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Sample records for absorbance difference spectra

  1. Differential ultraviolet-visible absorbance spectra for characterizing metal ions binding onto extracellular polymeric substances in different mixed microbial cultures.

    PubMed

    Yin, Cuiqin; Meng, Fangang; Meng, Yabing; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-09-01

    Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorbance spectra was adopted to quantify the binding of major metal ions (e.g., Na(I), Ca((II)), Fe(III), Cu(II), and Pb(II)) on extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) extracted from different mixed cultures. The results showed that the differential absorbance spectra (DAS) provided discernible features for revealing the changes in optical properties of EPSs induced by metals, i.e., the intensity of DAS increased largely with incrementally increased metal concentrations (Fe(III), Cu(II), and Pb(II)). It can be assumed attributable to the changes in the conformations and inter-chromophores of the EPS biomolecules. In addition, the changes in spectral parameters of DSlope325-375 (spectral slope in the range of wavelengths 325-375 nm) and DA300 (differential absorbance at 300 nm) were found to be closely related to the amounts of metals bound onto all extracted EPSs, particularly for Fe(III) and Cu(II). The decreased SR (the ratio of slope275-295 to slope350-400) of the EPS solutions after dosage of metals suggested increased molecular weight or size of the EPS biomolecules. Deconvolution of the DAS yielded six Gaussian bands, which were present in all of the EPS samples with various metals. Moreover, the relative contributions of different Gaussian bands in the DAS were determined by the nature of EPS-metal ions interactions good correlated with the covalent-bonding index. This study concluded that DAS and selected spectral parameters (DA300, DSlope325-375 and SR) can be used to successfully characterize the binding of metals onto EPS at environmentally relevant concentrations. PMID:27300774

  2. Calculation of interaction-induced spectra using complex absorbing potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, Magnus; Antipov, Sergey V.

    2010-10-29

    A complex absorbing potential method is implemented for calculation of collision-induced spectra. The scheme provides a way to avoid the integration of the Schroedinger equation to very large separations of the collisional pair. The method is tested by reproducing a previously computed absorption spectrum for H-He at two different temperatures.

  3. Absorbed dose and LET spectra measurements on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Csige, I.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Frigo, L. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Watts, J.; Harmon, A.

    1995-01-01

    Total absorbed doses measured with TLD's, linear energy transfer (LET) spectra measured with plastic track detectors, and low energy neutrons measured on LDEF have been compared with model calculations. The total absorbed doses measured in TLD's were higher than predicted in the calculations of Armstrong et al. and differ from the calculations of Atwell et al. LDEF LET spectra are dependent on detector orientation, shielding and experiment location. These factors need to be taken into account when modeling the LDEF LET spectra. LET spectra measured with plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD's) also deviate significantly from calculations especially for high LET particles (LET(sub infinity) H2O greater than 100keV/micron). Modeling efforts to date do not include the contribution of proton induced secondaries. Analysis of polycarbonate PNTD's from the West-side of LDEF has revealed a very high fluence of tracks (greater than 1 x 10(exp 7) tracks/cm(exp 2) under 2 gm/cm(exp 2) shielding). Fluence drops off rapidly as shielding depth increases. Tracks only form in the region of the detector closest to the surface, not in the bulk of the detector. To date no adequate explanation for this observation has been found. We plan to measure range distribution of very high LET (LET (sub infinity) H2O greater than 500 keV/micron) secondary particles produced in silicon wafer by high energy primary cosmic ray particles. Refinements of experimental techniques and model calculations are being carried out in order to understand existing discrepancies between experimental measurements and calculations.

  4. Lake and Sea Populations of Mysis relicta (Crustacea, Mysida) with Different Visual-Pigment Absorbance Spectra Use the Same A1 Chromophore

    PubMed Central

    Belikov, Nikolai; Yakovleva, Marina; Feldman, Tatiana; Demina, Olga; Khodonov, Andrei; Lindström, Magnus; Donner, Kristian; Ostrovsky, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Glacial-relict species of the genus Mysis (opossum shrimps) inhabiting both fresh-water lakes and brackish sea waters in northern Europe show a consistent lake/sea dichotomy in eye spectral sensitivity. The absorbance peak (λmax) recorded by microspectrophotometry in isolated rhabdoms is invariably 20–30 nm red-shifted in “lake” compared with “sea” populations. The dichotomy holds across species, major opsin lineages and light environments. Chromophore exchange from A1 to A2 (retinal → 3,4-didehydroretinal) is a well-known mechanism for red-shifting visual pigments depending on environmental conditions or stages of life history, present not only in fishes and amphibians, but in some crustaceans as well. We tested the hypothesis that the lake/sea dichotomy in Mysis is due to the use of different chromophores, focussing on two populations of M. relicta from, respectively, a Finnish lake and the Baltic Sea. They are genetically very similar, having been separated for less than 10 kyr, and their rhabdoms show a typical lake/sea difference in λmax (554 nm vs. 529 nm). Gene sequencing has revealed no differences translating into amino acid substitutions in the transmembrane parts of their opsins. We determined the chromophore identity (A1 or A2) in the eyes of these two populations by HPLC, using as standards pure chromophores A1 and A2 as well as extracts from bovine (A1) and goldfish (A2) retinas. We found that the visual-pigment chromophore in both populations is A1 exclusively. Thus the spectral difference between these two populations of M. relicta is not due to the use of different chromophores. We argue that this conclusion is likely to hold for all populations of M. relicta as well as its European sibling species. PMID:24516590

  5. Warm Absorbers in the ROSAT Spectra of Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiore, Fabrizio

    1998-01-01

    We present two ROSAT PSPC observations of the radio-loud, lobe-dominated quasar 3C 351, which shows an 'ionized absorber' in its X-ray spectrum. The factor 1.7 change in flux in the approx. 2 years between the observations allows a test of of models for this ionized absorber. The absorption feature at approx. 0.7 keV (quasar frame) is present in both spectra but with a lower optical depth when the source intensity - and hence the ionizing flux at the absorber - is higher, in accordance with a simple, single-zone, equilibrium photoionization model. Detailed modeling confirms this agreement quantitatively. The maximum response time of 2 years allows us to limit the gas density: n(sub e) greater than 2 x 10(exp 4)cm(exp -3); and the distance of the ionized gas from the central source R less than 19 pc. This produces a strong test for a photoionized absorber in 3C 351: a factor 2 flux change in approx. 1 week in this source must show non-equilibrium effects in the ionized absorber.

  6. Visible absorbance spectra: A basis for in situ and passive remote sensing of phytoplankton concentration and community composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, F. H.; Jarrett, O., Jr.; Brown, C. A., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The concentration and composition of phytoplankton populations are measured by an optical method which can be used either in situ or remotely. This method is based upon the in vivo light absorption characteristics of phytoplankton. To provide a data base for testing assumptions relative to the proposed method, visible absorbance spectra of pure cultures of 20 marine phytoplankton were obtained under laboratory conditions. Descriptive and analytical statistics were computed for the absorbance spectra and were used to make comparisons between members of major taxonomic groups and between groups. Spectral variation between the members of the major taxonomic groups was observed to be considerably less than the spectral variation between these groups. In several cases the differences between the mean absorbance spectra of major taxonomic groups are significant enough to be detected with passive remote sensing techniques.

  7. Design of wide bandwidth pyramidal microwave absorbers using ferrite composites with broad magnetic loss spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Myung-Jun; Kim, Sung-Soo

    2016-07-01

    Wide bandwidth microwave absorbers with a pyramidal shape and a significantly reduced thickness can be designed using high lossy ferrite materials with broad magnetic loss spectra. The microwave absorbing properties of pyramidal cone absorbers are analyzed using the transmission line approximation, which provides the reflection loss as a function of the material parameters and absorber geometry. Three types of ferrite materials (NiZn spinel ferrite, Co2Z hexaferrite, and RuCoM hexaferrite) are used as the absorbent fillers in a rubber matrix. Among these, Co2Z ferrite is the most suitable material for wide bandwidth pyramidal absorbers, due to its broad magnetic loss spectrum in the GHz frequency range. The optimal geometry of the pyramidal absorber is also determined using the transmission line theory. With the reduced total height of the pyramidal absorber (approximately 60 mm), a wide bandwidth (1.5-18 GHz with respect to the -20 dB reflection loss) can be realized. The proposed absorbers have a thickness advantage over the classical pyramidal ohmic absorbers; thus, they are suitable for small and semi-anechoic chambers.

  8. Effect of reference spectra in spectral fitting to discriminate enzyme-activatable photoacoustic probe from intrinsic optical absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirasawa, Takeshi; Okawa, Shinpei; Iwatate, Ryu J.; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru; Ishihara, Miya

    2016-03-01

    Multispectral photoacoustic (MS-PA) imaging has been researched to image molecular probes in the presence of strong background signals produced from intrinsic optical absorbers. Spectral fitting method (SFM) discriminates probe signals from background signals by fitting the PA spectra that are calculated from MS-PA images to reference spectra of the probe and background, respectively. Because hemoglobin is a dominant optical absorber in visible to near-infrared wavelength range, absorption spectra of hemoglobin have been widely used as reference background spectra. However, the spectra of background signals produced from heterogeneous biological tissue differ from the reference background spectra due to presence of other intrinsic optical absorbers and effect of optical scattering. Due to the difference, the background signals partly remain in the probe images. To image the probe injected in subcutaneous tumors of mice clearly, we added the melanosome absorption spectrum to the reference background spectra because skin contains nonnegligible concentration of melanosome and the spectrum is very similar to the scattering spectrum of biological tissue. The probe injected in the subcutaneous tumor of mice was an enzyme-activatable probe which show their original colors only in the presence of γ-glutamyltranspeptidase, an enzyme associated with cancer. The probes have been successfully used for rapid fluorescence imaging of cancer. As a result of MS-PA imaging, by considering the melanosome absorption spectrum, the background signals were successfully suppressed and then clearer probe image was obtained. Our MS-PA imaging method afforded successful imaging of tumors in mice injected with activatable PA probes.

  9. Comparison of the action spectra and relative DNA absorbance spectra of microorganisms: information important for the determination of germicidal fluence (UV dose) in an ultraviolet disinfection of water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ren Zhuo; Craik, Stephen A; Bolton, James R

    2009-12-01

    The action spectra of Bacillus subtilis spores (ATCC6633) and Salmonella typhimurium LT2 were characterized using physical radiometry for irradiance measurements and a multiple target model to interpret the inactivation kinetics. The observed action spectrum of B. subtilis spores deviated significantly from the relative absorbance spectrum of the DNA purified from the spores, but matched quite well with the relative absorbance spectrum of decoated spores. The action spectrum of B. subtilis spores determined in this study was statistically different from those reported in previous studies. On the other hand, the action spectrum of S. typhimurium bacteria matched quite well with the relative absorbance spectrum of DNA extracted from vegetative cells, except in the region below 240nm. It is concluded that the common use of the relative DNA absorbance spectrum as a surrogate for the germicidal action spectrum can result in systematic errors when evaluating the performance of a polychromatic UV light reactors using bioassays. For example, if the weighted germicidal fluence (UV dose) calculated using the relative DNA absorbance spectrum as the germicidal weighting factor is found to be 40mJcm(-2) for a medium pressure lamp UV reactor, that calculated using the relative action spectrum of B. subtilis spores, as determined in this study, would be 66mJcm(-2). PMID:19762061

  10. Determining the Absorbance Spectra of Photochromic Materials From Measured Spectrophotometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.

    1998-01-01

    If a two-state photochromic material is optically bleached, the absorbance spectrum data measured by a spectrophotometer is in general comprised of components from both the ground state and the upper state. Under general conditions, it may be difficult to extract the actual upper state spectrum from the spectrum of the bleached material. A simple algorithm is presented here for the recovery of the pure absorbance spectra of the upper state of a material such as bacteriorhodopsin, given single wavelength bleaching illumination, steady-state conditions, and accurate knowledge of phototransition rates and thermal decay rates.

  11. Measurement of Raman spectra of single airborne absorbing particles trapped by a single laser beam.

    PubMed

    Ling, Lin; Li, Yong-qing

    2013-02-15

    We demonstrate a method for optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of micron-sized, airborne absorbing particles using a single focused laser beam. A single Gaussian beam at 532 nm is used to trap and precisely manipulate absorbing airborne particles. The fluctuation of the position of the trapped particles is substantially reduced by controlling the power of the laser beam with a position-sensitive detector and a locking circuit. Raman spectra of the position-stabilized particles or clusters are then measured with an objective and CCD spectrograph. PMID:23455087

  12. The Average Properties Of CaII And NaI Absorbing Galaxies From Stacked Quasar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Ladbeck, Regina E.; Cherinka, B.

    2014-01-01

    Cherinka & Schulte-Ladbeck (2011, AJ 142, 122) used the Sloan Digital Sky Survey SDSS/DR7 to construct a sample of 97,489 galaxy/quasar projections at impact parameters up to 100 kpc from the foreground galaxy, then searched the quasar spectra for CaII and NaI absorption within 500 km s-1 from the galaxy’s velocity. Here, we split the sample into absorbers, ≥3σ, and non-absorbers, <2σ, for galaxy redshifts z>0.01, and perform a spectral stacking analysis to derive average properties. In the 19 CaII absorbers, the CaIIK line has EW = (1.46±0.03) Å and vFWHM = (725±17) km s-1, and the H line has EW = (0.84±0.03) Å and vFWHM = (746±28) km s-1. The doublet is partially saturated with a ratio of ~1.7. We find weak NaI with EW = (0.16±0.02) Å and vFWHM = (294±38) km s-1. We detect no CaII features in 12,545 CaII non-absorbers. We do detect NaI with EW = (0.10±0.04) Å and vFWHM = (930±32) km s-1. In 36 NaI absorbers, the blended NaI feature has EW = (1.86±0.03) Å and vFWHM = (813±11) km s-1. We detect no CaII. We detect a weak NaI feature in the stack of 11,520 NaI non-absorbers, EW = (0.035±0.028) Å and vFWHM = (917±67) km s-1. We detect no CaII. Our main results are: 1. NaI absorption is ubiquitous. 2. CaII and NaI in absorbers is detected to our cutoff of 100 kpc. 3. No significant differences between absorbers and non-absorbers for a wide range of galaxy properties (size, color, concentration index, surface brightness profile) 4. Absorbers and non-absorbers occupy similar impact-parameter—luminosity space. 5. No difference in galaxy inclination, or azimuthal angle distribution, between absorbers and non-absorbers 6. Covering fractions of CaII and NaI are higher than non-absorbers, ~5% within 10 kpc, and drop off significantly, to <1% above 10 kpc. 7. Covering fractions within 10 kpc are slightly higher for luminous galaxies >0.1 Lr*, 12.5% for CaII and 6% for NaI, than for low-luminosity galaxies. Acknowledgements: We acknowledge the use of

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of reflection spectra of random multilayer media strongly scattering and absorbing light

    SciTech Connect

    Meglinskii, I V

    2001-12-31

    The reflection spectra of a multilayer random medium - the human skin - strongly scattering and absorbing light are numerically simulated. The propagation of light in the medium and the absorption spectra are simulated by the stochastic Monte Carlo method, which combines schemes for calculations of real photon trajectories and the statistical weight method. The model takes into account the inhomogeneous spatial distribution of blood vessels, water, and melanin, the degree of blood oxygenation, and the hematocrit index. The attenuation of the incident radiation caused by reflection and refraction at Fresnel boundaries of layers inside the medium is also considered. The simulated reflection spectra are compared with the experimental reflection spectra of the human skin. It is shown that a set of parameters that was used to describe the optical properties of skin layers and their possible variations, despite being far from complete, is nevertheless sufficient for the simulation of the reflection spectra of the human skin and their quantitative analysis. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  14. Effective absorbing column density in the gamma-ray burst afterglow X-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, S.; Bernardini, M. G.; Braito, V.; Cusumano, G.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Melandri, A.; Salvaterra, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S. D.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the scaling relation between the observed amount of absorption in the X-ray spectra of gamma-ray burst afterglows and the absorber redshift. Through dedicated numerical simulations of an ideal instrument, we establish that this dependence has a power-law shape with index 2.4. However, for real instruments, this value depends on their low-energy cut-off, spectral resolution and on the detector spectral response in general. We thus provide appropriate scaling laws for specific instruments. Finally, we discuss the possibility to measure the absorber redshift from X-ray data alone. We find that 105-106 counts in the 0.3-10 keV band are needed to constrain the redshift with 10 per cent accuracy. As a test case, we discuss the XMM-Newton observation of GRB 090618 at z = 0.54. We are able to recover the correct redshift of this burst with the expected accuracy.

  15. Hot absorbers and the x-ray spectra of BL Lac objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. Megan

    1994-01-01

    This is the final report to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) concerning NASA grant NAG5-1671. This grant was awarded to Dr. C. Megan Urry of the Space Telescope Science Institute in response to a proposal, entitled 'Hot Absorbers and the X-Ray Spectra of BL Lac Objects.' The grant was originally awarded in October 1991 and expired in February 1994. The purpose of this project was to detect spectral features in high signal-to-noise Rosat PSPC spectra of X-ray-bright BL Lac objects. We were granted observations of three targets: PKS2155-304, Mrk421, and Mrk501. All three were bright and yielded 5,000-30,000 photons in the good PSPC data.

  16. A detailed analysis of the high-resolution X-ray spectra of NGC 3516: variability of the ionized absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Huerta, E. M.; Krongold, Y.; Jimenez-Bailon, E.; Nicastro, F.; Mathur, S.; Longinotti, A. L.

    2014-09-20

    The 1.5 Seyfert galaxy NGC 3516 presents a strong time variability in X-rays. We re-analyzed the nine observations performed in 2006 October by XMM-Newton and Chandra in the 0.3 to 10 keV energy band. An acceptable model was found for the XMM-Newton data fitting the EPIC-PN and RGS spectra simultaneously; later, this model was successfully applied to the contemporary Chandra high-resolution data. The model consists of a continuum emission component (power law + blackbody) absorbed by four ionized components (warm absorbers), and 10 narrow emission lines. Three absorbing components are warm, producing features only in the soft X-ray band. The fourth ionization component produces Fe XXV and Fe XXVI in the hard-energy band. We study the time response of the absorbing components to the well-detected changes in the X-ray luminosity of this source and find that the two components with the lower ionization state show clear opacity changes consistent with gas close to photoionization equilibrium. These changes are supported by the models and by differences in the spectral features among the nine observations. On the other hand, the two components with higher ionization state do not seem to respond to continuum variations. The response time of the ionized absorbers allows us to constrain their electron density and location. We find that one component (with intermediate ionization) must be located within the obscuring torus at a distance 2.7 × 10{sup 17} cm from the central engine. This outflowing component likely originated in the accretion disk. The three remaining components are at distances larger than 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} cm. Two of the absorbing components in the soft X-rays have similar outflow velocities and locations. These components may be in pressure equilibrium, forming a multi-phase medium, if the gas has metallicity larger than the solar one (≳ 5 Z {sub ☉}). We also search for variations in the covering factor of the ionized absorbers (although partial

  17. Light-absorbing aldol condensation products in acidic aerosols: Spectra, kinetics, and contribution to the absorption index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozière, Barbara; Esteve, William

    The radiative properties of aerosols that are transparent to light in the near-UV and visible, such as sulfate aerosols, can be dramatically modified when mixed with absorbing material such as soot. In a previous work we had shown that the aldol condensation of carbonyl compounds produces light-absorbing compounds in sulfuric acid solutions. In this work we report the spectroscopic and kinetic parameters necessary to estimate the effects of these reactions on the absorption index of sulfuric acid aerosols in the atmosphere. The absorption spectra obtained from the reactions of six different carbonyl compounds (acetaldehyde, acetone, propanal, butanal, 2-butanone, and trifluoroacetone) and their mixtures were compared over 190-1100 nm. The results indicated that most carbonyl compounds should be able to undergo aldol condensation. The products are oligomers absorbing light in the 300-500 nm region where few other compounds absorb, making them important for the radiative properties of aerosols. Kinetic experiments in 96-75 wt% H 2SO 4 solutions and between 273 and 314 K gave an activation energy for the rate constant of formation of the aldol products of acetaldehyde of -(70±15) kJ mol -1 in 96 wt% solution and showed that the effect of acid concentration was exponential. A complete expression for this rate constant is proposed where the absolute value in 96 wt% H 2SO 4 and at 298 K is scaled to the Henry's law coefficient for acetaldehyde and the absorption cross-section for the aldol products assumed in this work. The absorption index of stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols after a 2-year residence time was estimated to 2×10 -4, optically equivalent to a content of 0.5% of soot and potentially significant for the radiative forcing of these aerosols and for satellite observations in channels where the aldol products absorb.

  18. Absorbed Dose Determination Using Experimental and Analytical Predictions of X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Carruth, Ralph (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Electron beam welding in a vacuum is a technology that NASA is investigating as a joining technique for manufacture of space structures. This investigation characterizes the x-ray environment due to operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool and provides recommendations for adequate shielding for astronauts performing the in-vacuum electron beam welding. NASA, in a joint venture with the Russian Space Agency, was scheduled to perform a series of welding in space experiments on board the U.S. Space Shuttle. This series of experiments was named the international space welding experiment (ISWE). The hardware associated with the ISWE was leased to NASA by the Paton Welding Institute (PWI) in Ukraine for ground-based welding experiments in preparation for flight. Two ground tests were scheduled, using the ISWE electron beam welding tool, to characterize the radiation exposure to an astronaut during the operation of the ISWE. These radiation exposure tests used thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's) shielded with material currently used by astronauts during extravehicular activities to measure the radiation dose. The TLD's were exposed to x-ray radiation generated by operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. This investigation was the first known application of TLD's to measure absorbed dose from x rays of energy less than 10 keV. The ISWE hardware was returned to Ukraine before the issue of adequate shielding for the astronauts was completely verified. Therefore, alternate experimental and analytical methods were developed to measure and predict the x-ray spectral and intensity distribution generated by ISWE electron beam impact with metal. These x-ray spectra were normalized to an equivalent ISWE exposure, then used to calculate the absorbed radiation dose to astronauts. These absorbed dose values were compared to TLD measurements obtained during actual operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. The calculated absorbed dose

  19. Colorful solar selective absorber integrated with different colored units.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feiliang; Wang, Shao-Wei; Liu, Xingxing; Ji, Ruonan; Li, Zhifeng; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Chen, Yuwei; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-25

    Solar selective absorbers are the core part for solar thermal technologies such as solar water heaters, concentrated solar power, solar thermoelectric generators and solar thermophotovoltaics. Colorful solar selective absorber can provide new freedom and flexibility beyond energy performance, which will lead to wider utilization of solar technologies. In this work, we present a monolithic integration of colored solar absorber array with different colors on a single substrate based on a multilayered structure of Cu/TiN(x)O(y)/TiO(2)/Si(3)N(4)/SiO(2). A colored solar absorber array with 16 color units is demonstrated experimentally by using combinatorial deposition technique via changing the thickness of SiO(2) layer. The solar absorptivity and thermal emissivity of all the color units is higher than 92% and lower than 5.5%, respectively. The colored solar selective absorber array can have colorful appearance and designable patterns while keeping high energy performance at the same time. It is a new candidate for a number of solar applications, especially for architecture integration and military camouflage. PMID:26832602

  20. Fluorescence characterization of IHSS humic substances: Total luminescence spectra with absorbance correction

    SciTech Connect

    Mobed, J.J.; Hemmingsen, S.L.; Autry, J.L.; Mcgown, L.B.

    1996-10-01

    Total luminescence spectroscopy was applied to the fluorescence characterization of humic substances obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). Results show that total luminescence spectra, represented as excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), may be used to discriminate between soil-derived and aquatic-derived IHSS humic substances and between humic and fulvic acids derived from the same source (soil or aquatic). Ionic strength in the range of 0-1 M KCl and humic substance concentration in the range 5-100 mg/L had little effect on the fluorescence spectral characteristics of the humic substances, while pH had significant effects as expected. Absorbance correction was shown to be essential for accurate representation and comparison of the EEMs of the humic substances at high concentrations. 16 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Foliage nitrogen turnover: differences among nitrogen absorbed at different times by Quercus serrata saplings

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Miki U.; Mizumachi, Eri; Tokuchi, Naoko

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Nitrogen turnover within plants has been intensively studied to better understand nitrogen use strategies. However, differences among the nitrogen absorbed at different times are not completely understood and the fate of nitrogen absorbed during winter is largely uncharacterized. In the present study, nitrogen absorbed at different times of the year (growing season, winter and previous growing season) was traced, and the within-leaf nitrogen turnover of a temperate deciduous oak Quercus serrata was investigated. Methods The contributions of nitrogen absorbed at the three different times to leaf construction, translocation during the growing season, and the leaf-level resorption efficiency during leaf senescence were compared using 15N. Key Results Winter- and previous growing season-absorbed nitrogen significantly contributed to leaf construction, although the contribution was smaller than that of growing season-absorbed nitrogen. On the other hand, the leaf-level resorption efficiency of winter- and previous growing season-absorbed nitrogen was higher than that of growing season-absorbed nitrogen, suggesting that older nitrogen is better retained in leaves than recently absorbed nitrogen. Conclusions The results demonstrate that nitrogen turnover in leaves varies with nitrogen absorption times. These findings are important for understanding plant nitrogen use strategies and nitrogen cycles in forest ecosystems. PMID:21515608

  2. PHITS simulations of absorbed dose out-of-field and neutron energy spectra for ELEKTA SL25 medical linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) based calculation methods for modeling photon and particle transport, have several potential applications in radiotherapy. An essential requirement for successful radiation therapy is that the discrepancies between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient are minimized. It is also essential to minimize the dose to radiosensitive and critical organs. With MC technique, the dose distributions from both the primary and scattered photons can be calculated. The out-of-field radiation doses are of particular concern when high energy photons are used, since then neutrons are produced both in the accelerator head and inside the patients. Using MC technique, the created photons and particles can be followed and the transport and energy deposition in all the tissues of the patient can be estimated. This is of great importance during pediatric treatments when minimizing the risk for normal healthy tissue, e.g. secondary cancer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate 3D general purpose PHITS MC code efficiency as an alternative approach for photon beam specification. In this study, we developed a model of an ELEKTA SL25 accelerator and used the transport code PHITS for calculating the total absorbed dose and the neutron energy spectra infield and outside the treatment field. This model was validated against measurements performed with bubble detector spectrometers and Boner sphere for 18 MV linacs, including both photons and neutrons. The average absolute difference between the calculated and measured absorbed dose for the out-of-field region was around 11%. Taking into account a simplification for simulated geometry, which does not include any potential scattering materials around, the obtained result is very satisfactorily. A good agreement between the simulated and measured neutron energy spectra was observed while comparing to data found in the literature.

  3. PHITS simulations of absorbed dose out-of-field and neutron energy spectra for ELEKTA SL25 medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    2015-06-21

    Monte Carlo (MC) based calculation methods for modeling photon and particle transport, have several potential applications in radiotherapy. An essential requirement for successful radiation therapy is that the discrepancies between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient are minimized. It is also essential to minimize the dose to radiosensitive and critical organs. With MC technique, the dose distributions from both the primary and scattered photons can be calculated. The out-of-field radiation doses are of particular concern when high energy photons are used, since then neutrons are produced both in the accelerator head and inside the patients. Using MC technique, the created photons and particles can be followed and the transport and energy deposition in all the tissues of the patient can be estimated. This is of great importance during pediatric treatments when minimizing the risk for normal healthy tissue, e.g. secondary cancer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate 3D general purpose PHITS MC code efficiency as an alternative approach for photon beam specification. In this study, we developed a model of an ELEKTA SL25 accelerator and used the transport code PHITS for calculating the total absorbed dose and the neutron energy spectra infield and outside the treatment field. This model was validated against measurements performed with bubble detector spectrometers and Boner sphere for 18 MV linacs, including both photons and neutrons. The average absolute difference between the calculated and measured absorbed dose for the out-of-field region was around 11%. Taking into account a simplification for simulated geometry, which does not include any potential scattering materials around, the obtained result is very satisfactorily. A good agreement between the simulated and measured neutron energy spectra was observed while comparing to data found in the literature. PMID:26057186

  4. Precious Metals in SDSS Quasar Spectra. II. Tracking the Evolution of Strong, 0.4 < z < 2.3 Mg II Absorbers with Thousands of Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyffert, Eduardo N.; Cooksey, Kathy L.; Simcoe, Robert A.; O'Meara, John M.; Kao, Melodie M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2013-12-01

    We have performed an analysis of over 34,000 Mg II doublets at 0.36 < z < 2.29 in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 quasar spectra; the catalog, advanced data products, and tools for analysis are publicly available. The catalog was divided into 14 small redshift bins with roughly 2500 doublets in each and from Monte Carlo simulations, we estimate 50% completeness at rest equivalent width W r ≈ 0.8 Å. The equivalent width frequency distribution is described well by an exponential model at all redshifts, and the distribution becomes flatter with increasing redshift, i.e., there are more strong systems relative to weak ones. Direct comparison with previous SDSS Mg II surveys reveals that we recover at least 70% of the doublets in these other catalogs, in addition to detecting thousands of new systems. We discuss how these surveys came by their different results, which qualitatively agree but because of the very small uncertainties, differ by a statistically significant amount. The estimated physical cross section of Mg II-absorbing galaxy halos increased approximately threefold from z = 0.4 to z = 2.3, while the W r >= 1 Å absorber line density, d {N}_{{Mg}\\,\\scriptsize{II}}/d X, grew by roughly 45%. Finally, we explore the different evolution of various absorber populations—damped Lyα absorbers, Lyman limit systems, strong C IV absorbers, and strong and weaker Mg II systems—across cosmic time (0 < z < 6).

  5. Probing the circumgalactic medium at high-redshift using composite BOSS spectra of strong Lyman α forest absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieri, Matthew M.; Mortonson, Michael J.; Frank, Stephan; Crighton, Neil; Weinberg, David H.; Lee, Khee-Gan; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Bailey, Stephen; Busca, Nicolas; Ge, Jian; Kirkby, David; Lundgren, Britt; Mathur, Smita; Pâris, Isabelle; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Petitjean, Patrick; Rich, James; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.; York, Donald G.

    2014-06-01

    We present composite spectra constructed from a sample of 242 150 Lyman α (Lyα) forest absorbers at redshifts 2.4 < z < 3.1 identified in quasar spectra from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) as part of Data Release 9 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. We select forest absorbers by their flux in bins 138 km s-1 wide (approximately the size of the BOSS resolution element). We split these absorbers into five samples spanning the range of flux -0.05 ≤ F < 0.45. Tests on a smaller set of high-resolution spectra show that our three strongest absorption samples would probe circumgalactic regions (projected separation <300 proper kpc and |Δv| < 300 km s-1) in about 60 per cent of cases for very high signal-to-noise ratio. Within this subset, weakening Lyα absorption is associated with decreasing purity of circumgalactic selection once BOSS noise is included. Our weaker two Lyα absorption samples are dominated by the intergalactic medium. We present composite spectra of these samples and a catalogue of measured absorption features from H I and 13 metal ionization species, all of which we make available to the community. We compare measurements of seven Lyman series transitions in our composite spectra to single line models and obtain further constraints from their associated excess Lyman limit opacity. This analysis provides results consistent with column densities over the range 14.4 ≲ log (N_{H I}) ≲ 16.45. We compare our measurements of metal absorption to a variety of simple single-line, single-phase models for a preliminary interpretation. Our results imply clumping on scales down to ˜30 pc and near-solar metallicities in the circumgalactic samples, while high-ionization metal absorption consistent with typical IGM densities and metallicities is visible in all samples.

  6. Simulation of attenuated total reflection infrared absorbance spectra: applications to automotive clear coat forensic analysis.

    PubMed

    Lavine, Barry K; Fasasi, Ayuba; Mirjankar, Nikhil; Nishikida, Koichi; Campbell, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Attenuated total reflection (ATR) is a widely used sampling technique in infrared (IR) spectroscopy because minimal sample preparation is required. Since the penetration depth of the ATR analysis beam is quite shallow, the outer layers of a laminate or multilayered paint sample can be preferentially analyzed with the entire sample intact. For this reason, forensic laboratories are taking advantage of ATR to collect IR spectra of automotive paint systems that may consist of three or more layers. However, the IR spectrum of a paint sample obtained by ATR will exhibit distortions, e.g., band broadening and lower relative intensities at higher wavenumbers, compared with its transmission counterpart. This hinders library searching because most library spectra are measured in transmission mode. Furthermore, the angle of incidence for the internal reflection element, the refractive index of the clear coat, and surface contamination due to inorganic contaminants can profoundly influence the quality of the ATR spectrum obtained for automotive paints. A correction algorithm to allow ATR spectra to be searched using IR transmission spectra of the paint data query (PDQ) automotive database is presented. The proposed correction algorithm to convert transmission spectra from the PDQ library to ATR spectra is able to address distortion issues such as the relative intensities and broadening of the bands, and the introduction of wavelength shifts at lower frequencies, which prevent library searching of ATR spectra using archived IR transmission data. PMID:25014606

  7. Study of two-photon excitation spectra of organic compounds absorbing in the UV region

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, V A; Sychev, Andrei A

    2004-12-31

    A method is proposed for recording two-photon excitation (TPE) spectra of organic compounds with the help of picosecond pulses from a dye laser tunable in the range from 550 to 640 nm. The TPE spectra are obtained for organic scintillators and drugs: paraterphenyl in liquid and solid phases, stilbene single crystal and Streptocid powder, having a one-photon absorption band in the region from 270 to 350 nm. It is shown that the vibronic structure in the TPE spectra of these compounds is independent of their aggregate state and is an individual characteristic of each of the compounds. (active media)

  8. Temperature and hydration effects on absorbance spectra and radiation sensitivity of a radiochromic medium

    PubMed Central

    Rink, Alexandra; Lewis, David F.; Varma, Sangya; Vitkin, I. Alex; Jaffray, David A.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of temperature on real time changes in optical density (ΔOD) of GAFCHROMIC® EBT film were investigated. The spectral peak of maximum change in absorbance (λmax) was shown to downshift linearly when the temperature of the film was increased from 22 to 38 °C. The ΔOD values were also shown to decrease linearly with temperature, and this decrease could not be attributed to the shift in λmax. A compensation scheme using λmax and a temperature-dependent correction factor was investigated, but provided limited improvement. Part of the reason may be the fluctuations in hydration of the active component, which were found to affect both position of absorbance peaks and the sensitivity of the film. To test the effect of hydration, laminated and unlaminated films were desiccated. This shifted both the major and minor absorbance peaks in the opposite direction to the change observed with temperature. The desiccated film also exhibited reduced sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Rehydration of the desiccated films did not reverse the effects, but rather gave rise to another form of the polymer with absorbance maxima upshifted further 20 nm. Hence, the spectral characteristics and sensitivity of the film can be dependent on its history, potentially complicating both real-time and conventional radiation dosimetry. PMID:18975701

  9. FLUORESCENCE CHARACTERIZATION OF IHSS HUMIC SUBSTANCES: TOTAL LUMINESCENCE SPECTRA WITH ABSORBANCE CORRECTION. (R822251)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total luminescence spectroscopy was applied to the fluorescence characterization of humic substances obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). Results show that total luminescence spectra, represented as excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), may be used to d...

  10. Precious metals in SDSS quasar spectra. II. Tracking the evolution of strong, 0.4 < z < 2.3 Mg II absorbers with thousands of systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seyffert, Eduardo N.; Simcoe, Robert A.; Cooksey, Kathy L.; O'Meara, John M.; Kao, Melodie M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier E-mail: simcoe@space.mit.edu E-mail: jomeara@smcvt.edu E-mail: xavier@ucolick.org

    2013-12-20

    We have performed an analysis of over 34,000 Mg II doublets at 0.36 < z < 2.29 in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 quasar spectra; the catalog, advanced data products, and tools for analysis are publicly available. The catalog was divided into 14 small redshift bins with roughly 2500 doublets in each and from Monte Carlo simulations, we estimate 50% completeness at rest equivalent width W {sub r} ≈ 0.8 Å. The equivalent width frequency distribution is described well by an exponential model at all redshifts, and the distribution becomes flatter with increasing redshift, i.e., there are more strong systems relative to weak ones. Direct comparison with previous SDSS Mg II surveys reveals that we recover at least 70% of the doublets in these other catalogs, in addition to detecting thousands of new systems. We discuss how these surveys came by their different results, which qualitatively agree but because of the very small uncertainties, differ by a statistically significant amount. The estimated physical cross section of Mg II-absorbing galaxy halos increased approximately threefold from z = 0.4 to z = 2.3, while the W {sub r} ≥ 1 Å absorber line density, dN{sub MgII}/dX, grew by roughly 45%. Finally, we explore the different evolution of various absorber populations—damped Lyα absorbers, Lyman limit systems, strong C IV absorbers, and strong and weaker Mg II systems—across cosmic time (0 < z < 6).

  11. Dynamics of quantum turbulence of different spectra

    PubMed Central

    Walmsley, Paul; Zmeev, Dmitry; Pakpour, Fatemeh; Golov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Turbulence in a superfluid in the zero-temperature limit consists of a dynamic tangle of quantized vortex filaments. Different types of turbulence are possible depending on the level of correlations in the orientation of vortex lines. We provide an overview of turbulence in superfluid 4He with a particular focus on recent experiments probing the decay of turbulence in the zero-temperature regime below 0.5 K. We describe extensive measurements of the vortex line density during the free decay of different types of turbulence: ultraquantum and quasiclassical turbulence in both stationary and rotating containers. The observed decays and the effective dissipation as a function of temperature are compared with theoretical models and numerical simulations. PMID:24704876

  12. Depth dependence of absorbed dose, dose equivalent and linear energy transfer spectra of galactic and trapped particles in polyethylene and comparison with calculations of models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    A matched set of five tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs), embedded at the centers of 0 (bare), 3, 5, 8 and 12-inch-diameter polyethylene spheres, were flown on the Shuttle flight STS-81 (inclination 51.65 degrees, altitude approximately 400 km). The data obtained were separated into contributions from trapped protons and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR). From the measured linear energy transfer (LET) spectra, the absorbed dose and dose-equivalent rates were calculated. The results were compared to calculations made with the radiation transport model HZETRN/NUCFRG2, using the GCR free-space spectra, orbit-averaged geomagnetic transmission function and Shuttle shielding distributions. The comparison shows that the model fits the dose rates to a root mean square (rms) error of 5%, and dose-equivalent rates to an rms error of 10%. Fairly good agreement between the LET spectra was found; however, differences are seen at both low and high LET. These differences can be understood as due to the combined effects of chord-length variation and detector response function. These results rule out a number of radiation transport/nuclear fragmentation models. Similar comparisons of trapped-proton dose rates were made between calculations made with the proton transport model BRYNTRN using the AP-8 MIN trapped-proton model and Shuttle shielding distributions. The predictions of absorbed dose and dose-equivalent rates are fairly good. However, the prediction of the LET spectra below approximately 30 keV/microm shows the need to improve the AP-8 model. These results have strong implications for shielding requirements for an interplanetary manned mission.

  13. Effects of heavy metals on the absorbance and reflectance spectra of plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horler, D. N. H.; Barber, J.; Barringer, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    The spectral responses of plants to various concentrations of heavy metals in their rooting media are investigated in relation to the application of remote sensing methods to the detection of vegetation under stress. Absorption photometry of chloroplasts, measurements of metal and chlorophyll concentrations and reflectance spectrometry were performed on leaves of pea, sunflower and soybean plants grown under greenhouse conditions with the addition of various concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn to their rooting media and on leaves of oak trees growing naturally in an area of a copper-arsenic mineralization. Under laboratory conditions, the most general effect observed was growth inhibition and ultimately death, with pea plants also exhibiting changes of chlorophyll a/ chlorophyll b ratios with Cd and Cu and reflectance increases in the visible and decreases in the infrared. Although results for other species indicate that reflectance effects are dependent on species, correlations between reflectance and metal exposure is confirmed by the field investigations. It is concluded that a remote sensing system would be improved by the inclusion of bands around 1.65 and 2.20 microns to detect soil mineralization from plant spectra.

  14. Assessment of different computational models for generation of x-ray spectra in diagnostic radiology and mammography.

    PubMed

    Ay, M R; Sarkar, S; Shahriari, M; Sardari, D; Zaidi, H

    2005-06-01

    Different computational methods based on empirical or semi-empirical models and sophisticated Monte Carlo calculations have been proposed for prediction of x-ray spectra both in diagnostic radiology and mammography. In this work, the x-ray spectra predicted by various computational models used in the diagnostic radiology and mammography energy range have been assessed by comparison with measured spectra and their effect on the calculation of absorbed dose and effective dose (ED) imparted to the adult ORNL hermaphroditic phantom quantified. This includes empirical models (TASMIP and MASMIP), semi-empirical models (X-rayb&m, X-raytbc, XCOMP, IPEM, Tucker et al., and Blough et al.), and Monte Carlo modeling (EGS4, ITS3.0, and MCNP4C). As part of the comparative assessment, the K x-ray yield, transmission curves, and half value layers (HVLs) have been calculated for the spectra generated with all computational models at different tube voltages. The measured x-ray spectra agreed well with the generated spectra when using X-raytbc and IPEM in diagnostic radiology and mammography energy ranges, respectively. Despite the systematic differences between the simulated and reference spectra for some models, the student's t-test statistical analysis showed there is no statistically significant difference between measured and generated spectra for all computational models investigated in this study. The MCNP4C-based Monte Carlo calculations showed there is no discernable discrepancy in the calculation of absorbed dose and ED in the adult ORNL hermaphroditic phantom when using different computational models for generating the x-ray spectra. Nevertheless, given the limited flexibility of the empirical and semi-empirical models, the spectra obtained through Monte Carlo modeling offer several advantages by providing detailed information about the interactions in the target and filters, which is relevant for the design of new target and filter combinations and optimization of

  15. Assessment of different computational models for generation of x-ray spectra in diagnostic radiology and mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Ay, M.R.; Sarkar, S.; Shahriari, M.; Sardari, D.; Zaidi, H.

    2005-06-15

    Different computational methods based on empirical or semi-empirical models and sophisticated Monte Carlo calculations have been proposed for prediction of x-ray spectra both in diagnostic radiology and mammography. In this work, the x-ray spectra predicted by various computational models used in the diagnostic radiology and mammography energy range have been assessed by comparison with measured spectra and their effect on the calculation of absorbed dose and effective dose (ED) imparted to the adult ORNL hermaphroditic phantom quantified. This includes empirical models (TASMIP and MASMIP), semi-empirical models (X-rayb and m, X-raytbc, XCOMP, IPEM, Tucker et al., and Blough et al.), and Monte Carlo modeling (EGS4, ITS3.0, and MCNP4C). As part of the comparative assessment, the K x-ray yield, transmission curves, and half value layers (HVLs) have been calculated for the spectra generated with all computational models at different tube voltages. The measured x-ray spectra agreed well with the generated spectra when using X-raytbc and IPEM in diagnostic radiology and mammography energy ranges, respectively. Despite the systematic differences between the simulated and reference spectra for some models, the student's t-test statistical analysis showed there is no statistically significant difference between measured and generated spectra for all computational models investigated in this study. The MCNP4C-based Monte Carlo calculations showed there is no discernable discrepancy in the calculation of absorbed dose and ED in the adult ORNL hermaphroditic phantom when using different computational models for generating the x-ray spectra. Nevertheless, given the limited flexibility of the empirical and semi-empirical models, the spectra obtained through Monte Carlo modeling offer several advantages by providing detailed information about the interactions in the target and filters, which is relevant for the design of new target and filter combinations and optimization of

  16. A Structural Basis for Reversible Photoswitching of Absorbance Spectra in Red Fluorescent Protein rsTagRFP

    SciTech Connect

    Pletnev, Sergei; Subach, Fedor V.; Dauter, Zbigniew; Wlodawer, Alexander; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2012-09-05

    rsTagRFP is the first monomeric red fluorescent protein (FP) with reversibly photoswitchable absorbance spectra. The switching is realized by irradiation of rsTagRFP with blue (440 nm) and yellow (567 nm) light, turning the protein fluorescence ON and OFF, respectively. It is perhaps the most useful probe in this color class that has yet been reported. Because of the photoswitchable absorbance, rsTagRFP can be used as an acceptor in photochromic Foerster resonance energy transfer. Yellow FPs, YPet and mVenus, are demonstrated to be excellent photochromic Foerster resonance energy transfer donors for the rsTagRFP acceptor in its fusion constructs. Analysis of X-ray structures has shown that photoswitching of rsTagRFP is accompanied by cis-trans isomerization and protonation/deprotonation of the chromophore, with the deprotonated cis- and protonated trans-isomers corresponding to its ON and OFF states, respectively. Unlike in other photoswitchable FPs, both conformers of rsTagRFP chromophore are essentially coplanar. Two other peculiarities of the rsTagRFP chromophore are an essentially hydrophobic environment of its p-hydroxyphenyl site and the absence of direct hydrogen bonding between this moiety and the protein scaffold. The influence of the immediate environment on rsTagRFP chromophore was probed by site-directed mutagenesis. Residues Glu145 and His197 were found to participate in protonation/deprotonation of the chromophore accompanying the photoswitching of rsTagRFP fluorescence, whereas residues Met160 and Leu174 were shown to spatially restrict chromophore isomerization, favoring its radiative decay.

  17. Resonance Raman spectra of organic molecules absorbed on inorganic semiconducting surfaces: Contribution from both localized intramolecular excitation and intermolecular charge transfer excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, ChuanXiang; Zhao, Yi E-mail: liangwz@xmu.edu.cn; Liang, WanZhen E-mail: liangwz@xmu.edu.cn

    2015-10-21

    The time-dependent correlation function approach for the calculations of absorption and resonance Raman spectra (RRS) of organic molecules absorbed on semiconductor surfaces [Y. Zhao and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 044108 (2011)] is extended to include the contribution of the intermolecular charge transfer (CT) excitation from the absorbers to the semiconducting nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that the bidirectionally interfacial CT significantly modifies the spectral line shapes. Although the intermolecular CT excitation makes the absorption spectra red shift slightly, it essentially changes the relative intensities of mode-specific RRS and causes the oscillation behavior of surface enhanced Raman spectra with respect to interfacial electronic couplings. Furthermore, the constructive and destructive interferences of RRS from the localized molecular excitation and CT excitation are observed with respect to the electronic coupling and the bottom position of conductor band. The interferences are determined by both excitation pathways and bidirectionally interfacial CT.

  18. Resolution of overlapped spectra for the determination of ternary mixture using different and modified spectrophotometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Bahia Abbas; El-Zaher, Asmaa Ahmed; Mahrouse, Marianne Alphonse; Ahmed, Maha Said

    2016-08-01

    Four new spectrophotometric methods were developed, applied to resolve the overlapped spectra of a ternary mixture of [aliskiren hemifumarate (ALS)-amlodipine besylate (AM)-hydrochlorothiazide (HCT)] and to determine the three drugs in pure form and in combined dosage form. Method A depends on simultaneous determination of ALS, AM and HCT using principal component regression and partial least squares chemometric methods. In Method B, a modified isosbestic spectrophotometric method was applied for the determination of the total concentration of ALS and HCT by measuring the absorbance at 274.5 nm (isosbestic point, Aiso). On the other hand, the concentration of HCT in ternary mixture with ALS and AM could be calculated without interference using first derivative spectrophotometric method by measuring the amplitude at 279 nm (zero crossing of ALS and zero value of AM). Thus, the content of ALS was calculated by subtraction. Method C, double divisor first derivative ratio spectrophotometry (double divisor 1DD method), was based on that for the determination of one drug, the ratio spectra were obtained by dividing the absorption spectra of its different concentrations by the sum of the absorption spectra of the other two drugs as a double divisor. The first derivative of the obtained ratio spectra were then recorded using the appropriate smoothing factor. The amplitudes at 291 nm, 380 nm and 274.5 nm were selected for the determination of ALS, AM and HCT in their ternary mixture, respectively. Method D was based on mean centering of ratio spectra. The mean centered values at 287, 295.5 and 269 nm were recorded and used for the determination of ALS, AM and HCT, respectively. The developed methods were validated according to ICH guidelines and proved to be accurate, precise and selective. Satisfactory results were obtained by applying the proposed methods to the analysis of pharmaceutical dosage form.

  19. Resolution of overlapped spectra for the determination of ternary mixture using different and modified spectrophotometric methods.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Bahia Abbas; El-Zaher, Asmaa Ahmed; Mahrouse, Marianne Alphonse; Ahmed, Maha Said

    2016-08-01

    Four new spectrophotometric methods were developed, applied to resolve the overlapped spectra of a ternary mixture of [aliskiren hemifumarate (ALS)-amlodipine besylate (AM)-hydrochlorothiazide (HCT)] and to determine the three drugs in pure form and in combined dosage form. Method A depends on simultaneous determination of ALS, AM and HCT using principal component regression and partial least squares chemometric methods. In Method B, a modified isosbestic spectrophotometric method was applied for the determination of the total concentration of ALS and HCT by measuring the absorbance at 274.5nm (isosbestic point, Aiso). On the other hand, the concentration of HCT in ternary mixture with ALS and AM could be calculated without interference using first derivative spectrophotometric method by measuring the amplitude at 279nm (zero crossing of ALS and zero value of AM). Thus, the content of ALS was calculated by subtraction. Method C, double divisor first derivative ratio spectrophotometry (double divisor (1)DD method), was based on that for the determination of one drug, the ratio spectra were obtained by dividing the absorption spectra of its different concentrations by the sum of the absorption spectra of the other two drugs as a double divisor. The first derivative of the obtained ratio spectra were then recorded using the appropriate smoothing factor. The amplitudes at 291nm, 380nm and 274.5nm were selected for the determination of ALS, AM and HCT in their ternary mixture, respectively. Method D was based on mean centering of ratio spectra. The mean centered values at 287, 295.5 and 269nm were recorded and used for the determination of ALS, AM and HCT, respectively. The developed methods were validated according to ICH guidelines and proved to be accurate, precise and selective. Satisfactory results were obtained by applying the proposed methods to the analysis of pharmaceutical dosage form. PMID:27128521

  20. Magnetism, optical absorbance, and 19F NMR spectra of nafion films with self-assembling paramagnetic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, E. M.; Chen, Q.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2012-01-15

    Magnetization, optical absorbance, and {sup 19}F NMR spectra of Nafion transparent films as received and doped with Mn{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, and Fe{sup 3+} ions with and without treatment in 1H-1,2,4-triazole (trz) have been studied. Doping of Nafion with Fe{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+} and their bridging to nitrogen of triazole yields a hybrid self-assembling paramagnetic system that exhibits interesting magnetic and optical properties. These include spin crossover phenomena between high-spin (HS) and low-spin (LS) states in Nafion-Fe{sup 2+}-trz and Nafion-Co{sup 2+}-trz accompanied by thermochromic effects in the visible range induced by temperature. A large shift of the magnetization curve induced by a magnetic field in the vicinity of the HS {leftrightarrow} LS, {approx}220 K, observed for Nafion-Fe{sup 2+}-trz has a rate of {approx}6 K/kOe, which is about three orders of magnitude larger than that in bulk spin crossover Fe{sup 2+} materials. Selective response of {sup 19}F NMR signals on doping with paramagnetic ions demonstrates that NMR can be used as spatially resolved method to study Nafion film with paramagnetic network. Both chemical shift and width of {sup 19}F NMR signals show that SO groups of Nafion, Fe or Co ions, and nitrogen of triazole are bonded whereas they form a spin crossover system. Based on a model of nanosize cylinders proposed for Nafion [K. Schmidt-Rohr and Q. Chen, Nat Mater (2008), 75], we suggest that paramagnetic ions are located inside these cylinders, forming self-assembling magnetically and optically active nanoscale networks.

  1. Identifying different types of stochastic processes with the same spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong U.; Kish, Laszlo B.; Schmera, Gabor

    2005-05-01

    We propose a new way of pattern recognition which can distinguish different stochastic processes even if they have the same power density spectrum. Known crosscorrelation techniques recognize only the same realizations of a stochastic process in the two signal channels. However, crosscorrelation techniques do not work for recognizing independent realizations of the same stochastic process because their crosscorrelation function and cross spectrum are zero. A method able to do that would have the potential to revolutionize identification and pattern recognition, techniques, including sensing and security applications. The new method we are proposing is able to identify independent realizations of the same process, and at the same time, does not give false alarm for different processes which are very similar in nature. We demonstrate the method by using different realizations of two different types of random telegram signals, which are indistinguishable with respect to power density spectra (PDS). We call this method bispectrum correlation coefficient (BCC) technique.

  2. Infrared and Visible Absolute and Difference Spectra of Bacteriorhodopsin Photocycle Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Hendler, Richard W.; Meuse, Curtis W.; Braiman, Mark S.; Smith, Paul D.; Kakareka, John W.

    2014-01-01

    We have used new kinetic fitting procedures to obtain IR absolute spectra for intermediates of the main bacteriorhodopsin (bR) photocycle(s). The linear algebra-based procedures of Hendler et al. (2001) J. Phys. Chem. B, 105, 3319–3228, for obtaining clean absolute visible spectra of bR photocycle intermediates, were adapted for use with IR data. This led to isolation, for the first time, of corresponding clean absolute IR spectra, including the separation of the M intermediate into its MF and MS components from parallel photocycles. This in turn permitted the computation of clean IR difference spectra between pairs of successive intermediates, allowing for the most rigorous analysis to date of changes occurring at each step of the photocycle. The statistical accuracy of the spectral calculation methods allows us to identify, with great confidence, new spectral features. One of these is a very strong differential IR band at 1650 cm−1 for the L intermediate at room temperature that is not present in analogous L spectra measured at cryogenic temperatures. This band, in one of the noisiest spectral regions, has not been identified in any previous time-resolved IR papers, although retrospectively it is apparent as one of the strongest L absorbance changes in their raw data, considered collectively. Additionally, our results are most consistent with Arg82 as the primary proton-release group (PRG), rather than a protonated water cluster or H-bonded grouping of carboxylic residues. Notably, the Arg82 deprotonation occurs exclusively in the MF pathway of the parallel cycles model of the photocycle. PMID:21929858

  3. Memory cost of absorbing conditions for the finite-difference time-domain method.

    PubMed

    Chobeau, Pierre; Savioja, Lauri

    2016-07-01

    Three absorbing layers are investigated using standard rectilinear finite-difference schemes. The perfectly matched layer (PML) is compared with basic lossy layers terminated by two types of absorbing boundary conditions, all simulated using equivalent memory consumption. Lossy layers present the advantage of being scalar schemes, whereas the PML relies on a staggered scheme where both velocity and pressure are split. Although the PML gives the lowest reflection magnitudes over all frequencies and incidence angles, the most efficient lossy layer gives reflection magnitudes of the same order as the PML from mid- to high-frequency and for restricted incidence angles. PMID:27475200

  4. Ultraviolet light absorbers having two different chromophors in the same molecule

    DOEpatents

    Vogl, Otto; Li, Shanjun

    1988-05-17

    Ultraviolet light absorbing compounds having two different chromophors in the same molecule, particularly the benzotriazole chromophor and either the dihydroxybenzophenone or dihydroxyacetophenone chromophor; specifically, the two compounds 3,5-[di(2H-benzotriazole-2-yl)]-2,4-dihydroxyacetophenone and 3,5-[di(2H-benzotriazole-2-yl)]2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone.

  5. Comparison of different fittings of drop spectra for rainfall retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adirosi, E.; Baldini, L.; Lombardo, F.; Russo, F.; Napolitano, F.; Volpi, E.; Tokay, A.

    2015-09-01

    It is widely acknowledged that a thorough characterization of the raindrop size distribution (DSD) may address many needs regarding the remote sensing of precipitation, which is central to new research challenges related to the estimation and management of water resources. In particular, the third and higher moments (up to the sixth) of DSD are proportional to relevant hydrological and meteorological parameters (i.e., rain rate, liquid water content, radar reflectivity, and kinetic energy). Therefore, the retrieval process of these quantities is usually based upon higher-order statistics that are mainly influenced by the upper part of the DSD (i.e., its tail behavior). In this study, we first investigate the effects on rainfall integral parameters of truncating the DSD at upper drop diameters when assuming heavy- and light-tailed distributions. Then, we compare both the tails (i.e., large drops only) and the entire empirical distributions of thousands of disdrometer-measured raindrop spectra with four common theoretical distributions characterized by different tail behaviors (i.e., heavy- and light-tailed distributions): the Pareto, lognormal, gamma, and Weibull distributions. In particular, we analyze the relative quality of each distribution (relative ranking) by means of a straightforward method. Observational data consist of 1-min spectra collected by two-dimensional video disdrometers (2DVD) during three pre-launch field campaigns of the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission located in (i) Rome (HyMeX SOP 1, (ii) Central Oklahoma (MC3E,), and (iii) Eastern Iowa (IFloodS). The results obtained from the analysis of the three datasets were consistent with each other, and they show that the lighter-tailed distributions are in better agreement with the observed size spectra than the heavier-tailed distributions. However, we also found significant departures of empirical drop spectra from light-tailed distributions, especially when fitting only the

  6. Multi-pulse LIBDE of fused silica at different thicknesses of the organic absorber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yunxiang; Ehrhardt, Martin; Lorenz, Pierre; Han, Bing; Hopp, Bela; Vass, Csaba; Ni, Xiaowu; Zimmer, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Laser-induced etching techniques feature several unique characteristics that enable ultraprecise machining of transparent materials. However, LIBDE (laser-induced back side dry etching) and LIBWE (laser-induced back side wet etching) are preferentially studied due to experimental feasibilities either using a very thin or a bulk absorber at the rear side of the transparent material. This study aims to fill the gap by examining the thickness dependence of the absorbing material. Multi-pulse-LIBDE (MP-LIBDE) of fused silica using different thick photoresist absorber layers (dL = 0.2-11.7 μm) was performed with a KrF excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, tp ≈ 20 ns). The influence of several experimental parameters, such as laser fluence, pulse number, film thickness, on the ablation morphology and the etching rate were investigated. Especially at moderate fluences (F = 0.7-1.5 J/cm2) MP-LIBDE and LIBWE show several similar process characteristics such as the etching rate dependence on the laser fluence and the pulse number with a typical etching rate of approx. 12 nm at 1 J/cm2. However, the specific etching rate values depend on the absorber layer thickness, for instance. The morphology of the etched surface is smooth with a roughness of below 5 nm rms. Further, the modification of the surface has been observed and will be discussed in relation to the multi-pulse laser etching mechanism.

  7. Method for outlier detection: a tool to assess the consistency between laboratory data and ultraviolet-visible absorbance spectra in wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Zamora, D; Torres, A

    2014-01-01

    Reliable estimations of the evolution of water quality parameters by using in situ technologies make it possible to follow the operation of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), as well as improving the understanding and control of the operation, especially in the detection of disturbances. However, ultraviolet (UV)-Vis sensors have to be calibrated by means of a local fingerprint laboratory reference concentration-value data-set. The detection of outliers in these data-sets is therefore important. This paper presents a method for detecting outliers in UV-Vis absorbances coupled to water quality reference laboratory concentrations for samples used for calibration purposes. Application to samples from the influent of the San Fernando WWTP (Medellín, Colombia) is shown. After the removal of outliers, improvements in the predictability of the influent concentrations using absorbance spectra were found. PMID:24901626

  8. Incidence of strong Mg II absorbers towards different types of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Ravi; Chand, Hum; Gopal-Krishna

    2013-10-01

    We report the first comparative study of strong Mg II absorbers (Wr ≥ 1.0 Å) seen towards radio-loud quasars of core-dominated (CDQ) and lobe-dominated (LDQ) types and normal quasars (QSOs). The CDQ and LDQ samples were derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 after excluding known `broad-absorption-line' quasars and blazars. The Mg II associated absorption systems having a velocity offset v < 5000 km s-1 from the systemic velocity of the background quasar were also excluded. Existing spectroscopic data for redshift-matched sightlines of 3975 CDQs and 1583 LDQs, covering an emission redshift range 0.39-4.87, were analysed and 864 strong Mg II absorbers were found, covering the redshift range 0.45-2.17. The conclusions reached using this well-defined large data set of strong Mg II absorbers are (i) the number density, dN/dz, towards CDQs shows a small, marginally significant excess (˜9 per cent at 1.5σ significance) over the estimate available for QSOs; (ii) in the redshift space, this difference is reflected in terms of a 1.6σ excess of dN/dz over the QSOs, within the narrow redshift interval 1.2-1.8; (iii) the dN/dβ distribution (with β = v/c) for CDQs shows a significant excess (at 3.75σ level) over the distribution found for a redshift- and luminosity-matched sample of QSOs, at β in the range 0.05-0.1. This leads us to infer that a significant fraction of strong Mg II absorption systems seen in this offset velocity range are probably associated with the CDQs and might be accelerated into the line of sight by their powerful jets and/or due to the accretion-disc outflows close to our direction. Support to this scenario comes from a consistency check in which we consider only the spectral range corresponding to β > 0.2. The computed redshift distribution for strong Mg II absorbers towards CDQs now shows excellent agreement with that known for QSOs, as indeed is expected for purely intervening absorption systems. Thus, it appears that for

  9. Investigation of Lyman-limit absorption in QSO spectra - indirect evidence for evolution of the multicomponent nature of the absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzetta, K.M.

    1988-09-01

    This paper reexamines the redshift distribution of the class of QSO absorption-line systems that are optically-thick to Lyman continuum radiation (i.e., the Lyman-limit systems LLS), using a sample of 129 QSOs for which suitable data are available. It was found that the LLSs are uniformly distributed in velocity, relative to the background QSOs, and that the rate of incidence of the systems does not strongly evolve with redshift; the observed redshift distribution is consistent with nonevolving absorbers in a standard Friedmann cosmology with the deceleration parameter equal to 0.5. The reason for the discrepancy of this finding with data published on systems selected on the basis of Mg II absorption is discussed. It is suggested that the number of separate velocity components comprising the Mg II absorption lines decreases with time. 63 references.

  10. Different Structural Changes Occur in the Blue- and Green-Absorbing Proteorhodopsin During the Primary Photoreaction†

    PubMed Central

    Amsden, Jason J.; Kralj, Joel M.; Bergo, Vladislav B.; Spudich, Elena N.; Spudich, John L.; Rothschild, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the structural changes during the primary photoreaction in blue-absorbing proteorhodopsin (BPR), a light-driven retinylidene proton pump, using low-temperature FTIR difference spectroscopy. Comparison of the light induced BPR difference spectrum recorded at 80 K to that of green-absorbing proteorhodopsin (GPR) reveals that there are several differences in the BPR and GPR primary photoreactions despite the similar structure of the retinal chromophore and all-trans → 13-cis isomerization. Strong bands near 1700 cm−1 assigned previously to a change in hydrogen bonding of Asn230 in GPR are still present in BPR but in addition bands in the same region are assigned on the basis of site-directed mutagenesis to changes occurring in Gln105. In the amide II region bands are assigned on the basis of total-N15 labeling to structural changes of the protein backbone, although no such bands were previously observed for GPR. A band at 3642 cm−1 in BPR, assigned to the OH stretching mode of a water molecule on the basis of H218O substitution, appears at a different frequency than a band at 3626 cm−1 previously assigned to a water molecule in GPR. However, the substitution of Gln105 for Leu105 in BPR leads to the appearance of both bands at 3642 and 3626 cm−1 indicating the waters assigned in BPR and GPR exist in separate distinct locations and can coexist in the GPR-like Q105L mutant of BPR. These results indicate that there exist significant differences in the conformational changes occurring in these two types proteorhodopsin during the initial photoreaction despite their similar chromophores structures, which might reflect a different arrangement of water in the active site as well as substitution of a hydrophilic for hydrophobic residue at residue 105. PMID:18842006

  11. Distinguishing Vaccinium species by chemical fingerprinting based on NMR spectra, validated with spectra collected in different laboratories.

    PubMed

    Markus, Michelle A; Ferrier, Jonathan; Luchsinger, Sarah M; Yuk, Jimmy; Cuerrier, Alain; Balick, Michael J; Hicks, Joshua M; Killday, K Brian; Kirby, Christopher W; Berrue, Fabrice; Kerr, Russell G; Knagge, Kevin; Gödecke, Tanja; Ramirez, Benjamin E; Lankin, David C; Pauli, Guido F; Burton, Ian; Karakach, Tobias K; Arnason, John T; Colson, Kimberly L

    2014-06-01

    A method was developed to distinguish Vaccinium species based on leaf extracts using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Reference spectra were measured on leaf extracts from several species, including lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium), oval leaf huckleberry (Vaccinium ovalifolium), and cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon). Using principal component analysis, these leaf extracts were resolved in the scores plot. Analysis of variance statistical tests demonstrated that the three groups differ significantly on PC2, establishing that the three species can be distinguished by nuclear magnetic resonance. Soft independent modeling of class analogies models for each species also showed discrimination between species. To demonstrate the robustness of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for botanical identification, spectra of a sample of lowbush blueberry leaf extract were measured at five different sites, with different field strengths (600 versus 700 MHz), different probe types (cryogenic versus room temperature probes), different sample diameters (1.7 mm versus 5 mm), and different consoles (Avance I versus Avance III). Each laboratory independently demonstrated the linearity of their NMR measurements by acquiring a standard curve for chlorogenic acid (R(2) = 0.9782 to 0.9998). Spectra acquired on different spectrometers at different sites classifed into the expected group for the Vaccinium spp., confirming the utility of the method to distinguish Vaccinium species and demonstrating nuclear magnetic resonance fingerprinting for material validation of a natural health product. PMID:24963620

  12. Intravaginal and in vitro temperature changes with tampons of differing composition and absorbency.

    PubMed

    Hill, Donna R; Davis, Catherine C; Osborn, Thomas W

    2010-02-01

    Vaginal tampons are Class II medical devices used by women to manage menstruation. The purpose of this study was to investigate intravaginal temperature changes with simulated and actual menstrual tampon use. Tampons (with varying absorbent compositions) embedded with a thermocouple sensor were used to study temperature effects in vitro in a model of the vagina (condom placed in a hollow glass tube, jacketed in a 37 degrees C water bath, and dosed with human menses to fluid saturation) and clinically during menstrual tampon wear under controlled conditions (up to 8 h in a stationary, supine position). Elevations in the temperature of the tampon core occurred upon menses fluid acquisition both in vitro and clinically. Temperature profile characteristics varied from a transient spike with commercial cotton-rayon blend tampons of two different absorbencies to a small but sustained rise (> or =6 h) with a carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-containing prototype. On the basis of the results from this study, fluid absorption by tampons generates an exothermic event whose characteristics vary with tampon design and composition. We speculate the small, sustained increased in tampon temperature noted during this study may enhance the production of a bacterial exotoxin associated with tampons composed of CMC. PMID:20024967

  13. Different temporal patterns of vector soliton bunching induced by polarization-dependent saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei-Cheng; Chen, Guo-Jie; Han, Ding-An; Li, Bin

    2014-06-01

    A fiber laser with either a polarization-independent semiconductor saturable absorption mirror (PID-SESAM) or a polarization-dependent SESAM (PD-SESAM) as a passive mode-locker is constructed for obtaining the vector soliton bunching. The temporal patterns of the soliton bunching generated from the fiber laser with a PD-SESAM are much more abundant than that in fiber laser with a PID-SESAM. Only the vibrating soliton bunching is generated from the fiber laser with a PID-SESAM. However, there are another three interesting temporal patterns of the soliton bunching generated from the fiber laser with a PD-SESAM except for the vibrating soliton bunching. They are variable length soliton bunching, breathing soliton bunching and stable soliton bunching along the slow axis induced by polarization instability. It is found that the polarization property of the saturable absorber plays a pivotal role for achieving different temporal patterns of the soliton bunching.

  14. Ultra-wideband microwave absorber by connecting multiple absorption bands of two different-sized hyperbolic metamaterial waveguide arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiang; Long, Chang; Li, Junhao; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Lin; Guan, Jianguo; Li, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Microwave absorbers have important applications in various areas including stealth, camouflage, and antenna. Here, we have designed an ultra-broadband light absorber by integrating two different-sized tapered hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) waveguides, each of which has wide but different absorption bands due to broadband slow-light response, into a unit cell. Both the numerical and experimental results demonstrate that in such a design strategy, the low absorption bands between high absorption bands with a single-sized tapered HMM waveguide array can be effectively eliminated, resulting in a largely expanded absorption bandwidth ranging from 2.3 to 40 GHz. The presented ultra-broadband light absorber is also insensitive to polarization and robust against incident angle. Our results offer a further step in developing practical artificial electromagnetic absorbers, which will impact a broad range of applications at microwave frequencies. PMID:26477740

  15. Ultra-wideband microwave absorber by connecting multiple absorption bands of two different-sized hyperbolic metamaterial waveguide arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiang; Long, Chang; Li, Junhao; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Lin; Guan, Jianguo; Li, Xun

    2015-10-01

    Microwave absorbers have important applications in various areas including stealth, camouflage, and antenna. Here, we have designed an ultra-broadband light absorber by integrating two different-sized tapered hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) waveguides, each of which has wide but different absorption bands due to broadband slow-light response, into a unit cell. Both the numerical and experimental results demonstrate that in such a design strategy, the low absorption bands between high absorption bands with a single-sized tapered HMM waveguide array can be effectively eliminated, resulting in a largely expanded absorption bandwidth ranging from 2.3 to 40 GHz. The presented ultra-broadband light absorber is also insensitive to polarization and robust against incident angle. Our results offer a further step in developing practical artificial electromagnetic absorbers, which will impact a broad range of applications at microwave frequencies.

  16. Ultra-wideband microwave absorber by connecting multiple absorption bands of two different-sized hyperbolic metamaterial waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiang; Long, Chang; Li, Junhao; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Lin; Guan, Jianguo; Li, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Microwave absorbers have important applications in various areas including stealth, camouflage, and antenna. Here, we have designed an ultra-broadband light absorber by integrating two different-sized tapered hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) waveguides, each of which has wide but different absorption bands due to broadband slow-light response, into a unit cell. Both the numerical and experimental results demonstrate that in such a design strategy, the low absorption bands between high absorption bands with a single-sized tapered HMM waveguide array can be effectively eliminated, resulting in a largely expanded absorption bandwidth ranging from 2.3 to 40 GHz. The presented ultra-broadband light absorber is also insensitive to polarization and robust against incident angle. Our results offer a further step in developing practical artificial electromagnetic absorbers, which will impact a broad range of applications at microwave frequencies. PMID:26477740

  17. Measurement of LET (linear energy transfer) spectra using CR-39 at different depths of water irradiated by 171 MeV protons: A comparison with Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, G. S.; Tripathy, S. P.; Molokanov, A. G.; Aleynikov, V. E.; Sharma, S. D.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we have used CR-39 detectors to estimate the LET (linear energy transfer) spectrum of secondary particles due to 171 MeV proton beam at different depths of water including the Bragg peak region. The measured LET spectra were compared with those obtained from FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation. The absorbed dose (DLET), dose equivalent (HLET) were estimated using the LET spectra. The values of DLET and HLET per incident proton fluence were found to increase with the increase in depth of water and were maximum at Bragg peak.

  18. Ultraviolet light absorbers having two different chromophors in the same molecule

    DOEpatents

    Vogl, O.; Li, S.

    1983-10-06

    This invention relates to novel ultraviolet light absorbers having two chromophors in the same molecule, and more particularly to benzotriazole substituted dihydroxybenzophenones and acetophenones. More particularly, this invention relates to 3,5-(di(2H-benzotriazole-2-yl))-2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone and 3,5-(di(2H-benzotriazole-2-yl))-2,4-dihydroxyacetophenone which are particularly useful as an ultraviolet light absorbers.

  19. Finite-difference time-domain synthesis of infrasound propagation through an absorbing atmosphere.

    PubMed

    de Groot-Hedlin, C

    2008-09-01

    Equations applicable to finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computation of infrasound propagation through an absorbing atmosphere are derived and examined in this paper. It is shown that over altitudes up to 160 km, and at frequencies relevant to global infrasound propagation, i.e., 0.02-5 Hz, the acoustic absorption in dB/m varies approximately as the square of the propagation frequency plus a small constant term. A second-order differential equation is presented for an atmosphere modeled as a compressible Newtonian fluid with low shear viscosity, acted on by a small external damping force. It is shown that the solution to this equation represents pressure fluctuations with the attenuation indicated above. Increased dispersion is predicted at altitudes over 100 km at infrasound frequencies. The governing propagation equation is separated into two partial differential equations that are first order in time for FDTD implementation. A numerical analysis of errors inherent to this FDTD method shows that the attenuation term imposes additional stability constraints on the FDTD algorithm. Comparison of FDTD results for models with and without attenuation shows that the predicted transmission losses for the attenuating media agree with those computed from synthesized waveforms. PMID:19045635

  20. 2004: Finite-Difference Time Domain Solution of Light Scattering by an Infinite Dielectric Column Immersed in an Absorbing Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, W.; Loeb, N. G.; Tanev, S.; Videen, G.

    2004-01-01

    The two-dimensional (2-D) finite-difference time domain (FDTD) method is applied to calculate light scattering and absorption by an arbitrarily shaped infinite column embedded in an absorbing dielectric medium. A uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML) absorbing boundary condition (ABC) is used to truncate the computational domain. The single-scattering properties of the infinite column embedded in the absorbing medium, including scattering phase functions, extinction and absorption efficiencies, are derived using an area integration of the internal field. An exact solution for light scattering and absorption by a circular cylinder in an absorbing medium is used to examine the accuracy of the 2-D UPML FDTD code. With use of a cell size of 1/120 incident wavelength in the FDTD calculations, the errors in the extinction and absorption efficiencies and asymmetry factors from the 2-D UPML FDTD are generally smaller than approx .1%. The errors in the scattering phase functions are typically smaller than approx .4%. Using the 2-D UPML FDTD technique, light scattering and absorption by long noncircular columns embedded in absorbing media can be accurately solved.

  1. Analysis of the effect of different absorber materials and loading on the shielding effectiveness of a metallic enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parr, S.; Karcoon, H.; Dickmann, S.; Rambousky, R.

    2015-11-01

    Metallic rooms as part of a complex system, like a ship, are necessarily connected electromagnetically via apertures and cables to the outside. Therefore, their electromagnetic shielding effectiveness (SE) is limited by ventilation openings, cable feed-throughs and door gaps. Thus, electronic equipment inside these rooms is susceptible to outer electromagnetic threats like IEM (Intentional Electromagnetic Interference). Dielectric or magnetic absorber inside such a screened room can be used in order to prevent the SE from collapsing at the resonant frequencies. In this contribution, the effect of different available absorber materials is compared, as well as other properties like weight and workability. Furthermore, parameter variations of the absorber as well as the effect of loading in form of metallic and dielectric structures on the SE are analyzed.

  2. Performance evaluation and parameter sensitivity of energy-harvesting shock absorbers on different vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Sijing; Liu, Yilun; Xu, Lin; Guo, Xuexun; Zuo, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Traditional shock absorbers provide favourable ride comfort and road handling by dissipating the suspension vibration energy into heat waste. In order to harvest this dissipated energy and improve the vehicle fuel efficiency, many energy-harvesting shock absorbers (EHSAs) have been proposed in recent years. Among them, two types of EHSAs have attracted much attention. One is a traditional EHSA which converts the oscillatory vibration into bidirectional rotation using rack-pinion, ball-screw or other mechanisms. The other EHSA is equipped with a mechanical motion rectifier (MMR) that transforms the bidirectional vibration into unidirectional rotation. Hereinafter, they are referred to as NonMMR-EHSA and MMR-EHSA, respectively. This paper compares their performances with the corresponding traditional shock absorber by using closed-form analysis and numerical simulations on various types of vehicles, including passenger cars, buses and trucks. Results suggest that MMR-EHSA provides better ride performances than NonMMR-EHSA, and that MMR-EHSA is able to improve both the ride comfort and road handling simultaneously over the traditional shock absorber when installed on light-damped, heavy-duty vehicles. Additionally, the optimal parameters of MMR-EHSA are obtained for ride comfort. The optimal solutions ('Pareto-optimal solutions') are also obtained by considering the trade-off between ride comfort and road handling.

  3. Computing the Absorption and Emission Spectra of 5-Methylcytidine in Different Solvents: A Test-Case for Different Solvation Models.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fernández, L; Pepino, A J; Segarra-Martí, J; Banyasz, A; Garavelli, M; Improta, R

    2016-09-13

    The optical spectra of 5-methylcytidine in three different solvents (tetrahydrofuran, acetonitrile, and water) is measured, showing that both the absorption and the emission maximum in water are significantly blue-shifted (0.08 eV). The absorption spectra are simulated based on CAM-B3LYP/TD-DFT calculations but including solvent effects with three different approaches: (i) a hybrid implicit/explicit full quantum mechanical approach, (ii) a mixed QM/MM static approach, and (iii) a QM/MM method exploiting the structures issuing from molecular dynamics classical simulations. Ab-initio Molecular dynamics simulations based on CAM-B3LYP functionals have also been performed. The adopted approaches all reproduce the main features of the experimental spectra, giving insights on the chemical-physical effects responsible for the solvent shifts in the spectra of 5-methylcytidine and providing the basis for discussing advantages and limitations of the adopted solvation models. PMID:27529792

  4. Numerical and theoretical analysis on the absorption properties of metasurface-based terahertz absorbers with different thicknesses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kaimin; Huang, Yongjun; Wanghuang, Tenglong; Chen, Weijian; Wen, Guangjun

    2015-01-10

    In this paper, we numerically and theoretically discuss the novel absorption properties of a conventional metasurface-based terahertz (THz) electromagnetic (EM) absorber with different dielectric thicknesses. Two absorption modes are presented in the considered frequency band due to the increased dielectric thickness, and both modes can achieve near-unity absorptions when the dielectric layers reach additional nλ(d)/2 (n=1, 2) thicknesses, where λ(d) is the operating wavelength at the peak absorption in the dielectric slabs. The surface currents between the metasurface resonators and ground plane are not associated any longer, different from the conventional thin absorbers. Moreover, the EM wave energies are completely absorbed by the metasurface resonators and dielectric layer, and the main function of ground plane is to reflect the incident EM waves back to the resonators. The discussed novel absorption properties are analyzed and explained by classical EM theory and interference theory after numerical demonstrations. These findings can broaden the potential applications of the metasurface-based absorbers in the THz frequency range for different requirements. PMID:25967629

  5. Do Different Colors Absorb Heat Better? Grades PreK-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Erik; Ryan, Emily; Swift, Charles

    In this activity, students test whether the color of a material affects how much heat it absorbs. An ice cube is placed in a box made of colored paper (one box per color; white, yellow, red, and black) which is then placed in the sun. Students predict which color will melt the ice cube first and record the order and time required for the ice cubes…

  6. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: extending the predictions to different years and different sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggente, M.; Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-11-01

    Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) are major components of atmospheric particulate matter (PM), which has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality, climate change and reduced visibility. Typically OC and EC concentrations are measured using thermal optical methods such as thermal optical reflectance (TOR) from samples collected on quartz filters. In this work, we estimate TOR OC and EC using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters using partial least square regression (PLSR) calibrated to TOR OC and EC measurements for a wide range of samples. The proposed method can be integrated with analysis of routinely collected PTFE filter samples that, in addition to OC and EC concentrations, can concurrently provide information regarding the composition of the organic aerosol. We have used the FT-IR absorbance spectra and TOR OC and EC concentrations collected in the Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) network (USA). We used 526 samples collected in 2011 at seven sites to calibrate the models, and more than 2000 samples collected in 2013 at 17 sites to test the models. Samples from six sites are present both in the calibration and test sets. The calibrations produce accurate predictions both for samples collected at the same six sites present in the calibration set (R2=0.97 and R2=0.95 for OC and EC respectively), and for samples from nine of the 11 sites not included in the calibration set (R2=0.96 and R2=0.91 for OC and EC respectively). Samples collected at the other two sites require a different calibration model to achieve accurate predictions. We also propose a method to anticipate the prediction error: we calculate the squared Mahalanobis distance in the feature space (scores determined by PLSR) between new spectra and spectra in the calibration set. The squared Mahalanobis distance provides a crude method for assessing the magnitude of mean error

  7. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: extending the predictions to different years and different sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggente, Matteo; Dillner, Ann M.; Takahama, Satoshi

    2016-02-01

    Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) are major components of atmospheric particulate matter (PM), which has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality, climate change, and reduced visibility. Typically OC and EC concentrations are measured using thermal-optical methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) from samples collected on quartz filters. In this work, we estimate TOR OC and EC using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE Teflon) filters using partial least square regression (PLSR) calibrated to TOR OC and EC measurements for a wide range of samples. The proposed method can be integrated with analysis of routinely collected PTFE filter samples that, in addition to OC and EC concentrations, can concurrently provide information regarding the functional group composition of the organic aerosol. We have used the FT-IR absorbance spectra and TOR OC and EC concentrations collected in the Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network (USA). We used 526 samples collected in 2011 at seven sites to calibrate the models, and more than 2000 samples collected in 2013 at 17 sites to test the models. Samples from six sites are present both in the calibration and test sets. The calibrations produce accurate predictions both for samples collected at the same six sites present in the calibration set (R2 = 0.97 and R2 = 0.95 for OC and EC respectively), and for samples from 9 of the 11 sites not included in the calibration set (R2 = 0.96 and R2 = 0.91 for OC and EC respectively). Samples collected at the other two sites require a different calibration model to achieve accurate predictions. We also propose a method to anticipate the prediction error; we calculate the squared Mahalanobis distance in the feature space (scores determined by PLSR) between new spectra and spectra in the calibration set. The squared Mahalanobis distance provides a crude method for assessing the

  8. Finite-Difference Time Domain Solution of Light Scattering and Absorption by Particles in an Absorbing Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, W.; Loeb, N. G.; Fu, Q.

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique has been extended to simulate light scattering and absorption by nonspherical particles embedded in an absorbing dielectric medium. A uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML) absorbing boundary condition is used to truncate the computational domain. When computing the single-scattering properties of a particle in an absorbing dielectric medium, we derive the single-scattering properties including scattering phase functions, extinction, and absorption efficiencies using a volume integration of the internal field. A Mie solution for light scattering and absorption by spherical particles in an absorbing medium is used to examine the accuracy of the 3-D UPML FDTD code. It is found that the errors in the extinction and absorption efficiencies from the 3-D UPML FDTD are less than similar to 2%. The errors in the scattering phase functions are typically less than similar to 5%. The errors in the asymmetry factors are less than similar to 0.l%. For light scattering by particles in free space, the accuracy of the 3-D UPML FDTD scheme is similar to a previous model.

  9. Response of different maturity stages of sapota (Manilkara achras Mill.) cv. Kallipatti to in-package ethylene absorbent.

    PubMed

    Bhutia, Wangdup; Pal, R K; Sen, Sangita; Jha, S K

    2011-12-01

    Sapota fruits are highly perishable due to their climacteric nature. The rapid softening of fruits is primarily due to high activity of many oxidative enzymes and liberation of ethylene. Harvest maturity plays a crucial role in deciding the marketability of climacteric fruits in general. Attempt has been made to evaluate the response of ethylene absorbent on variable maturity groups of harvested Sapota cv. Kallipatti with the objective to delay the ripening during transit and extend its marketability during storage at ambient condition (27-32 °C & 65-75% R.H.). Harvested fruits having three different degree of ripeness (as maturity indices viz. mature, half-ripe and ripe) were packed with or without ethylene absorbent sachets (Bioconservación, France) in 10 kg CFB boxes and transported from Dahnu to Delhi covering a distant of approximately 2500 KM by truck on road along with conventional packaging as control. The fruits were evaluated immediately on arrival at Delhi and subsequently during storage for various physical, physiological, biochemical and decay parameters. Mature fruits with ethylene absorbent exhibited maximum delay in ripening, low ethylene liberation, weight loss and high fruit firmness. The response of ethylene absorbent to extend the marketability of ripe fruit was not significant. PMID:23572819

  10. A hybrid absorbing boundary condition for frequency-domain finite-difference modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhiming; Liu, Yang

    2013-10-01

    Liu and Sen (2010 Geophysics 75 A1-6 2012 Geophys. Prospect. 60 1114-32) proposed an efficient hybrid scheme to significantly absorb boundary reflections for acoustic and elastic wave modelling in the time domain. In this paper, we extend the hybrid absorbing boundary condition (ABC) into the frequency domain and develop specific strategies for regular-grid and staggered-grid modelling, respectively. Numerical modelling tests of acoustic, visco-acoustic, elastic and vertically transversely isotropic (VTI) equations show significant absorptions for frequency-domain modelling. The modelling results of the Marmousi model and the salt model also demonstrate the effectiveness of the hybrid ABC. For elastic modelling, the hybrid Higdon ABC and the hybrid Clayton and Engquist (CE) ABC are implemented, respectively. Numerical simulations show that the hybrid Higdon ABC gets better absorption than the hybrid CE ABC, especially for S-waves. We further compare the hybrid ABC with the classical perfectly matched layer (PML). Results show that the two ABCs cost the same computation time and memory space for the same absorption width. However, the hybrid ABC is more effective than the PML for the same small absorption width and the absorption effects of the two ABCs gradually become similar when the absorption width is increased.

  11. [The radial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type low resolution stellar spectra at different signal-to-noise ratio].

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Fei; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2014-02-01

    The radial velocity of the star is very important for the study of the dynamics structure and chemistry evolution of the Milky Way, is also an useful tool for looking for variable or special objects. In the present work, we focus on calculating the radial velocity of different spectral types of low-resolution stellar spectra by adopting a template matching method, so as to provide effective and reliable reference to the different aspects of scientific research We choose high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra of different spectral type stellar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and add different noise to simulate the stellar spectra with different SNR. Then we obtain theradial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type stellar spectra at different SNR by employing a template matching method. Meanwhile, the radial velocity measurement accuracy of white dwarf stars is analyzed as well. We concluded that the accuracy of radial velocity measurements of early-type stars is much higher than late-type ones. For example, the 1-sigma standard error of radial velocity measurements of A-type stars is 5-8 times as large as K-type and M-type stars. We discuss the reason and suggest that the very narrow lines of late-type stars ensure the accuracy of measurement of radial velocities, while the early-type stars with very wide Balmer lines, such as A-type stars, become sensitive to noise and obtain low accuracy of radial velocities. For the spectra of white dwarfs stars, the standard error of radial velocity measurement could be over 50 km x s(-1) because of their extremely wide Balmer lines. The above conclusion will provide a good reference for stellar scientific study. PMID:24822441

  12. Computational Modeling of Cellular Effects Post-Irradiation with Low- and High-Let Particles and Different Absorbed Doses

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Adriana Alexandre S.; Tavares, João Manuel R. S.

    2013-01-01

    The use of computational methods to improve the understanding of biological responses to various types of radiation is an approach where multiple parameters can be modelled and a variety of data is generated. This study compares cellular effects modelled for low absorbed doses against high absorbed doses. The authors hypothesized that low and high absorbed doses would contribute to cell killing via different mechanisms, potentially impacting on targeted tumour radiotherapy outcomes. Cellular kinetics following irradiation with selective low- and high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles were investigated using the Virtual Cell (VC) radiobiology algorithm. Two different cell types were assessed using the VC radiobiology algorithm: human fibroblasts and human crypt cells. The results showed that at lower doses (0.01 to 0.2 Gy), all radiation sources used were equally able to induce cell death (p>0.05, ANOVA). On the other hand, at higher doses (1.0 to 8.0 Gy), the radiation response was LET and dose dependent (p<0.05, ANOVA). The data obtained suggests that the computational methods used might provide some insight into the cellular effects following irradiation. The results also suggest that it may be necessary to re-evaluate cellular radiation-induced effects, particularly at low doses that could affect therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:23930101

  13. Raman spectra of the different phases in the CaSO4-H2O system.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Taboada, Nagore; Gómez-Laserna, Olivia; Martínez-Arkarazo, Irantzu; Olazabal, María Ángeles; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2014-10-21

    Although it is known that the CaSO4/H2O system is formed by at least five different phases, this fact is not correctly documented in Raman spectroscopy studies. The main problem detected in the literature was the incorrect definition of the anhydrite, which produced the assignation of different spectra for a single compound. In this sense, two different spectra were clearly identified from the bibliography, which showed different main Raman bands at 1017 or 1025 cm(-1), although anhydrite could be present even as three different polymorphous species with different structures. A better understanding of the whole system obtained from a review of the literature allowed new conclusions to be established. Thanks to that revision and the development of different thermodynamical experiments by Raman spectroscopy, the Raman spectra of each phase were successfully identified for the first time. In this way, the main Raman bands of gypsum, bassanite, anhydrite III, anhydrite II and anhydrite I were identified at 1008, 1015, 1025, 1017 and 1017 cm(-1), respectively. To conclude this work, the contradictions found in literature were critically summarized. PMID:25226433

  14. Power spectra and distribution of contrasts of natural images from different habitats.

    PubMed

    Balboa, Rosario M; Grzywacz, Norberto M

    2003-11-01

    Some theories for visual receptive fields postulate that they depend on the image statistics of the natural habitat. Consequently, different habitats may lead to different receptive fields. We thus decided to study how some of the most relevant statistics vary across habitats. In particular, atmospheric and underwater habitats were compared. For these habitats, we looked at two measures of the power spectrum and one of the distributions of contrasts. From power spectra, we analyzed the log-log slope of the fall and the degree of isotropy. From the distribution of contrasts, we analyzed the fall in a semi-log scale. Past studies found that the spatial power spectra of natural atmospheric images fall linearly in logarithmic axes with a slope of about -2 and that their distribution of contrasts shows an approximate linear fall in semi-logarithmic axes. Here, we show that the power spectrum of underwater images have statistically significantly steeper slopes ( approximately -2.5 in log-log axes) than atmospheric images. The vast majority of power spectra are non-isotropic, but their degree of anisotropy is extremely low, especially in atmospheric images. There are also statistical differences across habitats for the distribution of contrasts, with it falling faster for underwater images than for atmospheric ones. We will argue that these differences are due to the optical properties of water and that the differences have relevance for theories of visual receptive fields. These theories would predict larger receptive fields for aquatic animals compared to land animals. PMID:13129540

  15. Role of shielding in modulating the effects of solar particle events: Monte Carlo calculation of absorbed dose and DNA complex lesions in different organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, F.; Biaggi, M.; De Biaggi, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ottolenghi, A.; Panzarasa, A.; Paretzke, H. G.; Pelliccioni, M.; Sala, P.; Scannicchio, D.; Zankl, M.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2004-01-01

    Distributions of absorbed dose and DNA clustered damage yields in various organs and tissues following the October 1989 solar particle event (SPE) were calculated by coupling the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code with two anthropomorphic phantoms (a mathematical model and a voxel model), with the main aim of quantifying the role of the shielding features in modulating organ doses. The phantoms, which were assumed to be in deep space, were inserted into a shielding box of variable thickness and material and were irradiated with the proton spectra of the October 1989 event. Average numbers of DNA lesions per cell in different organs were calculated by adopting a technique already tested in previous works, consisting of integrating into "condensed-history" Monte Carlo transport codes--such as FLUKA--yields of radiobiological damage, either calculated with "event-by-event" track structure simulations, or taken from experimental works available in the literature. More specifically, the yields of "Complex Lesions" (or "CL", defined and calculated as a clustered DNA damage in a previous work) per unit dose and DNA mass (CL Gy-1 Da-1) due to the various beam components, including those derived from nuclear interactions with the shielding and the human body, were integrated in FLUKA. This provided spatial distributions of CL/cell yields in different organs, as well as distributions of absorbed doses. The contributions of primary protons and secondary hadrons were calculated separately, and the simulations were repeated for values of Al shielding thickness ranging between 1 and 20 g/cm2. Slight differences were found between the two phantom types. Skin and eye lenses were found to receive larger doses with respect to internal organs; however, shielding was more effective for skin and lenses. Secondary particles arising from nuclear interactions were found to have a minor role, although their relative contribution was found to be larger for the Complex Lesions than for the

  16. Optical properties of light absorbing carbon aggregates mixed with sulfate: assessment of different model geometries for climate forcing calculations.

    PubMed

    Kahnert, Michael; Nousiainen, Timo; Lindqvist, Hannakaisa; Ebert, Martin

    2012-04-23

    Light scattering by light absorbing carbon (LAC) aggregates encapsulated into sulfate shells is computed by use of the discrete dipole method. Computations are performed for a UV, visible, and IR wavelength, different particle sizes, and volume fractions. Reference computations are compared to three classes of simplified model particles that have been proposed for climate modeling purposes. Neither model matches the reference results sufficiently well. Remarkably, more realistic core-shell geometries fall behind homogeneous mixture models. An extended model based on a core-shell-shell geometry is proposed and tested. Good agreement is found for total optical cross sections and the asymmetry parameter. PMID:22535095

  17. The use of difference spectra with a filtered rolling average background in mobile gamma spectrometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresswell, A. J.; Sanderson, D. C. W.

    2009-08-01

    The use of difference spectra, with a filtering of a rolling average background, as a variation of the more common rainbow plots to aid in the visual identification of radiation anomalies in mobile gamma spectrometry systems is presented. This method requires minimal assumptions about the radiation environment, and is not computationally intensive. Some case studies are presented to illustrate the method. It is shown that difference spectra produced in this manner can improve signal to background, estimate shielding or mass depth using scattered spectral components, and locate point sources. This approach could be a useful addition to the methods available for locating point sources and mapping dispersed activity in real time. Further possible developments of the procedure utilising more intelligent filters and spatial averaging of the background are identified.

  18. Radiatively driven winds for different power law spectra. [for explaining narrow and broad quasar absorption lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltrametti, M.

    1980-01-01

    The analytic solutions for radiatively driven winds are given for the case in which the winds are driven by absorption of line and continuum radiation. The wind solutions are analytically estimated for different parameters of the central source and for different power law spectra. For flat spectra, three sonic points can exist; it is shown, however, that only one of these sonic points is physically realistic. Parameters of the central source are given which generate winds of further interest for explaining the narrow and broad absorption lines in quasars. For the quasar model presented here, winds which could give rise to the narrow absorption lines are generated by central sources with parameters which are not realistic for quasars.

  19. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF2 etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  20. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shinpei Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-26

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF{sub 2} etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  1. Power spectra and dynamical invariants for delay-differential and difference equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensour, Boualem; Longtin, André

    1998-02-01

    The Mackey-Glass and Ikeda delay-differential equations (DDEs) are models of feedback systems in which attractor dimension is proportional to the delay. Power spectra from these models are investigated analytically and numerically. As the delay increases much beyond the system response time, an exponentially decaying spectrum with a near-periodic superimposed modulation appears. It is shown that each peak in this modulation is associated with a mode of oscillation predicted by linear stability analysis around the fixed point. The number of such modes within a characteristic autocorrelation time of the solution agrees with the Lyapunov dimension of the attractor. The disappearance of this modulation at higher delay values is also explained. The decay rate of the spectrum in the mid-to-high frequency range is found to agree with the sum of the positive Lyapunov exponents, i.e. with the metric entropy. Realistic models with a distribution of delays display similar spectra as their memory kernel narrows into a delta-function. For very large delay, the DDE approaches an infinite-dimensional continuous-time difference equation (CTDE), with each point on a delay interval evolving independently and according to a chaotic discrete-time map. CTDE spectra, which have many features of finite-delay DDE spectra, can be computed analytically if the spectrum of this map is known. For constant initial functions, they have a {1}/{f 2} form at low frequencies. Our analysis suggests that the spectrum of the chaotic map is at the origin of the peak shapes in DDE spectra at low frequency. Our findings highlight the relevance of the linear prrperties of DDEs to the characterization of their nonlinear properties.

  2. Integrating Field Spectra and Worldview-2 Data for Grapevine Productivity in Different Irrigation Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maimaitiyiming, M.; Bozzolo, A.; Wulamu, A.; Wilkins, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Precision farming requires high spectral, spatial and temporal resolution remote sensing data to detect plant physiological changes. The higher spatial resolution is particularly as important as the spectral resolution for crop monitoring. It is important to develop data integration techniques between field or airborne hyperspectral data with spaceborne broad band multispectral images for plant productivity monitoring. To investigate varying rootstock and irrigation interactions, different irrigation treatments are implemented in a vineyard experimental site either i) unirrigated ii) full replacement of evapotranspiration (ET) iii) irrigated at 50 % of the potential ET. In summer 2014, we collected leaf and canopy spectra of the vineyard using field spectroscopy along with other plant physiological and nutritional variables. In this contribution, we integrate the field spectra and the spectral wavelengths of WorldView-2 to develop a predictive model for plant productivity,i.e., fruit quality and yield. First, we upscale field and canopy spectra to WorldView-2 spectral bands using radiative transfer simulations (e.g., MODTRAN). Then we develop remote sensing techniques to quantify plant productivity in different scenarios water stress by identifying the most effective and sensitive wavelengths, and indices that are capable of early detection of plant health and estimation of crop nutrient status. Finally we present predictive models developed from partial least square regression (PLSR) for plant productivity using spectral wavelengths and indices derived from integrated field and satellite remote sensing data.

  3. Impact of different visible light spectra on oxygen absorption and surface discoloration of bologna sausage.

    PubMed

    Böhner, Nadine; Rieblinger, Klaus

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of several visible light spectra in various intensities on the oxygen absorption and surface color of sliced bologna. Sausage samples were stored in a gastight model packaging system and illuminated at 5°C with six single-colored LEDs covering the main part of the visible light spectrum. The initial oxygen level was set at 0.5% in order to simulate common residual oxygen amounts in conventional packaging. The oxygen absorption and the discoloration measured as changes in CIE a*-value were dependent from the applied light intensity. The color stability of bologna was differently affected by light of various wavelengths. The results show that the use of suitable LEDs with specific spectra for display illumination can help to reduce the light induced deterioration of cured sausages in retail markets. PMID:27343458

  4. Detection of significant differences between absorption spectra of neutral helium and low temperature photoionized helium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bartnik, A.; Wachulak, P.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Fok, T.; Jarocki, R.; Szczurek, M.

    2013-11-15

    In this work, spectral investigations of photoionized He plasmas were performed. The photoionized plasmas were created by irradiation of helium stream, with intense pulses from laser-plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source. The EUV source was based on a double-stream Xe/Ne gas-puff target irradiated with 10 ns/10 J Nd:YAG laser pulses. The most intense emission from the source spanned a relatively narrow spectral region below 20 nm, however, spectrally integrated intensity at longer wavelengths was also significant. The EUV radiation was focused onto a gas stream, injected into a vacuum chamber synchronously with the EUV pulse. The long-wavelength part of the EUV radiation was used for backlighting of the photoionized plasmas to obtain absorption spectra. Both emission and absorption spectra in the EUV range were investigated. Significant differences between absorption spectra acquired for neutral helium and low temperature photoionized plasmas were demonstrated for the first time. Strong increase of intensities and spectral widths of absorption lines, together with a red shift of the K-edge, was shown.

  5. [Spectra characteristic effect of different density-resistant maize variety on planting density].

    PubMed

    Tang, Li-Yuan; Ma, Wei; Li, Lian-Lu; Zhao, Ming

    2013-03-01

    With Chlorophyll Meter SPAD-502 and Canopy Analyzer AccuPAR LP-80, the spectra characteristic effect of different density-resistant maize variety on planting density was studied, and the effect of planting density on photosynthetic performance of maize was discussed. The materials of the experiment were Yinong-103, Xianyu-335, Zhengdan-958 and Denghai-661, the row spacing was 80 cm X 40 cm, the plant spacing was gradually changed from Im to smaller spacing, the densities were 3.33, 3.70, 4.17, 4.50, 4.76, 5.56, 6.67, 6.80, 8.33, 9.00, 11.11, 11.20 and 16.67 planting.m-2 respectively. We studied spectra characteristic effect on planting density, and investigated maize photosynthetic characteristics and density-yield relationship to get high yield. This research can be good case of using maize spectra characteristic to reflect plant photosynthetic characteristics and canopy architecture. The end of this paper was to explore density effect on yield with spectroscopy means. PMID:23705451

  6. Rigidity Spectra of Primary Protons and Different Classes of Galactic Cosmic Ray Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alania, Michael; Modzelewska, Renata; Siluszyk, Marek; Gil, Agnieszka; Wawrzynczak-Szaban, Anna; Iskra, Krzysztof

    We study changes of proton spectra of Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) in free space for various minimum and near minimum epochs of 21/22, 22/23/ and 23/24 solar activity using data of different space probes. There are distinctions for positive (A>0) and negative (A<0) polarity epochs demonstrating a soft proton spectra for A<0 polarity epochs. We ascribe it to the increase of parallel and drift diffusion coefficients for the A<0 minimum epochs. We calculate rigidity spectra of long period variations of the GCR intensity using neutron monitors (NMs) and muon telescopes (MTs) data. We find that rigidity spectra of the GCR intensity variations are gradually hardening before and after reaching the maximum of the GCR intensity for all considered 21/22, 22/23/ and 23/24 minimum epochs of solar activity. In these periods an increase of the exponent nu of the Power Spectral Density (PSD) of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) turbulence is observed confirming a validity of the quasi linear theory to describe a propagation of GCR to which NMs and MTs respond. We also study rigidity dependencies of the amplitudes of Forbush degreases and 27-day variations of the GCR intensity. We compare results of 2-D and 3-D modeling of GCR transport with the experimental data in free space (interplanetary space) and at earth orbit. We conclude that in formation of the rigidity spectrum of 11-year, 27-days and Forbush decreases measured by NMs and MTs at earth’s orbit a crucial role belongs to the character of the dependence of diffusion coefficient on the GCR particle’s rigidity, i.e. to the structure of the IMF turbulence.

  7. ζ2 Reticuli, its debris disk, and its lonely stellar companion ζ1 Ret. Different Tc trends for different spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibekyan, V.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Figueira, P.; Sousa, S. G.; Santos, N. C.; Faria, J. P.; González Hernández, J. I.; Israelian, G.; Harutyunyan, G.; Suárez-Andrés, L.; Hakobyan, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Several studies have reported a correlation between the chemical abundances of stars and condensation temperature (known as Tc trend). Very recently, a strong Tc trend was reported for the ζ Reticuli binary system, which consists of two solar analogs. The observed trend in ζ2 Ret relative to its companion was explained by the presence of a debris disk around ζ2 Ret. Aims: Our goal is to re-evaluate the presence and variability of the Tc trend in the ζ Reticuli system and to understand the impact of the presence of the debris disk on a star. Methods: We used very high-quality spectra of the two stars retrieved from the HARPS archive to derive very precise stellar parameters and chemical abundances. We derived the stellar parameters with the classical (nondifferential) method, while we applied a differential line-by-line analysis to achieve the highest possible precision in abundances, which are fundamental to explore for very tiny differences in the abundances between the stars. Results: We confirm that the abundance difference between ζ2 Ret and ζ1 Ret shows a significant (~2σ) correlation with Tc. However, we also find that the Tc trends depend on the individual spectrum used (even if always of very high quality). In particular, we find significant but varying differences in the abundances of the same star from different individual high-quality spectra. Conclusions: Our results for the ζ Reticuli system show, for example, that nonphysical factors, such as the quality of spectra employed and errors that are not accounted for, can be at the root of the Tc trends for the case of individual spectra. Based on data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility under request number vadibekyan204818, vadibekyan204820, and vadibekyan185979.The tables with EWs of the lines and chemical abundances are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A34

  8. Attenuation of external Bremsstrahlung in metallic absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Dhaliwal, A.S.; Powar, M.S.; Singh, M. )

    1990-12-01

    In this paper attenuation of bremsstrahlung from {sup 147}Pm and {sup 170}Tm beta emitters has been studied in aluminum, copper, tin, and lead metallic absorbers. Bremsstrahlung spectra and mass attenuation coefficients for monoenergetic gamma rays are used to calculate theoretical attenuation curves. Magnetic deflection and beta stopping techniques are used to measure the integral bremsstrahlung intensities above 30 keV in different target thicknesses. Comparison of measured and calculated attenuation curves shows a good agreement for various absorbers, thus providing a test of this technique, which may be useful in understanding bremsstrahlung intensity buildup and in the design of optimum shielding for bremsstrahlung sources. It is found that the absorption of bremsstrahlung in metallic absorbers does not obey an exponential law and that absorbers act as energy filters.

  9. Change in the amount of epsilon-hexosyllysine, UV absorbance, and fluorescence of collagen with age in different animal species

    SciTech Connect

    Miksik, I.; Deyl, Z. )

    1991-05-01

    Skin and aorta collagen specimens of Wistar rats, white mice, beagle dogs, cats, horses, and human necropsies of different ages were examined with respect to the content of glycated products. The data presented show that (a) glycation and accumulation of the chromophore(s) are comparable in collagen samples from different species of comparable age; (b) glycation and pigmented accumulation increase markedly during the first 5-10 years of age; (c) the extent of glycation is different in different tissues (in particular, glycation of aortal collagen is about twice that of skin collagen); and (d) collagen pigmentation as followed by fluorescence is comparable in aortal and skin collagen (except below 10 years); pigmentation measured by absorbance at 350 nm is, on the contrary, lower in aortal than in skin collagen. Based on the assumption of constant blood glucose level during the life span, it appears feasible to conclude that the degree of nonenzymatic collagen glycation reflects the time period for which the protein was exposed to the action of sugars. This period, because of increased cross-linking, is likely to be extended in older animals. Other factors, such as differences in collagen turnover between different tissues and the intensity of the removal process of the glycated products, should be taken into consideration as well.

  10. 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR spectra of mullites from different kaolinites.

    PubMed

    He, Hongping; Guo, Jiugao; Zhu, Jianxi; Yuan, Peng; Hu, Cheng

    2004-04-01

    Mullites synthesized from four kaolinites with different random defect densities have been studied by 27Al and 29Si magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MAS NMR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). All these mullites show the same XRD pattern. However, 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR spectra reveal that the mullites derived from kaolinites with high defect densities, have a sillimanite-type Al/Si ordering scheme and are low in silica, whereas those mullites derived from kaolinites with low defect densities, consist of both sillimanite- and mullite-type Al/Si ordering schemes and are rich in silica. PMID:15084323

  11. Remote sensing of soot carbon - Part 1: Distinguishing different absorbing aerosol species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, G. L.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a method of using the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) size distributions and complex refractive indices to retrieve the relative proportion of carbonaceous aerosols and free iron minerals (hematite and goethite). We assume that soot carbon has a spectrally flat refractive index and enhanced imaginary indices at the 440 nm wavelength are caused by brown carbon or hematite. Carbonaceous aerosols can be separated from dust in imaginary refractive index space because 95 % of biomass burning aerosols have imaginary indices greater than 0.0042 at the 675-1020 nm wavelengths, and 95 % of dust has imaginary refractive indices of less than 0.0042 at those wavelengths. However, mixtures of these two types of particles can not be unambiguously partitioned on the basis of optical properties alone, so we also separate these particles by size. Regional and seasonal results are consistent with expectations. Monthly climatologies of fine mode soot carbon are less than 1.0 % by volume for West Africa and the Middle East, but the southern African and South American biomass burning sites have peak values of 3.0 and 1.7 %. Monthly averaged fine mode brown carbon volume fractions have a peak value of 5.8 % for West Africa, 2.1 % for the Middle East, 3.7 % for southern Africa, and 5.7 % for South America. Monthly climatologies of free iron volume fractions show little seasonal variability, and range from about 1.1 to 1.7 % for coarse mode aerosols in all four study regions. Finally, our sensitivity study indicates that the soot carbon retrieval is not sensitive to the component refractive indices or densities assumed for carbonaceous and free iron aerosols, and the retrieval differs by only 15.4 % when these parameters are altered from our chosen baseline values. The total uncertainty of retrieving soot carbon mass is ˜ 50 % (when uncertainty in the AERONET product and mixing state is included in the analysis).

  12. TDDFT prediction of UV-vis absorption and emission spectra of tocopherols in different media.

    PubMed

    Bakhouche, Kahina; Dhaouadi, Zoubeida; Lahmar, Souad; Hammoutène, Dalila

    2015-06-01

    We use the TDDFT/PBE0/6-31+G* method to determine the electronic absorption and emission energies, in different media, of the four forms of tocopherol, which differ by the number and the position of methyl groups on the chromanol. Geometries of the ground state S0 and the first singlet excited state S1 were optimized in the gas phase, and various solvents. The solvent effect is evaluated using an implicit solvation model (IEF-PCM). Our results are compared to the experimental ones obtained for the vitamin E content in several vegetable oils. For all forms of tocopherols, the HOMO-LUMO first vertical excitation is a π-π* transition. Gas phase and non-polar solvents (benzene and toluene) give higher absorption wavelengths than polar solvents (acetone, ethanol, methanol, DMSO, and water); this can be interpreted by a coplanarity between the O-H group and the chroman, allowing a better electronic resonance of the oxygen lone pairs and the aromatic ring, and therefore giving an important absorption wavelength, whereas the polar solvents give high emission wavelengths comparatively to gas phase and non-polar solvents. Fluorescence spectra permit the determination, the separation, and the identification of the four forms of tocopherols by a large difference in emission wavelength values. Graphical Abstract Scheme from process methodological to obtain the absorption and emission spectra for tocopherols. PMID:26026299

  13. Deriving the intermediate spectra and photocycle kinetics from time-resolved difference spectra of bacteriorhodopsin. The simpler case of the recombinant D96N protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimanyi, L.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1993-01-01

    The bacteriorhodopsin photocycle contains more than five spectrally distinct intermediates, and the complexity of their interconversions has precluded a rigorous solution of the kinetics. A representation of the photocycle of mutated D96N bacteriorhodopsin near neutral pH was given earlier (Varo, G., and J. K. Lanyi. 1991. Biochemistry. 30:5008-5015) as BRhv-->K<==>L<==>M1-->M2--> BR. Here we have reduced a set of time-resolved difference spectra for this simpler system to three base spectra, each assumed to consist of an unknown mixture of the pure K, L, and M difference spectra represented by a 3 x 3 matrix of concentration values between 0 and 1. After generating all allowed sets of spectra for K, L, and M (i.e., M1 + M2) at a 1:50 resolution of the matrix elements, invalid solutions were eliminated progressively in a search based on what is expected, empirically and from the theory of polyene excited states, for rhodopsin spectra. Significantly, the average matrix values changed little after the first and simplest of the search criteria that disallowed negative absorptions and more than one maximum for the M intermediate. We conclude from the statistics that during the search the solutions strongly converged into a narrow region of the multidimensional space of the concentration matrix. The data at three temperatures between 5 and 25 degrees C yielded a single set of spectra for K, L, and M; their fits are consistent with the earlier derived photocycle model for the D96N protein.

  14. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  15. Rotational spectra of propargyl alcohol dimer: A dimer bound with three different types of hydrogen bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Devendra; Arunan, E.

    2014-10-28

    Pure rotational spectra of the propargyl alcohol dimer and its three deuterium isotopologues have been observed in the 4 to 13 GHz range using a pulsed-nozzle Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. For the parent dimer, a total of 51 transitions could be observed and fitted within experimental uncertainty. For two mono-substituted and one bi-substituted deuterium isotopologues, a total of 14, 17, and 19 transitions were observed, respectively. The observed rotational constants for the parent dimer [A = 2321.8335(4) MHz, B = 1150.4774(2) MHz, and C = 1124.8898(2) MHz] are close to those of the most stable structure predicted by ab initio calculations. Spectra of the three deuterated isotopologues and Kraitchman analysis positively confirm this structure. Geometrical parameters and “Atoms in Molecules” analysis on the observed structure reveal that the two propargyl alcohol units in the dimer are bound by three different types of hydrogen bonds: O–H⋯O, O–H⋯π, and C–H⋯π. To the best of our knowledge, propargyl alcohol seems to be the smallest molecule forming a homodimer with three different points of contact.

  16. Understanding cirrus ice crystal number variability for different heterogeneous ice nucleation spectra

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sullivan, Sylvia C.; Morales Betancourt, Ricardo; Barahona, Donifan; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-03-03

    Along with minimizing parameter uncertainty, understanding the cause of temporal and spatial variability of the nucleated ice crystal number, Ni, is key to improving the representation of cirrus clouds in climate models. To this end, sensitivities of Ni to input variables like aerosol number and diameter provide valuable information about nucleation regime and efficiency for a given model formulation. Here we use the adjoint model of the adjoint of a cirrus formation parameterization (Barahona and Nenes, 2009b) to understand Ni variability for various ice-nucleating particle (INP) spectra. Inputs are generated with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, and simulations are donemore » with a theoretically derived spectrum, an empirical lab-based spectrum and two field-based empirical spectra that differ in the nucleation threshold for black carbon particles and in the active site density for dust. The magnitude and sign of Ni sensitivity to insoluble aerosol number can be directly linked to nucleation regime and efficiency of various INP. The lab-based spectrum calculates much higher INP efficiencies than field-based ones, which reveals a disparity in aerosol surface properties. Ni sensitivity to temperature tends to be low, due to the compensating effects of temperature on INP spectrum parameters; this low temperature sensitivity regime has been experimentally reported before but never deconstructed as done here.« less

  17. Understanding cirrus ice crystal number variability for different heterogeneous ice nucleation spectra

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sullivan, Sylvia C.; Morales Betancourt, Ricardo; Barahona, Donifan; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-03-03

    Along with minimizing parameter uncertainty, understanding the cause of temporal and spatial variability of the nucleated ice crystal number, Ni, is key to improving the representation of cirrus clouds in climate models. To this end, sensitivities of Ni to input variables like aerosol number and diameter provide valuable information about nucleation regime and efficiency for a given model formulation. Here we use the adjoint model of the adjoint of a cirrus formation parameterization (Barahona and Nenes, 2009b) to understand Ni variability for various ice-nucleating particle (INP) spectra. Inputs are generated with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, and simulations are donemore » with a theoretically derived spectrum, an empirical lab-based spectrum and two field-based empirical spectra that differ in the nucleation threshold for black carbon particles and in the active site density for dust. The magnitude and sign of Ni sensitivity to insoluble aerosol number can be directly linked to nucleation regime and efficiency of various INP. The lab-based spectrum calculates much higher INP efficiencies than field-based ones, which reveals a disparity in aerosol surface properties. In conclusion, Ni sensitivity to temperature tends to be low, due to the compensating effects of temperature on INP spectrum parameters; this low temperature sensitivity regime has been experimentally reported before but never deconstructed as done here.« less

  18. Understanding cirrus ice crystal number variability for different heterogeneous ice nucleation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Sylvia C.; Morales Betancourt, Ricardo; Barahona, Donifan; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-03-01

    Along with minimizing parameter uncertainty, understanding the cause of temporal and spatial variability of the nucleated ice crystal number, Ni, is key to improving the representation of cirrus clouds in climate models. To this end, sensitivities of Ni to input variables like aerosol number and diameter provide valuable information about nucleation regime and efficiency for a given model formulation. Here we use the adjoint model of the adjoint of a cirrus formation parameterization (Barahona and Nenes, 2009b) to understand Ni variability for various ice-nucleating particle (INP) spectra. Inputs are generated with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5, and simulations are done with a theoretically derived spectrum, an empirical lab-based spectrum and two field-based empirical spectra that differ in the nucleation threshold for black carbon particles and in the active site density for dust. The magnitude and sign of Ni sensitivity to insoluble aerosol number can be directly linked to nucleation regime and efficiency of various INP. The lab-based spectrum calculates much higher INP efficiencies than field-based ones, which reveals a disparity in aerosol surface properties. Ni sensitivity to temperature tends to be low, due to the compensating effects of temperature on INP spectrum parameters; this low temperature sensitivity regime has been experimentally reported before but never deconstructed as done here.

  19. Reflectance-difference spectra of Si(001) surfaces with semi-empirical self-enegy corrections^

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Li, L.; Chang, Y.-C.

    1997-03-01

    We present ab initio pseudopotential calculations of the reflectance-difference (RD) spectra of Si(001) surfaces. For calculating optical responses it is important to have the correct excited states, which are not easily obtained from the ab initio calculation. Our calculation is based on the density functional theory and planar-orbital basis, which is periodic in the plane and localized in the perpendicular direction. We have included the many-body self-energy corrections semi-empirically by using ad hoc model potentials in order to reproduce the experimentally observed band gaps at Γ, X, and L points in the Brillouin zone and the surface bands (with respect to bulk bands). Comparison between theory and experiment for Si (001) 2×1 and 2×2 reconstructions and with overlayers (e.g., H, As, and Sb) will be presented. Work supported by ONR N00014-89-J-1157.

  20. Stratospheric mean state: modelling the sensitivity to different solar irradiance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misios, Stergios; Tourpali, Klairie; Habbereiter, Margit

    2016-04-01

    The sensitivity of the stratospheric mean state to four different reference solar irradiance spectra describing a quite Sun (year 2008) is investigated using a chemistry climate model. Simulations show that the mean thermal state of the stratosphere depends considerably on the specified spectrum given that the annual mean temperature in tropical stratopause varies by more than 3 K, in some cases. Temperature anomalies are stronger in boreal winter and the polar night westerlies strengthen by about 15%. The simulated ozone climatology is also influenced by the choice of the reference spectrum and our model simulates concentration changes up to 6-7% in the middle stratosphere. Given that net effect of the ozone response is to dump temperature anomalies, we find an amplified temperature perturbation of about 20-30% in twin simulations without interactive chemistry coupling. Using a 2-D chemistry climate model we trace the spectral regions that contribute the most to the simulated changes in the stratosphere.

  1. An algorithm for chlorophyll using first difference transformations of AVIRIS reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novo, Evlyn; Gastil, Mary; Melack, John

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results have shown the existence of a strong relationship between chlorophyll alpha concentration and remote sensing reflectance measured at lake level with a high resolution spectroradiometer. The objective of our study was to investigate the relationship between surface chlorophyll alpha concentration at Mono Lake and water reflectance retrieved from Airborne Visible - Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data obtained in october 7, 1992. AVIRIS data were atmospherically corrected as described by Green et al. A description of the lake-level sampling is found in Melack and Gastil. The relationship between chlorophyll concentration and both the single band reflectance and the first difference transformation of the reflectance spectra for the first 40 AVIRIS spectral bands (400 nm to 740 nm) was examined. The relationship was then used to produce a map of the surface chlorophyll distribution.

  2. Links between two different types of spectra of charged nanometer aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luts, A.; Komsaare, K.; Parts, T.-E.; Hõrrak, U.

    2011-08-01

    We have, since 2007, continuously measured the electrical mobility distribution of small (< 1.5 nm in diameter) corona-generated one-second-aged air ions, using our Small Air Ion Spectrometer (KAIS), in urban area, in the center of the town of Tartu, Estonia. We have simultaneously measured the mobility distributions of natural air ions (0.42-7.4 nm in diameter) with the Balanced Scanning Mobility Analyzer (BSMA). In this work we employ these data to establish certain links between the concurrent spectra of two types, especially for days with new particle formation events. We elaborated and tested an automatic classification method, which selected the spectra according their shape. In the case of the BSMA negative ions, we obtained four classes of the spectra which are associated with the intermediate ion (1.6-7.4 nm in diameter) nucleation burst events and rain-type events. The spectra within these classes are characterized by special shapes and they are called "event-like spectra". The first class demonstrates the strongest increase in the concentration of all ions with the mobilities below 0.8 cm 2V -1 s -1 (above 1.25 nm in diameter), it mainly contains spring and early summer spectra, recorded around midday. In the second class, the events are weaker; it contains a large number of late spring morning time spectra, when relative humidity (RH) tends to decrease. The third and the fourth classes contain many spectra, which resemble to short isolated events. These spectra are excluded from the further analysis. In the first class, the precipitation spectra make about 34% of all the event-like spectra, in the other classes about 10%. In the case of the BSMA positive ions, only the first and second classes were present. The precipitation spectra make about 20% of all event-like classes. About 45% of the event-like spectra are without precipitation, but with RH > 90%, and these spectra are excluded from the further analysis. The spectra with RH < 50% formed 12% of

  3. TL emission spectra from differently doped LiF:Mg detectors.

    PubMed

    Mandowska, E; Bilski, P; Ochab, E; Swiatek, J; Mandowski, A

    2002-01-01

    There are two widely applied types of thermoluminescent detectors based on LiF:Mg luminophor: Lif:Mg,Ti and highly sensitive LiF:Mg,Cu,P. The role of luminescence centres in these materials is usually attributed to defects connected with, respectively, titanium and phosphorus dopants. In order to check how composition of dopants introduced into the LiF lattice influences emission spectra, measurements on a series of variously doped LiF:Mg samples were performed. Apart from LiF:Mg,Cu,P and LiF:Mg,Ti detectors with different concentration of activators, an experimental sample being a kind of a 'hybrid' between both standard materials was also prepared. It was synthesised with concentrations of magnesium and copper identical to those used for LiF:Mg,Cu,P preparation. but instead of phosphorus it was doped with titanium (LiF:Mg,Cu,Ti). The measurements of the emission spectra were performed by using a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD 1024E detector with an SP150 spectrograph. During the measurements the samples were placed inside a cryostat in a vacuum. Resulting data were numerically deconvoluted for individual peaks with respect to the wavelength and the temperature. The glow curve shape of this material resembles that of LiF:Mg,Cu,P, while sensitivity is at the level of LiF:Mg,Ti. Preliminary results indicate that emission of the LiF:Mg,Cu,Ti sample is similar to that of LiF:Mg,Cu,P rather than to LiF:Mg,Ti, showing a maximum for wavelengths well below 400 nm. PMID:12382919

  4. Vibronic Coupling Explains the Different Shape of Electronic Circular Dichroism and of Circularly Polarized Luminescence Spectra of Hexahelicenes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanli; Cerezo, Javier; Mazzeo, Giuseppe; Lin, Na; Zhao, Xian; Longhi, Giovanna; Abbate, Sergio; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2016-06-14

    We present the simulation of the absorption (ABS), electronic circular dichroism (ECD), emission (EMI), and circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) spectra for the weak electronic transition between the ground (S0) and the lowest excited state (S1) of hexahelicene, 2-methylhexahelicene, 2-bromohexahelicene, and 5-azahexahelicene. Vibronic contributions have been computed at zero Kelvin and at room temperature in harmonic approximation including Duschinsky effects and accounting for both Franck-Condon and Herzberg-Teller contributions. Our results nicely capture the effects of the different substituents on the experimental spectra. They also show that HT effects dominate the shape of ECD and CPL spectra where they even induce changes of signs; HT effects are also relevant in ABS and EMI, tuning the relative intensities of the different vibronic bands. HT effects are the main reason for the differences in the line shapes of ABS and ECD and of EMI and CPL spectra and for the mirror-symmetry breaking between ABS and EMI and between ECD and CPL spectra. In order to check the robustness of our results, given also that few examples of calculations of vibronic CPL spectra exist, we adopted both adiabatic and vertical approaches to define the model potential energy surfaces of the (S0) and the (S1) states; moreover we expanded the electric and magnetic dipole transition moments around both the S0 and S1 equilibrium geometries. PMID:27120334

  5. The impact of different physical processes on the statistics of Lyman-limit and damped Lyman α absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altay, Gabriel; Theuns, Tom; Schaye, Joop; Booth, C. M.; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio

    2013-12-01

    We compute the z = 3 neutral hydrogen column density distribution function f(NHI) for 19 simulations drawn from the Overwhelmingly Large Simulations project using a post-processing correction for self-shielding calculated with full radiative transfer of the ionizing background radiation. We investigate how different physical processes and parameters affect the abundance of Lyman-limit systems (LLSs) and damped Lyman α absorbers including: (i) metal-line cooling; (ii) the efficiency of feedback from supernovae and active galactic nuclei; (iii) the effective equation of state for the interstellar medium; (iv) cosmological parameters; (v) the assumed star formation law and (vi) the timing of hydrogen reionization. We find that the normalization and slope, D = d log _{10} f /d log _{10} N_{H I}, of f(NHI) in the LLS regime are robust to changes in these physical processes. Among physically plausible models, f(NHI) varies by less than 0.2 dex and D varies by less than 0.18 for LLSs. This is primarily due to the fact that these uncertain physical processes mostly affect star-forming gas which contributes less than 10 per cent to f(NHI) in the LLS column density range. At higher column densities, variations in f(NHI) become larger (approximately 0.5 dex at f(NHI) = 1022 cm-2 and 1.0 dex at f(NHI) = 1022 cm-2) and molecular hydrogen formation also becomes important. Many of these changes can be explained in the context of self-regulated star formation in which the amount of star-forming gas in a galaxy will adjust such that outflows driven by feedback balance inflows due to accretion. Tools to reproduce all figures in this work can be found at the following url: https://bitbucket.org/galtay/hi-cddf-owls-1

  6. Quantitative determination based on the differences between spectra-temperature relationships.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Zhou, Mei; Luo, Yongshun; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2016-08-01

    In the Near-infrared (NIR) spectral measurement it is not always possible to keep the experimental conditions constant. The fluctuations in external variables, such as temperature, will result in a nonlinear shift and a broadening of the spectral bands. In this study, the temperature-induced spectral variation coefficient (TSVC) was obtained by using loading space standardization (LSS). The relationship between TSVC and normalized squared temperature was quantitatively analyzed and applied to the quantitative determination of the compositions in mixtures. NIR spectra of peanut-soy-corn oil mixtures measured at seven temperatures were analyzed. It was found that, the relationship between TSVC and normalized squared temperature can be established by using LSS. Furthermore, the quantitative determination of the compositions in a mixture can be achieved by using the difference between the relationships, i.e., the slope of the relationship. The calibration curves between slope and composition volume are found to be reliable with the correlation coefficients (R(2)) as high as 0.9992. Quantitative determination by the calibration curves were also validated. Therefore, the method can be an effective tool for investigating the effect of temperature and quantitatively analysis. PMID:27216655

  7. Evaluation of X-ray spectra transmitted by different concrete compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, P. R.; Vieira, D. V.; Naccache, V. K.; Ferreira, K. R.; Priszkulnik, S.

    2015-11-01

    Additional shielding material must frequently be incorporated to medical facilities in order to comply with radiation protection requirements when using radiation sources. Typical materials for shielding walls, floor and ceiling are the lead, concrete and barite. In the present work, a group of four concrete compositions was evaluated by using broad beam transmission curves and transmitted spectra in the range of X-ray energies used for diagnostic imaging. The studied concretes were classified as ordinary concrete (Type C), concrete with addition of hematite (Types H1 and H2) and concrete with addition of steel grit (Type S). Concrete with steel grit shows be more efficient as shielding material of the three heavy types concrete studied. The two mixes of concrete and hematite are practically equivalent from the radioprotection point of view. However, the granulation difference between them might be important to other fields, as shielding is not the only function of concrete in the building structure. Although they are not as efficient as concrete with steel grit, they may be a shielding option in a facility with low shielding requirement.

  8. Differential analysis of band-edge photoluminescence spectra of germanium single crystals with different orientations under biaxial tensile strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'yanov, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The previously published photoluminescence spectra of bulk germanium single crystals with orientations (100), (110), and (111) under different biaxial tensile strains have been investigated using the differential method proposed by the author for the analysis of luminescence spectra of semiconductors. An increase in the strain for all these orientations of the single crystals leads to a shift in the maxima of the differential spectra in the region of direct radiative transitions toward lower photon energies due to the narrowing of the germanium direct band gap. At the same time, the positions of the maxima of the differential spectra in the region of indirect radiative transitions remain almost unchanged. This indicates that the germanium indirect band gap does not depend on the tensile strains, at least for their values of ˜0.2-0.3%.

  9. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-08-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  10. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-01-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  11. Discriminating Different Classes of Biological Networks by Analyzing the Graphs Spectra Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Daniel Yasumasa; Sato, João Ricardo; Ferreira, Carlos Eduardo; Fujita, André

    2012-01-01

    The brain's structural and functional systems, protein-protein interaction, and gene networks are examples of biological systems that share some features of complex networks, such as highly connected nodes, modularity, and small-world topology. Recent studies indicate that some pathologies present topological network alterations relative to norms seen in the general population. Therefore, methods to discriminate the processes that generate the different classes of networks (e.g., normal and disease) might be crucial for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of the disease. It is known that several topological properties of a network (graph) can be described by the distribution of the spectrum of its adjacency matrix. Moreover, large networks generated by the same random process have the same spectrum distribution, allowing us to use it as a “fingerprint”. Based on this relationship, we introduce and propose the entropy of a graph spectrum to measure the “uncertainty” of a random graph and the Kullback-Leibler and Jensen-Shannon divergences between graph spectra to compare networks. We also introduce general methods for model selection and network model parameter estimation, as well as a statistical procedure to test the nullity of divergence between two classes of complex networks. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed methods by applying them to (1) protein-protein interaction networks of different species and (2) on networks derived from children diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and typically developing children. We conclude that scale-free networks best describe all the protein-protein interactions. Also, we show that our proposed measures succeeded in the identification of topological changes in the network while other commonly used measures (number of edges, clustering coefficient, average path length) failed. PMID:23284629

  12. A comparative study of different aspects of manipulating ratio spectra applied for ternary mixtures: derivative spectrophotometry versus wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Salem, Hesham; Lotfy, Hayam M; Hassan, Nagiba Y; El-Zeiny, Mohamed B; Saleh, Sarah S

    2015-01-25

    This work represents a comparative study of different aspects of manipulating ratio spectra, which are: double divisor ratio spectra derivative (DR-DD), area under curve of derivative ratio (DR-AUC) and its novel approach, namely area under the curve correction method (AUCCM) applied for overlapped spectra; successive derivative of ratio spectra (SDR) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) methods. The proposed methods represent different aspects of manipulating ratio spectra of the ternary mixture of Ofloxacin (OFX), Prednisolone acetate (PA) and Tetryzoline HCl (TZH) combined in eye drops in the presence of benzalkonium chloride as a preservative. The proposed methods were checked using laboratory-prepared mixtures and were successfully applied for the analysis of pharmaceutical formulation containing the cited drugs. The proposed methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines. A comparative study was conducted between those methods regarding simplicity, limitation and sensitivity. The obtained results were statistically compared with those obtained from the reported HPLC method, showing no significant difference with respect to accuracy and precision. PMID:25171050

  13. A comparative study of different aspects of manipulating ratio spectra applied for ternary mixtures: Derivative spectrophotometry versus wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Hesham; Lotfy, Hayam M.; Hassan, Nagiba Y.; El-Zeiny, Mohamed B.; Saleh, Sarah S.

    2015-01-01

    This work represents a comparative study of different aspects of manipulating ratio spectra, which are: double divisor ratio spectra derivative (DR-DD), area under curve of derivative ratio (DR-AUC) and its novel approach, namely area under the curve correction method (AUCCM) applied for overlapped spectra; successive derivative of ratio spectra (SDR) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) methods. The proposed methods represent different aspects of manipulating ratio spectra of the ternary mixture of Ofloxacin (OFX), Prednisolone acetate (PA) and Tetryzoline HCl (TZH) combined in eye drops in the presence of benzalkonium chloride as a preservative. The proposed methods were checked using laboratory-prepared mixtures and were successfully applied for the analysis of pharmaceutical formulation containing the cited drugs. The proposed methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines. A comparative study was conducted between those methods regarding simplicity, limitation and sensitivity. The obtained results were statistically compared with those obtained from the reported HPLC method, showing no significant difference with respect to accuracy and precision.

  14. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  15. Three different spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra for determination of binary mixture of Amlodipine and Atorvastatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Hany W.; Hassan, Said A.; Salem, Maissa Y.; El-Zeiny, Badr A.

    2011-12-01

    Three simple, specific, accurate and precise spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra are developed for the simultaneous determination of Amlodipine besylate (AM) and Atorvastatin calcium (AT) in tablet dosage forms. The first method is first derivative of the ratio spectra ( 1DD), the second is ratio subtraction and the third is the method of mean centering of ratio spectra. The calibration curve is linear over the concentration range of 3-40 and 8-32 μg/ml for AM and AT, respectively. These methods are tested by analyzing synthetic mixtures of the above drugs and they are applied to commercial pharmaceutical preparation of the subjected drugs. Standard deviation is <1.5 in the assay of raw materials and tablets. Methods are validated as per ICH guidelines and accuracy, precision, repeatability and robustness are found to be within the acceptable limit.

  16. Accurate modeling of fluorescence line narrowing difference spectra: Direct measurement of the single-site fluorescence spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reppert, Mike; Naibo, Virginia; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2010-07-01

    Accurate lineshape functions for modeling fluorescence line narrowing (FLN) difference spectra (ΔFLN spectra) in the low-fluence limit are derived and examined in terms of the physical interpretation of various contributions, including photoproduct absorption and emission. While in agreement with the earlier results of Jaaniso [Proc. Est. Acad. Sci., Phys., Math. 34, 277 (1985)] and Fünfschilling et al. [J. Lumin. 36, 85 (1986)], the derived formulas differ substantially from functions used recently [e.g., M. Rätsep et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 479, 140 (2009)] to model ΔFLN spectra. In contrast to traditional FLN spectra, it is demonstrated that for most physically reasonable parameters, the ΔFLN spectrum reduces simply to the single-site fluorescence lineshape function. These results imply that direct measurement of a bulk-averaged single-site fluorescence lineshape function can be accomplished with no complicated extraction process or knowledge of any additional parameters such as site distribution function shape and width. We argue that previous analysis of ΔFLN spectra obtained for many photosynthetic complexes led to strong artificial lowering of apparent electron-phonon coupling strength, especially on the high-energy side of the pigment site distribution function.

  17. Adjusting spectral indices for spectral response function differences of very high spatial resolution sensors simulated from field spectra.

    PubMed

    Cundill, Sharon L; van der Werff, Harald M A; van der Meijde, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The use of data from multiple sensors is often required to ensure data coverage and continuity, but differences in the spectral characteristics of sensors result in spectral index values being different. This study investigates spectral response function effects on 48 spectral indices for cultivated grasslands using simulated data of 10 very high spatial resolution sensors, convolved from field reflectance spectra of a grass covered dike (with varying vegetation condition). Index values for 48 indices were calculated for original narrow-band spectra and convolved data sets, and then compared. The indices Difference Vegetation Index (DVI), Global Environmental Monitoring Index (GEMI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Modified Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI2) and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), which include the difference between the near-infrared and red bands, have values most similar to those of the original spectra across all 10 sensors (1:1 line mean 1:1R2 > 0.960 and linear trend mean ccR2 > 0.997). Additionally, relationships between the indices' values and two quality indicators for grass covered dikes were compared to those of the original spectra. For the soil moisture indicator, indices that ratio bands performed better across sensors than those that difference bands, while for the dike cover quality indicator, both the choice of bands and their formulation are important. PMID:25781511

  18. Adjusting Spectral Indices for Spectral Response Function Differences of Very High Spatial Resolution Sensors Simulated from Field Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cundill, Sharon L.; van der Werff, Harald M. A.; van der Meijde, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The use of data from multiple sensors is often required to ensure data coverage and continuity, but differences in the spectral characteristics of sensors result in spectral index values being different. This study investigates spectral response function effects on 48 spectral indices for cultivated grasslands using simulated data of 10 very high spatial resolution sensors, convolved from field reflectance spectra of a grass covered dike (with varying vegetation condition). Index values for 48 indices were calculated for original narrow-band spectra and convolved data sets, and then compared. The indices Difference Vegetation Index (DVI), Global Environmental Monitoring Index (GEMI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Modified Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI2) and Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), which include the difference between the near-infrared and red bands, have values most similar to those of the original spectra across all 10 sensors (1:1 line mean 1:1R2 > 0.960 and linear trend mean ccR2 > 0.997). Additionally, relationships between the indices’ values and two quality indicators for grass covered dikes were compared to those of the original spectra. For the soil moisture indicator, indices that ratio bands performed better across sensors than those that difference bands, while for the dike cover quality indicator, both the choice of bands and their formulation are important. PMID:25781511

  19. Comparison of Accuracy in Calculation of Absorbed Dose to Patients Following Bone Scan with (99m)Tc-Marked Diphosphonates by Two Different Background Correction Methods.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Damoori, Mehri; Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Moslehi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    To improve the accuracy of the activity quantification and the image quality in scintigraphy, scatter correction is a vital procedure. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy in calculation of absorbed dose to patients following bone scan with (99m)Tc-marked diphosphonates ((99m)Tc-MDP) by two different methods of background correction in conjugate view method. This study involved 22 patients referring to the Nuclear Medicine Center of Shahid Chamran Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. After the injection of (99m)Tc-MDP, whole-body images from patients were acquired at 10, 60, 90, and 180 min. Organ activities were calculated using the conjugate view method by Buijs and conventional background correction. Finally, the absorbed dose was calculated using the Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) technique. The results of this study showed that the absorbed dose per unit of injected activity (rad/mCi) ± standard deviation for pelvis bone, bladder, and kidneys by Buijs method was 0.19 ± 0.05, 0.08 ± 0.01, and 0.03 ± 0.01 and by conventional method was 0.13 ± 0.04, 0.08 ± 0.01, and 0.024 ± 0.01, respectively. This showed that Buijs background correction method had a high accuracy compared to conventional method for the estimated absorbed dose of bone and kidneys whereas, for the bladder, its accuracy was low. PMID:27014610

  20. Comparison of Accuracy in Calculation of Absorbed Dose to Patients Following Bone Scan with 99mTc-Marked Diphosphonates by Two Different Background Correction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Damoori, Mehri; Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Moslehi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    To improve the accuracy of the activity quantification and the image quality in scintigraphy, scatter correction is a vital procedure. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy in calculation of absorbed dose to patients following bone scan with 99mTc-marked diphosphonates (99mTc-MDP) by two different methods of background correction in conjugate view method. This study involved 22 patients referring to the Nuclear Medicine Center of Shahid Chamran Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. After the injection of 99mTc-MDP, whole-body images from patients were acquired at 10, 60, 90, and 180 min. Organ activities were calculated using the conjugate view method by Buijs and conventional background correction. Finally, the absorbed dose was calculated using the Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) technique. The results of this study showed that the absorbed dose per unit of injected activity (rad/mCi) ± standard deviation for pelvis bone, bladder, and kidneys by Buijs method was 0.19 ± 0.05, 0.08 ± 0.01, and 0.03 ± 0.01 and by conventional method was 0.13 ± 0.04, 0.08 ± 0.01, and 0.024 ± 0.01, respectively. This showed that Buijs background correction method had a high accuracy compared to conventional method for the estimated absorbed dose of bone and kidneys whereas, for the bladder, its accuracy was low. PMID:27014610

  1. Chemical changes in soil charcoal of differing ages inferred from DRIFT spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobley, E. U.; Willgoose, G. R.; Frisia, S.; Jacobsen, G.

    2012-04-01

    Visible charcoal fragments were manually isolated from a sandy soil from the Southern Highlands of NSW, Australia, at depths of 0 - 30 cm and 30 - 60 cm. In the topsoil, the charcoal had a radiocarbon age of 85 ± 35 years BP, whereas the charcoal from the 30 - 60 cm layer was radiocarbon dated at 2540 ± 35 years BP. Diffuse reflectance FTIR (DRIFT) spectra of the charcoal reveal differences in both the number of peaks detected and their magnitudes. In the IR region 750 - 3800 cm-1, the charcoal from the lower depth had less peaks (140) than that of the topsoil (217). In the 1400 - 1600 cm-1 region, generally attributed to aromatics, the peaks were larger and more numerous (22 peaks) in the 0 - 30 cm sample than those of the 30 - 60 cm depth (14 peaks). The C-H stretch of alkenes and aromatics (3000 - 3100 cm-1) was similar at both depths, but the peak generally associated with the C-H stretch of alkanes (methyl and methylene groups) at 2850 - 3000 cm-1 was smaller in 30 - 60 cm depth than in the topsoil. In contrast to the reduction in aromatic and alkane signatures, oxidised forms were more pronounced in the older, deeper charcoal. Peaks associated with the free hydroxyl O-H stretch (alcohols and phenols) at 3640 - 3610 cm-1, carboxylic acids (910 - 950 cm-1), aliphatic O-H (alcohols) (1050 - 1150 cm-1) and cellulose-like structures (1020 cm-1), which contain a large number of uncondensed, oxidised rings, were larger in the charcoal from 30 - 60 cm than in that from the topsoil. Our results confirm that charcoal is highly persistent in soils, being retained for millennia. Aromatic structures are present in both younger and older charcoal, but decay leads to a reduction in the number and area of peaks detected at 1400 - 1600 cm-1, indicating less aromaticity. Alkane C-H also decreases with aging, probably attributable to its preferential degradation by soil microbes compared with condensed aromatic structures. Concurrent with diminished aromatic and alkane

  2. Spectra of photons and neutrons generated in a heterogeneous head of a 15 MV LINAC at differents field sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Benites-Rengifo, J. L.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Velazquez-Fernandez, J. B.

    2012-10-23

    Spectra of photons and neutrons were calculated, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5 using the e/p/n mode. A heterogeneous model was used to define the linac head where the collimators were modeled to produce five different treatment fields at the isocenter. Photon and neutron spectra were estimated in several points along two directions from the isocenter. The total photon fluence beyond 60 cm behaves according to 1/r{sup 2} rule, while total neutron fluence, beyond 80 cm, can be described by diffusion theory using an infinite plane as a neutron source.

  3. Optical spectra and Judd-Ofelt analysis of Pr3+ and Er3+ in different phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, M.; Venkata Rao, K.; Hemantha Kumar, G. N.; Ratnakaram, Y. C.

    2009-07-01

    Optical absorption and emission spectra of Pr3+ and Er3+ ions in different (Li, Na, K, Ca, LiNa, LiK and NaK) phosphate glasses are presented. Judd-Ofelt analysis has been carried out for the absorption spectra and studied variation of Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters (Ωλ, λ=2, 4, 6) with the variation of glass matrix. From the variation of peak wavelengths of the hypersensitive transition and Ω2 parameter structural details are obtained for both Pr3+ and Er3+ ions in these glass matrices. Radiative transition rates (AT), radiative lifetimes (τxR), branching ratios (βR) and integrated absorption cross-sections (Σ) for certain excited states of Pr3+ and Er3+ ions are obtained. The stimulated emission cross-sections (σP) have been determined from the line shape of the emission spectra of Pr3+ and Er3+ in these phosphate glass matrices.

  4. [Infrared Spectra Characteristics of the Silicate Nickel Ores: A Comparison Study on Different Ore Samples from Indonesia and China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng-li; Fu, Wei; Wang, Bao-hua; Zhang, Ya-qian; Huang, Xiao-rong; Niu, Hu-jie

    2015-03-01

    The silicate nickel ores developed in the lateritic nickel deposit, from Kolonodale, Sulawesi Island, Indonesia, and Yuanjiang, Yunnan province, China, were selected for the present study. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier infrared spectra were used to analyze the mineralogical attribute of laterite nickel ores from two different places. The results show that these two different silicate nickel ores have unique infrared spectra characteristics individually, which contributes to the ore classification. The silicate nickel ores from Kolonodale deposit, Indonesia, can be classified as the serpentine type, the montmorillonite + serpentine type, and the garnierite type. While, the silicate nickel ores from Yuanjiang deposit, China, can be classified as the serpentine type and the talc + serpentine type. Moreover, the mineral crystallinity of Yuanjiang nickel ores is generally better than Kolonodale nickel ores. According to the advantage of infrared absorption spectra in distinguishing mineral polytypes, it can be determined that lizardite is the main mineral type in the silicate nickel ores of the two deposits, and there is no obvious evidence of chrysotile and antigorite's existence. The characteristic of infrared absorption spectra also shows that frequency change of OH libration indicates Ni (Fe) replacing Mg in the serpentine type nickel-bearing mineral, that is, OH libration of serpentine moves to higher frequency, with the proportion of Ni (Fe) replacing Mg increasing. PMID:26117869

  5. Investigation of the chemical origin and evidential value of differences in the SERS spectra of blue gel inks.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yen Cheng; Lee, Wendy W Y; Bell, Steven E J

    2016-08-15

    Highly swellable polymer films doped with Ag nanoparticle aggregates (poly-SERS films) have been used to record very high signal : noise ratio, reproducible surface-enhanced (resonance) Raman (SER(R)S) spectra of in situ dried ink lines and their constituent dyes using both 633 and 785 nm excitation. These allowed the chemical origins of differences in the SERRS spectra of different inks to be determined. Initial investigation of pure samples of the 10 most common blue dyes showed that the dyes which had very similar chemical structures such as Patent Blue V and Patent Blue VF (which differ only by a single OH group) gave SERRS spectra in which the only indications that the dye structure had been changed were small differences in peak positions or relative intensities of the bands. SERRS studies of 13 gel pen inks were consistent with this observation. In some cases inks from different types of pens could be distinguished even though they were dominated by a single dye such as Victoria Blue B (Zebra Surari) or Victoria Blue BO (Pilot Acroball) because their predominant dye did not appear in other inks. Conversely, identical spectra were also recorded from different types of pens (Pilot G7, Zebra Z-grip) because they all had the same dominant Brilliant Blue G dye. Finally, some of the inks contained mixtures of dyes which could be separated by TLC and removed from the plate before being analysed with the same poly-SERS films. For example, the Pentel EnerGel ink pen was found to give TLC spots corresponding to Erioglaucine and Brilliant Blue G. Overall, this study has shown that the spectral differences between different inks which are based on chemically similar, but nonetheless distinct dyes, are extremely small, so very close matches between SERRS spectra are required for confident identification. Poly-SERS substrates can routinely provide the very stringent reproducibility and sensitivity levels required. This, coupled with the awareness of the reasons

  6. Interference effects in the sum frequency generation spectra of thin organic films. II: Applications to different thin-film systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yujin; Zhao, Yanbao; Li, Na; Ma, Yunsheng; Osawa, Masatoshi; Davies, Paul B.; Ye, Shen

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, the results of the modeling calculations carried out for predicting the interference effects expected in the sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra of a specific thin-layer system, described in the accompanying paper, are tested by comparing them with the experimental spectra obtained for a real thin-layer film comprising an organic monolayer/variable thickness dielectric layer/gold substrate. In this system, two contributions to the SFG spectra arise, a resonant contribution from the organic film and a nonresonant contribution from the gold substrate. The modeling calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental spectra over a wide range of thicknesses and for different polarization combinations. The introduction of another resonant monolayer adjacent to the gold substrate and with the molecules having a reverse orientation has a significant affect on the spectral shapes which is predicted. If a dielectric substrate such as CaF2 is used instead of a gold substrate, only the spectral intensities vary with the film thickness but not the spectral shapes. The counterpropagating beam geometry will change both the thickness dependent spectral shapes and the intensity of different vibrational modes in comparison with a copropagating geometry. The influences of these experimental factors, i.e., the molecular orientational structure in the thin film, the nature of the substrate, and the selected incident beam geometry, on the experimental SFG spectra are quantitatively predicted by the calculations. The thickness effects on the signals from a SFG active monolayer contained in a thin liquid-layer cell of the type frequently used for in situ electrochemical measurements is also discussed. The modeling calculation is also valid for application to other thin-film systems comprising more than two resonant SFG active interfaces by appropriate choice of optical geometries and relevant optical properties.

  7. Differences among Monte Carlo codes in the calculations of voxel S values for radionuclide targeted therapy and analysis of their impact on absorbed dose evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Pacilio, M.; Lanconelli, N.; Lo Meo, S.; Betti, M.; Montani, L.; Torres Aroche, L. A.; Coca Perez, M. A.

    2009-05-15

    Several updated Monte Carlo (MC) codes are available to perform calculations of voxel S values for radionuclide targeted therapy. The aim of this work is to analyze the differences in the calculations obtained by different MC codes and their impact on absorbed dose evaluations performed by voxel dosimetry. Voxel S values for monoenergetic sources (electrons and photons) and different radionuclides ({sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, and {sup 188}Re) were calculated. Simulations were performed in soft tissue. Three general-purpose MC codes were employed for simulating radiation transport: MCNP4C, EGSnrc, and GEANT4. The data published by the MIRD Committee in Pamphlet No. 17, obtained with the EGS4 MC code, were also included in the comparisons. The impact of the differences (in terms of voxel S values) among the MC codes was also studied by convolution calculations of the absorbed dose in a volume of interest. For uniform activity distribution of a given radionuclide, dose calculations were performed on spherical and elliptical volumes, varying the mass from 1 to 500 g. For simulations with monochromatic sources, differences for self-irradiation voxel S values were mostly confined within 10% for both photons and electrons, but with electron energy less than 500 keV, the voxel S values referred to the first neighbor voxels showed large differences (up to 130%, with respect to EGSnrc) among the updated MC codes. For radionuclide simulations, noticeable differences arose in voxel S values, especially in the bremsstrahlung tails, or when a high contribution from electrons with energy of less than 500 keV is involved. In particular, for {sup 90}Y the updated codes showed a remarkable divergence in the bremsstrahlung region (up to about 90% in terms of voxel S values) with respect to the EGS4 code. Further, variations were observed up to about 30%, for small source-target voxel distances, when low-energy electrons cover an important part of the emission spectrum of the radionuclide

  8. 3D acoustic wave modelling with time-space domain dispersion-relation-based finite-difference schemes and hybrid absorbing boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Sen, Mrinal K.

    2011-09-01

    Most conventional finite-difference methods adopt second-order temporal and (2M)th-order spatial finite-difference stencils to solve the 3D acoustic wave equation. When spatial finite-difference stencils devised from the time-space domain dispersion relation are used to replace these conventional spatial finite-difference stencils devised from the space domain dispersion relation, the accuracy of modelling can be increased from second-order along any directions to (2M)th-order along 48 directions. In addition, the conventional high-order spatial finite-difference modelling accuracy can be improved by using a truncated finite-difference scheme. In this paper, we combine the time-space domain dispersion-relation-based finite difference scheme and the truncated finite-difference scheme to obtain optimised spatial finite-difference coefficients and thus to significantly improve the modelling accuracy without increasing computational cost, compared with the conventional space domain dispersion-relation-based finite difference scheme. We developed absorbing boundary conditions for the 3D acoustic wave equation, based on predicting wavefield values in a transition area by weighing wavefield values from wave equations and one-way wave equations. Dispersion analyses demonstrate that high-order spatial finite-difference stencils have greater accuracy than low-order spatial finite-difference stencils for high frequency components of wavefields, and spatial finite-difference stencils devised in the time-space domain have greater precision than those devised in the space domain under the same discretisation. The modelling accuracy can be improved further by using the truncated spatial finite-difference stencils. Stability analyses show that spatial finite-difference stencils devised in the time-space domain have better stability condition. Numerical modelling experiments for homogeneous, horizontally layered and Society of Exploration Geophysicists/European Association of

  9. Spectral Profiles of Complex Fractionated Atrial Electrograms Are Different in Longstanding and Acute Onset Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Electrogram Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Edward J.; Biviano, Angelo B.; Whang, William; Gambhir, Alok; Garan, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Background Spectral analysis of complex fractionated atrial electrograms (CFAE)may be useful for gaining insight into mechanisms underlying paroxysmal and longstanding atrial fibrillation (AF). The commonly used dominant frequency (DF) measurement has limitations. Method CFAE recordings were acquired from outside the 4 pulmonary vein ostia and at 2 left atrial free wall sites in 10 paroxysmal and 10 persistent AF patients. Two consecutive 8s-series were analyzed from recordings >16s in duration. Power spectra were computed for each 8s-series in the range 3–12 Hz and normalized. The mean and standard deviation of normalized power spectra (MPS and SPS, respectively) were compared for paroxysmal versus persistent CFAE. Also, the DF and its peak amplitude (ADF) were compared for pulmonary vein sites only. Power spectra were computed using ensemble average and Fourier methods. Results No significant changes occurred in any parameter from the first to second recording sequence. For both sequences, MPS and SPS were significantly greater, and DF and ADF were significantly less, in paroxysmals versus persistents. The MPS and ADF measurements from ensemble spectra produced the most significant differences in paroxysmals versus persistents (P < 0.0001). DF differences were less significant, which can be attributed to the relatively high variability of DF in paroxysmals. The MPS was correlated to the duration of uninterrupted persistent AF prior to electrophysiologic study (P = 0.01), and to left atrial volume for all AF (P < 0.05). Conclusions The MPS and ADF measurements introduced in this study are probably superior to DF for discerning power spectral differences in paroxysmal versus longstanding CFAE. PMID:22578068

  10. Emissivity Spectra of Meteoritic Powders mixed with Liquid Formamide (NH2COH) at Different Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffaele, S.; Maturilli, A.; D'Amore, M.; Ferrari, S.; Helbert, J.

    2013-12-01

    noticed in the emissivity spectra strong signatures attributable to liquid formamide. We interpret them as being originated from a column of hot vaporized formamide, lying above the sample surface. For all the samples this effect vanished already at 100°C, probably due to complete evaporation of liquid formamide that was deposited on the meteorite sample surfaces. However, all the spectra measured at 100° and 140° C show signs of the presence of formamide, that we infer from comparing them with the 70° C dry measurement of the same sample. For 2 samples out of 3, when heating at 200°C (and only there) a new feature appears at 7.08 μm. This band is very close to a similar band that liquid formamide has at 7.19 μm, and that was even present in all the spectra of wet meteorites taken at 70°C. We interpret this band shift as a possible sign of interaction of formamide with the catalyst (the meteorite powder): the CH bend responsible for that is probably strengthening.

  11. Decreased UV absorbance as an indicator of micropollutant removal efficiency in wastewater treated with ozone.

    PubMed

    Wittmer, A; Heisele, A; McArdell, C S; Böhler, M; Longree, P; Siegrist, H

    2015-01-01

    Ozone transforms various organic compounds that absorb light within the UV and visible spectra. UV absorbance can therefore be used to detect the transformation of chemicals during ozonation. In wastewater, decolourisation can be observed after ozonation. This study investigates the correlation of the UV absorbance difference between the ozonation inlet and outlet and the removal efficiency of micropollutants in wastewater. The absorbance at 254 and 366 nm was measured at the ozonation inlet and outlet, as was the concentration of 24 representative micropollutants and the dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The results clearly showed that the relative decrease of absorbance (ΔAbs) is positively correlated with the relative removal efficiency of micropollutants. We therefore suggest that UV absorbance can be used as a feedback control parameter to achieve optimal ozone dosage in wastewater treatment plants and to gain a fast insight into the process efficiency and stability of the ozonation. PMID:25860699

  12. Composite spectra: XX. 45 Cancri. Two stars with very similar masses but quite different evolutionary states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, R. E. M.; Griffin, R. F.

    2015-02-01

    From accurate radial-velocity measurements covering 11 circuits of the orbit of the composite-spectrum binary 45 Cnc, together with high-resolution spectroscopy spanning nearly 3 circuits, we have (i) isolated cleanly the spectrum of the early-type secondary, (ii) classified the component spectra as G8 III and A3 III, (iii) derived the first double-lined orbit for the system and a mass ratio (M_1/M_2) of 1.035 ± 0.01, and (iv) extracted physical parameters for the component stars, deriving the masses and (log) luminosities of the G star and A star as 3.11 and 3.00 M⊙} R⊙, and 2.34 and 2.28 L⊙, respectively, with corresponding uncertainties of ±0.10 M⊙ R⊙ and ±0.09 L⊙. Since the mass ratio is close to unity, we argue that the more evolved component is unlikely to have been a red giant long enough to have made multiple ascents of the RGB, an argument that is supported somewhat by the rather high eccentricity of the orbit (e = 0.46) and the evolutionary time-scales of the two components, but chiefly by the presence of significant Li I in the spectrum of the cool giant.

  13. Comparison of Cathodoluminescent and Photoluminescent Emission Spectra of LuPO4 with Different Dopants

    SciTech Connect

    Goedeke, Shawn; Hollerman, William Andrew; Allison, Stephen W; Gray, P A; Lewis, Linda A; Smithwick III, Robert W; Boatner, Lynn A; Glasgow, David C; Wise, H.

    2008-01-01

    The current interest in returning human exploration to the Moon and Mars makes cost-effective and low-mass health monitoring sensors essential for spacecraft development. In space, there are many surface measurements that are required to monitor the condition of the spacecraft including: surface temperature, radiation dose, and impact. Through the use of tailored phosphors, these conditions can be monitored. Practical space-based phosphor sensors will depend heavily upon research investigating the resistance of phosphors to ionizing radiation and their ability to anneal or 'self-heal' from damage caused by ionizing radiation. For the present research, a group of lutetium orthophosphate (LuPO{sub 4}) crystals with dopants including europium, erbium, and neodymium were characterized. Cathodoluminescence (CL) testing was performed using the low energy electron system located at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The data were collected using an Ocean Optics HR4000 spectrometer and a fiber optic feed-through. Previous research has shown that increases in both beam energy and current density improved the CL fluorescence yield. While the total electron dose was small, the intention was to maximize the number of irradiated materials. Additionally, these samples were evaluated using a PTI Quantum Master Spectrophotometer to determine the photoluminescence emission spectra.

  14. Resolved difference spectra of redox centers involved in photosynthetic electron flow in Rhodopseudomonas capsulata and Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, J R; Meinhardt, S W; Tierney, G V; Crofts, A R

    1981-03-12

    1. In Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides the Qx absorption band of the reaction center bacteriochlorophyll dimer which bleaches on photo-oxidation is both blue-shifted and has an increased extinction coefficient on solubilisation of the chromatophore membrane with lauryldimethylamine-N-oxide. These effects may be attributable in part to the particle flattening effect. 2. The difference spectrum of photo-oxidisable c type cytochrome in the chromatophore was found to have a slightly variable peak position in the alpha-band (lambda max at 551--551.25 nm); this position was always red-shifted in comparison to that of isolated cytochrome c2 (lambda max at 549.5 +/- 0.5 nm). The shift in wavelength maximum was not due to association with the reaction center protein. A possible heterogeneity in the c-type cytochromes of chromatophores is discussed. 3. Flash-induced difference spectra attributed to cytochrome b were resolved at several different redox potentials and in the presence and absence of antimycin. Under most conditions, one major component, cytochrome b50 appeared to be involved. However, in some circumstances, reduction of a component with the spectral characteristics of cytochrome b-90 was observed. 4. Difference spectra attributed to (BChl)2, (Formula: see text), c type cytochrome and cytochrome b50 were resolved in the Soret region for Rhodopseudomonas capsulata. 5. A computer-linked kinetic spectrophotometer for obtaining automatically the difference spectra of components functioning in photosynthetic electron transfer chains is described. The system incorporates a novel method for automatically adjusting and holding the photomultiplier supply voltage. PMID:6260162

  15. Analysis of fingerprints features of infrared spectra of various processed products of Rhizoma Coptidis and their different extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Beilei; Zhang, Guijun; Xu, Changhua; Sun, Suqin

    2015-09-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) associated with second derivative infrared spectroscopy (SD-IR) and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2D-IR) are employed to analyze various processed products and different extracts of Rhizoma Coptidis. There is a shift of the peak of 1641 cm-1 of raw Rhizoma Coptidis after processed, which drifts to lower wave number. Peaks at 1508, 1387, 1363, 1332, 1274 and 1234 cm-1 barely change in most samples, except an obvious enhancement of these peaks after processed, suggesting that processed Rhizoma Coptidis may have higher content of berberine than raw material, which is corresponding to the results of correlation coefficients analysis. There are some differences in the absorption peaks in the range of 1800-1000 cm-1 in the SD-IR spectra, which have better resolution, of different processed products. 2D-IR spectra, which elevate the resolution further, can present more differences among the products in the range of 1300-800 cm-1 and 1800-1300 cm-1. Analysis of aqueous, ethanol and petroleum ether extracts of various processed products proves that there are distinctive differences of all auto-peaks in shapes and intensities in all of them. With the advantages of high resolution, high speed and convenience, FT-IR combined with 2D-IR can quickly and precisely distinguish various processed products of Rhizoma Coptidis and can be applied to predict the tendency of transformation of the complicated chemical mixture systems under heat perturbation.

  16. Investigation of effect of different total area coverage values of inks on reflection spectra and color gamut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonov, I.; Shopova, M.; Boeva, R.

    2013-03-01

    The paper presents investigation of the effect of different values of total area coverage of inks (TAC) on reflection spectra and color gamut. Total area coverage is a key factor for achieving of maximal volume of color gamut. The reflection spectra of color surfaces in entire visible spectrum are used for determination the effect of different values of TAC. For study the effect of TAC values on color gamut, we have used special test form that contains many components and test charts with over 1500 color patches. According to measurement of reflectance spectrum of test charts, we have compared the color gamuts with different values of TAC to obtain comprehensive information of all colors, which could be reproduced in the specific conditions. In addition we have converted the reflection spectra data to CIE L*a*b* coordinates, and we have calculated the color difference ΔE* ab to determine the effect of TAC on color reproduction accuracy. The main goal of this study is development of methodology, which gives objective and analytical assessment, for determining the optimal value of total area coverage (TAC). A practical implementation of the correct and optimal value of total area coverage should improve the printability, better ink layers adhesion, biggest number of trapping values and reduce the quantity of process inks. The optimal value of the TAC determined by this new methodology helps to achieve a significant reduction of ink cost and a maximal color gamut volume, i.e. improve the quality of printed image and reduce financial costs.

  17. Storm Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    These images, taken with the LEISA infrared camera on the New Horizons Ralph instrument, show fine details in Jupiter's turbulent atmosphere using light that can only be seen using infrared sensors. These are 'false color' pictures made by assigning infrared wavelengths to the colors red, green and blue. LEISA (Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array) takes images across 250 IR wavelengths in the range from 1.25 to 2.5 microns, allowing scientists to obtain an infrared spectrum at every location on Jupiter. A micron is one millionth of a meter.

    These pictures were taken at 05:58 UT on February 27, 2007, from a distance of 2.9 million kilometers (1.6 million miles). They are centered at 8 degrees south, 32 degrees east in Jupiter 'System III' coordinates. The large oval-shaped feature is the well-known Great Red Spot. The resolution of each pixel in these images is about 175 kilometers (110 miles); Jupiter's diameter is approximately 145,000 kilometers (97,000 miles).

    The image on the left is an altitude map made by assigning the color red to 1.60 microns, green to 1.89 microns and blue to 2.04 microns. Because Jupiter's atmosphere absorbs light strongly at 2.04 microns, only clouds at very high altitude will reflect light at this wavelength. Light at 1.89 microns can go deeper in the atmosphere and light at 1.6 microns can go deeper still. In this map, bluish colors indicate high clouds and reddish colors indicate lower clouds. This picture shows, for example, that the Great Red Spot extends far up into the atmosphere.

    In the image at right, red equals 1.28 microns, green equals 1.30 microns and blue equals 1.36 microns, a range of wavelengths that similarly probes different altitudes in the atmosphere. This choice of wavelengths highlights Jupiter's high-altitude south polar hood of haze. The edge of Jupiter's disk at the bottom of the panel appears slightly non-circular because the left-hand portion is the true edge of the disk, while the right

  18. Neutron irradiation of superconductors and damage energy scaling of different neutron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, P. A.; Weber, H. W.; Guinan, M. W.; Birtcher, R. C.; Brown, B. S.; Greenwood, L. R.

    1985-08-01

    Three different neutron sources were used to irradiate identical sets of NbTi superconductors up to about half the lifetime dose of a superconducting magnet in a fusion reactor. Based on a careful source characterization of the TRIGA Mark-II reactor in Vienna, the spallation neutron source IPNS at Argonne and the 14 MeV neutron source RTNS-II at Livermore, the damage energy cross sections were calculated for four different types of NbTi alloys (42, 46.5, 49 and 54 wt % Ti). The experimental results on the variations of critical current densities j sub c with neutron dose are found to scale within the experimental uncertainties with the appropriate damage energy cross sections. This first explicit proof of damage energy scaling for j sub c-variations in superconductors is considered to be most valuable for the evaluation of radiation damage in superconductors under fusion reactor conditions.

  19. Measurement of magnetic field aligned potential differences using high resolution conjugate photoelectron energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Doering, J. P.; Potemra, T. A.; Bostrom, C. O.; Brace, L. H.; Heelis, R. A.; Hanson, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Simultaneous high-resolution observations of a distinctive feature in the energy spectrum of conjugate photoelectrons and spacecraft potential relative to the local ionosphere have allowed the net potential difference between magnetic conjugate points at latitudes below the region of low-energy (i.e., lower than 100 eV) auroral electron precipitation to be determined. Measurements made at 300 km from Atmosphere Explorer C show that there is normally no net potential difference between hemispheres in this region, which extended up to invariant latitudes as high as 74 deg. Two types of apparently related anomalous behavior were infrequently observed at high latitudes. During these periods the incident flux of conjugate photoelectrons was either decelerated by about 3 eV or was not detected.

  20. Validation of three different scientific ozone products retrieved from IASI spectra using ozonesondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, G.; Eremenko, M.; Griesfeller, A.; Barret, B.; Leflochmoën, E.; Clerbaux, C.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; Coheur, P.-F.; Hurtmans, D.

    2011-08-01

    Three scientific ozone products from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) aboard MetOp-A, retrieved in three different research teams (LA, LATMOS/ULB, LISA) with different retrieval schemes, are characterized and validated using ozonesondes measurements. The three products are mature enough to be used for detailed analyses of atmospheric chemistry and transport in the troposphere. The characteristics of the products are analyzed in terms of retrieval sensitivity, systematic and random errors, and ability to retrieve the natural variability of ozone and focus on different partial columns from the lower troposphere up to 30 km. The validation covers the midlatitudes and the tropics and the period from January to December 2008. The products present degrees of freedom (DOF) in the troposphere between 1 and 1.2 on average in the midlatitudes and between 1 and 1.4 in the tropics. The DOF are distributed differently on the vertical depending on the profiles and the season: summer leading to a better sensitivity to the lower troposphere, as expected. The error estimates range between 10 and 20 % from the lower tropospheric partial columns (0-6 km and 0-8 km for the midlatitudes and the tropics respectively) to the UTLS partial columns (8-16 km and 11-20 km for the midlatitudes and the tropics respectively) for all the products and are about 5 % in the stratosphere (16-30 km) and for the column up to 30 km. The main feature that arises from the comparison with the ozonesondes is a systematic overestimation of ozone in the UTLS (between 10 and 25 %) by the three products in the midlatitudes and the tropics, attributed to the moderate vertical resolution of IASI and possibly to spectroscopic inconsistencies. The ability of the products to reproduce natural variability of tropospheric ozone is fairly good and depends on the considered season and region.

  1. Specific absorption spectra of hemoglobin at different PO2 levels: potential noninvasive method to detect PO2 in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peipei; Zhu, Zhirong; Zeng, Changchun; Nie, Guang

    2012-12-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb), as one of main components of blood, has a unique quaternary structure. Its release of oxygen is controlled by oxygen partial pressure (PO2). We investigate the specific spectroscopic changes in Hb under different PO2 levels to optimize clinical methods of measuring tissue PO2. The transmissivity of Hb under different PO2 levels is measured with a UV/Vis fiber optic spectrometer. Its plotted absorption spectral curve shows two high absorption peaks at 540 and 576 nm and an absorption valley at 560 nm when PO2 is higher than 100 mm Hg. The two high absorption peaks decrease gradually with a decrease in PO2, whereas the absorption valley at 560 nm increases. When PO2 decreases to approximately 0 mm Hg, the two high absorption peaks disappear completely, while the absorption valley has a hypochromic shift (8 to 10 nm) and forms a specific high absorption peak at approximately 550 nm. The same phenomena can be observed in visible reflectance spectra of finger-tip microcirculation. Specific changes in extinction coefficient and absorption spectra of Hb occur along with variations in PO2, which could be used to explain pathological changes caused by tissue hypoxia and for early detection of oxygen deficiency diseases in clinical monitoring.

  2. Theoretical polarization-dependent X-ray spectra of Be-like Fe calculated for different electron beam densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlyaptseva, Alla; Mancini, Roberto

    1998-05-01

    We study theoretically the polarization properties of X-ray spectra of Be-like Fe ions excited through resonant capture by an electron beam with different electron densities. Our previous work in this area was related to the study of polarization of dielectronic satellite lines of Fe ions excited by a low-density electron beam. (A.S. Shlyaptseva, R.C. Mancini, P. Neill, P. Beiersdorfer, J.R. Crespo López-Urrutia, and K. Widmann, Phys. Rev. A, 57), 888 (1998) Here we extend our work to the case of higher-density electron beams. As the density of the electron beam increases, new channels of electron capture appear. Thus the atomic and polarization characteristics of the satellite lines change. Moreover, additional X-ray satellite lines will appear. Using the density matrix formalism, we calculate the polarization characteristics and polarization-dependent spectra of dielectronic satellite lines of Be-like Fe produced at different energies and densities of the electron beam. We compare the results of the present work with our previous ones for low-density electron beams. These results are relevant to the identification of X-ray polarization-dependent spectral features and for X-ray line polarization spectroscopy.

  3. [The Study on the Far-FTIR and THz Spectra of Azitromycin Drugs with Different Physical Forms].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-ping; Fan, Li-jie; Cui, Bin; Chen, Gen-xiang; Zhang, Zhen-wei; Zhang, Cun-lin

    2015-11-01

    Far Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (Far-FTIR) and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) were used to measure the fingerprint spectra of Azitromycin suspension, capsule, tablet and dispersible tablet under vacuum and nitrogen conditions, respectively. In the frequency range of 0.2-15 THz, highly resolved spectral features for Azitromycin suspension were measured and some minor differences were observed between domestic and exotic Azitromycin Suspension, such as linewidth broadening and additional peaks. As same time, for the domestic Azitromycin capsule, tablet and dispersible tablet, the absorption baselines in the range of 0.2-2.7 THz rise with the increase of frequency while absorption peaks become weaker due to the scattering of bigger particles and smaller amount of Azitromycin. Also, the additional peaks are caused by the absorption of filling materials. In parallel with the qualitative measurement, the THz absorption spectra for mixtures of polyethylene (PE) powders and exotic Azithomycin suspension with different concentrations were also measured. According to the linear correlation between the concentration and the absorption intensity, the concentration of effective component can be evaluated accurately. This means that THz-TDS method is suitable for the quality inspection and evaluation of the mixed Azithromycin system. PMID:26978907

  4. Mapping of the second-order nonlinear susceptibility of inhomogeneous absorbing media by Maker fringes analysis of optical difference mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubkov, Andrey A.; Makarov, Vladimir A.

    2012-04-01

    This paper proves the possibility of and offers a technique for a unique reconstitution of the spatial profiles of various components of the complex second-order susceptibility tensor χ(z,ω-ω;ω,-ω) responsible for difference frequency generation in one-dimensionally inhomogeneous plates. To be able to achieve such reconstitution it is necessary to measure the complex amplitude of the reflected difference frequency wave in a certain range of incidence angles of the plane biharmonic wave with frequencies ω1 and ω2 in its spectrum. By altering the incidence plane of the initial biharmonic wave and/or the polarization of its monochromatic components it is possible to uniquely determine the coordinate dependences of more than a half of all second-order susceptibility tensor components. Such reconstitution is successful when the symmetric nature of the medium ensures the diagonal character of the linear dielectric permittivity tensor of the plate. Besides, the dielectric properties of the plate can change arbitrarily along the z axis. The suggested approach includes measuring the intensity of difference frequency waves generated under specific conditions with the use of an auxiliary reference plate to be able to avoid complex phase measurements.

  5. Virulence spectra of typed strains of Campylobacter jejuni from different sources: a blinded in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Tull, D E S; Coote, J G; Thompson, D H; Candlish, Denise; Wardlaw, A C; Candlish, A

    2009-05-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of human diarrhoeal disease, but specific virulence mechanisms have not been well defined. The aims of the present blinded study were to measure and compare the in vivo properties of 40 serotyped, biotyped and genotyped C. jejuni isolates from different sources and genetic makeup. An 11-day-old chick embryo lethality assay, which measured embryo deaths and total viable bacteria over 72 h following inoculation of bacteria into the chorioallantoic membrane, revealed a spectrum of activity within the C. jejuni strains. Human and chicken isolates showed similar high virulence values for embryo deaths while the virulence of the bovine isolates was less pronounced. A one-way ANOVA comparison between the capacity of the strains to kill the chick embryos after 24 h with cytotoxicity towards cultured CaCo-2 cells was significant (P=0.025). After inoculation with a Campylobacter strain, mouse ligated ileal loops were examined histologically and revealed degrees of villous atrophy, abnormal mucosa, dilation of the lumen, congestion and blood in lumen, depending on the isolate examined. A 'total pathology score', derived for each C. jejuni strain after grading the pathology features for degree of severity, showed no apparent relationship with the source of isolation. Some relationship was found between amplified fragment length polymorphism groups and total ileal loop pathology scores, and a one-way ANOVA comparison of the mouse pathology scores against total chick embryo deaths after 72 h was significant (P=0.049). PMID:19369514

  6. Allelic Spectra of Risk SNPs Are Different for Environment/Lifestyle Dependent versus Independent Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have generated sufficient data to assess the role of selection in shaping allelic diversity of disease-associated SNPs. Negative selection against disease risk variants is expected to reduce their frequencies making them overrepresented in the group of minor (<50%) alleles. Indeed, we found that the overall proportion of risk alleles was higher among alleles with frequency <50% (minor alleles) compared to that in the group of major alleles. We hypothesized that negative selection may have different effects on environment (or lifestyle)-dependent versus environment (or lifestyle)-independent diseases. We used an environment/lifestyle index (ELI) to assess influence of environmental/lifestyle factors on disease etiology. ELI was defined as the number of publications mentioning “environment” or “lifestyle” AND disease per 1,000 disease-mentioning publications. We found that the frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with strong environmental/lifestyle components follow the distribution expected under a selectively neutral model, while frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with weak environmental/lifestyle influences is shifted to the lower values indicating effects of negative selection. We hypothesized that previously selectively neutral variants become risk alleles when environment changes. The hypothesis of ancestrally neutral, currently disadvantageous risk-associated alleles predicts that the distribution of risk alleles for the environment/lifestyle dependent diseases will follow a neutral model since natural selection has not had enough time to influence allele frequencies. The results of our analysis suggest that prediction of SNP functionality based on the level of evolutionary conservation may not be useful for SNPs associated with environment/lifestyle dependent diseases. PMID:26201053

  7. Estimation of absorbed cadmium in tissues of male and female albino rats through different routes of administration.

    PubMed

    Nwokocha, C R; Nwokocha, M I; Owu, D U; Edidjana, E; Nwogbo, N; Ekpo, U; Ufearo, C S

    2011-06-01

    The resultant effects of cadmium exposure are seen in almost all the systems of the body, however, this study is designed to quantify its accumulation in tissues of animals exposed to cadmium. The rats were divided into two distinct groups of males and females, which were then divided into three groups, each for the monitoring of exposure. Group 1 served as control male and female and received normal rat chow and tap water. Group 2 males and females were treated with 5 mg/kg body weight of cadmium chloride (Cd) intraperitoneally for eight days while Group 3 males and females rats received 100 ppm of Cd in drinking water for 18 days. The concentrations of cadmium were analyzed in tissues (lung, stomach, kidney, heart, spleen, blood) by AAS. There were significant (P<0.05) increase in Cd (ppm) accumulation in males compared with females lungs (2.253 ± 1.47 vs 0.317 ± 0.001), stomach (0.187 ± 0.094 vs 0.045 ± 0.032) and blood (0.070 ± 0.001 vs 0.001±0.001) when Cd was administered intraperitoneally. Following oral administration, there were significant (P<0.05) difference in Cd (ppm) content between males and females (kidney (0.506 ± 0.074 vs 0.748 ± 0.147), stomach (0.045 ± 0.020 vs 0.001± 0.001) and blood (1.126 ± 0.001 vs 0.114 ± 0.001). Our results suggest that Cd accumulation in the various organs was sex and route of exposure-dependent in rats. PMID:22314995

  8. Different signal processing techniques of ratio spectra for spectrophotometric resolution of binary mixture of bisoprolol and hydrochlorothiazide; a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Elzanfaly, Eman S; Hassan, Said A; Salem, Maissa Y; El-Zeany, Badr A

    2015-04-01

    Five signal processing techniques were applied to ratio spectra for quantitative determination of bisoprolol (BIS) and hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) in their binary mixture. The proposed techniques are Numerical Differentiation of Ratio Spectra (ND-RS), Savitsky-Golay of Ratio Spectra (SG-RS), Continuous Wavelet Transform of Ratio Spectra (CWT-RS), Mean Centering of Ratio Spectra (MC-RS) and Discrete Fourier Transform of Ratio Spectra (DFT-RS). The linearity of the proposed methods was investigated in the range of 2-40 and 1-22 μg/mL for BIS and HCT, respectively. The proposed methods were applied successfully for the determination of the drugs in laboratory prepared mixtures and in commercial pharmaceutical preparations and standard deviation was less than 1.5. The five signal processing techniques were compared to each other and validated according to the ICH guidelines and accuracy, precision, repeatability and robustness were found to be within the acceptable limit. PMID:25615684

  9. Different signal processing techniques of ratio spectra for spectrophotometric resolution of binary mixture of bisoprolol and hydrochlorothiazide; a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elzanfaly, Eman S.; Hassan, Said A.; Salem, Maissa Y.; El-Zeany, Badr A.

    2015-04-01

    Five signal processing techniques were applied to ratio spectra for quantitative determination of bisoprolol (BIS) and hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) in their binary mixture. The proposed techniques are Numerical Differentiation of Ratio Spectra (ND-RS), Savitsky-Golay of Ratio Spectra (SG-RS), Continuous Wavelet Transform of Ratio Spectra (CWT-RS), Mean Centering of Ratio Spectra (MC-RS) and Discrete Fourier Transform of Ratio Spectra (DFT-RS). The linearity of the proposed methods was investigated in the range of 2-40 and 1-22 μg/mL for BIS and HCT, respectively. The proposed methods were applied successfully for the determination of the drugs in laboratory prepared mixtures and in commercial pharmaceutical preparations and standard deviation was less than 1.5. The five signal processing techniques were compared to each other and validated according to the ICH guidelines and accuracy, precision, repeatability and robustness were found to be within the acceptable limit.

  10. Visible light broadband perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, X. L.; Meng, Q. X.; Yuan, C. X.; Zhou, Z. X.; Wang, X. O.

    2016-03-01

    The visible light broadband perfect absorbers based on the silver (Ag) nano elliptical disks and holes array are studied using finite difference time domain simulations. The semiconducting indium silicon dioxide thin film is introduced as the space layer in this sandwiched structure. Utilizing the asymmetrical geometry of the structures, polarization sensitivity for transverse electric wave (TE)/transverse magnetic wave (TM) and left circular polarization wave (LCP)/right circular polarization wave (RCP) of the broadband absorption are gained. The absorbers with Ag nano disks and holes array show several peaks absorbance of 100% by numerical simulation. These simple and flexible perfect absorbers are particularly desirable for various potential applications including the solar energy absorber.

  11. Spectra and vegetation index variations in moss soil crust in different seasons, and in wet and dry conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Shibo; Yu, Weiguo; Qi, Yue

    2015-06-01

    Similar to vascular plants, non-vascular plant mosses have different periods of seasonal growth. There has been little research on the spectral variations of moss soil crust (MSC) over different growth periods. Few studies have paid attention to the difference in spectral characteristics between wet MSC that is photosynthesizing and dry MSC in suspended metabolism. The dissimilarity of MSC spectra in wet and dry conditions during different seasons needs further investigation. In this study, the spectral reflectance of wet MSC, dry MSC and the dominant vascular plant (Artemisia) were characterized in situ during the summer (July) and autumn (September). The variations in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), biological soil crust index (BSCI) and CI (crust index) in different seasons and under different soil moisture conditions were also analyzed. It was found that (1) the spectral characteristics of both wet and dry MSCs varied seasonally; (2) the spectral features of wet MSC appear similar to those of the vascular plant, Artemisia, whether in summer or autumn; (3) both in summer and in autumn, much higher NDVI values were acquired for wet than for dry MSC (0.6 ∼ 0.7 vs. 0.3 ∼ 0.4 units), which may lead to misinterpretation of vegetation dynamics in the presence of MSC and with the variations in rainfall occurring in arid and semi-arid zones; and (4) the BSCI and CI values of wet MSC were close to that of Artemisia in both summer and autumn, indicating that BSCI and CI could barely differentiate between the wet MSC and Artemisia.

  12. Evidence from CD spectra that d(purine).r(pyrimidine) and r(purine).d(pyrimidine) hybrids are in different structural classes.

    PubMed Central

    Hung, S H; Yu, Q; Gray, D M; Ratliff, R L

    1994-01-01

    CD spectra and difference CD spectra of four d(oligopurine).r(oligopyrimidine) and four r(oligopurine).d(oligopyrimidine) hybrid duplexes containing mixed A.T(U) and G.C base pairs were compared with the spectra of four DNA.DNA and four RNA.RNA oligomer duplexes of similar repeating sequences. The 16 duplexes were formed by mixing oligomers that were 24 nucleotides long. The buffer was 0.05 M Na+ (phosphate), pH 7.0. DNA.DNA and RNA.RNA oligomer duplexes were used as reference B-form and A-form structures. We found that the CD spectra of d(purine).r(pyrimidine) and r(purine).d(pyrimidine) hybrid duplexes were different from the CD spectra of either DNA.DNA or RNA.RNA duplexes. The data suggested that these hybrids have intermediate structures between A-form RNA and B-form DNA structures. The CD spectra of d(purine).r(pyrimidine) and r(purine).d(pyrimidine) hybrid duplexes were different from each other, but the hybrids in each class had consistent CD spectra as indicated by nearest-neighbor comparisons. Thus, it appeared that the two types of hybrids belonged to different structural classes. The negative 210 nm band found in difference CD spectra was correlated with the presence of an r(purine) strand in the hybrid duplexes. The melting temperatures (Tm values) of these hybrids were compared with the Tm values of the DNA.DNA and RNA.RNA duplexes. The order of the thermal stability was: RNA.RNA duplex > r(purine).d(pyrimidine) hybrid > DNA.DNA duplex > d(purine).r(pyrimidine) hybrid, when comparing analogous sequences. PMID:7937162

  13. Use of UV absorbance To monitor furans in dilute acid hydrolysates of biomass.

    PubMed

    Martinez, A; Rodriguez, M E; York, S W; Preston, J F; Ingram, L O

    2000-01-01

    A simple method based on UV spectra was developed for the estimation of total furans (furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural) in hemicellulose hydrolysates. UV spectra of hemicellulose hydrolysate contained a single dominant peak at around 278 nm. Approximately two-thirds of this peak can be attributed to furan absorbance (furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural). At 284 nm, both furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural have equal absorbance on a weight basis. A comparison of HPLC determinations for different samples of hydrolysate was used to develop a simple equation that allows the accurate prediction of total furans based on the difference in absorbance at 284 and 320 nm. This method may prove useful for quality control applications during the production of biomass syrups using a dilute acid hydrolysis process and during treatments for the amelioration of toxins. Although furans represent only a portion of the toxins present in hemicellulose hydrolysates, the abundance of furans appears to serve as a useful marker to predict relative toxicity. PMID:10933839

  14. A new method to discriminate secondary organic aerosols from different sources using high-resolution aerosol mass spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heringa, M. F.; Decarlo, P. F.; Chirico, R.; Tritscher, T.; Clairotte, M.; Mohr, C.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Pfaffenberger, L.; Dommen, J.; Weingartner, E.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2012-02-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) represents a significant and often major fraction of the non-refractory PM1 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter da < 1 μm) mass. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is an important contributor to the OA and can be formed from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors. Here we present results from the characterization of SOA produced from the emissions of three different anthropogenic sources. SOA from a log wood burner, a Euro 2 diesel car and a two-stroke Euro 2 scooter were characterized with an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS) and compared to SOA from α-pinene. The emissions were sampled from the chimney/tailpipe by a heated inlet system and filtered before injection into a smog chamber. The gas phase emissions were irradiated by xenon arc lamps to initiate photo-chemistry which led to nucleation and subsequent particle growth by SOA production. Duplicate experiments were performed for each SOA type, with the averaged organic mass spectra showing Pearson's r values >0.94 for the correlations between the four different SOA types after five hours of aging. High-resolution mass spectra (HR-MS) showed that the dominant peaks in the MS, m/z 43 and 44, are dominated by the oxygenated ions C2H3O+ and CO2+, respectively, similarly to the relatively fresh semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) observed in the ambient aerosol. The atomic O:C ratios were found to be in the range of 0.25-0.55 with no major increase during the first five hours of aging. On average, the diesel SOA showed the lowest O:C ratio followed by SOA from wood burning, α-pinene and the scooter emissions. Grouping the fragment ions revealed that the SOA source with the highest O:C ratio had the largest fraction of small ions. The HR data of the four sources could be clustered and separated using principal component analysis (PCA). The model showed a significant separation of the four SOA types and clustering of the duplicate

  15. A new method to discriminate secondary organic aerosols from different sources using high-resolution aerosol mass spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heringa, M. F.; Decarlo, P. F.; Chirico, R.; Tritscher, T.; Clairotte, M.; Mohr, C.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Pfaffenberger, L.; Dommen, J.; Weingartner, E.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2011-10-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) represents a significant and often major fraction of the non-refractory PM1 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter da < 1 μm) mass. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is an important contributor to the OA and can be formed from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors. Here we present results from the characterization of SOA produced from the emissions of three different anthropogenic sources. SOA from a log wood burner, a Euro 2 diesel car and a two-stroke Euro 2 scooter were characterized with an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS) and compared to SOA from α-pinene. The emissions were sampled from the chimney/tailpipe by a heated inlet system and filtered before injection into a smog chamber. The gas phase emissions were irradiated by xenon arc lamps to initiate photo-chemistry which led to nucleation and subsequent particle growth by SOA production. Duplicate experiments were performed for each SOA type, with the averaged organic mass spectra in the m/z range 12-250 showing Pearson's r values >0.94 for the correlations between the different SOA types after 5 h of aging. High-resolution mass spectra (HR-MS) showed that the dominant peaks in the MS, m/z 43 and 44, are dominated by the oxygenated ions C2H3O+ and CO2+, respectively, similarly to the relatively fresh semi-volatile oxidized OA (SV-OOA) observed in the ambient aerosol. The atomic O : C ratios were found to be in the range of 0.25-0.55 with no major increase during the first 5 h of aging. On average, the diesel SOA showed the lowest O : C ratio followed by SOA from wood burning, α-pinene and the scooter emissions. Grouping the fragment ions based on their carbon number revealed that the SOA source with the highest O : C ratio had the largest fraction of small ions. Fragment ions containing up to 3 carbon atoms accounted for 66%, 68%, 72% and 76% of the organic spectrum of the SOA produced by the diesel car, wood burner, α-pinene and

  16. Weighted least-squares deconvolution method for discovery of group differences between complex biofluid 1H NMR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gipson, Geoffrey T.; Tatsuoka, Kay S.; Sweatman, Brian C.; Connor, Susan C.

    2006-12-01

    Biomarker discovery through analysis of high-throughput NMR data is a challenging, time-consuming process due to the requirement of sophisticated, dataset specific preprocessing techniques and the inherent complexity of the data. Here, we demonstrate the use of weighted, constrained least-squares for fitting a linear mixture of reference standard data to complex urine NMR spectra as an automated way of utilizing current assignment knowledge and the ability to deconvolve confounded spectral regions. Following the least-squares fit, univariate statistics were used to identify metabolites associated with group differences. This method was evaluated through applications on simulated datasets and a murine diabetes dataset. Furthermore, we examined the differential ability of various weighting metrics to correctly identify discriminative markers. Our findings suggest that the weighted least-squares approach is effective for identifying biochemical discriminators of varying physiological states. Additionally, the superiority of specific weighting metrics is demonstrated in particular datasets. An additional strength of this methodology is the ability for individual investigators to couple this analysis with laboratory specific preprocessing techniques.

  17. Meteoric smoke particle properties derived using dual-beam Arecibo UHF observations of D-region spectra during different seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fentzke, J. T.; Janches, D.; Strelnikova, I.; Rapp, M.

    2009-12-01

    We present a seasonal study of the presence and characteristics of meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) in the D-region plasma derived from observations using the Gregorian and line feeds of the 430 MHz dual-beam Arecibo Observatory (AO) incoherent scatter radar (ISR) in Puerto Rico (18oN,67oW). MSPs are the product of re-condensation of ablated meteoric material and are believed to be the condensation nuclei for the formation of ice particles in the polar mesopause region. These CNs can then be responsible for the formation of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs), noctilucent clouds (NLCs) and polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSEs). For this work, we simultaneously employed both AO antenna feeds to define two radar beams inclined 15o east and west of zenith (Janches et al., 2006). Because of the non-vertical pointing, the sampled spectra are Doppler shifted due to the rapidly changing neutral dynamics of the MLT region. We correct this effect by removing the Doppler shift using the radial velocities estimated every ~2 min and then integrate the corrected spectra for longer periods to enhance signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and better investigate the variability of MSP properties. We determine MSP radii and number densities utilizing a method similar to the one developed by Strelnikova et al. (2007) in which the autocorrelation function (ACF) is approximated as the sum of two exponential decays, i.e., the power spectrum is approximated as the sum of two Lorentzians. This method, which assumes mono-disperse particles, allows us to determine mean particle properties in the 80-95 km altitude range during the hours of 10-14 AO LT when the detected SNR from the D-region is highest. Results from this work show MSP radii approximately 0.6-1.5 nm is size depending on altitude and season. Also, MSP densities as a function of altitude and season are determined with the aid of the IRI model resulting in values on the order of 102-104 per cubic centimeter. Our error analysis shows that

  18. Cuprizone-induced demyelination and demyelination-associated inflammation result in different proton magnetic resonance metabolite spectra

    PubMed Central

    Praet, Jelle; Orije, Jasmien; Kara, Firat; Guglielmetti, Caroline; Santermans, Eva; Daans, Jasmijn; Hens, Niel; Verhoye, Marleen; Berneman, Zwi; Ponsaerts, Peter; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2015-01-01

    Conventional MRI is frequently used during the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis but provides only little additional pathological information. Proton MRS (1H-MRS), however, provides biochemical information on the lesion pathology by visualization of a spectrum of metabolites. In this study we aimed to better understand the changes in metabolite concentrations following demyelination of the white matter. Therefore, we used the cuprizone model, a well-established mouse model to mimic type III human multiple sclerosis demyelinating lesions. First, we identified CX3CL1/CX3CR1 signaling as a major regulator of microglial activity in the cuprizone mouse model. Compared with control groups (heterozygous CX3CR1+/− C57BL/6 mice and wild type CX3CR1+/+ C57BL/6 mice), microgliosis, astrogliosis, oligodendrocyte cell death and demyelination were shown to be highly reduced or absent in CX3CR1−/− C57BL/6 mice. Second, we show that 1H-MRS metabolite spectra are different when comparing cuprizone-treated CX3CR1−/− mice showing mild demyelination with cuprizone-treated CX3CR1+/+ mice showing severe demyelination and demyelination-associated inflammation. Following cuprizone treatment, CX3CR1+/+ mice show a decrease in the Glu, tCho and tNAA concentrations as well as an increased Tau concentration. In contrast, following cuprizone treatment CX3CR1−/− mice only showed a decrease in tCho and tNAA concentrations. Therefore, 1H-MRS might possibly allow us to discriminate demyelination from demyelination-associated inflammation via changes in Tau and Glu concentration. In addition, the observed decrease in tCho concentration in cuprizone-induced demyelinating lesions should be further explored as a possible diagnostic tool for the early identification of human MS type III lesions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25802215

  19. The AWWE-based hybrid absorbing boundary condition for finite-difference modeling and its application in reverse-time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi; Liu, Yang; Cai, Xiaohui; Ren, Zhiming

    2015-12-01

    The reverse-time migration (RTM) crosscorrelation imaging condition requires that the forward-propagated source wavefield and the backward-propagated receiver wavefield must be obtained at the same time. The easiest way to get the source wavefield is to save the entire time history of the full wavefield into computer memory. However, this strategy requires huge amount of data storage. It is impossible for large-scale 3D RTM. To reduce the computer memory cost, the back-propagated source wavefield is reconstructed by using the stored boundary wavefield. Its computer memory is proportional to the saved boundary grid points. For high order of spatial finite-difference (FD) schemes, more boundary grid points are needed to be stored, which consumes a large amount of the computer memory required for RTM. To further reduce the computer memory cost, we adopt the hybrid absorbing boundary condition (ABC) combined with the arbitrarily wide-angle wave equations (AWWEs). In our method, three boundary grid points can obtain good absorption. The source wavefield can be accurately reconstructed by using these points and the mirror-image symmetry method. Numerical experiments demonstrate the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed method. We compared our method with the conventional hybrid ABC method based on the 15°one way wave equations (OWWEs). Comparisons show that our method with three boundary grid points can achieve the same absorption as the conventional method with ten boundary grid points. For twentieth order of accuracy in space, our method uses only about 30% of memory requirement and about 59% of computation time required by the conventional method.

  20. A comparative study of different concentrations of pure Zn powder effects on synthesis, structure, magnetic and microwave-absorbing properties in mechanically-alloyed Ni-Zn ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajalilou, Abdollah; Mazlan, Saiful Amri; Shameli, Kamyar

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a powder mixture of Zn, Fe2O3 and NiO was used to produce different compositions of Ni1-xZnxFe2O4 (x=0.36, 0.5 and 0.64) nanopowders. High-energy ball milling with a subsequent heat treatment method was carried out. The XRD results indicated that for the content of Zn, x=0.64 a single phase of Ni-Zn ferrite was produced after 30 h milling while for the contents of Zn, x=0.36 and 0.5, the desired ferrite was formed after sintering the 30 h-milled powders at 500 °C. The average crystallite size decreased with increase in the Zn content. A DC electrical resistivity of the Ni-Zn ferrite, however, decreased with increase in the Zn content, its value was much higher than those samples prepared by the conventional ceramic route by using ZnO instead of Zn. This is attributed to smaller grains size which were obtained by using Zn. The FT-IR results suggested two absorption bands for octahedral and tetrahedral sites in the range of 350-700 cm-1. The VSM results revealed that by increasing the Zn content from 0.36 to 0.5, a saturation magnetization reached its maximum value; afterwards, a decrease was observed for Zn with x=0.64. Finally, magnetic permeability and dielectric permittivity were studied by using vector network analyzer to explore microwave-absorbing properties in X-band frequency. The minimum reflection loss value obtained for Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 samples, about -34 dB at 9.7 GHz, making them the best candidates for high frequency applications.

  1. Effects of temporal laser profile on the emission spectra for underwater laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: Study by short-interval double pulses with different pulse durations

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Ayaka Matsumoto, Ayumu; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo; Nakajima, Takashi; Ogata, Yukio H.; Fukami, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-14

    We investigate the effects of temporal laser profile on the emission spectra of laser ablation plasma in water. We use short-interval (76 ns) double pulses with different pulse durations of the composing two pulses for the irradiation of underwater target. Narrow atomic spectral lines in emission spectra are obtained by the irradiation, where the two pulses are wide enough to be merged into a single-pulse-like temporal profile, while deformed spectra are obtained when the two pulses are fully separated. The behavior of the atomic spectral lines for the different pulse durations is consistent with that of the temporal profiles of the optical emission intensities of the plasma. All these results suggest that continuous excitation of the plasma during the laser irradiation for ∼100 ns is a key to obtain narrow emission spectral lines.

  2. 1/f 2 Characteristics and isotropy in the fourier power spectra of visual art, cartoons, comics, mangas, and different categories of photographs.

    PubMed

    Koch, Michael; Denzler, Joachim; Redies, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Art images and natural scenes have in common that their radially averaged (1D) Fourier spectral power falls according to a power-law with increasing spatial frequency (1/f(2) characteristics), which implies that the power spectra have scale-invariant properties. In the present study, we show that other categories of man-made images, cartoons and graphic novels (comics and mangas), have similar properties. Further on, we extend our investigations to 2D power spectra. In order to determine whether the Fourier power spectra of man-made images differed from those of other categories of images (photographs of natural scenes, objects, faces and plants and scientific illustrations), we analyzed their 2D power spectra by principal component analysis. Results indicated that the first fifteen principal components allowed a partial separation of the different image categories. The differences between the image categories were studied in more detail by analyzing whether the mean power and the slope of the power gradients from low to high spatial frequencies varied across orientations in the power spectra. Mean power was generally higher in cardinal orientations both in real-world photographs and artworks, with no systematic difference between the two types of images. However, the slope of the power gradients showed a lower degree of mean variability across spectral orientations (i.e., more isotropy) in art images, cartoons and graphic novels than in photographs of comparable subject matters. Taken together, these results indicate that art images, cartoons and graphic novels possess relatively uniform 1/f(2) characteristics across all orientations. In conclusion, the man-made stimuli studied, which were presumably produced to evoke pleasant and/or enjoyable visual perception in human observers, form a subset of all images and share statistical properties in their Fourier power spectra. Whether these properties are necessary or sufficient to induce aesthetic perception remains

  3. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  4. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Enz, Glenn L.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  5. Quantitation of the area of overlap between second-derivative amide I infrared spectra to determine the structural similarity of a protein in different states.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, B S; Dong, A; Allison, S D; Manning, M C; Carpenter, J F

    1996-02-01

    Maintaining a native-like structure of protein pharmaceuticals during lyophilization is an important aspect of formulation. Infrared spectroscopy can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of formulations in protecting the secondary structural integrity of proteins in the dried solid. This necessitates making quantitative comparisons of the overall similarity of infrared spectra in the conformationally sensitive amide I region. We initially used the correlation coefficient r, as defined by Prestrelski et al. (Biophys. J. 1993, 65, 661-671), for this quantitation. Occasionally, we noticed that the r value did not agree with a visual assessment of the spectral similarity. In some cases this was due to an offset in baselines, which led artifactually to an unreasonably low r value. Conversely, if the spectra were baseline corrected and there existed a large similarity between peak positions, but differences in relative peak heights, the r value would be unreasonably high. Our approach to avoiding these problems is to use area-normalized second-derivative spectra. We have found that quantitating the area of overlap between area-normalized spectra provides a reliable, objective method to compare overall spectral similarity. In the current report, we demonstrate this method with selected protein spectra, which were taken from experiments where unfolding was induced by lyophilization or guanidine hydrochloride, and artificial data sets. With this analysis, we document how problems associated with calculation of the correlation coefficient, r, are avoided. PMID:8683440

  6. Modelling Absorbent Phenomena of Absorbent Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayeb, S.; Ladhari, N.; Ben Hassen, M.; Sakli, F.

    Absorption, retention and strike through time, as evaluating criteria of absorbent structures quality were studied. Determination of influent parameters on these criteria were realized by using the design method of experimental sets. In this study, the studied parameters are: Super absorbent polymer (SAP)/fluff ratio, compression and the porosity of the non woven used as a cover stock. Absorption capacity and retention are mostly influenced by SAP/fluff ratio. However, strike through time is affected by compression. Thus, a modelling of these characteristics in function of the important parameter was established.

  7. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Guillen, Donna P.; Longhurst, Glen R.; Porter, Douglas L.; Parry, James R.

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  8. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Ronald J.

    1987-09-22

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  9. Alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra under different shieldings in the Los Alamos high-energy neutron field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Huff, H.; Wilkins, R.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear interactions of space radiation with shielding materials result in alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra that depend on the specific elemental composition, density and thickness of the material. The shielding characteristics of materials have been studied using charged-particle beams and radiation transport models by examining the risk reduction using the conventional dose-equivalent approach. Secondary neutrons contribute a significant fraction of the total radiation exposure in space. An experiment to study the changes in dose and lineal energy spectra by shielding materials was carried out at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center neutron facility. In the energy range of about 2 to 200 MeV, this neutron spectrum is similar in shape within a factor of about 2 to the spectrum expected in the International Space Station habitable modules. It is shown that with a shielding thickness of about 5 g cm(-2), the conventional radiation risk increases, in some cases by as much as a factor of 2, but decreases with thicknesses of about of 20 g cm(-2). This suggests that care must be taken in evaluating the shielding effectiveness of a given material by including both the charged-particle and neutron components of space radiation.

  10. [Quantitative evaluation of the genetic divergence of amphibian taxa of different rank by the spectra of total proteins and nonspecific esterases].

    PubMed

    Chernyshov, K I; Truveller, K A

    2007-01-01

    Based on the PAAG disc-electrophoretic spectra of water-soluble total proteins (Pr) and non-specific esterases (Est) from several types of tissues in representatives of Urodela (Triturus vulgaris vulgaris, T. v. lantzi, T. cristatus, T. montandoni, T. dobrogicus) and Anura amphibians (Rana ridibunda, R. lessonae, R. temporaria, R. arvalis; Bufo bufo, B. viridis, Bombina bombina; Xenopus laevis, X. borealis; Hymenochirus boettgeri), mean genetic distances (D = -ln[2i/(2i + d)], where i is the number of fractions identical and d is the number of fractions different by Rf-bands, were estimated within and between taxa of intra-, inter-, and superspecific ranks. The most stable estimates were obtained for Pr and Est spectra of skeletal muscles and eyes. In most cases, the spectra of tissues of the digestive system gave higher D values than those of the other organs. The levels of intraspecific differentiation by D (both Pr and Est) were higher in the studied representatives of the order Urodela, probably due to their lower migration ability and more conservative choice of water-bodies for spawning than in the representatives of the other order; the same trend is true for the interspecific differentiation by Pr spectra. Est, on the contrary, gave lighter interspecific differentiation level in Anura than in Urodela, evidently due to the prevalence of sympatric species pairs able to hybridize among the studied representatives of the latter order. PMID:17484154

  11. Effects of UV-B radiation on growth, photosynthesis, UV-B-absorbing compounds and NADP-malic enzyme in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) grown under different nitrogen conditions.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M E; Casati, P; Hsu, T P; Ku, M S; Edwards, G E

    1999-02-01

    The effects of UV-B radiation on growth, photosynthesis, UV-B-absorbing compounds and NADP-malic enzyme have been examined in different cultivars of Phaseolous vulgaris L. grown under 1 and 12 mM nitrogen. Low nitrogen nutrition reduces chlorophyll and soluble protein contents in the leaves and thus the photosynthesis rate and dry-matter accumulation. Chlorophyll, soluble protein and Rubisco contents and photosynthesis rate are not significantly altered by ambient levels of UV-B radiation (17 microW m-2, 290-320 nm, 4 h/day for one week). Comparative studies show that under high nitrogen, UV-B radiation slightly enhances leaf expansion and dry-matter accumulation in cultivar Pinto, but inhibits these parameters in Vilmorin. These results suggest that the UV-B effect on growth is mediated through leaf expansion, which is particularly sensitive to UV-B, and that Pinto is more tolerant than Vilmorin. The effect of UV-B radiation on UV-B-absorbing compounds and on NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME) activity is also examined. Both UV-B radiation and low-nitrogen nutrition enhance the content of UV-B-absorbing compounds, and among the three cultivars used, Pinto exhibits the highest increases and Arroz the lowest. The same trend is observed for the specific activity and content of NADP-ME. On a leaf-area basis, the amount of UV-B-absorbing compounds is highly correlated with the enzyme activity (r2 = 0.83), suggesting that NADP-ME plays a key role in biosynthesis of these compounds. Furthermore, the higher sensitivity of Vilmorin than Pinto to UV-B radiation appears to be related to the activity of NADP-ME and the capacity of the plants to accumulate UV-B-absorbing compounds. PMID:10343405

  12. Comparison of the performance of different DFT methods in the calculations of the molecular structure and vibration spectra of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue; Gao, Hongwei

    2012-04-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter which plays an important role in treating acute or clinical stress. The comparative performance of different density functional theory (DFT) methods at various basis sets in predicting the molecular structure and vibration spectra of serotonin was reported. The calculation results of different methods including mPW1PW91, HCTH, SVWN, PBEPBE, B3PW91 and B3LYP with various basis sets including LANL2DZ, SDD, LANL2MB, 6-31G, 6-311++G and 6-311+G* were compared with the experimental data. It is remarkable that the SVWN/6-311++G and SVWN/6-311+G* levels afford the best quality to predict the structure of serotonin. The results also indicate that PBEPBE/LANL2DZ level show better performance in the vibration spectra prediction of serotonin than other DFT methods.

  13. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  14. Comparison of GEANT4 Simulations with Experimental Data for Thick Al Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevseyeva, Olga; de Assis, Joaquim; Evseev, Ivan; Schelin, Hugo; Paschuk, Sergei; Milhoretto, Edney; Setti, João; Díaz, Katherin; Hormaza, Joel; Lopes, Ricardo

    2009-06-01

    Proton beams in medical applications deal with relatively thick targets like the human head or trunk. Therefore, relatively small differences in the total proton stopping power given, for example, by the different models provided by GEANT4 can lead to significant disagreements in the final proton energy spectra when integrated along lengthy proton trajectories. This work presents proton energy spectra obtained by GEANT4.8.2 simulations using ICRU49, Ziegler1985 and Ziegler2000 models for 19.68 MeV protons passing through a number of Al absorbers with various thicknesses. The spectra were compared with the experimental data, with TRIM/SRIM2008 and MCNPX2.4.0 simulations, and with the Payne analytical solution for the transport equation in the Fokker-Plank approximation. It is shown that the MCNPX simulations reasonably reproduce well all experimental spectra. For the relatively thin targets all the methods give practically identical results but this is not the same for the thick absorbers. It should be noted that all the spectra were measured at the proton energies significantly above 2 MeV, i.e., in the so-called "Bethe-Bloch region". Therefore the observed disagreements in GEANT4 results, simulated with different models, are somewhat unexpected. Further studies are necessary for better understanding and definitive conclusions.

  15. Multispectral metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Grant, J; McCrindle, I J H; Li, C; Cumming, D R S

    2014-03-01

    We present the simulation, implementation, and measurement of a multispectral metamaterial absorber (MSMMA) and show that we can realize a simple absorber structure that operates in the mid-IR and terahertz (THz) bands. By embedding an IR metamaterial absorber layer into a standard THz metamaterial absorber stack, a narrowband resonance is induced at a wavelength of 4.3 μm. This resonance is in addition to the THz metamaterial absorption resonance at 109 μm (2.75 THz). We demonstrate the inherent scalability and versatility of our MSMMA by describing a second device whereby the MM-induced IR absorption peak frequency is tuned by varying the IR absorber geometry. Such a MSMMA could be coupled with a suitable sensor and formed into a focal plane array, enabling multispectral imaging. PMID:24690713

  16. The Evolving Structure of AG Pegasi, Emerging from the Interpretation of the Emission Spectra at Different Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, Marcella

    1997-07-01

    A model of AG Peg is presented, focusing on the physical conditions in the emission nebulae. The model accounts in a consistent way for photoionization by the star and ionization by shocks. The SUMA code is used in the calculations of the spectra. We show that two regions contribute to the UV and optical line spectra. The broad lines are emitted from photoionized gas surrounding the hot star, while narrow lines are emitted by shocked gas--which is also reached by the ionizing flux from the hot star--near the red giant. At an early phase (φ = 2.33) the emitting region is between the stars but already very close to the red giant. The nebula surrounding the hot star is not exactly symmetric. At a later phase (φ = 7.05) the shock created by ``head-on-back'' collision of the winds propagates outward and slightly accelerates throughout the giant atmosphere characterized by a decreasing slope of the density. The strong shock caused by head-on collision of the winds from the two stars cannot be recognized in the UV-optical line spectrum. The spectral energy distribution of the continuum is well fitted by blackbody emissions from the stars. The fit of the optical-UV observed continuum at the early phase presents some problems connected with the reddening correction of the data. On the other hand, the fit of the data at a later phase is consistent with the parameters deduced by the modeling of the system. The far-IR data are well fitted by reradiation by dust, which could not be recognized without modeling, and indicate a dust-to-gas ratio similar to the Galactic one.

  17. Internal absorber solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Sletten, Carlyle J.; Herskovitz, Sheldon B.; Holt, F. S.; Sletten, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Thin solar collecting panels are described made from arrays of small rod collectors consisting of a refracting dielectric rod lens with an absorber imbedded within it and a reflecting mirror coated on the back side of the dielectric rod. Non-tracking collector panels on vertical walls or roof tops receive approximately 90% of solar radiation within an acceptance zone 60.degree. in elevation angle by 120.degree. or more in the azimuth sectors with a collector concentration ratio of approximately 3.0. Miniaturized construction of the circular dielectric rods with internal absorbers reduces the weight per area of glass, plastic and metal used in the collector panels. No external parts or insulation are needed as heat losses are low due to partial vacuum or low conductivity gas surrounding heated portions of the collector. The miniature internal absorbers are generally made of solid copper with black selective surface and the collected solar heat is extracted at the collector ends by thermal conductivity along the absorber rods. Heat is removed from end fittings by use of liquid circulants. Several alternate constructions are provided for simplifying collector panel fabrication and for preventing the thermal expansion and contraction of the heated absorber or circulant tubes from damaging vacuum seals. In a modified version of the internal absorber collector, oil with temperature dependent viscosity is pumped through a segmented absorber which is now composed of closely spaced insulated metal tubes. In this way the circulant is automatically diverted through heated portions of the absorber giving higher collector concentration ratios than theoretically possible for an unsegmented absorber.

  18. Photon extremity absorbed dose and kerma conversion coefficients for calibration geometries.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G; Hertel, N E

    2007-02-01

    Absorbed dose and dose equivalent conversion coefficients are routinely used in personnel dosimetry programs. These conversion coefficients can be applied to particle fluences or to measured air kerma values to determine appropriate operational monitoring quantities such as the ambient dose equivalent or personal dose equivalent for a specific geometry. For personnel directly handling materials, the absorbed dose to the extremities is of concern. This work presents photon conversion coefficients for two extremity calibration geometries using finger and wrist/arm phantoms described in HPS N13.32. These conversion coefficients have been calculated as a function of photon energy in terms of the kerma and the absorbed dose using Monte Carlo techniques and the calibration geometries specified in HPS N13.32. Additionally, kerma and absorbed dose conversion coefficients for commonly used x-ray spectra and calibration source fields are presented. The kerma values calculated in this work for the x-ray spectra and calibration sources compare well to those listed in HPS N13.32. The absorbed dose values, however, differ significantly for higher energy photons because charged particle equilibrium conditions have not been satisfied for the shallow depth. Thus, the air-kerma-to-dose and exposure-to-dose conversion coefficients for Cs and Co listed in HPS N13.32 overestimate the absorbed dose to the extremities. Applying the conversion coefficients listed in HPS N13.32 for Cs, for example, would result in an overestimate of absorbed dose of 62% for the finger phantom and 55% for the wrist phantom. PMID:17220720

  19. Metal shearing energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, R. J.; Wittrock, E. P. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A metal shearing energy absorber is described. The absorber is composed of a flat thin strip of metal which is pulled through a slot in a cutter member of a metal, harder than the metal of the strip. The slot's length, in the direction perpendicular to the pull direction, is less than the strip's width so that as the strip is pulled through the slot, its edges are sheared off, thereby absorbing some of the pulling energy. In one embodiment the cutter member is a flat plate of steel, while in another embodiment the cutter member is U-shaped with the slot at its base.

  20. Lipid-absorbing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Wallace, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The removal of bile acids and cholesterol by polymeric absorption is discussed in terms of micelle-polymer interaction. The results obtained with a polymer composed of 75 parts PEO and 25 parts PB plus curing ingredients show an absorption of 305 to 309%, based on original polymer weight. Particle size effects on absorption rate are analyzed. It is concluded that crosslinked polyethylene oxide polymers will absorb water, crosslinked polybutadiene polymers will absorb lipids; neither polymer will absorb appreciable amounts of lipids from micellar solutions of lipids in water.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of {sup 40}K in-vivo body-count spectra for different body shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Schillaci, M.E.; Brown, T.H.

    1996-06-01

    Over the course of several years of measuring in-vivo spectra (whole-body counts) in search of transuranic radionuclides, it has been observed that, relative to the count rate in a region around 80 keV (defined as region 3), large persons have relatively higher count rates than thin persons at around 60 keV (region 2, where an {sup 241}Am line is expected), and relatively lower count rates at around 17 keV (region 1, where both {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am lines are expected). The observed data can be understood in terms of relative amounts of scattering and absorption of the 1.461-MeV photon from {sup 40}K, which occurs naturally in the human body. For larger persons, increased scattering causes the Compton peak to shift to lower energies, thereby increasing the count rate in region 2 relative to region 3. Also, because of increased absorption of very low energy photons, the count rate in region 1 decreases relative to region 3. To test this hypothesis, we compute the Spectrum of photons emerging from cylindrical human phantoms of various dimensions, assuming a variety of distributions of {sup 40}K within the phantom. The calculations are carried out using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP. The results of these calculations qualitatively agree with the observations and support our hypothesis.

  2. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  3. "Smart" Electromechanical Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, Lebarian; Glenn, Dean C.; Carroll, Monty B.

    1989-01-01

    Shock-absorbing apparatus includes electromechanical actuator and digital feedback control circuitry rather than springs and hydraulic damping as in conventional shock absorbers. Device not subject to leakage and requires little or no maintenance. Attenuator parameters adjusted in response to sensory feedback and predictive algorithms to obtain desired damping characteristic. Device programmed to decelerate slowly approaching vehicle or other large object according to prescribed damping characteristic.

  4. Iron Chalcogenide Photovoltaic Absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Liping; Lany, Stephan; Kykyneshi, Robert; Jieratum, Vorranutch; Ravichandran, Ram; Pelatt, Brian; Altschul, Emmeline; Platt, Heather A. S.; Wager, John F.; Keszler, Douglas A.; Zunger, Alex

    2011-08-10

    An integrated computational and experimental study of FeS₂ pyrite reveals that phase coexistence is an important factor limiting performance as a thin-film solar absorber. This phase coexistence is suppressed with the ternary materials Fe₂SiS₄ and Fe₂GeS₄, which also exhibit higher band gaps than FeS₂. Thus, the ternaries provide a new entry point for development of thin-film absorbers and high-efficiency photovoltaics.

  5. Plants absorb heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, J.

    1995-02-01

    Decontamination of heavy metals-polluted soils remains one of the most intractable problems of cleanup technology. Currently available techniques include extraction of the metals by physical and chemical means, such as acid leaching and electroosmosis, or immobilization by vitrification. There are presently no techniques for cleanup which are low cost and retain soil fertility after metals removal. But a solution to the problem could be on the horizon. A small but growing number of plants native to metalliferous soils are known to be capable of accumulating extremely high concentrations of metals in their aboveground portions. These hyperaccumulators, as they are called, contain up to 1,000 times larger metal concentrations in their aboveground parts than normal species. Their distribution is global, including many different families of flowering plants of varying growth forms, from herbaceous plants to trees. Hyperaccumulators absorb metals they do not need for their own nutrition. The metals are accumulated in the leaf and stem vacuoles, and to a lesser extent in the roots.

  6. Closed-form exact solution to H(infinity) optimization of dynamic vibration absorbers: II. Application to different performance indexes for vibration isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Toshihiko; Nishihara, Osamu

    2000-04-01

    Recently, Nishihara and Matsuhisa have proposed a new theory for attaining the H(infinity) optimization of a dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) in the linear vibratory systems. The H(infinity) optimization of DVA is a classical optimization problem, and already solved more than 50 years ago. All of us know the solution through the textbook written by Den Hartog. The new theory proposed them gives us the exact algebraic solution of the problem. In the first report, we have expounded the theory and showed the procedure of finding the algebraic solution to a typical performance index (compliance transfer function) of the viscous damped system. In this paper, we will apply this theory to another performance indexes: mobility and accelerance transfer functions for force excitation system, and the absolute and relative displacement responses to acceleration, velocity or displacement input to foundation for motion excitation system. We apply this theory not only the viscous damped system but also the hysteretic damped system. As a result, we found the closed-form exact solutions in every performance indexes when the primary system has no damping. The solutions obtained here are compared with the classical ones solved by the fixed-points theory. We further apply this theory to design of DVAs attached to damped primary systems, and found the closed-form exact solutions to some performance indexes of the hysteretic damped system.

  7. Photoexited switchable metamaterial absorber at terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zongcheng; Gao, Runmei; Ding, Chunfeng; Wu, Liang; Zhang, Yating; Xu, Degang; Yao, Jianquan

    2015-06-01

    We propose a design and numerical study of an optically switchable metamaterial absorber in the terahertz regime. The metamaterial absorber comprises a periodic array of metallic split-ring resonators sitting back to back with an embedded semiconductor silicon. Filing the gap between the resonator arms with a semiconductor (silicon), leads to easy modification of its optical response through a pump beam which changes conductivity of Si. The conductivity of silicon is a function of incident pump power. Therefore, the resonance frequencies of the metamaterial can be tunable by applying an external pump power. The resonance peak of the absorption spectra shows a shift from 1.17 to 0.68 THz via external optical stimulus, with granting a resonance tuning range on the order of 42%. The optical-tuned absorber has potential applications as a terahertz modulator and switchable device and offer a step forward in filling the "THz gap".

  8. Theoretical analysis of the absorption spectra of organic dyes differing by the conjugation sequence: illusion of negative solvatochromism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzhos, Sergei; Segawa, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-06-01

    Absorption peak maxima of two organic dyes differing by the position of the methine unit differ by 61 nm in dioxane and 128 nm in acetonnitrile. The difference is not reproduced by TDDFT using ab initio or hybrid functionals. TDDFT errors are different between the molecules due to a different albeit small extent of charge transfer, leading to a qualitative failure of TDDFT to predict relative energetics of the dyes. The TDDFT errors in non-polar solvents (such as dioxane) could be corrected based on the approach of Peach et al. (J. Chem. Phy. 128, 044118 (2008)). Here, we focus on the effect on the absorption spectrum of a polar solvent, specifically of the different between the two molecules sign of the solvatochromic shift vs. dioxane. Using the corrrection due to Peach et al, the absolute TDDFT errors can be brought within accetable ranges of 0.2-0.3 eV with the PCM solvent model, and the blue shift vs.dioxane is reporoduced, although both dyes are predicted to exhibit positive solvatochromism. The inclusion of explicit solvent molecules forming hydrogen bonds with the dye did not appreciably change neither TDDFT energies nor the correction term. These results show the importance of a more careful assessment of computational errors in the strategy of computationaly dye design by changing the conjugation order, where they are expected to be more important than in the case of an extension of the size of conjugation, and more so when polar solvents are used.

  9. On the information content of natural frequency spectra associated with different angular numbers. [acoustic velocity in vibrating fluid sphere model of earth structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcilon, V.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of inferring the speed of sound in a contained spherically symmetric fluid solely from its natural frequencies of vibration is considered. An investigation of the case in which the data consist of the two spectra associated with the angular numbers 0 and 1, suggests the possibility that a one-parameter family of slowness profiles can be constructed. These profiles are compatible with the data, up to first order in the non-uniformity of the fluid. It is conjectured that for other angular numbers, the loss of information increases as the difference between them increases.

  10. The Assignment of the Different Infrared Continuum Absorbance Changes Observed in the 3000–1800-cm−1 Region during the Bacteriorhodopsin Photocycle

    PubMed Central

    Garczarek, Florian; Wang, Jianping; El-Sayed, Mostafa A.; Gerwert, Klaus

    2004-01-01

    The bleach continuum in the 1900–1800-cm−1 region was reported during the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) and was assigned to the dissociation of a polarizable proton chain during the proton release step. More recently, a broad band pass filter was used and additional infrared continua have been reported: a bleach at >2700 cm−1, a bleach in the 2500–2150-cm−1 region, and an absorptive behavior in the 2100–1800-cm−1 region. To fully understand the importance of the hydrogen-bonded chains in the mechanism of the proton transport in bR, a detailed study is carried out here. Comparisons are made between the time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy experiments on wild-type bR and its E204Q mutant (which has no early proton release), and between the changes in the continua observed in thermally or photothermally heated water (using visible light-absorbing dye) and those observed during the photocycle. The results strongly suggest that, except for the weak bleach in the 1900–1800-cm−1 region and >2500 cm−1, there are other infrared continua observed during the bR photocycle, which are inseparable from the changes in the absorption of the solvent water molecules that are photothermally excited via the nonradiative relaxation of the photoexcited retinal chromophore. A possible structure of the hydrogen-bonded system, giving rise to the observed bleach in the 1900–1800-cm−1 region and the role of the polarizable proton in the proton transport is discussed. PMID:15298873

  11. Warm Absorber Diagnostics of AGN Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, Timothy

    Warm absorbers and related phenomena are observable manifestations of outflows or winds from active galactic nuclei (AGN) that have great potential value. Understanding AGN outflows is important for explaining the mass budgets of the central accreting black hole, and also for understanding feedback and the apparent co-evolution of black holes and their host galaxies. In the X-ray band warm absorbers are observed as photoelectric absorption and resonance line scattering features in the 0.5-10 keV energy band; the UV band also shows resonance line absorption. Warm absorbers are common in low luminosity AGN and they have been extensively studied observationally. They may play an important role in AGN feedback, regulating the net accretion onto the black hole and providing mechanical energy to the surroundings. However, fundamental properties of the warm absorbers are not known: What is the mechanism which drives the outflow?; what is the gas density in the flow and the geometrical distribution of the outflow?; what is the explanation for the apparent relation between warm absorbers and the surprising quasi-relativistic 'ultrafast outflows' (UFOs)? We propose a focused set of model calculations that are aimed at synthesizing observable properties of warm absorber flows and associated quantities. These will be used to explore various scenarios for warm absorber dynamics in order to answer the questions in the previous paragraph. The guiding principle will be to examine as wide a range as possible of warm absorber driving mechanisms, geometry and other properties, but with as careful consideration as possible to physical consistency. We will build on our previous work, which was a systematic campaign for testing important class of scenarios for driving the outflows. We have developed a set of tools that are unique and well suited for dynamical calculations including radiation in this context. We also have state-of-the-art tools for generating synthetic spectra, which are

  12. SPECTRA CHARACTERISTICS OF WATER EXTRACTABLE ORGANIC MATTER FROM SOILS OF DIFFERENT LAND USES IN A SUBARCTIC ALASKA ENVIRONMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to determine characteristics of soil water extractable organic matter (WEOM) under different land uses in a subarctic environment. Soil (Volkmar, Aquic Eutrocrepts) samples were taken in October, 2005 from forestry, agricultural, and USDA Conservation Reserve Prog...

  13. Rubber shock absorber for deep-well rod operated pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Bagirov, M.M.

    1984-05-01

    Tests of hydropneumatic shock absorbers of deep-well pumps in oil fields showed that they improve the efficiency of the installations by their design is very complicated. Mechanically acting absorbers of dynamic forces are simpler in design. Rubber shock absorbers differ advantageously from spring absorbers in that considerable oscillation-damping forces of any amplitude act in them. The design of a shock absorber is described which is situated under the balance arm of a pumping jack. A prototype of the shock absorber, in which the elastic elements were cylinders made of rubber was tested in a test borehole. Dynamographic recordings made in this borehole in operation with and without shock absorber show that the shock absorber reduces the maximum load on the rods and the double amplitude of load change. Calculations show that when the described shock absorber is used the reduced load is 11-18% smaller. This may considerably reduce the number of breakages of deepwell pump rods.

  14. Leaf Spectra and Weight of Species in Canopy, Subcanopy, and Understory Layers in a Venezuelan Andean Cloud Forest

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Miguel F.; Ataroff, Michele

    2012-01-01

    We characterize the leaf spectra of tree species of an Andean cloud forest in Venezuela, grouped according to position in canopy, subcanopy and understory. We measured leaf reflectance and transmittance spectra in the 400–750 nm range using a high-resolution spectrometer. Both signals were subtracted from unity to calculate the absorbance signal. Nine spectral variables were calculated for each signal, three based on wide-bands and six based on features. We measured leaf mass per unit area of all species, and calculated efficiency of absorbance, as ratio of absorbance in photosynthetic range over leaf mass. Differences among groups were significant for several absorbance and transmittance variables, leaf mass, and efficiency of absorbance. The clearest differences are between canopy and understory species. There is strong correlation for at least one pair of band variables for each signal, and each band variable is strongly correlated with at least one feature variable for most signals. High canonical correlations are obtained between pairs of the three canonical axes for bands and the first three canonical axes for features. Absorbance variables produce species clusters having the closest correspondence to the species groups. Linear discriminant analysis shows that species groups can be sorted by all signals, particularly absorbance. PMID:24278746

  15. Leaf spectra and weight of species in canopy, subcanopy, and understory layers in a venezuelan andean cloud forest.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Miguel F; Ataroff, Michele

    2012-01-01

    We characterize the leaf spectra of tree species of an Andean cloud forest in Venezuela, grouped according to position in canopy, subcanopy and understory. We measured leaf reflectance and transmittance spectra in the 400-750 nm range using a high-resolution spectrometer. Both signals were subtracted from unity to calculate the absorbance signal. Nine spectral variables were calculated for each signal, three based on wide-bands and six based on features. We measured leaf mass per unit area of all species, and calculated efficiency of absorbance, as ratio of absorbance in photosynthetic range over leaf mass. Differences among groups were significant for several absorbance and transmittance variables, leaf mass, and efficiency of absorbance. The clearest differences are between canopy and understory species. There is strong correlation for at least one pair of band variables for each signal, and each band variable is strongly correlated with at least one feature variable for most signals. High canonical correlations are obtained between pairs of the three canonical axes for bands and the first three canonical axes for features. Absorbance variables produce species clusters having the closest correspondence to the species groups. Linear discriminant analysis shows that species groups can be sorted by all signals, particularly absorbance. PMID:24278746

  16. Unidirectional perfect absorber.

    PubMed

    Jin, L; Wang, P; Song, Z

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices. PMID:27615125

  17. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Young, Emma; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Moysiadis, Theodoros; Plevova, Karla; Rossi, Davide; Kminkova, Jana; Stalika, Evangelia; Pedersen, Lone Bredo; Malcikova, Jitka; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Davis, Zadie; Mansouri, Larry; Scarfò, Lydia; Boudjoghra, Myriam; Navarro, Alba; Muggen, Alice F.; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Larrayoz, Marta; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Niemann, Carsten Utoft; Belessi, Chrysoula; Campo, Elias; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Langerak, Anton W.; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pospisilova, Sarka; Davi, Frederic; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations (BIRC3, MYD88, NOTCH1, SF3B1 and TP53) and cytogenetic aberrations, we reveal a subset-biased acquisition of gene mutations. More specifically, the frequency of NOTCH1 mutations was found to be enriched in subsets expressing unmutated immunoglobulin genes, i.e. #1, #6, #8 and #59 (22–34%), often in association with trisomy 12, and was significantly different (P<0.001) to the frequency observed in subset #2 (4%, aggressive disease, variable somatic hypermutation status) and subset #4 (1%, indolent disease, mutated immunoglobulin genes). Interestingly, subsets harboring a high frequency of NOTCH1 mutations were found to carry few (if any) SF3B1 mutations. This starkly contrasts with subsets #2 and #3 where, despite their immunogenetic differences, SF3B1 mutations occurred in 45% and 46% of cases, respectively. In addition, mutations within TP53, whilst enriched in subset #1 (16%), were rare in subsets #2 and #8 (both 2%), despite all being clinically aggressive. All subsets were negative for MYD88 mutations, whereas BIRC3 mutations were infrequent. Collectively, this striking bias and skewed distribution of mutations and cytogenetic aberrations within specific chronic lymphocytic leukemia subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s). PMID:27198719

  18. Evaluating open-path FTIR spectrometer data using different quantification methods, libraries, and background spectra obtained under varying environmental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    Studies were performed to evaluate the accuracy of open-path Fourier Transform Infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometers using a 35 foot outdoor exposure chamber in Pittsboro, North Carolina. Results obtained with the OP-FTIR spectrometer were compared to results obtained with a reference method (a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector, GC-FID). Concentration results were evaluated in terms of the mathematical methods and spectral libraries used for quantification. In addition, the research investigated the effect on quantification of using different backgrounds obtained at various times during the day. The chemicals used in this study were toluene, cyclohexane, and methanol; and these were evaluated over the concentration range of 5-30 ppm.

  19. thin films as absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J. O.; Shaji, S.; Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G. A.; Das Roy, T. K.; Krishnan, B.

    2014-09-01

    Photovoltaic structures were prepared using AgSb(S x Se1- x )2 as absorber and CdS as window layer at various conditions via a hybrid technique of chemical bath deposition and thermal evaporation followed by heat treatments. Silver antimony sulfo selenide thin films [AgSb(S x Se1- x )2] were prepared by heating multilayers of sequentially deposited Sb2S3/Ag dipped in Na2SeSO3 solution, glass/Sb2S3/Ag/Se. For this, Sb2S3 thin films were deposited from a chemical bath containing SbCl3 and Na2S2O3. Then, Ag thin films were thermally evaporated on glass/Sb2S3, followed by selenization by dipping in an acidic solution of Na2SeSO3. The duration of dipping was varied as 3, 4 and 5 h. Two different heat treatments, one at 350 °C for 20 min in vacuum followed by a post-heat treatment at 325 °C for 2 h in Ar, and the other at 350 °C for 1 h in Ar, were applied to the multilayers of different configurations. X-ray diffraction results showed the formation of AgSb(S x Se1- x )2 thin films as the primary phase and AgSb(S,Se)2 and Sb2S3 as secondary phases. Morphology and elemental detection were done by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies showed the depthwise composition of the films. Optical properties were determined by UV-vis-IR transmittance and reflection spectral analysis. AgSb(S x Se1- x )2 formed at different conditions was incorporated in PV structures glass/FTO/CdS/AgSb(S x Se1- x )2/C/Ag. Chemically deposited post-annealed CdS thin films of various thicknesses were used as window layer. J- V characteristics of the cells were measured under dark and AM1.5 illumination. Analysis of the J- V characteristics resulted in the best solar cell parameters of V oc = 520 mV, J sc = 9.70 mA cm-2, FF = 0.50 and η = 2.7 %.

  20. Multiple-layer Radiation Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert M. L.; Baker, Bonnie Sue

    A structure is discussed for absorbing incident radiation, either electromagnetic (EM) or sound. Such a surface structure is needed, for example, in a highly sensitive high-frequency gravitational wave or HFGW detector such as the Li-Baker. The multi-layer absorber, which is discussed, is constructed with metamaterial [MM] layer or layers on top. This MM is configured for a specific EM or sound radiation frequency band, which absorbs incident EM or sound radiation without reflection. Below these top MM layers is a substrate of conventional EM-radiation absorbing or acoustical absorbing reflective material, such as an array of pyramidal foam absorbers. Incident radiation is partially absorbed by the MM layer or layers, and then it is more absorbed by the lower absorbing and reflecting substrate. The remaining reflected radiation is even further absorbed by the MM layers on its "way out_ so that essentially all of the incident radiation is absorbed _ a nearly perfect black-body absorber. In a HFGW detector a substrate, such as foam absorbers, may outgas into a high vacuum and reduce the capability of the vacuum-producing equipment, however, the layers above this lowest substrate will seal the absorbing and reflecting substrate from any external vacuum. The layers also serve to seal the absorbing material against air or water flow past the surfaces of aircraft, watercraft or submarines. Other applications for such a multiple-level radiation absorber include stealth aircraft, missiles and submarines.

  1. Different approaches in manipulating ratio spectra applied for the analysis of Cefprozil in presence of its alkaline-induced degradation product: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attia, Khalid A. M.; Nassar, Mohammed W. I.; El-Zeiny, Mohamed B.; Serag, Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    Four simple, accurate and precise stability-indicating spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra were developed and validated for simultaneous determination of Cefprozil (CZ) and its alkaline-induced degradation product (DCZ) without prior separation namely; ratio difference, mean centering, derivative ratio using Savitsky-Golay filter and continuous wavelet transform. The accuracy, precision and linearity ranges of the proposed methods were determined. The methods were validated and the specificity was assessed by analyzing synthetic mixtures containing the drug and its degradate. The four methods were applied for the determination of the cited drug in tablets and the obtained results were statistically compared with those of a reported method. The comparison showed that there are no significant differences between the proposed methods and the reported method regarding both accuracy and precision.

  2. Overconstrained library-based fitting method reveals age- and disease-related differences in transcutaneous Raman spectra of murine bones

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Jason R.; Inzana, Jason A.; Awad, Hani A.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Clinical diagnoses of bone health and fracture risk typically rely on measurements of bone density or structure, but the strength of a bone is also dependent on its chemical composition. Raman spectroscopy has been used extensively in ex vivo studies to measure the chemical composition of bone. Recently, spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) has been utilized to measure bone transcutaneously. Although the results are promising, further advancements are necessary to make noninvasive, in vivo measurements of bone with SORS that are of sufficient quality to generate accurate predictions of fracture risk. In order to separate the signals from bone and soft tissue that contribute to a transcutaneous measurement, we developed an overconstrained extraction algorithm that is based on fitting with spectral libraries. This approach allows for accurate spectral unmixing despite the fact that similar chemical components (e.g., type I collagen) are present in both bone and soft tissue. The algorithm was utilized to transcutaneously detect biochemical differences in the tibiae of wild-type mice between 1 and 7 months of age and between the tibiae of wild-type mice and a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta. These results represent the first diagnostically sensitive, transcutaneous measurements of bone using SORS. PMID:23817761

  3. [Inversion of winter wheat water content with the relationship between canopy parameters and spectra based on different irrigations].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-juan; Xie, Dong-hui; Zhang, Jia-hua; Xu, Yun

    2012-01-01

    In order to monitor the canopy water content of winter wheat, canopy spectrums of winter wheat with narrow-band were resampled to broad-band according to relative spectral response (RSR) function of TM5. And then, normalized different water index (NDWI) and simple water index (WI) were calculated with broad-band reflectance. Fuel moisture content (FMC) and equivalent water thickness for canopy (EWTc) were got using dry weight, fresh weight and leaf area (index). The results show that b7 of TM5 is better than b5 in inversing canopy water content of winter wheat. Meanwhile, NDWI is more suitable than WI. Suitable fitting equations are built with NDWI (b4, b7) for FMC and EWTc, whose R2 reaches to 0.576 9 and 0.695 6, respectively. Finally, the spatial mapping of canopy water content is done with fitting equations. The results demonstrate that canopy water content of winter wheat is high in west and low in east in the studied area, and it's high in booting stage and low in milk stage. PMID:22497161

  4. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  5. Comparison of proton energy loss in thick absorbers in terms of a reduced calibration curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevseyeva, O.; de Assis, J. T.; Evseev, I. G.; Schelin, H. R.; Ahmann, F.; Paschuk, S. A.; Milhoretto, E.; Setti, J. A. P.; Diaz, K. S.; Hormaza, J. M.; Lopes, R. T.

    2011-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are essential for the support of particle experiments and developments of novel particle registration systems ranging from detectors developed for high-energy physics experiments at CERN to those for medical tomography. For proton beams, popular Monte Carlo codes like TRIM/SRIM, MCNPX and GEANT4 generate very similar final energy spectra for relatively thin absorbers, with differences unlikely to be detected in experiments. For thick absorbers, however, the disagreement is much larger, even for a moderate energy resolution. The reason for this is unclear because the actual overall accuracy of the proton stopping power in the Bethe-Bloch domain is known to be about 1%. One approach to investigate these differences is to compare, for example, the data from the NIST PSTAR and the SRIM reference data tables with the output of the Monte Carlo codes. When the various codes are validated against these tables, the differences in the simulated spectra mainly reflect the differences in the reference tables. Of more practical interest is the validation of the codes against experimental data for thick absorbers. However, only few experimental data sets are available here, and the existing data have been acquired at different initial proton energies and for different absorber materials. In order to compare the results of Monte Carlo simulations with existing experimental data, we applied the so-called reduced calibration method. This reduced calibration curve represents the range-energy dependence normalizing the range scale to the full projected range (for a given initial proton energy in a given material), and the proton energy scale to the given initial proton energy. The advantage of this approach is that the reduced calibration curve is nearly energy and material independent, and, thus, experimental, simulated and published reference data obtained at different energies and for different materials can be compared in one graph.

  6. Energy-Absorbing, Lightweight Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waydo, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Improved energy-absorbing wheels are under development for use on special-purpose vehicles that must traverse rough terrain under conditions (e.g., extreme cold) in which rubber pneumatic tires would fail. The designs of these wheels differ from those of prior non-pneumatic energy-absorbing wheels in ways that result in lighter weights and more effective reduction of stresses generated by ground/wheel contact forces. These wheels could be made of metals and/or composite materials to withstand the expected extreme operating conditions. As shown in the figure, a wheel according to this concept would include an isogrid tire connected to a hub via spring rods. The isogrid tire would be a stiff, lightweight structure typically made of aluminum. The isogrid aspect of the structure would both impart stiffness and act as a traction surface. The hub would be a thin-walled body of revolution having a simple or compound conical or other shape chosen for structural efficiency. The spring rods would absorb energy and partially isolate the hub and the supported vehicle from impact loads. The general spring-rod configuration shown in the figure was chosen because it would distribute contact and impact loads nearly evenly around the periphery of the hub, thereby helping to protect the hub against damage that would otherwise be caused by large loads concentrated onto small portions of the hub.

  7. Grover walks on a line with absorbing boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Wu, Nan; Kuklinski, Parker; Xu, Ping; Hu, Haixing; Song, Fangmin

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study Grover walks on a line with one and two absorbing boundaries. In particular, we present some results for the absorbing probabilities in both a semi-finite and finite line. Analytical expressions for these absorbing probabilities are presented by using the combinatorial approach. These results are perfectly matched with numerical simulations. We show that the behavior of Grover walks on a line with absorbing boundaries is strikingly different from that of classical walks and that of Hadamard walks.

  8. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of indacaterol and glycopyrronium in a newly approved pharmaceutical formulation using different signal processing techniques of ratio spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Ghany, Maha F.; Hussein, Lobna A.; Magdy, Nancy; Yamani, Hend Z.

    2016-03-01

    Three spectrophotometric methods have been developed and validated for determination of indacaterol (IND) and glycopyrronium (GLY) in their binary mixtures and novel pharmaceutical dosage form. The proposed methods are considered to be the first methods to determine the investigated drugs simultaneously. The developed methods are based on different signal processing techniques of ratio spectra namely; Numerical Differentiation (ND), Savitsky-Golay (SG) and Fourier Transform (FT). The developed methods showed linearity over concentration range 1-30 and 10-35 (μg/mL) for IND and GLY, respectively. The accuracy calculated as percentage recoveries were in the range of 99.00%-100.49% with low value of RSD% (< 1.5%) demonstrating an excellent accuracy of the proposed methods. The developed methods were proved to be specific, sensitive and precise for quality control of the investigated drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage form without the need for any separation process.

  9. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of indacaterol and glycopyrronium in a newly approved pharmaceutical formulation using different signal processing techniques of ratio spectra.

    PubMed

    Abdel Ghany, Maha F; Hussein, Lobna A; Magdy, Nancy; Yamani, Hend Z

    2016-03-15

    Three spectrophotometric methods have been developed and validated for determination of indacaterol (IND) and glycopyrronium (GLY) in their binary mixtures and novel pharmaceutical dosage form. The proposed methods are considered to be the first methods to determine the investigated drugs simultaneously. The developed methods are based on different signal processing techniques of ratio spectra namely; Numerical Differentiation (ND), Savitsky-Golay (SG) and Fourier Transform (FT). The developed methods showed linearity over concentration range 1-30 and 10-35 (μg/mL) for IND and GLY, respectively. The accuracy calculated as percentage recoveries were in the range of 99.00%-100.49% with low value of RSD% (<1.5%) demonstrating an excellent accuracy of the proposed methods. The developed methods were proved to be specific, sensitive and precise for quality control of the investigated drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage form without the need for any separation process. PMID:26779820

  10. Cosmic ray LET spectra and doses on board Cosmos-2044 biosatellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudkin, V. E.; Kovalev, E. E.; Potapov, Y. V.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Watts, J. W. Jr; Parnell, T. A.; Schopper, E.; Baican, B.; et, a. l.

    1992-01-01

    Results of the experiments on board Cosmos-2044 (Biosatellite 9) are presented. Various nuclear track detectors (NTD) (dielectric, AgCl-based, nuclear emulsions) were used to obtain the LET spectra inside and outside the satellite. The spectra from the different NTDs have proved to be in general agreement. The results of LET spectra calculations using two different models are also presented. The resultant LET distributions are used to calculate the absorbed and equivalent doses and the orbit-averaged quality factors (QF) of the cosmic rays (CR). Absorbed dose rates inside (approximately 20 g cm-2 shielding) and outside (1 g cm-2) the spacecraft, omitting electrons, were found to be 4.8 and 8.6 mrad d-1, respectively, while the corresponding equivalent doses were 8.8 and 19.7 mrem d-1. The effects of the flight parameters on the total fluence of, and on the dose from, the CR particles are analyzed. Integral dose distributions of the detected particles are also determined. The LET values which separate absorbed and equivalent doses into 50% intervals are estimated. The CR-39 dielectric NTD is shown to detect 20-30% of the absorbed dose and 60-70% of the equivalent dose in the Cosmos-2044 orbit. The influence of solar activity phase on the magnitude of CR flux is discussed.

  11. Cosmic ray LET spectra and doses on board Cosmos-2044 biosatellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, J. W., Jr.; Parnell, T. A.; Dudkin, V. E.; Kovalev, E. E.; Potapov, Yu. V.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Beaujean, R.; Heilmann, C.

    1995-01-01

    Results of the experiments on board Cosmos-2044 (Biosatellite 9) are presented. Various nuclear track detectors (NTD) (dielectric, AgCl-based, nuclear emulsions) were used to obtain the Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra inside and outside the satellite. The spectra from the different NTDs have proved to be in general agreement. The results of LET spectra calculations using two different models are also presented. The resultant LET distributions are used to calculate the absorbed and equivalent doses and the orbit-averaged quality factors (QF) of the cosmic rays (CR). Absorbed dose rates inside (approximately 20 g cm (exp -2) shielding) and outside (1 g cm(exp -2) the spacecraft, omitting electrons, were found to be 4.8 and 8.6 mrad d (exp -1), respectively, while the corresponding equivalent doses were 8.8 and 19.7 mrem d(exp -1). The effects of the flight parameters on the total fluence of, and on the dose from the CR particles are analyzed. Integral dose distributions of the detected particles are also determined. The LET values which separate absorbed and equivalent doses into 50% intervals are estimated. The CR-39 dielectric NTD is shown to detect 20-30% of the absorbed dose and 60-70% of the equivalent dose in the Cosmos-2044 orbit. The influence of solar activity phase on the magnitude of CR flux is discussed.

  12. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Moreover, our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributionsmore » to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.« less

  13. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure. PMID:26828999

  14. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.

  15. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul K; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J M; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R; Luk, Ting S; Taylor, Antoinette J; Dalvit, Diego A R; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure. PMID:26828999

  16. Fluorescence spectroscopy: considerations for highly absorbing dissolved organic matter samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simone, B. E.; Miller, M.; McKnight, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a robust method for characterizing organic matter (OM). However, proper collection and correction of spectra are necessary to provide useful data. One important correction is the inner-filter correction, which primarily accounts for the inner-filter effect by adjusting for the wavelength dependent attenuation of emitted light by the solution prior to detection by the fluorometer. The most commonly used correction is based on an assumption that light is emitted at the center of the pathlength. Thus, the inner-filter effect is more pronounced in highly absorbing samples, and has the potential to skew the fluorescence spectra. For this study, the terrestrially derived Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) and microbially derived Pony Lake fulvic acid (PLFA), from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS), were diluted to incremental absorbances at a wavelength of 254 nm from 0.05 to 1.0 at pH 4 and 7. Three dimensional fluorescence spectra were measured and modeled with the Cory and McKnight (2005) parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model which resolves the fluorescence spectra into 13 components, including quinone-like and protein-like components. In the absence of inner-filter effects, plots of absorbance vs. loadings should be linear. Using the data from absorbance of 0.05 to 0.3, where the inner-filter affect is least pronounced, a linear regression was created and used as a baseline to predict component loadings at higher absorbance values in the absence of inner-filter effects. Results indicate that at absorbance values greater than 0.3, the commonly-used inner-filter correction is not able to remove the inner-filter effect. Therefore, in order to obtain reliable component loadings and correctly interpret the spectra, samples should be diluted to absorbance values less than 0.3 at 254 nm prior to collection of three dimensional fluorescence scans. The recommendation of a maximum absorbance of 0.3 agrees with the results of a

  17. Thermodynamic analysis of spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G. E.; Shriner, J. F. Jr.

    2008-04-04

    Although random matrix theory had its initial application to neutron resonances, there is a relative scarcity of suitable nuclear data. The primary reason for this is the sensitivity of the standard measures used to evaluate spectra--the spectra must be essential pure (no state with a different symmetry) and complete (no states missing). Additional measures that are less sensitive to these experimental limitations are of significant value. The standard measure for long range order is the {delta}{sub 3} statistic. In the original paper that introduced this statistic, Dyson and Mehta also attempted to evaluate spectra with thermodynamic variables obtained from the circular orthogonal ensemble. We consider the thermodynamic 'internal energy' and evaluate its sensitivity to experimental limitations such as missing and spurious levels. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that the internal energy is less sensitive to mistakes than is {delta}{sub 3}, and thus the internal energy can serve as a addition to the tool kit for evaluating experimental spectra.

  18. Design of a magnetorheological automotive shock absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindler, Jason E.; Dimock, Glen A.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2000-06-01

    Double adjustable shock absorbers allow for independent adjustment of the yield force and post-yield damping in the force versus velocity response. To emulate the performance of a conventional double adjustable shock absorber, a magnetorheological (MR) automotive shock absorber was designed and fabricated at the University of Maryland. Located in the piston head, an applied magnetic field between the core and flux return increases the force required for a given piston rod velocity. Between the core and flux return, two different shaped gaps meet the controllable performance requirements of a double adjustable shock. A uniform gap between the core and the flux return primarily adjusts the yield force of the shock absorber, while a non-uniform gap allows for control of the post-yield damping. Force measurements from sinusoidal displacement cycles, recorded on a mechanical damper dynamometer, validate the performance of uniform and non- uniform gaps for adjustment of the yield force and post-yield damping, respectively.

  19. Pigmentation and Spectral Absorbance Signatures in Deep-Water Corals from the Trondheimsfjord, Norway

    PubMed Central

    Elde, Anette C.; Pettersen, Ragnhild; Bruheim, Per; Järnegren, Johanna; Johnsen, Geir

    2012-01-01

    The pigmentation and corresponding in vivo and in vitro absorption characteristics in three different deep-water coral species: white and orange Lophelia pertusa, Paragorgia arborea and Primnoa resedaeformis, collected from the Trondheimsfjord are described. Pigments were isolated and characterized by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) analysis and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (LC-TOF MS). The main carotenoids identified for all three coral species were astaxanthin and a canthaxanthin-like carotenoid. Soft tissue and skeleton of orange L. pertusa contained 2 times more astaxanthin g−1 wet weight compared to white L. pertusa. White and orange L. pertusa were characterized with in vivo absorbance peaks at 409 and 473 nm, respectively. In vivo absorbance maxima for P. arborea and P. resedaeformis was typically at 475 nm. The shapes of the absorbance spectra (400–700 nm) were species-specific, indicated by in vivo, in vitro and the corresponding difference spectra. The results may provide important chemotaxonomic information for pigment when bonded to their proteins in vivo, bio-prospecting, and for in situ identification, mapping and monitoring of corals. PMID:22822381

  20. Absorber for terahertz radiation management

    DOEpatents

    Biallas, George Herman; Apeldoorn, Cornelis; Williams, Gwyn P.; Benson, Stephen V.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Heckman, John D.

    2015-12-08

    A method and apparatus for minimizing the degradation of power in a free electron laser (FEL) generating terahertz (THz) radiation. The method includes inserting an absorber ring in the FEL beam path for absorbing any irregular THz radiation and thus minimizes the degradation of downstream optics and the resulting degradation of the FEL output power. The absorber ring includes an upstream side, a downstream side, and a plurality of wedges spaced radially around the absorber ring. The wedges form a scallop-like feature on the innermost edges of the absorber ring that acts as an apodizer, stopping diffractive focusing of the THz radiation that is not intercepted by the absorber. Spacing between the scallop-like features and the shape of the features approximates the Bartlett apodization function. The absorber ring provides a smooth intensity distribution, rather than one that is peaked on-center, thereby eliminating minor distortion downstream of the absorber.

  1. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C.; Lee, Chuck K.; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  2. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  3. Effects of different peak fitting strategies for XRF-spectra and their implications for paleoenvironmental studies: an example from powdered loess-paleosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Profe, Jörn; Neumann, Lena; Ohlendorf, Christian; Zolitschka, Bernd; Frechen, Manfred; Barta, Gabriella

    2015-04-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) core scanning is influenced by numerous sample-specific effects such as water content, sediment matrix and grain size. All these parameters affect the characteristics of fluorescent X-rays recorded by the detector. Subsequently, the recorded spectra are translated into element-specific counts by mathematical peak fitting strategies allowing for qualitative element tracking along a sediment profile. Down-core changes of these element counts or ratios often serve as a basis for paleoenvironmental interpretation. However, for such studies detailed information about peak fitting procedures is rarely provided. Therefore, we investigate the influence of different peak fitting strategies on elemental count rates derived from XRF (Mo-tube) scanning of powdered samples from the Süttő loess-paleosol sequence, Hungary - a sequence chosen due to its pronounced lithological changes between loess and paleosol sections. In contrast to sediment cores, for dried and powdered samples the effects related to grain size and water content are minimized whereas those related to sediment matrix and lithology are emphasized. Using the ITRAX XRF core-scanner (Cox analytical systems) peak fitting is accomplished by the processing software Q-Spec (version 8.60). In this software, the mean square error (MSE) indicates the goodness-of-fit of the mathematical model to the actually measured energies. To consider all different lithologies occurring within a sediment profile, a sum-spectrum of all individual sample spectra is calculated. Despite optimizing the fit for the sum-spectrum, first results indicate that drastic changes between loess and paleosols can cause the MSE to increase (reduce the goodness-of-fit) and thus alter the modelled element counts within paleosols. Therefore, succeeding samples with a poor fit are collected in a subset based on a user-defined MSE threshold. Subsequently, a new sum-spectrum is calculated and fitted for this subset separately

  4. Solar radiation absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.; Whitehead, Harlan D.

    1977-01-01

    Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

  5. Absorber for solar power.

    PubMed

    Powell, W R

    1974-10-01

    A simple, economical absorber utilizing a new principle of operation to achieve very low reradiation losses while generating temperatures limited by material properties of quartz is described. Its performance is analyzed and indicates approximately 90% thermal efficiency and 73% conversion efficiency for an earth based unit with moderately concentrated (~tenfold) sunlight incident. It is consequently compatible with the most economic of concentrator mirrors (stamped) or mirrors deployable in space. Space applications are particularly attractive, as temperatures significantly below 300 K are possible and permit even higher conversion efficiency. PMID:20134700

  6. The Double Absorbing Boundary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstrom, Thomas; Givoli, Dan; Rabinovich, Daniel; Bielak, Jacobo

    2014-02-01

    A new approach is devised for solving wave problems in unbounded domains. It has common features to each of two types of existing techniques: local high-order Absorbing Boundary Conditions (ABC) and Perfectly Matched Layers (PML). However, it is different from both and enjoys relative advantages with respect to both. The new method, called the Double Absorbing Boundary (DAB) method, is based on truncating the unbounded domain to produce a finite computational domain Ω, and on applying a local high-order ABC on two parallel artificial boundaries, which are a small distance apart, and thus form a thin non-reflecting layer. Auxiliary variables are defined on the two boundaries and inside the layer bounded by them, and participate in the numerical scheme. The DAB method is first introduced in general terms, using the 2D scalar time-dependent wave equation as a model. Then it is applied to the 1D Klein-Gordon equation, using finite difference discretization in space and time, and to the 2D wave equation in a wave guide, using finite element discretization in space and dissipative time stepping. The computational aspects of the method are discussed, and numerical experiments demonstrate its performance.

  7. The thermal instability of the warm absorber in NGC 3783

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goosmann, R. W.; Holczer, T.; Mouchet, M.; Dumont, A.-M.; Behar, E.; Godet, O.; Gonçalves, A. C.; Kaspi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The X-ray absorption spectra of active galactic nuclei frequently show evidence of winds with velocities in the order of 103 km s-1 extending up to 104 km s-1 in the case of ultra-fast outflows. At moderate velocities, these winds are often spectroscopically explained by assuming a number of absorbing clouds along the line of sight. In some cases it was shown that the absorbing clouds are in pressure equilibrium with each other. Aims: We assume a photo-ionized medium with a uniform total (gas+radiation) pressure. The irradiation causes the wind to be radiation pressure compressed (RPC). We attempt to reproduce the observed spectral continuum shape, ionic column densities, and X-ray absorption measure distribution (AMD) of the extensively observed warm absorber in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 3783. Methods: We compare the observational characteristics derived from the 900 ks Chandra observation to radiative transfer computations in pressure equilibrium using the radiative transfer code titan. We explore different values of the ionization parameter ξ of the incident flux and adjust the hydrogen-equivalent column density, NH0, of the warm absorber to match the observed soft X-ray continuum. From the resulting models we derive the column densities for a broad range of ionic species of iron and neon and a theoretical AMD that we compare to the observations. Results: We find an extension of the degeneracy between ξ and NH0 for the constant pressure models previously discussed for NGC 3783. Including the ionic column densities of iron and neon in the comparison between observations and data we conclude that a range of ionization parameters between 4000 and 8000 erg cm s-1 is preferred. For the first time, we present theoretical AMDs for a constant pressure wind in NGC 3783 that correctly reproduces the observed level and is in approximate agreement with the observational appearance of an instability region. Conclusions: Using a variety of observational indicators, we

  8. New atlas of IR solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Murcray, F. H.; Vanallen, J. W.; Bradford, C. M.; Cook, G. R.; Murcray, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Over 4500 absorption lines have been marked on the spectra and the corresponding line positions tabulated. The associated absorbing telluric or solar species for more than 90% of these lines have been identified and only a fraction of the unidentified lines have peak absorptions greater than a few percent. The high resolution and the low Sun spectra greatly enhance the sensitivity limits for identification of trace constituents.

  9. The Investigation of Property of Radiation and Absorbed of Infrared Lights of the Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Deng, Bo; Xiao, He-Lan; Cai, Guo-Ping

    2010-04-01

    The properties of absorption of infrared light for collagen, hemoglobin, bivine serum albumen (BSA) protein molecules with α- helix structure and water in the living systems as well as the infrared transmission spectra for person’s skins and finger hands of human body in the region of 400-4000 cm-1 (i.e., wavelengths of 2-20 μm) have been collected and determined by using a Nicolet Nexus 670 FT-IR Spectrometer, a Perkin Elmer GX FT-IR spectrometer, an OMA (optical multichannel analysis) and an infrared probe systems, respectively. The experimental results obtained show that the protein molecules and water can all absorb the infrared lights in the ranges of 600-1900 cm-1 and 2900-3900 cm-l, but their properties of absorption are somewhat different due to distinctions of their structure and conformation and molecular weight. We know from the transmission spectra of person’s finger hands and skin that the infrared lights with wavelengths of 2 μm-7 μm can not only transmit over the person’s skin and finger hands, but also be absorbed by the above proteins and water in the living systems. Thus, we can conclude from this study that the human beings and animals can absorb the infrared lights with wavelengths of 2 μm-7 μm.

  10. Liquid Cryogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Baynham, D.E.; Bish, P.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Cummings, M.A.; Green,M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivaniouchenkov, I.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.Q.; Zisman, M.S.

    2005-08-20

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will test ionization cooling of muons. In order to have effective ionization cooling, one must use an absorber that is made from a low-z material. The most effective low z materials for ionization cooling are hydrogen, helium, lithium hydride, lithium and beryllium, in that order. In order to measure the effect of material on cooling, several absorber materials must be used. This report describes a liquid-hydrogen absorber that is within a pair of superconducting focusing solenoids. The absorber must also be suitable for use with liquid helium. The following absorber components are discussed in this report; the absorber body, its heat exchanger, the hydrogen system, and the hydrogen safety. Absorber cooling and the thin windows are not discussed here.

  11. The Variable Warm Absorber in Circinus X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, N. S.; Kallman, T. E.; Galloway, D. K.; Brandt, W. N.

    2008-01-01

    We observed Circinus X-1 twice during a newly reached low-flux phase near zero orbital phase using the High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) onboard Chandra. In both observations the source did not show the P Cygni lines we observed during the high-flux phases of the source in 2000 and 2001. During the prezero phase the source did not exhibit significant variability but did exhibit an emission-line spectrum rich in H- and He-like lines from high-Z elements such as Si, S, Ar, and Ca. The light curve in the postdip observation showed quiescent and flaring episodes. Only in these flaring episodes was the source luminosity significantly higher than observed during the prezero phase. We analyzed all high-resolution X-ray spectra by fitting photoionization and absorption models from the most recent version of the XSTAR code. The prezero-phase spectrum could be fully modeled with a very hot photoionized plasma with an ionization parameter of log ξ = 3.0, down from log ξ = 4.0 in the high-flux state. The ionization balances we measure from the spectra during the postzero-phase episodes are significantly different. Both episodes feature absorbers with variable high columns, ionization parameters, and luminosity. While cold absorption remains at levels quite similar to that observed in previous years, the new observations show unprecedented levels of variable warm absorption. The line emissivities also indicate that the observed low source luminosity is inconsistent with a static hot accretion disk corona (ADC), an effect that seems common to other near-edge-on ADC sources as well. We conclude that unless there exists some means of coronal heating other than X-rays, the true source luminosity is likely much higher, and we observe obscuration in analogy to the extragalactic Seyfert 2 sources. We discuss possible consequences and relate cold, lukewarm, warm, and hot absorbers to dynamic accretion scenarios.

  12. Effect of Mg diffusion on photoluminescence spectra of MgZnO/ZnO bi-layers annealed at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amit K.; Misra, P.; Ajimsha, R. S.; Bose, A.; Joshi, S. C.; Porwal, S.; Sharma, T. K.; Oak, S. M.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2013-11-01

    MgZnO/ZnO bilayers (Mg concentration of ˜30%) have been grown and subsequently annealed at different temperatures in the range of 600-900 °C with the specific interest of studying the effect of inter-diffusion of Mg on the photoluminescence (PL) properties of the bilayers. The influence of Mg diffusion and material homogenization is evaluated through absorption, PL, and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements. No appreciable change in the spectral positions is seen either in PL or absorption up to an annealing temperature of 700 °C, which is also supported by SIMS. However at higher annealing temperatures, diffusion of Mg into the ZnO layer is clearly evident in SIMS profile, which results in the red-shift (blue-shift) of spectral positions of MgZnO (ZnO) layer, respectively. Finally, for the sample annealed at 900 °C, the two layers are completely merged providing a single peak at ˜3.60 eV in PL/absorption corresponding to a completely homogenized MgZnO layer. Spectroscopic results are corroborated by the numerical simulations based on a simple theoretical model, which correlates the observed PL spectra of the heterostructures with the experimental Mg diffusion profiles across the heterointerface, as measured by SIMS.

  13. Determination of decay coefficients for combustors with acoustic absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. E.; Espander, W. R.; Baer, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical technique for the calculation of linear decay coefficients in combustors with acoustic absorbers is presented. Tuned circumferential slot acoustic absorbers were designed for the first three transverse modes of oscillation, and decay coefficients for these absorbers were found as a function of backing distance for seven different chamber configurations. The effectiveness of the absorbers for off-design values of the combustion response and acoustic mode is also investigated. Results indicate that for tuned absorbers the decay coefficient increases approximately as the cube of the backing distance. For most off-design situations the absorber still provides a damping effect. However, if an absorber designed for some higher mode of oscillation is used to damp lower mode oscillations, a driving effect is frequently found.

  14. Determination of phytoplankton composition using absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Guijarro, R; Romero, I; Pachés, M; Del Río, J G; Martí, C M; Gil, G; Ferrer-Riquelme, A; Ferrer, J

    2009-05-15

    Characterisation of phytoplankton communities in aquatic ecosystems is a costly task in terms of time, material and human resources. The general objective of this paper is not to replace microscopic counts but to complement them, by fine-tuning a technique using absorption spectra measurements that reduces the above-mentioned costs. Therefore, the objective proposed in this paper is to assess the possibility of achieving a qualitative determination of phytoplankton communities by classes, and also a quantitative estimation of the number of phytoplankton cells within each of these classes, using spectrophotometric determination. Samples were taken in three areas of the Spanish Mediterranean coast. These areas correspond to estuary systems that are influenced by both continental waters and Mediterranean Sea waters. 139 Samples were taken in 7-8 stations per area, at different depths in each station. In each sample, the absorption spectrum and the phytoplankton classes (Bacyllariophyceae (diatoms), Cryptophyceae, Clorophyceae, Chrysophyceae, Prasynophyceae, Prymnesophyceae, Euglenophyceae, Cyanophyceae, Dynophyceae and the Synechococcus sp.) were determined. Data were analysed by means of the Partial Least Squares (PLS) multivariate statistical technique. The absorbances obtained between 400 and 750 nm were used as the independent variable and the cell/l of each phytoplankton class was used as the dependent variable, thereby obtaining models which relate the absorbance of the sample extract to the phytoplankton present in it. Good results were obtained for diatoms (Bacillarophyceae), Chlorophyceae and Cryptophyceae. PMID:19269434

  15. Metamaterial electromagnetic wave absorbers.

    PubMed

    Watts, Claire M; Liu, Xianliang; Padilla, Willie J

    2012-06-19

    The advent of negative index materials has spawned extensive research into metamaterials over the past decade. Metamaterials are attractive not only for their exotic electromagnetic properties, but also their promise for applications. A particular branch-the metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA)-has garnered interest due to the fact that it can achieve unity absorptivity of electromagnetic waves. Since its first experimental demonstration in 2008, the MPA has progressed significantly with designs shown across the electromagnetic spectrum, from microwave to optical. In this Progress Report we give an overview of the field and discuss a selection of examples and related applications. The ability of the MPA to exhibit extreme performance flexibility will be discussed and the theory underlying their operation and limitations will be established. Insight is given into what we can expect from this rapidly expanding field and future challenges will be addressed. PMID:22627995

  16. Absorber coatings' degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    This report is intended to document some of the Los Alamos efforts that have been carried out under the Department of Energy (DOE) Active Heating and Cooling Materials Reliability, Maintainability, and Exposure Testing program. Funding for these activities is obtained directly from DOE although they represent a variety of projects and coordination with other agencies. Major limitations to the use of solar energy are the uncertain reliability and lifetimes of solar systems. This program is aimed at determining material operating limitations, durabilities, and failure modes such that materials improvements can be made and lifetimes can be extended. Although many active and passive materials and systems are being studied at Los Alamos, this paper will concentrate on absorber coatings and degradation of these coatings.

  17. Diode-based microbolometer with performance enhanced by broadband metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei; Jia, Delin; Wen, Yongzheng; Yu, Xiaomei; Feng, Yun; Zhao, Yuejin

    2016-07-01

    This Letter reports a microbolometer integrated with a broadband metamaterial absorber (MMA) to enhance its performance, which contains series-connected silicon diodes as the temperature sensor. The broadband MMA is readily integrated into the device by introducing an array of different-sized square resonators on the silicon nitride structural layer, while the widened titanium interconnecting wires between individual diodes serve as the ground plane. In a comparative experiment, the broadband MMA was demonstrated to be superior to the ordinary silicon nitride absorber in a broad spectra range, especially in a long-wavelength IR regime, which directly leads to an increase in IR responsivity by 60%. More importantly, this enhancement in responsivity was achieved with no sacrifice of the response time due to the negligible thermal mass of the introduced resonator array. PMID:27367079

  18. Doppler-width thermodynamic thermometry by means of line-absorbance analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Castrillo, A.; De Vizia, M. D.; Gianfrani, L.; Moretti, L.; Galzerano, G.; Laporta, P.; Merlone, A.

    2011-09-15

    A clean and effective implementation of Doppler-width thermometry is described. Exploiting the relationship between line-center absorbance and integrated absorbance, the Doppler width of a molecular spectral line can be retrieved from a set of profiles resulting from different gas pressures. The method is validated by its application to numerically simulated spectra. Preliminary experiments, in water vapor samples, turn out to be successful, demonstrating Doppler-widths' retrieval in the near-infrared with a precision of 8x10{sup -5}, at the water triple point temperature. The direct link to the Boltzmann constant makes the proposed method very attractive for temperature metrology as a tool for the realization of a new thermodynamic temperature scale.

  19. Surface-Induced Dissociation Mass Spectra as a Tool for Distinguishing Different Structural Forms of Gas-Phase Multimeric Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Quintyn, Royston S; Zhou, Mowei; Yan, Jing; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2015-12-01

    One attractive feature of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) lies in its ability to provide experimental collision cross section (CCS) measurements, which can be used to distinguish different conformations that a protein complex may adopt during its gas-phase unfolding. However, CCS values alone give no detailed information on subunit structure within the complex. Consequently, structural characterization typically requires molecular modeling, which can have uncertainties without experimental support. One method of obtaining direct experimental evidence on the structures of these intermediates is utilizing gas-phase activation techniques that can effectively dissociate the complexes into substructures while preserving the native topological information. The most commonly used activation method, collision-induced dissociation (CID) with low-mass target gases, typically leads to unfolding of monomers of a protein complex. Here, we describe a method that couples IM-MS and surface-induced dissociation (SID) to dissociate the source-activated precursors of three model protein complexes: C-reactive protein (CRP), transthyretin (TTR), and concanavalin A (Con A). The results of this study confirm that CID involves the unfolding of the protein complex via several intermediates. More importantly, our experiments also indicate that retention of similar CCS between different intermediates does not guarantee retention of structure. Although CID spectra (at a given collision energy) of source-activated, mass-selected precursors do not distinguish between native-like, collapsed, and expanded forms of a protein complex, dissociation patterns and/or average charge states of monomer products in SID of each of these forms are unique. PMID:26499904

  20. X-Ray Spectra of VY Scl Stars Are Not Blackbodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauche, C. W.; Mukai, K.

    2001-01-01

    Using ASCA data, we find, contrary to other researchers using ROSAT data, that the X, ray spectra of the VY Scl stars TT Ari and KR Aur are poorly fit by an absorbed blackbody model but are well fit by an absorbed thermal plasma model. The different conclusions about the nature of the X-ray spectrum of KR Aur may be due to differences in the accretion rate, since this star was in a high optical state during the ROSAT observation, but in an intermediate optical state during the ASCA observation. TT Ari, on the other hand, was in a high optical state during both observations, so directly contradicts the hypothesis that the X-ray spectra of VY Sol stars in their high optical states are blackbodies. Instead, based on theoretical expectations and the ASCA, Chandra, and XMM spectra of other nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables, we believe that the X-ray spectra of VY Sol stars in their low and high optical states are due to hot thermal plasma in the boundary layer between the accretion disk and the surface of the white dwarf, and appeal to the acquisition of Chandra and XMM grating spectra to test this prediction.

  1. The X-Ray Spectra of VY Sculptoris Stars Are Not Blackbodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauche, Christopher W.; Mukai, Koji

    2002-02-01

    Using ASCA data, we find, contrary to other researchers using ROSAT data, that the X-ray spectra of the VY Sculptoris stars TT Arietis and KR Aurigae are poorly fitted by an absorbed blackbody model but are well fitted by an absorbed thermal plasma model. The different conclusions about the nature of the X-ray spectrum of KR Aur may be due to differences in the accretion rate since this star was in a high optical state during the ROSAT observation but in an intermediate optical state during the ASCA observation. TT Ari, on the other hand, was in a high optical state during both observations and so directly contradicts the hypothesis that the X-ray spectra of VY Scl stars in their high optical states are blackbodies. Instead, based on theoretical expectations and the ASCA, Chandra, and XMM spectra of other nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables, we believe that the X-ray spectra of VY Scl stars in their low and high optical states are due to hot thermal plasma in the boundary layer between the accretion disk and the surface of the white dwarf, and we appeal to the acquisition of Chandra and XMM grating spectra to test this prediction.

  2. Plasmonic Structure Enhanced Exciton Generation at the Interface between the Perovskite Absorber and Copper Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuen-Feng; Chiang, Chien-Hung; Wu, Chun-Guey

    2014-01-01

    The refractive index and extinction coefficient of a triiodide perovskite absorber (TPA) were obtained by fitting the transmittance spectra of TPA/PEDOT:PSS/ITO/glass using the transfer matrix method. Cu nanoplasmonic structures were designed to enhance the exciton generation in the TPA and to simultaneously reduce the film thickness of the TPA. Excitons were effectively generated at the interface between TPA and Cu nanoparticles, as observed through the 3D finite-difference time-domain method. The exciton distribution is advantageous for the exciton dissociation and carrier transport. PMID:25295290

  3. Hydroxide absorption heat pumps with spray absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Summerer, F.; Alefeld, G.; Zeigler, F.; Riesch, P.

    1996-11-01

    The absorber is one of the most expensive components of an absorption heat pump or chiller, respectively. In order to reduce the cost of a heat exchanger, much effort is invested into searching for additives for heat transfer enhancement. Another way to reduce heat exchanger cost, especially for machines with low capacities, is to use an adiabatic spray absorber. The basic principles of the spray absorber is to perform heat and mass transfer separated from each other in two different components. In this way the heat can be rejected effectively in a liquid-liquid heat exchanger, whereas the mass transfer occurs subsequently in a simple vessel. The spray technique can not only save heat exchanger cost in conventional absorption systems working with water and lithium bromide, it also allows the use of quite different working fluids such as hydroxides, which have lower heat transfer coefficients in falling films. Moreover, the separated heat transfer can easily be performed in a liquid-to-air heat exchanger. Hence it is obvious to use hydroxides that allow for a high temperature lift for building an air-cooled chiller with spray absorber. In this presentation theoretical and experimental investigations of the spray absorber as well as the setup will be described. Finally, possible applications will be outlined.

  4. Electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Heppner, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary designs were generated for two electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber concepts. Initially, an electrochemically regenerable absorption bed concept was designed. This concept incorporated the required electrochemical regeneration components in the absorber design, permitting the absorbent to be regenerated within the absorption bed. This hardware was identified as the electrochemical absorber hardware. The second hardware concept separated the functional components of the regeneration and absorption process. This design approach minimized the extravehicular activity component volume by eliminating regeneration hardware components within the absorber. The electrochemical absorber hardware was extensively characterized for major operating parameters such as inlet carbon dioxide partial pressure, process air flow rate, operational pressure, inlet relative humidity, regeneration current density and absorption/regeneration cycle endurance testing.

  5. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshida, M.; Green, Michael A.; Kuno, Y.; Lau, Wing

    2010-05-30

    Liquid hydrogen absorbers for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) have been developed, and the first absorber has been tested at KEK. In the preliminary test at KEK we have successfully filled the absorber with {approx}2 liters of liquid hydrogen. The measured hydrogen condensation speed was 2.5 liters/day at 1.0 bar. No hydrogen leakage to vacuum was found between 300 K and 20 K. The MICE experiment includes three AFC (absorber focusing coil) modules, each containing a 21 liter liquid hydrogen absorber made of aluminum. The AFC module has safety windows to separate its vacuum from that of neighboring modules. Liquid hydrogen is supplied from a cryocooler with cooling power 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The first absorber will be assembled in the AFC module and installed in MICE at RAL.

  6. Broadband patterned magnetic microwave absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Wu, Tianlong; Wang, Wei; Guan, Jianguo; Zhai, Pengcheng

    2014-07-28

    It is a tough task to greatly improve the working bandwidth for the traditional flat microwave absorbers because of the restriction of available material parameters. In this work, a simple patterning method is proposed to drastically broaden the absorption bandwidth of a conventional magnetic absorber. As a demonstration, an ultra-broadband microwave absorber with more than 90% absorption in the frequency range of 4–40 GHz is designed and experimentally realized, which has a thin thickness of 3.7 mm and a light weight equivalent to a 2-mm-thick flat absorber. In such a patterned absorber, the broadband strong absorption is mainly originated from the simultaneous incorporation of multiple λ/4 resonances and edge diffraction effects. This work provides a facile route to greatly extend the microwave absorption bandwidth for the currently available absorbing materials.

  7. Tunable enhanced optical absorption of graphene using plasmonic perfect absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yijun; Zhu, Jinfeng; Liu, Qing Huo

    2015-01-26

    Enhancement and manipulation of light absorption in graphene is a significant issue for applications of graphene-based optoelectronic devices. In order to achieve this purpose in the visible region, we demonstrate a design of a graphene optical absorber inspired by metal-dielectric-metal metamaterial for perfect absorption of electromagnetic waves. The optical absorbance ratios of single and three atomic layer graphene are enhanced up to 37.5% and 64.8%, respectively. The graphene absorber shows polarization-dependence and tolerates a wide range of incident angles. Furthermore, the peak position and bandwidth of graphene absorption spectra are tunable in a wide wavelength range through a specific structural configuration. These results imply that graphene in combination with plasmonic perfect absorbers have a promising potential for developing advanced nanophotonic devices.

  8. Dynamic vibration absorbers for vibration control within a frequency band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Li, Deyu; Cheng, Li

    2011-04-01

    The use of dynamic vibration absorbers to control the vibration of a structure in both narrow and broadbands is discussed in this paper. As a benchmark problem, a plate incorporating multiple vibration absorbers is formulated, leading to an analytical solution when the number of absorbers yields one. Using this analytical solution, control mechanisms of the vibration absorber in different frequency bandwidths are studied; the coupling properties due to the introduction of the absorber into the host structure are analyzed; and the control performance of the absorber in different control bandwidths is examined with respect to its damping and location. It is found that the interaction between the plate and the absorber by means of the reaction force from the absorber plays a dominant role in a narrow band control, while in a relatively broadband control the dissipation by the absorber damping governs the control performance. When control bandwidth further enlarges, the optimal locations of the absorbers are not only affected by the targeted mode, but also by the other plate modes. These locations need to be determined after establishing a trade-off between the targeted mode and other modes involved in the coupling. Finally, numerical findings are assessed based on a simply-supported plate and a fair agreement between the predicted and measured results is obtained.

  9. Modeling the Absorbing Aerosol Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Joyce; Zhang, Sophia

    2003-01-01

    We propose a scheme to model the absorbing aerosol index and improve the biomass carbon inventories by optimizing the difference between TOMS aerosol index (AI) and modeled AI with an inverse model. Two absorbing aerosol types are considered, including biomass carbon and mineral dust. A priori biomass carbon source was generated by Liousse et al [1996]. Mineral dust emission is parameterized according to surface wind and soil moisture using the method developed by Ginoux [2000]. In this initial study, the coupled CCM1 and GRANTOUR model was used to determine the aerosol spatial and temporal distribution. With modeled aerosol concentrations and optical properties, we calculate the radiance at the top of the atmosphere at 340 nm and 380 nm with a radiative transfer model. The contrast of radiance at these two wavelengths will be used to calculate AI. Then we compare the modeled AI with TOMS AI. This paper reports our initial modeling for AI and its comparison with TOMS Nimbus 7 AI. For our follow-on project we will model the global AI with aerosol spatial and temporal distribution recomputed from the IMPACT model and DAO GEOS-1 meteorology fields. Then we will build an inverse model, which applies a Bayesian inverse technique to optimize the agreement of between model and observational data. The inverse model will tune the biomass burning source strength to reduce the difference between modelled AI and TOMS AI. Further simulations with a posteriori biomass carbon sources from the inverse model will be carried out. Results will be compared to available observations such as surface concentration and aerosol optical depth.

  10. An extremely wideband and lightweight metamaterial absorber

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Pei, Zhibin; Pang, Yongqiang; Wang, Jiafu; Zhang, Anxue; Qu, Shaobo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional microwave metamaterial absorber based on the stand-up resistive film patch array. The absorber has wideband absorption, lightweight, and polarization-independent properties. Our design comes from the array of unidirectional stand-up resistive film patches backed by a metallic plane, which can excite multiple standing wave modes. By rolling the resistive film patches as a square enclosure, we obtain the polarization-independent property. Due to the multiple standing wave modes, the most incident energy is dissipated by the resistive film patches, and thus, the ultra-wideband absorption can be achieved by overlapping all the absorption modes at different frequencies. Both the simulated and experimental results show that the absorber possesses a fractional bandwidth of 148.2% with the absorption above 90% in the frequency range from 3.9 to 26.2 GHz. Moreover, the proposed absorber is extremely lightweight. The areal density of the fabricated sample is about 0.062 g/cm2, which is approximately equivalent to that of eight stacked standard A4 office papers. It is expected that our proposed absorber may find potential applications such as electromagnetic interference and stealth technologies. PMID:26130845

  11. Oxygen absorbers in food preservation: a review.

    PubMed

    Cichello, Simon Angelo

    2015-04-01

    The preservation of packaged food against oxidative degradation is essential to establish and improve food shelf life, customer acceptability, and increase food security. Oxygen absorbers have an important role in the removal of dissolved oxygen, preserving the colour, texture and aroma of different food products, and importantly inhibition of food spoilage microbes. Active packaging technology in food preservation has improved over decades mostly due to the sealing of foods in oxygen impermeable package material and the quality of oxygen absorber. Ferrous iron oxides are the most reliable and commonly used oxygen absorbers within the food industry. Oxygen absorbers have been transformed from sachets of dried iron-powder to simple self-adhesive patches to accommodate any custom size, capacity and application. Oxygen concentration can be effectively lowered to 100 ppm, with applications spanning a wide range of food products and beverages across the world (i.e. bread, meat, fish, fruit, and cheese). Newer molecules that preserve packaged food materials from all forms of degradation are being developed, however oxygen absorbers remain a staple product for the preservation of food and pharmaceutical products to reduce food wastage in developed nations and increased food security in the developing & third world. PMID:25829570

  12. An extremely wideband and lightweight metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yang; Pei, Zhibin; Pang, Yongqiang; Wang, Jiafu; Zhang, Anxue; Qu, Shaobo

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional microwave metamaterial absorber based on the stand-up resistive film patch array. The absorber has wideband absorption, lightweight, and polarization-independent properties. Our design comes from the array of unidirectional stand-up resistive film patches backed by a metallic plane, which can excite multiple standing wave modes. By rolling the resistive film patches as a square enclosure, we obtain the polarization-independent property. Due to the multiple standing wave modes, the most incident energy is dissipated by the resistive film patches, and thus, the ultra-wideband absorption can be achieved by overlapping all the absorption modes at different frequencies. Both the simulated and experimental results show that the absorber possesses a fractional bandwidth of 148.2% with the absorption above 90% in the frequency range from 3.9 to 26.2 GHz. Moreover, the proposed absorber is extremely lightweight. The areal density of the fabricated sample is about 0.062 g/cm2, which is approximately equivalent to that of eight stacked standard A4 office papers. It is expected that our proposed absorber may find potential applications such as electromagnetic interference and stealth technologies.

  13. Coherent perfect absorber based on metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Guangyu; Shi, Quanchao; Zhu, Zheng; Shi, Jinhui

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate selective coherent perfect absorption based on interaction between bilayered asymmetrically split rings (ASRs) metamaterials and a standing wave formed by two coherent counter propagating beams. The selective coherent perfect absorbers with high absorption have been achieved depending on the phase difference between two coherent beams. The selective coherent control absorbers can be well designed by changing the thickness of the dielectric layer and the asymmetry of the ASRs. The coherently controlled metamaterials provide an opportunity to realize selective multiband absorption and ultrafast information processing.

  14. Spatial-frequency multiplication via absorbance modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.-Y.; Wallraff, Gregory M.; Menon, Rajesh

    2007-08-27

    The absorbance of a thin film of photochromic material can be reversibly modified by exposure to two different wavelengths, {lambda}{sub 1} and {lambda}{sub 2}. When such a film is illuminated by both wavelengths simultaneously, and the longer wavelength {lambda}{sub 2} possesses a node in its intensity distribution, then the absorbance of the layer can be made high except at an arbitrarily small region near the node. By exploiting the large nonlinearity introduced by this mechanism, combined with the reversibility of the absorbance of the photochromic layer, the authors demonstrate that spatial frequencies larger than those present in incident intensity distributions may be generated. They show photoresist exposures to demonstrate this technique.

  15. The ROSAT spectrum of 3C 351 - A warm absorber in an X-ray-'quiet' quasar?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiore, Fabrizio; Elvis, Martin; Mathur, Smita; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Mcdowell, Jonathan C.

    1993-01-01

    3C 351 is one of the most X-ray-quiet radio quasars (alpha(ox) about 1.6). We have observed 3C 351 with the ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) and find a complex X-ray spectrum which is not well reproduced by a power law plus low-energy cut-off model. Soft excess, partial covering, and 'warm absorber' models can all produce acceptable fits, although only the warm absorber model gives typical values for the high-energy continuum slope. The alpha(ox) measured by using quasi-simultaneous ROSAT, MMT, and HST observations is in the range 1.5-1.6, significantly above the average of 1.37 for a complete sample of 33 3CR quasars. If the soft excess or partial covering models are correct, 3C 351 appears X-ray-quiet in the PSPC band because it has an extremely steep or flat intrinsic high-energy spectral slope. However, if the warm absorber model is correct, the quasar is intrinsically X-ray-quiet; the normalization of the intrinsic (unabsorbed) X-ray emission is unusually low relative to the optical luminosity. We investigate the properties of our warm absorber model in some detail. The apparently complicated behavior of the fit parameters may be understood by considering the effects of changing absorbing column and ionization parameter on intrinsic power-law-spectra of different slopes.

  16. Cloud Power Spectra-Dependence on Solar Zenith Angle and Wavelength, Implications for Cloud Optical Property Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Marshak, A.; Cahalan, R. F.; Wen, G.

    1999-01-01

    Scale breaks (spatial scales at which power-law exponent changes occur) observed in Landsat radiances have proven to be useful indicators of radiative interactions, and have aided the development of improved techniques in the remote sensing of clouds. This work extends previous theoretical studies to absorbing wavelengths by using both Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) observations and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to infer the systematic dependencies of power spectral shape on cloud characteristics, illumination conditions, and wavelength. We show that MC simulations operating on a simple fractal model of horizontally inhomogeneous clouds produce power spectra that qualitatively resemble observed spectra. We also show that the decrease in the spectra power-law exponent seen at intermediate scales (referred to as "roughening") as the Sun becomes more oblique is more pronounced at absorbing wavelengths. An automated procedure designed to detect the small scale break location is unable to find systematic differences between TM Band 4 and Band 7, despite the fact that MC simulations point to systematic differences in horizontal fluxes. The effect of these qualitative characteristics of the spatial spectra on the retrieval of cloud optical properties is examined by comparing power spectra of nadir radiances with power spectra of optical properties retrieved using either traditional Independent Pixel Approximation approaches or modifications based on normalized radiance indices and the inverse Non-local Independent Pixel Approximation. Assuming that the actual cloud properties follow perfect scaling behavior at all scales, we show the improvement of the proposed retrieval modifications.

  17. Development and validation of different methods manipulating zero order and first order spectra for determination of the partially overlapped mixture benazepril and amlodipine: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemdan, A.

    2016-07-01

    Three simple, selective, and accurate spectrophotometric methods have been developed and then validated for the analysis of Benazepril (BENZ) and Amlodipine (AML) in bulk powder and pharmaceutical dosage form. The first method is the absorption factor (AF) for zero order and amplitude factor (P-F) for first order spectrum, where both BENZ and AML can be measured from their resolved zero order spectra at 238 nm or from their first order spectra at 253 nm. The second method is the constant multiplication coupled with constant subtraction (CM-CS) for zero order and successive derivative subtraction-constant multiplication (SDS-CM) for first order spectrum, where both BENZ and AML can be measured from their resolved zero order spectra at 240 nm and 238 nm, respectively, or from their first order spectra at 214 nm and 253 nm for Benazepril and Amlodipine respectively. The third method is the novel constant multiplication coupled with derivative zero crossing (CM-DZC) which is a stability indicating assay method for determination of Benazepril and Amlodipine in presence of the main degradation product of Benazepril which is Benazeprilate (BENZT). The three methods were validated as per the ICH guidelines and the standard curves were found to be linear in the range of 5-60 μg/mL for Benazepril and 5-30 for Amlodipine, with well accepted mean correlation coefficient for each analyte. The intra-day and inter-day precision and accuracy results were well within the acceptable limits.

  18. Development and validation of different methods manipulating zero order and first order spectra for determination of the partially overlapped mixture benazepril and amlodipine: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Hemdan, A

    2016-07-01

    Three simple, selective, and accurate spectrophotometric methods have been developed and then validated for the analysis of Benazepril (BENZ) and Amlodipine (AML) in bulk powder and pharmaceutical dosage form. The first method is the absorption factor (AF) for zero order and amplitude factor (P-F) for first order spectrum, where both BENZ and AML can be measured from their resolved zero order spectra at 238nm or from their first order spectra at 253nm. The second method is the constant multiplication coupled with constant subtraction (CM-CS) for zero order and successive derivative subtraction-constant multiplication (SDS-CM) for first order spectrum, where both BENZ and AML can be measured from their resolved zero order spectra at 240nm and 238nm, respectively, or from their first order spectra at 214nm and 253nm for Benazepril and Amlodipine respectively. The third method is the novel constant multiplication coupled with derivative zero crossing (CM-DZC) which is a stability indicating assay method for determination of Benazepril and Amlodipine in presence of the main degradation product of Benazepril which is Benazeprilate (BENZT). The three methods were validated as per the ICH guidelines and the standard curves were found to be linear in the range of 5-60μg/mL for Benazepril and 5-30 for Amlodipine, with well accepted mean correlation coefficient for each analyte. The intra-day and inter-day precision and accuracy results were well within the acceptable limits. PMID:27078209

  19. Energy absorber for the CETA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J.

    1994-05-01

    The energy absorber that was developed for the CETA (Crew Equipment and Translation Aid) on Space Station Freedom is a metal on metal frictional type and has a load regulating feature that prevents excessive stroking loads from occurring while in operation. This paper highlights some of the design and operating aspects and the testing of this energy absorber.

  20. Energy absorber for the CETA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J.

    1994-01-01

    The energy absorber that was developed for the CETA (Crew Equipment and Translation Aid) on Space Station Freedom is a metal on metal frictional type and has a load regulating feature that prevents excessive stroking loads from occurring while in operation. This paper highlights some of the design and operating aspects and the testing of this energy absorber.

  1. Metal-shearing energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, R. J.; Wittrock, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Device, consisting of tongue of thin aluminum alloy strip, pull tab, slotted steel plate which serves as cutter, and steel buckle, absorbs mechanical energy when its ends are subjected to tensile loading. Device is applicable as auxiliary shock absorbing anchor for automobile and airplane safety belts.

  2. Influence of different sized nanoparticles combined with ultrasound on the optical properties of in vitro normal and cancerous human lung tissue studied with OCT and diffuse reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L. P.; Wu, G. Y.; Wei, H. J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Yang, H. Q.; He, Y. H.; Xie, S. S.; Liu, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The present study is concerned with the in vitro study of different sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles’ (NPs) penetration and accumulation in human normal lung (NL) tissue and lung adenocarcinoma tumor (LAT) tissue by the methods of continuous optical coherence tomography (OCT) monitoring and diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra measurement, and their evaluating the effects of TiO2 NPs in two sizes (60 nm and 100 nm) and their combination with ultrasound (US) on the optical properties of human NL and LAT tissue. Spectral measurements indicate that TiO2 NPs penetrate and accumulate into the tissues and thus induce enhancement of DR. The averaged and normalized OCT signal intensity suggests that light penetration depth is significantly enlarged by ultrasound. The average attenuation coefficient of NL tissue changes from 5.10  ±  0.26 mm-1 to 3.12  ±  0.43 mm-1 and 2.15  ±  0.54 mm-1 at 120 min for 60 nm TiO2 NPs and 60 nm TiO2NPs/US treatment, respectively, and from 5.54  ±  0.46 mm-1 to 3.24  ±  0.73 mm-1 and 2.69  ±  0.34 mm-1 at 150 min for 100 nm TiO2 NPs and 100 nm TiO2NPs/US, respectively. The average attenuation coefficient of LAT tissue changes from 9.12  ±  0.54 mm-1 to 4.54  ±  0.39 mm-1 and 3.61  ±  0.38 mm-1 at 120 min for 60 nm TiO2 NPs and 60 nm TiO2NPs/US treatment, respectively, and from 9.79  ±  0.32 mm-1 to 5.12  ±  0.47 mm-1 and 4.89  ±  0.59 mm-1 at 150 min for 100 nm TiO2 NPs and 100 nm TiO2NPs/US, respectively. The results suggest that the optical properties of NL and LAT tissues are greatly influenced by TiO2 NPs and their combination with ultrasound.

  3. Dual band metamaterial perfect absorber based on artificial dielectric "molecules".

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen; Li, Bo; Zhao, Qian; Zhou, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Dual band metamaterial perfect absorbers with two absorption bands are highly desirable because of their potential application areas such as detectors, transceiver system, and spectroscopic imagers. However, most of these dual band metamaterial absorbers proposed were based on resonances of metal patterns. Here, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate a dual band metamaterial perfect absorber composed of artificial dielectric "molecules" with high symmetry. The artificial dielectric "molecule" consists of four "atoms" of two different sizes corresponding to two absorption bands with near unity absorptivity. Numerical and experimental absorptivity verify that the dual-band metamaterial absorber is polarization insensitive and can operate in wide-angle incidence. PMID:27406699

  4. SU-D-19A-02: Electron and Photon Absorbed Fractions for Tumors of Varying Sizes and Compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Olguin, E; Bolch, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To calculate absorbed fractions for mono-energetic photons and electrons in tumors of varying compositions using Monte Carlo simulations in MCNPX. Although tumor dosimetry has been previously investigated, these studies are very limited as they only consider absorbed fractions for soft-tissue tumors. Methods: The tumors were modeled as spheres with radii ranging from 0.10 cm to 6.0 cm and with compositions varying from 100% soft tissue to 100% bone. The energies of both the photons and electrons were varied from 10 keV to 10 MeV and were homogenously distributed throughout the tumor volume. Furthermore, this investigation addresses the issue of spherical versus elliptical tumors. Both prolate and oblate spheroid tumors of different compositions were modeled, and absorbed fractions were calculated for various electron and photon energies. Results: The data clearly shows an absorbed fraction dependence on tumor composition. For example, a soft-tissue model for a 3 MeV electron emitted in a 1 cm diameter bone tumor would have an 83% error, and this same assumption for a 500 keV photon would yield a 74% error. Ultimately, empirical fits were created for each of the five material compositions in order to facilitate the absorbed fraction calculation, requiring only the tumor size and particle energy. Furthermore, the data shows that absorbed fractions for moderate spheroids can be well approximated by spherical tumors of equal mass to within 8%, but in the extreme cases where the spheroid resembles more of a disk, the errors can be as high as 30%. Conclusion: This comprehensive data set is most valuable for nuclear medicine dosimetry because it incorporates particle type, particle energy, tumor size, and tumor composition. Although mono-energetic particles were modeled, absorbed fractions and S-values may be calculated for any radionuclide via linear interpolation, as long as the particle energies or spectra are known.

  5. Determination of thickness and optical constants of solgel derived polyvinylpyrrolidone/ZrO2 films from transmission spectra using different dispersion models.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hongbao; Sun, Jinghua; Xu, Yao; Wu, Dong

    2012-10-10

    Transmission measurements have been used to investigate the optical properties of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/ZrO(2) films synthesized by the solgel route. The optical constants of PVP/ZrO(2) films deposited on quartz substrates were determined by fitting transmission spectra in the wavelength range of 200-800 nm with the Tauc-Lorentz and Cody-Lorentz physical models. Combined with Urbach tail, both models give a good description of transmission data and reveal that refractive index of film slightly decreases with increasing PVP mass fraction. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements were also performed on PVP/ZrO(2) films to complement the thicknesses. The value of film thickness, including interface information from transmission spectra, is consistent with that result obtained from XRR, indicating that fitting transmission spectrum is a high reliable optical characterization. PMID:23052070

  6. Absorbent product to absorb fluids. [for collection of human wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Correale, J. V. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A multi-layer absorbent product for use in contact with the skin to absorb fluids is discussed. The product utilizes a water pervious facing layer for contacting the skin, overlayed by a first fibrous wicking layer, the wicking layer preferably being of the one-way variety in which fluid or liquid is moved away from the facing layer. The product further includes a first container section defined by inner and outer layer of a water pervious wicking material between which is disposed a first absorbent mass. A second container section defined by inner and outer layers between which is disposed a second absorbent mass and a liquid impermeable/gas permeable layer. Spacesuit applications are discussed.

  7. Science on a Roll. Part One: Absorbing Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendzel, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity that tests the absorbency of different brands of paper towels. Suggests making this activity into an open-ended inquiry type of activity. Includes sample questions to guide students, topics for class discussion, and sample methods of using the absorbency activity. (KHR)

  8. An Absorbing Look at Terry-Cloth Towels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Richard; Everett, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a lesson where students explore the absorbency of several towels with different weaves and weights. The lesson follows the 5E learning-cycle model and incorporates engineering in the sense of product testing with a focus on the relationship between the weave of a towel and its absorbency. The National Science Education…

  9. Physically absorbable reagents-collectors in elementary flotation

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Kondrat'ev; I.G. Bochkarev

    2007-09-15

    Based on the reviewed researches held at the Institute of Mining, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, the effect of physically absorbable reagents-collectors on formation of a flotation complex and its stability in turbulent pulp flows in flotation machines of basic types is considered. The basic requirements for physically absorbable reagents-collectors at different flotation stages are established.

  10. Metal-rich absorbers at high redshifts: abundance patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshakov, S. A.; Agafonova, I. I.; Molaro, P.; Reimers, D.; Hou, J. L.

    2009-11-01

    Aims: To study chemical composition of metal-rich absorbers at high redshifts in order to understand their nature and to determine sources of their metal enrichment. Methods: From six spectra of high-z QSOs, we select eleven metal-rich, Z ⪆ Z_⊙, and optically-thin to the ionizing radiation, N(H i) < 1017 cm-2, absorption systems ranging between z = 1.5 and z = 2.9 and revealing lines of different ions in subsequent ionization stages. Computations are performed using the Monte Carlo inversion (MCI) procedure complemented with the adjustment of the spectral shape of the ionizing radiation. This procedure along with selection criteria for the absorption systems guarantee the accuracy of the ionization corrections and of the derived element abundances (C, N, O, Mg, Al, Si, Fe). Results: The majority of the systems (10 from 11) show abundance patterns which relate them to outflows from low and intermediate mass stars. One absorber is enriched prevalently by SNe II, however, a low percentage of such systems in our sample is conditioned by the selection criteria. All systems have sub-kpc linear sizes along the line-of-sight with many less than 20 pc. In several systems, silicon is deficient, presumably due to the depletion onto dust grains in the envelopes of dust-forming stars and the subsequent gas-dust separation. At any value of [C/H], nitrogen can be either deficient, [N/C] < 0, or enhanced, [N/C] > 0, which supposes that the nitrogen enrichment occurs irregularly. In some cases, the lines of Mg ii λλ2796, 2803 appear to be shifted, probably as a result of an enhanced content of heavy isotopes 25Mg and 26Mg in the absorbing gas relative to the solar isotopic composition. Seven absorbers are characterized by low mean ionization parameter U, logU < - 2.3, among them only one system has a redshift z > 2 (z_abs = 2.5745) whereas all others are found at z 1.8. This statistics is not affected by any selection criteria and reflects the real rise in number of such

  11. Estimators of bottom reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, L.; Holloway, J.

    1992-01-01

    Estimators of in situ bottom spectral reflectance are calculated from multi-station optical field data gathered with standard instrumentation from different sites. These spectra are then compared to reflectance spectra measured in the laboratory of the bottom sediments collected in the field for the stations at these different sites. The relative fit of the estimated spectral curves to those measured in the laboratory was measured. The most accurate absolute estimation was provided by the single scattering irradiance model.

  12. Optimization of ramified absorber networks doing desalination.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Martin S; Heiss, Gregor; Hübler, Alfred

    2011-01-01

    An iterated function system is used to generate fractal-like ramified graph networks of absorbers, which are optimized for desalination performance. The diffusion equation is solved for the boundary case of constant pressure difference at the absorbers and a constant ambient salt concentration far from the absorbers, while constraining both the total length of the network and the total area of the absorbers to be constant as functions of generation G. A linearized form of the solution was put in dimensionless form which depends only on a dimensionless membrane resistance, a dimensionless inverse svelteness ratio, and G. For each of the first nine generations G=2,…,10, the optimal graph shapes were obtained. Total water production rate increases parabolically as a function of generation, with a maximum at G=7. Total water production rate is shown to be approximately linearly related to the power consumed, for a fixed generation. Branching ratios which are optimal for desalination asymptote decreasingly to r=0.510 for large G, while branching angles which are optimal for desalination asymptote decreasingly to 1.17 radians. Asymmetric graphs were found to be less efficient for desalination than symmetric graphs. The geometry which is optimal for desalination does not depend strongly on the dimensionless parameters, but the optimal water production does. The optimal generation was found to increase with the inverse svelteness ratio. PMID:21405775

  13. Development of optical tool for the characterization of selective solar absorber tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braillon, Julien; Stollo, Alessio; Delord, Christine; Raccurt, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    In the Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) technologies, selective solar absorbers, which have a cylindrical geometry, are submitted to strong environmental constraints. The degradation of their optical properties (total solar absorbance and total emittance) has a direct impact on the performances. In order to know optical properties of absorber tubes, we present in this article a new optical tool developed by our laboratory which fit onto commercial spectrometers. Total solar absorbance and total emittance are calculated from total reflectance spectra measured by UV-Vis and IR spectrophotometry. To verify and validate the measurement method, we performed a comparative study between flat and cylindrical samples with same surface properties.

  14. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, William H.

    1984-01-01

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system.

  15. Hyperuniformity of critical absorbing states.

    PubMed

    Hexner, Daniel; Levine, Dov

    2015-03-20

    The properties of the absorbing states of nonequilibrium models belonging to the conserved directed percolation universality class are studied. We find that, at the critical point, the absorbing states are hyperuniform, exhibiting anomalously small density fluctuations. The exponent characterizing the fluctuations is measured numerically, a scaling relation to other known exponents is suggested, and a new correlation length relating to this ordering is proposed. These results may have relevance to photonic band-gap materials. PMID:25839254

  16. Hyperuniformity of Critical Absorbing States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hexner, Daniel; Levine, Dov

    2015-03-01

    The properties of the absorbing states of nonequilibrium models belonging to the conserved directed percolation universality class are studied. We find that, at the critical point, the absorbing states are hyperuniform, exhibiting anomalously small density fluctuations. The exponent characterizing the fluctuations is measured numerically, a scaling relation to other known exponents is suggested, and a new correlation length relating to this ordering is proposed. These results may have relevance to photonic band-gap materials.

  17. Packed Alumina Absorbs Hypergolic Vapors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. J.; Mauro, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    Beds of activated alumina effective as filters to remove hypergolic vapors from gas streams. Beds absorb such substances as nitrogen oxides and hydrazines and may also absorb acetylene, ethylene, hydrogen sulfide, benzene, butadiene, butene, styrene, toluene, and xoylene. Bed has no moving parts such as pumps, blowers and mixers. Reliable and energy-conservative. Bed readily adapted to any size from small portable units for use where little vapor release is expected to large stationary units for extensive transfer operations.

  18. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, W.H.

    1984-10-16

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system. 9 figs.

  19. Effect of irradiance spectra on the photoinduced toxicity of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, S.A.; Mount, D.R.; Burkhard, L.P.; Ankley, G.T.; Makynen, E.A.; Leonard, E.N.

    2000-05-01

    Photoinduced toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is dependent on the concentration of compounds present and the dose of light received. Of the light present, only those wavelengths absorbed by the compound have the potential to initiate the photochemical events underlying phototoxicity. This suggests that variation in light spectra present in natural waters, arising from variation in dissolved organic carbon composition, is an important determinant of phototoxicity risk in specific, PAH-contaminated waterbodies. To quantify the effect of environmentally realistic variation in light spectra on toxicity, brine shrimp (Artemia salina) assays were conducted under various light spectra and with three PAHs (pyrene, fluoranthene, and anthracene) of known phototoxicity potential. In these spectral assays, the total ultraviolet light present was equivalent; only the spectral characteristics varied. Based on the absorbance spectra of these PAHs, it was predicted that toxicity, quantified using immobilization as the endpoint, would vary significantly among light spectra in pyrene assays, but not in anthracene assays, and that variation in toxicity in fluoranthene assays would be intermediate. The results supported these assumptions. In the pyrene exposures, the glass filter time to 50% population immobilization (IT50) (39.5 min) was 117% longer than the KCr filter IT50 (18.2 min). In the fluoranthene exposures, the glass filter IT50 (49.5 min) was 27% longer than the KCr filter IT50 (39.1 min). In the anthracene exposures, the glass filter IT50 (62.2 min) was not statistically different from the KCr filter IT50 (63.8 min). Comparison of these results with the results of assays conducted under neutral-density filters (that change intensity but not spectral distribution) demonstrate that multiplying spectral intensity by wavelength-specific absorbance accurately predicts relative photoinduced toxicity among the experimental treatments. These results indicate

  20. Erbium concentration dependent absorbance in tellurite glass

    SciTech Connect

    Sazali, E. S. Rohani, M. S. Sahar, M. R. Arifin, R. Ghoshal, S. K. Hamzah, K.

    2014-09-25

    Enhancing the optical absorption cross-section in topically important rare earth doped tellurite glasses is challenging for photonic devices. Controlled synthesis and detailed characterizations of the optical properties of these glasses are important for the optimization. The influence of varying concentration of Er{sup 3+} ions on the absorbance characteristics of lead tellurite glasses synthesized via melt-quenching technique are investigated. The UV-Vis absorption spectra exhibits six prominent peaks centered at 490, 526, 652, 800, 982 and 1520 nm ascribed to the transitions in erbium ion from the ground state to the excited states {sup 4}F{sub 7/2}, {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}, {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}, {sup 4}I{sub 9/2}, {sup 2}H{sub 11/2} and {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}, respectively. The results are analyzed by means of optical band gap E{sub g} and Urbach energy E{sub u}. The values of the energy band gap are found decreased from 2.82 to 2.51 eV and the Urbach energy increased from 0.15 to 0.24 eV with the increase of the Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration from 0 to 1.5 mol%. The excellent absorbance of the prepared tellurite glasses makes them suitable for fabricating solid state lasers.

  1. Methods for applying microchannels to separate methane using liquid absorbents, especially ionic liquid absorbents from a mixture comprising methane and nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y.; Litt, Robert D.; Dongming, Qiu; Silva, Laura J.; Lamont, Micheal Jay; Fanelli, Maddalena; Simmons, Wayne W.; Perry, Steven

    2011-10-04

    Methods of using microchannel separation systems including absorbents to improve thermal efficiency and reduce parasitic power loss. Energy is typically added to desorb methane and then energy or heat is removed to absorb methane using a working solution. The working solution or absorbent may comprise an ionic liquid, or other fluids that demonstrate a difference in affinity between methane and nitrogen in a solution.

  2. Simultaneous in-bore rail and insulator spectra from a railgun plasma armature

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, D.; Sedghinasah, A.; Crawford, R. . Space Inst.)

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on absolute spectral radiance measurements obtained simultaneously at the rail and insulator surface of the UTSI 1 cm square-bore railgun. The emission spectra were obtained through the use of quartz optical fibers which penetrated both the rail and the insulator walls. The spectral characteristics of the rail and insulator emission are quite similar but differ significantly in magnitude. A detailed plasma radiation model was used to analyze these spectra. In order to obtain reasonable agreement between the model predictions and the experimental spectra, it was necessary to assume that these existed a broadband absorbing layer at the insulator surface. This result suggests a new physical model of the plasma armature in which insulator ablation leads to significant 3-dimensional flow and affects the shape of the current emission pattern on the rail surfaces.

  3. A recyclable and regenerable magnetic chitosan absorbent for dye uptake.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weifeng; Huang, Xuelian; Wang, Yilin; Sun, Shudong; Zhao, Changsheng

    2016-10-01

    A recyclable and regenerable magnetic polysaccharide absorbent for methylene blue (MB) removal was prepared by coating magnetic polyethyleneimine nanoparticles (PEI@MNPs) with sulfonated chitosan (SCS) and further cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. The driving force for coating is the electrostactic interaction between positively charged PEI and negatively charged SCS. Infrared spectra, zeta potential, thermal gravimetric analysis and X-ray diffraction demonstrated the successful synthesis of magnetic polysaccharide absorbent. The self-assembly of polysaccharide with magnetic nanopartices did not alter the saturation magnetization value of the absorbent confirmed by vibrating sample magnetometer. The nanoparticles showed fast removal (about 30min reached equilibrium) of MB. In particular, the removal ability of MB after desorption did not reduce, demonstrating an excellent regeneration ability. Our study provides new insights into utilizing polysaccharides for environmental remediation and creating advanced magnetic materials for various promising applications. PMID:27312630

  4. Determination of cell culture medium components with overlapping near-IR absorbance peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McShane, Michael J.; Cote, Gerard L.

    1998-04-01

    A noninvasive method to measure levels of important tissue culture nutrients and metabolic by-products would provide the potential for computer control of the growth process, decreasing the amount of human attention necessary while improving efficiency and repeatability of experiments by precise maintenance of important parameters without contaminating the culture environment. Our approach to meeting this need is the development of optical sensor that extract chemical information based on the absorbance of near-IR radiation. Near-IR spectroscopy of the 2.0-2.5 micrometers region was used to collect absorbance data of aqueous mixtures containing glucose, lactate, ammonia, glutamate, and glutamine, as well as cell culture media samples from a three-day growth period. Multivariate calibration was used with these data to prove that complicated spectra can yield reasonable prediction errors. Calibration models using different combinations of spectra from aqueous mixtures and culture media were built and evaluated for glucose, ammonia, and lactate. Prediction errors of 2 percent, 8 percent, and 15 percent were obtained for glucose, lactate, and ammonia, respectively.

  5. First-order optimal linear and nonlinear detuning of centrifugal pendulum vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayet, J.; Ulbrich, H.

    2015-01-01

    Centrifugal pendulum vibration absorbers are used to attenuate steady-state torsional vibrations in rotating and reciprocating machines. In most practical implementations, a set of multiple absorbers is symmetrically arranged on a rotor. Typically, each absorber mass is bifilar suspended, which allows the absorber mass to be moved along a prescribed path. Previous studies have considered how to determine absorber paths in order to obtain absorbers with amplitude-independent frequency known as tautochronic absorbers. It is known that a tautochronic absorber is highly desirable if only one absorber is installed on the rotor. However, in most applications multiple interacting absorbers are installed and as a result symmetry-induced nonlinear instabilities or localization caused by relative imperfections among the absorbers may occur. An effective strategy to avoid such situations is to perturb the tautochronic tuning which has been confirmed in practice and by previous theoretical investigations. This paper presents an approach for detuning a recently developed general tautochronic absorber design. The general design makes it possible to consider a wide class of tautochronic absorbers, e.g. absorbers without bifilar suspensions. The intent of this paper is to extend the existing tautochronic design guideline to non-tautochronic designs. As a result, different absorber designs can be addressed by one uniform theoretical approach, and existing absorber designs are included as special cases. Former studies on detuning of bifilar tautochronic absorbers use a one-parameter family of curves on which the absorber mass rides. Here, however, the detuning is not restricted to a one-parameter family of curves, which makes it possible to either optimize system performance or to avoid asynchronous absorber responses. In the case of synchronously responding equal absorbers, a necessary condition for optimal performance is derived analytically. Further, it is shown that asynchronous

  6. Inorganic UV absorbers for the photostabilisation of wood-clearcoating systems: Comparison with organic UV absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloui, F.; Ahajji, A.; Irmouli, Y.; George, B.; Charrier, B.; Merlin, A.

    2007-02-01

    Inorganic UV absorbers which are widely used today were originally designed neither as a UV blocker in coatings applications, nor for wood protection. In recent years however, there has been extensive interest in these compounds, especially with regard to their properties as a UV blocker in coating applications. In this work, we carried out a comparative study to look into some inorganic and organic UV absorbers used in wood coating applications. The aim of this study is to determine the photostabilisation performances of each type of UV absorbers, to seek possible synergies and the influences of different wood species. We have also searched to find eventual correlation between these performances and the influence of UV absorbers on the film properties. Our study has compared the performances of the following UV absorbers: hombitec RM 300, hombitec RM 400 from the Sachtleben Company; transparent yellow and red iron oxides from Sayerlack as inorganic UV absorbers; organic UV absorbers Tinuvin 1130 and Tinuvin 5151 from Ciba Company. The study was carried out on three wood species: Abies grandis, tauari and European oak. The environmental constraints (in particular the limitation of the emission of volatile organic compounds VOCs) directed our choice towards aqueous formulations marketed by the Sayerlack Arch Coatings Company. The results obtained after 800 h of dry ageing showed that the Tinuvins and the hombitecs present better wood photostabilisations. On the other hand in wet ageing, with the hombitec, there are appearances of some cracks and an increase in the roughness of the surface. This phenomenon is absent when the Tinuvins are used. With regard to these results, the thermomechanical analyses relating to the follow-up of the change of the glass transition temperature ( Tg) of the various coating systems, show a different behaviour between the two types of absorbers. However, contrary to organic UV absorbers, inorganic ones tend to increase Tg during ageing

  7. Nearby Galaxies as Damped Lyman alpha Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Sandhya

    1993-12-01

    The evolution of the neutral hydrogen content of galaxies as a function of time is an important constraint on processes in galactic evolution. We present a comprehensive, statistical description of the HI content and distribution within galaxies at the present epoch and compare these statistics with the properties of HI associated with ``damped Lyman alpha '' absorption systems at high redshift that are observed in the spectra of QSOs. Omega_ {HI}(z=0), the HI mass density at the present epoch relative to the present critical mass density, is found to be (2.3 +/- 0.6) times 10(-4) h75(-1) , consistent with the decreasing trend of the HI content with time deduced from QSO absorption line statistics for redshifts from about 4 to 0.5 (Lanzetta 1993). Spiral galaxies contain an overwhelming 94% of this neutral hydrogen mass. The rest is contained in irregulars (3%), and S0s plus ellipticals (3%). Spirals also offer the largest cross-section to line-of-sight absorption of light from QSOs. By considering nearby spirals as potential absorbers, the interception probability as a function of the HI column density, N(HI), is derived for comparison with the cross-sections inferred from observations of damped Lyman alpha systems. Consistent with previous studies, the comparison shows that the damped Ly alpha lines are created by absorbers that subtend larger cross-sections than present-day spirals by a factor of 5 implying that galaxies were either larger or more numerous at z ~ 2.5. We are also investigating the statistics of damped Lyman alpha absorbers in the redshift range 0.2spectra of QSOs with known Mg II absorption lines. The results, which are based on HST observations, fill in the gap in the Omega_ {HI}(z) curve between our point at z= 0 and the extensive ground-based studies for z > 1.5.

  8. [Absorbed doses in dental radiology].

    PubMed

    Bianchi, S D; Roccuzzo, M; Albrito, F; Ragona, R; Anglesio, S

    1996-01-01

    The growing use of dento-maxillo-facial radiographic examinations has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies on dosimetry. A thorough review of the literature is presented in this article. Most studies were carried out on tissue equivalent skull phantoms, while only a few were in vivo. The aim of the present study was to evaluate in vivo absorbed doses during Orthopantomography (OPT). Full Mouth Periapical Examination (FMPE) and Intraoral Tube Panoramic Radiography (ITPR). Measurements were made on 30 patients, reproducing clinical conditions, in 46 anatomical sites, with 24 intra- and 22 extra-oral thermoluminiscent dosimeters (TLDS). The highest doses were measured, in orthopantomography, at the right mandibular angle (1899 mu Gy) in FMPE on the right naso-labial fold (5640 mu Gy and in ITPR on the palatal surface of the left second upper molar (1936 mu Gy). Intraoral doses ranged from 21 mu Gy, in orthopantomography, to 4494 mu Gy in FMPE. Standard errors ranged from 142% in ITPR to 5% in orthopantomography. The highest rate of standard errors was found in FMPE and ITPR. The data collected in this trial are in agreement with others in major literature reports. Disagreements are probably due to different exam acquisition and data collections. Such differences, presented comparison in several sites, justify lower doses in FMPE and ITPR. Advantages and disadvantages of in vivo dosimetry of the maxillary region are discussed, the former being a close resemblance to clinical conditions of examination and the latter the impossibility of collecting values in depth of tissues. Finally, both ITPR and FMPE required lower doses than expected, and can be therefore reconsidered relative to their radiation risk. PMID:8966249

  9. Multispectral processing without spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drew, Mark S.; Finlayson, Graham D.

    2003-07-01

    It is often the case that multiplications of whole spectra, component by component, must be carried out, for example when light reflects from or is transmitted through materials. This leads to particularly taxing calculations, especially in spectrally based ray tracing or radiosity in graphics, making a full-spectrum method prohibitively expensive. Nevertheless, using full spectra is attractive because of the many important phenomena that can be modeled only by using all the physics at hand. We apply to the task of spectral multiplication a method previously used in modeling RGB-based light propagation. We show that we can often multiply spectra without carrying out spectral multiplication. In previous work J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11 , 1553 (1994) we developed a method called spectral sharpening, which took camera RGBs to a special sharp basis that was designed to render illuminant change simple to model. Specifically, in the new basis, one can effectively model illuminant change by using a diagonal matrix rather than the 33 linear transform that results from a three-component finite-dimensional model G. Healey and D. Slater, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11 , 3003 (1994). We apply this idea of sharpening to the set of principal components vectors derived from a representative set of spectra that might reasonably be encountered in a given application. With respect to the sharp spectral basis, we show that spectral multiplications can be modeled as the multiplication of the basis coefficients. These new product coefficients applied to the sharp basis serve to accurately reconstruct the spectral product. Although the method is quite general, we show how to use spectral modeling by taking advantage of metameric surfaces, ones that match under one light but not another, for tasks such as volume rendering. The use of metamers allows a user to pick out or merge different volume structures in real time simply by changing the lighting. 2003 Optical Society of America

  10. Multispectral processing without spectra.

    PubMed

    Drew, Mark S; Finlayson, Graham D

    2003-07-01

    It is often the case that multiplications of whole spectra, component by component, must be carried out,for example when light reflects from or is transmitted through materials. This leads to particularly taxing calculations, especially in spectrally based ray tracing or radiosity in graphics, making a full-spectrum method prohibitively expensive. Nevertheless, using full spectra is attractive because of the many important phenomena that can be modeled only by using all the physics at hand. We apply to the task of spectral multiplication a method previously used in modeling RGB-based light propagation. We show that we can often multiply spectra without carrying out spectral multiplication. In previous work [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11, 1553 (1994)] we developed a method called spectral sharpening, which took camera RGBs to a special sharp basis that was designed to render illuminant change simple to model. Specifically, in the new basis, one can effectively model illuminant change by using a diagonal matrix rather than the 3 x 3 linear transform that results from a three-component finite-dimensional model [G. Healey and D. Slater, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 11, 3003 (1994)]. We apply this idea of sharpening to the set of principal components vectors derived from a representative set of spectra that might reasonably be encountered in a given application. With respect to the sharp spectral basis, we show that spectral multiplications can be modeled as the multiplication of the basis coefficients. These new product coefficients applied to the sharp basis serve to accurately reconstruct the spectral product. Although the method is quite general, we show how to use spectral modeling by taking advantage of metameric surfaces, ones that match under one light but not another, for tasks such as volume rendering. The use of metamers allows a user to pick out or merge different volume structures in real time simply by changing the lighting. PMID:12868625

  11. The difference in the energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays at the minima of the 19th and 20th solar activity cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svirzhevskaya, A. K.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Svirzhevsky, N. S.; Charakhchyan, T. N.

    1985-01-01

    The absorption curves of the cosmic ray charged component for solar minima in 1965 and 1975 to 1977 are analyzed on the basis of daily stratospheric measurements in Murmansk, Moscow, Alma-Ata and Mirny (Antarctic). Two distinct features in the energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays are revealed during these periods. At the 20th solar activity minimum there was the additional short range component of cosmic rays. Additional fluxes in the stratosphere at high latitudes caused by this component are probably protons and He nuclei with the energy 100 to 500 MeV/n. The fluxes are estimates as Approx. 300 sq m/s/sr. At the minimum in 1975 to 1977 the proton intensity in the energy range 1 to 15 GeV is 10 to 15% lower than that in the 1965 solar activity minimum.

  12. Investigation of robust flexible conformal THz perfect metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ju-Hyung; Hokmabadi, Mohammad P.; Balci, Soner; Rivera, Elmer; Wilbert, David; Kung, Patrick; Kim, Seongsin Margaret

    2016-04-01

    The flexible metamaterials have promised to greatly expand our ability to realize a wide range of novel applications including new methods of sensing and cloaking. In this work, flexible metamaterial absorbers, targeted to operate at terahertz frequencies, have been designed, simulated, and fabricated. The absorber structure consisted of a conducting ground plane, a dielectric spacer, and a frequency selective surface which was composed of two layers of nonconcentric, differently sized, single-ring arrays. Absorber structure was designed and simulated such that absorbers exhibited two distinct resonance frequencies with the strength of absorption for both sensitive to the center-to-center spacing of the rings and polarization. The functionality of the absorbers was seen to be similar both in planar and deformed positions, which promises robustness of the conformal flexible metamaterials device under the deformation and uneven surfaces.

  13. Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment (CARE)

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric

    2015-12-23

    During Project DE-FE0007528, CARE (Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment), Neumann Systems Group (NSG) designed, installed and tested a 0.5MW NeuStream® carbon dioxide (CO2) capture system using the patented NeuStream® absorber equipment and concentrated (6 molal) piperazine (PZ) as the solvent at Colorado Springs Utilities’ (CSU’s) Martin Drake pulverized coal (PC) power plant. The 36 month project included design, build and test phases. The 0.5MW NeuStream® CO2 capture system was successfully tested on flue gas from both coal and natural gas combustion sources and was shown to meet project objectives. Ninety percent CO2 removal was achieved with greater than 95% CO2product purity. The absorbers tested support a 90% reduction in absorber volume compared to packed towers and with an absorber parasitic power of less than 1% when configured for operation with a 550MW coal plant. The preliminary techno-economic analysis (TEA) performed by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) predicted an over-the-fence cost of $25.73/tonne of CO2 captured from a sub-critical PC plant.

  14. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  15. Nonventing, Regenerable, Lightweight Heat Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    A lightweight, regenerable heat absorber (RHA), developed for rejecting metabolic heat from a space suit, may also be useful on Earth for short-term cooling of heavy protective garments. Unlike prior space-suit-cooling systems, a system that includes this RHA does not vent water. The closed system contains water reservoirs, tubes through which water is circulated to absorb heat, an evaporator, and an absorber/radiator. The radiator includes a solution of LiCl contained in a porous material in titanium tubes. The evaporator cools water that circulates through a liquid-cooled garment. Water vapor produced in the evaporator enters the radiator tubes where it is absorbed into the LiCl solution, releasing heat. Much of the heat of absorption is rejected to the environment via the radiator. After use, the RHA is regenerated by heating it to a temperature of 100 C for about 2 hours to drive the absorbed water back to the evaporator. A system including a prototype of the RHA was found to be capable of maintaining a temperature of 20 C while removing heat at a rate of 200 W for 6 hours.

  16. Vibrational absorption and vibrational circular dichroism spectra of leucine in water under different pH conditions: hydrogen-bonding interactions with water.

    PubMed

    Poopari, Mohammad Reza; Zhu, Peiyan; Dezhahang, Zahra; Xu, Yunjie

    2012-11-21

    Vibrational absorption (VA) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy have been used to study leucine, a flexible branched-chain amino acid, in aqueous solution. The VA spectra in the range of 1800-1250 cm(-1) of leucine in D(2)O under three representative pHs from strongly acidic (pH = 1), near neutral (pH = 6), to strongly basic (pH = 13), have been measured. The related VCD spectrum has been obtained under near neutral condition. Searches have been carried out to identify the most stable conformers of the Zwitterionic, protonated, and deprotonated forms of leucine in water. The geometry optimization, harmonic frequency calculations, and VA and VCD intensities have been computed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level with the implicit polarizable continuum solvation model. While the observed VA spectra under three pHs can be well interpreted with the inclusion of the implicit solvation model, both implicit and explicit solvation models have been found to be crucial for the adequate interpretation of the complex VCD features observed. Molecular dynamics simulations and radial distribution functions have been used to aid the modeling of the leucine-(water)(N) clusters. It has been recognized that the insertion of a water molecule between the COO(-) and NH(3) (+) functional groups in the explicit solvated clusters is critical to reproduce the VCD signatures observed. Furthermore, the inclusion of the implicit bulk water environment has been found to be essential to lock water molecules, which are directly hydrogen bonded to leucine, into the positions expected in solution. The application of the explicit and implicit solvation models simultaneously allows new insights into the hydrogen bonding network surrounding leucine in aqueous solution and the role of the surrounding bulk water in stabilizing such hydrogen-bonding network. PMID:23181307

  17. Vibrational absorption and vibrational circular dichroism spectra of leucine in water under different pH conditions: Hydrogen-bonding interactions with water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poopari, Mohammad Reza; Zhu, Peiyan; Dezhahang, Zahra; Xu, Yunjie

    2012-11-01

    Vibrational absorption (VA) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy have been used to study leucine, a flexible branched-chain amino acid, in aqueous solution. The VA spectra in the range of 1800-1250 cm-1 of leucine in D2O under three representative pHs from strongly acidic (pH = 1), near neutral (pH = 6), to strongly basic (pH = 13), have been measured. The related VCD spectrum has been obtained under near neutral condition. Searches have been carried out to identify the most stable conformers of the Zwitterionic, protonated, and deprotonated forms of leucine in water. The geometry optimization, harmonic frequency calculations, and VA and VCD intensities have been computed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level with the implicit polarizable continuum solvation model. While the observed VA spectra under three pHs can be well interpreted with the inclusion of the implicit solvation model, both implicit and explicit solvation models have been found to be crucial for the adequate interpretation of the complex VCD features observed. Molecular dynamics simulations and radial distribution functions have been used to aid the modeling of the leucine-(water)N clusters. It has been recognized that the insertion of a water molecule between the COO- and NH3+ functional groups in the explicit solvated clusters is critical to reproduce the VCD signatures observed. Furthermore, the inclusion of the implicit bulk water environment has been found to be essential to lock water molecules, which are directly hydrogen bonded to leucine, into the positions expected in solution. The application of the explicit and implicit solvation models simultaneously allows new insights into the hydrogen bonding network surrounding leucine in aqueous solution and the role of the surrounding bulk water in stabilizing such hydrogen-bonding network.

  18. THE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION OF INTERVENING WEAK Mg II QUASAR ABSORBERS AND A CURIOUS DEPENDENCE ON QUASAR LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Jessica L.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Klimek, Elizabeth S.; Murphy, Michael T.

    2013-05-01

    We have identified 469 Mg II {lambda}{lambda}2796, 2803 doublet systems having W{sub r} {>=} 0.02 A in 252 Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer and UVES/Very Large Telescope quasar spectra over the redshift range 0.1 < z < 2.6. Using the largest sample yet of 188 weak Mg II systems (0.02 A {<=}W{sub r} < 0.3 A), we calculate their absorber redshift path density, dN/dz. We find clear evidence of evolution, with dN/dz peaking at z {approx} 1.2, and that the product of the absorber number density and cross section decreases linearly with increasing redshift; weak Mg II absorbers seem to vanish above z {approx_equal} 2.7. If the absorbers are ionized by the UV background, we estimate number densities of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 9} Mpc{sup -3} for spherical geometries and 10{sup 2}-10{sup 5} Mpc{sup -3} for more sheetlike geometries. We also find that dN/dz toward intrinsically faint versus bright quasars differs significantly for weak and strong (W{sub r} {>=} 1.0 A) absorbers. For weak absorption, dN/dz toward bright quasars is {approx}25% higher than toward faint quasars (10{sigma} at low redshift, 0.4 {<=} z {<=} 1.4, and 4{sigma} at high redshift, 1.4 < z {<=} 2.34). For strong absorption the trend reverses, with dN/dz toward faint quasars being {approx}20% higher than toward bright quasars (also 10{sigma} at low redshift and 4{sigma} at high redshift). We explore scenarios in which beam size is proportional to quasar luminosity and varies with absorber and quasar redshifts. These do not explain dN/dz's dependence on quasar luminosity.

  19. Spectral absorbance of benthic cladoceran carapaces as a new method for inferring past UV exposure of aquatic biota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevalainen, Liisa; Rautio, Milla

    2014-01-01

    We developed a method for measuring fossil cladoceran (Branchiopoda) carapace absorbance to infer past ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure in lakes. This was done under the presumptions that cladocerans synthesize photoprotective compounds, of which melanin is the main UV-absorbing pigment, to their exoskeletons and melanin is preserved in sedimentary cladoceran remains. We extracted large-sized cladoceran (benthic Alona spp.) carapaces from subsections of sediment cores from two environmentally divergent lakes; a humic boreal forest lake in eastern Finland (past 1500 years) and a clear-water mountain lake in the Austrian Alps (past 300 years). We measured the absorbance of extracted carapaces with a spectrophotometer under visible light and UV wavelengths using an adapter, which was designed to hold the microfossils. When compared to the spectrum of synthetic melanin, the shapes of absorbance spectra at the 700-280 nm range suggested that the fossil carapaces contained melanin. The carapace absorbance under UV throughout the sediment cores was significantly higher in the clear-water alpine lake than in the humic boreal lake reflecting differences in the general underwater UV and optical environments between the sites. In addition, carapace absorbance was significantly higher during the Little Ice Age (LIA) than during pre- or post-LIA periods in both lakes. In the alpine lake, this was most likely a response to increased underwater UV induced by reduced primary production and more transparent water column during the cold summers of LIA, whereas reduced input of carbon compounds from the catchment through elongated permafrost and ice-cover periods likely induced higher water transparency in the boreal lake during this cold climate phase. We conclude that fossil melanin provides a good estimation of past underwater UV exposure in lakes with large cladoceran carapaces preserved in sediments and that the method introduced here is easy and cost- and time

  20. Strong enhancement of optical absorbance from ionic self-assembled multilayer thin films of nanocluster Pt and polymer dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanjing; Claus, Richard O.

    1999-01-01

    The observation of unusually enhanced optical absorbance spectra of ionic self assembled multilayer (ISAM) thin films composed of alternating layers of Pt nanoclusters (<1 nm dimension) and polymer dye is reported. The first bilayer absorbance is found to be considerably larger than that of several succeeding bilayers even though there is no difference in composition for each bilayer. A layer-by-layer-dependent redshift in maximum wavelength position due to the strong coupling of metals and polymer molecules is observed. The saturation absorption is obtained for the first time when the required thickness of the ISAM film is deposited. The large and unusual enhancement effects are attributed to both the charge-transfer mechanism and very large local fields and collective phenomena near the surface of the small metal clusters/electrolytes and at the interfaces between the cluster/polymer multilayers.

  1. New Co-containing glass ceramics saturable absorbers for 1.5-μm solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyarevich, Alexander M.; Denisov, Igor A.; Yumashev, Konstantin V.; Chuvaeva, Tamara I.; Dymshits, Olga S.; Onushchenko, Alexei A.; Zhilin, Alexander A.

    2001-03-01

    New saturable absorber Q-switch for 1.54 %mum Er: glass laser is present. The saturable absorber is transparent glass ceramic containing magnesium-aluminum spinel nanocrystallites doped with tetrahedrally coordinated Co2+ ions. Q-switched pulses of up to 5.5 mJ in energy and 80 ns in duration at 1.54 micrometers were achieved. Relaxation time of the 4A2 to 4T1(4F) transition bleaching was measured to be (450+/- 150)ns. Ground-state absorption cross-sections at 1.54 micrometers wavelength were estimated to be (3.2+/- 0.4)*10-19 cm2 and (5.0+/- 0.6)X10-20 cm2, respectively. Results of study absorption and luminescence spectra of different glass ceramics on the base of magnesium-aluminum, zinc-aluminum, lithium-aluminum spinel nanocrystallites doped with tetrahedrally coordinated Co2+ ions are also analyzed.

  2. Comparison of piezoelectronic networks acting as distributed vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurini, Corrado; dell'Isola, Francesco; Del Vescovo, Dionisio

    2004-09-01

    Electric vibration absorbers made of distributed piezoelectric devices for the control of beam vibrations are studied. The absorbers are obtained by interconnecting an array of piezoelectric transducers uniformly distributed on a beam with different modular electric networks. Five different topologies are considered and their damping performance is analysed and compared. Their optimal parameters are found by adopting a criterion for critical damping of k¯-waves: the parameters are suitably chosen to have the quickest temporal vibration decay for a single wave number k¯. The analysis is based on homogenized models of the modular piezo-electromechanical systems, i.e. they are regarded as continuous systems by assuming that the number of modules per unit length is high enough with respect to the considered wave numbers. Calling k¯ -absorbers the corresponding optimal absorbers, we show that: (i) k¯-waves are damped in k¯-absorbers with an optimal decay time which is independent of the absorber interconnecting topology, while it depends only on the piezoelectric coupling coefficient; (ii) the efficiency of k¯-absorbers depends significantly on the absorber interconnecting topology for k different from k¯; (iii) one of the proposed absorbers (which is made of a fourth-order electric transmission line with a second-order electric dissipation) equally performs for all the wave numbers and accomplishes an effective multi-modal damping for the mechanically forced response; (iv) the optimal values of the electric parameters differently depend on the number n of used circuit modules for different interconnecting topologies and, in particular, the optimal inductance per module needed in a fourth-order electric transmission line is proportional 1/ n3.

  3. Evolution of organic aerosol mass spectra upon heating: implications for OA phase and partitioning behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, C. D.; Wilson, K. R.; Smith, J. D.; Kolesar, K.

    2010-12-01

    VUV mass spectra for two distinct aerosol types as they are passed through a thermodenuder at different temperatures have been measured. The two aerosol types considered are primary lubricating oil (LO) aerosol and secondary aerosol from the α-pinene + O3 reaction (αP). The evolution of the VUV mass spectra for the two aerosol types with temperature are observed to differ dramatically. For LO particles, the spectra exhibit distinct, T-dependent changes in which the lower m/z peaks, corresponding to compounds with higher vapor pressures, disappear more rapidly than the high m/z peaks. In stark contrast, the αP aerosol spectrum is essentially unchanged by temperature even though the particles experience significant mass loss due to evaporation. The variations in the LO spectra are found to be quantitatively in good agreement with expectations from absorptive partitioning theory whereas the αP spectra suggest that the evaporation of αP particles is not governed by partitioning theory. We postulate that this difference arises from the αP particles existing as a glass instead of having the expected liquid-like behavior. To reconcile these observations with decades of aerosol growth experiments, which indicate that OA formation is describable through equilibrium partitioning, we put forward a sequential partitioning model wherein secondary OA is rapidly converted from an absorbing form to a non-absorbing form. The results suggest that although OA growth may be describable through equilibrium partitioning theory, the thermodynamic properties of formed OA particles may differ significantly from the properties determined in the equilibrium framework.

  4. What is the best microwave absorber?

    SciTech Connect

    Hutcheon, R.M.; Adams, F.P.; De Jong, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    The absorption of microwave power by samples with different shapes and dielectric properties was studied for single-mode excitation of a microwave applicator. Exact calculations were done of the quality factor, Q and the frequency shift of a cylindrically-symmetric cavity with a small, cylindrically-symmetric sample on-axis in the cavity, demonstrating the influence of sample shape and dielectric properties on the power absorption per unit volume of the sample. An approximate, but very general, analytical formalism was developed for calculating the power absorbed by the sample and thus the contribution of the sample to the Q of the cavity. This simple formalism is shown, by comparison with the exact calculations, to be quite accurate over a very broad range of properties. Thus, it can be used to calculate the power absorbed by samples which are smaller than the internal wavelength, and also to gain insight into the factors that influence the microwave absorption.

  5. Ultra-broadband terahertz metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianfei; Ma, Zhaofeng; Sun, Wujiong; Ding, Fei; He, Qiong; Zhou, Lei; Ma, Yungui

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrated an ultra-broadband, polarization-insensitive, and wide-angle metamaterial absorber for terahertz (THz) frequencies using arrays of truncated pyramid unit structure made of metal-dielectric multilayer composite. In our design, each sub-layer behaving as an effective waveguide is gradually modified in their lateral width to realize a wideband response by effectively stitching together the resonance bands of different waveguide modes. Experimentally, our five layer sample with a total thickness 21 μm is capable of producing a large absorptivity above 80% from 0.7 to 2.3 THz up to the maximum measurement angle 40°. The full absorption width at half maximum of our device is around 127%, greater than those previously reported for THz frequencies. Our absorber design has high practical feasibility and can be easily integrated with the semiconductor technology to make high efficient THz-oriented devices.

  6. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Hamby, C. Jr.; Akerman, M.A.; Seals, R.D.

    1993-09-07

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, is prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000 C to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm[sup 3]. 9 figures.

  7. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Hamby, Jr., Clyde; Akerman, M. Alfred; Seals, Roland D.

    1993-01-01

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000.degree. C. to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm.sup.3.

  8. Adaptive inertial shock-absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraj, Rami; Holnicki-Szulc, Jan; Knap, Lech; Seńko, Jarosław

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces and discusses a new concept of impact absorption by means of impact energy management and storage in dedicated rotating inertial discs. The effectiveness of the concept is demonstrated in a selected case-study involving spinning management, a recently developed novel impact-absorber. A specific control technique performed on this device is demonstrated to be the main source of significant improvement in the overall efficiency of impact damping process. The influence of various parameters on the performance of the shock-absorber is investigated. Design and manufacturing challenges and directions of further research are formulated.

  9. Scaling neutron absorbed dose distributions from one medium to another

    SciTech Connect

    Awschalom, M.; Rosenberg, I.; Ten Haken, R.K.

    1982-11-01

    Central axis depth dose (CADD) and off-axis absorbed dose ratio (OAR) measurements were made in water, muscle and whole skeletal bone TE-solutions, mineral oil and glycerin with a clinical neutron therapy beam. These measurements show that, for a given neutron beam quality and field size, there is a universal CADD distribution at infinity if the depth in the phantom is expressed in terms of appropriate scaling lengths. These are essentially the kerma-weighted neutron mean free paths in the media. The method used in ICRU No. 26 to scale the CADD by the ratio of the densities is shown to give incorrect results. the OAR's measured in different media at depths proportional to the respective mean free paths were also found to be independent of the media to a good approximation. It is recommended that relative CADD and OAR measurements be performed in water because of its universality and convenience. A table of calculated scaling lengths is given for various neutron energy spectra and for various tissues and materials of practical importance in neutron dosimetry.

  10. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2014-11-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, the organic carbon concentration is measured using thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) from quartz fiber filters. Here, methods are presented whereby Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters are used to accurately predict TOR OC. Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filters. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites sampled during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to artifact-corrected TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date which leads to precise and accurate OC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of determination (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, all μg m-3 values based on the nominal IMPROVE sample volume of 32.8 m-3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision and accuracy to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also divided into calibration and test sets by OC mass and by OM / OC which reflects the organic composition of the particulate matter and is obtained from organic functional group composition; this division also leads to precise and accurate OC predictions. Low OC concentrations have higher bias and normalized error due to TOR analytical errors and artifact correction errors, not due to the range of OC mass of the samples in the calibration set. However, samples with low OC mass can be used to predict samples with high OC mass indicating that the

  11. DFT study of the effect of different metals on structures and electronic spectra of some organic-metal compounds as sensitizing dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guodong; Li, Rongqing; Kou, Shanshan; Tang, Tingling; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yiwei

    2014-02-01

    Ruthenium polypyridined-derivative complexes are used in dye-sensitized solar cell [DSSC] as a light to current conversion sensitizer. In order to lower the cost of the DSSC the normal transition metals were used to replace the noble metal ruthenium, and some compounds [ML2L'] (M = Pt, Fe, Ni, Zn; L = isonicotinic acid, L' = maleonitriledithiolate, I = PtL2L', II = FeL2L', III = NiL2L', IV = ZnL2L') were selected as the replacement. The geometries, electronic structures and optical absorption spectra of these compounds have been studied by using density functional theory (DFT) calculation at the B3LYP/LANL2DZ, B3P86/LANL2DZ, B3LYP/GEN level of theory. All the geometric parameters are close to the experimental values. The HOMOs are mainly on the maleonitriledithiolate groups mixed with fewer characters of the metal atom, the LUMOs are mainly on the two pyridine ligands. This means that the electron transition is attributed to the LLCT. The maximum absorptions of complexes are found to be at 351 nm, 806 nm for compound I, and 542 nm for compound II. The maximum absorptions of complexes are found to be at 884 nm for compound III, and 560 nm for compound IV. This means that those compounds may be as a suitable sensitizer for solar energy conversion applications.

  12. Interaction of inhalational anaesthetics with CO2 absorbents.

    PubMed

    Baum, Jan A; Woehlck, Harvey J

    2003-03-01

    We review the currently available carbon dioxide absorbents: sodium hydroxide lime (=soda lime), barium hydroxide lime, potassium-hydroxide-free soda lime, calcium hydroxide lime and non-caustic lime. In general, all of these carbon dioxide absorbents are liable to react with inhalational anaesthetics. However, there is a decreasing reactivity of the different absorbents with inhalational anaesthetics: barium hydroxide lime > soda lime > potassium-hydroxide-free soda lime > calcium hydroxide lime and non-caustic lime. Gaseous compounds generated by the reaction of the anaesthetics with desiccated absorbents are those that threaten patients. All measures are comprehensively described to--as far as possible--prevent any accidental drying out of the absorbent. Whether or not compound A, a gaseous compound formed by the reaction of sevoflurane with normally hydrated absorbents, is still a matter of concern is discussed. Even after very high loading with this compound, during long-lasting low-flow sevoflurane anaesthesias, no clinical or laboratory signs of renal impairment were observed in any of the surgical patients. Finally, guidelines for the judicious use of different absorbents are given. PMID:12751549

  13. Counterflow absorber for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    An air-cooled, vertical tube absorber for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. Strong absorbent solution is supplied to the top of the absorber and refrigerant vapor is supplied to the bottom of the absorber to create a direct counterflow of refrigerant vapor and absorbent solution in the absorber. The refrigeration system is designed so that the volume flow rate of refrigerant vapor in the tubes of the absorber is sufficient to create a substantially direct counterflow along the entire length of each tube in the absorber. This provides several advantages for the absorber such as higher efficiency and improved heat transfer characteristics, and allows improved purging of non-condensibles from the absorber.

  14. Oil and fat absorbing polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for forming a solid network polymer having a minimal amount of crosslinking for use in absorbing fats and oils. The polymer remains solid at a swelling ratio in oil or fat of at least ten and provides an oil absorption greater than 900 weight percent.

  15. The Composite Spectrum of Strong Lyα Forest Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieri, Matthew M.; Frank, Stephan; Weinberg, David H.; Mathur, Smita; York, Donald G.

    2010-11-01

    We present a new method for probing the physical conditions and metal enrichment of the intergalactic medium: the composite spectrum of Lyα forest absorbers. We apply this technique to a sample of 9480 Lyα absorbers with redshift 2 < z < 3.5 identified in the spectra of 13,279 high-redshift quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Fifth Data Release (DR5). Absorbers are selected as local minima in the spectra with 2.4 < τLyα < 4.0; at SDSS resolution (≈150 km s-1 FWHM), these absorbers are blends of systems that are individually weaker. In the stacked spectra, we detect seven Lyman series lines and metal lines of O VI, N V, C IV, C III, Si IV, C II, Al II, Si II, Fe II, Mg II, and O I. Many of these lines have peak optical depths of <0.02, but they are nonetheless detected at high statistical significance. Modeling the Lyman series measurements implies that our selected systems have total H I column densities N_{H I} ≈ 10^{15.4} cm^{-2}. Assuming typical physical conditions ρ /\\bar{ρ}=10, T = 104-104.5 K, and [Fe/H]=-2 yields reasonable agreement with the line strengths of high-ionization species, but it underpredicts the low-ionization species by two orders of magnitude or more. This discrepancy suggests that the low-ionization lines arise in dense, cool, metal-rich clumps, present in some absorption systems.

  16. Heaving buoys, point absorbers and arrays.

    PubMed

    Falnes, Johannes; Hals, Jørgen

    2012-01-28

    Absorption of wave energy may be considered as a phenomenon of interference between incident and radiated waves generated by an oscillating object; a wave-energy converter (WEC) that displaces water. If a WEC is very small in comparison with one wavelength, it is classified as a point absorber (PA); otherwise, as a 'quasi-point absorber'. The latter may be a dipole-mode radiator, for instance an immersed body oscillating in the surge mode or pitch mode, while a PA is so small that it should preferably be a source-mode radiator, for instance a heaving semi-submerged buoy. The power take-off capacity, the WEC's maximum swept volume and preferably also its full physical volume should be reasonably matched to the wave climate. To discuss this matter, two different upper bounds for absorbed power are applied in a 'Budal diagram'. It appears that, for a single WEC unit, a power capacity of only about 0.3 MW matches well to a typical offshore wave climate, and the full physical volume has, unfortunately, to be significantly larger than the swept volume, unless phase control is used. An example of a phase-controlled PA is presented. For a sizeable wave-power plant, an array consisting of hundreds, or even thousands, of mass-produced WEC units is required. PMID:22184661

  17. Microscopic modeling of nitride intersubband absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montano, Ines; Allerman, A. A.; Wierer, J. J.; Moseley, M.; Skogen, E. J.; Tauke-Pedretti, A.; Vawter, G. A.

    III-nitride intersubband structures have recently attracted much interest because of their potential for a wide variety of applications ranging from electro-optical modulators to terahertz quantum cascade lasers. To overcome present simulation limitations we have developed a microscopic absorbance simulator for nitride intersubband devices. Our simulator calculates the band structure of nitride intersubband systems using a fully coupled 8x8 k.p Hamiltonian and determines the material response of a single period in a density-matrix-formalism by solving the Heisenberg equation including many-body and dephasing contributions. After calculating the polarization due to intersubband transitions in a single period, the resulting absorbance of a superlattice structure including radiative coupling between the different periods is determined using a non-local Green's-function formalism. As a result our simulator allows us to predict intersubband absorbance of superlattice structures with microscopically determined lineshapes and linewidths accounting for both many-body and correlation contributions. This work is funded by Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory Directed Research and Development program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin.

  18. Broadband metasurface absorber for solar thermal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, C.; Chen, L.; Cryan, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we propose a broadband polarization-independent selective absorber for solar thermal applications. It is based on a metal-dielectric-metal metasurface structure, but with an interlayer of absorbing amorphous carbon rather than a low loss dielectric. Optical absorbance results derived from finite difference time domain modelling are shown for ultra-thin carbon layers in air and on 200 nm of gold for a range of carbon thicknesses. A gold-amorphous carbon-gold trilayer with a top layer consisting of a 1D grating is then optimised in 2D to give a sharp transition from strong absorption up to 2 μm to strong reflection above 2 μm resulting in good solar selective performance. The gold was replaced by the high-melting-point metal tungsten, which is shown to have very similar performance to the gold case. 3D simulations then show that the gold-based structure performs well as a square periodic array of squares, however there is low absorption around 400 nm. A cross-based structure is found to increase this absorption without significantly reducing the performance at longer wavelengths.

  19. Fluorescence spectra and biological activity of aerosolized bacillus spores and MS2 bacteriophage exposed to ozone at different relative humidities in a rotating drum

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; Kinahan, Sean; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Santarpia, Joshua L.

    2015-10-14

    Biological aerosols (bioaerosols) released into the environment may undergo physical and chemical transformations when exposed to atmospheric constituents such as solar irradiation, reactive oxygenated species, ozone, free radicals, water vapor and pollutants. Aging experiments were performed in a rotating drum chamber subjecting bioaerosols, Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (BtAH) spores and MS2 bacteriophages to ozone at 0 and 150 ppb, and relative humidities (RH) at 10%, 50%, and 80+%. Fluorescence spectra and intensities of the aerosols as a function of time in the reaction chamber were measured with a single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an Ultra-Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer® Spectrometer (UV-APS). Losses in biological activity were measured by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assay. For both types of aerosols the largest change in fluorescence emission was between 280 and 400 nm when excited at 263 nm followed by fluorescence emission between 380 and 700 nm when excited at 351 nm. The fluorescence for both BtAH and MS2 were observed to decrease significantly at high ozone concentration and high RH when excited at 263 nm excitation. The decreases in 263 nm excited fluorescence are indicative of hydrolysis and oxidation of tryptophan in the aerosols. Fluorescence measured with the UV-APS (355-nm excitation) increased with time for both BtAH and MS2 aerosols. A two log loss of MS2 bacteriophage infectivity was observed in the presence of ozone at ~50% and 80% RH when measured by culture and normalized for physical losses by q-PCR. Viability of BtAH spores after exposure could not be measured due to the loss of genomic material during experiments, suggesting degradation of extracelluar DNA attributable to oxidation. The results of these studies indicate that the physical and biological properties of bioaerosols change significantly after exposure to ozone and water vapor.

  20. Fluorescence spectra and biological activity of aerosolized bacillus spores and MS2 bacteriophage exposed to ozone at different relative humidities in a rotating drum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; Kinahan, Sean; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Santarpia, Joshua L.

    2015-10-14

    Biological aerosols (bioaerosols) released into the environment may undergo physical and chemical transformations when exposed to atmospheric constituents such as solar irradiation, reactive oxygenated species, ozone, free radicals, water vapor and pollutants. Aging experiments were performed in a rotating drum chamber subjecting bioaerosols, Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (BtAH) spores and MS2 bacteriophages to ozone at 0 and 150 ppb, and relative humidities (RH) at 10%, 50%, and 80+%. Fluorescence spectra and intensities of the aerosols as a function of time in the reaction chamber were measured with a single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an Ultra-Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer® Spectrometermore » (UV-APS). Losses in biological activity were measured by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assay. For both types of aerosols the largest change in fluorescence emission was between 280 and 400 nm when excited at 263 nm followed by fluorescence emission between 380 and 700 nm when excited at 351 nm. The fluorescence for both BtAH and MS2 were observed to decrease significantly at high ozone concentration and high RH when excited at 263 nm excitation. The decreases in 263 nm excited fluorescence are indicative of hydrolysis and oxidation of tryptophan in the aerosols. Fluorescence measured with the UV-APS (355-nm excitation) increased with time for both BtAH and MS2 aerosols. A two log loss of MS2 bacteriophage infectivity was observed in the presence of ozone at ~50% and 80% RH when measured by culture and normalized for physical losses by q-PCR. Viability of BtAH spores after exposure could not be measured due to the loss of genomic material during experiments, suggesting degradation of extracelluar DNA attributable to oxidation. The results of these studies indicate that the physical and biological properties of bioaerosols change significantly after exposure to ozone and water vapor.« less

  1. Fluorescence spectra and biological activity of aerosolized bacillus spores and MS2 bacteriophage exposed to ozone at different relative humidities in a rotating drum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; Kinahan, Sean; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Santarpia, Joshua L.

    2015-03-01

    Biological aerosols (bioaerosols) released into the environment may undergo physical and chemical transformations when exposed to atmospheric constituents such as solar irradiation, reactive oxygenated species, ozone, free radicals, water vapor and pollutants. Aging experiments were performed in a rotating drum chamber subjecting bioaerosols, Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (BtAH) spores and MS2 bacteriophages to ozone at 0 and 150 ppb, and relative humidities (RH) at 10%, 50%, and 80+%. Fluorescence spectra and intensities of the aerosols as a function of time in the reaction chamber were measured with a single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an Ultra-Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer® Spectrometer (UV-APS). Losses in biological activity were measured by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assay. For both types of aerosols the largest change in fluorescence emission was between 280 and 400 nm when excited at 263 nm followed by fluorescence emission between 380 and 700 nm when excited at 351 nm. The fluorescence for both BtAH and MS2 were observed to decrease significantly at high ozone concentration and high RH when excited at 263 nm excitation. The decreases in 263 nm excited fluorescence are indicative of hydrolysis and oxidation of tryptophan in the aerosols. Fluorescence measured with the UV-APS (355-nm excitation) increased with time for both BtAH and MS2 aerosols. A two log loss of MS2 bacteriophage infectivity was observed in the presence of ozone at ~50% and 80% RH when measured by culture and normalized for physical losses by q-PCR. Viability of BtAH spores after exposure could not be measured due to the loss of genomic material during experiments, suggesting degradation of extracelluar DNA attributable to oxidation. The results of these studies indicate that the physical and biological properties of bioaerosols change significantly after exposure to ozone and water vapor.

  2. Night Spectra Quest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    Presents the Night Spectra Quest, a pocket-sized chart that identifies in color the spectra of all the common night lights and has an integrally mounted, holographic diffraction grating to look through. (JRH)

  3. [Study of new blended chemical absorbents to absorb CO2].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Lian; Fang, Meng-Xiang; Yan, Shui-Ping; Luo, Zhong-Yang; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2007-11-01

    Three kinds of blended absorbents were investigated on bench-scale experimental bench according to absorption rate and regeneration grade to select a reasonable additive concentration. The results show that, among methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and piperazine (PZ) mixtures, comparing MDEA : PZ = 1 : 0.4 (m : m) with MDEA : PZ = 1 : 0.2 (m : m), the absorption rate is increased by about 70% at 0.2 mol x mol(-1). When regeneration lasting for 40 min, regeneration grade of blended absorbents with PZ concentration of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 is decreased to 83.06%, 77.77% and 76.67% respectively while 91.04% for PZ concentration of 0. MDEA : PZ = 1 : 0.4(m : m) is a suitable ratio for MDEA/PZ mixtures as absorption and regeneration properties of the blended absorbents are all improved. The aqueous blends with 10% primary amines and 2% tertiary amines could keep high CO2 absorption rate, and lower regeneration energy consumption. Adding 2% 2-Amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) to 10% diethanolamine (DEA), the blended amine solvents have an advantage in absorption and regeneration properties over other DEA/AMP mixtures. Blended solvents, which consist of a mixture of primary amines with a small amount of tertiary amines, have the highest absorption rate among the three. And mixed absorbents of secondary amines and a small amount of sterically hindered amines have the best regeneration property. To combine absorption and regeneration properties, blends with medium activator addition to tertiary amines are competitive. PMID:18290495

  4. Spectra of normal and nutrient-deficient maize leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Abbas, A. H.; Barr, R.; Hall, J. D.; Crane, F. L.; Baumgardner, M. F.

    1973-01-01

    Reflectance, transmittance and absorptance spectra of normal and six types of nutrient-deficient (N, P, K, S, Mg, and Ca) maize (Zea mays L.) leaves were analyzed at 30 selected wavelengths from 500 to 2600 nm. The analysis of variance showed significant differences in reflectance, transmittance and absorptance in the visible wavelengths among leaf numbers 3, 4, and 5, among the seven treatments, and among the interactions of leaf number and treatments. In the infrared wavelengths only treatments produced significant differences. The chlorophyll content of leaves was reduced in all nutrient-deficient treatments. Percent moisture was increased in S-, Mg-, and N-deficiencies. Polynomial regression analysis of leaf thickness and leaf moisture content showed that these two variables were significantly and directly related. Leaves from the P- and Ca-deficient plants absorbed less energy in the near infrared than the normal plants; S-, Mg-, K-, and N-deficient leaves absorbed more than the normal. Both S- and N-deficient leaves had higher temperatues than normal maize leaves.

  5. Leaf color is fine-tuned on the solar spectra to avoid strand direct solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Kume, Atsushi; Akitsu, Tomoko; Nasahara, Kenlo Nishida

    2016-07-01

    The spectral distributions of light absorption rates by intact leaves are notably different from the incident solar radiation spectra, for reasons that remain elusive. Incident global radiation comprises two main components; direct radiation from the direction of the sun, and diffuse radiation, which is sunlight scattered by molecules, aerosols and clouds. Both irradiance and photon flux density spectra differ between direct and diffuse radiation in their magnitude and profile. However, most research has assumed that the spectra of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) can be averaged, without considering the radiation classes. We used paired spectroradiometers to sample direct and diffuse solar radiation, and obtained relationships between the PAR spectra and the absorption spectra of photosynthetic pigments and organs. As monomers in solvent, the spectral absorbance of Chl a decreased with the increased spectral irradiance (W m(-2) nm(-1)) of global PAR at noon (R(2) = 0.76), and was suitable to avoid strong spectral irradiance (λmax = 480 nm) rather than absorb photon flux density (μmol m(-2) s(-1) nm(-1)) efficiently. The spectral absorption of photosystems and the intact thallus and leaves decreased linearly with the increased spectral irradiance of direct PAR at noon (I dir-max), where the wavelength was within the 450-650 nm range (R(2) = 0.81). The higher-order structure of photosystems systematically avoided the strong spectral irradiance of I dir-max. However, when whole leaves were considered, leaf anatomical structure and light scattering in leaf tissues made the leaves grey bodies for PAR and enabled high PAR use efficiency. Terrestrial green plants are fine-tuned to spectral dynamics of incident solar radiation and PAR absorption is increased in various structural hierarchies. PMID:26943164

  6. Broadband ultrathin low-profile metamaterial microwave absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Deepak; Tripathi, Chandra Charu

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a single-layer broadband low-profile ultrathin metamaterial microwave absorber is proposed for wide angle of incidence. The proposed absorber provides triple-band absorption under normal incidence of electromagnetic wave with two peaks lying in X-band and one in Ku-band. The unit cell is designed by using parametric optimization in such a way that the three peaks merge together to give broadband absorption. The absorber exhibits full width at half maxima bandwidth (FWHM) of 7.75 GHz from 7.55 to 15.30 GHz for wide angle of incidence up to 60° for both TE and TM polarizations. The mechanism of absorption of the absorber has been analyzed by field and surface current distributions. The proposed absorber has been fabricated and experimentally tested for different angles of incidence and polarization of the incident wave. The absorber is low profile with unit cell dimension of the order of 0.168 λ 0, and it is ultrathin with a thickness of ~ λ 0/17 at the center frequency of 11.43 GHz corresponding to the FWHM absorption bandwidth. This proposed absorber can be used for many potential applications such as stealth technology, cloaking and in antenna systems.

  7. AVIRIS spectra of California wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Michael F.; Ustin, Susan L.; Klemas, Vytautas

    1988-01-01

    Spectral data gathered by the AVIRIS from wetlands in the Suisun Bay area of California on 13 October 1987 were analyzed. Spectra representing stands of numerous vegetation types (including Sesuvium verrucosum, Scirpus acutus and Scirpus californicus, Xanthium strumarium, Cynadon dactylon, and Distichlis spicata) and soil were isolated. Despite some defects in the data, it was possible to detect vegetation features such as differences in the location of the chlorophyll red absorption maximum. Also, differences in cover type spectra were evident in other spectral regions. It was not possible to determine if the observed features represent noise, variability in canopy architecture, or chemical constituents of leaves.

  8. Transient radiative transfer through scattering absorbing media

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, K.; Kumar, S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper outlines the formulation of the different methods for determining transient radiative transfer through scattering absorbing media. A boundary driven radiative problem is considered in a one-dimensional plane-parallel slab. The different methods of solving the transient radiative transfer equation include the P{sub 1}, P{sub 3}, and P{sub 5} approximations, two-flux method, and eight, twelve and sixteen discrete ordinates methods. In addition, the general transient radiative transfer equation is also solved by direct numerical integration without any simplifying assumptions. Different orders of approximation for the phase function are considered as is a parametric analysis of the different parameters such as the scattering albedo and optical depth is performed. The propagation speed obtained and the magnitude of the transmitted and back-scattered fluxes for different models obtained are a function of the approximation used to represent the intensity distribution.

  9. A new optical method coupling light polarization and Vis-NIR spectroscopy to improve the measured absorbance signal's quality of soil samples.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobrecht, Alexia; Bendoula, Ryad; Roger, Jean-Michel; Bellon-Maurel, Véronique

    2014-05-01

    Visible - Near-infrared spectroscopy (Vis-NIRS) is now commonly used to measure different physical and chemical parameters of soils, including carbon content. However, prediction model accuracy is insufficient for Vis-NIRS to replace routine laboratory analysis. One of the biggest issues this technique is facing up to is light scattering due to soil particles. It causes departure in the assumed linear relationship between the Absorbance spectrum and the concentration of the chemicals of interest as stated by Beer-Lambert's Law, which underpins the calibration models. Therefore it becomes essential to improve the metrological quality of the measured signal in order to optimize calibration as light/matter interactions are at the basis of the resulting linear modeling. Optics can help to mitigate scattering effect on the signal. We put forward a new optical setup coupling linearly polarized light with a Vis-NIR spectrometer to free the measured spectra from multi-scattering effect. The corrected measured spectrum was then used to compute an Absorbance spectrum of the sample, using Dahm's Equation in the frame of the Representative Layer Theory. This method has been previously tested and validated on liquid (milk+ dye) and powdered (sand + dye) samples showing scattering (and absorbing) properties. The obtained Absorbance was a very good approximation of the Beer-Lambert's law absorbance. Here, we tested the method on a set of 54 soil samples to predict Soil Organic Carbon content. In order to assess the signal quality improvement by this method, we built and compared calibration models using Partial Least Square (PLS) algorithm. The prediction model built from new Absorbance spectrum outperformed the model built with the classical Absorbance traditionally obtained with Vis-NIR diffuse reflectance. This study is a good illustration of the high influence of signal quality on prediction model's performances.

  10. Evolution of organic aerosol mass spectra upon heating: implications for OA phase and partitioning behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, C. D.; Wilson, K. R.

    2011-03-01

    Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure the evolution of chemical composition for two distinct organic aerosol types as they are passed through a thermodenuder at different temperatures. The two organic aerosol types considered are primary lubricating oil (LO) aerosol and secondary aerosol from the α-pinene + O3 reaction (αP). The evolution of the VUV mass spectra for the two aerosol types with temperature are observed to differ dramatically. For LO particles, the spectra exhibit distinct changes with temperature in which the lower m/z peaks, corresponding to compounds with higher vapor pressures, disappear more rapidly than the high m/z peaks. In contrast, the αP aerosol spectrum is essentially unchanged by temperature even though the particles experience significant mass loss due to evaporation. The variations in the LO spectra are found to be quantitatively in agreement with expectations from absorptive partitioning theory whereas the αP spectra suggest that the evaporation of αP derived aerosol appears to not be governed by partitioning theory. We postulate that this difference arises from diffusivity within the αP particles being sufficiently slow that they do not exhibit the expected liquid-like behavior and perhaps exist in a glassy state. To reconcile these observations with decades of aerosol growth measurements, which indicate that OA formation is described by equilibrium partitioning, we present a conceptual model wherein the secondary OA is formed and then rapidly converted from an absorbing form to a non-absorbing form. The results suggest that, although OA growth may be describable by equilibrium partitioning theory, the properties of organic aerosol once formed may differ significantly from the properties determined in the equilibrium framework.

  11. Evolution of organic aerosol mass spectra upon heating: implications for OA phase and partitioning behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, C. D.; Wilson, K. R.

    2010-11-01

    Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure the evolution of chemical composition for two distinct organic aerosol types as they are passed through a thermodenuder at different temperatures. The two organic aerosol types considered are primary lubricating oil (LO) aerosol and secondary aerosol from the α-pinene + O3 reaction (αP). The evolution of the VUV mass spectra for the two aerosol types with temperature are observed to differ dramatically. For LO particles, the spectra exhibit distinct changes with temperature in which the lower m/z peaks, corresponding to compounds with higher vapor pressures, disappear more rapidly than the high m/z peaks. In contrast, the αP aerosol spectrum is essentially unchanged by temperature even though the particles experience significant mass loss due to evaporation. The variations in the LO spectra are found to be quantitatively in agreement with expectations from absorptive partitioning theory whereas the αP spectra suggest that the evaporation of αP derived aerosol appears to not be governed by partitioning theory. We postulate that this difference arises from the αP particles existing as in a glassy state instead of having the expected liquid-like behavior. To reconcile these observations with decades of aerosol growth measurements, which indicate that OA formation is described by equilibrium partitioning, we present a conceptual model wherein the secondary OA is formed and then rapidly converted from an absorbing form to a non-absorbing form. The results suggest that although OA growth may be describable by equilibrium partitioning theory, the properties of organic aerosol once formed may differ significantly from the properties determined in the equilibrium framework.

  12. Evolution of organic aerosol mass spectra upon heating: implications for OA phase and partitioning behavior

    SciTech Connect

    UC Davis; Cappa, Christopher D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-10-28

    Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure the evolution of chemical composition for two distinct organic aerosol types as they are passed through a thermodenuder at different temperatures. The two organic aerosol types considered are primary lubricating oil (LO) aerosol and secondary aerosol from the alpha-pinene + O3 reaction (alphaP). The evolution of the VUV mass spectra for the two aerosol types with temperature are observed to differ dramatically. For LO particles, the spectra exhibit distinct changes with temperature in which the lower m/z peaks, corresponding to compounds with higher vapor pressures, disappear more rapidly than the high m/z peaks. In contrast, the alphaP aerosol spectrum is essentially unchanged by temperature even though the particles experience significant mass loss due to evaporation. The variations in the LO spectra are found to be quantitatively in agreement with expectations from absorptive partitioning theory whereas the alphaP spectra suggest that the evaporation of alphaP derived aerosol appears to not be governed by partitioning theory. We postulate that this difference arises from the alphaP particles existing as in a glassy state instead of having the expected liquid-like behavior. To reconcile these observations with decades of aerosol growth measurements, which indicate that OA formation is described by equilibrium partitioning, we present a conceptual model wherein the secondary OA is formed and then rapidly converted from an absorbing form to a non-absorbing form. The results suggest that although OA growth may be describable by equilibrium partitioning theory, the properties of organic aerosol once formed may differ significantly from the properties determined in the equilibrium framework.

  13. The contribution of magnetic susceptibility effects to transmembrane chemical shift differences in the 31P NMR spectra of oxygenated erythrocyte suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kirk, K; Kuchel, P W

    1988-01-01

    Triethyl phosphate, dimethyl methylphosphonate, and the hypophosphite ion all contain the phosphoryl functional group. When added to an oxygenated erythrocyte suspension, the former compound gives rise to a single 31P NMR resonance, whereas the latter compounds give rise to separate intra- and extracellular 31P NMR resonances. On the basis of experiments with intact oxygenated cell suspensions (in which the hematocrit was varied) and with oxygenated cell lysates (in which the lysate concentration was varied), it was concluded that the chemical shifts of the intra- and extracellular populations of triethyl phosphate differ as a consequence of the diamagnetic susceptibility of intracellular oxyhemoglobin but that this difference is averaged by the rapid exchange of the compound across the cell membrane. The difference in the magnetic susceptibility of the intra- and extracellular compartments contributes to the observed separation of the intra- and extracellular resonances of dimethyl methylphosphonate and hypophosphite. The magnitude of this contribution is, however, substantially less than that calculated using a simple two-compartment model and varies with the hematocrit of the suspension. Furthermore, it is insufficient to fully account for the transmembrane chemical shift differences observed for dimethyl methylphosphonate and hypophosphite. An additional effect is operating to move the intracellular resonances of these compounds to a lower chemical shift. The effect is mediated by an intracellular component, and the magnitude of the resultant chemical shift variations depends upon the chemical structure of the phosphoryl compound involved. PMID:3275636

  14. Contribution of magnetic susceptibility effects to transmembrane chemical shift differences in the /sup 31/P NMR spectra of oxygenated erythrocyte suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, K.; Kuchel, P.W.

    1988-01-05

    Triethyl phosphate, dimethyl methylphosphonate, and the hypophosphite ion all contain the phosphoryl functional group. When added to an oxygenated erythrocyte suspension, the former compound gives rise to a single /sup 31/P NMR resonance, whereas the latter compounds give rise to separate intra- and extracellular /sup 31/P NMR resonances. On the basis of experiments with intact oxygenated cell suspensions (in which the hematocrit was varied) and with oxygenated cell lysates (in which the lysate concentration was varied) it was concluded that the chemical shifts of the intra- and extracellular populations of triethyl phosphate differ as a consequence of the diamagnetic susceptibility of intracellular oxyhemoglobin but that this difference is averaged by the rapid exchange of the compound across the cell membrane. The difference is the magnetic susceptibility of the intra- and extracellular compartments contributes to the observed separation of the intra- and extracellular resonances of dimethyl methylphosphonate and hypophosphite. The magnitude of this contribution is, however, substantially less than that calculated using a simple two-compartment model and varies with the hematocrit of the suspension. Furthermore, it is insufficient to fully account for the transmembrane chemical shift differences observed for dimethyl methylphosphonate and hypophosphite. An additional effect is operating to move the intracellular resonances of these compounds to a lower chemical shift. The effect is mediated by an intracellular component, and the magnitude of the resultant chemical shift variations depends upon the chemical structure of the phosphoryl compound involved.

  15. Cascaded Perforates as One-Dimensional, Bulk Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, T. L.; Jones, M. G.

    2006-01-01

    Porous cell honeycomb liners for aircraft engine nacelles offer the possibility of exploiting extended reaction effects to improve liner attenuation bandwidth as generally attributed to the performance of bulk absorbers. This paper describes an analytical procedure, starting with an impedance prediction model for a single perforated plate, to estimate the bulk-absorber parameters for a cascade of such perforates - a first step to modeling a porous wall honeycomb structure. The objective is to build confidence in a lumped element impedance model, when applied to a uniformly-spaced set of porous plates to predict its .bulk. absorber properties. The model is based upon a modified version of the two-parameter flow resistance model of the form A + BV(sub inc), where A and B are physics-based, semi-empirical parameters that are adjusted to provide an optimum fit to a composite dataset from three plate porosities of 2.5, 5 and 10%. The composite dataset is achieved by reformulating the two-parameter flow resistance model into a .reduced pressure drop coefficient. dependency on perforate hole Reynolds number. The resulting impedance model is employed to calculate surface impedance spectra for N and 2N-layer perforate cascades. The well-known two-thickness method for experimental determination of bulk-absorber parameters is then applied to these .synthesized. data sets to predict the characteristic impedance and propagation constant for the perforate cascades. These results are then compared with experimental results reported in a companion paper.

  16. Infrared band absorptance correlations and applications to nongray radiation. [mathematical models of absorption spectra for nongray atmospheres in order to study air pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Manian, S. V. S.

    1976-01-01

    Various mathematical models for infrared radiation absorption spectra for atmospheric gases are reviewed, and continuous correlations for the total absorptance of a wide band are presented. Different band absorptance correlations were employed in two physically realistic problems (radiative transfer in gases with internal heat source, and heat transfer in laminar flow of absorbing-emitting gases between parallel plates) to study their influence on final radiative transfer results. This information will be applied to the study of atmospheric pollutants by infrared radiation measurement.

  17. Techniques for measuring intercepted and absorbed PAR in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The quantity of radiation potentially available for photosynthesis that is captured by the crop is best described as absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR (APAR) is the difference between descending and ascending fluxes. The four components of APAR were measured above and within two planting densities of corn (Zea mays L.) and several methods of measuring and estimating APAR were examined. A line quantum sensor that spatially averages the photosynthetic photon flux density provided a rapid and portable method of measuring APAR. PAR reflectance from the soil (Typic Argiaquoll) surface decreased from 10% to less than 1% of the incoming PAR as the canopy cover increased. PAR reflectance from the canopy decreased to less than 3% at maximum vegetative cover. Intercepted PAR (1 - transmitted PAR) generally overestimated absorbed PAR by less than 4% throughout most of the growing season. Thus intercepted PAR appears to be a reasonable estimate of absorbed PAR.

  18. Photo-excited broadband tunable terahertz metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianna; Wang, Guocui; Zhang, Bo; He, Ting; He, Yanan; Shen, Jingling

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a photo-excited broadband tunable metamaterial absorber for use in the terahertz region. The metamaterial absorber consists of a hybrid metal-semiconductor square split ring and a metallic ground plane that are separated by a dielectric resonator spacer. The conductivity of the silicon used to fill the gap in the metallic resonator is tuned actively as a function of the incident pump power, which results in frequency modulation of the resonance absorption peak. Broadband tunable metamaterial absorbers are produced by suitable placement of the photoconductive silicon in different critical regions of the metallic resonator. In addition, the proposed method is applicable to a concentric rings-based metallic resonator. The proposed photo-excited broadband tunable metamaterial absorber has numerous potential applications, including uses as terahertz modulators and switches.

  19. Millimeter wave absorption spectra of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, O.P.; Hagmann, M.J.; Hill, D.W.; Partlow, L.M.; Bush, L.

    1980-01-01

    A solid-state computer-controlled system has been used to make swept-frequency measurements of absorption of biological specimens from 26.5 to 90.0 GHz. A wide range of samples was used, including solutions of DNA and RNA, and suspensions of BHK-21/C13 cells, Candida albicans, C krusei, and Escherichia coli. Sharp spectra reported by other workers were not observed. The strong absorbance of water (10--30 dB/mm) caused the absorbance of all aqueous preparations that we examined to have a water-like dependence on frequency. Reduction of incident power (to below 1.0 microW), elimination of modulation, and control of temperature to assure cell viability were not found to significantly alter the water-dominated absorbance. Frozen samples of BHK-21/C13 cells tested at dry ice and liquid nitrogen temperatures were found to have average insertion loss reduced to 0.2 dB/cm but still showed no reproducible peaks that could be attributed to absorption spectra. It is concluded that the special resonances reported by others are likely to be in error.

  20. Discovery of dense absorbing clouds in Cygnus X-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucinska-Church, Monika; Schulz, Norbert S.; Church, Michael; Wilms, Joern; Hanke, Manfred

    We report results of several day-long observation of Cygnus X-2 using Chandra and XMM-Newton. The source displayed extensive dipping events in the lightcurve often seen before in the source and causing an additional track in the hardness-intensity Z-track diagram. For the first time we are able to investigate these events using both high efficiency CCD continuum spectra and highly-resolved grating data. In the XMM PN instrument, the dips are 30% deep and resemble those in the low mass X-ray binary dip sources. However, remarkably, in the Chandra HEG and MEG no absorption or edge features can be seen corresponding to expected increases of column density in excess of the interstellar column. Non-dip and dip PN spectra are fitted well with a model containing point-like blackbody emission which we associate with the neutron star plus Comptonized emission of the ADC which must be extended. Dipping can be explained without absorption of the blackbody emission, but by covering 40% of the extended ADC emission by dense absorber. In the covered fraction almost no flux remains and so no significant additional optical depths appear in the neutral K edges in the grating spectra. The dipping appears not to be explicable by absorption in the outer disk, but requires large, dense blobs of absorber that do not overlap the neutron star in the line-of-sight. The nature of these blobs is unknown.

  1. Size Effect on Nuclear Gamma-Ray Energy Spectra Acquired by Different Sized CeBr3, LaBr3:Ce, and NaI:Tl Gamma-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Paul; Reed, Michael; Yuan, Ding; Beller, Denis; Cutler, Matthew; Contreras, Chris; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wilde, Scott UNLV

    2014-03-01

    Gamma-ray energy spectra were acquired for different sizes of cerium tribromide (CeBr3), cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce), and thallium-doped sodium iodide (NaI:Tl) detectors. A comparison was conducted of the energy resolution and detection efficiency of these scintillator detectors for different sizes of detectors. The results of this study are consistent with the observation that for each size detector, LaBr3:Ce offers better resolution than either a CeBr3 or NaI:Tl detector of the same size. In addition, CeBr3 and LaBr3:Ce detectors could resolve some closely spaced peaks in the spectra of several radioisotopes that NaI:Tl could not. As the detector size increased, all three detector materials exhibited higher efficiency, albeit with slightly reduced resolution. Significantly, the very low intrinsic activity of CeBr3 is also demonstrated in this study, which, when combined with energy resolution characteristics for a range of detector sizes, could lead to an improved ability to detect special nuclear materials compared to the other detectors.

  2. Shock absorber operates over wide range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creasy, W. K.; Jones, J. C.

    1965-01-01

    Piston-type hydraulic shock absorber, with a metered damping system, operates over a wide range of kinetic energy loading rates. It is used for absorbing shock and vibration on mounted machinery and heavy earth-moving equipment.

  3. Infrared spectra of thyroid tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Butra, V. A.

    2010-07-01

    We used infrared spectroscopy methods to study thyroid tumor tissues removed during surgery. The IR spectra of the surgical material are compared with data from histological examination. We show that in malignant neoplasms, the spectra of proteins in the region of C=O vibrations are different from the spectra of these substances in benign tumors and in tissues outside the pathological focus at a distance >1 cm from the margin of the tumor. The differences in the spectra are due to changes in the supermolecular structure of the proteins, resulting from rearrangement of the system of hydrogen bonds. We identify the spectral signs of malignant pathologies.

  4. Neural network consistent empirical physical formula construction for density functional theory based nonlinear vibrational absorbance and intensity of 6-choloronicotinic acid molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, Nihat; Karabacak, Mehmet; Kurt, Mustafa; Akkoyun, Serkan

    2012-05-01

    Being directly related to the electric charge distributions in a molecule, the vibrational spectra intensities are both experimentally and theoretically important physical quantities. However, these intensities are inherently highly nonlinear and of complex pattern. Therefore, in particular for unknown detailed spatial molecular structures, it is difficult to make ab initio intensity calculations to compare with new experimental data. In this respect, we very recently initiated entirely novel layered feedforward neural network (LFNN) approach to construct empirical physical formulas (EPFs) for density functional theory (DFT) vibrational spectra of some molecules. In this paper, as a new and far improved contribution to our novel molecular vibrational spectra LFNN-EPF approach, we constructed LFFN-EPFs for absorbances and intensities of 6-choloronicotinic acid (6-CNA) molecule. The 6-CNA data, borrowed from our previous study, was entirely different and much larger than the vibrational intensity data of our formerly used LFNN-EPF molecules. In line with our another previous work which theoretically proved the LFNN relevance to EPFs, although the 6-CNA DFT absorbance and intensity were inherently highly nonlinear and sharply fluctuating in character, still the optimally constructed train set LFFN-EPFs very successfully fitted the absorbances and intensities. Moreover, test set (i.e. yet-to-be measured experimental data) LFNN-EPFs consistently and successfully predicted the absorbance and intensity data. This simply means that the physical law embedded in the 6-CNA vibrational data was successfully extracted by the LFNN-EPFs. In conclusion, these vibrational LFNN-EPFs are of explicit form. Therefore, by various suitable operations of mathematical analysis, they can be used to estimate the electronic charge distributions of the unknown molecule of the significant complexity. Additionally, these estimations can be combined with those of theoretical DFT atomic polar

  5. Rotational Spectra of Symmetric Top Molecules in Ground and Different Vibrational Excited States, and Phenomenon of Resonance – Applying in CF3CCH

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi, Masoud

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with review of exploration of resonance in symmetric top molecules in different vibrational excited states, vt = n (n =1, 2, 3, 4). Calculations for CF3CCH shows that resonance take place at k=xℓℓ+(A-B)-2AζAζ-(A-B) and k=xℓℓ+(A-B)-2AζAζ-(A-B) for v10 = 2 and v10 = 3 respectively. In order to account for splitting about 3 MHz for the − 2 series in v10 = 4 is necessary to introduce the element 〈 J,k, ℓ|f24| J,k + 2, ℓ − 4〉 in fitting program.

  6. Photographic spectra of fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, J.

    2016-01-01

    Two methods of spectroscopy of meteors using image intensified video cameras and classical photographic film cameras are compared. Video cameras provide large number of low resolution spectra of meteors of normal brightness, which can be used for statistical studies. Large format film cameras have been used through the history and provide high resolution spectra, which can be used to derive temperature, density and absolute abundances of various elements in the radiating plasma. The sensitivity of films is, however, low and only spectra of bright meteors (fireballs) can be studied. Examples of photographic fireball spectra are provided.

  7. 21 CFR 872.6050 - Saliva absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Saliva absorber. 872.6050 Section 872.6050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... absorber is a device made of paper or cotton intended to absorb moisture from the oral cavity during...

  8. 21 CFR 872.6050 - Saliva absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Saliva absorber. 872.6050 Section 872.6050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... absorber is a device made of paper or cotton intended to absorb moisture from the oral cavity during...

  9. Improving the laboratory monitoring of absorbent oil

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Shved; S.S. Sychev; I.V. Safina; S.A. Klykov

    2009-05-15

    The performance of absorbent coal tar oil is analyzed as a function of the constituent and group composition. The qualitative and quantitative composition of the oil that ensures the required absorbent properties is determined. Operative monitoring may be based on absorbent characteristics that permit regulation of the beginning and end of regeneration.

  10. Embedded absorbers for helicopter rotor lag damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, Lynn; Gandhi, Farhan

    2009-09-01

    Radial and chordwise damped vibration absorbers embedded in the rotor blade are compared for rotor lag damping augmentation. Results show that the radial absorber is more effective in transferring damping to the rotor blade lag mode. The chordwise absorber needs to be at a more outboard location and have a larger mass to introduce levels of lag damping comparable to that introduced by the radial absorber. The 1/rev amplitude of a chordwise absorber at the blade tip, per degree of blade lead-lag motion in forward flight, is of the order of 35% of the blade chord, and such a stroke might be difficult to accommodate. The 1/rev amplitude of a radial absorber at 70% span (having significantly lower mass than the chordwise absorber and producing comparable lag damping) is of the order of 4% of the rotor blade span. The static displacement of the radial absorber under centrifugal load needs to be limited using a frequency-dependent (high static stiffness, low dynamic stiffness) or nonlinear spring. The chordwise absorber can also undergo a large static displacement under the chordwise component of the centrifugal load if there is an offset from the feather axis, and this would again have to be limited using a strategy such as a frequency-dependent spring. Significant advantages of the radial absorber are—higher lag damping, lower absorber mass, space for absorber mass travel, and no chordwise travel of blade center of gravity reducing susceptibility to aeroelastic instability and dynamic pitch-link loads.

  11. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-02-06

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  12. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, D.C.

    1987-11-20

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compound of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved. 2 figs.

  13. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-01-01

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  14. Photon spectra from WIMP annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J. A. R.; Cruz-Dombriz, A. de la; Dobado, A.; Maroto, A. L.; Lineros, R. A.

    2011-04-15

    If the present dark matter in the Universe annihilates into standard model particles, it must contribute to the fluxes of cosmic rays that are detected on the Earth and, in particular, to the observed gamma-ray fluxes. The magnitude of such a contribution depends on the particular dark matter candidate, but certain features of the produced photon spectra may be analyzed in a rather model-independent fashion. In this work we provide the complete photon spectra coming from WIMP annihilation into standard model particle-antiparticle pairs obtained by extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We present results for each individual annihilation channel and provide analytical fitting formulas for the different spectra for a wide range of WIMP masses.

  15. FOURIER ENCODED DATA SEARCHING OF INFRARED SPECTRA (FEDS/IRS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new library searching technique is reported that relies on Fourier transforms of infrared (IR) absorbance spectra. Searching in the time domain is shown to be more tolerant to noise than searches in the spectral domain and fewer points are required to encode the unique characte...

  16. Infrared spectra of natural and synthetic malachites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuiskii, A. V.; Zorina, M. L.

    2013-09-01

    IR absorption and reflection spectra of dark and light samples of natural and synthetic malachite over 400-4000 cm-1 are studied for the purpose of improving the synthesis technique and in order to distinguish between natural malachite and malachite grown from ammonia solutions. Nitrogen was not detected in the IR spectra or in microprobe analyses of the synthetic material. The differences found in the IR spectra were insignificant and cannot be regarded as distinctive indicators of these materials.

  17. Neutron Spectra and Dose Equivalent Inside Nuclear Power Reactor Containment

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, J. M.

    1981-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine absorbed dose, dose-equivalent rates, and neutron spectra inside containment at nuclear power plants. We gratefully acknowledge funding support by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The purpose of this study is: 1) measure dose-equivalent rates with various commercial types of rem meters, such as the Snoopy and Rascal, and neutron absorbed dose rates with a tissue-equivalent proportional counter 2) determine neutron spectra using the multi sphere or Bonner sphere technique and a helium-3 spectrometer 3) compare several types of personnel neutron dosimeter responses such as NTA film, polycarbonates, TLD albedo, and a recently introduced proton recoil track etch dosimeter, and CR-39. These measurements were made inside containments of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and outside containment penetrations of boiling water reactors (BWRs) operating at full power. The neutron spectral information, absorbed dose. and dose-equivalent measurements are needed for proper interpretation of instrument and personnel dosimeter responses.

  18. Investigations on laser transmission welding of absorber-free thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamuschkin, Viktor; Olowinsky, Alexander; Britten, Simon W.; Engelmann, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    Within the plastic industry laser transmission welding ranks among the most important joining techniques and opens up new application areas continuously. So far, a big disadvantage of the process was the fact that the joining partners need different optical properties. Since thermoplastics are transparent for the radiation of conventional beam sources (800- 1100 nm) the absorbance of one of the joining partners has to be enhanced by adding an infrared absorber (IR-absorber). Until recently, welding of absorber-free parts has not been possible. New diode lasers provide a broad variety of wavelengths which allows exploiting intrinsic absorption bands of thermoplastics. The use of a proper wavelength in combination with special optics enables laser welding of two optically identical polymer parts without absorbers which can be utilized in a large number of applications primarily in the medical and food industry, where the use of absorbers usually entails costly and time-consuming authorization processes. In this paper some aspects of the process are considered as the influence of the focal position, which is crucial when both joining partners have equal optical properties. After a theoretical consideration, an evaluation is carried out based on welding trials with polycarbonate (PC). Further aspects such as gap bridging capability and the influence of thickness of the upper joining partner are investigated as well.

  19. Photobleaching Response of Different Sources of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Exposed to Natural Solar Radiation Using Absorption and Excitation–Emission Matrix Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunlin; Liu, Xiaohan; Osburn, Christopher L.; Wang, Mingzhu; Qin, Boqiang; Zhou, Yongqiang

    2013-01-01

    CDOM biogeochemical cycle is driven by several physical and biological processes such as river input, biogeneration and photobleaching that act as primary sinks and sources of CDOM. Watershed-derived allochthonous (WDA) and phytoplankton-derived autochthonous (PDA) CDOM were exposed to 9 days of natural solar radiation to assess the photobleaching response of different CDOM sources, using absorption and fluorescence (excitation-emission matrix) spectroscopy. Our results showed a marked decrease in total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) concentration under natural sunlight exposure for both WDA and PDA CDOM, indicating photoproduction of ammonium from TDN. In contrast, photobleaching caused a marked increase in total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) concentration for both WDA and PDA CDOM. Thus TDN∶TDP ratios decreased significantly both for WDA and PDA CDOM, which partially explained the seasonal dynamic of TDN∶TDP ratio in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching rate of CDOM absorption a(254), was 0.032 m/MJ for WDA CDOM and 0.051 m/MJ for PDA CDOM from days 0–9, indicating that phototransformations were initially more rapid for the newly produced CDOM from phytoplankton than for the river CDOM. Extrapolation of these values to the field indicated that 3.9%–5.1% CDOM at the water surface was photobleached and mineralized every day in summer in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching caused the increase of spectral slope, spectral slope ratio and molecular size, indicating the CDOM mean molecular weight decrease which was favorable to further microbial degradation of mineralization. Three fluorescent components were validated in parallel factor analysis models calculated separately for WDA and PDA CDOM. Our study suggests that the humic-like fluorescence materials could be rapidly and easily photobleached for WDA and PDA CDOM, but the protein-like fluorescence materials was not photobleached and even increased from the transformation of the humic-like fluorescence substance to the protein

  20. Spectra of linear energy transfer and other dosimetry characteristics as measured in C290 MeV/n MONO and SOBP ion beams at HIMAC-BIO (NIRS, Japan) with different detectors.

    PubMed

    Spurný, F; Pachnerová Brabcová, K; Ploc, O; Ambrožová, I; Mrázová, Z

    2011-02-01

    Active mobile dosimetry unit (Liulin), passive plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD) and thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) were exposed in a C290 MeV/n beam at HIMAC-BIO (NIRS, Japan). Two different types of beam configuration were used--monoenergetic beam (MONO) and spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP); the detectors were placed at several depths from the entrance up to the depths behind the Bragg peak. Relative response of TLDs in beams has been studied as a function of the depth, and it was re-proved that it can depend on the linear energy transfer (LET). Liulin measures energy deposition in Si; the spectra of energy deposited in Si can be transformed to the spectra of lineal energy or LET. PNTDs are able to determine the LET of registered particles directly. The limitation of both methods is in the range in which they can determine the LET-Liulin is able to measure perpendicularly incident charged particles up to ∼35 keV/µm (in water), PNTD can measure from ∼7 to 400 keV/µm, independently of the registration angle. The results from both methods are compared and combined for both beams' configuration, and a good agreement is observed. PMID:21245064

  1. A triple-band, polarization- and incident angle-independent microwave metamaterial absorber with interference theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junfeng; Hu, Zhaoyang; Wang, Shengming; Huang, Xiutao; Liu, Minghai

    2016-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication and characterization of an ultrathin triple-band metamaterial absorber (MMA) in the microwave frequencies. The unit cell of the MMA consists of three different sizes of electric split ring resonators (eSRRs) and continuous metal film separated by only 1 mm dielectric substrate. The single-band MMA of this structure is firstly investigated. Then, by tuning the scale factor of the unit cells, the proposed triple-band MMA achieves absorption peaks at 9.85 GHz, 13.05 GHz and 14.93 GHz, respectively. Electric field distributions at three resonant frequencies are investigated to qualitatively analyze the loss mechanism. The further simulated and experimental results indicate that the proposed MMA is also polarization- and incident angle-independent. Finally, the interference theory is introduced to quantitatively analyze the MMA, which provides good insight into the physics behind the absorbing structure. To calculate the absorption rates accurately, we employ a simulation strategy make the near-field coupling between two metallic layers get back (compensation method). The measured absorption spectra show an excellent agreement with the theoretical calculation and simulation results. Therefore, the explanation to the physical mechanism of the triple-band MMA is presented and verified.

  2. Acoustical model of a Shoddy fibre absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, John Peter

    Shoddy fibres or "Shoddies" are a mixture of post-consumer and post-industrial fibres diverted from textile waste streams and recycled into their raw fibre form. They have found widespread use as a raw material for manufacturing sound absorbers that include, but are not limited to: automotive, architectural and home appliance applications. The purpose of this project is to develop a simple acoustic model to describe the acoustic behaviour of sound absorbers composed primarily of Shoddy fibres. The model requires knowledge of the material's bulk density only. To date, these materials have not been the focus of much published research and acoustical designers must rely on models that were developed for other materials or are overly complex. For modelling purposes, an equivalent fluid approach is chosen to balance complexity and accuracy. In deriving the proposed model, several popular equivalent fluid models are selected and the required input parameters for each model identified. The models are: the model of Delaney and Bazley, two models by Miki, the model of Johnson in conjunction with the model of Champoux and Allard and the model of Johnson in conjunction with the model of Lafarge. Characterization testing is carried out on sets of Shoddy absorbers produced using three different manufacturing methods. The measured properties are open porosity, tortuosity, airflow resistivity, the viscous and thermal characteristic lengths and the static thermal permeability. Empirical relationships between model parameters and bulk density are then derived and used to populate the selected models. This yields several 'simplified' models with bulk density as the only parameter. The most accurate model is then selected by comparing each model's prediction to the results of normal incidence sound absorption tests. The model of Johnson-Lafarge populated with the empirical relations is the most accurate model over the range of frequencies considered (approx. 300 Hz - 4000 Hz

  3. [Using spectra and visual modeling to study animal coloration].

    PubMed

    Yang, Can-Chao; Liang, Wei

    2013-12-01

    Animal coloration has many adaptive functions and plays an important role in signal communication both among intra- and interspecies. For example, it has been widely used in mate choice, intrasexual competition, and as aposematic or cryptic coloration in predator avoidance. Many colors and pigments also function in microbial resistance, structural support, photoprotection, and thermoregulation. Differing from human vision, based on RGB system, many other animals have tetrachromatic vision system, which includes the ultraviolet (UV) range that is undetectable by human eyes. Previous studies showed that ultraviolet is important in some species' social signaling and communication. Moreover, cone inner segments of most classes of vertebrate contain an oil droplet, which acts as a cut-off filter absorbing wavelengths below a critical value, and transmitting longer wavelengths. Animal and human vision is significantly different in that the classification of color by human standards may be a misleading for measuring animal coloration. Here, we illuminate how to use fiber spectrophotometer to quantify animal coloration, and analyze it by spectra analysis and visual modeling. As an example, we obtained plumage reflectance spectra from male and female scarlet minivets (Pericrocotus flammeus). This bird species is sexually dimorphic that the males have plumage color in black and red, while the females have grey and yellow accordingly. These plumage colors are typically generated from melanin and carotenoid pigments, which have an effect on antioxidant activity. Analysis of spectra segments provides hue, chroma, brightness and relative brightness of each wave range. Visual modeling maps color patches on tetrahedral color space and Robinson projection, meanwhile, calculates color span and color space volume which describe the color contrast and color diversity, respectively. In visual modeling, ambient light irradiance and spectral sensitivity of animal retinas are included

  4. Application of the Polynomial-Based Least Squares and Total Least Squares Models for the Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra of Binary Mixtures of Hydroxyl Compounds.

    PubMed

    Shan, Peng; Peng, Silong; Zhao, Yuhui; Tang, Liang

    2016-03-01

    An analysis of binary mixtures of hydroxyl compound by Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR) and classical least squares (CLS) yield large model error due to the presence of unmodeled components such as H-bonded components. To accommodate these spectral variations, polynomial-based least squares (LSP) and polynomial-based total least squares (TLSP) are proposed to capture the nonlinear absorbance-concentration relationship. LSP is based on assuming that only absorbance noise exists; while TLSP takes both absorbance noise and concentration noise into consideration. In addition, based on different solving strategy, two optimization algorithms (limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (LBFGS) algorithm and Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm) are combined with TLSP and then two different TLSP versions (termed as TLSP-LBFGS and TLSP-LM) are formed. The optimum order of each nonlinear model is determined by cross-validation. Comparison and analyses of the four models are made from two aspects: absorbance prediction and concentration prediction. The results for water-ethanol solution and ethanol-ethyl lactate solution show that LSP, TLSP-LBFGS, and TLSP-LM can, for both absorbance prediction and concentration prediction, obtain smaller root mean square error of prediction than CLS. Additionally, they can also greatly enhance the accuracy of estimated pure component spectra. However, from the view of concentration prediction, the Wilcoxon signed rank test shows that there is no statistically significant difference between each nonlinear model and CLS. PMID:26810185

  5. Absorbed dose measurements and predictions on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. V.; Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1993-01-01

    The overall radiation environment of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was determined in part through the use of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD's) which were included in several experiments. The results given are from four experiments (A0015 Biostack, M0004 Fiber Optics Data Link, P0004 Seeds in Space, and P0006 Linear Energy Transfer Spectrum Measurement) and represent a large fraction of existing absorbed dose data. The TLD's were located on the leading and the trailing edges and the Earth end of the spacecraft under various shielding depths (0.48 to 15.4 g/sq cm). The measured absorbed doses were found to reflect both directional dependence of incident trapped protons and shielding. At the leading edge, doses ranged from 2.10 to 2.58 Gy under shielding of 2.90 to 1.37 g/sq cm Al equivalent (M0004). At the trailing edge, doses varied from 3.04 to 4.49 Gy under shielding of 11.7 to 3.85 g/sq cm (A0015), doses varied from 2.91 to 6.64 Gy under shielding of 11.1 to 0.48 g/sq cm (P0004), and a dose range of 2.66 to 6.48 Gy was measured under shielding of 15.4 to 0.48 g/sq cm (P0006). At the Earth end of the spacecraft, doses from 2.41 to 3.93 Gy were found under shielding of 10.0 to 1.66 g/sq cm (A0015). The effect of the trapped proton anisotropy was such that the western side of LDEF received more than 2 times the dose of the eastern side at shielding depths of approximately 1 g/sq cm. Calculations utilizing a directional model of trapped proton spectra predict smaller doses than those measured, being about 50 percent of measured values at the trailing edge and Earth end, and about 80 percent near the leading edge.

  6. XMM-Newton Observations of the Heavily Absorbed Seyfert 1 Galaxy IC 4329A

    SciTech Connect

    Steenbrugge, K.

    2005-01-05

    We detect seven distinct absorbing systems in the high-resolution X-ray spectrum of the Seyfert 1 galaxy IC 4329A, taken with XMM-Newton. Firstly we detect absorption due to cold gas in our own Galaxy and warm gas in the Galactic halo or the Local Group. This local warm gas is only detected through O VII absorption, from which we deduce a temperature between 0.03 and 0.2 keV. In IC 4329A we detect absorption from the host galaxy as well as from a warm absorber, close to the nucleus, which has 4 components. The absorption from the host galaxy is well modeled by neutral material. The warm absorber detected in IC 4329A is photoionized and has an ionization range between log {xi} = -1.37 and log {xi} = 2.7. A broad excess is measured at the O VIII Ly{alpha} and N VII Ly{alpha} emission lines, which can be modeled by either disklines or multiple Gaussians. From the lightcurve we find that the source changed luminosity by about 20 % over the 140 ks observation, while the spectral shape, i.e. the softness ratio did not vary. In the EPIC spectra a narrow Fe K{alpha} and Fe XXVI Ly{alpha} emission line are detected. The narrowness of the Fe K{alpha} line and the fact that there is no evidence for flux variability between different observations leads us to conclude that the Fe K{alpha} line is formed at a large distance from the central black hole.

  7. Design and simulation of multi-color infrared CMOS metamaterial absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhengxi; Chen, Yongping; Ma, Bin

    2016-05-01

    Metamaterial electromagnetic wave absorbers, which usually can be fabricated in a low weight thin film structure, have a near unity absorptivity in a special waveband, and therefore have been widely applied from microwave to optical waveband. To increase absorptance of CMOS MEMS devices in 2-5 μmm waveband, multi-color infrared metamaterial absorbers are designed with CSMC 0.5 μmm 2P3M and 0.18 μmm 1P6M CMOS technology in this work. Metal-insulator-metal (MIM) three-layer MMAs and Insulator-metal-insulator-metal (MIMI) four-layer MMAs are formed by CMOS metal interconnect layers and inter metal dielectrics layer. To broaden absorption waveband in 2-5μmm range, MMAs with a combination of different sizes cross bars are designed. The top metal layer is a periodic aluminum square array or cross bar array with width ranging from submicron to several microns. The absorption peak position and intensity of MMAs can be tuned by adjusting the top aluminum micro structure array. Post-CMOS process is adopted to fabricate MMAs. The infrared absorption spectra of MMAs are verified with finite element method simulation, and the effects of top metal structure sizes, patterns, and films thickness are also simulated and intensively discussed. The simulation results show that CMOS MEMS MMAs enhance infrared absorption in 2-20 μmm. The MIM broad MMA has an average absorptance of 0.22 in 2-5 μmm waveband, and 0.76 in 8-14 μm waveband. The CMOS metamaterial absorbers can be inherently integrated in many kinds of MEMS devices fabricated with CMOS technology, such as uncooled bolometers, infrared thermal emitters.

  8. Modeling electron dynamics coupled to continuum states in finite volumes with absorbing boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Giovannini, Umberto; Larsen, Ask Hjorth; Rubio, Angel

    2015-03-01

    Absorbing boundaries are frequently employed in real-time propagation of the Schrödinger equation to remove spurious reflections and efficiently emulate outgoing boundary conditions. These conditions are a fundamental ingredient for the calculation of observables involving infinitely extended continuum states in finite volumes. In the literature, several boundary absorbers have been proposed. They mostly fall into three main families: mask function absorbers, complex absorbing potentials, and exterior complex-scaled potentials. To date none of the proposed absorbers is perfect, and all present a certain degree of reflections. Characterization of such reflections is thus a critical task with strong implications for time-dependent simulations of atoms and molecules. We introduce a method to evaluate the reflection properties of a given absorber and present a comparison of selected samples for each family of absorbers. Further, we discuss the connections between members of each family and show how the same reflection curves can be obtained with very different absorption schemes.

  9. The Two-Phase, Two-Velocity Ionized Absorber in the Seyfert 1 Galaxy NGC 5548

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade-Velázquez, Mercedes; Krongold, Yair; Elvis, Martin; Nicastro, Fabrizio; Brickhouse, Nancy; Binette, Luc; Mathur, Smita; Jiménez-Bailón, Elena

    2010-03-01

    We present an analysis of X-ray high-quality grating spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 using archival Chandra-High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer and Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer observations for a total exposure time of 800 ks. The continuum emission (between 0.2 keV and 8 keV) is well represented by a power law (Γ = 1.6) plus a blackbody component (kT = 0.1 keV). We find that the well-known X-ray warm absorber (WA) in this source consists of two different outflow velocity systems. One absorbing system has a velocity of -1110 ± 150 km s-1 and the other of -490 ± 150 km s-1. Recognizing the presence of these kinematically distinct components allows each system to be fitted independently, each with two absorption components with different ionization levels. The high-velocity system consists of two components, one with a temperature of 2.7 ± 0.6 × 106 K, log U = 1.23, and another with a temperature of 5.8 ± 1.0 × 105 K, log U = 0.67. The high-velocity, high-ionization component produces absorption by charge states Fe XXI-XXIV, while the high-velocity, low-ionization component produces absorption by Ne IX-X, Fe XVII-XX, and O VII-VIII. The low-velocity system also required two absorbing components, one with a temperature of 5.8 ± 0.8 × 105 K, log U = 0.67, producing absorption by Ne IX-X, Fe XVII-XX, and O VII-VIII, and the other with a lower temperature of 3.5 ± 0.35 × 104 K and a lower ionization of log U = -0.49, producing absorption by O VI-VII and the Fe VII-XII M-shell Unresolved Transitions Array. Once these components are considered, the data do not require any further absorbers. In particular, a model consisting of a continuous radial range of ionization structures (as suggested by a previous analysis) is not required. The two absorbing components in each velocity system are in pressure equilibrium with each other. This suggests that each velocity system consists of a multi-phase medium. This is the first time that

  10. THE TWO-PHASE, TWO-VELOCITY IONIZED ABSORBER IN THE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY NGC 5548

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade-Velazquez, Mercedes; Krongold, Yair; Binette, Luc; Jimenez-Bailon, Elena; Elvis, Martin; Nicastro, Fabrizio; Brickhouse, Nancy; Mathur, Smita

    2010-03-10

    We present an analysis of X-ray high-quality grating spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 using archival Chandra-High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer and Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer observations for a total exposure time of 800 ks. The continuum emission (between 0.2 keV and 8 keV) is well represented by a power law (GAMMA = 1.6) plus a blackbody component (kT = 0.1 keV). We find that the well-known X-ray warm absorber (WA) in this source consists of two different outflow velocity systems. One absorbing system has a velocity of -1110 +- 150 km s{sup -1} and the other of -490 +- 150 km s{sup -1}. Recognizing the presence of these kinematically distinct components allows each system to be fitted independently, each with two absorption components with different ionization levels. The high-velocity system consists of two components, one with a temperature of 2.7 +- 0.6 x 10{sup 6} K, log U = 1.23, and another with a temperature of 5.8 +- 1.0 x 10{sup 5} K, log U = 0.67. The high-velocity, high-ionization component produces absorption by charge states Fe XXI-XXIV, while the high-velocity, low-ionization component produces absorption by Ne IX-X, Fe XVII-XX, and O VII-VIII. The low-velocity system also required two absorbing components, one with a temperature of 5.8 +- 0.8 x 10{sup 5} K, log U = 0.67, producing absorption by Ne IX-X, Fe XVII-XX, and O VII-VIII, and the other with a lower temperature of 3.5 +- 0.35 x 10{sup 4} K and a lower ionization of log U = -0.49, producing absorption by O VI-VII and the Fe VII-XII M-shell Unresolved Transitions Array. Once these components are considered, the data do not require any further absorbers. In particular, a model consisting of a continuous radial range of ionization structures (as suggested by a previous analysis) is not required. The two absorbing components in each velocity system are in pressure equilibrium with each other. This suggests that each velocity system consists of a multi

  11. Action spectra again?

    PubMed

    Coohill, T P

    1991-11-01

    Action spectroscopy has a long history and is of central importance to photobiological studies. Action spectra were among the first assays to point to chlorophyll as the molecule most responsible for plant growth and to DNA as the genetic material. It is useful to construct action spectra early in the investigation of new areas of photobiological research in an attempt to determine the wavelength limits of the radiation region causing the studied response. But due to the severe absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation by biological samples, UV action spectra were first limited to small cells (bacteria and fungi). Advances in techniques (e.g. single cell culture) and analysis allowed accurate action spectra to be reported even for mammalian cells. But precise analytical action spectra are often difficult to obtain when large, pigmented, or groups of cells are investigated. Here some action spectra are limited in interpretation and merely supply a wavelength vs effect curve. When polychromatic sources are employed, the interpretation of action spectra is even more complex and formidable. But such polychromatic action spectra can be more directly related to ambient responses. Since precise action spectra usually require the completion of a relatively large number of careful experiments using somewhat sophisticated equipment over a range of at least six wavelengths, they are often not pursued. But they remain central to the elucidation of the effect being studied. The worldwide community has agreed that stratospheric ozone is depleting, with the possibility of a consequent rise in the amount of UV-B (290-320 nm) reaching the earth's surface. It is therefore essential that new action spectra be completed for UV-B effects on a large variety of responses of human, animal, and aquatic plant systems. Combining these action spectra with the known amounts of UV-B reaching the biosphere can give rise to solar UV effectiveness spectra that, in turn, can give rise to estimates

  12. The Warm Absorber of the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 5548

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, M.; Krongold, Y.; Elvis, M.; Nicastro, F.; Binette, L.; Brickhouse, N.

    2008-04-01

    We present a spectral analysis of the X-ray Chandraof the Seyfert 1 Galaxy NGC 5548. The warm absorber present in this object was modeled with the code PHASE. We detected two different outflow velocity systems in this source. One of the absorbing systems has outflow velocity of -1091+/-63 km s(-1) and the other of -568+/-49 km s(-1) . Each system required two absorption components with different ionization level to fit the observed features. Each velocity system may consist of a multi-phase medium.

  13. Combined near-infrared excited SEHRS and SERS spectra of pH sensors using silver nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Gühlke, Marina; Heiner, Zsuzsanna; Kneipp, Janina

    2015-10-21

    Surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering (SEHRS) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of para-mercaptobenzoic acid (pMBA) were studied with an excitation wavelength of 1064 nm, using different silver nanostructures as substrates for both SEHRS and SERS. The spectra acquired for different pH values between pH 2 and pH 12 were compared with SERS data obtained from the identical samples at 532 nm excitation. Comparison of the ratios of the enhancement factors from SEHRS and SERS experiments with those from calculations using plasmonic absorbance spectra suggests that the difference between total surface-enhancement factors of SEHRS and SERS for pMBA is mainly explained by a difference between the electromagnetic contributions for linear and non-linear SERS. SERS and SEHRS spectra obtained at near-infrared (NIR) excitation indicate an overall reduction of enhancement by a factor of 2-3 at very low and very high pH, compared to neutral pH. Our data provide evidence that different molecular vibrations and/or different adsorption species are probed in SERS and SEHRS, and that SEHRS is very sensitive to slight changes in the pMBA-nanostructure interactions. We conclude that the combination of SEHRS and SERS using NIR excitation is more powerful for micro-environmental pH sensing than one-photon spectra excited in the visible range alone. PMID:26377486

  14. Modeling the distribution of Mg II absorbers around galaxies using background galaxies and quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Bordoloi, R.; Lilly, S. J.; Kacprzak, G. G.; Churchill, C. W.

    2014-04-01

    We present joint constraints on the distribution of Mg II absorption around high redshift galaxies obtained by combining two orthogonal probes, the integrated Mg II absorption seen in stacked background galaxy spectra and the distribution of parent galaxies of individual strong Mg II systems as seen in the spectra of background quasars. We present a suite of models that can be used to predict, for different two- and three-dimensional distributions, how the projected Mg II absorption will depend on a galaxy's apparent inclination, the impact parameter b and the azimuthal angle between the projected vector to the line of sight and the projected minor axis. In general, we find that variations in the absorption strength with azimuthal angles provide much stronger constraints on the intrinsic geometry of the Mg II absorption than the dependence on the inclination of the galaxies. In addition to the clear azimuthal dependence in the integrated Mg II absorption that we reported earlier in Bordoloi et al., we show that strong equivalent width Mg II absorbers (W{sub r} (2796) ≥ 0.3 Å) are also asymmetrically distributed in azimuth around their host galaxies: 72% of the absorbers in Kacprzak et al., and 100% of the close-in absorbers within 35 kpc of the center of their host galaxies, are located within 50° of the host galaxy's projected semi minor axis. It is shown that either composite models consisting of a simple bipolar component plus a spherical or disk component, or a single highly softened bipolar distribution, can well represent the azimuthal dependencies observed in both the stacked spectrum and quasar absorption-line data sets within 40 kpc. Simultaneously fitting both data sets, we find that in the composite model the bipolar cone has an opening angle of ∼100° (i.e., confined to within 50° of the disk axis) and contains about two-thirds of the total Mg II absorption in the system. The single softened cone model has an exponential fall off with azimuthal

  15. Anatomy of the AGN in NGC 5548. VI. Long-term variability of the warm absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrero, J.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kriss, G. A.; Di Gesu, L.; Costantini, E.; Mehdipour, M.; Bianchi, S.; Cappi, M.; Boissay, R.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Ponti, G.; Pozo Núñez, F.; Seta, H.; Steenbrugge, K. C.; Whewell, M.

    2016-03-01

    Context. We observed the archetypal Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 in 2013-2014 in the context of an extensive multiwavelength campaign involving several satellites, which revealed the source to be in an extraordinary state of persistent heavy obscuration. Aims: We re-analyzed the archival grating spectra obtained by XMM-Newton and Chandra between 1999 and 2007 in order to characterize the classic warm absorber (WA) using consistent models and up-to-date photoionization codes and atomic physics databases and to construct a baseline model that can be used as a template for the physical state of the WA in the 2013 observations. Methods: We used the latest version of the photoionization code CLOUDY and the SPEX fitting package to model the X-ray grating spectra of the different archival observations of NGC 5548. Results: We find that the WA in NGC 5548 is composed of six distinct ionization phases outflowing in four kinematic regimes. The components seem to be in the form of a stratified wind with several layers intersected by our line of sight. Assuming that the changes in the WA are solely due to ionization or recombination processes in response to variations in the ionizing flux among the different observations, we are able to estimate lower limits on the density of the absorbing gas, finding that the farthest components are less dense and have a lower ionization. These limits are used to put stringent upper limits on the distance of the WA components from the central ionizing source, with the lowest ionization phases at several pc distances (<50, <20, and <5 pc, respectively), while the intermediately ionized components lie at pc-scale distances from the center (<3.6 and <2.2 pc, respectively). The highest ionization component is located at ~0.6 pc or closer to the AGN central engine. The mass outflow rate summed over all WA components is ~0.3 M⊙ yr-1, about six times the nominal accretion rate of the source. The total kinetic luminosity injected into the surrounding

  16. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  17. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-07-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells.

  18. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  19. The first observation of Carbon-13 spin noise spectra

    PubMed Central

    Schlagnitweit, Judith; Müller, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the first 13C NMR spin noise spectra obtained without any pulse excitation by direct detection of the randomly fluctuating noise from samples in a cryogenically cooled probe. Noise power spectra were obtained from 13C enriched methanol and glycerol samples at 176 MHz without and with 1H decoupling, which increases the sensitivity without introducing radio frequency interference with the weak spin noise. The multiplet amplitude ratios in 1H coupled spectra indicate that, although pure spin noise prevails in these spectra, the influence of absorbed circuit noise is still significant at the high concentrations used. In accordance with the theory heteronuclear Overhauser enhancements are absent from the 1H-decoupled 13C spin noise spectra. PMID:23041799

  20. Extended LY alpha -absorbing Halos around Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, David V.; Blades, J. Chris; Pettini, Max

    1996-06-01

    In order to establish the Lyα absorption cross section of present-day galaxies, we have identified 38 galaxies with z = 0-0.08 that lie within 40-500 h^-1^ kpc of the line of sight to a QSO observed with the Faint Object Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Including three galaxies in the field of 3C 273 investigated by previous authors, we find that nine of 41 galaxies have associated Lyα absorption. If the identified Lyα absorption systems are genuinely associated with the galaxies, then the covering factor of gas around galaxies remains roughly constant at ~40% between 100 and 300 h^-1^ kpc. Beyond 300 h^-1^ kpc, the incidence of absorption drops sharply. We conclude that (1) nearby galaxies do not possess Lyα-absorbing halos beyond 300 h^-1^ kpc in radius and (2) the covering factor of present-day galaxies between 50 and 300 h^-1^ kpc is 44% at an equivalent width limit of W >= 0.3 A. For the nine galaxies with associated Lyα absorption lines, differences in the galaxies systemic velocities and the velocity of the absorption line, {DELTA}v, range over +/- 300 km s^-1^, consistent with the distribution found at redshifts > 0.1 by Lanzetta et al. and Le Brun, Bergeron, & Boisse. Values of {DELTA}v spanning several hundred km s^-1^ are probably real for some of the QSO-galaxy pairs, however, and do not simply arise from errors in measuring cz_gal_ or cz_abs_. This suggests that the absorbing clouds are kinematically tied to the galaxy disks and that the distribution of {DELTA}v may arise because of the effects of galaxy inclination. We find no evidence for a correlation between Lyα equivalent width and galaxy line-of-sight separation, which weakens the argument that the identified galaxies are directly associated with the Lyα lines. Also, we find that absorption does not arise only from bright galaxies, since there are several examples in which low-luminosity galaxies apparently cause absorption. Yet we show that the absorbing halos around

  1. The Quasar 2175 Å Dust Absorbers in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release Twelve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yinan; Ge, Jian; Ma, Jingzhe; Hu, Teng; Zhang, Shaohua; Jiang, Peng; Prochaska, Jason X.; Zhou, Hongyan; Ji, Tuo; Brandt, W. Niel

    2016-01-01

    We report detection of quasar 2175 Å dust absorber (2DA) candidates in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release Twelve (DR12). These dust absorbers are searched from 39,242 Mg II absorbers with the absorption redshift 0.7≦ z(abs)≦ 2.67. The redshift range is chosen to allow 2DAs to be covered within SDSS spectrograph operation wavelength range (~3650-10,400 Å). We optimized our previously developed searching and identification procedures. The parameterized extinction curve is applied to fit the observation spectra with DR12 composite spectra (blue, average and red) in the rest-frame of Mg II absorbers. The best fitted spectra are used to extract bump parameters (width, depth and location). Only absorbers with bump strength above the 3σ level are chosen as 2DA candidates and used for statistical study. A total of over 400 2DA candidates have been identified as the first complete sample of 2DAs. In this sample, the bump strengths of most candidates are similar to the absorption bump observed in the Large Magellanic Clouds (LMC) and significantly weaker than those in the Milky Way (MW). The UV bump strength decreases with redshift. The UV bump strength is projected to evolve to the MW value at the present time. A subsample of these absorbers were observed with the MMT and Keck. All of them show strong dust depletion and high metallicity. Our results support a steadily increasing chemical enrichment of the ISM in quasar 2175 absorbers, unlike DLAs which show very weak redshift evolution.

  2. Benford's law, its applicability and breakdown in the IR spectra of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashenko, Ed.; Shulzinger, E.; Whyman, G.; Bormashenko, Ye.

    2016-02-01

    Infrared spectra of various polymers were treated statistically. It was established that for the absorbance spectra the Benford distribution of leading digits takes place, whereas the distribution of leading digits for transmittance spectra is random. This observation may be explained by the fact that the value of transmittance Tr is restricted 0 < Tr < 1, due to the physical reasons, whereas the value of absorbance is not. Moreover, the transmittance and absorbance A are interrelated by the logarithmic dependence A = - log Tr. This observation supplies the idea that the Benford law is valid in the situations, when logarithmic dependencies take place. Amalgamation of spectral data obtained for various polymers brings the distribution of the leading digits in the absorbance domain into proximity to the Benford Law.

  3. Fast ionized X-ray absorbers in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, K.; Tombesi, F.; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C.; Behar, E.; Contopoulos, I.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the physics of the X-ray ionized absorbers often identified as warm absorbers (WAs) and ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) in Seyfert AGNs from spectroscopic studies in the context of magnetically-driven accretion-disk wind scenario. Launched and accelerated by the action of a global magnetic field anchored to an underlying accretion disk around a black hole, outflowing plasma is irradiated and ionized by an AGN radiation field characterized by its spectral energy density (SED). By numerically solving the Grad-Shafranov equation in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) framework, the physical property of the magnetized disk-wind is determined by a wind parameter set, which is then incorporated into radiative transfer calculations with xstar photoionization code under heating-cooling equilibrium state to compute the absorber's properties such as column density N_H, line-of-sight (LoS) velocity v, ionization parameter ξ, among others. Assuming that the wind density scales as n ∝ r-1, we calculate theoretical absorption measure distribution (AMD) for various ions seen in AGNs as well as line spectra especially for the Fe Kα absorption feature by focusing on a bright quasar PG 1211+143 as a case study and show the model's plausibility. In this note we demonstrate that the proposed MHD-driven disk-wind scenario is not only consistent with the observed X-ray data, but also help better constrain the underlying nature of the AGN environment in a close proximity to a central engine.

  4. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  5. Absorbed doses from temporomandibular joint radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, S.L.; Lanzetta, M.L.

    1985-06-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used in a tissue-equivalent phantom to measure doses of radiation absorbed by various structures in the head when the temporomandibular joint was examined by four different radiographic techniques--the transcranial, transorbital, and sigmoid notch (Parma) projections and the lateral tomograph. The highest doses of radiation occurred at the point of entry for the x-ray beam, ranging from 112 mrad for the transorbital view to 990 mrad for the sigmoid notch view. Only the transorbital projection a radiation dose to the lens of the eye. Of the four techniques evaluated, the lateral tomograph produced the highest doses to the pituitary gland and the bone marrow, while the sigmoid notch radiograph produced the highest doses to the parotid gland.

  6. Cusps, self-organization, and absorbing states.

    PubMed

    Bonachela, Juan A; Alava, Mikko; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2009-05-01

    Elastic interfaces embedded in (quenched) random media exhibit metastability and stick-slip dynamics. These nontrivial dynamical features have been shown to be associated with cusp singularities of the coarse-grained disorder correlator. Here we show that annealed systems with many absorbing states and a conservation law but no quenched disorder exhibit identical cusps. On the other hand, similar nonconserved systems in the directed percolation class are also shown to exhibit cusps but of a different type. These results are obtained both by a recent method to explicitly measure disorder correlators and by defining an alternative new protocol inspired by self-organized criticality, which opens the door to easily accessible experimental realizations. PMID:19518401

  7. Porous Carbon Nanoparticle Networks with Tunable Absorbability

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wei; Kim, Seong Jin; Seong, Won-Kyeong; Kim, Sang Hoon; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Kim, Ho-Young; Moon, Myoung-Woon

    2013-01-01

    Porous carbon materials with high specific surface areas and superhydrophobicity have attracted much research interest due to their potential application in the areas of water filtration, water/oil separation, and oil-spill cleanup. Most reported superhydrophobic porous carbon materials are fabricated by complex processes involving the use of catalysts and high temperatures but with low throughput. Here, we present a facile single-step method for fabricating porous carbon nanoparticle (CNP) networks with selective absorbability for water and oils via the glow discharge of hydrocarbon plasma without a catalyst at room temperature. Porous CNP networks were grown by the continuous deposition of CNPs at a relatively high deposition pressure. By varying the fluorine content, the porous CNP networks exhibited tunable repellence against liquids with various degrees of surface tension. These porous CNP networks could be applied for the separation of not only water/oil mixtures but also mixtures of liquids with different surface tension levels. PMID:23982181

  8. Detection of Organic Compounds in Water by an Optical Absorbance Method

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chihoon; Eom, Joo Beom; Jung, Soyoun; Ji, Taeksoo

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an optical method which allows determination of the organic compound concentration in water by measurement of the UV (ultraviolet) absorption at a wavelength of 250 nm~300 nm. The UV absorbance was analyzed by means of a multiple linear regression model for estimation of the total organic carbon contents in water, which showed a close correlation with the UV absorbance, demonstrating a high adjusted coefficient of determination, 0.997. The comparison of the TOC (total organic carbon) concentrations for real samples (tab water, sea, and river) calculated from the UV absorbance spectra, and those measured by a conventional TOC analyzer indicates that the higher the TOC value the better the agreement. This UV absorbance method can be easily configured for real-time monitoring water pollution, and built into a compact system applicable to industry areas. PMID:26742043

  9. Detection of Organic Compounds in Water by an Optical Absorbance Method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chihoon; Eom, Joo Beom; Jung, Soyoun; Ji, Taeksoo

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an optical method which allows determination of the organic compound concentration in water by measurement of the UV (ultraviolet) absorption at a wavelength of 250 nm~300 nm. The UV absorbance was analyzed by means of a multiple linear regression model for estimation of the total organic carbon contents in water, which showed a close correlation with the UV absorbance, demonstrating a high adjusted coefficient of determination, 0.997. The comparison of the TOC (total organic carbon) concentrations for real samples (tab water, sea, and river) calculated from the UV absorbance spectra, and those measured by a conventional TOC analyzer indicates that the higher the TOC value the better the agreement. This UV absorbance method can be easily configured for real-time monitoring water pollution, and built into a compact system applicable to industry areas. PMID:26742043

  10. Scattering Spectra of Single Gold Nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Jason H.; Nehl, Colleen L.; Goodrich, Glenn P.; Tam, Felicia; Halas, Naomi J.

    2004-03-01

    Gold nanoshells are metal coated silica nanoparticles whose plasmon resonances vary from the visible to IR depending on their core to shell thickness ratio. Monodisperse nanoshell solutions can be synthesized such that their absorbance spectra match the calculated extinction spectra for the corresponding nanoshell structure. Using transmitted light dark field illumination and high numerical aperture optics, we have studied the scattering spectra of single gold nanoshells supported on ITO substrates in an optically homogeneous medium. With the aid of alignment marks, the same nanoshell can then be structurally characterized by electron microscopy. We have used this system to investigate the lineshape of single nanoshell scattering spectra to further elucidate the relative contributions of retardation, electron-interface scattering, and structural inhomogeneity. [1] Single particle measurements also facilitate the observation subtle interparticle and particle-substrate hybridization effects. [2] [1] S. L. Westcott, J. B. Jackson, C. Radloff, N. J. Halas, Phys. Rev. B 66, 155431 (2002). [2] E. Prodan, C. Radloff, N. J. Halas, P. Nordlander, Science 302, 419-422 (2003).

  11. Absorption spectra of cold dilute solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, R.F.; Maier, W.B. II; Freund, S.; Beattie, W.H.

    1983-06-01

    Infrared absorption spectra have been obtained for some compounds trapped in crystalline solids by freezing liquid Xe, Kr, Ar, or CH/sub 4/ solutions. The optical quality of the solid solutions is good, and they have been cooled to approx.80 K in 1.35 cm sample thicknesses to study the absorption in fundamental vibrational bands of the solutes. In the cases discussed, the bands are narrow, with observed full widths at half-maximum absorbance 0.05--0.30 cm/sup -1/ greater than the instrumental resolution (0.18--0.29 cm/sup -1/). The spectra appear to be free of ''multiple site'' and solute aggregate absorptions. Spectra displaying isotropic splitting in bands of natural BCl/sub 3/, SeF/sub 6/, OsO/sub 4/, TiCl/sub 4/, and MoF/sub 6/ are presented, and band frequencies are compared with some results obtained in evaporative matrices, in the gas phase, and in liquid solutions. For this comparison we have obtained some spectra of SeF/sub 6/ and BCl/sub 3/ gas.

  12. Scan-Free Absorbance Spectral Imaging A(x, y, λ) of Single Live Algal Cells for Quantifying Absorbance of Cell Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Isono, Takumi; Yamashita, Kyohei; Momose, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Hiroki; Kitamura, Masashi; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Hosoya, Takahiro; Kanda, Hiroaki; Kudo, Ayane; Okada, Norihide; Yagi, Takafumi; Nakata, Kazuaki; Mineki, Shigeru; Tokunaga, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Label-free, non-invasive, rapid absorbance spectral imaging A(x,y,λ) microscopy of single live cells at 1.2 μm × 1.2 μm resolution with an NA = 0.85 objective was developed and applied to unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. By introducing the fiber assembly to rearrange a two-dimensional image to the one-dimensional array to fit the slit of an imaging spectrograph equipped with a CCD detector, scan-free acquisition of three-dimensional information of A(x,y,λ) was realized. The space-resolved absorbance spectra of the eyespot, an orange organelle about 1 μm, were extracted from the green-color background in a chlorophyll-rich single live cell absorbance image. Characteristic absorbance change in the cell suspension after hydrogen photoproduction in C. reinhardtii was investigated to find a single 715-nm absorption peak was locally distributed within single cells. The formula to calculate the absorbance of cell suspensions from that of single cells was presented to obtain a quantitative, parameter-free agreement with the experiment. It is quantitatively shown that the average number of chlorophylls per cell is significantly underestimated when it is evaluated from the absorbance of the cell suspensions due to the package effect. PMID:26061268

  13. Advanced absorber assembly design for breeder reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Pitner, A.L.; Birney, K.R.

    1980-01-01

    An advanced absorber assembly design has been developed for breeder reactor control rod applications that provides for improved in-reactor performance, longer lifetimes, and reduced fabrication costs. The design comprises 19 vented pins arranged in a circular array inside of round duct tubes. The absorber material is boron carbide; cladding and duct components are constructed from the modified Type 316 stainless steel alloy. Analyses indicate that this design will scram 30 to 40% faster than the reference FFTF absorber assembly. The basic design characteristics of this advanced FFTF absorber assembly are applicable to large core breeder reactor design concepts.

  14. Absorbent product and articles made therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Correale, J. V. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A multilayer absorbent product for use in contact with the skin to absorb fluids is described. The product has a water pervious facing layer for contacting the skin, and a first fibrous wicking layer overlaying the water pervious layer. A first container section is defined by inner and outer layers of a water pervious wicking material in between a first absorbent mass and a second container section defined by inner and outer layers of a water pervious wicking material between what is disposed a second absorbent mass, and a liquid impermeable/gas permeable layer overlaying the second fibrous wicking layer.

  15. TPX/TFTR Neutral Beam energy absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlgren, F.; Wright, K.; Kamperschroer, J.; Grisham, L.; Lontai, L.; Peters, C.; VonHalle, A.

    1993-11-01

    The present beam energy absorbing surfaces on the TFTR Neutral Beams such as Ion Dumps, Calorimeters, beam defining apertures, and scrapers, are simple water cooled copper plates which wee designed to absorb (via their thermal inertia) the incident beam power for two seconds with a five minute coal down interval between pulses. These components are not capable of absorbing the anticipated beam power loading for 1000 second TPX pulses and will have to be replaced with an actively cooled design. While several actively cooled energy absorbing designs were considered,, the hypervapotron elements currently being used on the JET beamlines were chosen due to their lower cooling water demands and reliable performance on JET.

  16. Advanced Reflector and Absorber Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of advanced reflector and absorber materials: evaluating performance, determining degradation rates and lifetime, and developing new coatings.

  17. Polarization insensitive metamaterial absorber based on E-shaped all-dielectric structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liyang; Wang, Jun; Ma, Hua; Wang, Jiafu; Du, Hongliang; Qu, Shaobo

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we designed a metamaterial absorber performed in microwave frequency band. This absorber is composed of E-shaped dielectrics which are arranged along different directions. The E-shaped all-dielectric structure is made of microwave ceramics with high permittivity and low loss. Within about 1 GHz frequency band, more than 86% absorption efficiency was observed for this metamaterial absorber. This absorber is polarization insensitive and is stable for incident angles. It is figured out that the polarization insensitive absorption is caused by the nearly located varied resonant modes which are excited by the E-shaped all-dielectric resonators with the same size but in the different direction. The E-shaped dielectric absorber contains intensive resonant points. Our research work paves a way for designing all-dielectric absorber.

  18. A Fluidically Tunable Metasurface Absorber for Flexible Large-Scale Wireless Ethanol Sensor Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Ki; Lee, Dongju; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel flexible tunable metasurface absorber is proposed for large-scale remote ethanol sensor applications. The proposed metasurface absorber consists of periodic split-ring-cross resonators (SRCRs) and microfluidic channels. The SRCR patterns are inkjet-printed on paper using silver nanoparticle inks. The microfluidic channels are laser-etched on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material. The proposed absorber can detect changes in the effective permittivity for different liquids. Therefore, the absorber can be used for a remote chemical sensor by detecting changes in the resonant frequencies. The performance of the proposed absorber is demonstrated with full-wave simulation and measurement results. The experimental results show the resonant frequency increases from 8.9 GHz to 10.04 GHz when the concentration of ethanol is changed from 0% to 100%. In addition, the proposed absorber shows linear frequency shift from 20% to 80% of the different concentrations of ethanol. PMID:27509498

  19. Analysis and evaluation of RF absorbing material in suppressing modes associated with a metallic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, David L.

    Application of absorbing materials within enclosures designed to house high-speed digital electronics has become common practice for suppressing resonances associated with the enclosure geometry. Use of absorbing material is often considered toward the end of the design phase when the product is undergoing electromagnetic compatibility compliance testing, leaving little time for the additional experimentation required to optimize absorber material selection or placement within the device. The engineering principles required for maximizing absorber performance within the enclosure are often disregarded, replaced by a "shotgun" approach where multiple material options are experimented with until a solution is achieved. For this research a frequency domain reverberation chamber technique and one-port time domain quality factor estimation technique are employed to quantify the ability of various absorbing materials to suppress resonances of a physically small, electrically large cavity representative of those that may be used to enclose high-speed circuitry. Using both measurement techniques, assessment of the performance of various absorbing materials was performed as well as an evaluation of the affect absorber position has on overall material performance. It was found that both measurement techniques were effective in quantifying absorber performance within the cavity. For the frequency domain reverberation chamber approach the absorber effectiveness, defined as the difference in insertion loss between the cavity with and without absorbing material, was analyzed for various materials. For the undermoded cavity it was found that absorber effectiveness was positionally dependent. For the overmoded cavity, however, the position of the absorber within the cavity, as long as the total exposed surface area remained constant, did not have a significant impact on the absorber effectiveness. Similar results were also found by comparing the estimated quality factor for

  20. Wideband polarization-insensitive metamaterial absorber with perfect dual resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayop, Osman; Rahim, Mohamad Kamal A.; Murad, Noor Asniza; Samsuri, Noor Asmawati

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the analysis of wideband polarization-insensitive metamaterial absorber with perfect dual resonances. The structure is designed using lossy FR4 substrate with copper layers. The resonating elements are designed using the combination of circular ring with modified circle-shaped structure. The resonating elements are printed on the top surface of FR4 substrate, while the bottom surface is printed with full copper ground plane. From the simulation, the proposed design achieves nearly perfect absorbance at dual resonant frequency with improved bandwidth compared to the general circular ring design. Two peaks absorbance of 98.66 and 99.84 % are observed at 9.81 and 10.41 GHz respectively with full width half maximum (FWHM) bandwidth of 1050 MHz or 10.38 % at normal incident EM wave. The structure is also simulated for different polarization angles and it is observed that the structure can maintain the absorbance characteristic for all polarization angles. The experimental work is done to validate the simulated result. It is confirmed that two peaks absorbance are achieved with magnitudes of 99.88 and 99.67 % at 10.14 and 10.79 GHz, respectively. The measured FWHM is 1160 MHz.

  1. Advanced UV Absorbers for the Protection of Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Hüglin, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    The increasing awareness of the damaging effects of UV radiation to human skin triggered the market introduction of new cosmetic UV absorbers. This article summarizes the outcome of a multi-year research program, in which the author contributed to the development of different new UV filters. First of all, the molecular design and the basic properties of bis-ethylhexyloxyphenol methoxyphenyl triazine (BEMT) will be presented. This oil-soluble filter, which today is widely used in both beach products and skin care products, exhibits inherent photostability and strong broad-spectrum UV-A+B absorbance. Based on the concept of micronized organic UV absorbers, the UV-B filter tris biphenyl triazine (TBPT) will be introduced. At present TBPT exhibits the highest efficacy of all cosmetic UV absorbers in the market (measured by area under the UV spectrum). Finally, the concept of liposomogenic UV absorbers will be featured. This approach was developed to create water-resistant UV filters, as liposomogenic structures are thought to integrate into the lipids of the horny layer. Due to prohibitively high costs, this technology did not result in a commercial product so far. PMID:27561611

  2. Study of the Influence of the Source Quality on the Determination of the Shape Factor of Beta Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le-Bret, C.; Loidl, M.; Rodrigues, M.; Mougeot, X.; Bouchard, J.

    2012-06-01

    We are developing metallic magnetic calorimeters for beta spectrometry with the aim of determining the shape factors of beta spectra. The beta emitter is enclosed inside the detector absorber and the absorber size is chosen such that the detection efficiency is close to 100% for the entire spectrum. The nature of the deposit of the beta emitter is critical for precise measurement. A dependence of the shape of the spectrum on the quality of the source has been observed, supposedly due to interactions between the electrons and the deposit itself. We chose for this comparative study a nuclide with an allowed transition whose theoretical spectrum is relatively well-known, 63Ni, a pure beta emitter with an endpoint energy of 66.98 keV. Results of measurements of 63Ni deposited with different techniques are presented and compared to each other and to the theoretical spectrum.

  3. Device for absorbing mechanical shock

    DOEpatents

    Newlon, C.E.

    1979-08-29

    This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

  4. Device for absorbing mechanical shock

    DOEpatents

    Newlon, Charles E.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

  5. Generating attenuation-resistant frozen waves in absorbing fluid.

    PubMed

    Dorrah, Ahmed H; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Mojahedi, Mo

    2016-08-15

    We demonstrate a class of nondiffracting beams, called frozen waves, with a central spot that can be made to maintain a predefined intensity profile while propagating in an absorbing fluid. Frozen waves are composed of Bessel beams with different transverse and longitudinal wavenumbers, and are generated using a programmable spatial light modulator. The attenuation-resistant frozen waves demonstrated here address the problem of propagation losses in absorbing media. This development can be beneficial for many applications in particle micro-manipulation, data communications, remote sensing, and imaging. PMID:27519067

  6. High-Efficiency Absorber for Damping the Transverse Wake Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Weathersby, S.; /SLAC

    2007-02-28

    Transverse wake fields generated by intense beams may propagate long distances in the vacuum chamber and dissipate power in different shielded elements such as bellows, vacuum valves or vacuum pumps. Induced heating in these elements may be high enough to deteriorate vacuum conditions. We have developed a broadband water-cooled bellows-absorber to capture and damp these harmful transverse fields without impacting the longitudinal beam impedance. Experimental results at the PEP-II SLAC B-factory demonstrate high efficiency of this device. This absorber may be useful in other machines like synchrotron light sources or International Linear Collider.

  7. Absorbed Power Minimization in Cellular Users with Circular Antenna Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christofilakis, Vasilis; Votis, Constantinos; Tatsis, Giorgos; Raptis, Vasilis; Kostarakis, Panos

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays electromagnetic pollution of non ionizing radiation generated by cellular phones concerns millions of people. In this paper the use of circular antenna array as a means of minimizing the absorbed power by cellular phone users is introduced. In particular, the different characteristics of radiation patterns produced by a helical conventional antenna used in mobile phones operating at 900 MHz and those produced by a circular antenna array, hypothetically used in the same mobile phones, are in detail examined. Furthermore, the percentage of decrement of the power absorbed in the head as a function of direction of arrival is estimated for the circular antenna array.

  8. High-efficiency absorber for damping transverse wakefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Weathersby, S.

    2007-04-01

    Transverse wakefields generated by intense beams may propagate long distances in a vacuum chamber and dissipate power in different shielded elements such as bellows, vacuum valves, or vacuum pumps. Induced heating in these elements may be high enough to deteriorate vacuum conditions. We have developed a broadband water-cooled bellows absorber to capture and damp these harmful transverse fields without impacting the longitudinal beam impedance. Experimental results at the PEP-II SLAC B-factory demonstrate a high efficiency for this device. This absorber may be useful in super B-factories, the International Linear Collider, the Large Hadron Collider, or synchrotron light sources.

  9. Freshwater DOM quantity and quality from a two-component model of UV absorbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Heather T.; Tipping, Edward; Koprivnjak, Jean-Francois; Miller, Matthew P.; Cookson, Brenda; Hamilton-Taylor, John

    2012-01-01

    We present a model that considers UV-absorbing dissolved organic matter (DOM) to consist of two components (A and B), each with a distinct and constant spectrum. Component A absorbs UV light strongly, and is therefore presumed to possess aromatic chromophores and hydrophobic character, whereas B absorbs weakly and can be assumed hydrophilic. We parameterised the model with dissolved organic carbon concentrations [DOC] and corresponding UV spectra for c. 1700 filtered surface water samples from North America and the United Kingdom, by optimising extinction coefficients for A and B, together with a small constant concentration of non-absorbing DOM (0.80 mg DOC L-1). Good unbiased predictions of [DOC] from absorbance data at 270 and 350 nm were obtained (r2 = 0.98), the sum of squared residuals in [DOC] being reduced by 66% compared to a regression model fitted to absorbance at 270 nm alone. The parameterised model can use measured optical absorbance values at any pair of suitable wavelengths to calculate both [DOC] and the relative amounts of A and B in a water sample, i.e. measures of quantity and quality. Blind prediction of [DOC] was satisfactory for 9 of 11 independent data sets (181 of 213 individual samples).

  10. Different Strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In these line graphs of laboratory spectra, it is evident that different minerals have different spectra. The graph on the left shows the typical minerals found in igneous rocks, which are rocks related to magma or volcanic activity. The graph on the right shows iron-bearing candidates for further study and comparison to spectra from the Mars Exploration Rover panoramic cameras on Mars.

  11. Enhancement of acoustical performance of hollow tube sound absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, Azma; Khair, Fazlin Abd; Nor, Mohd Jailani Mohd

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents acoustical performance of hollow structures utilizing the recycled lollipop sticks as acoustic absorbers. The hollow cross section of the structures is arranged facing the sound incidence. The effects of different length of the sticks and air gap on the acoustical performance are studied. The absorption coefficient was measured using impedance tube method. Here it is found that improvement on the sound absorption performance is achieved by introducing natural kapok fiber inserted into the void between the hollow structures. Results reveal that by inserting the kapok fibers, both the absorption bandwidth and the absorption coefficient increase. For test sample backed by a rigid surface, best performance of sound absorption is obtained for fibers inserted at the front and back sides of the absorber. And for the case of test sample with air gap, this is achieved for fibers introduced only at the back side of the absorber.

  12. Olive oil phenols are absorbed in humans.

    PubMed

    Vissers, Maud N; Zock, Peter L; Roodenburg, Annet J C; Leenen, Rianne; Katan, Martijn B

    2002-03-01

    Animal and in vitro studies suggest that olive oil phenols are effective antioxidants. The most abundant phenols in olive oil are the nonpolar oleuropein- and ligstroside-aglycones and the polar hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol. The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the metabolism of those phenols in humans. We measured their absorption in eight healthy ileostomy subjects. We also measured urinary excretion in the ileostomy subjects and in 12 volunteers with a colon. Subjects consumed three different supplements containing 100 mg of olive oil phenols on separate days in random order. Ileostomy subjects consumed a supplement with mainly nonpolar phenols, one with mainly polar phenols and one with the parent compound oleuropein-glycoside. Subjects with a colon consumed a supplement without phenols (placebo) instead of the supplement with oleuropein-glycoside. Ileostomy effluent and urine were collected for 24 h after supplement intake. Tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol concentrations were low (< 4 mol/100 mol of intake) in the ileostomy effluent, and no aglycones were detected. We estimated that the apparent absorption of phenols was at least 55-66% of the ingested dose. Absorption was confirmed by the excretion of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol in urine. In ileostomy subjects, 12 mol/100 mol and in subjects with a colon, 6 mol/100 mol of the phenols from the nonpolar supplement were recovered in urine as tyrosol or hydroxytyrosol. In both subject groups, 5--6 mol/100 mol of the phenols was recovered from the polar supplement. When ileostomy subjects were given oleuropein-glycoside, 16 mol/100 mol was recovered in 24-h urine, mainly in the form of hydroxytyrosol. Thus, humans absorb a large part of ingested olive oil phenols and absorbed olive oil phenols are extensively modified in the body. PMID:11880564

  13. Comments on liquid hydrogen absorbers for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2003-02-01

    This report describes the heat transfer problems associatedwith a liquid hydrogen absorber for the MICE experiment. This reportdescribes a technique for modeling heat transfer from the outside world,to the abosrber case and in its vacuum vessel, to the hydrogen and theninto helium gas at 14 K. Also presented are the equation for freeconvection cooling of the liquid hydrogen in the absorber.

  14. Tracking the Partial Covering Absorbers in NGC 2110 with Suzaku: Constraints on Clumpy Absorber Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothschild, Richard

    How do matter, energy, space and time behave under the extraordinarily diverse conditions of the cosmos? How did the Universe originate and evolve to produce the galaxies we see today? These are some of the biggest unanswered questions in astronomy today. In our study of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) we want to explore these questions and ask more explicitly what is the accretion history of the Universe? How do supermassive black holes acquire material and what happens when it does? To answer this we need to know the physical conditions and geometry of the accreting circumnuclear material in the vicinity of the supermassive black holes in AGN. This is an important piece of the AGN puzzle that we are able to study through detailed X-ray spectroscopic observations of AGN. We herein request support for our analysis of two Suzaku observations of the AGN NGC 2110, an unpublished archival observation from 2005 and an upcoming observation. This type 2 Seyfert AGN shows significant obscuration in the soft X-ray band from a complex of multiple absorbers with different column densities and covering fractions. Studying these partial-covering absorbers can tell us about the material surrounding the central black hole. We can learn how much material there is by through the level of absorption and the location of the accreting gas from the black hole via measurements of the level of ionization. Additionally, covering fractions and particularly time variability of covering fractions can hint at the clumpiness of the medium. Taking advantage of Suzaku s large energy range we can also quantify the Compton reflection hump, a broad spectral feature which peaks around 20 30 keV and is indicative of reflection off Compton-thick material in the vicinity of the central black hole. most likely either the accretion disk itself or a geometrically thick torus of material further out. The nature of this material is still an open question and recent work has been done using infrared

  15. Solar sustained plasma/absorber conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, R. J.; Krascella, N. L.; Kendall, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    A space power system concept was evaluated which uses concentrated solar energy to heat a working fluid to temperatures as high as 4000 K. The high temperature working fluid could be used for efficient electric power production in advanced thermal or magnetohydrodynamic conversion cycles. Energy absorber configurations utilizing particles or cesium vapor absorber material were investigaed. Results of detailed radiant heat transfer calculations indicated approximately 86 percent of the incident solar energy could be absorbed within a 12-cm-dia flowing stream of gas borne carbon particles. Calculated total energy absorption in the cesium vapor seeded absorber configuration ranged from 34 percent to 64 percent of the incident solar energy. Solar flux concentration ratios of between approximately 3000 and 10,000 will be required to sustain absorber temperatures in the range from 3000 K to 4000 K.

  16. Gold absorbing film for a composite bolometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragovan, M.; Moseley, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    The principles governing the design of metal films are reviewed, with attention also given to the choice of metals. A description is then given of the characteristics of a bolometer with a gold absorbing film. It is demonstrated that gold is effective as an absorbing film for a millimeter bolometer operated at 1.5 K. At 1.5 K, gold is significantly better than bismuth since gold has a lower heat capacity for the absorbing film. At 0.3 K, gold and bismuth are both suitable. It is pointed out that at temperatures below 0.3 K, a superconducting absorbing film can have a heat capacity low enough not to dominate the heat capacity of the detector; for this reason, it may give better performance than a nonsuperconducting absorbing film.

  17. Structured Metal Film as Perfect Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiang; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu

    2014-03-01

    With standing U-shaped resonators, fish-spear-like resonator has been designed for the first time as the building block to assemble perfect absorbers. The samples have been fabricated with two-photon polymerization process and FTIR measurement results support the effectiveness of the perfect absorber design. In such a structure the polarization-dependent resonance occurs between the tines of the spears instead of the conventional design where the resonance occurs between the metallic layers separated by a dielectric interlayer. The incident light neither transmits nor reflects back which results in unit absorbance. The power of light is trapped between the tines of spears and finally be absorbed. The whole structure is covered with a continuous metallic layer with good thermo-conductance, which provides an excellent approach to deal with heat dissipation, is enlightening in exploring metamaterial absorbers.

  18. A Monte Carlo study of absorbed dose distributions in both the vapor and liquid phases of water by intermediate energy electrons based on different condensed-history transport schemes.

    PubMed

    Bousis, C; Emfietzoglou, D; Hadjidoukas, P; Nikjoo, H

    2008-07-21

    Monte Carlo transport calculations of dose point kernels (DPKs) and depth dose profiles (DDPs) in both the vapor and liquid phases of water are presented for electrons with initial energy between 10 keV and 1 MeV. The results are obtained by the MC4 code using three different implementations of the condensed-history technique for inelastic collisions, namely the continuous slowing down approximation, the mixed-simulation with delta-ray transport and the addition of straggling distributions for soft collisions derived from accurate relativistic Born cross sections. In all schemes, elastic collisions are simulated individually based on single-scattering cross sections. Electron transport below 10 keV is performed in an event-by-event mode. Differences on inelastic interactions between the vapor and liquid phase are treated explicitly using our recently developed dielectric response function which is supplemented by relativistic corrections and the transverse contribution. On the whole, the interaction coefficients used agree to better than approximately 5% with NIST/ICRU values. It is shown that condensed phase effects in both DPKs and DDPs practically vanish above 100 keV. The effect of delta-rays, although decreases with energy, is sizeable leading to more diffused distributions, especially for DPKs. The addition of straggling for soft collisions is practically inconsequential above a few hundred keV. An extensive benchmarking with other condensed-history codes is provided. PMID:18574312

  19. The JHU-SDSS Metal Absorption Line Catalog: Redshift Evolution and Properties of Mg II Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangtun; Ménard, Brice

    2013-06-01

    We present a generic and fully automatic method aimed at detecting absorption lines in the spectra of astronomical objects. The algorithm estimates the source continuum flux using a dimensionality reduction technique and nonnegative matrix factorization, and then detects and identifies metal absorption lines. We apply it to a sample of ~105 quasar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and compile a sample of ~40,000 Mg II- and Fe II-absorber systems, spanning the redshift range 0.4 < z < 2.3. The corresponding catalog is publicly available. We study the statistical properties of these absorber systems and find that the rest equivalent width distribution of strong Mg II absorbers follows an exponential distribution at all redshifts, confirming previous studies. Combining our results with recent near-infrared observations of Mg II absorbers, we introduce a new parameterization that fully describes the incidence rate of these systems up to z ~ 5. We find the redshift evolution of strong Mg II absorbers to be remarkably similar to the cosmic star formation history over 0.4 < z < 5.5 (the entire redshift range covered by observations), suggesting a physical link between these two quantities.

  20. THE JHU-SDSS METAL ABSORPTION LINE CATALOG: REDSHIFT EVOLUTION AND PROPERTIES OF Mg II ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Guangtun; Menard, Brice

    2013-06-20

    We present a generic and fully automatic method aimed at detecting absorption lines in the spectra of astronomical objects. The algorithm estimates the source continuum flux using a dimensionality reduction technique and nonnegative matrix factorization, and then detects and identifies metal absorption lines. We apply it to a sample of {approx}10{sup 5} quasar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and compile a sample of {approx}40,000 Mg II- and Fe II-absorber systems, spanning the redshift range 0.4 < z < 2.3. The corresponding catalog is publicly available. We study the statistical properties of these absorber systems and find that the rest equivalent width distribution of strong Mg II absorbers follows an exponential distribution at all redshifts, confirming previous studies. Combining our results with recent near-infrared observations of Mg II absorbers, we introduce a new parameterization that fully describes the incidence rate of these systems up to z {approx} 5. We find the redshift evolution of strong Mg II absorbers to be remarkably similar to the cosmic star formation history over 0.4 < z < 5.5 (the entire redshift range covered by observations), suggesting a physical link between these two quantities.

  1. Experimental and Mathematical Evaluation of Dynamic Behaviour of AN Oil-Air Coupling Shock Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PING, Y.

    2003-11-01

    The physical mechanism of the actual shock absorber with multi-types of damping and non-linear stiffness through coupling the oil, air, rubber and spring by ingenious devices is systematically investigated. The experimental results of the key-model machine in multi-parameter coupling dynamic test show complex non-linearity dynamic characteristics. Based on this, the non-linear dynamic model for the shock absorber is presented by analysing the internal fluid dynamic phenomenon with respect to the shock absorber. Comparisons with experimental data confirm the validity of the model. Using the model, it is possible to evaluate the importance of different factors for designing the shock absorber.

  2. Dual band metamaterial perfect absorber based on artificial dielectric “molecules”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen; Li, Bo; Zhao, Qian; Zhou, Ji

    2016-07-01

    Dual band metamaterial perfect absorbers with two absorption bands are highly desirable because of their potential application areas such as detectors, transceiver system, and spectroscopic imagers. However, most of these dual band metamaterial absorbers proposed were based on resonances of metal patterns. Here, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate a dual band metamaterial perfect absorber composed of artificial dielectric “molecules” with high symmetry. The artificial dielectric “molecule” consists of four “atoms” of two different sizes corresponding to two absorption bands with near unity absorptivity. Numerical and experimental absorptivity verify that the dual-band metamaterial absorber is polarization insensitive and can operate in wide-angle incidence.

  3. Effect of absorbents on water vapor transmission of free and applied polymer films.

    PubMed

    Amann, A H

    1976-04-01

    The influence of different types of absorbents on moisture transmission through free (cast films) and applied (coated tablets) polymer films was investigated. In free film studies, lubricated granulations were considered to be the absorbent. The compressed tablet was considered to be the absorbent in applied film studies. The results suggested that, using the same film formulation and film thickness in all cases, the polymer film reduced moisture absorption to the same degree, independent of the absorbent used, suggesting a constant moisture permeation. The results of the free film studies also simulated those of the applied films, allowing the correlation of the data. PMID:1271250

  4. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  5. Power absorbed during whole-body fore-and-aft vibration: Effects of sitting posture, backrest, and footrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawayseh, Naser; Griffin, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Although the discomfort or injury associated with whole-body vibration cannot be predicted directly from the power absorbed during exposure to vibration, the absorbed power may contribute to understanding of the biodynamics involved in such responses. From measurements of force and acceleration at the seat, the feet, and the backrest, the power absorbed at these three locations was calculated for subjects sitting in four postures (feet hanging, maximum thigh contact, average thigh contact, and minimum thigh contact) both with and without a rigid vertical backrest while exposed to four magnitudes (0.125, 0.25, 0.625, and 1.25 m s -2 rms) of random fore-and-aft vibration. The power absorbed by the body at the supporting seat surface when there was no backrest showed a peak around 1 Hz and another peak between 3 and 4 Hz. Supporting the back with the backrest decreased the power absorbed at the seat at low frequencies but increased the power absorbed at high frequencies. Foot support influenced both the magnitude and the frequency of the peaks in the absorbed power spectra as well as the total absorbed power. The measurements of absorbed power are consistent with backrests being beneficial during exposure to low frequency fore-and-aft vibration but detrimental with high frequency fore-and-aft vibration.

  6. Study on matching map for the absorber filled by metallic magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Xu, Fei; Tang, Liyun; Qiao, Liang; Li, Fashen

    2014-11-01

    A map displaying the matching characteristics and absorption performance for the metallic carbonyl iron composite in microwave frequency band is developed based on the origin of absorption peaks. In this map, the dependence of matching frequency fm on absorber thickness, input impendence, and absorption peak value is achieved simultaneously from the complex permeability and permittivity spectra without any approximation. From this map, the perfect matching frequency fpm and perfect matching thickness tpm at input impendence Z = 1 can be directly searched. Moreover, the required absorber thickness and the reflection loss value at any expected frequency where the absorption peak locates can be directly observed.

  7. Antimony sulphide, an absorber layer for solar cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, N.; Hussain, Arshad; Ahmed, R.; Shamsuri, W. N. Wan; Shaari, A.; Ahmad, N.; Abbas, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Replacement of the toxic, expensive and scarce materials with nontoxic, cheap and earth-abundant one, in solar cell absorber layer, is immensely needed to realize the vision of green and sustainable energy. Two-micrometre-thin antimony sulphide film is considered to be adequate as an absorbing layer in solar cell applications. In this paper, we synthesize antimony sulphide thin films on glass substrate by physical vapour deposition technique, and the obtained films were then annealed at different temperatures (150-250 °C). The as-deposited and annealed samples were investigated for structural and optoelectronic properties using different characterization techniques. The X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the annealed samples were polycrystalline with Sb2S3 phase, while the as-deposited sample was amorphous in nature. The optical properties are measured via optical ellipsometric techniques. The measured absorbance of the film is adequately high, and every photon is found to be absorbed in visible and NIR range. The conductivity type of the films measured by hot-point probe technique is determined to be p-type. The optical band gap of the resulted samples was in the range (2.4-1.3 eV) for the as-deposited and annealed films.

  8. Thin film absorber for a solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, William G.

    1985-01-01

    This invention pertains to energy absorbers for solar collectors, and more particularly to high performance thin film absorbers. The solar collectors comprising the absorber of this invention overcome several problems seen in current systems, such as excessive hardware, high cost and unreliability. In the preferred form, the apparatus features a substantially rigid planar frame with a thin film window bonded to one planar side of the frame. An absorber in accordance with the present invention is comprised of two thin film layers that are sealed perimetrically. In a preferred embodiment, thin film layers are formed from a metal/plastic laminate. The layers define a fluid-tight planar envelope of large surface area to volume through which a heat transfer fluid flows. The absorber is bonded to the other planar side of the frame. The thin film construction of the absorber assures substantially full envelope wetting and thus good efficiency. The window and absorber films stress the frame adding to the overall strength of the collector.

  9. SCALING PROPERTIES OF THE TRANSVERSE MASS SPECTRA.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHAFFNER-BIELICH,J.; KHARZEEV,D.; MCLERRAN,L.; VENUGOPALAN,R.

    2002-01-13

    Motivated from the formation of an initial state of gluon-saturated matter, we discuss scaling relations for the transverse mass spectra at BNL's Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). We show on linear plots, that the transverse mass spectra for various hadrons can be described by an universal function in m{sub t}. The transverse mass spectra for different centralities can be rescaled into each other. Finally, we demonstrate that m{sub t}-scaling is also present in proton-antiproton collider data and compare it to m{sub t}-scaling at RHIC.

  10. Optical properties of Cu-chalcogenide photovoltaic absorbers from self-consistent G W and the Bethe-Salpeter equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körbel, Sabine; Kammerlander, David; Sarmiento-Pérez, Rafael; Attaccalite, Claudio; Marques, Miguel A. L.; Botti, Silvana

    2015-02-01

    Self-consistent G W calculations and the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation are to date the best available approaches to simulate electronic excitations in a vast class of materials, ranging from molecules to solids. However, up to now numerical instabilities made it impossible to use these techniques to calculate optical absorption spectra of the best-known thin-film absorbers for solar cells: Cu(In ,Ga )(S ,Se ) 2 chalcopyrites and Cu2ZnSn(S ,Se ) 4 kesterites/stannites. We show here how to solve this problem using a finite-difference method in k space to evaluate the otherwise diverging dipole matrix elements, obtaining an excellent agreement with experiments. Having established the validity of this approach, we use it then to calculate the optical response of the less studied, but promising, Cu2ZnGe(S ,Se ) 4 compounds, opening the way to predictive calculations of still unknown materials.

  11. Investigation of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Changjun; Tong, Na; Song, Lixin; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-08-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The morphology structures were observed under different conditions using Atomic Force Microscope. The results show that the spectral intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is higher than that untreated between 200-1750 cm-1, while the intensity of PET treated with sodium hydroxide is lower than that untreated beyond 1750 cm-1 and the fluorescence background of Raman spectra is decreased. The spectral intensity of PET treated with sulfuric acid is remarkably reduced than that untreated, and the intensity of PET treated with copper sulphate is much higher than that untreated.

  12. Use of narrow-band spectra to estimate the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G.; Huemmrich, Karl F.; Goward, Samuel N.

    1990-01-01

    A novel approach is proposed for using high-spectral resolution imagers to estimate the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation adsorbed, f(apar), by vegetated land surfaces. In comparison to approaches using broad-band vegetation indices, the proposed method appears to be relatively insensitive to the reflectance of nonphotosynthetically active material beneath the canopy, such as leaf litter or soil. The method is based on a relationship between the second derivative of the reflectance vs wavelength function for terrestrial vegetation and f(apar). The relationship can be defined by the second derivatives in either of two windows, one in the visible region centered at 0.69 micron, another in the near-infrared region centered at 0.74 micron.

  13. Stars and their Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaler, James B.

    1997-03-01

    This unique and informative text describes how stars are classified according to their spectral qualities and temperature. James Kaler explains the alphabet of stellar astronomy, running from cool M stars to hot O stars, and tells the story of their evolution. Before embarking on a voyage of cosmic discovery, the author discusses the fundamental properties of stars, their atomic structure and the formation of spectra. Then, Kaler considers each star type individually and explores its spectra in detail. A review of unusual, hard-to-classify stars, and a discussion of data related to the birth, life and death of stars round out the text. This book is an important resource for all amateur astronomers and students of astronomy. Professionals will find it a refreshing read as well.

  14. Parmeterization of spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornish, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Following reception and analog to digital conversion (A/D) conversion, atmospheric radar backscatter echoes need to be processed so as to obtain desired information about atmospheric processes and to eliminate or minimize contaminating contributions from other sources. Various signal processing techniques have been implemented at mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar facilities to estimate parameters of interest from received spectra. Such estimation techniques need to be both accurate and sufficiently efficient to be within the capabilities of the particular data-processing system. The various techniques used to parameterize the spectra of received signals are reviewed herein. Noise estimation, electromagnetic interference, data smoothing, correlation, and the Doppler effect are among the specific points addressed.

  15. Multicolor generation using silicon nanodisk absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Sheng-Chieh Richter, Karola; Fischer, Wolf-Joachim

    2015-02-23

    A multicolored matrix that spans the visible range was demonstrated by using silicon nanodisk arrays. A nanostructured silicon substrate, which featured periodic silicon nanodisk arrays of various diameters, inter-nanodisk distances, and heights, was fabricated using electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching. These silicon nanodisks were able to support HE{sub 1m} leaky modes, which depended on the diameter of the nanodisks, resulting in wavelength-dependent reflection spectra. The resonant wavelength redshifted linearly with the increasing nanodisk diameter. The output color lay in the visible range and was observed to be tunable when varying the diameter, interdistance, and height. The results of finite-difference time-domain simulations exhibited close agreement with the observed optical properties of the periodic silicon nanodisk arrays.

  16. Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Wright, Richard N.; Swank, William D.; Lister, Tedd E.; Pinhero, Patrick J.

    2007-10-23

    A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

  17. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. The objective of this task is to quantify lifetimes through measurement of the optical and mechanical stability of candidate polymeric glazing and absorber materials. Polycarbonate sheet glazings, as proposed by two industry partners, have been tested for resistance to UV radiation with three complementary methods. Incorporation of a specific 2-mil thick UV-absorbing screening layer results in glazing lifetimes of at least 15 years; improved screens promise even longer lifetimes. Proposed absorber materials were tested for creep and embrittlement under high temperature, and appear adequate for planned ICS absorbers.

  18. Mucool Hydrogen Absorber R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Mary Anne

    2006-03-20

    The Mucool hydrogen absorber program will be presented. An update of current projects will be described, and the next year's plan will be reviewed, along with efforts in collaboration with the Muon International Cooling Experiment.

  19. Passive Earth Entry Vehicle Energy Absorbing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellas, S.; Maddock, R. W.

    2014-06-01

    A critical element of a passive EEV performance is the energy absorbing system required to attenuate the dynamic landing loads. Two design approaches are described and the pros and cons based on particular mission requirements are discussed.

  20. Perfectly matched layer based multilayer absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefaniuk, Tomasz; Stolarek, Marcin; Pastuszczak, Anna; Wróbel, Piotr; Wieciech, Bartosz; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Kotyński, Rafał

    2015-05-01

    Broadband layered absorbers are analysed theoretically and experimentally. A genetic algorithm is used to opti- mize broadband and wide-angle of incidence metal-dielectric layered absorbers. An approximate representation of the perfectly matched layer with a spatially varied absorption strength is discussed. The PML is realised as a stack of uniform and isotropic metamaterial layers with permittivieties and permeabilities given from the effective medium theory. This approximate representation of PML is based on the effective medium theory and we call it an effective medium PML (EM-PML).1 We compare the re ection properties of the layered absorbers to that of a PML material and demonstrate that after neglecting gain and magnetic properties, the absorber remains functional.

  1. Chandra and XMM-Newton view of the warm absorbing gas in Mrk 290

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. N.; Ji, L.; Marshall, H. L.; Longinotti, A. L.; Evans, D.; Gu, Q. S.

    2011-02-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) and XMM-Newton high-resolution spectra of the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy, Mrk 290. The Chandra HETGS spectra reveal complex absorption features that can be best described by a combination of three ionized absorbers. The outflow velocities of these warm absorbers are about 450 km s-1, consistent with the three absorption components found in a previous far-UV study. The ionizing continuum of Mrk 290 fluctuated by a factor of 1.4 during Chandra observations on a time-scale of 17 d. Using the response in opacity of the three absorbers to this fluctuation, we put a lower limit on the distance from the ionizing source of 0.9 pc for the medium ionized absorber and an upper limit on a distance of 2.5 pc for the lowest ionized absorber. The three ionization components lie on the stable branch of the thermal equilibrium curve, indicating roughly the same gas pressure. Therefore, the thermal wind from the torus is most likely the origin of warm absorbing gas in Mrk 290. During the XMM-Newton observation, the ionizing luminosity was 50 per cent lower compared to that in the Chandra observation. The Reflection Grating Spectrometer spectrum is well fitted by a two-phase warm absorber, with several additional absorption lines attributed to a Galactic high-velocity cloud, complex C. Neither the ionization parameter ξ nor the column density NH of the two absorbing components varied significantly, compared to the results from Chandra observations. The outflow velocities of both components were 1260 km s-1. We suggest that an entirely new warm absorber from the torus passed through our line of sight. Assuming the torus wind model, the estimated mass outflow rate is ˜0.1 M⊙ per year while the nuclear accretion rate is ˜0.04 M⊙ per year. The O VII and Ne IX forbidden lines are the most prominent soft X-ray emission lines, with a mean redshift of 700 km s-1 relative to the systematic

  2. Barnacle Bill Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These IMP spectra show the characteristics of the rock surface measured by the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (blue), the soil trapped in pits on the rock surface (red), and the deposit of bright drift on the top of the rock. The area measured by the APXS has the properties expected for nearly unweathered igneous rock, and the soil trapped in the pits is intermediate to the unweathered rock and the highly weathered drift material.

  3. Efficacy of an improved absorbent pad on incontinence-associated dermatitis in older women: cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most older adults with urinary incontinence use absorbent pads. Because of exposure to moisture and chemical irritating substances in urine, the perineal skin region is always at risk for development of incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD). The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of an improved absorbent pad against IAD. Methods A cluster randomized controlled design was used to compare the efficacy of two absorbent pads. Female inpatients aged ≥65 years who had IAD and used an absorbent pad or diaper all day were enrolled. Healing rate of IAD and variables of skin barrier function such as skin pH and skin moisture were compared between the usual absorbent pad group (n = 30) and the test absorbent pad group (n = 30). Results Thirteen patients (43.3%) from the test absorbent pad group and 4 patients (13.3%) from the usual absorbent pad group recovered completely from IAD. Moreover, the test absorbent pad group healed significantly faster than the usual absorbent pad group (p = 0.009). On the other hand, there were no significant differences between the two groups in skin barrier function. Conclusion The test absorbent pad for older adults with urinary incontinence might be more efficacious against IAD than usual absorbent pad. Trial registration UMIN-CTR: UMIN000006188 PMID:22642800

  4. Gold-black as IR Absorber and Solar Cell Enhancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peale, Robert E.; Cleary, Justin W.; Ishimaru, Manabu; Smith, C. W.; Baillie, K.; Colwell, J. E.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Joly, Alan G.; Edwards, Oliver; Fredricksen, C. J.

    2010-03-01

    Infrared absorbance and visible/near-IR excited plasmon resonances are investigated in gold-black, a porous nano-structured conducting film. A two level full factorial optimization study with evaporation-chamber pressure, boat current, substrate temperature, and degree of polymer infusion (for hardening) was performed. Polymer infusion was found generally to reduce absorbance in the long wave IR but has little effect at THz wavelengths, although for samples with the highest absorbance there is a slight improvement in the absorbance figure of merit (FOM) in both wavelength regimes. The characteristic length scales of the structured films vary considerably as a function of deposition parameters, but the IR FOM is found to be only weakly correlated with these distributions, which are determined by wavelet analysis of scanning electron micrographs images. Initial investigations of gold-black by photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) reveal plasmon resonances, which have potential to enhance the efficiency of thin film solar cells. For films with different characteristic length scales, the plasmon resonances appear in portions of the film with similar length scales.

  5. Plasmonic broadband absorber by stacking multiple metallic nanoparticle layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ting; Peng, Lining; Zhu, Yuntao; Yang, Fan; Cui, Yanxia; Wu, Xueyan; Liu, Liu; He, Sailing; Zhu, Furong; Hao, Yuying

    2015-04-01

    High efficiency, broadband plasmonic absorbers are constructed based on a stack of alternating metallic nanoparticle layers (MNLs) and SiO2 slabs on top of a reflective Ag substrate. Experimental results show that the stacks with thick MNLs absorb light better than those with thin MNLs when the number of MNL/SiO2 cells (N) is small (e.g., 1 or 2), but the situation gets reversed when N is greater than 3. When the nominal thickness of MNL is as thin as 5 nm, the acquired Ag nanoparticles are so small that light penetration through all of the stacked MNLs in the proposed design is possible. Thus, an increase in N leads to a growing number of light trapping elements. Our simulation reveals that the Ag nanoparticles at different layers are hybridized to excite rich localized plasmonic resonances, resulting in multiple absorption peaks at optical frequencies and thus a broader absorption band. The broadband absorbers with an integrated absorption efficiency of 96% over the 300-1100 nm wavelength range were achieved by stacking 18 MNL/SiO2 cells. The proposed absorbers can be used for applications in solar energy harvesting and thermal emission tailoring, due to their easy fabrication procedure and excellent optical properties.

  6. Multilayer Radar Absorbing Non-Woven Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedov, A. V.; Nazarov, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    We study the electrical properties of multilayer radar absorbing materials obtained by adding nonwoven sheets of dielectric fibers with an intermediate layer of electrically conductive carbon fibers. Multilayer materials that absorb electromagnetic radiation in a wide frequency range are obtained by varying the content of the carbon fibers. The carbon-fiber content dependent mechanism of absorption of electromagnetic radiation by sheets and multilayer materials is considered.

  7. Porous absorber for solar air heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, J.A.

    1980-09-10

    A general discussion of the factors affecting solar collector performance is presented. Bench scale tests done to try to determine the heat transfer characteristics of various screen materials are explained. The design, performance, and evaluation of a crude collector with a simple screen stack absorber is treated. The more sophisticated absorber concept, and its first experimental approximation is examined. A short summary of future plans for the collector concept is included. (MHR)

  8. Prediction of earthquake response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joyner, W.B.; Boore, David M.

    1982-01-01

    We have developed empirical equations for predicting earthquake response spectra in terms of magnitude, distance, and site conditions, using a two-stage regression method similar to the one we used previously for peak horizontal acceleration and velocity. We analyzed horizontal pseudo-velocity response at 5 percent damping for 64 records of 12 shallow earthquakes in Western North America, including the recent Coyote Lake and Imperial Valley, California, earthquakes. We developed predictive equations for 12 different periods between 0.1 and 4.0 s, both for the larger of two horizontal components and for the random horizontal component. The resulting spectra show amplification at soil sites compared to rock sites for periods greater than or equal to 0.3 s, with maximum amplification exceeding a factor of 2 at 2.0 s. For periods less than 0.3 s there is slight deamplification at the soil sites. These results are generally consistent with those of several earlier studies. A particularly significant aspect of the predicted spectra is the change of shape with magnitude (confirming earlier results by McGuire and by Irifunac and Anderson). This result indicates that the conventional practice of scaling a constant spectral shape by peak acceleration will not give accurate answers. The Newmark and Hall method of spectral scaling, using both peak acceleration and peak velocity, largely avoids this error. Comparison of our spectra with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum anchored at the same value at 0.1 s shows that the Regulatory Guide 1.60 spectrum is exceeded at soil sites for a magnitude of 7.5 at all distances for periods greater than about 0.5 s. Comparison of our spectra for soil sites with the corresponding ATC-3 curve of lateral design force coefficient for the highest seismic zone indicates that the ATC-3 curve is exceeded within about 7 km of a magnitude 6.5 earthquake and within about 15 km of a magnitude 7.5 event. The amount by

  9. A subsystem approach for analysis of dynamic vibration absorbers suppressing broadband vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Y. L.; Wong, W. O.; Cheng, L.

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic vibration absorbers are commonly designed and tuned to suppress vibrations of one vibration mode of a vibrating structure even it is a multi degree-of-freedom (MDOF) or continuous structure. Resonance at other vibration modes of the structure may still occur if the exciting force has a wide frequency band. A subsystem approach is proposed for analysis of the added stiffness and damping of vibration absorbers to the primary structure to which they are attached. The transfer function between the counteracting force from the vibration absorber and the vibration amplitude can then be derived for the comparison of their counteracting forces to the primary system. The major advantage of using the proposed method is that different designs of vibration absorber can be analysed separately from the primary system and therefore the dynamics characteristics of different designs of vibration absorber can be compared efficiently.

  10. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-03-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, organic carbon is measured from a quartz fiber filter that has been exposed to a volume of ambient air and analyzed using thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR). Here, methods are presented that show the feasibility of using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters to accurately predict TOR OC. This work marks an initial step in proposing a method that can reduce the operating costs of large air quality monitoring networks with an inexpensive, non-destructive analysis technique using routinely collected PTFE filter samples which, in addition to OC concentrations, can concurrently provide information regarding the composition of organic aerosol. This feasibility study suggests that the minimum detection limit and errors (or uncertainty) of FT-IR predictions are on par with TOR OC such that evaluation of long-term trends and epidemiological studies would not be significantly impacted. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least-squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date. The calibration produces precise and accurate TOR OC predictions of the test set samples by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, the nominal IMPROVE sample volume is 32.8 m3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also

  11. Radar Absorbing Materials for Cube Stealth Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, D.; Pastore, R.; Vricella, A.; Marchetti, M.

    A Cube Stealth Satellite is proposed for potential applications in defense system. Particularly, the faces of the satellite exposed to the Earth are made of nanostructured materials able to absorb radar surveillance electromagnetic waves, conferring stealth capability to the cube satellite. Microwave absorbing and shielding material tiles are proposed using composite materials consisting in epoxy-resin and carbon nanotubes filler. The electric permittivity of the composite nanostructured materials is measured and discussed. Such data are used by the modeling algorithm to design the microwave absorbing and the shielding faces of the cube satellite. The electromagnetic modeling takes into account for several incidence angles (0-80°), extended frequency band (2-18 GHz), and for the minimization of the electromagnetic reflection coefficient. The evolutionary algorithm used for microwave layered microwave absorber modeling is the recently developed Winning Particle Optimization. The mathematical model of the absorbing structure is finally experimentally validated by comparing the electromagnetic simulation to the measurement of the manufactured radar absorber tile. Nanostructured composite materials manufacturing process and electromagnetic reflection measurements methods are described. Finally, a finite element method analysis of the electromagnetic scattering by cube stealth satellite is performed.

  12. Perfect terahertz absorber using fishnet based metafilm

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu; Chen, Houtong; Taylor, Antoinette; Smirnova, E I; O' Hara, John F

    2009-01-01

    We present a perfect terahertz (THz) absorber working for a broad-angle of incidence. The two fold symmetry of rectangular fishnet structure allows either complete absorption or mirror like reflection depending on the polarization of incident the THz beam. Metamaterials enable the ability to control the electromagnetic wave in a unique fashion by designing the permittivity or permeability of composite materials with desired values. Although the initial idea of metamaterials was to obtain a negative index medium, however, the evolution of metamaterials (MMs) offers a variety of practically applicable devices for controlling electromagnetic wave such as tunable filters, modulators, phase shifters, compact antenna, absorbers, etc. Terahertz regime, a crucial domain of the electromagnetic wave, is suffering from the scarcity of the efficient devices and might take the advantage of metamaterials. Here, we demonstrate design, fabrication, and characterization of a terahertz absorber based on a simple fishnet metallic film separated from a ground mirror plane by a dielectric spacer. Such absorbers are in particular important for bolometric terahertz detectors, high sensitivity imaging, and terahertz anechoic chambers. Recently, split-ring-resonators (SRR) have been employed for metamaterial-based absorbers at microwave and THz frequencies. The experimental demonstration reveals that such absorbers have absorptivity close to unity at resonance frequencies. However, the downside of these designs is that they all employ resonators of rather complicated shape with many fine parts and so they are not easy to fabricate and are sensitive to distortions.

  13. Multifunctional Space Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Hodgson, Ed; Izenson, Mike; Chen, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    A system for non-venting thermal control for spacesuits was built by integrating two previously developed technologies, namely NASA's Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare's flexible version of the Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator (LCAR). This SEAR system was tested in relevant thermal vacuum conditions. These tests show that a 1 sq m radiator having about three times as much absorption media as in the test article would be required to support a 7 hour spacewalk. The serial flow arrangement of the LCAR of the flexible version proved to be inefficient for venting non-condensable gas (NCG). A different LCAR packaging arrangement was conceived wherein the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) housing would be made with a high-strength carbon fiber composite honeycomb, the cells of which would be filled with the chemical absorption media. This new packaging reduce the mass and volume impact of the SEAR on the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) compared to the flexible design. A 0.2 sq m panel with flight-like honeycomb geometry is being constructed and will be tested in thermal and thermal vacuum conditions. Design analyses forecast improved system performance and improved NCG control. A flight-like regeneration system also is also being built and tested. Design analyses for the structurally integrated prototype as well as the earlier test data show that SEAR is not only practical for spacesuits but also has useful applications in spacecraft thermal control.

  14. Space Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Stephan, Ryan; Hodgson, Ed; Izenson, Mike; Chen, Weibo

    2012-01-01

    A system for non-venting thermal control for spacesuits was built by integrating two previously developed technologies, namely NASA s Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare s flexible version of the Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator (LCAR). This SEAR system was tested in relevant thermal vacuum conditions. These tests show that a 1 m2 radiator having about three times as much absorption media as in the test article would be required to support a 7 hour spacewalk. The serial flow arrangement of the LCAR of the flexible version proved to be inefficient for venting non-condensable gas (NCG). A different LCAR packaging arrangement was conceived wherein the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) housing would be made with a high-strength carbon fiber composite honeycomb, the cells of which would be filled with the chemical absorption media. This new packaging reduces the mass and volume impact of the SEAR on the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) compared to the flexible design. A 0.2 sq m panel with flight-like honeycomb geometry is being constructed and will be tested in thermal and thermal vacuum conditions. Design analyses forecast improved system performance and improved NCG control. A flight-like regeneration system also is also being built and tested. Design analyses for the structurally integrated prototype as well as the earlier test data show that SEAR is not only practical for spacesuits but also has useful applications in spacecraft thermal control.

  15. Design of a multiband terahertz perfect absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Hu; Hong-yan, Wang; Zhen-jie, Tang; Xi-wei, Zhang; Lin, Ju; Hua-ying, Wang

    2016-03-01

    A thin-flexible multiband terahertz metamaterial absorber (MA) has been investigated. Each unit cell of the MA consists of a simple metal structure, which includes the top metal resonator ring and the bottom metallic ground plane, separated by a thin-flexible dielectric spacer. Finite-difference time domain simulation indicates that this MA can achieve over 99% absorption at frequencies of 1.50 THz, 3.33 THz, and 5.40 THz by properly assembling the sandwiched structure. However, because of its asymmetric structure, the MA is polarization-sensitive and can tune the absorptivity of the second absorption peak by changing the incident polarization angle. The effect of the error of the structural parameters on the absorption efficiency is also carefully analyzed in detail to guide the fabrication. Moreover, the proposed MA exhibits high refractive-index sensing sensitivity, which has potential applications in multi-wavelength sensing in the terahertz region. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11504006), the Key Scientific Research Project of Higher Education of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 15A140002), and the Science and Technology Planning Project of Henan Province, China (Grant No. 142300410366).

  16. Altered UV absorbance and cytotoxicity of chlorinated sunscreen agents.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Vaughn F; Kennedy, Steven; Zhang, Hualin; Purser, Gordon H; Sheaff, Robert J

    2012-12-01

    Sunscreens are widely utilized due to the adverse effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on human health. The safety of their active ingredients as well as that of any modified versions generated during use is thus of concern. Chlorine is used as a chemical disinfectant in swimming pools. Its reactivity suggests sunscreen components might be chlorinated, altering their absorptive and/or cytotoxic properties. To test this hypothesis, the UV-filters oxybenzone, dioxybenzone, and sulisobenzone were reacted with chlorinating agents and their UV spectra analyzed. In all cases, a decrease in UV absorbance was observed. Given that chlorinated compounds can be cytotoxic, the effect of modified UV-filters on cell viability was examined. Chlorinated oxybenzone and dioxybenzone caused significantly more cell death than unchlorinated controls. In contrast, chlorination of sulisobenzone actually reduced cytotoxicity of the parent compound. Exposing a commercially available sunscreen product to chlorine also resulted in decreased UV absorbance, loss of UV protection, and enhanced cytotoxicity. These observations show chlorination of sunscreen active ingredients can dramatically decrease UV absorption and generate derivatives with altered biological properties. PMID:22257218

  17. Uniform silica nanoparticles encapsulating two-photon absorbing fluorescent dye

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weibing; Liu Chang; Wang Mingliang; Huang Wei; Zhou Shengrui; Jiang Wei; Sun Yueming; Cui Yiping; Xu Chunxinag

    2009-04-15

    We have prepared uniform silica nanoparticles (NPs) doped with a two-photon absorbing zwitterionic hemicyanine dye by reverse microemulsion method. Obvious solvatochromism on the absorption spectra of dye-doped NPs indicates that solvents can partly penetrate into the silica matrix and then affect the ground and excited state of dye molecules. For dye-doped NP suspensions, both one-photon and two-photon excited fluorescence are much stronger and recorded at shorter wavelength compared to those of free dye solutions with comparative overall dye concentration. This behavior is possibly attributed to the restricted twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT), which reduces fluorescence quenching when dye molecules are trapped in the silica matrix. Images from two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy demonstrate that the dye-doped silica NPs can be actively uptaken by Hela cells with low cytotoxicity. - Graphical abstract: Water-soluble silica NPs doped with a two-photon absorbing zwitterionic hemicyanine dye were prepared. They were found of enhanced one-photon and two-photon excited fluorescence compared to free dye solutions. Images from two-photon laser scanning fluorescence microscopy demonstrate that the dye-doped silica NPs can be actively uptaken by Hela cells.

  18. Fast Ionized X-ray Absorbers in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, K.; Tombesi, F.; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C.; Behar, E.; Contopoulos, I.

    2015-07-01

    We present a study of X-ray ionization of MHD accretion-disk wind models in an effort to explain the highly-ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) identified as X-ray absorbers recently detected in various sub-classes of Seyfert AGNs. Our primary focus is to show that magnetically-driven outflows are physically plausible candidates to account for the AGN X-ray spectroscopic observations. We calculate its X-ray ionization and the ensuing X-ray absorption line spectra in comparison with an XXM-Newton/EPIC spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert AGN, PG 1211+143. We find, through identifying the detected features with Fe Kα transitions, that the absorber has a characteristic ionization parameter of log(xi[erg cm/s]) = 5-6 and a hydrogen-equivalent column density on the order of 1e23 cm-2, outflowing at a sub-relativistic velocity of v/c = 0.1-0.2. The best-fit model favors its radial location at R = 200 Rs (Rs is the Schwarzschild radius), with a disk inner truncation radius at Rt = 30Rs. The overall K-shell feature in data is suggested to be dominated by Fe XXV with very little contribution from Fe XXVI and weakly-ionized iron, which is in a good agreement with a series of earlier analysis of the UFOs in various AGNs including PG 1211+143.

  19. On Spectral Invariance of Single Scattering Albedo for Weakly Absorbing Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The single scattering albedo omega (sub 0 lambda) in atmospheric radiative transfer is the ratio of the scattering coefficient to the total extinction coefficient. For cloud water droplets both the scattering and absorption coefficients, thus the single scattering albedo, are functions of wavelength A and droplet size r. In this presentation we will show that for water droplets at weakly absorbing wavelengths, the ratio omega (sub 0 lambda)(r). The slope and intercept of the linear function are wavelength independent and sum to unity. This relationship allows for a representation of any single scattering albedo omega (sub 0 lambda) via one known spectrum omega (sub 0 lambda)(r(sub o)). We will provide a simple physical explanation of the discovered relationship. In addition to water droplets, similar linear relationships were found for the single scattering albedo of non-spherical ice crystals. The single scattering albedo $\\omega _ {0\\lambda }$ in atmospheric radiative transfer is the ratio of the scattering coefficient to the total extinction coefficient. For cloud water droplets both the scattering and absorption coefficients, and thus the single scattering albedo, are functions of wavelength $\\lambda $ and droplet size $r$. We show that for water droplets at weakly absorbing wavelengths, the ratio $\\omega _ {0\\lambda } (r)$/$\\omega _ {0\\lambda } (r_{0})$ of two single scattering albedo spectra for two different droplet sizes is a linear function of $\\omega _{0\\lambda }(r)$. The slope and intercept of the linear function are wavelength independent and sum to unity. This relationship allows for a representation of any single scattering albedo $\\omega_{0\\lambda }(r)$ via one known spectrum $\\omega_{0\\lambda }(r_{0})$. We provide a simple physical explanation of the discovered relationship. Similar linear relationships characterize the single scattering albedo of non-spherical ice crystals.

  20. Phase angle description of perturbation correlation analysis and its application to time-resolved infrared spectra.

    PubMed

    Morita, Shigeaki; Tanaka, Masaru; Noda, Isao; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2007-08-01

    A method of spectral analysis, phase angle description of perturbation correlation analysis, is proposed. This method is based on global phase angle description of generalized two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy, proposed by Shin-ichi Morita et al., and perturbation-correlation moving-window 2D (PCMW2D) correlation spectroscopy, proposed by Shigeaki Morita et al. For a spectral data set collected under an external perturbation, such as time-resolved infrared spectra, this method provides only one phase angle spectrum. A phase angle of the Fourier frequency domain correlation between a spectral intensity (e.g., absorbance) variation and a perturbation variation (e.g., scores of the first principle component) as a function of spectral variable (e.g., wavenumber) is plotted. Therefore, a degree of time lag of each band variation with respect to the perturbation variation is directly visualized in the phase angle spectrum. This method is applied to time-resolved infrared spectra in the O-H stretching region of the water sorption process into a poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) (PMEA) film. The time-resolved infrared (IR) spectra show three broad and overlapping bands in the region. Each band increases toward saturated water sorption with different relaxation times. In comparison to conventional methods of generalized 2D correlation spectroscopy and global phase angle mapping, the method proposed in the present study enables the easier visualization of the sequence as a degree of phase angle in the spectrum. PMID:17716406

  1. Microdosimetric characterisation of 28 kVp Mo/Mo, Rh/Rh, Rh/Al, W/Rh and Mo/Rh mammography X ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Verhaegen, F; Castellano, I A

    2002-01-01

    Microdosimetric characteristics of 28 kVp mammography X ray spectra were studied for several target/added filtration combinations (Mo/Mo, Rh/Rh, Rh/Al, W/Rh, Mo/Rh). Monte Carlo techniques were used to model X ray production from mammography units and to calculate distributions of absorbed dose and energy imparted in breast tissue. The results show that the dose averaged lineal energy is about 5.0 keV.micron-1, about 25% higher than for general diagnostic imaging X ray spectra. Significant differences in lineal energy between the five X ray qualities were noted, with the highest value for the commonly used Mo/Mo combination. Spectral hardening with depth in the tissues causes a 5% decrease in lineal energy over 5 cm. No significant differences were found for the different tissue compositions. PMID:12194338

  2. Action spectra of photosystems II and I and quantum yield of photosynthesis in leaves in State 1.

    PubMed

    Laisk, Agu; Oja, Vello; Eichelmann, Hillar; Dall'Osto, Luca

    2014-02-01

    The spectral global quantum yield (YII, electrons/photons absorbed) of photosystem II (PSII) was measured in sunflower leaves in State 1 using monochromatic light. The global quantum yield of PSI (YI) was measured using low-intensity monochromatic light flashes and the associated transmittance change at 810nm. The 810-nm signal change was calibrated based on the number of electrons generated by PSII during the flash (4·O2 evolution) which arrived at the PSI donor side after a delay of 2ms. The intrinsic quantum yield of PSI (yI, electrons per photon absorbed by PSI) was measured at 712nm, where photon absorption by PSII was small. The results were used to resolve the individual spectra of the excitation partitioning coefficients between PSI (aI) and PSII (aII) in leaves. For comparison, pigment-protein complexes for PSII and PSI were isolated, separated by sucrose density ultracentrifugation, and their optical density was measured. A good correlation was obtained for the spectral excitation partitioning coefficients measured by these different methods. The intrinsic yield of PSI was high (yI=0.88), but it absorbed only about 1/3 of quanta; consequently, about 2/3 of quanta were absorbed by PSII, but processed with the low intrinsic yield yII=0.63. In PSII, the quantum yield of charge separation was 0.89 as detected by variable fluorescence Fv/Fm, but 29% of separated charges recombined (Laisk A, Eichelmann H and Oja V, Photosynth. Res. 113, 145-155). At wavelengths less than 580nm about 30% of excitation is absorbed by pigments poorly connected to either photosystem, most likely carotenoids bound in pigment-protein complexes. PMID:24333386

  3. Nebular spectra of pair-instability supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerkstrand, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Heger, A.

    2016-01-01

    If very massive stars (M ≳ 100 M⊙) can form and avoid too strong mass-loss during their evolution, they are predicted to explode as pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). One critical test for candidate events is whether their nucleosynthesis yields and internal ejecta structure, being revealed through nebular-phase spectra at t ≳ 1 yr, match those of model predictions. Here, we compute theoretical spectra based on model PISN ejecta at 1-3 yr post-explosion to allow quantitative comparison with observations. The high column densities of PISNe lead to complete gamma-ray trapping for t ≳ 2 yr which, combined with fulfilled conditions of steady state, leads to bolometric supernova luminosities matching the 56Co decay. Most of the gamma-rays are absorbed by the deep-lying iron and silicon/sulphur layers. The ionization balance shows a predominantly neutral gas state, which leads to emission lines of Fe I, Si I, and S I. For low-mass PISNe, the metal core expands slowly enough to produce a forest of distinct lines, whereas high-mass PISNe expand faster and produce more featureless spectra. Line blocking is complete below ˜5000 Å for several years, and the model spectra are red. The strongest line is typically [Ca II] λλ7291, 7323, one of few lines from ionized species. We compare our models with proposed PISN candidates SN 2007bi and PTF12dam, finding discrepancies for several key observables and thus no support for a PISN interpretation. We discuss distinct spectral features predicted by the models, and the possibility of detecting pair-instability explosions among non-superluminous supernovae.

  4. Dose spectra from energetic particles and neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, Nathan; Bancroft, Chris; Bloser, Peter; Legere, Jason; Ryan, James; Smith, Sonya; Spence, Harlan; Mazur, Joe; Zeitlin, Cary

    2013-10-01

    spectra from energetic particles and neutrons (DoSEN) are an early-stage space technology research project that combines two advanced complementary radiation detection concepts with fundamental advantages over traditional dosimetry. DoSEN measures not only the energy but also the charge distribution (including neutrons) of energetic particles that affect human (and robotic) health in a way not presently possible with current dosimeters. For heavy ions and protons, DoSEN provides a direct measurement of the lineal energy transfer (LET) spectra behind shielding material. For LET measurements, DoSEN contains stacks of thin-thick Si detectors similar in design to those used for the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation. With LET spectra, we can now directly break down the observed spectrum of radiation into its constituent heavy-ion components and through biologically based quality factors that provide not only doses and dose rates but also dose equivalents, associated rates, and even organ doses. DoSEN also measures neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV, which requires enough sensitive mass to fully absorb recoil particles that the neutrons produce. DoSEN develops the new concept of combining these independent measurements and using the coincidence of LET measurements and neutron detection to significantly reduce backgrounds in each measurement. The background suppression through the use of coincidence allows for significant reductions in size, mass, and power needed to provide measurements of dose, neutron dose, dose equivalents, LET spectra, and organ doses. Thus, we introduce the DoSEN concept: a promising low-mass instrument that detects the full spectrum of energetic particles, heavy ions, and neutrons to determine biological impact of radiation in space.

  5. Solar-energy absorber: Active infrared (IR) trap without glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantley, L. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Absorber efficiency can be improved to 90% by removing glass plates and using infrared traps. Absorber configuration may be of interest to manufacturers of solar absorbers and to engineers and scientists developing new sources of energy.

  6. Modelling of TES X-ray Microcalorimeters with a Novel Absorber Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyomoto, Naoko; Bandler, Simon; Brefosky, Regis; Brown, Ari; Chervenak, James; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Finkbeiner, Frederick; Kelley, Richard; Kilbourne, Caroline; Lindeman, Mark; Porter, Frederick; Saab, Tarek; Sadleir, Jack; Smith, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Our development of a novel x-ray absorber design that has enabled the incorporation of high-conductivity electroplated gold into our absorbers has yielded devices that not only have achieved breakthrough performance at 6 keV, but also are extraordinarily well modelled. We have determined device parameters that reproduce complex impedance curves and noise spectra throughout transition. Observed pulse heights, decay time and baseline energy resolution were in good agreement with simulated results using the same parameters. In the presentation, we will show these results in detail and we will also show highlights of the characterization of our gold/bismuth-absorber devices. We will discuss possible improvement of our current devices and expected performance of future devices using the modelling results.

  7. AIS-2 spectra of California wetland vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Michael F.; Ustin, Susan L.; Klemas, Vytautas

    1987-01-01

    Spectral data gathered by Airborne Imaging Spectrometers-2 from wetlands were analyzed. Spectra representing stands of green Salicornia virginica, green Sesuvium verrucosum, senescing Distichlis spicata, a mixture of senescing Scirpus acutus and Scirpus californicus, senescing Scirpus paludosus, senescent S. paludosus, mowed senescent S. paludosus, and soil were isolated. No difference among narrowband spectral reflectance of the cover types was apparent between 0.8 to 1.6 micron. There were, however, broadband differences in brightness. These differences were sufficient to permit a fairly accurate decomposition of the image into its major cover type components using a procedure that assumes an additive linear mixture of surface spectra.

  8. Cooperative Interaction Within RNA Virus Mutant Spectra.

    PubMed

    Shirogane, Yuta; Watanabe, Shumpei; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses usually consist of mutant spectra because of high error rates of viral RNA polymerases. Growth competition occurs among different viral variants, and the fittest clones predominate under given conditions. Individual variants, however, may not be entirely independent of each other, and internal interactions within mutant spectra can occur. Examples of cooperative and interfering interactions that exert enhancing and suppressing effects on replication of the wild-type virus, respectively, have been described, but their underlying mechanisms have not been well defined. It was recently found that the cooperation between wild-type and variant measles virus genomes produces a new phenotype through the heterooligomer formation of a viral protein. This observation provides a molecular mechanism underlying cooperative interactions within mutant spectra. Careful attention to individual sequences, in addition to consensus sequences, may disclose further examples of internal interactions within mutant spectra. PMID:26162566

  9. Study on Raman spectra of synthetic celluloses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Na; Zhu, Changjun; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-02-01

    Raman spectrometry was employed to study the characteristics of Raman spectra of aliphatic polyamide fiber and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which were treated with sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid and copper sulfate, respectively. Raman spectra under different conditions were obtained and the characteristics of the Raman spectra were analyzed. The results show that Raman peaks beyond 1200 cm-1 appear for aliphatic polyamide fiber processed by sodium hydroxide, while the Raman peaks beyond 1000 cm-1 disappear for aliphatic polyamide fiber processed by sulfuric acid. Raman peaks beyond 1750 cm-1 decrease for polyethylene terephthalate processed by sodium hydroxide, while Raman peaks beyond 1000 cm-1 disappear, except weak peaks around 3000 cm-1 , for polyethylene terephthalate processed by sulfuric acid. The variations of the Raman spectra are primarily related to the changes of chemical bonds and molecular structures.

  10. Evolution and infrared spectra of brown dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.; Hubbard, William B.; Marley, Mark S.

    1986-01-01

    Self-consistent models are constructed for the structure, evolution, and observable properties of degenerately cooling objects, or 'brown dwarfs'. Model atmospheres composed of a range of likely gaseous and particulate opacity sources are calculated in order to provide a boundary condition for interior temperature-pressure profiles and to determine the emergent spectra for such objects. The radius derived from the interior models is combined with the emergent fluxes calculated from the atmosphere model to fit the data of McCarthy, Probst, and Low (1985) and to derive the luminosity and mass of VB 8B. The latter is found to be most probably an 0.05 solar mass object with effective temperature in the 1200-1500 K range and an atmosphere which very likely contains particulate absorbers. Key changes in chemical oxidation state and condensation of major constituents during the evolution of brown dwarfs are presented.

  11. Optical design and co-sputtering preparation of high performance Mo-SiO2 cermet solar selective absorbing coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liqing; Gao, Fangyuan; Zhao, Shuxi; Zhou, Fuyun; Nshimiyimana, Jean Pierre; Diao, Xungang

    2013-09-01

    In order to optimize and prepare high performance Mo-SiO2 cermet solar selective absorbing coating, a series of Mo-SiO2 cermet films with different metal volume fraction were deposited on optical glass using mid-frequency (MF) and radio frequency (RF) co-sputtering. The reflectance (R) and transmittance (T) in the wavelength range of 250-2500 nm have been simulated using SCOUT software with different dielectric function models. The optical constants, film thickness, metal volume fraction and other parameters have been deduced from the modeling. The fitted optical constants were then used to simulate and optimize the Mo-SiO2 solar selective coating and samples were prepared based on the optimized parameters. The Maxwell Garnett (MG) and Bruggeman (BR) effective-medium theory have been added in the dielectric function models to describe low metal volume fraction cermet layer (LMVF) and high metal volume fraction cermet layer (HMVF), separately. The optical spectra (R and T) of all single films were in a good agreement with the fitted spectra by dielectric function models. The experimental measured reflectance of the solar selective coating was also in rather good agreement with the optimized result. The solar absorptance of theoretically optimized selective coating was 0.945, while the absorptance of the experimental coating was 0.95. The thermal emittance of 0.15 (at 400 °C) was obtained.

  12. Long-Wavelength-Absorbing Forms of Bacteriochlorophyll a in Solutions of Triton X-100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottstein, J.; Scheer, H.

    1983-04-01

    At leat three forms of Triton X-100-solubilized bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) have been characterized by UV/visible/near-IR absorption and CD spectra. One, absorbing at 770 nm, is similar to a monomeric solution in methanol. The two others have strongly red-shifted absorption peaks (860 nm and 930, 835 nm) and intense and complex CD bands in this region, indicative of strong interaction of at least two and three molecules of BChl a, respectively.

  13. [The role of plastic shock absorbers in dental implantation].

    PubMed

    Szücs, A; Divinyi, T; Belina, K; Vörös, G

    1999-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour of different plastics (PE, PP, PI, PA, ABS, POM) was examined by static and dynamic loading. Detection of microdeformations and photoelastic stress analysis served as the examination method. According to the results, polyethylene is unsuitable, however the other plastics, with clauses, are suitable as shock absorbers. Apart from the mechanical investigation photoelastic stress analysis also revealed the benefit of osseointegration in force transmission to the bone. PMID:10028763

  14. On the definition of absorbed dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grusell, Erik

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: The quantity absorbed dose is used extensively in all areas concerning the interaction of ionizing radiation with biological organisms, as well as with matter in general. The most recent and authoritative definition of absorbed dose is given by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) in ICRU Report 85. However, that definition is incomplete. The purpose of the present work is to give a rigorous definition of absorbed dose. Methods: Absorbed dose is defined in terms of the random variable specific energy imparted. A random variable is a mathematical function, and it cannot be defined without specifying its domain of definition which is a probability space. This is not done in report 85 by the ICRU, mentioned above. Results: In the present work a definition of a suitable probability space is given, so that a rigorous definition of absorbed dose is possible. This necessarily includes the specification of the experiment which the probability space describes. In this case this is an irradiation, which is specified by the initial particles released and by the material objects which can interact with the radiation. Some consequences are discussed. Specific energy imparted is defined for a volume, and the definition of absorbed dose as a point function involves the specific energy imparted for a small mass contained in a volume surrounding the point. A possible more precise definition of this volume is suggested and discussed. Conclusions: The importance of absorbed dose motivates a proper definition, and one is given in the present work. No rigorous definition has been presented before.

  15. Experimental simulation of A-bomb gamma ray spectra: revisited.

    PubMed

    Pattison, John E; Payne, Lester C; Hugtenburg, Richard P; Beddoe, Alun H; Charles, Monty W

    2004-01-01

    It has been reported recently that the A-bomb gamma ray spectra received by the colon of the average Japanese survivor of Hiroshima and Nagasaki may be experimentally simulated using a hospital-based Philips SL15 linear accelerator. The simulated A-bomb gamma radiation may be used in radiobiology experiments to determine, amongst other things, the biological effectiveness of the A-bomb gamma radiation. However, in that study, the electron beams from the linear accelerator were poorly defined and photon contamination was ignored. In the study reported here, a Varian Clinac 2100C linear accelerator has been used for the same purpose but with photon contamination included in better defined output electron beams. It is found that the A-bomb gamma radiation can still be matched to an acceptable degree (<10%). The cause of the slightly poorer fit was due mainly to the different ranges of energies available from the linear accelerators used. The absorbed dose received by model breasts was also estimated in this study for the same situations as in the previous study. The ratio of the breast to colon doses was found to be only (3.9 +/- 4.0)% low compared with the expected values of 1.17 and 1.16 for Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively. These results provide further confirmation of the acceptability of the simple cylindrically symmetrical body models employed in these studies to represent the average Japanese survivor. PMID:15254320

  16. Complex permeability spectra of permendur composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasagi, Teruhiro; Tsutaoka, Takanori; Hatakeyama, Kenichi

    2010-01-01

    Complex permeability μ* and permittivity epsilon* spectra of permendur (Co50Fe50) composite materials have been studied in the microwave frequency range considering the application to the left-handed meta-materials and EMC devices. High surface electrical resistance of the permendur particles was achieved by the heat-treatment in order to suppress the eddy current effect in the high particle content composites. For the 82.6 vol.% composite, the μ' is 11 and less than 1 at 100 MHz and 6 GHz, respectively; the μ'' shows the two peaks around 700 MHz and 3GHz due to the domain wall and gyromagnetic spin resonance. On the other hand, the epsilon' is almost constant value of 28 and the epsilon'' is almost zero in the frequency range from 100 MHz to 6 GHz. The calculated reflection loss of a single-layer electromagnetic wave absorber (EM absorber) designed by using permendur composites indicates less than -20 dB around the matching frequency of 1 GHz.

  17. Einstein spectra of quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the initial stage of the CfA survey of quasar energy distributions are reviewed. Einstein imaging proportional counter spectra of 33 quasars have been studied by fitting a single power law slope and absorption by an equivalent column density of neutral hydrogen. Comparison with the higher energy HEAO-A2 data leads to a two-component model for the X-ray spectrum. The X-ray column density is systematically lower than the 21-cm measured Galactic column density along the same line of sight.

  18. Absorption features in the quasar HS 1603 + 3820 II. Distance to the absorber obtained from photoionisation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różańska, A.; Nikołajuk, M.; Czerny, B.; Dobrzycki, A.; Hryniewicz, K.; Bechtold, J.; Ebeling, H.

    2014-04-01

    We present the photoionisation modelling of the intrinsic absorber in the bright quasar HS 1603 + 3820. We constructed the broad-band spectral energy distribution using the optical/UV/X-ray observations from different instruments as inputs for the photoionisation calculations. The spectra from the Keck telescope show extremely high CIV to HI ratios, for the first absorber in system A, named A1. This value, together with high column density of CIV ion, place strong constraints on the photoionisation model. We used two photoionisation codes to derive the hydrogen number density at the cloud illuminated surface. By estimating bolometric luminosity of HS 1603 + 3820 using the typical formula for quasars, we calculated the distance to A1. We could find one photoionization solution, by assuming either a constant density cloud (which was modelled using CLOUDY), or a stratified cloud (which was modelled using TITAN), as well as the solar abundances. This model explained both the ionic column density of CIV and the high CIV to HI ratio. The location of A1 is 0.1 pc, and it is situated even closer to the nucleus than the possible location of the Broad Line Region in this object. The upper limit of the distance is sensitive to the adopted covering factor and the carbon abundance. Photoionisation modelling always prefers dense clouds with the number density n0 = 1010 - 1012 cm-3, which explains intrinsic absorption in HS 1603 + 3820. This number density is of the same order as that in the disk atmosphere at the implied distance of A1. Therefore, our results show that the disk wind that escapes from the outermost accretion disk atmosphere can build up dense absorber in quasars.

  19. Specification of absorbed dose to water using model-based dose calculation algorithms for treatment planning in brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun

    2013-04-01

    Model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), recently introduced in treatment planning systems (TPS) for brachytherapy, calculate tissue absorbed doses. In the TPS framework, doses have hereto been reported as dose to water and water may still be preferred as a dose specification medium. Dose to tissue medium Dmed then needs to be converted into dose to water in tissue Dw,med. Methods to calculate absorbed dose to differently sized water compartments/cavities inside tissue, infinitesimal (used for definition of absorbed dose), small, large or intermediate, are reviewed. Burlin theory is applied to estimate photon energies at which cavity sizes in the range 1 nm-10 mm can be considered small or large. Photon and electron energy spectra are calculated at 1 cm distance from the central axis in cylindrical phantoms of bone, muscle and adipose tissue for 20, 50, 300 keV photons and photons from 125I, 169Yb and 192Ir sources; ratios of mass-collision-stopping powers and mass energy absorption coefficients are calculated as applicable to convert Dmed into Dw,med for small and large cavities. Results show that 1-10 nm sized cavities are small at all investigated photon energies; 100 µm cavities are large only at photon energies <20 keV. A choice of an appropriate conversion coefficient Dw, med/Dmed is discussed in terms of the cavity size in relation to the size of important cellular targets. Free radicals from DNA bound water of nanometre dimensions contribute to DNA damage and cell killing and may be the most important water compartment in cells implying use of ratios of mass-collision-stopping powers for converting Dmed into Dw,med.

  20. Method of absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas Vyankatrao; Zelepouga, Sergeui; Pratapas, John

    2013-09-17

    A method and apparatus for absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor in which a reference light intensity measurement is made on a non-absorbing reference fluid, a light intensity measurement is made on a sample fluid, and a measured light absorbance of the sample fluid is determined. A corrective light intensity measurement at a non-absorbing wavelength of the sample fluid is made on the sample fluid from which an absorbance correction factor is determined. The absorbance correction factor is then applied to the measured light absorbance of the sample fluid to arrive at a true or accurate absorbance for the sample fluid.

  1. Ultraviolet optical properties of MgF2 coatings deposited by resistance boat evaporation at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Shuzhen; Shen, Jian; Yi, Kui; Jin, Yunxia; Shao, Jianda; Fan, Zhengxiu

    2006-01-01

    Single layers of MgF2 were deposited upon super polished fused-silica substrates by resistance boat evaporation at different temperatures. The transmittance and reflectance spectra were measured and the optical losses were analyzed. The laser-induced damage thresholds (LIDT) were characterized at the wavelength of 355nm for certain samples. The absorbance of the samples was discussed related to the LIDT. The increasing absorbance with the higher deposited temperature was attributed to the decreasing of the LIDT. And the high micro-defect density of the sample surface resulted in the low LIDT.

  2. Absorbed dose to water reference dosimetry using solid phantoms in the context of absorbed-dose protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Seuntjens, Jan; Olivares, Marina; Evans, Michael; Podgorsak, Ervin

    2005-09-15

    For reasons of phantom material reproducibility, the absorbed dose protocols of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) (TG-51) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (TRS-398) have made the use of liquid water as a phantom material for reference dosimetry mandatory. In this work we provide a formal framework for the measurement of absorbed dose to water using ionization chambers calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water but irradiated in solid phantoms. Such a framework is useful when there is a desire to put dose measurements using solid phantoms on an absolute basis. Putting solid phantom measurements on an absolute basis has distinct advantages in verification measurements and quality assurance. We introduce a phantom dose conversion factor that converts a measurement made in a solid phantom and analyzed using an absorbed dose calibration protocol into absorbed dose to water under reference conditions. We provide techniques to measure and calculate the dose transfer from solid phantom to water. For an Exradin A12 ionization chamber, we measured and calculated the phantom dose conversion factor for six Solid Water{sup TM} phantoms and for a single Lucite phantom for photon energies between {sup 60}Co and 18 MV photons. For Solid Water{sup TM} of certified grade, the difference between measured and calculated factors varied between 0.0% and 0.7% with the average dose conversion factor being low by 0.4% compared with the calculation whereas for Lucite, the agreement was within 0.2% for the one phantom examined. The composition of commercial plastic phantoms and their homogeneity may not always be reproducible and consistent with assumed composition. By comparing measured and calculated phantom conversion factors, our work provides methods to verify the consistency of a given plastic for the purpose of clinical reference dosimetry.

  3. Reflectance spectra of primitive chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.; Moyano-Cambero, C. E.; Llorca, J.

    2013-05-01

    We are studying a wide sample of pristine carbonaceous chondrites from the NASA Antarctic collection in order to get clues on the physico-chemical processes occurred in the parent bodies of these meteorites. We are obtaining laboratory reflectance spectra of different groups of carbonaceous chondrites, but here we focus in CM and CI chondrites. We discuss the main spectral features that can be used to identify primitive carbonaceous asteroids by remote sensing techniques. Two different spectrometers were used covering the entire 0.3 to 30 μm electromagnetic window. Only a handful of Near Earth Objects (NEOs) exhibit bands or features clearly associated with aqueous alteration. Among them are the target asteroids of Osiris Rex and Marco Polo-R missions.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of X-ray spectra and evaluation of filter effect using MCNP4C and FLUKA code.

    PubMed

    Taleei, R; Shahriari, M

    2009-02-01

    The general-purpose MCNP4C and FLUKA codes were used for simulating X-ray spectra. The electrons were transported until they slow down and stop in the target. Both bremsstrahlung and characteristic X-ray production were considered in this work. Tungsten/aluminum combination was used as target/filter in the simulation. The results of two codes were generated in 80, 100, 120 and 140 kV and compared with each other. In order to survey filter effect on X-ray spectra, the attenuation coefficient of filter was calculated in 120 kV. More details of filter effect have been investigated. The results of MCNP4C and FLUKA are comparable in the range of bremsstrahlung spectra, but there are some differences between them especially in specific X-ray peaks. Since the specific peaks have not significant role on image quality, both FLUKA and MCNP4C codes are fairly appropriate for production of X-ray spectra and evaluating image quality, absorbed dose and improvement in filter design. PMID:19054680

  5. Ultrathin flexible dual band terahertz absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Yan; Chen, Lin; Shi, Cheng; Cheng, Zhaoxiang; Zang, Xiaofei; Xu, Boqing; Zhu, Yiming

    2015-09-01

    We propose an ultrathin and flexible dual band absorber operated at terahertz frequencies based on metamaterial. The metamaterial structure consists of periodical split ring resonators with two asymmetric gaps and a metallic ground plane, separated by a thin-flexible dielectric spacer. Particularly, the dielectric spacer is a free-standing polyimide film with thickness of 25 μm, resulting in highly flexible for our absorber and making it promising for non-planar applications such as micro-bolometers and stealth aircraft. Experimental results show that the absorber has two resonant absorption frequencies (0.41 THz and 0.75 THz) with absorption rates 92.2% and 97.4%, respectively. The resonances at the absorption frequencies come from normal dipole resonance and high-order dipole resonance which is inaccessible in the symmetrical structure. Multiple reflection interference theory is used to analyze the mechanism of the absorber and the results are in good agreement with simulated and experimental results. Furthermore, the absorption properties are studied under various spacer thicknesses. This kind of metamaterial absorber is insensitive to polarization, has high absorption rates (over 90%) with wide incident angles range from 0° to 45° and the absorption rates are also above 90% when wrapping it to a curved surface.

  6. Solar absorber material reflectivity measurements at temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Bonometti, J.A.; Hawk, C.W.

    1999-07-01

    Assessment of absorber shell material properties at high operating temperatures is essential to the full understanding of the solar energy absorption process in a solar thermal rocket. A review of these properties, their application and a new experimental methodology to measure them at high temperatures is presented. The direct application for the research is absorber cavity development for a Solar Thermal Upper Stage (STUS). High temperature measurements, greater than 1,000 Kelvin, are difficult to obtain for incident radiation upon a solid surface that forms an absorber cavity in a solar thermal engine. The basic material properties determine the amount of solar energy that is absorbed, transmitted or reflected and are dependent upon the material's temperature. This investigation developed a new approach to evaluate the material properties (i.e., reflectivity, absorptive) of the absorber wall and experimentally determined them for rhenium and niobium sample coupons. The secular reflectivity was measured both at room temperature and at temperatures near 1,000 Kelvin over a range of angles from 0 to 90 degrees. The same experimental measurements were used to calculate the total reflectivity of the sample by integrating the recorded intensities over a hemisphere. The test methodology used the incident solar energy as the heating source while directly measuring the reflected light (an integrated value over all visible wavelengths). Temperature dependence on total reflectivity was found to follow an inverse power function of the material's temperature.

  7. Theoretical Studies of Molecular Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher (Technical Monitor); Freedman, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    This summary describes the research activities of the principal investigator during the reporting period. The research includes spectroscopy, management of molecular databases, and generation of spectral line profiles and opacity data. The spectroscopy research includes oxygen broadening of nitric oxide (NO), analysis of CO2 spectra, analysis of HNO3 spectra, and analysis of CO spectra.

  8. A Reanalysis of XMM-Newton Data of the Classical Nova V2491 Cyg Using Hot Collisionally Ionized Absorber Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamsizkan, Cigdem; Balman, Solen

    2016-07-01

    We present a reanalysis of a selection of archival XMM-Newton RGS (Reflection Grating Spectrometer) data of the classical nova; V2491 Cyg obtained on 2008 May 20.6 and May 30.3. Our aim is to model the complex absorption features in the high resolution spectra assuming these can be due to different components of absorption from warm photo-ionized or hot collisionally ionized plasma originating from the wind/ejecta along with the features of the stellar emission. Here, we focus on absorption from a hot collisionally ionized plasma model. We utilise SRON software SPEX version 2.05.04 for the analysis and use a blackbody (BB) plus collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) model for the continuum, modified by a collisionally ionized hot absorber (HOT) along with interstellar gas and dust absorption. We consider that the hot collisonally ionized plasma absorption is effective only on the BB emission whereas the cold interstellar gas and dust absorption modifies both BB and CIE emission. Our fits model the ionized absorption features simultaneously and show that hot collisionally ionized absorption model improves the fits upon warm photo-ionized absorption models considerably. We find that the X-ray spectrum shows deep and complex absorption features blue shifted by 2630-3700 km/s consistent with ejecta/wind speeds. We derive C, N, O abundances of V2491 Cyg which shows a typical signature of H-burning with a nitrogen and oxygen overabundance (ratio to solar abundance) of N ≃ 6, O ≃ 38, and carbon depletion of C ≃ 0.4. Our fits yield two collisonally ionized hot plasma absorption components with temperatures T_1≃1.1-2.7, T_{2}≃0.6-0.9 keV and rms velocities σ_{v1}˜850, σ_{v2}˜55 km/s. The different temperatures, column densities and corresponding rms velocities of the absorbers may indicate the existence of high and low density regions with less and high strongly ionized material in the ejecta/wind that might cause the complex absorbed spectra of V2491 Cyg.

  9. Infrared extinction spectra of some common liquid aerosols.

    PubMed

    Carlon, H R; Anderson, D H; Milham, M E; Tarnove, T L; Frickel, R H; Sindoni, I

    1977-06-01

    Infrared extinction spectra in the 3-5-microm and 7-13-microm atmospheric window regions have been obtained for smokes of petroleum oil, sulfuric acid, and phosphoric acid of varying droplet concentration and for water fogs. Spectra were also obtained at 0.36-2.35microm for petroleum oil and sulfuric acid smokes. Experimental results were compared, for sulfuric acid and water aerosols, to calculated values obtained from the Mie theory. Agreement was as good as +/-10%. When absorbing smoke droplets are small compared to wavelength, very useful approximations apply, and droplet clouds may be spectrally simulated by thin liquid films. In such cases, the imaginary component of refractive index may be approximated directly from aerosol spectra. At 12.5-microm wavelength, water fog extinction is nearly independent of droplet size distribution, suggesting a simple scheme for measurement of total liquid water content of an optical path. PMID:20168760

  10. Circular polarization sensitive absorbers based on graphene

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kunpeng; Wang, Min; Pu, Mingbo; Wu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Hui; Hu, Chenggang; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the polarization of a linearly polarized (LP) light would rotate after passing through a single layer graphene under the bias of a perpendicular magnetostatic field. Here we show that a corresponding phase shift could be expected for circularly polarized (CP) light, which can be engineered to design the circular polarization sensitive devices. We theoretically validate that an ultrathin graphene-based absorber with the thickness about λ/76 can be obtained, which shows efficient absorption >90% within incident angles of ±80°. The angle-independent phase shift produced by the graphene is responsible for the nearly omnidirectional absorber. Furthermore, a broadband absorber in frequencies ranging from 2.343 to 5.885 THz with absorption over 90% is designed by engineering the dispersion of graphene. PMID:27034257

  11. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  12. Temporal, latitude and altitude absorbed dose dependences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stozhkov, Y.; Svirzhevsky, N.; Bazilevskaya, G.

    The regular balloon measurements in the Earth's atmosphere are carried on at the Lebedev Physical Institute since 1957. The regular balloon flights have been made at the high latitude stations (near Murmansk - northern hemisphere and Mi ny -r Antarctica) and at the middle latitude (Moscow). Based on these long-term measurements as well as on the latitude data obtained in the several Soviet Antarctic expeditions the calculations of absorbed doses were fulfilled for altitudes of 10, 15, 20 and 30 km. The absorbed dose dependences on the geomagnetic cutoff rigidities and the phase of the 11-year solar cycle were found. The evaluation of the solar proton events and energetic electron precipitation contributions to the absorbed dose enhancements was made.

  13. Circular polarization sensitive absorbers based on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kunpeng; Wang, Min; Pu, Mingbo; Wu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Hui; Hu, Chenggang; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that the polarization of a linearly polarized (LP) light would rotate after passing through a single layer graphene under the bias of a perpendicular magnetostatic field. Here we show that a corresponding phase shift could be expected for circularly polarized (CP) light, which can be engineered to design the circular polarization sensitive devices. We theoretically validate that an ultrathin graphene-based absorber with the thickness about λ/76 can be obtained, which shows efficient absorption >90% within incident angles of ±80°. The angle-independent phase shift produced by the graphene is responsible for the nearly omnidirectional absorber. Furthermore, a broadband absorber in frequencies ranging from 2.343 to 5.885 THz with absorption over 90% is designed by engineering the dispersion of graphene.

  14. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  15. A Dynamic Absorber With Active Vibration Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.-J.; Lian, R.-J.

    1994-12-01

    The design and construction of a dynamic absorber incorporating active vibration control is described. The absorber is a two-degrees-of-freedom spring — lumped mass system sliding on a guide pillar, with two internal vibration disturbance sources. Both the main mass and the secondary absorber mass are acted on by DC servo motors, respectively, to suppress the vibration amplitude. The state variable technique is used to model this dynamic system and a decoupling PID control method is used. First, the discrete time state space model is identified by using the commercial software MATLAB. Then the decoupling controller of this multi-input/multi-output system is derived from the identified model. Finally the results of some experiments are presented. The experimental results show that the system is effective in suppressing vibration. Also, the performance of this control strategy for position tracking control is evaluated based on experimental data.

  16. Non-Absorbable Gas Behavior in the Absorber/Evaporator of a Absorption Chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nagamoto, Wataru; Sugiyama, Takahide

    A two-dimensional numerical study on non-absorbable gas behavior in the absorber/evaporator of an absorption chiller has been performed. In the present study, the effect of the pitch-to-diameter ratio of a cylinder bundle in the absorber was highlighted. From the results, a sudden decrease of the overall heat transfer coefficient of the absorber was observed at a certain mean concentration of non-absorbable gas for each pitch-to-diameter ratio. Such a critical concentration was also found to decrease as the pitch-to- diameter ratio increased. The sudden decrease occurs due to the sudden disappearance of recirculating region, which is formed between the absorber and the evaporator, and where most of non-absorbable gas stays when it exists. As the pitch-to-diameter ratio increases, the recirculating region becomes weak because the velocity of the high velocity region supporting the recirculating flow decreases. Then, the critical mean concentration of non-absorbable gas is found to decrease as pitch-to-ratio increases.

  17. Towards absorbing outer boundaries in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchman, Luisa T.; Sarbach, Olivier C. A.

    2006-12-01

    We construct exact solutions to the Bianchi equations on a flat spacetime background. When the constraints are satisfied, these solutions represent in- and outgoing linearized gravitational radiation. We then consider the Bianchi equations on a subset of flat spacetime of the form [0, T] × BR, where BR is a ball of radius R, and analyse different kinds of boundary conditions on ∂BR. Our main results are as follows. (i) We give an explicit analytic example showing that boundary conditions obtained from freezing the incoming characteristic fields to their initial values are not compatible with the constraints. (ii) With the help of the exact solutions constructed, we determine the amount of artificial reflection of gravitational radiation from constraint-preserving boundary conditions which freeze the Weyl scalar Ψ0 to its initial value. For monochromatic radiation with wave number k and arbitrary angular momentum number ell >= 2, the amount of reflection decays as (kR)-4 for large kR. (iii) For each L >= 2, we construct new local constraint-preserving boundary conditions which perfectly absorb linearized radiation with ell <= L. (iv) We generalize our analysis to a weakly curved background of mass M and compute first-order corrections in M/R to the reflection coefficients for quadrupolar odd-parity radiation. For our new boundary condition with L = 2, the reflection coefficient is smaller than that for the freezing Ψ0 boundary condition by a factor of M/R for kR > 1.04. Implications of these results for numerical simulations of binary black holes on finite domains are discussed.

  18. Mode locking of diode- and flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG lasers using semiconductor saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrovsky, Andrej; Kubecek, Vaclav; Zvonicek, K.; Diels, Jean-Claude M.; Stintz, Andreas

    2003-07-01

    Operation of laser diode and flash lamp pumped Nd:YAG lasers mode locked with two different types of semiconductor saturable absorbers is reported. In the first type that is used mainly in diode pumped systems the absorber layers are integrated on highly reflective Bragg mirror. The second type is for use in transmission mode inside the resonator. Different design of semiconductor elements, pumping geometries and resonator configurations were investigated and characteristics of laser operation in mode-locked regime are presented.

  19. Application of the double absorbing boundary condition in seismic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Shuang-Quan

    2015-03-01

    We apply the newly proposed double absorbing boundary condition (DABC) (Hagstrom et al., 2014) to solve the boundary reflection problem in seismic finite-difference (FD) modeling. In the DABC scheme, the local high-order absorbing boundary condition is used on two parallel artificial boundaries, and thus double absorption is achieved. Using the general 2D acoustic wave propagation equations as an example, we use the DABC in seismic FD modeling, and discuss the derivation and implementation steps in detail. Compared with the perfectly matched layer (PML), the complexity decreases, and the stability and flexibility improve. A homogeneous model and the SEG salt model are selected for numerical experiments. The results show that absorption using the DABC is considerably improved relative to the Clayton-Engquist boundary condition and nearly the same as that in the PML.

  20. On the Huygens absorbing boundary conditions for electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Berenger, Jean-Pierre

    2007-09-10

    A new absorbing boundary condition (ABC) is presented for the solution of Maxwell equations in unbounded spaces. Called the Huygens ABC, this condition is a generalization of two previously published ABCs, namely the multiple absorbing surfaces (MAS) and the re-radiating boundary condition (rRBC). The properties of the Huygens ABC are derived theoretically in continuous spaces and in the finite-difference (FDTD) discretized space. A solution is proposed to render the Huygens ABC effective for the absorption of evanescent waves. Numerical experiments with the FDTD method show that the effectiveness of the Huygens ABC is close to that of the PML ABC in some realistic problems of numerical electromagnetics. It is also shown in the paper that a combination of the Huygens ABC with the PML ABC is very well suited to the solution of some particular problems.