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Sample records for absolute upper bound

  1. Lower and upper bounds for the absolute free energy by the hypothetical scanning Monte Carlo method: application to liquid argon and water.

    PubMed

    White, Ronald P; Meirovitch, Hagai

    2004-12-08

    The hypothetical scanning (HS) method is a general approach for calculating the absolute entropy S and free energy F by analyzing Boltzmann samples obtained by Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics techniques. With HS applied to a fluid, each configuration i of the sample is reconstructed by gradually placing the molecules in their positions at i using transition probabilities (TPs). At each step of the process the system is divided into two parts, the already treated molecules (the "past"), which are fixed, and the as yet unspecified (mobile) "future" molecules. Obtaining the TP exactly requires calculating partition functions over all positions of the future molecules in the presence of the frozen past, thus it is customary to invoke various approximations to best represent these quantities. In a recent publication [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101, 9235 (2004)] we developed a version of HS called complete HSMC, where each TP is calculated from an MC simulation involving all of the future molecules (the complete future); the method was applied very successfully to Lennard-Jones systems (liquid argon) and a box of TIP3P water molecules. In its basic implementation the method provides lower and upper bounds for F, where the latter can be evaluated only for relatively small systems. Here we introduce a new expression for an upper bound, which can be evaluated for larger systems. We also propose a new exact expression for F and verify its effectiveness. These free energy functionals lead to significantly improved accuracy (as applied to the liquid systems above) which is comparable to our thermodynamic integration results. We formalize and discuss theoretical aspects of HSMC that have not been addressed in previous studies. Additionally, several functionals are developed and shown to provide the free energy through the analysis of a single configuration.

  2. Generalized upper bound for inelastic diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshin, S. M.; Tyurin, N. E.

    2017-01-01

    For inelastic diffraction, we obtain an upper bound valid for the whole range of the elastic scattering amplitude variation allowed by unitarity. We discuss the energy dependence of the inelastic diffractive cross-section on the base of this bound and recent Large Hadron Collider (LHC) data.

  3. Maximum common subgraph: some upper bound and lower bound results

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiuzhen; Lai, Jing; Jennings, Steven F

    2006-01-01

    Background Structure matching plays an important part in understanding the functional role of biological structures. Bioinformatics assists in this effort by reformulating this process into a problem of finding a maximum common subgraph between graphical representations of these structures. Among the many different variants of the maximum common subgraph problem, the maximum common induced subgraph of two graphs is of special interest. Results Based on current research in the area of parameterized computation, we derive a new lower bound for the exact algorithms of the maximum common induced subgraph of two graphs which is the best currently known. Then we investigate the upper bound and design techniques for approaching this problem, specifically, reducing it to one of finding a maximum clique in the product graph of the two given graphs. Considering the upper bound result, the derived lower bound result is asymptotically tight. Conclusion Parameterized computation is a viable approach with great potential for investigating many applications within bioinformatics, such as the maximum common subgraph problem studied in this paper. With an improved hardness result and the proposed approaches in this paper, future research can be focused on further exploration of efficient approaches for different variants of this problem within the constraints imposed by real applications. PMID:17217524

  4. Upper bounds on superpartner masses from upper bounds on the Higgs boson mass.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, M E; Casas, J A; Delgado, A

    2012-01-13

    The LHC is putting bounds on the Higgs boson mass. In this Letter we use those bounds to constrain the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) parameter space using the fact that, in supersymmetry, the Higgs mass is a function of the masses of sparticles, and therefore an upper bound on the Higgs mass translates into an upper bound for the masses for superpartners. We show that, although current bounds do not constrain the MSSM parameter space from above, once the Higgs mass bound improves big regions of this parameter space will be excluded, putting upper bounds on supersymmetry (SUSY) masses. On the other hand, for the case of split-SUSY we show that, for moderate or large tanβ, the present bounds on the Higgs mass imply that the common mass for scalars cannot be greater than 10(11)  GeV. We show how these bounds will evolve as LHC continues to improve the limits on the Higgs mass.

  5. Upper bounds for flexoelectric coefficients in ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, P. V.; Ahluwalia, R.; Tagantsev, A. K.

    2014-02-01

    Flexoelectric effect is the response of electric polarization to the mechanical strain gradient. At the nano-scale, where large strain gradients are expected, the flexoelectric effect becomes appreciable and may substitute piezoelectric effect in centrosymmetric materials. These features make flexoelectricity of growing interest during the last decade. At the same time, the available theoretical and experimental results are rather contradictory. In particular, experimentally measured flexoelectric coefficients in some ferroelectric materials largely exceed theoretically predicted values. Here, we determine the upper limits for the magnitude of the static bulk contribution to the flexoelectric effect in ferroelectrics, the contribution which was customarily considered as the dominating one. The magnitude of the upper bounds obtained suggests that the anomalously high flexoelectric coupling documented for perovskite ceramics can hardly be attributed to a manifestation of the static bulk effect.

  6. A sharp upper bound for departure from normality

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.L.

    1993-08-01

    The departure from normality of a matrix is a real scalar that is impractical to compute if a matrix is large and its eigenvalues are unknown. A simple formula is presented for computing an upper bound for departure from normality in the Frobenius norm. This new upper bound is cheaper to compute than the upper bound derived by Henrici. Moreover, the new bound is sharp for Hermitian matrices, skew-Hermitian matrices and, in general, any matrix with eigenvalues that are horizontally or vertically aligned in the complex plane. In terms of applications, the new bound can be used in computing bounds for the spectral norm of matrix functions or bounds for the sensitivity of eigenvalues to matrix perturbations.

  7. Absolute limit on rotation of gravitationally bound stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1994-03-01

    The authors seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein`s theory of relativity, Le Chatelier`s principle, causality and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass-shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a M = 1.442 M{circle_dot} neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). If the limit were found to be broken by any pulsar, it would signal that the confined hadronic phase of ordinary nucleons and nuclei is only metastable, an extraordinary conclusion.

  8. Absolute limit on rotation of gravitationally bound stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendenning, N. K.

    1994-03-01

    The authors seek an absolute limit on the rotational period for a neutron star as a function of its mass, based on the minimal constraints imposed by Einstein's theory of relativity, Le Chatelier's principle, causality, and a low-density equation of state, uncertainties which can be evaluated as to their effect on the result. This establishes a limiting curve in the mass-period plane below which no pulsar that is a neutron star can lie. For example, the minimum possible Kepler period, which is an absolute limit on rotation below which mass-shedding would occur, is 0.33 ms for a M = 1.442 solar mass neutron star (the mass of PSR1913+16). If the limit were found to be broken by any pulsar, it would signal that the confined hadronic phase of ordinary nucleons and nuclei is only metastable.

  9. Variational upper and lower bounds for probabilistic graphical models.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Ydo; Geiger, Dan

    2008-09-01

    Probabilistic phylogenetic models which relax the site independence evolution assumption often face the problem of infeasible likelihood computations, for example, for the task of selecting suitable parameters for the model. We present a new approximation method, applicable for a wide range of probabilistic models, which guarantees to upper and lower bound the true likelihood of data, and apply it to the problem of probabilistic phylogenetic models. The new method is complementary to known variational methods that lower bound the likelihood, and it uses similar methods to optimize the bounds from above and below. We applied our method to aligned DNA sequences of various lengths from human in the region of the CFTR gene and homologous from eight mammals, and found the bounds to be appreciably close to the true likelihood whenever it could be computed. When computing the exact likelihood was not feasible, we demonstrated the proximity of the upper and lower variational bounds, implying a tight approximation of the likelihood.

  10. Upper bounds for parabolic equations and the Landau equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestre, Luis

    2017-02-01

    We consider a parabolic equation in nondivergence form, defined in the full space [ 0 , ∞) ×Rd, with a power nonlinearity as the right-hand side. We obtain an upper bound for the solution in terms of a weighted control in Lp. This upper bound is applied to the homogeneous Landau equation with moderately soft potentials. We obtain an estimate in L∞ (Rd) for the solution of the Landau equation, for positive time, which depends only on the mass, energy and entropy of the initial data.

  11. Upper bound on the radii of black-hole photonspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2013-11-01

    One of the most remarkable predictions of the general theory of relativity is the existence of black-hole “photonspheres”, compact null hypersurfaces on which massless particles can orbit the central black hole. We prove that every spherically-symmetric asymptotically flat black-hole spacetime is characterized by a photonsphere whose radius is bounded from above by rγ⩽3M, where M is the total ADM mass of the black-hole spacetime. It is shown that hairy black-hole configurations conform to this upper bound. In particular, the null circular geodesic of the (bald) Schwarzschild black-hole spacetime saturates the bound.

  12. Upper and lower covariance bounds for perturbed linear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, J.-H.; Skelton, R. E.; Zhu, G.

    1990-01-01

    Both upper and lower bounds are established for state covariance matrices under parameter perturbations of the plant. The motivation for this study lies in the fact that many robustness properties of linear systems are given explicitly in terms of the state covariance matrix. Moreover, there exists a theory for control by covariance assignment. The results provide robustness properties of these covariance controllers.

  13. Improved semidefinite programming upper bound on distillable entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Duan, Runyao

    2016-11-01

    An additive and semidefinite programming (SDP) computable entanglement measure is introduced to upper bound the amount of distillable entanglement in bipartite quantum states by operations completely preserving the positivity of partial transpose (PPT). This quantity is always smaller than or equal to the logarithmic negativity, the previously best known SDP bound on distillable entanglement, and the inequality is strict in general. Furthermore, a succinct SDP characterization of the one-copy PPT deterministic distillable entanglement for any given state is also obtained, which provides a simple but useful lower bound on the PPT distillable entanglement. Remarkably, there is a genuinely mixed state of which both bounds coincide with the distillable entanglement, while being strictly less than the logarithmic negativity.

  14. New upper bounds on the rate of a code via the Delsarte-MacWilliams inequalities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceliece, R. J.; Rodemich, E. R.; Rumsey, H., Jr.; Welch, L. R.

    1977-01-01

    An upper bound on the rate of a binary code as a function of minimum code distance (using a Hamming code metric) is arrived at from Delsarte-MacWilliams inequalities. The upper bound so found is asymptotically less than Levenshtein's bound, and a fortiori less than Elias' bound. Appendices review properties of Krawtchouk polynomials and Q-polynomials utilized in the rigorous proofs.

  15. Sandia Hyperspectral Upper-Bound Spectrum Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, Stephen

    2016-04-15

    The Sandia hyperspectral upper-bound spectrum algorithm (hyper-UBS) is a cosmic ray despiking algorithm for hyperspectral data sets. When naturally-occurring, high-energy (gigaelectronvolt) cosmic rays impact the earth’s atmosphere, they create an avalanche of secondary particles which will register as a large, positive spike on any spectroscopic detector they hit. Cosmic ray spikes are therefore an unavoidable spectroscopic contaminant which can interfere with subsequent analysis. A variety of cosmic ray despiking algorithms already exist and can potentially be applied to hyperspectral data matrices, most notably the upper-bound spectrum data matrices (UBS-DM) algorithm by Dongmao Zhang and Dor Ben-Amotz which served as the basis for the hyper-UBS algorithm. However, the existing algorithms either cannot be applied to hyperspectral data, require information that is not always available, introduce undesired spectral bias, or have otherwise limited effectiveness for some experimentally relevant conditions. Hyper-UBS is more effective at removing a wider variety of cosmic ray spikes from hyperspectral data without introducing undesired spectral bias. In addition to the core algorithm the Sandia hyper-UBS software package includes additional source code useful in evaluating the effectiveness of the hyper-UBS algorithm. The accompanying source code includes code to generate simulated hyperspectral data contaminated by cosmic ray spikes, several existing despiking algorithms, and code to evaluate the performance of the despiking algorithms on simulated data.

  16. Upper bounds on Nusselt number at finite Prandtl number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choffrut, Antoine; Nobili, Camilla; Otto, Felix

    2016-02-01

    We study Rayleigh-Bénard convection based on the Boussinesq approximation. We are interested in upper bounds on the Nusselt number Nu, the upwards heat transport, in terms of the Rayleigh number Ra, that characterizes the relative strength of the driving mechanism and the Prandtl number Pr, that characterizes the strength of the inertial effects. We show that, up to logarithmic corrections, the upper bound Nu ≲Ra1/3 from [1] persists as long as Pr ≳Ra1/3 and then crosses over to Nu ≲Pr-1/2Ra1/2. This result improves the one of Wang [2] by going beyond the perturbative regime Pr ≫ Ra . The proof uses a new way to estimate the transport nonlinearity in the Navier-Stokes equations capitalizing on the no-slip boundary condition. It relies on a new Calderón-Zygmund estimate for the non-stationary Stokes equations in L1 with a borderline Muckenhoupt weight.

  17. A New Upper Bound for Laplacian Graph Eigenvalues

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Shengbiao

    2008-11-06

    Let G = (V,E) be a graph with vertex set V = {l_brace}v{sub i},V{sub 2},...,v{sub n}{r_brace}. The degree of v{sub i} and the average degree of the adjacent vertices of v{sub i} are denoted by d{sub i} and m{sub v{sub i}}, respectively. In this paper, we prove that max {l_brace}(d{sub v}m{sub v}/d{sub u})+(d{sub u}m{sub u}/d{sub v}):uv(set-membership sign)E{r_brace} is an upper bound for the largest Laplacian eigenvalue of G, the equality holds if G is a d-regular bipartite graph.

  18. Upper bound for the length of commutative algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markova, Ol'ga V.

    2009-12-01

    By the length of a finite system of generators for a finite-dimensional associative algebra over an arbitrary field one means the least positive integer k such that the words of length not exceeding k span this algebra (as a vector space). The maximum length for the systems of generators of an algebra is referred to as the length of the algebra. In the present paper, an upper bound for the length of a commutative algebra in terms of a function of two invariants of the algebra, the dimension and the maximal degree of the minimal polynomial for the elements of the algebra, is obtained. As a corollary, a formula for the length of the algebra of diagonal matrices over an arbitrary field is obtained. Bibliography: 8 titles.

  19. Upper and lower bounds for the speed of pulled fronts with a cut-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benguria, R. D.; Depassier, M. C.; Loss, M.

    2008-02-01

    We establish rigorous upper and lower bounds for the speed of pulled fronts with a cut-off. For all reaction terms of KPP type a simple analytic upper bound is given. The lower bounds however depend on details of the reaction term. For a small cut-off parameter the two leading order terms in the asymptotic expansion of the upper and lower bounds coincide and correspond to the Brunet-Derrida formula. For large cut-off parameters the bounds do not coincide and permit a simple estimation of the speed of the front.

  20. Best upper and lower bounds of the generalized binomial distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Suprun, A.D.

    1995-01-01

    The persistent interest in efficient reliability bounds for complex-structure systems keeps producing new bounds, which are characterized by low computational costs and ensure acceptable error levels for applications. In this paper, we construct best bounds for the generalized binomial distribution (GBD) (known as {open_quotes}m out of n{close_quotes} in reliability theory), which are derived using edge-disjoint paths and cuts. We also propose fundamentally new bounds based on the geometric-mean transformation of the GBD to a homogeneous BD. These new bounds have certain advantages both in terms of computational complexity and in terms of the error level.

  1. UPPER BOUND ON THE FIRST STAR FORMATION HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Madejski, Grzegorz M.; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Domínguez, Alberto

    2014-02-01

    Our understanding of the nature of the extragalactic background light (EBL) has improved with the recent development of gamma-ray observation techniques. An open subject in the context of the EBL is the reionization epoch, which is an important probe of the formation history of first stars, the so-called Population III (Pop III) stars. Although the mechanisms for the formation of Pop III stars are rather well understood on theoretical grounds, their formation history is still veiled in mystery because of their faintness. To shed light on this matter, we study jointly the gamma-ray opacity of distant objects and the reionization constraints from studies of intergalactic gas. By combining these studies, we obtain a sensitive upper bound on the Pop III star formation rate density of ρ-dot {sub ∗}(z)<0.01[(1+z)/(1+7.0)]{sup 3.4}(f{sub esc}/0.2){sup −1}(C/3.0) M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} Mpc{sup −3} at z ≥ 7, where f {sub esc} and C are the escape fraction of ionizing photons from galaxies and the clumping factor of the intergalactic hydrogen gas. This limit is a ∼10 times tighter constraint compared with previous studies that take into account gamma-ray opacity constraints only. Even if we do not include the current gamma-ray constraints, the results do not change. This is because the detected gamma-ray sources are still at z ≤ 4.35 where the reionization has already finished.

  2. The upper bound of radiation energy in the Myers-Perry black hole collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwak, Bogeun; Lee, Bum-Hoon

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the upper bound of the radiation energy in the head-on collision of two Myers-Perry black holes. Initially, the two black holes are far away from each other, and they become one black hole after the collision. We have obtained the upper bound of the radiation energy thermodynamically allowed in the process. The upper bound of the radiation energy is obtained in general dimensions. The radiation bound depends on the alignments of rotating axes for a given initial condition due to spin-spin interaction. We have found that the collision may not be occurred for a initially ultra-spinning black hole.

  3. Upper and lower bounds for a serial dilution test.

    PubMed

    Blodgett, Robert J

    2005-01-01

    A Poisson-binomial model estimates the concentration of a target microbe from a serial dilution test. The maximum likelihood procedure gives an equation whose solution equals the estimate of the concentration. This paper gives bounds for the solution to this equation that require only minimal calculations.

  4. Bounded Rationality and Cognitive Development: Upper Limits on Growth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaklee, Harriet

    1979-01-01

    Piaget's characterization of formal operational thought and human judgment psychologists' model of bounded rationality are two conflicting models dealing with the nature and limits of mature thought. However, a look at the respective databases demonstrates their complementarity and their contribution to understanding mature cognition. (Author/RD)

  5. Upper bound SEU rate for devices in an isotropic or nonisotropic flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    1991-01-01

    A method for constructing upper bound estimates for device single event upset (SEU) rates is presented. A directional Heinrich flux, as a function of direction, must be known. A computer code, included, converts the directional Heinrich flux into an 'effective flux'. The effective flux provides a simple way to estimate upper bound SEU rates for devices with a known normal incident cross section versus LET curve.

  6. Upper bound on the secret key rate distillable from effective quantum correlations with imperfect detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Moroder, Tobias; Curty, Marcos; Luetkenhaus, Norbert

    2006-01-15

    We provide a simple method to obtain an upper bound on the secret key rate that is particularly suited to analyze practical realizations of quantum key distribution protocols with imperfect devices. We consider the so-called trusted device scenario where Eve cannot modify the actual detection devices employed by Alice and Bob. The upper bound obtained is based on the available measurements results, but it includes the effect of the noise and losses present in the detectors of the legitimate users.

  7. Memory effect in the upper bound of the heat flux induced by quantum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koide, T.

    2016-10-01

    Thermodynamic behaviors in a quantum Brownian motion coupled to a classical heat bath is studied. We then define a heat operator by generalizing the stochastic energetics and show the energy balance (first law) and the upper bound of the expectation value of the heat operator (second law). We further find that this upper bound depends on the memory effect induced by quantum fluctuations and hence the maximum extractable work can be qualitatively modified in quantum thermodynamics.

  8. Memory effect in the upper bound of the heat flux induced by quantum fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Koide, T

    2016-10-01

    Thermodynamic behaviors in a quantum Brownian motion coupled to a classical heat bath is studied. We then define a heat operator by generalizing the stochastic energetics and show the energy balance (first law) and the upper bound of the expectation value of the heat operator (second law). We further find that this upper bound depends on the memory effect induced by quantum fluctuations and hence the maximum extractable work can be qualitatively modified in quantum thermodynamics.

  9. Upper and Lower Bounds on the Stability of Calving Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Bassis, J. N.

    2015-12-01

    Iceberg calving is responsible for nearly half of the mass lost from ice sheets to the oceans. However, a lack of a well-parameterized calving model leaves most numerical ice sheet models incomplete. Previous studies have sought to parameterize iceberg calving assuming that calving occurs when a surface crevasse intersects with a basal one. Although a variety of models have successfully reproduced patterns of glacier retreat, they are frequently tuned by adding melt water into surface crevasses until glacier behavior matches observations, which is puzzling because calving also occurs during winter when no melt water is available. Here we examine crevasse propagation using a 2D full-Stokes finite element model along the center flow of an idealized glacier terminating in ocean to see when water-free surface crevasses intersect with water-filled basal crevasses on a lubricated bed. Crevasse propagation is computed using the Nye zero-stress-model, assuming they have a negligible effect on the stress field of the glacier. We find that for a given water depth, simulated glaciers evolve to a state where either basal and surface crevasses intersect or the glacier begins to float. This allows us to map out a stability threshold that predicts for a given water depth if certain ice thicknesses will result in full thickness failure. Assuming seeds for crevasses are present everywhere, this threshold poses an upper limit on ice thickness: as the thickness decreases full thickness penetration is increasingly likely. Comparing our theoretical stability threshold with observational data deduced from Operation IceBridge, we find that most tidewater glaciers have water depth and ice thickness combinations fall in a narrow region above our predicted threshold and below buoyancy. The agreement between observations and our simulations suggests that glaciers evolve until they approach a critical stability threshold where small perturbations can trigger calving events. The stability

  10. Stochastic Upper Bounds in the Lorenz Equations and Applications to Geophysical Flows and Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, S.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Many geophysical systems are described by chaotic nonlinear systems of equations. A natural question arising is the relative roles of chaos and stochastic fluctuations. We calculate the stochastic upper bounds for the Lorenz equations using an extension of the background method. In analogy with Rayleigh-Bénard convection the upper bounds are for heat transport versus Rayleigh number. As might be expected the stochastic upper bounds are larger than the deterministic counterpart of Souza & Doering (2015). but their variation with noise amplitude exhibits interesting behavior. Below the transition to chaotic dynamics the upper bounds increase monotonically with noise amplitude. However, in the chaotic regime this monotonicity depends on the number of realizations in the ensemble; at a particular Rayleigh number the bound may increase or decrease with noise amplitude. The origin of this behavior is the coupling between the noise and unstable periodic orbits, the degree of which depends on the degree to which the ensemble represents the ergodic set. This is confirmed by examining the close returns plots of the full solutions to the stochastic equations. Finally, we note that these solutions demonstrate that the effect of noise is equivalent to the effect of chaos. Such results have a wide range of implications in geophysical fluid dynamics.

  11. Absolute Properties of the Upper Main-Sequence Eclipsing Binary Star MU Cassiopeiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Claret, Antonio; Sabby, Jeffrey A.

    2004-10-01

    We present 6151 differential observations in the V filter measured by a robotic telescope, as well as 29 pairs of radial velocities from high-resolution spectroscopic observations, of the detached, EA-type, 9.65 day period double-lined eclipsing binary star MU Cas. Absolute dimensions of the components are determined with good precision (better than 2% in the masses and radii) for the purpose of testing various aspects of theoretical modeling. We obtain 4.57+/-0.09 Msolar and 3.67+/-0.04 Rsolar for the hotter, but smaller, less massive and less luminous photometric primary (star A), and 4.66+/-0.10 Msolar and 4.19+/-0.05 Rsolar for the cooler, larger, more massive and more luminous photometric secondary (star B). The effective temperatures and interstellar reddening of the stars are accurately determined from uvbyβ photometry: 15,100+/-500 K for the primary, 14,750+/-500 K for the secondary-corresponding to spectral types of B5 and B5-and 0.356 mag for Eb-y. The stars are located at a distance of about 1.7 kpc near the plane of the Galactic disk. The orbits of the stars are eccentric, and spectral line widths give observed rotational velocities that are synchronous with the mean orbital motion for both components. The components of MU Cas are upper main-sequence stars with an age of about 65 Myr according to models.

  12. About the Upper Bound of the Chiral Index of Multivariate Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Petitjean, Michel

    2008-11-06

    A family of distributions in R{sup d} having a chiral index greater or equal to a constant arbitrarily close to 1/2 is exhibited. It is deduced that the upper bound of the chiral index lies in the interval [1/2; 1], for any dimension d.

  13. An Upper Bound for the Expected Range of a Random Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marengo, James; Lopez, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    We consider the expected range of a random sample of points chosen from the interval [0, 1] according to some probability distribution. We then use the notion of convexity to derive an upper bound for this expected range which is valid for all possible choices of this distribution. Finally we show that there is only one distribution for which this…

  14. The upper bound of Pier Scour defined by selected laboratory and field data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benedict, Stephen; Caldwell, Andral

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation, conducted several field investigations of pier scour in South Carolina (Benedict and Caldwell, 2006; Benedict and Caldwell, 2009) and used that data to develop envelope curves defining the upper bound of pier scour. To expand upon this previous work, an additional cooperative investigation was initiated to combine the South Carolina data with pier-scour data from other sources and evaluate the upper bound of pier scour with this larger data set. To facilitate this analysis, a literature review was made to identify potential sources of published pier-scour data, and selected data were compiled into a digital spreadsheet consisting of approximately 570 laboratory and 1,880 field measurements. These data encompass a wide range of laboratory and field conditions and represent field data from 24 states within the United States and six other countries. This extensive database was used to define the upper bound of pier-scour depth with respect to pier width encompassing the laboratory and field data. Pier width is a primary variable that influences pier-scour depth (Laursen and Toch, 1956; Melville and Coleman, 2000; Mueller and Wagner, 2005, Ettema et al. 2011, Arneson et al. 2012) and therefore, was used as the primary explanatory variable in developing the upper-bound envelope curve. The envelope curve provides a simple but useful tool for assessing the potential maximum pier-scour depth for pier widths of about 30 feet or less.

  15. Upper bounds on the error probabilities and asymptotic error exponents in quantum multiple state discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Audenaert, Koenraad M. R.; Mosonyi, Milán

    2014-10-01

    We consider the multiple hypothesis testing problem for symmetric quantum state discrimination between r given states σ₁, …, σ{sub r}. By splitting up the overall test into multiple binary tests in various ways we obtain a number of upper bounds on the optimal error probability in terms of the binary error probabilities. These upper bounds allow us to deduce various bounds on the asymptotic error rate, for which it has been hypothesized that it is given by the multi-hypothesis quantum Chernoff bound (or Chernoff divergence) C(σ₁, …, σ{sub r}), as recently introduced by Nussbaum and Szkoła in analogy with Salikhov's classical multi-hypothesis Chernoff bound. This quantity is defined as the minimum of the pairwise binary Chernoff divergences min{sub jbound is actually achieved. It was known to be achieved, in particular, when the state pair that is closest together in Chernoff divergence is more than 6 times closer than the next closest pair. Our results improve on this in two ways. First, we show that the optimal asymptotic rate must lie between C/2 and C. Second, we show that the Chernoff bound is already achieved when the closest state pair is more than 2 times closer than the next closest pair. We also show that the Chernoff bound is achieved when at least r - 2 of the states are pure, improving on a previous result by Nussbaum and Szkoła. Finally, we indicate a number of potential pathways along which a proof (or disproof) may eventually be found that the multi-hypothesis quantum Chernoff bound is always achieved.

  16. Analysis of upper and lower bounds of the frame noise in linear detector arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggi, S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper estimates the upper and lower bounds of the frame noise of a linear detector array that uses a one-dimensional scan pattern. Using chi-square distribution, it is analytically shown why it is necessary to use the average of the variances and not the average of the standard deviations to estimate these bounds. Also, a criteria for determining whether any excessively noisy lines exist among the detectors is derived from these bounds. Using a Gaussian standard random variable generator, these bounds are demonstrated to be accurate within the specified confidence interval. A silicon detector array is then used for actual dark current measurements. The criterion developed for determination of noisy detectors is checked on the experimentally obtained data.

  17. Upper bound for the average entropy production based on stochastic entropy extrema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limkumnerd, Surachate

    2017-03-01

    The second law of thermodynamics, which asserts the non-negativity of the average total entropy production of a combined system and its environment, is a direct consequence of applying Jensen's inequality to a fluctuation relation. It is also possible, through this inequality, to determine an upper bound of the average total entropy production based on the entropies along the most extreme stochastic trajectories. In this work, we construct an upper bound inequality of the average of a convex function over a domain whose average is known. When applied to the various fluctuation relations, the upper bounds of the average total entropy production are established. Finally, by employing the result of Neri, Roldán, and Jülicher [Phys. Rev. X 7, 011019 (2017)], 10.1103/PhysRevX.7.011019, we are able to show that the average total entropy production is bounded only by the total entropy production supremum, and vice versa, for a general nonequilibrium stationary system.

  18. Upper and lower bounds for semi-Markov reliability models of reconfigurable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    This paper determines the information required about system recovery to compute the reliability of a class of reconfigurable systems. Upper and lower bounds are derived for these systems. The class consists of those systems that satisfy five assumptions: the components fail independently at a low constant rate, fault occurrence and system reconfiguration are independent processes, the reliability model is semi-Markov, the recovery functions which describe system configuration have small means and variances, and the system is well designed. The bounds are easy to compute, and examples are included.

  19. Causal inference methods to assess safety upper bounds in randomized trials with noncompliance

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Jesse A; Pinheiro, José; Wilcox, Marsha A

    2015-01-01

    Background Premature discontinuation and other forms of noncompliance with treatment assignment can complicate causal inference of treatment effects in randomized trials. The intent-to-treat analysis gives unbiased estimates for causal effects of treatment assignment on outcome, but may understate potential benefit or harm of actual treatment. The corresponding upper confidence limit can also be underestimated. Purpose To compare estimates of the hazard ratio and upper bound of the two-sided 95% confidence interval from causal inference methods that account for noncompliance with those from the intent-to-treat analysis. Methods We used simulations with parameters chosen to reflect cardiovascular safety trials of diabetes drugs, with a focus on upper bound estimates relative to 1.3, based on regulatory guidelines. A total of 1000 simulations were run under each parameter combination for a hypothetical trial of 10,000 total subjects randomly assigned to active treatment or control at 1:1 ratio. Noncompliance was considered in the form of treatment discontinuation and cross-over at specified proportions, with an assumed true hazard ratio of 0.9, 1, and 1.3, respectively. Various levels of risk associated with being a non-complier (independent of treatment status) were evaluated. Hazard ratio and upper bound estimates from causal survival analysis and intent-to-treat were obtained from each simulation and summarized under each parameter setting. Results Causal analysis estimated the true hazard ratio with little bias in almost all settings examined. Intent-to-treat was unbiased only when the true hazard ratio = 1; otherwise it underestimated both benefit and harm. When upper bound estimates from intent-to-treat were ≥1.3, corresponding estimates from causal analysis were also ≥1.3 in almost 100% of the simulations, regardless of the true hazard ratio. When upper bound estimates from intent-to-treat were <1.3 and the true hazard ratio = 1, corresponding

  20. One-way quantum key distribution: Simple upper bound on the secret key rate

    SciTech Connect

    Moroder, Tobias; Luetkenhaus, Norbert; Curty, Marcos

    2006-11-15

    We present a simple method to obtain an upper bound on the achievable secret key rate in quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols that use only unidirectional classical communication during the public-discussion phase. This method is based on a necessary precondition for one-way secret key distillation; the legitimate users need to prove that there exists no quantum state having a symmetric extension that is compatible with the available measurements results. The main advantage of the obtained upper bound is that it can be formulated as a semidefinite program, which can be efficiently solved. We illustrate our results by analyzing two well-known qubit-based QKD protocols: the four-state protocol and the six-state protocol.

  1. Experimental Validation of the New Modular Application of the Upper Bound Theorem in Indentation

    PubMed Central

    Bermudo, Carolina; Martín, Francisco; Martín, María Jesús; Sevilla, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, thanks to the new manufacturing processes, indentation is becoming an essential part of the new arising processes such as the Incremental Forming Processes. This work presents the experimental validation of the analytical model developed for an indentation-based process. The analytical model is originated from the Upper Bound Theorem application by means of its new modular distribution. The modules considered are composed of two Triangular Rigid Zones each. The experimental validation is performed through a series of indentation tests with work-pieces of annealed aluminium EN AW-2030 and punches of steel AISI 304, under plane strain conditions. The results are compared with the ones obtained from the application of this new modular distribution of the Upper Bound Theorem, showing a good approximation and suitability of the model developed for an indentation-based process. PMID:25826738

  2. Upper error bounds on calculated outputs of interest for linear and nonlinear structural problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladevèze, Pierre

    2006-07-01

    This Note introduces new strict upper error bounds on outputs of interest for linear as well as time-dependent nonlinear structural problems calculated by the finite element method. Small-displacement problems without softening, such as (visco)plasticity problems, are included through the standard thermodynamics framework involving internal state variables. To cite this article: P. Ladevèze, C. R. Mecanique 334 (2006).

  3. An upper diameter bound for compact Ricci solitons with application to the Hitchin-Thorpe inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadano, Homare

    2017-02-01

    In this article, stimulated by Fernández-López and García-Río, we shall give an upper diameter bound for compact shrinking Ricci solitons in terms of the range of the scalar curvature, as well as in terms of the range of the potential function. As an application, we shall provide some new sufficient conditions for compact four-dimensional shrinking Ricci solitons to satisfy the Hitchin-Thorpe inequality.

  4. Considerations on Estimating Upper Bounds of Neutron Doses Equivalents to Military Participants at Atmospheric Nuclear Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    Tissue kerma for monoenergetic neutrons of energy up to 14 MeV and contributions from different interactions that produce charged ionizing particles...fluence for each energy group obtained from calculations for monoenergetic neutrons similar to calculations in Figure 2-I, and the energy dependence of the...Considerations on Estimating Upper Bounds of Neutron Dose Equivalents to Military Partici pants at Atmospheric Nuclear Tests Approved for public release

  5. An upper bound solution for the spread extrusion of elliptical sections

    SciTech Connect

    Abrinia, K.; Makaremi, M.

    2007-04-07

    The three dimensional problem of extrusion of elliptical sections with side material flow or spread has been formulated using the upper bound theory. The shape of the die for such a process is such that it could allow the material to flow sideways as well as in the forward direction. When flat faced dies are used a deforming region is developed with dead metal zones. Therefore this deforming region has been represented in the formulation based on the definitions of streamlines and stream surfaces. A generalized kinematically admissible velocity field was then derived for this formulation and strain rate components obtained for the upper bound solution. The general formulation for the deforming region and the velocity and strain rate fields allow for the optimization of the upper bound solution so that the nearest geometry of the deforming region and dead metal zone to the actual one was obtained.Using this geometry a die with similar surfaces to those of the dead metal zone is designed having converging and diverging surfaces to lead the material flow. The analysis was also carried out for this die and results were obtained showing a reduction in the extrusion pressure compared to the flat faced die. Effects of reduction of area, shape complexity, spread ratio and friction on the extrusion process were also investigated.

  6. The upper bound of abutment scour defined by selected laboratory and field data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benedict, Stephen; Caldwell, Andral W.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation, conducted a field investigation of abutment scour in South Carolina and used that data to develop envelope curves defining the upper bound of abutment scour. To expand upon this previous work, an additional cooperative investigation was initiated to combine the South Carolina data with abutment-scour data from other sources and evaluate the upper bound of abutment scour with the larger data set. To facilitate this analysis, a literature review was made to identify potential sources of published abutment-scour data, and selected data, consisting of 446 laboratory and 331 field measurements, were compiled for the analysis. These data encompassed a wide range of laboratory and field conditions and represent field data from 6 states within the United States. The data set was used to evaluate the South Carolina abutment-scour envelope curves. Additionally, the data were used to evaluate a dimensionless abutment-scour envelope curve developed by Melville (1992), highlighting the distinct difference in the upper bound for laboratory and field data. The envelope curves evaluated in this investigation provide simple but useful tools for assessing the potential maximum abutment-scour depth in the field setting.

  7. Adaptive correction method for an OCXO and investigation of analytical cumulative time error upper bound.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Kunz, Thomas; Schwartz, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Traditional oscillators used in timing modules of CDMA and WiMAX base stations are large and expensive. Applying cheaper and smaller, albeit more inaccurate, oscillators in timing modules is an interesting research challenge. An adaptive control algorithm is presented to enhance the oscillators to meet the requirements of base stations during holdover mode. An oscillator frequency stability model is developed for the adaptive control algorithm. This model takes into account the control loop which creates the correction signal when the timing module is in locked mode. A recursive prediction error method is used to identify the system model parameters. Simulation results show that an oscillator enhanced by our adaptive control algorithm improves the oscillator performance significantly, compared with uncorrected oscillators. Our results also show the benefit of explicitly modeling the control loop. Finally, the cumulative time error upper bound of such enhanced oscillators is investigated analytically and comparison results between the analytical and simulated upper bound are provided. The results show that the analytical upper bound can serve as a practical guide for system designers.

  8. A Tight Upper Bound on Online Buffer Management for Multi-Queue Switches with Bicodal Buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Koji; Miyazaki, Shuichi; Okabe, Yasuo

    The online buffer management problem formulates the problem of queuing policies of network switches supporting QoS (Quality of Service) guarantee. In this paper, we consider one of the most standard models, called multi-queue switches model. In this model, Albers et al. gave a lower bound \\frac{e}{e-1}, and Azar et al. gave an upper bound \\frac{e}{e-1} on the competitive ratio when m, the number of input ports, is large. They are tight, but there still remains a gap for small m. In this paper, we consider the case where m = 2, namely, a switch is equipped with two ports, which is called a bicordal buffer model. We propose an online algorithm called Segmental Greedy Algorithm (SG) and show that its competitive ratio is at most \\frac{16}{13} (\\simeq 1.231), improving the previous upper bound by \\frac{9}{7} (\\simeq 1.286). This matches the lower bound given by Schmidt.

  9. An upper bound on damage of elastic-plastic structures at shakedown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xi-Qiao; Yu, Shou-Wen

    1994-07-01

    In this paper, a shakedown theory for plastic-damaged structures is presented. Damage mechanics and shakedown theory are closely related to each other in some aspects. The damage of materials may change their mechanical properties and as well as the shakedown load domains of structures. Here the damage variable is proposed as the failure criterion of ductile structures at shakedown. Based on an elastic prefectly-plastic damage model, an upper bound on local damage of structures is given via a mathematical programming. The suggested method is illustrated by an example of thick-walled cylindrical tube.

  10. Upper bound on the equilibrium concentration of atomic H in solid H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, G.

    1977-01-01

    A phenomenological rate process theory has been developed for the production, storage and recombination of atomic H free radicals in a tritium-impregnated solid H2 at temperatures in the range of about 0.1 to 4 K. In this paper it is shown that the theory requires a stringent upper bound on the equilibrium concentration of trapped atomic H, namely that it cannot exceed about 0.125%, even if the temperature is reduced to an arbitrary low value and a very strong magnetic field is applied to the tritium-impregnated H2 solid.

  11. Safe Upper-Bounds Inference of Energy Consumption for Java Bytecode Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navas, Jorge; Mendez-Lojo, Mario; Hermenegildo, Manuel V.

    2008-01-01

    Many space applications such as sensor networks, on-board satellite-based platforms, on-board vehicle monitoring systems, etc. handle large amounts of data and analysis of such data is often critical for the scientific mission. Transmitting such large amounts of data to the remote control station for analysis is usually too expensive for time-critical applications. Instead, modern space applications are increasingly relying on autonomous on-board data analysis. All these applications face many resource constraints. A key requirement is to minimize energy consumption. Several approaches have been developed for estimating the energy consumption of such applications (e.g. [3, 1]) based on measuring actual consumption at run-time for large sets of random inputs. However, this approach has the limitation that it is in general not possible to cover all possible inputs. Using formal techniques offers the potential for inferring safe energy consumption bounds, thus being specially interesting for space exploration and safety-critical systems. We have proposed and implemented a general frame- work for resource usage analysis of Java bytecode [2]. The user defines a set of resource(s) of interest to be tracked and some annotations that describe the cost of some elementary elements of the program for those resources. These values can be constants or, more generally, functions of the input data sizes. The analysis then statically derives an upper bound on the amount of those resources that the program as a whole will consume or provide, also as functions of the input data sizes. This article develops a novel application of the analysis of [2] to inferring safe upper bounds on the energy consumption of Java bytecode applications. We first use a resource model that describes the cost of each bytecode instruction in terms of the joules it consumes. With this resource model, we then generate energy consumption cost relations, which are then used to infer safe upper bounds. How

  12. Rare attributes in finite universe: Hypotheses testing specification and exact randomized upper confidence bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.

    1993-03-01

    When attributes are rare and few or none are observed in the selected sample from a finite universe, sampling statisticians are increasingly being challenged to use whatever methods are available to declare with high probability or confidence that the universe is near or completely attribute-free. This is especially true when the attribute is undesirable. Approximations such as those based on normal theory are frequently inadequate with rare attributes. For simple random sampling without replacement, an appropriate probability distribution for statistical inference is the hypergeometric distribution. But even with the hypergeometric distribution, the investigator is limited from making claims of attribute-free with high confidence unless the sample size is quite large using nonrandomized techniques. In the hypergeometric setting with rare attributes, exact randomized tests of hypothesis a,re investigated to determine the effect on power of how one specifies the null hypothesis. In particular, specifying the null hypothesis as zero attributes does not always yield maximum possible power. We also consider the hypothesis specification question under complex sampling designs including stratified random sampling and two-stage cluster sampling (one case involves random selection at first stage and another case involves probability proportional to size without replacement selection at first stage). Also under simple random sampling, this article defines and presents a simple algorithm for the construction of exact randomized'' upper confidence bounds which permit one to possibly report tighter bounds than those exact bounds obtained using nonrandomized'' methods.

  13. Rare attributes in finite universe: Hypotheses testing specification and exact randomized upper confidence bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.

    1993-03-01

    When attributes are rare and few or none are observed in the selected sample from a finite universe, sampling statisticians are increasingly being challenged to use whatever methods are available to declare with high probability or confidence that the universe is near or completely attribute-free. This is especially true when the attribute is undesirable. Approximations such as those based on normal theory are frequently inadequate with rare attributes. For simple random sampling without replacement, an appropriate probability distribution for statistical inference is the hypergeometric distribution. But even with the hypergeometric distribution, the investigator is limited from making claims of attribute-free with high confidence unless the sample size is quite large using nonrandomized techniques. In the hypergeometric setting with rare attributes, exact randomized tests of hypothesis a,re investigated to determine the effect on power of how one specifies the null hypothesis. In particular, specifying the null hypothesis as zero attributes does not always yield maximum possible power. We also consider the hypothesis specification question under complex sampling designs including stratified random sampling and two-stage cluster sampling (one case involves random selection at first stage and another case involves probability proportional to size without replacement selection at first stage). Also under simple random sampling, this article defines and presents a simple algorithm for the construction of exact ``randomized`` upper confidence bounds which permit one to possibly report tighter bounds than those exact bounds obtained using ``nonrandomized`` methods.

  14. The Upper Bound on Solar Power Conversion Efficiency Through Photonic Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yunlu; Munday, Jeremy

    The power conversion efficiency is a key parameter by which different photovoltaic devices are compared. The maximum value can be calculated under steady-state conditions where the photon flux absorbed by the device equals the outgoing flux of particles (also known as the principle of detailed balance). The photonic engineering of a solar cell offers a new alternative for boosting efficiency. We show that, for an ideally photonic engineered solar cell, its efficiency is subject to an upper bound dictated by a generalized form of detailed balance equation where nano-concentration is taken into account. Results under realistic operating conditions and recent experimental studies will also be discussed. Authors acknowledge the University of Maryland for startup funds to initiate this project and support by the National Science Foundation under Grant CBET-1335857.

  15. Upper bound on the hadronic light-by-light contribution to the muon g - 2.

    PubMed

    Erler, Jens; Sánchez, Genaro Toledo

    2006-10-20

    There are indications that hadronic loops in some electroweak observables are almost saturated by parton level effects. Taking this as the hypothesis for this work, we propose a genuine parton level estimate of the hadronic light-by-light contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a(LBL)/(mu)(had). Our quark mass definitions and values are motivated in detail, and the simplicity of our approach allows for a transparent error estimate. For infinitely heavy quarks our treatment is exact, while for asymptotically small quark masses a(LBL)/(mu)(had) is overestimated. Interpolating, this suggests quoting an upper bound. We obtain a(LBL)/(mu)(had)<1.59x10;{-9} (95% C.L.).

  16. Upper Bounds on Waiting Times for the Thin-Film Equation: The Case of Weak Slippage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Julian

    2014-03-01

    We derive upper bounds on the waiting time of solutions to the thin-film equation in the regime of weak slippage . In particular, we give sufficient conditions on the initial data for instantaneous forward motion of the free boundary. For , our estimates are sharp, for n = 2, they are sharp up to a logarithmic correction term. Note that the case n = 2 corresponds—with a grain of salt—to the assumption of the Navier slip condition at the fluid-solid interface. We also obtain results in the regime of strong slippage ; however, in this regime we expect them not to be optimal. Our method is based on weighted backward entropy estimates, Hardy's inequality and singular weight functions; we deduce a differential inequality which would enforce blowup of the weighted entropy if the contact line were to remain stationary for too long.

  17. Upper bounds for convergence rates of acceleration methods with initial iterations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidi, Avram; Shapira, Yair

    1998-06-01

    GMRES(n,k), a version of GMRES for the solution of large sparse linear systems, is introduced. A cycle of GMRES(n,k) consists of n Richardson iterations followed by k iterations of GMRES. Such cycles can be repeated until convergence is achieved. The advantage in this approach is in the opportunity to use moderate k, which results in time and memory saving. Because the number of inner products among the vectors of iteration is about k2/2, using a moderate k is particularly attractive on message-passing parallel architectures, where inner products require expensive global communication. The present analysis provides tight upper bounds for the convergence rates of GMRES(n,k) for problems with diagonalizable coefficient matrices whose spectra lie in an ellipse in 0. The advantage of GMRES(n,k) over GMRES(k) is illustrated numerically.

  18. An Upper Bound on Orbital Debris Collision Probability When Only One Object has Position Uncertainty Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Joseph H., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Upper bounds on high speed satellite collision probability, P (sub c), have been investigated. Previous methods assume an individual position error covariance matrix is available for each object. The two matrices being combined into a single, relative position error covariance matrix. Components of the combined error covariance are then varied to obtain a maximum P (sub c). If error covariance information for only one of the two objects was available, either some default shape has been used or nothing could be done. An alternative is presented that uses the known covariance information along with a critical value of the missing covariance to obtain an approximate but useful P (sub c) upper bound. There are various avenues along which an upper bound on the high speed satellite collision probability has been pursued. Typically, for the collision plane representation of the high speed collision probability problem, the predicted miss position in the collision plane is assumed fixed. Then the shape (aspect ratio of ellipse), the size (scaling of standard deviations) or the orientation (rotation of ellipse principal axes) of the combined position error ellipse is varied to obtain a maximum P (sub c). Regardless as to the exact details of the approach, previously presented methods all assume that an individual position error covariance matrix is available for each object and the two are combined into a single, relative position error covariance matrix. This combined position error covariance matrix is then modified according to the chosen scheme to arrive at a maximum P (sub c). But what if error covariance information for one of the two objects is not available? When error covariance information for one of the objects is not available the analyst has commonly defaulted to the situation in which only the relative miss position and velocity are known without any corresponding state error covariance information. The various usual methods of finding a maximum P (sub c) do

  19. An upper-bound assessment of the benefits of reducing perchlorate in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Lutter, Randall

    2014-10-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency plans to issue new federal regulations to limit drinking water concentrations of perchlorate, which occurs naturally and results from the combustion of rocket fuel. This article presents an upper-bound estimate of the potential benefits of alternative maximum contaminant levels for perchlorate in drinking water. The results suggest that the economic benefits of reducing perchlorate concentrations in drinking water are likely to be low, i.e., under $2.9 million per year nationally, for several reasons. First, the prevalence of detectable perchlorate in public drinking water systems is low. Second, the population especially sensitive to effects of perchlorate, pregnant women who are moderately iodide deficient, represents a minority of all pregnant women. Third, and perhaps most importantly, reducing exposure to perchlorate in drinking water is a relatively ineffective way of increasing iodide uptake, a crucial step linking perchlorate to health effects of concern.

  20. An upper-bound metric for characterizing spectral and spatial coregistration errors in spectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Skauli, Torbjørn

    2012-01-16

    Coregistration errors in multi- and hyperspectral imaging sensors arise when the spatial sensitivity pattern differs between bands or when the spectral response varies across the field of view, potentially leading to large errors in the recorded image data. In imaging spectrometers, spectral and spatial offset errors are customarily specified as "smile" and "keystone" distortions. However these characteristics do not account for errors resulting from variations in point spread function shape or spectral bandwidth. This paper proposes improved metrics for coregistration error both in the spatial and spectral dimensions. The metrics are essentially the integrated difference between point spread functions. It is shown that these metrics correspond to an upper bound on the error in image data. The metrics enable estimation of actual data errors for a given image, and can be used as part of the merit function in optical design optimization, as well as for benchmarking of spectral image sensors.

  1. An upper bound to time-averaged space-charge limited diode currents

    SciTech Connect

    Griswold, M. E.; Fisch, N. J.; Wurtele, J. S.

    2010-11-15

    The Child-Langmuir law limits the steady-state current density across a one-dimensional planar diode. While it is known that the peak current density can surpass this limit when the boundary conditions vary in time, it remains an open question of whether the average current can violate the Child-Langmuir limit under time-dependent conditions. For the case where the applied voltage is constant but the electric field at the cathode is allowed to vary in time, one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations suggest that such a violation is impossible. Although a formal proof is not given, an upper bound on the time-averaged current density is offered.

  2. Paleohydrologic bounds and extreme flood frequency of the Upper Arkansas River, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, J. F., Jr.; Godaire, J. E.; Klinger, R. E.; Bauer, T. R.; Julien, P. Y.

    2010-12-01

    The Upper Arkansas River basin has experienced notable large floods, including the event of 2-6 June 1921 that devastated the city of Pueblo, Colorado. We investigated flood and paleoflood hydrology at strategic sites to determine the frequency and geographic extent of extreme floods within the basin for a dam safety application. Streamgage, historical, and paleoflood data were utilized to develop frequency curves at sites near Salida, Cotopaxi, Parkdale, and Pueblo. Soil/stratigraphic descriptions, radiocarbon dating, and hydraulic modeling were used to estimate paleoflood nonexceedance bounds at the four sites, which ranged from 400 to 2200 YBP for late Holocene surfaces to late Pleistocene surfaces near Cotopaxi. Peak-flow data are from lower-magnitude snowmelt runoff in May and June in the upper basin and from high-magnitude rainfall runoff from June to August in the lower basin. Flood frequency curves reflect this transition near Parkdale from snowmelt to extreme rainfall-runoff. For similar return periods, paleoflood peak discharges increase from about 480 m 3/s upstream at Loma Linda to about 4250 m 3/s downstream near Pueblo. This increase is attributed to the larger rainfall component derived from lower elevations between Loma Linda and Pueblo. Return periods for design floods at Pueblo Dam exceeded 10,000 years based on paleoflood frequency curve extrapolations.

  3. A new upper bound for the norm of interval matrices with application to robust stability analysis of delayed neural networks.

    PubMed

    Faydasicok, Ozlem; Arik, Sabri

    2013-08-01

    The main problem with the analysis of robust stability of neural networks is to find the upper bound norm for the intervalized interconnection matrices of neural networks. In the previous literature, the major three upper bound norms for the intervalized interconnection matrices have been reported and they have been successfully applied to derive new sufficient conditions for robust stability of delayed neural networks. One of the main contributions of this paper will be the derivation of a new upper bound for the norm of the intervalized interconnection matrices of neural networks. Then, by exploiting this new upper bound norm of interval matrices and using stability theory of Lyapunov functionals and the theory of homomorphic mapping, we will obtain new sufficient conditions for the existence, uniqueness and global asymptotic stability of the equilibrium point for the class of neural networks with discrete time delays under parameter uncertainties and with respect to continuous and slope-bounded activation functions. The results obtained in this paper will be shown to be new and they can be considered alternative results to previously published corresponding results. We also give some illustrative and comparative numerical examples to demonstrate the effectiveness and applicability of the proposed robust stability condition.

  4. An Upper Bound on High Speed Satellite Collision Probability When Only One Object has Position Uncertainty Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Joseph H., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Upper bounds on high speed satellite collision probability, PC †, have been investigated. Previous methods assume an individual position error covariance matrix is available for each object. The two matrices being combined into a single, relative position error covariance matrix. Components of the combined error covariance are then varied to obtain a maximum PC. If error covariance information for only one of the two objects was available, either some default shape has been used or nothing could be done. An alternative is presented that uses the known covariance information along with a critical value of the missing covariance to obtain an approximate but potentially useful Pc upper bound.

  5. The Estimation of the IRT Reliability Coefficient and Its Lower and Upper Bounds, with Comparisons to CTT Reliability Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seonghoon; Feldt, Leonard S.

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the mathematical characteristics of the test reliability coefficient rho[subscript XX'] as a function of item response theory (IRT) parameters and present the lower and upper bounds of the coefficient. Another purpose is to examine relative performances of the IRT reliability statistics and two…

  6. Removing cosmic spikes using a hyperspectral upper-bound spectrum method

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, Stephen Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn A.

    2016-11-04

    Cosmic ray spikes are especially problematic for hyperspectral imaging because of the large number of spikes often present and their negative effects upon subsequent chemometric analysis. Fortunately, while the large number of spectra acquired in a hyperspectral imaging data set increases the probability and number of cosmic spikes observed, the multitude of spectra can also aid in the effective recognition and removal of the cosmic spikes. Zhang and Ben-Amotz were perhaps the first to leverage the additional spatial dimension of hyperspectral data matrices (DM). They integrated principal component analysis (PCA) into the upper bound spectrum method (UBS), resulting in a hybrid method (UBS-DM) for hyperspectral images. Here, we expand upon their use of PCA, recognizing that principal components primarily present in only a few pixels most likely correspond to cosmic spikes. Eliminating the contribution of those principal components in those pixels improves the cosmic spike removal. Both simulated and experimental hyperspectral Raman image data sets are used to test the newly developed UBS-DM-hyperspectral (UBS-DM-HS) method which extends the UBS-DM method by leveraging characteristics of hyperspectral data sets. As a result, a comparison is provided between the performance of the UBS-DM-HS method and other methods suitable for despiking hyperspectral images, evaluating both their ability to remove cosmic ray spikes and the extent to which they introduce spectral bias.

  7. Removing cosmic spikes using a hyperspectral upper-bound spectrum method

    DOE PAGES

    Anthony, Stephen Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn A.

    2016-11-04

    Cosmic ray spikes are especially problematic for hyperspectral imaging because of the large number of spikes often present and their negative effects upon subsequent chemometric analysis. Fortunately, while the large number of spectra acquired in a hyperspectral imaging data set increases the probability and number of cosmic spikes observed, the multitude of spectra can also aid in the effective recognition and removal of the cosmic spikes. Zhang and Ben-Amotz were perhaps the first to leverage the additional spatial dimension of hyperspectral data matrices (DM). They integrated principal component analysis (PCA) into the upper bound spectrum method (UBS), resulting in amore » hybrid method (UBS-DM) for hyperspectral images. Here, we expand upon their use of PCA, recognizing that principal components primarily present in only a few pixels most likely correspond to cosmic spikes. Eliminating the contribution of those principal components in those pixels improves the cosmic spike removal. Both simulated and experimental hyperspectral Raman image data sets are used to test the newly developed UBS-DM-hyperspectral (UBS-DM-HS) method which extends the UBS-DM method by leveraging characteristics of hyperspectral data sets. As a result, a comparison is provided between the performance of the UBS-DM-HS method and other methods suitable for despiking hyperspectral images, evaluating both their ability to remove cosmic ray spikes and the extent to which they introduce spectral bias.« less

  8. Removing Cosmic Spikes Using a Hyperspectral Upper-Bound Spectrum Method.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Stephen M; Timlin, Jerilyn A

    2017-03-01

    Cosmic ray spikes are especially problematic for hyperspectral imaging because of the large number of spikes often present and their negative effects upon subsequent chemometric analysis. Fortunately, while the large number of spectra acquired in a hyperspectral imaging data set increases the probability and number of cosmic spikes observed, the multitude of spectra can also aid in the effective recognition and removal of the cosmic spikes. Zhang and Ben-Amotz were perhaps the first to leverage the additional spatial dimension of hyperspectral data matrices (DM). They integrated principal component analysis (PCA) into the upper bound spectrum method (UBS), resulting in a hybrid method (UBS-DM) for hyperspectral images. Here, we expand upon their use of PCA, recognizing that principal components primarily present in only a few pixels most likely correspond to cosmic spikes. Eliminating the contribution of those principal components in those pixels improves the cosmic spike removal. Both simulated and experimental hyperspectral Raman image data sets are used to test the newly developed UBS-DM-hyperspectral (UBS-DM-HS) method which extends the UBS-DM method by leveraging characteristics of hyperspectral data sets. A comparison is provided between the performance of the UBS-DM-HS method and other methods suitable for despiking hyperspectral images, evaluating both their ability to remove cosmic ray spikes and the extent to which they introduce spectral bias.

  9. Regional Variations of the ω-upper Bound Magnitude of GIII Distribution in the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Hiwa; Bayrak, Yusuf

    2016-08-01

    The Iranian Plateau does not appear to be a single crustal block, but an assemblage of zones comprising the Alborz—Azerbaijan, Zagros, Kopeh—Dagh, Makran, and Central and East Iran. The Gumbel's III asymptotic distribution method (GIII) and maximum magnitude expected by Kijko—Sellevoll method is applied in order to check the potentiality of the each seismogenic zone in the Iranian Plateau for the future occurrence of maximum magnitude ( M max). For this purpose, a homogeneous and complete seismicity database of the instrumental period during 1900-2012 is used in 29 seismogenic zones of the examined region. The spatial mapping of hazard parameters (upper bound magnitude ( ω), most probable earthquake magnitude in next 100 years ( M 100) and maximum magnitude expected by maximum magnitude estimated by Kijko—Sellevoll method (max M K - S max) reveals that Central and East Iran, Alborz and Azerbaijan, Kopeh—Dagh and SE Zagros are a dangerous place for the next occurrence of a large earthquake.

  10. Sources, transport, and mixing of particle-bound PAHs fluxes in the upper Neckar River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwientek, Marc; Rügner, Hermann; Qin, Xintong; Scherer, Ulrike; Grathwohl, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Transport of many urban pollutants in rivers is coupled to transport of suspended particles. The degree of contamination of these suspended particles depends on the mixture of "polluted" urban and "clean" background particles. Recent results have shown that, in several meso-scale catchments studied in southwestern and eastern Germany, the loading of particles with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was stable over time and characteristic for each catchment. The absence of significant long-term trends or pronounced changes of the catchment-specific loadings indicate that either input and output of PAHs into the stream networks are largely at steady state or that storage of PAHs in the sediments within the stream network are sufficient to smooth out larger fluctuations. Moreover, it was shown that the contamination of sediments and suspended particles with PAHs is proportional to the number of inhabitants per suspended sediment flux in a catchment. These processes are being further studied at larger scale in the upper Neckar River basin (2300 km²) in southwestern Germany. This basin, located between the mountain ranges of the Black Forest and the Swabian Alb, comprises sub-catchments that are diverse in terms of urban impact, geology (ranging from gypsum and limetstones to siliceous sandstones) and hydrology (dynamics driven either by summerly convective events or by winterly frontal systems and snow melt). Accordingly, quality and quantity of particles being released in the sub-catchments as potential vectors for hydrophobic pollutants differ; and so do the events that mobilize the particles. These settings enable the investigation of how particle-bound pollutant fluxes generated at the meso-scale are mixed and transported at larger scales when introduced into a higher order river. A prominent research question is whether varying contributions from contrasting sub-catchments lead to changing contamination patterns in the main stem or if the sediment storage in

  11. Pre-Test Assessment of the Upper Bound of the Drag Coefficient Repeatability of a Wind Tunnel Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, N.; L'Esperance, A.

    2017-01-01

    A new method is presented that computes a pre{test estimate of the upper bound of the drag coefficient repeatability of a wind tunnel model. This upper bound is a conservative estimate of the precision error of the drag coefficient. For clarity, precision error contributions associated with the measurement of the dynamic pressure are analyzed separately from those that are associated with the measurement of the aerodynamic loads. The upper bound is computed by using information about the model, the tunnel conditions, and the balance in combination with an estimate of the expected output variations as input. The model information consists of the reference area and an assumed angle of attack. The tunnel conditions are described by the Mach number and the total pressure or unit Reynolds number. The balance inputs are the partial derivatives of the axial and normal force with respect to all balance outputs. Finally, an empirical output variation of 1.0 microV/V is used to relate both random instrumentation and angle measurement errors to the precision error of the drag coefficient. Results of the analysis are reported by plotting the upper bound of the precision error versus the tunnel conditions. The analysis shows that the influence of the dynamic pressure measurement error on the precision error of the drag coefficient is often small when compared with the influence of errors that are associated with the load measurements. Consequently, the sensitivities of the axial and normal force gages of the balance have a significant influence on the overall magnitude of the drag coefficient's precision error. Therefore, results of the error analysis can be used for balance selection purposes as the drag prediction characteristics of balances of similar size and capacities can objectively be compared. Data from two wind tunnel models and three balances are used to illustrate the assessment of the precision error of the drag coefficient.

  12. Strict upper error bounds on computed outputs of interest in computational structural mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladevèze, Pierre

    2008-07-01

    This paper introduces new strict error bounds of computed outputs of interest for time-dependent nonlinear problems in quasi-statics as well as in dynamics. All sources of errors, including modeling errors, are taken into account. Therefore, such error bounds are also suitable tools for analyzing various approximations, particularly in dynamics. Small-displacement problems without softening, such as (visco)plasticity problems, are included through the classical thermodynamics framework involving internal state variables; the material models are not necessarily standard.

  13. Convective heat transport in a rotating fluid layer of infinite Prandtl number: optimum fields and upper bounds on Nusselt number.

    PubMed

    Vitanov, Nikolay K

    2003-02-01

    By means of the Howard-Busse method of the optimum theory of turbulence we investigate numerically upper bounds on convective heat transport for the case of infinite fluid layer with stress-free vertical boundaries rotating about a vertical axis. We discuss the case of infinite Prandtl number, 1-alpha solution of the obtained variational problem and optimum fields possessing internal, intermediate, and boundary layers. We investigate regions of Rayleigh and Taylor numbers R and Ta, where no analytical bounds can be derived, and compare the analytical and numerical bounds for these regions of R and Ta where such comparison is possible. The increasing rotation has a different influence on the rescaled optimum fields of velocity w(1), temperature theta(1) and the vertical component of the vorticity f(1). The increasing Ta for fixed R leads to vanishing of the boundary layers of w(1) and theta(1). Opposite to this, the increasing Ta leads first to a formation of boundary layers of the field f(1) but further increasing the rotation causes vanishing of these boundary layers. We obtain optimum profiles of the horizontal averaged total temperature field which could be used as hints for construction of the background fields when applying Doering-Constantin method to the problems of rotating convection. The wave number alpha(1) corresponding to the optimum fields follows the asymptotic relationship alpha(1)=(R/5)(1/4) for intermediate Rayleigh numbers. However, when R becomes large with respect to Ta, after a transition region, the power law for alpha(1) becomes close to the power law for the case without rotation. The Nusselt number Nu is close to the nonrotational bound 0.32R(1/3) for the case of large R and small Ta. Nu decreases with increasing Taylor number. Thus, the upper bounds reflect the tendency of inhibiting thermal convection by increasing rotation for a fixed Rayleigh number. For the regions of Rayleigh and Taylor numbers where the numerical and asymptotic

  14. Seeking realistic upper-bounds for internal reliability of systems with uncorrelated observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prószyński, Witold

    2014-06-01

    From the theory of reliability it follows that the greater the observational redundancy in a network, the higher is its level of internal reliability. However, taking into account physical nature of the measurement process one may notice that the planned additional observations may increase the number of potential gross errors in a network, not raising the internal reliability to the theoretically expected degree. Hence, it is necessary to set realistic limits for a sufficient number of observations in a network. An attempt to provide principles for finding such limits is undertaken in the present paper. An empirically obtained formula (Adamczewski 2003) called there the law of gross errors, determining the chances that a certain number of gross errors may occur in a network, was taken as a starting point in the analysis. With the aid of an auxiliary formula derived on the basis of the Gaussian law, the Adamczewski formula was modified to become an explicit function of the number of observations in a network. This made it possible to construct tools necessary for the analysis and finally, to formulate the guidelines for determining the upper-bounds for internal reliability indices. Since the Adamczewski formula was obtained for classical networks, the guidelines should be considered as an introductory proposal requiring verification with reference to modern measuring techniques. Z teorii niezawodności wynika, że im większy jest nadmiar obserwacyjny w sieci, tym wyższy poziom jej niezawodności wewnętrznej. Biorąc jednakże pod uwagę fi zykalną naturę procesu pomiaru można zauważyć, że projektowane dodatkowe obserwacje mogą zwiększyć liczbę potencjalnych błędów grubych w sieci, nie podnosząc niezawodności wewnętrznej do oczekiwanego według teorii poziomu. Niezbędne jest zatem ustalenie realistycznych poziomów górnych dla liczby obserwacji w sieci. W niniejszym artykule podjęta jest próba sformułowania zasad ustalania takich poziom

  15. Online estimation of lower and upper bounds for heart sound boundaries in chest sound using Convex-hull algorithm.

    PubMed

    Çağlar, F; Ozbek, I Y

    2012-01-01

    Heart sound localization in chest sound is an essential part for many heart sound cancellation algorithms. The main difficulty for heart sound localization methods is the precise determination of the onset and offset boundaries of the heart sound segment. This paper presents a novel method to estimate lower and upper bounds for the onset and offset of the heart sound segment, which can be used as anchor points for more precise estimation. For this purpose, first chest sound is divided into frames and then entropy and smoothed entropy features of these frames are extracted, and used in the Convex-hull algorithm to estimate the upper and lower bounds for heart sound boundaries. The Convex-hull algorithm constructs a special type of envelope function for entropy features and if the maximal difference between the envelope function and the entropy is larger than a certain threshold, this point is considered as a heart sound bound. The results of the proposed method are compared with a baseline method which is a modified version of a well-known heart sound localization method. The results show that the proposed method outperforms the baseline method in terms of accuracy and detection error rate. Also, the experimental results show that smoothing entropy features significantly improves the performance of both baseline and proposed methods.

  16. Lower and upper bounds for the two-echelon capacitated location-routing problem.

    PubMed

    Contardo, Claudio; Hemmelmayr, Vera; Crainic, Teodor Gabriel

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we introduce two algorithms to address the two-echelon capacitated location-routing problem (2E-CLRP). We introduce a branch-and-cut algorithm based on the solution of a new two-index vehicle-flow formulation, which is strengthened with several families of valid inequalities. We also propose an adaptive large-neighbourhood search (ALNS) meta-heuristic with the objective of finding good-quality solutions quickly. The computational results on a large set of instances from the literature show that the ALNS outperforms existing heuristics. Furthermore, the branch-and-cut method provides tight lower bounds and is able to solve small- and medium-size instances to optimality within reasonable computing times.

  17. Lower and upper bounds for the two-echelon capacitated location-routing problem

    PubMed Central

    Contardo, Claudio; Hemmelmayr, Vera; Crainic, Teodor Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce two algorithms to address the two-echelon capacitated location-routing problem (2E-CLRP). We introduce a branch-and-cut algorithm based on the solution of a new two-index vehicle-flow formulation, which is strengthened with several families of valid inequalities. We also propose an adaptive large-neighbourhood search (ALNS) meta-heuristic with the objective of finding good-quality solutions quickly. The computational results on a large set of instances from the literature show that the ALNS outperforms existing heuristics. Furthermore, the branch-and-cut method provides tight lower bounds and is able to solve small- and medium-size instances to optimality within reasonable computing times. PMID:24511176

  18. Absolutely classical spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

  19. Analysis of Upper Bound Power Output for a Wrist-Worn Rotational Energy Harvester from Real-World Measured Inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, T.; Ma, X.; Rahn, C.; Roundy, S.

    2014-11-01

    Energy harvesting from human motion addresses the growing need for battery-free health and wellness sensors in wearable applications. The major obstacles to harvesting energy in such applications are low and random frequencies due to the nature of human motion. This paper presents a generalized rotational harvester model in 3 dimensions to determine the upper bound of power output from real world measured data. Simulation results indicate much space for improvement on power generation comparing to existing devices. We have developed a rotational energy harvester for human motion that attempts to close the gap between theoretical possibility and demonstrated devices. Like previous work, it makes use of magnetically plucked piezoelectric beams. However, it more fully utilizes the space available and has many degrees of freedom available for optimization. Finally we present a prototype harvester based on the coupled harvester model with preliminary experimental validation.

  20. Refinement of the Upper and Lower Bounds of Effective Heat Conductivity Coefficients of Rib-Reinforced Composite Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovskii, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    We propose two refined structural models of the thermal behavior of a rib-reinforced composite medium at general anisotropy of the materials of compound components. For the criterion of equivalence of the rib-reinforced composite to the fictitious homogeneous anisotropic material, equality of the specific heat dissipation in them was used, which permits determining the upper and lower bounds of the effective heat conductivity coefficients of the composite material. The design values of the effective heat conductivity coefficients of a honeycomb structure with cavities filled and not filled with foam plastic have been determined. It has been shown that the refinement of certain thermal characteristics of 12%, and the refined "fork" of values of these quantities, does not exceed 2.5%. Indirect comparison has been made between the calculated and experimental values of the effective heat conductivity coefficients of such compounds, which has shown that the results obtained in the work are qualitatively reliable.

  1. Potential radiological impacts of upper-bound operational accidents during proposed waste disposal alternatives for Hanford defense waste

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, J.; Sutter, S.L.; Hawley, K.A.; Jenkins, C.E.; Napier, B.A.

    1986-02-01

    The Geologic Disposal Alternative, the In-Place Stabilization and Disposal Alternative, and the Reference Disposal Alternative are being evaluated for disposal of Hanford defense high-level, transuranic, and tank wastes. Environmental impacts associated with disposal of these wastes according to the alternatives listed above include potential doses to the downwind population from operation during the application of the handling and processing techniques comprising each disposal alternative. Scenarios for operational accident and abnormal operational events are postulated, on the basis of the currently available information, for the application of the techniques employed for each waste class for each disposal alternative. From these scenarios, an upper-bound airborne release of radioactive material was postulated for each waste class and disposal alternative. Potential downwind radiologic impacts were calculated from these upper-bound events. In all three alternatives, the single postulated event with the largest calculated radiologic impact for any waste class is an explosion of a mixture of ferri/ferro cyanide precipitates during the mechanical retrieval or microwave drying of the salt cake in single shell waste tanks. The anticipated downwind dose (70-year dose commitment) to the maximally exposed individual is 3 rem with a total population dose of 7000 man-rem. The same individual would receive 7 rem from natural background radiation during the same time period, and the same population would receive 3,000,000 man-rem. Radiological impacts to the public from all other postulated accidents would be less than that from this accident; furthermore, the radiological impacts resulting from this accident would be less than one-half that from the natural background radiation dose.

  2. Upper bound on neutrino mass based on T2K neutrino timing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Adam, J.; Aihara, H.; Akiri, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Assylbekov, S.; Autiero, D.; Barbi, M.; Barker, G. J.; Barr, G.; Bartet-Friburg, P.; Bass, M.; Batkiewicz, M.; Bay, F.; Berardi, V.; Berger, B. E.; Berkman, S.; Bhadra, S.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Bolognesi, S.; Bordoni, S.; Boyd, S. B.; Brailsford, D.; Bravar, A.; Bronner, C.; Buchanan, N.; Calland, R. G.; Caravaca Rodríguez, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castillo, R.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Cherdack, D.; Chikuma, N.; Christodoulou, G.; Clifton, A.; Coleman, J.; Coleman, S. J.; Collazuol, G.; Connolly, K.; Cremonesi, L.; Dabrowska, A.; Danko, I.; Das, R.; Davis, S.; de Perio, P.; De Rosa, G.; Dealtry, T.; Dennis, S. R.; Densham, C.; Dewhurst, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Di Luise, S.; Dolan, S.; Drapier, O.; Duboyski, T.; Duffy, K.; Dumarchez, J.; Dytman, S.; Dziewiecki, M.; Emery-Schrenk, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escudero, L.; Feusels, T.; Finch, A. J.; Fiorentini, G. A.; Friend, M.; Fujii, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Furmanski, A. P.; Galymov, V.; Garcia, A.; Giffin, S.; Giganti, C.; Gilje, K.; Goeldi, D.; Golan, T.; Gonin, M.; Grant, N.; Gudin, D.; Hadley, D. R.; Haegel, L.; Haesler, A.; Haigh, M. D.; Hamilton, P.; Hansen, D.; Hara, T.; Hartz, M.; Hasegawa, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashino, T.; Hayato, Y.; Hearty, C.; Helmer, R. L.; Hierholzer, M.; Hignight, J.; Hillairet, A.; Himmel, A.; Hiraki, T.; Hirota, S.; Holeczek, J.; Horikawa, S.; Hosomi, F.; Huang, K.; Ichikawa, A. K.; Ieki, K.; Ieva, M.; Ikeda, M.; Imber, J.; Insler, J.; Irvine, T. J.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Iwai, E.; Iwamoto, K.; Iyogi, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jacob, A.; Jamieson, B.; Jiang, M.; Johnson, R. A.; Johnson, S.; Jo, J. H.; Jonsson, P.; Jung, C. K.; Kabirnezhad, M.; Kaboth, A. C.; Kajita, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kameda, J.; Kanazawa, Y.; Karlen, D.; Karpikov, I.; Katori, T.; Kearns, E.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kielczewska, D.; Kikawa, T.; Kilinski, A.; Kim, J.; King, S.; Kisiel, J.; Kitching, P.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, L.; Koga, T.; Kolaceke, A.; Konaka, A.; Kopylov, A.; Kormos, L. L.; Korzenev, A.; Koshio, Y.; Kropp, W.; Kubo, H.; Kudenko, Y.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lagoda, J.; Lamont, I.; Larkin, E.; Laveder, M.; Lawe, M.; Lazos, M.; Lindner, T.; Lister, C.; Litchfield, R. P.; Longhin, A.; Lopez, J. P.; Ludovici, L.; Magaletti, L.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Manly, S.; Marino, A. D.; Marteau, J.; Martin, J. F.; Martins, P.; Martynenko, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matveev, V.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.; McCauley, N.; McFarland, K. S.; McGrew, C.; Mefodiev, A.; Metelko, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mijakowski, P.; Miller, C. A.; Minamino, A.; Mineev, O.; Missert, A.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Mueller, Th. A.; Murakami, A.; Murdoch, M.; Murphy, S.; Myslik, J.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K. G.; Nakamura, K.; Nakayama, S.; Nakaya, T.; Nakayoshi, K.; Nantais, C.; Nielsen, C.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Nowak, J.; O'Keeffe, H. M.; Ohta, R.; Okumura, K.; Okusawa, T.; Oryszczak, W.; Oser, S. M.; Ovsyannikova, T.; Owen, R. A.; Oyama, Y.; Palladino, V.; Palomino, J. L.; Paolone, V.; Payne, D.; Perevozchikov, O.; Perkin, J. D.; Petrov, Y.; Pickard, L.; Pinzon Guerra, E. S.; Pistillo, C.; Plonski, P.; Poplawska, E.; Popov, B.; Posiadala-Zezula, M.; Poutissou, J.-M.; Poutissou, R.; Przewlocki, P.; Quilain, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ravonel, M.; Rayner, M. A. M.; Redij, A.; Reeves, M.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Riccio, C.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Rojas, P.; Rondio, E.; Roth, S.; Rubbia, A.; Ruterbories, D.; Rychter, A.; Sacco, R.; Sakashita, K.; Sánchez, F.; Sato, F.; Scantamburlo, E.; Scholberg, K.; Schoppmann, S.; Schwehr, J.; Scott, M.; Seiya, Y.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekiya, H.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shah, R.; Shaker, F.; Shaw, D.; Shiozawa, M.; Short, S.; Shustrov, Y.; Sinclair, P.; Smith, B.; Smy, M.; Sobczyk, J. T.; Sobel, H.; Sorel, M.; Southwell, L.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Still, B.; Suda, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Tacik, R.; Tada, M.; Takahashi, S.; Takeda, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, H. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tanaka, M. M.; Terhorst, D.; Terri, R.; Thompson, L. F.; Thorley, A.; Tobayama, S.; Toki, W.; Tomura, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Touramanis, C.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tzanov, M.; Uchida, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Vasseur, G.; Wachala, T.; Wakamatsu, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wark, D.; Warzycha, W.; Wascko, M. O.; Weber, A.; Wendell, R.; Wilkes, R. J.; Wilking, M. J.; Wilkinson, C.; Williamson, Z.; Wilson, J. R.; Wilson, R. J.; Wongjirad, T.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yano, T.; Yen, S.; Yershov, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoo, J.; Yoshida, K.; Yuan, T.; Yu, M.; Zalewska, A.; Zalipska, J.; Zambelli, L.; Zaremba, K.; Ziembicki, M.; Zimmerman, E. D.; Zito, M.; Żmuda, J.; T2K Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Tokai to Kamioka (T2K) long-baseline neutrino experiment consists of a muon neutrino beam, produced at the J-PARC accelerator, a near detector complex and a large 295-km-distant far detector. The present work utilizes the T2K event timing measurements at the near and far detectors to study neutrino time of flight as a function of derived neutrino energy. Under the assumption of a relativistic relation between energy and time of flight, constraints on the neutrino rest mass can be derived. The sub-GeV neutrino beam in conjunction with timing precision of order tens of ns provide sensitivity to neutrino mass in the few MeV /c2 range. We study the distribution of relative arrival times of muon and electron neutrino candidate events at the T2K far detector as a function of neutrino energy. The 90% C.L. upper limit on the mixture of neutrino mass eigenstates represented in the data sample is found to be mν2<5.6 MeV2/c4 .

  3. Time-stepping approach for solving upper-bound problems: Application to two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Baole; Chini, Gregory P.; Kerswell, Rich R.; Doering, Charles R.

    2015-10-01

    An alternative computational procedure for numerically solving a class of variational problems arising from rigorous upper-bound analysis of forced-dissipative infinite-dimensional nonlinear dynamical systems, including the Navier-Stokes and Oberbeck-Boussinesq equations, is analyzed and applied to Rayleigh-Bénard convection. A proof that the only steady state to which this numerical algorithm can converge is the required global optimal of the relevant variational problem is given for three canonical flow configurations. In contrast with most other numerical schemes for computing the optimal bounds on transported quantities (e.g., heat or momentum) within the "background field" variational framework, which employ variants of Newton's method and hence require very accurate initial iterates, the new computational method is easy to implement and, crucially, does not require numerical continuation. The algorithm is used to determine the optimal background-method bound on the heat transport enhancement factor, i.e., the Nusselt number (Nu), as a function of the Rayleigh number (Ra), Prandtl number (Pr), and domain aspect ratio L in two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection between stress-free isothermal boundaries (Rayleigh's original 1916 model of convection). The result of the computation is significant because analyses, laboratory experiments, and numerical simulations have suggested a range of exponents α and β in the presumed Nu˜PrαRaβ scaling relation. The computations clearly show that for Ra≤1010 at fixed L =2 √{2 },Nu≤0.106 Pr0Ra5/12 , which indicates that molecular transport cannot generally be neglected in the "ultimate" high-Ra regime.

  4. Time-stepping approach for solving upper-bound problems: Application to two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    PubMed

    Wen, Baole; Chini, Gregory P; Kerswell, Rich R; Doering, Charles R

    2015-10-01

    An alternative computational procedure for numerically solving a class of variational problems arising from rigorous upper-bound analysis of forced-dissipative infinite-dimensional nonlinear dynamical systems, including the Navier-Stokes and Oberbeck-Boussinesq equations, is analyzed and applied to Rayleigh-Bénard convection. A proof that the only steady state to which this numerical algorithm can converge is the required global optimal of the relevant variational problem is given for three canonical flow configurations. In contrast with most other numerical schemes for computing the optimal bounds on transported quantities (e.g., heat or momentum) within the "background field" variational framework, which employ variants of Newton's method and hence require very accurate initial iterates, the new computational method is easy to implement and, crucially, does not require numerical continuation. The algorithm is used to determine the optimal background-method bound on the heat transport enhancement factor, i.e., the Nusselt number (Nu), as a function of the Rayleigh number (Ra), Prandtl number (Pr), and domain aspect ratio L in two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection between stress-free isothermal boundaries (Rayleigh's original 1916 model of convection). The result of the computation is significant because analyses, laboratory experiments, and numerical simulations have suggested a range of exponents α and β in the presumed Nu∼Pr(α)Ra(β) scaling relation. The computations clearly show that for Ra≤10(10) at fixed L=2√[2],Nu≤0.106Pr(0)Ra(5/12), which indicates that molecular transport cannot generally be neglected in the "ultimate" high-Ra regime.

  5. Easy Absolute Values? Absolutely

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon E.; Mittag, Kathleen Cage

    2015-01-01

    The authors teach a problem-solving course for preservice middle-grades education majors that includes concepts dealing with absolute-value computations, equations, and inequalities. Many of these students like mathematics and plan to teach it, so they are adept at symbolic manipulations. Getting them to think differently about a concept that they…

  6. About lamination upper and convexification lower bounds on the free energy of monoclinic shape memory alloys in the context of T 3-configurations and R-phase formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fechte-Heinen, R.; Schlömerkemper, A.

    2016-11-01

    This work is concerned with different estimates of the quasiconvexification of multi-well energy landscapes of NiTi shape memory alloys, which models the overall behavior of the material. Within the setting of the geometrically linear theory of elasticity, we consider a formula of the quasiconvexification which involves the so-called energy of mixing.We are interested in lower and upper bounds on the energy of mixing in order to get a better understanding of the quasiconvexification. The lower bound on the energy of mixing is obtained by convexification; it is also called Sachs or Reuß lower bound. The upper bound on the energy of mixing is based on second-order lamination. In particular, we are interested in the difference between the lower and upper bounds. Our numerical simulations show that the difference is in fact of the order of 1% and less in martensitic NiTi, even though both bounds on the energy of mixing were rather expected to differ more significantly. Hence, in various circumstances it may be justified to simply work with the convexification of the multi-well energy, which is relatively easy to deal with, or with the lamination upper bound, which always corresponds to a physically realistic microstructure, as an estimate of the quasiconvexification. In order to obtain a potentially large difference between upper and lower bound, we consider the bounds along paths in strain space which involve incompatible strains. In monoclinic shape memory alloys, three-tuples of pairwise incompatible strains play a special role since they form so-called T 3-configurations, originally discussed in a stress-free setting. In this work, we therefore consider in particular numerical simulations along paths in strain space which are related to these T 3-configurations. Interestingly, we observe that the second-order lamination upper bound along such paths is related to the geometry of the T 3-configurations. In addition to the purely martensitic regime, we also consider

  7. How much can Greenland melt? An upper bound on mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet through surface melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Bassis, J. N.

    2015-12-01

    With observations showing accelerated mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet due to surface melt, the Greenland Ice Sheet is becoming one of the most significant contributors to sea level rise. The contribution of the Greenland Ice Sheet o sea level rise is likely to accelerate in the coming decade and centuries as atmospheric temperatures continue to rise, potentially triggering ever larger surface melt rates. However, at present considerable uncertainty remains in projecting the contribution to sea level of the Greenland Ice Sheet both due to uncertainty in atmospheric forcing and the ice sheet response to climate forcing. Here we seek an upper bound on the contribution of surface melt from the Greenland to sea level rise in the coming century using a surface energy balance model coupled to an englacial model. We use IPCC Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP8.5, RCP6, RCP4.5, RCP2.6) climate scenarios from an ensemble of global climate models in our simulations to project the maximum rate of ice volume loss and related sea-level rise associated with surface melting. To estimate the upper bound, we assume the Greenland Ice Sheet is perpetually covered in thick clouds, which maximize longwave radiation to the ice sheet. We further assume that deposition of black carbon darkens the ice substantially turning it nearly black, substantially reducing its albedo. Although assuming that all melt water not stored in the snow/firn is instantaneously transported off the ice sheet increases mass loss in the short term, refreezing of retained water warms the ice and may lead to more melt in the long term. Hence we examine both assumptions and use the scenario that leads to the most surface melt by 2100. Preliminary models results suggest that under the most aggressive climate forcing, surface melt from the Greenland Ice Sheet contributes ~1 m to sea level by the year 2100. This is a significant contribution and ignores dynamic effects. We also examined a lower bound

  8. Upper-Bound Radiation Dose Assessment for Military Personnel at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, between 1962 and 1979, Revision 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-29

    for support personnel using those types of measurements. During DF 78, 43 environmental thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were exposed for 85 days... thermoluminescent dosimeter TRIGA Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics UA uncertainty analysis UB upper-bound USDOE United States Department of

  9. Design of a light confining concentrator for a solar photochemical reactor and upper bound to the method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamata, Boris; Andersen, Marilyne

    2016-09-01

    Optical concentration obtained by light confinement bears unique features that can increase the efficiency of a photochemical reactor. A suitable implementation of this method for a solar reactor is a series of parallel tubular receivers sealed in a slab-shape reflective cavity, in which light is trapped thanks to a self-adaptive optical filtering mechanism. To predict the concentration in such a generic configuration, we had previously established an analytical model based on idealistic assumptions, which are not valid in our real configuration. Here, we use analytical calculations and numerical ray-trace simulations to investigate how the finite size of the latter impacts the prediction of our model and extrapolate design guidelines for minimal departure from ideality. We apply these guidelines to design an optical concentrator maximizing flux density on tubular receivers and discuss the upper bound to the method, as well as the benefits from its unique features. Accounting for practical and technological limitations, this method can provide optical concentration in the order of ten suns in our generic configuration.

  10. Upper bound of 0.28 eV on neutrino masses from the largest photometric redshift survey.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shaun A; Abdalla, Filipe B; Lahav, Ofer

    2010-07-16

    We present a new limit of ∑m(v) ≤ 0.28 (95% CL) on the sum of the neutrino masses assuming a flat ΛCDM cosmology. This relaxes slightly to ∑m(ν) ≤ 0.34 and ∑m(v) ≤ 0.47 when quasinonlinear scales are removed and w≠ -1, respectively. These are derived from a new photometric catalogue of over 700,000 luminous red galaxies (MegaZ DR7) with a volume of 3.3  (Gpc h(-1))(3) and redshift range 0.45 < z < 0.65. The data are combined with WMAP 5-year CMB, baryon acoustic oscillations, supernovae, and a Hubble Space Telescope prior on h. When combined with WMAP these data are as constraining as adding all supernovae and baryon oscillation data available. The upper limit is one of the tightest constraints on the neutrino from cosmology or particle physics. Further, if these bounds hold, they all predict that current-to-next generation neutrino experiments, such as KATRIN, are unlikely to obtain a detection.

  11. Gradient-dependent upper bound for the exchange-correlation energy and application to density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Lucian A.; Terentjevs, Aleksandrs; Della Sala, Fabio; Fabiano, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    We propose a simple gradient-dependent bound for the exchange-correlation energy (sLL), based on the recent nonlocal bound derived by Lewin and Lieb. We show that sLL is equivalent to the original Lieb-Oxford bound in rapidly varying density cases, but it is tighter for slowly varying density systems. To show the utility of the sLL bound we apply it to the construction of simple semilocal and nonlocal exchange and correlation functionals. In both cases improved results, with respect to the use of Lieb-Oxford bound, are obtained, showing the power of the sLL bound.

  12. The upper bound to the Relative Reporting Ratio—a measure of the impact of the violation of hidden assumptions underlying some disproportionality methods used in signal detection

    PubMed Central

    Van Holle, Lionel; Bauchau, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Purpose For disproportionality measures based on the Relative Reporting Ratio (RRR) such as the Information Component (IC) and the Empirical Bayesian Geometrical Mean (EBGM), each product and event is assumed to represent a negligible fraction of the spontaneous report database (SRD). Here, we provide the tools for allowing signal detection experts to assess the consequence of the violation of this assumption on their specific SRD. Methods For each product–event pair (P–E), a worst-case scenario associated all the reported events-of-interest with the product of interest. The values of the RRR under this scenario were measured for different sets of stratification factors using the GlaxoSmithKline vaccines SRD. These values represent the RRR upper bound that RRR cannot exceed whatever the true strength of association. Results Depending on the choice of stratification factors, the RRR could not exceed an upper bound of 2 for up to 2.4% of the P–Es. For Engerix™, 23.4% of all reports in the SDR, the RRR could not exceed an upper bound of 2 for up to 13.8% of pairs. For the P–E Rotarix™-Intussusception, the choice of stratification factors impacted the upper bound to RRR: from 52.5 for an unstratified RRR to 2.0 for a fully stratified RRR. Conclusions The quantification of the upper bound can indicate whether measures such as EBGM, IC, or RRR can be used for SRD for which products or events represent a non-negligible fraction of the entire SRD. In addition, at the level of the product or P–E, it can also highlight detrimental impact of overstratification. © 2014 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24395594

  13. Absolute quantification of the total and antidrug antibody-bound concentrations of recombinant human α-glucosidase in human plasma using protein G extraction and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Bronsema, Kees J; Bischoff, Rainer; Pijnappel, W W M Pim; van der Ploeg, Ans T; van de Merbel, Nico C

    2015-04-21

    The administration of protein-based pharmaceuticals can cause the in vivo formation of antidrug antibodies (ADAs), which may reduce the efficacy of the therapy by binding to the protein drug. An accurate determination of the total and ADA-bound concentrations of the drug gives information on the extent of this immune response and its consequences and may help develop improved therapeutic regimens. We present an absolute quantitative method to differentiate between total, free, and ADA-bound drug for recombinant human alpha acid glucosidase (rhGAA) in plasma from patients suffering from Pompe's disease. LC-MS/MS quantification of a signature peptide after trypsin digestion of plasma samples before and after an extraction of the total IgG content of plasma with protein G coated beads was used to determine the total and the ADA-bound fractions of rhGAA in samples from Pompe patients after enzyme infusion. The methods for total and ADA-bound rhGAA allow quantitation of the drug in the range of 0.5 to 500 μg/mL using 20 μL of plasma and met the regular bioanalytical validation requirements, both in the absence and presence of high levels of anti-rhGAA antibodies. This demonstrates that the ADA-bound rhGAA fraction can be accurately and precisely determined and is not influenced by sample dilution, repeated freezing and thawing, or extended benchtop or frozen storage. In samples from a patient with a reduced response to therapy due to ADAs, high ADA-bound concentrations of rhGAA were found, while in the samples from a patient lacking ADAs, no significant ADA-bound concentrations were found. Since protein G captures the complete IgG content of plasma, including all antidrug antibodies, the described extraction approach is universally applicable for the quantification of ADA-bound concentrations of all non-IgG-based biopharmaceuticals.

  14. Parameter sets for upper and lower bounds on soil-to-indoor-air contaminant attenuation predicted by the Johnson and Ettinger vapor intrusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillman, Fred D.; Weaver, James W.

    Migration of volatile chemicals from the subsurface into overlying buildings is known as vapor intrusion (VI). Under certain circumstances, people living in homes above contaminated soil or ground water may be exposed to harmful levels of these vapors. A popular VI screening-level algorithm widely used in the United States, Canada and the UK to assess this potential risk is the "Johnson and Ettinger" (J&E) model. Concern exists over using the J&E model for deciding whether or not further action is necessary at sites, as many parameters are not routinely measured (or are un-measurable). Using EPA-recommended ranges of parameter values for nine soil-type/source depth combinations, input parameter sets were identified that correspond to bounding results of the J&E model. The results established the existence of generic upper and lower bound parameter sets for maximum and minimum exposure for all soil types and depths investigated. Using the generic upper and lower bound parameter sets, an analysis can be performed that, given the limitations of the input ranges and the model, bounds the attenuation factor in a VI investigation.

  15. Upper bounds on FST in terms of the frequency of the most frequent allele and total homozygosity: the case of a specified number of alleles.

    PubMed

    Edge, Michael D; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2014-11-01

    FST is one of the most frequently-used indices of genetic differentiation among groups. Though FST takes values between 0 and 1, authors going back to Wright have noted that under many circumstances, FST is constrained to be less than 1. Recently, we showed that at a genetic locus with an unspecified number of alleles, FST for two subpopulations is strictly bounded from above by functions of both the frequency of the most frequent allele (M) and the homozygosity of the total population (HT). In the two-subpopulation case, FST can equal one only when the frequency of the most frequent allele and the total homozygosity are 1/2. Here, we extend this work by deriving strict bounds on FST for two subpopulations when the number of alleles at the locus is specified to be I. We show that restricting to I alleles produces the same upper bound on FST over much of the allowable domain for M and HT, and we derive more restrictive bounds in the windows M∈[1/I,1/(I-1)) and HT∈[1/I,I/(I(2)-1)). These results extend our understanding of the behavior of FST in relation to other population-genetic statistics.

  16. Negative absolute temperature for mobile particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Simon; Ronzheimer, Philipp; Schreiber, Michael; Hodgman, Sean; Bloch, Immanuel; Schneider, Ulrich

    2013-05-01

    Absolute temperature is usually bound to be strictly positive. However, negative absolute temperature states, where the occupation probability of states increases with their energy, are possible in systems with an upper energy bound. So far, such states have only been demonstrated in localized spin systems with finite, discrete spectra. We realized a negative absolute temperature state for motional degrees of freedom with ultracold bosonic 39K atoms in an optical lattice, by implementing the attractive Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. This new state strikingly revealed itself by a quasimomentum distribution that is peaked at maximum kinetic energy. The measured kinetic energy distribution and the extracted negative temperature indicate that the ensemble is close to degeneracy, with coherence over several lattice sites. The state is as stable as a corresponding positive temperature state: The negative temperature stabilizes the system against mean-field collapse driven by negative pressure. Negative temperatures open up new parameter regimes for cold atoms, enabling fundamentally new many-body states. Additionally, they give rise to several counterintuitive effects such as heat engines with above unity efficiency.

  17. Determination of the upper and lower bound of the mass limit of degenerate fermionic dark matter objects

    SciTech Connect

    Kupi, Gabor

    2008-01-15

    We give a gravitational upper limit for the mass of static degenerate fermionic dark matter objects. The treatment we use includes fully relativistic equations for describing the static solutions of these objects. We study the influence of the annihilation of the particles on this mass limit. We give the change of its value over the age of the Universe with annihilation cross sections relevant for such fermions constituting the dark matter. Our calculations take into account the possibility of Dirac as well Majorana spinors.

  18. ON A SUFFICIENT CONDITION FOR ABSOLUTE CONTINUITY.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The formulation of a condition which yields absolute continuity when combined with continuity and bounded variation is the problem considered in the...Briefly, the formulation is achieved through a discussion which develops a proof by contradiction of a sufficiently theorem for absolute continuity which uses in its hypothesis the condition of continuity and bounded variation .

  19. Acceleration of type 2 spicules in the solar chromosphere. II. Viscous braking and upper bounds on coronal energy input

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Michael L.

    2014-04-20

    A magnetohydrodynamic model is used to determine conditions under which the Lorentz force accelerates plasma to type 2 spicule speeds in the chromosphere. The model generalizes a previous model to include a more realistic pre-spicule state, and the vertical viscous force. Two cases of acceleration under upper chromospheric conditions are considered. The magnetic field strength for these cases is ≤12.5 and 25 G. Plasma is accelerated to terminal vertical speeds of 66 and 78 km s{sup –1} in 100 s, compared with 124 and 397 km s{sup –1} for the case of zero viscosity. The flows are localized within horizontal diameters ∼80 and 50 km. The total thermal energy generated by viscous dissipation is ∼10 times larger than that due to Joule dissipation, but the magnitude of the total cooling due to rarefaction is ≳ this energy. Compressive heating dominates during the early phase of acceleration. The maximum energy injected into the corona by type 2 spicules, defined as the energy flux in the upper chromosphere, may largely balance total coronal energy losses in quiet regions, possibly also in coronal holes, but not in active regions. It is proposed that magnetic flux emergence in intergranular regions drives type 2 spicules.

  20. Upper Bounds on r-Mode Amplitudes from Observations of Low-Mass X-Ray Binary Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahmoodifar, Simin; Strohmayer, Tod

    2013-01-01

    We present upper limits on the amplitude of r-mode oscillations and gravitational-radiation-induced spin-down rates in low-mass X-ray binary neutron stars, under the assumption that the quiescent neutron star luminosity is powered by dissipation from a steady-state r-mode. For masses <2M solar mass we find dimensionless r-mode amplitudes in the range from about 1×10(exp-8) to 1.5×10(exp-6). For the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar sources with known quiescent spin-down rates, these limits suggest that approx. less than 1% of the observed rate can be due to an unstable r-mode. Interestingly, the source with the highest amplitude limit, NGC 6440, could have an r-mode spin-down rate comparable to the observed, quiescent rate for SAX J1808-3658. Thus, quiescent spin-down measurements for this source would be particularly interesting. For all sources considered here, our amplitude limits suggest that gravitational wave signals are likely too weak for detection with Advanced LIGO. Our highest mass model (2.21M solar mass) can support enhanced, direct Urca neutrino emission in the core and thus can have higher r-mode amplitudes. Indeed, the inferred r-mode spin-down rates at these higher amplitudes are inconsistent with the observed spin-down rates for some of the sources, such as IGR J00291+5934 and XTE J1751-305. In the absence of other significant sources of internal heat, these results could be used to place an upper limit on the masses of these sources if they were made of hadronic matter, or alternatively it could be used to probe the existence of exotic matter in them if their masses were known.

  1. Kinetic instability, symmetry breaking and role of geometric constraints on the upper bounds of disorder in two dimensional packings

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Raj; Das, Shreeja; Nussinov, Zohar; Sahu, Kisor K.

    2016-01-01

    Although the energetics of grain boundaries are more or less understood, their mechanical description remains challenging primarily because of very fast dynamics in the atomic length scale. By contrast, granular dynamics are extraordinarily sluggish. In this study, two dimensional centripetal packings of macroscopic granular particles are employed to investigate the role of geometric aspects of grain boundary formation. Using a novel sampling scheme, the extensive configuration space is well represented by a few prominent structures. Our results suggest that cohesive effects “iron out” any disorder present and enforce a transition towards a “fixed point” basin associated with a universal high density jammed hexagonal structure. Two main conjectures are advanced: (i) the appearance of grain boundary like structures is the manifestation of the kinetic instabilities of the densification process and has its origin in the structural rearrangement and (ii) the departure from six-fold coordination in the final packing is bounded from above by a sixth of the angular dispersion present in the initial configuration. If similar predictive consequences are further developed for three dimensional cases, this may have far reaching consequences in many areas of science and technology. PMID:27245111

  2. Absolute Zero

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell J.; Sheibley, D.; Belloni, M.; Stamper-Kurn, D.; Vinen, W. F.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Zero is a two hour PBS special attempting to bring to the general public some of the advances made in 400 years of thermodynamics. It is based on the book “Absolute Zero and the Conquest of Cold” by Tom Shachtman. Absolute Zero will call long-overdue attention to the remarkable strides that have been made in low-temperature physics, a field that has produced 27 Nobel Prizes. It will explore the ongoing interplay between science and technology through historical examples including refrigerators, ice machines, frozen foods, liquid oxygen and nitrogen as well as much colder fluids such as liquid hydrogen and liquid helium. A website has been established to promote the series: www.absolutezerocampaign.org. It contains information on the series, aimed primarily at students at the middle school level. There is a wealth of material here and we hope interested teachers will draw their student’s attention to this website and its substantial contents, which have been carefully vetted for accuracy.

  3. Evidence for an allocyclic origin of marine strata bounding the Upper Carboniferous Mary Lee coal zone, Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Gastaldo, R.A. . Dept. of Geology); Demko, T.M. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Black Warrior Basin, a triangular foreland basin of Carboniferous age, is located at the southern end of the Appalachian orogen. A southwestward wedge of Mississippian and Lower Pennsylvanian sedimentary rocks occurs in the basin. The generally accepted model for basin-fill involves the progradation of a single delta, or multiple deltas (the Pottsville Formation), over an offshore carbonate bank (the Bangor Limestone). The Pottsville Formation is typical of Euramerican Carboniferous strata and is composed of the cyclical alternation of marine and terrestrial facies. The deposition of marine facies overlying terrestrial facies has been interpreted to have been the result of delta lobe switching and the compaction of underlying sediments, hence, autocyclic processes. Sedimentological features associated with the marine strata bounding the Mary Lee coal zone, the informal Jagger bedrock sandstone below and the Morris Shale above, are not indicative of circumstances generated by autocyclic processes. Rather, the marine strata highlight features resulting from allocyclic processes. The Jagger bedrock sandstone is a thick (> 15 m) sublitharenite interpreted as representing subtidal, shore-parallel bars. It is a sandstone body that was stranded on the shoreline during regional regression. The terrestrial coal-bearing strata are truncated by an erosional surface, marking the base of the Morris Shale. This ravinement surface is overlain by a ravinement bed representing a substrate developed by regional transgressive erosion that was subsequently colonized by open-marine macroinvertebrates. The ravinement bed is interpreted as a condensed section that accumulated under maximum water depth. Both of these features are indicative of development in response to extrinsic causes rather than intrinsic ones.

  4. Absolute Summ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Alfred, Jr.

    Summ means the entirety of the multiverse. It seems clear, from the inflation theories of A. Guth and others, that the creation of many universes is plausible. We argue that Absolute cosmological ideas, not unlike those of I. Newton, may be consistent with dynamic multiverse creations. As suggested in W. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, and with the Anthropic Principle defended by S. Hawking, et al., human consciousness, buttressed by findings of neuroscience, may have to be considered in our models. Predictability, as A. Einstein realized with Invariants and General Relativity, may be required for new ideas to be part of physics. We present here a two postulate model geared to an Absolute Summ. The seedbed of this work is part of Akhnaton's philosophy (see S. Freud, Moses and Monotheism). Most important, however, is that the structure of human consciousness, manifest in Kenya's Rift Valley 200,000 years ago as Homo sapiens, who were the culmination of the six million year co-creation process of Hominins and Nature in Africa, allows us to do the physics that we do. .

  5. Absolute Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartig, George

    1990-12-01

    The absolute sensitivity of the FOS will be determined in SV by observing 2 stars at 3 epochs, first in 3 apertures (1.0", 0.5", and 0.3" circular) and then in 1 aperture (1.0" circular). In cycle 1, one star, BD+28D4211 will be observed in the 1.0" aperture to establish the stability of the sensitivity and flat field characteristics and improve the accuracy obtained in SV. This star will also be observed through the paired apertures since these are not calibrated in SV. The stars will be observed in most detector/grating combinations. The data will be averaged to form the inverse sensitivity functions required by RSDP.

  6. Absolute continuity on paths of spatial open discrete mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golberg, Anatoly; Sevost'yanov, Evgeny

    2016-12-01

    We prove that open discrete mappings of Sobolev classes W_loc^{1, p}, p>n-1, with locally integrable inner dilatations admit ACP_p^{ -1} -property, which means that these mappings are absolutely continuous on almost all preimage paths with respect to p-module. In particular, our results extend the well-known Poletskiĭ lemma for quasiregular mappings. We also establish the upper bounds for p-module of such mappings in terms of integrals depending on the inner dilatations and arbitrary admissible functions.

  7. Froissart bound on inelastic cross section without unknown constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, André; Roy, S. M.

    2015-04-01

    Assuming that axiomatic local field theory results hold for hadron scattering, André Martin and S. M. Roy recently obtained absolute bounds on the D wave below threshold for pion-pion scattering and thereby determined the scale of the logarithm in the Froissart bound on total cross sections in terms of pion mass only. Previously, Martin proved a rigorous upper bound on the inelastic cross-section σinel which is one-fourth of the corresponding upper bound on σtot, and Wu, Martin, Roy and Singh improved the bound by adding the constraint of a given σtot. Here we use unitarity and analyticity to determine, without any high-energy approximation, upper bounds on energy-averaged inelastic cross sections in terms of low-energy data in the crossed channel. These are Froissart-type bounds without any unknown coefficient or unknown scale factors and can be tested experimentally. Alternatively, their asymptotic forms, together with the Martin-Roy absolute bounds on pion-pion D waves below threshold, yield absolute bounds on energy-averaged inelastic cross sections. For example, for π0π0 scattering, defining σinel=σtot-(σπ0π0→π0π0+σπ0π0→π+π-) , we show that for c.m. energy √{s }→∞, σ¯ inel(s ,∞)≡s ∫s∞d s'σinel(s')/s'2≤(π /4 )(mπ)-2[ln (s /s1)+(1 /2 )ln ln (s /s1)+1 ]2 where 1 /s1=34 π √{2 π }mπ-2 . This bound is asymptotically one-fourth of the corresponding Martin-Roy bound on the total cross section, and the scale factor s1 is one-fourth of the scale factor in the total cross section bound. The average over the interval (s,2s) of the inelastic π0π0 cross section has a bound of the same form with 1 /s1 replaced by 1 /s2=2 /s1.

  8. OBSERVATIONAL UPPER BOUND ON THE COSMIC ABUNDANCES OF NEGATIVE-MASS COMPACT OBJECTS AND ELLIS WORMHOLES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY QUASAR LENS SEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Ryuichi; Asada, Hideki

    2013-05-01

    The latest result in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search (SQLS) has set the first cosmological constraints on negative-mass compact objects and Ellis wormholes. There are no multiple images lensed by the above two exotic objects for {approx}50, 000 distant quasars in the SQLS data. Therefore, an upper bound is put on the cosmic abundances of these lenses. The number density of negative-mass compact objects is n < 10{sup -8}(10{sup -4}) h {sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} at the mass scale |M| > 10{sup 15}(10{sup 12}) M{sub Sun }, which corresponds to the cosmological density parameter |{Omega}| < 10{sup -4} at the galaxy and cluster mass range |M| = 10{sup 12-15} M{sub Sun }. The number density of the Ellis wormhole is n < 10{sup -4} h {sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} for a range of the throat radius a = 10-10{sup 4} pc, which is much smaller than the Einstein ring radius.

  9. Multiple test procedures using an upper bound of the number of true hypotheses and their use for evaluating high-dimensional EEG data.

    PubMed

    Hemmelmann, Claudia; Ziegler, Andreas; Guiard, Volker; Weiss, Sabine; Walther, Mario; Vollandt, Rüdiger

    2008-05-15

    Frequency analyses of EEG data yield large data sets, which are high-dimensional and have to be evaluated statistically without a large number of false positive statements. There exist several methods to deal with this problem in multiple comparisons. Knowing the number of true hypotheses increases the power of some multiple test procedures, however the number of true hypotheses is unknown, in general, and must be estimated. In this paper, we derive two new multiple test procedures by using an upper bound for the number of true hypotheses. Our first procedure controls the generalized family-wise error rate, and thus is an improvement of the step-down procedure of Hommel and Hoffmann [Hommel G., Hoffmann T. Controlled uncertainty. In: Bauer P. Hommel G. Sonnemann E., editors. Multiple Hypotheses Testing, Heidelberg: Springer 1987;ISBN 3540505598:p. 154-61]. The second new procedure controls the false discovery proportion and improves upon the approach of Lehmann and Romano [Lehmann E.L., Romano J.P. Generalizations of the familywise error rate. Ann. Stat. 2005;33:1138-54]. By Monte-Carlo simulations, we show how the gain in power depends upon the accuracy of the estimate of the number of true hypotheses. The gain in power of our procedures is demonstrated in an example using EEG data on the processing of memorized lexical items.

  10. Mixed Multifractal Analysis for Functions: General Upper Bound and Optimal Results for Vectors of Self-Similar or Quasi-Self of Functions and Their Superpositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Slimane, Mourad; Ben Mabrouk, Anouar; Aouidi, Jamil

    2016-08-01

    Mixed multifractal analysis for functions studies the Hölder pointwise behavior of more than one single function. For a vector F = (f1,…,fL) of L functions, with L ≥ 2, we are interested in the mixed Hölder spectrum, which is the Hausdorff dimension of the set of points for which each function fl has exactly a given value αl of pointwise Hölder regularity. We will conjecture a formula which relates the mixed Hölder spectrum to some mixed averaged wavelet quantities of F. We will prove an upper bound valid for any vector of uniform Hölder functions. Then we will prove the validity of the conjecture for self-similar vectors of functions, quasi-self-similar vectors and their superpositions. These functions are written as the superposition of similar structures at different scales, reminiscent of some possible modelization of turbulence or cascade models. Their expressions look also like wavelet decompositions.

  11. Approach to calculating upper bounds on maximum individual doses from the use of contaminated well water following a WIPP repository breach. Report EEG-9

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegler, P.

    1981-09-01

    As part of the assessment of the potential radiological consequences of the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), this report evaluates the post-closure radiation dose commitments associated with a possible breach event which involves dissolution of the repository by groundwaters and subsequent transport of the nuclear waste through an aquifer to a well assumed to exist at a point 3 miles downstream from the repository. The concentrations of uranium and plutonium isotopes at the well are based on the nuclear waste inventory presently proposed for WIPP and basic assumptions concerning the transport of waste as well as treatment to reduce the salinity of the water. The concentrations of U-233, Pu-239, and Pu-240, all radionuclides originally emplaced as waste in the repository, would exceed current EPA drinking water limits. The concentrations of U-234, U-235, and U-236, all decay products of plutonium isotopes originally emplaced as waste, would be well below current EPA drinking water limits. The 50-year dose commitments from one year of drinking treated water contaminated with U-233 or Pu-239 and Pu-240 were found to be comparable to a one-year dose from natural background. The 50-year dose commitments from one year of drinking milk would be no more than about 1/5 the dose obtained from ingestion of treated water. These doses are considered upper bounds because of several very conservative assumptions which are discussed in the report.

  12. Bounding the bias of contrastive divergence learning.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Asja; Igel, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Optimization based on k-step contrastive divergence (CD) has become a common way to train restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs). The k-step CD is a biased estimator of the log-likelihood gradient relying on Gibbs sampling. We derive a new upper bound for this bias. Its magnitude depends on k, the number of variables in the RBM, and the maximum change in energy that can be produced by changing a single variable. The last reflects the dependence on the absolute values of the RBM parameters. The magnitude of the bias is also affected by the distance in variation between the modeled distribution and the starting distribution of the Gibbs chain.

  13. Upper bounds on ɛ'/ ɛ parameters B 6 (1/2) and B 8 (3/2) from large N QCD and other news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buras, Andrzej J.; Gérard, Jean-Marc

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that in the large N approach developed by the authors in collaboration with Bardeen, the parameters B 6 (1/2) and B 8 (3/2) parametrizing the K → ππ matrix elements < Q 6>0 and < Q 8>2 of the dominant QCD and electroweak operators receive both negative O(1/N) corrections such that B 6 (1/2) ≤ B 8 (3/2) < 1 in agreement with the recent lattice results of the RBC-UKQCD collaboration. We also point out that the pattern of the size of the hadronic matrix elements of all QCD and electroweak penguin operators Q i contributing to the K → ππ amplitudes A 0 and A 2, obtained by this lattice collaboration, provides further support to our large N approach. In particular, the lattice result for the matrix element < Q 8>0 implies for the corresponding parameter B 8 (1/2) = 1.0 ± 0.2 to be compared with large N value B 8 (1/2) = 1.1 ± 0.1. We discuss briefly the implications of these findings for the ratio ɛ' /ɛ. In fact, with the precise value for B 8 (3/2) from RBC-UKQCD collaboration, our upper bound on B 6 (1/2) implies ɛ' /ɛ in the SM roughly by a factor of two below its experimental value (16 .6± 2 .3) × 10-4. We also briefly comment on the parameter {widehat{B}}_K and the Δ I = 1 /2 rule.

  14. Physical Uncertainty Bounds (PUB)

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, Diane Elizabeth; Preston, Dean L.

    2015-03-19

    This paper introduces and motivates the need for a new methodology for determining upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulations of engineered systems due to limited fidelity in the composite continuum-level physics models needed to simulate the systems. We show that traditional uncertainty quantification methods provide, at best, a lower bound on this uncertainty. We propose to obtain bounds on the simulation uncertainties by first determining bounds on the physical quantities or processes relevant to system performance. By bounding these physics processes, as opposed to carrying out statistical analyses of the parameter sets of specific physics models or simply switching out the available physics models, one can obtain upper bounds on the uncertainties in simulated quantities of interest.

  15. Allostratigraphy of the U.S. middle Atlantic continental margin; characteristics, distribution, and depositional history of principal unconformity-bounded upper Cretaceous and Cenozoic sedimentary units

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C. Wylie; Ward, Lauck W.

    1993-01-01

    Publication of Volumes 93 and 95 ('The New Jersey Transect') of the Deep Sea Drilling Project's Initial Reports completed a major phase of geological and geophysical research along the middle segment of the U. S. Atlantic continental margin. Relying heavily on data from these and related published records, we have integrated outcrop, borehole, and seismic-reflection data from this large area (500,000 km^2 ) to define the regional allostratigraphic framework for Upper Cretaceous and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks. The framework consists of 12 alloformations, which record the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic depositional history of the contiguous Baltimore Canyon trough (including its onshore margin) and Hatteras basin (northern part). We propose stratotype sections for each alloformation and present a regional allostratigraphic reference section, which crosses these basins from the inner edge of the coastal plain to the inner edge of the abyssal plain. Selected supplementary reference sections on the coastal plain allow observation of the alloformations and their bounding unconformities in outcrop. Our analyses show that sediment supply and its initial dispersal on the middle segment of the U. S. Atlantic margin have been governed, in large part, by hinterland tectonism and subsequently have been modified by paleoclimate, sea-level changes, and oceanic current systems. Notable events in the Late Cretaceous to Holocene sedimentary evolution of this margin include (1) development of continental-rise depocenters in the northern part of the Hatteras basin during the Late Cretaceous; (2) the appear ance of a dual shelf-edge system, a marked decline in siliciclastic sediment accumulation rates, and widespread acceleration of carbonate production during high sea levels of the Paleogene; (3) rapid deposition and progradation of thick terrigenous delta complexes and development of abyssal depocenters during the middle Miocene to Quaternary interval; and (4) deep incision of the

  16. Teaching Absolute Value Meaningfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Angela

    2012-01-01

    What is the meaning of absolute value? And why do teachers teach students how to solve absolute value equations? Absolute value is a concept introduced in first-year algebra and then reinforced in later courses. Various authors have suggested instructional methods for teaching absolute value to high school students (Wei 2005; Stallings-Roberts…

  17. Automatic section thickness determination using an absolute gradient focus function.

    PubMed

    Elozory, D T; Kramer, K A; Chaudhuri, B; Bonam, O P; Goldgof, D B; Hall, L O; Mouton, P R

    2012-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of microstructures using computerized stereology systems is an essential tool in many disciplines of bioscience research. Section thickness determination in current nonautomated approaches requires manual location of upper and lower surfaces of tissue sections. In contrast to conventional autofocus functions that locate the optimally focused optical plane using the global maximum on a focus curve, this study identified by two sharp 'knees' on the focus curve as the transition from unfocused to focused optical planes. Analysis of 14 grey-scale focus functions showed, the thresholded absolute gradient function, was best for finding detectable bends that closely correspond to the bounding optical planes at the upper and lower tissue surfaces. Modifications to this function generated four novel functions that outperformed the original. The 'modified absolute gradient count' function outperformed all others with an average error of 0.56 μm on a test set of images similar to the training set; and, an average error of 0.39 μm on a test set comprised of images captured from a different case, that is, different staining methods on a different brain region from a different subject rat. We describe a novel algorithm that allows for automatic section thickness determination based on just out-of-focus planes, a prerequisite for fully automatic computerized stereology.

  18. Estimating Upper Bounds for Occupancy and Number of Manatees in Areas Potentially Affected by Oil from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Julien; Edwards, Holly H.; Bled, Florent; Fonnesbeck, Christopher J.; Dupuis, Jérôme A.; Gardner, Beth; Koslovsky, Stacie M.; Aven, Allen M.; Ward-Geiger, Leslie I.; Carmichael, Ruth H.; Fagan, Daniel E.; Ross, Monica A.; Reinert, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The explosion of the Deepwater Horizon drilling platform created the largest marine oil spill in U.S. history. As part of the Natural Resource Damage Assessment process, we applied an innovative modeling approach to obtain upper estimates for occupancy and for number of manatees in areas potentially affected by the oil spill. Our data consisted of aerial survey counts in waters of the Florida Panhandle, Alabama and Mississippi. Our method, which uses a Bayesian approach, allows for the propagation of uncertainty associated with estimates from empirical data and from the published literature. We illustrate that it is possible to derive estimates of occupancy rate and upper estimates of the number of manatees present at the time of sampling, even when no manatees were observed in our sampled plots during surveys. We estimated that fewer than 2.4% of potentially affected manatee habitat in our Florida study area may have been occupied by manatees. The upper estimate for the number of manatees present in potentially impacted areas (within our study area) was estimated with our model to be 74 (95%CI 46 to 107). This upper estimate for the number of manatees was conditioned on the upper 95%CI value of the occupancy rate. In other words, based on our estimates, it is highly probable that there were 107 or fewer manatees in our study area during the time of our surveys. Because our analyses apply to habitats considered likely manatee habitats, our inference is restricted to these sites and to the time frame of our surveys. Given that manatees may be hard to see during aerial surveys, it was important to account for imperfect detection. The approach that we described can be useful for determining the best allocation of resources for monitoring and conservation. PMID:24670971

  19. Estimating upper bounds for occupancy and number of manatees in areas potentially affected by oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Martin, Julien; Edwards, Holly H; Bled, Florent; Fonnesbeck, Christopher J; Dupuis, Jérôme A; Gardner, Beth; Koslovsky, Stacie M; Aven, Allen M; Ward-Geiger, Leslie I; Carmichael, Ruth H; Fagan, Daniel E; Ross, Monica A; Reinert, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    The explosion of the Deepwater Horizon drilling platform created the largest marine oil spill in U.S. history. As part of the Natural Resource Damage Assessment process, we applied an innovative modeling approach to obtain upper estimates for occupancy and for number of manatees in areas potentially affected by the oil spill. Our data consisted of aerial survey counts in waters of the Florida Panhandle, Alabama and Mississippi. Our method, which uses a Bayesian approach, allows for the propagation of uncertainty associated with estimates from empirical data and from the published literature. We illustrate that it is possible to derive estimates of occupancy rate and upper estimates of the number of manatees present at the time of sampling, even when no manatees were observed in our sampled plots during surveys. We estimated that fewer than 2.4% of potentially affected manatee habitat in our Florida study area may have been occupied by manatees. The upper estimate for the number of manatees present in potentially impacted areas (within our study area) was estimated with our model to be 74 (95%CI 46 to 107). This upper estimate for the number of manatees was conditioned on the upper 95%CI value of the occupancy rate. In other words, based on our estimates, it is highly probable that there were 107 or fewer manatees in our study area during the time of our surveys. Because our analyses apply to habitats considered likely manatee habitats, our inference is restricted to these sites and to the time frame of our surveys. Given that manatees may be hard to see during aerial surveys, it was important to account for imperfect detection. The approach that we described can be useful for determining the best allocation of resources for monitoring and conservation.

  20. Robust control design with real parameter uncertainty using absolute stability theory. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    How, Jonathan P.; Hall, Steven R.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate an extension of mu theory for robust control design by considering systems with linear and nonlinear real parameter uncertainties. In the process, explicit connections are made between mixed mu and absolute stability theory. In particular, it is shown that the upper bounds for mixed mu are a generalization of results from absolute stability theory. Both state space and frequency domain criteria are developed for several nonlinearities and stability multipliers using the wealth of literature on absolute stability theory and the concepts of supply rates and storage functions. The state space conditions are expressed in terms of Riccati equations and parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions. For controller synthesis, these stability conditions are used to form an overbound of the H2 performance objective. A geometric interpretation of the equivalent frequency domain criteria in terms of off-axis circles clarifies the important role of the multiplier and shows that both the magnitude and phase of the uncertainty are considered. A numerical algorithm is developed to design robust controllers that minimize the bound on an H2 cost functional and satisfy an analysis test based on the Popov stability multiplier. The controller and multiplier coefficients are optimized simultaneously, which avoids the iteration and curve-fitting procedures required by the D-K procedure of mu synthesis. Several benchmark problems and experiments on the Middeck Active Control Experiment at M.I.T. demonstrate that these controllers achieve good robust performance and guaranteed stability bounds.

  1. Negative absolute temperature for motional degrees of freedom.

    PubMed

    Braun, S; Ronzheimer, J P; Schreiber, M; Hodgman, S S; Rom, T; Bloch, I; Schneider, U

    2013-01-04

    Absolute temperature is usually bound to be positive. Under special conditions, however, negative temperatures-in which high-energy states are more occupied than low-energy states-are also possible. Such states have been demonstrated in localized systems with finite, discrete spectra. Here, we prepared a negative temperature state for motional degrees of freedom. By tailoring the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian, we created an attractively interacting ensemble of ultracold bosons at negative temperature that is stable against collapse for arbitrary atom numbers. The quasimomentum distribution develops sharp peaks at the upper band edge, revealing thermal equilibrium and bosonic coherence over several lattice sites. Negative temperatures imply negative pressures and open up new parameter regimes for cold atoms, enabling fundamentally new many-body states.

  2. Constraining absolute neutrino masses via detection of galactic supernova neutrinos at JUNO

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jia-Shu; Cao, Jun; Li, Yu-Feng; Zhou, Shun E-mail: caoj@ihep.ac.cn E-mail: zhoush@ihep.ac.cn

    2015-05-01

    A high-statistics measurement of the neutrinos from a galactic core-collapse supernova is extremely important for understanding the explosion mechanism, and studying the intrinsic properties of neutrinos themselves. In this paper, we explore the possibility to constrain the absolute scale of neutrino masses m{sub ν} via the detection of galactic supernova neutrinos at the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) with a 20 kiloton liquid-scintillator detector. In assumption of a nearly-degenerate neutrino mass spectrum and a normal mass ordering, the upper bound on the absolute neutrino mass is found to be m{sub ν} < (0.83 ± 0.24) eV at the 95% confidence level for a typical galactic supernova at a distance of 10 kpc, where the mean value and standard deviation are shown to account for statistical fluctuations. For comparison, we find that the bound in the Super-Kamiokande experiment is m{sub ν} < (0.94 ± 0.28) eV at the same confidence level. However, the upper bound will be relaxed when the model parameters characterizing the time structure of supernova neutrino fluxes are not exactly known, and when the neutrino mass ordering is inverted.

  3. Constraining absolute neutrino masses via detection of galactic supernova neutrinos at JUNO

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jia-Shu; Cao, Jun; Li, Yu-Feng; Zhou, Shun

    2015-05-26

    A high-statistics measurement of the neutrinos from a galactic core-collapse supernova is extremely important for understanding the explosion mechanism, and studying the intrinsic properties of neutrinos themselves. In this paper, we explore the possibility to constrain the absolute scale of neutrino masses m{sub ν} via the detection of galactic supernova neutrinos at the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) with a 20 kiloton liquid-scintillator detector. In assumption of a nearly-degenerate neutrino mass spectrum and a normal mass ordering, the upper bound on the absolute neutrino mass is found to be m{sub ν}<(0.83±0.24) eV at the 95% confidence level for a typical galactic supernova at a distance of 10 kpc, where the mean value and standard deviation are shown to account for statistical fluctuations. For comparison, we find that the bound in the Super-Kamiokande experiment is m{sub ν}<(0.94±0.28) eV at the same confidence level. However, the upper bound will be relaxed when the model parameters characterizing the time structure of supernova neutrino fluxes are not exactly known, and when the neutrino mass ordering is inverted.

  4. High-resolution birefringence investigation of octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB): An upper bound on the discontinuity at the smectic-A to nematic phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetinkaya, M. C.; Yildiz, S.; Özbek, H.; Losada-Pérez, P.; Leys, J.; Thoen, J.

    2013-10-01

    We report optical birefringence data by two different methods with high temperature resolution for octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB) near the smectic-A to nematic (Sm-A-N) phase transition temperature TAN. Within the resolution of our experiments, we find that the Sm-A-N phase transition is continuous. For a possible discontinuity in the orientational order parameter S(T) at TAN, we arrive at an upper limit of 0.0002, which is substantially smaller than other estimates in literature, but consistent with the value of 0.00008 derived from the upper limit of the latent heat from high-resolution adiabatic scanning calorimetry (ASC), which is itself consistent with the Halperin-Lubensky-Ma theory. The temperature derivative of the order parameter exhibits a power law divergence with a critical exponent that is consistent with the value α=0.31±0.03 for the specific heat capacity obtained by ASC.

  5. An upper-bound on the discontinuity at the smectic A-nematic phase transition in octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB): A high-resolution birefringence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetinkaya, Mehmet Can; Yildiz, Sevtap; Ozbek, Haluk; Losada-Pérez, Patricia; Leys, Jan; Thoen, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Although the nematic-smectic A (N-Sm A) transition in liquid crystals (LCs) has been extensively studied, it is still quite controversial. Most theoretical studies predict that the transition should be of 3-dimensional (3D) XY type. However, the experimental results to date have not established a clear case of 3D XY universality. Halperin, Lubensky and Ma (HLM) predicted that the crossover should always make the N-Sm A transition first order with very small latent heats. HLM-type first order N-Sm A transitions has been evidenced by ASC data, but inconsistencies remain in reported discontinuity values. Of particular relevance is pure 8CB LC with an estimated HLM contribution substantially smaller than the upper limit for the latent heat from ASC. We carried out high-resolution birefringence measurements near the N-Sm Atransition of 8CB LC. We find that the Sm A- Nphase transition is continuous. For a possible discontinuity in the N order parameter S(T) at TAN we obtain an upper limit of 0.0002, which is consistent with the ASC latent upper limit and HLM theory. The temperature derivative of S(T) exhibits a power law divergence with a critical exponent that is consistent with α = 0.31 +/- 0.03 obtained from ASC.

  6. Length bounds for connecting discharges in triggered lightning subsequent strokes

    SciTech Connect

    Idone, V.P. )

    1990-11-20

    Highly time resolved streak recordings from nine subsequent strokes in four triggered flashes have been examined for evidence of the occurrence of upward connecting discharges. These photographic recordings were obtained with superior spatial and temporal resolution (0.3 m and 0.5 {lambda}s) and were examined with a video image analysis system to help delineate the separate leader and return stroke image tracks. Unfortunately, a definitive determination of the occurrence of connecting discharges in these strokes could not be made. The data did allow various determinations of an upper bound length for any possible connecting discharge in each stroke. Under the simplest analysis approach possible, an 'absolute' upper bound set of lengths was measured that ranged from 12 to 27 m with a mean of 19 m; two other more involved analyses yielded arguably better upper bound estimates of 8-18 m and 7-26 m with means of 19 m; two other more involved analyses yielded arguably better upper bound estimates of 8-18 m and 7-26 m with means of 12 and 13 m, respectively. An additional set of low time-resolution telephoto recordings of the lowest few meters of channel revealed six strokes in these flashes with one or more upward unconnected channels originating from the lightning rod tip. The maximum length of unconnected channel seen in each of these strokes ranged from 0.2 to 1.6 m with a mean of 0.7 m. This latter set of observations is interpreted as indirect evidence that connecting discharges did occur in these strokes and that the lower bound for their length is about 1 m.

  7. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  8. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  9. THE TAOS PROJECT: UPPER BOUNDS ON THE POPULATION OF SMALL KUIPER BELT OBJECTS AND TESTS OF MODELS OF FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, F. B.; Zhang, Z.-W.; King, S.-K.; Wang, J.-H.; Lee, T.; Lin, H.-C.; Lehner, M. J.; Mondal, S.; Giammarco, J.; Holman, M. J.; Alcock, C.; Coehlo, N. K.; Axelrod, T.; Byun, Y.-I.; Kim, D.-W.; Chen, W. P.; Cook, K. H.; Dave, R.; De Pater, I.; Lissauer, J. J.

    2010-04-15

    We have analyzed the first 3.75 years of data from the Taiwanese American Occultation Survey (TAOS). TAOS monitors bright stars to search for occultations by Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs). This data set comprises 5 x 10{sup 5} star hours of multi-telescope photometric data taken at 4 or 5 Hz. No events consistent with KBO occultations were found in this data set. We compute the number of events expected for the Kuiper Belt formation and evolution models of Pan and Sari, Kenyon and Bromley, Benavidez and Campo Bagatin, and Fraser. A comparison with the upper limits we derive from our data constrains the parameter space of these models. This is the first detailed comparison of models of the KBO size distribution with data from an occultation survey. Our results suggest that the KBO population is composed of objects with low internal strength and that planetary migration played a role in the shaping of the size distribution.

  10. A Priori Estimates for Fractional Nonlinear Degenerate Diffusion Equations on Bounded Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonforte, Matteo; Vázquez, Juan Luis

    2015-10-01

    We investigate quantitative properties of the nonnegative solutions to the nonlinear fractional diffusion equation, , posed in a bounded domain, , with m > 1 for t > 0. As we use one of the most common definitions of the fractional Laplacian , 0 < s < 1, in a bounded domain with zero Dirichlet boundary conditions. We consider a general class of very weak solutions of the equation, and obtain a priori estimates in the form of smoothing effects, absolute upper bounds, lower bounds, and Harnack inequalities. We also investigate the boundary behaviour and we obtain sharp estimates from above and below. In addition, we obtain similar estimates for fractional semilinear elliptic equations. Either the standard Laplacian case s = 1 or the linear case m = 1 are recovered as limits. The method is quite general, suitable to be applied to a number of similar problems.

  11. Limitations on upper bound dose to adults due to intake of 129I in drinking water and a total diet-implications relative to the proposed Yucca Mountain high level radioactive waste repository.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Dade W; Ryan, Michael T

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to comment on the potential annual doses due to the intake by adults of I, an important radionuclide in the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. An often overlooked, but significant, factor is that, in this case, the ground water, which would be the primary transport vehicle for any releases, contains relatively high concentrations of stable iodine (127I); in fact, the median concentration in the ground water in the vicinity of the proposed repository is 5.0 microg L-1. In comparison, the maximum concentration of 129I in the ground water, due to potential releases of 129I during the first 10,000 y following closure of the repository, is estimated to be approximately 3.7 x 10(-7) Bq L-1 (approximately 10(-5) pCi L-1). This would result in a 127I to 129I ratio in the water of almost 90 million to one. Assuming no other sources of these two isotopes were being consumed, this would place an upper bound on the annual committed thyroid dose of 1.2 x 10(-1) mSv (1.2 x 10(-1) mrem), less than one thousandth of the Ground Water Protection Standard of 4 mrem y-1. When the additional intake of stable and radioactive iodine in other components of the diet is considered, the overall ratio of 127I to 129I would be more than 2 billion to one. The would place an upper bound on the annual committed effective dose of approximately 2.5 x 10(-8) mSv (approximately 2.5 x 10(-6) mrem), less than one millionth of the Individual Protection Standard of 0.15 mSv (15 mrem).

  12. Bounds for Asian basket options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deelstra, Griselda; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vanmaele, Michèle

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we propose pricing bounds for European-style discrete arithmetic Asian basket options in a Black and Scholes framework. We start from methods used for basket options and Asian options. First, we use the general approach for deriving upper and lower bounds for stop-loss premia of sums of non-independent random variables as in Kaas et al. [Upper and lower bounds for sums of random variables, Insurance Math. Econom. 27 (2000) 151-168] or Dhaene et al. [The concept of comonotonicity in actuarial science and finance: theory, Insurance Math. Econom. 31(1) (2002) 3-33]. We generalize the methods in Deelstra et al. [Pricing of arithmetic basket options by conditioning, Insurance Math. Econom. 34 (2004) 55-57] and Vanmaele et al. [Bounds for the price of discrete sampled arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 185(1) (2006) 51-90]. Afterwards we show how to derive an analytical closed-form expression for a lower bound in the non-comonotonic case. Finally, we derive upper bounds for Asian basket options by applying techniques as in Thompson [Fast narrow bounds on the value of Asian options, Working Paper, University of Cambridge, 1999] and Lord [Partially exact and bounded approximations for arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Finance 10 (2) (2006) 1-52]. Numerical results are included and on the basis of our numerical tests, we explain which method we recommend depending on moneyness and time-to-maturity.

  13. Absolute and relative blindsight.

    PubMed

    Balsdon, Tarryn; Azzopardi, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The concept of relative blindsight, referring to a difference in conscious awareness between conditions otherwise matched for performance, was introduced by Lau and Passingham (2006) as a way of identifying the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC) in fMRI experiments. By analogy, absolute blindsight refers to a difference between performance and awareness regardless of whether it is possible to match performance across conditions. Here, we address the question of whether relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers can be accounted for by response bias. In our replication of Lau and Passingham's experiment, the relative blindsight effect was abolished when performance was assessed by means of a bias-free 2AFC task or when the criterion for awareness was varied. Furthermore, there was no evidence of either relative or absolute blindsight when both performance and awareness were assessed with bias-free measures derived from confidence ratings using signal detection theory. This suggests that both relative and absolute blindsight in normal observers amount to no more than variations in response bias in the assessment of performance and awareness. Consideration of the properties of psychometric functions reveals a number of ways in which relative and absolute blindsight could arise trivially and elucidates a basis for the distinction between Type 1 and Type 2 blindsight.

  14. Absolute neutrino mass scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelli, Silvia; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2013-04-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments firmly established non-vanishing neutrino masses, a result that can be regarded as a strong motivation to extend the Standard Model. In spite of being the lightest massive particles, neutrinos likely represent an important bridge to new physics at very high energies and offer new opportunities to address some of the current cosmological puzzles, such as the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and Dark Matter. In this context, the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale is a key issue within modern High Energy Physics. The talks in this parallel session well describe the current exciting experimental activity aiming to determining the absolute neutrino mass scale and offer an overview of a few models beyond the Standard Model that have been proposed in order to explain the neutrino masses giving a prediction for the absolute neutrino mass scale and solving the cosmological puzzles.

  15. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  16. Upward Bound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes an Upward Bound program at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University designed to assist disadvantaged high school juniors and seniors in overcoming academic deficiencies in order to enter and succeed in college. The Saturday program centered on various aspects of aviation, including career opportunities. (MLH)

  17. Outward Bound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outward Bound, Inc., Andover, MA.

    The Outward Bound concept was developed in Germany and Great Britain with the saving of human life as the ultimate goal. Courses are designed to help students discover their true physical and mental limits through development of skills including emergency medical aid, firefighting, search and rescue, mountaineering, and sailing. Five Outward Bound…

  18. Bounds on multipartite concurrence and tangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Ming; Li, Hongfang; Fei, Shao-Ming; Li-Jost, Xianqing

    2016-10-01

    We present an analytical lower bound of multipartite concurrence based on the generalized Bloch representations of density matrices. It is shown that the lower bound can be used as an effective entanglement witness of genuine multipartite entanglement. Tight lower and upper bounds for multipartite tangles are also derived. Since the lower bounds depend on just part of the correlation tensors, the result is experimentally feasible.

  19. Electronic Absolute Cartesian Autocollimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator performs the same basic optical function as does a conventional all-optical or a conventional electronic autocollimator but differs in the nature of its optical target and the manner in which the position of the image of the target is measured. The term absolute in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of the position measurement, which, unlike in a conventional electronic autocollimator, is based absolutely on the position of the image rather than on an assumed proportionality between the position and the levels of processed analog electronic signals. The term Cartesian in the name of this apparatus reflects the nature of its optical target. Figure 1 depicts the electronic functional blocks of an electronic absolute Cartesian autocollimator along with its basic optical layout, which is the same as that of a conventional autocollimator. Referring first to the optical layout and functions only, this or any autocollimator is used to measure the compound angular deviation of a flat datum mirror with respect to the optical axis of the autocollimator itself. The optical components include an illuminated target, a beam splitter, an objective or collimating lens, and a viewer or detector (described in more detail below) at a viewing plane. The target and the viewing planes are focal planes of the lens. Target light reflected by the datum mirror is imaged on the viewing plane at unit magnification by the collimating lens. If the normal to the datum mirror is parallel to the optical axis of the autocollimator, then the target image is centered on the viewing plane. Any angular deviation of the normal from the optical axis manifests itself as a lateral displacement of the target image from the center. The magnitude of the displacement is proportional to the focal length and to the magnitude (assumed to be small) of the angular deviation. The direction of the displacement is perpendicular to the axis about which the

  20. Absolute airborne gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Henri

    This work consists of a feasibility study of a first stage prototype airborne absolute gravimeter system. In contrast to relative systems, which are using spring gravimeters, the measurements acquired by absolute systems are uncorrelated and the instrument is not suffering from problems like instrumental drift, frequency response of the spring and possible variation of the calibration factor. The major problem we had to resolve were to reduce the influence of the non-gravitational accelerations included in the measurements. We studied two different approaches to resolve it: direct mechanical filtering, and post-processing digital compensation. The first part of the work describes in detail the different mechanical passive filters of vibrations, which were studied and tested in the laboratory and later in a small truck in movement. For these tests as well as for the airborne measurements an absolute gravimeter FG5-L from Micro-G Ltd was used together with an Inertial navigation system Litton-200, a vertical accelerometer EpiSensor, and GPS receivers for positioning. These tests showed that only the use of an optical table gives acceptable results. However, it is unable to compensate for the effects of the accelerations of the drag free chamber. The second part describes the strategy of the data processing. It is based on modeling the perturbing accelerations by means of GPS, EpiSensor and INS data. In the third part the airborne experiment is described in detail, from the mounting in the aircraft and data processing to the different problems encountered during the evaluation of the quality and accuracy of the results. In the part of data processing the different steps conducted from the raw apparent gravity data and the trajectories to the estimation of the true gravity are explained. A comparison between the estimated airborne data and those obtained by ground upward continuation at flight altitude allows to state that airborne absolute gravimetry is feasible and

  1. Consistent thermostatistics forbids negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hilbert, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, a considerable number of theories and experiments have claimed the existence of negative absolute temperature in spin systems and ultracold quantum gases. This has led to speculation that ultracold gases may be dark-energy analogues and also suggests the feasibility of heat engines with efficiencies larger than one. Here, we prove that all previous negative temperature claims and their implications are invalid as they arise from the use of an entropy definition that is inconsistent both mathematically and thermodynamically. We show that the underlying conceptual deficiencies can be overcome if one adopts a microcanonical entropy functional originally derived by Gibbs. The resulting thermodynamic framework is self-consistent and implies that absolute temperature remains positive even for systems with a bounded spectrum. In addition, we propose a minimal quantum thermometer that can be implemented with available experimental techniques.

  2. Absolute-structure reports.

    PubMed

    Flack, Howard D

    2013-08-01

    All the 139 noncentrosymmetric crystal structures published in Acta Crystallographica Section C between January 2011 and November 2012 inclusive have been used as the basis of a detailed study of the reporting of absolute structure. These structure determinations cover a wide range of space groups, chemical composition and resonant-scattering contribution. Defining A and D as the average and difference of the intensities of Friedel opposites, their level of fit has been examined using 2AD and selected-D plots. It was found, regardless of the expected resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, that the Friedel-difference intensities are often dominated by random uncertainty and systematic error. An analysis of data collection strategy is provided. It is found that crystal-structure determinations resulting in a Flack parameter close to 0.5 may not necessarily be from crystals twinned by inversion. Friedifstat is shown to be a robust estimator of the resonant-scattering contribution to Friedel opposites, very little affected by the particular space group of a structure nor by the occupation of special positions. There is considerable confusion in the text of papers presenting achiral noncentrosymmetric crystal structures. Recommendations are provided for the optimal way of treating noncentrosymmetric crystal structures for which the experimenter has no interest in determining the absolute structure.

  3. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  4. Absolute multilateration between spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelaner, Jody; Wadsworth, William; Azini, Maria; Mullineux, Glen; Hughes, Ben; Reichold, Armin

    2017-04-01

    Environmental effects typically limit the accuracy of large scale coordinate measurements in applications such as aircraft production and particle accelerator alignment. This paper presents an initial design for a novel measurement technique with analysis and simulation showing that that it could overcome the environmental limitations to provide a step change in large scale coordinate measurement accuracy. Referred to as absolute multilateration between spheres (AMS), it involves using absolute distance interferometry to directly measure the distances between pairs of plain steel spheres. A large portion of each sphere remains accessible as a reference datum, while the laser path can be shielded from environmental disturbances. As a single scale bar this can provide accurate scale information to be used for instrument verification or network measurement scaling. Since spheres can be simultaneously measured from multiple directions, it also allows highly accurate multilateration-based coordinate measurements to act as a large scale datum structure for localized measurements, or to be integrated within assembly tooling, coordinate measurement machines or robotic machinery. Analysis and simulation show that AMS can be self-aligned to achieve a theoretical combined standard uncertainty for the independent uncertainties of an individual 1 m scale bar of approximately 0.49 µm. It is also shown that combined with a 1 µm m‑1 standard uncertainty in the central reference system this could result in coordinate standard uncertainty magnitudes of 42 µm over a slender 1 m by 20 m network. This would be a sufficient step change in accuracy to enable next generation aerospace structures with natural laminar flow and part-to-part interchangeability.

  5. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency) by removing the source spectrum (moment-rate spectrum) from

  6. Observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: A reappraisal after WMAP 3-year and first MINOS results

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G. L.; Lisi, E.; Marrone, A.; Melchiorri, A.; Serra, P.; Palazzo, A.; Silk, J.; Slosar, A.

    2007-03-01

    In the light of recent neutrino oscillation and nonoscillation data, we revisit the phenomenological constraints applicable to three observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: The effective neutrino mass in single beta decay (m{sub {beta}}); the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay (m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}}); and the sum of neutrino masses in cosmology ({sigma}). In particular, we include the constraints coming from the first Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) data and from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) three-year (3y) data, as well as other relevant cosmological data and priors. We find that the largest neutrino squared mass difference is determined with a 15% accuracy (at 2{sigma}) after adding MINOS to world data. We also find upper bounds on the sum of neutrino masses {sigma} ranging from {approx}2 eV (WMAP-3y data only) to {approx}0.2 eV (all cosmological data) at 2{sigma}, in agreement with previous studies. In addition, we discuss the connection of such bounds with those placed on the matter power spectrum normalization parameter {sigma}{sub 8}. We show how the partial degeneracy between {sigma} and {sigma}{sub 8} in WMAP-3y data is broken by adding further cosmological data, and how the overall preference of such data for relatively high values of {sigma}{sub 8} pushes the upper bound of {sigma} in the sub-eV range. Finally, for various combination of data sets, we revisit the (in)compatibility between current {sigma} and m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} constraints (and claims), and derive quantitative predictions for future single and double beta decay experiments.

  7. Absolute entropy and free energy of fluids using the hypothetical scanning method. I. Calculation of transition probabilities from local grand canonical partition functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szarecka, Agnieszka; White, Ronald P.; Meirovitch, Hagai

    2003-12-01

    The hypothetical scanning (HS) method provides the absolute entropy and free energy from a Boltzmann sample generated by Monte Carlo, molecular dynamics or any other exact simulation procedure. Thus far HS has been applied successfully to magnetic and polymer chain models; in this paper and the following one it is extended to fluid systems by treating a Lennard-Jones model of argon. With HS a probability Pi approximating the Boltzmann probability of system configuration i is calculated with a stepwise reconstruction procedure, based on adding atoms gradually layer-by-layer to an initially empty volume, where they are replaced in their positions at i. At each step a transition probability (TP) is obtained from local grand canonical partition functions calculated over a limited space of the still unvisited (future) volume, the larger this space the better the approximation. Pi is the product of the step TPs, where ln Pi is an upper bound of the absolute entropy, which leads to upper and lower bounds for the free energy. We demonstrate that very good results for the entropy and the free energy can be obtained for a wide range of densities of the argon system by calculating TPs that are based on only a very limited future volume.

  8. Cryogenic, Absolute, High Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J. (Inventor); Shams. Qamar A. (Inventor); Powers, William T. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A pressure sensor is provided for cryogenic, high pressure applications. A highly doped silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor is bonded to a silicon substrate in an absolute pressure sensing configuration. The absolute pressure sensor is bonded to an aluminum nitride substrate. Aluminum nitride has appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion for use with highly doped silicon at cryogenic temperatures. A group of sensors, either two sensors on two substrates or four sensors on a single substrate are packaged in a pressure vessel.

  9. Absolute, Extreme-Ultraviolet, Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor (AESSIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Martin C. E.; Smith, Peter L.; Parkinson, W. H.; Kuehne, M.; Kock, M.

    1988-01-01

    AESSIM, the Absolute, Extreme-Ultraviolet, Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor, is designed to measure the absolute solar spectral irradiance at extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths. The data are required for studies of the processes that occur in the earth's upper atmosphere and for predictions of atmospheric drag on space vehicles. AESSIM is comprised of sun-pointed spectrometers and newly-developed, secondary standards of spectral irradiance for the EUV. Use of the in-orbit standard sources will eliminate the uncertainties caused by changes in spectrometer efficiency that have plagued all previous measurements of the solar spectral EUV flux.

  10. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  11. Amos-type bounds for modified Bessel function ratios.

    PubMed

    Hornik, Kurt; Grün, Bettina

    2013-12-01

    We systematically investigate lower and upper bounds for the modified Bessel function ratio [Formula: see text] by functions of the form [Formula: see text] in case [Formula: see text] is positive for all [Formula: see text], or equivalently, where [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text] is a negative integer. For [Formula: see text], we give an explicit description of the set of lower bounds and show that it has a greatest element. We also characterize the set of upper bounds and its minimal elements. If [Formula: see text], the minimal elements are tangent to [Formula: see text] in exactly one point [Formula: see text], and have [Formula: see text] as their lower envelope. We also provide a new family of explicitly computable upper bounds. Finally, if [Formula: see text] is a negative integer, we explicitly describe the sets of lower and upper bounds, and give their greatest and least elements, respectively.

  12. Amos-type bounds for modified Bessel function ratios☆

    PubMed Central

    Hornik, Kurt; Grün, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    We systematically investigate lower and upper bounds for the modified Bessel function ratio Rν=Iν+1/Iν by functions of the form Gα,β(t)=t/(α+t2+β2) in case Rν is positive for all t>0, or equivalently, where ν≥−1 or ν is a negative integer. For ν≥−1, we give an explicit description of the set of lower bounds and show that it has a greatest element. We also characterize the set of upper bounds and its minimal elements. If ν≥−1/2, the minimal elements are tangent to Rν in exactly one point 0≤t≤∞, and have Rν as their lower envelope. We also provide a new family of explicitly computable upper bounds. Finally, if ν is a negative integer, we explicitly describe the sets of lower and upper bounds, and give their greatest and least elements, respectively. PMID:24926105

  13. Database applicaton for absolute spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, Valery V.; Shumko, Sergiy

    2002-12-01

    32-bit database application with multidocument interface for Windows has been developed to calculate absolute energy distributions of observed spectra. The original database contains wavelength calibrated observed spectra which had been already passed through apparatus reductions such as flatfielding, background and apparatus noise subtracting. Absolute energy distributions of observed spectra are defined in unique scale by means of registering them simultaneously with artificial intensity standard. Observations of sequence of spectrophotometric standards are used to define absolute energy of the artificial standard. Observations of spectrophotometric standards are used to define optical extinction in selected moments. FFT algorithm implemented in the application allows performing convolution (deconvolution) spectra with user-defined PSF. The object-oriented interface has been created using facilities of C++ libraries. Client/server model with Windows Socket functionality based on TCP/IP protocol is used to develop the application. It supports Dynamic Data Exchange conversation in server mode and uses Microsoft Exchange communication facilities.

  14. Enhanced lower entropy bounds with application to constructive learning

    SciTech Connect

    Beiu, V.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper the authors prove two new lower bounds for the number-of-bits required by neural networks for classification problems defined by m examples from R{sup n}. Because they are obtained in a constructive way, they can be used for designing a constructive algorithm. These results rely on techniques used for determining tight upper bounds, which start by upper bounding the space with an n-dimensional ball. Very recently, a better upper bound has been detailed by showing that the volume of the ball can always be replaced by the volume of the intersection of two balls. A first lower bound for the case of integer weights in the range [{minus}p,p] has been detailed: it is based on computing the logarithm of the quotient between the volume of the ball containing all the examples (rough approximation) and the maximum volume of a polyhedron. A first improvement over that bound will come from a tighter upper bound of the maximum volume of the polyhedron by two n-dimensional cones. An even tighter bound will be obtained by upper bounding the space by the intersection of two balls.

  15. Absolute classification with unsupervised clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    An absolute classification algorithm is proposed in which the class definition through training samples or otherwise is required only for a particular class of interest. The absolute classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering when one cluster is known initially. The definitions and statistics of the other classes are automatically developed through the weighted unsupervised clustering procedure, which is developed to keep the cluster corresponding to the class of interest from losing its identity as the class of interest. Once all the classes are developed, a conventional relative classifier such as the maximum-likelihood classifier is used in the classification.

  16. Absolute transition probabilities of phosphorus.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. H.; Roig, R. A.; Bengtson, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Use of a gas-driven shock tube to measure the absolute strengths of 21 P I lines and 126 P II lines (from 3300 to 6900 A). Accuracy for prominent, isolated neutral and ionic lines is estimated to be 28 to 40% and 18 to 30%, respectively. The data and the corresponding theoretical predictions are examined for conformity with the sum rules.-

  17. Relativistic Absolutism in Moral Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogt, W. Paul

    1982-01-01

    Discusses Emile Durkheim's "Moral Education: A Study in the Theory and Application of the Sociology of Education," which holds that morally healthy societies may vary in culture and organization but must possess absolute rules of moral behavior. Compares this moral theory with current theory and practice of American educators. (MJL)

  18. Absolute Standards for Climate Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leckey, J.

    2016-10-01

    In a world of changing climate, political uncertainty, and ever-changing budgets, the benefit of measurements traceable to SI standards increases by the day. To truly resolve climate change trends on a decadal time scale, on-orbit measurements need to be referenced to something that is both absolute and unchanging. One such mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to definitively quantify climate change. In the CLARREO mission, we will utilize phase change cells in which a material is melted to calibrate the temperature of a blackbody that can then be observed by a spectrometer. A material's melting point is an unchanging physical constant that, through a series of transfers, can ultimately calibrate a spectrometer on an absolute scale. CLARREO consists of two primary instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer and a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy to calibrate other space-based instrumentation and thus transferring the absolute traceability. The status of various mission options will be presented.

  19. Bounds on mixedness and entanglement of quantum teleportation resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulson, K. G.; Satyanarayana, S. V. M.

    2017-04-01

    For a standard teleportation protocol, rank dependent upper bounds on Von Neumann entropy and linear entropy beyond which the states of respective ranks cease to be useful for quantum teleportation are derived analytically for a general d × d bipartite systems. For two qubit mixed states, we obtain rank dependent lower bound on concurrence below which the state is useless for quantum teleportation. For two qubit system, we construct mixed states of different ranks that exhibit theoretical rank dependent upper bounds on the measures of mixedness and lower bounds on the concurrence.

  20. Upper Endoscopy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Drainage Stent Placement Stricture Dilation Upper Endoscopy (EGD) Quality & Safety GIQuIC Registry Infection Control Privileging & Credentialing Quality Indicators Education & Meetings Advanced Education & ...

  1. Bound states and the Bekenstein bound

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael

    2003-10-16

    We explore the validity of the generalized Bekenstein bound, S<= pi M a. We define the entropy S as the logarithm of the number of states which have energy eigenvalue below M and are localized to a flat space region of width alpha. If boundary conditions that localize field modes are imposed by fiat, then the bound encounters well-known difficulties with negative Casimir energy and large species number, as well as novel problems arising only in the generalized form. In realistic systems, however, finite-size effects contribute additional energy. We study two different models for estimating such contributions. Our analysis suggests that the bound is both valid and nontrivial if interactions are properly included, so that the entropy S counts the bound states of interacting fields.

  2. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  3. The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Spectrum Polarimeter (ASP) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from 30 GHz to 5 THz. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r much greater than 1O(raised to the power of { -3}) and Compton distortion y < 10 (raised to the power of{-6}). We describe the ASP instrument and mission architecture needed to detect the signature of an inflationary epoch in the early universe using only 4 semiconductor bolometers.

  4. Physics of negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Eitan; Penrose, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Negative absolute temperatures were introduced into experimental physics by Purcell and Pound, who successfully applied this concept to nuclear spins; nevertheless, the concept has proved controversial: a recent article aroused considerable interest by its claim, based on a classical entropy formula (the "volume entropy") due to Gibbs, that negative temperatures violated basic principles of statistical thermodynamics. Here we give a thermodynamic analysis that confirms the negative-temperature interpretation of the Purcell-Pound experiments. We also examine the principal arguments that have been advanced against the negative temperature concept; we find that these arguments are not logically compelling, and moreover that the underlying "volume" entropy formula leads to predictions inconsistent with existing experimental results on nuclear spins. We conclude that, despite the counterarguments, negative absolute temperatures make good theoretical sense and did occur in the experiments designed to produce them.

  5. Optomechanics for absolute rotation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davuluri, Sankar

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we present an application of optomechanical cavity for the absolute rotation detection. The optomechanical cavity is arranged in a Michelson interferometer in such a way that the classical centrifugal force due to rotation changes the length of the optomechanical cavity. The change in the cavity length induces a shift in the frequency of the cavity mode. The phase shift corresponding to the frequency shift in the cavity mode is measured at the interferometer output to estimate the angular velocity of absolute rotation. We derived an analytic expression to estimate the minimum detectable rotation rate in our scheme for a given optomechanical cavity. Temperature dependence of the rotation detection sensitivity is studied.

  6. Nonclassicality in phase by breaking classical bounds on statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Daniel; Luis, Alfredo

    2010-09-15

    We derive upper bounds on the statistics of phase and phase difference that are satisfied by all classical states. They are obtained by finding the maximum projection of classical states on phase states. For a single-mode phase, meaningful bounds are obtained conditioned to a fixed mean number of photons. We also derive classical bounds for the projection on phase-coherent states, discussing their relation with phase-state bounds within the context of analytic representations. We find states with nonclassical phase properties disclosed by the violation of these classical bounds. These are quadrature and SU(2) squeezed states and phase-coherent states.

  7. Synthetic bounds for semi-Markov reliability models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Upper and lower bounds are derived for the probability of failure for a class of highly reliable process control computers. The bounds are synthetic in the sense that the descriptions of component failure and system recovery are assumed to be obtained from different sources. The reliability model is constructed under the assumption that the processes are independent.

  8. Absolute calibration of optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Viana, N.B.; Mazolli, A.; Maia Neto, P.A.; Nussenzveig, H.M.; Rocha, M.S.; Mesquita, O.N.

    2006-03-27

    As a step toward absolute calibration of optical tweezers, a first-principles theory of trapping forces with no adjustable parameters, corrected for spherical aberration, is experimentally tested. Employing two very different setups, we find generally very good agreement for the transverse trap stiffness as a function of microsphere radius for a broad range of radii, including the values employed in practice, and at different sample chamber depths. The domain of validity of the WKB ('geometrical optics') approximation to the theory is verified. Theoretical predictions for the trapping threshold, peak position, depth variation, multiple equilibria, and 'jump' effects are also confirmed.

  9. Observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: Constraints and correlations from world neutrino data

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G.L.; Lisi, E.; Marrone, A.; Palazzo, A.; Melchiorri, A.; Serra, P.; Silk, J.

    2004-12-01

    In the context of three-flavor neutrino mixing, we present a thorough study of the phenomenological constraints applicable to three observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: The effective neutrino mass in Tritium beta-decay (m{sub {beta}}); the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta-decay (m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}}); and the sum of neutrino masses in cosmology ({sigma}). We discuss the correlations among these variables which arise from the combination of all the available neutrino oscillation data, in both normal and inverse neutrino mass hierarchy. We set upper limits on m{sub {beta}} by combining updated results from the Mainz and Troitsk experiments. We also consider the latest results on m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} from the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment, both with and without the lower bound claimed by such experiment. We derive upper limits on {sigma} from an updated combination of data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite and the two degrees Fields (2dF) Galaxy Redshifts Survey, with and without Lyman-{alpha} forest data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), in models with a nonzero running of the spectral index of primordial inflationary perturbations. The results are discussed in terms of two-dimensional projections of the globally allowed region in the (m{sub {beta}},m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}},{sigma}) parameter space, which neatly show the relative impact of each data set. In particular, the (in)compatibility between {sigma} and m{sub {beta}}{sub {beta}} constraints is highlighted for various combinations of data. We also briefly discuss how future neutrino data (both oscillatory and nonoscillatory) can further probe the currently allowed regions.

  10. A Cramer-Rao Type Lower Bound for Essentially Unbiased Parameter Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-03

    should apply to the entire class of estimators with acceptably small bias. In this report a new CR-type lower bound is derived which takes into account a...unbiased CR bound. If an upper bound on the bias gradient ot tne estimator is specified, our lower bound on estimator variance can subsequently be applied ...multiple parameters. Finally, Section 8 applies the new bound to covariance estimation for a pair of HD Gaussian sequences. 2 2. PRELIMINARIES 2.1

  11. Bounding Species Distribution Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Jarnevich, Cahterine S.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used [Current Zoology 57 (5): 642-647, 2011].

  12. Causality and Tsirelson's bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Buhrman, H.; Massar, S.

    2005-11-15

    We study the properties of no-signaling correlations that cannot be reproduced by local measurements on entangled quantum states. We say that such correlations violate Tsirelson bounds. We show that if these correlations are obtained by some reversible unitary quantum evolution U, then U cannot be written in the product form U{sub A}xU{sub B}. This implies that U can be used for signaling and for entanglement generation. This result is completely general and in fact can be viewed as a characterization of Tsirelson bounds. We then show how this result can be used as a tool to study Tsirelson bounds and we illustrate this by rederiving the Tsirelson bound of 2{radical}(2) for the Clauser-Horn-Shimony-Holt inequality, and by deriving a new Tsirelson bound for qutrits.

  13. Bounding species distribution models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Jarnevich, C.S.; Esaias, W.E.; Morisette, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Species distribution models are increasing in popularity for mapping suitable habitat for species of management concern. Many investigators now recognize that extrapolations of these models with geographic information systems (GIS) might be sensitive to the environmental bounds of the data used in their development, yet there is no recommended best practice for "clamping" model extrapolations. We relied on two commonly used modeling approaches: classification and regression tree (CART) and maximum entropy (Maxent) models, and we tested a simple alteration of the model extrapolations, bounding extrapolations to the maximum and minimum values of primary environmental predictors, to provide a more realistic map of suitable habitat of hybridized Africanized honey bees in the southwestern United States. Findings suggest that multiple models of bounding, and the most conservative bounding of species distribution models, like those presented here, should probably replace the unbounded or loosely bounded techniques currently used. ?? 2011 Current Zoology.

  14. Cosmology with negative absolute temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, J. P. P.; Byrnes, Christian T.; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Negative absolute temperatures (NAT) are an exotic thermodynamical consequence of quantum physics which has been known since the 1950's (having been achieved in the lab on a number of occasions). Recently, the work of Braun et al. [1] has rekindled interest in negative temperatures and hinted at a possibility of using NAT systems in the lab as dark energy analogues. This paper goes one step further, looking into the cosmological consequences of the existence of a NAT component in the Universe. NAT-dominated expanding Universes experience a borderline phantom expansion (w < -1) with no Big Rip, and their contracting counterparts are forced to bounce after the energy density becomes sufficiently large. Both scenarios might be used to solve horizon and flatness problems analogously to standard inflation and bouncing cosmologies. We discuss the difficulties in obtaining and ending a NAT-dominated epoch, and possible ways of obtaining density perturbations with an acceptable spectrum.

  15. Validity of Field Tests of Upper Body Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Russell, R; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined the validity of field tests of elementary students' upper body muscular strength and endurance. Field tests were found to be moderately valid measures of weight-relative muscular strength but not of absolute strength and muscular endurance. (SM)

  16. Determination of absolute internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorri, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Papadakis, P.; Konki, J.; Cox, D. M.; Auranen, K.; Partanen, J.; Sandzelius, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Uusitalo, J.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Smallcombe, J.; Davies, P. J.; Barton, C. J.; Jenkins, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    A non-reference based method to determine internal conversion coefficients using the SAGE spectrometer is carried out for transitions in the nuclei of 154Sm, 152Sm and 166Yb. The Normalised-Peak-to-Gamma method is in general an efficient tool to extract internal conversion coefficients. However, in many cases the required well-known reference transitions are not available. The data analysis steps required to determine absolute internal conversion coefficients with the SAGE spectrometer are presented. In addition, several background suppression methods are introduced and an example of how ancillary detectors can be used to select specific reaction products is given. The results obtained for ground-state band E2 transitions show that the absolute internal conversion coefficients can be extracted using the methods described with a reasonable accuracy. In some cases of less intense transitions only an upper limit for the internal conversion coefficient could be given.

  17. Sample Complexity Bounds for Differentially Private Learning

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Kamalika; Hsu, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This work studies the problem of privacy-preserving classification – namely, learning a classifier from sensitive data while preserving the privacy of individuals in the training set. In particular, the learning algorithm is required in this problem to guarantee differential privacy, a very strong notion of privacy that has gained significant attention in recent years. A natural question to ask is: what is the sample requirement of a learning algorithm that guarantees a certain level of privacy and accuracy? We address this question in the context of learning with infinite hypothesis classes when the data is drawn from a continuous distribution. We first show that even for very simple hypothesis classes, any algorithm that uses a finite number of examples and guarantees differential privacy must fail to return an accurate classifier for at least some unlabeled data distributions. This result is unlike the case with either finite hypothesis classes or discrete data domains, in which distribution-free private learning is possible, as previously shown by Kasiviswanathan et al. (2008). We then consider two approaches to differentially private learning that get around this lower bound. The first approach is to use prior knowledge about the unlabeled data distribution in the form of a reference distribution chosen independently of the sensitive data. Given such a reference , we provide an upper bound on the sample requirement that depends (among other things) on a measure of closeness between and the unlabeled data distribution. Our upper bound applies to the non-realizable as well as the realizable case. The second approach is to relax the privacy requirement, by requiring only label-privacy – namely, that the only labels (and not the unlabeled parts of the examples) be considered sensitive information. An upper bound on the sample requirement of learning with label privacy was shown by Chaudhuri et al. (2006); in this work, we show a lower bound. PMID:25285183

  18. Bounds on tensor wave and twisted inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, Sudhakar; Sami, M.; Ward, John

    2010-11-15

    We study the bounds on tensor wave in a class of twisted inflation models, where D(4+2k)-branes are wrapped on cycles in the compact manifold and wrap the Kaluza-Klein direction in the corresponding effective field theory. While the lower bound is found to be analogous to that in type IIB models of brane inflation, the upper bound turns out to be significantly different. This is argued for a range of values for the parameter g{sub s}M satisfying the self-consistency relation and the WMAP data. Further, we observe that the wrapped D8-brane appears to be the most attractive from a cosmological perspective.

  19. Upper bounds on asymmetric dark matter self annihilation cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwanger, Ulrich; Mitropoulos, Pantelis

    2012-07-01

    Most models for asymmetric dark matter allow for dark matter self annihilation processes, which can wash out the asymmetry at temperatures near and below the dark matter mass. We study the coupled set of Boltzmann equations for the symmetric and antisymmetric dark matter number densities, and derive conditions applicable to a large class of models for the absence of a significant wash-out of an asymmetry. These constraints are applied to various existing scenarios. In the case of left- or right-handed sneutrinos, very large electroweak gaugino masses, or very small mixing angles are required.

  20. An Upper Bound for Population Exposure Variability (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tools for the rapid assessment of exposure potential are needed in order to put the results of rapidly-applied tools for assessing biological activity, such as ToxCast® and other high throughput methodologies, into a quantitative exposure context. The ExpoCast models (Wambaugh et...

  1. AN UPPER BOUND TO THE SPACE DENSITY OF INTERSTELLAR COMETS

    SciTech Connect

    Jura, M.

    2011-05-15

    Two well-studied white dwarfs with helium-dominated atmospheres (DBs) each possess less hydrogen than carried by a single average-mass comet. Plausibly, the wind rates from these stars are low enough that most accreted hydrogen remains with the star. If so, and presuming their nominal effective temperatures, then these DBs have faced minimal impact by interstellar comets during their 50 Myr cooling age; interstellar iceballs with radii between 10 m and 2 km contain less than 1% of all interstellar oxygen. This analysis suggests that most stars do not produce comets at the rate predicted by 'optimistic' scenarios for the formation of the Oort Cloud.

  2. The Balloon Popping Problem Revisited: Lower and Upper Bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hyunwoo; Chwa, Kyung-Yong

    We consider the balloon popping problem introduced by Immorlica et al. in 2007 [13]. This problem is directly related to the problem of profit maximization in online auctions, where an auctioneer is selling a collection of identical items to anonymous unit-demand bidders. The auctioneer has the full knowledge of bidders’ private valuations for the items and tries to maximize his profit. Compared with the profit of fixed price schemes, the competitive ratio of Immorlica et al.’s algorithm was in the range [1.64, 4.33]. In this paper, we narrow the gap to [1.659, 2].

  3. Virial Expansion Bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Stephen James

    2013-10-01

    In the 1960s, the technique of using cluster expansion bounds in order to achieve bounds on the virial expansion was developed by Lebowitz and Penrose (J. Math. Phys. 5:841, 1964) and Ruelle (Statistical Mechanics: Rigorous Results. Benjamin, Elmsford, 1969). This technique is generalised to more recent cluster expansion bounds by Poghosyan and Ueltschi (J. Math. Phys. 50:053509, 2009), which are related to the work of Procacci (J. Stat. Phys. 129:171, 2007) and the tree-graph identity, detailed by Brydges (Phénomènes Critiques, Systèmes Aléatoires, Théories de Jauge. Les Houches 1984, pp. 129-183, 1986). The bounds achieved by Lebowitz and Penrose can also be sharpened by doing the actual optimisation and achieving expressions in terms of the Lambert W-function. The different bound from the cluster expansion shows some improvements for bounds on the convergence of the virial expansion in the case of positive potentials, which are allowed to have a hard core.

  4. A lower bound for the decoder error probability of the linear MDS code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, K.-M.

    1988-01-01

    A lower bound for the decoder error probability (P sub E (u)) of a linear maximum distance separable (MDS) code is derived by counting the dominant types of decoding words around code words. It is shown that the lower bound derived is similar in form, and close numerically, to the upper bound derived.

  5. Absolute exponential stability of recurrent neural networks with Lipschitz-continuous activation functions and time delays.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jinde; Wang, Jun

    2004-04-01

    This paper investigates the absolute exponential stability of a general class of delayed neural networks, which require the activation functions to be partially Lipschitz continuous and monotone nondecreasing only, but not necessarily differentiable or bounded. Three new sufficient conditions are derived to ascertain whether or not the equilibrium points of the delayed neural networks with additively diagonally stable interconnection matrices are absolutely exponentially stable by using delay Halanay-type inequality and Lyapunov function. The stability criteria are also suitable for delayed optimization neural networks and delayed cellular neural networks whose activation functions are often nondifferentiable or unbounded. The results herein answer a question: if a neural network without any delay is absolutely exponentially stable, then under what additional conditions, the neural networks with delay is also absolutely exponentially stable.

  6. Neon and Oxygen Absolute Abundances in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.

    2007-04-01

    In the present work we use the UV spectrum of a solar flare observed with SOHO SUMER to measure the absolute abundance of Ne in the solar atmosphere. The measurement is carried out using the intensity ratio between the allowed 1s2s3S1-1s2p3P2 Ne IX line at 1248.28 Å and the free-free continuum radiation observed close to the Ne IX line. We find a value of the absolute Ne abundance ANe=8.11+/-0.12, in agreement with previous estimates but substantially higher than the very recent estimate by Asplund et al. based on the oxygen photospheric abundance and the Ne/O relative abundance. Considering our measured ANe value, we argue that the absolute oxygen abundance of Asplund et al. is too low by a factor 1.9. This result has important consequences for models of the solar interior based on helioseismology measurements, as well as on the FIP bias determination of the solar upper atmosphere, solar wind, and solar energetic particles.

  7. Thermalization Time Bounds for Pauli Stabilizer Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temme, Kristan

    2017-03-01

    We prove a general lower bound to the spectral gap of the Davies generator for Hamiltonians that can be written as the sum of commuting Pauli operators. These Hamiltonians, defined on the Hilbert space of N-qubits, serve as one of the most frequently considered candidates for a self-correcting quantum memory. A spectral gap bound on the Davies generator establishes an upper limit on the life time of such a quantum memory and can be used to estimate the time until the system relaxes to thermal equilibrium when brought into contact with a thermal heat bath. The bound can be shown to behave as {λ ≥ O(N^{-1} exp(-2β overline{ɛ}))}, where {overline{ɛ}} is a generalization of the well known energy barrier for logical operators. Particularly in the low temperature regime we expect this bound to provide the correct asymptotic scaling of the gap with the system size up to a factor of N -1. Furthermore, we discuss conditions and provide scenarios where this factor can be removed and a constant lower bound can be proven.

  8. Absolute optical metrology : nanometers to kilometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, O. P.; Peters, R. D.; Liebe, C. C.

    2005-01-01

    We provide and overview of the developments in the field of high-accuracy absolute optical metrology with emphasis on space-based applications. Specific work on the Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging (MSTAR) sensor is described along with novel applications of the sensor.

  9. Introducing the Mean Absolute Deviation "Effect" Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits the use of effect sizes in the analysis of experimental and similar results, and reminds readers of the relative advantages of the mean absolute deviation as a measure of variation, as opposed to the more complex standard deviation. The mean absolute deviation is easier to use and understand, and more tolerant of extreme…

  10. Monolithically integrated absolute frequency comb laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael C.

    2016-07-12

    Rather than down-convert optical frequencies, a QCL laser system directly generates a THz frequency comb in a compact monolithically integrated chip that can be locked to an absolute frequency without the need of a frequency-comb synthesizer. The monolithic, absolute frequency comb can provide a THz frequency reference and tool for high-resolution broad band spectroscopy.

  11. Validation of EMP bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, L.K.; Merewether, K.O.; Chen, K.C.; Jorgenson, R.E.; Morris, M.E.; Solberg, J.E.; Lewis, J.G.; Derr, W.

    1996-07-01

    Test data on canonical weapon-like fixtures are used to validate previously developed analytical bounding results. The test fixtures were constructed to simulate (but be slightly worse than) weapon ports of entry but have known geometries (and electrical points of contact). The exterior of the test fixtures exhibited exterior resonant enhancement of the incident fields at the ports of entry with magnitudes equal to those of weapon geometries. The interior consisted of loaded transmission lines adjusted to maximize received energy or voltage but incorporating practical weapon geometrical constraints. New analytical results are also presented for bounding the energies associated with multiple bolt joints and for bounding the exterior resonant enhancement of the exciting fields.

  12. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  13. Improvement of cosmological neutrino mass bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusarma, Elena; Gerbino, Martina; Mena, Olga; Vagnozzi, Sunny; Ho, Shirley; Freese, Katherine

    2016-10-01

    The most recent measurements of the temperature and low-multipole polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background from the Planck satellite, when combined with galaxy clustering data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey in the form of the full shape of the power spectrum, and with baryon acoustic oscillation measurements, provide a 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper bound on the sum of the three active neutrinos ∑mν<0.183 eV , among the tightest neutrino mass bounds in the literature, to date, when the same data sets are taken into account. This very same data combination is able to set, at ˜70 % C.L., an upper limit on ∑mν of 0.0968 eV, a value that approximately corresponds to the minimal mass expected in the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy scenario. If high-multipole polarization data from Planck is also considered, the 95% C.L. upper bound is tightened to ∑mν<0.176 eV . Further improvements are obtained by considering recent measurements of the Hubble parameter. These limits are obtained assuming a specific nondegenerate neutrino mass spectrum; they slightly worsen when considering other degenerate neutrino mass schemes. Low-redshift quantities, such as the Hubble constant or the reionization optical depth, play a very important role when setting the neutrino mass constraints. We also comment on the eventual shifts in the cosmological bounds on ∑mν when possible variations in the former two quantities are addressed.

  14. Absolute quantitation of protein posttranslational modification isoform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied in characterization and quantification of proteins from complex biological samples. Because the numbers of absolute amounts of proteins are needed in construction of mathematical models for molecular systems of various biological phenotypes and phenomena, a number of quantitative proteomic methods have been adopted to measure absolute quantities of proteins using mass spectrometry. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) coupled with internal peptide standards, i.e., the stable isotope-coded peptide dilution series, which was originated from the field of analytical chemistry, becomes a widely applied method in absolute quantitative proteomics research. This approach provides more and more absolute protein quantitation results of high confidence. As quantitative study of posttranslational modification (PTM) that modulates the biological activity of proteins is crucial for biological science and each isoform may contribute a unique biological function, degradation, and/or subcellular location, the absolute quantitation of protein PTM isoforms has become more relevant to its biological significance. In order to obtain the absolute cellular amount of a PTM isoform of a protein accurately, impacts of protein fractionation, protein enrichment, and proteolytic digestion yield should be taken into consideration and those effects before differentially stable isotope-coded PTM peptide standards are spiked into sample peptides have to be corrected. Assisted with stable isotope-labeled peptide standards, the absolute quantitation of isoforms of posttranslationally modified protein (AQUIP) method takes all these factors into account and determines the absolute amount of a protein PTM isoform from the absolute amount of the protein of interest and the PTM occupancy at the site of the protein. The absolute amount of the protein of interest is inferred by quantifying both the absolute amounts of a few PTM

  15. Computing Graphical Confidence Bounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezzacappa, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Approximation for graphical confidence bounds is simple enough to run on programmable calculator. Approximation is used in lieu of numerical tables not always available, and exact calculations, which often require rather sizable computer resources. Approximation verified for collection of up to 50 data points. Method used to analyze tile-strength data on Space Shuttle thermal-protection system.

  16. Diffusional creep and sintering -- The application of bounding theorems

    SciTech Connect

    Cocks, A.C.F.; Aparicio, N.D.

    1995-02-01

    In this paper upper and lower bound theorems for the creep and sintering response of bodies which deform by grain-boundary diffusion controlled mechanisms are presented. The utility of the bounds is demonstrated by using them to analyze the classical problem of Hull-Rimmer void growth. Further insight into the material response when diffusion mechanisms dominate is provided by analyzing the response of two contacting spheres, which represents a fundamental problem for the analysis of stage 1 sintering.

  17. Absolute realization of low BRDF value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zilong; Liao, Ningfang; Li, Ping; Wang, Yu

    2010-10-01

    Low BRDF value is widespread used in many critical domains such as space and military fairs. These values below 0.1 Sr-1 . So the Absolute realization of these value is the most critical issue in the absolute measurement of BRDF. To develop the Absolute value realization theory of BRDF , defining an arithmetic operators of BRDF , achieving an absolute measurement Eq. of BRDF based on radiance. This is a new theory method to solve the realization problem of low BRDF value. This theory method is realized on a self-designed common double orientation structure in space. By designing an adding structure to extend the range of the measurement system and a control and processing software, Absolute realization of low BRDF value is achieved. A material of low BRDF value is measured in this measurement system and the spectral BRDF value are showed within different angles allover the space. All these values are below 0.4 Sr-1 . This process is a representative procedure about the measurement of low BRDF value. A corresponding uncertainty analysis of this measurement data is given depend on the new theory of absolute realization and the performance of the measurement system. The relative expand uncertainty of the measurement data is 0.078. This uncertainty analysis is suitable for all measurements using the new theory of absolute realization and the corresponding measurement system.

  18. Cosmological perturbations in massive gravity and the Higuchi bound

    SciTech Connect

    Fasiello, Matteo; Tolley, Andrew J. E-mail: andrew.j.tolley@case.edu

    2012-11-01

    In de Sitter spacetime there exists an absolute minimum for the mass of a spin-2 field set by the Higuchi bound m{sup 2} ≥ 2H{sup 2}. We generalize this bound to arbitrary spatially flat FRW geometries in the context of the recently proposed ghost-free models of Massive Gravity with an FRW reference metric, by performing a Hamiltonian analysis for cosmological perturbations. We find that the bound generically indicates that spatially flat FRW solutions in FRW massive gravity, which exhibit a Vainshtein mechanism in the background as required by consistency with observations, imply that the helicity zero mode is a ghost. In contradistinction to previous works, the tension between the Higuchi bound and the Vainshtein mechanism is equally strong regardless of the equation of state for matter.

  19. Host-Guest Assembly of a Molecular Reporter with Chiral Cyanohydrins for Assignment of Absolute Stereochemistry.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Hadi; Anyika, Mercy; Zhang, Jun; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Borhan, Babak

    2016-06-27

    The absolute stereochemistry of cyanohydrins, derived from ketones and aldehydes, is obtained routinely, in a microscale and derivatization-free manner, upon their complexation with Zn-MAPOL, a zincated porphyrin host with a binding pocket comprised of a biphenol core. The host-guest complex leads to observable exciton-coupled circular dichroism (ECCD), the sign of which is easily correlated to the absolute stereochemistry of the bound cyanohydrin. A working model, based on the ECCD signal of cyanohydrins with known configuration, is proposed.

  20. Absolute Definition of Phase Shift in the Elastic Scattering of a Particle from Compound Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temkin, A.

    1961-01-01

    The projection of the target wave function on the total wave function of a scattered particle interacting with the target system is used to define an absolute phase shift including any multiples of pi. With this definition of the absolute phase shift, one can prove rigorously in the limit of zero energy for s-wave electrons scattered from atomic hydrogen that the triplet phase shift must approach a nonzero multiple of pi. One can further show that at least one pi of this phase shift is not connected with the existence of a bound state of the H- ion.

  1. Bounds for departure from normality and the Frobenius norm of matrix eigenvalues

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.L.

    1994-12-01

    New lower and upper bounds for the departure from normality and the Frobenius norm of the eigenvalues of a matrix axe given. The significant properties of these bounds axe also described. For example, the upper bound for matrix eigenvalues improves upon the one derived by Kress, de Vries and Wegmann in [Lin. Alg. Appl., 8 (1974), pp. 109-120]. The upper bound for departure from normality is sharp for any matrix whose eigenvalues are collinear in the complex plane. Moreover, the latter formula is a practical estimate that costs (at most) 2m multiplications, where m is the number of nonzeros in the matrix. In terms of applications, the results can be used to bound from above the sensitivity of eigenvalues to matrix perturbations or bound from below the condition number of the eigenbasis of a matrix.

  2. A New Gimmick for Assigning Absolute Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayorinde, F. O.

    1983-01-01

    A five-step procedure is provided to help students in making the assignment absolute configuration less bothersome. Examples for both single (2-butanol) and multi-chiral carbon (3-chloro-2-butanol) molecules are included. (JN)

  3. Magnifying absolute instruments for optically homogeneous regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tyc, Tomas

    2011-09-15

    We propose a class of magnifying absolute optical instruments with a positive isotropic refractive index. They create magnified stigmatic images, either virtual or real, of optically homogeneous three-dimensional spatial regions within geometrical optics.

  4. The Simplicity Argument and Absolute Morality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mijuskovic, Ben

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the author has maintained that there is a similarity of thought to be found in the writings of Cudworth, Emerson, and Husserl in his investigation of an absolute system of morality. (Author/RK)

  5. Bounded Partial Sums?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brilleslyper, Michael A.; Wolverton, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    In this article we consider an example suitable for investigation in many mid and upper level undergraduate mathematics courses. Fourier series provide an excellent example of the differences between uniform and non-uniform convergence. We use Dirichlet's test to investigate the convergence of the Fourier series for a simple periodic saw tooth…

  6. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  7. Absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capurro, O. A.

    1993-11-01

    The program SEEF is a Fortran IV computer code for the extraction of absolute cross sections of compound nucleus reactions. When the evaporation residue is fed by its parents, only cumulative cross sections will be obtained from off-line gamma ray measurements. But, if one has the parent excitation function (experimental or calculated), this code will make it possible to determine absolute cross sections of any exit channel.

  8. Kelvin and the absolute temperature scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlichson, Herman

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the absolute temperature scale of Kelvin (William Thomson). Kelvin found that Carnot's axiom about heat being a conserved quantity had to be abandoned. Nevertheless, he found that Carnot's fundamental work on heat engines was correct. Using the concept of a Carnot engine Kelvin found that Q1/Q2 = T1/T2. Thermometers are not used to obtain absolute temperatures since they are calculated temperatures.

  9. 38. STAIRS FROM ENTRANCE AT SIXTEENTH STREET TO UPPER MALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. STAIRS FROM ENTRANCE AT SIXTEENTH STREET TO UPPER MALL PARK, LOOKING SOUTH, summer 1985 - Meridian Hill Park, Bounded by Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Euclid & W Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. 37. STAIRS TO ENTRANCE AT SIXTEENTH STREET FROM UPPER MALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. STAIRS TO ENTRANCE AT SIXTEENTH STREET FROM UPPER MALL PARK, LOOKING NORTH, August 1976 - Meridian Hill Park, Bounded by Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Euclid & W Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. 17. UPPER DECK, VIEW OF SUPPORTING STRUCTURE AND ROOF OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. UPPER DECK, VIEW OF SUPPORTING STRUCTURE AND ROOF OF FERRY SHED. LOOKING WEST - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad & Ferry Terminal, Ferry Slips & Bridges, Bounded by Observer, Newark & River Streets, Hudson River, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  12. Mutual Information Rate and Bounds for It

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Murilo S.; Rubinger, Rero M.; Viana, Emilson R.; Sartorelli, José C.; Parlitz, Ulrich; Grebogi, Celso

    2012-01-01

    The amount of information exchanged per unit of time between two nodes in a dynamical network or between two data sets is a powerful concept for analysing complex systems. This quantity, known as the mutual information rate (MIR), is calculated from the mutual information, which is rigorously defined only for random systems. Moreover, the definition of mutual information is based on probabilities of significant events. This work offers a simple alternative way to calculate the MIR in dynamical (deterministic) networks or between two time series (not fully deterministic), and to calculate its upper and lower bounds without having to calculate probabilities, but rather in terms of well known and well defined quantities in dynamical systems. As possible applications of our bounds, we study the relationship between synchronisation and the exchange of information in a system of two coupled maps and in experimental networks of coupled oscillators. PMID:23112809

  13. Performance bound for quantum absorption refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Luis A.; Palao, José P.; Adesso, Gerardo; Alonso, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    An implementation of quantum absorption chillers with three qubits has been recently proposed that is ideally able to reach the Carnot performance regime. Here we study the working efficiency of such self-contained refrigerators, adopting a consistent treatment of dissipation effects. We demonstrate that the coefficient of performance at maximum cooling power is upper bounded by 3/4 of the Carnot performance. The result is independent of the details of the system and the equilibrium temperatures of the external baths. We provide design prescriptions that saturate the bound in the limit of a large difference between the operating temperatures. Our study suggests that delocalized dissipation, which must be taken into account for a proper modeling of the machine-baths interaction, is a fundamental source of irreversibility which prevents the refrigerator from approaching the Carnot performance arbitrarily closely in practice. The potential role of quantum correlations in the operation of these machines is also investigated.

  14. Generalized Hofmann quantum process fidelity bounds for quantum filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlák, Michal; Fiurášek, Jaromír

    2016-04-01

    We propose and investigate bounds on the quantum process fidelity of quantum filters, i.e., probabilistic quantum operations represented by a single Kraus operator K . These bounds generalize the Hofmann bounds on the quantum process fidelity of unitary operations [H. F. Hofmann, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 160504 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.94.160504] and are based on probing the quantum filter with pure states forming two mutually unbiased bases. Determination of these bounds therefore requires far fewer measurements than full quantum process tomography. We find that it is particularly suitable to construct one of the probe bases from the right eigenstates of K , because in this case the bounds are tight in the sense that if the actual filter coincides with the ideal one, then both the lower and the upper bounds are equal to 1. We theoretically investigate the application of these bounds to a two-qubit optical quantum filter formed by the interference of two photons on a partially polarizing beam splitter. For an experimentally convenient choice of factorized input states and measurements we study the tightness of the bounds. We show that more stringent bounds can be obtained by more sophisticated processing of the data using convex optimization and we compare our methods for different choices of the input probe states.

  15. Universal bounds on current fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2016-05-01

    For current fluctuations in nonequilibrium steady states of Markovian processes, we derive four different universal bounds valid beyond the Gaussian regime. Different variants of these bounds apply to either the entropy change or any individual current, e.g., the rate of substrate consumption in a chemical reaction or the electron current in an electronic device. The bounds vary with respect to their degree of universality and tightness. A universal parabolic bound on the generating function of an arbitrary current depends solely on the average entropy production. A second, stronger bound requires knowledge both of the thermodynamic forces that drive the system and of the topology of the network of states. These two bounds are conjectures based on extensive numerics. An exponential bound that depends only on the average entropy production and the average number of transitions per time is rigorously proved. This bound has no obvious relation to the parabolic bound but it is typically tighter further away from equilibrium. An asymptotic bound that depends on the specific transition rates and becomes tight for large fluctuations is also derived. This bound allows for the prediction of the asymptotic growth of the generating function. Even though our results are restricted to networks with a finite number of states, we show that the parabolic bound is also valid for three paradigmatic examples of driven diffusive systems for which the generating function can be calculated using the additivity principle. Our bounds provide a general class of constraints for nonequilibrium systems.

  16. Absolute quantum cutting efficiency of Tb3+-Yb3+ co-doped glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Qianqian; Qin, Feng; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2013-12-01

    The absolute quantum cutting efficiency of Tb3+-Yb3+ co-doped glass was quantitatively measured by an integrating sphere detection system, which is independent of the excitation power. As the Yb3+ concentration increases, the near infrared quantum efficiency exhibited an exponential growth with an upper limit of 13.5%, but the visible light efficiency was reduced rapidly. As a result, the total quantum efficiency monotonically decreases rather than increases as theory predicted. In fact, the absolute quantum efficiency was far less than the theoretical value due to the low radiative efficiency of Tb3+ (<61%) and significant cross-relaxation nonradiative loss between Yb3+ ions.

  17. Jasminum flexile flower absolute from India--a detailed comparison with three other jasmine absolutes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Norbert A; Kohlenberg, Birgit; Sim, Sherina; Meier, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-01

    Jasminum flexile flower absolute from the south of India and the corresponding vacuum headspace (VHS) sample of the absolute were analyzed using GC and GC-MS. Three other commercially available Indian jasmine absolutes from the species: J. sambac, J. officinale subsp. grandiflorum, and J. auriculatum and the respective VHS samples were used for comparison purposes. One hundred and twenty-one compounds were characterized in J. flexile flower absolute, with methyl linolate, benzyl salicylate, benzyl benzoate, (2E,6E)-farnesol, and benzyl acetate as the main constituents. A detailed olfactory evaluation was also performed.

  18. Landsat-7 ETM+ radiometric stability and absolute calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markham, B.L.; Barker, J.L.; Barsi, J.A.; Kaita, E.; Thome, K.J.; Helder, D.L.; Palluconi, Frank Don; Schott, J.R.; Scaramuzza, P.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Launched in April 1999, the Landsat-7 ETM+ instrument is in its fourth year of operation. The quality of the acquired calibrated imagery continues to be high, especially with respect to its three most important radiometric performance parameters: reflective band instrument stability to better than ??1%, reflective band absolute calibration to better than ??5%, and thermal band absolute calibration to better than ??0.6 K. The ETM+ instrument has been the most stable of any of the Landsat instruments, in both the reflective and thermal channels. To date, the best on-board calibration source for the reflective bands has been the Full Aperture Solar Calibrator, which has indicated changes of at most -1.8% to -2.0% (95% C.I.) change per year in the ETM+ gain (band 4). However, this change is believed to be caused by changes in the solar diffuser panel, as opposed to a change in the instrument's gain. This belief is based partially on ground observations, which bound the changes in gain in band 4 at -0.7% to +1.5%. Also, ETM+ stability is indicated by the monitoring of desert targets. These image-based results for four Saharan and Arabian sites, for a collection of 35 scenes over the three years since launch, bound the gain change at -0.7% to +0.5% in band 4. Thermal calibration from ground observations revealed an offset error of +0.31 W/m 2 sr um soon after launch. This offset was corrected within the U. S. ground processing system at EROS Data Center on 21-Dec-00, and since then, the band 6 on-board calibration has indicated changes of at most +0.02% to +0.04% (95% C.I.) per year. The latest ground observations have detected no remaining offset error with an RMS error of ??0.6 K. The stability and absolute calibration of the Landsat-7 ETM+ sensor make it an ideal candidate to be used as a reference source for radiometric cross-calibrating to other land remote sensing satellite systems.

  19. Blog life: Entropy Bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Peter

    2008-06-01

    Who is the blog written by? Peter Steinberg is a nuclear physicist at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York, US. He is acting project manager of the PHOBOS experiment, which used Brookhaven's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to search for unusual events produced during collisions between gold nuclei. He is also involved with the PHENIX experiment, which seeks to discover a new state of matter known as the quark-gluon plasma. In addition to his own blog Entropy Bound, Steinberg is currently blogging on a website that was set up last year to publicize the involvement of US scientists with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  20. A Simple Tight Bound on Error Probability of Block Codes with Application to Turbo Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divsalar, D.

    1999-07-01

    A simple bound on the probability of decoding error for block codes is derived in closed form. This bound is based on the bounding techniques developed by Gallager. We obtained an upper bound both on the word-error probability and the bit-error probability of block codes. The bound is simple, since it does not require any integration or optimization in its final version. The bound is tight since it works for signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) very close to the Shannon capacity limit. The bound uses only the weight distribution of the code. The bound for nonrandom codes is tighter than the original Gallager bound and its new versions derived by Sason and Shamai and by Viterbi and Viterbi. It also is tighter than the recent simpler bound by Viterbi and Viterbi and simpler than the bound by Duman and Salehi, which requires two-parameter optimization. For long blocks, it competes well with more complex bounds that involve integration and parameter optimization, such as the tangential sphere bound by Poltyrev, elaborated by Sason and Shamai, and investigated by Viterbi and Viterbi, and the geometry bound by Dolinar, Ekroot, and Pollara. We also obtained a closed-form expression for the minimum SNR threshold that can serve as a tight upper bound on maximum-likelihood capacity of nonrandom codes. We also have shown that this minimum SNR threshold of our bound is the same as for the tangential sphere bound of Poltyrev. We applied this simple bound to turbo-like codes.

  1. Universal Cosmic Absolute and Modern Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostro, Ludwik

    The official Sciences, especially all natural sciences, respect in their researches the principle of methodic naturalism i.e. they consider all phenomena as entirely natural and therefore in their scientific explanations they do never adduce or cite supernatural entities and forces. The purpose of this paper is to show that Modern Science has its own self-existent, self-acting, and self-sufficient Natural All-in Being or Omni-Being i.e. the entire Nature as a Whole that justifies the scientific methodic naturalism. Since this Natural All-in Being is one and only It should be considered as the own scientifically justified Natural Absolute of Science and should be called, in my opinion, the Universal Cosmic Absolute of Modern Science. It will be also shown that the Universal Cosmic Absolute is ontologically enormously stratified and is in its ultimate i.e. in its most fundamental stratum trans-reistic and trans-personal. It means that in its basic stratum. It is neither a Thing or a Person although It contains in Itself all things and persons with all other sentient and conscious individuals as well, On the turn of the 20th century the Science has begun to look for a theory of everything, for a final theory, for a master theory. In my opinion the natural Universal Cosmic Absolute will constitute in such a theory the radical all penetrating Ultimate Basic Reality and will substitute step by step the traditional supernatural personal Absolute.

  2. Multifunctions of bounded variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinter, R. B.

    2016-02-01

    Consider control systems described by a differential equation with a control term or, more generally, by a differential inclusion with velocity set F (t , x). Certain properties of state trajectories can be derived when it is assumed that F (t , x) is merely measurable w.r.t. the time variable t. But sometimes a refined analysis requires the imposition of stronger hypotheses regarding the time dependence. Stronger forms of necessary conditions for minimizing state trajectories can be derived, for example, when F (t , x) is Lipschitz continuous w.r.t. time. It has recently become apparent that significant addition properties of state trajectories can still be derived, when the Lipschitz continuity hypothesis is replaced by the weaker requirement that F (t , x) has bounded variation w.r.t. time. This paper introduces a new concept of multifunctions F (t , x) that have bounded variation w.r.t. time near a given state trajectory, of special relevance to control. We provide an application to sensitivity analysis.

  3. Performance bounds on parallel self-initiating discrete-event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1990-01-01

    The use is considered of massively parallel architectures to execute discrete-event simulations of what is termed self-initiating models. A logical process in a self-initiating model schedules its own state re-evaluation times, independently of any other logical process, and sends its new state to other logical processes following the re-evaluation. The interest is in the effects of that communication on synchronization. The performance is considered of various synchronization protocols by deriving upper and lower bounds on optimal performance, upper bounds on Time Warp's performance, and lower bounds on the performance of a new conservative protocol. The analysis of Time Warp includes the overhead costs of state-saving and rollback. The analysis points out sufficient conditions for the conservative protocol to outperform Time Warp. The analysis also quantifies the sensitivity of performance to message fan-out, lookahead ability, and the probability distributions underlying the simulation.

  4. Quantitative standards for absolute linguistic universals.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Steven T; Gibson, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Absolute linguistic universals are often justified by cross-linguistic analysis: If all observed languages exhibit a property, the property is taken to be a likely universal, perhaps specified in the cognitive or linguistic systems of language learners and users. In many cases, these patterns are then taken to motivate linguistic theory. Here, we show that cross-linguistic analysis will very rarely be able to statistically justify absolute, inviolable patterns in language. We formalize two statistical methods--frequentist and Bayesian--and show that in both it is possible to find strict linguistic universals, but that the numbers of independent languages necessary to do so is generally unachievable. This suggests that methods other than typological statistics are necessary to establish absolute properties of human language, and thus that many of the purported universals in linguistics have not received sufficient empirical justification.

  5. Absolute Distance Measurement with the MSTAR Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Oliver P.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Peters, Robert; Burger, Johan; Ahn, Seh-Won; Steier, William H.; Fetterman, Harrold R.; Chang, Yian

    2003-01-01

    The MSTAR sensor (Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Ranging) is a new system for measuring absolute distance, capable of resolving the integer cycle ambiguity of standard interferometers, and making it possible to measure distance with sub-nanometer accuracy. The sensor uses a single laser in conjunction with fast phase modulators and low frequency detectors. We describe the design of the system - the principle of operation, the metrology source, beamlaunching optics, and signal processing - and show results for target distances up to 1 meter. We then demonstrate how the system can be scaled to kilometer-scale distances.

  6. Absolutely relative or relatively absolute: violations of value invariance in human decision making.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Andrei R; Moran, Rani; Usher, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Making decisions based on relative rather than absolute information processing is tied to choice optimality via the accumulation of evidence differences and to canonical neural processing via accumulation of evidence ratios. These theoretical frameworks predict invariance of decision latencies to absolute intensities that maintain differences and ratios, respectively. While information about the absolute values of the choice alternatives is not necessary for choosing the best alternative, it may nevertheless hold valuable information about the context of the decision. To test the sensitivity of human decision making to absolute values, we manipulated the intensities of brightness stimuli pairs while preserving either their differences or their ratios. Although asked to choose the brighter alternative relative to the other, participants responded faster to higher absolute values. Thus, our results provide empirical evidence for human sensitivity to task irrelevant absolute values indicating a hard-wired mechanism that precedes executive control. Computational investigations of several modelling architectures reveal two alternative accounts for this phenomenon, which combine absolute and relative processing. One account involves accumulation of differences with activation dependent processing noise and the other emerges from accumulation of absolute values subject to the temporal dynamics of lateral inhibition. The potential adaptive role of such choice mechanisms is discussed.

  7. Estimation variance bounds of importance sampling simulations in digital communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, D.; Yao, K.

    1991-01-01

    In practical applications of importance sampling (IS) simulation, two basic problems are encountered, that of determining the estimation variance and that of evaluating the proper IS parameters needed in the simulations. The authors derive new upper and lower bounds on the estimation variance which are applicable to IS techniques. The upper bound is simple to evaluate and may be minimized by the proper selection of the IS parameter. Thus, lower and upper bounds on the improvement ratio of various IS techniques relative to the direct Monte Carlo simulation are also available. These bounds are shown to be useful and computationally simple to obtain. Based on the proposed technique, one can readily find practical suboptimum IS parameters. Numerical results indicate that these bounding techniques are useful for IS simulations of linear and nonlinear communication systems with intersymbol interference in which bit error rate and IS estimation variances cannot be obtained readily using prior techniques.

  8. Enhancements of branch and bound methods for the maximal constraint satisfaction problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Two methods are described for enhancing performance of branch and bound methods for overconstrained CSPs. These methods improve either the upper or lower bound, respectively, during search, so the two can be combined. Upper bounds are improved by using heuristic repair methods before search to find a good solution quickly, whose cost is used as the initial upper bound. The method for improving lower bounds is an extension of directed arc consistency preprocessing, used in conjunction with forward checking. After computing directed arc consistency counts, inferred counts are computed for all values based on minimum counts for values of adjacent variables that are later in the search order. This inference process can be iterated, so that counts are cascaded from the end to the beginning of the search order, to augment the initial counts. Improvements in time and effort are demonstrated for both techniques using random problems.

  9. Culture-bound syndromes.

    PubMed

    Levine, R E; Gaw, A C

    1995-09-01

    Since its inception, scholars have struggled with the concept of CBSs. This struggle is reflected in the continuing use of a term that is confusing and inaccurate. Most authors would agree that the term "culture-bound syndrome" was intended to describe forms of otherwise common mental illness that are rendered unusual because of the pathoplastic influence of culture. It was intended not only to describe specific syndromes, but also meanings of illness and non-Western notions of disease causation. The term has become an anachronism, for the word, "syndrome," implies specific disease entities, not illnesses of attribution of idioms of distress. Furthermore, the word "bound" implies that the entities described are restricted to a single culture. Close examination reveals that many of the so-called "culture-bound" syndromes are found in multiple cultures that have in common only that they are "non-Western." It may be unreasonable to expect one term to describe these different concepts. The most accurate of the designations offered might be "folk diagnostic categories." Perhaps the most difficult question remaining is "How can we understand (and classify) these phenomena in such a way that highlights their uniqueness but does not dismiss them as too rare and exotic to warrant attention?" The first step is to recognize that the CBSs are a heterogeneous group of conditions. We must next acknowledge that the concepts represented may be difficult for the average Western clinician to recognize but, in their respective cultures, are neither rare nor unusual. With 80% of our increasingly shrinking world coming from "non-Western" cultures, a familiarity with non-Western notions of disease causation is particularly important for modern clinicians. Many authors have recommended that those CBSs that are "true" syndromes be classified together with their Western counterparts. In order to do this, the folk labels need to be put aside and the fundamental components of each disorder

  10. Vibrational Bound States of the He2Ne+ Cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zúniga, José; Bastida, Adolfo; Requena, Alberto; Halberstadt, Nadine; Beswick, J. Alberto; Janda, Kenneth C.

    2009-10-01

    The vibrational bound states of the He2Ne+ complex have been determined using a potential energy surface previously published by Seong et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 2004, 120, 7456]. The calculation was performed by sequential diagonalization-truncation techniques in a discrete variable representation using Radau hyperspherical coordinates. There are 52 bound levels. The ground state has an energy of 605.3 cm-1 above the absolute minimum and lies about half way to dissociation. The evaporation energy of one He atom is equal to 866.1 cm-1. Only four levels have energies below the classical energy for dissociation, and all the other 48 states are bound by the zero-point energy of the HeNe+ fragment. The implications of the properties of the eigenvalue spectrum and of the corresponding wave functions on the vibrational relaxation dynamics and infrared spectra of HeNNe+ clusters is discussed.

  11. Blockage of upper airway

    MedlinePlus

    ... Airway obstruction - acute upper Images Throat anatomy Choking Respiratory system References Cukor J, Manno M. Pediatric respiratory emergencies: upper airway obstruction and infections. In: Marx ...

  12. Comparative vs. Absolute Judgments of Trait Desirability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstee, Willem K. B.

    1970-01-01

    Reversals of trait desirability are studied. Terms indicating conservativw behavior appeared to be judged relatively desirable in comparative judgement, while traits indicating dynamic and expansive behavior benefited from absolute judgement. The reversal effect was shown to be a general one, i.e. reversals were not dependent upon the specific…

  13. New Techniques for Absolute Gravity Measurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-07

    Hammond, J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J. A., and Iliff, R. L. (1979) The AFGL absolute gravity system...International Gravimetric Bureau, No. L:I-43. 7. Hammond. J.A. (1978) Bollettino Di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata Vol. XX. 8. Hammond, J.A., and

  14. An Absolute Electrometer for the Physics Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.; Cartacci, A.

    2009-01-01

    A low-cost, easy-to-use absolute electrometer is presented: two thin metallic plates and an electronic balance, usually available in a laboratory, are used. We report on the very good performance of the device that allows precise measurements of the force acting between two charged plates. (Contains 5 footnotes, 2 tables, and 6 figures.)

  15. Stimulus Probability Effects in Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Christopher; Lamberts, Koen

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of stimulus presentation probability on accuracy and response times in an absolute identification task. Three schedules of presentation were used to investigate the interaction between presentation probability and stimulus position within the set. Data from individual participants indicated strong effects of…

  16. Absolute Positioning Using the Global Positioning System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has becom a useful tool In providing relativ survey...Includes the development of a low cost navigator for wheeled vehicles. ABSTRACT The Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has become a useful tool In providing...technique of absolute or point positioning involves the use of a single Global Positioning System ( GPS ) receiver to determine the three-dimenslonal

  17. ON COMPUTING UPPER LIMITS TO SOURCE INTENSITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Van Dyk, David A.; Xu Jin; Connors, Alanna; Freeman, Peter E.; Zezas, Andreas E-mail: asiemiginowska@cfa.harvard.ed E-mail: jinx@ics.uci.ed E-mail: pfreeman@cmu.ed

    2010-08-10

    A common problem in astrophysics is determining how bright a source could be and still not be detected in an observation. Despite the simplicity with which the problem can be stated, the solution involves complicated statistical issues that require careful analysis. In contrast to the more familiar confidence bound, this concept has never been formally analyzed, leading to a great variety of often ad hoc solutions. Here we formulate and describe the problem in a self-consistent manner. Detection significance is usually defined by the acceptable proportion of false positives (background fluctuations that are claimed as detections, or Type I error), and we invoke the complementary concept of false negatives (real sources that go undetected, or Type II error), based on the statistical power of a test, to compute an upper limit to the detectable source intensity. To determine the minimum intensity that a source must have for it to be detected, we first define a detection threshold and then compute the probabilities of detecting sources of various intensities at the given threshold. The intensity that corresponds to the specified Type II error probability defines that minimum intensity and is identified as the upper limit. Thus, an upper limit is a characteristic of the detection procedure rather than the strength of any particular source. It should not be confused with confidence intervals or other estimates of source intensity. This is particularly important given the large number of catalogs that are being generated from increasingly sensitive surveys. We discuss, with examples, the differences between these upper limits and confidence bounds. Both measures are useful quantities that should be reported in order to extract the most science from catalogs, though they answer different statistical questions: an upper bound describes an inference range on the source intensity, while an upper limit calibrates the detection process. We provide a recipe for computing upper

  18. Pricing bounds for discrete arithmetic Asian options under Lévy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmens, D.; Liang, L. Z. J.; Tempere, J.; De Schepper, A.

    2010-11-01

    Analytical bounds for Asian options are almost exclusively available in the Black-Scholes framework. In this paper we derive bounds for the price of a discretely monitored arithmetic Asian option when the underlying asset follows an arbitrary Lévy process. Explicit formulas are given for Kou’s model, Merton’s model, the normal inverse Gaussian model, the CGMY model and the variance gamma model. The results are compared with the comonotonic upper bound, existing numerical results, Monte carlo simulations and in the case of the variance gamma model with an existing lower bound. The method outlined here provides lower and upper bounds that are quick to evaluate, and more accurate than existing bounds.

  19. Absolute Radiation Thermometry in the NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünger, L.; Taubert, R. D.; Gutschwager, B.; Anhalt, K.; Briaudeau, S.; Sadli, M.

    2017-04-01

    A near infrared (NIR) radiation thermometer (RT) for temperature measurements in the range from 773 K up to 1235 K was characterized and calibrated in terms of the "Mise en Pratique for the definition of the Kelvin" (MeP-K) by measuring its absolute spectral radiance responsivity. Using Planck's law of thermal radiation allows the direct measurement of the thermodynamic temperature independently of any ITS-90 fixed-point. To determine the absolute spectral radiance responsivity of the radiation thermometer in the NIR spectral region, an existing PTB monochromator-based calibration setup was upgraded with a supercontinuum laser system (0.45 μm to 2.4 μm) resulting in a significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio. The RT was characterized with respect to its nonlinearity, size-of-source effect, distance effect, and the consistency of its individual temperature measuring ranges. To further improve the calibration setup, a new tool for the aperture alignment and distance measurement was developed. Furthermore, the diffraction correction as well as the impedance correction of the current-to-voltage converter is considered. The calibration scheme and the corresponding uncertainty budget of the absolute spectral responsivity are presented. A relative standard uncertainty of 0.1 % (k=1) for the absolute spectral radiance responsivity was achieved. The absolute radiometric calibration was validated at four temperature values with respect to the ITS-90 via a variable temperature heatpipe blackbody (773 K ...1235 K) and at a gold fixed-point blackbody radiator (1337.33 K).

  20. Bound Rationality and Organizational Learning.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-23

    8217 . 90 0 8 0.. O 4 BOUNDED RATIONALITY AND ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING Technical Report AlP - 107 Herbert A. Simon Department of Psychology Carnegie Mellon...ACCESSION No N/A N/A N/A N/A 1 1 TITLE (include Security Classificarnon) Bounded rationality and organizational learning 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) HretA io 13a...organizations organizational psychology organizational learning bounded rationality cognitive psychology 𔄃 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary

  1. Efficiency bounds for nonequilibrium heat engines

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Pankaj; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2013-05-15

    We analyze the efficiency of thermal engines (either quantum or classical) working with a single heat reservoir like an atmosphere. The engine first gets an energy intake, which can be done in an arbitrary nonequilibrium way e.g. combustion of fuel. Then the engine performs the work and returns to the initial state. We distinguish two general classes of engines where the working body first equilibrates within itself and then performs the work (ergodic engine) or when it performs the work before equilibrating (non-ergodic engine). We show that in both cases the second law of thermodynamics limits their efficiency. For ergodic engines we find a rigorous upper bound for the efficiency, which is strictly smaller than the equivalent Carnot efficiency. I.e. the Carnot efficiency can be never achieved in single reservoir heat engines. For non-ergodic engines the efficiency can be higher and can exceed the equilibrium Carnot bound. By extending the fundamental thermodynamic relation to nonequilibrium processes, we find a rigorous thermodynamic bound for the efficiency of both ergodic and non-ergodic engines and show that it is given by the relative entropy of the nonequilibrium and initial equilibrium distributions. These results suggest a new general strategy for designing more efficient engines. We illustrate our ideas by using simple examples. -- Highlights: ► Derived efficiency bounds for heat engines working with a single reservoir. ► Analyzed both ergodic and non-ergodic engines. ► Showed that non-ergodic engines can be more efficient. ► Extended fundamental thermodynamic relation to arbitrary nonequilibrium processes.

  2. Energy Bounds for a Compressed Elastic Film on a Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, David P.; Conti, Sergio; Müller, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    We study pattern formation in a compressed elastic film which delaminates from a substrate. Our key tool is the determination of rigorous upper and lower bounds on the minimum value of a suitable energy functional. The energy consists of two parts, describing the two main physical effects. The first part represents the elastic energy of the film, which is approximated using the von Kármán plate theory. The second part represents the fracture or delamination energy, which is approximated using the Griffith model of fracture. A simpler model containing the first term alone was previously studied with similar methods by several authors, assuming that the delaminated region is fixed. We include the fracture term, transforming the elastic minimisation into a free boundary problem, and opening the way for patterns which result from the interplay of elasticity and delamination. After rescaling, the energy depends on only two parameters: the rescaled film thickness, {σ }, and a measure of the bonding strength between the film and substrate, {γ }. We prove upper bounds on the minimum energy of the form {σ }^a {γ }^b and find that there are four different parameter regimes corresponding to different values of a and b and to different folding patterns of the film. In some cases, the upper bounds are attained by self-similar folding patterns as observed in experiments. Moreover, for two of the four parameter regimes we prove matching, optimal lower bounds.

  3. Seesaw model in SO(10) with an upper limit on right-handed neutrino masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abud, M.; Buccella, F.; Falcone, D.; Oliver, L.

    2012-08-01

    In the framework of SO(10) gauge unification and the seesaw mechanism, we show that the upper bound on the mass of the heaviest right-handed neutrino MR3<3×1011GeV, given by the Pati-Salam intermediate scale of B-L spontaneous symmetry breaking, constrains the observables related to the left-handed light neutrino mass matrix. We assume such an upper limit on the masses of right-handed neutrinos and, as a first approximation, a Cabibbo form for the matrix VL that diagonalizes the Dirac neutrino matrix mD. Using the inverse seesaw formula, we show that our hypotheses imply a triangular relation in the complex plane of the light neutrino masses with the Majorana phases. We obtain normal hierarchy with an absolute scale for the light neutrino spectrum. Two regions are allowed for the lightest neutrino mass m1 and for the Majorana phases, implying predictions for the neutrino mass measured in Tritium decay and for the double beta decay effective mass |⟨mee⟩|.

  4. From Hubble's NGSL to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, Don

    2012-01-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R-l000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.00 microns. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsll. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We are therefore developing an observing procedure that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1 % and will take part in an HST proposal to observe up to 15 stars using this new procedure.

  5. Absolute measurement of length with nanometric resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, D.; Garoi, F.; Timcu, A.; Damian, V.; Logofatu, P. C.; Nascov, V.

    2005-08-01

    Laser interferometer displacement measuring transducers have a well-defined traceability route to the definition of the meter. The laser interferometer is de-facto length scale for applications in micro and nano technologies. However their physical unit -half lambda is too large for nanometric resolution. Fringe interpolation-usual technique to improve the resolution-lack of reproducibility could be avoided using the principles of absolute distance measurement. Absolute distance refers to the use of interferometric techniques for determining the position of an object without the necessity of measuring continuous displacements between points. The interference pattern as produced by the interference of two point-like coherent sources is fitted to a geometric model so as to determine the longitudinal location of the target by minimizing least square errors. The longitudinal coordinate of the target was measured with accuracy better than 1 nm, for a target position range of 0.4μm.

  6. Asteroid absolute magnitudes and slope parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedesco, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    A new listing of absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) has been created and published in the Minor Planet Circulars; this same listing will appear in the 1992 Ephemerides of Minor Planets. Unlike previous listings, the values of the current list were derived from fits of data at the V band. All observations were reduced in the same fashion using, where appropriate, a single basis default value of 0.15 for the slope parameter. Distances and phase angles were computed for each observation. The data for 113 asteroids was of sufficiently high quality to permit derivation of their H and G. These improved absolute magnitudes and slope parameters will be used to deduce the most reliable bias-corrected asteroid size-frequency distribution yet made.

  7. Computer processing of spectrograms for absolute intensities.

    PubMed

    Guttman, A; Golden, J; Galbraith, H J

    1967-09-01

    A computer program was developed to process photographically recorded spectra for absolute intensity. Test and calibration films are subjected to densitometric scans that provide digitally recorded densities on magnetic tapes. The nonlinear calibration data are fitted by least-squares cubic polynomials to yield a good approximation to the monochromatic H&D curves for commonly used emulsions (2475 recording film, Royal-X, Tri-X, 4-X). Several test cases were made. Results of these cases show that the machine processed absolute intensities are accurate to within 15%o. Arbitrarily raising the sensitivity threshold by 0.1 density units above gross fog yields cubic polynomial fits to the H&D curves that are radiometrically accurate within 10%. In addition, curves of gamma vs wavelength for 2475, Tri-X, and 4-X emulsions were made. These data show slight evidence of the photographic Purkinje effect in the 2475 emulsion.

  8. An absolute measure for a key currency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Shunsuke; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Hirata, Yoshito

    It is generally considered that the US dollar and the euro are the key currencies in the world and in Europe, respectively. However, there is no absolute general measure for a key currency. Here, we investigate the 24-hour periodicity of foreign exchange markets using a recurrence plot, and define an absolute measure for a key currency based on the strength of the periodicity. Moreover, we analyze the time evolution of this measure. The results show that the credibility of the US dollar has not decreased significantly since the Lehman shock, when the Lehman Brothers bankrupted and influenced the economic markets, and has increased even relatively better than that of the euro and that of the Japanese yen.

  9. Probing absolute spin polarization at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Eltschka, Matthias; Jäck, Berthold; Assig, Maximilian; Kondrashov, Oleg V; Skvortsov, Mikhail A; Etzkorn, Markus; Ast, Christian R; Kern, Klaus

    2014-12-10

    Probing absolute values of spin polarization at the nanoscale offers insight into the fundamental mechanisms of spin-dependent transport. Employing the Zeeman splitting in superconducting tips (Meservey-Tedrow-Fulde effect), we introduce a novel spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy that combines the probing capability of the absolute values of spin polarization with precise control at the atomic scale. We utilize our novel approach to measure the locally resolved spin polarization of magnetic Co nanoislands on Cu(111). We find that the spin polarization is enhanced by 65% when increasing the width of the tunnel barrier by only 2.3 Å due to the different decay of the electron orbitals into vacuum.

  10. Absolute and relative dosimetry for ELIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Candiano, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Leonora, E.; Lo Presti, D.; Musumarra, A.; Pisciotta, P.; Raffaele, L.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.; Cirio, R.; Marchetto, F.; Sacchi, R.; Giordanengo, S.; Monaco, V.

    2013-07-01

    The definition of detectors, methods and procedures for the absolute and relative dosimetry of laser-driven proton beams is a crucial step toward the clinical use of this new kind of beams. Hence, one of the ELIMED task, will be the definition of procedures aiming to obtain an absolute dose measure at the end of the transport beamline with an accuracy as close as possible to the one required for clinical applications (i.e. of the order of 5% or less). Relative dosimetry procedures must be established, as well: they are necessary in order to determine and verify the beam dose distributions and to monitor the beam fluence and the energetic spectra during irradiations. Radiochromic films, CR39, Faraday Cup, Secondary Emission Monitor (SEM) and transmission ionization chamber will be considered, designed and studied in order to perform a fully dosimetric characterization of the ELIMED proton beam.

  11. Silicon Absolute X-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Korde, Raj; Sprunck, Jacob; Medjoubi, Kadda; Hustache, Stephanie

    2010-06-23

    The responsivity of silicon photodiodes having no loss in the entrance window, measured using synchrotron radiation in the 1.75 to 60 keV range, was compared to the responsivity calculated using the silicon thickness measured using near-infrared light. The measured and calculated responsivities agree with an average difference of 1.3%. This enables their use as absolute x-ray detectors.

  12. Measurement of absolute gravity acceleration in Firenze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, M.; Greco, F.; Pistorio, A.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Saccorotti, G.; Sorrentino, F.; Tino, G. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results from the accurate measurement of the acceleration of gravity g taken at two separate premises in the Polo Scientifico of the University of Firenze (Italy). In these laboratories, two separate experiments aiming at measuring the Newtonian constant and testing the Newtonian law at short distances are in progress. Both experiments require an independent knowledge on the local value of g. The only available datum, pertaining to the italian zero-order gravity network, was taken more than 20 years ago at a distance of more than 60 km from the study site. Gravity measurements were conducted using an FG5 absolute gravimeter, and accompanied by seismic recordings for evaluating the noise condition at the site. The absolute accelerations of gravity at the two laboratories are (980 492 160.6 ± 4.0) μGal and (980 492 048.3 ± 3.0) μGal for the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, respectively. Other than for the two referenced experiments, the data here presented will serve as a benchmark for any future study requiring an accurate knowledge of the absolute value of the acceleration of gravity in the study region.

  13. System for absolute measurements by interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Douglas A.

    1993-03-01

    The most common problem of interferometric sensors is their inability to measure absolute path imbalance. Presented in this paper is a signal processing system that gives absolute, unambiguous reading of optical path difference for almost any style of interferometric sensor. Key components are a wide band (incoherent) optical source, a polychromator, and FFT electronics. Advantages include no moving parts in the signal processor, no active components at the sensor location, and the use of standard single mode fiber for sensor illumination and signal transmission. Actual absolute path imbalance of the interferometer is determined without using fringe counting or other inferential techniques. The polychromator extracts the interference information that occurs at each discrete wavelength within the spectral band of the optical source. The signal processing consists of analog and digital filtering, Fast Fourier analysis, and a peak detection and interpolation algorithm. This system was originally designed for use in a remote pressure sensing application that employed a totally passive fiber optic interferometer. A performance qualification was made using a Fabry-Perot interferometer and a commercially available laser interferometer to measure the reference displacement.

  14. Chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil.

    PubMed

    Perriot, Rodolphe; Breme, Katharina; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Carenini, Elise; Ferrando, Georges; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2010-02-10

    Since decades mimosa (Acacia dealbata) absolute oil has been used in the flavor and perfume industry. Today, it finds an application in over 80 perfumes, and its worldwide industrial production is estimated five tons per year. Here we report on the chemical composition of French mimosa absolute oil. Straight-chain analogues from C6 to C26 with different functional groups (hydrocarbons, esters, aldehydes, diethyl acetals, alcohols, and ketones) were identified in the volatile fraction. Most of them are long-chain molecules: (Z)-heptadec-8-ene, heptadecane, nonadecane, and palmitic acid are the most abundant, and constituents such as 2-phenethyl alcohol, methyl anisate, and ethyl palmitate are present in smaller amounts. The heavier constituents were mainly triterpenoids such as lupenone and lupeol, which were identified as two of the main components. (Z)-Heptadec-8-ene, lupenone, and lupeol were quantified by GC-MS in SIM mode using external standards and represents 6%, 20%, and 7.8% (w/w) of the absolute oil. Moreover, odorant compounds were extracted by SPME and analyzed by GC-sniffing leading to the perception of 57 odorant zones, of which 37 compounds were identified by their odorant description, mass spectrum, retention index, and injection of the reference compound.

  15. Constrained Least Absolute Deviation Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhishun; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that least absolute deviation (LAD) criterion or L1-norm used for estimation of parameters is characterized by robustness, i.e., the estimated parameters are totally resistant (insensitive) to large changes in the sampled data. This is an extremely useful feature, especially, when the sampled data are known to be contaminated by occasionally occurring outliers or by spiky noise. In our previous works, we have proposed the least absolute deviation neural network (LADNN) to solve unconstrained LAD problems. The theoretical proofs and numerical simulations have shown that the LADNN is Lyapunov-stable and it can globally converge to the exact solution to a given unconstrained LAD problem. We have also demonstrated its excellent application value in time-delay estimation. More generally, a practical LAD application problem may contain some linear constraints, such as a set of equalities and/or inequalities, which is called constrained LAD problem, whereas the unconstrained LAD can be considered as a special form of the constrained LAD. In this paper, we present a new neural network called constrained least absolute deviation neural network (CLADNN) to solve general constrained LAD problems. Theoretical proofs and numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed CLADNN is Lyapunov stable and globally converges to the exact solution to a given constrained LAD problem, independent of initial values. The numerical simulations have also illustrated that the proposed CLADNN can be used to robustly estimate parameters for nonlinear curve fitting, which is extensively used in signal and image processing. PMID:18269958

  16. Bounds on Block Error Probability for Multilevel Concatenated Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu; Moorthy, Hari T.; Stojanovic, Diana

    1996-01-01

    Maximum likelihood decoding of long block codes is not feasable due to large complexity. Some classes of codes are shown to be decomposable into multilevel concatenated codes (MLCC). For these codes, multistage decoding provides good trade-off between performance and complexity. In this paper, we derive an upper bound on the probability of block error for MLCC. We use this bound to evaluate difference in performance for different decompositions of some codes. Examples given show that a significant reduction in complexity can be achieved when increasing number of stages of decoding. Resulting performance degradation varies for different decompositions. A guideline is given for finding good m-level decompositions.

  17. Experimental bounds on collapse models from gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlesso, Matteo; Bassi, Angelo; Falferi, Paolo; Vinante, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Wave function collapse models postulate a fundamental breakdown of the quantum superposition principle at the macroscale. Therefore, experimental tests of collapse models are also fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. Here, we compute the upper bounds on the collapse parameters, which can be inferred by the gravitational wave detectors LIGO, LISA Pathfinder, and AURIGA. We consider the most widely used collapse model, the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model. We show that these experiments exclude a huge portion of the CSL parameter space, the strongest bound being set by the recently launched space mission LISA Pathfinder. We also rule out a proposal for quantum-gravity-induced decoherence.

  18. Northwest Outward Bound Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Outward Bound School, Portland, OR.

    Instructor responsibilities, procedures for completing activities safely, and instructional methods and techniques are outlined to assist instructors in the Northwest Outward Bound School (Portland, Oregon) as they strive for teaching excellence. Information is organized into six chapters addressing: history and philosophy of Outward Bound; course…

  19. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGES

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; ...

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  20. Metabolism of organically bound tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    The classic methodology for estimating dose to man from environmental tritium ignores the fact that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs may be directly assimilated in the bound compartment of tissues without previous oxidation. We propose a four-compartment model consisting of a free body water compartment, two organic compartments, and a small, rapidly metabolizing compartment. The utility of this model lies in the ability to input organically bound tritium in foodstuffs directly into the organic compartments of the model. We found that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs can increase cumulative total body dose by a factor of 1.7 to 4.5 times the free body water dose alone, depending on the bound-to-loose ratio of tritium in the diet. Model predictions are compared with empirical measurements of tritium in human urine and tissue samples, and appear to be in close agreement. 10 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Upper Limit of Weights in TAI Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Claudine; Azoubib, Jacques

    1996-01-01

    The international reference time scale International Atomic Time (TAI) computed by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) relies on a weighted average of data from a large number of atomic clocks. In it, the weight attributed to a given clock depends on its long-term stability. In this paper the TAI algorithm is used as the basis for a discussion of how to implement an upper limit of weight for clocks contributing to the ensemble time. This problem is approached through the comparison of two different techniques. In one case, a maximum relative weight is fixed: no individual clock can contribute more than a given fraction to the resulting time scale. The weight of each clock is then adjusted according to the qualities of the whole set of contributing elements. In the other case, a parameter characteristic of frequency stability is chosen: no individual clock can appear more stable than the stated limit. This is equivalent to choosing an absolute limit of weight and attributing this to to the most stable clocks independently of the other elements of the ensemble. The first technique is more robust than the second and automatically optimizes the stability of the resulting time scale, but leads to a more complicated computatio. The second technique has been used in the TAI algorithm since the very beginning. Careful analysis of tests on real clock data shows that improvement of the stability of the time scale requires revision from time to time of the fixed value chosen for the upper limit of absolute weight. In particular, we present results which confirm the decision of the CCDS Working Group on TAI to increase the absolute upper limit by a factor of 2.5. We also show that the use of an upper relative contribution further helps to improve the stability and may be a useful step towards better use of the massive ensemble of HP 507IA clocks now contributing to TAI.

  2. The Dynamic Electric Polarizability of a Particle Bound by a Double Delta Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maize, M. A.; Smetanka, J. J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we derive an expression for the dynamic electric polarizability of a particle bound by a double delta potential for frequencies below and above the absolute value of the particle's ground state energy. The derived expression will be used to study some of the fundamental features of the system and its representation of real systems.…

  3. Cosmic backgrounds of relic gravitons and their absolute normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    Provided the consistency relations are not violated, the recent BICEP2 observations pin down the absolute normalization, the spectral slope and the maximal frequency of the cosmic graviton background produced during inflation. The properly normalized spectra are hereby computed from the lowest frequencies (of the order of the present Hubble rate) up to the highest frequency range in the GHz region. Deviations from the conventional paradigm cannot be excluded and are examined by allowing for different physical possibilities including, in particular, a running of the tensor spectral index, an explicit breaking of the consistency relations and a spike in the high-frequency tail of the spectrum coming either from a post-inflationary phase dominated by a stiff fluid or from the contribution of waterfall fields in a hybrid inflationary context. The direct determinations of the tensor to scalar ratio at low frequencies, if confirmed by the forthcoming observations, will also affect and constrain the high-frequency uncertainties. The limits on the cosmic graviton backgrounds coming from wide-band interferometers (such as LIGO/Virgo, LISA and BBO/DECIGO) together with a more accurate scrutiny of the tensor B-mode polarization at low frequencies will set direct bounds on the post-inflationary evolution and on other unconventional completions of the standard lore.

  4. On the calculation of absolute macromolecular binding free energies

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hengbin; Sharp, Kim

    2002-01-01

    The standard framework for calculating the absolute binding free energy of a macromolecular association reaction A + B → AB with an association constant KAB is to equate chemical potentials of the species on the left- and right-hand sides of this reaction and evaluate the chemical potentials from theory. This theory involves (usually hidden) assumptions about what constitutes the bound species, AB, and where the contribution of the solvent appears. We present here an alternative derivation that can be traced back to Bjerrum, in which the expectation value of KAB is obtained directly through the statistical mechanical method of evaluating its ensemble (Boltzmann-weighted) average. The generalized Bjerrum approach more clearly delineates: (i) the different contributions to binding; (ii) the origin of the much-discussed and somewhat controversial association entropy term; and (iii) where the solvent contribution appears. This approach also allows approximations required for practical evaluation of the binding constant in complex macromolecular systems, to be introduced in a well defined way. We provide an example, with application to test cases that illustrate a range of binding behavior. PMID:12149474

  5. Absolute versus convective helical magnetorotational instability in a Taylor-Couette flow.

    PubMed

    Priede, Jānis; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2009-04-01

    We analyze numerically the magnetorotational instability of a Taylor-Couette flow in a helical magnetic field [helical magnetorotational instability (HMRI)] using the inductionless approximation defined by a zero magnetic Prandtl number (Pr_{m}=0) . The Chebyshev collocation method is used to calculate the eigenvalue spectrum for small-amplitude perturbations. First, we carry out a detailed conventional linear stability analysis with respect to perturbations in the form of Fourier modes that corresponds to the convective instability which is not in general self-sustained. The helical magnetic field is found to extend the instability to a relatively narrow range beyond its purely hydrodynamic limit defined by the Rayleigh line. There is not only a lower critical threshold at which HMRI appears but also an upper one at which it disappears again. The latter distinguishes the HMRI from a magnetically modified Taylor vortex flow. Second, we find an absolute instability threshold as well. In the hydrodynamically unstable regime before the Rayleigh line, the threshold of absolute instability is just slightly above the convective one although the critical wavelength of the former is noticeably shorter than that of the latter. Beyond the Rayleigh line the lower threshold of absolute instability rises significantly above the corresponding convective one while the upper one descends significantly below its convective counterpart. As a result, the extension of the absolute HMRI beyond the Rayleigh line is considerably shorter than that of the convective instability. The absolute HMRI is supposed to be self-sustained and, thus, experimentally observable without any external excitation in a system of sufficiently large axial extension.

  6. Butterfly velocity bound and reverse isoperimetric inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xing-Hui; Lü, H.

    2017-03-01

    We study the butterfly effect of the AdS planar black holes in the framework of Einstein's general relativity. We find that the butterfly velocities can be expressed by a universal formula vB2=T S /(2 VthP ). In doing so, we come upon a near-horizon geometrical formula for the thermodynamical volume Vth . We verify the volume formula by examining a variety of AdS black holes. We also show that the volume formula implies that the conjectured reverse isoperimetric inequality follows straightforwardly from the null-energy condition, for static AdS black holes. The inequality is thus related to an upper bound of the butterfly velocities.

  7. Evidence for a bound on the lifetime of de Sitter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freivogel, Ben; Lippert, Matthew

    2008-12-01

    Recent work has suggested a surprising new upper bound on the lifetime of de Sitter vacua in string theory. The bound is parametrically longer than the Hubble time but parametrically shorter than the recurrence time. We investigate whether the bound is satisfied in a particular class of de Sitter solutions, the KKLT vacua. Despite the freedom to make the supersymmetry breaking scale exponentially small, which naively would lead to extremely stable vacua, we find that the lifetime is always less than about exp(1022) Hubble times, in agreement with the proposed bound. This result, however, is contingent on several estimates and assumptions; in particular, we rely on a conjectural upper bound on the Euler number of the Calabi-Yau fourfolds used in KKLT compactifications.

  8. Clock time is absolute and universal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xinhang

    2015-09-01

    A critical error is found in the Special Theory of Relativity (STR): mixing up the concepts of the STR abstract time of a reference frame and the displayed time of a physical clock, which leads to use the properties of the abstract time to predict time dilation on physical clocks and all other physical processes. Actually, a clock can never directly measure the abstract time, but can only record the result of a physical process during a period of the abstract time such as the number of cycles of oscillation which is the multiplication of the abstract time and the frequency of oscillation. After Lorentz Transformation, the abstract time of a reference frame expands by a factor gamma, but the frequency of a clock decreases by the same factor gamma, and the resulting multiplication i.e. the displayed time of a moving clock remains unchanged. That is, the displayed time of any physical clock is an invariant of Lorentz Transformation. The Lorentz invariance of the displayed times of clocks can further prove within the framework of STR our earth based standard physical time is absolute, universal and independent of inertial reference frames as confirmed by both the physical fact of the universal synchronization of clocks on the GPS satellites and clocks on the earth, and the theoretical existence of the absolute and universal Galilean time in STR which has proved that time dilation and space contraction are pure illusions of STR. The existence of the absolute and universal time in STR has directly denied that the reference frame dependent abstract time of STR is the physical time, and therefore, STR is wrong and all its predictions can never happen in the physical world.

  9. Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wielicki, Bruce A.; Young, D. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Thome, K. J; Leroy, S.; Corliss, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Ao, C. O.; Bantges, R.; Best, F.; Bowman, K.; Brindley, H.; Butler, J. J.; Collins, W.; Dykema, J. A.; Doelling, D. R.; Feldman, D. R.; Fox, N.; Huang, X.; Holz, R.; Huang, Y.; Jennings, D.; Jin, Z.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K.; Kato, S.; Kratz, D. P.; Liu, X.; Lukashin, C.; Mannucci, A. J.; Phojanamongkolkij, N.; Roithmayr, C. M.; Sandford, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Xiong, X.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5-50 micron), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320-2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a "NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit." CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

  10. DEB: definite error bounded tangent estimator for digital curves.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Dilip K; Leung, Maylor K H; Quek, Chai; Brown, Michael S

    2014-10-01

    We propose a simple and fast method for tangent estimation of digital curves. This geometric-based method uses a small local region for tangent estimation and has a definite upper bound error for continuous as well as digital conics, i.e., circles, ellipses, parabolas, and hyperbolas. Explicit expressions of the upper bounds for continuous and digitized curves are derived, which can also be applied to nonconic curves. Our approach is benchmarked against 72 contemporary tangent estimation methods and demonstrates good performance for conic, nonconic, and noisy curves. In addition, we demonstrate a good multigrid and isotropic performance and low computational complexity of O(1) and better performance than most methods in terms of maximum and average errors in tangent computation for a large variety of digital curves.

  11. Brownian motion: Absolute negative particle mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Alexandra; Eichhorn, Ralf; Regtmeier, Jan; Duong, Thanh Tu; Reimann, Peter; Anselmetti, Dario

    2005-08-01

    Noise effects in technological applications, far from being a nuisance, can be exploited with advantage - for example, unavoidable thermal fluctuations have found application in the transport and sorting of colloidal particles and biomolecules. Here we use a microfluidic system to demonstrate a paradoxical migration mechanism in which particles always move in a direction opposite to the net acting force (`absolute negative mobility') as a result of an interplay between thermal noise, a periodic and symmetric microstructure, and a biased alternating-current electric field. This counterintuitive phenomenon could be used for bioanalytical purposes, for example in the separation and fractionation of colloids, biological molecules and cells.

  12. Arbitrary segments of absolute negative mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruyin; Nie, Linru; Chen, Chongyang; Wang, Chaojie

    2017-01-01

    In previous research work, investigators have reported only one or two segments of absolute negative mobility (ANM) in a periodic potential. In fact, many segments of ANM also occur in the system considered here. We investigate transport of an inertial particle in a gating ratchet periodic potential subjected to a constant bias force. Our numerical results show that its mean velocity can decrease with the bias force increasing, i.e. ANM phenomenon. Furthermore, the ANM can take place arbitrary segments, even up to more than thirty. Intrinsic physical mechanism and conditions for arbitrary segments of ANM to occur are discussed in detail.

  13. Absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Manabe, Osamu; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-07-21

    With the increasing availability of positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging, the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) has become popular in clinical settings. Quantitative MBF provides an important additional diagnostic or prognostic information over conventional visual assessment. The success of MBF quantification using PET/computed tomography (CT) has increased the demand for this quantitative diagnostic approach to be more accessible. In this regard, MBF quantification approaches have been developed using several other diagnostic imaging modalities including single-photon emission computed tomography, CT, and cardiac magnetic resonance. This review will address the clinical aspects of PET MBF quantification and the new approaches to MBF quantification.

  14. An absolute radius scale for Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, Philip D.; Cooke, Maren L.; Pelton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Radio and stellar occultation observations of Saturn's rings made by the Voyager spacecraft are discussed. The data reveal systematic discrepancies of almost 10 km in some parts of the rings, limiting some of the investigations. A revised solution for Saturn's rotation pole has been proposed which removes the discrepancies between the stellar and radio occultation profiles. Corrections to previously published radii vary from -2 to -10 km for the radio occultation, and +5 to -6 km for the stellar occultation. An examination of spiral density waves in the outer A Ring supports that the revised absolute radii are in error by no more than 2 km.

  15. Absolute Rate Theories of Epigenetic Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, Jose N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2006-03-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape, and the transmission factor, depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates.

  16. Absolute rate theories of epigenetic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-12-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape and the transmission factor depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic, and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates. rate theory | stochastic gene expression | gene switches

  17. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  18. Absolute Priority for a Vehicle in VANET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirani, Rostam; Hendessi, Faramarz; Montazeri, Mohammad Ali; Sheikh Zefreh, Mohammad

    In today's world, traffic jams waste hundreds of hours of our life. This causes many researchers try to resolve the problem with the idea of Intelligent Transportation System. For some applications like a travelling ambulance, it is important to reduce delay even for a second. In this paper, we propose a completely infrastructure-less approach for finding shortest path and controlling traffic light to provide absolute priority for an emergency vehicle. We use the idea of vehicular ad-hoc networking to reduce the imposed travelling time. Then, we simulate our proposed protocol and compare it with a centrally controlled traffic light system.

  19. Upper airway biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... upper airway Images Upper airway test Bronchoscopy Throat anatomy References Yung RC, Boss EF. Tracheobronchial endoscopy. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  20. Robust Design Optimization via Failure Domain Bounding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper extends and applies the strategies recently developed by the authors for handling constraints under uncertainty to robust design optimization. For the scope of this paper, robust optimization is a methodology aimed at problems for which some parameters are uncertain and are only known to belong to some uncertainty set. This set can be described by either a deterministic or a probabilistic model. In the methodology developed herein, optimization-based strategies are used to bound the constraint violation region using hyper-spheres and hyper-rectangles. By comparing the resulting bounding sets with any given uncertainty model, it can be determined whether the constraints are satisfied for all members of the uncertainty model (i.e., constraints are feasible) or not (i.e., constraints are infeasible). If constraints are infeasible and a probabilistic uncertainty model is available, upper bounds to the probability of constraint violation can be efficiently calculated. The tools developed enable approximating not only the set of designs that make the constraints feasible but also, when required, the set of designs for which the probability of constraint violation is below a prescribed admissible value. When constraint feasibility is possible, several design criteria can be used to shape the uncertainty model of performance metrics of interest. Worst-case, least-second-moment, and reliability-based design criteria are considered herein. Since the problem formulation is generic and the tools derived only require standard optimization algorithms for their implementation, these strategies are easily applicable to a broad range of engineering problems.

  1. Measurements of absolute concentrations of NADH in cells using the phasor FLIM method.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Digman, Michelle A; Malacrida, Leonel; Gratton, Enrico

    2016-07-01

    We propose a graphical method using the phasor representation of the fluorescence decay to derive the absolute concentration of NADH in cells. The method requires the measurement of a solution of NADH at a known concentration. The phasor representation of the fluorescence decay accounts for the differences in quantum yield of the free and bound form of NADH, pixel by pixel of an image. The concentration of NADH in every pixel in a cell is obtained after adding to each pixel in the phasor plot a given amount of unmodulated light which causes a shift of the phasor towards the origin by an amount that depends on the intensity at the pixel and the fluorescence lifetime at the pixel. The absolute concentration of NADH is obtained by comparison of the shift obtained at each pixel of an image with the shift of the calibrated solution.

  2. Measurements of absolute concentrations of NADH in cells using the phasor FLIM method

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ning; Digman, Michelle A.; Malacrida, Leonel; Gratton, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    We propose a graphical method using the phasor representation of the fluorescence decay to derive the absolute concentration of NADH in cells. The method requires the measurement of a solution of NADH at a known concentration. The phasor representation of the fluorescence decay accounts for the differences in quantum yield of the free and bound form of NADH, pixel by pixel of an image. The concentration of NADH in every pixel in a cell is obtained after adding to each pixel in the phasor plot a given amount of unmodulated light which causes a shift of the phasor towards the origin by an amount that depends on the intensity at the pixel and the fluorescence lifetime at the pixel. The absolute concentration of NADH is obtained by comparison of the shift obtained at each pixel of an image with the shift of the calibrated solution. PMID:27446681

  3. [Design and accuracy analysis of upper slicing system of MSCT].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rongjian

    2013-05-01

    The upper slicing system is the main components of the optical system in MSCT. This paper focuses on the design of upper slicing system and its accuracy analysis to improve the accuracy of imaging. The error of slice thickness and ray center by bearings, screw and control system were analyzed and tested. In fact, the accumulated error measured is less than 1 microm, absolute error measured is less than 10 microm. Improving the accuracy of the upper slicing system contributes to the appropriate treatment methods and success rate of treatment.

  4. Gradient bounds for a thin film epitaxy equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Qiao, Zhonghua; Tang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    We consider a gradient flow modeling the epitaxial growth of thin films with slope selection. The surface height profile satisfies a nonlinear diffusion equation with biharmonic dissipation. We establish optimal local and global wellposedness for initial data with critical regularity. To understand the mechanism of slope selection and the dependence on the dissipation coefficient, we exhibit several lower and upper bounds for the gradient of the solution in physical dimensions d ≤ 3.

  5. Limited weights neural networks: Very tight entropy based bounds

    SciTech Connect

    Beiu, V.; Draghici, S.

    1997-04-01

    Being given a set of m examples (i.e., data-set) from IR{sup n} belonging to k different classes, the problem is to compute the required number-of-bits (i.e., entropy) for correctly classifying the data-set. Very tight upper and lower bounds for a dichotomy (i.e., k = 2) will be presented, but they are valid for the general case.

  6. Angular-momentum nonclassicality by breaking classical bounds on statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Luis, Alfredo; Rivas, Angel

    2011-10-15

    We derive simple practical procedures revealing the quantum behavior of angular momentum variables by the violation of classical upper bounds on the statistics. Data analysis is minimum and definite conclusions are obtained without evaluation of moments, or any other more sophisticated procedures. These nonclassical tests are very general and independent of other typical quantum signatures of nonclassical behavior such as sub-Poissonian statistics, squeezing, or oscillatory statistics, being insensitive to the nonclassical behavior displayed by other variables.

  7. Bound states in string nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Marc Daniel; Dusuel, Sébastien; Vidal, Julien

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the emergence of bound states in the low-energy spectrum of the string-net Hamiltonian in the presence of a string tension. In the ladder geometry, we show that a single bound state arises either for a finite tension or in the zero-tension limit depending on the theory considered. In the latter case, we perturbatively compute the binding energy as a function of the total quantum dimension. We also address this issue in the honeycomb lattice where the number of bound states in the topological phase depends on the total quantum dimension. Finally, the internal structure of these bound states is analyzed in the zero-tension limit.

  8. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  9. Linear ultrasonic motor for absolute gravimeter.

    PubMed

    Jian, Yue; Yao, Zhiyuan; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2017-02-01

    Thanks to their compactness and suitability for vacuum applications, linear ultrasonic motors are considered as substitutes for classical electromagnetic motors as driving elements in absolute gravimeters. Still, their application is prevented by relatively low power output. To overcome this limitation and provide better stability, a V-type linear ultrasonic motor with a new clamping method is proposed for a gravimeter. In this paper, a mechanical model of stators with flexible clamping components is suggested, according to a design criterion for clamps of linear ultrasonic motors. After that, an effect of tangential and normal rigidity of the clamping components on mechanical output is studied. It is followed by discussion of a new clamping method with sufficient tangential rigidity and a capability to facilitate pre-load. Additionally, a prototype of the motor with the proposed clamping method was fabricated and the performance tests in vertical direction were implemented. Experimental results show that the suggested motor has structural stability and high dynamic performance, such as no-load speed of 1.4m/s and maximal thrust of 43N, meeting the requirements for absolute gravimeters.

  10. Why to compare absolute numbers of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the absolute number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to absolute mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations.

  11. The absolute threshold of cone vision

    PubMed Central

    Koeing, Darran; Hofer, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of the absolute threshold of cone vision, which has been previously underestimated due to sub-optimal conditions or overly strict subjective response criteria. We avoided these limitations by using optimized stimuli and experimental conditions while having subjects respond within a rating scale framework. Small (1′ fwhm), brief (34 msec), monochromatic (550 nm) stimuli were foveally presented at multiple intensities in dark-adapted retina for 5 subjects. For comparison, 4 subjects underwent similar testing with rod-optimized stimuli. Cone absolute threshold, that is, the minimum light energy for which subjects were just able to detect a visual stimulus with any response criterion, was 203 ± 38 photons at the cornea, ∼0.47 log units lower than previously reported. Two-alternative forced-choice measurements in a subset of subjects yielded consistent results. Cone thresholds were less responsive to criterion changes than rod thresholds, suggesting a limit to the stimulus information recoverable from the cone mosaic in addition to the limit imposed by Poisson noise. Results were consistent with expectations for detection in the face of stimulus uncertainty. We discuss implications of these findings for modeling the first stages of human cone vision and interpreting psychophysical data acquired with adaptive optics at the spatial scale of the receptor mosaic. PMID:21270115

  12. [Estimation of absolute risk for fracture].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Saeko

    2009-03-01

    Osteoporosis treatment aims to prevent fractures and maintain the QOL of the elderly. However, persons at high risk of future fracture cannot be effectively identified on the basis of bone density (BMD) alone, although BMD is used as an diagnostic criterion. Therefore, the WHO recommended that absolute risk for fracture (10-year probability of fracture) for each individual be evaluated and used as an index for intervention threshold. The 10-year probability of fracture is calculated based on age, sex, BMD at the femoral neck (body mass index if BMD is not available), history of previous fractures, parental hip fracture history, smoking, steroid use, rheumatoid arthritis, secondary osteoporosis and alcohol consumption. The WHO has just announced the development of a calculation tool (FRAX: WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool) in February this year. Fractures could be prevented more effectively if, based on each country's medical circumstances, an absolute risk value for fracture to determine when to start medical treatment is established and persons at high risk of fracture are identified and treated accordingly.

  13. Absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A and alterporriols.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Saki; Honma, Miho; Murakami, Takanori; Tsushima, Taro; Kudo, Shinji; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Nihei, Ken-Ichi; Nehira, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Masaru

    2012-02-01

    The absolute stereochemistry of altersolanol A (1) was established by observing a positive exciton couplet in the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of the C3,C4-O-bis(2-naphthoyl) derivative 10 and by chemical correlations with known compound 8. Before the discussion, the relative stereochemistry of 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. The shielding effect at C7'-OMe group by C1-O-benzoylation established the relative stereochemical relationship between the C8-C8' axial bonding and the C1-C4/C1'-C4' polyol moieties of alterporriols E (3), an atropisomer of the C8-C8' dimer of 1. As 3 could be obtained by dimerization of 1 in vitro, the absolute configuration of its central chirality elements (C1-C4) must be identical to those of 1. Spectral comparison between the experimental and theoretical CD spectra supported the above conclusion. Axial stereochemistry of novel C4-O-deoxy dimeric derivatives, alterporriols F (4) and G (5), were also revealed by comparison of their CD spectra to those of 2 and 3.

  14. Absolute Electron Extraction Efficiency of Liquid Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamdin, Katayun; Mizrachi, Eli; Morad, James; Sorensen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Dual phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chambers (TPCs) currently set the world's most sensitive limits on weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored dark matter candidate. These detectors rely on extracting electrons from liquid xenon into gaseous xenon, where they produce proportional scintillation. The proportional scintillation from the extracted electrons serves to internally amplify the WIMP signal; even a single extracted electron is detectable. Credible dark matter searches can proceed with electron extraction efficiency (EEE) lower than 100%. However, electrons systematically left at the liquid/gas boundary are a concern. Possible effects include spontaneous single or multi-electron proportional scintillation signals in the gas, or charging of the liquid/gas interface or detector materials. Understanding EEE is consequently a serious concern for this class of rare event search detectors. Previous EEE measurements have mostly been relative, not absolute, assuming efficiency plateaus at 100%. I will present an absolute EEE measurement with a small liquid/gas xenon TPC test bed located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  15. Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. )

    1991-12-01

    EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

  16. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometers Burst Mode Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, P.; Vigneron, P.; Hulot, G.; Crespo Grau, R.; Brocco, L.; Lalanne, X.; Sirol, O.; Leger, J. M.; Jager, T.; Bertrand, F.; Boness, A.; Fratter, I.

    2014-12-01

    Each of the three Swarm satellites embarks an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) to provide absolute scalar measurements of the magnetic field with high accuracy and stability. Nominal data acquisition of these ASMs is 1 Hz. But they can also run in a so-called "burst mode" and provide data at 250 Hz. During the commissioning phase of the mission, seven burst mode acquisition campaigns have been run simultaneously for all satellites, obtaining a total of ten days of burs-mode data. These campaigns allowed the identification of issues related to the operations of the piezo-electric motor and the heaters connected to the ASM, that do not impact the nominal 1 Hz scalar data. We analyze the burst mode data to identify high frequency geomagnetic signals, focusing the analysis in two regions: the low latitudes, where we seek signatures of ionospheric irregularities, and the high latitudes, to identify high frequency signals related to polar region currents. Since these campaigns have been conducted during the initial months of the mission, the three satellites where still close to each other, allowing to analyze the spatial coherency of the signals. Wavelet analysis have revealed 31 Hz signals appearing in the night-side in the equatorial region.

  17. Variational study of bound states in the Higgs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siringo, Fabio

    2000-12-01

    The possible existence of Higgs-boson-Higgs-boson bound states in the Higgs sector of the standard model is explored using the \\|hh>+\\|hhh> variational ansatz of Di Leo and Darewych. The resulting integral equations can be decoupled exactly, yielding a one-dimensional integral equation, solved numerically. We thereby avoid the extra approximations employed by Di Leo and Darewych, and we find a qualitatively different mass renormalization. Within the conventional scenario, where a not-too-large cutoff is invoked to avoid ``triviality,'' we find, as usual, an upper bound on the Higgs boson mass. Bound-state solutions are only found in the very strong coupling regime, but at the same time a relatively small physical mass is required as a consequence of renormalization.

  18. Entropy bound for the photon gas in noncommutative spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozari, K.; Gorji, M. A.; Damavandi Kamali, A.; Vakili, B.

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by the doubly special relativity theories and noncommutative spacetime structures, thermodynamical properties of the photon gas in a phase space with compact spatial momentum space is studied. At the high temperature limit, the upper bounds for the internal energy and entropy are obtained which are determined by the size of the compact spatial momentum space. The maximum internal energy turns out to be of the order of the Planck energy and the entropy bound is then determined by the factor (V /lPl3) through the relevant identification of the size of the momentum space with Planck scale. The entropy bound is very similar to the case of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of black holes and suggests that thermodynamics of black holes may be deduced from a saturated state in the framework of a full quantum gravitational statistical mechanics.

  19. Interpretation of the Arcade 2 Absolute Sky Brightness Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiffert, M.; Fixsen, D. J.; Kogut, A.; Levin, S. M.; Limon, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Mirel, P.; Singal, J.; Villela, T.; Wollack, E.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    We use absolutely calibrated data between 3 and 90 GHz from the 2006 balloon flight of the ARCADE 2 instrument, along with previous measurements at other frequencies to constrain models of extragalactic emission. Such emission is a combination of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) monopole, Galactic foreground emission, the integrated contribution of radio emission from external galaxies, any spectral distortions present in the CMB, and any other extragalactic source. After removal of estimates of foreground emission from our own Galaxy, and an estimated contribution of external galaxies, we present fits to a combination of the flat-spectrum CMB and potential spectral distortions in the CMB. We find 217 upper limits to CMB spectral distortions of u < 6x10(exp -4) and [Y(sub ff)] < 1x10(exp -4). We also find a significant detection of a residual signal beyond that, which can be explained by the CMB plus the integrated radio emission from galaxies estimated from existing surveys. This residual signal may be due to an underestimated galactic foreground contribution, an unaccounted for contribution of a background of radio sources, or some combination of both. The residual signal is consistent with emission in the form of a power law with amplitUde 18.4 +/- 2.1 K at 0.31 GHz and a spectral index of -2.57 +/- 0.05.

  20. [Study on the absolute spectral irradiation calibration method for far ultraviolet spectrometer in remote sensing].

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Lin, Guan-Yu; Chen, Bin

    2013-01-01

    The present paper studied spectral irradiation responsivities calibration method which can be applied to the far ultraviolet spectrometer for upper atmosphere remote sensing. It is difficult to realize the calibration for far ultraviolet spectrometer for many reasons. Standard instruments for far ultraviolet waveband calibration are few, the degree of the vacuum experiment system is required to be high, the stabilities of the experiment are hardly maintained, and the limitation of the far ultraviolet waveband makes traditional diffuser and the integrating sphere radiance calibration method difficult to be used. To solve these problems, a new absolute spectral irradiance calibration method was studied, which can be applied to the far ultraviolet calibration. We build a corresponding special vacuum experiment system to verify the calibration method. The light source system consists of a calibrated deuterium lamp, a vacuum ultraviolet monochromater and a collimating system. We used the calibrated detector to obtain the irradiance responsivities of it. The three instruments compose the calibration irradiance source. We used the "calibration irradiance source" to illuminate the spectrometer prototype and obtained the spectral irradiance responsivities. It realized the absolute spectral irradiance calibration for the far ultraviolet spectrometer utilizing the calibrated detector. The absolute uncertainty of the calibration is 7.7%. The method is significant for the ground irradiation calibration of the far ultraviolet spectrometer in upper atmosphere remote sensing.

  1. Extracting infrared absolute reflectance from relative reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Berets, Susan L; Milosevic, Milan

    2012-06-01

    Absolute reflectance measurements are valuable to the optics industry for development of new materials and optical coatings. Yet, absolute reflectance measurements are notoriously difficult to make. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of extracting the absolute reflectance from a relative reflectance measurement using a reference material with known refractive index.

  2. A Conceptual Approach to Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark W.; Bryson, Janet L.

    2011-01-01

    The absolute value learning objective in high school mathematics requires students to solve far more complex absolute value equations and inequalities. When absolute value problems become more complex, students often do not have sufficient conceptual understanding to make any sense of what is happening mathematically. The authors suggest that the…

  3. General lower bounds for b{yields}d penguin processes

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, Robert; Recksiegel, Stefan

    2005-03-01

    For the exploration of flavor physics, b{yields}d penguin processes are an important aspect, with the prominent example of B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}K{sup 0}K{sup 0}. We recently derived lower bounds for the CP-averaged branching ratio of this channel in the standard model; they were found to be very close to the corresponding experimental upper limits, thereby suggesting that B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}K{sup 0}K{sup 0} should soon be observed. In fact, the BABAR Collaboration subsequently announced the first signals of this transition. Here we point out that it is also possible to derive lower bounds for B{yields}{rho}{gamma} decays, which are again surprisingly close to the current experimental upper limits. We show that these bounds are realizations of a general bound that holds within the standard model for b{yields}d penguin processes, allowing further applications to decays of the kind B{sup {+-}}{yields}K{sup (}*{sup ){+-}}K{sup (}*{sup )} and B{sup {+-}}{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}l{sup +}l{sup -}, {rho}{sup {+-}}l{sup +}l{sup -}.

  4. An explicit expression of supremum of bounded quantum observables

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaoming; Du Hongke; Fang Xiaochun

    2009-03-15

    Bounded observables corresponding to a quantum system are usually represented by S(H), the set of all bounded linear self-adjoint operators on a Hilbert space H. In 2006, Gudder introduced a logic order, prcue, on S(H). For A,B(set-membership sign)S(H), A prcue B if and only if there exists C(set-membership sign)S(H) such that AC=0 and A+C=B. Given A,B(set-membership sign)S(H), let A or B be the least upper bound (supremum) for A and B with respect to the Gudder order. In 2007, Pulmannova and Vincenkova proved that A or B exists if and only if A and B have an upper bound for the Gudder order. In this paper, we present some new necessary and sufficient conditions for which A or B exists and give an explicit representation of A or B (if A or B exists).0.

  5. Higgs Mass Triviality Bounds on F(4) Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klomfass, Markus

    In order to accurately describe the cutoff dependence of the Higgs mass triviality bound, the varphi ^4 theory is formulated on an F_4 lattice which preserves Lorentz invariance to a higher degree than the commonly used hypercubic lattice. We solve this model non-perturbatively by evaluating the linked cluster expansion through 12th order following the approach of Luscher and Weisz. The results are continued across the transition line into the broken phase by integrating the perturbative renormalization group equations. In the Goldstone phase, the renormalized coupling never exceeds 2/3 of the tree level unitarity bound when Lambda /m_{R}>= 2. Our results confirm recent Monte Carlo data and we obtain as an upper bound for the Higgs mass m_{R }/f_pi=2.45(7) at Lambda/m_{R }=2. Attempting to produce a heavier Higgs on the lattice, additional four-derivative terms are introduced in the naive action which serve to parameterize the leading order cutoff effects. Using a cluster reflection algorithm of the Swendsen-Wang-Wolff type, we simulate this action on an F_4 lattice in a region where the region where the effects of the new terms are expected to be maximal. As an upper bound we now obtain M _sigma/f_pi~ 2.8, an increase of about 20% compared to the simplest non-linear action. Despite triviality, the scalar sector may thus not be weakly interacting.

  6. Ultrahigh enhancement in absolute and relative rotation sensing using fast and slow light

    SciTech Connect

    Shahriar, M. S.; Pati, G. S.; Tripathi, R.; Gopal, V.; Messall, M.; Salit, K.

    2007-05-15

    We describe a resonator-based optical gyroscope whose sensitivity for measuring absolute rotation is enhanced via use of the anomalous dispersion characteristic of superluminal light propagation. The enhancement is given by the inverse of the group index, saturating to a bound determined by the group velocity dispersion. We also show how the offsetting effect of the concomitant broadening of the resonator linewidth may be circumvented by using an active cavity. For realistic conditions, the enhancement factor is as high as 10{sup 6}. We also show how normal dispersion used for slow light can enhance relative rotation sensing in a specially designed Sagnac interferometer, with the enhancement given by the slowing factor.

  7. Absolute stability and synchronization in neural field models with transmission delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Chiu-Yen; Shih, Chih-Wen; Wu, Chang-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Neural fields model macroscopic parts of the cortex which involve several populations of neurons. We consider a class of neural field models which are represented by integro-differential equations with transmission time delays which are space-dependent. The considered domains underlying the systems can be bounded or unbounded. A new approach, called sequential contracting, instead of the conventional Lyapunov functional technique, is employed to investigate the global dynamics of such systems. Sufficient conditions for the absolute stability and synchronization of the systems are established. Several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the theoretical results.

  8. Does upper body strength and power influence upper body Wingate performance in men and women?

    PubMed

    Lovell, D; Mason, D; Delphinus, E; Eagles, A; Shewring, S; McLellan, C

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of muscular strength and power on upper body Wingate performance in men and women. Muscular strength (1 repetition maximum bench press), muscular power (bench throws) and upper body anaerobic performance (Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT)) was assessed in 24 men and 16 women. Men had significantly ( P<0.001) higher absolute and relative peak and mean power and blood lactate concentration during the WAnT compared to their female counterparts. Men also produced significantly ( P<0.001) higher strength and absolute and relative peak and mean power during the bench press and throw, respectively, compared to the female participants. For men body mass and mean power produced during the bench throw explained approximately 84% and 87% of the variance in Wingate peak ( P<0.001 and P=0.039, respectively) and mean ( P<0.001 and P=0.028, respectively) power. For women mean power produced during the bench throw explained approximately 72% and 52% of the variance in Wingate peak ( P=0.002) and mean ( P=0.017) power, respectively. For men body mass and to a lesser extent muscular power best predicts upper body Wingate performance while for women only muscular power predicts upper body Wingate performance.

  9. Absolute Instability near the Band Edge of Traveling-Wave Amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Hung, D M H; Rittersdorf, I M; Zhang, P; Chernin, D; Lau, Y Y; Antonsen, T M; Luginsland, J W; Simon, D H; Gilgenbach, R M

    2015-09-18

    Applying the Briggs-Bers "pole-pinch" criterion to the exact transcendental dispersion relation of a dielectric traveling wave tube (TWT), we find that there is no absolute instability regardless of the beam current. We extend this analysis to the circuit band edges of a linear beam TWT by approximating the circuit mode as a hyperbola in the frequency-wave-number (ω-k) plane and consider the weak coupling limit. For an operating mode whose group velocity is in the same direction as the beam mode, we find that the lower band edge is not subjected to absolute instability. At the upper band edge, we find a threshold beam current beyond which absolute instability is excited. The nonexistence of absolute instability in a linear beam TWT and the existence in a gyrotron TWT, both at the lower band edge, is contrasted. The general study given here is applicable to some contemporary TWTs such as metamaterial-based and advanced Smith-Purcell TWTs.

  10. Use of Absolute and Comparative Performance Feedback in Absolute and Comparative Judgments and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Don A.; Klein, William M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Which matters more--beliefs about absolute ability or ability relative to others? This study set out to compare the effects of such beliefs on satisfaction with performance, self-evaluations, and bets on future performance. In Experiment 1, undergraduate participants were told they had answered 20% correct, 80% correct, or were not given their…

  11. Absolute nonlocality via distributed computing without communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekaj, Ł.; Pawłowski, M.; Vértesi, T.; Grudka, A.; Horodecki, M.; Horodecki, R.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the role that quantum entanglement plays as a resource in various information processing tasks is one of the crucial goals of quantum information theory. Here we propose an alternative perspective for studying quantum entanglement: distributed computation of functions without communication between nodes. To formalize this approach, we propose identity games. Surprisingly, despite no signaling, we obtain that nonlocal quantum strategies beat classical ones in terms of winning probability for identity games originating from certain bipartite and multipartite functions. Moreover we show that, for a majority of functions, access to general nonsignaling resources boosts success probability two times in comparison to classical ones for a number of large enough outputs. Because there are no constraints on the inputs and no processing of the outputs in the identity games, they detect very strong types of correlations: absolute nonlocality.

  12. In vivo absorption spectroscopy for absolute measurement.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiromitsu; Fukuda, Takashi

    2012-10-01

    In in vivo spectroscopy, there are differences between individual subjects in parameters such as tissue scattering and sample concentration. We propose a method that can provide the absolute value of a particular substance concentration, independent of these individual differences. Thus, it is not necessary to use the typical statistical calibration curve, which assumes an average level of scattering and an averaged concentration over individual subjects. This method is expected to greatly reduce the difficulties encountered during in vivo measurements. As an example, for in vivo absorption spectroscopy, the method was applied to the reflectance measurement in retinal vessels to monitor their oxygen saturation levels. This method was then validated by applying it to the tissue phantom under a variety of absorbance values and scattering efficiencies.

  13. Determining Absolute Zero Using a Tuning Fork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldader, Jeffrey D.

    2008-04-01

    The Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales, we tell our students, are related. We explain that a change in temperature of 1°C corresponds to a change of 1 Kelvin and that atoms and molecules have zero kinetic energy at zero Kelvin, -273°C. In this paper, we will show how students can derive the relationship between the Celsius and Kelvin temperature scales using a simple, well-known physics experiment. By making multiple measurements of the speed of sound at different temperatures, using the classic physics experiment of determining the speed of sound with a tuning fork and variable-length tube, they can determine the temperature at which the speed of sound is zero—absolute zero.

  14. MAGSAT: Vector magnetometer absolute sensor alignment determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described for accurately determining the absolute alignment of the magnetic axes of a triaxial magnetometer sensor with respect to an external, fixed, reference coordinate system. The method does not require that the magnetic field vector orientation, as generated by a triaxial calibration coil system, be known to better than a few degrees from its true position, and minimizes the number of positions through which a sensor assembly must be rotated to obtain a solution. Computer simulations show that accuracies of better than 0.4 seconds of arc can be achieved under typical test conditions associated with existing magnetic test facilities. The basic approach is similar in nature to that presented by McPherron and Snare (1978) except that only three sensor positions are required and the system of equations to be solved is considerably simplified. Applications of the method to the case of the MAGSAT Vector Magnetometer are presented and the problems encountered discussed.

  15. An estimate of global absolute dynamic topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, C.-K.; Wunsch, C.

    1984-01-01

    The absolute dynamic topography of the world ocean is estimated from the largest scales to a short-wavelength cutoff of about 6700 km for the period July through September, 1978. The data base consisted of the time-averaged sea-surface topography determined by Seasat and geoid estimates made at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The issues are those of accuracy and resolution. Use of the altimetric surface as a geoid estimate beyond the short-wavelength cutoff reduces the spectral leakage in the estimated dynamic topography from erroneous small-scale geoid estimates without contaminating the low wavenumbers. Comparison of the result with a similarly filtered version of Levitus' (1982) historical average dynamic topography shows good qualitative agreement. There is quantitative disagreement, but it is within the estimated errors of both methods of calculation.

  16. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  17. Absolute measurements of fast neutrons using yttrium.

    PubMed

    Roshan, M V; Springham, S V; Rawat, R S; Lee, P; Krishnan, M

    2010-08-01

    Yttrium is presented as an absolute neutron detector for pulsed neutron sources. It has high sensitivity for detecting fast neutrons. Yttrium has the property of generating a monoenergetic secondary radiation in the form of a 909 keV gamma-ray caused by inelastic neutron interaction. It was calibrated numerically using MCNPX and does not need periodic recalibration. The total yttrium efficiency for detecting 2.45 MeV neutrons was determined to be f(n) approximately 4.1x10(-4) with an uncertainty of about 0.27%. The yttrium detector was employed in the NX2 plasma focus experiments and showed the neutron yield of the order of 10(8) neutrons per discharge.

  18. Measured and modelled absolute gravity in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, E.; Forsberg, R.; Strykowski, G.

    2012-12-01

    Present day changes in the ice volume in glaciated areas like Greenland will change the load on the Earth and to this change the lithosphere will respond elastically. The Earth also responds to changes in the ice volume over a millennial time scale. This response is due to the viscous properties of the mantle and is known as Glaical Isostatic Adjustment (GIA). Both signals are present in GPS and absolute gravity (AG) measurements and they will give an uncertainty in mass balance estimates calculated from these data types. It is possible to separate the two signals if both gravity and Global Positioning System (GPS) time series are available. DTU Space acquired an A10 absolute gravimeter in 2008. One purpose of this instrument is to establish AG time series in Greenland and the first measurements were conducted in 2009. Since then are 18 different Greenland GPS Network (GNET) stations visited and six of these are visited more then once. The gravity signal consists of three signals; the elastic signal, the viscous signal and the direct attraction from the ice masses. All of these signals can be modelled using various techniques. The viscous signal is modelled by solving the Sea Level Equation with an appropriate ice history and Earth model. The free code SELEN is used for this. The elastic signal is modelled as a convolution of the elastic Greens function for gravity and a model of present day ice mass changes. The direct attraction is the same as the Newtonian attraction and is calculated as this. Here we will present the preliminary results of the AG measurements in Greenland. We will also present modelled estimates of the direct attraction, the elastic and the viscous signals.

  19. Absolute bioavailability of quinine formulations in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Babalola, C P; Bolaji, O O; Ogunbona, F A; Ezeomah, E

    2004-09-01

    This study compared the absolute bioavailability of quinine sulphate as capsule and as tablet against the intravenous (i.v.) infusion of the drug in twelve male volunteers. Six of the volunteers received intravenous infusion over 4 h as well as the capsule formulation of the drug in a cross-over manner, while the other six received the tablet formulation. Blood samples were taken at predetermined time intervals and plasma analysed for quinine (QN) using reversed-phase HPLC method. QN was rapidly absorbed after the two oral formulations with average t(max) of 2.67 h for both capsule and tablet. The mean elimination half-life of QN from the i.v. and oral dosage forms varied between 10 and 13.5 hr and were not statistically different (P > 0.05). On the contrary, the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) and area under the curve (AUC) from capsule were comparable to those from i.v. (P > 0.05), while these values were markedly higher than values from tablet formulation (P < 0.05). The therapeutic QN plasma levels were not achieved with the tablet formulation. The absolute bioavailability (F) were 73% (C.l., 53.3 - 92.4%) and 39 % (C.I., 21.7 - 56.6%) for the capsule and tablet respectively and the difference was significant (P < 0.05). The subtherapeutic levels obtained from the tablet form used in this study may cause treatment failure during malaria and caution should be taken when predictions are made from results obtained from different formulations of QN.

  20. Absolute GPS Positioning Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramillien, G.

    A new inverse approach for restoring the absolute coordinates of a ground -based station from three or four observed GPS pseudo-ranges is proposed. This stochastic method is based on simulations of natural evolution named genetic algorithms (GA). These iterative procedures provide fairly good and robust estimates of the absolute positions in the Earth's geocentric reference system. For comparison/validation, GA results are compared to the ones obtained using the classical linearized least-square scheme for the determination of the XYZ location proposed by Bancroft (1985) which is strongly limited by the number of available observations (i.e. here, the number of input pseudo-ranges must be four). The r.m.s. accuracy of the non -linear cost function reached by this latter method is typically ~10-4 m2 corresponding to ~300-500-m accuracies for each geocentric coordinate. However, GA can provide more acceptable solutions (r.m.s. errors < 10-5 m2), even when only three instantaneous pseudo-ranges are used, such as a lost of lock during a GPS survey. Tuned GA parameters used in different simulations are N=1000 starting individuals, as well as Pc=60-70% and Pm=30-40% for the crossover probability and mutation rate, respectively. Statistical tests on the ability of GA to recover acceptable coordinates in presence of important levels of noise are made simulating nearly 3000 random samples of erroneous pseudo-ranges. Here, two main sources of measurement errors are considered in the inversion: (1) typical satellite-clock errors and/or 300-metre variance atmospheric delays, and (2) Geometrical Dilution of Precision (GDOP) due to the particular GPS satellite configuration at the time of acquisition. Extracting valuable information and even from low-quality starting range observations, GA offer an interesting alternative for high -precision GPS positioning.

  1. Ultra-low-frequency vertical vibration isolator based on a two-stage beam structure for absolute gravimetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Wu, K; Hu, H; Li, G; Wang, L J

    2016-10-01

    To reduce seismic and environmental vibration noise, ultra-low-frequency vertical vibration isolation systems play an important role in absolute gravimetry. For this purpose, an isolator based on a two-stage beam structure is proposed and demonstrated. The isolator has a simpler and more robust structure than the present ultra-low-frequency vertical active vibration isolators. In the system, two beams are connected to a frame using flexural pivots. The upper beam is suspended from the frame with a normal hex spring and the lower beam is suspended from the upper one using a zero-length spring. The pivot of the upper beam is not vertically above the pivot of the lower beam. With this special design, the attachment points of the zero-length spring to the beams can be moved to adjust the effective stiffness. A photoelectric detector is used to detect the angle between the two beams, and a voice coil actuator attached to the upper beam is controlled by a feedback circuit to keep the angle at a fixed value. The system can achieve a natural period of 100 s by carefully moving the attachment points of the zero-length spring to the beams and tuning the feedback parameters. The system has been used as an inertial reference in the T-1 absolute gravimeter. The experiment results demonstrate that the system has significant vibration isolation performance that holds promise in applications such as absolute gravimeters.

  2. Ultra-low-frequency vertical vibration isolator based on a two-stage beam structure for absolute gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Wu, K.; Hu, H.; Li, G.; Wang, L. J.

    2016-10-01

    To reduce seismic and environmental vibration noise, ultra-low-frequency vertical vibration isolation systems play an important role in absolute gravimetry. For this purpose, an isolator based on a two-stage beam structure is proposed and demonstrated. The isolator has a simpler and more robust structure than the present ultra-low-frequency vertical active vibration isolators. In the system, two beams are connected to a frame using flexural pivots. The upper beam is suspended from the frame with a normal hex spring and the lower beam is suspended from the upper one using a zero-length spring. The pivot of the upper beam is not vertically above the pivot of the lower beam. With this special design, the attachment points of the zero-length spring to the beams can be moved to adjust the effective stiffness. A photoelectric detector is used to detect the angle between the two beams, and a voice coil actuator attached to the upper beam is controlled by a feedback circuit to keep the angle at a fixed value. The system can achieve a natural period of 100 s by carefully moving the attachment points of the zero-length spring to the beams and tuning the feedback parameters. The system has been used as an inertial reference in the T-1 absolute gravimeter. The experiment results demonstrate that the system has significant vibration isolation performance that holds promise in applications such as absolute gravimeters.

  3. Universal Bounds for the Littlewood-Paley First-Order Moments of the 3D Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Felix; Ramos, Fabio

    2010-12-01

    We derive upper bounds for the infinite-time and space average of the L 1-norm of the Littlewood-Paley decomposition of weak solutions of the 3 D periodic Navier-Stokes equations. The result suggests that the Kolmogorov characteristic velocity scaling, {mathbf{U}_kappa˜ɛ^{1/3} kappa^{-1/3}} , holds as an upper bound for a region of wavenumbers near the dissipative cutoff.

  4. Seismic Q of the lunar upper mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Koyama, J.

    1982-01-01

    Shallow moonquake data are used to determine the frequency dependence of Q values for both compressional and shear waves in the upper mantle of the moon at frequencies between 3 and 8 Hz. The seismic P wave Q is estimated to be at least 4000 and is nearly independent of frequency or decreases slightly with increasing frequency, while the S wave Q increases from at least 4000 at 3 Hz to at least 7000 at 8 Hz. The rate of increase of Q(S) is approximately proportional to the 0.7 + or - 0.1 power of the frequency above 5 Hz. With the absence of other dissipation mechanisms, compressional heat loss may be a dominant factor in the lunar interior. Uncertainty remains, however, in the absolute values of Q's owing to the largely unknown detailed structure of the lunar upper mantle.

  5. Seismic Q of the lunar upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Koyama, J.

    1982-06-01

    Shallow moonquake data are used to determine the frequency dependence of Q values for both compressional and shear waves in the upper mantle of the moon at frequencies between 3 and 8 Hz. The seismic P wave Q is estimated to be at least 4000 and is nearly independent of frequency or decreases slightly with increasing frequency, while the S wave Q increases from at least 4000 at 3 Hz to at least 7000 at 8 Hz. The rate of increase of Q(S) is approximately proportional to the 0.7 + or - 0.1 power of the frequency above 5 Hz. With the absence of other dissipation mechanisms, compressional heat loss may be a dominant factor in the lunar interior. Uncertainty remains, however, in the absolute values of Q's owing to the largely unknown detailed structure of the lunar upper mantle.

  6. Uncertainty bounds using sector theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Schmidt, David K.

    1989-01-01

    An approach based on sector-stability theory can furnish a description of the uncertainty associated with the frequency response of a model, given sector-bounds on the individual parameters of the model. The application of the sector-based approach to the formulation of useful uncertainty descriptions for linear, time-invariant multivariable systems is presently explored, and the approach is applied to two generic forms of parameter uncertainty in order to investigate its advantages and limitations. The results obtained show that sector-uncertainty bounds can be used to evaluate the impact of parameter uncertainties on the frequency response of the design model.

  7. Transconjunctival upper blepharoplasty.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, J S; Nahai, F

    1999-03-01

    Transconjunctival lower lid blepharoplasty now has an established role as an option in rejuvenation of the lower eyelid. Transconjunctival upper lid blepharoplasty, or transconjunctival removal of medial upper eyelid fat, also has a role in rejuvenation of the upper eyelid. However, this is a rather limited role. We have found this approach safe and efficacious as a primary as well as a secondary procedure for removal of excess medial upper eyelid fat. We report on 20 patients who have undergone this operation: 5 as a primary procedure and 15 as secondary. There were no complications, no revisions, and the patients have been uniformly happy with their results.

  8. Upper Lid Blepharoplasty.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Samuel; Holds, John B; Couch, Steven M

    2016-05-01

    Upper lid blepharoplasty is a common procedure for restoration and rejuvenation of the upper eyelids that can be performed safely and reliably. Understanding the anatomy and aging process of the brow-upper lid aesthetic unit along with properly assessing the excesses and deficiencies of the periorbital region helps to formulate an appropriate surgical plan. Volume deficiency in the aging upper lid may require corrective augmentation. Preexisting asymmetries and ptosis need to be identified and discussed before surgery. Standardized photography along with a candid discussion regarding patients' desired outcomes and realistic expectations are essential to a successful outcome.

  9. Approximate formula and bounds for the time-varying susceptible-infected-susceptible prevalence in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Mieghem, P.

    2016-05-01

    Based on a recent exact differential equation, the time dependence of the SIS prevalence, the average fraction of infected nodes, in any graph is first studied and then upper and lower bounded by an explicit analytic function of time. That new approximate "tanh formula" obeys a Riccati differential equation and bears resemblance to the classical expression in epidemiology of Kermack and McKendrick [Proc. R. Soc. London A 115, 700 (1927), 10.1098/rspa.1927.0118] but enhanced with graph specific properties, such as the algebraic connectivity, the second smallest eigenvalue of the Laplacian of the graph. We further revisit the challenge of finding tight upper bounds for the SIS (and SIR) epidemic threshold for all graphs. We propose two new upper bounds and show the importance of the variance of the number of infected nodes. Finally, a formula for the epidemic threshold in the cycle (or ring graph) is presented.

  10. Measurements of the absolute branching fractions of B+/- --> K+/-X(cc).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Minamora, J S; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Schott, G; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Edgar, C L; Hodgkinson, M C; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Marco, E Di; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Graziani, G; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-02-10

    We study the two-body decays of B+/- mesons to K+/- and a charmonium state X(cc) in a sample of 210.5 fb(-1) of data from the BABAR experiment. We perform measurements of absolute branching fractions beta(B+/- --> K+/-X(cc)) using a missing mass technique, and report several new or improved results. In particular, the upper limit beta(B+/- --> K+/- X(3872)) < 3.2 x 10(-4) at 90% C.L. and the inferred lower limit beta(X(3872)J/psipi+ pi-) > 4.2% will help in understanding the nature of the recently discovered X(3872).

  11. Bounds on the information rate of quantum-secret-sharing schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarvepalli, Pradeep

    2011-04-15

    An important metric of the performance of a quantum-secret-sharing scheme is its information rate. Beyond the fact that the information rate is upper-bounded by one, very little is known in terms of bounds on the information rate of quantum-secret-sharing schemes. Furthermore, not every scheme can be realized with rate one. In this paper we derive upper bounds for the information rates of quantum-secret-sharing schemes. We show that there exist quantum access structures on n players for which the information rate cannot be better than O((log{sub 2}n)/n). These results are the quantum analogues of the bounds for classical-secret-sharing schemes proved by Csirmaz.

  12. Loosely-Bound Diatomic Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfour, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses concept of covalent bonding as related to homonuclear diatomic molecules. Article draws attention to the existence of bound rare gas and alkaline earth diatomic molecules. Summarizes their molecular parameters and offers spectroscopic data. Strength and variation with distance of interatomic attractive forces is given. (Author/SA)

  13. Variational Bounds for Creeping Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procházka, Petr

    2010-05-01

    In the paper time dependent variational bounds are derived based on Extended Hashin-Shtrikman variational principles. Direct calculation leads to explicit formulas to be presented in the text. For various mechanical properties easy coding in Excel, say, can be used and verification of accuracy for numerical procedures is available using the derived formulas.

  14. Pieter Paul Rubens, "Prometheus Bound."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoemaker, Marla K.

    1986-01-01

    Provides a full-color reproduction of Pieter Paul Rubens' painting, "Prometheus Bound," and a lesson plan for using it with students in grades 10 through 12. The goal of the lesson is to introduce students to the techniques of design and execution used by Rubens. (JDH)

  15. Teacher Education in Outward Bound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Richard A.

    A series of Outward Bound programs and experiences was planned for El Paso County, Colorado, school teachers to increase their awareness of their personal characteristics, especially those that might enhance learning on the part of their students. Part of the planning for the program involved a survey of county high school teachers, counselors,…

  16. Wronskian Method for Bound States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple and straightforward method based on Wronskians for the calculation of bound-state energies and wavefunctions of one-dimensional quantum-mechanical problems. We explicitly discuss the asymptotic behaviour of the wavefunction and show that the allowed energies make the divergent part vanish. As illustrative examples we consider…

  17. Absolute calibration of forces in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutra, R. S.; Viana, N. B.; Maia Neto, P. A.; Nussenzveig, H. M.

    2014-07-01

    Optical tweezers are highly versatile laser traps for neutral microparticles, with fundamental applications in physics and in single molecule cell biology. Force measurements are performed by converting the stiffness response to displacement of trapped transparent microspheres, employed as force transducers. Usually, calibration is indirect, by comparison with fluid drag forces. This can lead to discrepancies by sizable factors. Progress achieved in a program aiming at absolute calibration, conducted over the past 15 years, is briefly reviewed. Here we overcome its last major obstacle, a theoretical overestimation of the peak stiffness, within the most employed range for applications, and we perform experimental validation. The discrepancy is traced to the effect of primary aberrations of the optical system, which are now included in the theory. All required experimental parameters are readily accessible. Astigmatism, the dominant effect, is measured by analyzing reflected images of the focused laser spot, adapting frequently employed video microscopy techniques. Combined with interface spherical aberration, it reveals a previously unknown window of instability for trapping. Comparison with experimental data leads to an overall agreement within error bars, with no fitting, for a broad range of microsphere radii, from the Rayleigh regime to the ray optics one, for different polarizations and trapping heights, including all commonly employed parameter domains. Besides signaling full first-principles theoretical understanding of optical tweezers operation, the results may lead to improved instrument design and control over experiments, as well as to an extended domain of applicability, allowing reliable force measurements, in principle, from femtonewtons to nanonewtons.

  18. Elevation correction factor for absolute pressure measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, Joseph W.; Sorrells, Mark R.

    1996-01-01

    With the arrival of highly accurate multi-port pressure measurement systems, conditions that previously did not affect overall system accuracy must now be scrutinized closely. Errors caused by elevation differences between pressure sensing elements and model pressure taps can be quantified and corrected. With multi-port pressure measurement systems, the sensing elements are connected to pressure taps that may be many feet away. The measurement system may be at a different elevation than the pressure taps due to laboratory space or test article constraints. This difference produces a pressure gradient that is inversely proportional to height within the interface tube. The pressure at the bottom of the tube will be higher than the pressure at the top due to the weight of the tube's column of air. Tubes with higher pressures will exhibit larger absolute errors due to the higher air density. The above effect is well documented but has generally been taken into account with large elevations only. With error analysis techniques, the loss in accuracy from elevation can be easily quantified. Correction factors can be applied to maintain the high accuracies of new pressure measurement systems.

  19. What is Needed for Absolute Paleointensity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Many alternative approaches to the Thellier and Thellier technique for absolute paleointensity have been proposed during the past twenty years. One reason is the time consuming aspect of the experiments. Another reason is to avoid uncertainties in determinations of the paleofield which are mostly linked to the presence of multidomain grains. Despite great care taken by these new techniques, there is no indication that they always provide the right answer and in fact sometimes fail. We are convinced that the most valid approach remains the original double heating Thellier protocol provided that natural remanence is controlled by pure magnetite with a narrow distribution of small grain sizes, mostly single domains. The presence of titanium, even in small amount generates biases which yield incorrect field values. Single domain grains frequently dominate the magnetization of glass samples, which explains the success of this selective approach. They are also present in volcanic lava flows but much less frequently, and therefore contribute to the low success rate of most experiments. However the loss of at least 70% of the magnetization at very high temperatures prior to the Curie point appears to be an essential prerequisite that increases the success rate to almost 100% and has been validated from historical flows and from recent studies. This requirement can easily be tested by thermal demagnetization while low temperature experiments can document the detection of single domain magnetite using the δFC/δZFC parameter as suggested (Moskowitz et al, 1993) for biogenic magnetite.

  20. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  1. Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) is a mission, led and developed by NASA, that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to quantify and attribute climate change. CLARREO consists of three separate instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer, a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer, and a radio occultation (RO) instrument. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy, including on orbit verification, to calibrate other space-based instrumentation, increasing their respective accuracy by as much as an order of magnitude. The IR spectrometer is a Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) working in the 5 to 50 microns wavelength region with a goal of 0.1 K (k = 3) accuracy. The FTS will achieve this accuracy using phase change cells to verify thermistor accuracy and heated halos to verify blackbody emissivity, both on orbit. The RS spectrometer will measure the reflectance of the atmosphere in the 0.32 to 2.3 microns wavelength region with an accuracy of 0.3% (k = 2). The status of the instrumentation packages and potential mission options will be presented.

  2. Absolute flux measurements for swift atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M.; Kohl, D. A.; Keto, J. W.; Antoniewicz, P.

    1987-01-01

    While a torsion balance in vacuum can easily measure the momentum transfer from a gas beam impinging on a surface attached to the balance, this measurement depends on the accommodation coefficients of the atoms with the surface and the distribution of the recoil. A torsion balance is described for making absolute flux measurements independent of recoil effects. The torsion balance is a conventional taut suspension wire design and the Young modulus of the wire determines the relationship between the displacement and the applied torque. A compensating magnetic field is applied to maintain zero displacement and provide critical damping. The unique feature is to couple the impinging gas beam to the torsion balance via a Wood's horn, i.e., a thin wall tube with a gradual 90 deg bend. Just as light is trapped in a Wood's horn by specular reflection from the curved surfaces, the gas beam diffuses through the tube. Instead of trapping the beam, the end of the tube is open so that the atoms exit the tube at 90 deg to their original direction. Therefore, all of the forward momentum of the gas beam is transferred to the torsion balance independent of the angle of reflection from the surfaces inside the tube.

  3. Titania bound sodium titanate ion exchanger

    DOEpatents

    DeFilippi, Irene C. G.; Yates, Stephen Frederic; Shen, Jian-Kun; Gaita, Romulus; Sedath, Robert Henry; Seminara, Gary Joseph; Straszewski, Michael Peter; Anderson, David Joseph

    1999-03-23

    This invention is method for preparing a titania bound ion exchange composition comprising admixing crystalline sodium titanate and a hydrolyzable titanium compound and, thereafter drying the titania bound crystalline sodium titanate and subjecting the dried titania bound ion exchange composition to optional compaction and calcination steps to improve the physical strength of the titania bound composition.

  4. Absolute continuity for operator valued completely positive maps on C∗-algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheondea, Aurelian; Kavruk, Ali Şamil

    2009-02-01

    Motivated by applicability to quantum operations, quantum information, and quantum probability, we investigate the notion of absolute continuity for operator valued completely positive maps on C∗-algebras, previously introduced by Parthasarathy [in Athens Conference on Applied Probability and Time Series Analysis I (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1996), pp. 34-54]. We obtain an intrinsic definition of absolute continuity, we show that the Lebesgue decomposition defined by Parthasarathy is the maximal one among all other Lebesgue-type decompositions and that this maximal Lebesgue decomposition does not depend on the jointly dominating completely positive map, we obtain more flexible formulas for calculating the maximal Lebesgue decomposition, and we point out the nonuniqueness of the Lebesgue decomposition as well as a sufficient condition for uniqueness. In addition, we consider Radon-Nikodym derivatives for absolutely continuous completely positive maps that, in general, are unbounded positive self-adjoint operators affiliated to a certain von Neumann algebra, and we obtain a spectral approximation by bounded Radon-Nikodym derivatives. An application to the existence of the infimum of two completely positive maps is indicated, and formulas in terms of Choi's matrices for the Lebesgue decomposition of completely positive maps in matrix algebras are obtained.

  5. A lower bound for routing on a completely connected optical communication parallel computer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.A.; Jerrum, M.; MacKenzie, P.D.

    1993-08-03

    The task of routing a 2-relation on an n-processor completely connected optical communication parallel computer (OCPC) is considered. A lower bound is presented that applies to any randomized distributed algorithm for this task: specifically, it is shown that the expected number of steps required to route a 2-relation is {Omega}({radical} log log n) in the worst case. For comparison, the best upper bound known is O(log log n).

  6. A Posteriori Finite Element Bounds for Sensitivity Derivatives of Partial-Differential-Equation Outputs. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert Michael; Patera, Anthony T.; Peraire, Jaume

    1998-01-01

    We present a Neumann-subproblem a posteriori finite element procedure for the efficient and accurate calculation of rigorous, 'constant-free' upper and lower bounds for sensitivity derivatives of functionals of the solutions of partial differential equations. The design motivation for sensitivity derivative error control is discussed; the a posteriori finite element procedure is described; the asymptotic bounding properties and computational complexity of the method are summarized; and illustrative numerical results are presented.

  7. Gluon mass generation in the massless bound-state formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibañez, D.; Papavassiliou, J.

    2013-02-01

    We present a detailed, all-order study of gluon mass generation within the massless bound-state formalism, which constitutes the general framework for the systematic implementation of the Schwinger mechanism in non-Abelian gauge theories. The main ingredient of this formalism is the dynamical formation of bound states with vanishing mass, which give rise to effective vertices containing massless poles; these latter vertices, in turn, trigger the Schwinger mechanism, and allow for the gauge-invariant generation of an effective gluon mass. This particular approach has the conceptual advantage of relating the gluon mass directly to quantities that are intrinsic to the bound-state formation itself, such as the “transition amplitude” and the corresponding “bound-state wave function.” As a result, the dynamical evolution of the gluon mass is largely determined by a Bethe-Salpeter equation that controls the dynamics of the relevant wave function, rather than the Schwinger-Dyson equation of the gluon propagator, as happens in the standard treatment. The precise structure and field-theoretic properties of the transition amplitude are scrutinized in a variety of independent ways. In particular, a parallel study within the linear-covariant (Landau) gauge and the background-field method reveals that a powerful identity, known to be valid at the level of conventional Green’s functions, also relates the background and quantum transition amplitudes. Despite the differences in the ingredients and terminology employed, the massless bound-state formalism is absolutely equivalent to the standard approach based on Schwinger-Dyson equations. In fact, a set of powerful relations allows one to demonstrate the exact coincidence of the integral equations governing the momentum evolution of the gluon mass in both frameworks.

  8. Absolute Measurements Of Methane On Mars: The Current Status.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, G. L.; Novak, R. E.; Hewagama, T.; Bonev, B. P.; DiSanti, M. A.; Smith, M. D.

    2008-09-01

    Our study of methane on Mars now extends over three Mars years, sampling a wide range of seasons with significant spatial coverage. Three spectrometer-telescope combinations were used. With the spectrometer slit oriented North-South on the planet, we obtain simultaneous spectra at latitudes along the central meridian. Successive longitudes are sampled as the planet rotates, and the combination then permits partial mapping of the planet. We earlier reported differential detections of methane and water on Mars. Here, we present absolute extractions of methane, based on improved analytical procedures developed since 2005. We now identify and correct instrumental effects such as variations in resolving power along the slit, second-order optical fringe removal, and correction of (minor) internal scattered light. We synthesize the fully-resolved terrestrial transmittance spectrum, convolve it to the instrumental resolution, and subtract it from the measured Mars-Earth spectrum. Fraunhofer lines are removed from the residual Mars spectra along with spectral lines of water and of (newly identified by us) carbon dioxide isotopomers. The residuals are then inspected for signatures of methane and other possible trace constituents such as HDO and H2O (Villanueva et al., this Conference). On certain dates, the residual spectra display spectral lines at the Doppler-shifted positions expected for methane on Mars. The positive indications favor certain seasons (e.g., Ls = 121° & 155°) and locations. Mixing ratios derived from those residuals (up to 60 ppb) greatly exceed upper limits obtained at other seasons (e.g., < 3ppb at Ls = 17°) these variations could be consistent with episodic release. The CH4 spatial extent requires transport over large distances (coupled with eddy diffusion), and destruction lifetimes of order one year. Details will be presented and implications will be discussed. This work was supported by NASA's Astrobiology, Planetary Astronomy, and Postdoctoral

  9. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Mano K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2015-12-01

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  10. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-06-05

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  11. Positioning, alignment and absolute pointing of the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, F.; Distefano, C.; Antares Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    A precise detector alignment and absolute pointing is crucial for point-source searches. The ANTARES neutrino telescope utilises an array of hydrophones, tiltmeters and compasses for the relative positioning of the optical sensors. The absolute calibration is accomplished by long-baseline low-frequency triangulation of the acoustic reference devices in the deep-sea with a differential GPS system at the sea surface. The absolute pointing can be independently verified by detecting the shadow of the Moon in cosmic rays.

  12. Upper Extremity Length Equalization

    PubMed Central

    DeCoster, Thomas A.; Ritterbusch, John; Crawford, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Significant upper extremity length inequality is uncommon but can cause major functional problems. The ability to position and use the hand may be impaired by shortness of any of the long bones of the upper extremity. In many respects upper and lower extremity length problems are similar. They most commonly occur after injury to a growing bone and the treatment modalities utilized in the lower extremity may be applied to the upper extremity. These treatment options include epiphysiodesis, shortening osteotomy, angulatory correction osteotomy and lengthening. This report reviews the literature relative to upper extremity length inequality and equalization and presents an algorithm for evaluation and planning appropriate treatment for patients with this condition. This algorithm is illustrated by two clinical cases of posttraumatic shortness of the radius which were effectively treated. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

  13. Absolute X-ray emission cross section measurements of Fe K transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, Natalie; Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Boyce, Kevin R.; Grinberg, Victoria; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Porter, Frederick Scott; Wilms, Jörn

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the absolute X-ray emission cross sections of K-shell transitions in highly charged L- and K-shell Fe ions using the LLNL EBIT-I electron beam ion trap and the NASA GSFC EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS). The cross sections are determined by using the ECS to simultaneously record the spectrum of the bound-bound K-shell transitions and the emission from radiative recombination from trapped Fe ions. The measured spectrum is then brought to an absolute scale by normalizing the measured flux in the radiative recombination features to their theoretical cross sections, which are well known. Once the spectrum is brought to an absolute scale, the cross sections of the K-shell transitions are determined. These measurements are made possible by the ECS, which consists of a 32 channel array, with 14 channels optimized for detecting high energy photons (hν > 10 keV) and 18 channels optimized for detecting low energy photons (hν < 10 keV). The ECS has a large collection area, relatively high energy resolution, and a large bandpass; all properties necessary for this measurement technique to be successful. These data will be used to benchmark cross sections in the atomic reference data bases underlying the plasma modeling codes used to analyze astrophysical spectra, especially those measured by the Soft X-ray Spectrometer calorimeter instrument recently launched on the Hitomi X-ray Observatory.This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and supported by NASA grants to LLNL and NASA/GSFC and by ESA under contract No. 4000114313/15/NL/CB.

  14. Tank 41H bounding uranium enrichment. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cavin, W.S.

    1994-09-30

    The intent of this document is to combine data from salt samples and historical process information to bound the uranium (U-235) enrichment which could be expected in the upper portion of the salt in Tank 41H. This bounding enrichment will be used in another document to establish a nuclear safety basis for initial salt removal operations. Any number of mixing scenarios could have been examined for the components which fed the evaporator during the formation of the last five feet of salt. The scenario presented was designed to be conservative, while still incorporating process knowledge and available data where possible. In the scenario, the lowest enrichment seen in any feed material was for the L4 feed which was evaporated to form the top part of the salt in Tank 41H. The lowest enrichment of 17% is still higher than the 16% (95% confidence) maximum enrichment actually found at the salt surface (from sample results). This leads to the conclusion that the uranium enrichment of the material (L1) which was being fed to the evaporate when the last five feet began to form, was lower than 22%. The conservatism used in this analysis, combined with the available sample data are believed to provide a defensible basis for establishing an upper bounding enrichment of 22% for the top five feet of salt.

  15. Absolute and Convective Instability of a Liquid Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Hudman, M.; Chen, J. N.

    1999-01-01

    The existence of absolute instability in a liquid jet has been predicted for some time. The disturbance grows in time and propagates both upstream and downstream in an absolutely unstable liquid jet. The image of absolute instability is captured in the NASA 2.2 sec drop tower and reported here. The transition from convective to absolute instability is observed experimentally. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical predictions on the transition Weber number as functions of the Reynolds number. The role of interfacial shear relative to all other relevant forces which cause the onset of jet breakup is explained.

  16. Transversely bounded DFB lasers. [bounded distributed-feedback lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Evans, G.; Yeh, C.

    1975-01-01

    Bounded distributed-feedback (DFB) lasers are studied in detail. Threshold gain and field distribution for a number of configurations are derived and analyzed. More specifically, the thin-film guide, fiber, diffusion guide, and hollow channel with inhomogeneous-cladding DFB lasers are considered. Optimum points exist and must be used in DFB laser design. Different-modes feedback and the effects of the transverse boundaries are included. A number of applications are also discussed.

  17. Absolute Plate Velocities from Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreemer, Corné; Zheng, Lin; Gordon, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The orientation of seismic anisotropy inferred beneath plate interiors may provide a means to estimate the motions of the plate relative to the sub-asthenospheric mantle. Here we analyze two global sets of shear-wave splitting data, that of Kreemer [2009] and an updated and expanded data set, to estimate plate motions and to better understand the dispersion of the data, correlations in the errors, and their relation to plate speed. We also explore the effect of using geologically current plate velocities (i.e., the MORVEL set of angular velocities [DeMets et al. 2010]) compared with geodetically current plate velocities (i.e., the GSRM v1.2 angular velocities [Kreemer et al. 2014]). We demonstrate that the errors in plate motion azimuths inferred from shear-wave splitting beneath any one tectonic plate are correlated with the errors of other azimuths from the same plate. To account for these correlations, we adopt a two-tier analysis: First, find the pole of rotation and confidence limits for each plate individually. Second, solve for the best fit to these poles while constraining relative plate angular velocities to consistency with the MORVEL relative plate angular velocities. The SKS-MORVEL absolute plate angular velocities (based on the Kreemer [2009] data set) are determined from the poles from eight plates weighted proportionally to the root-mean-square velocity of each plate. SKS-MORVEL indicates that eight plates (Amur, Antarctica, Caribbean, Eurasia, Lwandle, Somalia, Sundaland, and Yangtze) have angular velocities that differ insignificantly from zero. The net rotation of the lithosphere is 0.25±0.11° Ma-1 (95% confidence limits) right-handed about 57.1°S, 68.6°E. The within-plate dispersion of seismic anisotropy for oceanic lithosphere (σ=19.2° ) differs insignificantly from that for continental lithosphere (σ=21.6° ). The between-plate dispersion, however, is significantly smaller for oceanic lithosphere (σ=7.4° ) than for continental

  18. Orion Absolute Navigation System Progress and Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, Greg N.; D'Souza, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The absolute navigation design of NASA's Orion vehicle is described. It has undergone several iterations and modifications since its inception, and continues as a work-in-progress. This paper seeks to benchmark the current state of the design and some of the rationale and analysis behind it. There are specific challenges to address when preparing a timely and effective design for the Exploration Flight Test (EFT-1), while still looking ahead and providing software extensibility for future exploration missions. The primary onboard measurements in a Near-Earth or Mid-Earth environment consist of GPS pseudo-range and delta-range, but for future explorations missions the use of star-tracker and optical navigation sources need to be considered. Discussions are presented for state size and composition, processing techniques, and consider states. A presentation is given for the processing technique using the computationally stable and robust UDU formulation with an Agee-Turner Rank-One update. This allows for computational savings when dealing with many parameters which are modeled as slowly varying Gauss-Markov processes. Preliminary analysis shows up to a 50% reduction in computation versus a more traditional formulation. Several state elements are discussed and evaluated, including position, velocity, attitude, clock bias/drift, and GPS measurement biases in addition to bias, scale factor, misalignment, and non-orthogonalities of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. Another consideration is the initialization of the EKF in various scenarios. Scenarios such as single-event upset, ground command, and cold start are discussed as are strategies for whole and partial state updates as well as covariance considerations. Strategies are given for dealing with latent measurements and high-rate propagation using multi-rate architecture. The details of the rate groups and the data ow between the elements is discussed and evaluated.

  19. Evaluation of the Absolute Regional Temperature Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.

    2012-01-01

    The Absolute Regional Temperature Potential (ARTP) is one of the few climate metrics that provides estimates of impacts at a sub-global scale. The ARTP presented here gives the time-dependent temperature response in four latitude bands (90-28degS, 28degS-28degN, 28-60degN and 60-90degN) as a function of emissions based on the forcing in those bands caused by the emissions. It is based on a large set of simulations performed with a single atmosphere-ocean climate model to derive regional forcing/response relationships. Here I evaluate the robustness of those relationships using the forcing/response portion of the ARTP to estimate regional temperature responses to the historic aerosol forcing in three independent climate models. These ARTP results are in good accord with the actual responses in those models. Nearly all ARTP estimates fall within +/-20%of the actual responses, though there are some exceptions for 90-28degS and the Arctic, and in the latter the ARTP may vary with forcing agent. However, for the tropics and the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes in particular, the +/-20% range appears to be roughly consistent with the 95% confidence interval. Land areas within these two bands respond 39-45% and 9-39% more than the latitude band as a whole. The ARTP, presented here in a slightly revised form, thus appears to provide a relatively robust estimate for the responses of large-scale latitude bands and land areas within those bands to inhomogeneous radiative forcing and thus potentially to emissions as well. Hence this metric could allow rapid evaluation of the effects of emissions policies at a finer scale than global metrics without requiring use of a full climate model.

  20. Absolute determination of local tropospheric OH concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armerding, Wolfgang; Comes, Franz-Josef

    1994-01-01

    Long path absorption (LPA) according to Lambert Beer's law is a method to determine absolute concentrations of trace gases such as tropospheric OH. We have developed a LPA instrument which is based on a rapid tuning of the light source which is a frequency doubled dye laser. The laser is tuned across two or three OH absorption features around 308 nm with a scanning speed of 0.07 cm(exp -1)/microsecond and a repetition rate of 1.3 kHz. This high scanning speed greatly reduces the fluctuation of the light intensity caused by the atmosphere. To obtain the required high sensitivity the laser output power is additionally made constant and stabilized by an electro-optical modulator. The present sensitivity is of the order of a few times 10(exp 5) OH per cm(exp 3) for an acquisition time of a minute and an absorption path length of only 1200 meters so that a folding of the optical path in a multireflection cell was possible leading to a lateral dimension of the cell of a few meters. This allows local measurements to be made. Tropospheric measurements have been carried out in 1991 resulting in the determination of OH diurnal variation at specific days in late summer. Comparison with model calculations have been made. Interferences are mainly due to SO2 absorption. The problem of OH self generation in the multireflection cell is of minor extent. This could be shown by using different experimental methods. The minimum-maximum signal to noise ratio is about 8 x 10(exp -4) for a single scan. Due to the small size of the absorption cell the realization of an open air laboratory is possible in which by use of an additional UV light source or by additional fluxes of trace gases the chemistry can be changed under controlled conditions allowing kinetic studies of tropospheric photochemistry to be made in open air.

  1. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of KOMPSAT-3A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, H. Y.; Shin, D. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, D. C.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a vicarious radiometric calibration of the Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite-3A (KOMPSAT-3A) performed by the Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI) and the Pukyong National University Remote Sensing Group (PKNU RSG) in 2015.The primary stages of this study are summarized as follows: (1) A field campaign to determine radiometric calibrated target fields was undertaken in Mongolia and South Korea. Surface reflectance data obtained in the campaign were input to a radiative transfer code that predicted at-sensor radiance. Through this process, equations and parameters were derived for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor to enable the conversion of calibrated DN to physical units, such as at-sensor radiance or TOA reflectance. (2) To validate the absolute calibration coefficients for the KOMPSAT-3A sensor, we performed a radiometric validation with a comparison of KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 TOA reflectance using one of the six PICS (Libya 4). Correlations between top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances and the spectral band responses of the KOMPSAT-3A sensors at the Zuunmod, Mongolia and Goheung, South Korea sites were significant for multispectral bands. The average difference in TOA reflectance between KOMPSAT-3A and Landsat-8 image over the Libya 4, Libya site in the red-green-blue (RGB) region was under 3%, whereas in the NIR band, the TOA reflectance of KOMPSAT-3A was lower than the that of Landsat-8 due to the difference in the band passes of two sensors. The KOMPSAT-3Aensor includes a band pass near 940 nm that can be strongly absorbed by water vapor and therefore displayed low reflectance. Toovercome this, we need to undertake a detailed analysis using rescale methods, such as the spectral bandwidth adjustment factor.

  2. Orthogonal Polynomials with Recursion Coefficients of Generalized Bounded Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukic, Milivoje

    2011-09-01

    We consider probability measures on the real line or unit circle with Jacobi or Verblunsky coefficients satisfying an ℓ p condition and a generalized bounded variation condition. This latter condition requires that a sequence can be expressed as a sum of sequences β ( l), each of which has rotated bounded variation, i.e., sum_{n=0}^infty \\vert e^{iφ_l}β_{n+1}^{(l)} -β_n^{(l)}\\vert < infty for some {φ_l} . This includes a large class of discrete Schrödinger operators with almost periodic potentials modulated by ℓ p decay, i.e. linear combinations of {λ_n cos(2πα n + φ)} with {λ in ell^p} of bounded variation and any α. In all cases, we prove absence of singular continuous spectrum, preservation of absolutely continuous spectrum from the corresponding free case, and that pure points embedded in the continuous spectrum can only occur in an explicit finite set.

  3. Secure Key from Bound Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horodecki, Karol; Horodecki, Michał; Horodecki, Paweł; Oppenheim, Jonathan

    2005-04-01

    We characterize the set of shared quantum states which contain a cryptographically private key. This allows us to recast the theory of privacy as a paradigm closely related to that used in entanglement manipulation. It is shown that one can distill an arbitrarily secure key from bound entangled states. There are also states that have less distillable private keys than the entanglement cost of the state. In general, the amount of distillable key is bounded from above by the relative entropy of entanglement. Relationships between distillability and distinguishability are found for a class of states which have Bell states correlated to separable hiding states. We also describe a technique for finding states exhibiting irreversibility in entanglement distillation.

  4. Tight bounds on the size of neural networks for classification problems

    SciTech Connect

    Beiu, V.; Pauw, T. de

    1997-06-01

    This paper relies on the entropy of a data-set (i.e., number-of-bits) to prove tight bounds on the size of neural networks solving a classification problem. First, based on a sequence of geometrical steps, the authors constructively compute an upper bound of O(mn) on the number-of-bits for a given data-set - here m is the number of examples and n is the number of dimensions (i.e., R{sup n}). This result is used further in a nonconstructive way to bound the size of neural networks which correctly classify that data-set.

  5. Lower Bounds on Paraclique Density.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Ronald D; Langston, Michael A; Wang, Kai

    2016-05-11

    The scientific literature teems with clique-centric clustering strategies. In this paper we analyze one such method, the paraclique algorithm. Paraclique has found practical utility in a variety of application domains, and has been successfully employed to reduce the effects of noise. Nevertheless, its formal analysis and worst-case guarantees have remained elusive. We address this issue by deriving a series of lower bounds on paraclique densities.

  6. 78 FR 18326 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Upward Bound and Upward Bound Math Science... Upward Bound Math Science Annual Performance Report. OMB Control Number: 1840-NEW. Type of Review: New... under the regular Upward Bound (UB) and Upward Bound Math and Science (UBMS) Programs. The Department...

  7. Information bounds for Gaussian copulas

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Peter D.; Niu, Xiaoyue; Wellner, Jon A.

    2013-01-01

    Often of primary interest in the analysis of multivariate data are the copula parameters describing the dependence among the variables, rather than the univariate marginal distributions. Since the ranks of a multivariate dataset are invariant to changes in the univariate marginal distributions, rank-based estimators are natural candidates for semiparametric copula estimation. Asymptotic information bounds for such estimators can be obtained from an asymptotic analysis of the rank likelihood, i.e. the probability of the multivariate ranks. In this article, we obtain limiting normal distributions of the rank likelihood for Gaussian copula models. Our results cover models with structured correlation matrices, such as exchangeable or circular correlation models, as well as unstructured correlation matrices. For all Gaussian copula models, the limiting distribution of the rank likelihood ratio is shown to be equal to that of a parametric likelihood ratio for an appropriately chosen multivariate normal model. This implies that the semiparametric information bounds for rank-based estimators are the same as the information bounds for estimators based on the full data, and that the multivariate normal distributions are least favorable. PMID:25313292

  8. Bounded Linear Stability Analysis - A Time Delay Margin Estimation Approach for Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Ishihara, Abraham K.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje Srinlvas; Bakhtiari-Nejad, Maryam

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a method for estimating time delay margin for model-reference adaptive control of systems with almost linear structured uncertainty. The bounded linear stability analysis method seeks to represent the conventional model-reference adaptive law by a locally bounded linear approximation within a small time window using the comparison lemma. The locally bounded linear approximation of the combined adaptive system is cast in a form of an input-time-delay differential equation over a small time window. The time delay margin of this system represents a local stability measure and is computed analytically by a matrix measure method, which provides a simple analytical technique for estimating an upper bound of time delay margin. Based on simulation results for a scalar model-reference adaptive control system, both the bounded linear stability method and the matrix measure method are seen to provide a reasonably accurate and yet not too conservative time delay margin estimation.

  9. Termination Proofs for String Rewriting Systems via Inverse Match-Bounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky (Technical Monitor); Geser, Alfons; Hofbauer, Dieter; Waldmann, Johannes

    2004-01-01

    Annotating a letter by a number, one can record information about its history during a reduction. A string rewriting system is called match-bounded if there is a global upper bound to these numbers. In earlier papers we established match-boundedness as a strong sufficient criterion for both termination and preservation of regular languages. We show now that the string rewriting system whose inverse (left and right hand sides exchanged) is match-bounded, also have exceptional properties, but slightly different ones. Inverse match-bounded systems effectively preserve context-free languages; their sets of normalized strings and their sets of immortal strings are effectively regular. These sets of strings can be used to decide the normalization, the termination and the uniform termination problems of inverse match-bounded systems. We also show that the termination problem is decidable in linear time, and that a certain strong reachability problem is deciable, thus solving two open problems of McNaughton's.

  10. Estimating Bounds on Expected Plateau Size in MAXSAT Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Andrew M.; Howe, Adele E.; Whitley, L. Darrell

    Stochastic local search algorithms can now successfully solve MAXSAT problems with thousands of variables or more. A key to this success is how effectively the search can navigate and escape plateau regions. Furthermore, the solubility of a problem depends on the size and exit density of plateaus, especially those closest to the optimal solution. In this paper we model the plateau phenomenon as a percolation process on hypercube graphs. We develop two models for estimating bounds on the size of plateaus and prove that one is a lower bound and the other an upper bound on the expected size of plateaus at a given level. The models’ accuracy is demonstrated on controlled random hypercube landscapes. We apply the models to MAXSAT through analogy to hypercube graphs and by introducing an approach to estimating, through sampling, a key parameter of the models. Using this approach, we assess the accuracy of our bound estimations on uniform random and structured benchmarks. Surprisingly, we find similar trends in accuracy across random and structured problem instances. Less surprisingly, we find a high accuracy on smaller plateaus with systematic divergence as plateaus increase in size.

  11. Theorising "Geo-Identity" and David Harvey's Space: School Choices of the Geographically Bound Middle-Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Emma

    2015-01-01

    This paper draws on David Harvey's theories of absolute and relational space in order to critique geographically bound school choices of the gentrified middle-class in the City of Melbourne, Australia. The paper relies on interviews with inner-city school choosers as generated by a longitudinal ethnographic school choice study. I argue that the…

  12. Determination of Absolute Zero Using a Computer-Based Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple computer-based laboratory experiment for evaluating absolute zero in degrees Celsius, which can be performed in college and undergraduate physical sciences laboratory courses. With a computer, absolute zero apparatus can help demonstrators or students to observe the relationship between temperature and pressure and use…

  13. A Global Forecast of Absolute Poverty and Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, M. J. D.

    1980-01-01

    Estimates are made of absolute poverty and employment under the hypothesis that existing trends continue. Concludes that while the number of people in absolute poverty is not likely to decline by 2000, the proportion will fall. Jobs will have to grow 3.9% per year in developing countries to achieve full employment. (JOW)

  14. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonality of Influenza (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaman, J. L.; Pitzer, V.; Viboud, C.; Grenfell, B.; Goldstein, E.; Lipsitch, M.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent re-analysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here we show that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. In addition, we show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility and changes in population mixing and contact rates.

  15. Novalis' Poetic Uncertainty: A "Bildung" with the Absolute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mika, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Novalis, the Early German Romantic poet and philosopher, had at the core of his work a mysterious depiction of the "absolute." The absolute is Novalis' name for a substance that defies precise knowledge yet calls for a tentative and sensitive speculation. How one asserts a truth, represents an object, and sets about encountering things…

  16. Bound on the speed of sound from holography

    SciTech Connect

    Cherman, Aleksey; Cohen, Thomas D.; Nellore, Abhinav

    2009-09-15

    We show that the squared speed of sound v{sub s}{sup 2} is bounded from above at high temperatures by the conformal value of 1/3 in a class of strongly coupled four-dimensional field theories, given some mild technical assumptions. This class consists of field theories that have gravity duals sourced by a single-scalar field. There are no known examples to date of field theories with gravity duals for which v{sub s}{sup 2} exceeds 1/3 in energetically favored configurations. We conjecture that v{sub s}{sup 2}=1/3 represents an upper bound for a broad class of four-dimensional theories.

  17. Bound on Hardy's nonlocality from the principle of information causality

    SciTech Connect

    Ahanj, Ali; Kunkri, Samir; Rai, Ashutosh; Rahaman, Ramij; Joag, Pramod S.

    2010-03-15

    Recently, the principle of nonviolation of information causality [Nature 461, 1101 (2009)] has been proposed as one of the foundational properties of nature. We explore the Hardy's nonlocality theorem for two-qubit systems, in the context of generalized probability theory, restricted by the principle of nonviolation of information causality. Applying a sufficient condition for information causality violation, we derive an upper bound on the maximum success probability of Hardy's nonlocality argument. We find that the bound achieved here is higher than that allowed by quantum mechanics but still much less than what the no-signaling condition permits. We also study the Cabello type nonlocality argument (a generalization of Hardy's argument) in this context.

  18. Thermodynamic models for bounding pressurant mass requirements of cryogenic tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandresar, Neil T.; Haberbusch, Mark S.

    1994-01-01

    Thermodynamic models have been formulated to predict lower and upper bounds for the mass of pressurant gas required to pressurize a cryogenic tank and then expel liquid from the tank. Limiting conditions are based on either thermal equilibrium or zero energy exchange between the pressurant gas and initial tank contents. The models are independent of gravity level and allow specification of autogenous or non-condensible pressurants. Partial liquid fill levels may be specified for initial and final conditions. Model predictions are shown to successfully bound results from limited normal-gravity tests with condensable and non-condensable pressurant gases. Representative maximum collapse factor maps are presented for liquid hydrogen to show the effects of initial and final fill level on the range of pressurant gas requirements. Maximum collapse factors occur for partial expulsions with large final liquid fill fractions.

  19. Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Series

    MedlinePlus

    ... barium or flavoring in the barium intestinal obstruction Seek care right away If you have any of the following symptoms after an upper GI series, seek medical attention right away: fever no bowel movement ...

  20. Upper GI Endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... or IV fluids during or after the procedure. Seek Care Right Away If you have any of the following symptoms after an upper GI endoscopy, seek medical care right away: chest pain problems breathing ...

  1. Upper respiratory tract (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The major passages and structures of the upper respiratory tract include the nose or nostrils, nasal cavity, mouth, throat (pharynx), and voice box (larynx). The respiratory system is lined with a mucous membrane that ...

  2. Upper Animas Mining District

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Web page provides narrative of What's New?, Site Description, Site Risk, Cleanup Progress, Community Involvement, Next Steps, Site Documents, FAQ, Contacts and LInks for the Upper Animas Mining District site in San Juan County, Colorado.

  3. Uranus' Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This computer enhancement of a Voyager 2 image, emphasizes the high-level haze in Uranus' upper atmosphere. Clouds are obscured by the overlying atmosphere.

    JPL manages and controls the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  4. Absolute radiometric calibration of advanced remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1982-01-01

    The distinction between the uses of relative and absolute spectroradiometric calibration of remote sensing systems is discussed. The advantages of detector-based absolute calibration are described, and the categories of relative and absolute system calibrations are listed. The limitations and problems associated with three common methods used for the absolute calibration of remote sensing systems are addressed. Two methods are proposed for the in-flight absolute calibration of advanced multispectral linear array systems. One makes use of a sun-illuminated panel in front of the sensor, the radiance of which is monitored by a spectrally flat pyroelectric radiometer. The other uses a large, uniform, high-radiance reference ground surface. The ground and atmospheric measurements required as input to a radiative transfer program to predict the radiance level at the entrance pupil of the orbital sensor are discussed, and the ground instrumentation is described.

  5. A developmental study of latent absolute pitch memory.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Müllensiefen, Daniel; Stewart, Lauren

    2017-03-01

    The ability to recall the absolute pitch level of familiar music (latent absolute pitch memory) is widespread in adults, in contrast to the rare ability to label single pitches without a reference tone (overt absolute pitch memory). The present research investigated the developmental profile of latent absolute pitch (AP) memory and explored individual differences related to this ability. In two experiments, 288 children from 4 to12 years of age performed significantly above chance at recognizing the absolute pitch level of familiar melodies. No age-related improvement or decline, nor effects of musical training, gender, or familiarity with the stimuli were found in regard to latent AP task performance. These findings suggest that latent AP memory is a stable ability that is developed from as early as age 4 and persists into adulthood.

  6. Absolute and relative endocranial size in Neandertals and later Pleistocene Homo.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    Eurasian Neandertals encompass the entire observed range of recent and fossil Homo sapiens in absolute, but not relative endocranial volume, and Neandertals attest an average EQ significantly lower than their Upper Pleistocene successors. While the cognitive, social, and evolutionary implications of this phenomenon have been emphasised, the statistical basis of a mean inference of EQ in the Neandertal hypodigm has not been appropriately demonstrated. A demonstrable male bias in the available postcranial, not cranial, series has skewed perceptions of Neandertal brain-to-body size scaling towards a rejection of the null hypothesis. A simple resolution to this problem is a concise assessment of paired associated covariates against a suitable recent human comparator series. Permutations of Fisher's z and Student's t statistics are valid metrics in tests of significance in single datum hypotheses. Bootstrapped single observation tests determined significance in body size, absolute and relative endocranial volume in Pleistocene archaic, early modern, and late Pleistocene H. sapiens. With respect to absolute ECV, all current Middle-Upper Pleistocene crania fall within the substantial recent Homo range. Nevertheless, simple indices derived from raw and modified data in normal and logarithmic space reveal that Western European Neandertal males approach the lower extremes of our observed size range in relative ECV, yet none exceed statistical significance. Results confirm that relative ECV/brain size in Neandertals was not significantly depressed relative to recent and fossil H. sapiens and this is consistent with a substantial body of data from living humans dismissing any simple correspondence of relative brain size with intelligence and, by extension, evolutionary success.

  7. Bounds on the thermoelastic properties of suspensions of spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torquato, S.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on computations of three-point upper and lower bounds on the effective thermal expansion coefficient, the effective constant-pressure specific heat, and the effective constant-volume specific heat of statistically isotropic suspensions of mutually impenetrable spheres. The effect of polydispersivity in sphere size on the thermoelastic properties is investigated by considering the cases of both equisized and multisized spheres. For reasons of mathematical analogy, the results obtained for the effective thermal expansion coefficient translate immediately into equivalent results for the hygroscopic expansion coefficient.

  8. Bounded Nonlinear Control of a Rotating Pendulum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luyckx, L.; Loccufier, M.; Noldus, E.

    2004-08-01

    We are interested in the output feedback control of mechanical systems governed by the Euler-Lagrange formalism. The systems are collocated actuator-sensor controlled and underactuated. We present a design method by means of a specific example : the set point control of a rotating pendulum. We use constrained output feedback, whereby the control inputs satisfy a priori imposed upper bounds. The closed loop stability analysis relies on the direct method of Liapunov. This results in a frequency criterion on the controller's linear dynamic component and some restrictions on its nonlinearities. The control parameters are tuned for maximizing closed loop damping.

  9. Upper GI Bleeding in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Upper GI Bleeding in Children What is upper GI Bleeding? Irritation and ulcers of the lining of the esophagus, stomach or duodenum can result in upper GI bleeding. When this occurs the child may vomit ...

  10. Lower bounds for randomized Exclusive Write PRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    MacKenzie, P.D.

    1995-05-02

    In this paper we study the question: How useful is randomization in speeding up Exclusive Write PRAM computations? Our results give further evidence that randomization is of limited use in these types of computations. First we examine a compaction problem on both the CREW and EREW PRAM models, and we present randomized lower bounds which match the best deterministic lower bounds known. (For the CREW PRAM model, the lower bound is asymptotically optimal.) These are the first non-trivial randomized lower bounds known for the compaction problem on these models. We show that our lower bounds also apply to the problem of approximate compaction. Next we examine the problem of computing boolean functions on the CREW PRAM model, and we present a randomized lower bound, which improves on the previous best randomized lower bound for many boolean functions, including the OR function. (The previous lower bounds for these functions were asymptotically optimal, but we improve the constant multiplicative factor.) We also give an alternate proof for the randomized lower bound on PARITY, which was already optimal to within a constant additive factor. Lastly, we give a randomized lower bound for integer merging on an EREW PRAM which matches the best deterministic lower bound known. In all our proofs, we use the Random Adversary method, which has previously only been used for proving lower bounds on models with Concurrent Write capabilities. Thus this paper also serves to illustrate the power and generality of this method for proving parallel randomized lower bounds.

  11. Neck muscle fatigue alters upper limb proprioception.

    PubMed

    Zabihhosseinian, Mahboobeh; Holmes, Michael W R; Murphy, Bernadette

    2015-05-01

    Limb proprioception is an awareness by the central nervous system (CNS) of the location of a limb in three-dimensional space and is essential for movement and postural control. The CNS uses the position of the head and neck when interpreting the position of the upper limb, and altered input from neck muscles may affect the sensory inputs to the CNS and consequently may impair the awareness of upper limb joint position. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fatigue of the cervical extensors muscles (CEM) using a submaximal fatigue protocol alters the ability to recreate a previously presented elbow angle with the head in a neutral position. Twelve healthy individuals participated. CEM activity was examined bilaterally using surface electromyography, and kinematics of the elbow joint was measured. The fatigue protocol included an isometric neck extension task at 70 % of maximum until failure. Joint position error increased following fatigue, demonstrating a significant main effect of time (F 2, 18 = 19.41, p ≤ 0.0001) for absolute error. No significant differences were found for variable error (F 2, 18 = 0.27, p = 0.76) or constant error (F 2, 18 = 1.16 of time, p ≤ 0.33). This study confirms that fatigue of the CEM can reduce the accuracy of elbow joint position matching. This suggests that altered afferent input from the neck subsequent to fatigue may impair upper limb proprioception.

  12. Bound Anionic States of Aadenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H.

    2007-03-20

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation,wehave demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the newfound anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The new valence states observed here, unlike the dipole-bound state, could exist in condensed phases and might be relevant to radiobiological damage. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of (i) an experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a combinatorial/quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules.

  13. Bound Anionic States of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H.

    2007-03-20

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the newfound anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The new valence states observed here, unlike the dipole-bound state, could exist in condensed phases and might be relevant to radiobiological damage. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of (i) an experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (it) a combinatorial/quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules.

  14. Error bounds in cascading regressions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlinger, M.R.; Troutman, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Cascading regressions is a technique for predicting a value of a dependent variable when no paired measurements exist to perform a standard regression analysis. Biases in coefficients of a cascaded-regression line as well as error variance of points about the line are functions of the correlation coefficient between dependent and independent variables. Although this correlation cannot be computed because of the lack of paired data, bounds can be placed on errors through the required properties of the correlation coefficient. The potential meansquared error of a cascaded-regression prediction can be large, as illustrated through an example using geomorphologic data. ?? 1985 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  15. Finite Element Output Bounds for Hyperbolic Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Machiels, L.

    2000-03-27

    We propose a Neumann-subproblem a posteriori finite element error bound technique for linear stationary scalar advection problems. The method is similar in many respects to the previous output bound technique developed for elliptic problems. In the new approach, however, the primal residual is enhanced with a streamline diffusion term. We first formulate the bound algorithm, with particular emphasis on the proof of the bounding properties; then, we provide numerical results for an illustrative example.

  16. Z boson decay to photon plus Kaluza Klein graviton: large extra dimensional bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, B. C.; Skittrall, J. P.

    2008-05-01

    We consider the phenomenology of the decay of a Z boson into a photon and a Kaluza Klein excitation of the graviton in the ADD model. Using LEP data, we obtain an upper bound on the branching ratio corresponding to this process of ˜10-11. We also investigate energy profiles of the process.

  17. Nonclassicality tests by classical bounds on the statistics of multiple outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Luis, Alfredo

    2010-08-15

    We derive simple practical tests revealing the quantum nature of states by the violation of classical upper bounds on the statistics of multiple outcomes of an observable. These criteria can be expressed in terms of the Kullback-Leibler divergence (or relative entropy). Nonclassicality tests for multiple outcomes can be satisfied by states that do not fulfill the corresponding single-outcome criteria.

  18. Bounds of the spectral radius and the Nordhaus-Gaddum type of the graphs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianfei; Jia, Liping; Sun, Feng

    2013-01-01

    The Laplacian spectra are the eigenvalues of Laplacian matrix L(G) = D(G) - A(G), where D(G) and A(G) are the diagonal matrix of vertex degrees and the adjacency matrix of a graph G, respectively, and the spectral radius of a graph G is the largest eigenvalue of A(G). The spectra of the graph and corresponding eigenvalues are closely linked to the molecular stability and related chemical properties. In quantum chemistry, spectral radius of a graph is the maximum energy level of molecules. Therefore, good upper bounds for the spectral radius are conducive to evaluate the energy of molecules. In this paper, we first give several sharp upper bounds on the adjacency spectral radius in terms of some invariants of graphs, such as the vertex degree, the average 2-degree, and the number of the triangles. Then, we give some numerical examples which indicate that the results are better than the mentioned upper bounds in some sense. Finally, an upper bound of the Nordhaus-Gaddum type is obtained for the sum of Laplacian spectral radius of a connected graph and its complement. Moreover, some examples are applied to illustrate that our result is valuable.

  19. Error bounds on complex floating-point multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, Richard; Percival, Colin; Zimmermann, Paul

    2007-09-01

    Given floating-point arithmetic with t -digit base- beta significands in which all arithmetic operations are performed as if calculated to infinite precision and rounded to a nearest representable value, we prove that the product of complex values z_0 and z_1 can be computed with maximum absolute error \\vert z_0Vert z_1\\vert frac{1}{2} beta^{1 - t} sqrt{5} . In particular, this provides relative error bounds of 2^{-24} sqrt{5} and 2^{-53} sqrt{5} for IEEE 754 single and double precision arithmetic respectively, provided that overflow, underflow, and denormals do not occur. We also provide the numerical worst cases for IEEE 754 single and double precision arithmetic.

  20. Lower bound on the spectral dimension near a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlip, S.; Grumiller, D.

    2011-10-01

    We consider an evaporating Schwarzschild black hole in a framework in which the spectral dimension of spacetime varies continuously from four at large distances to a number smaller than three at small distances, as suggested by various approaches to quantum gravity. We demonstrate that the evaporation stops when the horizon radius reaches a scale at which spacetime becomes effectively three-dimensional, and argue that an observer remaining outside the horizon cannot probe the properties of the black hole at smaller scales. This result is universal in the sense that it does not depend on the details of the effective dimension as a function of the diffusion time. Observers falling into the black hole can resolve smaller scales, as can external observers in the presence of a cosmological constant. Even in these cases, though, we obtain an absolute bound D≥2 on the effective dimension that can be seen in any such attempt to measure the properties of the black hole.

  1. Mini-implants and miniplates generate sub-absolute and absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Consolaro, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The functional demand imposed on bone promotes changes in the spatial properties of osteocytes as well as in their extensions uniformly distributed throughout the mineralized surface. Once spatial deformation is established, osteocytes create the need for structural adaptations that result in bone formation and resorption that happen to meet the functional demands. The endosteum and the periosteum are the effectors responsible for stimulating adaptive osteocytes in the inner and outer surfaces. Changes in shape, volume and position of the jaws as a result of skeletal correction of the maxilla and mandible require anchorage to allow bone remodeling to redefine morphology, esthetics and function as a result of spatial deformation conducted by orthodontic appliances. Examining the degree of changes in shape, volume and structural relationship of areas where mini-implants and miniplates are placed allows us to classify mini-implants as devices of subabsolute anchorage and miniplates as devices of absolute anchorage.

  2. The Acquisition of Bound and Free Anaphora.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koster, Jan; Koster, Charlotte

    Most linguists assume that bound anaphors such as "himself" are connected with their antecedents in a different way from free anaphors such as "him." Bound anaphora resolution is deterministic, based on Principle A of Chomsky's binding theory. Free anaphors, pronominals, cannot be bound in the domain of reflexives (principle…

  3. Some Educational Implications & Contributions of Outward Bound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Outward Bound School, Sydney.

    The development of Outward Bound, from the early beginnings in Britain through expansion in over 30 locations throughout the world, is outlined, and Outward Bound educational aspects are analyzed in terms of the Australian Outward Bound School. The concepts of experiential education, lifelong education, and the broader Australian educational scene…

  4. Consistent Tolerance Bounds for Statistical Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezzacappa, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Assumption that sample comes from population with particular distribution is made with confidence C if data lie between certain bounds. These "confidence bounds" depend on C and assumption about distribution of sampling errors around regression line. Graphical test criteria using tolerance bounds are applied in industry where statistical analysis influences product development and use. Applied to evaluate equipment life.

  5. Absolute dose verifications in small photon fields using BANGTM gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheib, S. G.; Schenkel, Y.; Gianolini, S.

    2004-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters change their magnetic resonance (MR) and optical properties with the absorbed dose when irradiated and are suitable for narrow photon beam dosimetry in radiosurgery. Such dosimeters enable relative and absolute 3D dose verifications in order to check the entire treatment chain from imaging to dose application during commissioning and quality assurance. For absolute 3D dose verifications in radiosurgery using Gamma Knife B, commercially available BANGTM Gels (BANG 25 Gy and BANG 3 Gy) together with dedicated phantoms were chosen in order to determine the potential of absolute gel dosimetry in radiosurgery.

  6. Measuring the absolute magnetic field using high-Tc SQUID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, D. F.; Itozaki, H.

    2006-06-01

    SQUID normally can only measure the change of magnetic field instead of the absolute value of magnetic field. Using a compensation method, a mobile SQUID, which could keep locked when moving in the earth's magnetic field, was developed. Using the mobile SQUID, it was possible to measure the absolute magnetic field. The absolute value of magnetic field could be calculated from the change of the compensation output when changing the direction of the SQUID in a magnetic field. Using this method and the mobile SQUID, we successfully measured the earth's magnetic field in our laboratory.

  7. Absolute Antenna Calibration at the US National Geodetic Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, G. L.; Bilich, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Geodetic GNSS applications routinely demand millimeter precision and extremely high levels of accuracy. To achieve these accuracies, measurement and instrument biases at the centimeter to millimeter level must be understood. One of these biases is the antenna phase center, the apparent point of signal reception for a GNSS antenna. It has been well established that phase center patterns differ between antenna models and manufacturers; additional research suggests that the addition of a radome or the choice of antenna mount can significantly alter those a priori phase center patterns. For the more demanding GNSS positioning applications and especially in cases of mixed-antenna networks, it is all the more important to know antenna phase center variations as a function of both elevation and azimuth in the antenna reference frame and incorporate these models into analysis software. Determination of antenna phase center behavior is known as "antenna calibration". Since 1994, NGS has computed relative antenna calibrations for more than 350 antennas. In recent years, the geodetic community has moved to absolute calibrations - the IGS adopted absolute antenna phase center calibrations in 2006 for use in their orbit and clock products, and NGS's CORS group began using absolute antenna calibration upon the release of the new CORS coordinates in IGS08 epoch 2005.00 and NAD 83(2011,MA11,PA11) epoch 2010.00. Although NGS relative calibrations can be and have been converted to absolute, it is considered best practice to independently measure phase center characteristics in an absolute sense. Consequently, NGS has developed and operates an absolute calibration system. These absolute antenna calibrations accommodate the demand for greater accuracy and for 2-dimensional (elevation and azimuth) parameterization. NGS will continue to provide calibration values via the NGS web site www.ngs.noaa.gov/ANTCAL, and will publish calibrations in the ANTEX format as well as the legacy ANTINFO

  8. Asymmetric dark matter bound state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Xiao-Jun; Kang, Zhaofeng; Ko, P.; Li, Jinmian; Li, Tianjun

    2017-02-01

    We propose an interesting framework for asymmetric scalar dark matter (ADM), which has novel collider phenomenology in terms of an unstable ADM bound state (ADMonium) produced via Higgs portals. ADMonium is a natural consequence of the basic features of ADM: the (complex scalar) ADM is charged under a dark local U (1 )d symmetry which is broken at a low scale and provides a light gauge boson X . The dark gauge coupling is strong and then ADM can annihilate away into X -pair effectively. Therefore, the ADM can form a bound state due to its large self-interaction via X mediation. To explore the collider signature of ADMonium, we propose that ADM has a two-Higgs doublet portal. The ADMonium can have a sizable mixing with the heavier Higgs boson, which admits a large cross section of ADMonium production associated with b b ¯. The resulting signature at the LHC depends on the decays of X . In this paper we consider a case of particular interest: p p →b b ¯ +ADMonium followed by ADMonium→2 X →2 e+e- where the electrons are identified as (un)converted photons. It may provide a competitive explanation to heavy di-photon resonance searches at the LHC.

  9. Quantum correlations beyond Tsirelson's bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Dominic; Ringbauer, Martin; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; White, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Violations of Bell inequalities show that there are correlations that cannot explained by any classical theory. Further violation, beyond Tsirelson's bound, shows that there are correlations that are not explained by quantum mechanics. Such super-quantum correlations would enable violation of information causality, where communication of one bit provides more than one bit of information [Nature 461, 1101 (2009)]. An unavoidable feature of all realistic Bell inequality experiments is loss. If one postselects on successful measurements, unentangled states can violate Bell inequalities. On the other hand, loss can be used to enhance the violation of Bell inequalities for entangled states. This can improve the ability to distinguish between entangled and unentangled states, despite loss. Here we report an optical experiment providing maximal violation of the CHSH-Bell inequality with entangled states. Due to loss and postselection, Tsirelson's bound is also violated. This enables us to more easily distinguish between entangled and unentangled states. In addition, it provides violation of information causality for the postselected data.

  10. Endurance bounds of aerial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Aaron M.; Kroninger, Christopher M.

    2014-06-01

    Within the past few years micro aerial vehicles (MAVs) have received much more attention and are starting to proliferate into military as well as civilian roles. However, one of the major drawbacks for this technology currently, has been their poor endurance, usually below 10 minutes. This is a direct result of the inefficiencies inherent in their design. Often times, designers do not consider the various components in the vehicle design and match their performance to the desired mission for the vehicle. These vehicles lack a prescribed set of design guidelines or empirically derived design equations which often limits their design to selection of commercial off-the-shelf components without proper consideration of their affect on vehicle performance. In the current study, the design space for different vehicle configurations has been examined including insect flapping, avian flapping, rotary wing, and fixed wing, and their performance bounds are established. The propulsion system typical of a rotary wing vehicle is analyzed to establish current baselines for efficiency of vehicles at this scale. The power draw from communications is analyzed to determine its impact on vehicle performance. Finally, a representative fixed wing MAV is examined and the effects of adaptive structures as a means for increasing vehicle endurance and range are examined. This paper seeks to establish the performance bounds for micro air vehicles and establish a path forward for future designs so that efficiency may be maximized.

  11. A Lagrangian Relax-and-Cut Approach for the Bounded Diameter Minimum Spanning Tree Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raidl, Günther R.; Gruber, Martin

    2008-09-01

    We consider the problem of finding for a given weighted graph a minimum cost spanning tree whose diameter does not exceed a specified upper bound. This problem is NP-hard and has several applications, e.g. when designing communication networks and quality of service is of concern. We model the problem as an integer linear program (ILP) using so-called jump inequalities. Since the number of these constraints grows exponentially with the problem size, solving this ILP directly is not feasible. Instead, we relax the jump constraints in a Lagrangian fashion and apply a cutting plane algorithm to separate violated inequalities. This relax-and-cut approach yields relatively tight lower bounds especially for larger problem instances on which exact techniques are not applicable. High quality feasible solutions, i.e. upper bounds, are obtained by a repair heuristic in combination with a powerful variable neighborhood descent strategy.

  12. Upper Eyelid Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Gabriela Mabel; Prost, Angela Michelle

    2016-05-01

    Reconstruction of the upper eyelid is complicated because the eyelid must retain mobility, flexibility, function, and a suitable mucosal surface over the delicate cornea. Defects of the upper eyelid may be due to congenital defects or traumatic injury or follow oncologic resection. This article focuses on reconstruction due to loss of tissue. Multiple surgeries may be needed to reach the desired results, addressing loss of tissue and then loss of function. Each defect is unique and the laxity and availability of surrounding tissue vary. Knowing the most common techniques for repair assists surgeons in the multifaceted planning that takes place.

  13. Tightening the entropic uncertainty bound in the presence of quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adabi, F.; Salimi, S.; Haseli, S.

    2016-06-01

    The uncertainty principle is a fundamental principle in quantum physics. It implies that the measurement outcomes of two incompatible observables cannot be predicted simultaneously. In quantum information theory, this principle can be expressed in terms of entropic measures. M. Berta et al. [Nat. Phys. 6, 659 (2010), 10.1038/nphys1734] have indicated that uncertainty bound can be altered by considering a particle as a quantum memory correlating with the primary particle. In this article, we obtain a lower bound for entropic uncertainty in the presence of a quantum memory by adding an additional term depending on the Holevo quantity and mutual information. We conclude that our lower bound will be tightened with respect to that of Berta et al. when the accessible information about measurements outcomes is less than the mutual information about the joint state. Some examples have been investigated for which our lower bound is tighter than Berta et al.'s lower bound. Using our lower bound, a lower bound for the entanglement of formation of bipartite quantum states has been obtained, as well as an upper bound for the regularized distillable common randomness.

  14. Creating multiphoton-polarization bound entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Tzu-Chieh; Lavoie, Jonathan; Kaltenbaek, Rainer

    2011-03-15

    Bound entangled states are the exotic objects in the entangled world. They require entanglement to create them, but once they are formed, it is not possible to locally distill any free entanglement from them. It is only until recently that a few bound entangled states were realized in the laboratory. Motivated by these experiments, we propose schemes for creating various classes of bound entangled states with photon polarization. These include Acin-Bruss-Lewenstein-Sanpara states, Duer's states, Lee-Lee-Kim bound entangled states, and an unextendible-product-basis bound entangled state.

  15. Monochromator-Based Absolute Calibration of Radiation Thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keawprasert, T.; Anhalt, K.; Taubert, D. R.; Hartmann, J.

    2011-08-01

    A monochromator integrating-sphere-based spectral comparator facility has been developed to calibrate standard radiation thermometers in terms of the absolute spectral radiance responsivity, traceable to the PTB cryogenic radiometer. The absolute responsivity calibration has been improved using a 75 W xenon lamp with a reflective mirror and imaging optics to a relative standard uncertainty at the peak wavelength of approximately 0.17 % ( k = 1). Via a relative measurement of the out-of-band responsivity, the spectral responsivity of radiation thermometers can be fully characterized. To verify the calibration accuracy, the absolutely calibrated radiation thermometer is used to measure Au and Cu freezing-point temperatures and then to compare the obtained results with the values obtained by absolute methods, resulting in T - T 90 values of +52 mK and -50 mK for the gold and copper fixed points, respectively.

  16. Gibbs Paradox Revisited from the Fluctuation Theorem with Absolute Irreversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashita, Yûto; Ueda, Masahito

    2017-02-01

    The inclusion of the factor ln (1 /N !) in the thermodynamic entropy proposed by Gibbs is shown to be equivalent to the validity of the fluctuation theorem with absolute irreversibility for gas mixing.

  17. Absolute Value Boundedness, Operator Decomposition, and Stochastic Media and Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adomian, G.; Miao, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    The research accomplished during this period is reported. Published abstracts and technical reports are listed. Articles presented include: boundedness of absolute values of generalized Fourier coefficients, propagation in stochastic media, and stationary conditions for stochastic differential equations.

  18. Absolute flux calibration of optical spectrophotometric standard stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colina, Luis; Bohlin, Ralph C.

    1994-01-01

    A method based on Landolt photometry in B and V is developed to correct for a wavelength independent offset of the absolute flux level of optical spectrophotometric standards. The method is based on synthetic photometry techniques in B and V and is accurate to approximately 1%. The correction method is verified by Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph absolute fluxes for five calibration stars, which agree with Landolt photometry to 0.5% in B and V.

  19. Bound states in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia Wei; Zhen, Bo; Stone, A. Douglas; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-09-01

    Bound states in the continuum (BICs) are waves that remain localized even though they coexist with a continuous spectrum of radiating waves that can carry energy away. Their very existence defies conventional wisdom. Although BICs were first proposed in quantum mechanics, they are a general wave phenomenon and have since been identified in electromagnetic waves, acoustic waves in air, water waves and elastic waves in solids. These states have been studied in a wide range of material systems, such as piezoelectric materials, dielectric photonic crystals, optical waveguides and fibres, quantum dots, graphene and topological insulators. In this Review, we describe recent developments in this field with an emphasis on the physical mechanisms that lead to BICs across seemingly very different materials and types of waves. We also discuss experimental realizations, existing applications and directions for future work.

  20. Lower bound for the variation of the hyperfine populations in the ground state of spin-1 condensates against a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, W. F.; He, Y. Z.; Bao, C. G.

    2015-10-01

    A simple and analytical expression for the variation of the lower bound and upper bound of the population density ρ0 of hyperfine component μ = 0 particles in the ground state of spin-1 condensates against a magnetic field B has been derived. The lower bound has a distinguished feature, namely, it will tend to the actual ρ0 when B tends to zero and infinite. This feature assures that, in the whole range of B, the lower bound can provide an effective constraint. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the applicability of the bound.

  1. STS upper stage operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchens, M. D.; Schnyer, A. D.

    1977-01-01

    Several design/development and operational approaches for STS upper stages are being pursued to realize maximum operational and economic benefits upon the introduction of the STS in the 1980s. The paper focuses special attention on safety operations, launch site operations and on-orbit operations.

  2. Upper Grades Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer Learning, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Describes computer-oriented teaching activities for the upper grades. They focus on the use of databases in history classes, checking taxes, examining aspects of the joystick button on Atari microcomputers, printing control using Logo, and a Logo program that draws whirling squares. All activities can be adapted for lower grades. (JN)

  3. Tri-critical behavior of the Blume-Emery-Griffiths model on a Kagomé lattice: Effective-field theory and Rigorous bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Jander P.; Sá Barreto, F. C.

    2016-01-01

    Spin correlation identities for the Blume-Emery-Griffiths model on Kagomé lattice are derived and combined with rigorous correlation inequalities lead to upper bounds on the critical temperature. From the spin correlation identities the mean field approximation and the effective field approximation results for the magnetization, the critical frontiers and the tricritical points are obtained. The rigorous upper bounds on the critical temperature improve over those effective-field type theories results.

  4. Massively parallel computation of absolute binding free energy with well-equilibrated states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujitani, Hideaki; Tanida, Yoshiaki; Matsuura, Azuma

    2009-02-01

    A force field formulator for organic molecules (FF-FOM) was developed to assign bond, angle, and dihedral parameters to arbitrary organic molecules in a unified manner including proteins and nucleic acids. With the unified force field parametrization we performed massively parallel computations of absolute binding free energies for pharmaceutical target proteins and ligands. Compared with the previous calculation with the ff99 force field in the Amber simulation package (Amber99) and the ligand charges produced by the Austin Model 1 bond charge correction (AM1-BCC), the unified parametrization gave better absolute binding energies for the FK506 binding protein (FKBP) and ligand system. Our method is based on extensive work measurement between thermodynamic states to calculate the free energy difference and it is also the same as the traditional free energy perturbation. There are important requirements for accurate calculations. The first is a well-equilibrated bound structure including the conformational change of the protein induced by the binding of the ligand. The second requirement is the convergence of the work distribution with a sufficient number of trajectories and dense spacing of the coupling constant between the ligand and the rest of the system. Finally, the most important requirement is the force field parametrization.

  5. Using tolerance bounds in scientific investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Wendelberger, J.R.

    1996-07-01

    Assessment of the variability in population values plays an important role in the analysis of scientific data. Analysis of scientific data often involves developing a bound on a proportion of a population. Sometimes simple probability bounds are obtained using formulas involving known mean and variance parameters and replacing the parameters by sample estimates. The resulting bounds are only approximate and fail to account for the variability in the estimated parameters. Tolerance bounds provide bounds on population proportions which account for the variation resulting from the estimated mean and variance parameters. A beta content, gamma confidence tolerance interval is constructed so that a proportion beta of the population lies within the region bounded by the interval with confidence gamma. An application involving corrosion measurements is used to illustrate the use of tolerance bounds for different situations. Extensions of standard tolerance intervals are applied to generate regression tolerance bounds, tolerance bounds for more general models of measurements collected over time, and tolerance intervals for varying precision data. Tolerance bounds also provide useful information for designing the collection of future data.

  6. Optimal design of the absolute positioning sensor for a high-speed maglev train and research on its fault diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dapeng; Long, Zhiqiang; Xue, Song; Zhang, Junge

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies an absolute positioning sensor for a high-speed maglev train and its fault diagnosis method. The absolute positioning sensor is an important sensor for the high-speed maglev train to accomplish its synchronous traction. It is used to calibrate the error of the relative positioning sensor which is used to provide the magnetic phase signal. On the basis of the analysis for the principle of the absolute positioning sensor, the paper describes the design of the sending and receiving coils and realizes the hardware and the software for the sensor. In order to enhance the reliability of the sensor, a support vector machine is used to recognize the fault characters, and the signal flow method is used to locate the faulty parts. The diagnosis information not only can be sent to an upper center control computer to evaluate the reliability of the sensors, but also can realize on-line diagnosis for debugging and the quick detection when the maglev train is off-line. The absolute positioning sensor we study has been used in the actual project.

  7. Optimal Design of the Absolute Positioning Sensor for a High-Speed Maglev Train and Research on Its Fault Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dapeng; Long, Zhiqiang; Xue, Song; Zhang, Junge

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies an absolute positioning sensor for a high-speed maglev train and its fault diagnosis method. The absolute positioning sensor is an important sensor for the high-speed maglev train to accomplish its synchronous traction. It is used to calibrate the error of the relative positioning sensor which is used to provide the magnetic phase signal. On the basis of the analysis for the principle of the absolute positioning sensor, the paper describes the design of the sending and receiving coils and realizes the hardware and the software for the sensor. In order to enhance the reliability of the sensor, a support vector machine is used to recognize the fault characters, and the signal flow method is used to locate the faulty parts. The diagnosis information not only can be sent to an upper center control computer to evaluate the reliability of the sensors, but also can realize on-line diagnosis for debugging and the quick detection when the maglev train is off-line. The absolute positioning sensor we study has been used in the actual project. PMID:23112619

  8. Verifying the error bound of numerical computation implemented in computer systems

    DOEpatents

    Sawada, Jun

    2013-03-12

    A verification tool receives a finite precision definition for an approximation of an infinite precision numerical function implemented in a processor in the form of a polynomial of bounded functions. The verification tool receives a domain for verifying outputs of segments associated with the infinite precision numerical function. The verification tool splits the domain into at least two segments, wherein each segment is non-overlapping with any other segment and converts, for each segment, a polynomial of bounded functions for the segment to a simplified formula comprising a polynomial, an inequality, and a constant for a selected segment. The verification tool calculates upper bounds of the polynomial for the at least two segments, beginning with the selected segment and reports the segments that violate a bounding condition.

  9. Auditory working memory predicts individual differences in absolute pitch learning.

    PubMed

    Van Hedger, Stephen C; Heald, Shannon L M; Koch, Rachelle; Nusbaum, Howard C

    2015-07-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is typically defined as the ability to label an isolated tone as a musical note in the absence of a reference tone. At first glance the acquisition of AP note categories seems like a perceptual learning task, since individuals must assign a category label to a stimulus based on a single perceptual dimension (pitch) while ignoring other perceptual dimensions (e.g., loudness, octave, instrument). AP, however, is rarely discussed in terms of domain-general perceptual learning mechanisms. This is because AP is typically assumed to depend on a critical period of development, in which early exposure to pitches and musical labels is thought to be necessary for the development of AP precluding the possibility of adult acquisition of AP. Despite this view of AP, several previous studies have found evidence that absolute pitch category learning is, to an extent, trainable in a post-critical period adult population, even if the performance typically achieved by this population is below the performance of a "true" AP possessor. The current studies attempt to understand the individual differences in learning to categorize notes using absolute pitch cues by testing a specific prediction regarding cognitive capacity related to categorization - to what extent does an individual's general auditory working memory capacity (WMC) predict the success of absolute pitch category acquisition. Since WMC has been shown to predict performance on a wide variety of other perceptual and category learning tasks, we predict that individuals with higher WMC should be better at learning absolute pitch note categories than individuals with lower WMC. Across two studies, we demonstrate that auditory WMC predicts the efficacy of learning absolute pitch note categories. These results suggest that a higher general auditory WMC might underlie the formation of absolute pitch categories for post-critical period adults. Implications for understanding the mechanisms that underlie the

  10. Bound anionic states of adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  11. Search for Chemically Bound Water in the Surface Layer of Mars Based on HEND/Mars Odyssey Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basilevsky, A. T.; Litvak, M. L.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W.; Saunders, R. S.

    2003-01-01

    This study is emphasized on search for signatures of chemically bound water in surface layer of Mars based on data acquired by High Energy Neutron Detector (HEND) which is part of the Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS). Fluxes of epithermal (probe the upper 1-2 m) and fast (the upper 20-30 cm) neutrons, considered in this work, were measured since mid February till mid June 2002. First analysis of this data set with emphasis of chemically bound water was made. Early publications of the GRS results reported low neutron flux at high latitudes, interpreted as signature of ground water ice, and in two low latitude areas: Arabia and SW of Olympus Mons (SWOM), interpreted as 'geographic variations in the amount of chemically and/or physically bound H2O and or OH...'. It is clear that surface materials of Mars do contain chemically bound water, but its amounts are poorly known and its geographic distribution was not analyzed.

  12. Alignment between seafloor spreading directions and absolute plate motions through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Simon E.; Flament, Nicolas; Müller, R. Dietmar

    2016-02-01

    The history of seafloor spreading in the ocean basins provides a detailed record of relative motions between Earth's tectonic plates since Pangea breakup. Determining how tectonic plates have moved relative to the Earth's deep interior is more challenging. Recent studies of contemporary plate motions have demonstrated links between relative plate motion and absolute plate motion (APM), and with seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle. Here we explore the link between spreading directions and APM since the Early Cretaceous. We find a significant alignment between APM and spreading directions at mid-ocean ridges; however, the degree of alignment is influenced by geodynamic setting, and is strongest for mid-Atlantic spreading ridges between plates that are not directly influenced by time-varying slab pull. In the Pacific, significant mismatches between spreading and APM direction may relate to a major plate-mantle reorganization. We conclude that spreading fabric can be used to improve models of APM.

  13. Arctic Upper Ocean Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    understand the turbulent transfer of momentum, heat , salt, and other scalar contaminants in naturally occurring boundary layers of the ocean, and to apply...numerical models of the sea ice/upper ocean system. APPROACH I have developed systems for measuring vertical turbulent fluxes of momentum, heat , and...the empirical observation that the length scale associated with vertical turbulent tranfer (mixing length) is inversely proportional to the wavenumber

  14. View down and east from the Upper Tier of Upper ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View down and east from the Upper Tier of Upper Raceway, Rogers Storage Building immediate right, Rogers Frame Fitting Shop (HAER No. NJ-3-B) in background - Great Falls/S. U. M. Power Canal System, Paterson, Passaic County, NJ

  15. 4. SHOWING BRIDGE AT UPPER LEFT, UPPER FALLS AND TOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. SHOWING BRIDGE AT UPPER LEFT, UPPER FALLS AND TOP OF MAIN WATERFALL, FACING NORTHEAST - Paradise River First Crossing Bridge, Spanning Paradise River at Narada Falls on Service Road, Longmire, Pierce County, WA

  16. New bounding and decomposition approaches for MILP investment problems: Multi-area transmission and generation planning under policy constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, F. D.; Hobbs, B. F.; Watson, J. -P.

    2016-02-01

    A novel two-phase bounding and decomposition approach to compute optimal and near-optimal solutions to large-scale mixed-integer investment planning problems is proposed and it considers a large number of operating subproblems, each of which is a convex optimization. Our motivating application is the planning of power transmission and generation in which policy constraints are designed to incentivize high amounts of intermittent generation in electric power systems. The bounding phase exploits Jensen’s inequality to define a lower bound, which we extend to stochastic programs that use expected-value constraints to enforce policy objectives. The decomposition phase, in which the bounds are tightened, improves upon the standard Benders’ algorithm by accelerating the convergence of the bounds. The lower bound is tightened by using a Jensen’s inequality-based approach to introduce an auxiliary lower bound into the Benders master problem. Upper bounds for both phases are computed using a sub-sampling approach executed on a parallel computer system. Numerical results show that only the bounding phase is necessary if loose optimality gaps are acceptable. But, the decomposition phase is required to attain optimality gaps. Moreover, use of both phases performs better, in terms of convergence speed, than attempting to solve the problem using just the bounding phase or regular Benders decomposition separately.

  17. New bounding and decomposition approaches for MILP investment problems: Multi-area transmission and generation planning under policy constraints

    DOE PAGES

    Munoz, F. D.; Hobbs, B. F.; Watson, J. -P.

    2016-02-01

    A novel two-phase bounding and decomposition approach to compute optimal and near-optimal solutions to large-scale mixed-integer investment planning problems is proposed and it considers a large number of operating subproblems, each of which is a convex optimization. Our motivating application is the planning of power transmission and generation in which policy constraints are designed to incentivize high amounts of intermittent generation in electric power systems. The bounding phase exploits Jensen’s inequality to define a lower bound, which we extend to stochastic programs that use expected-value constraints to enforce policy objectives. The decomposition phase, in which the bounds are tightened, improvesmore » upon the standard Benders’ algorithm by accelerating the convergence of the bounds. The lower bound is tightened by using a Jensen’s inequality-based approach to introduce an auxiliary lower bound into the Benders master problem. Upper bounds for both phases are computed using a sub-sampling approach executed on a parallel computer system. Numerical results show that only the bounding phase is necessary if loose optimality gaps are acceptable. But, the decomposition phase is required to attain optimality gaps. Moreover, use of both phases performs better, in terms of convergence speed, than attempting to solve the problem using just the bounding phase or regular Benders decomposition separately.« less

  18. Absolute and relative family affluence and psychosomatic symptoms in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Elgar, Frank J; De Clercq, Bart; Schnohr, Christina W; Bird, Phillippa; Pickett, Kate E; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Hofmann, Felix; Currie, Candace

    2013-08-01

    Previous research on the links between income inequality and health and socioeconomic differences in health suggests that relative differences in affluence impact health and well-being more than absolute affluence. This study explored whether self-reported psychosomatic symptoms in adolescents relate more closely to relative affluence (i.e., relative deprivation or rank affluence within regions or schools) than to absolute affluence. Data on family material assets and psychosomatic symptoms were collected from 48,523 adolescents in eight countries (Austria, Belgium, Canada, Norway, Scotland, Poland, Turkey, and Ukraine) as part of the 2009/10 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study. Multilevel regression analyses of the data showed that relative deprivation (Yitzhaki Index, calculated in regions and in schools) and rank affluence (in regions) (1) related more closely to symptoms than absolute affluence, and (2) related to symptoms after differences in absolute affluence were held constant. However, differences in family material assets, whether they are measured in absolute or relative terms, account for a significant variation in adolescent psychosomatic symptoms. Conceptual and empirical issues relating to the use of material affluence indices to estimate socioeconomic position are discussed.

  19. High speed image acquisition system of absolute encoder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jianxiang; Chen, Xin; Chen, Xindu; Zhang, Fangjian; Wang, Han

    2017-01-01

    Absolute optical encoder as a product of optical, mechanical and electronic integration has been widely used in displacement measuring fields. However, how to improve the measurement velocity and reduce the manufacturing cost of absolute optical encoder is the key problem to be solved. To improve the measurement speed, a novel absolute optical encoder image acquisition system is proposed. The proposed acquisition system includes a linear CCD sensor is applied for capturing coding pattern images, an optical magnifying system is used for enlarging the grating stripes, an analog-digital conversion(ADC) module is used for processing the CCD analogy signal, a field programmable gate array(FPGA) device and other peripherals perform driving task. An absolute position measurement experiment was set up to verify and evaluate the proposed image acquisition system. The experimental result indicates that the proposed absolute optical encoder image acquisition system has the image acquisition speed of more than 9500fp/s with well reliability and lower manufacture cost.

  20. Absolute irradiance of the Moon for on-orbit calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, T.C.; Kieffer, H.H.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The recognized need for on-orbit calibration of remote sensing imaging instruments drives the ROLO project effort to characterize the Moon for use as an absolute radiance source. For over 5 years the ground-based ROLO telescopes have acquired spatially-resolved lunar images in 23 VNIR (Moon diameter ???500 pixels) and 9 SWIR (???250 pixels) passbands at phase angles within ??90 degrees. A numerical model for lunar irradiance has been developed which fits hundreds of ROLO images in each band, corrected for atmospheric extinction and calibrated to absolute radiance, then integrated to irradiance. The band-coupled extinction algorithm uses absorption spectra of several gases and aerosols derived from MODTRAN to fit time-dependent component abundances to nightly observations of standard stars. The absolute radiance scale is based upon independent telescopic measurements of the star Vega. The fitting process yields uncertainties in lunar relative irradiance over small ranges of phase angle and the full range of lunar libration well under 0.5%. A larger source of uncertainty enters in the absolute solar spectral irradiance, especially in the SWIR, where solar models disagree by up to 6%. Results of ROLO model direct comparisons to spacecraft observations demonstrate the ability of the technique to track sensor responsivity drifts to sub-percent precision. Intercomparisons among instruments provide key insights into both calibration issues and the absolute scale for lunar irradiance.

  1. Accurate absolute GPS positioning through satellite clock error estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.-C.; Kwon, J. H.; Jekeli, C.

    2001-05-01

    An algorithm for very accurate absolute positioning through Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite clock estimation has been developed. Using International GPS Service (IGS) precise orbits and measurements, GPS clock errors were estimated at 30-s intervals. Compared to values determined by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the agreement was at the level of about 0.1 ns (3 cm). The clock error estimates were then applied to an absolute positioning algorithm in both static and kinematic modes. For the static case, an IGS station was selected and the coordinates were estimated every 30 s. The estimated absolute position coordinates and the known values had a mean difference of up to 18 cm with standard deviation less than 2 cm. For the kinematic case, data obtained every second from a GPS buoy were tested and the result from the absolute positioning was compared to a differential GPS (DGPS) solution. The mean differences between the coordinates estimated by the two methods are less than 40 cm and the standard deviations are less than 25 cm. It was verified that this poorer standard deviation on 1-s position results is due to the clock error interpolation from 30-s estimates with Selective Availability (SA). After SA was turned off, higher-rate clock error estimates (such as 1 s) could be obtained by a simple interpolation with negligible corruption. Therefore, the proposed absolute positioning technique can be used to within a few centimeters' precision at any rate by estimating 30-s satellite clock errors and interpolating them.

  2. Absolute Instability in Swept Leading-Edge Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R.-S.; Li, F.; Malik, M. R.

    1997-11-01

    Absolute instabilities in the swept Hiemenz flow and flows over Poll's swept cylinder are studied. It is assumed that the span is infinite and the laminar flow field is subjected to a line impulsive excitation so that the spanwise wavenumber (β) is taken to be real, which is akin to the rotating disk study made by Lingwood.footnote Lingwood, R. J., J. Fluid Mech., 299, 17, 1995. We found that these flows can be absolutely unstable in the chordwise (x) direction. The pinch-point singularities formed by the coalescence of two distinct spatial branches can lie either below or above the real α-axis. The pinch points with a positive αi imply the existence of an unstable disturbance propagating against the mainstream, which has never been observed before. It is found that singularities of pinch type occur in a region very close to the leading edge, therefore the attachment-line Reynolds number is used to correlate the onset of absolute instability. The critical Reynolds number for absolute instability is found to be about R=540 compared to 583 for the attachment-line instability. Provided the non-linear behavior of this absolute instability is sufficient to trigger the laminar to turbulent transition, then it would cause a complete loss of laminar flow on a swept wing as does the attachment-line instability.

  3. Stabilization of the Upper Equilibrium Position of a Pendulum by Spinning an Inertial Flywheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoroshun, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    A way to control a spinning flywheel that ensures the absolute asymptotic stability of the upper equilibrium position of a pendulum is proposed. The robustness of this control is proved. A method to estimate the robustness domain in the space of parameters of the mechanical system is proposed. The results obtained are exemplified by a real model

  4. System and method for calibrating a rotary absolute position sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Donald R. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Radford, Nicolaus A (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system includes a rotary device, a rotary absolute position (RAP) sensor generating encoded pairs of voltage signals describing positional data of the rotary device, a host machine, and an algorithm. The algorithm calculates calibration parameters usable to determine an absolute position of the rotary device using the encoded pairs, and is adapted for linearly-mapping an ellipse defined by the encoded pairs to thereby calculate the calibration parameters. A method of calibrating the RAP sensor includes measuring the rotary position as encoded pairs of voltage signals, linearly-mapping an ellipse defined by the encoded pairs to thereby calculate the calibration parameters, and calculating an absolute position of the rotary device using the calibration parameters. The calibration parameters include a positive definite matrix (A) and a center point (q) of the ellipse. The voltage signals may include an encoded sine and cosine of a rotary angle of the rotary device.

  5. Absolute distance sensing by two laser optical interferometry.

    PubMed

    Thurner, Klaus; Braun, Pierre-François; Karrai, Khaled

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a method for absolute distance sensing by two laser optical interferometry. A particularity of this technique is that a target distance is determined in absolute and is no longer limited to within an ambiguity range affecting usually multiple wavelength interferometers. We implemented the technique in a low-finesse Fabry-Pérot miniature fiber based interferometer. We used two diode lasers, both operating in the 1550 nm wavelength range. The wavelength difference is chosen to create a 25 μm long periodic beating interferometric pattern allowing a nanometer precise position measurement but limited to within an ambiguity range of 25 μm. The ambiguity is then eliminated by scanning one of the wavelengths over a small range (3.4 nm). We measured absolute distances in the sub-meter range and this with just few nanometer repeatability.

  6. Method and apparatus for two-dimensional absolute optical encoding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    This invention presents a two-dimensional absolute optical encoder and a method for determining position of an object in accordance with information from the encoder. The encoder of the present invention comprises a scale having a pattern being predetermined to indicate an absolute location on the scale, means for illuminating the scale, means for forming an image of the pattern; and detector means for outputting signals derived from the portion of the image of the pattern which lies within a field of view of the detector means, the field of view defining an image reference coordinate system, and analyzing means, receiving the signals from the detector means, for determining the absolute location of the object. There are two types of scale patterns presented in this invention: grid type and starfield type.

  7. Global classical solutions to the 3D isentropic compressible Navier-Stokes equations in a bounded domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haibo; Zhao, Junning

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we study the global existence for classical solutions to the 3D isentropic compressible Navier-Stokes equations in a cuboid domain. Compared to the Cauchy problem studied in Hoff (1995 J. Differ. Equ. 120 215-54), Hoff (2005 J. Math. Fluid Mech. 7 315-38), Huang et al (2012 Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 65 549-85), some new thoughts are applied to obtain upper bounds for density. Precisely, through piecewise estimation and some time-depending a priori estimates, we establish time-uniform upper bounds for density under the assumption that the initial energy is small. The initial vacuum is allowed.

  8. The Absolute Gravimeter FG5 - Adjustment and Residual Data Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlob, M.; Braun, A.; Henton, J.; Courtier, N.; Liard, J.

    2009-05-01

    The most widely used method of direct terrestrial gravity determination is performed by using a ballistic absolute gravimeter. Today, the FG5 (Micro-g LaCoste; Lafayette, CO) is the most common free-fall absolute gravimeter. It uses the Michelson-type interferometer to determine the absolute gravity value with accuracies up to one part- per-billion of g. Furthermore, absolute gravimeter measurements can be used to assist in the validation and interpretation of temporal variations of the global gravity field, e.g. from the GRACE mission. In addition, absolute gravimetry allows for monitoring gravity changes which are caused by subsurface mass redistributions and/or vertical displacements. In this study,adjustment software was developed and applied to the raw data sets of FG5#106 and FG5#236, made available by Natural Resources Canada. Both data sets have been collected at the same time and place which leads to an intercomparison of the instruments performance. The adjustment software was validated against the official FG5 software package developed by Micro-g Lacoste. In order to identify potential environmental or instrument disturbances in the observed time series, a Lomb- Scargle periodogram analysis was employed. The absolute gravimeter FG5 is particularly sensitive to low frequencies between 0-3Hz. Hence, the focus of the analysis is to detect signals in the band of 0-100 Hz. An artificial signal was added to the measurements for demonstration purposes. Both the performance of the adjustment software and the Lomb-Scargle analysis will be discussed.

  9. Measurements of the reactor neutron power in absolute units

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, G. V.

    2015-12-15

    The neutron power of the reactor of the Yenisei space nuclear power plant is measured in absolute units using the modernized method of correlation analysis during the ground-based tests of the Yenisei prototypes. Results of the experiments are given. The desired result is obtained in a series of experiments carried out at the stage of the plant preparation for tests. The acceptability of experimental data is confirmed by the results of measuring the reactor neutron power in absolute units at the nominal level by the thermal balance during the life cycle tests of the ground prototypes.

  10. STS-9 Shuttle grow - Ram angle effect and absolute intensities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Clifton, K. S.

    1986-01-01

    Visible imagery from Space Shuttle mission STS-9 (Spacelab 1) has been analyzed for the ram angle effect and the absolute intensity of glow. The data are compared with earlier measurements and the anomalous high intensities at large ram angles are confirmed. Absolute intensities of the ram glow on the shuttle tile, at 6563 A, are observed to be about 20 times more intense than those measured on the AE-E spacecraft. Implications of these observations for an existing theory of glow involving NO2 are presented.

  11. Absolute integrated intensity for the nu-1 sulfur dioxide band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilon, P. J.; Young, C.

    1976-01-01

    The absolute integrated intensity of the IR vibration-rotation nu-1 SO2 band was measured using the linear portion of the curve of growth. Infrared spectroscopic-absorption cell measurements were performed on sulfur dioxide at partial pressures less than 0.15 torr with nitrogen added to give a total pressure of 705 torr, the path length being 4 mm. The absolute integrated intensity was determined to be 112.0 plus or minus 2.6/cm/sq (atm cm) at 296 K at the 95% confidence level.

  12. From Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) to Absolute Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, S. R.; Lindler, D.

    2016-05-01

    Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL) consists of R˜1000 spectra of 374 stars of assorted temperature, gravity, and metallicity. Each spectrum covers the wavelength range, 0.18-1.03 μ. The library can be viewed and/or downloaded from the website, http://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/stisngsl/. Stars in the NGSL are now being used as absolute flux standards at ground-based observatories. However, the uncertainty in the absolute flux is about 2%, which does not meet the requirements of dark-energy surveys. We have therefore developed an observing procedure, data-reduction procedure, and correction algorithms that should yield fluxes with uncertainties less than 1%.

  13. Absolute configuration determination of angular dihydrocoumarins from Peucedanum praeruptorum.

    PubMed

    Lou, Hong-Xiang; Sun, Long-Ru; Yu, Wen-Tao; Fan, Pei-Hong; Cui, Lei; Gao, Yan-Hui; Ma, Bin; Ren, Dong-Mei; Ji, Mei

    2004-09-01

    From Peucedanum praeruptorum, one new khellactone ester (3'R)-O-acetyl-(4'S)-O-angeloylkhellactone (3), as well as four known angular dihydropyranocoumarins (1, 2, 4, 5) have been isolated. On the basis of NMR spectra and X-ray crystallography, their structures were determined. We have elucidated their absolute configuration by either chiral separation of their alkaline hydrolysis products with Rp-18 HPLC eluted with 5% hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (beta-HCD) or by measurement of their CD spectra. A general rule relating the position and absolute streochemistry of the khellactone esters to the sign of their Cotton effects in CD curves is proposed.

  14. Large-Scale Measurement of Absolute Protein Glycosylation Stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shisheng; Zhang, Hui

    2015-07-07

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most important protein modifications. Glycosylation site occupancy alteration has been implicated in human diseases and cancers. However, current glycoproteomic methods focus on the identification and quantification of glycosylated peptides and glycosylation sites but not glycosylation occupancy or glycoform stoichiometry. Here we describe a method for large-scale determination of the absolute glycosylation stoichiometry using three independent relative ratios. Using this method, we determined 117 absolute N-glycosylation occupancies in OVCAR-3 cells. Finally, we investigated the possible functions and the determinants for partial glycosylation.

  15. Non-Invasive Method of Determining Absolute Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H., Jr. (Inventor); Hargens, Alan E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method is presented for determining absolute intracranial pressure (ICP) in a patient. Skull expansion is monitored while changes in ICP are induced. The patient's blood pressure is measured when skull expansion is approximately zero. The measured blood pressure is indicative of a reference ICP value. Subsequently, the method causes a known change in ICP and measured the change in skull expansion associated therewith. The absolute ICP is a function of the reference ICP value, the known change in ICP and its associated change in skull expansion; and a measured change in skull expansion.

  16. Absolute gain measurement by the image method under mismatched condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Baddour, Maurice F.

    1987-01-01

    Purcell's image method for measuring the absolute gain of an antenna is particularly attractive for small test antennas. The method is simple to use and utilizes only one antenna with a reflecting plane to provide an image for the receiving antenna. However, the method provides accurate results only if the antenna is matched to its waveguide. In this paper, a waveguide junction analysis is developed to determine the gain of an antenna under mismatched condition. Absolute gain measurements for two standard gain horn antennas have been carried out. Experimental results agree closely with published data.

  17. Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Haddad, G. N.

    1974-01-01

    Absolute photon-flux measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet have extended to short wavelengths by use of rare-gas ionization chambers. The technique involves the measurement of the ion current as a function of the gas pressure in the ion chamber. The true value of the ion current, and hence the absolute photon flux, is obtained by extrapolating the ion current to zero gas pressure. Examples are given at 162 and 266 A. The short-wavelength limit is determined only by the sensitivity of the current-measuring apparatus and by present knowledge of the photoionization processes that occur in the rate gases.

  18. Nonexistence of equilibrium states at absolute negative temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Rochín, Víctor

    2013-08-01

    We show that states of macroscopic systems with purported absolute negative temperatures are not stable under small, yet arbitrary, perturbations. We prove the previous statement using the fact that, in equilibrium, the entropy takes its maximum value. We discuss that, while Ramsey theoretical reformulation of the second law for systems with negative temperatures is logically correct, it must be a priori assumed that those states are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Since we argue that those states cannot occur, reversible processes are impossible, and, thus, Ramsey identification of absolute negative temperatures is untenable.

  19. Absolute Stability Analysis of a Phase Plane Controlled Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Jiann-Woei; Plummer, Michael; Bedrossian, Nazareth; Hall, Charles; Jackson, Mark; Spanos, Pol

    2010-01-01

    Many aerospace attitude control systems utilize phase plane control schemes that include nonlinear elements such as dead zone and ideal relay. To evaluate phase plane control robustness, stability margin prediction methods must be developed. Absolute stability is extended to predict stability margins and to define an abort condition. A constrained optimization approach is also used to design flex filters for roll control. The design goal is to optimize vehicle tracking performance while maintaining adequate stability margins. Absolute stability is shown to provide satisfactory stability constraints for the optimization.

  20. Secret key capacity of the thermal-loss channel: improving the lower bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottaviani, Carlo; Laurenza, Riccardo; Cope, Thomas P. W.; Spedalieri, Gaetana; Braunstein, Samuel L.; Pirandola, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    We consider the secret key capacity of the thermal loss channel, which is modeled by a beam splitter mixing an input signal mode with an environmental thermal mode. This capacity is the maximum value of secret bits that two remote parties can generate by means of the most general adaptive protocols assisted by unlimited and two-way classical communication. To date, only upper and lower bounds are known. The present work improves the lower bound by resorting to Gaussian protocols based on suitable trusted-noise detectors.

  1. X-ray bounds on the r-mode amplitude in millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwenzer, Kai; Boztepe, Tuğba; Güver, Tolga; Vurgun, Eda

    2017-04-01

    r-mode asteroseismology provides a unique way to study the internal composition of compact stars. Due to their precise timing, recycled millisecond radio pulsars present a particularly promising class of sources. Although their thermal properties are still poorly constrained, X-ray data is very useful for asteroseismology since r-modes could strongly heat a star. Using known and new upper bounds on the temperatures and luminosities of several non-accreting millisecond radio pulsars, we derive bounds on the r-mode amplitude as low as α ≲ 10-8 and discuss the impact on scenarios for their internal composition.

  2. Approximation bounds for smooth functions in C(IRd) by neural and mixture networks.

    PubMed

    Maiorov, V; Meir, R S

    1998-01-01

    We consider the approximation of smooth multivariate functions in C(IRd) by feedforward neural networks with a single hidden layer of nonlinear ridge functions. Under certain assumptions on the smoothness of the functions being approximated and on the activation functions in the neural network, we present upper bounds on the degree of approximation achieved over the domain IRd, thereby generalizing available results for compact domains. We extend the approximation results to the so-called mixture of expert architecture, which has received considerable attention in recent years, showing that the same type of approximation bound may be achieved.

  3. Error probability bounds for trellis coded modulation over sequence dependent channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Ikuo; Biglieri, Ezio

    1989-04-01

    A technique for obtaining an upper bound to the error event probability of trellis-coded modulation in sequence-dependent channels is derived. The technique is based on the transfer function of a state diagram which has N + 1 nodes and whose branch labels are N x N error matrices. Some methods for simplifying the computation of bit error probability at the price of a looser bound are proposed. Numerical results show the applicability of the techniques presented here to trellis-coded 16-QAM with two-symbol intersymbol interference.

  4. Comparisons of Upper Tropospheric Humidity Retrievals from TOVS and METEOSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escoffier, C.; Bates, J.; Chedin, A.; Rossow, W. B.; Schmetz, J.

    1999-01-01

    Two different methods for retrieving Upper Tropospheric Humidities (UTH) from the TOVS (TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder) instruments aboard NOAA polar orbiting satellites are presented and compared. The first one, from the Environmental Technology Laboratory, computed by J. Bates and D. Jackson (hereafter BJ method), estimates UTH from a simplified radiative transfer analysis of the upper tropospheric infrared water vapor channel at wavelength measured by HIRS (6.3 micrometer). The second one results from a neural network analysis of the TOVS (HIRS and MSU) data developed at, the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique (hereafter the 3I (Improved Initialization Inversion) method). Although the two methods give very similar retrievals in temperate regions (30-60 N and S), an absolute bias up to 16% appears in the convective zone of the tropics. The two datasets have also been compared with UTH retrievals from infrared radiance measurements in the 6.3 micrometer channel from the geostationary satellite METEOSAT (hereafter MET method). The METEOSAT retrievals are systematically drier than the TOVS-based results by an absolute bias between 5 and 25%. Despite the biases, the spatial and temporal correlations are very good. The purpose of this study is to explain the deviations observed between the three datasets. The sensitivity of UTH to air temperature and humidity profiles is analysed as are the clouds effects. Overall, the comparison of the three retrievals gives an assessment of the current uncertainties in water vapor amounts in the upper troposphere as determined from NOAA and METEOSAT satellites.

  5. A lower bound for the QRQW PRAM

    SciTech Connect

    MacKenzie, P.D.

    1995-05-02

    The queue-read, queue-write (QRQW) parallel random access machine (PRAM) model is a shared memory model which allows concurrent reading and writing with a time cost proportional to the contention. This is designed to model currently available parallel machines more accurately than either the CRCW PRAM or EREW PRAM models. Many algorithmic results have been developed for the QRQW PRAM. However, the only lower bound results have been fairly simple reductions from lower bounds for other models, such as the EREW PRAM or the ``few-write`` CREW PRAM. Here we present a lower bound specific to the QRQW PRAM. This lower bound is on the problem of Linear Approximate Compaction (LAC), whose input consists of at most m marked items in an array of size n, and whose output consists of the rn marked items in an array of size 0(m). There is an O({radical}log n), expected time randomized algorithm for LAC on the QRQW PRAM. We prove a lower bound of {Omega}(log log log n) expected time for any randomized algorithm for LAC. This bound applies regardless of the number of processors and memory cells of the QRQW PRAM. The previous best lower bound was {Omega}(log* n) time, taken from the known lower bound for LAC on the CRCW PRAM.

  6. Outward Bound: An Innovative Patient Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stich, Thomas F.; Gaylor, Michael S.

    A 1975 Dartmouth Outward Bound Mental Health Project, begun with a pilot project for disturbed adolescents, has evolved into an ongoing treatment option in three separate clinical settings for psychiatric patients and recovering alcoholics. Outward Bound consists of a series of prescribed physical and social tasks where the presence of stress,…

  7. THE HOPF BIFURCATION WITH BOUNDED NOISE

    PubMed Central

    Botts, Ryan T.; Homburg, Ale Jan; Young, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    We study Hopf-Andronov bifurcations in a class of random differential equations (RDEs) with bounded noise. We observe that when an ordinary differential equation that undergoes a Hopf bifurcation is subjected to bounded noise then the bifurcation that occurs involves a discontinuous change in the Minimal Forward Invariant set. PMID:24748762

  8. Outward Bound: an Experience in Human Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danenburg, William; Gaggi, Silvio

    1974-01-01

    Two authors describe how their participation in an outward bound program has helped them develop a greater degree of general self confidence, greater ease in dealing with complex and frustrating problems, and a greater appreciation of man's place in the natural environment. They also describe Outward Bound courses that have been especially…

  9. Upper lumbar disk herniations.

    PubMed

    Cedoz, M E; Larbre, J P; Lequin, C; Fischer, G; Llorca, G

    1996-06-01

    Specific features of upper lumbar disk herniations are reviewed based on data from the literature and from a retrospective study of 24 cases treated surgically between 1982 and 1994 (seven at L1-L2 and 17 at L2-L3). Clinical manifestations are polymorphic, misleading (abdominogenital pain suggestive of a visceral or psychogenic condition, meralgia paresthetica, isolated sciatica; femoral neuralgia is uncommon) and sometimes severe (five cases of cauda equina syndrome in our study group). The diagnostic usefulness of imaging studies (radiography, myelography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and results of surgery are discussed. The risk of misdiagnosis and the encouraging results of surgery are emphasized.

  10. Upper Extremity Regional Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Joseph M.; Gerancher, J.C.; Hebl, James R.; Ilfeld, Brian M.; McCartney, Colin J.L.; Franco, Carlo D.; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2009-01-01

    Brachial plexus blockade is the cornerstone of the peripheral nerve regional anesthesia practice of most anesthesiologists. As part of the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine’s commitment to providing intensive evidence-based education related to regional anesthesia and analgesia, this article is a complete update of our 2002 comprehensive review of upper extremity anesthesia. The text of the review focuses on (1) pertinent anatomy, (2) approaches to the brachial plexus and techniques that optimize block quality, (4) local anesthetic and adjuvant pharmacology, (5) complications, (6) perioperative issues, and (6) challenges for future research. PMID:19282714

  11. Upper extremity golf injuries.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Michael A; Lee, Steven K; Strauss, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Golf is a global sport enjoyed by an estimated 60 million people around the world. Despite the common misconception that the risk of injury during the play of golf is minimal, golfers are subject to a myriad of potential pathologies. While the majority of injuries in golf are attributable to overuse, acute traumatic injuries can also occur. As the body's direct link to the golf club, the upper extremities are especially prone to injury. A thorough appreciation of the risk factors and patterns of injury will afford accurate diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of further injury.

  12. The Stardust Mission: Homeward Bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Tsou, P.; Hanner, M. S.; Newburn, R.; Sekanina, Z.; Anderson, J. D.; Clark, B. C.; Horz, F.; Zolensky, M. E.; Kissel, J.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Sandford, S. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    2003-05-01

    Stardust, NASA's fourth Discovery mission, will fly past comet Wild 2 on Jan 2, 2004 and head towards an Earth return in Jan 2006. During the 6.1 km/s flyby, 150 km from the nucleus, Stardust will collect thousands of particles for Earth return, do insitu analyses of particles with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, take high resolution images of the nucleus, measure the flux and size distribution of dust in the coma and place an upper limit on the comet mass. The samples are collected by impact into low density silica aerogel and they will returned to a landing site west of Salt Lake city Utah by small direct atmospheric entry capsule. The collected samples will be made available for researchers world-wide for study by analytical techniques that are appropriate for the study of small primitive particulate samples. The samples from the Kuiper Belt will provide information on the materials and processes that existed at the edge of the solar nebula disk at the time of formation of Kuiper Belt objects. They should provide fundamental insight into the relative roles of pre-solar grains and nebular solids in the outer regions of the nebula and they can provide information, literally the atomic level, on key issues such as the nature of interstellar silicate grains and the interrelationships between amorphous and crystalline materials around stars and in the ISM. Stardust is doing quite well and it has completed all of its major tasks except for two: Wild 2 flyby and Earth return. In November 2, 2002 Stardust completed a highly successful ?dress rehearsal? flyby of the remarkably shaped S type asteroid Annefrank.

  13. Rigorous bounds for optimal dynamical decoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, Goetz S.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2010-07-15

    We present rigorous performance bounds for the optimal dynamical decoupling pulse sequence protecting a quantum bit (qubit) against pure dephasing. Our bounds apply under the assumption of instantaneous pulses and of bounded perturbing environment and qubit-environment Hamiltonians such as those realized by baths of nuclear spins in quantum dots. We show that if the total sequence time is fixed the optimal sequence can be used to make the distance between the protected and unperturbed qubit states arbitrarily small in the number of applied pulses. If, on the other hand, the minimum pulse interval is fixed and the total sequence time is allowed to scale with the number of pulses, then longer sequences need not always be advantageous. The rigorous bound may serve as a testbed for approximate treatments of optimal decoupling in bounded models of decoherence.

  14. On the perturbation of the group generalized inverse for a class of bounded operators in Banach spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-González, N.; Vélez-Cerrada, J. Y.

    2008-05-01

    Given a bounded operator A on a Banach space X with Drazin inverse AD and index r, we study the class of group invertible bounded operators B such that I+AD(B-A) is invertible and . We show that they can be written with respect to the decomposition as a matrix operator, , where B1 and are invertible. Several characterizations of the perturbed operators are established, extending matrix results. We analyze the perturbation of the Drazin inverse and we provide explicit upper bounds of ||B#-AD|| and ||BB#-ADA||. We obtain a result on the continuity of the group inverse for operators on Banach spaces.

  15. Rigorous upper bounds for fluid and plasma transport due to passive advection

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.; Smith, R.A.; Kim, C.B.

    1987-07-01

    The formulation of variational principles for transport due to passive advection is described. A detailed account of the work has been published elsewhere. In the present paper, the motivations, philosophy, and implications of the method are briefly discussed. 15 refs.

  16. An upper bound from helioseismology on the stochastic background of gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Daniel M.; Roth, Markus

    2014-04-01

    The universe is expected to be permeated by a stochastic background of gravitational radiation of astrophysical and cosmological origin. This background is capable of exciting oscillations in solar-like stars. Here we show that solar-like oscillators can be employed as giant hydrodynamical detectors for such a background in the μHz to mHz frequency range, which has remained essentially unexplored until today. We demonstrate this approach by using high-precision radial velocity data for the Sun to constrain the normalized energy density of the stochastic gravitational-wave background around 0.11 mHz. These results open up the possibility for asteroseismic missions like CoRoT and Kepler to probe fundamental physics.

  17. Bound-free Spectra for Diatomic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.

    2012-01-01

    It is now recognized that prediction of radiative heating of entering space craft requires explicit treatment of the radiation field from the infrared (IR) to the vacuum ultra violet (VUV). While at low temperatures and longer wavelengths, molecular radiation is well described by bound-bound transitions, in the short wavelength, high temperature regime, bound-free transitions can play an important role. In this work we describe first principles calculations we have carried out for bound-bound and bound-free transitions in N2, O2, C2, CO, CN, NO, and N2+. Compared to bound ]bound transitions, bound-free transitions have several particularities that make them different to deal with. These include more complicated line shapes and a dependence of emission intensity on both bound state diatomic and atomic concentrations. These will be discussed in detail below. The general procedure we used was the same for all species. The first step is to generate potential energy curves, transition moments, and coupling matrix elements by carrying out ab initio electronic structure calculations. These calculations are expensive, and thus approximations need to be made in order to make the calculations tractable. The only practical method we have to carry out these calculations is the internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction (icMRCI) method as implemented in the program suite Molpro. This is a widely used method for these kinds of calculations, and is capable of generating very accurate results. With this method, we must first of choose which electrons to correlate, the one-electron basis to use, and then how to generate the molecular orbitals.

  18. Locating Bound Structures in the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, David; Batuski, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Given the overwhelming evidence of the universe’s accelerating expansion, the question of what structures are gravitationally bound becomes one of utmost interest. Dunner et al. 2006 (D06) and Busha et al. 2003 (B03) set out to answer this question analytically, and they arrived at fairly different answers owing to the differences in their assumptions of velocities at the present epoch. Applying their criteria to different superclusters, it’s possible to make predictions about what structures may be bound. We apply the criteria of D06 and B03 to the Aquarius, Microscopium, Corona Borealis, and Shapley superclusters to make predictions about what structures might be bound and compare with the results of simple N-body simulations to determine which method is a better predictor and to determine the likelihood that parts or all of the superclusters listed above are bound. We find that D06 tend to predict more structure to be bound than B03, and the results of the N-body simulations usually lie somewhere in between the two sets of predictions. Observational evidence, and simulation data suggests that pairs of clusters in Aquarius and Microscopium are gravitationally bound, and that Shapley contains a large complex of clusters that are bound, along with some additional bound pairs. The likelihood that any of the clusters in Corona Borealis are bound to one another is very small, contrary to the claims of Small et al. 1998, who claimed that the entire supercluster is likely gravitationally bound. Busha M. T., Adams F. C., Wechsler R. H., Evrard A. E., 2003, ApJ, 596, 713 Dunner R., Araya P. A., Meza A., Reisenegger A., 2006, MNRAS, 306, 803 Small T. A., Ma C., Sargent W. L. W., Hamilton D., 1998, ApJ, 492, 45

  19. The neutral upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S. N.

    2002-07-01

    After World War II, Professor S.K. Mitra wrote a comprehensive book called The Upper Atmosphere, which dealt with information available from ground-based and balloon-borne experiments. As a result, topics such as day airglow were investigated and further ground-based experiments using incoherent back-scattering were carried out. These activities resulted in important new information on the ozonosphere. The dramatic discovery of ozone holes forms a new and exciting chapter in the discovery of atmospheric processes. While dealing with the limits of the atmosphere, reference may be made to interstellar molecules whose discovery has raised considerable scientific curiosity. Knowledge on the solar-terrestrial relationship advanced a great deal when more information on solar radiation became available by measuring higher energy photons in the UV, EUV, and even X-ray regime. All this information is incorporated in this volume and presented under the title The Neutral Upper Atmosphere. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/0-7923-6434-1

  20. Calculation of absolute free energy of binding for theophylline and its analogs to RNA aptamer using nonequilibrium work values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanida, Yoshiaki; Ito, Masakatsu; Fujitani, Hideaki

    2007-08-01

    The massively parallel computation of absolute binding free energy with a well-equilibrated system (MP-CAFEE) has been developed [H. Fujitani, Y. Tanida, M. Ito, G. Jayachandran, C.D. Snow, M.R. Shirts, E.J. Sorin, V.S. Pande, J. Chem. Phys. 123 (2005) 084108]. As an application, we perform the binding affinity calculations of six theophylline-related ligands with RNA aptamer. Basically, our method is applicable when using many compute nodes to accelerate simulations, thus a parallel computing system is also developed. To further reduce the computational cost, the adequate non-uniform intervals of coupling constant λ, connecting two equilibrium states, namely bound and unbound, are determined. The absolute binding energies Δ G thus obtained have effective linear relation between the computed and experimental values. If the results of two other different methods are compared, thermodynamic integration (TI) and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) by the paper of Gouda et al. [H. Gouda, I.D. Kuntz, D.A. Case, P.A. Kollman, Biopolymers 68 (2003) 16], the predictive accuracy of the relative values ΔΔ G is almost comparable to that of TI: the correlation coefficients ( R) obtained are 0.99 (this work), 0.97 (TI), and 0.78 (MM-PBSA). On absolute binding energies meanwhile, a constant energy shift of ˜-7 kcal/mol against the experimental values is evident. To solve this problem, several presumable reasons are investigated.

  1. Two methods for absolute calibration of dynamic pressure transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, G. W.; Migliori, A.; Garrett, S. L.; Wheatley, J. C.

    1982-12-01

    Two techniques are described for absolute calibration of a dynamic pressure transducer from 0 to 400 Hz in 1-MPa helium gas. One technique is based on a comparison to a mercury manometer; the other is based on the principle of reciprocity. The two techniques agree within the instrumental uncertainties of 1%.

  2. Toward The Absolute Age of M92 With MIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jieun; Conroy, Charlie; Dotter, Aaron; Weisz, Daniel; Rosenfield, Philip; Dolphin, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Globular clusters provide a fundamental link between stars and galaxies. For example, it has been suggested that ultra faint dwarf galaxies formed all of their stars prior to the epoch of reionization, but this conclusion hinges entirely on the striking similarity of their stellar populations to the ancient, metal-poor globular cluster M92. The accurate measurement of absolute ages of ancient globular clusters therefore has direct implications for the formation histories of the smallest galaxies in the Universe. However, a reliable determination of the absolute ages of globular clusters has proven to be a challenge due to uncertainties in stellar physics and complications in how the models are compared to observations. I will present preliminary results from a comprehensive study to measure the absolute age of M92 using high-quality HST archival imaging data. We pair our new MESA Isochrones and Stellar Tracks (MIST) models with a full CMD fitting framework to jointly fit multi-color CMDs, taking into account the uncertainties in abundances, distance, and stellar physics. The goal of this project is two-fold. First, we aim to provide the most secure absolute age of M92 to date with robustly estimated uncertainties. Second, we explore and quantify the degeneracies between uncertain physical quantities and model variables, such as the distance, mixing-length-alpha parameter, and helium abundance, with the ultimate goal of better constraining these unknowns with data from ongoing and future surveys such as K2, Gaia, TESS, JWST, and WFIRST.

  3. Individual Differences in Absolute and Relative Metacomprehension Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maki, Ruth H.; Shields, Micheal; Wheeler, Amanda Easton; Zacchilli, Tammy Lowery

    2005-01-01

    The authors investigated absolute and relative metacomprehension accuracy as a function of verbal ability in college students. Students read hard texts, revised texts, or a mixed set of texts. They then predicted their performance, took a multiple-choice test on the texts, and made posttest judgments about their performance. With hard texts,…

  4. Absolute Value Inequalities: High School Students' Solutions and Misconceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almog, Nava; Ilany, Bat-Sheva

    2012-01-01

    Inequalities are one of the foundational subjects in high school math curricula, but there is a lack of academic research into how students learn certain types of inequalities. This article fills part of the research gap by presenting the findings of a study that examined high school students' methods of approaching absolute value inequalities,…

  5. Is There a Rule of Absolute Neutralization in Nupe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krohn, Robert

    1975-01-01

    A previously prosed rule of absolute neutralization (merging underlying low vowels) is eliminated in an alternative analysis including instead a rule that "breaks" the feature matrix of certain low vowels and redistributes the features of each vowel as a sequence of vowel-like transition plus (a). (Author/RM)

  6. A mathematical biologist's guide to absolute and convective instability.

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Jonathan A; Dagbovie, Ayawoa S; Hilker, Frank M

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models have been highly successful at reproducing the complex spatiotemporal phenomena seen in many biological systems. However, the ability to numerically simulate such phenomena currently far outstrips detailed mathematical understanding. This paper reviews the theory of absolute and convective instability, which has the potential to redress this inbalance in some cases. In spatiotemporal systems, unstable steady states subdivide into two categories. Those that are absolutely unstable are not relevant in applications except as generators of spatial or spatiotemporal patterns, but convectively unstable steady states can occur as persistent features of solutions. The authors explain the concepts of absolute and convective instability, and also the related concepts of remnant and transient instability. They give examples of their use in explaining qualitative transitions in solution behaviour. They then describe how to distinguish different types of instability, focussing on the relatively new approach of the absolute spectrum. They also discuss the use of the theory for making quantitative predictions on how spatiotemporal solutions change with model parameters. The discussion is illustrated throughout by numerical simulations of a model for river-based predator-prey systems.

  7. Ophthalmoplegic migraine. Two patients with an absolute response to indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Pareja, J A; Churruca, J; de la Casa Fages, B; de Silanes, C López; Sánchez, C; Barriga, F J

    2010-06-01

    Two patients suffering from ophthalmoplegic migraine had a strictly unilateral headache absolutely responsive to indomethacin, but not to other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, analgesics or corticosteroids. Such observations raise a therapeutic alternative and suggest that ophthalmoplegic migraine may present with different headache phenotypes.

  8. Absolute Interrogative Intonation Patterns in Buenos Aires Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Su Ar

    2010-01-01

    In Spanish, each uttered phrase, depending on its use, has one of a variety of intonation patterns. For example, a phrase such as "Maria viene manana" "Mary is coming tomorrow" can be used as a declarative or as an absolute interrogative (a yes/no question) depending on the intonation pattern that a speaker produces. …

  9. Absolute configurations of zingiberenols isolated from ginger (Zingiber officinale) rhizomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sesquiterpene alcohol zingiberenol, or 1,10-bisaboladien-3-ol, was isolated some time ago from ginger, Zingiber officinale, rhizomes, but its absolute configuration had not been determined. With three chiral centers present in the molecule, zingiberenol can exist in eight stereoisomeric forms. ...

  10. Lyman alpha SMM/UVSP absolute calibration and geocoronal correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, Juan M.; Reichmann, Edwin J.

    1987-01-01

    Lyman alpha observations from the Ultraviolet Spectrometer Polarimeter (UVSP) instrument of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft were analyzed and provide instrumental calibration details. Specific values of the instrument quantum efficiency, Lyman alpha absolute intensity, and correction for geocoronal absorption are presented.

  11. Urey: to measure the absolute age of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randolph, J. E.; Plescia, J.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Bartlett, P.; Bickler, D.; Carlson, R.; Carr, G.; Fong, M.; Gronroos, H.; Guske, P. J.; Herring, M.; Javadi, H.; Johnson, D. W.; Larson, T.; Malaviarachchi, K.; Sherrit, S.; Stride, S.; Trebi-Ollennu, A.; Warwick, R.

    2003-01-01

    UREY, a proposed NASA Mars Scout mission will, for the first time, measure the absolute age of an identified igneous rock formation on Mars. By extension to relatively older and younger rock formations dated by remote sensing, these results will enable a new and better understanding of Martian geologic history.

  12. Relative versus Absolute Stimulus Control in the Temporal Bisection Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Carvalho, Marilia Pinhiero; Machado, Armando

    2012-01-01

    When subjects learn to associate two sample durations with two comparison keys, do they learn to associate the keys with the short and long samples (relational hypothesis), or with the specific sample durations (absolute hypothesis)? We exposed 16 pigeons to an ABA design in which phases A and B corresponded to tasks using samples of 1 s and 4 s,…

  13. Mechanism for an absolute parametric instability of an inhomogeneous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipenko, V. I.; Budnikov, V. N.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Romanchuk, I. A.; Simonchik, L. V.

    1984-05-01

    The structure of plasma oscillations in a region of parametric spatial amplification has been studied experimentally for the first time. A new mechanism for an absolute parametric instability has been observed. This mechanism operates when a pump wave with a spatial structure more complicated than a plane wave propagates through a plasma which is inhomogeneous along more than one dimension.

  14. Absolute calibration in the 1750 - 3350 A region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strongylis, G. J.; Bohlin, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The absolute flux measurements in the rocket ultraviolet made by Bohlin, Frimout, and Lillie (BFL) are revised using a more correct treatment of the air extinction that enters the air calibration of their instrument. The absorption by molecular oxygen and ozone, Rayleigh scattering, and extinction by aerosols is tabulated for general use in ultraviolet calibrations performed in air. The revised absolute flux of eta UMa and final fluxes for alpha Lyr and zeta Oph are presented in the 1750-3350 A region. The absolute flux of the star eta UMa is compared to four other independent determinations in the 1200-3400 A region and a maximum difference of 35% is found near 1500 A between the OAO-2 and Apollo 17 fluxes. The rocket measurements of BFL, the ANS and TD-1 satellite data, and the Apollo 17 data are compared to the ultraviolet fluxes from the OAO-2, demonstrating a photometric reproducibility of about + or - 3 percent. Therefore, all four sets of spectrophotometry can be reduced to a common absolute scale.

  15. Mathematical Model for Absolute Magnetic Measuring Systems in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fügenschuh, Armin; Fügenschuh, Marzena; Ludszuweit, Marina; Mojsic, Aleksandar; Sokół, Joanna

    2015-09-01

    Scales for measuring systems are either based on incremental or absolute measuring methods. Incremental scales need to initialize a measurement cycle at a reference point. From there, the position is computed by counting increments of a periodic graduation. Absolute methods do not need reference points, since the position can be read directly from the scale. The positions on the complete scales are encoded using two incremental tracks with different graduation. We present a new method for absolute measuring using only one track for position encoding up to micrometre range. Instead of the common perpendicular magnetic areas, we use a pattern of trapezoidal magnetic areas, to store more complex information. For positioning, we use the magnetic field where every position is characterized by a set of values measured by a hall sensor array. We implement a method for reconstruction of absolute positions from the set of unique measured values. We compare two patterns with respect to uniqueness, accuracy, stability and robustness of positioning. We discuss how stability and robustness are influenced by different errors during the measurement in real applications and how those errors can be compensated.

  16. Series that Converge Absolutely but Don't Converge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantrowitz, Robert; Schramm, Michael

    2012-01-01

    If a series of real numbers converges absolutely, then it converges. The usual proof requires completeness in the form of the Cauchy criterion. Failing completeness, the result is false. We provide examples of rational series that illustrate this point. The Cantor set appears in connection with one of the examples.

  17. Analysis of standard reference materials by absolute INAA

    SciTech Connect

    Heft, R.E.; Koszykowski, R.F.

    1981-07-01

    Three standard reference materials, flyash, soil, and ASI 4340 steel, were analyzed by a method of absolute instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Two different light water pool-type reactors were used to produce equivalent analytical results even though the epithermal to thermal flux ratio in one reactor was higher than that in the other by a factor of two.

  18. Bounds on the Information Carrying Capacity of Pn Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, D B

    2008-12-01

    Upper and lower bounds on the capacity of the Pn wave to transmit information about source identity are developed using models and measurements of Pn spatial signal structure across the ARCES array. The results show a very significant increase in information carrying capacity when contrasting observed propagation conditions with idealized free-space propagation. In essence, scattering greatly increases Pn channel capacity. As shown in a previous contribution, this increase in information can be captured with matched field calibrations and exploited to resolve sources more closely spaced than the Rayleigh resolution limit. These results mirror practices in cellular telephones that use arrays at the transmitter and receiver to exploit scattering for increased channel capacity.

  19. Bounds on the calving cliff height of marine terminating glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yue; Tripathy, Cory S.; Bassis, Jeremy N.

    2017-02-01

    Increased calving and rapid retreat of glaciers can contribute significantly to sea level rise, but the processes controlling glacier retreat remain poorly understood. We seek to improve our understanding of calving by investigating the stress field controlling tensile and shear failure using a 2-D full-Stokes finite element model. Using idealized rectangular geometries, we find that when rapidly sliding glaciers thin to near buoyancy, full thickness tensile failure occurs, similar to observations motivating height-above-buoyancy calving laws. In contrast, when glaciers are frozen to their beds, basal crevasse penetration is suppressed and calving is minimal. We also find that shear stresses are largest when glaciers are thickest. Together, the tensile and shear failure criteria map out a stable envelope in an ice-thickness-water-depth diagram. The upper and lower bounds on cliff height can be incorporated into numerical ice sheet models as boundary conditions, thus bracketing the magnitude of calving rates in marine-terminating glaciers.

  20. Absolute Gravity Datum in the Age of Cold Atom Gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childers, V. A.; Eckl, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The international gravity datum is defined today by the International Gravity Standardization Net of 1971 (IGSN-71). The data supporting this network was measured in the 1950s and 60s using pendulum and spring-based gravimeter ties (plus some new ballistic absolute meters) to replace the prior protocol of referencing all gravity values to the earlier Potsdam value. Since this time, gravimeter technology has advanced significantly with the development and refinement of the FG-5 (the current standard of the industry) and again with the soon-to-be-available cold atom interferometric absolute gravimeters. This latest development is anticipated to provide improvement in the range of two orders of magnitude as compared to the measurement accuracy of technology utilized to develop ISGN-71. In this presentation, we will explore how the IGSN-71 might best be "modernized" given today's requirements and available instruments and resources. The National Geodetic Survey (NGS), along with other relevant US Government agencies, is concerned about establishing gravity control to establish and maintain high order geodetic networks as part of the nation's essential infrastructure. The need to modernize the nation's geodetic infrastructure was highlighted in "Precise Geodetic Infrastructure, National Requirements for a Shared Resource" National Academy of Science, 2010. The NGS mission, as dictated by Congress, is to establish and maintain the National Spatial Reference System, which includes gravity measurements. Absolute gravimeters measure the total gravity field directly and do not involve ties to other measurements. Periodic "intercomparisons" of multiple absolute gravimeters at reference gravity sites are used to constrain the behavior of the instruments to ensure that each would yield reasonably similar measurements of the same location (i.e. yield a sufficiently consistent datum when measured in disparate locales). New atomic interferometric gravimeters promise a significant