the W branching fractionsmore » to leptons in order to obtain the total WW production cross section, which is found to be 71.1 ± 1.1(stat)–5.0+ 5.7(syst) ± 1.4(lumi) pb. This agrees with the next-to-next-to-leading-order Standard Model prediction of 63.2–1.4+1.6(scale) ± 1.2(PDF) pb. Fiducial differential cross sections are measured as a function of each of six kinematic variables. In conclusion, the distribution of the transverse momentum of the leading lepton is used to set limits on anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings.« less

  11. Measurement of total and differential W + W - production cross sections in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector and limits on anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.

    2016-09-01

    The production of W boson pairs in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=8 TeV is studied using data corresponding to 20.3 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the ATLAS detector during 2012 at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The W bosons are reconstructed using their leptonic decays into electrons or muons and neutrinos. Events with reconstructed jets are not included in the candidate event sample. A total of 6636 WW candidate events are observed. Measurements are performed in fiducial regions closely approximating the detector acceptance. The integrated measurement is corrected for all acceptance effects and for the W branching fractions to leptons in order to obtain the total WW production cross section, which is found to be 71 .1 ± 1 .1(stat) - 5.0 + 5.7 (syst) ± 1.4(lumi) pb. This agrees with the next-to-next-to-leading-order Standard Model prediction of 63. 2 - 1.4 + 1.6 (scale) ± 1.2(PDF) pb. Fiducial differential cross sections are measured as a function of each of six kinematic variables. The distribution of the transverse momentum of the leading lepton is used to set limits on anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Absolute Distance Measurement with the MSTAR Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Peters, Robert; Burger, Johan; Ahn, Seh-Won; Steier, William H.; Fetterman, Harrold R.; Chang, Yian

    2003-01-01

    The MSTAR sensor (Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging) is a new system for measuring absolute distance, capable of resolving the integer cycle ambiguity of standard interferometers, and making it possible to measure distance with sub-nanometer accuracy. The sensor uses a single laser in conjunction with fast phase modulators and low frequency detectors. We describe the design of the system - the principle of operation, the metrology source, beamlaunching optics, and signal processing - and show results for target distances up to 1 meter. We then demonstrate how the system can be scaled to kilometer-scale distances.

  13. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed.

  14. Measurement of the absolute solar UV irradiance and variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mentall, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation in the wavelength interval 150-350 nm initiates chemical reactions in the lower mesosphere and the stratosphere through the photodissociation of ambient molecular species. This experiment measures the total solar irradiance, above the Earth's atmosphere, in this wavelength interval, using three spectrometers. Measurements are made from rockets on a once-a-year basis and are used with satellite observations to determine both the absolute irradiance and the long term variability of the sun in the UV. A fourth spectrometer is being added to the payload to measure the emission in the hydrogen Lyman-alpha emission at 121.67 nm.

  15. Decreasing the number of small eating occasions (<15 % of total energy intake) regardless of the time of day may be important to improve diet quality but not adiposity: a cross-sectional study in British children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kentaro; Livingstone, M Barbara E

    2016-01-28

    Evidence of associations between meal frequency (MF) and snack frequency (SF) and diet and obesity in young populations is limited. This cross-sectional study examined MF and SF in relation to dietary intake and adiposity measures in British children aged 4-10 years (n 818) and adolescents aged 11-18 years (n 818). Based on data from a 7-d weighed dietary record, all eating occasions were divided into meals or snacks on the basis of contribution to energy intake (≥15 or <15 %) or time (06.00-10.00, 12.00-15.00 and 18.00-21.00 hours or others). All measures of MF and SF showed positive associations with energy intake, except for MF based on energy contribution in children. Irrespective of the definition of snacks, SF was associated with higher intakes of soft drinks, confectionery and total sugar, lower intakes of cereals, fish, meat, protein, PUFA, starch and dietary fibre, and a lower diet quality (assessed by the Mediterranean diet score, except for SF based on energy contribution in adolescents). MF based on time, but not based on energy contribution, was associated with higher intakes of confectionery and total sugar, lower intakes of fish, protein, PUFA and starch, and, only in children, a lower diet quality. All measures of MF and SF showed no association with adiposity measures. In conclusion, this cross-sectional study in British children and adolescents suggests that decreasing the number of small eating occasions (<15 % of total energy intake) regardless of the time of day may be important to improve diet quality but not adiposity.

  16. Comparative vs. Absolute Judgments of Trait Desirability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstee, Willem K. B.

    1970-01-01

    Reversals of trait desirability are studied. Terms indicating conservativw behavior appeared to be judged relatively desirable in comparative judgement, while traits indicating dynamic and expansive behavior benefited from absolute judgement. The reversal effect was shown to be a general one, i.e. reversals were not dependent upon the specific…

  17. New Techniques for Absolute Gravity Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-07

    Hammond, J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J. A., and Iliff, R. L. (1979) The AFGL absolute gravity system...International Gravimetric Bureau, No. L:I-43. 7. Hammond. J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J.A., and

  18. An Absolute Electrometer for the Physics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.; Cartacci, A.

    2009-01-01

    A low-cost, easy-to-use absolute electrometer is presented: two thin metallic plates and an electronic balance, usually available in a laboratory, are used. We report on the very good performance of the device that allows precise measurements of the force acting between two charged plates. (Contains 5 footnotes, 2 tables, and 6 figures.)

  19. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  20. Absolute Positioning Using the Global Positioning System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has becom a useful tool In providing relativ survey...Includes the development of a low cost navigator for wheeled vehicles. ABSTRACT The Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has become a useful tool In providing...technique of absolute or point positioning involves the use of a single Global Positioning System ( GPS ) receiver to determine the three-dimenslonal

  1. Absolute Radiation Thermometry in the NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünger, L.; Taubert, R. D.; Gutschwager, B.; Anhalt, K.; Briaudeau, S.; Sadli, M.

    2017-04-01

    A near infrared (NIR) radiation thermometer (RT) for temperature measurements in the range from 773 K up to 1235 K was characterized and calibrated in terms of the "Mise en Pratique for the definition of the Kelvin" (MeP-K) by measuring its absolute spectral radiance responsivity. Using Planck's law of thermal radiation allows the direct measurement of the thermodynamic temperature independently of any ITS-90 fixed-point. To determine the absolute spectral radiance responsivity of the radiation thermometer in the NIR spectral region, an existing PTB monochromator-based calibration setup was upgraded with a supercontinuum laser system (0.45 μm to 2.4 μm) resulting in a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio. The RT was characterized with respect to its nonlinearity, size-of-source effect, distance effect, and the consistency of its individual temperature measuring ranges. To further improve the calibration setup, a new tool for the aperture alignment and distance measurement was developed. Furthermore, the diffraction correction as well as the impedance correction of the current-to-voltage converter is considered. The calibration scheme and the corresponding uncertainty budget of the absolute spectral responsivity are presented. A relative standard uncertainty of 0.1 % (k=1) for the absolute spectral radiance responsivity was achieved. The absolute radiometric calibration was validated at four temperature values with respect to the ITS-90 via a variable temperature heatpipe blackbody (773 K ...1235 K) and at a gold fixed-point blackbody radiator (1337.33 K).

  2. Measurement of the nu(mu)-CCQE cross-section in the SciBooNE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz-Aunion, Jose Luis; Walding, Joseph; /Imperial Coll., London

    2009-09-01

    SciBooNE is a neutrino and anti-neutrino cross-section experiment at Fermilab, USA. The SciBooNE experiment is summarized and two independent CCQE analyses are described. For one of the analyses, an absolute {nu}{sub {mu}}-CCQE cross section in the neutrino energy region (0.6-1.6) GeV is shown and the technique developed for such a purpose is also explained. The total cross section measured over this energy range agrees well with expectations, based on the NEUT event generator and using a value of 1.21 GeV for the CCQE axial mass.

  3. Total Synthesis of the Potent HIF-1 Inhibitory Antitumor Natural Product, (8R)-Mycothiazole, via Baldwin-Lee CsF/CuI sp(3)-sp(2)-Stille Cross-Coupling. Confirmation of the Crews Reassignment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Hale, Karl J

    2015-09-04

    A convenient asymmetric total synthesis of the potent HIF-1 inhibitory antitumor natural product, (-)- or (+)-(8R)-mycothiazole (1), is described. Not only does our synthesis confirm the 2006 structural reassignment made by Crews ( Crews , P. , et al. J. Nat. Prod. 2006 , 69 , 145 ), it revises the [α]D data previously reported for this molecule in MeOH from -13.7° to +42.3°. The newly developed route to (8R)-1 sets the C(8)-OH stereocenter via Sharpless AE/2,3-epoxy alcohol reductive ring opening and utilizes two Baldwin-Lee CsF/cat. CuI Stille cross-coupling reactions with vinylstannanes 8 and 3 to efficiently elaborate the C(1)-C(4) and C(14)-C(18) sectors.

  4. Froissart bound on inelastic cross section without unknown constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, André; Roy, S. M.

    2015-04-01

    Assuming that axiomatic local field theory results hold for hadron scattering, André Martin and S. M. Roy recently obtained absolute bounds on the D wave below threshold for pion-pion scattering and thereby determined the scale of the logarithm in the Froissart bound on total cross sections in terms of pion mass only. Previously, Martin proved a rigorous upper bound on the inelastic cross-section σinel which is one-fourth of the corresponding upper bound on σtot, and Wu, Martin, Roy and Singh improved the bound by adding the constraint of a given σtot. Here we use unitarity and analyticity to determine, without any high-energy approximation, upper bounds on energy-averaged inelastic cross sections in terms of low-energy data in the crossed channel. These are Froissart-type bounds without any unknown coefficient or unknown scale factors and can be tested experimentally. Alternatively, their asymptotic forms, together with the Martin-Roy absolute bounds on pion-pion D waves below threshold, yield absolute bounds on energy-averaged inelastic cross sections. For example, for π0π0 scattering, defining σinel=σtot-(σπ0π0→π0π0+σπ0π0→π+π-) , we show that for c.m. energy √{s }→∞, σ¯ inel(s ,∞)≡s ∫s∞d s'σinel(s')/s'2≤(π /4 )(mπ)-2[ln (s /s1)+(1 /2 )ln ln (s /s1)+1 ]2 where 1 /s1=34 π √{2 π }mπ-2 . This bound is asymptotically one-fourth of the corresponding Martin-Roy bound on the total cross section, and the scale factor s1 is one-fourth of the scale factor in the total cross section bound. The average over the interval (s,2s) of the inelastic π0π0 cross section has a bound of the same form with 1 /s1 replaced by 1 /s2=2 /s1.

  5. Upgrade of absolute extreme ultraviolet diagnostic on J-TEXT.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X L; Cheng, Z F; Hou, S Y; Zhuang, G; Luo, J

    2014-11-01

    The absolute extreme ultraviolet (AXUV) diagnostic system is used for radiation observation on J-TEXT tokamak [J. Zhang, G. Zhuang, Z. J. Wang, Y. H. Ding, X. Q. Zhang, and Y. J. Tang, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 073509 (2010)]. The upgrade of the AXUV system is aimed to improve the spatial resolution and provide a three-dimensional image on J-TEXT. The new system consists of 12 AXUV arrays (4 AXUV16ELG arrays, 8 AXUV20ELG arrays). The spatial resolution in the cross-section is 21 mm for the AXUV16ELG arrays and 17 mm for the AXUV20ELG arrays. The pre-amplifier is also upgraded for a higher signal to noise ratio. By upgrading the AXUV imaging system, a more accurate observation on the radiation information is obtained.

  6. Measurement of absolute hadronic branching fractions of D mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xin

    Using 818 pb-1 of e +e- collisions recorded at the psi(3770) resonance with the CLEO-c detector at CESR, we determine absolute hadronic branching fractions of charged and neutral D mesons using a double tag technique. Among measurements for three D 0 and six D+ modes, we obtain reference branching fractions B (D0 → K -pi+) = (3.906 +/- 0.021 +/- 0.062)% and B (D+ → K -pi+pi+) = (9.157 +/- 0.059 +/- 0.125)%, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic errors. Using an independent determination of the integrated luminosity, we also extract the cross sections sigma(e +e- → D 0D¯0) = (3.650 +/- 0.017 +/- 0.083) nb and sigma(e+ e- → D+ D-) = (2.920 +/- 0.018 +/- 0.062) nb at a center of mass energy, Ecm = 3774 +/- 1 MeV.

  7. Upgrade of absolute extreme ultraviolet diagnostic on J-TEXT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. L.; Cheng, Z. F. Hou, S. Y.; Zhuang, G.; Luo, J.

    2014-11-15

    The absolute extreme ultraviolet (AXUV) diagnostic system is used for radiation observation on J-TEXT tokamak [J. Zhang, G. Zhuang, Z. J. Wang, Y. H. Ding, X. Q. Zhang, and Y. J. Tang, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 073509 (2010)]. The upgrade of the AXUV system is aimed to improve the spatial resolution and provide a three-dimensional image on J-TEXT. The new system consists of 12 AXUV arrays (4 AXUV16ELG arrays, 8 AXUV20ELG arrays). The spatial resolution in the cross-section is 21 mm for the AXUV16ELG arrays and 17 mm for the AXUV20ELG arrays. The pre-amplifier is also upgraded for a higher signal to noise ratio. By upgrading the AXUV imaging system, a more accurate observation on the radiation information is obtained.

  8. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Schönau, T; Zakosarenko, V; Schmelz, M; Stolz, R; Anders, S; Linzen, S; Meyer, M; Meyer, H-G

    2015-10-01

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth's magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz(1/2). The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 μm in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 μT amplitude without the need for recalibration.

  9. Landsat-5 TM reflective-band absolute radiometric calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Helder, D.L.; Markham, B.L.; Dewald, J.D.; Kaita, E.; Thome, K.J.; Micijevic, E.; Ruggles, T.A.

    2004-01-01

    The Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor provides the longest running continuous dataset of moderate spatial resolution remote sensing imagery, dating back to its launch in March 1984. Historically, the radiometric calibration procedure for this imagery used the instrument's response to the Internal Calibrator (IC) on a scene-by-scene basis to determine the gain and offset of each detector. Due to observed degradations in the IC, a new procedure was implemented for U.S.-processed data in May 2003. This new calibration procedure is based on a lifetime radiometric calibration model for the instrument's reflective bands (1-5 and 7) and is derived, in part, from the IC response without the related degradation effects and is tied to the cross calibration with the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus. Reflective-band absolute radiometric accuracy of the instrument tends to be on the order of 7% to 10%, based on a variety of calibration methods.

  10. A three-axis SQUID-based absolute vector magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Schönau, T.; Schmelz, M.; Stolz, R.; Anders, S.; Linzen, S.; Meyer, H.-G.; Zakosarenko, V.; Meyer, M.

    2015-10-15

    We report on the development of a three-axis absolute vector magnetometer suited for mobile operation in the Earth’s magnetic field. It is based on low critical temperature dc superconducting quantum interference devices (LTS dc SQUIDs) with sub-micrometer sized cross-type Josephson junctions and exhibits a white noise level of about 10 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}. The width of superconducting strip lines is restricted to less than 6 μm in order to avoid flux trapping during cool-down in magnetically unshielded environment. The long-term stability of the flux-to-voltage transfer coefficients of the SQUID electronics is investigated in detail and a method is presented to significantly increase their reproducibility. We further demonstrate the long-term operation of the setup in a magnetic field varying by about 200 μT amplitude without the need for recalibration.

  11. Upgrade of absolute extreme ultraviolet diagnostic on J-TEXTa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. L.; Cheng, Z. F.; Hou, S. Y.; Zhuang, G.; Luo, J.

    2014-11-01

    The absolute extreme ultraviolet (AXUV) diagnostic system is used for radiation observation on J-TEXT tokamak [J. Zhang, G. Zhuang, Z. J. Wang, Y. H. Ding, X. Q. Zhang, and Y. J. Tang, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 073509 (2010)]. The upgrade of the AXUV system is aimed to improve the spatial resolution and provide a three-dimensional image on J-TEXT. The new system consists of 12 AXUV arrays (4 AXUV16ELG arrays, 8 AXUV20ELG arrays). The spatial resolution in the cross-section is 21 mm for the AXUV16ELG arrays and 17 mm for the AXUV20ELG arrays. The pre-amplifier is also upgraded for a higher signal to noise ratio. By upgrading the AXUV imaging system, a more accurate observation on the radiation information is obtained.

  12. Electron-impact dissociation cross sections for CHF3 and C3F8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baio, J. E.; Yu, H.; Flaherty, D. W.; Winters, H. F.; Graves, D. B.

    2007-11-01

    Absolute total dissociation cross sections, σt,diss, by electron-impact are reported for CHF3 and C3F8 from 10 to 300 eV using the chemical gettering technique described by Winters and Inokuti (1982 Phys. Rev. A 25 1420). Data are concentrated in the near-threshold region (10-30 eV). The thresholds for dissociation of CHF3 and C3F8 are determined to be 10.4 eV and 11.9 eV, respectively. Ionization thresholds occur at 16 eV for CHF3 and 16.2 eV for C3F8. Neutral dissociation cross sections of both CHF3 and C3F8 are obtained by subtracting the ionization cross sections, σt,ion, from the total dissociation cross sections, σt,diss.

  13. The most appropriate position and number for absolute anchorages for orthodontic tooth movements.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Takakuda, Kazuo; Miyairi, Hiroo; Soma, Kunimichi

    2003-04-01

    Absolute anchorages proved to be very effective for orthodontic tooth movements. We used a 3D digitizer to record each tooth on pre-treatment diagnostic and post-treatment predictive setup models and then 3D coordinate system conversion was performed to make the coordinate values comparable. An arithmetic calculation of vector and moment based on the orthodontic forces and the tooth displacement under preliminary premises undertaken to decide the most favorable position and number for absolute anchorages. Position--For two-dimensional and three-dimensional calculations, the most appropriate positions for absolute anchorages should theoretically be on the line of resultant force (2D) and the plane (3D) where the total moment effect tends to be zero. Number--As for the number of the absolute anchorages needed, it depends on the number of target teeth. Different combinations of target teeth provide different sets of results.

  14. Lunar eclipse photometry: absolute luminance measurements and modeling.

    PubMed

    Hernitschek, Nina; Schmidt, Elmar; Vollmer, Michael

    2008-12-01

    The Moon's time-dependent luminance was determined during the 9 February 1990 and 3 March 2007 total lunar eclipses by using calibrated, industry standard photometers. After the results were corrected to unit air mass and to standard distances for both Moon and Sun, an absolute calibration was accomplished by using the Sun's known luminance and a pre-eclipse lunar albedo of approximately 13.5%. The measured minimum level of brightness in the total phase of both eclipses was relatively high, namely -3.32 m(vis) and -1.7 m(vis), which hints at the absence of pronounced stratospheric aerosol. The light curves were modeled in such a way as to let the Moon move through an artificial Earth shadow composed of a multitude of disk and ring zones, containing a relative luminance data set from an atmospheric radiative transfer calculation.

  15. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  16. Consistent thermostatistics forbids negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hilbert, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, a considerable number of theories and experiments have claimed the existence of negative absolute temperature in spin systems and ultracold quantum gases. This has led to speculation that ultracold gases may be dark-energy analogues and also suggests the feasibility of heat engines with efficiencies larger than one. Here, we prove that all previous negative temperature claims and their implications are invalid as they arise from the use of an entropy definition that is inconsistent both mathematically and thermodynamically. We show that the underlying conceptual deficiencies can be overcome if one adopts a microcanonical entropy functional originally derived by Gibbs. The resulting thermodynamic framework is self-consistent and implies that absolute temperature remains positive even for systems with a bounded spectrum. In addition, we propose a minimal quantum thermometer that can be implemented with available experimental techniques.

  17. Absolute measurement of length with nanometric resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, D.; Garoi, F.; Timcu, A.; Damian, V.; Logofatu, P. C.; Nascov, V.

    2005-08-01

    Laser interferometer displacement measuring transducers have a well-defined traceability route to the definition of the meter. The laser interferometer is de-facto length scale for applications in micro and nano technologies. However their physical unit -half lambda is too large for nanometric resolution. Fringe interpolation-usual technique to improve the resolution-lack of reproducibility could be avoided using the principles of absolute distance measurement. Absolute distance refers to the use of interferometric techniques for determining the position of an object without the necessity of measuring continuous displacements between points. The interference pattern as produced by the interference of two point-like coherent sources is fitted to a geometric model so as to determine the longitudinal location of the target by minimizing least square errors. The longitudinal coordinate of the target was measured with accuracy better than 1 nm, for a target position range of 0.4μm.

  18. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  19. Computer processing of spectrograms for absolute intensities.

    PubMed

    Guttman, A; Golden, J; Galbraith, H J

    1967-09-01

    A computer program was developed to process photographically recorded spectra for absolute intensity. Test and calibration films are subjected to densitometric scans that provide digitally recorded densities on magnetic tapes. The nonlinear calibration data are fitted by least-squares cubic polynomials to yield a good approximation to the monochromatic H&D curves for commonly used emulsions (2475 recording film, Royal-X, Tri-X, 4-X). Several test cases were made. Results of these cases show that the machine processed absolute intensities are accurate to within 15%o. Arbitrarily raising the sensitivity threshold by 0.1 density units above gross fog yields cubic polynomial fits to the H&D curves that are radiometrically accurate within 10%. In addition, curves of gamma vs wavelength for 2475, Tri-X, and 4-X emulsions were made. These data show slight evidence of the photographic Purkinje effect in the 2475 emulsion.

  20. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  1. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum.

  2. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Raffaele, L.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Marchetto, F.; Sacchi, R.; Giordanengo, S.; Monaco, V.

    2013-07-01

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  3. Absolute versus temporal anomaly and percent of saturation soil moisture spatial variability for six networks worldwide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocca, L.; Zucco, G.; Mittelbach, H.; Moramarco, T.; Seneviratne, S. I.

    2014-07-01

    The analysis of the spatial-temporal variability of soil moisture can be carried out considering the absolute (original) soil moisture values or relative values, such as the percent of saturation or temporal anomalies. Over large areas, soil moisture data measured at different sites can be characterized by large differences in their minimum, mean, and maximum absolute values, even though in relative terms their temporal patterns are very similar. In these cases, the analysis considering absolute compared with percent of saturation or temporal anomaly soil moisture values can provide very different results with significant consequences for their use in hydrological applications and climate science. In this study, in situ observations from six soil moisture networks in Italy, Spain, France, Switzerland, Australia, and United States are collected and analyzed to investigate the spatial soil moisture variability over large areas (250-150,000 km2). Specifically, the statistical and temporal stability analyses of soil moisture have been carried out for absolute, temporal anomaly, and percent of saturation values (using two different formulations for temporal anomalies). The results highlight that the spatial variability of the soil moisture dynamic (i.e., temporal anomalies) is significantly lower than that of the absolute soil moisture values. The spatial variance of the time-invariant component (temporal mean of each site) is the predominant contribution to the total spatial variance of absolute soil moisture data. Moreover, half of the networks show a minimum in the spatial variability for intermediate conditions when the temporal anomalies are considered, in contrast with the widely recognized behavior of absolute soil moisture data. The analyses with percent saturation data show qualitatively similar results as those for the temporal anomalies because of the applied normalization which reduces spatial variability induced by differences in mean absolute soil moisture

  4. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  5. Negative absolute temperature for mobile particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Simon; Ronzheimer, Philipp; Schreiber, Michael; Hodgman, Sean; Bloch, Immanuel; Schneider, Ulrich

    2013-05-01

    Absolute temperature is usually bound to be strictly positive. However, negative absolute temperature states, where the occupation probability of states increases with their energy, are possible in systems with an upper energy bound. So far, such states have only been demonstrated in localized spin systems with finite, discrete spectra. We realized a negative absolute temperature state for motional degrees of freedom with ultracold bosonic 39K atoms in an optical lattice, by implementing the attractive Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. This new state strikingly revealed itself by a quasimomentum distribution that is peaked at maximum kinetic energy. The measured kinetic energy distribution and the extracted negative temperature indicate that the ensemble is close to degeneracy, with coherence over several lattice sites. The state is as stable as a corresponding positive temperature state: The negative temperature stabilizes the system against mean-field collapse driven by negative pressure. Negative temperatures open up new parameter regimes for cold atoms, enabling fundamentally new many-body states. Additionally, they give rise to several counterintuitive effects such as heat engines with above unity efficiency.

  6. Measurement of absolute gravity acceleration in Firenze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, M.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the University of Firenze (Italy). In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the Newtonian law at short distances are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. The only available datum, pertaining to the italian zero-order gravity network, was taken more than 20 years ago at a distance of more than 60 km from the study site. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 absolute gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The absolute accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are (980 492 160.6 ± 4.0) μGal and (980 492 048.3 ± 3.0) μGal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the absolute value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.

  7. Chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil.

    PubMed

    Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-10

    Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) absolute oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the absolute oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound.

  8. A randomised controlled trial comparing highly cross-linked and contemporary annealed polyethylene after a minimal eight-year follow-up in total hip arthroplasty using cemented acetabular components.

    PubMed

    Langlois, J; Atlan, F; Scemama, C; Courpied, J P; Hamadouche, M

    2015-11-01

    Most published randomised controlled trials which compare the rates of wear of conventional and cross-linked (XL) polyethylene (PE) in total hip arthroplasty (THA) have described their use with a cementless acetabular component. We conducted a prospective randomised study to assess the rates of penetration of two distinct types of PE in otherwise identical cemented all-PE acetabular components. A total of 100 consecutive patients for THA were randomised to receive an acetabular component which had been either highly XL then remelted or moderately XL then annealed. After a minimum of eight years follow-up, 38 hips in the XL group and 30 hips in the annealed group had complete data (mean follow-up of 9.1 years (7.6 to 10.7) and 8.7 years (7.2 to 10.2), respectively). In the XL group, the steady state rate of penetration from one year onwards was -0.0002 mm/year (sd 0.108): in the annealed group it was 0.1382 mm/year (sd 0.129) (Mann-Whitney U test, p < 0.001). No complication specific to either material was recorded. These results show that the yearly linear rate of femoral head penetration can be significantly reduced by using a highly XLPE cemented acetabular component.

  9. Spectroscopy of electronic thermal noise as a direct probe of absolute thermoelectric coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrity, Patrick L.

    2011-04-01

    The utilization of thermal fluctuations or Johnson/Nyquist noise as a generalized spectroscopic technique to experimentally measure transport properties is applied to Pt and W metal films. Through cross-correlation and autocorrelation functions obtained from voltage power spectral density measurements, multiple transport coefficients are obtained through the Green-Kubo formalism. Supported rigorously by the underlying fluctuation-dissipation theorem and Green-Kubo transport theory, this novel experimental technique provides a direct measurement of absolute Seebeck and Peltier coefficients in addition to the electrical resistivity, electronic contribution to thermal conductivity, and Lorenz number. This work reports the validation results of the experiment accomplished through the use of materials with thermoelectric properties widely accepted by the thermoelectric community, Pt and W. Further validation of the data was accomplished by comparing the resistivity results to standard collinear four-probe resistivity measurements. Spectroscopic results for resistivity at 300 K resulted in 5.3% and 2.5% agreement with four-probe resistivity measurements for Pt and W, respectively. The Seebeck coefficient measurements at 300 K showed agreement with published values within 3.8% and 7.5% for Pt and W, respectively. The electronic thermal conductivity measured 66% and 75% of the total thermal conductivity for Pt and W, respectively, at 300 K.

  10. Discrimination of nylon polymers using attenuated total reflection mid-infrared spectra and multivariate statistical techniques.

    PubMed

    Enlow, Elizabeth M; Kennedy, Jennifer L; Nieuwland, Alexander A; Hendrix, James E; Morgan, Stephen L

    2005-08-01

    Nylons are an important class of synthetic polymers, from an industrial, as well as forensic, perspective. A spectroscopic method, such as Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, is necessary to determine the nylon subclasses (e. g., nylon 6 or nylon 6,6). Library searching using absolute difference and absolute derivative difference algorithms gives inconsistent results for identifying nylon subclasses. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of peak ratio analysis and multivariate statistics for the identification of nylon subclasses using attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectral data. Many nylon subclasses could not be distinguished by the peak ratio of the N-H vibrational stretch to the sp(3) C-H(2) vibrational stretch intensities. Linear discriminant analysis, however, provided a graphical visualization of differences between nylon subclasses and was able to correctly classify a set of 270 spectra from eight different subclasses with 98.5% cross-validated accuracy.

  11. Total synthesis of fostriecin: via a regio- and stereoselective polyene hydration, oxidation, and hydroboration sequence.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong; O'Doherty, George A

    2010-09-03

    A total synthesis of the fostriecin has been achieved in 24 steps from enyne 11. The lactone moiety was installed by a Leighton allylation and Grubbs ring-closing metathesis reaction. The highly reactive Z,Z,E-triene moiety was installed via a late-stage Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling of a remarkably stable Z-vinyl boronate. The relative and absolute stereocenters of the C-8,9,11 triol were generated with a regio- and stereoselective asymmetric hydration/oxidation sequence.

  12. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  13. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  14. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  15. Absolute poverty measures for the developing world, 1981-2004.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaohua; Ravallion, Martin

    2007-10-23

    We report new estimates of measures of absolute poverty for the developing world for the period 1981-2004. A clear trend decline in the percentage of people who are absolutely poor is evident, although with uneven progress across regions. We find more mixed success in reducing the total number of poor. Indeed, the developing world outside China has seen little or no sustained progress in reducing the number of poor, with rising poverty counts in some regions, notably sub-Saharan Africa. There are encouraging signs of progress in all regions after 2000, although it is too early to say whether this is a new trend. We also summarize results from estimating a new series incorporating an allowance for the higher cost of living facing poor people in urban areas. This reveals a marked urbanization of poverty in the developing world, which is stronger in some regions than others, although it remains that three-quarters of the poor live in rural areas.

  16. Brownian motion: Absolute negative particle mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Alexandra; Eichhorn, Ralf; Regtmeier, Jan; Duong, Thanh Tu; Reimann, Peter; Anselmetti, Dario

    2005-08-01

    Noise effects in technological applications, far from being a nuisance, can be exploited with advantage - for example, unavoidable thermal fluctuations have found application in the transport and sorting of colloidal particles and biomolecules. Here we use a microfluidic system to demonstrate a paradoxical migration mechanism in which particles always move in a direction opposite to the net acting force (`absolute negative mobility') as a result of an interplay between thermal noise, a periodic and symmetric microstructure, and a biased alternating-current electric field. This counterintuitive phenomenon could be used for bioanalytical purposes, for example in the separation and fractionation of colloids, biological molecules and cells.

  17. Arbitrary segments of absolute negative mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruyin; Nie, Linru; Chen, Chongyang; Wang, Chaojie

    2017-01-01

    In previous research work, investigators have reported only one or two segments of absolute negative mobility (ANM) in a periodic potential. In fact, many segments of ANM also occur in the system considered here. We investigate transport of an inertial particle in a gating ratchet periodic potential subjected to a constant bias force. Our numerical results show that its mean velocity can decrease with the bias force increasing, i.e. ANM phenomenon. Furthermore, the ANM can take place arbitrary segments, even up to more than thirty. Intrinsic physical mechanism and conditions for arbitrary segments of ANM to occur are discussed in detail.

  18. Absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-07-21

    With the increasing availability of positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging, the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) has become popular in clinical settings. Quantitative MBF provides an important additional diagnostic or prognostic information over conventional visual assessment. The success of MBF quantification using PET/computed tomography (CT) has increased the demand for this quantitative diagnostic approach to be more accessible. In this regard, MBF quantification approaches have been developed using several other diagnostic imaging modalities including single-photon emission computed tomography, CT, and cardiac magnetic resonance. This review will address the clinical aspects of PET MBF quantification and the new approaches to MBF quantification.

  19. An absolute radius scale for Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Cooke, Maren L.; Pelton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Radio and stellar occultation observations of Saturn's rings made by the Voyager spacecraft are discussed. The data reveal systematic discrepancies of almost 10 km in some parts of the rings, limiting some of the investigations. A revised solution for Saturn's rotation pole has been proposed which removes the discrepancies between the stellar and radio occultation profiles. Corrections to previously published radii vary from -2 to -10 km for the radio occultation, and +5 to -6 km for the stellar occultation. An examination of spiral density waves in the outer A Ring supports that the revised absolute radii are in error by no more than 2 km.

  20. Absolute Rate Theories of Epigenetic Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, Jose N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2006-03-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape, and the transmission factor, depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates.

  1. Absolute rate theories of epigenetic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-12-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape and the transmission factor depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic, and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates. rate theory | stochastic gene expression | gene switches

  2. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  3. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  4. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  5. Linear ultrasonic motor for absolute gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yue; Yao, Zhiyuan; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2017-02-01

    Thanks to their compactness and suitability for vacuum applications, linear ultrasonic motors are considered as substitutes for classical electromagnetic motors as driving elements in absolute gravimeters. Still, their application is prevented by relatively low power output. To overcome this limitation and provide better stability, a V-type linear ultrasonic motor with a new clamping method is proposed for a gravimeter. In this paper, a mechanical model of stators with flexible clamping components is suggested, according to a design criterion for clamps of linear ultrasonic motors. After that, an effect of tangential and normal rigidity of the clamping components on mechanical output is studied. It is followed by discussion of a new clamping method with sufficient tangential rigidity and a capability to facilitate pre-load. Additionally, a prototype of the motor with the proposed clamping method was fabricated and the performance tests in vertical direction were implemented. Experimental results show that the suggested motor has structural stability and high dynamic performance, such as no-load speed of 1.4m/s and maximal thrust of 43N, meeting the requirements for absolute gravimeters.

  6. Why to compare absolute numbers of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the absolute number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to absolute mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations.

  7. The absolute threshold of cone vision

    PubMed Central

    Koeing, Darran; Hofer, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of the absolute threshold of cone vision, which has been previously underestimated due to sub-optimal conditions or overly strict subjective response criteria. We avoided these limitations by using optimized stimuli and experimental conditions while having subjects respond within a rating scale framework. Small (1′ fwhm), brief (34 msec), monochromatic (550 nm) stimuli were foveally presented at multiple intensities in dark-adapted retina for 5 subjects. For comparison, 4 subjects underwent similar testing with rod-optimized stimuli. Cone absolute threshold, that is, the minimum light energy for which subjects were just able to detect a visual stimulus with any response criterion, was 203 ± 38 photons at the cornea, ∼0.47 log units lower than previously reported. Two-alternative forced-choice measurements in a subset of subjects yielded consistent results. Cone thresholds were less responsive to criterion changes than rod thresholds, suggesting a limit to the stimulus information recoverable from the cone mosaic in addition to the limit imposed by Poisson noise. Results were consistent with expectations for detection in the face of stimulus uncertainty. We discuss implications of these findings for modeling the first stages of human cone vision and interpreting psychophysical data acquired with adaptive optics at the spatial scale of the receptor mosaic. PMID:21270115

  8. [Estimation of absolute risk for fracture].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2009-03-01

    Osteoporosis treatment aims to prevent fractures and maintain the QOL of the elderly. However, persons at high risk of future fracture cannot be effectively identified on the basis of bone density (BMD) alone, although BMD is used as an diagnostic criterion. Therefore, the WHO recommended that absolute risk for fracture (10-year probability of fracture) for each individual be evaluated and used as an index for intervention threshold. The 10-year probability of fracture is calculated based on age, sex, BMD at the femoral neck (body mass index if BMD is not available), history of previous fractures, parental hip fracture history, smoking, steroid use, rheumatoid arthritis, secondary osteoporosis and alcohol consumption. The WHO has just announced the development of a calculation tool (FRAX: WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool) in February this year. Fractures could be prevented more effectively if, based on each country's medical circumstances, an absolute risk value for fracture to determine when to start medical treatment is established and persons at high risk of fracture are identified and treated accordingly.

  9. Absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A and alterporriols.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Saki; Honma, Miho; Murakami, Takanori; Tsushima, Taro; Kudo, Shinji; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Nihei, Ken-Ichi; Nehira, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Masaru

    2012-02-01

    The absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A (1) was established by observing a positive exciton couplet in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of the C3,C4-O-bis(2-naphthoyl) derivative 10 and by chemical correlations with known compound 8. Before the discussion, the relative stereochemistry of 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The shielding effect at C7'-OMe group by C1-O-benzoylation established the relative stereochemical relationship between the C8-C8' axial bonding and the C1-C4/C1'-C4' polyol moieties of alterporriols E (3), an atropisomer of the C8-C8' dimer of 1. As 3 could be obtained by dimerization of 1 in vitro, the absolute configuration of its central chirality elements (C1-C4) must be identical to those of 1. Spectral comparison between the experimental and theoretical CD spectra supported the above conclusion. Axial stereochemistry of novel C4-O-deoxy dimeric derivatives, alterporriols F (4) and G (5), were also revealed by comparison of their CD spectra to those of 2 and 3.

  10. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  11. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. )

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  12. Improve the Absolute Accuracy of Ozone Intensities in the 9-11 μm Region via Mw/ir Multi-Wavelength Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shanshan; Drouin, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Ozone (O_3) is crucial for studies of air quality, human and crop health, and radiative forcing. Spectroscopic remote sensing techniques have been extensively employed to investigate ozone globally and regionally. Infrared intensities of ≤1% accuracy are desired by the remote sensing community. The accuracy of the current state-of-the-art infrared ozone intensities is on the order of 4-10%, resulting in ad hoc intensity scaling factors for consistent atmospheric retrievals. The large uncertainties on the infrared ozone intensities arise from the fact that pure ozone is very difficult to generate and sustain in the laboratory. Best estimates have employed IR/UV cross beam experiments to determine the accurate O_3 volume mixing ratio of the sample through its standard cross section value at 254 nm. This presentation reports our effort to improve the absolute accuracy of ozone intensities in the 9-11 μm region via a transfer of the precision of the rotational dipole moment onto the infrared measurement (MW/IR). Our approach was to use MW/IR cross beam experiments and determine the O_3 mixing ratio through alternately measuring pure rotation ozone lines from 692 to 779 GHz. The uncertainty of these pure rotation line intensities is better than 0.1%. The sample cell was a slow flow cross cell and the total pressure inside the sample cell was maintained constant through a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) flow control. Five infrared O_3 spectra were obtained, with a path length of 3.74 m, pressures ranging from 30 to 120 mTorr, and mixing ratio ranging from 0.5 to 0.9. A multi spectrum fitting technique was employed to fit all the FTS spectra simultaneously. The results show that we can determine intensities of the 9.6μm band with absolute accuracy better than 4%.

  13. Precision measurements of {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He total cross sections at Big Bang nucleosynthesis energies

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, D.S.; Karwowski, H.J.; Brune, C.R.; Fisher, B.M.; Ludwig, E.J.

    2006-04-15

    Recent Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) measurements have determined the baryon density of the Universe {omega}{sub b} with a precision of about 4%. With {omega}{sub b} tightly constrained, comparisons of Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) abundance predictions to primordial abundance observations can be made and used to test BBN models and/or to further constrain abundances of isotopes with weak observational limits. To push the limits and improve constraints on BBN models, uncertainties in key nuclear reaction rates must be minimized. To this end, we made new precise measurements of the {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He total cross sections at lab energies from 110 to 650 keV. A complete fit was performed in energy and angle to both angular distribution and normalization data for both reactions simultaneously. By including parameters for experimental variables in the fit, error correlations between detectors, reactions, and reaction energies were accurately tabulated by computational methods. With uncertainties around 2%{+-}1% scale error, these new measurements significantly improve on the existing data set. At relevant temperatures, by using the data of the present work, both reaction rates are found to be about 7% higher than those in the widely used NACRE (nuclear astrophysics compilation of reaction rates) database. These data will thus lead not only to reduced uncertainties, but also to modifications in the BBN abundance predictions.

  14. Extracting infrared absolute reflectance from relative reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Berets, Susan L; Milosevic, Milan

    2012-06-01

    Absolute reflectance measurements are valuable to the optics industry for development of new materials and optical coatings. Yet, absolute reflectance measurements are notoriously difficult to make. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of extracting the absolute reflectance from a relative reflectance measurement using a reference material with known refractive index.

  15. A Conceptual Approach to Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. When absolute value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…

  16. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE TRIPLE STAR CF TAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Torres, Guillermo; Claret, Antonio E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu

    2012-12-01

    CF Tau is now known to be an eclipsing triple star with relatively deep total and annular eclipses. New light and radial velocity curves as well as new times of minima were obtained and used for further modeling of the system. Very accurate (better than 0.9%) masses and radii of the eclipsing pair are determined from analysis of the two new light curves, the radial velocity curve, and the times of minimum light. The mass and luminosity of the distant third component is accurately determined as well. Theoretical models of the detached, evolved eclipsing pair match the observed absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 4.3 Gyr and [Fe/H] = -0.14.

  17. Active radiometric calorimeter for absolute calibration of radioactive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stump, K.E.; DeWerd, L.A.; Rudman, D.A.; Schima, S.A.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes the design and initial noise floor measurements of a radiometric calorimeter designed to measure therapeutic medical radioactive sources. The instrument demonstrates a noise floor of approximately 2 nW. This low noise floor is achieved by using high temperature superconducting (HTS) transition edge sensor (TES) thermometers in a temperature-control feedback loop. This feedback loop will be used to provide absolute source calibrations based upon the electrical substitution method. Other unique features of the calorimeter are (a) its ability to change sources for calibration without disrupting the vacuum of the instrument, and (b) the ability to measure the emitted power of a source in addition to the total contained source power.

  18. Landsat-7 ETM+ radiometric stability and absolute calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markham, B.L.; Barker, J.L.; Barsi, J.A.; Kaita, E.; Thome, K.J.; Helder, D.L.; Palluconi, Frank Don; Schott, J.R.; Scaramuzza, P.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Launched in April 1999, the Landsat-7 ETM+ instrument is in its fourth year of operation. The quality of the acquired calibrated imagery continues to be high, especially with respect to its three most important radiometric performance parameters: reflective band instrument stability to better than ??1%, reflective band absolute calibration to better than ??5%, and thermal band absolute calibration to better than ??0.6 K. The ETM+ instrument has been the most stable of any of the Landsat instruments, in both the reflective and thermal channels. To date, the best on-board calibration source for the reflective bands has been the Full Aperture Solar Calibrator, which has indicated changes of at most -1.8% to -2.0% (95% C.I.) change per year in the ETM+ gain (band 4). However, this change is believed to be caused by changes in the solar diffuser panel, as opposed to a change in the instrument's gain. This belief is based partially on ground observations, which bound the changes in gain in band 4 at -0.7% to +1.5%. Also, ETM+ stability is indicated by the monitoring of desert targets. These image-based results for four Saharan and Arabian sites, for a collection of 35 scenes over the three years since launch, bound the gain change at -0.7% to +0.5% in band 4. Thermal calibration from ground observations revealed an offset error of +0.31 W/m 2 sr um soon after launch. This offset was corrected within the U. S. ground processing system at EROS Data Center on 21-Dec-00, and since then, the band 6 on-board calibration has indicated changes of at most +0.02% to +0.04% (95% C.I.) per year. The latest ground observations have detected no remaining offset error with an RMS error of ??0.6 K. The stability and absolute calibration of the Landsat-7 ETM+ sensor make it an ideal candidate to be used as a reference source for radiometric cross-calibrating to other land remote sensing satellite systems.

  19. Comparison of absolute gain photometric calibration between Planck/HFI and Herschel/SPIRE at 545 and 857 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertincourt, B.; Lagache, G.; Martin, P. G.; Schulz, B.; Conversi, L.; Dassas, K.; Maurin, L.; Abergel, A.; Beelen, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Crill, B. P.; Dole, H.; Eales, S.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Lellouch, E.; Moreno, R.; Perdereau, O.

    2016-04-01

    We compare the absolute gain photometric calibration of the Planck/HFI and Herschel/SPIRE instruments on diffuse emission. The absolute calibration of HFI and SPIRE each relies on planet flux measurements and comparison with theoretical far-infrared emission models of planetary atmospheres. We measure the photometric cross calibration between the instruments at two overlapping bands, 545 GHz/500 μm and 857 GHz/350 μm. The SPIRE maps used have been processed in the Herschel Interactive Processing Environment (Version 12) and the HFI data are from the 2015 Public Data Release 2. For our study we used 15 large fields observed with SPIRE, which cover a total of about 120 deg2. We have selected these fields carefully to provide high signal-to-noise ratio, avoid residual systematics in the SPIRE maps, and span a wide range of surface brightness. The HFI maps are bandpass-corrected to match the emission observed by the SPIRE bandpasses. The SPIRE maps are convolved to match the HFI beam and put on a common pixel grid. We measure the cross-calibration relative gain between the instruments using two methods in each field, pixel-to-pixel correlation and angular power spectrum measurements. The SPIRE/HFI relative gains are 1.047 (±0.0069) and 1.003 (±0.0080) at 545 and 857 GHz, respectively, indicating very good agreement between the instruments. These relative gains deviate from unity by much less than the uncertainty of the absolute extended emission calibration, which is about 6.4% and 9.5% for HFI and SPIRE, respectively, but the deviations are comparable to the values 1.4% and 5.5% for HFI and SPIRE if the uncertainty from models of the common calibrator can be discounted. Of the 5.5% uncertainty for SPIRE, 4% arises from the uncertainty of the effective beam solid angle, which impacts the adopted SPIRE point source to extended source unit conversion factor, highlighting that as a focus for refinement.

  20. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis on an absolute scale in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; D'Alfonso, A J; Weyland, M; Taplin, D J; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate absolute scale agreement between the number of X-ray counts in energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using an atomic-scale coherent electron probe and first-principles simulations. Scan-averaged spectra were collected across a range of thicknesses with precisely determined and controlled microscope parameters. Ionization cross-sections were calculated using the quantum excitation of phonons model, incorporating dynamical (multiple) electron scattering, which is seen to be important even for very thin specimens.