Science.gov

Sample records for absorb infrared radiation

  1. The Investigation of Property of Radiation and Absorbed of Infrared Lights of the Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Deng, Bo; Xiao, He-Lan; Cai, Guo-Ping

    2010-04-01

    The properties of absorption of infrared light for collagen, hemoglobin, bivine serum albumen (BSA) protein molecules with α- helix structure and water in the living systems as well as the infrared transmission spectra for person’s skins and finger hands of human body in the region of 400-4000 cm-1 (i.e., wavelengths of 2-20 μm) have been collected and determined by using a Nicolet Nexus 670 FT-IR Spectrometer, a Perkin Elmer GX FT-IR spectrometer, an OMA (optical multichannel analysis) and an infrared probe systems, respectively. The experimental results obtained show that the protein molecules and water can all absorb the infrared lights in the ranges of 600-1900 cm-1 and 2900-3900 cm-l, but their properties of absorption are somewhat different due to distinctions of their structure and conformation and molecular weight. We know from the transmission spectra of person’s finger hands and skin that the infrared lights with wavelengths of 2 μm-7 μm can not only transmit over the person’s skin and finger hands, but also be absorbed by the above proteins and water in the living systems. Thus, we can conclude from this study that the human beings and animals can absorb the infrared lights with wavelengths of 2 μm-7 μm.

  2. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF2 etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  3. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shinpei Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-26

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF{sub 2} etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  4. Optimum combinations of visible and near-infrared reflectances for estimating the fraction of photosynthetically available radiation absorbed by plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podaire, Alain; Deschamps, Pierre-Yves; Frouin, R.; Asrar, Ghassem

    1991-01-01

    A useful parameter to estimate terrestrial primary productivity, that can be sensed from space, is the daily averaged fraction of Photosynthetically Available Radiation (PAR) absorbed by plants. To evaluate this parameter, investigators have relied on the fact that the relative amount of radiation reflected by a vegetated surface in the visible and near infrared depends on the fraction of the surface covered by the vegetation and therefore, correlates with absorbed PAR. They have used vegetation indices, namely normalized difference and simple ratio, to derive absorbed PAR. The problem with normalized difference and simple ratio is first, they are non linear functions of radiance or reflectance and therefore, cannot be readily applied to heterogeneous targets, second, they are used in generally nonlinear relationships, which make time integrals of the indices not proportional to primary productivity, and third, the relationships depend strongly on the type of canopy and background. To remove these limitations, linear combinations of visible and near infrared reflectances at optimum (one or two) viewing zenith angles are proposed.

  5. Multiple-layer Radiation Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert M. L.; Baker, Bonnie Sue

    A structure is discussed for absorbing incident radiation, either electromagnetic (EM) or sound. Such a surface structure is needed, for example, in a highly sensitive high-frequency gravitational wave or HFGW detector such as the Li-Baker. The multi-layer absorber, which is discussed, is constructed with metamaterial [MM] layer or layers on top. This MM is configured for a specific EM or sound radiation frequency band, which absorbs incident EM or sound radiation without reflection. Below these top MM layers is a substrate of conventional EM-radiation absorbing or acoustical absorbing reflective material, such as an array of pyramidal foam absorbers. Incident radiation is partially absorbed by the MM layer or layers, and then it is more absorbed by the lower absorbing and reflecting substrate. The remaining reflected radiation is even further absorbed by the MM layers on its "way out_ so that essentially all of the incident radiation is absorbed _ a nearly perfect black-body absorber. In a HFGW detector a substrate, such as foam absorbers, may outgas into a high vacuum and reduce the capability of the vacuum-producing equipment, however, the layers above this lowest substrate will seal the absorbing and reflecting substrate from any external vacuum. The layers also serve to seal the absorbing material against air or water flow past the surfaces of aircraft, watercraft or submarines. Other applications for such a multiple-level radiation absorber include stealth aircraft, missiles and submarines.

  6. Infrared bolometers with silicon nitride micromesh absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, J. J.; Turner, A. D.; DelCastillo, H. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Lange, A. E.; Mauskopf, P. D.

    1996-01-01

    Sensitive far infrared and millimeter wave bolometers fabricated from a freestanding membrane of low stress silicon nitride are reported. The absorber, consisting of a metallized silicon nitride micromesh thermally isolated by radial legs of silicon nitride, is placed in an integrating cavity to efficiently couple to single mode or multiple mode infrared radiation. This structure provides low heat capacity, low thermal conduction and minimal cross section to energetic particles. A neutron transmutation doped Ge thermister is bump bonded to the center of the device and read out with evaporated Cr-Au leads. The limiting performance of the micromesh absorber is discussed and the recent results obtained from a 300 mK cold stage are summarized.

  7. Absorber for terahertz radiation management

    DOEpatents

    Biallas, George Herman; Apeldoorn, Cornelis; Williams, Gwyn P.; Benson, Stephen V.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Heckman, John D.

    2015-12-08

    A method and apparatus for minimizing the degradation of power in a free electron laser (FEL) generating terahertz (THz) radiation. The method includes inserting an absorber ring in the FEL beam path for absorbing any irregular THz radiation and thus minimizes the degradation of downstream optics and the resulting degradation of the FEL output power. The absorber ring includes an upstream side, a downstream side, and a plurality of wedges spaced radially around the absorber ring. The wedges form a scallop-like feature on the innermost edges of the absorber ring that acts as an apodizer, stopping diffractive focusing of the THz radiation that is not intercepted by the absorber. Spacing between the scallop-like features and the shape of the features approximates the Bartlett apodization function. The absorber ring provides a smooth intensity distribution, rather than one that is peaked on-center, thereby eliminating minor distortion downstream of the absorber.

  8. Solar radiation absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.; Whitehead, Harlan D.

    1977-01-01

    Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

  9. Solar-energy absorber: Active infrared (IR) trap without glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantley, L. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Absorber efficiency can be improved to 90% by removing glass plates and using infrared traps. Absorber configuration may be of interest to manufacturers of solar absorbers and to engineers and scientists developing new sources of energy.

  10. Survey Of Infrared-Absorbing Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sheldon M.; Howitt, Richard V.

    1990-01-01

    Carbon black and silicon carbide grit low reflectance additives. Report presents results of survey of candidate materials for use as attenuators of stray radiation in far-infrared telescopes. More than 40 reflectance spectra at 17 degrees incidence, in wave-length range from 20 to 500 micrometer, obtained from variety of coatings, binders, and additives.

  11. Design of integration-ready metasurface-based infrared absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ogando, Karim Pastoriza, Hernán

    2015-07-28

    We introduce an integration ready design of metamaterial infrared absorber, highly compatible with many kinds of fabrication processes. We present the results of an exhaustive experimental characterization, including an analysis of the effects of single meta-atom geometrical parameters and collective arrangement. We confront the results with the theoretical interpretations proposed in the literature. Based on the results, we develop a set of practical design rules for metamaterial absorbers in the infrared region.

  12. Multi-spectral materials: hybridisation of optical plasmonic filters, a mid infrared metamaterial absorber and a terahertz metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Grant, James; McCrindle, Iain J H; Cumming, David R S

    2016-02-22

    Multi-spectral imaging systems typically require the cumbersome integration of disparate filtering materials and detectors in order to operate simultaneously in multiple spectral regions. Each distinct waveband must be detected at different spatial locations on a single chip or by separate chips optimised for each band. Here, we report on a single component that optically multiplexes visible, Mid Infrared (4.5 μm) and Terahertz (126 μm) radiation thereby maximising the spectral information density. We hybridise plasmonic and metamaterial structures to form a device capable of simultaneously filtering 15 visible wavelengths and absorbing Mid Infrared and Terahertz. Our synthetic multi-spectral component could be integrated with silicon complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology where Si photodiodes are available to detect the visible radiation and micro-bolometers available to detect the Infrared/Terahertz and render an inexpensive, mass-producible camera capable of forming coaxial visible, Infrared and Terahertz images. PMID:26907004

  13. Estimating the radiation absorbed by a human.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Natasha A; Warland, Jon S; Brown, Robert D; Gillespie, Terry G

    2008-07-01

    The complexities of the interactions between long- and short-wave radiation fluxes and the human body make it inherently difficult to estimate precisely the total radiation absorbed (R) by a human in an outdoor environment. The purpose of this project was to assess and compare three methods to estimate the radiation absorbed by a human in an outdoor environment, and to compare the impact of applying various skin and clothing albedos (alpha ( h )) on R. Field tests were conducted under both clear and overcast skies to evaluate the performance of applying a cylindrical radiation thermometer (CRT), net radiometer, and a theoretical estimation model to predict R. Three albedos were evaluated: light (alpha ( h ) = 0.57), medium (alpha ( h ) = 0.37), and dark (alpha ( h ) = 0.21). During the sampling periods, the range of error between the methods used to estimate the radiation absorbed by a cylindrical body under clear and overcast skies ranged from 3 to 8%. Clothing and skin albedo had a substantial impact on R, with the mean change in R between the darkest and lightest albedos ranging from 115 to 157 W m( - 2) over the sampling period. Radiation is one of the most important variables to consider in outdoor thermal comfort research, as R is often the largest contributor to the human energy balance equation. The methods outlined and assessed in this study can be conveniently applied to provide reliable estimates of the radiation absorbed by a human in an outdoor environment. PMID:18273649

  14. Rapid-Response Low Infrared Emission Broadband Ultrathin Plasmonic Light Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Tagliabue, Giulia; Eghlidi, Hadi; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures can significantly advance broadband visible-light absorption, with absorber thicknesses in the sub-wavelength regime, much thinner than conventional broadband coatings. Such absorbers have inherently very small heat capacity, hence a very rapid response time, and high light power-to-temperature sensitivity. Additionally, their surface emissivity can be spectrally tuned to suppress infrared thermal radiation. These capabilities make plasmonic absorbers promising candidates for fast light-to-heat applications, such as radiation sensors. Here we investigate the light-to-heat conversion properties of a metal-insulator-metal broadband plasmonic absorber, fabricated as a free-standing membrane. Using a fast IR camera, we show that the transient response of the absorber has a characteristic time below 13 ms, nearly one order of magnitude lower than a similar membrane coated with a commercial black spray. Concurrently, despite the small thickness, due to the large absorption capability, the achieved absorbed light power-to-temperature sensitivity is maintained at the level of a standard black spray. Finally, we show that while black spray has emissivity similar to a black body, the plasmonic absorber features a very low infra-red emissivity of almost 0.16, demonstrating its capability as selective coating for applications with operating temperatures up to 400°C, above which the nano-structure starts to deform. PMID:25418040

  15. Rapid-response low infrared emission broadband ultrathin plasmonic light absorber.

    PubMed

    Tagliabue, Giulia; Eghlidi, Hadi; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures can significantly advance broadband visible-light absorption, with absorber thicknesses in the sub-wavelength regime, much thinner than conventional broadband coatings. Such absorbers have inherently very small heat capacity, hence a very rapid response time, and high light power-to-temperature sensitivity. Additionally, their surface emissivity can be spectrally tuned to suppress infrared thermal radiation. These capabilities make plasmonic absorbers promising candidates for fast light-to-heat applications, such as radiation sensors. Here we investigate the light-to-heat conversion properties of a metal-insulator-metal broadband plasmonic absorber, fabricated as a free-standing membrane. Using a fast IR camera, we show that the transient response of the absorber has a characteristic time below 13 ms, nearly one order of magnitude lower than a similar membrane coated with a commercial black spray. Concurrently, despite the small thickness, due to the large absorption capability, the achieved absorbed light power-to-temperature sensitivity is maintained at the level of a standard black spray. Finally, we show that while black spray has emissivity similar to a black body, the plasmonic absorber features a very low infra-red emissivity of almost 0.16, demonstrating its capability as selective coating for applications with operating temperatures up to 400°C, above which the nano-structure starts to deform. PMID:25418040

  16. Rapid-Response Low Infrared Emission Broadband Ultrathin Plasmonic Light Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliabue, Giulia; Eghlidi, Hadi; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2014-11-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures can significantly advance broadband visible-light absorption, with absorber thicknesses in the sub-wavelength regime, much thinner than conventional broadband coatings. Such absorbers have inherently very small heat capacity, hence a very rapid response time, and high light power-to-temperature sensitivity. Additionally, their surface emissivity can be spectrally tuned to suppress infrared thermal radiation. These capabilities make plasmonic absorbers promising candidates for fast light-to-heat applications, such as radiation sensors. Here we investigate the light-to-heat conversion properties of a metal-insulator-metal broadband plasmonic absorber, fabricated as a free-standing membrane. Using a fast IR camera, we show that the transient response of the absorber has a characteristic time below 13 ms, nearly one order of magnitude lower than a similar membrane coated with a commercial black spray. Concurrently, despite the small thickness, due to the large absorption capability, the achieved absorbed light power-to-temperature sensitivity is maintained at the level of a standard black spray. Finally, we show that while black spray has emissivity similar to a black body, the plasmonic absorber features a very low infra-red emissivity of almost 0.16, demonstrating its capability as selective coating for applications with operating temperatures up to 400°C, above which the nano-structure starts to deform.

  17. Preparation of nonconducting infrared-absorbing thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradhand, Martin; Breitenstein, Otwin

    2005-05-01

    A simple procedure for preparing colloidal "black" bismuth films is introduced, which leaves the target cold and does not pollute the recipient. The Bi evaporation occurs in a closed box in the evaporation chamber with an internal radiation shield. The bismuth is evaporated from a tantalum boat at a residual air pressure of 2×102Pa. The resulting films with a thickness of about 10μm are structureless down to a spatial resolution of 5.6μm, they become electrically insulating after 48h storage time in air, and they show an IR absorbance of above 70% in the 3-5μm wavelength range. The films are easily removable in an ultrasonic water bath. Thus, these films are ideally appropriate to increase the IR emissivity of microelectronic structures in microthermal infrared failure analysis investigations such as lock-in thermography, as is demonstrated in an application example. The application of this film may improve the thermographic detection limit of heat sources below metallized areas by up to a factor of 10, leading to a saving in acquisition time by a factor of 100.

  18. Transient radiative transfer through scattering absorbing media

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, K.; Kumar, S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper outlines the formulation of the different methods for determining transient radiative transfer through scattering absorbing media. A boundary driven radiative problem is considered in a one-dimensional plane-parallel slab. The different methods of solving the transient radiative transfer equation include the P{sub 1}, P{sub 3}, and P{sub 5} approximations, two-flux method, and eight, twelve and sixteen discrete ordinates methods. In addition, the general transient radiative transfer equation is also solved by direct numerical integration without any simplifying assumptions. Different orders of approximation for the phase function are considered as is a parametric analysis of the different parameters such as the scattering albedo and optical depth is performed. The propagation speed obtained and the magnitude of the transmitted and back-scattered fluxes for different models obtained are a function of the approximation used to represent the intensity distribution.

  19. Preliminary report of plants and processes for infrared radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-18

    The industrial uses and unwanted industrial occurrences of infrared radiation were discussed. The physical characteristics of infrared radiation were described. Exposure to infrared radiation was considered for the following industries: chemicals and allied products, contract construction, electrical equipment, fabricated metals, food and related products, furniture and fixtures, instruments, leather products, manufacturing, primary metals, printing and publishing, rubber and plastics, and stone, clay and glass. The extent of employee exposure to infrared radiation depended on wavelength and energy, proximity of worker to source, degree of worker protection with heat shields, clothing, and tinted goggles, and general workplace conditions. The eye was the critical organ due to its limited ability to dissipate the absorbed heat and its sensitivity to elevated intraocular temperatures. The skin was also a primary concern as it has an extensive surface area and is the initial absorber of incident infrared radiation.

  20. Compensated infrared absorption sensor for carbon dioxide and other infrared absorbing gases

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Thomas E.

    2005-11-29

    A gas sensor, whose chamber uses filters and choppers in either a semicircular geometry or annular geometry, and incorporates separate infrared radiation filters and optical choppers. This configuration facilitates the use of a single infrared radiation source and a single detector for infrared measurements at two wavelengths, such that measurement errors may be compensated.

  1. Spacesuit Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, Ed; Izenson, Mike; Chan, Weibo; Bue, Grant C.

    2012-01-01

    For decades advanced spacesuit developers have pursued a regenerable, robust nonventing system for heat rejection. Toward this end, this paper investigates linking together two previously developed technologies, namely NASA s Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare s Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator (LCAR). Heat from a liquid cooled garment is transported to SWME that provides cooling through evaporation. This water vapor is then captured by solid LiCl in the LCAR with a high enthalpy of absorption, resulting in sufficient temperature lift to reject heat to space by radiation. After the sortie, the LCAR would be heated up and dried in a regenerator to drive off and recover the absorbed evaporant. A engineering development prototype was built and tested in vacuum conditions at a sink temperature of 250 K. The LCAR was able to stably reject 75 W over a 7-hour period. A conceptual design of a full-scale radiator is proposed. Excess heat rejection above 240 W would be accomplished through venting of the evaporant. Loop closure rates were predicted for various exploration environment scenarios.

  2. Photothermal response of near-infrared-absorbing NanoGUMBOS.

    PubMed

    Dumke, Jonathan C; Qureshi, Ammar; Hamdan, Suzana; El-Zahab, Bilal; Das, Susmita; Hayes, Daniel J; Boldor, Dorin; Rupnik, Kresimir; Warner, Isiah M

    2014-01-01

    The photothermal properties of several near-infrared-absorbing nanoparticles derived from group of uniform materials based on organic salts (GUMBOS) and composed of cationic dyes coupled with biocompatible anions are evaluated. These nanoparticles were synthesized using a reprecipitation method performed at various pH values: 2.0, 5.0, 7.0, 9.0, and 11.0. The cations for the nanoparticles derived from GUMBOS (nanoGUMBOS), [1048] and [1061], have absorbance maxima at wavelengths overlapping with human soft tissue absorbance minima. Near-infrared-absorbing nanoGUMBOS excited with a 1064 nm continuous laser led to heat generation, with an average temperature increase of 20.4 ± 2.7 °C. Although the [1061][Deoxycholate] nanoGUMBOS generated the highest temperature increase (23.7 ± 2.4 °C), it was the least photothermally efficient compound (13.0%) due to its relatively large energy band gap of 0.892 eV. The more photothermally efficient compound [1048][Ascorbate] (64.4%) had a smaller energy band gap of 0.861 eV and provided an average photothermal temperature increase of 21.0 ± 2.1 °C. PMID:24666951

  3. Electromagnetic radiation absorbers and modulators comprising polyaniline

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, Arthur J.; Ginder, John M.; Roe, Mitchell G.; Hajiseyedjavadi, Hamid

    1992-01-01

    A composition for absorbing electromagnetic radiation, wherein said electromagnetic radiation possesses a wavelength generally in the range of from about 1000 Angstroms to about 50 meters, wherein said composition comprises a polyaniline composition of the formula ##STR1## where y can be equal to or greater than zero, and R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are independently selected from the group containing of H, --OCH.sub.3, --CH.sub.3, --F, --Cl, --Br, --I, NR.sup.3 .sub.2, --NHCOR.sup.3, --OH, --O.sup.-, SR.sup.3, --OCOR.sup.3, --NO.sub.2, --COOH, --COOR.sup.3, --COR.sup.3, --CHO, and --CN, where R.sup.3 is a C.sub.1 to C.sub.8 alkyl, aryl or aralkyl group.

  4. Infrared Radiation and Planetary Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond T.

    2011-11-01

    Infrared radiative transfer theory, one of the most productive physical theories of the past century, has unlocked myriad secrets of the universe including that of planetary temperature and the connection between global warming and greenhouse gases.

  5. Remote infrared radiation detection using piezoresistive microcantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P.G.; Oden, P.I.; Thundat, T.; Wachter, E.A.; Warmack, R.J.; Hunter, S.R.

    1996-11-01

    A novel micromechanical infrared (IR) radiation sensor has been developed using commercially available piezoresistive microcantilevers. Microcantilevers coated with a heat absorbing layer undergo bending due to the differential stress between the top layer (coating) and the substrate. The bending causes a change in the piezoresistance and is proportional to the amount of heat absorbed. The microcantilever IR sensor exhibits two distinct thermal responses: a fast one ({lt}ms) and a slower one ({approximately}10 ms). A noise equivalent power (at a modulation frequency of 30 Hz) was estimated to be {approximately}70 nW/Hz{sup 1/2}. This value can be further reduced by designing microcantilevers with better thermal isolation that can allow microcantilevers to be used as uncooled IR radiation detectors. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Spacesuit Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Hodgson, Ed; Izenso, Mike; Chan, Weibo; Cupples, Scott

    2011-01-01

    For decades advanced spacesuit developers have pursued a regenerable, robust non-venting system for heat rejection. Toward this end, this paper investigates linking together two previously developed technologies, namely NASA's Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare's lithium chloride Heat Pump Radiator (HPR). Heat from a liquid cooled garment is transported to SWME that provides cooling through evaporation. The SEAR is evacuated at the onset of operations and thereafter, the water vapor absorption rate of the HPR maintains a low pressure environment for the SWME to evaporate effectively. This water vapor captured by solid LiCl in the HPR with a high enthalpy of absorption, results in sufficient temperature lift to reject most of the heat to space by radiation. After the sortie, the HPR would be heated up in a regenerator to drive off and recover the absorbed evaporant. A one-fourth scale prototype was built and tested in vacuum conditions at a sink temperature of 250 K. The HPR was able to stably reject 60 W over a 7-hour period. A conceptual design of a full-scale radiator is proposed. Excess heat rejection above 240 W would be accomplished through venting of the evaporant. Loop closure rates were predicted for various exploration environment scenarios.

  7. A broadband micro-machined far-infrared absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Datesman, A. M.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Miller, K. H.; Quijada, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    The experimental investigation of a broadband far-infrared meta-material absorber is described. The observed absorptance is >0.95 from 1 to 20 THz (300-15 μm) over a temperature range spanning 5-300 K. The meta-material, realized from an array of tapers ≈100 μm in length, is largely insensitive to the detailed geometry of these elements and is cryogenically compatible with silicon-based micro-machined technologies. The electromagnetic response is in general agreement with a physically motivated transmission line model.

  8. A broadband micro-machined far-infrared absorber.

    PubMed

    Wollack, E J; Datesman, A M; Jhabvala, C A; Miller, K H; Quijada, M A

    2016-05-01

    The experimental investigation of a broadband far-infrared meta-material absorber is described. The observed absorptance is >0.95 from 1 to 20 THz (300-15 μm) over a temperature range spanning 5-300 K. The meta-material, realized from an array of tapers ≈100 μm in length, is largely insensitive to the detailed geometry of these elements and is cryogenically compatible with silicon-based micro-machined technologies. The electromagnetic response is in general agreement with a physically motivated transmission line model. PMID:27250445

  9. A Broadband Micro-Machined Far-Infrared Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datesman, A. M.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Miller, K. H.; Wollack, E. J.; Quijada, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    The experimental investigation of a broadband far-infrared meta-material absorber is described. The observed absorptance is greater than 0.95 from 1 to 20 terahertz (300-15 microns) over a temperature range spanning 5-300 degrees Kelvin. The meta-material, realized from an array of tapers approximately 100 microns in length, is largely insensitive to the detailed geometry of these elements and is cryogenically compatible with silicon-based micro-machined technologies. The electromagnetic response is in general agreement with a physically motivated transmission line model.

  10. Multifunctional Space Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Hodgson, Ed; Izenson, Mike; Chen, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    A system for non-venting thermal control for spacesuits was built by integrating two previously developed technologies, namely NASA's Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare's flexible version of the Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator (LCAR). This SEAR system was tested in relevant thermal vacuum conditions. These tests show that a 1 sq m radiator having about three times as much absorption media as in the test article would be required to support a 7 hour spacewalk. The serial flow arrangement of the LCAR of the flexible version proved to be inefficient for venting non-condensable gas (NCG). A different LCAR packaging arrangement was conceived wherein the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) housing would be made with a high-strength carbon fiber composite honeycomb, the cells of which would be filled with the chemical absorption media. This new packaging reduce the mass and volume impact of the SEAR on the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) compared to the flexible design. A 0.2 sq m panel with flight-like honeycomb geometry is being constructed and will be tested in thermal and thermal vacuum conditions. Design analyses forecast improved system performance and improved NCG control. A flight-like regeneration system also is also being built and tested. Design analyses for the structurally integrated prototype as well as the earlier test data show that SEAR is not only practical for spacesuits but also has useful applications in spacecraft thermal control.

  11. Space Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Stephan, Ryan; Hodgson, Ed; Izenson, Mike; Chen, Weibo

    2012-01-01

    A system for non-venting thermal control for spacesuits was built by integrating two previously developed technologies, namely NASA s Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare s flexible version of the Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator (LCAR). This SEAR system was tested in relevant thermal vacuum conditions. These tests show that a 1 m2 radiator having about three times as much absorption media as in the test article would be required to support a 7 hour spacewalk. The serial flow arrangement of the LCAR of the flexible version proved to be inefficient for venting non-condensable gas (NCG). A different LCAR packaging arrangement was conceived wherein the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) housing would be made with a high-strength carbon fiber composite honeycomb, the cells of which would be filled with the chemical absorption media. This new packaging reduces the mass and volume impact of the SEAR on the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) compared to the flexible design. A 0.2 sq m panel with flight-like honeycomb geometry is being constructed and will be tested in thermal and thermal vacuum conditions. Design analyses forecast improved system performance and improved NCG control. A flight-like regeneration system also is also being built and tested. Design analyses for the structurally integrated prototype as well as the earlier test data show that SEAR is not only practical for spacesuits but also has useful applications in spacecraft thermal control.

  12. Micro-electro-mechanically switchable near infrared complementary metamaterial absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Pitchappa, Prakash; Pei Ho, Chong; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Singh, Navab; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Lee, Chengkuo

    2014-05-19

    We experimentally demonstrate a micro-electro-mechanically switchable near infrared complementary metamaterial absorber by integrating the metamaterial layer to be the out of plane movable microactuator. The metamaterial layer is electrostatically actuated by applying voltage across the suspended complementary metamaterial layer and the stationary bottom metallic reflector. Thus, the effective spacing between the metamaterial layer and bottom metal reflector is varied as a function of applied voltage. With the reduction of effective spacing between the metamaterial and reflector layers, a strong spectral blue shift in the peak absorption wavelength can be achieved. With spacing change of 300 nm, the spectral shift of 0.7 μm in peak absorption wavelength was obtained for near infrared spectral region. The electro-optic switching performance of the device was characterized, and a striking switching contrast of 1500% was achieved at 2.1 μm. The reported micro-electro-mechanically tunable complementary metamaterial absorber device can potentially enable a wide range of high performance electro-optical devices, such as continuously tunable filters, modulators, and electro-optic switches that form the key components to facilitate future photonic circuit applications.

  13. Band models and correlations for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption of infrared radiation by various line and band models are briefly reviewed. Narrow band model relations for absorptance are used to develop 'exact' formulations for total absorption by four wide band models. Application of a wide band model to a particular gas largely depends upon the spectroscopic characteristic of the absorbing-emitting molecule. Seven continuous correlations for the absorption of a wide band model are presented and each one of these is compared with the exact (numerical) solutions of the wide band models. Comparison of these results indicate the validity of a correlation for a particular radiative transfer application. In radiative transfer analyses, use of continuous correlations for total band absorptance provides flexibilities in various mathematical operations.

  14. Banana Dehydration Utilizing Infrared Radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enzyme of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has been found to be the main cause of browning in bananas. Infrared radiation (IR) drying could be used to minimize biochemical degradation hence eliminating the need for pre-treatments. This study was to investigate quality characteristics of bananas dried ...

  15. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1998-09-22

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

  16. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, Paul H.

    1998-01-01

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

  17. Methane and carbon dioxide increases in the urban boundary layer: Inferences from whole-column infrared absorbance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gurney, K.R.; Hansen, A.D.A.; Rosen, H.

    1988-01-01

    Using the sun as an infrared source, we determined the total atmospheric column absorbance of methane and carbon dioxide spectral lines in the 8- to 10-..mu..m infrared region. At our laboratory located in an urban region, these absorbances showed fluctuations larger than can be accounted for by known variabilities in the background atmosphere. We interpret these observations in terms of large changes in concentration of methane and carbon dioxide within the urban boundary layer. These increases could affect the radiative balance in urban locations and contribute to the urban heat island. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  18. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  19. Porphyrin Based Near Infrared-Absorbing Materials for Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Qiwen

    The conservation and transformation of energy is essential to the survival of mankind, and thus concerns every modern society. Solar energy, as an everlasting source of energy, holds one of the key solutions to some of the most urgent problems the world now faces, such as global warming and the oil crisis. Advances in technologies utilizing clean, abundant solar energy, could be the steering wheel of our societies. Solar cells, one of the major advances in converting solar energy into electricity, are now capturing people's interest all over the globe. While solar cells have been commercially available for many years, the manufacturing of solar cells is quite expensive, limiting their broad based implementation. The cost of solar cell based electricity is 15-50 cents per kilowatt hour (¢/kwh), depending on the type of solar cell, compared to 0.7 ¢/kwh for fossil fuel based electricity. Clearly, decreasing the cost of electricity from solar cells is critical for their wide spread deployment. This will require a decrease in the cost of light absorbing materials and material processing used in fabricating the cells. Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) utilize organic materials such as polymers and small molecules. These devices have the advantage of being flexible and lower cost than conventional solar cells built from inorganic semiconductors (e.g. silicon). The low cost of OPVs is tied to lower materials and fabrication costs of organic cells. However, the current power conversion efficiencies of OPVs are still below 15%, while convention crystalline Si cells have efficiencies of 20-25%. A key limitation in OPVs today is their inability to utilize the near infrared (NIR) portion of the solar spectrum. This part of the spectrum comprises nearly half of the energy in sunlight that could be used to make electricity. The first and foremost step in conversion solar energy conversion is the absorption of light, which nature has provided us optimal model of, which is

  20. Solar-energy absorber: Active infrared (IR) trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantley, L. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Efficiency of solar-energy absorbers may be improved to 95% by actively cooling their intermediate glass plates. This approach may be of interest to manufacturers of solar absorbers and to engineers and scientists developing new sources of energy.

  1. Infrared Radiative Properties of Food Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precisely, infrared radiation is electromagnetic radiation whose wavelength is longer than that of visible light, but shorter than that of terahertz radiation and microwaves. The infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum spans roughly three orders of magnitude (750 nm to 100 µm) and has been...

  2. Absorbed radiation doses in transcranial temporomandibular joint radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, T.S.; Fischer, W.G.; Verbin, R.S.

    1986-05-01

    Lateral transcranial radiographs are commonly used to evaluate TMJ morphology and function. This study evaluated the use of four TMJ positioners in controlling the amount of radiation absorbed at predetermined sites on a phantom head. Use of positioners and collimators can reduce the amount of radiation exposure.

  3. Polymeric near-infrared absorbing dendritic nanogels for efficient in vivo photothermal cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Molina, Maria; Wedepohl, Stefanie; Calderón, Marcelo

    2016-03-10

    In recent years, several near-infrared light absorbing inorganic nanomaterials have been developed for photothermal therapy. However, their biological fate after injection limits their clinical utilization. In this work, we developed a novel polymeric near-infrared light absorbing material based on a biocompatible thermoresponsive nanogel that is semi-interpenetrated with polyaniline, a conjugated polymer with strong near-infrared absorbance. This polymeric nanocomposite generates heat after being irradiated by NIR light, thereby inducing a local hyperthermia that is used for photothermal cancer therapy in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26931077

  4. Performance enhancement of uncooled infrared focal plane array by integrating metamaterial absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Wei; Wen, Yongzheng; Yu, Xiaomei

    2015-03-16

    This letter presents an infrared (IR) focal plane array (FPA) with metamaterial absorber (MMA) integrated to enhance its performance. A glass substrate, on which arrays of bimaterial cantilevers are fabricated as the thermal-sensitive pixels by a polyimide surface sacrificial process, is employed to allow the optical readout from the back side of the substrate. Whereas the IR wave radiates onto the FPA from the front side, which consequently avoids the energy loss caused by the silicon substrate compared with the previous works. This structure also facilitates the integration of MMA by introducing a layer of periodic square resonators atop the SiN{sub x} structural layer to form a metal/dielectric/metal stack with the gold mirror functioning as the ground plane. A comparative experiment was carried out on the FPAs that use MMA and ordinary SiN{sub x} as the absorbers, respectively. The performance improvement was verified by the evaluation of the absorbers as well as the imaging results of both FPAs.

  5. Models for infrared atmospheric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1976-01-01

    Line and band models for infrared spectral absorption are discussed. Radiative transmittance and integrated absorptance of Lorentz, Doppler, and voigt line profiles were compared for a range of parameters. It was found that, for the intermediate path lengths, the combined Lorentz-Doppler (Voigt) profile is essential in calculating the atmospheric transmittance. Narrow band model relations for absorptance were used to develop exact formulations for total absorption by four wide band models. Several continuous correlations for the absorption of a wide band model were compared with the numerical solutions of the wide band models. By employing the line-by-line and quasi-random band model formulations, computational procedures were developed for evaluating transmittance and upwelling atmospheric radiance. Homogeneous path transmittances were calculated for selected bands of CO, CO2, and N2O and compared with experimental measurements. The upwelling radiance and signal change in the wave number interval of the CO fundamental band were also calculated.

  6. Solar and Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffel, T

    2005-07-01

    The Solar Infrared Radiation Station (SIRS) provides continuous measurements of broadband shortwave (solar) and longwave (atmospheric or infrared) irradiances for downwelling and upwelling components. The following six irradiance measurements are collected from a network of stations to help determine the total radiative flux exchange within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility: • Direct normal shortwave (solar beam) • Diffuse horizontal shortwave (sky) • Global horizontal shortwave (total hemispheric) • Upwelling shortwave (reflected) • Downwelling longwave (atmospheric infrared) • Upwelling longwave (surface infrared)

  7. Performance of a Multifunctional Space Evaporator- Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Bue, Grant; Quinn, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    The Space Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR) is a nonventing thermal control subsystem that combines a Space Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) with a Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator (LCAR). The LCAR is a heat pump radiator that absorbs water vapor produced in the SWME. Because of the very low water vapor pressure at equilibrium with lithium chloride solution, the LCAR can absorb water vapor at a temperature considerably higher than the SWME, enabling heat rejection by thermal radiation from a relatively small area radiator. Prior SEAR prototypes used a flexible LCAR that was designed to be installed on the outer surface of a portable life support system (PLSS) backpack. This paper describes a SEAR subsystem that incorporates a very compact LCAR. The compact, multifunctional LCAR is built in the form of thin panels that can also serve as the PLSS structural shell. We designed and assembled a 2 sq ft prototype LCAR based on this design and measured its performance in thermal vacuum tests when supplied with water vapor by a SWME. These tests validated our models for SEAR performance and showed that there is enough area available on the PLSS backpack shell to enable heat rejection from the LCAR.

  8. Performance of a Multifunctional Space Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Phillips, Scott; Chepko, Ariane; Bue, Grant; Quinn, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    The Space Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR) is a nonventing thermal control subsystem that combines a Space Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME) with a Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator (LCAR). The LCAR is a heat pump radiator that absorbs water vapor produced in the SWME. Because of the very low water vapor pressure at equilibrium with lithium chloride solution, the LCAR can absorb water vapor at a temperature considerably higher than the SWME, enabling heat rejection sufficient for most EVA activities by thermal radiation from a relatively small area radiator. Prior SEAR prototypes used a flexible LCAR that was designed to be installed on the outer surface of a portable life support system (PLSS) backpack. This paper describes a SEAR subsystem that incorporates a very compact LCAR. The compact, multifunctional LCAR is built in the form of thin panels that can also serve as the PLSS structural shell. We designed and assembled a 2 ft² prototype LCAR based on this design and measured its performance in thermal vacuum tests when supplied with water vapor by a SWME. These tests validated our models for SEAR performance and showed that there is enough area available on the PLSS backpack shell to enable rejection of metabolic heat from the LCAR. We used results of these tests to assess future performance potential and suggest approaches for integrating the SEAR system with future space suits.

  9. Spectral estimators of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Bauer, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Most models of crop growth and yield require an estimate of canopy leaf area index (LAI) or absorption of radiation. Relationships between photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by corn canopies and the spectral reflectance of the canopies were investigated. Reflectance factor data were acquired with a Landsat MSS band radiometer. From planting to silking, the three spectrally predicted vegetation indices examined were associated with more than 95 percent of the variability in absorbed PAR. The relationships developed between absorbed PAR and the three indices were evaluated with reflectance factor data acquired from corn canopies planted in 1979 through 1982. Seasonal cumulations of measured LAI and each of the three indices were associated with greater than 50 percent of the variation in final grain yields from the test years. Seasonal cumulations of daily absorbed PAR were associated with up to 73 percent of the variation in final grain yields. Absorbed PAR, cumulated through the growing season, is a better indicator of yield than cumulated leaf area index. Absorbed PAR may be estimated reliably from spectral reflectance data of crop canopies.

  10. Spectral estimators of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Bauer, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Most models of crop growth and yield require an estimate of canopy leaf area index (LAI) or absorption of radiation. Relationships between photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by corn canopies and the spectral reflectance of the canopies were investigated. Reflectance factor data were acquired with a LANDSAT MSS band radiometer. From planting to silking, the three spectrally predicted vegetation indices examined were associated with more than 95% of the variability in absorbed PAR. The relationships developed between absorbed PAR and the three indices were evaluated with reflectance factor data acquired from corn canopies planted in 1979 through 1982. Seasonal cumulations of measured LAI and each of the three indices were associated with greater than 50% of the variation in final grain yields from the test years. Seasonal cumulations of daily absorbed PAR were associated with up to 73% of the variation in final grain yields. Absorbed PAR, cumulated through the growing season, is a better indicator of yield than cumulated leaf area index. Absorbed PAR may be estimated reliably from spectral reflectance data of crop canopies.

  11. Polymeric near-infrared absorbing dendritic nanogels for efficient in vivo photothermal cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Maria; Wedepohl, Stefanie; Calderón, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, several near-infrared light absorbing inorganic nanomaterials have been developed for photothermal therapy. However, their biological fate after injection limits their clinical utilization. In this work, we developed a novel polymeric near-infrared light absorbing material based on a biocompatible thermoresponsive nanogel that is semi-interpenetrated with polyaniline, a conjugated polymer with strong near-infrared absorbance. This polymeric nanocomposite generates heat after being irradiated by NIR light, thereby inducing a local hyperthermia that is used for photothermal cancer therapy in vitro and in vivo.In recent years, several near-infrared light absorbing inorganic nanomaterials have been developed for photothermal therapy. However, their biological fate after injection limits their clinical utilization. In this work, we developed a novel polymeric near-infrared light absorbing material based on a biocompatible thermoresponsive nanogel that is semi-interpenetrated with polyaniline, a conjugated polymer with strong near-infrared absorbance. This polymeric nanocomposite generates heat after being irradiated by NIR light, thereby inducing a local hyperthermia that is used for photothermal cancer therapy in vitro and in vivo. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07587d

  12. Global warming due to increasing absorbed solar radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenberth, Kevin E.; Fasullo, John T.

    2009-04-01

    Global climate models used in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) are examined for the top-of-atmosphere radiation changes as carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases build up from 1950 to 2100. There is an increase in net radiation absorbed, but not in ways commonly assumed. While there is a large increase in the greenhouse effect from increasing greenhouse gases and water vapor (as a feedback), this is offset to a large degree by a decreasing greenhouse effect from reducing cloud cover and increasing radiative emissions from higher temperatures. Instead the main warming from an energy budget standpoint comes from increases in absorbed solar radiation that stem directly from the decreasing cloud amounts. These findings underscore the need to ascertain the credibility of the model changes, especially insofar as changes in clouds are concerned.

  13. Thermal radiation absorbed by dairy cows in pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Roberto Gomes; Guilhermino, Magda Maria; de Morais, Débora Andréia E. Façanha

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the present paper was to assess a method for estimating the thermal radiation absorbed by dairy cows (0.875 Holstein-0.125 Guzerath) on pasture. A field test was conducted with 472 crossbred dairy cows in three locations of a tropical region. The following environmental data were collected: air temperature, partial vapour pressure, wind speed, black globe temperature, ground surface temperature and solar radiation. Average total radiation absorbed by animals was calculated as {R_{abs}} = 640.0 ± 3.1 W.{m^{ - 2}} . Absorbed short-wave radiation (solar direct, diffuse and reflected) averaged 297.9 ± 2.7 W m-2; long wave (from the sky and from terrestrial surfaces) averaged 342.1 ± 1.5 W m-2. It was suggested that a new environmental measurement, the effective radiant heat load (ERHL), could be used to assess the effective mean radiant temperature ( {T_{mr}^* } ) . Average T_{mr}^* was 101.4 ± 1.2°C, in contrast to the usual mean radiant temperature, {T_{mr}} = 65.1 ± 0.5° C . Estimates of T_{mr}^* were considered as more reliable than those of T mr in evaluating the thermal environment in the open field, because T mr is almost totally associated only with long wave radiation.

  14. Prediction of multiple resonance characteristics by an extended resistor-inductor-capacitor circuit model for plasmonic metamaterials absorbers in infrared.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaolun; Li, Yongqian; Wang, Binbin; Zhou, Zili

    2015-10-01

    The resonance characteristics of plasmonic metamaterials absorbers (PMAs) are strongly dependent on geometric parameters. A resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) circuit model has been extended to predict the resonance wavelengths and the bandwidths of multiple magnetic polaritons modes in PMAs. For a typical metallic-dielectric-metallic structure absorber working in the infrared region, the developed model describes the correlation between the resonance characteristics and the dimensional sizes. In particular, the RLC model is suitable for not only the fundamental resonance mode, but also for the second- and third-order resonance modes. The prediction of the resonance characteristics agrees fairly well with those calculated by the finite-difference time-domain simulation and the experimental results. The developed RLC model enables the facilitation of designing multi-band PMAs for infrared radiation detectors and thermal emitters. PMID:26421549

  15. High-Capacity Spacesuit Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Phillips, Scott; Chepko, Ariane; Bue, Grant; Quinn, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Future human space exploration missions will require advanced life support technology that can operate across a wide range of applications and environments. Thermal control systems for space suits and spacecraft will need to meet critical requirements for water conservation and adaptability to highly variable thermal environments. This paper describes a Space Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) that has been designed to meet performance requirements for future life support systems. A SEAR system comprises a lithium chloride absorber radiator (LCAR) for heat rejection coupled with a space water membrane evaporator (SWME) for heat acquisition. SEAR systems provide heat pumping to minimize radiator size, thermal storage to accommodate variable environmental conditions, and water absorption to minimize use of expendables. We have built and tested a flightlike, high-capacity LCAR, demonstrated its performance in thermal vacuum tests, and explored the feasibility of an ISS demonstration test of a SEAR system. The new LCAR design provides the same cooling capability as prior LCAR prototypes while enabling over 30% more heat absorbing capacity. Studies show that it should be feasible to demonstrate SEAR operation in flight by coupling with an existing EMU on the space station.

  16. High-Capacity Spacesuit Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Phillips, Scott; Chepko, Ariane; Bue, Grant; Quinn, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Future human space exploration missions will require advanced life support technology that can operate across a wide range of applications and environments. Thermal control systems for space suits and spacecraft will need to meet critical requirements for water conservation and multifunctional operation. This paper describes a Space Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) that has been designed to meet performance requirements for future life support systems. A SEAR system comprises a lithium chloride absorber radiator (LCAR) for heat rejection coupled with a space water membrane evaporator (SWME) for heat acquisition. SEAR systems provide heat pumping to minimize radiator size, thermal storage to accommodate variable environmental conditions, and water absorption to minimize use of expendables. We have built and tested a flight-like, high-capacity LCAR, demonstrated its performance in thermal vacuum tests, and explored the feasibility of an ISS demonstration test of a SEAR system. The new LCAR design provides the same cooling capability as prior LCAR prototypes while enabling over 30% more heat absorbing capacity. Studies show that it should be feasible to demonstrate SEAR operation in flight by coupling with an existing EMU on the space station.

  17. Patterning and hardening of gold black infrared absorber by shadow mask deposition with ethyl cyanoacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjwani, Deep; Nader-Esfahani, Nima; Maukonen, Doug; Rezadad, Imen; Boroumand, Javaneh; Smith, Evan; Nath, Janardan; Peale, R. E.

    2013-06-01

    Patterning of gold-black infrared absorbing films by stencil lithography and hardening by polymer infusion is reported. Gold black nano-structured films are deposited through a thin metal shadow mask in a thermal evaporator in ~400 mTorr pressure of inert gas, followed by ethyl cyanoacrylate fuming through the same mask to produce rugged IR absorptive patterns of ~100 micron scale dimensions. Infrared absorptivity is determined by transmission and reflectivity measurements using a Fourier spectrometer and infrared microscope. Results indicate that the optimized hardening process reduces the usual degradation of the absorptivity with age. This work has potential application to infrared array bolometers.

  18. Absorbed radiation by various tissues during simulated endodontic radiography.

    PubMed

    Torabinejad, M; Danforth, R; Andrews, K; Chan, C

    1989-06-01

    The amount of absorbed radiation by various organs was determined by placing lithium fluoride thermoluminescent chip dosimeters at selected anatomical sites in and on a human-like X-ray phantom and exposing them to radiation at 70- and 90-kV X-ray peaks during simulated endodontic radiography. The mean exposure dose was determined for each anatomical site. The results show that endodontic X-ray doses received by patients are low when compared with other radiographic procedures. PMID:2592879

  19. Frequency Integrated Radiation Models for Absorbing and Scattering Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripoll, J. F.; Wray, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work is to contribute to the simplification of existing radiation models used in complex emitting, absorbing, scattering media. The application in view is the computation of flows occurring in such complex media, such as certain stellar interiors or combusting gases. In these problems, especially when scattering is present, the complexity of the radiative transfer leads to a high numerical cost, which is often avoided by simply neglecting it. The complexity lies partly in the strong dependence of the spectral coefficients on frequency. Models are then needed to capture the effects of the radiation when one cannot afford to directly solve for it. In this work, the frequency dependence will be modeled and integrated out in order retain only the average effects. A frequency-integrated radiative transfer equation (RTE) will be derived.

  20. Theoretical analysis and design of a near-infrared broadband absorber based on EC model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Bai, Lihua; Bai, Zhengyuan; Hu, Pidong; Liu, Chengpu

    2015-04-01

    We theoretically introduced a design paradigm and tool by extending the circuit functionalities from radio frequency to near infrared domain, and its first usage to design a broadband near-infrared (1.5μm~3.5μm) absorber, is successfully demonstrated. After extracting the equivalent circuit (EC) model of the absorber structure, the formerly relatively complicated frequency response can be evaluated relatively easily based on classic circuit formulas. The feasibility is confirmed by its consistency with the rigorous FDTD calculation. The absorber is an array of truncated metal-dielectric multilayer composited pyramid unit structure, and the gradually modified square patch design makes the absorber be not sensitive to the incident angle and polarization of light. PMID:25968728

  1. Improved source of infrared radiation for spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhard, D. G.; Rao, K. N.

    1971-01-01

    Radiation from a crimped V-groove in the electrically heated metallic element of a high-resolution infrared spectrometer is more intense than that from plane areas adjacent to the element. Radiation from the vee and the flat was compared by alternately focusing on the entrance slit of a spectrograph.

  2. Radiation environments and absorbed dose estimations on manned space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, S. B.; Atwell, W.; Beever, R.; Hardy, A.

    In order to make an assessment of radiation risk during manned missions in space, it is necessary first to have as accurate an estimation as possible of the radiation environment within the spacecraft to which the astronauts will be exposed. Then, with this knowledge and the inclusion of body self-shielding, estimations can be made of absorbed doses for various body organs (skin, eye, blood-forming organs, etc.). A review is presented of our present knowledge of the radiation environments and absorbed doses expected for several space mission scenarios selected for our development of the new radiation protection guidelines. The scenarios selected are a 90-day mission at an altitude (450 km) and orbital inclinations (28.5°, 57° and 90°) appropriate for NASA's Space Station, a 15-day sortie to geosynchronous orbit and a 90-day lunar mission. All scenarios chosen yielded dose equivalents between five and ten rem to the blood forming organs if no large solar particle event were encountered. Such particle events could add considerable exposure particularly to the skin and eye for all scenarios except the one at 28.5° orbital inclination.

  3. Aqueous infrared carboxylate absorbances: Aliphatic di-acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cabaniss, S.E.; Leenheer, J.A.; McVey, I.F.

    1998-01-01

    Aqueous attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra of 18 aliphatic di-carboxylic acids are reported as a function of pH. The spectra show isosbestic points and intensity changes which indicate that Beer's law is obeyed, and peak frequencies lie within previously reported ranges for aqueous carboxylates and pure carboxylic acids. Intensity sharing from the symmetric carboxylate stretch is evident in many cases, so that bands which are nominally due to alkyl groups show increased intensity at higher pH. The asymmetric stretch of the HA- species is linearly related to the microscopic acidity constant of the H2A species, with ??pK 2 intervening atoms). The results suggest that aqueous ATR-FTIR may be able to estimate 'intrinsic' pKa values of carboxylic acids, in addition to providing quantitative estimates of ionization. ?? 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Coherent tunable far infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Tunable, CW, FIR radiation has been generated by nonlinear mixing of radiation from two CO2 lasers in a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diode. The FIR difference-frequency power was radiated from the MIM diode antenna to a calibrated InSb bolometer. FIR power of 200 nW was generated by 250 mW from each of the CO2 lasers. Using the combination of lines from a waveguide CO2 laser, with its larger tuning range, with lines from CO2, N2O, and CO2-isotope lasers promises complete coverage of the entire FIR band with stepwise-tunable CW radiation.

  5. Conformal dual-band near-perfectly absorbing mid-infrared metamaterial coating.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhi Hao; Yun, Seokho; Toor, Fatima; Werner, Douglas H; Mayer, Theresa S

    2011-06-28

    Metamaterials offer a new approach to create surface coatings with highly customizable electromagnetic absorption from the microwave to the optical regimes. Thus far, efficient metamaterial absorbers have been demonstrated at microwave frequencies, with recent efforts aimed at much shorter terahertz and infrared wavelengths. The present infrared absorbers have been constructed from arrays of nanoscale metal resonators with simple circular or cross-shaped geometries, which provide a single band response. In this paper, we demonstrate a conformal metamaterial absorber with a narrow band, polarization-independent absorptivity of >90% over a wide ±50° angular range centered at mid-infrared wavelengths of 3.3 and 3.9 μm. The highly efficient dual-band metamaterial was realized by using a genetic algorithm to identify an array of H-shaped nanoresonators with an effective electric and magnetic response that maximizes absorption in each wavelength band when patterned on a flexible Kapton and Au thin film substrate stack. This conformal metamaterial absorber maintains its absorption properties when integrated onto curved surfaces of arbitrary materials, making it attractive for advanced coatings that suppress the infrared reflection from the protected surface. PMID:21456579

  6. Thin-film, wide-angle, design-tunable, selective absorber from near UV to far infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Janardan; Maukonen, Douglas; Smith, Evan; Figueiredo, Pedro; Zummo, Guy; Panjwani, Deep; Peale, Robert E.; Boreman, Glenn; Cleary, Justin W.; Eyink, Kurt

    2013-06-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a structured thin film that selectively absorbs incident electromagnetic waves in discrete bands, which by design occur in any chosen range from near UV to far infrared. The structure consists of conducting islands separated from a conducting plane by a dielectric layer. By changing dimensions and materials, we have achieved broad absorption resonances centered at 0.36, 1.1, 14, and 53 microns wavelength. Angle-dependent specular reflectivity spectra are measured using UV-visible or Fourier spectrometers. The peak absorption ranges from 85 to 98%. The absorption resonances are explained using the model of an LCR resonant circuit created by coupling between dipolar plasma resonance in the surface structures and their image dipoles in the ground plane. The resonance wavelength is proportional to the dielectric permittivity and to the linear dimension of the surface structures. These absorbers have application to thermal detectors of electromagnetic radiation.

  7. Transition undulator radiation as bright infrared sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.

    1995-02-01

    Undulator radiation contains, in addition to the usual component with narrow spectral features, a broad-band component in the low frequency region emitted in the near forward direction, peaked at an angle 1/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the relativistic factor. This component is referred to as the transition undulator radiation, as it is caused by the sudden change in the electron`s longitudinal velocity as it enters and leaves the undulator. The characteristic of the transition undulator radiation are analyzed and compared with the infrared radiation from the usual undulator harmonics and from bending magnets.

  8. Space radiation absorbed dose distribution in a human phantom.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Atwell, W; Badavi, F F; Yang, T C; Cleghorn, T F

    2002-01-01

    The radiation risk to astronauts has always been based on measurements using passive thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The skin dose is converted to dose equivalent using an average radiation quality factor based on model calculations. The radiological risk estimates, however, are based on organ and tissue doses. This paper describes results from the first space flight (STS-91, 51.65 degrees inclination and approximately 380 km altitude) of a fully instrumented Alderson Rando phantom torso (with head) to relate the skin dose to organ doses. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose in 34 1-inch-thick sections measured using TLDs are described. There is about a 30% change in dose as one moves from the front to the back of the phantom body. Small active dosimeters were developed specifically to provide time-resolved measurements of absorbed dose rates and quality factors at five organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) inside the phantom. Using these dosimeters, it was possible to separate the trapped-proton and the galactic cosmic radiation components of the doses. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a charged-particle directional spectrometer (CPDS) were flown next to the phantom torso to provide data on the incident internal radiation environment. Accurate models of the shielding distributions at the site of the TEPC, the CPDS and a scalable Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model of the phantom torso were developed. These measurements provided a comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human phantom, and to assess the accuracy and validity of radiation transport models throughout the human body. The results show that for the conditions in the International Space Station (ISS) orbit during periods near the solar minimum, the ratio of the blood-forming organ dose rate to the skin absorbed dose rate is about 80%, and the ratio of the dose equivalents is almost one. The results show that the GCR model dose

  9. Space radiation absorbed dose distribution in a human phantom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Atwell, W.; Badavi, F. F.; Yang, T. C.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2002-01-01

    The radiation risk to astronauts has always been based on measurements using passive thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The skin dose is converted to dose equivalent using an average radiation quality factor based on model calculations. The radiological risk estimates, however, are based on organ and tissue doses. This paper describes results from the first space flight (STS-91, 51.65 degrees inclination and approximately 380 km altitude) of a fully instrumented Alderson Rando phantom torso (with head) to relate the skin dose to organ doses. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose in 34 1-inch-thick sections measured using TLDs are described. There is about a 30% change in dose as one moves from the front to the back of the phantom body. Small active dosimeters were developed specifically to provide time-resolved measurements of absorbed dose rates and quality factors at five organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) inside the phantom. Using these dosimeters, it was possible to separate the trapped-proton and the galactic cosmic radiation components of the doses. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a charged-particle directional spectrometer (CPDS) were flown next to the phantom torso to provide data on the incident internal radiation environment. Accurate models of the shielding distributions at the site of the TEPC, the CPDS and a scalable Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model of the phantom torso were developed. These measurements provided a comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human phantom, and to assess the accuracy and validity of radiation transport models throughout the human body. The results show that for the conditions in the International Space Station (ISS) orbit during periods near the solar minimum, the ratio of the blood-forming organ dose rate to the skin absorbed dose rate is about 80%, and the ratio of the dose equivalents is almost one. The results show that the GCR model dose

  10. An absorbed dose to water calorimeter for collimated radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brede, H. J.; Hecker, O.; Hollnagel, R.

    2000-12-01

    A transportable calorimeter of compact design has been developed as a device for the absolute determination of the absorbed dose to water. The ease of operation of the calorimeter allows the application in clinical therapy beams of various energies, specifically for neutron, proton and heavy ion beams. The calorimeter requires collimated radiation fields with diameters lesser than 40 mm. The temperature rise caused by radiation is measured with a thermistor probe which is located in the centre of the calorimeter core. The calorimeter core consists of a cylindrical water-filled gilded aluminium can suspended by three thin nylon threads in a vacuum block in order to reduce the heat transfer by conduction. In addition, it operates at a temperature of 4°C, preventing heat transfer in water by convection. Heat transfer from the core to the surrounding by radiation is minimised by the use of two concentric temperature-controlled jackets, the inner jacket being operated at core temperature. A description of the mechanical and electrical design, of the construction and operation of the water calorimeter is given. In addition, calculations with a finite-element program code performed to determine correction factors for various radiation conditions are included.

  11. Near-infrared radiation curable multilayer coating systems and methods for applying same

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Mark P; Verdun, Shelley D; Post, Gordon L

    2015-04-28

    Multilayer coating systems, methods of applying and related substrates are disclosed. The coating system may comprise a first coating comprising a near-IR absorber, and a second coating deposited on a least a portion of the first coating. Methods of applying a multilayer coating composition to a substrate may comprise applying a first coating comprising a near-IR absorber, applying a second coating over at least a portion of the first coating and curing the coating with near infrared radiation.

  12. Nanostructured thin film-based near-infrared tunable perfect absorber using phase-change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocer, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured thin film absorbers embedded with phase-change thermochromic material can provide a large level of absorption tunability in the near-infrared region. Vanadium dioxide was employed as the phase-change material in the designed structures. The optical absorption properties of the designed structures with respect to the geometric and material parameters were systematically investigated using finite-difference time-domain computations. Absorption level of the resonance wavelength in the near-IR region was tuned from the perfect absorption level to a low level (17%) with a high positive dynamic range of near-infrared absorption intensity tunability (83%). Due to the phase transition of vanadium dioxide, the resonance at the near-infrared region is being turned on and turned off actively and reversibly under the thermal bias, thereby rendering these nanostructures suitable for infrared camouflage, emitters, and sensors.

  13. Infrared microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, G.L.; Williams, G.P.

    1997-09-01

    Infrared microspectroscopy with a high brightness synchrotron source can achieve a spatial resolution approaching the diffraction limit. However, in order to realize this intrinsic source brightness at the specimen location, some care must be taken in designing the optical system. Also, when operating in diffraction limited conditions, the effective spatial resolution is no longer controlled by the apertures typically used for a conventional (geometrically defined) measurement. Instead, the spatial resolution depends on the wavelength of light and the effective apertures of the microscope`s Schwarzchild objectives. The authors have modeled the optical system from the synchrotron source up to the sample location and determined the diffraction-limited spatial distribution of light. Effects due to the dependence of the synchrotron source`s numerical aperture on wavelength, as well as the difference between transmission and reflection measurement modes, are also addressed. Lastly, they examine the benefits (when using a high brightness source) of an extrinsic germanium photoconductive detector with cone optics as a replacement for the standard MCT detector.

  14. Absorbed dose to water: Standards and traceability for radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    Although the need for appropriate quantities and units for ionizing radiation has existed since shortly after discovery of X-rays, the quantities and units in general use today were not completely formalized until about 15 years ago. The development of appropriate national and international standards have also been ongoing. For many years the quantity, exposure, measured in units of roentgen was the national standard and they were also the quantity and units in which radiotherapy was described. With the introduction of megavoltage X-ray and electron-beam equipment and the adoption of the quantity {open_quotes}absorbed-dose{close_quotes} measured in units of rad (or gray) different approaches to calibrating these beams were needed. This was especially the case since the national standard in terms of exposure at a maximum photon energy for {sup 60}Co gamma rays was only available. Since the late 1960s various machine calibration protocols have been published. These protocols have to accommodate changes in modality, energy, quantities and units between the national standard and the user. Because of this, a new definition of traceability is proposed to accommodate the present system. By recording all intercomparisons and parameters used, an auditable calibration chain can be maintained. Even with the introduction of calibration protocols based upon national absorbed dose standards, the proposed traceability definition will still be needed.

  15. Thermal tuning of infrared resonant absorbers based on hybrid gold-VO{sub 2} nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kocer, Hasan; Butun, Serkan; Aydin, Koray; Banar, Berker; Wang, Kevin; Wu, Junqiao; Tongay, Sefaatttin

    2015-04-20

    Resonant absorbers based on plasmonic materials, metamaterials, and thin films enable spectrally selective absorption filters, where absorption is maximized at the resonance wavelength. By controlling the geometrical parameters of nano/microstructures and materials' refractive indices, resonant absorbers are designed to operate at wide range of wavelengths for applications including absorption filters, thermal emitters, thermophotovoltaic devices, and sensors. However, once resonant absorbers are fabricated, it is rather challenging to control and tune the spectral absorption response. Here, we propose and demonstrate thermally tunable infrared resonant absorbers using hybrid gold-vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) nanostructure arrays. Absorption intensity is tuned from 90% to 20% and 96% to 32% using hybrid gold-VO{sub 2} nanowire and nanodisc arrays, respectively, by heating up the absorbers above the phase transition temperature of VO{sub 2} (68 °C). Phase change materials such as VO{sub 2} deliver useful means of altering optical properties as a function of temperature. Absorbers with tunable spectral response can find applications in sensor and detector applications, in which external stimulus such as heat, electrical signal, or light results in a change in the absorption spectrum and intensity.

  16. High-throughput realization of an infrared selective absorber/emitter by DUV microsphere projection lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonakdar, Alireza; Rezaei, Mohsen; Dexheimer, Eric; Mohseni, Hooman

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a low-cost and high-throughput nanofabrication method to realize metasurfaces that have selective absorption/emission in the mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. We have developed DUV projection lithography to produce arbitrary patterns with sub-80 nm feature sizes. As examples of practical applications, we experimentally demonstrate structures with single and double spectral absorption/emission features, and in close agreement with numerical simulation. The fundamental mechanism of perfect absorption is discussed as well. Selective infrared absorbers/emitters are critical elements in realizing efficient thermophotovoltaic cells and high-performance biosensors.

  17. High-throughput realization of an infrared selective absorber/emitter by DUV microsphere projection lithography.

    PubMed

    Bonakdar, Alireza; Rezaei, Mohsen; Dexheimer, Eric; Mohseni, Hooman

    2016-01-22

    In this paper, we present a low-cost and high-throughput nanofabrication method to realize metasurfaces that have selective absorption/emission in the mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. We have developed DUV projection lithography to produce arbitrary patterns with sub-80 nm feature sizes. As examples of practical applications, we experimentally demonstrate structures with single and double spectral absorption/emission features, and in close agreement with numerical simulation. The fundamental mechanism of perfect absorption is discussed as well. Selective infrared absorbers/emitters are critical elements in realizing efficient thermophotovoltaic cells and high-performance biosensors. PMID:26650855

  18. Radiative transfer effects on reflected shock waves. II - Absorbing gas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, F. Y.; Olfe, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    Radiative cooling effects behind a reflected shock wave are calculated for an absorbing-emitting gas by means of an expansion procedure in the small density ratio across the shock front. For a gray gas shock layer with an optical thickness of order unity or less the absorption integral is simplified by use of the local temperature approximation, whereas for larger optical thicknesses a Rosseland diffusion type of solution is matched with the local temperature approximation solution. The calculations show that the shock wave will attenuate at first and then accelerate to a constant velocity. Under appropriate conditions the gas enthalpy near the wall may increase at intermediate times before ultimately decreasing to zero. A two-band absorption model yields end-wall radiant-heat fluxes which agree well with available shock-tube measurements.

  19. Mid-infrared mode-locked pulse generation with multilayer black phosphorus as saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhipeng; Xie, Guoqiang; Zhao, Chujun; Wen, Shuangchun; Yuan, Peng; Qian, Liejia

    2016-01-01

    A mid-infrared saturable absorber mirror is successfully fabricated by transferring the mechanically exfoliated black phosphorus onto the gold-coated mirror. With the as-prepared black phosphorus saturable absorber mirror, a continuous-wave passively mode-locked Er:ZBLAN fiber laser is demonstrated at the wavelength of 2.8 μm, which delivers a maximum average output power of 613 mW, a repetition rate of 24 MHz, and a pulse duration of 42 ps. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a black phosphorus mode-locked laser at 2.8 μm wavelength has been demonstrated. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of black phosphorus flake as a new two-dimensional material for application in mid-infrared ultrafast photonics. PMID:26696157

  20. A Switchable Mid-Infrared Plasmonic Perfect Absorber with Multispectral Thermal Imaging Capability.

    PubMed

    Tittl, Andreas; Michel, Ann-Katrin U; Schäferling, Martin; Yin, Xinghui; Gholipour, Behrad; Cui, Long; Wuttig, Matthias; Taubner, Thomas; Neubrech, Frank; Giessen, Harald

    2015-08-19

    A switchable perfect absorber with multispectral thermal imaging capability is presented. Aluminum nanoantenna arrays above a germanium antimony telluride (GST) spacer layer and aluminum mirror provide efficient wavelength-tunable absorption in the mid-infrared. Utilizing the amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition in GST, this device offers switchable absorption with strong reflectance contrast at resonance and large phase-change-induced spectral shifts. PMID:26173394

  1. Benzodipyrrole-based Donor-Acceptor-type Boron Complexes as Tunable Near-infrared-Absorbing Materials.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomoya; Furukawa, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2016-07-20

    Benzodipyrrole-based donor-acceptor boron complexes were designed and synthesized as near-infrared-absorbing materials. The electron-rich organic framework combined with the Lewis acidic boron co-ordination enabled us to tune the LUMO energy level and the HOMO-LUMO gap (i.e.,the absorption wavelength) by changing the organic acceptor units, the number of boron atoms, and the substituents on the boron atoms. PMID:27311060

  2. Dual-band absorber for multispectral plasmon-enhanced infrared photodetection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peng; Wu, Jiang; Ashalley, Eric; Govorov, Alexander; Wang, Zhiming

    2016-09-01

    For most of the reported metamaterial absorbers, the peak absorption only occurs at one single wavelength. Here, we investigated a dual-band absorber which is based on simple gold nano-rings. Two absorption peaks can be readily achieved in 3–5 µm and 8–14 µm via tuning the width and radius of gold nano-rings and dielectric constant. The average maximum absorption of two bands can be as high as 95.1% (‑0.22 dB). Based on the simulation results, the perfect absorber with nano-rings demonstrates great flexibility to create dual-band or triple-band absorption, and thus holds potential for further applications in thermophotovoltaics, multicolor infrared focal plane arrays, optical filters, and biological sensing applications.

  3. Radiation-induced biomarkers for the detection and assessment of absorbed radiation doses

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sudha; Kumar, Raj; Sultana, Sarwat; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Radiation incident involving living organisms is an uncommon but a very serious situation. The first step in medical management including triage is high-throughput assessment of the radiation dose received. Radiation exposure levels can be assessed from viability of cells, cellular organelles such as chromosome and different intermediate metabolites. Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation result in carcinogenesis, lowering of the immune response and, ultimately, damage to the hematopoietic system, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. Biodosimetry is based on the measurement of the radiation-induced changes, which can correlate them with the absorbed dose. Radiation biomarkers such as chromosome aberration are most widely used. Serum enzymes such as serum amylase and diamine oxidase are the most promising biodosimeters. The level of gene expression and protein are also good biomarkers of radiation. PMID:21829314

  4. Infrared radiation models for atmospheric methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Kratz, D. P.; Caldwell, J.; Kim, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Mutually consistent line-by-line, narrow-band and broad-band infrared radiation models are presented for methane, a potentially important anthropogenic trace gas within the atmosphere. Comparisons of the modeled band absorptances with existing laboratory data produce the best agreement when, within the band models, spurious band intensities are used which are consistent with the respective laboratory data sets, but which are not consistent with current knowledge concerning the intensity of the infrared fundamental band of methane. This emphasizes the need for improved laboratory band absorptance measurements. Since, when applied to atmospheric radiation calculations, the line-by-line model does not require the use of scaling approximations, the mutual consistency of the band models provides a means of appraising the accuracy of scaling procedures. It is shown that Curtis-Godson narrow-band and Chan-Tien broad-band scaling provide accurate means of accounting for atmospheric temperature and pressure variations.

  5. Development of an infrared radiative heating model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Helmle, L. C.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared radiative transfer solution algorithms used in global circulation models were assessed. Computation techniques applicable to the Ames circulation model are identified. Transmission properties of gaseous CO2, H2O, and O3 are gathered, and a computer program is developed, using the line parameter tape and Voight profile subroutine, which computes the transmission of CO2, H2O, and O3. A computer code designed to compute atmospheric cooling rates was developed.

  6. Enhanced spatial near-infrared modulation of graphene-loaded perfect absorbers using plasmonic nanoslits.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yijun; Zhu, Jinfeng; Liu, Qing Huo; Lin, Timothy; Zhou, Jianyang; Ye, Longfang; Cai, Zhiping

    2015-12-14

    Modulating spatial near-infrared light for ultra-compact electro-optic devices is a critical issue in optical communication and imaging applications. To date, spatial near-infrared modulators based on graphene have been reported, but they showed limited modulation effects due to the relatively weak light-graphene interaction. In combination with graphene and metallic nanoslits, we design a kind of ultrathin near-infrared perfect absorber with enhanced spatial modulation effects and independence on a wide range of incident angles. The modulated spectral shift of central wavelength is up to 258.2 nm in the near-infrared range, which is more promising in applications than state-of-the-art devices. The modulation enhancement is attributed to the plasmonic nanoslit mode, in which the optical electric field is highly concentrated in the deep subwavelength scale and the light-graphene interaction is significantly strengthened. The physical insight is deeply revealed by a combination of equivalent circuit and electromagnetic field analysis. The design principles are not only crucial for spatial near-infrared modulators, but also provide a key guide for developing active near-infrared patch nanoantennas based on graphene. PMID:26699022

  7. Imaging spectroscopy of albedo and radiative forcing by light-absorbing impurities in mountain snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, Thomas H.; Seidel, Felix C.; Bryant, Ann C.; McKenzie Skiles, S.; Rittger, Karl

    2013-09-01

    Recent studies show that deposition of dust and black carbon to snow and ice accelerates snowmelt and perturbs regional climate and hydrologic cycles. Radiative forcing by aerosols is often neglected in climate and hydrological models in part due to scarcity of observations. Here we describe and validate an algorithm suite (Imaging Spectrometer-Snow Albedo and Radiative Forcing (IS-SnARF)) that provides quantitative retrievals of snow grain size, snow albedo, and radiative forcing by light-absorbing impurities in snow and ice (LAISI) from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data collected on 15 June 2011 in the Senator Beck Basin Study Area (SBBSA), SW Colorado, USA. Radiative forcing by LAISI is retrieved by the integral of the convolution of spectral irradiance with spectral differences between the spectral albedo (scaled from the observed hemispherical-directional reflectance factor (HDRF)) and modeled clean snow spectral albedo. The modeled surface irradiance at time of acquisition at test sites was 1052 W m-2 compared to 1048 W m-2 measured with the field spectroradiometer measurements, a relative difference of 0.4%. HDRF retrievals at snow and bare soil sites had mean errors relative to in situ measurements of -0.4 ± 0.1% reflectance averaged across the spectrum and root-mean-square errors of 1.5 ± 0.1%. Comparisons of snow albedo and radiative forcing retrievals from AVIRIS with in situ measurements in SBBSA showed errors of 0.001-0.004 and 2.1 ± 5.1 W m-2, respectively. A counterintuitive result was that, in the presence of light absorbing impurities, near-surface snow grain size increased with elevation, whereas we generally expect that at lower elevation the grain size would be larger.

  8. Design and simulation of multi-color infrared CMOS metamaterial absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhengxi; Chen, Yongping; Ma, Bin

    2016-05-01

    Metamaterial electromagnetic wave absorbers, which usually can be fabricated in a low weight thin film structure, have a near unity absorptivity in a special waveband, and therefore have been widely applied from microwave to optical waveband. To increase absorptance of CMOS MEMS devices in 2-5 μmm waveband, multi-color infrared metamaterial absorbers are designed with CSMC 0.5 μmm 2P3M and 0.18 μmm 1P6M CMOS technology in this work. Metal-insulator-metal (MIM) three-layer MMAs and Insulator-metal-insulator-metal (MIMI) four-layer MMAs are formed by CMOS metal interconnect layers and inter metal dielectrics layer. To broaden absorption waveband in 2-5μmm range, MMAs with a combination of different sizes cross bars are designed. The top metal layer is a periodic aluminum square array or cross bar array with width ranging from submicron to several microns. The absorption peak position and intensity of MMAs can be tuned by adjusting the top aluminum micro structure array. Post-CMOS process is adopted to fabricate MMAs. The infrared absorption spectra of MMAs are verified with finite element method simulation, and the effects of top metal structure sizes, patterns, and films thickness are also simulated and intensively discussed. The simulation results show that CMOS MEMS MMAs enhance infrared absorption in 2-20 μmm. The MIM broad MMA has an average absorptance of 0.22 in 2-5 μmm waveband, and 0.76 in 8-14 μm waveband. The CMOS metamaterial absorbers can be inherently integrated in many kinds of MEMS devices fabricated with CMOS technology, such as uncooled bolometers, infrared thermal emitters.

  9. Evaluation of UV-permeability and photo-oxidisability of organic ultraviolet radiation-absorbing coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Neng; Chen, Yuhe; Bao, Yongjie; Zhang, Zeqian; Wu, Zaixing; Chen, Zhangmin

    2015-03-01

    Enhancing the durability of the coatings used on bamboo products is essential for increasing their use in outdoor environments. In this study, we investigated organic UV radiation-absorbing coatings for use on bamboo surfaces. The degree of resistance of the coatings, which contained 2-(2-hydroxy-3-tert-butyl-5-methyl-phenyl)-5-chlorinated benzotriazole (BTZ-1), to UV radiation degradation was determined through spectroscopic analysis. The critical BTZ-1 loading amount was determined by analysing the spectroscopic data. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to elucidate the relationship between the degree of photooxidation of the coatings and their BTZ-1 concentration. The experimental results showed that the coatings provided a high degree of shielding from UV radiation. The critical loading amount was determined to be 1.82 ± 0.05 g BTZ-1/m2. The coatings formed using the formulations that contained 3 and 5 wt% BTZ-1 exhibited the lowest degree of photooxidation after exposure to UV radiation.

  10. Infrared-Transparent Gold Nanoparticles Converted by Tumors to Infrared Absorbers Cure Tumors in Mice by Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hainfeld, James F.; O'Connor, Michael J.; Lin, Ping; Qian, Luping; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Smilowitz, Henry M.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) absorb light and can be used to heat and ablate tumors. The “tissue window” at ∼800 nm (near infrared, NIR) is optimal for best tissue penetration of light. Previously, large, 50–150 nm, gold nanoshells and nanorods that absorb well in the NIR have been used. Small AuNPs that may penetrate tumors better unfortunately barely absorb at 800 nm. We show that small AuNPs conjugated to anti-tumor antibodies are taken up by tumor cells that catalytically aggregate them (by enzyme degradation of antibodies and pH effects), shifting their absorption into the NIR region, thus amplifying their photonic absorption. The AuNPs are NIR transparent until they accumulate in tumor cells, thus reducing background heating in blood and non-targeted cells, increasing specificity, in contrast to constructs that are always NIR-absorptive. Treatment of human squamous cell carcinoma A431 which overexpresses epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) in subcutaneous murine xenografts with anti-EGFr antibodies conjugated to 15 nm AuNPs and NIR resulted in complete tumor ablation in most cases with virtually no normal tissue damage. The use of targeted small AuNPs therefore provides a potent new method of selective NIR tumor therapy. PMID:24520385

  11. Design and performance of a wide-angle infrared plasmonic absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Xianshun; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2014-08-01

    We study theoretically and experimentally a wide-angle infrared absorber constituting of a periodic array of rectangular metal patches on a thick metal layer, which were spaced by an ultrathin dielectric layer. We use a cavity plasmon resonator (CPR) model to describe the cavity mode field distribution in the absorber analytically and to analyze the resonant conditions and resonant absorption. A plasmonic absorber with square patches is numerically simulated and analyzed based on the CPR model, which shows that the absorption of the absorber is independent of the azimuth angle and remains high at moderate incident angles (θ <= 60° ) for both p and s polarizations. The dependence of the resonant wavelength and absorption on the geometric parameters and material of the structure is also investigated, with some design principles proposed for the parameter choice. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we design, fabricate and measure a sample, which shows over 85.7% absorption in the incident angle range of 20°~50° around the wavelength 1160nm for p-polarized incidence, and over 70% absorption around the wavelength 1135 nm for s-polarized incidence.

  12. The Visualization of Infrared Radiation Using Thermal Sensitive Foils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a set of demonstration school experiments where infrared radiation is detected using thermal sensitive foils. The possibility of using standard glass lenses for infrared imaging is discussed in detail. It is shown that with optic components made from glass, infrared radiation up to 2.5 µm of wavelength can be detected. The…

  13. Intensity tunable infrared broadband absorbers based on VO2 phase transition using planar layered thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocer, Hasan; Butun, Serkan; Palacios, Edgar; Liu, Zizhuo; Tongay, Sefaattin; Fu, Deyi; Wang, Kevin; Wu, Junqiao; Aydin, Koray

    2015-08-01

    Plasmonic and metamaterial based nano/micro-structured materials enable spectrally selective resonant absorption, where the resonant bandwidth and absorption intensity can be engineered by controlling the size and geometry of nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate a simple, lithography-free approach for obtaining a resonant and dynamically tunable broadband absorber based on vanadium dioxide (VO2) phase transition. Using planar layered thin film structures, where top layer is chosen to be an ultrathin (20 nm) VO2 film, we demonstrate broadband IR light absorption tuning (from ~90% to ~30% in measured absorption) over the entire mid-wavelength infrared spectrum. Our numerical and experimental results indicate that the bandwidth of the absorption bands can be controlled by changing the dielectric spacer layer thickness. Broadband tunable absorbers can find applications in absorption filters, thermal emitters, thermophotovoltaics and sensing.

  14. Symmetric Absorber-Coupled Far-Infrared Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor); Brown, Ari D. (Inventor); Stevenson, Thomas R. (Inventor); Patel, Amil A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a symmetric absorber-coupled far-infrared microwave kinetic inductance detector including: a membrane having an absorber disposed thereon in a symmetric cross bar pattern; and a microstrip including a plurality of conductor microstrip lines disposed along all edges of the membrane, and separated from a ground plane by the membrane. The conducting microstrip lines are made from niobium, and the pattern is made from a superconducting material with a transition temperature below niobium, including one of aluminum, titanium nitride, or molybdenum nitride. The pattern is disposed on both a top and a bottom of the membrane, and creates a parallel-plate coupled transmission line on the membrane that acts as a half-wavelength resonator at readout frequencies. The parallel-plate coupled transmission line and the conductor microstrip lines form a stepped impedance resonator. The pattern provides identical power absorption for both horizontal and vertical polarization signals.

  15. Electrically tunable metasurface perfect absorbers for ultrathin mid-infrared optical modulators.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yu; Shankar, Raji; Kats, Mikhail A; Song, Yi; Kong, Jing; Loncar, Marko; Capasso, Federico

    2014-11-12

    Dynamically reconfigurable metasurfaces open up unprecedented opportunities in applications such as high capacity communications, dynamic beam shaping, hyperspectral imaging, and adaptive optics. The realization of high performance metasurface-based devices remains a great challenge due to very limited tuning ranges and modulation depths. Here we show that a widely tunable metasurface composed of optical antennas on graphene can be incorporated into a subwavelength-thick optical cavity to create an electrically tunable perfect absorber. By switching the absorber in and out of the critical coupling condition via the gate voltage applied on graphene, a modulation depth of up to 100% can be achieved. In particular, we demonstrated ultrathin (thickness < λ0/10) high speed (up to 20 GHz) optical modulators over a broad wavelength range (5-7 μm). The operating wavelength can be scaled from the near-infrared to the terahertz by simply tailoring the metasurface and cavity dimensions. PMID:25310847

  16. Intensity tunable infrared broadband absorbers based on VO2 phase transition using planar layered thin films

    PubMed Central

    Kocer, Hasan; Butun, Serkan; Palacios, Edgar; Liu, Zizhuo; Tongay, Sefaattin; Fu, Deyi; Wang, Kevin; Wu, Junqiao; Aydin, Koray

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic and metamaterial based nano/micro-structured materials enable spectrally selective resonant absorption, where the resonant bandwidth and absorption intensity can be engineered by controlling the size and geometry of nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate a simple, lithography-free approach for obtaining a resonant and dynamically tunable broadband absorber based on vanadium dioxide (VO2) phase transition. Using planar layered thin film structures, where top layer is chosen to be an ultrathin (20 nm) VO2 film, we demonstrate broadband IR light absorption tuning (from ~90% to ~30% in measured absorption) over the entire mid-wavelength infrared spectrum. Our numerical and experimental results indicate that the bandwidth of the absorption bands can be controlled by changing the dielectric spacer layer thickness. Broadband tunable absorbers can find applications in absorption filters, thermal emitters, thermophotovoltaics and sensing. PMID:26294085

  17. NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING OF SIX METAL-RICH QUASAR ABSORBER GALAXY FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Straka, Lorrie A.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; York, Donald G.

    2011-06-15

    Absorption lines in quasar spectra allow us to locate and study intervening galaxies. In order to obtain a clearer picture of these absorber galaxies, we have used the Near-Infrared Camera Fabry-Perot System at Apache Point Observatory to obtain near-infrared broadband images in one or more filters (J and K{sub s} ) of six quasar fields containing metal-rich low-z damped or sub-damped Ly{alpha} systems. These data allow us to search for the galaxies and constrain their luminosities. Candidate absorber galaxies are detected at 2.''01-7.''38 separation from the quasar in three out of six fields in the J and K{sub s} bands at >3{sigma} level with luminosities ranging from log(L/L{sub sun}) = 10.44-10.36 in the J band (for E-Sc type galaxies) and log(L/L{sub sun}) = 11.59-10.03 in the K{sub s} band for our detections. We place limits on the remaining fields with no detections of log(L/L{sub sun}) <10.83-9.75 for the J band and log(L/L{sub sun}) <10.43-10.05 for the K{sub s} band. We are also able to utilize Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectra for each field to calculate optical fluxes and limits as well as limits on star formation rate via [O II]{lambda}3727 emission in spectra. Our data, combined with other recent imaging results for metal-rich absorbers, suggest a possible positive correlation between absorber metallicity and galaxy luminosity, although the samples are still small.

  18. Method for generation of tunable far infrared radiation from two-dimensional plasmons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Tunable far infrared radiation is produced from two-dimensional plasmons in a heterostructure, which provides large inversion-layer electron densities at the heterointerface, without the need for a metallic grating to couple out the radiation. Instead, a light interference pattern is produced on the planar surface of the heterostructure using two coherent laser beams of a wavelength selected to be strongly absorbed by the heterostructure in order to penetrate through the inversion layer. The wavelength of the far infrared radiation coupled out can then be readily tuned by varying the angle between the coherent beams, or varying the wavelength of the two interfering coherent beams, thus varying the periodicity of the photoconductivity grating to vary the wavelength of the far infrared radiation being coupled out.

  19. Infrared radiation models for atmospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kratz, David P.; Ces, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    A hierarchy of line-by-line, narrow-band, and broadband infrared radiation models are discussed for ozone, a radiatively important atmospheric trace gas. It is shown that the narrow-band (Malkmus) model is in near-precise agreement with the line-by-line model, thus providing a means of testing narrow-band Curtis-Godson scaling, and it is found that this scaling procedure leads to errors in atmospheric fluxes of up to 10 percent. Moreover, this is a direct consequence of the altitude dependence of the ozone mixing ratio. Somewhat greater flux errors arise with use of the broadband model, due to both a lesser accuracy of the broadband scaling procedure and to inherent errors within the broadband model, despite the fact that this model has been tuned to the line-by-line model.

  20. Infrared Camera System for Visualization of IR-Absorbing Gas Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert; Immer, Christopher; Cox, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Leak detection and location remain a common problem in NASA and industry, where gas leaks can create hazardous conditions if not quickly detected and corrected. In order to help rectify this problem, this design equips an infrared (IR) camera with the means to make gas leaks of IR-absorbing gases more visible for leak detection and location. By comparing the output of two IR cameras (or two pictures from the same camera under essentially identical conditions and very closely spaced in time) on a pixel-by-pixel basis, one can cancel out all but the desired variations that correspond to the IR absorption of the gas of interest. This can be simply done by absorbing the IR lines that correspond to the gas of interest from the radiation received by one of the cameras by the intervention of a filter that removes the particular wavelength of interest from the "reference" picture. This can be done most sensitively with a gas filter (filled with the gas of interest) placed in front of the IR detector array, or (less sensitively) by use of a suitable line filter in the same location. This arrangement would then be balanced against the unfiltered "measurement" picture, which will have variations from IR absorption from the gas of interest. By suitable processing of the signals from each pixel in the two IR pictures, the user can display only the differences in the signals. Either a difference or a ratio output of the two signals is feasible. From a gas concentration viewpoint, the ratio could be processed to show the column depth of the gas leak. If a variation in the background IR light intensity is present in the field of view, then large changes in the difference signal will occur for the same gas column concentration between the background and the camera. By ratioing the outputs, the same signal ratio is obtained for both high- and low-background signals, even though the low-signal areas may have greater noise content due to their smaller signal strength. Thus, one

  1. Effect of infrared radiation on the lens

    PubMed Central

    Aly, Eman Mohamed; Mohamed, Eman Saad

    2011-01-01

    Background: Infrared (IR) radiation is becoming more popular in industrial manufacturing processes and in many instruments used for diagnostic and therapeutic application to the human eye. Aim: The present study was designed to investigate the effect of IR radiation on rabbit’s crystalline lens and lens membrane. Materials and Methods: Fifteen New Zealand rabbits were used in the present work. The rabbits were classified into three groups; one of them served as control. The other two groups were exposed to IR radiation for 5 or 10 minutes. Animals from these two irradiated groups were subdivided into two subgroups; one of them was decapitated directly after IR exposure, while the other subgroup was decapitated 1 hour post exposure. IR was delivered from a General Electric Lamp model 250R 50/10, placed 20 cm from the rabbit and aimed at each eye. The activity of Na+-K+ ATPase was measured in the lens membrane. Soluble lens proteins were extracted and the following measurements were carried out: estimation of total soluble protein, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. For comparison between multiple groups, analysis of variance was used with significance level set at P < 0.001. Results: The results indicated a change in the molecular weight of different lens crystalline accompanied with changes in protein backbone structure. These changes increased for the groups exposed to IR for 10 minutes. Moreover, the activity of Na+-K+ ATPase significantly decreased for all groups. Conclusions: The protein of eye lens is very sensitive to IR radiation which is hazardous and may lead to cataract. PMID:21350278

  2. Remote sensing of solar radiation absorbed and reflected by vegetated land surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myneni, Ranga B.; Asrar, Ghassem; Tanre, Didier; Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    1992-01-01

    1D and 3D radiative-transfer models have been used to investigate the problem of remotely sensed determination of vegetated land surface-absorbed and reflected solar radiation. Calculations were conducted for various illumination conditions to determine surface albedo, soil- and canopy-absorbed photosynthetically active and nonactive radiation, and normalized difference vegetation index. Simple predictive models are developed on the basis of the relationships among these parameters.

  3. Infrared non-planar plasmonic perfect absorber for enhanced sensitive refractive index sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yongzhi; Mao, Xue Song; Wu, Chenjun; Wu, Lin; Gong, RongZhou

    2016-03-01

    We present a non-planar all-metal plasmonic perfect absorber (PA) with response polarization independent in infrared region, which can be served as a sensor for enhanced refractive index sensing. Distinct from previous designs, the proposed PA consisted of all metal structured film constructed with an assembly of four-tined rod resonators (FRRs). The PA with a high quality-factor (Q-factor) of 41.2 and an absorbance of 99.9% at 142.6 THz has been demonstrated numerically. The resonance behavior occurs in the space between the rods of the FRRs, which is remarkable different conventional sandwiched structural PAs. Based on equivalent LC circuit theory, the absorption peak can be finely tuned by varying the geometrical dimensions of the FRRs. Furthermore, the resonance frequency shows highly sensitive response to the change of refractive index in the surrounding medium. A careful design for refractive index sensor can yield a sensitivity of 1445 nm/refractive index unit (RIU) and a figure of merit (FOM) of 28.8. The demonstrated design of the plasmonic PA for sensing provides great potential application in enhancing refractive index sensors and the enhanced infrared spectroscopy.

  4. Radiation response issues for infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalma, Arne H.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers describe the most important radiation response issues for infrared detectors. In general, the two key degradation mechanisms in infrared detectors are the noise produced by exposure to a flux of ionizing particles (e.g.; trapped electronics and protons, debris gammas and electrons, radioactive decay of neutron-activated materials) and permanent damage produced by exposure to total dose. Total-dose-induced damage is most often the result of charge trapping in insulators or at interfaces. Exposure to short pulses of ionization (e.g.; prompt x rays or gammas, delayed gammas) will cause detector upset. However, this upset is not important to a sensor unless the recovery time is too long. A few detector technologies are vulnerable to neutron-induced displacement damage, but fortunately most are not. Researchers compare the responses of the new technologies with those of the mainstream technologies of PV HgCdTe and IBC Si:As. One important reason for this comparison is to note where some of the newer technologies have the potential to provide significantly improved radiation hardness compared with that of the mainstream technologies, and thus to provide greater motivation for the pursuit of these technologies.

  5. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, C. O.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University under the direction of Professor Charles H. Kruger, with Dr. Christophe O. Laux as Associate Investigator. The goal of this research was to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this end, spectral measurements and modeling were made of the radiation emitted between 2.4 and 5.5 micrometers by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3000 K. The objective was to examine the spectral emission of air species including nitric oxide, atomic oxygen and nitrogen lines, molecular and atomic continua, as well as secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperatures, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8x10(exp -4).

  6. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress during the second year of our research program on Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasmas at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Our previous annual report described spectral measurements and modeling of the radiation emitted between 3.2 and 5.5 microns by an atmospheric pressure air plasma in chemical and thermal equilibrium at a temperature of approximately 3100 K. One of our goals was to examine the spectral emission of secondary species such as water vapor or carbon dioxide. The cold air stream injected in the plasma torch contained approximately 330 parts per million Of CO2, which is the natural CO2 concentration in atmospheric air at room temperature, and a small amount of water vapor with an estimated mole fraction of 3.8 x 10(exp -4). As can be seen from Figure 1, it was found that the measured spectrum exhibited intense spectral features due to the fundamental rovibrational bands of NO at 4.9 - 5.5 microns and the V(3) band of CO2 (antisymmetric stretch) at 4.2-4.8 microns. These observations confirmed the well-known fact that infrared signatures between 4.15 - 5.5 microns can be masked by radiative emission in the interceptor's bow-shock. Figure I also suggested that the range 3.2 - 4.15 microns did not contain any significant emission features (lines or continuum) that could mask IR signatures. However, the signal-to-noise level, close to one in that range, precluded definite conclusions. Thus, in an effort to further investigate the spectral emission in the range of interest to signature masking problem, new measurements were made with a higher signal-to-noise ratio and an extended wavelength range.

  7. Theoretical investigation of all-metal-based mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers at infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    High-performance wavelength-selective infrared (IR) sensors require small pixel structures, a low-thermal mass, and operation in the middle-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) regions for multicolor IR imaging. All-metal-based mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) were investigated theoretically and were designed to enhance the performance of wavelength-selective uncooled IR sensors. All components of the MPMAs are based on thin layers of metals such as Au without oxide insulators for increased absorption. The absorption properties of the MPMAs were investigated by rigorous coupled-wave analysis. Strong wavelength-selective absorption is realized over a wide range of MWIR and LWIR wavelengths by the plasmonic resonance of the micropatch and the narrow-gap resonance, without disturbance from the intrinsic absorption of oxide insulators. The absorption wavelength is defined mainly by the micropatch size and is longer than its period. The metal post width has less impact on the absorption properties and can maintain single-mode operation. Through-holes can be formed on the plate area to reduce the thermal mass. A small pixel size with reduced thermal mass and wideband single-mode operation can be realized using all-metal-based MPMAs.

  8. Infrared band absorptance correlations and applications to nongray radiation. [mathematical models of absorption spectra for nongray atmospheres in order to study air pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Manian, S. V. S.

    1976-01-01

    Various mathematical models for infrared radiation absorption spectra for atmospheric gases are reviewed, and continuous correlations for the total absorptance of a wide band are presented. Different band absorptance correlations were employed in two physically realistic problems (radiative transfer in gases with internal heat source, and heat transfer in laminar flow of absorbing-emitting gases between parallel plates) to study their influence on final radiative transfer results. This information will be applied to the study of atmospheric pollutants by infrared radiation measurement.

  9. Radiation effects in IRAS extrinsic infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnell, L.; Langford, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    During the calibration and testing of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) focal plane, it was observed that the extrinsic photoconductor detectors were affected by gamma radiation at dose levels of the order of one rad. Since the flight environment will subject the focal plane to dose levels of this order from protons in single pass through the South Atlantic Anomaly, an extensive program of radiation tests was carried out to measure the radiation effects and to devise a method to counteract these effects. The effects observed after irradiation are increased responsivity, noise, and rate of spiking of the detectors after gamma-ray doses of less than 0.1 rad. The detectors can be returned almost to pre-irradiation performance by increasing the detector bias to breakdown and allowing a large current to flow for several minutes. No adverse effects on the detectors have been observed from this bias boost, and this technique will be used for IRAS with frequent calibration to ensure the accuracy of observations made with the instrument.

  10. Thermal Infrared Radiative Forcing By Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Narayan

    The work mainly focuses on the study of thermal infrared (IR) properties of atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the estimation of the aerosol-induced direct longwave (LW) radiative forcing in the spectral region 5-20 mum at the Earth's surface (BOA; bottom of the atmosphere) and the top of the atmosphere (TOA) in cloud-free atmospheric conditions. These objectives were accomplished by conducting case studies on clear sky, smoky, and dusty conditions that took place in the Great Basin of the USA in 2013. Both the solar and thermal IR measurements and a state-of-the-science radiative transfer model, the LBLDIS, a combination of the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model and the Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) solver were employed for the study. The LW aerosol forcing is often not included in climate models because the aerosol effect on the LW is often assumed to be negligible. We lack knowledge of aerosol characteristics in the LW region, and aerosol properties exhibit high variability. We have found that the LW TOA radiative forcing due to fine mode aerosols, mainly associated with small biomass burning smoke particles, is + 0.4 W/m2 which seems to be small, but it is similar to the LW radiative forcing due to increase in CO2 concentration in the Earth's atmosphere since the preindustrial era of 1750 (+ 1.6 W/m 2). The LW radiative forcing due to coarse mode aerosols, associated with large airborne mineral dust particles, was found to be as much as + 5.02 W/m2 at the surface and + 1.71 W/m2 at the TOA. All of these significant positive values of the aerosol radiative forcing both at the BOA and TOA indicate that the aerosols have a heating effect in the LW range, which contributes to counterbalancing the cooling effect associated with the aerosol radiative forcing in the shortwave (SW) spectral region. In the meantime, we have found that LW radiative forcing by aerosols is highly sensitive to particle size and complex refractive indices of

  11. Infrared radiation of thin plastic films.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, C. L.; Chan, C. K.; Cunnington, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    A combined analytical and experimental study is presented for infrared radiation characteristics of thin plastic films with and without a metal substrate. On the basis of the thin-film analysis, a simple analytical technique is developed for determining band-averaged optical constants of thin plastic films from spectral normal transmittance data for two different film thicknesses. Specifically, the band-averaged optical constants of polyethylene terephthalate and polyimide were obtained from transmittance measurements of films with thicknesses in the range of 0.25 to 3 mil. The spectral normal reflectance and total normal emittance of the film side of singly aluminized films are calculated by use of optical constants; the results compare favorably with measured values.

  12. Transport of infrared radiation in cuboidal clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HARSHVARDHAN; Weinman, J. A.; Davies, R.

    1981-01-01

    The transport of infrared radiation in a single cuboidal cloud using a vertical two steam approximation was modeled. The emittance of the top face of the model cloud is always less than that for a plane parallel cloud of the same optical depth. The hemisphere flux escaping from the cloud top has a gradient from the center to the edges which brighten when the cloud is over warmer ground. Cooling rate calculations in the 8 to 13.6 micrometer region show that there is cooling from the sides of the cloud at all levels even when there is heating of the core from the ground below. The radiances exiting from model cuboidal clouds were computed by path integration over the source function obtained with the two stream approximation. It is suggested that the brightness temperature measured from finite clouds will overestimate the cloud top temperature.

  13. Radiative Transfer Simulations of Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyuchenkov, Yaroslav; Wiebe, Dmitry; Fateeva, Anna; Vasyunina, Tatiana

    2011-04-01

    The determination of prestellar core structure is often based on observations of (sub)millimeter dust continuum. However, recently the Spitzer Space Telescope provided us with IR images of many objects not only in emission but also in absorption. We developed a technique to reconstruct the density and temperature distributions of protostellar objects based on radiation transfer (RT) simulations both in mm and IR wavelengths. Best-fit model parameters are obtained with the genetic algorithm. We apply the method to two cores of Infrared Dark Clouds and show that their observations are better reproduced by a model with an embedded heating source despite the lack of 70 μm emission in one of these cores. Thus, the starless nature of massive cores can only be established with the careful case-by-case RT modeling.

  14. Biophysical properties affecting vegetative canopy reflectance and absorbed photosynthetically active radiation at the FIFE site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter-Shea, E. A.; Blad, B. L.; Hays, C. J.; Mesarch, M. A.; Deering, D. W.; Middleton, E. M.

    1992-11-01

    Leaves of the dominant grass species of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) site reflect and transmit radiation in a similar manner to other healthy green leaves. Visible reflectance factors (RFs) and transmittance factors (TFs) were lower for older leaves than younger leaves except during senescence, when RF and TF values were higher. Near-infrared (NIR) RF values increased and TF values decreased with leaf age, with the reverse occurring as the leaf underwent senescence. Leaf optical properties were not found to be dependent on leaf water potential in the range from -0.5 to -3.0 MPa. Canopy bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) values generally increased with increasing view zenith angle (θυ). Maximum values were in the backscatter direction, whereas BRF values in the visible region were lowest at oblique off-nadir θυ in the forward scatter direction and at or near nadir in the NIR region. Solar principal plane BRF values varied most at large solar zenith angles (θs). Visible and mid-infrared canopy BRF values decreased and NIR BRF values increased with leaf area index (LAI). Soil BRF distributions in the solar principal plane varied slightly with θs and θυ and varied considerably for wet and dry surfaces. Spectral vegetation indices (SVIs) varied with θs and θυ; values were lowest in the backscatter direction and highest in the forward scatter direction. The fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR) increased with increasing θs. APAR had a strong linear relationship to nadir-derived SVI values but not to oblique off-nadir-derived SVI values. The relatively small dependence of off-nadir SVI values on θs should allow daily APAR values to be estimated from measurements made at any time of the day.

  15. Radiation shielding of the beam absorber in the MI 8-GeV beam line

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    Results of Monte Carlo radiation shielding calculations performed for the beam absorber of the MI 8 GeV beam line are presented and discussed. The possibility to reach the level of 10{sup 19} protons per year is investigated.

  16. Experimental study of acoustic radiation force of an ultrasound beam on absorbing and scattering objects

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V. Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2015-10-28

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter.

  17. Experimental Study of Acoustic Radiation Force of an Ultrasound Beam on Absorbing and Scattering Objects

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V.; Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter. PMID:27147775

  18. Experimental study of acoustic radiation force of an ultrasound beam on absorbing and scattering objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V.; Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter.

  19. 2,3-Naphtho-Fused BODIPYs as Near-Infrared Absorbing Dyes.

    PubMed

    Yamazawa, Sho; Nakashima, Mika; Suda, Yukie; Nishiyabu, Ryuhei; Kubo, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    2,3-Naphtho-fused boron-dipyrromethenes (BODIPYs) 1a and 1b, which absorb near-infrared light at 740-770 nm with molar extinction coefficients above 10(5) M(-1) cm(-1) in THF, have been synthesized through a palladium(II)-catalyzed direct acylation of N-BOC hydrazones and subsequent Paal-Knorr pyrrole synthesis. Simple benzo-annulation of dibenzo-BODIPY caused a significant red-shift in the absorption. Subsequent intramolecular B,O-cyclization of 1b gave 2, which exhibited an intense absorption band at 830 nm. The structure-optical property relationship has been investigated using theoretical calculations and cyclic voltammetry. PMID:26735048

  20. Infrared radiation budget of the Harmattan haze. [West Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, P. M.; Weickmann, H. K.

    1975-01-01

    Infrared in situ observations of the West African Harmaltan Haze during the 1974 GATE field phase were conducted to determine the radiative properties of the tropospheric phenomenon and to develop a calculation model for radiative transfer through the haze. Radiometric observations of the dust haze were analyzed for haze infrared transmission. Infrared and tropospheric cooling rates are given together with the haze volume absorption rate.

  1. Metamaterial Absorbers for Infrared Detection of Molecular Self-Assembled Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Tanaka, Takuo

    2015-07-01

    The emerging field of plasmonic metamaterials has introduced new degree of freedom to manipulate optical field from nano to macroscopic scale, offering an attractive platform for sensing applications. So far, metamaterial sensor concepts, however, have focused on hot-spot engineering to improve the near-field enhancement, rather than fully exploiting tailored material properties. Here, we present a novel spectroscopic technique based on the metamaterial infrared (IR) absorber allowing for a low-background detection scheme as well as significant plasmonic enhancement. Specifically, we experimentally demonstrate the resonant coupling of plasmonic modes of a metamaterial absorber and IR vibrational modes of a molecular self-assembled monolayer. The metamaterial consisting of an array of Au/MgF2/Au structures exhibits an anomalous absorption at ~3000 cm-1, which spectrally overlaps with C-H stretching vibrational modes. Symmetric/asymmetric C-H stretching modes of a 16-Mercaptohexadecanoic acid monolayer are clearly observed as Fano-like anti-resonance peaks within a broad plasmonic absorption of the metamaterial. Spectral analysis using Fano line-shape fitting reveals the underlying resonant interference in plasmon-molecular coupled systems. Our metamaterial approach achieves the attomole sensitivity with a large signal-to-noise ratio in the far-field measurement, thus may open up new avenues for realizing ultrasensitive IR inspection technologies.

  2. Metamaterial Absorbers for Infrared Detection of Molecular Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Tanaka, Takuo

    2015-01-01

    The emerging field of plasmonic metamaterials has introduced new degree of freedom to manipulate optical field from nano to macroscopic scale, offering an attractive platform for sensing applications. So far, metamaterial sensor concepts, however, have focused on hot-spot engineering to improve the near-field enhancement, rather than fully exploiting tailored material properties. Here, we present a novel spectroscopic technique based on the metamaterial infrared (IR) absorber allowing for a low-background detection scheme as well as significant plasmonic enhancement. Specifically, we experimentally demonstrate the resonant coupling of plasmonic modes of a metamaterial absorber and IR vibrational modes of a molecular self-assembled monolayer. The metamaterial consisting of an array of Au/MgF2/Au structures exhibits an anomalous absorption at ~ 3000 cm(-1), which spectrally overlaps with C-H stretching vibrational modes. Symmetric/asymmetric C-H stretching modes of a 16-Mercaptohexadecanoic acid monolayer are clearly observed as Fano-like anti-resonance peaks within a broad plasmonic absorption of the metamaterial. Spectral analysis using Fano line-shape fitting reveals the underlying resonant interference in plasmon-molecular coupled systems. Our metamaterial approach achieves the attomole sensitivity with a large signal-to-noise ratio in the far-field measurement, thus may open up new avenues for realizing ultrasensitive IR inspection technologies. PMID:26229011

  3. Design of practicable phase-change metadevices for near-infrared absorber and modulator applications.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Santiago García-Cuevas; Nash, Geoffrey R; Hayat, Hasan; Cryan, Martin J; Klemm, Maciej; Bhaskaran, Harish; Wright, C David

    2016-06-13

    Phase-change chalcogenide alloys, such as Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST), have very different optical properties in their amorphous and crystalline phases. The fact that such alloys can be switched, optically or electrically, between such phases rapidly and repeatedly means that they have much potential for applications as tunable photonic devices. Here we incorporate chalcogenide phase-change films into a metal-dielectric-metal metamaterial electromagnetic absorber structure and design absorbers and modulators for operation at technologically important near-infrared wavelengths, specifically 1550 nm. Our design not only exhibits excellent performance (e.g. a modulation depth of ~77% and an extinction ratio of ~20 dB) but also includes a suitable means for protecting the GST layer from environmental oxidation and is well-suited, as confirmed by electro-thermal and phase-transformation simulations, to in situ electrical switching. We also present a systematic study of design optimization, including the effects of expected manufacturing tolerances on device performance and, by means of a sensitivity analysis, identify the most critical design parameters. PMID:27410372

  4. Metamaterial Absorbers for Infrared Detection of Molecular Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Tanaka, Takuo

    2015-01-01

    The emerging field of plasmonic metamaterials has introduced new degree of freedom to manipulate optical field from nano to macroscopic scale, offering an attractive platform for sensing applications. So far, metamaterial sensor concepts, however, have focused on hot-spot engineering to improve the near-field enhancement, rather than fully exploiting tailored material properties. Here, we present a novel spectroscopic technique based on the metamaterial infrared (IR) absorber allowing for a low-background detection scheme as well as significant plasmonic enhancement. Specifically, we experimentally demonstrate the resonant coupling of plasmonic modes of a metamaterial absorber and IR vibrational modes of a molecular self-assembled monolayer. The metamaterial consisting of an array of Au/MgF2/Au structures exhibits an anomalous absorption at ~3000 cm−1, which spectrally overlaps with C-H stretching vibrational modes. Symmetric/asymmetric C-H stretching modes of a 16-Mercaptohexadecanoic acid monolayer are clearly observed as Fano-like anti-resonance peaks within a broad plasmonic absorption of the metamaterial. Spectral analysis using Fano line-shape fitting reveals the underlying resonant interference in plasmon-molecular coupled systems. Our metamaterial approach achieves the attomole sensitivity with a large signal-to-noise ratio in the far-field measurement, thus may open up new avenues for realizing ultrasensitive IR inspection technologies. PMID:26229011

  5. Polarization-selective uncooled infrared sensor using a one-dimensional plasmonic grating absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Takagawa, Yousuke; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-06-01

    A polarization-selective uncooled infrared (IR) sensor has been developed based on a one-dimensional plasmonic grating absorber (1-D PGA). The 1-D PGA has an Au-based one-dimensional periodic grating structure, where photons can be manipulated by surface plasmon resonance. A microelectromechanical systems-based uncooled IR sensor was fabricated using the 1-D PGA with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and micromachining techniques. The 1-D PGA was formed with an Au layer sputtered on a grating pattered SiO2 layer. An Al layer was then introduced onto the backside of the 1-D PGA to reflect scattered light and prevent absorption at the SiO2 backside of the absorber. The responsivity could be selectively enhanced depending on the polarization and the grating direction, and an absorption wavelength longer than the surface period and broadband absorption were realized due to the effect of the resonance in the grating depth direction. The 1-D PGAs enable a detection wavelength longer than the period and broadbandpolarization- selectivity by control of the grating depth in addition to the period. The results obtained in this study will contribute to the advancement of polarimetric IR imaging.

  6. Radiative cooling of solar absorbers using a visibly transparent photonic crystal thermal blackbody.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath P; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-10-01

    A solar absorber, under the sun, is heated up by sunlight. In many applications, including solar cells and outdoor structures, the absorption of sunlight is intrinsic for either operational or aesthetic considerations, but the resulting heating is undesirable. Because a solar absorber by necessity faces the sky, it also naturally has radiative access to the coldness of the universe. Therefore, in these applications it would be very attractive to directly use the sky as a heat sink while preserving solar absorption properties. Here we experimentally demonstrate a visibly transparent thermal blackbody, based on a silica photonic crystal. When placed on a silicon absorber under sunlight, such a blackbody preserves or even slightly enhances sunlight absorption, but reduces the temperature of the underlying silicon absorber by as much as 13 °C due to radiative cooling. Our work shows that the concept of radiative cooling can be used in combination with the utilization of sunlight, enabling new technological capabilities. PMID:26392542

  7. Radiative cooling of solar absorbers using a visibly transparent photonic crystal thermal blackbody

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath P.; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-01-01

    A solar absorber, under the sun, is heated up by sunlight. In many applications, including solar cells and outdoor structures, the absorption of sunlight is intrinsic for either operational or aesthetic considerations, but the resulting heating is undesirable. Because a solar absorber by necessity faces the sky, it also naturally has radiative access to the coldness of the universe. Therefore, in these applications it would be very attractive to directly use the sky as a heat sink while preserving solar absorption properties. Here we experimentally demonstrate a visibly transparent thermal blackbody, based on a silica photonic crystal. When placed on a silicon absorber under sunlight, such a blackbody preserves or even slightly enhances sunlight absorption, but reduces the temperature of the underlying silicon absorber by as much as 13 °C due to radiative cooling. Our work shows that the concept of radiative cooling can be used in combination with the utilization of sunlight, enabling new technological capabilities. PMID:26392542

  8. Soft and broadband infrared metamaterial absorber based on gold nanorod/liquid crystal hybrid with tunable total absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhaoxian; Yin, Jianbo; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2015-11-01

    We design a soft infrared metamaterial absorber based on gold nanorods dispersed in liquid crystal (LC) placed on a gold film and theoretically investigate its total absorption character. Because the nanorods align with the LC molecule, the gold nanorods/LC hybrid exhibits different permittivity as a function of tilt angle of LC. At a certain tilt angle, the absorber shows an omnidirectional total absorption effect. By changing the tilt angle of LC by an external electric field, the total absorption character can be adjusted. The total absorption character also depends on the concentration, geometric dimension of nanorods, and defect of nanorod arrangement in LC. When the LC contains different size of gold nanorods, a broadband absorption can be easily realized. The characteristics including flexibility, omnidirectional, broadband and tunablility make the infrared metamaterial absorber possess potential use in smart metamaterial devices.

  9. Soft and broadband infrared metamaterial absorber based on gold nanorod/liquid crystal hybrid with tunable total absorption

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhaoxian; Yin, Jianbo; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    We design a soft infrared metamaterial absorber based on gold nanorods dispersed in liquid crystal (LC) placed on a gold film and theoretically investigate its total absorption character. Because the nanorods align with the LC molecule, the gold nanorods/LC hybrid exhibits different permittivity as a function of tilt angle of LC. At a certain tilt angle, the absorber shows an omnidirectional total absorption effect. By changing the tilt angle of LC by an external electric field, the total absorption character can be adjusted. The total absorption character also depends on the concentration, geometric dimension of nanorods, and defect of nanorod arrangement in LC. When the LC contains different size of gold nanorods, a broadband absorption can be easily realized. The characteristics including flexibility, omnidirectional, broadband and tunablility make the infrared metamaterial absorber possess potential use in smart metamaterial devices. PMID:26576660

  10. Transport of infrared radiation in cuboidal clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan, MR.; Weinman, J. A.; Davies, R.

    1981-01-01

    The transport of infrared radiation in a single cuboidal cloud is modeled using a variable azimuth two-stream approximation. Computations are made at 10 microns for a Deirmendjian (1969) C-1 water cloud where the single scattering albedo is equal to 0.638 and the asymmetry parameter is 0.865. The results indicate that the emittance of the top face of the model cloud is always less than that for a plane parallel cloud of the same optical depth. The hemispheric flux escaping from the cloud top possesses a gradient from the center to the edges which are warmer when the cloud is over warmer ground. Cooling rate calculations in the 8-13.6 micron region demonstrate that there is cooling out of the sides of the cloud at all levels even when there is heating of the core from the ground below. The radiances exiting from model cuboidal clouds are computed by path integration over the source function obtained with the two-stream approximation. Results indicate that the brightness temperature measured from finite clouds will overestimate the cloud-top temperature.

  11. Characterization of highly absorbing black appliqués in the infrared.

    PubMed

    Meier, S R

    2001-06-01

    Angular and polarimetric directional hemispherical reflectance (DHR) measurements of three highly absorbing appliqués in the 2.5-14.3-microm IR spectral region are presented. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images are presented to probe the surface morphology of these appliqués. DHR measurements of Energy Science Laboratory, Incorporated (ESLI), Rippey, and Rodel appliqués were obtained at incidence angles of 8 degrees, 30 degrees, and 50 degrees and as a function of S, P, and unpolarized incident light. The ESLI appliqué exhibited the lowest DHR for all angles and incident polarization states. SEM images revealed a fibrous structure for the ESLI appliqué with fiber diameters of the order of 7-8 microm, whereas the Rippey and the Rodel appliqués showed spongelike surfaces with pore diameters of 40-50 and 30-40 microm, respectively. All the appliqués use cavities or fibers in conjunction with carbon compounds to absorb IR radiation. The optical system designed to perform these measurements, a method for correcting off-normal DHR measurements in center-mount integrating spheres, and sources of measurement error are also discussed. PMID:18357296

  12. Evidence for Solar Cycle Influence on the Infrared Energy Budget and Radiative Cooling of the Thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Marshall, B. Thomas; Thompson, R. Earl; Williams, Joshua; Turpin, TImothy; Kratz, D. P.; Russell, James M.; Woods, Tom; Gordley, Larry L.

    2007-01-01

    We present direct observational evidence for solar cycle influence on the infrared energy budget and radiative cooling of the thermosphere. By analyzing nearly five years of data from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument, we show that the annual mean infrared power radiated by the nitric oxide (NO) molecule at 5.3 m has decreased by a factor of 2.9. This decrease is correlated (r = 0.96) with the decrease in the annual mean F10.7 solar index. Despite the sharp decrease in radiated power (which is equivalent to a decrease in the vertical integrated radiative cooling rate), the variability of the power as given in the standard deviation of the annual means remains approximately constant. A simple relationship is shown to exist between the infrared power radiated by NO and the F10.7 index, thus providing a fundamental relationship between solar activity and the thermospheric cooling rate for use in thermospheric models. The change in NO radiated power is also consistent with changes in absorbed ultraviolet radiation over the same time period.

  13. Space Radiation Absorbed Dose Distribution in a Human Phantom Torso

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Yang, T.; Atwell, W.

    2000-01-01

    The flight of a human phantom torso with head that containing active dosimeters at 5 organ sites and 1400 TLDs distributed in 34 1" thick sections is described. Experimental dose rates and quality factors are compared with calculations for shielding distributions at the sites using the Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model. The measurements were complemented with those obtained from other instruments. These results have provided the most comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human and to assess the accuracy of radiation transport models and astronaut radiation risk.

  14. Colloidal metasurfaces displaying near-ideal and tunable light absorbance in the infrared.

    PubMed

    Rozin, Matthew J; Rosen, David A; Dill, Tyler J; Tao, Andrea R

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces are ultrathin, two-dimensional arrays of subwavelength resonators that have been demonstrated to control the flow of light in ways that are otherwise unattainable with natural materials. These arrays are typically composed of metallic Ag or Au nanostructures shaped like split rings, nanowire pairs or nanorods (commonly referred to as meta-atoms) that are arranged to produce a collective optical response spanning an impressive range of properties, from the perfect absorption of incident light to superresolution imaging. However, metasurfaces pose major challenges in their fabrication over large areas, which can be prohibitively expensive and time consuming using conventional nanolithography techniques. Here we show that differently shaped colloidal nanocrystals can be organized into metasurface architectures using robust, scalable assembly methods. These metasurfaces exhibit extreme in-plane electromagnetic coupling that is strongly dependent on nanocrystal size, shape and spacing. Colloidal metasurfaces that display near-ideal electromagnetic absorbance can be tuned from the visible into the mid-infrared wavelengths. PMID:26099835

  15. Colloidal metasurfaces displaying near-ideal and tunable light absorbance in the infrared

    PubMed Central

    Rozin, Matthew J.; Rosen, David A.; Dill, Tyler J.; Tao, Andrea R.

    2015-01-01

    Metasurfaces are ultrathin, two-dimensional arrays of subwavelength resonators that have been demonstrated to control the flow of light in ways that are otherwise unattainable with natural materials. These arrays are typically composed of metallic Ag or Au nanostructures shaped like split rings, nanowire pairs or nanorods (commonly referred to as meta-atoms) that are arranged to produce a collective optical response spanning an impressive range of properties, from the perfect absorption of incident light to superresolution imaging. However, metasurfaces pose major challenges in their fabrication over large areas, which can be prohibitively expensive and time consuming using conventional nanolithography techniques. Here we show that differently shaped colloidal nanocrystals can be organized into metasurface architectures using robust, scalable assembly methods. These metasurfaces exhibit extreme in-plane electromagnetic coupling that is strongly dependent on nanocrystal size, shape and spacing. Colloidal metasurfaces that display near-ideal electromagnetic absorbance can be tuned from the visible into the mid-infrared wavelengths. PMID:26099835

  16. Hydrogel-Coated Near Infrared Absorbing Nanoshells as Light-Responsive Drug Delivery Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle drug delivery carriers that can modulate drug release based on an exogenous signal, such as light, are of great interest, especially for improving cancer therapy. A light-activated delivery vehicle was fabricated by synthesizing a thin, thermally responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) hydrogel coating directly onto the surfaces of individual near-infrared (NIR) absorbing gold-silica nanoshells. This hydrogel was designed to be in a swollen state under physiological conditions and expel large amounts of water, along with any entrapped drug, at elevated temperatures. The required temperature change can be achieved via NIR absorption by the nanoshell, allowing the hydrogel phase change to be triggered by light, which was observed by monitoring changes in particle sizes as water was expelled from the hydrogel network. The phase change was reversible and repeatable. As a model drug, the chemotherapeutic doxorubicin was loaded into this delivery vehicle, and rapid release of doxorubicin occurred upon NIR exposure. Further, colon carcinoma cells exposed to the irradiated platform displayed nearly 3 times as much doxorubicin uptake as cells exposed to nonirradiated particles or free drug, which in turn resulted in a higher loss of cell viability. We hypothesize these effects are because the NIR-mediated heating results in a transient increase in cell membrane permeability, thus aiding in cellular uptake of the drug. PMID:26366438

  17. 3-μm Mid-infrared pulse generation using topological insulator as the saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Luo, Hongyu; Wang, Lele; Zhao, Chujun; Zhang, Han; Li, Heping; Liu, Yong

    2015-08-01

    We report an 1150-nm diode-pump passively Q-switched Ho3+-doped ZBLAN fiber laser using topological insulator (TI): Bi2Te3 as the saturable absorber (SA). The TI: Bi2Te3 prepared using the cost-effective hydrothermal intercalation/exfoliation method was dropped onto a CaF2 substrate to fabricate the free-space SA component. It has a low saturable peak intensity of 2.12  MW/cm2 and a high modulation depth of 51.3% measured at 2 μm. Inserting this component into a linear-cavity Ho3+-doped ZBLAN fiber laser, stable Q-switched pulses at 2979.9 nm were obtained with the repetition rate of 81.96 kHz and pulse duration of 1.37 μs. The achieved maximum output power and pulse energy were 327.4 mW at a slope efficiency of 11.6% and 3.99 μJ, respectively, only limited by the available pump power. Our work reveals that the TIs are absolutely a class of promising and reliable SAs for pulse generation at 3-μm mid-infrared waveband. PMID:26258382

  18. Detection Wavelength Control of Uncooled Infrared Sensors Using Two-Dimensional Lattice Plasmonic Absorbers

    PubMed Central

    Takagawa, Yousuke; Ogawa, Shinpei; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Wavelength-selective uncooled infrared (IR) sensors are highly promising for a wide range of applications, such as fire detection, gas analysis and biomedical analysis. We have recently developed wavelength-selective uncooled IR sensors using square lattice two-dimensional plasmonic absorbers (2-D PLAs). The PLAs consist of a periodic 2-D lattice of Au-based dimples, which allow photons to be manipulated using surface plasmon modes. In the present study, a detailed investigation into control of the detection wavelength was conducted by varying the PLA lattice structure. A comparison was made between wavelength-selective uncooled IR sensors with triangular and square PLA lattices that were fabricated using complementary metal oxide semiconductor and micromachining techniques. Selective enhancement of the responsivity could be achieved, and the detection wavelength for the triangular lattice was shorter than that for the square lattice. The results indicate that the detection wavelength is determined by the reciprocal-lattice vector for the PLAs. The ability to control the detection wavelength in this manner enables the application of such PLAs to many types of thermal IR sensors. The results obtained here represent an important step towards multi-color imaging in the IR region. PMID:26067198

  19. Atomic layer deposition of absorbing thin films on nanostructured electrodes for short-wavelength infrared photosensing

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jixian; Sutherland, Brandon R.; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Fan, Fengjia; Sargent, Edward H.; Kinge, Sachin

    2015-10-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD), prized for its high-quality thin-film formation in the absence of high temperature or high vacuum, has become an industry standard for the large-area deposition of a wide array of oxide materials. Recently, it has shown promise in the formation of nanocrystalline sulfide films. Here, we demonstrate the viability of ALD lead sulfide for photodetection. Leveraging the conformal capabilities of ALD, we enhance the absorption without compromising the extraction efficiency in the absorbing layer by utilizing a ZnO nanowire electrode. The nanowires are first coated with a thin shunt-preventing TiO{sub 2} layer, followed by an infrared-active ALD PbS layer for photosensing. The ALD PbS photodetector exhibits a peak responsivity of 10{sup −2} A W{sup −1} and a shot-derived specific detectivity of 3 × 10{sup 9} Jones at 1530 nm wavelength.

  20. Effect of Index of Refraction on Radiation Characteristics in a Heated Absorbing, Emitting, and Scattering Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the index of refraction on the temperature distribution and radiative heat flux in semitransparent materials, such as some ceramics, is investigated analytically. In the case considered here, a plane layer of a ceramic material is subjected to external radiative heating incident on each of its surfaces; the material emits, absorbs, and isotropically scatters radiation. It is shown that, for radiative equilibrium in a gray layer with diffuse interfaces, the temperature distribution and radiative heat flux for any index of refraction can be obtained in a simple manner from the results for an index of refraction of unity.

  1. Emittance of a radar absorber coated with an infrared layer in the 3~5microm window.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lingyun; Gong, Rongzhou; Cheng, Yongshan; Zhang, Fengguo; He, Huahui; Huang, Dexiu

    2005-12-12

    By use of the Kubelka-Munk theory, the Mie theory and the independent scattering approximation, we obtain the explicit expression of the emittance of an infrared coating attached to a radar absorber with a high emittance, in the 3~5microm window. Taking aluminum particles with spherical shape as the pigments within the coating, we give the dependence of the coating emittance with respect to the particle radius, the thickness of the coating. At a volume fraction of 0.05, we propose the optimum particle radius range of the pigment particles is around 0.35~0.6microm. When the thickness of the coating exceeds 300microm, the decrease of emittance at 4microm wavelength becomes negligible. Too much thickness of IR layer wouldn't contribute to the decrease of emittance. We study the influence of the infrared coating on the performance of the radar absorber, and believe that not too much thick infrared coating consisting of spherical Al particles wouldn't result in a remarkable deterioration of the absorbing ability of the radar absorber. PMID:19503253

  2. Radiative Transfer and Absorbing Structures in the Transition Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plovanic, Jacob; Kankelborg, C. C.

    2012-05-01

    A fully satisfactory explanation for the anomalous He II 304 Å intensity in the solar transition region has yet to be offered. As an extension of previous work, we use a full radiative transfer code to build a more consistent model of the transition region that allows the He II line to form with low filling factor and low opacity. Our results are constrained by the quiet sun center-to-limb profile of He II 304 Å obtained from the MOSES sounding rocket mission and by AIA full-disk data.

  3. The effect of clouds on the earth's solar and infrared radiation budgets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, G. F.; Wu, M.-L. C.; Johnson, W. T.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of global cloudiness on the solar and infrared components of the earth's radiation balance is studied in general circulation model experiments. A wintertime simulation is conducted in which the cloud radiative transfer calculations use realistic cloud optical properties and are fully interactive with model-generated cloudiness. This simulation is compared to others in which the clouds are alternatively non-interactive with respect to the solar or thermal radiation calculations. Other cloud processes (formation, latent heat release, precipitation, vertical mixing) were accurately simulated in these experiments. It is concluded that on a global basis clouds increase the global radiation balance by 40 W/sq m by absorbing longwave radiation, but decrease it by 56 W/sq m by reflecting solar radiation to space. The net cloud effect is therefore a reduction of the radiation balance by 16 W/sq m, and is dominated by the cloud albedo effect. Changes in cloud frequency and distribution and in atmospheric and land temperatures are also reported for the control and for the non-interactive simulations. In general, removal of the clouds' infrared absorption cools the atmosphere and causes additional cloudiness to occur, while removal of the clouds' solar radiative properties warms the atmosphere and causes fewer clouds to form. It is suggested that layered clouds and convective clouds over water enter the climate system as positive feedback components, while convective clouds over land enter as negative components.

  4. Refractive Index Effects on Radiation in an Absorbing, Emitting, and Scattering Laminated Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    A simple set of equations is derived for predicting temperature radiative energy flow in a two-region semitransparent laminated layer in the limit of zero heat conduction. The composite is heated on its two sides by unequal amounts of incident radiation. The two layers of the composite have different refractive indices, and each material absorbs, emits, and isotropically scatters radiation. The interfaces are diffuse, and all interface reflections are included. To illustrate the thermal behavior that is readily calculated from the equations, typical results an given for various optical thicknesses and refractive indices of the layers. Internal reflections have a substantial effect on the temperature distribution and radiative heat flow.

  5. Reduced radiation-absorbed dose to tissues with partial panoramic radiography for evaluation of third molars.

    PubMed

    Kircos, L T; Eakle, W S; Smith, R A

    1986-05-01

    The radiation-absorbed doses from panoramic radiography, distal molar radiography, and a partial panoramic radiographic technique that exposes only the third molar region to radiation are compared. Doses of radiation to the submandibular salivary gland were comparable by all three techniques, but doses of radiation to the head and neck were reduced greatly by the partial panoramic radiographic technique. Partial panoramic radiography is a diagnostically satisfactory and a radiologically safer technique for evaluation of third molar pathosis than is panoramic or distal molar radiography. PMID:3458783

  6. Reduced radiation-absorbed dose to tissues with partial panoramic radiography for evaluation of third molars

    SciTech Connect

    Kircos, L.T.; Eakle, W.S.; Smith, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    The radiation-absorbed doses from panoramic radiography, distal molar radiography, and a partial panoramic radiographic technique that exposes only the third molar region to radiation are compared. Doses of radiation to the submandibular salivary gland were comparable by all three techniques, but doses of radiation to the head and neck were reduced greatly by the partial panoramic radiographic technique. Partial panoramic radiography is a diagnostically satisfactory and a radiologically safer technique for evaluation of third molar pathosis than is panoramic or distal molar radiography.

  7. Bandwidth control of wavelength-selective uncooled infrared sensors using two-dimensional plasmonic absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Kimata, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    Although standard uncooled infrared (IR) sensors can be used to record information such as the shape, position, and average radiant intensity of objects, these devices cannot capture color (that is, wavelength) data. Achieving wavelength selectivity would pave the way for the development of advanced uncooled IR sensors capable of providing color information as well as multi-color image sensors that would have significant advantages in applications such as fire detection, gas analysis, hazardous material recognition, and biological analysis. We have previously demonstrated an uncooled IR sensor incorporating a two-dimensional plasmonic absorber (2D PLA) that exhibits wavelength selectivity over a wide range in the mid- and long-IR regions. This PLA has a 2D Au-based periodic array of dimples, in which surface plasmon modes are induced and wavelength-selective absorption occurs. However, the dependence of the absorption bandwidth on certain structural parameters has yet to be clarified. The bandwidth of such devices is a vital factor when considering the practical application of these sensors to tasks such as gas detection. In the present study, control of the bandwidth was theoretically investigated using a rigorous coupled wave analysis approach. It is demonstrated that the dimple sidewall structure has a significant impact on the bandwidth and can be used to control both narrow- and broadband absorption. Increasing the sidewall slope was found to decrease the bandwidth due to suppression of cavity-mode resonance in the depth direction of the dimples. These results will contribute to the development of high-resolution, wavelength-selective uncooled IR sensors.

  8. Size-controllable micro-bubble generation using a nanoimprinted plasmonic nanopillar array absorber in the near-infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Chieh; Fischer, Wolf-Joachim; Yang, Tsung-Lin

    2016-05-01

    Size-controllable micro-bubble generation from thermoplasmonic effect is of great interest in many fields. In this study, photothermal bubble generation is demonstrated by using a near-infrared plasmonic absorber. A plasmonic nanopillar array is fabricated using a simple and low-cost soft thermal nanoimprint lithography process. Under near-infrared illumination, the plasmonic absorber becomes a highly efficient nanosource of heat because of enhanced light absorption at the localized surface plasmon resonance wavelength. The plasmonic substrate is able to generate size-tunable bubbles, depending on the illumination power and exposure time. The results of finite-difference time-domain simulations exhibit close agreement with the experimental observations. This study could provide alternative chemical synthesis approaches in solvothermal chemistry and sol-gel chemistry.

  9. Dental Enamel Irradiated with Infrared Diode Laser and Photo-Absorbing Cream: Part 2—EDX Study

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Edson Aparecido Pereira; Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; do Espírito Santo, Ana Maria; Martin, Airton Abrahão; Duarte, Danilo Antônio; Pacheco-Soares, Cristina; Brugnera, Aldo

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The effects of laser-induced compositional changes on the enamel were investigated by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDX). After cariogenic challenge, we administered treatment of low-level infrared diode laser and a photo-absorbing cream (used to intensify the superficial light absorption). Background Data: Dental caries is considered the most prevalent oral disease. A simple and noninvasive caries preventive regimen is treating tooth enamel with a laser, either alone or in combination with fluoride, which reduces enamel solubility and dissolution rates. High power lasers are still not widely used in private practice. Low-power near-infrared lasers may be an alternative approach. Energy-dispersive μ-EDX is a versatile and nondestructive spectroscopic technique that allows for a qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis of inorganic enamel components, such as calcium and phosphorus. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four extracted or exfoliated caries-free deciduous molars were divided into six groups: 1) control group (CTR-no treatment); 2) infrared laser treatment (L) (λ = 810 nm, 100 mW/cm2, 90 sec, 4.47 J/cm2, 9 J); 3) infrared laser irradiation and photo-absorbing agent (CL); 4) photo-absorbing agent alone (C); 5) infrared laser irradiation and fluoridated photo-absorbing agent (FCL); and 6) fluoridated photo-absorbing agent alone (FC). Samples were analyzed using μ-EDX after two sets of treatments and pH cycling cariogenic challenges. Results: The CL group showed statistically significant increases in calcium and phosphorus (wt%) compared with the CTR group. The Ca/P ratio was similar in the FCL and CTR groups. There was a significant laser-induced reduction compared with the CTR group, and there was a possible modification of the organic balance content in enamel treated with laser and cream. Conclusion: μ-EDX may be able to detect compositional changes in mineral phases of lased enamel under

  10. Relationship between acoustic power and acoustic radiation force on absorbing and reflecting targets for spherically focusing radiators.

    PubMed

    Gélat, Pierre; Shaw, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Total acoustic output power is an important parameter required by standards for most ultrasonic medical equipment including high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) systems. Radiation force balances are routinely used; however, radiation force is not strictly dependent on the ultrasound power but, rather, on the wave momentum resolved in one direction. Consequently, measurements based on radiation force become progressively less accurate as the ultrasound wave deviates further from a true plane wave. HIFU transducers can be very strongly focused with F-numbers less than one: under these conditions, the uncertainty associated with use of the radiation force method becomes very significant. International Standards IEC 61161 and IEC 62555 suggest plane-wave correction factors for unfocused transducers radiating onto an ideal absorbing target and focusing corrections for focused transducers radiating onto ideal absorbing targets and onto conical reflecting targets (IEC 61161). Previous models have relied on calculations based on the Rayleigh integral, which is not strictly correct for curved sources. In the work described here, an approach combining finite element methods with a discretization of the Helmholtz equation was developed, making it possible to model the boundary condition at the structure/fluid interface more correctly. This has been used to calculate the relationship between radiation force and total power for both absorbing and conical reflecting targets for transducers ranging from planar to an F-number of 0.5 (hemispherical) and to compare with the recommendations of IEC 61161 and IEC 62555. PMID:25683223

  11. MEASUREMENT OF MICROWAVE RADIATION ABSORBED BY BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS, 2, ANALYSIS BY DEWAR-FLASK CALORIMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Free-field power density has long been used as an index of energy dosing in studies of biological effects of microwave radiation. However, this method of quantifying dose can lead to considerable error if it is used as an index of the rate of energy actually being absorbed by a s...

  12. A new thermal radiation detector using optical heterodyne detection of absorbed energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. C.; Petuchowski, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    The operating principles of a new kind of room-temperature thermal radiation detector are described. In this device modulated light heats a gas, either directly or by conduction from a thin absorbing membrane, and the resultant change in density of the gas is detected by optical heterodyning. The performance of a membrane device of this kind agrees well with the predictions of theory.

  13. The interaction of infrared radiation with the eye: A review of the literature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, H. S.

    1972-01-01

    A compilation of data concerning the effects of infrared radiation on the eye is presented. Information in the following areas is included: (1) transmission and absorption of infrared radiation by the ocular tissues, (2) range of infrared radiation which is harmful to the ocular tissues, (3) infrared radiation thresholds of the various oscular tissues, and (4) infrared radiation transmission and absorption of current optic materials.

  14. Geometric radiation exchange factors for axial radiative transfer in an LWR core filled with absorbing-emitting gases

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.H.; Cho, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    A reactor core filled with an emitting-absorbing mixture (like steam, hydrogen gas and fission gases) is considered. Analysis is provided to evaluate axial radiative heat exchange of a rod bundle with a nonuniform axial temperature distribution. The necessary radiation exchange shape factors (geometric mean absorptance, emittance and transmittance) between segments of the complex rod bundle arrangement are presented. They are applicable to arbitrary sizes of segments, well suited for numerical computations.

  15. Characterizing SixNy absorbers and support beams for far-infrared/submillimeter transition-edge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, A. D.; Kenyon, M. E.; Echternach, P. M.; Eom, B.-H.; Bueno, J.; Day, P. K.; Bock, J. J.; Bradford, C. M.

    2010-07-01

    We report on the characterization of SixNy (Si-N) optical absorbers and support beams for transition-edge sensors (TESs). The absorbers and support beams measured are suitable to meet ultra-sensitive noise equivalent power (NEP<=10-19W/√Hz) and effective response time (τ) requirements (τ<=100ms) for space-borne far-infrared( IR)/submillimeter(sub-mm) spectrometers, such as the Background Limited far-Infrared/Sub-mm Spectrograph (BLISS) and the SpicA FAR-infrared Instrument (SAFARI) for the SPace Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA). The thermal response time (τ0) of an absorber suspended by support beams from a lowtemperature substrate depends on the heat capacity (C) of the absorber and the thermal conductance (G) of the support beams (τ0=C/G). In membrane-isolated TESs for BLISS, the effective response time τ is expected to be a factor of 20 smaller than τ0 because of voltage-biased electrothermal feedback operation and assumption of a reasonable open-loop gain, LI~20. We present design specifications for the arrays of membrane-isolated ultra-sensitive TESs for BLISS. Additionally, we measured G and τ0 for two Si-N noise thermometry device (NTD) architectures made using different fabrication processes: (1) a solid membrane Si-N absorber suspended by thin and long Si-N support beams and (2) a wire-mesh Si-N absorber suspended by long, and even thinner, Si-N support beams. The measurements of G and τ0 were designed to test suitability of the Si-N thermal performance to meet the demands of the two SPICA instruments. The solid membrane NTD architecture is similar to the TES architecture for SAFARI and the mesh membrane NTD is similar to that of BLISS TESs. We report measured values of G and C for several BLISS and SAFARI NTD devices. We observe that the heat capacity of the solid membrane devices can be reduced to the order of 1fJ/K at 65mK for devices that are wet etched by KOH. However, C for these devices is found to be on the order

  16. Alpha-radiation tests on the transmission of cryogenically cooled infrared filter materials used in ISOPHOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Josef; Lemke, Dietrich; Kraetschmer, Wolfgang; Mampel, K.

    1995-09-01

    We have studied potential effects of the ISO spacecraft orbital radiation environment on the transmission of infrared interference filters and filter materials. To simulate the critical proton radiation within the earth radiation belts and its influence on the materials at cryogenic temperatures the samples were cooled to LHe temperature and subjected to an Am-241 (alpha) -radiation source (approximately 4.1 MeV) mounted inside a cryostat. The dose per hour absorbed in a 20 micron thick layer, the mean penetration depth for the (alpha) particles, was about 25 krad (Si). The substrates Ge, ZnSe, and CaF2 and three tested ISOPHOT interference bandpass filters (3.21-3.37 micrometers and 2-50 micrometers even after a total dose of approximately 0.5 Mrad (Si), which is more than 100 times the expected total dose for ISOPHOT. The multilayer interference blocking coating on sapphire used on all ISOPHOT far infrared filters to block the wavelength range 1.7-6.7 micrometers showed no degeneration either. The organic far infrared antireflex coating materials polyethylene deposited on a quartz substrate, and a 15 micrometers thick parylene foil used as field lens coating, were investigated in the wavelength range of 16-300 micrometers . Our data suggests a slightly reduced transmission < 6% after 350 krad (Si) exposure.

  17. Electronic modulation of infrared radiation in graphene plasmonic resonators.

    PubMed

    Brar, Victor W; Sherrott, Michelle C; Jang, Min Seok; Kim, Seyoon; Kim, Laura; Choi, Mansoo; Sweatlock, Luke A; Atwater, Harry A

    2015-01-01

    All matter at finite temperatures emits electromagnetic radiation due to the thermally induced motion of particles and quasiparticles. Dynamic control of this radiation could enable the design of novel infrared sources; however, the spectral characteristics of the radiated power are dictated by the electromagnetic energy density and emissivity, which are ordinarily fixed properties of the material and temperature. Here we experimentally demonstrate tunable electronic control of blackbody emission from graphene plasmonic resonators on a silicon nitride substrate. It is shown that the graphene resonators produce antenna-coupled blackbody radiation, which manifests as narrow spectral emission peaks in the mid-infrared. By continuously varying the nanoresonator carrier density, the frequency and intensity of these spectral features can be modulated via an electrostatic gate. This work opens the door for future devices that may control blackbody radiation at timescales beyond the limits of conventional thermo-optic modulation. PMID:25948173

  18. High speed infrared radiation thermometer, system, and method

    DOEpatents

    Markham, James R.

    2002-01-01

    The high-speed radiation thermometer has an infrared measurement wavelength band that is matched to the infrared wavelength band of near-blackbody emittance of ceramic components and ceramic thermal barrier coatings used in turbine engines. It is comprised of a long wavelength infrared detector, a signal amplifier, an analog-to-digital converter, an optical system to collect radiation from the target, an optical filter, and an integral reference signal to maintain a calibrated response. A megahertz range electronic data acquisition system is connected to the radiation detector to operate on raw data obtained. Because the thermometer operates optimally at 8 to 12 .mu.m, where emittance is near-blackbody for ceramics, interferences to measurements performed in turbine engines are minimized. The method and apparatus are optimized to enable mapping of surface temperatures on fast moving ceramic elements, and the thermometer can provide microsecond response, with inherent self-diagnostic and calibration-correction features.

  19. Polarimeter measures sea state characteristics using emitted infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, W. G.; Hilgeman, T.

    1977-01-01

    An infrared polarimeter, capable of operating between 1 and 12 micrometers wavelength has been used to measure the polarization of emitted radiation from the sea. The observed polarization at 10.6 micrometers from a smooth sea was found to be positive, indicating the dominance of reflected infrared sky radiation over the emitted. With the appearance of waves, the percent polarization increased, as expected, for a zenith angle well above the Brewster angle for water. This is qualitatively in accordance with a model presented to explain the behavior. Initial analyses indicate that the polarized components of the sea's emitted and reflected radiation are affected by type and direction of waves, angle of viewing, and foam. The effects of variations in these parameters require further delineation. The infrared polarimetric technique appears to be a novel new passive method for remote monitoring of waves.

  20. Infrared Radiation Filament And Metnod Of Manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Edward A.

    1998-11-17

    An improved IR radiation source is provided by the invention. A radiation filament has a textured surface produced by seeded ion bombardment of a metal foil which is cut to a serpentine shape and mounted in a windowed housing. Specific ion bombardment texturing techniques tune the surface to maximize emissions in the desired wavelength range and to limit emissions outside that narrow range, particularly at longer wavelengths. A combination of filament surface texture, thickness, material, shape and power circuit feedback control produce wavelength controlled and efficient radiation at much lower power requirements than devices of the prior art.

  1. Investigation of Infra-red and Nonequilibrium Air Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.; Laux, Christophe O.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained during a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University. This program was intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. Prior to this work, the radiative emission of air plasmas in the infrared had been the object of few experimental investigations, and although several infrared systems were already modeled in radiation codes such as NEQAIR, measurements were required to validate numerical predictions and indicate whether all transitions of importance were accounted for in the model. The program was further motivated by the fact that 9 excited states (A, B, C, D, B', F, H, and H') of NO radiate in the infrared, especially between 1 and 1.5 microns where at least 9 transitions involving can be observed. Because these IR transitions are relatively well separated from each other, excited NO states concentrations can be easily measured, thus providing essential information on excited-state chemistry for use in optical diagnostics or in electronic excitation model validation. Detailed comparisons between measured and simulated spectra are presented.

  2. Infrared radiative energy transfer in gaseous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the radiative interactions in various energy transfer processes in gaseous systems. Both gray and non-gray radiative formulations for absorption and emission by molecular gases are presented. The gray gas formulations are based on the Planck mean absorption coefficient and the non-gray formulations are based on the wide band model correlations for molecular absorption. Various relations for the radiative flux and divergence of radiative flux are developed. These are useful for different flow conditions and physical problems. Specific plans for obtaining extensive results for different cases are presented. The procedure developed was applied to several realistic problems. Results of selected studies are presented.

  3. THERMAL FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS X9 AND X29 X-RAY RING CROTCH RADIATION ABSORBERS.

    SciTech Connect

    MERCADO-CORUJO,H.

    1999-08-11

    This report details the efforts by engineers at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to evaluate the reliability of water-cooled radiation absorbers used in the NSLS X-ray ring. The absorbers on this report are part of the X-9 and X-29 dipole vacuum chambers. The absorbers are located at the intersection (crotch) of the beamline exit ports with the electron beam chamber, and are generally referred to as ''crotches''. The purpose of this analysis was to demonstrate the thermal reliability of the crotches under operating conditions that will be present over the expected life of the ring. The efforts described include general engineering layouts, engineering calculations, finite element analysis (FEA), results and conclusions of the analysis, and future design recommendations.

  4. Remote sensing of solar radiation absorbed and reflected by vegetated land surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tanre, D.; Myneni, R.B.; Choudhury, B.J. ); Asrar, G. )

    1992-03-01

    This paper discusses the problem of remotely sensing the amount of solar radiation absorbed and reflected by vegetated land surfaces which was investigated with the aid of one- and three-dimensional radiative transfer models. Desert-like vegetation was modeled as clumps of leaves randomly distributed on a bright dry soil with a ground cover of generally less than 100%. Surface albedo (ALB), fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by the canopy (FAPAR), fractions of solar radiation absorbed by the canopy (FASOLAR) and soil (FASOIL), and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) were calculated for various illumination conditions. A base case was defined with problem parameters considered typical for desert vegetation in order to understand the dynamics of NDVI and ALB with respect to ground cover, leaf area index, soil brightness, and illumination conditions. The magnitude of errors involved in the estimation of surface albedo from broad-band monodirectional measurements was assessed through model simulations of SPOT, AVHRR, and GOES sensors. The nature of the relationships between NDVI vs. FASOLAR, FAPAR, FASOIL, and ALB, and their sensitivity to all problem parameter was investigated in order to develop simple predictive models.

  5. Research on remote sensing of broadband absorbers by using near-infrared diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hui; Liu, Jian-Guo; He, Yabai; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Xu, Zhen-Yu; Ruan, Jun; Yao, Lu; Kan, Rui-Feng

    2014-10-01

    This paper reports the development of an experimental technique for optical remote sensing of broadband absorbers in ambient air. Broadband absorbers have been difficult to detect due to a lack of narrow absorption features, which makes it hard to separate them from interference with other absorbing species and background. In combination with a multidimensional linear regression procedure, we have developed a further step to correct for water vapor and background influences. Various physical processes limiting the detection sensitivity were studied and solutions were developed to reduce their influences. Although the received optical signal from backscatter was very weak as no corner cube reflector was used, we have demonstrated the technique on remote sensing of broadband absorption of ethanol vapor in ambient air with a moderate detection limit of 200 ppm · m. This portable handheld system is particularly suitable for quick "point-and-measure" applications. The developed technique is also applicable for detection of other broadband absorbers. PMID:25322224

  6. Prophylaxis and treatment of acute radiation ulcers in rats with low-power infrared laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursova, Larisa V.; Kaplan, Michael A.; Nikitina, Rosa G.; Maligina, Antonina I.

    1999-12-01

    Exposure of radiation ulcers in rats to low-power infrared laser radiation (LPLR) (wavelength--890 nm, pulse power--6 W, frequency--150 and 300 Hz, irradiation time--10 min) noticeably accelerates their healing, reduces exudative processes, increases number of specialized cells in wound. Application of LPLR prior to radiation damage decreases ulcer dimensions.

  7. Surface-enhanced molecular spectroscopy (SEMS) based on perfect-absorber metamaterials in the mid-infrared

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongqian; Su, Lei; Shou, Chen; Yu, Chunmeng; Deng, Jinjun; Fang, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy has attracted increased attention for direct access to molecular vibrational fingerprints in the mid-infrared. Perfect-absorber metamaterials (PAMs) with multi-band spectral responses and significant enhancement of the local near-field intensity were developed to improve the intrinsic absorption cross sections of absorption spectrum to identify the vibrational spectra of biomolecules. To verify its performance, the proposed infrared PAM array was used to identify the molecular stretches of a Parylene C film. The resonant responses of the infrared PAMs were accurately tuned to the vibrational modes of the C = C target bonds. The vibrational stretches of the C = C moiety were observed and the auto-fluorescence mechanisms of the Parylene C film were monitored. The unique properties of the PAMs indicate that this approach is a promising strategy for surface-enhanced molecular absorption spectroscopy (SEMS) in the mid-infrared region and for the tracking of characteristic molecular vibrational modes. PMID:24091778

  8. Surface-enhanced molecular spectroscopy (SEMS) based on perfect-absorber metamaterials in the mid-infrared.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqian; Su, Lei; Shou, Chen; Yu, Chunmeng; Deng, Jinjun; Fang, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy has attracted increased attention for direct access to molecular vibrational fingerprints in the mid-infrared. Perfect-absorber metamaterials (PAMs) with multi-band spectral responses and significant enhancement of the local near-field intensity were developed to improve the intrinsic absorption cross sections of absorption spectrum to identify the vibrational spectra of biomolecules. To verify its performance, the proposed infrared PAM array was used to identify the molecular stretches of a Parylene C film. The resonant responses of the infrared PAMs were accurately tuned to the vibrational modes of the C = C target bonds. The vibrational stretches of the C = C moiety were observed and the auto-fluorescence mechanisms of the Parylene C film were monitored. The unique properties of the PAMs indicate that this approach is a promising strategy for surface-enhanced molecular absorption spectroscopy (SEMS) in the mid-infrared region and for the tracking of characteristic molecular vibrational modes. PMID:24091778

  9. Near-infrared-absorbing gold nanopopcorns with iron oxide cluster core for magnetically amplified photothermal and photodynamic cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Bhana, Saheel; Lin, Gan; Wang, Lijia; Starring, Hunter; Mishra, Sanjay R; Liu, Gang; Huang, Xiaohua

    2015-06-01

    We present the synthesis and application of a new type of dual magnetic and plasmonic nanostructures for magnetic-field-guided drug delivery and combined photothermal and photodynamic cancer therapy. Near-infrared-absorbing gold nanopopcorns containing a self-assembled iron oxide cluster core were prepared via a seed-mediated growth method. The hybrid nanostructures are superparamagnetic and show great photothermal conversion efficiency (η=61%) under near-infrared irradiation. Compact and stable nanocomplexes for photothermal-photodynamic therapy were formed by coating the nanoparticles with near-infrared-absorbing photosensitizer silicon 2,3-naphthalocyannie dihydroxide and stabilization with poly(ethylene glycol) linked with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid. The nanocomplex showed enhanced release and cellular uptake of the photosensitizer with the use of a gradient magnetic field. In vitro studies using two different cell lines showed that the dual mode photothermal and photodynamic therapy with the assistance of magnetic-field-guided drug delivery dramatically improved the therapeutic efficacy of cancer cells as compared to the combination treatment without using a magnetic field and the two treatments alone. The "three-in-one" nanocomplex has the potential to carry therapeutic agents deep into a tumor through magnetic manipulation and to completely eradicate tumors by subsequent photothermal and photodynamic therapies without systemic toxicity. PMID:25965727

  10. Temperature and hydration effects on absorbance spectra and radiation sensitivity of a radiochromic medium

    PubMed Central

    Rink, Alexandra; Lewis, David F.; Varma, Sangya; Vitkin, I. Alex; Jaffray, David A.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of temperature on real time changes in optical density (ΔOD) of GAFCHROMIC® EBT film were investigated. The spectral peak of maximum change in absorbance (λmax) was shown to downshift linearly when the temperature of the film was increased from 22 to 38 °C. The ΔOD values were also shown to decrease linearly with temperature, and this decrease could not be attributed to the shift in λmax. A compensation scheme using λmax and a temperature-dependent correction factor was investigated, but provided limited improvement. Part of the reason may be the fluctuations in hydration of the active component, which were found to affect both position of absorbance peaks and the sensitivity of the film. To test the effect of hydration, laminated and unlaminated films were desiccated. This shifted both the major and minor absorbance peaks in the opposite direction to the change observed with temperature. The desiccated film also exhibited reduced sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Rehydration of the desiccated films did not reverse the effects, but rather gave rise to another form of the polymer with absorbance maxima upshifted further 20 nm. Hence, the spectral characteristics and sensitivity of the film can be dependent on its history, potentially complicating both real-time and conventional radiation dosimetry. PMID:18975701

  11. Far infrared radiation (FIR): its biological effects and medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Vatansever, Fatma; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Far infrared (FIR) radiation (λ = 3–100 μm) is a subdivision of the electromagnetic spectrum that has been investigated for biological effects. The goal of this review is to cover the use of a further sub-division (3– 12 μm) of this waveband, that has been observed in both in vitro and in vivo studies, to stimulate cells and tissue, and is considered a promising treatment modality for certain medical conditions. Technological advances have provided new techniques for delivering FIR radiation to the human body. Specialty lamps and saunas, delivering pure FIR radiation (eliminating completely the near and mid infrared bands), have became safe, effective, and widely used sources to generate therapeutic effects. Fibers impregnated with FIR emitting ceramic nanoparticles and woven into fabrics, are being used as garments and wraps to generate FIR radiation, and attain health benefits from its effects. PMID:23833705

  12. Fabrication of an Absorber-Coupled MKID Detector and Readout for Sub-Millimeter and Far-Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari-David; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Moseley, S. Harvey; Stevenson, Thomas R.; U-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We have fabricated absorber-coupled microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) arrays for sub-millimeter and far-infrared astronomy. Each detector array is comprised of lambda/2 stepped impedance resonators, a 1.5 micrometer thick silicon membrane, and 380 micrometer thick silicon walls. The resonators consist of parallel plate aluminum transmission lines coupled to low impedance Nb microstrip traces of variable length, which set the resonant frequency of each resonator. This allows for multiplexed microwave readout and, consequently, good spatial discrimination between pixels in the array. The Al transmission lines simultaneously act to absorb optical power and are designed to have a surface impedance and filling fraction so as to match the impedance of free space. Our novel fabrication techniques demonstrate high fabrication yield of MKID arrays on large single crystal membranes and sub-micron front-to-back alignment of the microstrip circuit.

  13. On the physical and geometrical properties responsible for the highly absorbing nature of black materials in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Steven Robert

    Black surfaces are of paramount importance in the design of terrestrial and space-borne optical systems. Optical designers can choose from a variety of black materials to suppress reflected and scattered stray light. Among these applications are the suppression of unwanted reflection or scattering of light in optical systems, solar collectors, blackbody absorbers, thermal insulators, telescope housing and baffles where stray light reduction is vital, and cold stops and light shields for infrared detectors. The physical mechanisms responsible for understanding the highly absorbing nature of black materials in the infrared spectral region are investigated in this dissertation. We present experimental data on the optical, surface, and constituent properties of black materials. In addition, we developed unique optical instrumentation to characterize the hemispherical reflectance and scattering properties of these materials as a function of incident angle and state of polarization. We compared the experimental data to theoretical rough surface scattering models to understand the absorption mechanisms of these black materials and found good agreement. Furthermore, results from a new, highly absorbing black material in the infrared wavelength regime, known as carbon aerogels, are presented and shown to be superior or equivalent to existing black materials used by optical designers. In addition, we presented a new cylindrical-spherical cavity enclosure and calculated the apparent emissivity along the bounding surfaces of this new cavity enclosure. To our knowledge, this was the first calculation of the apparent emissivity for a cavity enclosure with obscuration. Finally, we proposed several improvements for each individual black material in order to achieve even higher absorption levels.

  14. Unphysical consequences of negative absorbed power in linear passive scattering: Implications for radiation force and torque.

    PubMed

    Marston, Philip L; Zhang, Likun

    2016-06-01

    Contrary to some claims, the absorbed power associated with linear scattering of sound by passive objects in ideal fluids must be non-negative. Such unphysical claims suggest analytical or computational error, or use of an unphysical constitutive relation for material properties. The close connection with the evaluation of acoustic radiation force on targets according to Westervelt's formulation [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 29, 26-29 (1957)], recently generalized to certain acoustic beams, is briefly reviewed along with the theory of acoustic radiation torque on axisymmetric targets with power absorption. Applications to viscous dissipation and to issues pertaining to active targets are also examined. PMID:27369138

  15. Cooling systems and hybrid A/C systems using an electromagnetic radiation-absorbing complex

    SciTech Connect

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    2015-05-19

    A method for powering a cooling unit. The method including applying electromagnetic (EM) radiation to a complex, where the complex absorbs the EM radiation to generate heat, transforming, using the heat generated by the complex, a fluid to vapor, and sending the vapor from the vessel to a turbine coupled to a generator by a shaft, where the vapor causes the turbine to rotate, which turns the shaft and causes the generator to generate the electric power, wherein the electric powers supplements the power needed to power the cooling unit

  16. Rectenna that converts infrared radiation to electrical energy

    DOEpatents

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W.

    2016-09-06

    Technologies pertaining to converting infrared (IR) radiation to DC energy are described herein. In a general embodiment, a rectenna comprises a conductive layer. A thin insulator layer is formed on the conductive layer, and a nanoantenna is formed on the thin insulator layer. The thin insulator layer acts as a tunnel junction of a tunnel diode.

  17. SIMULTANEOUS ROUGH RICE DRYING AND DISINFESTATION WITH INFRARED RADIATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the drying characteristics, milling quality and disinfestation effectiveness of rough rice under infrared (IR) radiation heating. Freshly harvested medium grain rice (M202) samples with low (20.6%) and high (25.0%) moisture contents (MC) were used for ...

  18. Feasibility of Jujube peeling using novel infrared radiation heating technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infrared (IR) radiation heating has a promising potential to be used as a sustainable and effective method to eliminate the use of water and chemicals in the jujube-peeling process and enhance the quality of peeled products. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of use IR he...

  19. Quality Characteristics of Dried Bananas Produced with Infrared Radiation Technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Browning of fruits during drying is a major quality concern. The enzyme polyphenol oxidase has been found to be the main cause of browning in bananas. Infrared radiation (IR) drying could be used to minimize enzymatic browning hence eliminating the need for pre-treatments. This study was to inves...

  20. Hot spot generation in energetic materials created by long-wavelength infrared radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ming-Wei; You, Sizhu; Suslick, Kenneth S.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2014-02-10

    Hot spots produced by long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) radiation in an energetic material, crystalline RDX (1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine), were studied by thermal-imaging microscopy. The LWIR source was a CO{sub 2} laser operating in the 28-30 THz range. Hot spot generation was studied using relatively low intensity (∼100 W cm{sup −2}), long-duration (450 ms) LWIR pulses. The hot spots could be produced repeatedly in individual RDX crystals, to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of hot spot generation by LWIR, since the peak hot-spot temperatures were kept to ∼30 K above ambient. Hot spots were generated preferentially beneath RDX crystal planes making oblique angles with the LWIR beam. Surprisingly, hot spots were more prominent when the LWIR wavelength was tuned to be weakly absorbed (absorption depth ∼30 μm) than when the LWIR wavelength was strongly absorbed (absorption depth ∼5 μm). This unexpected effect was explained using a model that accounts for LWIR refraction and RDX thermal conduction. The weakly absorbed LWIR is slightly focused underneath the oblique crystal planes, and it penetrates the RDX crystals more deeply, increasing the likelihood of irradiating RDX defect inclusions that are able to strongly absorb or internally focus the LWIR beam.

  1. Search for the Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation using COBE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, Michael

    2001-01-01

    This project was initiated to allow completion of the primary investigation of the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) on NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (CORE) mission, and to study the implications of those findings. The Principal Investigator (PI) on this grant was also the Principal Investigator on the DIRBE team. The project had two specific goals: Goal 1: Seek improved limits upon, or detections of, the cosmic infrared background radiation using data from the COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE). Goal 2: Explore the implications of the limits and measured values of the cosmic infrared background for energy releases in the Universe since the formation of the first luminous sources. Both of these goals have been successfully accomplished.

  2. Independently tunable dual-band perfect absorber based on graphene at mid-infrared frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuping; Li, Tongtong; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Huiyun; O’Hara, John F.; Abele, Ethan; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Azad, Abul K.

    2015-01-01

    We design a dual-band absorber formed by combining two cross-shaped metallic resonators of different sizes within a super-unit-cell arranged in mirror symmetry. Simulations indicate that absorption efficiencies greater than 99% can be achieved at two different frequencies under normal incidence. We employ a design scheme with graphene integration, which allows independent tuning of individual absorption frequencies by electrostatically changing the Fermi energy of the graphene layer. High absorbance is maintained over a wide incident angle range up to 50 degrees for both TE and TM polarizations. It thus enables a promising way to design electrically tunable absorbers, which may contribute toward the realization of frequency selective detectors for sensing applications. PMID:26689917

  3. Independently tunable dual-band perfect absorber based on graphene at mid-infrared frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuping; Li, Tongtong; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Huiyun; O’Hara, John F.; Abele, Ethan; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Azad, Abul K.

    2015-12-22

    We design a dual-band absorber formed by combining two cross-shaped metallic resonators of different sizes within a super-unit-cell arranged in mirror symmetry. Simulations indicate that absorption efficiencies greater than 99% can be achieved at two different frequencies under normal incidence. We also employ a design scheme with graphene integration, which allows independent tuning of individual absorption frequencies by electrostatically changing the Fermi energy of the graphene layer. High absorbance is maintained over a wide incident angle range up to 50 degrees for both TE and TM polarizations. Thus, it enables a promising way to design electrically tunable absorbers, which may contribute toward the realization of frequency selective detectors for sensing applications.

  4. Independently tunable dual-band perfect absorber based on graphene at mid-infrared frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuping; Li, Tongtong; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Huiyun; O'Hara, John F.; Abele, Ethan; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Azad, Abul K.

    2015-12-01

    We design a dual-band absorber formed by combining two cross-shaped metallic resonators of different sizes within a super-unit-cell arranged in mirror symmetry. Simulations indicate that absorption efficiencies greater than 99% can be achieved at two different frequencies under normal incidence. We employ a design scheme with graphene integration, which allows independent tuning of individual absorption frequencies by electrostatically changing the Fermi energy of the graphene layer. High absorbance is maintained over a wide incident angle range up to 50 degrees for both TE and TM polarizations. It thus enables a promising way to design electrically tunable absorbers, which may contribute toward the realization of frequency selective detectors for sensing applications.

  5. Independently tunable dual-band perfect absorber based on graphene at mid-infrared frequencies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Yuping; Li, Tongtong; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Huiyun; O’Hara, John F.; Abele, Ethan; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Chen, Hou-Tong; Azad, Abul K.

    2015-12-22

    We design a dual-band absorber formed by combining two cross-shaped metallic resonators of different sizes within a super-unit-cell arranged in mirror symmetry. Simulations indicate that absorption efficiencies greater than 99% can be achieved at two different frequencies under normal incidence. We also employ a design scheme with graphene integration, which allows independent tuning of individual absorption frequencies by electrostatically changing the Fermi energy of the graphene layer. High absorbance is maintained over a wide incident angle range up to 50 degrees for both TE and TM polarizations. Thus, it enables a promising way to design electrically tunable absorbers, which maymore » contribute toward the realization of frequency selective detectors for sensing applications.« less

  6. Wide-angle polarization independent infrared broadband absorbers based on metallic multi-sized disk arrays.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng-Wen; Abbas, Mohammed Nadhim; Chiu, Chao-Wei; Lai, Kun-Ting; Shih, Min-Hsiung; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2012-04-23

    Two-dimensional metallic broadband absorbers on a SiO(2)/Ag/Si substrate were experimentally studied. The absorptivity of such structure can be increased by tailoring the ratio of disk size to the unit cell area. The metallic disk exhibits a localized surface plasmon polariton (LSPP) mode for both TE and TM polarizations. A broadband thermal emitter can be realized because the LSPP mode is independent of the periodicities. By manipulating the ratios and disk sizes, a high-performance, wide-angle, polarization-independent dual band absorber was experimentally achieved. The results demonstrated a substantial flexibility in absorber designs for applications in thermal photovoltaics, sensors, and camouflage. PMID:22535127

  7. Independently tunable dual-band perfect absorber based on graphene at mid-infrared frequencies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuping; Li, Tongtong; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Huiyun; O'Hara, John F; Abele, Ethan; Taylor, Antoinette J; Chen, Hou-Tong; Azad, Abul K

    2015-01-01

    We design a dual-band absorber formed by combining two cross-shaped metallic resonators of different sizes within a super-unit-cell arranged in mirror symmetry. Simulations indicate that absorption efficiencies greater than 99% can be achieved at two different frequencies under normal incidence. We employ a design scheme with graphene integration, which allows independent tuning of individual absorption frequencies by electrostatically changing the Fermi energy of the graphene layer. High absorbance is maintained over a wide incident angle range up to 50 degrees for both TE and TM polarizations. It thus enables a promising way to design electrically tunable absorbers, which may contribute toward the realization of frequency selective detectors for sensing applications. PMID:26689917

  8. Broadening of absorption band by coupled gap plasmon resonances in a near-infrared metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Jiawei; Yao, Hongbing; Gong, Daolei; Chen, Mingyang; Tong, Yanqun; Fu, Yonghong; Ren, Naifei

    2016-07-01

    We propose a strategy to broaden the absorption band of the conventional metamaterial absorber by incorporating alternating metal/dielectric films. Up to 7-fold increase in bandwidth and ∼95% average absorption are achieved arising from the coupling of induced multiple gap plasmon resonances. The resonance coupling is analytically demonstrated using the coupled oscillator model, which reveals that both the optimal coupling strength and the resonance wavelength matching are required for the enhancement of absorption bandwidth. The presented multilayer design is easily fabricated and readily implanted to other absorber configurations, offering a practical avenue for applications in photovoltaic cells and thermal emitters.

  9. Investigation of jewelry powders radiating far-infrared rays and the biological effects on human skin.

    PubMed

    Yoo, B H; Park, C M; Oh, T J; Han, S H; Kang, H H; Chang, I S

    2002-01-01

    Far-infrared rays have certain kinds of effects on the human body, especially on skin, blood circulation, and skin cell vitalizing. Some jewelry powders radiate far-infrared rays. Jade has powerful far-infrared ray radiation, and tourmaline has pyroelectric and piezoelectric properties and radiated far-infrared rays. The jewelry powders (fine powdered jade and tourmaline powders) were screened by far-infrared rays for radiation properties and tested for the effects of far-infrared rays on the human skin by temperature observation using an infrared thermal analyzer. PMID:12053208

  10. Infrared Radiography: Modeling X-ray Imaging Without Harmful Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zietz, Otto; Mylott, Elliot; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Planar x-ray imaging is a ubiquitous diagnostic tool and is routinely performed to diagnose conditions as varied as bone fractures and pneumonia. The underlying principle is that the varying attenuation coefficients of air, water, tissue, bone, or metal implants within the body result in non-uniform transmission of x-ray radiation. Through the detection of transmitted radiation, the spatial organization and composition of materials in the body can be ascertained. In this paper, we describe an original apparatus that teaches these concepts by utilizing near infrared radiation and an up-converting phosphorescent screen to safely probe the contents of an opaque enclosure.

  11. Direct MC conversion of absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water for 60Co radiation.

    PubMed

    Lye, J E; Butler, D J; Franich, R D; Harty, P D; Oliver, C P; Ramanathan, G; Webb, D V; Wright, T

    2013-06-01

    The ARPANSA calibration service for (60)Co gamma rays is based on a primary standard graphite calorimeter that measures absorbed dose to graphite. Measurements with the calorimeter are converted to the absorbed dose to water using the calculation of the ratio of the absorbed dose in the calorimeter to the absorbed dose in a water phantom. ARPANSA has recently changed the basis of this calculation from a photon fluence scaling method to a direct Monte Carlo (MC) calculation. The MC conversion uses an EGSnrc model of the cobalt source that has been validated against water tank and graphite phantom measurements, a step that is required to quantify uncertainties in the underlying interaction coefficients in the MC code. A comparison with the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) as part of the key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K4 showed an agreement of 0.9973 (53). PMID:23152147

  12. The Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on the Fraction of absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veroustraete, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol pollution attracts a growing interest from atmospheric scientists with regard to their impact on health, the global climate and vegetation stress. A hypothesis, less investigated, is whether atmospheric aerosol interactions in the solar radiation field affect the amount of radiation absorbed by vegetation canopies and hence terrestrial vegetation productivity. Typically, aerosols affect vegetation canopy radiation absorption efficiency by altering the physical characteristics of solar radiation incoming on for example a forest canopy. It has been illustrated, that increasing mixing ratio's of atmospheric particulate matter lead to a higher fraction of diffuse sunlight as opposed to direct sunlight. It can be demonstrated, based on the application of atmospheric (MODTRAN) and leaf/canopy radiative transfer (LIBERTY/SPRINT) models, that radiation absorption efficiency in the PAR band of Picea like forests increases with increasing levels of diffuse radiation. It can be documented - on a theoretical basis - as well, that increasing aerosol loads in the atmosphere, induce and increased canopy PAR absorption efficiency. In this paper it is suggested, that atmospheric aerosols have to be taken into account when estimating vegetation gross primary productivity (GPP). The results suggest that Northern hemisphere vegetation CO2 uptake magnitude may increase with increasing atmospheric aerosol loads. Many climate impact scenario's related to vegetation productivity estimates, do not take this phenomenon into account. Boldly speaking, the results suggest a larger sink function for terrestrial vegetation than generally accepted. Keywords: Aerosols, vegetation, fAPAR, CO2 uptake, diffuse radiation.

  13. Infrared radiative transfer in the dust-free Martian atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, D. )

    1990-08-30

    Gases in the Martian atmosphere, including CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CO, and O{sub 3}, combine to produce some absorption at most infrared wavelengths. Line-by-line and quasi-random models are used to derive synthetic spectra of dust-free Martian atmospheres. These spectra show where gases absorb most strongly and provide a baseline for comparison with the results from more complete models that include the effects of dust. Gas absorption and emission features at many infrared wavelengths provide a source of contamination that must be removed from remote sensing observations of the Martian surface. For example, the weak reflectance minimum observed at wavelengths near 2.35 {mu}m, which has been interpreted as evidence for a variety of surface materials, is produced almost entirely by atmospheric CO and CO{sub 2} absorption. Isotopic CO{sub 2} bands near 7 and 8 {mu}m and near-infrared water vapor absorption bands partially overlap strong carbonate and hydrate features and frustrate systematic spectroscopic searches for these important candidate surface materials on Mars. In other spectral regions, gas absorption bands provide opportunities to study the structure and composition of the Martian atmosphere. Computed radiances within the strong CO{sub 2} 15-{mu}m band are incorporated into an atmospheric retrieval algorithm to derive the atmospheric temperature structure from Mariner 9 IRIS observations. Absorption and emission by gases also contributes to the energetics of the Martian atmosphere. Near-infrared CO{sub 2} bands absorb enough sunlight to produce globally-averaged solar heating rates that vary from 1 K/Earth day at the surface, to 10 K/Earth day at pressures near 0.01 mbar. Other gases contribute 1-5% of the heating at some levels.

  14. Modeling and analyzing characteristics of self-infrared radiation on airplane-skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaozhao; Wu, Wenyuan; Wu, Chengguo; Yang, Yuntao; Huang, Yanhua; Sunxiaobo, Zhuan

    2016-01-01

    The characteristic of the self-infrared radiation of airplane-skin is very important for the stealth performance of airplane. Based on the theory of the airplane-skin temperature field, the distribution of the atmospheric temperature field and the principle of the black-body radiation function the self-infrared radiation model was established. In specified flight conditions, the influence of the atmospheric temperature, the speed of flight, the emissivity and the sight angle detection on the self-infrared radiation of the airplane skin were analyzed. Through the simulation of infrared radiation, some results under different flight states are obtained. The simulation results show that skin infrared radiation energy mainly concentrate on the far infrared wavebands, and various factors have different effects on the infrared radiation of skin. This conclusion can help reduce the infrared radiation and improve the stealth performance of airplane in the engineering design and the selection of flight conditions.

  15. Space Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) for Thermal Storage on Manned Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Chepko, Ariane; Bue, Grant; Quinn, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Future manned exploration spacecraft will need to operate in challenging thermal environments. State-of the- art technology for active thermal control relies on sublimating water ice and venting the vapor overboard in very hot environments. This approach can lead to large loss of water and a significant mass penalty for the spacecraft. This paper describes an innovative thermal control system that uses a Space Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) to control spacecraft temperatures in highly variable environments without venting water. SEAR uses heat pumping and energy storage by LiCl/water absorption to enable effective cooling during hot periods and regeneration during cool periods. The LiCl absorber technology has the potential to absorb over 800 kJ per kg of system mass, compared to phase change heat sink systems that typically achieve approx. 50 kJ/kg. The optimal system is based on a trade-off between the mass of water saved and extra power needed to regenerate the LiCl absorber. This paper describes analysis models and the predicted performance and optimize the size of the SEAR system, estimated size and mass of key components, and power requirements for regeneration. We also present a concept design for an ISS test package to demonstrate operation of a subscale system in zero gravity.

  16. Generating Far-Infrared Radiation By Two-Wave Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borenstain, Shmuel

    1992-01-01

    Far-infrared radiation 1 to 6 GHz generated by two-wave mixing in asymmetrically grown GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs multiple-quantum-well devices. Two near-infrared semiconductor diode lasers phase-locked. Outputs amplified, then combined in semiconductor nonlinear multiple-quantum-well planar waveguide. Necessary to optimize design of device with respect to three factors: high degree of confinement of electromagnetic field in nonlinear medium to maximize power density, phase matching to extend length of zone of interaction between laser beams in non-linear medium, and nonlinear susceptibility. Devices used as tunable local oscillators in heterodyne-detection radiometers.

  17. Estimation of radiation absorbed doses to the red marrow in radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Macey, D.J.; DeNardo, S.J.; DeNardo, G.L.; DeNardo, D.A.; Sui Shen

    1995-02-01

    Myelotoxicity is the dose-limiting factor in radioimmunotherapy. Traditional methods most commonly used to estimate the radiation adsorbed dose to the bone marrow of patients consider contribution from radionuclide in the blood and/or total body. Targeted therapies, such as radioimmunotherapy, add a third potential source for radiation to the bone marrow because the radiolabeled targeting molecules can accumulate specifically on malignant target cells infiltrating the bone marrow. A non-invasive method for estimating the radiation absorbed dose to the red marrow of patients who have received radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) has been developed and explored. The method depends on determining the cumulated activity in three contributing sources: (1) marrow; (2) blood; and (3) total body. The novel aspect of this method for estimating marrow radiation dose is derivation of the radiation dose for the entire red marrow from radiation dose estimates obtained by detection of cumulated activity in three lumbar vertebrae using a gamma camera. Contributions to the marrow radiation dose form marrow, blood, and total body cumulated activity were determined for patients who received an I-131 labeled MoAb, Lym-1, that reacts with malignant B-lymphocytes of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and nonHodgkin`s lymphoma. Six patients were selected for illustrative purposes because their vertebrae were readily visualized on lumbar images. 32 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Multi-parameter-fitting procedure for photothermal infrared radiometry on multilayered and bulk-absorbing solids

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, Peter; Gruss, Christian

    2001-06-15

    Photothermal infrared radiometry has been used for the measurement of thermophysical, optical, and geometrical properties of multilayered samples of paint on a metallic substrate. A special data normalization is applied to reduce the number of sensitive parameters which makes the identification task for the remaining parameters easier. The normalization stabilizes the evaluation of the photothermal signal and makes the infrared radiometry more attractive for applications in the industrial environment. It is shown that modeling and multi-parameter-fitting can be applied successfully to the normalized data for the determination of layer thicknesses. As a side product we can calculate some other physical properties of the sample. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Radiation absorbed dose to bladder walls from positron emitters in the bladder content

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, G.F.; Chen, C.T.

    1987-11-01

    A method to calculate absorbed doses at depths in the walls of a static spherical bladder from a positron emitter in the bladder content has been developed. The beta ray dose component is calculated for a spherical model by employing the solutions to the integration of Loevinger and Bochkarev point source functions over line segments and a line segment source array technique. The gamma ray dose is determined using the specific gamma ray constant. As an example, absorbed radiation doses to the bladder walls from F-18 in the bladder content are presented for static spherical bladder models having radii of 2.0 and 3.5 cm, respectively. Experiments with ultra-thin thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD's) were performed to verify the results of the calculations. Good agreement between TLD measurements and calculations was obtained.

  20. Reliability test: X-ray ring exit chambers crotch radiation absorbers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, D.R.; Morgan, J.

    1999-04-09

    This report details the efforts by engineers at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to evaluate the reliability of water-cooled radiation absorbers used in the NSLS X-ray ring. These absorbers are part of the 16 dipole vacuum chambers which comprise the arc sections of the ring. They are located at the intersections (crotch) of the beamline exit ports with the electron beam chamber, and are commonly referred to as crotches. The purpose of these efforts was to demonstrate the reliability of the crotches under operating conditions that the crotches will be subjected to over the entire expected life of the ring. The efforts described include engineering calculations, finite element analysis, conceptual design for a reliability test, test implementation and descriptions, results and conclusions related to these analyses and tests.

  1. Review of reconstruction of radiation incident air kerma by measurement of absorbed dose in tooth enamel with EPR.

    PubMed

    Wieser, A

    2012-03-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry with tooth enamel has been proved to be a reliable method to determine retrospectively exposures from photon fields with minimal detectable doses of 100 mGy or lower, which is lower than achievable with cytogenetic dose reconstruction methods. For risk assessment or validating dosimetry systems for specific radiation incidents, the relevant dose from the incident has to be calculated from the total absorbed dose in enamel by subtracting additional dose contributions from the radionuclide content in teeth, natural external background radiation and medical exposures. For calculating organ doses or evaluating dosimetry systems the absorbed dose in enamel from a radiation incident has to be converted to air kerma using dose conversion factors depending on the photon energy spectrum and geometry of the exposure scenario. This paper outlines the approach to assess individual dose contributions to absorbed dose in enamel and calculate individual air kerma of a radiation incident from the absorbed dose in tooth enamel. PMID:22128353

  2. A universal design to realize a tunable perfect absorber from infrared to microwaves

    PubMed Central

    Smaali, Rafik; Omeis, Fatima; Moreau, Antoine; Taliercio, Thierry; Centeno, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    We propose a design for an universal absorber, characterized by a resonance frequency that can be tuned from visible to microwave frequencies independently of the choice of the metal and the dielectrics involved. An almost perfect absorption up to 99.8% is demonstrated at resonance for all polarization states of light and for a very wide angular aperture. These properties originate from a magnetic Fabry-Perot mode that is confined in a dielectric spacer of λ/100 thickness by a metamaterial layer and a mirror. An extraordinary large funneling through nano-slits explains how light can be trapped in the structure. Simple scaling laws can be used as a recipe to design ultra-thin perfect absorbers whatever the materials and the desired resonance wavelength, making our design truly universal. PMID:27599634

  3. A universal design to realize a tunable perfect absorber from infrared to microwaves.

    PubMed

    Smaali, Rafik; Omeis, Fatima; Moreau, Antoine; Taliercio, Thierry; Centeno, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    We propose a design for an universal absorber, characterized by a resonance frequency that can be tuned from visible to microwave frequencies independently of the choice of the metal and the dielectrics involved. An almost perfect absorption up to 99.8% is demonstrated at resonance for all polarization states of light and for a very wide angular aperture. These properties originate from a magnetic Fabry-Perot mode that is confined in a dielectric spacer of λ/100 thickness by a metamaterial layer and a mirror. An extraordinary large funneling through nano-slits explains how light can be trapped in the structure. Simple scaling laws can be used as a recipe to design ultra-thin perfect absorbers whatever the materials and the desired resonance wavelength, making our design truly universal. PMID:27599634

  4. Infrared spectral emittance profiles of spectrally selective solar absorbing layers at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Soule, D E; Smith, D W

    1977-11-01

    A study was made to characterize parametrically the spectrally selective absorptance profiles of typical interference, bulk absorption, and mixed-type absorbing layers for solar-thermal conversion at temperatures to 500 degrees C. A five parameter empirical Fermi function was used to model the spectral absorptance converted from the measured spectral reflectance. An alternative method using the Fermi model is presented for defining the ir spectral emittance profile, as scaled to the measured hemispherical total emittahce. PMID:20174248

  5. Infrared Signature Masking by Air Plasma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, C. H.; Laux, C. O.

    1998-01-01

    Detailed measurements and modeling of the spectral emission of an atmospheric pressure air plasma at temperatures up to -3400 K have been made. The cold gas injected in the plasma torch contained an estimated mole fraction of water vapor of approximately 4.5 x 10(exp -3) and an estimated carbon dioxide mole fraction of approximately 3.3 x 10(exp -4). Under these conditions, the minimum level of air plasma emission is found to be between 3.9 and 4.15 microns. Outside this narrow region, significant spectral emission is detected that can be attributed to the fundamental and overtone bands of NO and OH, and to the v(sub 3) and the (v(sub 1)+v(sub 3)) bands Of CO2. Special attention was paid to the effects of ambient air absorption in the optical path between the plasma and the detector. Excellent quantitative agreement is obtained between the measured and simulated spectra, which are both on absolute intensity scales, thus lending confidence in the radiation models incorporated into NEQAIR2-IR over the course of this research program.

  6. Instabilities and chaos in an infrared laser with saturable absorber: experiments and vibrorotational model

    SciTech Connect

    de Tomasi, F.; Hennequin, D.; Zambon, B.; Arimondo, E.

    1989-01-01

    The instabilities and chaos in a CO/sub 2/ laser containing SF/sub 6/ and /sup 15/NH/sub 3/ absorbers have been studied as a function of the laser-control parameters. By making use of a phase-portrait analysis, the instabilities have been classified through their orbits in the phase space around the laser-with-saturable-absorber (LSA) fixed points. A chaotic regime, reached through a sequence of period-doubling bifurcations, has been observed for an instability of limit cycles around one fixed point. The transition between different instability operations presents an intermediate regime, which we have defined as the hesitation regime and have characterized through the fluctuations in the return times. The observed phenomena have been reproduced within a model, including the rotational--vibrational structure of the amplifier and absorber media. The numerical analysis has shown that the LSA time evolution, as described through homoclinic orbits in the LSA phase space, depends on the relative attractions of the saddle point and the saddle focus fixed points.

  7. Large-Area Metasurface Perfect Absorbers from Visible to Near-Infrared.

    PubMed

    Akselrod, Gleb M; Huang, Jiani; Hoang, Thang B; Bowen, Patrick T; Su, Logan; Smith, David R; Mikkelsen, Maiken H

    2015-12-22

    An absorptive metasurface based on film-coupled colloidal silver nanocubes is demonstrated. The metasurfaces are fabricated using simple dip-coating methods and can be deposited over large areas and on arbitrarily shaped objects. The surfaces show nearly complete absorption, good off-angle performance, and the resonance can be tuned from the visible to the near-infrared. PMID:26549512

  8. Broadband infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy using thermal blackbody radiation.

    PubMed

    O'Callahan, Brian T; Lewis, William E; Möbius, Silke; Stanley, Jared C; Muller, Eric A; Raschke, Markus B

    2015-12-14

    Infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy based on scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) provides intrinsic chemical specificity with nanometer spatial resolution. Here we use incoherent infrared radiation from a 1400 K thermal blackbody emitter for broadband infrared (IR) nano-spectroscopy. With optimized interferometric heterodyne signal amplification we achieve few-monolayer sensitivity in phonon polariton spectroscopy and attomolar molecular vibrational spectroscopy. Near-field localization and nanoscale spatial resolution is demonstrated in imaging flakes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and determination of its phonon polariton dispersion relation. The signal-to-noise ratio calculations and analysis for different samples and illumination sources provide a reference for irradiance requirements and the attainable near-field signal levels in s-SNOM in general. The use of a thermal emitter as an IR source thus opens s-SNOM for routine chemical FTIR nano-spectroscopy. PMID:26698997

  9. Effect of Index of Refraction on Radiation Characteristics in a Heated Absorbing, Emitting, and Scattering Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Spuckler, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    The index of refraction can considerably influence the temperature distribution and radiative heat flow in semitransparent materials such as some ceramics. For external radiant heating, the refractive index influences the amount of energy transmitted into the interior of the material. Emission within a material depends on the square of its refractive index, and hence this emission can be many times that for a biackbody radiating into a vacuum. Since radiation exiting through an interface into a vacuum cannot exceed that of a blackbody, there is extensive reflection at the internal surface of an interface, mostly by total internal reflection. This redistributes energy within the layer and tends to make its temperature distribution more uniform. The purpose of the present analysis is to show that, for radiative equilibrium in a gray layer with diffuse interfaces, the temperature distribution and radiative heat flux for any index of refraction can be obtained very simply from the results for an index of refraction of unity. For the situation studied here, the layer is subjected to external radiative heating incident on each of its surfaces. The material emits, absorbs, and isotropically scatters radiation. For simplicity the index of refraction is unity in the medium surrounding the layer. The surfaces of the layer are assumed diffuse. This is probably a reasonable approximation for a ceramic layer that has not been polished. When transmitted radiation or radiation emitted from the interior reaches the inner surface of an interface, the radiation is diffused and some of it thereby placed into angular directions for which there is total internal reflection. This provides a trapping effect for retaining energy within the layer and tends to equalize its temperature distribution. An analysis of temperature distributions in absorbing-emitting layers, including index of refraction effects, was developed by Gardon (1958) to predict cooling and heat treating of glass plates

  10. Selective fallopian tube catheterisation in female infertility: clinical results and absorbed radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Ishiguchi, T; Maekoshi, H; Ando, Y; Tsuzaka, M; Tamiya, T; Suganuma, N; Ishigaki, T

    1996-01-01

    Clinical results of fluoroscopic fallopian tube catheterisation and absorbed radiation doses during the procedure were evaluated in 30 infertility patients with unilateral or bilateral tubal obstruction documented on hysterosalpingography. The staged technique consisted of contrast injection through an intrauterine catheter with a vacuum cup device, ostial salpingography with the wedged catheter, and selective salpingography with a coaxial microcatheter. Of 45 fallopian tubes examined, 35 (78%) were demonstrated by the procedure, and at least one tube was newly demonstrated in 26 patients (87%). Six of these patients conceived spontaneously in the follow-up period of 1-11 months. Four pregnancies were intrauterine and 2 were ectopic. This technique provided accurate and detailed information in the diagnosis and treatment of tubal obstruction in infertility patients. The absorbed radiation dose to the ovary in the average standardised procedure was estimated to be 0.9 cGy. Further improvement in the X-ray equipment and technique is required to reduce the radiation dose. PMID:8798025

  11. A hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer in absorbing and scattering media

    SciTech Connect

    Roger, M.; Caliot, C.; Crouseilles, N.; Coelho, P.J.

    2014-10-15

    A new multi-scale hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer is proposed in order to improve the efficiency of the calculations close to the diffusive regime, in absorbing and strongly scattering media. In this model, the radiative intensity is decomposed into a macroscopic component calculated by the diffusion equation, and a mesoscopic component. The transport equation for the mesoscopic component allows to correct the estimation of the diffusion equation, and then to obtain the solution of the linear radiative transfer equation. In this work, results are presented for stationary and transient radiative transfer cases, in examples which concern solar concentrated and optical tomography applications. The Monte Carlo and the discrete-ordinate methods are used to solve the mesoscopic equation. It is shown that the multi-scale model allows to improve the efficiency of the calculations when the medium is close to the diffusive regime. The proposed model is a good alternative for radiative transfer at the intermediate regime where the macroscopic diffusion equation is not accurate enough and the radiative transfer equation requires too much computational effort.

  12. Signatures of semi-direct radiative forcing by absorbing aerosols in satellite observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, E. M.; Hosseinpour, F.; Colarco, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Semi-direct radiative forcing of climate occurs when interactions between aerosols and radiative fluxes in the atmosphere yield a dynamical response in clouds. Semi-direct forcing is typically thought to be a positive radiative forcing whereby soot and biomass burning aerosols absorb sunlight and burn-off clouds. However, a negative semi-direct forcing is suspected in at least two regimes, the summertime Southeast Atlantic Ocean and the wintertime North Indian Ocean, where the heating profile by aerosol absorption by solar radiation is elevated above the elevation of the low clouds. Here we use a combination of satellite data and a model simulation to further characterize the signature of semi-direct radiative forcing in these two locations and elsewhere on the globe. We apply CERES albedos, Calipso profiles of aerosol extinction and cloud-top altitude, and a simulation with the Goddard Earth Observing System Model version 5 (GEOS-5) Earth system model with meteorology constrained by MERRA and an assimilation of MODIS AOT (MERRAero). to quantify the vertical heating profile by aerosols under clear and cloudy skies. We seek to determine: (1) where aerosol heating by soot and biomass burning aerosol is occurring; (2) where vertically in the column the heating is occurring relative to the observed level of low cloud development; and (3) whether the variations of albedo with aerosol forcing suggest a positive, negative, or inconclusive semi-direct radiative forcing.

  13. A hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer in absorbing and scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, M.; Caliot, C.; Crouseilles, N.; Coelho, P. J.

    2014-10-01

    A new multi-scale hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer is proposed in order to improve the efficiency of the calculations close to the diffusive regime, in absorbing and strongly scattering media. In this model, the radiative intensity is decomposed into a macroscopic component calculated by the diffusion equation, and a mesoscopic component. The transport equation for the mesoscopic component allows to correct the estimation of the diffusion equation, and then to obtain the solution of the linear radiative transfer equation. In this work, results are presented for stationary and transient radiative transfer cases, in examples which concern solar concentrated and optical tomography applications. The Monte Carlo and the discrete-ordinate methods are used to solve the mesoscopic equation. It is shown that the multi-scale model allows to improve the efficiency of the calculations when the medium is close to the diffusive regime. The proposed model is a good alternative for radiative transfer at the intermediate regime where the macroscopic diffusion equation is not accurate enough and the radiative transfer equation requires too much computational effort.

  14. Lageos orbit decay due to infrared radiation from Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    1987-01-01

    Infrared radiation from the Earth may be the principal reason for the decay of Lageos' orbit. The radiation heats up the laser retroreflectors embedded in Lageos' aluminum surface. This creates a north-south temperature gradient on the satellite. The gradient in turn causes a force to be exerted on Lageos because of recoil from photons leaving its surface. The delayed heating of the retroreflectors due to their thermal inertia gives the force a net along-track component which always acts like drag. A simple thermal model for the retroreflectors indicates that this thermal drag accounts for about half the observed average along-track acceleration of -3.3 x 10 to the -10 power m/sec squared. The contribution from the aluminum surface to this effect is negligible. The infrared effect cannot explain the large observed fluctuations in drag which occur mainly when the orbit intersects the Earth's shadow.

  15. High field CdS detector for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Robertson, J. B.; Boer, K. W.; Hadley, H. C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An infrared radiation detector including a cadmium sulfide platelet having a cathode formed on one of its ends and an anode formed on its other end is presented. The platelet is suitably doped such that stationary high-field domains are formed adjacent the cathode when based in the negative differential conductivity region. A negative potential is applied to the cathode such that a high-field domain is formed adjacent to the cathode. A potential measuring probe is located between the cathode and the anode at the edge of the high-field domain and means are provided for measuring the potential at the probe whereby this measurement is indicative of the infrared radiation striking the platelet.

  16. Lageos orbit decay due to infrared radiation from earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    1987-01-01

    Infrared radiation from the earth may be the principal reason for the decay of Lageos' orbit. The radiation heats up the laser retroreflectors embedded in Lageos' aluminum surface. This creates a north-south temperature gradient on the satellite. The gradient in turn causes a force to be exerted on Lageos because of recoil from photons leaving its surface. The delayed heating of the retroreflectors due to their thermal inertia gives the force a net along-track component which always acts like drag. A simple thermal model for the retroreflectors indicates that this thermal drag accounts for about half the observed average along-track acceleration of -3.3 x 10 to the -10th power m/sec squared. The contribution from the aluminum surface to this effect is negligible. The infrared effect cannot explain the large observed fluctuations in drag which occur mainly when the orbit intersects the earth's shadow.

  17. fs Laser surface nano-structuring of high refractory ceramics to enhance solar radiation absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, E.; Orlando, S.; Sciti, D.; Bellucci, A.; Lettino, A.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2014-10-01

    High refractory pressure-less sintered ternary composite ceramics of AlN-SiC-MoSi2 (ASMY), polished by mechanical grinding to a surface roughness R a ~40 nm, have been treated in vacuum by fs Ti:sapphire laser, operating at 800 nm wavelength, 100 fs pulse duration, and increasing fluence, to generate a "black ceramic material", able to minimize solar radiation reflectance, in such a way that they could be used as the absorber material in an innovative conversion module of solar radiation into electrical energy. Disk specimens of approximately 3 cm in diameter and 3 mm thick have been treated by normal incident laser beam, generating a scanning pattern of parallel lines, at a lateral distance of about 80 μm, using a stage in motion, in the x, y, z directions, driven by a computer. The experimental conditions of laser treatment (energy fluence, speed of transition and lateral distance of steps) have been optimized to maximize the absorption properties of the patterned surface. In some samples this value was increased by about 15 %, compared to untreated surface, up to a value of final absorbance of about 95 %, all over the range of solar radiation spectrum (from UV to NIR). The morphological and chemical effects have been evaluated by SEM-EDS analysis. At higher fluence, we obtained the characteristic ablation craters and corresponding local material decomposition, while at lower fluence (over the ablation threshold) an ordered periodic nano-structure has been obtained, exploitable for its high capacity of entrapment of visible light. The laser treated ceramic specimen, characterized by very high absorption properties and reflectivity values lower than 4 %, has been used as active absorber material in a conversion module, installed in a solar test platform.

  18. Investigation of infra-red and nonequilibrium air radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, Charles H.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes progress on the first year of a research program on the infrared radiation of air plasmas conducted in the High Temperature Gasdynamics Laboratory at Stanford University. This program is intended to investigate the masking of infrared signatures by the air plasma formed behind the bow shock of high velocity missiles. To this date, the radiative emission of air plasmas in the infrared has been the object of few experimental investigations, and although several infrared systems are already modeled in radiation codes such as NEQAIR, measurements are required to validate numerical predictions and indicate whether all transitions of importance are accounted for. The present program is motivated by the fact that 9 excited states (A, B, C, D, B', F, H, and H') of NO radiate in the infrared, especially between 1 and 1.5 microns where at least 9 transitions involving can be observed. Because these IR transitions are relatively well separated from each other, excited NO states concentrations can be easily measured, thus providing essential information on excited-state chemistry for use in optical diagnostics or in electronic excitation model validation. Developing accurate collisional-radiative models for these excited NO states is of importance as the UV-VUV transitions of NO (beta, gamma, epsilon, beta prime, gamma prime) produce a major, if not dominant, fraction of the radiation emitted by air plasmas. During the first year of the program, research has focused on the spectral range 1.0 to 1.5 microns, as detailed in Section 2 of this report. The measurements, conducted in a 50 kW radio-frequency inductively coupled plasma torch operating on air at atmospheric pressure, extend previous shock tube investigations by Wray to a wider spectral range (1.0 to 1.5 microns vs 0.9 to 1.2 microns) and higher temperatures (7600 K in the plasma torch versus 6700 K in the shock-tube). These higher temperatures in the present experiment have made it possible to

  19. Space Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) for Thermal Storage on Manned Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo; Chepko, Ariane; Bue, Grant; Quinn, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Future manned exploration spacecraft will need to operate in challenging thermal environments. State-of-the-art technology for active thermal control relies on sublimating water ice and venting the vapor overboard in very hot environments, and or heavy phase change material heat exchangers for thermal storage. These approaches can lead to large loss of water and a significant mass penalties for the spacecraft. This paper describes an innovative thermal control system that uses a Space Evaporator Absorber Radiator (SEAR) to control spacecraft temperatures in highly variable environments without venting water. SEAR uses heat pumping and energy storage by LiCl/water absorption to enable effective cooling during hot periods and regeneration during cool periods. The LiCl absorber technology has the potential to absorb over 800 kJ per kg of system mass, compared to phase change heat sink systems that typically achieve approx. 50 kJ/kg. This paper describes analysis models to predict performance and optimize the size of the SEAR system, estimated size and mass of key components, and an assessment of potential mass savings compared with alternative thermal management approaches. We also describe a concept design for an ISS test package to demonstrate operation of a subscale system in zero gravity.

  20. Annual and interannual variations of absorbed solar radiation based on a 10-year data set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis; Charlock, Thomas P.; Bess, T. Dale; Rutan, David

    1990-01-01

    Annual and interannual variations of absorbed solar radiation (ASR) are studied using the 10-year earth radiation budget data set from the Nimbus-6 and Nimbus-7 earth radiation budget instruments in the form of monthly averaged maps of ASR. Empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) are computed for the global distribution of ASR. Six EOFs are found which have physical significance and which account for 97.8 percent of the spatial variance of the data set. The first EOF describes the annual cycle and is primarily a latitudinal variation which is driven by the incident solar radiation. The second and fourth EOFs are semiannual cycles. EOFs 3 through 6 are strongly longitudinally dependent. EOF 3 describes the spring/fall part of the annual cycle, and EOF 4 describes the part of the semiannual cycle which is out of phase with EOF 2. EOF 5 is the response of the ASR to El Nino. The annual cycle and its harmonics account for 97.6 percent of the variance with time. When the data set is deseasonalized, the first two EOFs of the resulting set are found to correspond closely to EOFs 5 and 6 of the data set with season included. As with outgoing longwave radiation, most of the interannual variation is found over the tropical oceans.

  1. Plasmonic materials based on ZnO films and their potential for developing broadband middle-infrared absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Kesim, Yunus E. Battal, Enes; Okyay, Ali K.

    2014-07-15

    Noble metals such as gold and silver have been extensively used for plasmonic applications due to their ability to support plasmons, yet they suffer from high intrinsic losses. Alternative plasmonic materials that offer low loss and tunability are desired for a new generation of efficient and agile devices. In this paper, atomic layer deposition (ALD) grown ZnO is investigated as a candidate material for plasmonic applications. Optical constants of ZnO are investigated along with figures of merit pertaining to plasmonic waveguides. We show that ZnO can alleviate the trade-off between propagation length and mode confinement width owing to tunable dielectric properties. In order to demonstrate plasmonic resonances, we simulate a grating structure and computationally demonstrate an ultra-wide-band (4–15 μm) infrared absorber.

  2. Effects of ionizing radiation on cryogenic infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Silverberg, R. F.; Lakew, B.

    1989-01-01

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5 K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. Here, ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors are reported. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  3. Effects of ionizing radiation on cryogenic infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Silverberg, R. F.; Lakew, B.

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5 K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. Here, ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors are reported. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  4. Effects Of Ionizing Radiation On Cryogenic Infrared Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseley, S. H.; Lakew, B.; Silverberg, R. F.

    1988-04-01

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. We report here on ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  5. Polymeric Prodrug Grafted Hollow Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles Encapsulating Near-Infrared Absorbing Dye for Potent Combined Photothermal-Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Ang, Chung Yen; Li, Menghuan; Tan, Si Yu; Qu, Qiuyu; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-03-23

    In this study, polymeric prodrug coated hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) with encapsulated near-infrared (NIR) absorbing dye were prepared and explored for combined photothermal-chemotherapy. A copolymer integrated with tert-butoxycarbonyl protected hydrazide groups and oligoethylene glycols was initially grafted on the surface of HMSNs via reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization followed by the deprotection to reactivate the hydrazide groups for the conjugation of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). DOX was covalently bound onto the polymer substrate by acid-labile hydrazone bond and released quickly in weak acidic environment for chemotherapy. The hollow cavity of HMSNs was loaded with an NIR absorbing dye IR825 to form the final multifunctional hybrid denoted as HMSNs-DOX/IR825. The hybrid exhibited good dispersity and stability as well as high light-to-heat conversion efficiency. As revealed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, the hybrid was efficiently taken up by cancer cells, and the conjugated DOX could be released under the cellular environment. In vitro cytotoxicity study demonstrated that anticancer activity of HMSNs-DOX/IR825 could be significantly improved by the NIR irradiation, which led to a satisfactory therapeutic efficacy through the combination treatment. Thus, the developed hybrid could be a promising candidate for the combined photothermal-chemotherapy of cancer. PMID:26937591

  6. Atlas of albedo and absorbed solar radiation derived from Nimbus 7 Earth radiation budget data set, November 1978 to October 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis; Rutan, David; Bess, T. Dale

    1990-01-01

    An atlas of monthly mean global contour maps of albedo and absorbed solar radiation is presented. This atlas contains 7 years of continuous data from November 1978 through October 1985. The data were retrieved from measurements made by the second Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) wide field-of-view instrument, which flew on the Nimbus 7 spacecraft in 1978. The deconvolution method used to produce these data is briefly discussed here so that the user may understand their generation and limitations. These geographical distributions of albedo and absorbed solar radiation are provided as a resource for researchers studying the radiation budget of the Earth. This atlas of albedo and absorbed solar radiation complements the atlases of outgoing longwave radiation by Bess and Smith, also based on the Nimbus 6 and 7 ERB data.

  7. Atlas of albedo and absorbed solar radiation derived from Nimbus 6 earth radiation budget data set, July 1975 to May 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis; Bess, T. Dale; Rutan, David

    1989-01-01

    An atlas of monthly mean global contour maps of albedo and absorbed solar radiation is presented. The atlas is based on 35 months of continuous measurements from July 1975 through May 1978. The data were retrieved from measurements made by the shortwave wide field-of-view radiometer of the first Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) instrument, which flew on the Nimbus 6 spacecraft in 1975. Profiles of zonal mean albedos and absorbed solar radiation are tabulated. These geographical distributions are provided as a resource for studying the radiation budget of the earth. This atlas of albedo and absorbed solar radiation complements the atlases of outgoing longwave radiation by Bess and Smith in NASA-RP-1185 and RP-1186, also based on the Nimbus 6 and 7 ERB data.

  8. Effect of UV-C radiation and vapor released from a water hyacinth root absorbent containing bergamot oil to control mold on storage of brown rice.

    PubMed

    Songsamoe, Sumethee; Matan, Narumol; Matan, Nirundorn

    2016-03-01

    The aims of this study were to develop absorbent material from a water hyacinth root containing bergamot oil and to improve its antifungal activity by using ultraviolet C (UV-C) against the growth of A. flavus on the brown rice. Process optimization was studied by the immersion of a water hyacinth root into a water and bergamot oil (300, 500 and 700 μl ml(-1)). The root (absorbent material) was dried at 50, 70, and 90 °C for 10 min. Then, ultraviolet C (UV-C) was used for enhancing the antifungal activity of bergamot oil for 10, 15, and 20 min. The shelf-life of the brown rice with the absorbent after incubation at 25 ° C with 100 % RH for 12 weeks was also investigated. A microscope and a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to find out possible mode of action. Results indicated that the absorbent material produced from the water hyacinth root containing bergamot oil at 500 μl ml(-1) in the water solution, dried at 70 ° C and UV for 15 min showed the highest antifungal activity in a vapor phase against A. flavus on the brown rice. A microscopy investigation confirmed that the water hyacinth root could absorb bergamot oil from an outside water solution into root cells. Limonene in vapor phase was shown to be a stronger inhibitor than essential oil after UV-C radiation and should be the key factor in boosting bergamot oil antifungal activity. A vapor phase of bergamot oil could be released and inhibit natural mold on the surface of the brown rice for up to 12 weeks; without the absorbent, mold covered the brown rice in only 4 weeks. PMID:27570269

  9. Temperature stability improvement of a QVGA uncooled infrared radiation FPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Koichi; Honda, Hiroto; Fujiwara, Ikuo; Sasaki, Keita; Yagi, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Kwon, Honam; Atsuta, Masaki; Funaki, Hideyuki

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a low-cost uncooled infrared radiation focal plane array (FPA) requiring no thermoelectric cooler (TEC), which has 320 x 240 detection pixels with 22 um pitch. The silicon single-crystal series p-n junction diodes and the low-noise readout circuit on the same SOI wafer fabricated by 0.13 um CMOS technology were utilized for infrared (IR) detection. The temperature dependence in the readout circuit was eliminated by correlated double sampling (CDS) operation with reference pixel that was insensitive to infrared radiation. In order to reduce the temperature dependence, we improved the reference pixel and the readout circuit. Although the reference pixels should be completely insensitive to IR radiation, prior reference pixels showed measurable sensitivity. The improved reference pixel was formed by partially releasing with bulk-micromachining and was verified to be insensitive to IR radiation by an object of 400°C. The readout circuit had a differential amplifier instead of a singletransistor amplifier and an analog-to-digital converter (ADC). In each portion, CDS was applied to reduce temperature dependence. The first CDS operation was used for eliminating the pixel output variation and the second operation was used for canceling the variation of the differential amplifier. The output variation referred to input was reduced to 1/30 compared with that of the prior circuit. Moreover, the residual variation of output voltage was reduced by CDS operation in ADC and stable output data was obtained with ambient temperature variation. With these improvements, the sensitivity variation of the FPA was improved to 10% in the range of -30 degrees to 80 degrees and noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of 40 mK was achieved.

  10. Simulate the volcanic radiation features in medium wave infrared channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Cailan; Jiang, Shan; Liu, Fengyi; Hu, Yong

    2015-10-01

    There are different scales and intensities of the volcanic eruption in the world every year. Existing medium wave infrared (MWI) remote sensing channels are often at atmospheric window in 3-5μm, lack of water vapor and carbon dioxide(CO2) absorption channels data, such as 2.2μm, 2.7μm and so on, however the 2.7μm absorption bands can be used as volcanoes, forest fires and other hot target identification. In order to obtain the high-temperature targets (HTT)radiation features, such as volcanic eruptions and forest fires in the water vapor absorption channels, Firstly, the HTT should be identified from the existing bands based on the temperature differences between the objects and the surrounding environment. Then, the HTT radiation features were simulated, and the correlation between the radiations of different bands were established with statistical analysis method. The HTT reorganization from remote sensing data, radiation characteristics simulation in different atmospheric models were described, then the bands transformed models were set up. The volcanic HTT radiation characteristics were simulated in wavelength 2.7μm and 4.433-4.498μm (band 24 of MODIS) based on the known bands of 3.55 -3.93μm (band 3 of FengYun-3 Visible and Infrared Scanning Radiometer (VIRR)). The simulated results were tested by the volcanic HTT radiation characteristics with 4.433-4.498μm by known bands of MODIS image and the simulated 4.433-4.498μm image. The causes of errors generated were analyzed. The study methods were useful to the new remote sensor bands imaging characteristics simulation analysis.

  11. The TIROS-N high resolution infrared radiation sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    The high-resolution infrared radiation sounder (HIRS/2) was developed and flown on the Television and Infrared Observation Satellite, N Series (TIROS-N) as one means of obtaining atmospheric vertical profile information. The HIRS/2 receives visible and infrared spectrum radiation through a single telescope and selects 20 narrow spectral channels by means of a rotating filter wheel. A passive radiant cooler provides an operating temperature of 106.7K for the HgCdTe and InSb detectors while the visible detector operates at instrument frame temperature. Low noise amplifiers and digital processing provide 13 bit data for spacecraft data multiplexing and transmission. The qualities of system performance that determine sounding capability are the dynamic range of data collection, the noise equivalent radiance of the system, the registration of the air columns sampled in each channel, and the ability to upgrade the calibration of the instrument to maintain the performance standard throughout life. The basic performance of the instrument in test is described. Early orbital information from the TIROS-N launched on October 13, 1978 are given and some observations on system quality are made.

  12. Laser welding of plastics transparent to near-infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kimitoshi; Kurosaki, Yasuo; Saito, Takushi; Satoh, Isao

    2002-06-01

    This paper deals with a development of laser welding of colored plastics. Welding of thermoplastics using near-IR lasers has been seen in wide industrial application. Most of thermoplastics are transparent to near-IR laser. Particular characteristic of near-IR laser radiation has the ability to heat the interface between the transparent part and absorbent one colored with pigments. However, it is difficult to weld a pair of transparent materials by a laser beam, since there is no absorption region within them. In this paper, the influence of near-IR transparent plastics on the yield strength of their weldments has been studied: various colored plastics transparent to diode laser radiation were tested as the welding material. The heat transfer within a welding system was also analyzed and assessed the appropriate absorptivity and transmittance of overlapping colored plastic.

  13. Photochemical synthesis of disilane from silane with infrared laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zavelovich, J. ); Lyman, J.L. )

    1989-07-27

    The authors report the clean and efficient conversion of silane to disilane by CO{sub 2} laser irradiation. The direct irradiation of pure silane at high pressures (from 75 to 1,700 Torr) converts silane to disilane with high selectivity and with efficient use of the absorbed laser radiation. Hydrogen is the only other major volatile product, and the production of solid products is minimal. The proposed mechanism of the photochemical reaction includes (1) collisionally enhanced absorption of the laser radiation by silane, (2) collisional deexcitation of the vibrationally excited silane, (3) concurrent decomposition to SiH{sub 2} and H{sub 2}, (4) production of vibrationally excited disilane by SiH{sub 2} insertion into a silane Si-H bond, (5) collisional quenching of the excited disilane, and (6) rapid cooling of the irradiated gas by thermal expansion. They support the proposed mechanism by additional experiments and model calculations.

  14. Spatial and spectral distributions of thermal radiation emitted by a semi-infinite body and absorbed by a flat film

    SciTech Connect

    Blandre, Etienne Chapuis, Pierre-Olivier; Vaillon, Rodolphe; Francoeur, Mathieu

    2015-05-15

    We analyze the radiative power emitted by a semi-infinite medium and absorbed by a flat film located in its vicinity. In the near-field regime, if the film is thin enough, the surface waves at the rear interface of the film can contribute to the heat transfer. As a result, the absorbed power can be enhanced farther from the front surface. In the near-to-far field transition regime, temporal coherence of thermal radiation and the associated interferences can be used to shape the spectrum of the transferred radiative heat flux by selecting approriate geometrical parameters. These results highlight possibilities to control both the location where the radiative power is absorbed in the film and the spectral distribution, which are of paramount importance for applications such as near-field thermophotovoltaics.

  15. Absorbed photosynthetically active radiation of steppe vegetation and sun-view geometry effects on APAR estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter-Shea, E. A.; Blad, B. L.; Mesarch, M. A.; Hays, C. J.; Deering, D. W.; Eck, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    Instantaneous fractions of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR) were measured at the Streletskaya Steppe Reserve in conjunction with canopy bidirectional-reflected radiation measured at solar zenith angles ranging between 37 and 74 deg during the Kursk experiment (KUREX-91). APAR values were higher for KUREX-91 than those for the first ISLSCP field experiment (FIFE-89) and the amount of APAR of a canopy was a function of solar zenith angle, decreasing as solar zenith angle increased at the resrve. Differences in absorption are attributed to leaf area index (LAI) and leaf angle distribution and subsequently transmitted radiation interactions. LAIs were considerably higher at the reserve than those at the FIFE site. Leaf angle distributions of the reserve approach a uniform distribution while distributions at the FIFE site more closely approximate erectophile distributions. Reflected photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) components at KUREX-91 and FIFE-89 were similar in magnitude and in their response to solar zenith angle. Transmitted PAR increased with increasing solar zenith angle at KUREX-91 and decreased with increasing solar zenith angle at FIFE-89. Transmitted PAR at FIFE-89 was considerably larger than those at KUREX-91.

  16. Acoustic radiation force and torque on an absorbing compressible particle in an inviscid fluid.

    PubMed

    Silva, Glauber T

    2014-11-01

    Exact formulas of the acoustic radiation force and torque exerted by an arbitrary time-harmonic wave on an absorbing compressible particle that is suspended in an inviscid fluid are presented. It is considered that the particle diameter is much smaller than the incident wavelength, i.e., the so-called Rayleigh scattering limit. Moreover, the particle absorption assumed here is due to the attenuation of compressional waves only. Shear waves inside and outside the particle are neglected, since the inner and outer viscous boundary layer of the particle are supposed to be much smaller than the particle radius. The obtained radiation force formulas are used to establish the trapping conditions of a particle by a single-beam acoustical tweezer based on a spherically focused ultrasound transducer. In this case, it is shown that the particle absorption has a pivotal role in single-beam trapping at the transducer focal region. Furthermore, it is found that only the first-order Bessel vortex beam can generate the radiation torque on a small particle. In addition, numerical evaluation of the radiation force and torque exerted on a benzene and an olive oil droplet suspended in water are presented and discussed. PMID:25373943

  17. Growth of textured thin Au coatings on iron oxide nanoparticles with near infrared absorbance

    PubMed Central

    Ma, L L; Borwankar, A U; Willsey, B W; Yoon, K Y; Tam, J O; Sokolov, K V; Feldman, M D; Milner, T E; Johnston, K P

    2013-01-01

    A homologous series of Au-coated iron oxide nanoparticles, with hydrodynamic diameters smaller than 60 nm was synthesized with very low Auto-iron mass ratios as low as 0.15. The hydrodynamic diameter was determined by dynamic light scattering and the composition by atomic absorption spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Unusually low Au precursor supersaturation levels were utilized to nucleate and grow Au coatings on iron oxide relative to formation of pure Au nanoparticles. This approach produced unusually thin coatings, by lowering autocatalytic growth of Au on Au, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Nearly all of the nanoparticles were attracted by a magnet indicating a minimal amount of pure Au particles The coatings were sufficiently thin to shift the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to the near infrared (NIR), with large extinction coefficients., despite the small particle hydrodynamic diameters, observed from dynamic light scattering to be less than 60 nm. PMID:23238021

  18. SUPERCRITICAL SOLVOTHERMAL SYNTHESIS AND NEAR-INFRARED ABSORBING PROPERTIES OF CsxWO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chongshen; Yin, Shu; Huang, Yunfang; Dong, Qiang; Li, Huihui; Sato, Tsugio

    2012-06-01

    CsxWO3 nanoparticles in the range of 20-50 nm have been successfully synthesized by the supercritical solvothermal approach, where after dissolving WCl6 and CsOH in a mixed solution of water, ethanol and oleic acid, the solution was heated at 300°C. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, TEM, HR-TEM, EDS, laser particle size analysis and thermographic measurements. CsxWO3 nanoparticles showed the high transparency in the visible region, excellent shielding performance of the near-infrared light and limited reflectance of light in the range of 200-2700 nm, indicating the strong absorption of NIR light on the nanosized CsxWO3. CsxWO3 nanoparticles also exhibited quick conversion of photo-energy to local heat.

  19. Transparent Organic Photodetector using a Near-Infrared Absorbing Cyanine Dye

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Jenatsch, Sandra; De Jonghe, Jelissa; Nüesch, Frank; Steim, Roland; Véron, Anna C.; Hany, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Organic photodetectors are interesting for low cost, large area optical sensing applications. Combining organic semiconductors with discrete absorption bands outside the visible wavelength range with transparent and conductive electrodes allows for the fabrication of visibly transparent photodetectors. Visibly transparent photodetectors can have far reaching impact in a number of areas including smart displays, window-integrated electronic circuits and sensors. Here, we demonstrate a near-infrared sensitive, visibly transparent organic photodetector with a very high average visible transmittance of 68.9%. The transmitted light of the photodetector under solar irradiation exhibits excellent transparency colour perception and rendering capabilities. At a wavelength of 850 nm and at −1 V bias, the photoconversion efficiency is 17% and the specific detectivity is 1012 Jones. Large area photodetectors with an area of 1.6 cm2 are demonstrated. PMID:25803320

  20. Note: Three wavelengths near-infrared spectroscopy system for compensating the light absorbance by water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhutta, M. Raheel; Hong, Keum-Shik; Kim, Beop-Min; Hong, Melissa Jiyoun; Kim, Yun-Hee; Lee, Se-Ho

    2014-02-01

    Given that approximately 80% of blood is water, we develop a wireless functional near-infrared spectroscopy system that detects not only the concentration changes of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin (HbO and HbR) during mental activity but also that of water (H2O). Additionally, it implements a water-absorption correction algorithm that improves the HbO and HbR signal strengths during an arithmetic task. The system comprises a microcontroller, an optical probe, tri-wavelength light emitting diodes, photodiodes, a WiFi communication module, and a battery. System functionality was tested by means of arithmetic-task experiments performed by healthy male subjects.

  1. Note: three wavelengths near-infrared spectroscopy system for compensating the light absorbance by water.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, M Raheel; Hong, Keum-Shik; Kim, Beop-Min; Hong, Melissa Jiyoun; Kim, Yun-Hee; Lee, Se-Ho

    2014-02-01

    Given that approximately 80% of blood is water, we develop a wireless functional near-infrared spectroscopy system that detects not only the concentration changes of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin (HbO and HbR) during mental activity but also that of water (H2O). Additionally, it implements a water-absorption correction algorithm that improves the HbO and HbR signal strengths during an arithmetic task. The system comprises a microcontroller, an optical probe, tri-wavelength light emitting diodes, photodiodes, a WiFi communication module, and a battery. System functionality was tested by means of arithmetic-task experiments performed by healthy male subjects. PMID:24593411

  2. Analysis of the radiative budget of Venus atmosphere based on infrared Net Exchange Rate formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebonnois, S.; Eymet, V.; Lee, C.; Vatant d'Ollone, J.

    2015-10-01

    The thick cloud cover present in the atmosphere of Venus between roughly 47 and 70 km of altitude plays a crucial role in the radiative balance of this system,by reflecting more than 75 % of the incoming solar flux back to space, absorbing half of the remaining flux, and being also optically thick over most of the infrared spectral range. The temperature profile of the atmosphere of Venus is characterized by a very hot troposphere from the surface (˜735 K) to roughly 60 km altitude, in the middle clouds. The strong greenhouse effect is provided by the 92 bars of CO2 that is the main constituent of the atmosphere and by the thick cloud layer.

  3. Verification of absorbed dose using diodes in cobalt-60 radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Gadhi, Muhammad Asghar; Fatmi, Shahab; Chughtai, Gul M; Arshad, Muhammad; Shakil, Muhammad; Rahmani, Uzma Mahmood; Imran, Malik Younas; Buzdar, Saeed Ahmad

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this work was to enhance the quality and safety of dose delivery in the practice of radiation oncology. To achieve this goal, the absorbed dose verification program was initiated by using the diode in vivo dosimetry (IVD) system (for entrance and exit). This practice was implemented at BINO, Bahawalpur, Pakistan. Diodes were calibrated for making absorbed dose measurements. Various correction factors (SSD, dose non-linearity, field size, angle of incidence, and wedge) were determined for diode IVD system. The measurements were performed in phantom in order to validate the IVD procedure. One hundred and nineteen patients were monitored and 995 measurements were performed. For phantom, the percentage difference between measured and calculated dose for entrance setting remained within ±2% and for exit setting ±3%. For patient measurements, the percentage difference between measured and calculated dose remained within ±5% for entrance/open fields and ±7% for exit/wedge/oblique fields. One hundred and nineteen patients and 995 fields have been monitored during the period of 6 months. The analysis of all available measurements gave a mean percent deviation of ±1.19% and standard deviation of ±2.87%. Larger variations have been noticed in oblique, wedge and exit measurements. This investigation revealed that clinical dosimetry using diodes is simple, provides immediate results and is a useful quality assurance tool for dose delivery. It has enhanced the quality of radiation dose delivery and increased/improved the reliability of the radiation therapy practice in BINO. PMID:26753835

  4. General Strategy for the Bioorthogonal Incorporation of Strongly Absorbing, Solvation-Sensitive Infrared Probes into Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A high-sensitivity metal-carbonyl-based IR probe is described that can be incorporated into proteins or other biomolecules in very high yield via Click chemistry. A two-step strategy is demonstrated. First, a methionine auxotroph is used to incorporate the unnatural amino acid azidohomoalanine at high levels. Second, a tricarbonyl (η5-cyclopentadienyl) rhenium(I) probe modified with an alkynyl linkage is coupled via the Click reaction. We demonstrate these steps using the C-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9 as a model system. An overall incorporation level of 92% was obtained at residue 109, which is a surface-exposed residue. Incorporation of the probe into a surface site is shown not to perturb the stability or structure of the target protein. Metal carbonyls are known to be sensitive to solvation and protein electrostatics through vibrational lifetimes and frequency shifts. We report that the frequencies and lifetimes of this probe also depend on the isotopic composition of the solvent. Comparison of the lifetimes measured in H2O versus D2O provides a probe of solvent accessibility. The metal carbonyl probe reported here provides an easy and robust method to label very large proteins with an amino-acid-specific tag that is both environmentally sensitive and a very strong absorber. PMID:24749542

  5. A Fast Infrared Radiative Transfer Model for Overlapping Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niu, Jianguo; Yang, Ping; Huang, Huang-Lung; Davies, James E.; Li, Jun; Baum, Bryan A.; Hu, Yong X.

    2006-01-01

    A fast infrared radiative transfer model (FIRTM2) appropriate for application to both single-layered and overlapping cloud situations is developed for simulating the outgoing infrared spectral radiance at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). In FIRTM2 a pre-computed library of cloud reflectance and transmittance values is employed to account for one or two cloud layers, whereas the background atmospheric optical thickness due to gaseous absorption can be computed from a clear-sky radiative transfer model. FIRTM2 is applicable to three atmospheric conditions: 1) clear-sky, 2) single-layered ice or water cloud, and 3) two simultaneous cloud layers in a column (e.g., ice cloud overlying water cloud). Moreover, FIRTM2 outputs the derivatives (i.e., Jacobians) of the TOA brightness temperature with respect to cloud optical thickness and effective particle size. Sensitivity analyses have been carried out to assess the performance of FIRTM2 for two spectral regions, namely the longwave (LW) band (587.3 - 1179.5/cm) and the short-to-medium wave (SMW) band (1180.1 - 2228.9/cm). The assessment is carried out in terms of brightness temperature differences (BTD) between FIRTM2 and the well-known discrete ordinates radiative transfer model (DISORT), henceforth referred to as BTD (F-D). The BTD (F-D) values for single-layered clouds are generally less than 0.8 K. For the case of two cloud layers (specifically ice cloud over water cloud), the BTD(F-D) values are also generally less than 0.8 K except for the SMW band for the case of a very high altitude (>15 km) cloud comprised of small ice particles. Note that for clear-sky atmospheres, FIRTM2 reduces to the clear-sky radiative transfer model that is incorporated into FIRTM2, and the errors in this case are essentially those of the clear-sky radiative transfer model.

  6. Ion-pair complexes with strong near infrared absorbance: syntheses, crystal structures and spectroscopic properties.

    PubMed

    Pei, Wen-Bo; Wu, Jian-Sheng; Liu, Jian-Lan; Ren, Xiao-Ming; Shen, Lin-Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Three ion-pair complexes, [4-NH(2)-Py](2)[M(mnt)(2)] (4-NH(2)-Py(1+)=4-amino-pyridinium; mnt(2-)=maleonitriledithiolate; M=Pt (1), Pd (2) or Ni (3)), have been synthesized and characterized. In the crystal of 1, the strong H-bonding interaction was found from the protonated N-atom of pyridinium to the CN group of [Pt(mnt)(2)](2-) together with a weak Pt...H interaction between the anion and the cation. The crystals of 2 and 3 are isostructural with very similar lattice parameters and packing structures, which are distinct from the crystal of 1. Two kinds of strong H-bonding interactions are observed in the crystals of 2 and 3 between the CN groups of [M(mnt)(2)](2-) anion and the protonated N-atom of 4-NH(2)-Py(1+) cation as well as the CN groups of [M(mnt)(2)](2-) anion and the amino group of 4-NH(2)-Py(1+) cation. Complex 1 shows an intense near-IR absorbance in acetonitrile and solid state, such an absorption band is probably assigned to IPCT transition as well as a trace amount of [Pt(mnt)(2)](1-) species; complex 3 possesses a weak near-IR absorption band which can be attributed to the mixture of d-d transition in [Ni(mnt)(2)](2-) and IPCT transition as well as a trace amount of [Ni(mnt)(2)](1-) species. PMID:19897406

  7. The distribution of sulfur dioxide and other infrared absorbers on the surface of Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, R.W.; Smythe, W.D.; Lopes-Gautier, R. M. C.; Davies, A.G.; Kamp, L.W.; Mosher, J.A.; Soderblom, L.A.; Leader, F.E.; Mehlman, R.; Clark, R.N.; Fanale, F.P.

    1997-01-01

    The Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer was used to investigate the distribution and properties of sulfur dioxide over the surface of Io, and qualitative results for the anti-Jove hemisphere are presented here. SO2, existing as a frost, is found almost everywhere, but with spatially variable concentration. The exceptions are volcanic hot spots, where high surface temperatures promote rapid vaporization and can produce SO2-free areas. The pervasive frost, if fully covering the cold surface, has characteristic grain sizes of 30 to 100 Urn, or greater. Regions of greater sulfur dioxide concentrations are found. The equatorial Colchis Regio area exhibits extensive snowfields with large particles (250 to 500 ??m diameter, or greater) beneath smaller particles. A weak feature at 3.15 ??m is observed and is perhaps due to hydroxides, hydrates, or water. A broad absorption in the 1 ??m region, which could be caused by iron-containing minerals, shows a concentration in Io'S southern polar region, with an absence in the Pele plume deposition ring. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Simulation of attenuated total reflection infrared absorbance spectra: applications to automotive clear coat forensic analysis.

    PubMed

    Lavine, Barry K; Fasasi, Ayuba; Mirjankar, Nikhil; Nishikida, Koichi; Campbell, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Attenuated total reflection (ATR) is a widely used sampling technique in infrared (IR) spectroscopy because minimal sample preparation is required. Since the penetration depth of the ATR analysis beam is quite shallow, the outer layers of a laminate or multilayered paint sample can be preferentially analyzed with the entire sample intact. For this reason, forensic laboratories are taking advantage of ATR to collect IR spectra of automotive paint systems that may consist of three or more layers. However, the IR spectrum of a paint sample obtained by ATR will exhibit distortions, e.g., band broadening and lower relative intensities at higher wavenumbers, compared with its transmission counterpart. This hinders library searching because most library spectra are measured in transmission mode. Furthermore, the angle of incidence for the internal reflection element, the refractive index of the clear coat, and surface contamination due to inorganic contaminants can profoundly influence the quality of the ATR spectrum obtained for automotive paints. A correction algorithm to allow ATR spectra to be searched using IR transmission spectra of the paint data query (PDQ) automotive database is presented. The proposed correction algorithm to convert transmission spectra from the PDQ library to ATR spectra is able to address distortion issues such as the relative intensities and broadening of the bands, and the introduction of wavelength shifts at lower frequencies, which prevent library searching of ATR spectra using archived IR transmission data. PMID:25014606

  9. Explosive crystallization of PZT microstructures by femtosecond infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshin, A. S.; Firsova, N. Yu; Emelianov, V. I.; Pronin, I. P.; Senkevich, S. V.; Zhigalina, O. M.; Mishina, E. D.; Sigov, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The features of microstructure crystallization into perovskite phase in lead zirconate titanate film by femtosecond laser radiation of near-infrared range were discussed. In-situ crystallization kinetics by method of second harmonic generation (SHG) was studied. The presence of several types of crystallization was shown, including ultra-fast (explosive) crystallization occurring immediately after the start of exposure, and slow (self-sustaining) crystallization, occurring after termination of exposure. The advantage of the second-harmonic generation microscopy for the study of annealed microstructures was shown. The morphology of microstructures was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  10. Stratospheric aerosol properties and their effects on infrared radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents a stratospheric aerosol model and infers its effects on terrestrial radiation. Composition of the aerosol is assumed to be concentrated sulfuric acid. An appropriate size distribution has been determined from available size distribution measurements of other investigators. Aerosols composed of concentrated sulfuric acid emit energy in the atmospheric window region of the infrared spectrum, 8-13 microns. Laboratory measurements of optical constant data obtained at room temperature are presented for 75 and 90% aqueous sulfuric acid. Calculations of an aerosol extinction coefficient are then performed by using the above data. Effects of changes in aerosol phase and temperature are discussed but not resolved.

  11. Measurement-based estimates of direct radiative effects of absorbing aerosols above clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Nan; Christopher, Sundar A.

    2015-07-01

    The elevated layers of absorbing smoke aerosols from western African (e.g., Gabon and Congo) biomass burning activities have been frequently observed above low-level stratocumulus clouds off the African coast, which presents an excellent natural laboratory for studying the effects of aerosols above clouds (AAC) on regional energy balance in tropical and subtropical environments. Using spatially and temporally collocated Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System data sets, the top-of-atmosphere shortwave aerosol direct shortwave radiative effects (ARE) of absorbing aerosols above low-level water clouds in the southeast Atlantic Ocean was examined in this study. The regional averaged instantaneous ARE has been estimated to be 36.7 ± 20.5 Wm-2 (regional mean ± standard deviation) along with a mean positive OMI Aerosol Index at 1.3 in August 2006 based on multisensors measurements. The highest magnitude of instantaneous ARE can even reach 138.2 Wm-2. We assess that the 660 nm cloud optical depth (COD) values of 8-12 is the critical value above (below) which aerosol absorption (scattering) effect dominates and further produces positive (negative) ARE values. The results further show that ARE values are more sensitive to aerosols above lower COD values than cases for higher COD values. This is among the first studies to provide quantitative estimates of shortwave ARE due to AAC events from an observational perspective.

  12. Transient radiative cooling of an absorbing and scattering cylinder - A separable solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1988-01-01

    A cylindrical region filled with absorbing-emitting material is cooled by radiation to surroundings at a much lower temperature. A solution is found showing that, for each set of parameters, the transient radial temperature distribution reaches a fixed shape, although the temperatures are decreasing with time. This 'fully developed' transient region is characterized by having a constant emittance based on instantaneous values of the cylinder heat loss and mean temperature. This emittance depends only on the optical radius of the cylinder and the scattering albedo. The emittance is lower than that for a cylinder at uniform temperature. This arises from the larger local cooling and, hence, reduced temperatures of the outer layers of the cylinder. An examination of this transient emittance provides the ranges of parameters within which the simplification can be made that the cylinder has uniform radial temperature distribution throughout the cooling process.

  13. Infrared radiation from explosions in a spark-ignition engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, Charles F , Jr; Caldwell, Frank R; Steele, Sydney

    1935-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation to determine the variations in intensity and spectral distribution of the radiant energy emitted by the flames during normal and knocking explosions in an engine. Radiation extending into the infrared was transmitted by a window of fluorite, placed either near the spark plug or over the detonation zone at opposite ends of the combustion chamber. Concave, surface-silvered mirrors focused the beam, first at the slit of a stroboscope which opened for about 2 degrees of crank angle at any desired point in the engine cycle, and then upon the target of a sensitive thermocouple for measuring radiation intensity. Spectral distribution of the radiant energy was determined by placing over the window, one at a time, a series of five filters selected with a view to identifying, as far as possible without the use of a spectrograph, the characteristic emissions of water vapor, carbon dioxide, and incandescent carbon.

  14. Temperature field inside an absorbing-emitting semi-transparent slab at radiative equilibrium with variable spatial refractive index.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, P. B.; Le Dez, V.

    2000-05-01

    The temperature field inside an absorbing-emitting slab of semi-transparent grey medium at radiative equilibrium has been determined with the help of a curved ray-tracing technique when the spatial variation of the refractive index in the medium is assumed to be linear. The integration of the radiative transfer equation has been carried out on the trajectories on which radiation propagates inside the medium, leading to the absorbed radiative energy at an internal point. For a linear refractive index, existence of totally reflected internal trajectories producing mirage effects have to be taken into account in the resolution of the radiative problem. Results obtained for different optical depths with low and strong gradients of refractive index display significant differences from the case of a constant refractive index.

  15. The influence of infrared radiation on short-term ultraviolet-radiation-induced injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Kaidbey, K.H.; Witkowski, T.A.; Kligman, A.M.

    1982-05-01

    Because heat has been reported to influence adversely short- and long-term ultraviolet (UV)-radiation-induced skin damage in animals, we investigated the short-term effects of infrared radiation on sunburn and on phototoxic reactions to topical methoxsalen and anthracene in human volunteers. Prior heating of the skin caused suppression of the phototoxic response to methoxsalen as evidenced by an increase in the threshold erythema dose. Heat administered either before or after exposure to UV radiation had no detectable influence on sunburn erythema or on phototoxic reactions provoked by anthracene.

  16. High near-infrared absorbing Cu5FeS4 nanoparticles for dual-modal imaging and photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qi; Yi, Xuan; Li, Meifang; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Shi, Quanliang; Yang, Kai

    2016-07-01

    Multifunctional nanomaterials have shown excellent and promising properties for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Herein, we have developed iron doped copper sulfide (Cu5FeS4) nanoparticles with a non-covalent polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating (Cu5FeS4-PEG) for tumor dual-modal imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT). The obtained Cu5FeS4-PEG nanoparticles with high near-infrared absorbance could be used for phototoacoustic (PA) imaging and PTT, whereas Fe3+ doping offer the nanoparticles the additional property for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. As shown by PA imaging, Cu5FeS4-PEG exhibit a high tumor uptake (~10% ID g-1) after intravenous injection. In vitro and in vivo cancer treatment further confirm that Cu5FeS4-PEG could act as a novel therapeutic agent for PTT of cancer cells. Our study further promotes the potential applications of multifunctional nanomaterials in a range of tumor diagnoses and treatments.Multifunctional nanomaterials have shown excellent and promising properties for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Herein, we have developed iron doped copper sulfide (Cu5FeS4) nanoparticles with a non-covalent polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating (Cu5FeS4-PEG) for tumor dual-modal imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT). The obtained Cu5FeS4-PEG nanoparticles with high near-infrared absorbance could be used for phototoacoustic (PA) imaging and PTT, whereas Fe3+ doping offer the nanoparticles the additional property for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. As shown by PA imaging, Cu5FeS4-PEG exhibit a high tumor uptake (~10% ID g-1) after intravenous injection. In vitro and in vivo cancer treatment further confirm that Cu5FeS4-PEG could act as a novel therapeutic agent for PTT of cancer cells. Our study further promotes the potential applications of multifunctional nanomaterials in a range of tumor diagnoses and treatments. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr04444a

  17. Tunable ultrasonic phononic crystal controlled by infrared radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Ezekiel; Neogi, Arup E-mail: arup@unt.edu; Reyes, Delfino; Rojas, Miguel Mayorga; Krokhin, Arkadii; Wang, Zhiming E-mail: arup@unt.edu

    2014-10-06

    A tunable phononic crystal based ultrasonic filter was designed by stimulating the phase of the polymeric material embedded in a periodic structure using infrared radiation. The acoustic filter can be tuned remotely using thermal stimulation induced by the infrared radiation. The filter is composed of steel cylinder scatterers arranged periodically in a background of bulk poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) polymer hydrogel. The lattice structure creates forbidden bands for certain sets of mechanical waves that cause it to behave as an ultrasonic filter. Since the bandstructure is determined by not only the arrangement of the scatterers but also the physical properties of the materials composing the scatterers and background, modulating either the arrangement or physical properties will alter the effect of the crystal on propagating mechanical waves. Here, the physical properties of the filter are varied by inducing changes in the polymer hydrogel using an electromagnetic thermal stimulus. With particular focus on the k{sub 00}-wave, the transmission of ultrasonic wave changes by as much as 20 dBm, and band widths by 22% for select bands.

  18. Near-infrared absorbing polymer nano-particle as a sensitive contrast agent for photo-acoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Hiroyuki; Nojiri, Mayumi; Mukai, Rieko; Ito, Shinzaburo

    2015-01-01

    Polymer nano-particles (PNPs) with a near-infrared (NIR) light absorption were prepared by the nano-emulsion method to develop contrast agents for photo-acoustic (PA) imaging. The PNP containing silicon naphthalocyanine showed a high absorption coefficient up to 10(10) M(-1) cm(-1). This is comparable to plasmonic gold nano-particles, which have been studied as PA contrast agents. For the PNP larger than 100 nm, the enhancement of the PA signal was observed compared to the gold nano-particle with a similar absorption coefficient and size. In the case of the PNP, the heat by the light absorption is confined in the particle due to the low thermal diffusivity of polymer materials. We showed that the strong thermal confinement effect of PNP results in the enhancement of the efficiency of the PA signal generation and that the PA intensity can be enhanced by the increase of the Grüneisen parameter of the matrix polymer of PNP. The PA signal from the PNP of poly(methyl methacrylate) was 9-fold larger than that of gold nano-particles with the same absorption coefficient. We demonstrated that in the in vivo PA imaging the detection limit of PNP was of the order of 10(-13) M. The NIR absorbing PNP will be a promising candidate of a sensitive contrast agent for PA imaging. PMID:25407911

  19. Injection, transport, and ionic interactions of carriers in polyacetylene ionomers as probed by near-infrared absorbance and visible photoresponse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Ethan Michael

    While mixed ionic-electronic conductors (MIECs) show promise in a number of different device structures, their successful application has been inhibited by difficulties with characterization. The simultaneous influence of both ionic and electronic systems often foils attempts to quantify material parameters important for rational device design. In many cases, even general models of MIEC function can prove uncertain or controversial. This dissertation addresses the broader issue of ambiguity in MIEC characterization by exploring near-infrared absorbance as a method of gaining further insight into these systems. In combination with a traditional suite of techniques, this method enables determination of parameters not otherwise accessible. The determination of a concentration-dependant carrier mobility in an MIEC material will be demonstrated, and MIEC conduction in the unipolar regime will be broadly described as a system of electrochemically-supported charge injection. This model will be subsequently expanded to describe an unusual and previously unreported phenomenon of rectification when MIECs are interfaced with otherwise appropriate semiconducting contacts. A model labeled as extracting-electrode space-charge limited current will be described and experimentally demonstrated. Finally, the unique photovoltaic properties of an ionic heterojunction system comprising two MIECs will be examined. The results will be used to gain insight into the role of ionic asymmetry in the behavior of MIEC interfaces. This dissertation contains coauthored, previously published, and unpublished work.

  20. High near-infrared absorbing Cu5FeS4 nanoparticles for dual-modal imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Yi, Xuan; Li, Meifang; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Shi, Quanliang; Yang, Kai

    2016-07-21

    Multifunctional nanomaterials have shown excellent and promising properties for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Herein, we have developed iron doped copper sulfide (Cu5FeS4) nanoparticles with a non-covalent polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating (Cu5FeS4-PEG) for tumor dual-modal imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT). The obtained Cu5FeS4-PEG nanoparticles with high near-infrared absorbance could be used for phototoacoustic (PA) imaging and PTT, whereas Fe(3+) doping offer the nanoparticles the additional property for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. As shown by PA imaging, Cu5FeS4-PEG exhibit a high tumor uptake (∼10% ID g(-1)) after intravenous injection. In vitro and in vivo cancer treatment further confirm that Cu5FeS4-PEG could act as a novel therapeutic agent for PTT of cancer cells. Our study further promotes the potential applications of multifunctional nanomaterials in a range of tumor diagnoses and treatments. PMID:27341480

  1. Estimating the Direct Radiative Effect of Absorbing Aerosols Overlying Marine Boundary Layer Clouds in the Southeast Atlantic Using MODIS and CALIOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Lee, Dongmin

    2013-01-01

    Absorbing aerosols such as smoke strongly absorb solar radiation, particularly at ultraviolet and visible/near-infrared (VIS/NIR) wavelengths, and their presence above clouds can have considerable implications. It has been previously shown that they have a positive (i.e., warming) direct aerosol radiative effect (DARE) when overlying bright clouds. Additionally, they can cause biased passive instrument satellite retrievals in techniques that rely on VIS/NIR wavelengths for inferring the cloud optical thickness (COT) and effective radius (re) of underlying clouds, which can in turn yield biased above-cloud DARE estimates. Here we investigate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud optical property retrieval biases due to overlying absorbing aerosols observed by Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and examine the impact of these biases on above-cloud DARE estimates. The investigation focuses on a region in the southeast Atlantic Ocean during August and September (2006-2011), where smoke from biomass burning in southern Africa overlies persistent marine boundary layer stratocumulus clouds. Adjusting for above-cloud aerosol attenuation yields increases in the regional mean liquid COT (averaged over all ocean-only liquid clouds) by roughly 6%; mean re increases by roughly 2.6%, almost exclusively due to the COT adjustment in the non-orthogonal retrieval space. It is found that these two biases lead to an underestimate of DARE. For liquid cloud Aqua MODIS pixels with CALIOP-observed above-cloud smoke, the regional mean above-cloud radiative forcing efficiency (DARE per unit aerosol optical depth (AOD)) at time of observation (near local noon for Aqua overpass) increases from 50.9Wm(sup-2)AOD(sup-1) to 65.1Wm(sup-2)AOD(sup -1) when using bias-adjusted instead of nonadjusted MODIS cloud retrievals.

  2. Use of narrow-band spectra to estimate the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G.; Huemmrich, Karl F.; Goward, Samuel N.

    1990-01-01

    A novel approach is proposed for using high-spectral resolution imagers to estimate the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation adsorbed, f(apar), by vegetated land surfaces. In comparison to approaches using broad-band vegetation indices, the proposed method appears to be relatively insensitive to the reflectance of nonphotosynthetically active material beneath the canopy, such as leaf litter or soil. The method is based on a relationship between the second derivative of the reflectance vs wavelength function for terrestrial vegetation and f(apar). The relationship can be defined by the second derivatives in either of two windows, one in the visible region centered at 0.69 micron, another in the near-infrared region centered at 0.74 micron.

  3. Radioimmunotherapy treatment planning based on radiation absorbed dose or patient size

    SciTech Connect

    Eary, J.F.; Krohn, K.A.; Press, O.W. |

    1996-05-01

    Several approaches have been used to plan treatment doses for patients undergoing radioimmunotherapy. Investigators often use fixed doses, or doses based on patient size (mCi/kg or mCi/m{sup 2}). Our treatment protocols for lymphoma and leukemia involved calculation of tissue radiation absorbed dose based on images from a trace labeled infusion of antibody prior to treatment. In a recent analysis of patients treated in the Phase I and II dose escalation trial for treatment of non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma with I-131 anti-CD20 antibody (B1), we investigated the relationship between our dosimetry based treatment and dose based on patient size. Tissue radiation dose for several normal organs and for tumors were plotted versus the mCi administered per kg or m{sup 2} of the patient to evaluate the relationship between the two treatment approaches. These graphs showed correlation coefficients ranging from 0.021 to 0.684, demonstrating the variability in antibody catabolism between patients. This means that fixed doses or administrations based on patient size do not deliver consistent radiation doses to normal organs or tumors. This finding was extrapolated to show that toxicity from doses based on patient size di not correlate with treatment dose; those based on calculated rad/organ did. Phase I clinical trials using treatment doses based on patient size where there are likely to be variations in patient antibody catabolism will result in confounding toxicities at apparently similar mCi dose levels. Use of pre-treatment scans for treatment dose planning are worth the additional effort by normalizing the normal tissue toxicity.

  4. Effect of aerosol concentration and absorbing aerosol on the radiation fog life cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalick, Z.; Kühn, T.; Korhonen, H.; Kokkola, H.; Laaksonen, A.; Romakkaniemi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Analogous to cloud formation, the formation and life cycle of fogs is largely influenced by aerosol particles. The objective of this work is to analyze how changes in aerosol properties affect the fog life cycle, with special emphasis on how droplet concentrations change with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and on the effect that absorbing black carbon (BC) particles have on fog dissipation. For our simulation case study, we chose a typical fall time radiation fog at mid-latitudes (45° north) in fairly highly polluted conditions. Our results show that CCN concentrations have a strong influence on the fog lifetime. This is because the immediate effect of CCN on cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC) is enhanced through two positive feedback loops: (1) Higher CDNC leads to more radiative cooling at the fog top, which leads to even stronger activation and (2) if CDNC is higher, the average droplet size is smaller, which slows down droplet removal through sedimentation. The effect that radiation fogs have on solar surface irradiation is large - the daily mean can change by 50% if CCN concentrations are doubled or halved (considering a reference CCN mixing ratio of 800 #/mg). With the same changes in CCN, the total fog lifetime increases 160 min or decreases 65 min, respectively. Although BC has a noticeable effect on fog height and dissipation time, its relative effect compared to CCN is small, even if BC concentrations are high. The fog formation is very sensitive to initial meteorological conditions which may be altered considerably if fog was present the previous day. This effect was neglected here, and future simulations, which span several days, may thus be a valuable extension of this study.

  5. Radiative Forcing of the Lower Stratosphere over the Arctic by Light Absorbing Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Raga, G.; Kok, G.

    2003-01-01

    Light absorbing particles (LAP), such as soot and dust, change the thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere and contribute to regional and global climate change. The lower stratosphere (LS) is particularly sensitive to the presence of LAP since the lifetime of particles in the LS may extend from months to years, in contrast to tropospheric lifetimes of at most a few days. The source of particles in the LS may be aircraft, meteorites or emissions from tropospheric sources. There has been a lack, however, of accurate, quantitative measurements made with sufficiently sensitive instruments. This limits our understanding of the origin and lifetime of aerosols in this region of the atmosphere. Here we present recent measurements in the Arctic UT/LS with a new, highly sensitive instrument that has detected black carbon (BC) mass concentrations of 20-1000 ng m(exp -3) that are 10-1000 times larger than those reported in previous studies and are at least 30 times larger than predicted masses based on fuel consumption by commercial aircraft that fly in these regions. Scattering and absorption of solar and terrestrial radiation by the particles in a layer from 8- 12 Km leads to a negative net forcing of -0.5 W sq m at the top of the atmosphere and 9C of heating in this layer during the average aerosol lifetime at these altitudes. The new measurements suggest that the influence of aircraft emissions have been underestimated or that aircraft may not be the only significant source of light absorbing particles in the UT/LS. The presence of these aerosols can cause local changes in the thermal structure of the lower stratosphere and a subsequent modification of stratosphere/tropopause exchange of gases and particles.

  6. 3D Thermal Infrared Radiative Transfer in Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W.; Liou, K.; Hall, A.

    2007-12-01

    We developed a 3D Monte Carlo photon tracing program for radiative transfer in inhomogeneous and irregular terrain coupled with the correlated k-distribution method for gaseous absorption in the atmosphere for the calculation of broadband thermal infrared (IR) fluxes at mountain surfaces. The thermal IR radiative transfer program includes emission from the atmosphere to the surface and vice versa as well as emissions between mountain surfaces. Both the atmosphere and the land surface are discretized by using finite cubic cells characterized by the spectral optical properties of molecules and background aerosols (absorption coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and scattering phase function) and terrain configuration (albedo, elevation, slope, and orientation). The emissivity of gases is parameterized in terms of the vertical optical depth of cubic cell. We selected an area of 100×100 km2 in the Tibetan Plateau near Lhasa city with a horizontal resolution of 1 km2 and used the surface temperature and albedo available from MODIS/Terra dataset for this study. We show that surface temperature is the dominating factor in radiative transfer calculations and that subgrid variability of the net surface IR flux distribution relative to a flat surface (1D) with average elevation and temperature can be as large as 50 W/m2 at cold mountain surfaces.

  7. Absorbing Aerosols Above Cloud: Detection, Quantitative Retrieval, and Radiative Forcing from Satellite-based Passive Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jethva, H.; Torres, O.; Remer, L. A.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    Light absorbing particles such as carbonaceous aerosols generated from biomass burning activities and windblown dust particles can exert a net warming effect on climate; the strength of which depends on the absorption capacity of the particles and brightness of the underlying reflecting background. When advected over low-level bright clouds, these aerosols absorb the cloud reflected radiation from ultra-violet (UV) to shortwave-IR (SWIR) and makes cloud scene darker-a phenomenon commonly known as "cloud darkening". The apparent "darkening" effect can be seen by eyes in satellite images as well as quantitatively in the spectral reflectance measurements made by space borne sensors over regions where light absorbing carbonaceous and dust aerosols overlay low-level cloud decks. Theoretical radiative transfer simulations support the observational evidence, and further reveal that the strength of the cloud darkening and its spectral signature (or color ratio) between measurements at two wavelengths are a bi-function of aerosol and cloud optical thickness (AOT and COT); both are measures of the total amount of light extinction caused by aerosols and cloud, respectively. Here, we developed a retrieval technique, named as the "color ratio method" that uses the satellite measurements at two channels, one at shorter wavelength in the visible and one at longer wavelength in the shortwave-IR for the simultaneous retrieval of AOT and COT. The present technique requires assumptions on the aerosol single-scattering albedo and aerosol-cloud separation which are supplemented by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and space borne CALIOP lidar measurements. The retrieval technique has been tested making use of the near-UV and visible reflectance observations made by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for distinct above-cloud smoke and dust aerosol events observed seasonally over the southeast and tropical Atlantic Ocean

  8. Far Infrared Spectrometry of the Cosmic Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Mather, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    I describe two experiments to measure the cosmic background radiation near 1 mm wavelength. The first was a ground-based search for spectral lines, made with a Fabry-Perot interferometer and an InSb detector. The second is a measurement of the spectrum from 3 to 18 cm{sup -1}, made with a balloon-borne Fourier transform spectrometer. It is a polarizing Michelson interferometer, cooled in liquid helium, and operated with a germanium bolometer. I give the theory of operation, construction details, and experimental results. The first experiment was successfully completed but the second suffered equipment malfunction on its first flight. I describe the theory of Fourier transformations and give a new understanding of convolutional phase correction computations. I discuss for infrared bolometer calibration procedures, and tabulate test results on nine detectors. I describe methods of improving bolometer sensitivity with immersion optics and with conductive film blackening.

  9. An infrared radiation based thermal biosensor for enzymatic biochemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Dong, Tao; Zhao, Xinyan; Yang, Zhaochu; Pires, Nuno M M

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a thermal biosensor based on the infrared radiation energy is proposed for calorimetric measurement of biochemical reactions. Having a good structure design combined with MEMS technology as well as employing the Si /SiGe quantum well sensing material with a high TCR and low 1/f noise, the sensor shows potentials to be high sensitive and real-time. The urea enzymatic reaction was tested to verify the performance of sensor, which demonstrates a linear detection range from 0.5mM to 150mM and a relative standard deviation less than 1%. For the sensor fabrication, wafer-level transfer bonding is a key process, which makes the integration of quantum well material and a free standing structure possible. It reduces the heat loss from the sensor to the surrounding environment. PMID:23365944

  10. Effects of flameless catalytic infrared radiation on Sitophilus oryzae (L.) life stages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory bench top flameless catalytic infrared emitter was evaluated against all life stages of the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.), an insect species associated with stored wheat. The infrared radiation emitted was in the 3 to 7 µm range. A non-contact infrared thermometer measured grain t...

  11. Studies on suppression methodology of internal radiation for satellite-borne infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Honggang; Jin, Libing; Liu, Jianfeng; Zhou, Feng

    2015-08-01

    Infrared camera, which works on cryogenic or normal temperature, has thermal radiation inside. It is called interior radiation. In the space optical remote sensor, interior radiation will produce a lot of bad effects. Firstly, it can depress image contrast. What is more, dynamic range and integral time will be decreased. Lastly, interior radiation is one of the main factors that affect the measurement accuracy. So, restraining interior radiation is one of the key technologies to enhance the quality of infrared thermal imaging technology. In this paper, the typical technology of restraining interior radiation is summarized. At the end of the paper, blue prints for restraining interior radiation are proposed.

  12. Algorithmic vs. finite difference Jacobians for infrared atmospheric radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno García, Sebastián; Vasquez, Mayte; Xu, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Jacobians, i.e. partial derivatives of the radiance and transmission spectrum with respect to the atmospheric state parameters to be retrieved from remote sensing observations, are important for the iterative solution of the nonlinear inverse problem. Finite difference Jacobians are easy to implement, but computationally expensive and possibly of dubious quality; on the other hand, analytical Jacobians are accurate and efficient, but the implementation can be quite demanding. GARLIC, our "Generic Atmospheric Radiation Line-by-line Infrared Code", utilizes algorithmic differentiation (AD) techniques to implement derivatives w.r.t. atmospheric temperature and molecular concentrations. In this paper, we describe our approach for differentiation of the high resolution infrared and microwave spectra and provide an in-depth assessment of finite difference approximations using "exact" AD Jacobians as a reference. The results indicate that the "standard" two-point finite differences with 1 K and 1% perturbation for temperature and volume mixing ratio, respectively, can exhibit substantial errors, and central differences are significantly better. However, these deviations do not transfer into the truncated singular value decomposition solution of a least squares problem. Nevertheless, AD Jacobians are clearly recommended because of the superior speed and accuracy.

  13. Secure thermal infrared communications using engineered blackbody radiation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiaoxin; Hu, Fangjing; Yan, Yuepeng; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2014-01-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands, from 20–40 THz and 60–100 THz, are best known for applications in thermography. This underused and unregulated part of the spectral range offers opportunities for the development of secure communications. The ‘THz Torch' concept was recently presented by the authors. This technology fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation, by partitioning thermally-generated spectral noise power into pre-defined frequency channels; the energy in each channel is then independently pulsed modulated and multiplexing schemes are introduced to create a robust form of short-range secure communications in the far/mid infrared. To date, octave bandwidth (25–50 THz) single-channel links have been demonstrated with 380 bps speeds. Multi-channel ‘THz Torch' frequency division multiplexing (FDM) and frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS) schemes have been proposed, but only a slow 40 bps FDM scheme has been demonstrated experimentally. Here, we report a much faster 1,280 bps FDM implementation. In addition, an experimental proof-of-concept FHSS scheme is demonstrated for the first time, having a 320 bps data rate. With both 4-channel multiplexing schemes, measured bit error rates (BERs) of < 10−6 are achieved over a distance of 2.5 cm. Our approach represents a new paradigm in the way niche secure communications can be established over short links. PMID:24912871

  14. Secure thermal infrared communications using engineered blackbody radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaoxin; Hu, Fangjing; Yan, Yuepeng; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2014-06-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands, from 20-40 THz and 60-100 THz, are best known for applications in thermography. This underused and unregulated part of the spectral range offers opportunities for the development of secure communications. The `THz Torch' concept was recently presented by the authors. This technology fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation, by partitioning thermally-generated spectral noise power into pre-defined frequency channels; the energy in each channel is then independently pulsed modulated and multiplexing schemes are introduced to create a robust form of short-range secure communications in the far/mid infrared. To date, octave bandwidth (25-50 THz) single-channel links have been demonstrated with 380 bps speeds. Multi-channel `THz Torch' frequency division multiplexing (FDM) and frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS) schemes have been proposed, but only a slow 40 bps FDM scheme has been demonstrated experimentally. Here, we report a much faster 1,280 bps FDM implementation. In addition, an experimental proof-of-concept FHSS scheme is demonstrated for the first time, having a 320 bps data rate. With both 4-channel multiplexing schemes, measured bit error rates (BERs) of < 10-6 are achieved over a distance of 2.5 cm. Our approach represents a new paradigm in the way niche secure communications can be established over short links.

  15. Secure thermal infrared communications using engineered blackbody radiation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoxin; Hu, Fangjing; Yan, Yuepeng; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2014-01-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands, from 20-40 THz and 60-100 THz, are best known for applications in thermography. This underused and unregulated part of the spectral range offers opportunities for the development of secure communications. The 'THz Torch' concept was recently presented by the authors. This technology fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation, by partitioning thermally-generated spectral noise power into pre-defined frequency channels; the energy in each channel is then independently pulsed modulated and multiplexing schemes are introduced to create a robust form of short-range secure communications in the far/mid infrared. To date, octave bandwidth (25-50 THz) single-channel links have been demonstrated with 380 bps speeds. Multi-channel 'THz Torch' frequency division multiplexing (FDM) and frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS) schemes have been proposed, but only a slow 40 bps FDM scheme has been demonstrated experimentally. Here, we report a much faster 1,280 bps FDM implementation. In addition, an experimental proof-of-concept FHSS scheme is demonstrated for the first time, having a 320 bps data rate. With both 4-channel multiplexing schemes, measured bit error rates (BERs) of < 10(-6) are achieved over a distance of 2.5 cm. Our approach represents a new paradigm in the way niche secure communications can be established over short links. PMID:24912871

  16. The correction model and error analysis of infrared radiation temperature measurement of semitransparent object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaolong; Yang, Li

    2015-10-01

    Based on the theory of infrared radiation and of the infrared thermography, the mathematical correction model of the infrared radiation temperature measurement of semitransparent object is developed taking account by the effects of the atmosphere, surroundings, radiation of transmissivity and many other factors. The effects of the emissivity, transmissivity and measurement error are analysed on temperature measurement error of the infrared thermography. The measurement error of semitransparent object are compared with that of opaque object. The countermeasures to reduce the measurement error are also discussed.

  17. Improved micro-distribution of antibody-photon absorber conjugates after initial near infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT).

    PubMed

    Nagaya, Tadanobu; Nakamura, Yuko; Sato, Kazuhide; Harada, Toshiko; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2016-06-28

    Near infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT), a targeted cancer therapy which uses an antibody-photo absorber conjugate (APC) and near infrared light exposure, dramatically improves nano-drug delivery into treated tumor beds due to enhanced vascular permeability. We investigated the micro-distribution of APCs in a variety of NIR-PIT treated tumors. Either cetuximab (cet) or trastuzumab (tra) conjugated with IR700 (cet-tra-IR700) was administered, as appropriate, to each mouse model of tumor. Tumor-bearing mice implanted with A431-GFP, MDAMB468-GFP, 3T3Her2-GFP or N87-GFP were separated into 5 groups: group 1=no treatment; group 2=cet-tra-IR700 i.v., no light exposure; group 3=cet-tra-IR700 i.v., NIR light exposure; group 4=cet-tra-IR700 i.v. and additional cet-tra-IR700 i.v. at 24h but no light exposure; group 5=cet-tra-IR700 i.v., NIR light exposure and additional cet-tra-IR700 i.v. immediately after NIR but no additional NIR light exposure. In vivo, ex vivo and microscopic fluorescence imaging was performed. Fluorescence from the surface of the tumor (s-tumor) was compared to fluorescence from deeper areas of the tumor (d-tumor). In general, there was no significant difference in the fluorescence intensity of GFP in the tumors among all groups, however the highest IR700 fluorescence intensity was consistently shown in group 5 tumors due to added APC after NIR-PIT. Fluorescence microscopy in all tumor types demonstrated that GFP relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) in s-tumor was significantly lower in group 3 and 5 (NIR-PIT groups) than in group 1, 2, and 4 (no NIR-PIT) yet there was no significant difference in d-tumor RFI among all groups. IR700 fluorescent RFI in the d-tumor was highest in group 5 (NIR-PIT+additional APC) compared to the other groups. Cell killing after NIR-PIT was primarily on the surface, however, APCs administered immediately after NIR-PIT penetrated deeper into tissue resulting in improved cell killing after a 2nd NIR-PIT session. This

  18. The use of high spectral resolution bands for estimating absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (A par)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Chappelle, E. W.; Mcmurtrey, J. E.; Walthall, C. L.

    1994-01-01

    Most remote sensing estimations of vegetation variables such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (APAR), and phytomass are made using broad band sensors with a bandwidth of approximately 100 nm. However, high resolution spectrometers are available and have not been fully exploited for the purpose of improving estimates of vegetation variables. A study directed to investigate the use of high spectral resolution spectroscopy for remote sensing estimates of APAR in vegetation canopies in the presence of nonphotosynthetic background materials such as soil and leaf litter is presented. A high spectral resolution method defined as the Chlorophyll Absorption Ratio Index (CARI) was developed for minimizing the effects of nonphotosynthetic materials in the remote estimates of APAR. CARI utilizes three bands at 550, 670, and 700 nm with bandwidth of 10 nm. Simulated canopy reflectance of a range of LAI were generated with the SAIL model using measurements of 42 different soil types as canopy background. CARI obtained from the simulated canopy reflectance was compared with the broad band vegetation indices (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), and Simple Ratio (SR)). CARI reduced the effect of nonphotosynthetic background materials in the assessment of vegetation canopy APAR more effectively than broad band vegetation indices.

  19. Estimation of the absorbed dose in radiation-processed food. 4. EPR measurements on eggshell

    SciTech Connect

    Desrosiers, M.F.; Le, F.G. ); Harewood, P.M.; Josephson, E.S. ); Montesalvo, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Fresh whole eggs treated with ionizing radiation for Salmonellae control testing. The eggshell was then removed and examined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine if EPR could be used to (1) distinguish irradiated from unirradiated eggs and (2) assess the absorbed dose. No EPR signals were detected in unirradiated eggs, while strong signals were measurable for more than 200 days after irradiation. Although a number of EPR signals were measured, the most intense resonance (g = 2.0019) was used for dosimetry throughout the study. This signal was observed to increase linearly with dose (up to [approximately]6 kGy), which decayed [approximately]20% within the first 5 days after irradiation and remained relatively constant thereafter. The standard added-dose method was used to assess, retrospectively, the dose to eggs processed at 0.2, 0.7, and 1.4 kGy. Relatively good results were obtained when measurement was made on the day the shell was reirradiated; with this procedure estimates were better for shell processed at the lower doses.

  20. [Estimation of absorbed dose of beta radiation into the critical tissues by a single injection of tritiated water].

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, T; Norimura, T; Yamamoto, H; Hatakeyama, S; Dohi, S; Kunugita, N

    1988-12-01

    The biological effects of tritium in humans need to be clarified, because the chances of humans becoming exposed to tritium beta radiation may increase with the development of the nuclear fusion reactor. To evaluate the biological effects of tritium, it is necessary to estimate exactly the absorbed dose from the tritium beta rays in the tissue. In many reports, the absorbed dose of HTO in the tissues is estimated from the tritium content in body fluid and dose calculations are customarily based upon the water content of soft tissues, which is taken to be 0.7 to 0.8. However, these methods may not show the exact absorbed dose in the organs. In the present study, the radioactivity of the critical tissues was measured directly using a sample oxidizer and the absorbed dose was calculated from the radioactivity of tritium in the tissues. Details on the method for calculation of the absorbed dose in tissues of the mouse is shown in this report. The results suggest that the absorbed dose should be obtained from the radioactivity in the tissues. PMID:3212298

  1. A Thermal Infrared Radiation Parameterization for Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Suarez, Max J.; Liang, Xin-Zhong; Yan, Michael M.-H.; Cote, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This technical memorandum documents the longwave radiation parameterization developed at the Climate and Radiation Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, for a wide variety of weather and climate applications. Based on the 1996-version of the Air Force Geophysical Laboratory HITRAN data, the parameterization includes the absorption due to major gaseous absorption (water vapor, CO2, O3) and most of the minor trace gases (N2O, CH4, CFCs), as well as clouds and aerosols. The thermal infrared spectrum is divided into nine bands. To achieve a high degree of accuracy and speed, various approaches of computing the transmission function are applied to different spectral bands and gases. The gaseous transmission function is computed either using the k-distribution method or the table look-up method. To include the effect of scattering due to clouds and aerosols, the optical thickness is scaled by the single-scattering albedo and asymmetry factor. The parameterization can accurately compute fluxes to within 1% of the high spectral-resolution line-by-line calculations. The cooling rate can be accurately computed in the region extending from the surface to the 0.01-hPa level.

  2. Infrared radiative transfer through a regular array of cuboidal clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    HARSHVARDHAN; Weinman, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared radiative transfer through a regular array of cuboidal clouds is studied and the interaction of the sides of the clouds with each other and the ground is considered. The theory is developed for black clouds and is extended to scattering clouds using a variable azimuth two-stream approximation. It is shown that geometrical considerations often dominate over the microphysical aspects of radiative transfer through the clouds. For example, the difference in simulated 10 micron brightness temperature between black isothermal cubic clouds and cubic clouds of optical depth 10, is less than 2 deg for zenith angles less than 50 deg for all cloud fractions when viewed parallel to the array. The results show that serious errors are made in flux and cooling rate computations if broken clouds are modeled as planiform. Radiances computed by the usual practice of area-weighting cloudy and clear sky radiances are in error by 2 to 8 K in brightness temperature for cubic clouds over a wide range of cloud fractions and zenith angles. It is also shown that the lapse rate does not markedly affect the exiting radiances for cuboidal clouds of unit aspect ratio and optical depth 10.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Radiation-Absorbed Dose Estimation of {sup 166}Ho Microspheres in Liver Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Seevinck, Peter R.; Maat, Gerrit H. van de; Wit, Tim C. de; Vente, Maarten A.D.; Nijsen, Johannes F.W.; Bakker, Chris J.G.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for accurate assessment of the three-dimensional {sup 166}Ho activity distribution to estimate radiation-absorbed dose distributions in {sup 166}Ho-loaded poly (L-lactic acid) microsphere ({sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS) liver radioembolization. Methods and Materials: MRI, computed tomography (CT), and single photon emission CT (SPECT) experiments were conducted on an anthropomorphic gel phantom with tumor-simulating gel samples and on an excised human tumor-bearing liver, both containing known amounts of {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS. Three-dimensional radiation-absorbed dose distributions were estimated at the voxel level by convolving the {sup 166}Ho activity distribution, derived from quantitative MRI data, with a {sup 166}Ho dose point-kernel generated by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code) and from Medical Internal Radiation Dose Pamphlet 17. MRI-based radiation-absorbed dose distributions were qualitatively compared with CT and autoradiography images and quantitatively compared with SPECT-based dose distributions. Both MRI- and SPECT-based activity estimations were validated against dose calibrator measurements. Results: Evaluation on an anthropomorphic phantom showed that MRI enables accurate assessment of local {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS mass and activity distributions, as supported by a regression coefficient of 1.05 and a correlation coefficient of 0.99, relating local MRI-based mass and activity calculations to reference values obtained with a dose calibrator. Estimated MRI-based radiation-absorbed dose distributions of {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS in an ex vivo human liver visually showed high correspondence to SPECT-based radiation-absorbed dose distributions. Quantitative analysis revealed that the differences in local and total amounts of {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS estimated by MRI, SPECT, and the dose calibrator were within 10%. Excellent agreement was observed between MRI- and SPECT-based dose

  4. Rational Molecular Design and Synthesis of Highly Thermo- and Photostable Near-Infrared-Absorbing Heptamethine Cyanine Dyes with the Use of Fluorine Atoms.

    PubMed

    Funabiki, Kazumasa; Yagi, Kazutaka; Ueta, Masato; Nakajima, Mitsuru; Horiuchi, Masako; Kubota, Yasuhiro; Mastui, Masaki

    2016-08-22

    Highly thermo- and photostable, near-infrared-absorbing heptamethine cyanine dyes were achieved with the use of fluorine-containing components. In particular, one prepared heptamethine cyanine dye, bearing a tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate as a counter anion and an N-ethyl-2,2,2-trifluoroacetamido group at the meso position, showed not only a high decomposition temperature (Tdt ), but also very high photostability toward white LED irradiation. PMID:27355196

  5. ON THE ANISOTROPY OF NUCLEI MID-INFRARED RADIATION IN NEARBY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Huan; Wang, JunXian; Liu, Teng E-mail: jxw@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-01-20

    In the center of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), the dusty torus absorbs the radiation from the central engine and reemits in mid-infrared (MIR). Observations have detected moderate anisotropy in the dust MIR emission, in the way that type 1 AGNs (type1s) are mildly brighter in MIR comparing with type 2 sources (type2s). However, type1s and type2s were found to follow statistically the same tight MIR-hard X-ray correlation, suggesting that the MIR emission is highly isotropic assuming that the hard X-ray radiation is inclination independent. We argue that this discrepancy could be solved considering that the hard X-ray emission in AGNs is also mildly anisotropic, as we recently discovered. To verify this diagram, we compare the subarcsecond 12 μm flux densities of type1s and type2s using the [O IV] λ25.89 μm emission line as an isotropic luminosity indicator. We find that on average type1s are brighter in nuclei 12 μm radiation by a factor of 2.6 ± 0.6 than type2s at given [O IV] λ25.89 μm luminosities, confirming the mild anisotropy of the nuclei 12 μm emission. We show that the anisotropy of the 12 μm emission we detected is in good agreement with radiative transfer models of clumpy tori. The fact that type1s and type2s follow the same tight MIR-hard X-ray correlation instead supports that both the MIR emission and hard X-ray emission in AGNs are mildly anisotropic.

  6. Preparation of thermal infrared and microwave absorber using SrTiO3/BaFe12O19/polyaniline nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Hossein; Zamani, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    In this research, first, SrTiO3 was synthesized as thermal infrared (TIR) absorbent and core and then BaFe12O19 as microwave absorbent was prepared on SrTiO3 via co-precipitation method as first shell. Second, polyaniline (PANI) was coated on SrTiO3/BaFe12O19 NPs (NPs) via in situ polymerization by multi core-shell structures (SrTiO3/BaFe12O19/PANI). Nanometer size and structures of samples were measured by TEM, XRD and FTIR. Morphology of nanocomposite was showed by SEM images. The magnetic and electric properties were also performed by VSM and four probe methods. The TIR absorption and microwave reflection loss of nanocomposites were investigated at 10-40 μm and 8-12 GHz, TIR and microwave frequencies, respectively. The results showed that the SrTiO3/BaFe12O19/PANI nanocomposites have good compatible electric and magnetic properties and hence the microwave absorbency show wide bandwidth properties. The infrared thermal image testing showed that the ability of infrared thermal imaging was increased by increasing SrTiO3/BaFe12O19 as core and independent to increasing PANI as final shell.

  7. Atlas of albedo and absorbed solar radiation derived from Nimbus 7 earth radiation budget data set, November 1985 to October 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. Louis; Rutan, David; Bess, T. Dale

    1992-01-01

    An atlas of monthly mean global contour maps of albedo and absorbed solar radiation is presented for 21 months from Nov. 1985 to Oct. 1987. These data were retrieved from measurements made by the shortwave wide-field-of-view radiometer of the Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) instrument aboard the Nimbus 7 spacecraft. Profiles of zonal mean albedos and absorbed solar radiation were tabulated. These geographical distributions are provided as a resource for researchers studying the radiation budget of the Earth. The El Nino/Southern Oscillation event of 1986-1987 is included in this data set. This atlas of albedo and absorbed solar radiation extends to 12 years the period covered by two similar atlases: NASA RP-1230 (Jul. 1975 - Oct. 1978) and NASA RP-1231 (Nov. 1978 - Oct. 1985). These three compilations complement the atlases of outgoing longwave radiation by Bess and Smith in NASA RP-1185, RP-1186, and RP-1261, which were also based on the Nimbus 6 and 7 ERB data.

  8. Analysis of the selected optical parameters of filters protecting against hazardous infrared radiation

    PubMed Central

    Gralewicz, Grzegorz; Owczarek, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The paper analyses the selected optical parameters of protective optic filters used for protection of the eyes against hazardous radiation within the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectrum range. The indexes characterizing transmission and reflection of optic radiation incident on the filter are compared. As it follows from the completed analysis, the newly developed interference filters provide more effective blocking of infrared radiation in comparison with the currently used protective filters. PMID:26327153

  9. Magnetic Field Discontinuity as a New Brighter Source of Infrared Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, Y.-L.; Roy, P.; Tremblay, B.; Nucara, A.; Lupi, S.; Calvani, P.; Gerschel, A.

    1998-02-01

    Strong emission of highly collimated infrared radiation demonstrates the presence of dipole edge emission and transient undulator radiation emission. The photon flux and spatial distribution for the Super-ACO sources (both dipole edge and wiggler) including coherence effects have been evaluated using the exact expression for the emission of a charged particle. The excellent agreement between these results and measurements performed at the SIRLOIN (Spectroscopie en Infrarouge LOINtain) beam line provides a new level of understanding of infrared synchrotron radiation.

  10. Analysis of the selected optical parameters of filters protecting against hazardous infrared radiation.

    PubMed

    Gralewicz, Grzegorz; Owczarek, Grzegorz

    2016-09-01

    The paper analyses the selected optical parameters of protective optic filters used for protection of the eyes against hazardous radiation within the visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectrum range. The indexes characterizing transmission and reflection of optic radiation incident on the filter are compared. As it follows from the completed analysis, the newly developed interference filters provide more effective blocking of infrared radiation in comparison with the currently used protective filters. PMID:26327153

  11. [Calculation and simulation on infrared radiation of hot jet from engine].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Xun; Tong, Zhong-Xiang; Wang, Chao-Zhe; Tong, Qi; Li, He; Zhang, Zhi-Bo

    2013-01-01

    Spectral distribution of infrared radiation from plume by the method to calculate infrared radiance of the gaze direction in small sight field was calculated. Based on numerical value and form of radiative transfer equation, infrared radiant intensity of the gaze direction was calculated using the Malkmus statistical narrow-band model and CG approach. Flow field and mole fraction distribution were simulated using a FLUENT computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software. Infrared imaging simulation model of hot jet was established. The hot jet's infrared images of liquid rocket engine were generated. The results demonstrate that the method can detect well-resolved fine structure of flow field. And the model is also applicable to calculation and simulation on infrared radiation of hot jet from engine. PMID:23586213

  12. Frequency selective infrared sensors

    DOEpatents

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2013-05-28

    A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

  13. Frequency selective infrared sensors

    DOEpatents

    Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2014-11-25

    A frequency selective infrared (IR) photodetector having a predetermined frequency band. The exemplary frequency selective photodetector includes: a dielectric IR absorber having a first surface and a second surface substantially parallel to the first surface; an electrode electrically coupled to the first surface of the dielectric IR absorber; and a frequency selective surface plasmonic (FSSP) structure formed on the second surface of the dielectric IR absorber. The FSSP structure is designed to selectively transmit radiation in the predetermined frequency band that is incident on the FSSP structure substantially independent of the angle of incidence of the incident radiation on the FSSP structure.

  14. Infrared floodlight

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Robert E.; English, George J.

    1986-08-05

    An infrared floodlight assembly designed particularly for security purposes and including a heat-conducting housing, a lens secured to the housing to provide a closure therefor, and a floodlight located within (and surrounded by) the housing. The floodlight combines the use of a tungsten halogen light source and dichroic hot and cold mirrors for directing substantially only infrared radiation toward the assembly's forward lens. Visible radiation is absorbed by the housing's interior wall(s) and, optionally, by a filter located between the floodlight and lens. An optional means may be used within the floodlight to reflect all forward radiation back toward the paraboloidal hot mirror or, alternatively, to reflect only visible radiation in this direction. The dichroic hot and cold mirrors preferably each comprise a glass substrate having multiple layers of titanium dioxide and silicon dioxide thereon.

  15. [Estimation of Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation for Winter Wheat Based on Hyperspectral Characteristic Parameters].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Cai, Huan-jie; Li, Zhi-jun

    2015-09-01

    Estimating fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) precisely has great importance for detecting vegetation water content, energy and carbon cycle balance. Based on this, ASD FieldSpec 3 and SunScan canopy analyzer were applied to measure the canopy spectral reflectance and photosynthetically active radiation over whole growth stage of winter wheat. Canopy reflectance spectral data was used to build up 24 hyperspectral characteristic parameters and the correlation between FPAR and different spectral characteristic parameters were analyzed to establish the estimation model of FPAR for winter wheat. The results indicated that there were extremely significant correlations (p<0.01) between FPAR and hyperspectral characteristic parameters except the slope of blue edge (Db). The correlation coefficient between FPAR and the ratio of red edge area to blue edge area (VI4) was the highest, reaching at 0.836. Seven spectral parameters with higher correlation coefficient were selected to establish optimal linear and nonlinear estimation models of FPAR, and the best estimating models of FPAR were obtained by accuracy analysis. For the linear model, the inversin model between green edge and FPAR was the best, with R2, RMSE and RRMSE of predicted model reaching 0.679, 0.111 and 20.82% respectively. For the nonlinear model, the inversion model between VI2 (normalized ratio of green peak to red valley of reflectivity) and FPAR was the best, with R2, RMSE and RRMSE of predicted model reaching 0.724, 0.088 and 21.84% for. In order to further improve the precision of the model, the multiple linear regression and BP neural network methods were used to establish models with multiple high spectral parameters BP neural network model (R2=0.906, RMSE=0.08, RRMSE=16.57%) could significantly improve the inversion precision compared with the single variable model. The results show that using hyperspectral characteristic parameters to estimate FPAR of winter wheat is

  16. Backward Monte Carlo analysis on stray radiation of an infrared optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xue; Sun, Chuang; Xia, Xinlin

    2013-09-01

    In an infrared optical system, the thermal radiation of high temperature components is the major noise as stray radiation that degrades the system performance. Backward Monte Carlo method based on radiation distribution factor is proposed to perform the stray radiation calculation. Theoretical deduction and some techniques are presented, considering the semitransparent element like IR window as radiation emitter. The radiation distribution factors are calculated with ray tracing from the detector to radiation sources. Propagation of stray radiation and its distribution on the detector are obtained simultaneously. It is unnecessary to implement ray tracing again to study the effect of different temperatures for a given system, expect that the geometry or radiative property is changed. An infrared system is simulated using this method. Two different situations are discussed and the analysis shows that stray radiation is mainly created by IR window and lens tube.

  17. Infrared [Fe II] Emission Lines from Radiative Atomic Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Raymond, John C.; Kim, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    [Fe II] emission lines are prominent in the infrared (IR) and important as diagnostic tools for radiative atomic shocks. We investigate the emission characteristics of [Fe II] lines using a shock code developed by te{raymond1979} with updated atomic parameters. We first review general characteristics of the IR [Fe II] emission lines from shocked gas, and derive their fluxes as a function of shock speed and ambient density. We have compiled available IR [Fe II] line observations of interstellar shocks and compare them to the ratios predicted from our model. The sample includes both young and old supernova remnants in the Galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud and several Herbig-Haro objects. We find that the observed ratios of the IR [Fe II] lines generally fall on our grid of shock models, but the ratios of some mid-IR lines, e.g., fethreefive/fetwofive, fefive/fetwofive, and fefive/feoneseven, are significantly offset from our model grid. We discuss possible explanations and conclude that while uncertainties in the shock modeling and the observations certainly exist, the uncertainty in atomic rates appears to be the major source of discrepancy.

  18. Biological Effects of Sunlight, Ultraviolet Radiation, Visible Light, Infrared Radiation and Vitamin D for Health.

    PubMed

    Holick, Michael F

    2016-03-01

    Humans evolved in sunlight and had depended on sunlight for its life giving properties that was appreciated by our early ancestors. However, for more than 40 years the lay press and various medical and dermatology associations have denounced sun exposure because of its association with increased risk for skin cancer. The goal of this review is to put into perspective the many health benefits that have been associated with exposure to sunlight, ultraviolet A (UVA) ultraviolet B (UVB), visible and infrared radiation. PMID:26977036

  19. Radiation absorbed from dental implant radiography: a comparison of linear tomography, CT scan, and panoramic and intra-oral techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Danforth, R.A.; Barnes, R.W.; Burtch, M.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Absorbed radiation dose in bone marrow, thyroid, salivary gland, eye, and skin entrance was determined by placement of lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD's) at selected anatomical sites within and on a human-like x-ray phantom. The phantom was exposed to radiation from linear tomographic and computer-assisted tomographic (CT) simulated dental implant radiographic examinations. The mean dose was determined for each anatomical site. Resulting dose measurements from linear tomography and computer-assisted tomography are compared with reported panoramic and intra-oral doses. CT examination delivered the greatest dose, while linear tomography was generally lowest. Panoramic and intra-oral doses were similar to those of linear tomography.

  20. Measurements of a prototype synchrotron radiation pumped absorber for future light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, T. S.; Foerster, C. L.; Halama, H.; Lanni, C.

    1988-09-01

    In the new generation of advanced synchrotron light sources, the conventional concept of distributed pumping is no longer suitable for removing the gas load caused by photon stimulated desorption (PSD). A new concept using a combination of photon absorber and pumping station has been designed, constructed, and installed in the U10B beam line at the VUV ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The system consists of an electrically insulated water cooled copper block, a titanium sublimation pump, calibrated BA gauges, a calibrated RGA, and a known conductance. A photon beam 10 milliradian wide and 3.26 milliradian high, having critical energy of 500 eV, is directed on the absorber. PSD yield is studied as a function of total beam dose and absorber surface preparation. The results from this experiment, pump characteristics, design of an absorber pump for future light sources, and the pressure improvement factors will be presented.

  1. Measurements of a prototype synchrotron radiation pumped absorber for future light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.S.; Foerster, C.L.; Halama, H.; Lanni, C.

    1988-01-01

    In the new generation of advanced synchrotron light sources, the conventional concept of distributed pumping is no longer suitable for removing the gas load caused by photon stimulated desorption (PSD). A new concept using a combination of photon absorber and pumping station has been designed, constructed, and installed in the U1OB beam line at the VUV ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The system consists of an electrically insulated water cooled copper block, a titanium sublimation pump, calibrated BA gauges, a calibrated RGA, and a known conductance. A photon beam 10 milliradian wide and 3.26 milliradian high, having critical energy of 500 eV, is directed on the absorber. PSD yield is studied as a function of total beam dose and absorber surface preparation. The results from this experiment, pump characteristics, design of an absorber pump for future light sources, and the pressure improvement factors will be presented. 5 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    'Infrared' is a very wide field in physics and the natural sciences which has evolved enormously in recent decades. It all started in 1800 with Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel's discovery of infrared (IR) radiation within the spectrum of the Sun. Thereafter a few important milestones towards widespread use of IR were the quantitative description of the laws of blackbody radiation by Max Planck in 1900; the application of quantum mechanics to understand the rotational-vibrational spectra of molecules starting in the first half of the 20th century; and the revolution in source and detector technologies due to micro-technological breakthroughs towards the end of the 20th century. This has led to much high-quality and sophisticated equipment in terms of detectors, sources and instruments in the IR spectral range, with a multitude of different applications in science and technology. This special issue tries to focus on a few aspects of the astonishing variety of different disciplines, techniques and applications concerning the general topic of infrared radiation. Part of the content is based upon an interdisciplinary international conference on the topic held in 2012 in Bad Honnef, Germany. It is hoped that the information provided here may be useful for teaching the general topic of electromagnetic radiation in the IR spectral range in advanced university courses for postgraduate students. In the most general terms, the infrared spectral range is defined to extend from wavelengths of 780 nm (upper range of the VIS spectral range) up to wavelengths of 1 mm (lower end of the microwave range). Various definitions of near, middle and far infrared or thermal infrared, and lately terahertz frequencies, are used, which all fall in this range. These special definitions often depend on the scientific field of research. Unfortunately, many of these fields seem to have developed independently from neighbouring disciplines, although they deal with very similar topics in respect of the

  3. Heat localization for targeted tumor treatment with nanoscale near-infrared radiation absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Bin; Singh, Ravi; Torti, F. M.; Keblinski, Pawel; Torti, Suzy

    2012-09-01

    Focusing heat delivery while minimizing collateral damage to normal tissues is essential for successful nanoparticle-mediated laser-induced thermal cancer therapy. We present thermal maps obtained via magnetic resonance imaging characterizing laser heating of a phantom tissue containing a multiwalled carbon nanotube inclusion. The data demonstrate that heating continuously over tens of seconds leads to poor localization (∼ 0.5 cm) of the elevated temperature region. By contrast, for the same energy input, heat localization can be reduced to the millimeter rather than centimeter range by increasing the laser power and shortening the pulse duration. The experimental data can be well understood within a simple diffusive heat conduction model. Analysis of the model indicates that to achieve 1 mm or better resolution, heating pulses of ∼2 s or less need to be used with appropriately higher heating power. Modeling these data using a diffusive heat conduction analysis predicts parameters for optimal targeted delivery of heat for ablative therapy.

  4. Intercomparison of three microwave/infrared high resolution line-by-line radiative transfer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, F.; Garcia, S. Gimeno; Milz, M.; Kottayil, A.; Höpfner, M.; von Clarmann, T.; Stiller, G.

    2013-05-01

    An intercomparison of three line-by-line (lbl) codes developed independently for atmospheric sounding - ARTS, GARLIC, and KOPRA - has been performed for a thermal infrared nadir sounding application assuming a HIRS-like (High resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder) setup. Radiances for the HIRS infrared channels and a set of 42 atmospheric profiles from the "Garand dataset" have been computed. Results of this intercomparison and a discussion of reasons of the observed differences are presented.

  5. Satellite Infrared Radiation Measurements Prior to the Major Earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Pulintes, S.; Bryant, N.; Taylor, Patrick; Freund, F.

    2005-01-01

    This work describes our search for a relationship between tectonic stresses and increases in mid-infrared (IR) flux as part of a possible ensemble of electromagnetic (EM) phenomena that may be related to earthquake activity. We present and &scuss observed variations in thermal transients and radiation fields prior to the earthquakes of Jan 22, 2003 Colima (M6.7) Mexico, Sept. 28 .2004 near Parkfield (M6.0) in California and Northern Sumatra (M8.5) Dec. 26,2004. Previous analysis of earthquake events has indicated the presence of an IR anomaly, where temperatures increased or did not return to its usual nighttime value. Our procedures analyze nighttime satellite data that records the general condtion of the ground after sunset. We have found from the MODIS instrument data that five days before the Colima earthquake the IR land surface nighttime temperature rose up to +4 degrees C in a 100 km radius around the epicenter. The IR transient field recorded by MODIS in the vicinity of Parkfield, also with a cloud free environment, was around +1 degree C and is significantly smaller than the IR anomaly around the Colima epicenter. Ground surface temperatures near the Parkfield epicenter four days prior to the earthquake show steady increase. However, on the night preceding the quake, a significant drop in relative humidity was indicated, process similar to those register prior to the Colima event. Recent analyses of continuous ongoing long- wavelength Earth radiation (OLR) indicate significant and anomalous variability prior to some earthquakes. The cause of these anomalies is not well understood but could be the result of a triggering by an interaction between the lithosphere-hydrosphere and atmospheric related to changes in the near surface electrical field and/or gas composition prior to the earthquake. The OLR anomaly usually covers large areas surrounding the main epicenter. We have found strong anomalies signal (two sigma) along the epicentral area signals on Dec 21

  6. Study of Banana Dehydration Using Sequential Infrared Radiation and Freeze-Drying

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The drying and quality characteristics of banana slices processed with a sequential infrared radiation and freeze-drying (SIRFD) method were investigated. To study the drying characteristics of bananas during the infrared (IR) and hot air predehydration, Cavendish bananas slices with 5 mm thickness...

  7. Infrared Aerosol Radiative Forcing at the Surface and the Top of the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Flatau, Piotr J.; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2003-01-01

    We study the clear-sky aerosol radiative forcing at infrared wavelengths using data from the Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) cruise of the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown. Limited number of data points is analyzed mostly from ship and collocated satellite values. An optical model is derived from chemical measurements, lidar profiles, and visible extinction measurements which is used to and estimate the infrared aerosol optical thickness and the single scattering albedo. The IR model results are compared to detailed Fourier Transform Interferometer based infrared aerosol forcing estimates, pyrgeometer based infrared downward fluxes, and against the direct solar forcing observations. This combined approach attests for the self-consistency of the optical model and allows to derive quantities such as the infrared forcing at the top of the atmosphere or the infrared optical thickness. The mean infrared aerosol optical thickness at 10 microns is 0.08 and the single scattering albedo is 0.55. The modeled infrared aerosol forcing reaches 10 W/sq m during the cruise, which is a significant contribution to the total direct aerosol forcing. The surface infrared aerosol radiative forcing is between 10 to 25% of the shortwave aerosol forcing. The infrared aerosol forcing at the top of the atmosphere can go up to 19% of the solar aerosol forcing. We show good agreement between satellite (CERES instrument) retrievals and model results at the top of the atmosphere. Over the Sea of Japan, the average infrared radiative forcing is 4.6 W/sq m in the window region at the surface and it is 1.5 W/sq m at top of the atmosphere. The top of the atmosphere IR forcing efficiency is a strong function of aerosol temperature while the surface IR forcing efficiency varies between 37 and 55 W/sq m (per infrared optical depth unit). and changes between 10 to 18 W/sq m (per infrared optical depth unit).

  8. Productivity, absorbed photosynthetically active radiation, and light use efficiency in crops: implications for remote sensing of crop primary production.

    PubMed

    Gitelson, Anatoly A; Peng, Yi; Arkebauer, Timothy J; Suyker, Andrew E

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation productivity metrics such as gross primary production (GPP) at the canopy scale are greatly affected by the efficiency of using absorbed radiation for photosynthesis, or light use efficiency (LUE). Thus, close investigation of the relationships between canopy GPP and photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation is the basis for quantification of LUE. We used multiyear observations over irrigated and rainfed contrasting C3 (soybean) and C4 (maize) crops having different physiology, leaf structure, and canopy architecture to establish the relationships between canopy GPP and radiation absorbed by vegetation and quantify LUE. Although multiple LUE definitions are reported in the literature, we used a definition of efficiency of light use by photosynthetically active "green" vegetation (LUE(green)) based on radiation absorbed by "green" photosynthetically active vegetation on a daily basis. We quantified, irreversible slowly changing seasonal (constitutive) and rapidly day-to-day changing (facultative) LUE(green), as well as sensitivity of LUE(green) to the magnitude of incident radiation and drought events. Large (2-3-fold) variation of daily LUE(green) over the course of a growing season that is governed by crop physiological and phenological status was observed. The day-to-day variations of LUE(green) oscillated with magnitude 10-15% around the seasonal LUE(green) trend and appeared to be closely related to day-to-day variations of magnitude and composition of incident radiation. Our results show the high variability of LUE(green) between C3 and C4 crop species (1.43 g C/MJ vs. 2.24 g C/MJ, respectively), as well as within single crop species (i.e., maize or soybean). This implies that assuming LUE(green) as a constant value in GPP models is not warranted for the crops studied, and brings unpredictable uncertainties of remote GPP estimation, which should be accounted for in LUE models. The uncertainty of GPP estimation due to facultative and

  9. Development of models for thermal infrared radiation above and within plant canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paw u, Kyaw T.

    1992-01-01

    Any significant angular dependence of the emitted longwave radiation could result in errors in remotely estimated energy budgets or evapotranspiration. Empirical data and thermal infrared radiation models are reviewed in reference to anisotropic emissions from the plant canopy. The biometeorological aspects of linking longwave models with plant canopy energy budgets and micrometeorology are discussed. A new soil plant atmosphere model applied to anisotropic longwave emissions from a canopy is presented. Time variation of thermal infrared emission measurements is discussed.

  10. On the conversion of infrared radiation from fission reactor-based photon engine into parallel beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulevich, Andrey V.; Levchenko, Vladislav E.; Loginov, Nicolay I.; Kukharchuk, Oleg F.; Evtodiev, Denis A.; Zrodnikov, Anatoly V.

    2002-01-01

    The efficiency of infrared radiation conversion from photon engine based on fission reactor into parallel photon beam is discussed. Two different ways of doing that are considered. One of them is to use the parabolic mirror to convert of infrared radiation into parallel photon beam. The another one is based on the use of special lattice consisting of numerous light conductors. The experimental facility and some results are described. .

  11. Moisture Diffusivity Characteristics of Rough Rice Under Infrared Radiation Heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To design an efficient infrared (IR) dryer for rough rice, it is important to understand the drying behavior of rice grains under infrared heating. The objective of this study was to determine the moisture diffusivity and moisture diffusivity coefficient of rough rice under IR heating and cooling. ...

  12. High field CdS detector for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Boer, K. W.; Hadley, H. C.; Robertson, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    New and highly sensitive method of detecting infrared irradiation makes possible solid state infrared detector which is more sensitive near room temperature than usual photoconductive low band gap semiconductor devices. Reconfiguration of high field domains in cadmium sulphide crystals provides basis for discovery.

  13. Improved estimates of the radiation absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Martin; Minarik, David; Johansson, Lennart; Mattsson, Sören; Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid

    2014-05-01

    Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) have been calculated as a function of the content in the urinary bladder in order to allow more realistic calculations of the absorbed dose to the bladder wall. The SAFs were calculated using the urinary bladder anatomy from the ICRP male and female adult reference computational phantoms. The urinary bladder and its content were approximated by a sphere with a wall of constant mass, where the thickness of the wall depended on the amount of urine in the bladder. SAFs were calculated for males and females with 17 different urinary bladder volumes from 10 to 800 mL, using the Monte Carlo computer program MCNP5, at 25 energies of mono-energetic photons and electrons ranging from 10 KeV to 10 MeV. The decay was assumed to be homogeneously distributed in the urinary bladder content and the urinary bladder wall, and the mean absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall was calculated. The Monte Carlo simulations were validated against measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeters. The SAFs obtained for a urine volume of 200 mL were compared to the values calculated for the urinary bladder wall using the adult reference computational phantoms. The mean absorbed dose to the urinary wall from 18F-FDG was found to be 77 µGy/MBq formales and 86 µGy/MBq for females, while for 99mTc-DTPA the mean absorbed doses were 80 µGy/MBq for males and 86 µGy/MBq for females. Compared to calculations using a constant value of the SAF from the adult reference computational phantoms, the mean absorbed doses to the bladder wall were 60% higher for 18F-FDG and 30% higher for 99mTc-DTPA using the new SAFs.

  14. Improving solar radiation absorbance of high refractory sintered ceramics by fs Ti:sapphire laser surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, E.; Orlando, S.; Sciti, D.; Bellucci, A.; Lettino, A.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2014-05-01

    Samples of high refractory pressure-less sintered carbide ceramics (HfC based), polished by mechanical grinding to a surface roughness Ra ∼ 40 nm, have been surface treated, in vacuum, by fs Ti:sapphire laser, operating at 800 nm wavelength, 1000 Hz repetition rate and 100 fs pulse duration, at fluence varying in the range (∼6-25 J/cm2), to optimize their solar radiation absorbance, in such a way that they could operate as absorber material in an innovative conversion module of solar radiation into electrical energy. To this aim, an area of approximately 9.6 cm2 was treated by the fs laser beam. The beam strikes perpendicular to the sample, placed on a stage set in motion in the x, y, z-directions, thus generating a scanning pattern of parallel lines. The experimental conditions of laser treatment (energy fluence, speed of transition, overlapping and lateral step distance) were varied in order to optimize the radiation absorption properties of the patterned surface. In laser treated samples the absorption value is increased by about 15%, compared to the original untreated surface, up to a value of final absorbance of about 95%, all over the range of solar radiation spectrum (from UV to IR). The morphological and chemical effects of the treatment have been evaluated by SEM-EDS analysis. At very high fluence, we obtained the characteristic ablation craters and local material decomposition, while at lower fluence (in any case above the threshold) typical periodic nano-structures have been obtained, exploitable for their modified optical properties.

  15. Average fetal depth in utero: data for estimation of fetal absorbed radiation dose

    SciTech Connect

    Ragozzino, M.W.; Breckle, R.; Hill, L.M.; Gray, J.E.

    1986-02-01

    To estimate fetal absorbed dose from radiographic examinations, the depth from the anterior maternal surface to the midline of the fetal skull and abdomen was measured by ultrasound in 97 pregnant women. The relationships between fetal depth, fetal presentation, and maternal parameters of height, weight, anteroposterior (AP) thickness, gestational age, placental location, and bladder volume were analyzed. Maternal AP thickness (MAP) can be estimated from gestational age, maternal height, and maternal weight. Fetal midskull and abdominal depths were nearly equal. Fetal depth normalized to MAP was independent or nearly independent of maternal parameters and fetal presentation. These data enable a reasonable estimation of absorbed dose to fetal brain, abdomen, and whole body.

  16. Validation of a MOSFET dosemeter system for determining the absorbed and effective radiation doses in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Manninen, A-L; Kotiaho, A; Nikkinen, J; Nieminen, M T

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to validate a MOSFET dosemeter system for determining absorbed and effective doses (EDs) in the dose and energy range used in diagnostic radiology. Energy dependence, dose linearity and repeatability of the dosemeter were examined. The absorbed doses (ADs) were compared at anterior-posterior projection and the EDs were determined at posterior-anterior, anterior-posterior and lateral projections of thoracic imaging using an anthropomorphic phantom. The radiation exposures were made using digital radiography systems. This study revealed that the MOSFET system with high sensitivity bias supply set-up is sufficiently accurate for AD and ED determination. The dosemeter is recommended to be calibrated for energies <60 and >80 kVp. The entrance skin dose level should be at least 5 mGy to minimise the deviation of the individual dosemeter dose. For ED determination, dosemeters should be implanted perpendicular to the surface of the phantom to prevent the angular dependence error. PMID:25213263

  17. Variable waveband infrared imager

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Scott R.

    2013-06-11

    A waveband imager includes an imaging pixel that utilizes photon tunneling with a thermally actuated bimorph structure to convert infrared radiation to visible radiation. Infrared radiation passes through a transparent substrate and is absorbed by a bimorph structure formed with a pixel plate. The absorption generates heat which deflects the bimorph structure and pixel plate towards the substrate and into an evanescent electric field generated by light propagating through the substrate. Penetration of the bimorph structure and pixel plate into the evanescent electric field allows a portion of the visible wavelengths propagating through the substrate to tunnel through the substrate, bimorph structure, and/or pixel plate as visible radiation that is proportional to the intensity of the incident infrared radiation. This converted visible radiation may be superimposed over visible wavelengths passed through the imaging pixel.

  18. Electro-optic detection of continuous-wave mid-infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hua; Nahata, Ajay

    2002-10-01

    We demonstrate coherent detection of continuous-wave mid-infrared radiation. This radiation is produced by use of conventional difference-frequency mixing and detected via the linear electro-optic effect. The detection process allows for the simultaneous measurement of the amplitude and phase properties of the infrared field. Both processes require an amplitude-modulated optical beam that is derived from the superimposed output of two single-frequency lasers. With appropriate choice of lasers and nonlinear optical crystals, the technique may be applied to any wavelength throughout the far and mid infrared.

  19. Metallic oriented nanowires films for infrared radiation manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larciprete, Maria Cristina; Centini, Marco; Voti, Roberto Li; Bertolotti, Mario; Sibilia, Concita

    2016-04-01

    We developed a numerical method to model the infrared spectral properties of metal nanowires on a flat substrate. Homogenization techniques and the transfer matrix method for birefringent layered materials are merged together so as to obtain a simple but effective tool for tailoring and optimizing the infrared properties of the resulting system. Different in-plane orientations can be investigated, ranging from randomly to perfectly aligned nanowires. Furthermore, the model allows the introduction of an off-plane tilt of the nanowires axes, thus increasing designing options. Possible applications such as broad band infrared polarizers, polarizing beam splitter and polarization rotators are discussed.

  20. Finite volume method for radiative heat transfer in an unstructured flow solver for emitting, absorbing and scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazdallah, Moncef; Feldheim, Véronique; Claramunt, Kilian; Hirsch, Charles

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the implementation of the finite volume method to solve the radiative transfer equation in a commercial code. The particularity of this work is that the method applied on unstructured hexahedral meshes does not need a pre-processing step establishing a particular marching order to visit all the control volumes. The solver simply visits the faces of the control volumes as numbered in the hexahedral unstructured mesh. A cell centred mesh and a spatial differencing step scheme to relate facial radiative intensities to nodal intensities is used. The developed computer code based on FVM has been integrated in the CFD solver FINE™/Open from NUMECA Int. Radiative heat transfer can be evaluated within systems containing uniform, grey, emitting, absorbing and/or isotropically or linear anisotropically scattering medium bounded by diffuse grey walls. This code has been validated for three test cases. The first one is a three dimensional rectangular enclosure filled with emitting, absorbing and anisotropically scattering media. The second is the differentially heated cubic cavity. The third one is the L-shaped enclosure. For these three test cases a good agreement has been observed when temperature and heat fluxes predictions are compared with references taken, from literature.

  1. Effective disinfection of rough rice using infrared radiation heating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Khir, Ragab; Pan, Zhongli; El-Mashad, Hamed; Atungulu, Griffiths G; Ma, Haile; McHugh, Tara H; Qu, Wenjuan; Wu, Bengang

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of infrared (IR) heating and tempering treatments on disinfection of Aspergillus flavus in freshly harvested rough rice and storage rice. Rice samples with initial moisture contents (IMCs) of 14.1 to 27.0% (wet basis) were infected with A. flavus spores before the tests. The infected samples were heated by IR radiation to 60°C in less than 1 min, and then samples were tempered at 60°C for 5, 10, 20, 30, 60, or 120 min. High heating rates and corresponding high levels of moisture removal were achieved using IR heating. The highest total moisture removal was 5.3% for the fresh rice with an IMC of 27.0% after IR heating and then 120 min of tempering. IR heating followed by tempering for 120 min resulted in 2.5- and 8.3-log reductions of A. flavus spores in rough rice with the lowest and highest IMCs, respectively. To study the effect on disinfection of rewetting dried storage rice, the surface of the dry rice was rewetted to achieve IMCs of 14.7 to 19.4% (wet basis). The rewetting process for the dry rice had a significant effect on disinfection. IR heating followed by tempering for 60 min resulted in 7.2-log reductions in A. flavus on rewetted rough rice. The log-linear plus tail model was applied to estimate the tempering time needed to achieve a 5-log reduction of A. flavus in rice of different IMCs. At least 30 and 20 min of tempering were needed for fresh rice and rewetted rice, respectively, with the highest IMCs. The recommended conditions of simultaneous disinfection and drying for fresh rice was IR heating to 60°C followed by tempering for 120 min and natural cooling, resulting in a final MC of 16.5 to 22.0%, depending on the IMC. For the rewetted dry rice with an IMC of 19.4%, the recommended condition for disinfection and drying involved only 20 min of tempering. The final MC of the sample was 13.8%, which is a safe MC for storage rice. PMID:25198845

  2. Development of a GPU-based high-performance radiative transfer model for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Bormin; Mielikainen, Jarno; Oh, Hyunjong; Allen Huang, Hung-Lung

    2011-03-20

    Satellite-observed radiance is a nonlinear functional of surface properties and atmospheric temperature and absorbing gas profiles as described by the radiative transfer equation (RTE). In the era of hyperspectral sounders with thousands of high-resolution channels, the computation of the radiative transfer model becomes more time-consuming. The radiative transfer model performance in operational numerical weather prediction systems still limits the number of channels we can use in hyperspectral sounders to only a few hundreds. To take the full advantage of such high-resolution infrared observations, a computationally efficient radiative transfer model is needed to facilitate satellite data assimilation. In recent years the programmable commodity graphics processing unit (GPU) has evolved into a highly parallel, multi-threaded, many-core processor with tremendous computational speed and very high memory bandwidth. The radiative transfer model is very suitable for the GPU implementation to take advantage of the hardware's efficiency and parallelism where radiances of many channels can be calculated in parallel in GPUs. In this paper, we develop a GPU-based high-performance radiative transfer model for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) launched in 2006 onboard the first European meteorological polar-orbiting satellites, METOP-A. Each IASI spectrum has 8461 spectral channels. The IASI radiative transfer model consists of three modules. The first module for computing the regression predictors takes less than 0.004% of CPU time, while the second module for transmittance computation and the third module for radiance computation take approximately 92.5% and 7.5%, respectively. Our GPU-based IASI radiative transfer model is developed to run on a low-cost personal supercomputer with four GPUs with total 960 compute cores, delivering near 4 TFlops theoretical peak performance. By massively parallelizing the second and third modules, we reached 364x

  3. Development of a GPU-based high-performance radiative transfer model for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bormin; Mielikainen, Jarno; Oh, Hyunjong; Allen Huang, Hung-Lung

    2011-03-01

    Satellite-observed radiance is a nonlinear functional of surface properties and atmospheric temperature and absorbing gas profiles as described by the radiative transfer equation (RTE). In the era of hyperspectral sounders with thousands of high-resolution channels, the computation of the radiative transfer model becomes more time-consuming. The radiative transfer model performance in operational numerical weather prediction systems still limits the number of channels we can use in hyperspectral sounders to only a few hundreds. To take the full advantage of such high-resolution infrared observations, a computationally efficient radiative transfer model is needed to facilitate satellite data assimilation. In recent years the programmable commodity graphics processing unit (GPU) has evolved into a highly parallel, multi-threaded, many-core processor with tremendous computational speed and very high memory bandwidth. The radiative transfer model is very suitable for the GPU implementation to take advantage of the hardware's efficiency and parallelism where radiances of many channels can be calculated in parallel in GPUs. In this paper, we develop a GPU-based high-performance radiative transfer model for the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) launched in 2006 onboard the first European meteorological polar-orbiting satellites, METOP-A. Each IASI spectrum has 8461 spectral channels. The IASI radiative transfer model consists of three modules. The first module for computing the regression predictors takes less than 0.004% of CPU time, while the second module for transmittance computation and the third module for radiance computation take approximately 92.5% and 7.5%, respectively. Our GPU-based IASI radiative transfer model is developed to run on a low-cost personal supercomputer with four GPUs with total 960 compute cores, delivering near 4 TFlops theoretical peak performance. By massively parallelizing the second and third modules, we reached 364

  4. Latest Development of Infrared Radiation Heating for Food Processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infrared (IR) heating could be an alternative technology for thermal and dehydration processing of food and agricultural products with many advantages, including high process and energy efficiencies, high product quality, improved food safety and reduced environmental pollution. This paper reviews ...

  5. Eye safety related to near infrared radiation exposure to biometric devices.

    PubMed

    Kourkoumelis, Nikolaos; Tzaphlidou, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Biometrics has become an emerging field of technology due to its intrinsic security features concerning the identification of individuals by means of measurable biological characteristics. Two of the most promising biometric modalities are iris and retina recognition, which primarily use nonionizing radiation in the infrared region. Illumination of the eye is achieved by infrared light emitting diodes (LEDs). Even if few LED sources are capable of causing direct eye damage as they emit incoherent light, there is a growing concern about the possible use of LED arrays that might pose a potential threat. Exposure to intense coherent infrared radiation has been proven to have significant effects on living tissues. The purpose of this study is to explore the biological effects arising from exposing the eye to near infrared radiation with reference to international legislation. PMID:21380486

  6. Silicone rubber curing by high intensity infrared radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, T.; Tsai, J.; Cherng, C.; Chen, J.

    1994-08-10

    A high-intensity (12 kW) and compact (80 cm) infrared heating oven for fast curing (12 seconds) of tube-like silicone rubber curing studies is reported. Quality inspection by DSC and DMA and results from pilot-scale curing oven all suggest that infrared heating provides a better way of vulcanization regarding to curing time, quality, cost, and spacing over conventional hot air heating. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  7. Conversion of recoilless γ radiation into a periodic sequence of short intense pulses in a set of several sequentially placed resonant absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radeonychev, Y. V.; Antonov, V. A.; Vagizov, F. G.; Shakhmuratov, R. N.; Kocharovskaya, Olga

    2015-10-01

    An efficient technique for producing a periodic sequence of short nearly bandwidth-limited pulses of recoilless γ radiation via its transmission through an optically thick vibrating resonant absorber was demonstrated recently [Nature (London) 508, 80 (2014), 10.1038/nature13018]. In this paper we extend the theoretical analysis to a case of multiple absorbers. We analyze a simple physical model describing control of spectral content of a frequency modulated γ radiation by adjusting the amplitudes and initial phases of spectral components, using the resonant absorption and dispersion in a set of several sequentially placed resonant absorbers. On the basis of analytical solutions, we determine the ultimate possibilities of the proposed technique.

  8. Inferring total canopy APAR from PAR bidirectional reflectances and vegetation indices in tallgrass prairie. [Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    1992-01-01

    The fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by a vegetated canopy (APARc) or landscape (APARs) is a critical parameter in climate processes. A grassland study examined: 1) whether APARs can be estimated from PAR bidirectional exitance fractions; and 2) whether APARs is correlated with spectral vegetation indices (SVIs). Data were acquired with a high resolution continuous spectroradiometer at 4 sun angles on grassland sites. APARs was computed from the scattered surface PAR exitance fractions. The nadir APARs value was the most variable diurnally; it provided a good estimate of the average surface APARs at 95 percent. APARc was best represented by exitance factors between 30-60* forward.

  9. Estimating the Infrared Radiation Wavelength Emitted by a Remote Control Device Using a Digital Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catelli, Francisco; Giovannini, Odilon; Bolzan, Vicente Dall Agnol

    2011-01-01

    The interference fringes produced by a diffraction grating illuminated with radiation from a TV remote control and a red laser beam are, simultaneously, captured by a digital camera. Based on an image with two interference patterns, an estimate of the infrared radiation wavelength emitted by a TV remote control is made. (Contains 4 figures.)

  10. Study of Banana Dehydration using Sequential Infrared Radiation Heating and Freeze-Drying

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The drying and quality characteristics of banana slices processed with a sequential infrared radiation and freeze drying (SIRFD) method were investigated. Cavendish banana slices with 5 mm thickness were predehydrated using IR heating at each one of three radiation intensities, 3000, 4000, and 5000...

  11. Near-field imaging and nano-Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy using broadband synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Peter; Hoehl, Arne; Patoka, Piotr; Huth, Florian; Rühl, Eckart; Ulm, Gerhard

    2013-02-11

    We demonstrate scanning near-field optical microscopy with a spatial resolution below 100 nm by using low intensity broadband synchrotron radiation in the IR regime. The use of such a broadband radiation source opens up the possibility to perform nano-Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy over a wide spectral range. PMID:23481749

  12. Measurement of absorbed dose rate of gamma radiation for lead compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudraswamy, B.; Dhananjaya, N.; Manjunatha, H. C.

    2010-07-01

    An attempt has been made to estimate the absorbed dose rate using both theoretical and measured mass energy attenuation coefficient of gamma for the lead compounds such as PbNO 3, PbCl 2, PbO 2 and PbO using various gamma sources such as 22Na (511, 1274), 137Cs (661.6), 54Mn (835) and 60Co (1173, 1332 keV).

  13. Radiation absorbed dose estimates for oxygen-15 radiopharmaceuticals (H2( V)O, C VO, O VO) in newborn infants

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, W.J.; Stabin, M.; Howse, D.; Eichling, J.O.; Herscovitch, P.

    1988-12-01

    In preparation for measurement of regional cerebral oxygen metabolism by positron emission tomography, radiation absorbed dose estimates for 19 internal organs, blood, and total body were calculated for newborn infants following bolus intravenous administration of H2( V)O and brief inhalation of C VO and O VO. Cumulated activity for each radiopharmaceutical was calculated from a compartmental model based on the known biologic behavior of the compound. Values for mean absorbed dose/unit cumulated activity (S) for internal organs and total body were based on a newborn phantom. S was separately calculated for blood. Total radiopharmaceutical absorbed dose estimates necessary to measure cerebral oxygen metabolism in a 3.51-kg infant based on 0.7 mCi/kg H2( V)O and 1 mCi/kg C VO and O VO were determined to be 1.6 rad to the lung (maximum organ dose), 0.28 rad to the marrow, 0.46 rad to the gonads, and 0.22 rad to total body. These values are similar to those for current clinical nuclear medicine procedures employing /sup 99m/Tc in newborn infants.

  14. Reverse-directional explosive crystallization of microstructures in transparent film on absorbing substrate by a multipulse femtosecond radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshin, A. S.; Pronin, I. P.; Zhigaliny, O. M.; Presniakov, M. Yu.; Khmelenin, D. N.; Mishina, E. D.; Emel'yanov, V. I.

    2015-12-01

    The crystallization in a transparent precursor of a perovskite ferroelectric film deposited on an absorbing platinized silicon substrate initiated by multipulse femtosecond sharply focused laser beam of near-infrared spectral range is studied by transmission electron microscopy. Time dependences of the shapes of crystallized areas point to initiation of explosive crystallization with a seed on the opposite side of a heat source localized in a platinum interface layer. The radius of the crystalized semispheres varies from 150 to 900 nm, with maximal crystallization velocity up to 1.2 cm/s. Reverse direction of the spherical wave front propagation regarding to a heat source is explained in terms of the developed model based on thermal stress-induced modification of the activation energy.

  15. Light Absorbing Impurities in Snow in the Western US: Partitioning Radiative Impacts from Mineral Dust and Black Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiles, M.; Painter, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Melt of annual mountain snow cover dominates water resources in the western United States. Recent studies in the Upper Colorado River Basin have shown that radiative forcing by light absorbing impurities (LAIs) in mountain snow cover has accelerated snowmelt, impacted runoff timing and magnitude, and reduced annual flow. However, these studies have assumed that LAIs are primarily mineral dust, and have not quantified the radiative contribution by carbonaceous particles from bio and fossil fuel (industrial and urban) sources. Here we quantify both dust and black carbon (BC) content and assess the unique BC radiative forcing contribution in this dust dominated impurity regime using a suite of advanced field, lab, and modeling techniques. Daily measurements of surface spectral albedo and optical grain radius were collected with a field spectrometer over the 2013 spring melt season in Senator Beck Basin Study Area in the San Juan Mountains, CO, Southwestern US. Coincident snow samples were collected daily and processed for; (1) dust and BC content (2) impurity particle size, and (3) impurity optical properties. Measured snow and impurity properties were then used to drive the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) model. Partitioning the unique radiative contribution from each constituents is achieved through unique model runs for clean snow, dust only, and BC only.

  16. Radiation hardness by design for mixed signal infrared readout circuit applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaalema, Stephen; Gates, James; Dobyns, David; Pauls, Greg; Wall, Bruce

    2013-09-01

    Readout integrated circuits (ROICs) to support space-based infrared detection applications often have severe radiation tolerance requirements. Radiation hardness-by-design (RHBD) significantly enhances the radiation tolerance of commercially available CMOS and custom radiation hardened fabrication techniques are not required. The combination of application specific design techniques, enclosed gate architecture nFETs and intrinsic thin oxide radiation hardness of 180 nm process node commercial CMOS allows realization of high performance mixed signal circuits. Black Forest Engineering has used RHBD techniques to develop ROICs with integrated A/D conversion that operate over a wide range of temperatures (40K-300K) to support infrared detection. ROIC radiation tolerance capability for 256x256 LWIR area arrays and 1x128 thermopile linear arrays is presented. The use of 130 nm CMOS for future ROIC RHBD applications is discussed.

  17. Fabrication of an absorber-coupled MKID detector and readout for sub-millimeter and far-infrared astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ari-David; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Moseley, S. Harvey; Stevenson, Thomas R.; U-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-07-01

    We have fabricated absorber-coupled microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) arrays for sub-millimeter and farinfrared astronomy. Each detector array is comprised of λ/2 stepped impedance resonators, a 1.5μm thick silicon membrane, and 380μm thick silicon walls. The resonators consist of parallel plate aluminum transmission lines coupled to low impedance Nb microstrip traces of variable length, which set the resonant frequency of each resonator. This allows for multiplexed microwave readout and, consequently, good spatial discrimination between pixels in the array. The Al transmission lines simultaneously act to absorb optical power and are designed to have a surface impedance and filling fraction so as to match the impedance of free space. Our novel fabrication techniques demonstrate high fabrication yield of MKID arrays on large single crystal membranes and sub-micron front-to-back alignment of the microstrip circuit.

  18. Dual-band infrared perfect absorber for plasmonic sensor based on the electromagnetically induced reflection-like effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Ying Qiao; Jin, Xing Ri; Zhang, Shou; Lee, Young Pak

    2016-07-01

    We present a scheme for realizing a narrow-dual-band perfect absorber based on the plasmonic analogy of the electromagnetically induced reflection (EIR)-like effect. In our scheme, two short gold bars are excited strongly by incident plane wave serving as the bright mode. The middle gold bar is excited by two short gold bars. Due to the strong hybridization between the two short gold bars and the middle gold bar, two absorption peaks occur. The corresponding absorption rates are both over 99%. The quality factors of the two absorption peaks are 41.76 (198.47 THz) and 71.42 (207.79 THz), respectively, and the narrow-distance of the two absorption peaks is 9.32 THz. Therefore, they are narrow enough for the absorber to be a filter and a dual-band plasmonic sensor.

  19. Fabrication of an Absorber-Coupled MKID Detector and Readout for Sub-Millimeter and Far-Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari-David; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Moseley, S. Harvey; Stevenson, Thomas R.; U-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We have fabricated absorber-coupled microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) arrays for sub-millimeter and farinfrared astronomy. Each detector array is comprised of lambda/2 stepped impedance resonators, a 1.5µm thick silicon membrane, and 380µm thick silicon walls. The resonators consist of parallel plate aluminum transmission lines coupled to low impedance Nb microstrip traces of variable length, which set the resonant frequency of each resonator. This allows for multiplexed microwave readout and, consequently, good spatial discrimination between pixels in the array. The Al transmission lines simultaneously act to absorb optical power and are designed to have a surface impedance and filling fraction so as to match the impedance of free space. Our novel fabrication techniques demonstrate high fabrication yield of MKID arrays on large single crystal membranes and sub-micron front-to-back alignment of the microstrip circuit.

  20. Photosynthesis, Growth, and Ultraviolet Irradiance Absorbance of Cucurbita pepo L. Leaves Exposed to Ultraviolet-B Radiation (280-315 nm) 1

    PubMed Central

    Sisson, William B.

    1981-01-01

    Net photosynthesis, growth, and ultraviolet (UV) radiation absorbance were determined for the first leaf of Cucurbita pepo L. exposed to two levels of UV-B irradiation and a UV-B radiation-free control treatment. Absorbance by extracted flavonoid pigments and other UV-B radiation-absorbing compounds from the first leaves increased with time and level of UV-B radiation impinging on leaf surfaces. Although absorbance of UV-B radiation by extracted pigments increased substantially, UV-B radiation attenuation apparently was insufficient to protect completely the photosynthetic apparatus or leaf growth processes. Leaf expansion was repressed by daily exposure to 1365 Joules per meter per day of biologically effective UV-B radiation but not by exposure to 660 Joules per meter per day. Photosynthesis measured through ontogenesis of the first leaf was depressed by both UV-B radiation treatments. Repression of photosynthesis by UV-B radiation was especially evident during the ontogenetic period of maximum photosynthetic activity. PMID:16661610

  1. Absorbed dose measurements for kV-cone beam computed tomography in image-guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Hioki, Kazunari; Araki, Fujio; Ohno, Takeshi; Nakaguchi, Yuji; Tomiyama, Yuuki

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we develope a novel method to directly evaluate an absorbed dose-to-water for kilovoltage-cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Absorbed doses for the kV-CBCT systems of the Varian On-Board Imager (OBI) and the Elekta X-ray Volumetric Imager (XVI) were measured by a Farmer ionization chamber with a (60)Co calibration factor. The chamber measurements were performed at the center and four peripheral points in body-type (30 cm diameter and 51 cm length) and head-type (16 cm diameter and 33 cm length) cylindrical water phantoms. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water by using a (60)Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo (MC)-calculated beam quality conversion factor, kQ, for (60)Co to kV-CBCT. The irradiation for OBI and XVI was performed with pelvis and head modes for the body- and the head-type phantoms, respectively. In addition, the dose distributions in the phantom for both kV-CBCT systems were calculated with MC method and were compared with measured values. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated at the center in the water phantom and compared with measured doses at four peripheral points. The measured absorbed doses at the center in the body-type phantom were 1.96 cGy for OBI and 0.83 cGy for XVI. The peripheral doses were 2.36-2.90 cGy for OBI and 0.83-1.06 cGy for XVI. The doses for XVI were lower up to approximately one-third of those for OBI. Similarly, the measured doses at the center in the head-type phantom were 0.48 cGy for OBI and 0.21 cGy for XVI. The peripheral doses were 0.26-0.66 cGy for OBI and 0.16-0.30 cGy for XVI. The calculated peripheral doses agreed within 3% in the pelvis mode and within 4% in the head mode with measured doses for both kV-CBCT systems. In addition, the absorbed dose determined in this study was approximately 4% lower than that in TG-61 but the absorbed dose by both methods was in agreement within their combined uncertainty. This method

  2. Infrared A radiation promotes survival of human melanocytes carrying ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kimeswenger, Susanne; Schwarz, Agatha; Födinger, Dagmar; Müller, Susanne; Pehamberger, Hubert; Schwarz, Thomas; Jantschitsch, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The link between solar radiation and melanoma is still elusive. Although infrared radiation (IR) accounts for over 50% of terrestrial solar energy, its influence on human skin is not well explored. There is increasing evidence that IR influences the expression patterns of several molecules independently of heat. A previous in vivo study revealed that pretreatment with IR might promote the development of UVR-induced non-epithelial skin cancer and possibly of melanoma in mice. To expand on this, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of IR on UVR-induced apoptosis and DNA repair in normal human epidermal melanocytes. The balance between these two effects is a key factor of malignant transformation. Human melanocytes were exposed to physiologic doses of IR and UVR. Compared to cells irradiated with UVR only, simultaneous exposure to IR significantly reduced the apoptotic rate. However, IR did not influence the repair of UVR-induced DNA damage. IR partly reversed the pro-apoptotic effects of UVR via modification of the expression and activity of proteins mainly of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. In conclusion, IR enhances the survival of melanocytes carrying UVR-induced DNA damage and thereby might contribute to melanomagenesis. PMID:26844814

  3. Cirrus microphysics and infrared radiative transfer: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Thomas P.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Valero, Francisco P. J.; Kinne, Stefan

    1988-01-01

    Coincident measurements of cirrus cloud microphysical properties such as particle size distribution and particle shape and morphology, and measurements of infrared intensity and flux were made. Data was acquired nearly simultaneously in space and time by a KingAir in cloud and by an ER-2 at an altitude of 19 km. Upwelling infrared intensities and fluxes measured from the ER-2 and observations of cloud particle size distributions and particle phase and morphology made from the KingAir are discussed. Broad-band flux measurements were available both in and below the cirrus layer from the KingAir.

  4. Radiative cryogenic cooler for the near infrared mapping spectrometer for the Galileo Jupiter Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cafferty, T. T.

    1981-01-01

    Summaries of the thermal design, analysis, and testing of a radiative cooler for the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) for the Galileo Jupiter Orbiter are presented. The radiative cooler rejects approximately 120 milliwatts of heat at a temperature of 75K when operating in the worst-case thermal environment. The cooler is designed to operate against a relatively hostile thermal environment which varies over 145 deg of instrument scan angle and which includes planetary radiation, solar radiation, and emissions from warm spacecraft surfaces (some of which rotate periodically through the radiator field of view).

  5. The measuring of the absorbed dose in human tissue that underwent irradiation with ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercea, S.; Nikolic, A.; Cenusa, C.; Celarel, A.

    2010-07-01

    Ionizing radiations are radiations of atomic origin (X) or nuclear origin (α, β, γ). They are composed of either subatomic particles (α, β) or electromagnetic waves (X, γ) which possess enough energy to remove electrons from the atoms and molecules of the medium with which particles interact. They thus generate ionizing processes. The effects that are produced by the interaction of the ionizing radiations with a particular medium (which could be human tissue) have different intensities depending on the nature of the incident radiations, on the rate in which these radiations release energy to the medium and on the total amount of energy released to the medium. For this reason, the energy released by a particular type of ionizing radiations to a particular type of medium has become of great interest both for researchers and for specialists who deal with using ionizing radiations in different fields, such as the biomedical one. The aim of the present paper is to briefly present some of the aspects connected to the way certain quantities are defined, quantities which are specific to the interaction of ionizing particles with the medium they pass through and which are also connected to the energy released in the medium. The paper also describes methods of measuring these quantities.

  6. Drying characteristics and quality of bananas under infrared radiation heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hot air (HA) drying of banana has low drying efficiency and results in undesirable product quality. The objectives of this research were to investigate the feasibility of infrared (IR) heating to improve banana drying rate, evaluate quality of the dried product, and establish models for predicting d...

  7. Moisture diffusivity of rough rice under infrared radiation drying

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To design efficient infrared (IR) dryers for rough rice, it is important to understand the drying behavior of rough rice under IR heating. The objective of this study was to determine the moisture diffusivity of rough rice under IR heating followed by cooling. The effects of initial moisture content...

  8. Effective disinfection of rough rice using infrared radiation heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of infrared (IR) heating and tempering treatments on disinfection of Aspergillus flavus in freshly harvested rough rice and storage rice. Rice samples with initial moisture contents (IMCs) of 14.1 to 27.0% (wet basis) were infected with A. fl...

  9. Development and commercialization of emerging infrared radiation food processing technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to demonstrate a newly developed simultaneous infrared dry-blanching and dehydration (SIRDBD) technology on an industrial scale, a mobile and continuous IR heating system was built and tested to examine its performance for SIRDBD of sliced and diced potatoes. The mobile IR heating equipment...

  10. Invisible Misconceptions: Student Understanding of Ultraviolet and Infrared Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libarkin, Julie C.; Asghar, Anila; Crockett, C.; Sadler, Philip

    2011-01-01

    The importance of nonvisible wavelengths for the study of astronomy suggests that student understanding of nonvisible light is an important consideration in astronomy classrooms. Questionnaires, interviews, and panel discussions were used to investigate 6-12 student and teacher conceptions of ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR). Alternative…

  11. MEASUREMENT OF MICROWAVE RADIATION ABSORBED BY BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS. 1. ANALYSIS OF HEATING AND COOLING DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order for meaningful comparisons to be made between experiments from different laboratories, reliable dosimetry is needed for biological systems exposed to microwave radiation. An improved analytical method is presented for determining energy absorption which uses heating and ...

  12. Waveguide integrated superconducting single-photon detectors implemented as near-perfect absorbers of coherent radiation.

    PubMed

    Akhlaghi, Mohsen K; Schelew, Ellen; Young, Jeff F

    2015-01-01

    At the core of an ideal single-photon detector is an active material that absorbs and converts every incident photon to a discriminable signal. A large active material favours efficient absorption, but often at the expense of conversion efficiency, noise, speed and timing accuracy. In this work, short (8.5 μm long) and narrow (8 × 35 nm(2)) U-shaped NbTiN nanowires atop silicon-on-insulator waveguides are embedded in asymmetric nanobeam cavities that render them as near-perfect absorbers despite their small volume. At 2.05 K, when biased at 0.9 of the critical current, the resulting superconducting single-photon detectors achieve a near-unity on-chip quantum efficiency for ∼1,545 nm photons, an intrinsic dark count rate <0.1 Hz, a reset time of ∼7 ns, and a timing jitter of ∼55 ps full-width at half-maximum. Such ultracompact, high-performance detectors are essential for progress in integrated quantum optics. PMID:26359204

  13. Waveguide integrated superconducting single-photon detectors implemented as near-perfect absorbers of coherent radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, Mohsen K.; Schelew, Ellen; Young, Jeff F.

    2015-09-01

    At the core of an ideal single-photon detector is an active material that absorbs and converts every incident photon to a discriminable signal. A large active material favours efficient absorption, but often at the expense of conversion efficiency, noise, speed and timing accuracy. In this work, short (8.5 μm long) and narrow (8 × 35 nm2) U-shaped NbTiN nanowires atop silicon-on-insulator waveguides are embedded in asymmetric nanobeam cavities that render them as near-perfect absorbers despite their small volume. At 2.05 K, when biased at 0.9 of the critical current, the resulting superconducting single-photon detectors achieve a near-unity on-chip quantum efficiency for ~1,545 nm photons, an intrinsic dark count rate <0.1 Hz, a reset time of ~7 ns, and a timing jitter of ~55 ps full-width at half-maximum. Such ultracompact, high-performance detectors are essential for progress in integrated quantum optics.

  14. AGN Obscuration Through Dusty Infrared Dominated Flows. II. Multidimensional, Radiation-Hydrodynamics Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorodnitsyn, Anton; Kallman, Tim; Bisno\\vatyiI-Kogan, Gennadyi

    2011-01-01

    We explore a detailed model in which the active galactic nucleus (AGN) obscuration results from the extinction of AGN radiation in a global ow driven by the pressure of infrared radiation on dust grains. We assume that external illumination by UV and soft X-rays of the dusty gas located at approximately 1pc away from the supermassive black hole is followed by a conversion of such radiation into IR. Using 2.5D, time-dependent radiation hydrodynamics simulations in a ux-limited di usion approximation we nd that the external illumination can support a geometrically thick obscuration via out ows driven by infrared radiation pressure in AGN with luminosities greater than 0:05 L(sub edd) and Compton optical depth, Tau(sub T) approx > & 1.

  15. Numerical study on the influence of aluminum on infrared radiation signature of exhaust plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Ye, Qing-qing; Li, Shi-peng; Wang, Ning-fei

    2013-09-01

    The infrared radiation signature of exhaust plume from solid propellant rockets has been widely mentioned for its important realistic meaning. The content of aluminum powder in the propellants is a key factor that affects the infrared radiation signature of the plume. The related studies are mostly on the conical nozzles. In this paper, the influence of aluminum on the flow field of plume, temperature distribution, and the infrared radiation characteristics were numerically studied with an object of 3D quadrate nozzle. Firstly, the gas phase flow field and gas-solid multi phase flow filed of the exhaust plume were calculated using CFD method. The result indicates that the Al203 particles have significant effect on the flow field of plume. Secondly, the radiation transfer equation was solved by using a discrete coordinate method. The spectral radiation intensity from 1000-2400 cm-1 was obtained. To study the infrared radiation characteristics of exhaust plume, an exceptional quadrate nozzle was employed and much attention was paid to the influences of Al203 particles in solid propellants. The results could dedicate the design of the divert control motor in such hypervelocity interceptors or missiles, or be of certain meaning to the improvement of ingredients of solid propellants.

  16. Determination of Radiation Absorbed Dose to Primary Liver Tumors and Normal Liver Tissue Using Post-Radioembolization 90Y PET

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Shyam M.; Natarajan, Navin; Kuroiwa, Joshua; Gallagher, Sean; Nasr, Elie; Shah, Shetal N.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Obuchowski, Nancy; Bazerbashi, Bana; Yu, Naichang; McLennan, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Background: Radioembolization with Yttrium-90 (90 Y) microspheres is becoming a more widely used transcatheter treatment for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Using post-treatment 90 Y positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) scans, the distribution of microspheres within the liver can be determined and quantitatively assessed. We studied the radiation dose of 90 Y delivered to liver and treated tumors. Methods: This retrospective study of 56 patients with HCC, including analysis of 98 liver tumors, measured and correlated the dose of radiation delivered to liver tumors and normal liver tissue using glass microspheres (TheraSpheres®) to the frequency of complications with modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECIST). 90 Y PET/CT and triphasic liver CT scans were used to contour treated tumor and normal liver regions and determine their respective activity concentrations. An absorbed dose factor was used to convert the measured activity concentration (Bq/mL) to an absorbed dose (Gy). Results: The 98 studied tumors received a mean dose of 169 Gy (mode 90–120 Gy; range 0–570 Gy). Tumor response by mRECIST criteria was performed for 48 tumors that had follow-up scans. There were 21 responders (mean dose 215 Gy) and 27 non-responders (mean dose 167 Gy). The association between mean tumor absorbed dose and response suggests a trend but did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.099). Normal liver tissue received a mean dose of 67 Gy (mode 60–70 Gy; range 10–120 Gy). There was a statistically significant association between absorbed dose to normal liver and the presence of two or more severe complications (p = 0.036). Conclusion: Our cohort of patients showed a possible dose–response trend for the tumors. Collateral dose to normal liver is non-trivial and can have clinical implications. These methods help us understand whether patient adverse events, treatment success, or

  17. A climate index derived from satellite measured spectral infrared radiation. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, M. D.; Fox, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    The vertical infrared radiative emitting structure (VIRES) climate index, based on radiative transfer theory and derived from the spectral radiances typically used to retrieve temperature profiles, is introduced. It is assumed that clouds and climate are closely related and a change in one will result in a change in the other. The index is a function of the cloud, temperature, and moisture distributions. It is more accurately retrieved from satellite data than is cloudiness per se. The VIRES index is based upon the shape and relative magnitude of the broadband weighting function of the infrared radiative transfer equation. The broadband weighting curves are retrieved from simulated satellite infrared sounder data (spectral radiances). The retrieval procedure is described and the error error sensitivities of the method investigated. Index measuring options and possible applications of the VIRES index are proposed.

  18. An inverse method for flue gas shielded metal surface temperature measurement based on infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Xu, C. L.; Wang, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    The infrared temperature measurement technique has been applied in various fields, such as thermal efficiency analysis, environmental monitoring, industrial facility inspections, and remote temperature sensing. In the problem of infrared measurement of the metal surface temperature of superheater surfaces, the outer wall of the metal pipe is covered by radiative participating flue gas. This means that the traditional infrared measurement technique will lead to intolerable measurement errors due to the absorption and scattering of the flue gas. In this paper, an infrared measurement method for a metal surface in flue gas is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The spectral emissivity of the metal surface, and the spectral absorption and scattering coefficients of the radiative participating flue gas are retrieved simultaneously using an inverse method called quantum particle swarm optimization. Meanwhile, the detected radiation energy simulated using a forward simulation method (named the source multi-flux method) is set as the input of the retrieval. Then, the temperature of the metal surface detected by an infrared CCD camera is modified using the source multi-flux method in combination with these retrieved physical properties. Finally, an infrared measurement system for metal surface temperature is built to assess the proposed method. Experimental results show that the modified temperature is closer to the true value than that of the direct measured temperature.

  19. The influence of absorbed solar radiation by Saharan dust on hurricane genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretl, Sebastian; Reutter, Philipp; Raible, Christoph C.; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Poberaj, Christina Schnadt; Revell, Laura E.; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2015-03-01

    To date, the radiative impact of dust and the Saharan air layer (SAL) on North Atlantic hurricane activity is not yet known. According to previous studies, dust stabilizes the atmosphere due to absorption of solar radiation but thus shifts convection to regions more conducive for hurricane genesis. Here we analyze differences in hurricane genesis and frequency from ensemble sensitivity simulations with radiatively active and inactive dust in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM6-HAM. We investigate dust burden and other hurricane-related variables and determine their influence on disturbances which develop into hurricanes (developing disturbances, DDs) and those which do not (nondeveloping disturbances, NDDs). Dust and the SAL are found to potentially have both inhibiting and supporting influences on background conditions for hurricane genesis. A slight southward shift of DDs is determined when dust is active as well as a significant warming of the SAL, which leads to a strengthening of the vertical circulation associated with the SAL. The dust burden of DDs is smaller in active dust simulations compared to DDs in simulations with inactive dust, while NDDs contain more dust in active dust simulations. However, no significant influence of radiatively active dust on other variables in DDs and NDDs is found. Furthermore, no substantial change in the DD and NDD frequency due to the radiative effects of dust can be detected.

  20. Theoretical analysis of infrared radiation shields of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    For a system of N diffuse, gray body radiation shields which view only adjacent surfaces and space, the net radiation method for enclosures has been used to formulate a system of linear, nonhomogeneous equations in terms of the temperatures to the fourth power of each surface in the coupled system of enclosures. The coefficients of the unknown temperatures in the system of equations are expressed in terms of configuration factors between adjacent surfaces and the emissivities. As an application, a system of four conical radiation shields for a spin stabilized STARPROBE spacecraft has been designed and analyzed with respect to variations of the cone half angles, the intershield spacings, and emissivities.

  1. Balloon measurements of the far-infrared background radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehlner, D.; Weiss, R.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a balloon-borne radiometer designed to make direct measurements of the background radiation in the spectral range from 1 to 20 cm, and evaluation of the results of two balloon flights performed with the aid of this radiometer. Measurements in five different passbands in the spectral region below 20 per cm were made with a liquid-helium-cooled radiometer in two flights at approximately 40-km altitude. The results obtained are found to be consistent with a 2.7 K thermal radiation background. In addition, an atmospheric radiation of certain magnitude is found to dominate the region above 11 per cm.

  2. Experimental scattering investigations and radiative transfer calculations of large arbitrarily shaped absorbing particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasse, Christian

    1993-12-01

    Measured optical properties of large absorbing arbitrarily shaped particulates are compared to calculated optical properties of smooth homogeneous spheres. The particulates examined are spherical carbon particles with rough surface structure and oil shale. The results of measurements of phase functions of single particles at (lambda) equals 514.5 nm and hemispherical reflectance from 450 to 1959 nm are used in an inverse two-flux model to calculate the average albedo of a single particle. For carbon particles, ideal spheres show a higher forward scatter contribution than measured properties of rough spheres. Two types of oil shale particles with different optical properties but similar size and surface structure are investigated. Particle albedo and phase functions are compared, and the error of measuring the phase function at one wavelength is investigated. Results are also compared to isotropic scattering particles.

  3. Research on power measurement device of jamming bomb based on Infrared Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shuai; Tong, Shoufeng; Song, Yansong; Dong, Yan

    2013-12-01

    In order to realize the non-connect measurement on the power and character of jamming bomb, we carried out the research on power measurement device of jamming bomb based on Infrared Radiation. First, the power and infrared radiant band of the jamming bomb was summarized and refined. Then, ensuring the feature and power of jamming bomb was characterized by the magnitude of Infrared Radiation. Afterwards, based on the theory of the above, a power measurement device of Infrared Radiation was simulated and developed. Including the selection of detector and the detector application design, analog signal processing and digital signal processing, using correlation measurement method to detect and calculate the power of device. Finally, the specific method and advantage of the device was introduced. The results of the experiment show that: the response time of the device is less than 3ms; the detection sensitivity is better than 3 x 108cm √HZ / W . The device successfully accomplished the accuracy measurement of Infrared Radiation between 1 to 20um wavelength with higher detection sensitivity and lower response time.

  4. Effect of rare earth Ce on the far infrared radiation property of iron ore tailings ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Meng, Junping; Liang, Jinsheng; Duan, Xinhui; Huo, Xiaoli; Tang, Qingguo

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Detailed process proposed for preparation of iron ore tailings ceramics. • Replace natural minerals with iron ore tailings as raw materials for preparing functional ceramics. • Impact mechanism of Ce on far infrared ceramics, as well as its optimum addition amounts can be obtained. • Propose a new perspective on considering the mechanism of far infrared radiation. - Abstract: A kind of far infrared radiation ceramics was prepared by using iron ore tailings, CaCO{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} as main raw materials, and Ce as additive. The result of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the sample exhibits excellent radiation value of 0.914 when doping 7 wt.% Ce. Ce{sup 4+} dissolved into iron diopside and formed interstitial solid solution with it sintered at 1150 °C. The oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} to Fe{sup 3+} caused by Ce{sup 4+} led to a decrease of crystallite sizes and enhancement of Mg–O and Fe–O vibration in iron diopside, which consequently improved the far infrared radiation properties of iron ore tailings ceramics.

  5. Validity criterion of the radiative Fourier law for an absorbing and scattering medium.

    PubMed

    Gomart, Hector; Taine, Jean

    2011-02-01

    For radiative heat transfer applications, in particular in homogenized phases of porous media, an exhaustive and accurate validity criterion of the radiative Fourier law, depending only on the logarithmic derivative of the temperature field and an effective absorption coefficient, accounting for possible multiple scattering phenomena, has been established for a semitransparent medium. This effective absorption coefficient is expressed as a function of the absorption coefficient, the albedo, and the scattering asymmetry parameter. The criterion can be applied to semitransparent media that do not follow Beer's laws related to extinction, absorption, and scattering. PMID:21405835

  6. Relations for local radiative heat transfer between rectangular boundaries of an absorbing-emitting medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1993-01-01

    An analytical solution was obtained by Siegel (1991, 1992) for local boundary heat fluxes by a radiating medium at uniform temperature in a 2D rectangular region. It is shown here that, after local fluxes from the medium to the walls have been evaluated, it is very easy to compute local fluxes arriving from the adjacent and opposite walls. This extends the previous analysis and provides convenient relations to include radiation from a black boundary, each side of the rectangle being at a different uniform temperature. The final expressions are helpful in performing spectral calculations that must be made for many spectral bands.

  7. Thermal radiation characteristics of silicon inverse opal in mid infrared range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Xie, Kai

    2015-03-01

    A binary solvent with large density was used as dispersant for silica spheres, in which silica spheres with large diameter can suspend steadily and disperse very well. With this suspension, fine opals with 2100 nm SiO2 mono-disperse spheres were successfully prepared by solvent evaporation method. Low pressure vapor deposition method was then used to fill the voids of the silica opals with Si, and silicon inverse opal with photonic band gaps in mid infrared region was obtained. The infrared radiation characteristic of resulted sample was examined. It is shown that silicon inverse opal structure is effective in suppressing silicon thermal radiation in the photonic band gap spectral region.

  8. Wavenumber dependent investigation of the terrestrial infrared radiation budget with two versions of the LOWTRAN5 band model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlock, T. P.

    1984-01-01

    Two versions of the LOWTRAN5 radiance code are used in a study of the earth's clear sky infrared radiation budget in the interval 30 per cm (333.3 microns) to 3530 per cm (2.8 microns). One version uses 5 per cm resolution and temperature dependent molecular absorption coefficients, and the second uses 20 per cm resolution and temperature independent molecular absorption coefficients. Both versions compare well with Nimbus 3 IRIS spectra, with some discrepancies at particular wavenumber intervals. Up and downgoing fluxes, calculated as functions of latitude, are displayed for wavenumbers at which the principle absorbers are active. Most of the variation of the fluxes with latitude is found in the higher wavenumber intervals for both clear and cloudy skies. The main features of the wavenumber integrated cooling rates are explained with reference to calculations in more restricted wavenumber intervals. A tropical lower tropospheric cooling maximum is produced by water vapor continuum effects in the 760-1240 per cm window. A secondary upper tropospheric cooling maximum, with wide meridional extent, is produced by water vapor rotational lines between 30-430 per cm. Water vapor lines throughout the terrestrial infrared spectrum prevent the upflux maximum from coinciding with the surface temperature maximum.

  9. Seasonal Variation in Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation and Vegetation Properties in Burned Forests in Interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, H.; Harazono, Y.; Iwama, C.; Ueyama, M.

    2011-12-01

    Wildfire is a major disturbance in boreal forest ecosystems, and it significantly influences carbon exchange processes. It is important to explicitly incorporate burned areas in estimating regional carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange. A simple approach to quantify regional CO2 exchange is an application of a light-use efficiency model with satellite data. The model calculates CO2 uptake from light-use efficiency and absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). In the regional application, the fraction of absorbed PAR (FAPAR) provided from MODIS satellite data, together with incident PAR, is often used to calculate absorbed PAR. In spite of the importance of FAPAR in estimating CO2 uptake, an earlier study revealed that the MODIS FAPAR data are overestimated for a burned boreal forest. This study aims to provide ground truth data to validate MODIS FAPAR in other burned boreal forests. It also focuses on obtaining an empirical relationship to estimate seasonal and interannual variation in FAPAR from satellite data such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) in the early stage of recovery after wildfire. We observed incident, reflected, and transmitted PAR to obtain FAPAR in one- and six-year-old burned black spruce forests. Vegetation properties such as NDVI, leaf area index (LAI), and vegetation cover were also observed to explain seasonal variation of FAPAR. CO2 flux was also continuously monitored using the eddy covariance technique. The analysis showed that MODIS FAPAR was overestimated in the two burned forests, and the degree of overestimation was especially large for the younger burned forest. The relationship between FAPAR and NDVI was similar at the two burned forests, implying that this single relationship can be applied to estimate FAPAR from MODIS NDVI regardless of age after wildfire for the early stage of recovery.

  10. Toward the development of transcriptional biodosimetry for the identification of irradiated individuals and assessment of absorbed radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Brzóska, Kamil; Kruszewski, Marcin

    2015-08-01

    The most frequently used and the best established method of biological dosimetry at present is the dicentric chromosome assay, which is poorly suitable for a mass casualties scenario. This gives rise to the need for the development of new, high-throughput assays for rapid identification of the subjects exposed to ionizing radiation. In the present study, we tested the usefulness of gene expression analysis in blood cells for biological dosimetry. Human peripheral blood from three healthy donors was X-irradiated with doses of 0 (control), 0.6, and 2 Gy. The mRNA level of 16 genes (ATF3, BAX, BBC3, BCL2, CDKN1A, DDB2, FDXR, GADD45A, GDF15, MDM2, PLK3, SERPINE1, SESN2, TNFRSF10B, TNFSF4, and VWCE) was assessed by reverse transcription quantitative PCR 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after exposure with ITFG1 and DPM1 used as a reference genes. The panel of radiation-responsive genes was selected comprising GADD45A, CDKN1A, BAX, BBC3, DDB2, TNFSF4, GDF15, and FDXR. Cluster analysis showed that ΔC t values of the selected genes contained sufficient information to allow discrimination between irradiated and non-irradiated blood samples. The samples were clearly grouped according to the absorbed doses of radiation and not to the time interval after irradiation or to the blood donor. PMID:25972268

  11. Resonant infrared detector with substantially unit quantum efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam (Inventor); Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A resonant infrared detector includes an infrared-active layer which has first and second parallel faces and which absorbs radiation of a given wavelength. The detector also includes a first tuned reflective layer, disposed opposite the first face of the infrared-active layer, which reflects a specific portion of the radiation incident thereon and allows a specific portion of the incident radiation at the given wavelength to reach the infrared-active layer. A second reflective layer, disposed opposite the second face of the infrared-active layer, reflects back into the infrared-active layer substantially all of the radiation at the given wavelength which passes through the infrared-active layer. The reflective layers have the effect of increasing the quantum efficiency of the infrared detector relative to the quantum efficiency of the infrared-active layer alone.

  12. Force, torque, and absorbed energy for a body of arbitrary shape and constitution in an electromagnetic radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsund, Ø.; Felderhof, B. U.

    1996-02-01

    The force and torque exerted on a body of arbitrary shape and constitution by a stationary radiation field are in principle given by integrals of Minkowski's stress tensor over a surface surrounding the body. Similarly the absorbed energy is given by an integral of the Poynting vector. These integrals are notoriously difficult to evaluate, and so far only spherical bodies have been considered. It is shown here that the integrals may be cast into a simpler form by use of Debye potentials. General expressions for the integrals are derived as sums of bilinear expressions in the coefficients of the expansion of the incident and scattered waves in terms of vector spherical waves. The expressions are simplified for small particles, such as atoms, for which the electric dipole approximation may be used. It is shown that the calculation is also relevant for bodies with nonlinear electromagnetic response.

  13. Multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-76: relationship to radiation dose absorbed by marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimaru, M.; Ishimaru, T.; Mikami, M.; Matsunaga, M.

    1982-08-01

    The relationship between atomic bomb exposure and the incidence of multiple myeloma has been examined in a fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors and controls in the life-span study sample for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. From October 1950 to December 1976, 29 cases of multiple myeloma were confirmed in this sample. Our analysis shows that the standardized relative risk (RR) adjusted for city, sex, and age at the time of bombings (ATB) increased with marrow-absorbed radiation dose. The increased RR does not appear to differ between cities or sexes and is demonstrable only for those survivors whose age ATB was between 20 and 59 years. The estimated risk in these individuals is approximately 0.48 cases/million person-years/rad for bone marrow total dose. This excess risk did not become apparent in individuals receiving 50 rad or more in marrow total dose until 20 years or more after exposure.

  14. Multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-76: relationship to radiation dose absorbed by marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimaru, M.; Ishimaru, T.; Mikami, M.; Matsunaga, M.

    1982-08-01

    The relationship between atomic bomb exposure and the incidence of multiple myeloma has been examined in a fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors and controls in the life-span study sample for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. From October 1950 to December 1976, 29 cases of multiple myeloma were confirmed in this sample. Our analysis shows that the standardized relative risk (RR) adjusted for city, sex, and age at the time of bombings (ATB) increased with marrow-absorbed radiation dose. The increased RR does not appear to differ between cities or sexes and is demonstrable only for those survivors whose age ATB was between 20 and 59 years. The estimaged risk in these individuals is approximately 0.48 cases/million person-years/rad for bone marrow total dose. This excess risk did not become apparent in individuals receiving 50 rad or more in marrow total dose until 20 years or more after exposure.

  15. Infrared luminescence for real time ionizing radiation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Veronese, Ivan Mattia, Cristina De; Cantone, Marie Claire; Fasoli, Mauro; Chiodini, Norberto; Vedda, Anna; Mones, Eleonora

    2014-08-11

    Radio-luminescence (RL) optical fiber sensors enable a remote, punctual, and real time detection of ionizing radiation. However, the employment of such systems for monitoring extended radiation fields with energies above the Cerenkov threshold is still challenging, since a spurious luminescence, namely, the “stem effect,” is also generated in the passive fiber portion exposed to radiation. Here, we present experimental measurements on Yb-doped silica optical fibers irradiated with photon fields of different energies and sizes. The results demonstrate that the RL of Yb{sup 3+}, displaying a sharp emission line at about 975 nm, is free from any spectral superposition with the spurious luminescence. This aspect, in addition with the suitable linearity, reproducibility, and sensitivity properties of the Yb-doped fibers, paves the way to their use in applications where an efficient stem effect removal is required.

  16. Biophysical properties affecting vegetative canopy reflectance and absorbed photosynthetically active radiation at the FIFE site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter-Shea, E. A.; Blad, B. L.; Hays, C. J.; Mesarch, M. A.; Deering, D. W.; Middleton, E. M.

    1992-01-01

    Leaves of the dominant grass species of the ISCLP FIFE site reflect and transmit radiation in a like manner to other healthy green leaves. Visible reflectance factors (RFs) and transmittance factors (TFs) were less for older leaves than younger leaves except during senescence, when RF and TF values were greater. NIR-RF values increased and TF values decreased with leaf age, with the reverse occurring as the leaf went through senescence.

  17. Interaction of laser radiation with a low-density structured absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, V. B.; Barishpol'tsev, D. V.; Vergunova, G. A.; Demchenko, N. N.; Ivanov, E. M.; Aristova, E. N.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Limpouch, I.; Ulschmidt, I.

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical model is proposed for computing simulations of laser radiation interaction with inhomogeneous foam materials doped with heavy elements and undoped materials. The model satisfactorily describes many experiments on the interaction of the first and third harmonics of a 200 J pulsed PALS iodine laser with low-density porous cellulose triacetate targets. The model can be used to analyze experimental data and estimate the reality of experimental results.

  18. Relative Efficiency of TLD-100 to Linear Energy Transfer Radiation: Correction to Astronaut Absorbed Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.; Cash, B. L.; Semones, E. J.; Yasuda, H.; Fujitaka, K.

    1999-01-01

    Response of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD-100) to high linear energy transfer (LET) particles has been studied using helium, carbon, silicon, and iron ions from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator at Chiba (Japan), iron ions from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (NY) Alternate Gradient Synchrotron, and 53, 134, 185, and 232 MeV protons from the Loma Linda accelerator. Using the measured relative (to (137)Cs dose efficiency, and measured LET spectra from a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) on 20 Space Shuttle flights, and 7 Mir flights, the underestimation of absorbed dose by these detectors has been evaluated. The dose underestimation is between 15-20% depending upon the flight inclination and shielding location. This has been confirmed by direct correlation of measured dose by TEPC and TLD-100 at a low shielded location in the Shuttle mid-deck. A comparison of efficiency- LET data with a compilation of similar data from TLD-700, shows that shapes of the two curves are nearly identical, but that the TLD-100 curve is systematically lower by about 13%, and is the major cause of dose underestimation. These results strongly suggest that TLDs used for crew dose estimation be regularly calibrated using heavy ions.

  19. Relative Efficiency of TLD-100 to High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation: Correction to Astronaut Absorbed Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cash, B. L.; Semones, E. J.; Yasuda, H.; Fujitaka, K.

    1999-01-01

    Response of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD-100) to high linear energy transfer (LET) particles has been studied using helium, carbon, silicon, and iron ions from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator at Chiba (Japan), iron ions from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (NY) Alternate Gradient Synchrotron, and 53, 134, 185, and 232 MeV protons from the Loma Linda accelerator. Using the measured relative (to 137Cs) dose efficiency, and measured LET spectra from a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) on 20 Space Shuttle flights, and 7 Mir flights, the underestimation of absorbed dose by these detectors has been evaluated. The dose underestimation is between 15-20% depending upon the flight inclination and shielding location. This has been confirmed by direct correlation of measured dose by TEPC and TLD-100 at a low shielded location in the Shuttle mid-deck. A comparison of efficiency- LET data with a compilation of similar data from TLD-700, shows that shapes of the two curves are nearly identical, but that the TLD-100 curve is systematically lower by about 13%, and is the major cause of dose underestimation. These results strongly suggest that TLDs used for crew dose estimation be regularly calibrated using heavy ions.

  20. The Effects of an Absorbing Smoke Layer on MODIS Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Optical Property Retrievals and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Clouds, aerosols, and their interactions are widely considered to be key uncertainty components in our current understanding of the Earth's atmosphere and radiation budget. The work presented here is focused on the quasi-permanent marine boundary layer . (MBL) clouds off the southern Atlantic coast of Africa and the effects on MODIS cloud optical property retrievals (MOD06) of an overlying absorbing smoke layer. During much of August and September, a persistent smoke layer resides over this region, produced from extensive biomass burning throughout the southern African savanna. The resulting absorption, which increases with decreasing wavelength, potentially introduces biases into the MODIS cloud optical property retrievals of the underlying MBL clouds. This effect is more pronounced in the cloud optical thickness retrievals, which over ocean are derived from the wavelength channel centered near 0.86 micron (effective particle size retrievals are derived from the longer-wavelength near-IR channels at 1.6, 2.1, and 3.7 microns). Here, the spatial distributions of the scalar statistics of both the cloud and aerosol layers are first determined from the CALIOP 5 km layer products. Next, the MOD06 look-up tables (LUTs) are adjusted by inserting an absorbing smoke layer of varying optical thickness over the cloud. Retrievals are subsequently performed for a subset of MODIS pixels collocated with the CALIOP ground track, using smoke optical thickness from the CALIOP 5km aerosol layer product to select the appropriate LUT. The resulting differences in cloud optical property retrievals due to the inclusion of the smoke layer in the LUTs will be examined. In addition, the direct radiative forcing of this smoke layer will be investigated from the perspective of the cloud optical property retrieval differences.

  1. Effects of simultaneously fiber transmitted erbium and holmium radiation on the interaction with highly absorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenz, Martin; Pratisto, Hans S.; Ith, Michael; Koenz, Flurin; Weber, Heinz P.

    1995-05-01

    Erbium and Holmium lasers have both been shown to be suitable for orthopedic surgery performed under water. Erbium lasers emitting in the 3 micrometers wavelength region corresponding to the maximum water absorption peak effectively ablated biological tissues with high precision and minimal thermal damage. Holmium laser radiation at 2 micrometers , due to a lower absorption coefficient, is characterized by a greater extent of thermal damage leading to hemostasis. To combine the special advantages of each system we simultaneously coupled their radiation into a zirconium fluoride fiber (ZrF4) which was protected with a quartz fiber tip. Pressure measurements performed in the liquid using a piezo electrical transducer, transmission measurements and video flash lamp schlieren imaging of the laser induced vapor bubble were used in order to determine optimum laser parameters. The cutting efficiency of the Erbium laser is drastically improved when a low energy Holmium laser pulse is additionally used which is just able to open a vapor channel through which the Erbium laser pulse can be transmitted. The dynamics of the channel formation, geometry and life time are measured as a function of the delay time between the two different laser pulses and the pulse energy applied. The combination of 2 micrometers and 3 micrometers radiation seems to be an ideal instrument for tissue treatment.

  2. Polarization of far-infrared radiation from molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, G.; Gonatas, D.P.; Hildebrand, R.H.; Platt, S.R.; Dragovan, M. AT T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ )

    1989-10-01

    The paper reports measurements of the polarization of far-infrared emission from dust in nine molecular clouds. Detections were obtained in Mon R2, in the Kleinmann-Low (KL) nebula in Orion, and in Sgr A. Upper limits were set for six other clouds. A comparison of the 100 micron polarization of KL with that previously measured at 270 microns provides new evidence that the polarization is due to emission from magnetically aligned dust grains. Comparing the results for Orion with measurements at optical wavelengths, it is inferred that the magnetic field direction in the outer parts of the Orion cloud is the same as that in the dense core. This direction is nearly perpendicular to the ridge of molecular emission and is parallel to both the molecular outflow in KL and the axis of rotation of the cloud core. In Mon R2, the field direction which the measurements imply does not agree withthat derived from 0.9-2.2 micron polarimetry. The discrepancy is attributed to scattering in the near-infrared. In Orion and Sgr A, where comparisons are possible, the measurements are in good agreement with 10 micron polarization measurements. 55 refs.

  3. Polarization of far-infrared radiation from molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, G.; Gonatas, D. P.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Platt, S. R.; Dragovan, M.

    1989-01-01

    The paper reports measurements of the polarization of far-infrared emission from dust in nine molecular clouds. Detections were obtained in Mon R2, in the Kleinmann-Low (KL) nebula in Orion, and in Sgr A. Upper limits were set for six other clouds. A comparison of the 100 micron polarization of KL with that previously measured at 270 microns provides new evidence that the polarization is due to emission from magnetically aligned dust grains. Comparing the results for Orion with measurements at optical wavelengths, it is inferred that the magnetic field direction in the outer parts of the Orion cloud is the same as that in the dense core. This direction is nearly perpendicular to the ridge of molecular emission and is parallel to both the molecular outflow in KL and the axis of rotation of the cloud core. In Mon R2, the field direction which the measurements imply does not agree withthat derived from 0.9-2.2 micron polarimetry. The discrepancy is attributed to scattering in the near-infrared. In Orion and Sgr A, where comparisons are possible, the measurements are in good agreement with 10 micron polarization measurements.

  4. Thermal damage of tissue during near-infrared laser irradiation with assistance of light-absorbing dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnyawali, Surya C.; Le, Kelvin; Le, Henry; Wicksted, James P.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Liu, Hong; Chen, Yichao; Chen, Wei R.

    2008-02-01

    The selective photothermal-tissue interaction using dye enhancement has been proven to be effective in minimizing the peripheral normal tissue damage during cancer treatment. It is important that the tissue-thermal damage be analyzed and the damage rate process be estimated before the photothermal-immunotherapy for cancer treatment. In this study, we have used the EMT6 mouse tumor model for the laser-tumor treatment with a simultaneous surface temperature measurement using infrared thermography. The images acquired were processed to obtain the temperature profiles. The saturation temperature and corresponding time of irradiation from the temporal profiles were used to calculate the damage parameter using Arrhenius rate process equation. The damage parameters obtained from six mice were compared. Our results of in vivo study show that the damage analyses agree with the previous in vitro study on skins.

  5. Measurement of thermal radiation using regular glass optics and short-wave infrared detectors.

    PubMed

    Yoon, H W; Eppeldauer, G P

    2008-01-21

    The measurement of thermal radiation from ambient-temperature objects using short-wave infrared detectors and regular glass optics is described. The detectors are chosen to operate in the 2.0 microm to 2.5 microm atmospheric window. Selection of detectors with high shunt resistance along with the 4-stage thermo-electric cooling of the detectors to -85 degrees C results in detectivity, D*, of 4 x 10(13) cm Hz(1/2)/W which is near the background limited performance at 295 K. Furthermore, the use of regular-glass commercial optics to collect the thermal radiation results in diffraction-limited imaging. The use of a radiation thermometer constructed with these elements for the measurement of a blackbody from 20 degrees C to 50 degrees C results in noise-equivalent temperature difference (NETD) of < 3 mK at 50 degrees C. The operation at shorter wavelengths than traditional thermal sensors also leads to lower sensitivity to the emissivity of the object in determining the temperature of the object. These elements are used to construct a calibrator for an infrared collimator, and such a system demonstrates noise-equivalent irradiances of < 5 fW/cm(2). These results indicate that radiometers using short-wave infrared sensors could be constructed utilizing commercial glass optics with possible better performance and lower NETD than existing radiometers using cryogenically-cooled mid-infrared or thermal infrared detectors. PMID:18542168

  6. Infrared Radiography: Modeling X-ray Imaging without Harmful Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zietz, Otto; Mylott, Elliot; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Planar x-ray imaging is a ubiquitous diagnostic tool and is routinely performed to diagnose conditions as varied as bone fractures and pneumonia. The underlying principle is that the varying attenuation coefficients of air, water, tissue, bone, or metal implants within the body result in non-uniform transmission of x-ray radiation. Through the…

  7. IPR 1.0: an efficient method for calculating solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Chen, W.; Li, J.

    2014-07-01

    Climate change may alter the spatial distribution, composition, structure and functions of plant communities. Transitional zones between biomes, or ecotones, are particularly sensitive to climate change. Ecotones are usually heterogeneous with sparse trees. The dynamics of ecotones are mainly determined by the growth and competition of individual plants in the communities. Therefore it is necessary to calculate the solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in order to understand and predict their responses to climate change. In this study, we developed an individual plant radiation model, IPR (version 1.0), to calculate solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities. The model is developed based on geometrical optical relationships assuming that crowns of woody plants are rectangular boxes with uniform leaf area density. The model calculates the fractions of sunlit and shaded leaf classes and the solar radiation absorbed by each class, including direct radiation from the sun, diffuse radiation from the sky, and scattered radiation from the plant community. The solar radiation received on the ground is also calculated. We tested the model by comparing with the results of random distribution of plants. The tests show that the model results are very close to the averages of the random distributions. This model is efficient in computation, and can be included in vegetation models to simulate long-term transient responses of plant communities to climate change. The code and a user's manual are provided as Supplement of the paper.

  8. IPR 1.0: an efficient method for calculating solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Chen, W.; Li, J.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change may alter the spatial distribution, composition, structure, and functions of plant communities. Transitional zones between biomes, or ecotones, are particularly sensitive to climate change. Ecotones are usually heterogeneous with sparse trees. The dynamics of ecotones are mainly determined by the growth and competition of individual plants in the communities. Therefore it is necessary to calculate solar radiation absorbed by individual plants for understanding and predicting their responses to climate change. In this study, we developed an individual plant radiation model, IPR (version 1.0), to calculate solar radiation absorbed by individual plants in sparse heterogeneous woody plant communities. The model is developed based on geometrical optical relationships assuming crowns of woody plants are rectangular boxes with uniform leaf area density. The model calculates the fractions of sunlit and shaded leaf classes and the solar radiation absorbed by each class, including direct radiation from the sun, diffuse radiation from the sky, and scattered radiation from the plant community. The solar radiation received on the ground is also calculated. We tested the model by comparing with the analytical solutions of random distributions of plants. The tests show that the model results are very close to the averages of the random distributions. This model is efficient in computation, and is suitable for ecological models to simulate long-term transient responses of plant communities to climate change.

  9. The Assignment of the Different Infrared Continuum Absorbance Changes Observed in the 3000–1800-cm−1 Region during the Bacteriorhodopsin Photocycle

    PubMed Central

    Garczarek, Florian; Wang, Jianping; El-Sayed, Mostafa A.; Gerwert, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    The bleach continuum in the 1900–1800-cm−1 region was reported during the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) and was assigned to the dissociation of a polarizable proton chain during the proton release step. More recently, a broad band pass filter was used and additional infrared continua have been reported: a bleach at >2700 cm−1, a bleach in the 2500–2150-cm−1 region, and an absorptive behavior in the 2100–1800-cm−1 region. To fully understand the importance of the hydrogen-bonded chains in the mechanism of the proton transport in bR, a detailed study is carried out here. Comparisons are made between the time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy experiments on wild-type bR and its E204Q mutant (which has no early proton release), and between the changes in the continua observed in thermally or photothermally heated water (using visible light-absorbing dye) and those observed during the photocycle. The results strongly suggest that, except for the weak bleach in the 1900–1800-cm−1 region and >2500 cm−1, there are other infrared continua observed during the bR photocycle, which are inseparable from the changes in the absorption of the solvent water molecules that are photothermally excited via the nonradiative relaxation of the photoexcited retinal chromophore. A possible structure of the hydrogen-bonded system, giving rise to the observed bleach in the 1900–1800-cm−1 region and the role of the polarizable proton in the proton transport is discussed. PMID:15298873

  10. Absorbed dose measurements for kV-cone beam computed tomography in image-guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hioki, Kazunari; Araki, Fujio; Ohno, Takeshi; Nakaguchi, Yuji; Tomiyama, Yuuki

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we develope a novel method to directly evaluate an absorbed dose-to-water for kilovoltage-cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Absorbed doses for the kV-CBCT systems of the Varian On-Board Imager (OBI) and the Elekta X-ray Volumetric Imager (XVI) were measured by a Farmer ionization chamber with a 60Co calibration factor. The chamber measurements were performed at the center and four peripheral points in body-type (30 cm diameter and 51 cm length) and head-type (16 cm diameter and 33 cm length) cylindrical water phantoms. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water by using a 60Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo (MC)-calculated beam quality conversion factor, kQ, for 60Co to kV-CBCT. The irradiation for OBI and XVI was performed with pelvis and head modes for the body- and the head-type phantoms, respectively. In addition, the dose distributions in the phantom for both kV-CBCT systems were calculated with MC method and were compared with measured values. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated at the center in the water phantom and compared with measured doses at four peripheral points. The measured absorbed doses at the center in the body-type phantom were 1.96 cGy for OBI and 0.83 cGy for XVI. The peripheral doses were 2.36-2.90 cGy for OBI and 0.83-1.06 cGy for XVI. The doses for XVI were lower up to approximately one-third of those for OBI. Similarly, the measured doses at the center in the head-type phantom were 0.48 cGy for OBI and 0.21 cGy for XVI. The peripheral doses were 0.26-0.66 cGy for OBI and 0.16-0.30 cGy for XVI. The calculated peripheral doses agreed within 3% in the pelvis mode and within 4% in the head mode with measured doses for both kV-CBCT systems. In addition, the absorbed dose determined in this study was approximately 4% lower than that in TG-61 but the absorbed dose by both methods was in agreement within their combined

  11. Tumoral fibrosis effect on the radiation absorbed dose of (177)Lu-Tyr(3)-octreotate and (177)Lu-Tyr(3)-octreotate conjugated to gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Azorín-Vega, E P; Zambrano-Ramírez, O D; Rojas-Calderón, E L; Ocampo-García, B E; Ferro-Flores, G

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the tumoral fibrosis effect on the radiation absorbed dose of the radiopharmaceuticals (177)Lu-Tyr(3)-octreotate (monomeric) and (177)Lu-Tyr(3)-octreotate-gold nanoparticles (multimeric) using an experimental HeLa cells tumoral model and the Monte Carlo PENELOPE code. Experimental and computer micro-environment models with or without fibrosis were constructed. Results showed that fibrosis increases up to 33% the tumor radiation absorbed dose, although the major effect on the dose was produced by the type of radiopharmaceutical (112Gy-multimeric vs. 43Gy-monomeric). PMID:25305748

  12. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: III. Galactic far-infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2015-07-01

    Using the three-component spectral model describing the FIRAS average continuum spectra, the exact analytical expressions for thermodynamic and radiative functions of Galactic far-infrared radiation are obtained. The COBE FIRAS instrument data in the 0.15-2.88 THz frequency interval at the mean temperatures of T1 = 17.72 K, T2 = 14 K and T3 = 6.73 K are used for calculating the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, total emissivity, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume and pressure for the warm, intermediate-temperature and very cold components of the Galactic continuum spectra. The generalized Stefan-Boltzmann law for warm, intermediate-temperature and very cold components is constructed. The temperature dependence of each component is determined by the formula IS-B(T) = σ‧T6. This result is important when we construct the cosmological models of radiative transfer that can be applied inside the Galaxy. Within the framework of the three-component spectral model, the total number of photons in our Galaxy and the total radiation power (total luminosity) emitted from a surface of the Galaxy are calculated. Their values are NGtotal = 1.3780 × 1068 and IGtotal(T) = 1.0482 × 1036 W. Other radiative and thermodynamic properties of the Galactic far-infrared radiation (photon gas) of the Galaxy are calculated. The expressions for astrophysical parameters, such as the entropy density/Boltzmann constant and number density of the Galactic far-infrared photons are obtained. We assume that the obtained analytical expressions for thermodynamic and radiative functions may be useful for describing the continuum spectra of the far-infrared radiation for other galaxies.

  13. Estimating scattered and absorbed radiation in plant canopies by remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, G. S. T.; Ranson, K. J.

    1987-01-01

    Several research avenues are summarized. The relationships of canopy characteristics to multispectral reflectance factors of vegetation are reviewed. Several alternative approaches for incorporating spectrally derived information into plant models are discussed, using corn as the main example. A method is described and evaluated whereby a leaf area index is estimated from measurements of radiation transmitted through plant canopies, using soybeans as an example. Albedo of a big bluestem grass canopy is estimated from 60 directional reflectance factor measurements. Effects of estimating albedo with substantially smaller subsets of data are evaluated.

  14. Susceptibility of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) life stages to flameless catalytic infrared radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The susceptibility of various life stages of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), a pest of stored wheat, to flameless catalytic infrared radiation in the 3 to 7 µm range was evaluated in the laboratory. Immature stages were collected from flour infested with T. castaneum adults only ...

  15. Feasibility of Simultaneous Rough Rice Drying and Disinfestations by Infrared Radiation Heating and Rice Milling Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the drying characteristics, milling quality and effectiveness of disinfestation of rough rice under conditions of infrared (IR) radiation heating. Freshly harvested medium grain rice (M202) samples with low (20.6%) and high (25.0%) moisture contents (M...

  16. High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) for the Nimbus F Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, E. W.

    1975-01-01

    Flown on Nimbus F in June 1975, the high resolution infrared radiation sounder (HIRS) scans with a geographical resolution of 23KM and samples radiance in seventeen selected spectral channels from visible (.7 micron) to far IR (15 micron). Vertical temperature profiles and atmospheric moisture content can be inferred from the output. System operation and test results are described.

  17. Moisture removal characteristics of thin layer rough rice under sequenced infrared radiation heating and cooling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice drying with infrared (IR) radiation has been investigated during recent years and showed promising potential with improved quality and energy efficiency. The objective of this study was to further investigate the moisture removal characteristics of thin layer rough rice heated by IR and cooled ...

  18. Drying Characteristics and Quality of Rough Rice Under Infrared Radiation Heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infrared (IR) radiation heating could provide high heating rate and rapid moisture removal for rough rice drying. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of drying bed thickness on drying characteristics and quality of rough rice under IR heating. The samples of freshly harves...

  19. Drying characteristics and quality of rough rice under infrared radiation heating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infrared (IR) radiation heating could provide high heating rate and rapid moisture removal for rough rice drying. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of the drying bed thickness on drying characteristics and quality of rough rice subjected to IR heating. Samples of freshly ...

  20. Mapping the infrared background radiation from the Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, D.; Fazio, G. G.; Traub, W. A.; Urban, E. W.; Katz, L.; Rieke, G. H.; Gautier, T. N.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Low, F. J.; Poteet, W.

    1981-01-01

    The Spacelab-2 Small Helium-Cooled Infrared Telescope will be used to map extended astronomical sources of low surface brightness emission, to measure the Shuttle induced environment and to develop techniques for managing large volumes of superfluid helium in space. The instrument is an f/4 15.2-cm Herschelian telescope with ten photoconductor detectors in the focal plane. This paper describes the hardware and software aspects of the instrument with emphasis on mission operations. In particular, a description is given of the observing plan formulated to meet the scientific and engineering objectives, the scan drive system, the precautions in design and operation necessary to prevent the sun, moon, and earth from adversely affecting the observations, the implications of thruster firings, and the on-board experiment computer application software to control the scanning of the telescope and support on-board displays.

  1. A perturbative treatment of aerosol scattering of infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, W. R.; Chameides, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    Calculations of long-wave atmospheric heating and cooling rates using the rate equations of Rodgers and Walshaw (1966) with the Malkmus (1967) random band model are presented. A perturbation scheme is developed for the inclusion of aerosol scattering effects in the numerical calculation. Unlike the flux differencing method for calculating long-wave heating and cooling rates, this scheme allows aerosol effects to be included in a simple manner with only a small additional use of computer time. The calculations indicate good agreement with those of previous investigators and demonstrate the expected equivalence of the flux-differencing method and the flux-divergence equation of Rodgers and Walshaw (1966), even at stratospheric altitudes. It is found that aerosols lead to a net heating in the lower troposphere due to infrared scattering and absorption.

  2. Dielectric waveguide for middle and far infrared radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Averkiev, N. S.; Slipchenko, S. O.; Sokolova, Z. N. Tarasov, I. S.

    2009-08-15

    The possibility of using the normal skin effect in dielectric waveguides for long-wavelength radiation is analyzed. A design of a waveguide integrated with a heterolaser is suggested, in which an undoped layer of GaAs is clad between heavily-doped n- and p-Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x} As alloy layers, reflecting radiation because of the normal skin effect. It is shown that an efficient waveguide can be formed using n-Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x} As layers with x < 0.45 and the electron concentration N > 5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and p-Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x} As layers of any composition with the hole concentration P {>=} 3 x 1019 cm{sup -3}.

  3. Characteristics of infrared photodetectors produced by radiation doping.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, C.; Mattauch, R. J.; Viola, T. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    High-energy electrons (approximately 7 MeV) were used to radiation-dope extrinsic silicon. Both n- and p-type silicon photodetectors were fabricated using this doping technique. The 500 K blackbody responsivity, spectral response, and peak detectivity were determined for these devices. The peak detectivity values measured were 4.8 Gm Hz to the 1/2 power per W at 2.15 microns for 0.1-ohm-cm n-type devices and 3.7 Gm Hz to the 1/2 power per W at 40 microns for 10-ohm-cm p-type detectors. A comparison of the thermally generated background majority carrier concentration for radiation-doped and conventional impurity-doped detectors is made.

  4. Effect of chlorofluoromethane infrared radiation on zonal atmospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. E.; Donahue, T. M.; Liu, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Estimates are made of changes in the atmospheric climate due to the radiative effects of 10 ppb of chlorofluoromethanes (CFM's). The estimates are derived on the basis of a 12-layer stratospheric general circulation model with a specified change of ocean temperature. Two tropical maxima in zonal average temperature change were observed: one in the upper troposphere and one centered at the tropopause. The temperature change exceeds the surface temperature change by a factor of at least two. If the 1975 CFM emission rate were to continue indefinitely, stratospheric water-vapor concentrations would increase by up to 60% due to CFM radiative effects. This would reduce ozone concentrations by an additional 4% of the natural ozone column.

  5. Study the penetration of IR laser radiation in human teeth: determination of the absorbed and scattered parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunova, Pepa; Rabadgiiska, Stanislava; Uzunov, Tzonko; Kisov, Hristo; Kaimakanova, Nadejda; Deneva, Margarita; Dinkov, Emil; Nenchev, Marin

    2013-03-01

    By using the developed by us approaches and instrumentation, we have obtained and presented series of systematized data, which are important for the use of the laser light in infrared (IR) spectral region. The obtained data include: 1) reflectivity of the human tooth dentin; 2) the spatial intensity distribution in the cross-section of the light beam penetrating the tooth's dentin; 3) the absorbed and the diffused parts of the laser light that have been determined separately through combination of optical and calorimetric techniques. The last result is the most important because it permits to calculate the dentin absorption and scattering coefficients. The study is performed for the laser light at two easily generated wavelengths - 1.06 μm and 1.36 μm, emitted by the Nd:YAG laser that is well known, commercially available, economical and widely used in many laboratories and medical institutions. The study is made on the basis of fresh in-vitro teeth samples from the persons of Bulgaria, Sofia region.

  6. Hydrogen Absorbing Materials for Use as Radiation Shielding During Extended Space Flight Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Minimizing radiation exposure from the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment during extended space missions is particularly crucial to crew health and safety. Here, an ideal candidate for shielding would be pure solid or liquid hydrogen, a material that effectively fragments heavy ions into ones of lower mass and energy that are more easily attenuated. Unfortunately, utilizing pure hydrogen is not presently feasible. It is, however, known that the hydrogen content of other materials (for example, metal hydrides, palladium alloys, and organic compounds) can exceed that of pure solid hydrogen and thus merit consideration as shielding candidates. This presentation will discuss an ongoing effort to develop novel shielding from such materials in concert with a coordinated testing/evaluation and modeling effort.

  7. [Infrared radiation experimental measurement and analyse of carbon dioxide at high temperature].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Guo-lin; Ma, Hao-jun; Liu, Li-ping

    2014-12-01

    This paper introduces the experiment technology for measuring the radiation of high temperature gas in the high frequency plasma wind tunnel. The infrared radiation of carbon dioxide at high temperature has been measured using this technology. We introduced the principium, flow field and the working gas of the high frequency plasma wind tunnel. The experiment condition, equipment, method of data processing and the analyse of the experiment results were introduced. We had measured the infrared radiation of carbon dioxide at four different temperatures between 1500 and 3000 K using this technology for measuring the radiation of high temperature gas which had been developed by ourselves. Measuring the spatial distribution of the infrared radiation of carbon dioxide using Able-transform were also introduced. We have analyzed the emission spectrum at 4.3 μm of carbon dioxide at high temperature. The conclusion had been obtained that the center wavelength of the emission spectrum moved to the long wave when the temperature risen. The authors also had analyzed and contrasted the experiment results and the data obtained from literatures. PMID:25881401

  8. AGN Obscuration Through Dusty Infrared Dominated Flows. 1; Radiation-Hydrodynamics Solution for the Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorodnitsyn, A.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan. G. S.; Kallman, T.

    2011-01-01

    We construct a radiation-hydrodynamics model for the obscuring toroidal structure in active galactic nuclei. In this model the obscuration is produced at parsec scale by a dense, dusty wind which is supported by infrared radiation pressure on dust grains. To find the distribution of radiation pressure, we numerically solve the 2D radiation transfer problem in a flux limited diffusion approximation. We iteratively couple the solution with calculations of stationary 1D models for the wind, and obtain the z-component of the velocity. Our results demonstrate that for AGN luminosities greater than 0.1 L(sub edd) external illumination can support a geometrically thick obscuration via outflows driven by infrared radiation pressure. The terminal velocity of marginally Compton-thin models (0.2 < tau(sub T) < 0.6), is comparable to or greater than the escape velocity. In Compton thick models the maximum value of the vertical component of the velocity is lower than the escape velocity, suggesting that a significant part of our torus is in the form of failed wind. The results demonstrate that obscuration via normal or failed infrared-driven winds is a viable option for the AGN torus problem and AGN unification models. Such winds can also provide an important channel for AGN feedback.

  9. Feasibility of far-infrared radiation modulators using high-{Tc} superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.M.

    1996-12-31

    The potential of using high-{Tc} superconductors as intensity modulators for far-infrared radiation is investigated in this work. Reflectance and transmittance for several design structures are computed using the published optical constants of the superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} and substrate materials. Notable differences in the reflectance and transmittance between the superconducting state and the normal state are illustrated. The best results are obtained based on the reflectance of thin films (10 nm--50 nm thick) on thin substrates (less than 100 {micro}m thick) and for radiation incident on the substrate. This study demonstrates that high-{Tc} superconductive thin films can be used to build far-infrared radiation modulators. Future experimental study is recommended in order to materialize this promising thermooptical device.

  10. Efficient far-infrared thermal bremsstrahlung radiation from a heterojunction bipolar transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Pei-Kang; Yen, Shun-Tung

    2015-08-28

    We investigate the far-infrared thermal radiation properties of a heterojunction bipolar transistor. The device conveniently provides a high electric field for electrons to heat the lattice and the electron gas in a background with ions embedded. Because of very high effective temperature of the electron gas in the collector, the electron-ion bremsstrahlung makes efficient the thermal radiation in the far-infrared region. The transistor can yield a radiation power of 0.1 mW with the spectral region between 2 and 75 THz and a power conversion efficiency of 6 × 10{sup −4}. Such output contains a power of 20 μW in the low-frequency part (2–20 THz) of the spectrum.

  11. Infrared radiation emerging from smoke produced by brush fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinman, J. A.; Olson, W. S.; Harshvardhan, M.

    1981-01-01

    The IR radiative transport properties of brush fire smoke clouds, computed for a model with finite horizontal dimensions as well as the more common plane-parallel model, are presented. The finite model is a three-dimensional version of the two-stream approximation applied to cubic clouds of steam, carbon, and silicates. Assumptions are made with regard to the shape and size distributions of the smoke particles. It is shown that 11.5-micron radiometry can detect fires beneath smoke clouds if the path integrated mass density of the smoke is less than or equal to 3 g/sq m.

  12. Scattering matrix of infrared radiation by ice finite circular cylinders.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lisheng; Ding, Jilie; Cheng, Andrew Y S

    2002-04-20

    Scattering matrix characteristics of polydisperse, randomly oriented, small ice crystals modeled by finite circular cylinders with various ratios of the length to diameter (L/D) ratio are calculated by use of the exact T-matrix approach, with emphasis on the thermal infrared spectral region that extends from the atmospheric short-wave IR window to the far-IR wavelengths to as large as 30 microm. The observed ice crystal size distribution and the well-known power-law distribution are considered. The results of the extensive calculations show that the characteristics of scattering matrix elements of small ice circular cylinders depend strongly on wavelengths and refractive indices, particle size distributions, and the L/D ratios. The applicability of the power-law distribution and particle shapes for light scattering calculations for small ice crystals is discussed. The effects of the effective variance of size distribution on light scattering characteristics are addressed. It seems from the behavior of scattering matrix elements of small ice crystals that the combination of 25 and 3.979 microm has some advantages and potential applications for remote sensing of cirrus and other ice clouds. PMID:12003228

  13. Absorbed Radiation Dose in Radiosensitive Organs Using 64- and 320-Row Multidetector Computed Tomography: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Atif N.; Nikolic, Boris; Khan, Mohammad K.; Kang, Jian; Khosa, Faisal

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To determine absorbed radiation dose (ARD) in radiosensitive organs during prospective and full phase dose modulation using ECG-gated MDCTA scanner under 64- and 320-row detector modes. Methods. Female phantom was used to measure organ radiation dose. Five DP-3 radiation detectors were used to measure ARD to lungs, breast, and thyroid using the Aquilion ONE scanner in 64- and 320-row modes using both prospective and dose modulation in full phase acquisition. Five measurements were made using three tube voltages: 100, 120, and 135 kVp at 400 mA at heart rate (HR) of 60 and 75 bpm for each protocol. Mean acquisition was recorded in milligrays (mGy). Results. Mean ARD was less for 320-row versus 64-row mode for each imaging protocol. Prospective EKG-gated imaging protocol resulted in a statistically lower ARD using 320-row versus 64-row modes for midbreast (6.728 versus 19.687 mGy, P < 0.001), lung (6.102 versus 21.841 mGy, P < 0.001), and thyroid gland (0.208 versus 0.913 mGy; P < 0.001). Retrospective imaging using 320- versus 64-row modes showed lower ARD for midbreast (10.839 versus 43.169 mGy, P < 0.001), lung (8.848 versus 47.877 mGy, P < 0.001), and thyroid gland (0.057 versus 2.091 mGy; P < 0.001). ARD reduction was observed at lower kVp and heart rate. Conclusions. Dose reduction to radiosensitive organs is achieved using 320-row compared to 64-row modes for both prospective and retrospective gating, whereas 64-row mode is equivalent to the same model 64-row MDCT scanner. PMID:25170427

  14. The development of early pediatric models and their application to radiation absorbed dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    This presentation will review and describe the development of pediatric phantoms for use in radiation dose calculations . The development of pediatric models for dose calculations essentially paralleled that of the adult. In fact, Snyder and Fisher at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory reported on a series of phantoms for such calculations in 1966 about two years before the first MIRD publication on the adult human phantom. These phantoms, for a newborn, one-, five-, ten-, and fifteen-year old, were derived from the adult phantom. The pediatric'' models were obtained through a series of transformations applied to the major dimensions of the adult, which were specified in a Cartesian coordinate system. These phantoms suffered from the fact that no real consideration was given to the influence of these mathematical transformations on the actual organ sizes in the other models nor to the relation of the resulting organ masses to those in humans of the particular age. Later, an extensive effort was invested in designing individual'' pediatric phantoms for each age based upon a careful review of the literature. Unfortunately, the phantoms had limited use and only a small number of calculations were made available to the user community. Examples of the phantoms, their typical dimensions, common weaknesses, etc. will be discussed.

  15. The development of early pediatric models and their application to radiation absorbed dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, J.W.

    1989-12-31

    This presentation will review and describe the development of pediatric phantoms for use in radiation dose calculations . The development of pediatric models for dose calculations essentially paralleled that of the adult. In fact, Snyder and Fisher at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory reported on a series of phantoms for such calculations in 1966 about two years before the first MIRD publication on the adult human phantom. These phantoms, for a newborn, one-, five-, ten-, and fifteen-year old, were derived from the adult phantom. The ``pediatric`` models were obtained through a series of transformations applied to the major dimensions of the adult, which were specified in a Cartesian coordinate system. These phantoms suffered from the fact that no real consideration was given to the influence of these mathematical transformations on the actual organ sizes in the other models nor to the relation of the resulting organ masses to those in humans of the particular age. Later, an extensive effort was invested in designing ``individual`` pediatric phantoms for each age based upon a careful review of the literature. Unfortunately, the phantoms had limited use and only a small number of calculations were made available to the user community. Examples of the phantoms, their typical dimensions, common weaknesses, etc. will be discussed.

  16. Method and apparatus for reducing radiation exposure through the use of infrared data transmission

    DOEpatents

    Austin, Frank S.; Hance, Albert B.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for transmitting information, for exae, dosimetry data from a hazardous environment such as a radioactive area to a remote relatively safe location. A radiation detector senses the radiation and generates an electrical signal which is fed as a binary coded decimal signal to an infrared transmitter having a microprocessor. The microprocessor formats the detected information into digits of data and modulates a 40 kHz oscillator, the output of which is fed to and intensity modulates one or more infrared emitting diodes. The infrared signal from the diodes is transmitted to a portable hand-held infrared receiver remote from the hazardous environment. The receiver includes an infrared sensitive diode which decodes the data and generates an electrical signal which is coupled to a microcomputer. The microcomputer synchronizes itself to the transmitter, reads the digits of data as they are received, sums the digits and compares the sum with a checksum signal generated and transmitted from the transmitter. If a match of the checksum signals exists, the received data is displayed, otherwise it is described and the receiver conditions itself for the next transmission of data.

  17. Dynamics of photoprocesses induced by femtosecond infrared radiation in free molecules and clusters of iron pentacarbonyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompanets, V. O.; Lokhman, V. N.; Poydashev, D. G.; Chekalin, S. V.; Ryabov, E. A.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of photoprocesses induced by femtosecond infrared radiation in free Fe(CO)5 molecules and their clusters owing to the resonant excitation of vibrations of CO bonds in the 5-μm range has been studied. The technique of infrared excitation and photoionization probing (λ = 400 nm) by femtosecond pulses has been used in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. It has been found that an infrared pulse selectively excites vibrations of CO bonds in free molecules, which results in a decrease in the yield of the Fe(CO)5 + molecular ion. Subsequent relaxation processes have been analyzed and the results have been interpreted. The time of the energy transfer from excited vibrations to other vibrations of the molecule owing to intramolecular relaxation has been measured. The dynamics of dissociation of [Fe(CO)5] n clusters irradiated by femtosecond infrared radiation has been studied. The time dependence of the yield of free molecules has been measured under different infrared laser excitation conditions. We have proposed a model that well describes the results of the experiment and makes it possible, in particular, to calculate the profile of variation of the temperature of clusters within the "evaporation ensemble" concept. The intramolecular and intracluster vibrational relaxation rates in [Fe(CO)5] n clusters have been estimated.

  18. A model study on the absorbed dose of radiation following respiratory intake of 238U3O8 aerosols.

    PubMed

    Canepa, Carlo

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols of depleted uranium oxides, formed upon high-energy impact of shells on hard targets during military operations, are able to disperse, reach the alveolar region of the lungs and be absorbed and distributed throughout various parts of the body. The absorbed particles are subjected to clearance in the upper respiratory tract, distribution to other body districts, dissolution and excretion. While the soluble forms of uranium are known to deliver a small dose of radiation to the body due to their homogeneous distribution and the low specific activity of (238)U, ceramic particles exhibit a low dissolution rate and irradiate a limited volume of tissue for a long time with alpha particles with an energy of 4.267 MeV. The extent of the irradiated tissues depends on the radius of the particles and the total intake of uranium oxides. For the measured intake of U3O8 of a war veteran (15.51 μg) the number of particles ranges from 5.56×10(4) to 6.95×10(6) for sizes of 0.4-2.0 μm. Modelling the distribution of the particles between two compartments of the body, the averaged dose absorbed in 20 y by tissues surrounding the particles and within the range of the alpha particles varies from 6.8 mGy to 0.85 Gy for lungs and 8.1 mGy to 1.0 Gy for the lymph nodes, respectively. Correspondingly, due to the clearance and redistribution, the mass irradiated by 2.0-μm particles falls in 20 y from 6.06 mg to 0.94 μg in the lungs and grows from 0 to 1.0 mg in the lymph nodes. The estimated rate of formation of hydroxyl radicals upon radiolysis of water in the lungs and lymph nodes is 5.17×10(4) d(-1) per cell after 1 y. PMID:24578528

  19. Geometrical gradients in the distribution of temperature and absorbed ultraviolet radiation in ocular tissues.

    PubMed

    Sliney, David H

    2002-01-01

    The geographical variations in the incidence of age-related ocular changes such as presbyopia and cataracts and diseases such as pterygium and droplet keratopathies have led to theories pointing to sunlight, ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure and ambient temperature as potential etiological factors. Some epidemiological evidence also points to an association of age-related macular degeneration to sunlight exposure. The actual distribution of sunlight exposure and the determination of temperature variations of different tissues within the anterior segment of the eye are difficult to assess. Of greatest importance are the geometrical factors that influence selective UVR exposures to different segments of the lens, cornea and retina. Studies show that the temperature of the lens and cornea varies by several degrees depending upon climate, and that the incidence of nuclear cataract incidence is greater in areas of higher ambient temperature (i.e., in the tropics). Likewise, sunlight exposure to local areas of the cornea, lens and retina varies greatly in different environments. However, epidemiological studies of the influence of environmental UVR in the development of cataract, pterygium, droplet keratopathies and age-related macular degeneration have produced surprisingly inconsistent findings. The lack of consistent results is seen to be due largely to either incomplete or erroneous estimates of outdoor UV exposure dose. Geometrical factors dominate the determination of UVR exposure of the eye. The degree of lid opening limits ocular exposure to rays entering at angles near the horizon. Clouds redistribute overhead UVR to the horizon sky. Mountains, trees and building shield the eye from direct sky exposure. Most ground surfaces reflect little UVR. The result is that highest UVR exposure occurs during light overcast where the horizon is visible and ground surface reflection is high. By contrast, exposure in a high mountain valley (lower ambient temperature) with

  20. Rf system for the NSLS coherent infrared radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Broome, W.; Biscardi, R.; Keane, J.; Mortazavi, P.; Thomas, M.; Wang, J.M.

    1995-05-01

    The existing NSLS X-ray Lithography Source (XLS Phase I) is being considered for a coherent synchrotron radiation source. The existing 211 MHz warm cavity will be replaced with a 5-cell 2856 MHz superconducting RF cavity, driven by a series of 2 kW klystrons. The RF system will provide a total V{sub RF} of 1.5 MV to produce {sigma}{sub L} = 0.3 mm electron bunches at an energy of 150 MeV. Superconducting technology significantly reduces the required space and power needed to achieve the higher voltage. It is the purpose of this paper to describe the superconducting RF system and cavity, power requirements, and cavity design parameters such as input coupling, Quality Factor, and Higher Order Modes.

  1. An infrared radiation routine for use in numerical atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, M.-D.; Arking, A.

    1978-01-01

    Previous methods for calculating radiative fluxes due to water vapor and CO2 absorption bands are extended to take into consideration the entire water vapor and CO2 bands, including e-type absorption in the window region and the overlapping of different absorptions. Cooling rate profiles in the water vapor bands for a tropical atmosphere were computed by a detailed line-by-line method and by a far-wing approximation method, and the error of both methods is less than 0.2 C/day. Cooling rate profiles in the 15 micron band including overlapping of CO2 absorption with water vapor were calculated by a method in which flux transmittance is computed by means of a linear expansion and the multiplication rule, and maximum errors of 0.3 C/day were found in comparison with the exact line-by-line method.

  2. Ambient temperature-independent dual-band mid-infrared radiation thermometry.

    PubMed

    Lü, You; He, Xin; Wei, Zhong-Hui; Sun, Zhi-Yuan; Chang, Song-Tao

    2016-03-20

    For temperature measurements of targets at low temperatures, dual-band radiation thermometry using mid-infrared detectors has been investigated extensively. However, the accuracy is greatly affected by the reflected ambient radiation and stray radiation, which depend on the ambient temperature. To ensure measurement accuracy, an improved dual-band measurement model is established by considering the reflected ambient radiation and the stray radiation. The effect of ambient temperature fluctuation on temperature measurement is then further analyzed in detail. Experimental results of measuring a gray-body confirm that the proposed method yields high accuracy at varying ambient temperatures. This method provides a practical approach to remove the effect of ambient temperature fluctuations on temperature measurements. PMID:27140549

  3. [Research on Spectrum Radiation Characteristics of a New Type Infrared/ Ultraviolet Dual Color Decoy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-sheng; Dai, Meng-yan; Liu, Hai-feng; Xie, Chang-you; Zhang, Tong; Fang, Guo-feng

    2015-07-01

    The advantage of traditional MTV infrared decoys which are mainly consist of magnesium, Teflon and VITON is that it emits high radiant energy, so it is an effective countermeasure to traditional seekers which seek the target by heat source. The spectral radiant intensity which generated from high temperature combustion of MTV infrared decoys in near infrared region and ultraviolet band is very high, and that in Mid-IR region is relative lower, however the radiant intensity of real jet fighter in ultraviolet band is low and the infrared radiant intensity ratio of Mid-IR to near IR band is greater than 1. Thus, the traditional MTV infrared decoys are hardly able to counter the seekers equipped with dual color combined guidance system. Based on the spectral matching principle, we designed and prepared a new infrared/ultraviolet dual color decoy which is mainly consist of oxidant (wt% 45-75), fuel (wt% 10-25), energetic binder (wt% 25-50) and additives. We conducted theoretical calculations on combustion products of the reagent combinations using CEA (Chemic equilibrium & Application) software and initially determined the content of each component of the decoy formulation on the basis of the calculations results, then investigated the infrared radiation characteristics of decoys employing SR5000 spectrum radiometer and remote sensing interferometer spectrometer Tensor37 and analyzed the possible reasons for test results difference of the two systems separately from the test principle and calculation method, the testing environment, stability of testing results and other aspects. We studied the ultraviolet radiation characteristics of decoys using S2000 fiber optical spectrometer and the test results were consistent with the fighter ultraviolet radiant intensity which gained from theoretical calculation. We researched on the temperature characteristics of decoys by Imager IR 8325 mid-infrared thermal imager and it turned out that the dual color decoy is similar to the

  4. [Evaluation of absorbed dose from kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography by radiotherapy planning system: influence on the radiation therapy for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Tetsuro; Murakami, Naoki; Okamura, Yoshiaki; Nishimura, Hideki; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Kimura, Kunihiko; Hase, Mamoru; Sasaki, Ryohei

    2013-05-01

    Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is increasingly being used in modern radiation therapy, and it is now possible to verify a patient's position using kilo-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT). However, if kV-CBCT is used frequently, the dose absorbed by the body cannot be disregarded. A number of studies have been made on the absorbed dose of kV-CBCT, in which absorbed dose measurements were made using a computed tomography dose index (CTDI) or a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD). Other methods include comparison of the absorbed dose between a kV-CBCT and other modalities. These techniques are now in common use. However, dose distribution within the patient varies with the patient's size, posture and the part of the body to which radiation therapy is applied. The chief purpose of this study was to evaluate the dose distribution of kV-CBCT by employing a radiotherapy planning system (RTPS); a secondary aim was to examine the influence of a dose of kV-CBCT radiation when used to treat prostate cancer. The beam data of an on-board imager (OBI) was registered in the RTPS, after which modeling was performed. The radiation dosimetry was arranged by the dosimeter in an elliptical phantom. Rotational radiation treatment was used to obtain the dose distribution of the kV-CBCT within the patient, and the patient dose was evaluated based on the simulation of the dose distribution. In radiation therapy for prostate cancer, if kV-CBCT was applied daily, the dose increment within the planning target volume (PTV) and the organ in question was about 1 Gy. PMID:23964528

  5. Near infrared radiation damage mechanism in the lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderberg, Per G.; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Galichanin, Konstantin; Kronschläger, Martin; Schulmeister, Karl; Yu, Zhaohua

    2015-03-01

    The current data strongly indicates that there is no photochemical effect of in vivo exposure to 1090 nm near IRR radiation within the pupil. Four groups of 20 Sprague-Dawley rats were unilaterally exposed in vivo to 96 W·cm-2 centered inside the pupil for 10, 18, 33 and 60 min, respectively depending on group belonging. This resulted in radiant exposure doses of 57, 103, 198 and 344 kJ·cm-2. Temperature evolution at the limbus during the exposure and difference of intensity of forward light scattering between the exposed and the contralateral not exposed eye was measured at 1 week after exposure. The temperature at the limbus was found to increase exponentially towards an asymptote with an asymptote temperature of around 7 °C and a time constant (1/k) of around 15 s. No increase of light scattering was found despite that the cumulated radiant exposure dose was [80;250] times the threshold for photochemically induced cataract suggested by previous empirical data. It is concluded that at 1090 nm near IRR there is no photochemical effect.

  6. The 3D plant canopy radiative transfer analysis in an Alaskan black spruce forest: the characteristics of fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation in the heterogeneous landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Suzuki, R.; Nagai, S.; Nakai, T.; Kim, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Over the last couple of decades, the three dimensional plant canopy radiative transfer models have been developed, improved and used for the retrievals of biophysical variables of vegetative surface. Fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FAPAR) by plant canopy, a similar variable to heating rate in the atmosphere, is one of the important biophysical variables to infer the terrestrial plant canopy photosynthesis. FAPAR can be estimated by the radiative transfer model inversion or the empirical relationships between FAPAR and vegetation indices such as normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). To date, some global FAPAR products are publicly available. These products are estimated from the moderate resolution satellites such as MODIS and SPOT-VEGETATION. One may apply the similar FAPAR algorithms to higher spatial resolution satellites if the ecosystem structures are horizontally homogeneous, which means that the adjacent satellite pixels have a similar spectral properties. If the vegetation surface is highly heterogeneous, "domain average FAPAR", which assumes no net horizontal radiation fluxes, can be unrealistically high (more than 1). In this presentation, we analyzed the characteristics of FAPAR in a heterogeneous landscape. As a case study, we selected our study site in a sparse black spruce forest in Alaska. We conducted the field campaigns to measure forest structural and optical properties that are used in the radiative transfer simulation. We used a 3D radiative transfer, FLiES (Kobayashi, H. and H. Iwabuchi (2008), A coupled 1-D atmosphere and 3-D canopy radiative transfer model for canopy reflectance, light environment, and photosynthesis simulation in a heterogeneous landscape, Remote Sensing of Environment, 112, 173-185) to create a high resolution simulated spectral reflectance and FAPAR images over the course of the growing season. From the analysis, we show (1) FAPAR with no net horizontal fluxes assumption can be higher than

  7. A far-infrared radiative closure study in the Arctic: Application to water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delamere, J. S.; Clough, S. A.; Payne, V. H.; Mlawer, E. J.; Turner, D. D.; Gamache, R. R.

    2010-09-01

    Far-infrared (λ > 15.0 μm) (far-IR) radiative processes provide a large fraction of Earth's outgoing longwave radiation and influence upper tropospheric vertical motion. Water vapor, because of its abundance and strong absorption properties over an extended spectral range, is the primary source of these radiative processes. Historically, the lack of spectrally resolved radiometric instruments and the opacity of the lower atmosphere have precluded extensive studies of far-IR water vapor absorption properties. The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has organized a series of field experiments, the Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaigns (RHUBC), to address this deficiency. The first phase of RHUBC took place in 2007 at the ARM North Slope of Alaska Climate Research Facility. Measurements taken before and during this campaign have provided the basis for a clear-sky radiative closure study aimed at reducing key uncertainties associated with far-IR radiative transfer models. Extended-range Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer infrared radiance observations taken in clear sky conditions were compared against calculations from the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model. The water vapor column amounts used in these calculations were retrieved from 183 GHz radiometer measurements. The uncertainty in these integrated water vapor retrievals is approximately 2%, a notable improvement over past studies. This far-IR radiative closure study resulted in an improvement to the Mlawer-Tobin Clough-Kneiyzs-Davies (MT_CKD) water vapor foreign continuum model and updates to numerous, far-IR water vapor line parameters from their values in the circa 2006 version of the HITRAN molecular line parameter database.

  8. Ultraviolet radiation effects on the infrared damage rate of a thermal control coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of ultraviolet radiation on the infrared reflectance of ZnO silicone white thermal coatings were investigated. Narrow band ultraviolet radiation for wavelengths in the 2200A to 3500A range by a monochromator and a high pressure, 150-W Eimac xenon lamp. The sample was irradiated while in a vacuum of at least 0.000001 torr, and infrared reflectance was measured in situ with a spectroreflectometer at 19,500A. Reflectance degradation was studied as a function of wavelength, time, intensity, and dose. Damage was wavelength dependent at constant exposure, but no maximum was evident above the shortest wavelength investigated here. The degradation rate at constant intensity was an exponential function of time and varies with intensity.

  9. Widely tunable parametric generation of picosecond visible and mid-infrared radiation in optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giree, Achut; Jauregui, Cesar; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Parametric generation in an endlessly single-mode photonic crystal fiber can be a simple and efficient way to generate tunable visible and mid-infrared radiation. In this manuscript we report on a visible light source that is tunable from 628nm to 661nm with up to 25% conversion efficiency. This was obtained by tuning the parametric pump from 1030nm to 1055nm in a 1.6m long LMA-10 PM photonic crystal fiber. At the same time, the source generates mid-infrared radiation that can be tuned from ~2.65μm to ~2.9μm. A further increase of the tunable range of both the visible and midinfrared is possible simply by extending the pump tuning range.

  10. Estimates of the generation of available potential energy by infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, A. R.; Nagle, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Data from the National Meteorological Center and net outgoing infrared radiation (IR) data measured by NOAA satellites for January 1977 are used to compute estimates of the spectral and spatial contributions to the net generation of available potential energy in the Northern Hemisphere due to infrared radiation. Although these estimates are necessarily crude, the results obtained indicate that IR causes destruction of both zonal and eddy available potential energy. The contributions from midlatitudes to the zonal and eddy generation are about -5.0 W/sq m and about -0.6 W/sq m, respectively. The eddy generation is due almost entirely to stationary wavenumbers one and two. Comparison with earlier studies and computation of Newtonian cooling coefficients are discussed.

  11. Pursuit of quantum monodromy in the far-infrared and mid-infrared spectra of NCNCS using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Winnewisser, Manfred; Winnewisser, Brenda P; De Lucia, Frank C; Tokaryk, Dennis W; Ross, Stephen C; Billinghurst, Brant E

    2014-09-01

    Quantum monodromy has a dramatic and defining impact on all those physical properties of chain-molecules that depend on a large-amplitude bending coordinate, including in particular the distribution of the ro-vibrational energy levels. As revealed by its pure rotational (a-type) spectrum [B. P. Winnewisser et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 8158-8189] cyanogen iso-thiocyanate, NCNCS, is a particularly illuminating exemplar of quantum monodromy: it clearly shows the distinctive monodromy-induced dislocation of the ro-vibrational energy level pattern for its low-lying bending mode. This dislocation centers on a lattice defect in the energy vs. momentum map of the ro-vibrational levels at the top of the barrier to linearity, and represents an example of an excited state quantum phase transition [D. Larese and F. Iachello, J. Mol. Struct., 2011, 1006, 611-628]. To complete the data, so far limited to ΔJ = +1 transitions, we decided to measure the high-resolution far-infrared band of the large-amplitude bending vibration ν7, and, if possible, mid-infrared bands. This Perspectives article presents our ongoing progress towards this goal, beginning with the description of how to predict line positions and intensities of the a- and b-type bands of the large amplitude bending mode using the Generalized-SemiRigid-Bender (GSRB) Hamiltonian for NCNCS and ab initio dipole moment functions [B. P. Winnewisser et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 8158-8189]. We include background information about synchrotron physics to clarify the advantages and limitations of that radiation source for our experiments. Details of the chemical preparation and sample handling, leading to the realization that NCNCS is 50 kJ mol(-1) lower in energy than its isomer S(CN)2 [Z. Kisiel et al., J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 13815-13824] are included. We present the far-infrared and mid-infrared spectrum of NCNCS obtained at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron, using the IFS 125HR Bruker

  12. Solar panel thermal cycling testing by solar simulation and infrared radiation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuss, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    For the solar panels of the European Space Agency (ESA) satellites OTS/MAROTS and ECS/MARECS the thermal cycling tests were performed by using solar simulation methods. The performance data of two different solar simulators used and the thermal test results are described. The solar simulation thermal cycling tests for the ECS/MARECS solar panels were carried out with the aid of a rotatable multipanel test rig by which simultaneous testing of three solar panels was possible. As an alternative thermal test method, the capability of an infrared radiation method was studied and infrared simulation tests for the ultralight panel and the INTELSAT 5 solar panels were performed. The setup and the characteristics of the infrared radiation unit using a quartz lamp array of approx. 15 sq and LN2-cooled shutter and the thermal test results are presented. The irradiation uniformity, the solar panel temperature distribution, temperature changing rates for both test methods are compared. Results indicate the infrared simulation is an effective solar panel thermal testing method.

  13. Experimental investigation and test on the radiation characteristics of the infrared-strengthened equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Qirang; Bu, Man

    1992-02-01

    The infrared radiation characteristics of IR-strengthened equipment (ISE) fixed on a target drone have been tested using on-the-spot measurements of ISE as a point source taken for different structures and ground states. The instruments and their combination in the IR test system are briefly described, and experimental methods are presented for testing the following ISE IR radiation characteristics: IR spectrum characteristics, the distribution of IR energy with respect to time and space, and the effective radiation intensity under manifold working states. The results indicate that the data have good repetitiveness and the parameters have very close correlativity. A test system and method used to develop new kinds of IR radiation sources are described.

  14. The application of color display techniques for the analysis of Nimbus infrared radiation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, L. J.; Cherrix, G. T.; Ausfresser, H.

    1972-01-01

    A color enhancement system designed for the Applications Technology Satellite (ATS) spin scan experiment has been adapted for the analysis of Nimbus infrared radiation measurements. For a given scene recorded on magnetic tape by the Nimbus scanning radiometers, a virtually unlimited number of color images can be produced at the ATS Operations Control Center from a color selector paper tape input. Linear image interpolation has produced radiation analyses in which each brightness-color interval has a smooth boundary without any mosaic effects. An annotated latitude-longitude gridding program makes it possible to precisely locate geophysical parameters, which permits accurate interpretation of pertinent meteorological, geological, hydrological, and oceanographic features.

  15. Angular and spectral distribution of infrared synchrotron radiation emitted by an undulator and its edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucara, Alessandro; Cestelli Guidi, Mariangela; Marcouille, Oliver; Roy, Pascale; Calvani, Paolo; Giura, P.; Paolone, A.; Mathis, Yves-Laurent

    1999-10-01

    Both the angular and the spectral distribution of the Infrared Synchrotron Radiation emitted by an undulator of Super-ACO have been measured. Structures due to undulator edges, as well as contributions from the edge emission of a bending magnet placed behind the undulator, have been observed. Detailed calculations including all these sources are in excellent agreement with the measurements, provided that both velocity and acceleration terms are considered.

  16. Selective Pyroelectric Detection of Millimetre Waves Using Ultra-Thin Metasurface Absorbers.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Paulish, Andrey G; Navarro-Cía, Miguel; Arzhannikov, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    Sensing infrared radiation is done inexpensively with pyroelectric detectors that generate a temporary voltage when they are heated by the incident infrared radiation. Unfortunately the performance of these detectors deteriorates for longer wavelengths, leaving the detection of, for instance, millimetre-wave radiation to expensive approaches. We propose here a simple and effective method to enhance pyroelectric detection of the millimetre-wave radiation by combining a compact commercial infrared pyro-sensor with a metasurface-enabled ultra-thin absorber, which provides spectrally- and polarization-discriminated response and is 136 times thinner than the operating wavelength. It is demonstrated that, due to the small thickness and therefore the thermal capacity of the absorber, the detector keeps the high response speed and sensitivity to millimetre waves as the original infrared pyro-sensor does against the regime of infrared detection. An in-depth electromagnetic analysis of the ultra-thin resonant absorbers along with their complex characterization by a BWO-spectroscopy technique is presented. Built upon this initial study, integrated metasurface absorber pyroelectric sensors are implemented and tested experimentally, showing high sensitivity and very fast response to millimetre-wave radiation. The proposed approach paves the way for creating highly-efficient inexpensive compact sensors for spectro-polarimetric applications in the millimetre-wave and terahertz bands. PMID:26879250

  17. Selective Pyroelectric Detection of Millimetre Waves Using Ultra-Thin Metasurface Absorbers

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Paulish, Andrey G.; Navarro-Cía, Miguel; Arzhannikov, Andrey V.

    2016-01-01

    Sensing infrared radiation is done inexpensively with pyroelectric detectors that generate a temporary voltage when they are heated by the incident infrared radiation. Unfortunately the performance of these detectors deteriorates for longer wavelengths, leaving the detection of, for instance, millimetre-wave radiation to expensive approaches. We propose here a simple and effective method to enhance pyroelectric detection of the millimetre-wave radiation by combining a compact commercial infrared pyro-sensor with a metasurface-enabled ultra-thin absorber, which provides spectrally- and polarization-discriminated response and is 136 times thinner than the operating wavelength. It is demonstrated that, due to the small thickness and therefore the thermal capacity of the absorber, the detector keeps the high response speed and sensitivity to millimetre waves as the original infrared pyro-sensor does against the regime of infrared detection. An in-depth electromagnetic analysis of the ultra-thin resonant absorbers along with their complex characterization by a BWO-spectroscopy technique is presented. Built upon this initial study, integrated metasurface absorber pyroelectric sensors are implemented and tested experimentally, showing high sensitivity and very fast response to millimetre-wave radiation. The proposed approach paves the way for creating highly-efficient inexpensive compact sensors for spectro-polarimetric applications in the millimetre-wave and terahertz bands. PMID:26879250

  18. Selective Pyroelectric Detection of Millimetre Waves Using Ultra-Thin Metasurface Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Paulish, Andrey G.; Navarro-Cía, Miguel; Arzhannikov, Andrey V.

    2016-02-01

    Sensing infrared radiation is done inexpensively with pyroelectric detectors that generate a temporary voltage when they are heated by the incident infrared radiation. Unfortunately the performance of these detectors deteriorates for longer wavelengths, leaving the detection of, for instance, millimetre-wave radiation to expensive approaches. We propose here a simple and effective method to enhance pyroelectric detection of the millimetre-wave radiation by combining a compact commercial infrared pyro-sensor with a metasurface-enabled ultra-thin absorber, which provides spectrally- and polarization-discriminated response and is 136 times thinner than the operating wavelength. It is demonstrated that, due to the small thickness and therefore the thermal capacity of the absorber, the detector keeps the high response speed and sensitivity to millimetre waves as the original infrared pyro-sensor does against the regime of infrared detection. An in-depth electromagnetic analysis of the ultra-thin resonant absorbers along with their complex characterization by a BWO-spectroscopy technique is presented. Built upon this initial study, integrated metasurface absorber pyroelectric sensors are implemented and tested experimentally, showing high sensitivity and very fast response to millimetre-wave radiation. The proposed approach paves the way for creating highly-efficient inexpensive compact sensors for spectro-polarimetric applications in the millimetre-wave and terahertz bands.

  19. Retrieval of atmospheric parameters and radiative properties using Far-Infrared remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Maryam; Milz, Mathias; Martín-Torres, Javier; Palchetti, Luca

    2016-04-01

    The far-infrared (FIR) spectral region, covering wavelengths between 15 μm (667 cm‑1) and about 1 μm (10,000 cm‑1) plays a critical role in the climate system. A good knowledge of the radiation processes in this spectral region is of high interest for observations and understanding of heating and cooling rates, and global energy balance. Even though approximately 50% of terrestrial radiation occurs in the FIR and despite the critical FIR contribution to the Earth's energy balance, this spectral region has been only studied by a few number of instruments. Also the full FIR spectral region has not ever been directly observed from space. High spectral resolution observations in this region can help to enlighten its role for the global energy budget and atmospheric radiation processes. Among others, the reasons for this lack of measurements are: (i) the decreasing intensity of the radiation towards longer wavelengths; and, then (ii) the high sensitivity and cooling of the detectors requirements. These requirements are now overcome and future space missions will have the capability to measure the full FIR and then open fully one-half of the Earth's spectrum, and accordingly improve our ability to model and assess climate processes. The aim of the study is to assess the use of FIR remote sensing instruments for retrievals of atmospheric parameters and radiative properties such as heating and cooling rates. Case studies with simulated spectra, together with ground based measurements in the FIR at Dome C over the Antarctic Plateau at 3,230 m a.s.l. (above sea level) in clear-sky conditions, which been observed almost continuously since 2012, are used to assess the potential of remote sensing instruments in the far-infrared region. Appropriate selection of spectral channels to directly measure the far-infrared spectra as needed for future space missions and recommended.

  20. Properties of QSO Metal-line Absorption Systems at High Redshifts: Nature and Evolution of the Absorbers and New Evidence on Escape of Ionizing Radiation from Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boksenberg, Alec; Sargent, Wallace L. W.

    2015-05-01

    Using Voigt-profile-fitting procedures on Keck High Resolution Spectrograph spectra of nine QSOs, we identify 1099 C IV absorber components clumped in 201 systems outside the Lyman forest over 1.6 <~ z <~ 4.4. With associated Si IV, C II, Si II and N V where available, we investigate the bulk statistical and ionization properties of the components and systems and find no significant change in redshift for C IV and Si IV while C II, Si II and N V change substantially. The C IV components exhibit strong clustering, but no clustering is detected for systems on scales from 150 km s-1 out to 50,000 km s-1. We conclude that the clustering is due entirely to the peculiar velocities of gas present in the circumgalactic media of galaxies. Using specific combinations of ionic ratios, we compare our observations with model ionization predictions for absorbers exposed to the metagalactic ionizing radiation background augmented by proximity radiation from their associated galaxies and find that the generally accepted means of radiative escape by transparent channels from the internal star-forming sites is spectrally not viable for our stronger absorbers. We develop an active scenario based on runaway stars with resulting changes in the efflux of radiation that naturally enable the needed spectral convergence, and in turn provide empirical indicators of morphological evolution in the associated galaxies. Together with a coexisting population of relatively compact galaxies indicated by the weaker absorbers in our sample, the collective escape of radiation is sufficient to maintain the intergalactic medium ionized over the full range 1.9 < z <~ 4.4. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck

  1. Probe And Enhancement Of SBS Based Phonons In Infrared Fibers Using Waveguide Coupled External Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chung; Chong, Yat C.; Fong, Chee K.

    1989-06-01

    Interaction of GHz and MHz radiation with CO2 laser propagation in a silver halide fiber using sBs based phonon coupling is furthet investigated. The external signal serves to both probe and enhance laser generated sBs phonons in the fiber. Efficient coupling of microwave radiation into the fiber is accomplished by placing the fiber in a hollow metallic waveguide, designed and constructed to transmit the dominant mode in the 0.9-2.0 GHz band. MHz radiation is conveniently coupled into the fiber using the guided microwave radiation as carrier. Phonon emissions from the fiber under CO2 laser pumping are first established on a spectrum analyzer; low frequency generators ale then tuned to match these frequencies and their maximum interaction recorded. Such interactions are systematically studied by monitoring the amplitude and waveform of the reflected and transmitted laser pulse at various power levels and frequencies of the externally coupled radiation. A plot of reflected laser power versus incident laser power reveals a distinct sBs generated phonon threshold. Variouslaunch directions of the GHz and MHz radiation with respect to the direction of laser propagation are realized to verify theory governing sBs interactions. The MHz radiation and its associated phonons in the fiber are convenient tools for probing sBs related phenomenon in infrared fibers.

  2. The application of infrared synchrotron radiation to the study of interfacial vibrational modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschmugl, C.J.; Williams, G.P.

    1992-12-31

    Synchrotron radiation provides an extremely bright broad-band source in the infrared which is ideally suited to the study of surface and interface vibrational modes in the range 50--3,000 cm{sup {minus}1}. Thus it covers the important range of molecule-substrate interactions, as well as overlapping with the more easily accessible near-ir region where molecular internal modes are found. Compared to standard broadband infrared sources such as globars, not only is it 1,000 times brighter, but its emittance matches the phase-space of the electrochemical cell leading to full utilization of this brightness advantage. In addition, the source is more stable even than water-cooled globars in vacuum for both short-term and long-term fluctuations. The authors summarize the properties of synchrotron radiation in the infrared, in particular pointing out the distinct differences between this and the x-ray region. They use experimental data in discussing important issues of signal to noise and address the unique problems and advantages of the synchrotron source. Thus they emphasize the important considerations necessary for developing new facilities. This analysis then leads to a discussion of phase-space matching to electrochemical cells, and to other surfaces in vacuum. Finally they show several examples of the application of infrared synchrotron radiation to surface vibrational spectroscopy. The examples are for metal crystal surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and include CO/Cu(100) and (111) and CO/K/Cu(100). The experiments show how the stability of the synchrotron source allows subtle changes in the background to be observed in addition to the discrete vibrational modes. These changes are due to electronic states induced by the adsorbate. In some cases the authors have seen interferences between these and the discrete vibrational modes, leading to a breakdown of the dipole selection rules, and the observation of additional modes.

  3. The application of infrared synchrotron radiation to the study of interfacial vibrational modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschmugl, C.J.; Williams, G.P.

    1992-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation provides an extremely bright broad-band source in the infrared which is ideally suited to the study of surface and interface vibrational modes in the range 50--3,000 cm[sup [minus]1]. Thus it covers the important range of molecule-substrate interactions, as well as overlapping with the more easily accessible near-ir region where molecular internal modes are found. Compared to standard broadband infrared sources such as globars, not only is it 1,000 times brighter, but its emittance matches the phase-space of the electrochemical cell leading to full utilization of this brightness advantage. In addition, the source is more stable even than water-cooled globars in vacuum for both short-term and long-term fluctuations. The authors summarize the properties of synchrotron radiation in the infrared, in particular pointing out the distinct differences between this and the x-ray region. They use experimental data in discussing important issues of signal to noise and address the unique problems and advantages of the synchrotron source. Thus they emphasize the important considerations necessary for developing new facilities. This analysis then leads to a discussion of phase-space matching to electrochemical cells, and to other surfaces in vacuum. Finally they show several examples of the application of infrared synchrotron radiation to surface vibrational spectroscopy. The examples are for metal crystal surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and include CO/Cu(100) and (111) and CO/K/Cu(100). The experiments show how the stability of the synchrotron source allows subtle changes in the background to be observed in addition to the discrete vibrational modes. These changes are due to electronic states induced by the adsorbate. In some cases the authors have seen interferences between these and the discrete vibrational modes, leading to a breakdown of the dipole selection rules, and the observation of additional modes.

  4. Influence of solar variability on the infrared radiative cooling of the thermosphere from 2002 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Mlynczak, Martin G; Hunt, Linda A; Mertens, Christopher J; Thomas Marshall, B; Russell, James M; Woods, Thomas; Earl Thompson, R; Gordley, Larry L

    2014-01-01

    Infrared radiative cooling of the thermosphere by carbon dioxide (CO2, 15 µm) and by nitric oxide (NO, 5.3 µm) has been observed for 12 years by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics satellite. For the first time we present a record of the two most important thermospheric infrared cooling agents over a complete solar cycle. SABER has documented dramatic variability in the radiative cooling on time scales ranging from days to the 11 year solar cycle. Deep minima in global mean vertical profiles of radiative cooling are observed in 2008–2009. Current solar maximum conditions, evidenced in the rates of radiative cooling, are substantially weaker than prior maximum conditions in 2002–2003. The observed changes in thermospheric cooling correlate well with changes in solar ultraviolet irradiance and geomagnetic activity during the prior maximum conditions. NO and CO2 combine to emit 7 × 1018 more Joules annually at solar maximum than at solar minimum. Key Points First record of thermospheric IR cooling rates over a complete solar cycleIR cooling in current solar maximum conditions much weaker than prior maximumVariability in thermospheric IR cooling observed on scale of days to 11 years PMID:26074647

  5. Infrared Heaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The heating units shown in the accompanying photos are Panelbloc infrared heaters, energy savers which burn little fuel in relation to their effective heat output. Produced by Bettcher Manufacturing Corporation, Cleveland, Ohio, Panelblocs are applicable to industrial or other facilities which have ceilings more than 12 feet high, such as those pictured: at left the Bare Hills Tennis Club, Baltimore, Maryland and at right, CVA Lincoln- Mercury, Gaithersburg, Maryland. The heaters are mounted high above the floor and they radiate infrared energy downward. Panelblocs do not waste energy by warming the surrounding air. Instead, they beam invisible heat rays directly to objects which absorb the radiation- people, floors, machinery and other plant equipment. All these objects in turn re-radiate the energy to the air. A key element in the Panelbloc design is a coating applied to the aluminized steel outer surface of the heater. This coating must be corrosion resistant at high temperatures and it must have high "emissivity"-the ability of a surface to emit radiant energy. The Bettcher company formerly used a porcelain coating, but it caused a production problem. Bettcher did not have the capability to apply the material in its own plant, so the heaters had to be shipped out of state for porcelainizing, which entailed extra cost. Bettcher sought a coating which could meet the specifications yet be applied in its own facilities. The company asked The Knowledge Availability Systems Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a NASA Industrial Applications Center (IAC), for a search of NASA's files

  6. Studies on a vinyl ruthenium-modified squaraine dye: multiple visible/near-infrared absorbance switching through dye- and substituent-based redox processes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Winter, Rainer F

    2012-08-20

    The bis(vinyl ruthenium)-modified squaraine dye 1 was synthesized by treatment of [RuHCl(CO)(PiPr(3) )(2) ] with bis(ethynyl)-substituted squaraine 8. Spectroscopic and electrochemical measurements on 1 and its organic precursors 6-8 were performed to study the effect of the vinyl ruthenium "substituents," particularly with respect to (poly)electrochromism. Attachment of the vinyl ruthenium moieties endows metal-organic squaraine 1 with two additional oxidation waves and lowers the first two oxidation potentials by approximately 300 mV with respect to its organic precursors. Squaraines 6, 7, 8, and 1 strongly absorb at 648, 663, 656, or 709 nm. Although organic dyes 6, 7, and 8 fluoresce, no room-temperature emission is observed for 1. The radical cations and anions of 6, 7, 8, and 1 as well as the doubly oxidized dications have been studied by IR and UV/Vis/NIR spectroelectrochemistry, and the -/0/+/2+ redox sequences were found to be reversible in each case. Our results indicate that the 1(2-/-/0/+/2+) redox system constitutes a polyelectrochromic switch in which absorption in the visible or the near-infrared range is reversibly turned off or shifted deep into the NIR. They also show that radical cation 1(.+) is an intrinsically delocalized system with only little contribution from the outer vinyl ruthenium tags to the oxidation process. Dication 1(2+) constitutes a class-II mixed-valent system with two electronically different vinyl ruthenium moieties and has an open-shell singlet electronic ground-state structure. ESR and NMR spectra of chemically prepared 1(.+) and 1(2+) corroborate these results. It has also emerged that reduction involves an orbital that is strongly delocalized across the entire squaraine π system and strongly affects the peripheral vinyl ruthenium sites. PMID:22807257

  7. Molecular modelling of the pH influence in the geometry and the absorbance spectrum of near-infrared TagRFP675 fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Randino, Carlos; Gelabert, Ricard; Moreno, Miquel; Lluch, José M; Piatkevich, Kiryl D

    2015-11-21

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out for the recently developed TagRFP675 fluorescent protein (FP), which is specifically designed to fully absorb and emit in the near infrared (NIR) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Since the X-ray data of TagRFP675 reveal that the chromophore exists in both the cis and trans configuration and it can also be neutral (protonated) or anionic (deprotonated) depending on the pH of the media, a total of 8 molecular dynamic simulations have been run to simulate all the possible states of the chromophore. Time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) single point calculations are performed at selected points along the simulation to theoretically mimic the absorption spectrum of the protein. Our simulations compare well (within the expected error of the computational method) with the experimental results. Our theoretical procedure allows for an analysis of the molecular orbitals involved in the lowest energy electronic excitations of the chromophore and, more interestingly, for a full analysis of the H-bond interactions between the chromophore and its surrounding residues and solvent (water) molecules. This study does not support the hypothesis, exclusively based on the analysis of X-ray data, that the isomerization of nearby residues provokes the rearrangement of the hydrogen bonds in the chromophore's immediate environment leading to the observed red shift of the absorption bands at higher pHs. Instead, we attribute this shift mainly to the superposition of bands of the neutral and anionic chromophores that are expected to coexist at almost the full range of pHs experimentally analyzed. An additional factor that could contribute to this shift is the experimentally observed increase of the cis configuration of the chromophore at higher pHs. PMID:26473582

  8. Technical report series on global modeling and data assimilation. Volume 3: An efficient thermal infrared radiation parameterization for use in general circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarex, Max J. (Editor); Chou, Ming-Dah

    1994-01-01

    A detailed description of a parameterization for thermal infrared radiative transfer designed specifically for use in global climate models is presented. The parameterization includes the effects of the main absorbers of terrestrial radiation: water vapor, carbon dioxide, and ozone. While being computationally efficient, the schemes compute very accurately the clear-sky fluxes and cooling rates from the Earth's surface to 0.01 mb. This combination of accuracy and speed makes the parameterization suitable for both tropospheric and middle atmospheric modeling applications. Since no transmittances are precomputed the atmospheric layers and the vertical distribution of the absorbers may be freely specified. The scheme can also account for any vertical distribution of fractional cloudiness with arbitrary optical thickness. These features make the parameterization very flexible and extremely well suited for use in climate modeling studies. In addition, the numerics and the FORTRAN implementation have been carefully designed to conserve both memory and computer time. This code should be particularly attractive to those contemplating long-term climate simulations, wishing to model the middle atmosphere, or planning to use a large number of levels in the vertical.

  9. Technical report series on global modeling and data assimilation. Volume 3: An efficient thermal infrared radiation parameterization for use in general circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarex, Max J.; Chou, Ming-Dah

    1994-11-01

    A detailed description of a parameterization for thermal infrared radiative transfer designed specifically for use in global climate models is presented. The parameterization includes the effects of the main absorbers of terrestrial radiation: water vapor, carbon dioxide, and ozone. While being computationally efficient, the schemes compute very accurately the clear-sky fluxes and cooling rates from the Earth's surface to 0.01 mb. This combination of accuracy and speed makes the parameterization suitable for both tropospheric and middle atmospheric modeling applications. Since no transmittances are precomputed the atmospheric layers and the vertical distribution of the absorbers may be freely specified. The scheme can also account for any vertical distribution of fractional cloudiness with arbitrary optical thickness. These features make the parameterization very flexible and extremely well suited for use in climate modeling studies. In addition, the numerics and the FORTRAN implementation have been carefully designed to conserve both memory and computer time. This code should be particularly attractive to those contemplating long-term climate simulations, wishing to model the middle atmosphere, or planning to use a large number of levels in the vertical.

  10. Visible and near-infrared radiative properties of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, X J; Flicker, J D; Lee, B J; Ready, W J; Zhang, Z M

    2009-05-27

    This work investigates the reflection and scattering from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, fabricated on silicon substrate using thermally enhanced chemical vapor deposition with both tip-growth and base-growth mechanisms. The directional-hemispherical reflectance in the visible and near-infrared wavelengths was measured with an integrating sphere. The polarization-dependent bidirectional reflectance distribution function was characterized with a laser scatterometer at the wavelength of 635 nm. The effective medium theory was used to elucidate the mechanism of high absorptance (greater than 0.97 in the spectral region from 400 to 1800 nm) of the multi-walled carbon nanotube samples. It is observed that scattering by impurities on the top of the nanotubes, by the nanotube tips, and by defects and misalignment can significantly increase the reflectance and introduce retroreflection. This study may facilitate application of carbon nanotubes in pyroelectric detectors as well as thermophotovoltaic emitters and absorbers. PMID:19423943

  11. These images show thermal infrared radiation from Jupiter at different wavelengths which are diagnos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images show thermal infrared radiation from Jupiter at different wavelengths which are diagnostic of physical phenomena The 7.85-micron image in the upper left shows stratospheric temperatures which are elevated in the region of the A fragment impact (to the left of bottom). Temperatures deeper in the atmosphere near 150-mbar are shown by the 17.2-micron image in the upper right. There is a small elevation of temperatures at this depth, indicated by the arrow, and confirmed by other measurements near this wavelength. This indicates that the influence of the impact of fragment A on the troposphere has been minimal. The two images in the bottom row show no readily apparent perturbation of the ammmonia condensate cloud field near 600 mbar, as diagnosed by 8.57-micron radiation, and deeper cloud layers which are diagnosed by 5-micron radiation.

  12. Shifting of infrared radiation using rotational raman resonances in diatomic molecular gases

    DOEpatents

    Kurnit, Norman A.

    1980-01-01

    A device for shifting the frequency of infrared radiation from a CO.sub.2 laser by stimulated Raman scattering in either H.sub.2 or D.sub.2. The device of the preferred embodiment comprises an H.sub.2 Raman laser having dichroic mirrors which are reflective for 16 .mu.m radiation and transmittive for 10 .mu.m, disposed at opposite ends of an interaction cell. The interaction cell contains a diatomic molecular gas, e.g., H.sub.2, D.sub.2, T.sub.2, HD, HT, DT and a capillary waveguide disposed within the cell. A liquid nitrogen jacket is provided around the capillary waveguide for the purpose of cooling. In another embodiment the input CO.sub.2 radiation is circularly polarized using a Fresnel rhomb .lambda./4 plate and applied to an interaction cell of much longer length for single pass operation.

  13. Infrared radiation scene generation of stars and planets in celestial background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Hong, Yaohui; Xu, Xiaojian

    2014-10-01

    An infrared (IR) radiation generation model of stars and planets in celestial background is proposed in this paper. Cohen's spectral template1 is modified for high spectral resolution and accuracy. Based on the improved spectral template for stars and the blackbody assumption for planets, an IR radiation model is developed which is able to generate the celestial IR background for stars and planets appearing in sensor's field of view (FOV) for specified observing date and time, location, viewpoint and spectral band over 1.2μm ~ 35μm. In the current model, the initial locations of stars are calculated based on midcourse space experiment (MSX) IR astronomical catalogue (MSX-IRAC) 2 , while the initial locations of planets are calculated using secular variations of the planetary orbits (VSOP) theory. Simulation results show that the new IR radiation model has higher resolution and accuracy than common model.

  14. IR (infrared radiation) observations of the ETA (Experimental Test Accelerator) beam channel. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, D.L.; Ditteon, R.P.; Frazier, E.N.; Giguere, R.P.; Rice, C.J.

    1985-09-30

    Aerospace Corporation scientists observed infrared radiation from the ETA beam channel in the wavelength range 0.65 -14.4 micrometer on September 12-16, 1983. The data consisted of time profiles of radiation pulses from the beam channel, measured with a limiting time resolution of 100 nanoseconds. Isolation of spectral bands was achieved through the use of broadband filters and circular variable filters (CVF). The latter had resolution lambda/delta lambda = 50 - 100, where lambda is wavelength. A total of 1076 radiation pulses were recorded. The beam propagation tube was filled with either ambient laboratory air or synthetic (dry) air at pressures ranging from 0.05 Torr to 500 Torr.

  15. Absorbed Radiation Dose in Radiosensitive Organs During Coronary CT Angiography Using 320-MDCT: Effect of Maximum Tube Voltage and Heart Rate Variations

    PubMed Central

    Nikolic, Boris; Khosa, Faisal; Lin, Pei-Jan Paul; Khan, Atif N.; Sarwar, Sheryar; Yam, Chun-Shan; Court, Laurence E.; Raptopoulos, Vassilios; Clouse, Melvin E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this article is to estimate the absorbed radiation dose in radiosensitive organs during coronary MDCT angiography using 320-MDCT and to determine the effects of tube voltage variation and heart rate (HR) control on absorbed radiation dose. MATERIALS AND METHODS Semiconductor field effect transistor detectors were used to measure absorbed radiation doses for the thyroid, midbreast, breast, and midlung in an anthropomorphic phantom at 100, 120, and 135 kVp at two different HRs of 60 and 75 beats per minute (bpm) with a scan field of view of 320 mm, 400 mA, 320 × 0.5 mm detectors, and 160 mm collimator width (160 mm range). The paired Student’s t test was used for data evaluation. RESULTS At 60 bpm, absorbed radiation doses for 100, 120, and 135 kVp were 13.41 ± 3.59, 21.7 ± 4.12, and 29.28 ± 5.17 mGy, respectively, for midbreast; 11.76 ± 0.58, 18.86 ± 1.06, and 24.82 ± 1.45 mGy, respectively, for breast; 12.19 ± 2.59, 19.09 ± 3.12, and 26.48 ± 5.0 mGy, respectively, for lung; and 0.37 ± 0.14, 0.69 ± 0.14, and 0.92 ± 0.2 mGy, respectively, for thyroid. Corresponding absorbed radiation doses for 75 bpm were 38.34 ± 2.02, 59.72 ± 3.13, and 77.8 ± 3.67 mGy for midbreast; 26.2 ± 1.74, 44 ± 1.11, and 52.84 ± 4.07 mGy for breast; 38.02 ± 1.58, 58.89 ± 1.68, and 78 ± 2.93 mGy for lung; and 0.79 ± 0.233, 1.04 ± 0.18, and 2.24 ± 0.52 mGy for thyroid. Absorbed radiation dose changes were significant for all organs for both tube voltage reductions as well as for HR control from 75 to 60 bpm at all tube voltage settings (p < 0.05). The absorbed radiation doses for the calcium score protocol were 11.2 ± 1.4 mGy for midbreast, 9.12 ± 0.48 mGy for breast, 10.36 ± 1.3 mGy for lung, and 0.4 ± 0.05 mGy for thyroid. CONCLUSION CT angiography with 320-MDCT scanners results in absorbed radiation doses in radiosensitive organs that compare favorably to those previously reported. Significant dose reductions can be achieved by tube

  16. Quantitative proteomics reveals middle infrared radiation-interfered networks in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Yi; Li, Ming-Hua; Huang, Tsui-Chin; Hsu, Chia-Lang; Tsai, Shang-Ru; Lee, Si-Chen; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading cancer-related causes of death worldwide. Treatment of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is complex and challenging, especially when metastasis has developed. In this study, we applied infrared radiation as an alternative approach for the treatment of TNBC. We used middle infrared (MIR) with a wavelength range of 3-5 μm to irradiate breast cancer cells. MIR significantly inhibited cell proliferation in several breast cancer cells but did not affect the growth of normal breast epithelial cells. We performed iTRAQ-coupled LC-MS/MS analysis to investigate the MIR-triggered molecular mechanisms in breast cancer cells. A total of 1749 proteins were identified, quantified, and subjected to functional enrichment analysis. From the constructed functionally enriched network, we confirmed that MIR caused G2/M cell cycle arrest, remodeled the microtubule network to an astral pole arrangement, altered the actin filament formation and focal adhesion molecule localization, and reduced cell migration activity and invasion ability. Our results reveal the coordinative effects of MIR-regulated physiological responses in concentrated networks, demonstrating the potential implementation of infrared radiation in breast cancer therapy. PMID:25556991

  17. Applications of Infrared Synchrotron Radiation to Industrial Analytical and Basic Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gwyn P.

    1996-03-01

    Synchrotron radiation is the brightest broadband infrared source available. It is almost 1000 times brighter than thermal sources in the range 1-1000 microns, and thus ideal for studies of samples of limited throughput, such as surfaces, microscopically small samples, samples in cryostats or in high pressure cells. Synchrotron radiation is also an absolute source, whose intensity is strictly proportional to the stored electron beam current and its high stability allows small changes - of the order of 0.01observed in time periods of the order of a minute. We have worked with several industrial companies and have implemented several synchrotron infrared facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The first of these was set up specifically to study intramolecular and bonding vibrational modes at surfaces of materials of industrial interest in areas of catalysis and corrosion. Semiconductor bulk and surface characterization also forms an important program, the bulk studies being done using an infrared microscope. Both substrates and actual devices have been studied. The instrument is a commercial Spectra-Tech IRus microspectrometer used with the synchrotron as an external source. In addition to the examples previously mentioned, we will also show others including applications to polymers and laminate structures. The National Synchrotron Light Source is funded by the United Sates Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-76CH00016.

  18. Contrail microphysical properties and radiative forcing over the Northern Hemisphere derived using MODIS infrared observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedka, S. T.; Minnis, P.; Duda, D. P.; Spangenberg, D.; Chee, T.; Khlopenkov, K. V.

    2015-12-01

    One of the primary ways that air traffic affects the Earth's radiation budget is through the formation of contrails. In order to quantify the radiative impact of contrails, one must assess their macro and microphysical properties (e.g. contrail temperature, optical depth and effective particle size) as well as the characteristics of the environment in which they occur (e.g. background radiation field and cloud properties). In-situ measurements of contrail microphysical properties are limited, and hence the retrieval of such properties from remotely sensed satellite data is useful. This paper details the ongoing progress being made to retrieve contrail properties and calculate the contrail radiative forcing from 2 years of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Aqua and Terra data. Contrail microphysical properties from the seasonal months (January, April, July, October) of 2006 and 2012 are derived using an infrared-only heritage algorithm developed at NASA Langley for the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) program. Results are subset by day/night, although the same retrieval algorithm will be used for all granules. Contrail properties and background cloud properties are then used as input into the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model to compute the overall contrail radiative forcing.

  19. Infrared radiation in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere: energetic effects and coupling with lower atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofilov, Artem; Kutepov, Alexander; Rezac, Ladislav

    2013-04-01

    The translational degrees of freedom of atmospheric molecular and atomic gaseous compounds represent the heat reservoir. This reservoir obtains or loses energy due to a number of sources and sinks, among them heating and cooling related to various types of mass motions, redistribution of energy released in the course of various photochemical reactions (the translational energy, the chemical energy and the nascent electronic, vibration and rotational energy of the reaction products), and absorption and emission of the infrared (IR) radiation. In the latter case, one deals with interaction between matter and the IR radiative field, which, for the case of the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT), includes the atmospheric radiation formed in these layers, the upwelling radiation from the ground and lower atmosphere, and, during daytime, the IR solar radiation. In this talk, we address the energetic effects of IR radiation in the MLT and its radiative coupling with lower atmosphere by analyzing the interaction between IR radiation and matter. In the MLT, this interaction is strongly affected by the situation when vibrational (and in its upper part also rotational) excitation of the molecules does not obey Boltzmann's law with the local kinetic temperature. As a result, the IR radiation emitted in these layers does not reflect the thermal state of matter. This situation is referred to as the breakdown of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) for the vibrational (or rotational-vibrational) degrees of freedom. Detailed treatment of non-LTE plays a crucial role for estimating thermal effects of the IR radiation as well as for the diagnostics of space-based IR observations. We discuss the peculiarities of the non-LTE radiation formation in the IR bands of CO2, O3, and H2O molecules, estimate radiative cooling/heating rates for typical atmospheric scenarios, and analyze sensitivity of the MLT radiative energy balance to various mechanisms of populating/depopulating molecular

  20. Absorbed dose to water determination with ionization chamber dosimetry and calorimetry in restricted neutron, photon, proton and heavy-ion radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Brede, H J; Greif, K-D; Hecker, O; Heeg, P; Heese, J; Jones, D T L; Kluge, H; Schardt, D

    2006-08-01

    Absolute dose measurements with a transportable water calorimeter and ionization chambers were performed at a water depth of 20 mm in four different types of radiation fields, for a collimated (60)Co photon beam, for a collimated neutron beam with a fluence-averaged mean energy of 5.25 MeV, for collimated proton beams with mean energies of 36 MeV and 182 MeV at the measuring position, and for a (12)C ion beam in a scanned mode with an energy per atomic mass of 430 MeV u(-1). The ionization chambers actually used were calibrated in units of air kerma in the photon reference field of the PTB and in units of absorbed dose to water for a Farmer-type chamber at GSI. The absorbed dose to water inferred from calorimetry was compared with the dose derived from ionometry by applying the radiation-field-dependent parameters. For neutrons, the quantities of the ICRU Report 45, for protons the quantities of the ICRU Report 59 and for the (12)C ion beam, the recommended values of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) protocol (TRS 398) were applied. The mean values of the absolute absorbed dose to water obtained with these two independent methods agreed within the standard uncertainty (k = 1) of 1.8% for calorimetry and of 3.0% for ionometry for all types and energies of the radiation beams used in this comparison. PMID:16861773

  1. Performance of the HIRS/2 instrument on TIROS-N. [High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, E. W.

    1980-01-01

    The High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS/2) was developed and flown on the TIROS-N satellite as one means of obtaining atmospheric vertical profile information. The HIRS/2 receives visible and infrared spectrum radiation through a single telescope and selects 20 narrow radiation channels by means of a rotating filter wheel. A passive radiant cooler provides an operating temperature of 106.7 K for the HgCdTe and InSb detectors while the visible detector operates at instrument frame temperature. Low noise amplifiers and digital processing provide 13 bit data for spacecraft data multiplexing and transmission. The qualities of system performance that determine sounding capability are the dynamic range of data collection, the noise equivalent radiance of the system, the registration of the air columns sampled in each channel and the ability to upgrade the calibration of the instrument to maintain the performance standard throughout life. The basic features, operating characteristics and performance of the instrument in test are described. Early orbital information from the TIROS-N launched on October 13, 1978 is given and some observations on system quality are made.

  2. Infrared Radiative Forcing and Atmospheric Lifetimes of Trace Species Based on Observations from UARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minschwaner, K.; Carver, R. W.; Briegleb, B. P.

    1997-01-01

    Observations from instruments on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) have been used to constrain calculations of infrared radiative forcing by CH4, CCl2F2 and N2O, and to determine lifetimes Of CCl2F2 and N2O- Radiative forcing is calculated as a change in net infrared flux at the tropopause that results from an increase in trace gas amount from pre-industrial (1750) to contemporary (1992) times. Latitudinal and seasonal variations are considered explicitly, using distributions of trace gases and temperature in the stratosphere from UARS measurements and seasonally averaged cloud statistics from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. Top-of-atmosphere fluxes calculated for the contemporary period are in good agreement with satellite measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. Globally averaged values of the radiative forcing are 0.536, 0.125, and 0.108 W m-2 for CH4, CCl2F2, and N2O, respectively. The largest forcing occurs near subtropical latitudes during summer, predominantly as a result of the combination of cloud-free skies and a high, cold tropopause. Clouds are found to play a significant role in regulating infrared forcing, reducing the magnitude of the forcing by 30-40% compared to the case of clear skies. The vertical profile of CCl2F2 is important in determining its radiative forcing; use of a height-independent mixing ratio in the stratosphere leads to an over prediction of the forcing by 10%. The impact of stratospheric profiles on radiative forcing by CH4 and N2O is less than 2%. UARS-based distributions of CCl2F2 and N2O are used also to determine global destruction rates and instantaneous lifetimes of these gases. Rates of photolytic destruction in the stratosphere are calculated using solar ultraviolet irradiances measured on UARS and a line-by-line model of absorption in the oxygen Schumann-Runge bands. Lifetimes are 114 +/- 22 and 118 +/- 25 years for CCl2F2 and N2O, respectively.

  3. A method for computing visible and infrared polarized monochromatic radiation in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauben, W. M. F.; de Haan, J. F.; Hovenier, J. W.

    1994-02-01

    In this paper we present a computational method, based on the so-called adding principle, for calculating the polarized monochromatic radiation in plane-parallel vertically inhomogeneous atmospheres. Our computer code is verified by comparing numerical results with those obtained by other investigators using different methods. We consider not only the well-known case of illumination by a unidirectional beam of light at the top of the atmosphere, but also illumination by isotropically radiating internal sources and illumination by an isotropically radiating ground surface below the atmosphere. Numerical results for all relevant Stokes parameters are tabulated for a two-layer atmosphere containing molecules and haze particles. These results pertain to the three types of illumination mentioned above. Furthermore, we describe some general features of polarized radiation in an optically thick homogeneous atmosphere containing cloud C1 water droplets. It is shown that multiple scattering of radiation in such a cloudy atmosphere may not be ignored at infrared wavelengths if molecular absorption is negligible.

  4. Infrared and Reflected Solar Radiation Measurements from the TIROS 2 Meteorological Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandeen, W. R.; Hanel, R. A.; Licht, John; Stampfl, R. A.; Stroud, W. G.

    1961-01-01

    TIROS II contains instrumentation for measuring infrared and reflected solar radiation from the earth and its atmosphere. A medium resolution scanning radiometer and a low resolution non-scanning radiometer are employed. The satellite's spin provides the scan line of the medium resolution radiometer which is then advanced by the orbital motion. The spatial resolution is about 40 miles square when the earth directly beneath the satellite is viewed. The five channels employ bolometer detectors and filters to limit the spectral responses to five bands: 6 to 6.5 microns, 8 to 12 microns, 0.2 to 6 microns, 8 to 30 microns, and 0.55 to 0.75 microns. These five bands study, respectively: radiation in the water vapor absorption band; day and nighttime cloud cover; albedo; thermal radiation; and visual maps for comparison with satellite vidicon pictures. The low resolution non-scanning radiometer measures the earth's black-body temperature and albedo. Its field when viewing directly below is a circle of 450 miles diameter, covering part of each frame from the wide-field television camera. This radiometer consists of two thermistors, each in the apex of a reflective cone which provides optical gain. One thermistor is black and responds to both thermal and reflected solar radiation. The second responds to thermal but reflects solar radiation. The design, calibration, performance, and data reduction for both systems are discussed herein.

  5. Pulsed mid-infrared radiation from spectral broadening in laser wakefield simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, W.; Palastro, J. P.; Antonsen, T. M.

    2013-07-15

    Spectral red-shifting of high power laser pulses propagating through underdense plasma can be a source of ultrashort mid-infrared (MIR) radiation. During propagation, a high power laser pulse drives large amplitude plasma waves, depleting the pulse energy. At the same time, the large amplitude plasma wave provides a dynamic dielectric response that leads to spectral shifting. The loss of laser pulse energy and the approximate conservation of laser pulse action imply that spectral red-shifts accompany the depletion. In this paper, we investigate, through simulation, the parametric dependence of MIR generation on pulse energy, initial pulse duration, and plasma density.

  6. Characterization of uncertainties when measuring metal cutting temperatures using infrared radiation thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitenton, Eric P.

    2009-05-01

    There are many error sources when using infrared radiation thermography to measure the temperature distribution of the tool, workpiece, and chip during metal cutting. It is important to understand how these error sources affect the measurement uncertainty. Some are familiar to anyone performing thermography measurements, such as uncertainties in the basic camera calibration. However, metal cutting presents unique measurement challenges due to factors such as the high magnification required, high surface speeds, polarization effects, micro-blackbody effects, and changing emissivity as chips form. This paper presents highlights of the current state of efforts at NIST to catalog and characterize error sources and the resulting uncertainties.

  7. Absorption of infrared radiation by electrons in the field of a neutral hydrogen atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical expression for the absorption coefficient is developed from a relationship between the cross-section for inverse bremsstrahlung absorption and the cross-section for electron-atom momentum transfer; it is accurate for those photon frequencies v and temperatures such that hv/kT is small. The determination of the absorption of infrared radiation by free-free transitions of the negative hydrogen ion has been extended to higher temperatures. A simple analytical expression for the absorption coefficient has been derived.

  8. Soil moisture estimation using reflected solar and emitted thermal infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D.; Cihlar, J.; Estes, J. E.; Heilman, J. L.; Kahle, A.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Millard, J.; Price, J. C.; Wiegand, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    Classical methods of measuring soil moisture such as gravimetric sampling and the use of neutron moisture probes are useful for cases where a point measurement is sufficient to approximate the water content of a small surrounding area. However, there is an increasing need for rapid and repetitive estimations of soil moisture over large areas. Remote sensing techniques potentially have the capability of meeting this need. The use of reflected-solar and emitted thermal-infrared radiation, measured remotely, to estimate soil moisture is examined.

  9. Photoblepharokeratoconjunctivitis caused by invisible infrared radiation emitted from a green laser pointer.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Yahya A H; Khedr, Abdulla H

    2014-01-01

    There are a wide variety of laser pointers sold to the general public. Among those are the high-powered diode-pumped solid-state lasers (>5 mW), which do not follow the laser safety regulations for packing, and are sold as regular lasers without the infrared (IR) filters. In this case report, we encountered a patient with photoblepharokeratoconjunctivitis caused by the invisible IR radiations emitted from a green laser pointer. Owing to the thermal effect of the invisible IR rays led to the disease. PMID:24618868

  10. Microprocessing of human hard tooth tissues surface by mid-infrared erbium lasers radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Andrey V.; Shatilova, Ksenia V.; Skrypnik, Alexei V.

    2015-03-01

    A new method of hard tooth tissues laser treatment is described. The method consists in formation of regular microdefects on tissue surface by mid-infrared erbium laser radiation with propagation ratio M2<2 (Er-laser microprocessing). Proposed method was used for preparation of hard tooth tissues surface before filling for improvement of bond strength between tissues surface and restorative materials, microleakage reduction between tissues surface and restorative materials, and for caries prevention as a result of increasing microhardness and acid resistance of tooth enamel.

  11. Extinction of visible and infrared radiation in rain Comparison of theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, C. W.; Atlas, D.

    1985-01-01

    A critical review is given of the experimental and theoretical results concerning the measurement of rainfall using optical extinction, i.e., the attenuation of radiation with wavelength less than or equal to that of the infrared band. It is shown that rainfall rates found from an empirical relation involving optical extinction generally display average deviations without regard for sign of only 25 percent when compared with those measured by raingages directly beneath the optical beam. It is also shown that the differences between experimental and theoretical results can be explained in terms of variations of the shape of the raindrop size distribution, i.e., deviations from exponentiality.

  12. Anomalous Polarization May Improve Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Chan-Lon; Pan, Dee-Son

    1990-01-01

    New configurations proposed for quantum-well devices. Simplifies alignment, increases sensitivity, and opens up more possibilities in design of quantum-well detectors of infrared radiation. In detector made according to proposed concept, light incident broadside on front surface absorbed. No special waveguide structures required.

  13. Retinal safety of near infrared radiation in photovoltaic restoration of sight.

    PubMed

    Lorach, H; Wang, J; Lee, D Y; Dalal, R; Huie, P; Palanker, D

    2016-01-01

    Photovoltaic restoration of sight requires intense near-infrared light to effectively stimulate retinal neurons. We assess the retinal safety of such radiation with and without the retinal implant. Retinal damage threshold was determined in pigmented rabbits exposed to 880nm laser radiation. The 50% probability (ED50) of retinal damage during 100s exposures with 1.2mm diameter beam occurred at 175mW, corresponding to a modeled temperature rise of 12.5°C. With the implant, the same temperature was reached at 78mW, close to the experimental ED50 of 71mW. In typical use conditions, the retinal temperature rise is not expected to exceed 0.43°C, well within the safety limits for chronic use. PMID:26819813

  14. Retinal safety of near infrared radiation in photovoltaic restoration of sight

    PubMed Central

    Lorach, H.; Wang, J.; Lee, D. Y.; Dalal, R.; Huie, P.; Palanker, D.

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic restoration of sight requires intense near-infrared light to effectively stimulate retinal neurons. We assess the retinal safety of such radiation with and without the retinal implant. Retinal damage threshold was determined in pigmented rabbits exposed to 880nm laser radiation. The 50% probability (ED50) of retinal damage during 100s exposures with 1.2mm diameter beam occurred at 175mW, corresponding to a modeled temperature rise of 12.5°C. With the implant, the same temperature was reached at 78mW, close to the experimental ED50 of 71mW. In typical use conditions, the retinal temperature rise is not expected to exceed 0.43°C, well within the safety limits for chronic use. PMID:26819813

  15. Infrared radiation from hot cones on cool conifers attracts seed-feeding insects

    PubMed Central

    Takács, Stephen; Bottomley, Hannah; Andreller, Iisak; Zaradnik, Tracy; Schwarz, Joseph; Bennett, Robb; Strong, Ward; Gries, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Foraging animals use diverse cues to locate resources. Common foraging cues have visual, auditory, olfactory, tactile or gustatory characteristics. Here, we show a foraging herbivore using infrared (IR) radiation from living plants as a host-finding cue. We present data revealing that (i) conifer cones are warmer and emit more near-, mid- and long-range IR radiation than needles, (ii) cone-feeding western conifer seed bugs, Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera: Coreidae), possess IR receptive organs and orient towards experimental IR cues, and (iii) occlusion of the insects' IR receptors impairs IR perception. The conifers' cost of attracting cone-feeding insects may be offset by occasional mast seeding resulting in cone crops too large to be effectively exploited by herbivores. PMID:18945664

  16. Infrared response measurements on radiation-damaged Si/Li/ detectors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A. H.; Liu, Y. M.; Keery, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The improved infrared response (IRR) technique has been used to qualitatively compare radiation effects on Si(Li) detectors with energy levels reported for silicon in the literature. Measurements have been made on five commercial silicon detectors and one fabricated in-house, both before and after irradiation with fast neutrons, 1.9-MeV protons, and 1.6-MeV electrons. Effects dependent upon the extent of radiation damage have been observed. It seems likely that the photo-EMF, or photo-voltage, effect is the basic mechanism for the observation of IRR in p-i-n diodes with a wide i-region. Experimental characteristics of the IRR measurement are in agreement with those of the photovoltage effect.

  17. Infra-red Radiative Cooling/heating Of The Mesosphere/lower Thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutepov, A. A.; Gusev, O. A.; Kaufmann, M.; Grossmann, K. U.; Feofilov, A. G.

    The new model of radiative cooling/heating of the mesosphere and lower thermo- sphere (MLT) in the ro-vibrational bands of atmospheric gases (CO2, O3, H2O, CO, NO, N2O and other) accounts for vibrational and rotational non­LTE, line- overlapping, and absorption and transformation of the near-infrared solar radiation. The model utilizes "accelerated lambda-iteration" (ALI) technique for the solution of the system of kinetic equations and the "discontinuous finite elements" (DFE) radia- tive transfer algorithm. The contributions of various band to the total cooling/heating are analyzed. The model is applied to the calculation of the MLT cooling/heating for atmospheric data retrieved from the CRISTA limb radiance measurements. Implica- tions for modeling of the MLT region are discussed.

  18. The polarization of the far-infrared radiation from the Galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, M. W.; Davidson, J. A.; Morris, M.; Novak, G.; Platt, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    The first detection of linear polarization of the far-infrared (100-micron) radiation from the about 3-pc-diameter dust ring surrounding the galactic nucleus is reported. The percentage of polarization is between 1 and 2 percent at the three measured positions. It is argued that the polarized radiation is produced by thermal emission from elongated interstellar grains oriented by the local magnetic field. The dust ring is optically thin at 100 microns; therefore the observations sample dust through the entire depth of the cloud and are free of confusing effects due to embedded sources, scattering, or selective absorption. These data provide the first information about the configuration of the magnetic field in the dust ring.

  19. Dichroic filters to protect milliwatt far-infrared detectors from megawatt ECRH radiation.

    PubMed

    Bertschinger, G; Endres, C P; Lewen, F; Oosterbeek, J W

    2008-10-01

    Dichroic filters have been used to shield effectively the far infrared (FIR) detectors at the interferometer/polarimeter on TEXTOR. The filters consist of metal foils with regular holes, the hole diameter, the mutual spacing and the thickness of the foils are chosen to transmit radiation at the design frequency with transmission >90%. The attenuation at the low frequency end of the bandpass filter is about 30 dB per octave, the high frequency transmission is between 20% and 40%. The filters have been used to block the stray radiation from the megawatt microwave heating beam to the detectors of the FIR interferometer, operating with power on the detector in the milliwatt range. If required, the low frequency attenuation can be still enhanced, without compromising the transmission in the passband. The FIR interferometer used for plasma density and position control is no longer disturbed by electromagnetic waves used for plasma heating. PMID:19044527

  20. Dichroic filters to protect milliwatt far-infrared detectors from megawatt ECRH radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertschinger, G.; Endres, C. P.; Lewen, F.; Oosterbeek, J. W.

    2008-10-01

    Dichroic filters have been used to shield effectively the far infrared (FIR) detectors at the interferometer/polarimeter on TEXTOR. The filters consist of metal foils with regular holes, the hole diameter, the mutual spacing and the thickness of the foils are chosen to transmit radiation at the design frequency with transmission >90%. The attenuation at the low frequency end of the bandpass filter is about 30dB per octave, the high frequency transmission is between 20% and 40%. The filters have been used to block the stray radiation from the megawatt microwave heating beam to the detectors of the FIR interferometer, operating with power on the detector in the milliwatt range. If required, the low frequency attenuation can be still enhanced, without compromising the transmission in the passband. The FIR interferometer used for plasma density and position control is no longer disturbed by electromagnetic waves used for plasma heating.

  1. A Monte Carlo method for 3D thermal infrared radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Liou, K. N.

    2006-09-01

    A 3D Monte Carlo model for specific application to the broadband thermal radiative transfer has been developed in which the emissivities for gases and cloud particles are parameterized by using a single cubic element as the building block in 3D space. For spectral integration in the thermal infrared, the correlated k-distribution method has been used for the sorting of gaseous absorption lines in multiple-scattering atmospheres involving 3D clouds. To check the Monte-Carlo simulation, we compare a variety of 1D broadband atmospheric fluxes and heating rates to those computed from the conventional plane-parallel (PP) model and demonstrate excellent agreement between the two. Comparisons of the Monte Carlo results for broadband thermal cooling rates in 3D clouds to those computed from the delta-diffusion approximation for 3D radiative transfer and the independent pixel-by-pixel approximation are subsequently carried out to understand the relative merits of these approaches.

  2. Dichroic filters to protect milliwatt far-infrared detectors from megawatt ECRH radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bertschinger, G.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Endres, C. P.; Lewen, F.

    2008-10-15

    Dichroic filters have been used to shield effectively the far infrared (FIR) detectors at the interferometer/polarimeter on TEXTOR. The filters consist of metal foils with regular holes, the hole diameter, the mutual spacing and the thickness of the foils are chosen to transmit radiation at the design frequency with transmission >90%. The attenuation at the low frequency end of the bandpass filter is about 30 dB per octave, the high frequency transmission is between 20% and 40%. The filters have been used to block the stray radiation from the megawatt microwave heating beam to the detectors of the FIR interferometer, operating with power on the detector in the milliwatt range. If required, the low frequency attenuation can be still enhanced, without compromising the transmission in the passband. The FIR interferometer used for plasma density and position control is no longer disturbed by electromagnetic waves used for plasma heating.

  3. Infrared Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lascours, Jean; Albe, Virginie

    2001-01-01

    Describes a series of simple and nontraditional experiments that enable students to discover the properties of infrared radiation by studying the propagation, reflection, diffusion, and refraction of infrared. The experiments rely on two modules, an infrared transmitter and an infrared receiver. (SAH)

  4. Enhanced thermal radiation in terahertz and far-infrared regime by hot phonon excitation in a field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Pei-Kang; Yen, Shun-Tung

    2014-11-14

    We demonstrate the hot phonon effect on thermal radiation in the terahertz and far-infrared regime. A pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor is used for efficiently exciting hot phonons. Boosting the hot phonon population can enhance the efficiency of thermal radiation. The transistor can yield at least a radiation power of 13 μW and a power conversion efficiency higher than a resistor by more than 20%.

  5. Status of the solar and infrared radiation submodels in the LLNL 1-D and 2-D chemical-transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, K.E.; Taylor, K.E.; Ellis, J.S.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1987-07-01

    The authors have implemented a series of state of the art radiation transport submodels in previously developed one dimensional and two dimensional chemical transport models of the troposphere and stratosphere. These submodels provide the capability of calculating accurate solar and infrared heating rates. They are a firm basis for further radiation submodel development as well as for studying interactions between radiation and model dynamics under varying conditions of clear sky, clouds, and aerosols. 37 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Effect of UV-B radiation on UV absorbing compounds and pigments of moss and lichen of Schirmacher oasis region, East Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Singh, J; Gautam, S; Bhushan Pant, A

    2012-01-01

    The survival of Antarctic flora under ozone depletion depends on their ability to acclimate against increasing UV—B radiation by employing photo protective mechanisms either by avoiding or repairing UV—B damage. A fifteen days experiment was designed to study moss (Bryum argenteum) and lichen (Umbilicaria aprina) under natural UV—B exposure and under UV filter frames at the Maitri region of Schirmacher oasis, East Antarctica. Changes in UV absorbing compounds, phenolics, carotenoids and chlorophyll content were studied for continuous fifteen days and significant changes were observed in the UV exposed plants of B. argenteum and U. aprina. The change in the UV absorbing compounds was more significant in B. argenteum (P<0.0001) than U. aprina (P<0.0002). The change in phenolic contents and total carotenoid content was significant (P<0.0001) in both B. argenteum and lichen U. aprina indicating that the increase in UV absorbing compounds, phenolic contents and total carotenoid content act as a protective mechanism against the deleterious effect of UV—B radiations. PMID:23273195

  7. Dependence of the absorption of pulsed CO{sub 2}-laser radiation by silane on wavenumber, fluence, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of absorbing and nonabsorbing gases

    SciTech Connect

    Blazejowski, J.; Gruzdiewa, L.; Rulewski, J.; Lampe, F.W.

    1995-05-15

    The absorption of three lines [{ital P}(20), 944.2 cm{sup {minus}1}; {ital P}(14), 949.2 cm{sup {minus}1}; and {ital R}(24), 978.5 cm{sup {minus}1}] of the pulsed CO{sub 2} laser (00{sup 0}1--10{sup 0}0 transition) by SiH{sub 4} was measured at various pulse energy, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of the compound and nonabsorbing foreign gases. In addition, low intensity infrared absorption spectrum of silane was compared with high intensity absorption characteristics for all lines of the pulsed CO{sub 2} laser. The experimental dependencies show deviations from the phenomenological Beer--Lambert law which can be considered as arising from the high intensity of an incident radiation and collisions of absorbing molecules with surroundings. These effects were included into the expression, being an extended form of the Beer--Lambert law, which reasonably approximates all experimental data. The results, except for extending knowledge on the interaction of a high power laser radiation with matter, can help understanding and planning processes leading to preparation of silicon-containing technologically important materials.

  8. Broadband near-field infrared spectromicroscopy using photothermal probes and synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Paul M; Kelley, Chris S; Frogley, Mark D; Filik, Jacob; Wehbe, Katia; Cinque, Gianfelice

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate the use of infrared synchrotron radiation (IR-SR) as a broadband source for photothermal near-field infrared spectroscopy. We assess two methods of signal transduction; cantilever resonant thermal expansion and scanning thermal microscopy. By means of rapid mechanical chopping (50-150 kHz), we modulate the IR-SR at rates matching the contact resonance frequencies of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers, allowing us to record interferograms yielding Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) photothermal absorption spectra of polystyrene and cyanoacrylate films. Complementary offline measurements using a mechanically chopped CW IR laser confirmed that the resonant thermal expansion IR-SR measurements were below the diffraction limit, with a spatial resolution better than 500 nm achieved at a wavelength of 6 μm, i.e. λ/12 for the samples studied. Despite achieving the highest signal to noise so far for a scanning thermal microscopy measurement under conditions approaching near-field (dictated by thermal diffusion), the IR-SR resonant photothermal expansion FT-IR spectra measured were significantly higher in signal to noise in comparison with the scanning thermal data. PMID:26906764

  9. Using Digital Cameras to Teach about Infrared Radiation and Instrumentation Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, S. M.; Croft, S. K.

    1998-12-01

    Digital cameras and image processing are used to create color composite images that illustrate the importance of the near infrared portion of the spectrum in providing additional information about an astronomical object. Demonstrations with digital cameras also help make infrared radiation real to students and illustrate the different aspects of a sensing system including the spectral emission properties of the source, the reflectivity of the object of interest, the use of filters, detector sensitivity, and the use of image processing. Using appropriate, easily available filters, students can demonstrate that two objects that appear green (such as a car and a plant) have very different properties in the near infrared, since chlorophyll in plants is reflective in the near IR. The results can be applied to imaging of the planets to look for chlorophyll features indicative of life. Digital cameras are affordable, relatively common devices which can be used in a wide variety of classroom and experimental settings. As such they can have a profound influence, in conjunction with image processing, on participatory teaching of observational astronomy and in sharing observations across the web. Some other general applications in this area as well as extensions to several areas of spectroscopy will also be discussed. This work was supported by an NSF instructional materials grant as part of the Astronomy Village: Investigating the Solar System development program. S. Pompea is an adjunct faculty member of Steward Observatory, University of Arizona.

  10. Infrared Radiative Properties of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeff I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Street, Ken W.; Markham, Jim R.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The infrared (IR) transmittance and reflectance of translucent thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have important implications for both the performance of these coatings as radiation barriers and emitters as well as affecting measurements of TBC thermal conductivity, especially as TBCs are being pushed to higher temperatures. In this paper, the infrared spectral directional-hemispherical transmittance and reflectance of plasma-sprayed 8wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) TBCs are reported. These measurements are compared to those for single crystal YSZ specimens to show the effects of the plasma-sprayed coating microstructure. It is shown that the coatings exhibit negligible absorption at wavelengths up to about 5 micrometers, and that internal scattering rather than surface reflections dominates the hemispherical reflectance. The translucent nature of the 8YSZ TBCs results in the absorptance/emittance and reflectance of TBC-coated substrates depending on the TBC thickness, microstructure, as well as the radiative properties of the underlying substrate. The effects of these properties on TBC measurements and performance are discussed.

  11. Infrared Heater Used in Qualification Testing of International Space Station Radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Two heat rejection radiator systems for the International Space Station (ISS) have undergone thermal vacuum qualification testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Plum Brook Station, Sandusky, Ohio. The testing was performed in the Space Power Facility (SPF), the largest thermal vacuum chamber in the world. The heat rejection system radiator was tested first; it removes heat from the ISS crew living quarters. The second system tested was the photovoltaic radiator (PVR), which rejects heat from the ISS photovoltaic arrays and the electrical power-conditioning equipment. The testing included thermal cycling, hot- and cold-soaked deployments, thermal gradient deployments, verification of the onboard heater controls, and for the PVR, thermal performance tests with ammonia flow. Both radiator systems are orbital replacement units for ease of replacement on the ISS. One key to the success of these tests was the performance of the infrared heater system. It was used in conjunction with a gaseous-nitrogen-cooled cryoshroud in the SPF vacuum chamber to achieve the required thermal vacuum conditions for the qualification tests. The heater, which was designed specifically for these tests, was highly successful and easily met the test requirements. This report discusses the heating requirements, the heater design features, the design approach, and the mathematical basis of the design.

  12. Time Resolved Detection of Infrared Synchrotron Radiation at DA{phi}NE

    SciTech Connect

    Bocci, A.; Marcelli, A.; Drago, A.; Guidi, M. Cestelli; Pace, E.; Piccinini, M.; Sali, D.; Morini, P.

    2007-01-19

    Synchrotron radiation is characterized by a very wide spectral emission from IR to X-ray wavelengths and a pulsed structure that is a function of the source time structure. In a storage ring, the typical temporal distance between two bunches, whose duration is a few hundreds of picoseconds, is on the nanosecond scale. Therefore, synchrotron radiation sources are a very powerful tools to perform time-resolved experiments that however need extremely fast detectors. Uncooled IR devices optimized for the mid-IR range with sub-nanosecond response time, are now available and can be used for fast detection of intense IR sources such as synchrotron radiation storage rings. We present here different measurements of the pulsed synchrotron radiation emission at DA{phi}NE (Double Annular {phi}-factory for Nice Experiments), the collider of the Laboratori Nazionali of Frascati (LNF) of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), performed with very fast uncooled infrared detectors with a time resolution of a few hundreds of picoseconds. We resolved the emission time structure of the electron bunches of the DA{phi}NE collider when it works in a normal condition for high energy physics experiments with both photovoltaic and photoconductive detectors. Such a technology should pave the way to new diagnostic methods in storage rings, monitoring also source instabilities and bunch dynamics.

  13. Radiation-absorbed doses and energy imparted from panoramic tomography, cephalometric radiography, and occlusal film radiography in children

    SciTech Connect

    Bankvall, G.; Hakansson, H.A.

    1982-05-01

    The absorbed doses and energy imparted from radiographic examinations of children, using panoramic tomography (PTG), cephalometric radiography (CPR), and maxillary frontal occlusal overview (FOO), were examined. The absorbed dose at various sites of the head were measured with TL dosimeters in a phantom and in patients. The energy imparted was calculated from measurements of areal exposure using a planparallel ionization chamber. The maximum absorbed doses for panoramic tomography were located around the lateral rotation center, for cephalometric radiography in the left (tube side) parotid region, and for frontal occlusal radiography in the nose. The absorbed doses in the eyes, thyroid gland, and skin are discussed and compared with previous reports and, for the most part, are found to be in agreement. The mean energy imparted from all three examination methods is 5 mJ with about 57 percent from panoramic, 33 percent from cephalometric, and 10 percent from frontal occlusal examinations. The energy imparted from cephalometric radiography can be reduced to about 10 percent with the use of an improved examination technique, leaving panoramic tomography responsible for contributing about 80 percent of the total energy imparted.

  14. Piezoresistive microcantilever optimization for uncooled infrared detection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Rajic, S.; Evans, B.M. III; Oden, P.I.; Datskos, P.G.; Thundat, T.

    1996-10-01

    Uncooled infrared sensors are significant in a number of scientific and technological applications. A new approach to uncooled infrared detectors has been developed using piezoresistive microcantilevers coated with thermal energy absorbing materials. Infrared radiation absorbed by the microcantilever detector can be sensitively detected as changes in electrical resistance as function of microcantilever bending. The dynamic range of these devices is extremely large due to measurable resistance change obtained with only nanometer level cantilever displacement. Optimization of geometrical properties for selected commercially available cantilevers is presented. We also present results obtained from a modeling analysis of the thermal properties of several different microcantilever detector architectures.

  15. Structural changes caused by radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis: the effect of X-ray absorbed dose in a fungal multicopper oxidase

    PubMed Central

    De la Mora, Eugenio; Lovett, Janet E.; Blanford, Christopher F.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Valderrama, Brenda; Rudino-Pinera, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    X-ray radiation induces two main effects at metal centres contained in protein crystals: radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis and a resulting decrease in metal occupancy. In blue multicopper oxidases (BMCOs), the geometry of the active centres and the metal-to-ligand distances change depending on the oxidation states of the Cu atoms, suggesting that these alterations are catalytically relevant to the binding, activation and reduction of O2. In this work, the X-ray-determined three-dimensional structure of laccase from the basidiomycete Coriolopsis gallica (Cg L), a high catalytic potential BMCO, is described. By combining spectroscopic techniques (UV–Vis, EPR and XAS) and X-ray crystallography, structural changes at and around the active copper centres were related to pH and absorbed X-­ray dose (energy deposited per unit mass). Depletion of two of the four active Cu atoms as well as low occupancies of the remaining Cu atoms, together with different conformations of the metal centres, were observed at both acidic pH and high absorbed dose, correlating with more reduced states of the active coppers. These observations provide additional evidence to support the role of flexibility of copper sites during O2 reduction. This study supports previous observations indicating that interpretations regarding redox state and metal coordination need to take radiation effects explicitly into account. PMID:22525754

  16. Spatial temperature distribution in human hairy and glabrous skin after infrared CO2 laser radiation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background CO2 lasers have been used for several decades as an experimental non-touching pain stimulator. The laser energy is absorbed by the water content in the most superficial layers of the skin. The deeper located nociceptors are activated by passive conduction of heat from superficial to deeper skin layers. Methods In the current study, a 2D axial finite element model was developed and validated to describe the spatial temperature distribution in the skin after infrared CO2 laser stimulation. The geometry of the model was based on high resolution ultrasound scans. The simulations were compared to the subjective pain intensity ratings from 16 subjects and to the surface skin temperature distributions measured by an infrared camera. Results The stimulations were sensed significantly slower and less intense in glabrous skin than they were in hairy skin (MANOVA, p < 0.001). The model simulations of superficial temperature correlated with the measured skin surface temperature (r > 0.90, p < 0.001). Of the 16 subjects tested; eight subjects reported pricking pain in the hairy skin following a stimulus of 0.6 J/cm2 (5 W, 0.12 s, d1/e2 = 11.4 mm) only two reported pain to glabrous skin stimulation using the same stimulus intensity. The temperature at the epidermal-dermal junction (depth 50 μm in hairy and depth 133 μm in glabrous skin) was estimated to 46°C for hairy skin stimulation and 39°C for glabrous skin stimulation. Conclusions As compared to previous one dimensional heat distribution models, the current two dimensional model provides new possibilities for detailed studies regarding CO2 laser stimulation intensity, temperature levels and nociceptor activation. PMID:21059226

  17. The phase transition in VO2 probed using x-ray, visible and infrared radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Suhas; Strachan, John Paul; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Pickett, Matthew D.; Santori, Charles; Gibson, Gary; Williams, R. Stanley

    2016-02-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is a model system that has been used to understand closely occurring multiband electronic (Mott) and structural (Peierls) transitions for over half a century due to continued scientific and technological interests. Among the many techniques used to study VO2, the most frequently used involve electromagnetic radiation as a probe. Understanding of the distinct physical information provided by different probing radiations is incomplete, mostly owing to the complicated nature of the phase transitions. Here, we use transmission of spatially averaged infrared (λ = 1.5 μm) and visible (λ = 500 nm) radiations followed by spectroscopy and nanoscale imaging using x-rays (λ = 2.25-2.38 nm) to probe the same VO2 sample while controlling the ambient temperature across its hysteretic phase transitions and monitoring its electrical resistance. We directly observed nanoscale puddles of distinct electronic and structural compositions during the transition. The two main results are that, during both heating and cooling, the transition of infrared and visible transmission occurs at significantly lower temperatures than the Mott transition, and the electronic (Mott) transition occurs before the structural (Peierls) transition in temperature. We use our data to provide insights into possible microphysical origins of the different transition characteristics. We highlight that it is important to understand these effects because small changes in the nature of the probe can yield quantitatively, and even qualitatively, different results when applied to a non-trivial multiband phase transition. Our results guide more judicious use of probe type and interpretation of the resulting data.

  18. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Moreover, our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributionsmore » to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.« less

  19. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure. PMID:26828999

  20. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.