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Sample records for absorbance values measured

  1. Establishing traceability of photometric absorbance values for accurate measurements of the haemoglobin concentration in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, K.; Wolf, H. U.; Heuck, C.; Kammel, M.; Kummrow, A.; Neukammer, J.

    2013-10-01

    Haemoglobin concentration in blood is one of the most frequently measured analytes in laboratory medicine. Reference and routine methods for the determination of the haemoglobin concentration in blood are based on the conversion of haeme, haemoglobin and haemiglobin species into uniform end products. The total haemoglobin concentration in blood is measured using the absorbance of the reaction products. Traceable absorbance measurement values on the highest metrological level are a prerequisite for the calibration and evaluation of procedures with respect to their suitability for routine measurements and their potential as reference measurement procedures. For this purpose, we describe a procedure to establish traceability of spectral absorbance measurements for the haemiglobincyanide (HiCN) method and for the alkaline haematin detergent (AHD) method. The latter is characterized by a higher stability of the reaction product. In addition, the toxic hazard of cyanide, which binds to the iron ion of the haem group and thus inhibits the oxygen transport, is avoided. Traceability is established at different wavelengths by applying total least-squares analysis to derive the conventional quantity values for the absorbance from the measured values. Extrapolation and interpolation are applied to get access to the spectral regions required to characterize the Q-absorption bands of the HiCN and AHD methods, respectively. For absorbance values between 0.3 and 1.8, the contributions of absorbance measurements to the total expanded uncertainties (95% level of confidence) of absorbance measurements range from 1% to 0.4%.

  2. Method of absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas Vyankatrao; Zelepouga, Sergeui; Pratapas, John

    2013-09-17

    A method and apparatus for absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor in which a reference light intensity measurement is made on a non-absorbing reference fluid, a light intensity measurement is made on a sample fluid, and a measured light absorbance of the sample fluid is determined. A corrective light intensity measurement at a non-absorbing wavelength of the sample fluid is made on the sample fluid from which an absorbance correction factor is determined. The absorbance correction factor is then applied to the measured light absorbance of the sample fluid to arrive at a true or accurate absorbance for the sample fluid.

  3. Solar absorber material reflectivity measurements at temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Bonometti, J.A.; Hawk, C.W.

    1999-07-01

    Assessment of absorber shell material properties at high operating temperatures is essential to the full understanding of the solar energy absorption process in a solar thermal rocket. A review of these properties, their application and a new experimental methodology to measure them at high temperatures is presented. The direct application for the research is absorber cavity development for a Solar Thermal Upper Stage (STUS). High temperature measurements, greater than 1,000 Kelvin, are difficult to obtain for incident radiation upon a solid surface that forms an absorber cavity in a solar thermal engine. The basic material properties determine the amount of solar energy that is absorbed, transmitted or reflected and are dependent upon the material's temperature. This investigation developed a new approach to evaluate the material properties (i.e., reflectivity, absorptive) of the absorber wall and experimentally determined them for rhenium and niobium sample coupons. The secular reflectivity was measured both at room temperature and at temperatures near 1,000 Kelvin over a range of angles from 0 to 90 degrees. The same experimental measurements were used to calculate the total reflectivity of the sample by integrating the recorded intensities over a hemisphere. The test methodology used the incident solar energy as the heating source while directly measuring the reflected light (an integrated value over all visible wavelengths). Temperature dependence on total reflectivity was found to follow an inverse power function of the material's temperature.

  4. DHCAL with minimal absorber: measurements with positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, B.; Neubüser, C.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Dotti, A.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H. L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schroeder, S.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kovalcuk, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Besson, D.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Corriveau, F.; Blazey, G. C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Zutshi, V.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-05-01

    In special tests, the active layers of the CALICE Digital Hadron Calorimeter prototype, the DHCAL, were exposed to low energy particle beams, without being interleaved by absorber plates. The thickness of each layer corresponded approximately to 0.29 radiation lengths or 0.034 nuclear interaction lengths, defined mostly by the copper and steel skins of the detector cassettes. This paper reports on measurements performed with this device in the Fermilab test beam with positrons in the energy range of 1 to 10 GeV. The measurements are compared to simulations based on GEANT4 and a standalone program to emulate the detailed response of the active elements.

  5. Absorber Alignment Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01

    As we pursue efforts to lower the capital and installation costs of parabolic trough solar collectors, it is essential to maintain high optical performance. While there are many optical tools available to measure the reflector slope errors of parabolic trough solar collectors, there are few tools to measure the absorber alignment. A new method is presented here to measure the absorber alignment in two dimensions to within 0.5 cm. The absorber alignment is measured using a digital camera and four photogrammetric targets. Physical contact with the receiver absorber or glass is not necessary. The alignment of the absorber is measured along its full length so that sagging of the absorber can be quantified with this technique. The resulting absorber alignment measurement provides critical information required to accurately determine the intercept factor of a collector.

  6. Measuring Teacher Value Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Russell; Lied, Terry

    The purpose of this study was to develop and assess the psychometric properties of a measure of teacher value systems. Three value systems were defined as values associated with (1) the pursuit of truth, (2) social and interpersonal relations, and (3) authority and its exercise. The scale was taken through three stages of development and field…

  7. Measurement and Simulation Results of Ti Coated Microwave Absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ding; McGinnis, Dave; /Fermilab

    1998-11-01

    When microwave absorbers are put in a waveguide, a layer of resistive coating can change the distribution of the E-M fields and affect the attenuation of the signal within the microwave absorbers. In order to study such effect, microwave absorbers (TT2-111) were coated with titanium thin film. This report is a document on the coating process and measurement results. The measurement results have been used to check the simulation results from commercial software HFSS (High Frequency Structure Simulator.)

  8. Techniques for measuring intercepted and absorbed PAR in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The quantity of radiation potentially available for photosynthesis that is captured by the crop is best described as absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR (APAR) is the difference between descending and ascending fluxes. The four components of APAR were measured above and within two planting densities of corn (Zea mays L.) and several methods of measuring and estimating APAR were examined. A line quantum sensor that spatially averages the photosynthetic photon flux density provided a rapid and portable method of measuring APAR. PAR reflectance from the soil (Typic Argiaquoll) surface decreased from 10% to less than 1% of the incoming PAR as the canopy cover increased. PAR reflectance from the canopy decreased to less than 3% at maximum vegetative cover. Intercepted PAR (1 - transmitted PAR) generally overestimated absorbed PAR by less than 4% throughout most of the growing season. Thus intercepted PAR appears to be a reasonable estimate of absorbed PAR.

  9. Simultaneous measurements of absorbed dose and linear energy transfer in therapeutic proton beams.

    PubMed

    Granville, Dal A; Sahoo, Narayan; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O

    2016-02-21

    The biological response resulting from proton therapy depends on both the absorbed dose in the irradiated tissue and the linear energy transfer (LET) of the beam. Currently, optimization of proton therapy treatment plans is based only on absorbed dose. However, recent advances in proton therapy delivery have made it possible to vary the LET distribution for potential therapeutic gain, leading to investigations of using LET as an additional parameter in plan optimization. Having a method to measure and verify both absorbed dose and LET as part of a quality assurance program would be ideal for the safe delivery of such plans. Here we demonstrated the potential of an optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique to simultaneously measure absorbed dose and LET. We calibrated the ratio of ultraviolet (UV) to blue emission intensities from Al2O3:C OSL detectors as a function of LET to facilitate LET measurements. We also calibrated the intensity of the blue OSL emission for absorbed dose measurements and introduced a technique to correct for the LET-dependent dose response of OSL detectors exposed to therapeutic proton beams. We demonstrated the potential of our OSL technique by using it to measure LET and absorbed dose under new irradiation conditions, including patient-specific proton therapy treatment plans. In the beams investigated, we found the OSL technique to measure dose-weighted LET within 7.9% of Monte Carlo-simulated values and absorbed dose within 2.5% of ionization chamber measurements.

  10. Simultaneous measurements of absorbed dose and linear energy transfer in therapeutic proton beams.

    PubMed

    Granville, Dal A; Sahoo, Narayan; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O

    2016-02-21

    The biological response resulting from proton therapy depends on both the absorbed dose in the irradiated tissue and the linear energy transfer (LET) of the beam. Currently, optimization of proton therapy treatment plans is based only on absorbed dose. However, recent advances in proton therapy delivery have made it possible to vary the LET distribution for potential therapeutic gain, leading to investigations of using LET as an additional parameter in plan optimization. Having a method to measure and verify both absorbed dose and LET as part of a quality assurance program would be ideal for the safe delivery of such plans. Here we demonstrated the potential of an optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique to simultaneously measure absorbed dose and LET. We calibrated the ratio of ultraviolet (UV) to blue emission intensities from Al2O3:C OSL detectors as a function of LET to facilitate LET measurements. We also calibrated the intensity of the blue OSL emission for absorbed dose measurements and introduced a technique to correct for the LET-dependent dose response of OSL detectors exposed to therapeutic proton beams. We demonstrated the potential of our OSL technique by using it to measure LET and absorbed dose under new irradiation conditions, including patient-specific proton therapy treatment plans. In the beams investigated, we found the OSL technique to measure dose-weighted LET within 7.9% of Monte Carlo-simulated values and absorbed dose within 2.5% of ionization chamber measurements. PMID:26859539

  11. Antioxidative activity of lactobacilli measured by oxygen radical absorbance capacity.

    PubMed

    Saide, J A O; Gilliland, S E

    2005-04-01

    The reducing ability and antioxidative activity of some species of Lactobacillus were compared under in vitro conditions. Cultures of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Lactobacillus casei were grown at 37 degrees C in de Man, Rogosa, Sharpe (MRS) broth supplemented with 0.5% 2,3,5 triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) to evaluate reducing activity. Reduced TTC was extracted from the cultures with acetone, and the intensity of the red color measured colorimetrically at 485 nm was an indication of reducing activity. The lactobacilli varied significantly in relative ability to reduce TTC when grown in MRS broth for 15 h. The relative amounts of growth as indicated by pH values at 18 h appeared to influence the amount of reduction. Antioxidative activity was evaluated by the ability of the whole cells or the cell-free extracts from cultures to protect a protein from being attacked by free radicals. These analyses were performed using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity method. All cultures tested exhibited some degree of antioxidative activity. Among the treatments, the cell-free extracts from cells grown in MRS broth exhibited significantly higher values than did whole cells. There was no apparent relationship between the reducing and antioxidative activities of the cultures evaluated. The results from this study show that these cultures can provide a source of dietary antioxidants. Furthermore, selection of cultures that produce antioxidants as starters could provide yet another health or nutritional benefit from cultured or culture-containing dairy products.

  12. Measurements of Light Absorbing Particles on Tropical South American Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. G.; All, J.; Schwarz, J. P.; Arnott, W. P.; Warthon, J.; Andrade, M.; Celestian, A. J.; Hoffmann, D.; Cole, R. J.; Lapham, E.; Horodyskyj, U. N.; Froyd, K. D.; Liao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes have been losing mass rapidly in recent decades. In addition to the documented increase in temperature, increases in light absorbing particulates deposited on glaciers could be contributing to the observed glacier loss. Here we present results of measurements of light absorbing particles from glaciers in Peru and Bolivia. Samples have been collected by American Climber Science Program volunteers and scientists at altitudes up to 6770 meters. Collected snow samples were melted and filtered in the field. A new inexpensive technique, the Light Absorption Heating Method (LAHM) has been developed for analysis of light absorbing particles collected on filters. Results from LAHM analysis are calibrated using filters with known amounts of fullerene soot, a common industrial surrogate for black carbon (BC). For snow samples collected at the same field location LAHM analysis and measurements from the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) instrument are well correlated (r2 = 0.92). Co-located SP2 and LAHM filter analysis suggest that BC could be the dominant absorbing component of the light absorbing particles in some areas.

  13. Direct measurement of pure absorbance spectra of living phototrophic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Göbel, F

    1978-02-01

    The pure absorbance of turbid cell suspensions of various phototrophic microorganisms were determined by collecting the scattered light. A conventional spectrophotometer was used, equipped with an intergrating sphere as receiver unit, which allowed precise measurements of the absorbance in the range from zero to 0.1. In the wavelength range 300--1100 nm, where photosynthesis occurs, light scattered only once by a bacterial cell retains predominantly the forward direction. This allows measurements of pure absorption, when the concentration of cells which the light has to pass through is small. For example, by comparison of measurements of pigmented and nonpigmented cell suspensions of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, it was shown that the total sum of scattered light can be collected. The best results were obtained using cuvettes with a light path of 0.1 cm or 0.2 cm to measure cell suspensions of about 0.2 mg dry weight per ml. For R. acidophila this corresponds to 1--3 cell layers. Extinction-, absorbance- and scattering spectra for R. acidophila are presented, in addition to the absorbance spectra for Rhodospirillum rubrum, Aphanocapsa and Scenedesmus.

  14. Water-absorbing capacitor system for measuring relative humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Eric G. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus using a known water-absorbent polymer as a capacitor which is operated at a dc voltage for measuring relative humidity is presented. When formed as a layer between porous electrically-conductive electrodes and operated in an RC oscillator circuit, the oscillator frequency varies inversely with the partial pressure of the moisture to be measured. In a preferred embodiment, the capacitor is formed from Nafion and is operated at a low dc voltage with a resistor as an RC circuit in an RC oscillator. At the low voltage, the leakage current is proper for oscillation over a satisfactory range. The frequency of oscillation varies in an essentially linear fashion with relative humidity which is represented by the moisture being absorbed into the Nafion. The oscillation frequency is detected by a frequency detector.

  15. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a 60Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the

  16. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a (60)Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the

  17. Measurement of ultrasonic power using an acoustically absorbing well.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Yvonne; Shaw, Adam; Zeqiri, Bajram

    2003-10-01

    This paper describes a quick and cost-effective method for constructing a radiation force balance for measuring ultrasonic output power. It utilises a target manufactured from a high-quality acoustical absorber material. The target geometry is in the form of a cup or well that is water-filled and placed directly on the pan of a top-loading chemical balance, thus overcoming the need for the traditional gantry arrangement found in the majority of commercially available balances. The face of the transducer is placed directly in the water contained within the well. This simplification reduces time spent in setting up a balance for measurement, and targets can be manufactured to any required geometry and used on any suitable top-loading balance to measure output power. Within this study, the performance of the absorbing well method was evaluated over the frequency range of 1 MHz to 5 MHz, for acoustic power levels up to 1 W. Power measurements on three transducers were compared with measurements made on the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) primary standard radiation force balance and good agreement is demonstrated between the two systems. At a power of 50 mW, using a chemical balance of resolution 0.1 mg, typical type A (random) uncertainties were +/- 2.0% when expressed at the 95% confidence level.

  18. Graphite calorimetry for absorbed dose measurements in heavy-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakama, M.; Kanai, T.; Fukumura, A.

    In order to sophisticate the radiotherapy high accuracy knowledge of the absorbed dose delivered to the patient is essential The main methods of absolute dosimetry are indicated as follows a Dosimetry by ion chamber b Fricke dosimetry and c Calorimetry The calorimetry is most direct method of dosimetry due to direct measurement of energy deposit in principle and no requirement of information of radiation fields for the calibration Many countries tend to adopt the calorimetry to determine the standard absorbed dose to water and become to be capable of deciding the absorbed dose in precision of about 0 6 for photon and electron beams Despite the recent progress of particle therapy the parameters such as w-value and stopping power ratio for ionization chambers in the particles is not obtained accurately Therefore that causes uncertainty in determination of the absolute dose For this reason we developed a graphite calorimeter to obtain high precision absorbed dose and reduce the uncertainty for various beams When the absorbed dose of 1 Gy is irradiated to the sensitive volume the temperature rise is about 1 4 milliKelvins The performance require the resolution of plus or minus 7 micro Kelvins to measure it in precision of plus or minus 0 5 The stability within several micro Kelvins per minute is necessary to obtain measurable background The miniature glass bead thermistors were embedded in the sensitive volume to perform active control of temperature The resistance change of these thermistors is approximately 0 68 Ohms and 488 micro Ohms at

  19. Absorbed dose and LET spectra measurements on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Csige, I.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Frigo, L. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Watts, J.; Harmon, A.

    1995-01-01

    Total absorbed doses measured with TLD's, linear energy transfer (LET) spectra measured with plastic track detectors, and low energy neutrons measured on LDEF have been compared with model calculations. The total absorbed doses measured in TLD's were higher than predicted in the calculations of Armstrong et al. and differ from the calculations of Atwell et al. LDEF LET spectra are dependent on detector orientation, shielding and experiment location. These factors need to be taken into account when modeling the LDEF LET spectra. LET spectra measured with plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD's) also deviate significantly from calculations especially for high LET particles (LET(sub infinity) H2O greater than 100keV/micron). Modeling efforts to date do not include the contribution of proton induced secondaries. Analysis of polycarbonate PNTD's from the West-side of LDEF has revealed a very high fluence of tracks (greater than 1 x 10(exp 7) tracks/cm(exp 2) under 2 gm/cm(exp 2) shielding). Fluence drops off rapidly as shielding depth increases. Tracks only form in the region of the detector closest to the surface, not in the bulk of the detector. To date no adequate explanation for this observation has been found. We plan to measure range distribution of very high LET (LET (sub infinity) H2O greater than 500 keV/micron) secondary particles produced in silicon wafer by high energy primary cosmic ray particles. Refinements of experimental techniques and model calculations are being carried out in order to understand existing discrepancies between experimental measurements and calculations.

  20. Scattering photoacoustic method in measurement of weakly absorbing turbid suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zuomin; Törmänen, Matti; Myllylä, Risto

    2006-08-01

    Conventional photoacoustic techniques in composition determination and biomedical diagnose and imaging are based on the optical absorption in target substance or objects from which the photons to be scattered are not concerned. It is obvious that the intensities of scattered lights closely relate to the property of the interrogated substance, therefore measuring the signals produced by them can give rise to more information of the substance. Based on this idea, a novel method entitled scattering photoacoustic (SPA) method is put forward to study weak absorption suspensions with highly scattering. In this method, a near infrared pulse laser irradiates the studied object which contacts with external absorbers, resulting the generation of a few photoacoustic signals; one is produced in the studied object as conventional case, others are in external absorbers which are produced by the scattered photons. All these signals are successively received by a piezoelectric detector with short damping period. Analyzing these signals is capable of determining reduced scattered coefficient and absorption coefficient, as well as acoustic attenuation of studied suspensions. Some measurement results in intralipid and fibre (paper pulp) suspensions are given rise to in the end.

  1. Strontium-89 therapy: measurement of absorbed dose to skeletal metastases.

    PubMed

    Blake, G M; Zivanovic, M A; Blaquiere, R M; Fine, D R; McEwan, A J; Ackery, D M

    1988-04-01

    We report measurements of absorbed dose to vertebral metastases in ten patients referred for 89Sr therapy for disseminated prostatic carcinoma. Patients received a tracer dose of 85Sr at the time of 89Sr treatment and metastatic strontium retention was monitored scintigraphically for 6 mo. Metastatic 85Sr activity corrected for tissue attenuation was measured using the conjugate view principle, with special care taken to eliminate errors due to the selection of the metastatic region of interest. Metastatic volume was determined from high resolution CT images, and density inferred from Hounsfield number using the QCT bone mineral calibration of Genant and Cann. The mean absorbed dose was 850 rad/mCi (23 cGy/MBq) with a range from 220-2260 rad/mCi (6 to 61 cGy/MBq). The wide range found was consistent with the variation expected to arise due to differences in strontium renal plasma clearance (range 0.1-11.81/day) and extent of skeletal metastatic disease (varying from two small metastases to a superscan on [99mTc]MDP images) among the patients studied. PMID:3351609

  2. Light Absorbing Particle (LAP) Measurements in the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Raga, G. B.; Anderson, B.; Diskin, G.; Sachse, G.; Kok, G.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers the capabilities and design of the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP-2), and reviews its role on the Sage III Ozone Loss Validation Experiment (SOLVE II) field campaign during 2003. On SOLVE II the SP-2 was carried into the Arctic onboard a DC-8 aircraft, in order to determine the size distribution of light-absorbing and non light-absorbing particles in the stratosphere. Graphs and tables relate some of the results from SOLVE II.

  3. New procedure for direct measurements of absorbance of thin films of ultra-high absorbance UV blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Norman D.; Solsvik, A.; Murphy, L.; Stevenson, A.; O'Neill, M.; Moore, J.

    2005-06-01

    A novel method for the measurement of ultra-high absorbance liquids has been devised and details are given of a new ultra absorbance instrument developed specifically for these thin liquid film measurements. The instrument specifically constructed for monitoring and measuring sunscreen products has been tested using locally produced sunscreen products. This new approach has been made possible by the development of very accurate liquid micro-dispensers and details are given of the novel procedure to carry out these measurements. Detailed description of the apparatus construction is given with photographs of the apparatus. The work described is largely based on research and quality control measurements of Parasol suncare products. Results on the reproducibility of measurements taken with the UAI for a commercial range of factor 20 sunscreen liquid are given and these have been used to validate the performance of the instrument. It is believed that the absorbance measurements described here are perhaps the largest ever reported. In addition, the photostability of this product has been monitored in aging tests. Finally, some studies have been done on two other commercially available factor 20 products that show that these are significantly worse with regards to both protection from ageing and burn.

  4. Measurement-based estimates of direct radiative effects of absorbing aerosols above clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Nan; Christopher, Sundar A.

    2015-07-01

    The elevated layers of absorbing smoke aerosols from western African (e.g., Gabon and Congo) biomass burning activities have been frequently observed above low-level stratocumulus clouds off the African coast, which presents an excellent natural laboratory for studying the effects of aerosols above clouds (AAC) on regional energy balance in tropical and subtropical environments. Using spatially and temporally collocated Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System data sets, the top-of-atmosphere shortwave aerosol direct shortwave radiative effects (ARE) of absorbing aerosols above low-level water clouds in the southeast Atlantic Ocean was examined in this study. The regional averaged instantaneous ARE has been estimated to be 36.7 ± 20.5 Wm-2 (regional mean ± standard deviation) along with a mean positive OMI Aerosol Index at 1.3 in August 2006 based on multisensors measurements. The highest magnitude of instantaneous ARE can even reach 138.2 Wm-2. We assess that the 660 nm cloud optical depth (COD) values of 8-12 is the critical value above (below) which aerosol absorption (scattering) effect dominates and further produces positive (negative) ARE values. The results further show that ARE values are more sensitive to aerosols above lower COD values than cases for higher COD values. This is among the first studies to provide quantitative estimates of shortwave ARE due to AAC events from an observational perspective.

  5. Laser measurement of extinction coefficients of highly absorbing liquids. [airborne oil spill monitoring application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Kincaid, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    A coaxial dual-channel laser system has been developed for the measurement of extinction coefficients of highly absorbing liquids. An empty wedge-shaped sample cell is first translated laterally through a He-Ne laser beam to measure the differential thickness using interference fringes in reflection. The wedge cell is carefully filled with the oil sample and translated through the coaxially positioned dye laser beam for the differential attenuation or extinction measurement. Optional use of the instrumentation as a single-channel extinction measurement system and also as a refractometer is detailed. The system and calibration techniques were applied to the measurement of two crude oils whose extinction values were required to complete the analysis of airborne laser data gathered over four controlled spills.

  6. Fine-Resolution Voxel S Values for Constructing Absorbed Dose Distributions at Variable Voxel Size

    PubMed Central

    Dieudonné, Arnaud; Hobbs, Robert F.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Sgouros, George; Gardin, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a revised voxel S values (VSVs) approach for dosimetry in targeted radiotherapy, allowing dose calculation for any voxel size and shape of a given SPECT or PET dataset. This approach represents an update to the methodology presented in MIRD pamphlet no. 17. Methods VSVs were generated in soft tissue with a fine spatial sampling using the Monte Carlo (MC) code MCNPX for particle emissions of 9 radionuclides: 18F, 90Y, 99mTc, 111In, 123I, 131I, 177Lu, 186Re, and 201Tl. A specific resampling algorithm was developed to compute VSVs for desired voxel dimensions. The dose calculation was performed by convolution via a fast Hartley transform. The fine VSVs were calculated for cubic voxels of 0.5 mm for electrons and 1.0 mm for photons. Validation studies were done for 90Y and 131I VSV sets by comparing the revised VSV approach to direct MC simulations. The first comparison included 20 spheres with different voxel sizes (3.8–7.7 mm) and radii (4–64 voxels) and the second comparison a hepatic tumor with cubic voxels of 3.8 mm. MC simulations were done with MCNPX for both. The third comparison was performed on 2 clinical patients with the 3D-RD (3-Dimensional Radiobiologic Dosimetry) software using the EGSnrc (Electron Gamma Shower National Research Council Canada)-based MC implementation, assuming a homogeneous tissue-density distribution. Results For the sphere model study, the mean relative difference in the average absorbed dose was 0.20% ± 0.41% for 90Y and −0.36% ± 0.51% for 131I (n = 20). For the hepatic tumor, the difference in the average absorbed dose to tumor was 0.33% for 90Y and −0.61% for 131I and the difference in average absorbed dose to the liver was 0.25% for 90Y and −1.35% for 131I. The comparison with the 3D-RD software showed an average voxel-to-voxel dose ratio between 0.991 and 0.996. The calculation time was below 10 s with the VSV approach and 50 and 15 h with 3D-RD for the 2 clinical patients. Conclusion This new

  7. In situ Measurements of Absorbing Aerosols from Urban Sources, in Maritime Environments and during Biomass Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoleni, C.; Manvendra, D.; Chylek, P.; Arnott, P.

    2006-12-01

    Absorbing aerosols have important but still ill quantified effects on climate, visibility, cloud processes, and air quality. The compilation of aerosol scattering and absorption databases from reliable measurements is essential to reduce uncertainties in these inter-linked research areas. The atmospheric radiative balance for example, is modeled using the aerosol single scattering albedo (ratio of scattering to scattering plus absorption, SSA) as a fundamental input parameter in climate models. Sulfate aerosols with SSA values close to 1 scatter solar radiation resulting in a negative radiative forcing. However aerosol SSA values less than 1 are common when combustion processes are contributing to the aerosol sources. Absorbing aerosols directly heat the atmosphere and reduce the solar radiation at the surface. Currently, the net global anthropogenic aerosol direct radiative forcing is estimated to be around -0.5W m-2 with uncertainty of about 80% largely due to lack of understanding of SSA of sulfate-organic-soot aerosols. We present a rapidly expanding data set of direct in situ aerosol absorption and scattering measurements performed since June 2005 by photoacoustic instrument (at 781 and 870 nm), with integrated a total scattering sensor, during numerous field campaigns. Data have been collected over a wide range of aerosol sources, local environments and anthropogenic activities. Airborne measurements were performed in marine stratus off shore of the California coast and in cumulus clouds and clear air in the Houston, TX area; ground-based measurements have been performed in many locations in Mexico City; while laboratory measurements have been collected during a controlled combustion experiment of many different biomass fuels. The large dynamic range of aerosol types and conditions from these different field campaigns will be integrated to help quantify the SSA values, their variability, and their implications on the radiative forcing of climate.

  8. Technical description of parameters influencing the pH value of suspension absorbent used in flue gas desulfurization systems.

    PubMed

    Głomba, Michał

    2010-08-01

    As a result of the large limestone deposits available in Poland, the low cost of reagent acquisition for the largescale technological use and relatively well-documented processes of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies based on limestone sorbent slurry, wet scrubbing desulfurization is a method of choice in Poland for flue gas treatment in energy production facilities, including power plants and industrial systems. The efficiency of FGD using the above method depends on several technological and kinetic parameters, particularly on the pH value of the sorbent (i.e., ground limestone suspended in water). Consequently, many studies in Poland and abroad address the impact of various parameters on the pH value of the sorbent suspension, such as the average diameter of sorbent particles (related to the limestone pulverization degree), sorbent quality (in terms of pure calcium carbonate [CaCO3] content of the sorbent material), stoichiometric surfeit of CaCO3 in relation to sulfur dioxide (SO2) absorbed from flue gas circulating in the absorption node, time of absorption slurry retention in the absorber tank, chlorine ion concentration in sorbent slurry, and concentration of dissolved metal salts (Na, K, Mg, Fe, Al, and others). This study discusses the results of laboratory-scale tests conducted to establish the effect of the above parameters on the pH value of limestone slurry circulating in the SO2 absorption node. On the basis of the test results, a correlation equation was postulated to help maintain the desirable pH value at the design phase of the wet FGD process. The postulated equation displays good coincidence between calculated pH values and those obtained using laboratory measurements. PMID:20842941

  9. Technical description of parameters influencing the pH value of suspension absorbent used in flue gas desulfurization systems.

    PubMed

    Głomba, Michał

    2010-08-01

    As a result of the large limestone deposits available in Poland, the low cost of reagent acquisition for the largescale technological use and relatively well-documented processes of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies based on limestone sorbent slurry, wet scrubbing desulfurization is a method of choice in Poland for flue gas treatment in energy production facilities, including power plants and industrial systems. The efficiency of FGD using the above method depends on several technological and kinetic parameters, particularly on the pH value of the sorbent (i.e., ground limestone suspended in water). Consequently, many studies in Poland and abroad address the impact of various parameters on the pH value of the sorbent suspension, such as the average diameter of sorbent particles (related to the limestone pulverization degree), sorbent quality (in terms of pure calcium carbonate [CaCO3] content of the sorbent material), stoichiometric surfeit of CaCO3 in relation to sulfur dioxide (SO2) absorbed from flue gas circulating in the absorption node, time of absorption slurry retention in the absorber tank, chlorine ion concentration in sorbent slurry, and concentration of dissolved metal salts (Na, K, Mg, Fe, Al, and others). This study discusses the results of laboratory-scale tests conducted to establish the effect of the above parameters on the pH value of limestone slurry circulating in the SO2 absorption node. On the basis of the test results, a correlation equation was postulated to help maintain the desirable pH value at the design phase of the wet FGD process. The postulated equation displays good coincidence between calculated pH values and those obtained using laboratory measurements.

  10. Simultaneous measurement of mass and rotation of trapped absorbing particles in air.

    PubMed

    Bera, Sudipta K; Kumar, Avinash; Sil, Souvik; Saha, Tushar Kanti; Saha, Tanumoy; Banerjee, Ayan

    2016-09-15

    We trap absorbing micro-particles in air by photophoretic forces generated using a single loosely focused Gaussian trapping beam. We measure a component of the radial Brownian motion of a trapped particle cluster and determine the power spectral density, mean squared displacement, and normalized position and velocity autocorrelation functions to characterize the photophoretic body force in a quantitative fashion for the first time. The trapped particles also undergo spontaneous rotation due to the action of this force. This is evident from the spectral density that displays clear peaks at the rotation and the particles' inertial resonance frequencies. We fit the spectral density to the well-known analytical function derived from the Langevin equation, measure the resonance and rotation frequencies, and determine the values for particle mass that we verify at different trapping laser powers with reasonable accuracy. PMID:27628396

  11. Robust sensor for turbidity measurement from light scattering and absorbing liquids.

    PubMed

    Kontturi, Ville; Turunen, Petri; Uozumi, Jun; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2009-12-01

    Internationally standardized turbidity measurements for probing solid particles in liquid are problematic in the case of simultaneous light scattering and absorption. A method and a sensor to determine the turbidity in the presence of light absorption are presented. The developed sensor makes use of the total internal reflection of a laser beam at the liquid-prism interface, and the turbidity is assessed using the concept of laser speckle pattern. Using average filtering in speckle data analyzing the observed dynamic speckle pattern, which is due to light scattering from particles and the static speckle due to stray light of the sensor, can be separated from each other. Good correlation between the standard deviation of dynamic speckle and turbidity value for nonabsorbing and for absorbing liquids was observed. The sensor is suggested, for instance, for the measurement of ill-behaved as well as small-volume turbid liquids in both medicine and process industry.

  12. Measured absorbed dose rates from semi-infinite hemispherical volumes of 133Xe.

    PubMed

    Munyon, W J; Barber, D E; Howley, J R

    1986-07-01

    Surface absorbed dose rates from different hemispheric volumes of 133Xe have been measured directly with an extrapolation chamber. The results indicate that a linear relationship exists between the radius of the cloud volume and the surface absorbed dose rate for radii between 0 and 23 cm. If cloud volumes with radii larger than 23 cm are taken to be infinite with respect to the range of the charged particles emitted, the absorbed dose rate calculated based on that assumption will be within the uncertainty of any measurement of absorbed dose rate that might be made. For hemispheric volumes having radii less than or equal to 23 cm, the surface absorbed dose rate in tissue-equivalent material, in mGy h-1, is approximated (+/- 20%) by the product of [1.30 mGy h-1 cm-1 kBq-1 cm3] X [cloud radius, cm] X [cloud activity concentration, kBq cm-3].

  13. In vivo absorbed dose measurements in mammography using a new real-time luminescence technique.

    PubMed

    Aznar, M C; Hemdal, B; Medin, J; Marckmann, C J; Andersen, C E; Bøtter-Jensen, L; Andersson, I; Mattsson, S

    2005-04-01

    A dosimetry system based on radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from carbon doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C) crystals was developed for in vivo absorbed dose measurements in mammography. A small cylindrical crystal of Al2O3:C (diameter 0.48 mm and length 2 mm) was coupled to the end of a 1 mm diameter optical fibre cable. Owing to their small size and characteristic shape, these probes can be placed on the body surface in the field of view during the examination, without compromising the reading of the mammogram. Our new technique was tested with a mammography unit (Siemens Mammomat 3000) and screen-film technique over a range of clinically relevant X-ray energies. The results were compared with those obtained from an ionization chamber usually used for the determination of absorbed dose in mammography. The reproducibility of measurements was around 3% (1 standard deviation) at 4.5 mGy for both RL and OSL data. The dose response was found to be linear between 4.5 mGy and 30 mGy. The energy dependence of the system is around 18% between 23 kV and 35 kV. In vivo measurements were performed during three patient examinations. It was shown that entrance and exit doses could be measured. The presence of the small probes did not significantly interfere with the diagnostic quality of the images. Entrance doses estimated by RL/OSL results agreed within 3% with entrance surface dose values calculated from the ionization chamber measurements. These results indicate a considerable potential for use in routine control and in vivo dose measurements in mammography.

  14. Measuring absorbed dose for i-CAT CBCT examinations in child, adolescent and adult phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Choi, E

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Design and construct child and adolescent head phantoms to measure the absorbed doses imparted during dental CBCT and compare with the absorbed dose measured in an adult phantom. Methods: A child phantom was developed to represent the smallest patients receiving CBCT, usually for craniofacial developmental concerns, and an adolescent phantom was developed to represent healthy orthodontic patients. Absorbed doses were measured using a thimble ionization chamber for the custom-built child and adolescent phantoms and compared with measurements using a commercially available adult phantom. Imaging was performed with an i-CAT Next Generation (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA) CBCT using two different fields of view covering the craniofacial complex (130 mm high) or maxilla/mandible (60 mm high). Results: Measured absorbed doses varied depending on the location of the ionization chamber within the phantoms. For CBCT images obtained using the same protocol for all phantoms, the highest absorbed dose was measured in all locations of the small child phantom. The lowest absorbed dose was measured in the adult phantom. Conclusions: Images were obtained with the same protocol for the adult, adolescent and child phantoms. A consistent trend was observed with the highest absorbed dose being measured in the smallest phantom (child), while the lowest absorbed dose was measured in the largest phantom (adult). This study demonstrates the importance of child-sizing the dose by using dedicated paediatric protocols optimized for the imaging task, which is critical as children are more sensitive to harmful effects of radiation and have a longer life-span post-irradiation for radiation-induced symptoms to develop than do adults. PMID:25785822

  15. A Novel, Real-Valued Genetic Algorithm for Optimizing Radar Absorbing Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, John Michael

    2004-01-01

    A novel, real-valued Genetic Algorithm (GA) was designed and implemented to minimize the reflectivity and/or transmissivity of an arbitrary number of homogeneous, lossy dielectric or magnetic layers of arbitrary thickness positioned at either the center of an infinitely long rectangular waveguide, or adjacent to the perfectly conducting backplate of a semi-infinite, shorted-out rectangular waveguide. Evolutionary processes extract the optimal physioelectric constants falling within specified constraints which minimize reflection and/or transmission over the frequency band of interest. This GA extracted the unphysical dielectric and magnetic constants of three layers of fictitious material placed adjacent to the conducting backplate of a shorted-out waveguide such that the reflectivity of the configuration was 55 dB or less over the entire X-band. Examples of the optimization of realistic multi-layer absorbers are also presented. Although typical Genetic Algorithms require populations of many thousands in order to function properly and obtain correct results, verified correct results were obtained for all test cases using this GA with a population of only four.

  16. Valuing Learning: The Measurement Journey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Greg

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the money wasted on ineffective training programs and the resulting surge in interest among training professionals in conducting learning evaluation and return on investment (ROI) measurement. Describes Kirkpatrick's four-level evaluation concept; questions regarding measurement validity and reliability; and new developments in learning…

  17. Value of forestation in absorbing carbon dioxide surrounding a coal fired power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, M.

    1980-08-01

    The dispersion of carbon dioxide emitted from 1000 MW(e) coal fired power plant is investigated. Calculated ground level carbon dioxide concentrations as a function of distance from the power plant stack is validated by the results derived from sulfur dioxide dispersion measurements. Forestation is examined as a means for removal and control of atmospheric carbon dioxide at a distance of 5 to 10 km away from the power plant stack. An equilibrium and a dynamic approach are considered. For an average temperate zone forest growth rate (7.42 mg/dm/sup 2/ h), the overall reduction in forested land area required to remove the equivalent of all of the CO/sub 2/ from a 1000 MW(e) power plant would be less than 3.3% compared to removing the equivalent amount of CO/sub 2/ by planting forests remotely from the plant. If faster growing tropical plants or trees having up to 4 times the temperate plant growth rate were used, there would be a maximum savings of 15% in forested land area compared to a remote planting. This magnitude of reduction in cultivated forest area is insufficient to recommend planting forested areas adjacent to central power stations as a means of controlling CO/sub 2/ emission. Rather it is suggested to provide sufficient increased regional forested areas on a global scale for the purposes of absorbing the equivalent increase in CO/sub 2/ emission due to increased fossil fuel use.

  18. SU-FF-T-390: In-Vivo Prostate Brachytherapy Absorbed Dose Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gueye, Paul; Velasco, Carlos; Keppel, Cynthia; Murphy, B; Sinesi, C

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: In-vivo prostate brachytherapy absorbed dosimetrydetector using scintillating fibers. Method and Materials: Five pairs of 85.5 {+-} 0.05 cm long blue shifted scintillating fibers (model BCF-10) with 1 mm{sup 2} cross sectional area were placed in a mixture of gelatin (368.6 {+-} 0.5 grams) and water (3.78 {+-} 0.025 liters) to measured the absorbed dose delivered by a 12 Ci {sup 192}Ir HDR source. The fibers were held by a 7 x 7 cm{sup 2} template grid and optically connected to a 16-channel multianode photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu, model H6568). Each pair consisted of one fiber 4 mm shorter than the other one to extract the dose by the subtraction method. A dose atlas was used for radiation delivered to the phantom. The plans followed delivered 5 and 7 Gy to a point located 2.0 centimeters away from the central dwelling positions. A total of 32 data points were acquired in a plan to assess the linearity and reproducibility of the measurements.Results: Reproducibility of the data was found to be within 5% and the overall accuracy of the system estimated to be {+-}5.5%. The linearity of the data for all 7 measureddose values (ranging from 0.6 to 7 Gy), gives a slope of 312 counts/Gy with a 1.4% relative deviation. Conclusion: This work indicates the possibility of measuring in real-time the dose effectively delivered to a biological system during prostate brachytherapy treatments. The availability of commercially thin (150 {micro}m) scintillating fibers opens the capability of using such system during clinical treatments (by embedding the fibers within the catheters) with the advantage of performing real-time adjustment of the dose delivery.

  19. Density measurement in air with saturable absorbing seed gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baganoff, D.

    1982-01-01

    Approaches which have the potential to make density measurements in a compressible flow, where one or more laser beams are used as probes, were investigated. Saturation in sulfur hexafluoride iodine and a crossed beam technique where one beam acts as a saturating beam and the other is at low intensity and acts as a probe beam are considered. It is shown that a balance between an increase in fluorescence intensity with increasing pressure from line broadening and the normal decrease in intensity with increasing pressure from quenching can be used to develop a linear relation between fluorescence intensity and number density and lead to a new density measurement scheme. The method is used to obtain a density image of the cross section of an iodine seeded underexpanded supersonic jet of nitrogen, by illuminating the cross section by a sheet of laser light.

  20. Density measurement in air with a saturable absorbing seed gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baganoff, D.

    1981-01-01

    Resonantly enhanced scattering from the iodine molecule is studied experimentally for the purpose of developing a scheme for the measurement of density in a gas dynamic flow. A study of the spectrum of iodine, the collection of saturation data in iodine, and the development of a mathematical model for correlating saturation effects were pursued for a mixture of 0.3 torr iodine in nitrogen and for mixture pressures up to one atmosphere. For the desired pressure range, saturation effects in iodine were found to be too small to be useful in allowing density measurements to be made. The effects of quenching can be reduced by detuning the exciting laser wavelength from the absorption line center of the iodine line used (resonant Raman scattering). The signal was found to be nearly independent of pressure, for pressures up to one atmosphere, when the excitation beam was detuned 6 GHz from line center for an isolated line in iodine. The signal amplitude was found to be nearly equal to the amplitude for fluorescence at atmospheric pressure, which indicates a density measurement scheme is possible.

  1. Most Wired 2006: measuring value.

    PubMed

    Solovy, Alden

    2006-07-01

    As the Most Wired hospitals incorporate information technology into their strategic plans, they combine a"balanced scorecard"approach with classic business analytics to measure how well IT delivers on their goals. To find out which organizations made this year's 100 Most Wired list, as well as those named in other survey categories, go to the foldout section.

  2. Measuring Added Value in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Andrew

    1993-01-01

    The measurement of the performance of schools is complicated by the need to adjust for differences in input mixes. Schools may have a differential effect on the performance of different types of pupils. Rather than a single performance indicator, a system of indicators is needed. Characteristics of a good indicator system are identified. (KDP)

  3. Most Wired 2006: measuring value.

    PubMed

    Solovy, Alden

    2006-07-01

    As the Most Wired hospitals incorporate information technology into their strategic plans, they combine a"balanced scorecard"approach with classic business analytics to measure how well IT delivers on their goals. To find out which organizations made this year's 100 Most Wired list, as well as those named in other survey categories, go to the foldout section. PMID:16915970

  4. Density measurement in air with a saturable absorbing seed gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baganoff, D.

    1982-01-01

    A method for making density measurements in a compressible flow by using off resonance laser induced fluorescence is studied. The seed molecule chosen for study is the iodine molecule which is excited with the 514.5 nm line of the argon ion laser whose output is frequency tuned, by as much as 3 GHz, relative to a strong iodine transition using an intracavity etalon. The theory which was developed to analyze the effect will be used in conjunction with two experiments being conducted to further study the method an acoustic resonance tube in which controlled perturbations about a uniform state are produced, and a small supersonic jet in which the conditions of the flow vary widely from point to point.

  5. Analysis and measurement of electromagnetic scattering by pyramidal and wedge absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, B. T.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1986-01-01

    By modifying the reflection coefficients in the Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction a solution that approximates the scattering from a dielectric wedge is found. This solution agrees closely with the exact solution of Rawlins which is only valid for a few minor cases. This modification is then applied to the corner diffraction coefficient and combined with an equivalent current and geometrical optics solutions to model scattering from pyramid and wedge absorbers. Measured results from 12 inch pyramid absorbers from 2 to 18 GHz are compared to calculations assuming the returns add incoherently and assuming the returns add coherently. The measured results tend to be between the two curves. Measured results from the 8 inch wedge absorber are also compared to calculations with the return being dominated by the wedge diffraction. The procedures for measuring and specifying absorber performance are discussed and calibration equations are derived to calculate a reflection coefficient or a reflectivity using a reference sphere. Shaping changes to the present absorber designs are introduced to improve performance based on both high and low frequency analysis. Some prototypes were built and tested.

  6. Estimation of bermudagrass forage intake from canopy spectral absorbance measurements using hyperspectral radiometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperspectral forage canopy absorbance was estimated on eight random plots in each of three 1.2 ha common bermudagrass pastures weekly over a period of 9 weeks from June through early August, 2005 using spectroradiometers measuring light reflectance from 410 nm to 1010 nm. Forage in each plot was ...

  7. Effects of Consecutive Wideband Tympanometry Trials on Energy Absorbance Measures of the Middle Ear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdiek, Laina M.; Sun, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) is a new technique for assessing middle ear transfer function. It includes energy absorbance (EA) measures and can be acquired with the ear canal pressure varied, known as "wideband tympanometry" (WBTymp). The authors of this study aimed to investigate effects of consecutive WBTymp testing on…

  8. On the use of a loudspeaker for measuring the viscoelastic properties of sound absorbing materials.

    PubMed

    Doutres, Olivier; Dauchez, Nicolas; Génevaux, Jean-Michel; Lemarquand, Guy

    2008-12-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility to use an electrodynamic loudspeaker to determine viscoelastic properties of sound-absorbing materials in the audible frequency range. The loudspeaker compresses the porous sample in a cavity, and a measurement of its electrical impedance allows one to determine the mechanical impedance of the sample: no additional sensors are required. Viscoelastic properties of the material are then estimated by inverting a 1D Biot model. The method is applied to two sound-absorbing materials (glass wool and polymer foam). Results are in good agreement with the classical compression quasistatic method.

  9. Sensitive absorbance measurement method based on laser multi-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Jinying; Tong, william G.

    1994-12-01

    A sensitive absorbance measurement based on nonlinear laser degenerate four-wave mixing is demonstrated for cadmium. The cadmium ions react with dithizone to form a cadium complex which is then extracted in carbon tetrachloride and analyzed. A relatively low-power argon ion laser line at 514.5 nm is used as the excitation light source. This nonlinear laser method offers many useful features including efficient and simple optical signal detection (signal is a collimated coherent beam), excellent detection sensitivity for absorbance, and efficient use of low laser power levels, small laser probe volumes and short analyte path legnths (e.g., <0.5 mm). A detection limit of 7 fg or 0.05 ng/ml for cadmium, corresponding to an absorbance detection limit of 1.8 × 10 -6 AU is reported using a flowing analyte cell at room temperature.

  10. Increasing dust-absorbing equipment operation efficiency using the automatic laser instrument for solid particle concentration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privalov, Vadim V.; Shemanin, Valery G.; Charty, Pavel V.

    2003-06-01

    The technological process of cement production, which side effect is dust generating and its exhausting to atmosphere, is not stopped as a rule when some faults were origin in dust-absorbing equipment (DAE). The analysis in reference one shows that longtime conducting of the technological process at DAE refusal or fault leads to its working efficiency reduction, which reveals itself in significant excess of nominal values of the dust output concentrations. The number of the most typical refusals and damages and algorithms of their searching were analyzed in work in reference 2 for the most wide-spread dust-absorber types: blanch and electrostatic filters. This work goal are the estimation of DAE working efficiency and choosing of the optimum way of its increasing with using of the automatic laser instrument for aerosol particles concentration measuring in the dust-air flows.

  11. In situ measurements of the oblique incidence sound absorption coefficient for finite sized absorbers.

    PubMed

    Ottink, Marco; Brunskog, Jonas; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Fernandez-Grande, Efren; Trojgaard, Per; Tiana-Roig, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Absorption coefficients are mostly measured in reverberation rooms or with impedance tubes. Since these methods are only suitable for measuring the random incidence and the normal incidence absorption coefficient, there exists an increasing need for absorption coefficient measurement of finite absorbers at oblique incidence in situ. Due to the edge diffraction effect, oblique incidence methods considering an infinite sample fail to measure the absorption coefficient at large incidence angles of finite samples. This paper aims for the development of a measurement method that accounts for the finiteness of the absorber. A sound field model, which accounts for scattering from the finite absorber edges, assuming plane wave incidence is derived. A significant influence of the finiteness on the radiation impedance and the corresponding absorption coefficient is found. A finite surface method, which combines microphone array measurements over a finite sample with the sound field model in an inverse manner, is proposed. Besides, a temporal subtraction method, a microphone array method, impedance tube measurements, and an equivalent fluid model are used for validation. The finite surface method gives promising agreement with theory, especially at near grazing incidence. Thus, the finite surface method is proposed for further measurements at large incidence angles. PMID:26827003

  12. Linear energy transfer dependence of a normoxic polymer gel dosimeter investigated using proton beam absorbed dose measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Helen; Bäck, Sven Å. J.; Medin, Joakim; Grusell, Erik; Olsson, Lars E.

    2004-09-01

    Three-dimensional dosimetry with good spatial resolution can be performed using polymer gel dosimetry, which has been investigated for dosimetry of different types of particles. However, there are only sparse data concerning the influence of the linear energy transfer (LET) properties of the radiation on the gel absorbed dose response. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible LET dependence for a polymer gel dosimeter using proton beam absorbed dose measurements. Polymer gel containing the antioxidant tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium (THP) was irradiated with 133 MeV monoenergetic protons, and the gel absorbed dose response was evaluated using MRI. The LET distribution for a monoenergetic proton beam was calculated as a function of depth using the Monte Carlo code PETRA. There was a steep increase in the Monte Carlo calculated LET starting at the depth corresponding to the front edge of the Bragg peak. This increase was closely followed by a decrease in the relative detector sensitivity (Srel = Dgel/Ddiode), indicating that the response of the polymer gel detector was dependent on LET. The relative sensitivity was 0.8 at the Bragg peak, and reached its minimum value at the end of the proton range. No significant effects in the detector response were observed for LET < 4.9 keV µm-1, thus indicating that the behaviour of the polymer gel dosimeter would not be altered for the range of LET values expected in the case of photons or electrons in a clinical range of energies.

  13. Complex weak values in quantum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Jozsa, Richard

    2007-10-15

    In the weak value formalism of Aharonov et al., the weak value A{sub w} of any observable A is generally a complex number. We derive a physical interpretation of its value in terms of the shift in the measurement pointer's mean position and mean momentum. In particular, we show that the mean position shift contains a term jointly proportional to the imaginary part of the weak value and the rate at which the pointer is spreading in space as it enters the measurement interaction.

  14. Near-infrared absorbance measurements of hemoglobin solutions incubated with glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhernovaya, Olga S.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Meglinski, Igor; Ritchie, Laurie

    2007-02-01

    It is known that glucose influences on spectral properties of blood and hemoglobin and interacts with plasma proteins and hemoglobin in erythrocytes. Changes of optical properties of blood and hemoglobin at glucose concentration within physiological level are important for diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of presence of glucose and glycation of hemoglobin on absorbance of aqueous hemoglobin solutions with different glucose concentrations. Measurements were taken using spectrophotometer EQUINOX 55 (Bruker Optic GmbH) in a range 1000-1800 nm. Water has absorption bands in the near-infrared region which may be influenced by glucose presence. We have hypothesized that glucose and hemoglobin, especially glycated hemoglobin, may influence the absorption band of water in solution. The hemoglobin solutions with different amount of glucose (from 0 to 1000 mg/dl with a step 100 mg/dl) were incubated up to 28 days. Our measurements show that presence of glucose affects the spectra of aqueous hemoglobin solutions. The magnitude of absorbance depends on glucose concentration. At the beginning of incubation hemoglobin solution without glucose has the lowest absorbance magnitude, but after a rather long time of incubation (28 days) the absorbance of hemoglobin solutions with glucose become smaller compared to the absorbance of hemoglobin solution without glucose. This fact may be explained by assumption of hemoglobin glycation, when glucose molecules chemically bind to hemoglobin, and water binding to hemoglobin. In the case of water binding to hemoglobin molecules the amount of free water molecules in solution decreases, so the water aborbance is excepted to decrease.

  15. Optical absorbance measurements and photoacoustic evaluation of freeze-thawed polyvinyl-alcohol vessel phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabul, M. U.; Heres, H. M.; Rutten, M.; van de Vosse, F.; Lopata, R.

    2015-03-01

    Multispectral photoacoustic (MPA) imaging is a promising tool for the diagnosis of atherosclerotic carotids. Excitation of different constituents of a plaque with different wavelengths of the light may provide morphological information to evaluate plaque vulnerability. Preclinical validation of in vivo photoacoustic (PA) imaging requires a comprehensive phantom study. In this study, the design of optically realistic vessel phantoms for photoacoustics was examined by characterizing their optical properties for different dye concentrations, and comparing those to PA measurements. Four different concentrations of Indian ink and molecular dye were added to a 15 wt% PVA and 1 wt% orgasol mixture. Next, the homogeneously mixed gels were subjected to five freeze - thaw cycles to increase the stiffness of vessel phantoms (rinner = 2:5mm, router = 4mm). For each cycle, the optical absorbance was measured between 400 nm 990 nm using a plate reader. Additionally, photoacoustic responses of each vessel phantom at 808 nm were tested with a novel, hand-held, integrated PA probe. Measurements show that the PA signal intensity increases with the optical absorber concentration (0.3 to 0.9) in close agreement with the absorbance measurements. The freeze - thaw process has no significant effect on PA intensity. However, the total attenuation of optical energy increases after each freeze-thaw cycle, which is primarily due to the increase in the scattering coefficient. In future work, the complexity of these phantoms will be increased to examine the feasibility of distinguishing different constituents with MPA imaging.

  16. Atomic Calculations and Laboratory Measurements Relevant to X-ray Warm Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, Tim; Bautista, M.; Palmeri, P.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the atomic calculations and the measurements from the laboratory that are relevant to our understanding of X-Ray Warm Absorbers. Included is a brief discussion of the theoretical and the experimental tools. Also included is a discussion of the challenges, and calculations relevant to dielectronic recombination, photoionization cross sections, and collisional ionization. A review of the models is included, and the sequence that the models were applied.

  17. Microdosimetric measurements for neutron-absorbed dose determination during proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; DeLuca, Paul M.; Thornton, Allan F.; Fitzek, Markus; Hecksel, Draik; Farr, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    This work presents microdosimetric measurements performed at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute in Bloomington, Indiana, USA. The measurements were done simulating clinical setups with a water phantom and for a variety of stopping targets. The water phantom was irradiated by a proton spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) and by a proton pencil beam. Stopping target measurements were performed only for the pencil beam. The targets used were made of polyethylene, brass and lead. The objective of this work was to determine the neutron-absorbed dose for a passive and active proton therapy delivery, and for the interactions of the proton beam with materials typically in the beam line of a proton therapy treatment nozzle. Neutron doses were found to be higher at 45° and 90° from the beam direction for the SOBP configuration by a factor of 1.1 and 1.3, respectively, compared with the pencil beam. Meanwhile, the pencil beam configuration produced neutron-absorbed doses 2.2 times higher at 0° than the SOBP. For stopping targets, lead was found to dominate the neutron-absorbed dose for most angles due to a large production of low-energy neutrons emitted isotropically. PMID:22334761

  18. An international dosimetry exchange for boron neutron capture therapy. Part I: Absorbed dose measurements.

    PubMed

    Binns, P J; Riley, K J; Harling, O K; Kiger, W S; Munck af Rosenschöld, P M; Giusti, V; Capala, J; Sköld, K; Auterinen, I; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Uusi-Simola, J; Marek, M; Viererbl, L; Spurny, F

    2005-12-01

    An international collaboration was organized to undertake a dosimetry exchange to enable the future combination of clinical data from different centers conducting neutron capture therapy trials. As a first step (Part I) the dosimetry group from the Americas, represented by MIT, visited the clinical centers at Studsvik (Sweden), VTT Espoo (Finland), and the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) at Rez (Czech Republic). A combined VTT/NRI group reciprocated with a visit to MIT. Each participant performed a series of dosimetry measurements under equivalent irradiation conditions using methods appropriate to their clinical protocols. This entailed in-air measurements and dose versus depth measurements in a large water phantom. Thermal neutron flux as well as fast neutron and photon absorbed dose rates were measured. Satisfactory agreement in determining absorbed dose within the experimental uncertainties was obtained between the different groups although the measurement uncertainties are large, ranging between 3% and 30% depending upon the dose component and the depth of measurement. To improve the precision in the specification of absorbed dose amongst the participants, the individually measured dose components were normalized to the results from a single method. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 microg g(-1) that is typical of concentrations realized clinically with the boron delivery compound boronophenylalanine-fructose, systematic discrepancies in the specification of the total biologically weighted dose of up to 10% were apparent between the different groups. The results from these measurements will be used in future to normalize treatment plan calculations between the different clinical dosimetry protocols as Part II of this study.

  19. Diamond detector in absorbed dose measurements in high-energy linear accelerator photon and electron beams.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Binukumar, John Pichy; Al Amri, Iqbal; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Antony

    2016-01-01

    Diamond detectors (DD) are preferred in small field dosimetry of radiation beams because of small dose profile penumbras, better spatial resolution, and tissue-equivalent properties. We investigated a commercially available 'microdiamond' detector in realizing absorbed dose from first principles. A microdiamond detector, type TM 60019 with tandem electrometer is used to measure absorbed doses in water, nylon, and PMMA phantoms. With sensitive volume 0.004 mm3, radius 1.1mm, thickness 1 x10(-3) mm, the nominal response is 1 nC/Gy. It is assumed that the diamond detector could collect total electric charge (nC) developed during irradiation at 0 V bias. We found that dose rate effect is less than 0.7% for changing dose rate by 500 MU/min. The reproducibility in obtaining readings with diamond detector is found to be ± 0.17% (1 SD) (n = 11). The measured absorbed doses for 6 MV and 15 MV photons arrived at using mass energy absorption coefficients and stop-ping power ratios compared well with Nd, water calibrated ion chamber measured absorbed doses within 3% in water, PMMA, and nylon media. The calibration factor obtained for diamond detector confirmed response variation is due to sensitivity due to difference in manufacturing process. For electron beams, we had to apply ratio of electron densities of water to carbon. Our results qualify diamond dosimeter as a transfer standard, based on long-term stability and reproducibility. Based on micro-dimensions, we recommend these detectors for pretreatment dose verifications in small field irradiations like stereotactic treatments with image guidance. PMID:27074452

  20. Measurements of the light-absorbing material inside cloud droplets and its effect on cloud albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Clarke, A. D.; Warren, Stephen G.; Radke, L. F.; Charleson, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    Most of the measurements of light-absorbing aerosol particles made previously have been in non-cloudy air and therefore provide no insight into aerosol effects on cloud properties. Here, researchers describe an experiment designed to measure light absorption exclusively due to substances inside cloud droplets, compare the results to related light absorption measurements, and evaluate possible effects on the albedo of clouds. The results of this study validate those of Twomey and Cocks and show that the measured levels of light-absorbing material are negligible for the radiative properties of realistic clouds. For the measured clouds, which appear to have been moderately polluted, the amount of elemental carbon (EC) present was insufficient to affect albedo. Much higher contaminant levels or much larger droplets than those measured would be necessary to significantly alter the radiative properties. The effect of the concentrations of EC actually measured on the albedo of snow, however, would be much more pronounced since, in contrast to clouds, snowpacks are usually optically semi-infinite and have large particle sizes.

  1. The effects of optical scattering on pulsed photoacoustic measurement in weakly absorbing liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zuomin; Myllylä, Risto

    2001-12-01

    In this article, a photoacoustic technique, excited by a pulsed diode laser, is used in a study of optically absorbing and scattering liquids. The article discusses the effects of optical scattering on the photoacoustic source and signal. In the empirical part, varying amounts of milk and carbon powder were added to water to control the absorption and scattering coefficients of the resulting liquids. The results showed that scattering increases the duration of the photoacoustic signal while decreasing the signal amplitude to some degree. This paper also shows a quite simple method for measuring the scattering coefficient in weakly absorbing materials using a PZT transducer, which can be used to determine the concentration of highly scattering compositions in some cases.

  2. Measurements of light-absorbing particles on the glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. G.; All, J. D.; Schwarz, J. P.; Arnott, W. P.; Cole, R. J.; Lapham, E.; Celestian, A.

    2015-02-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes have been rapidly losing mass since the 1970s. In addition to the documented increase in temperature, increases in light-absorbing particles deposited on glaciers could be contributing to the observed glacier loss. Here we report on measurements of light-absorbing particles sampled from glaciers during three surveys in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains in Peru. During three research expeditions in the dry seasons (May-August) of 2011, 2012 and 2013, 240 snow samples were collected from 15 mountain peaks over altitudes ranging from 4800 to nearly 6800 m. Several mountains were sampled each of the 3 years and some mountains were sampled multiple times during the same year. Collected snow samples were melted and filtered in the field then later analyzed using the Light Absorption Heating Method (LAHM), a new technique that measures the ability of particles on filters to absorb visible light. LAHM results have been calibrated using filters with known amounts of fullerene soot, a common industrial surrogate for black carbon (BC). As sample filters often contain dust in addition to BC, results are presented in terms of effective black carbon (eBC). During the 2013 survey, snow samples were collected and kept frozen for analysis with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Calculated eBC mass from the LAHM analysis and the SP2 refractory black carbon (rBC) results were well correlated (r2 = 0.92). These results indicate that a substantial portion of the light-absorbing particles in the more polluted regions were likely BC. The 3 years of data show that glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains close to human population centers have substantially higher levels of eBC (as high as 70 ng g-1) than remote glaciers (as low as 2.0 ng g-1 eBC), indicating that population centers can influence local glaciers by sourcing BC.

  3. Measurements of light absorbing particulates on the glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. G.; All, J. D.; Schwarz, J. P.; Arnott, W. P.; Cole, R. J.; Lapham, E.; Celestian, A.

    2014-10-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes have been rapidly losing mass since the 1970s. In addition to the documented increase in air temperature, increases in light absorbing particulates deposited on glaciers could be contributing to the observed glacier loss. Here we report on measurements of light absorbing particulates sampled from glaciers during three surveys in the Cordillera Blanca in Peru. During three research expeditions in the dry seasons (May-August) of 2011, 2012 and 2013, two hundred and forty snow samples were collected from fifteen mountain peaks over altitudes ranging from 4800 to nearly 6800 m. Several mountains were sampled each of the three expeditions and some mountains were sampled multiple times during the same expedition. Collected snow samples were melted and filtered in the field then later analyzed using the Light Absorption Heating Method (LAHM), a new technique that measures the ability of particulates on filters to absorb visible light. LAHM results have been calibrated using filters with known amounts of fullerene soot, a common industrial surrogate for black carbon (BC). As sample filters often contain dust in addition to BC, results are presented in terms of effective Black Carbon (eBC). During the 2013 survey, snow samples were collected and kept frozen for analysis with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Calculated eBC mass from the filter analysis and the SP2 refractory Black Carbon (rBC) results were well correlated (r2 = 0.92). These results indicate that a substantial portion of the light absorbing particulates in the more polluted areas were likely BC. The three years of data show that glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains close to human population centers have substantially higher levels of eBC (as high as 70 ng g-1) than remote glaciers (as low as 2.0 ng g-1 eBC), indicating that population centers can influence local glaciers by sourcing BC.

  4. Visual observation and quantitative measurement of the microwave absorbing effect at X band.

    PubMed

    Zhao, L; Chen, X; Ong, C K

    2008-12-01

    We have set up a two-dimensional spatial field mapping system to measure graphically the quasi-free-space electromagnetic wave in a parallel plate waveguide. Our apparatus illustrates a potential application in characterizing the microwave absorbing materials. From the measured mappings of the microwave field, the visualization of spatial physical process and quantitative characterization of reflectivity coefficients can be achieved. This simple apparatus has a remarkable advantage over with conventional testing methods which usually involve huge, expensive anechoic chambers and demand samples of large size. PMID:19123583

  5. Influence of voxel size on specific absorbed fractions and S-values in a mouse voxel phantom.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, A; Kinase, S

    2011-02-01

    Photon and electron specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) and S-values have been evaluated using mouse voxel phantoms. In voxel phantoms, it is important to choose the voxel size carefully since it affects the accuracy of results. In this study, two mouse voxel phantoms were constructed, with cubic voxels, one with 0.1-mm sides and the other with 0.4-mm sides. The sources were considered to be distributed uniformly in the main organs and the radiation transport was simulated using the Monte Carlo code EGS4. It was found that the effect of voxel size on SAFs for self-irradiation was not high (<10 %) for electrons and photons. However, it was appreciable for cross-irradiation especially for electrons. The effect of voxel size was investigated on S-values for some beta emitters such as (131)I, (153)Sm, (188)Re and (90)Y.

  6. Monte Carlo calculations and measurements of absorbed dose per monitor unit for the treatment of uveal melanoma with proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Nicholas; Newhauser, Wayne D; Titt, Uwe; Gombos, Dan; Coombes, Kevin; Starkschall, George

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of uveal melanoma with proton radiotherapy has provided excellent clinical outcomes. However, contemporary treatment planning systems use simplistic dose algorithms that limit the accuracy of relative dose distributions. Further, absolute predictions of absorbed dose per monitor unit are not yet available in these systems. The purpose of this study was to determine if Monte Carlo methods could predict dose per monitor unit (D/MU) value at the center of a proton spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) to within 1% on measured values for a variety of treatment fields relevant to ocular proton therapy. The MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code, in combination with realistic models for the ocular beam delivery apparatus and a water phantom, was used to calculate dose distributions and D/MU values, which were verified by the measurements. Measured proton beam data included central-axis depth dose profiles, relative cross-field profiles and absolute D/MU measurements under several combinations of beam penetration ranges and range-modulation widths. The Monte Carlo method predicted D/MU values that agreed with measurement to within 1% and dose profiles that agreed with measurement to within 3% of peak dose or within 0.5 mm distance-to-agreement. Lastly, a demonstration of the clinical utility of this technique included calculations of dose distributions and D/MU values in a realistic model of the human eye. It is possible to predict D/MU values accurately for clinical relevant range-modulated proton beams for ocular therapy using the Monte Carlo method. It is thus feasible to use the Monte Carlo method as a routine absolute dose algorithm for ocular proton therapy. PMID:18367789

  7. Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Munley, John T.; Nelson, Danny A.; Qiao, Hong; Phillips, Jon R.

    2012-07-17

    Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids, producing a small atomic uranium vapor plume. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. LAARS has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for U-235. The sample is scanned and assayed point-by-point at rates reaching 1 million measurements/hour, enabling LAARS to detect and analyze uranium in trace samples. The spectrometer is assembled using primarily commercially available components and features a compact design and automated analysis.Two specific gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) applications of the spectrometer are currently under development: 1) LAARS-Environmental Sampling (ES), which collects and analyzes aerosol particles for GCEP misuse detection and 2) LAARS-Destructive Assay (DA), which enables onsite enrichment DA sample collection and analysis for protracted diversion detection. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in GCEP safeguards verification.

  8. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of absorbed dose in teeth from citizens of Ozyorsk.

    PubMed

    Wieser, A; Vasilenko, E; Aladova, E; Fattibene, P; Semiochkina, N; Smetanin, M

    2014-05-01

    In 1945, within the frame of the Uranium Project for the production of nuclear weapons, the Mayak nuclear facilities were constructed at the Lake Irtyash in the Southern Urals, Russia. The nuclear workers of the Mayak Production Association (MPA), who lived in the city of Ozyorsk, are the focus of epidemiological studies for the assessment of health risks due to protracted exposure to ionising radiation. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of absorbed dose in tooth enamel have already been used in the past, in an effort to validate occupational external doses that were evaluated in the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System. In the present study, 229 teeth of Ozyorsk citizens not employed at MPA were investigated for the assessment of external background exposure in Ozyorsk. The annually absorbed dose in tooth enamel from natural background radiation was estimated to be (0.7 ± 0.3) mGy. For citizens living in Ozyorsk during the time of routine noble gas releases of the MPA, which peaked in 1953, the average excess absorbed dose in enamel above natural background was (36 ± 29) mGy, which is consistent with the gamma dose obtained by model calculations. In addition, there were indications of possible accidental gaseous MPA releases that affected the population of Ozyorsk, during the early and late MPA operation periods, before 1951 and after 1960. PMID:24604722

  9. Absorbed dose measurements for kV-cone beam computed tomography in image-guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hioki, Kazunari; Araki, Fujio; Ohno, Takeshi; Nakaguchi, Yuji; Tomiyama, Yuuki

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we develope a novel method to directly evaluate an absorbed dose-to-water for kilovoltage-cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Absorbed doses for the kV-CBCT systems of the Varian On-Board Imager (OBI) and the Elekta X-ray Volumetric Imager (XVI) were measured by a Farmer ionization chamber with a 60Co calibration factor. The chamber measurements were performed at the center and four peripheral points in body-type (30 cm diameter and 51 cm length) and head-type (16 cm diameter and 33 cm length) cylindrical water phantoms. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water by using a 60Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo (MC)-calculated beam quality conversion factor, kQ, for 60Co to kV-CBCT. The irradiation for OBI and XVI was performed with pelvis and head modes for the body- and the head-type phantoms, respectively. In addition, the dose distributions in the phantom for both kV-CBCT systems were calculated with MC method and were compared with measured values. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated at the center in the water phantom and compared with measured doses at four peripheral points. The measured absorbed doses at the center in the body-type phantom were 1.96 cGy for OBI and 0.83 cGy for XVI. The peripheral doses were 2.36-2.90 cGy for OBI and 0.83-1.06 cGy for XVI. The doses for XVI were lower up to approximately one-third of those for OBI. Similarly, the measured doses at the center in the head-type phantom were 0.48 cGy for OBI and 0.21 cGy for XVI. The peripheral doses were 0.26-0.66 cGy for OBI and 0.16-0.30 cGy for XVI. The calculated peripheral doses agreed within 3% in the pelvis mode and within 4% in the head mode with measured doses for both kV-CBCT systems. In addition, the absorbed dose determined in this study was approximately 4% lower than that in TG-61 but the absorbed dose by both methods was in agreement within their combined

  10. Precision frequency measurements with interferometric weak values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starling, David J.; Dixon, P. Ben; Jordan, Andrew N.; Howell, John C.

    2010-12-01

    We demonstrate an experiment which utilizes a Sagnac interferometer to measure a change in optical frequency of 129 ± 7 kHz/Hz with only 2 mW of continuous-wave, single-mode input power. We describe the measurement of a weak value and show how even higher-frequency sensitivities may be obtained over a bandwidth of several nanometers. This technique has many possible applications, such as precision relative frequency measurements and laser locking without the use of atomic lines.

  11. Measuring radiology's value in time saved.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christoph I; Enzmann, Dieter R

    2012-10-01

    Because radiology has historically not measured its added value to patient care and thus not communicated it in easily understood terms to all stakeholders, the specialty must correct this to prepare for the eventual transition from the current fee-for-service payment schedule to new value-based reimbursement systems. Given the increasing risk for marginalization, radiologists need to engage clinicians and managers to map the processes and associated costs of episodes of patient care to identify areas for providing and improving integrated diagnostic information and to measure the value thereof. In such time-driven, activity-based costing practices, radiologists should highlight how proper investments in the information generated by imaging and how radiologists' associated consultative and coordination of services can save greater resources downstream, especially in the nonrenewable resource of physician time, an increasingly scarce health care resource. Using physician time in the most efficient way will be a key element for decreasing health care costs at the aggregate level. Therefore, expressing radiology's contribution in terms of downstream physician time saved is a metric that can be easily understood by all stakeholders. In a conceptual framework centered on value, the specialty of radiology must focus more on its most important product, actionable information, rather than on imaging technologies themselves. Information, unlike imaging technologies, does not depreciate with time but rather increases in value the more it is used.

  12. Measuring radiology's value in time saved.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christoph I; Enzmann, Dieter R

    2012-10-01

    Because radiology has historically not measured its added value to patient care and thus not communicated it in easily understood terms to all stakeholders, the specialty must correct this to prepare for the eventual transition from the current fee-for-service payment schedule to new value-based reimbursement systems. Given the increasing risk for marginalization, radiologists need to engage clinicians and managers to map the processes and associated costs of episodes of patient care to identify areas for providing and improving integrated diagnostic information and to measure the value thereof. In such time-driven, activity-based costing practices, radiologists should highlight how proper investments in the information generated by imaging and how radiologists' associated consultative and coordination of services can save greater resources downstream, especially in the nonrenewable resource of physician time, an increasingly scarce health care resource. Using physician time in the most efficient way will be a key element for decreasing health care costs at the aggregate level. Therefore, expressing radiology's contribution in terms of downstream physician time saved is a metric that can be easily understood by all stakeholders. In a conceptual framework centered on value, the specialty of radiology must focus more on its most important product, actionable information, rather than on imaging technologies themselves. Information, unlike imaging technologies, does not depreciate with time but rather increases in value the more it is used. PMID:23025865

  13. Measurement of total ultrasonic power using thermal expansion and change in buoyancy of an absorbing target

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, P. K. Kumar, Yudhisther; Gupta, Reeta; Jain, Anshul; Gohiya, Chandrashekhar

    2014-05-15

    The Radiation Force Balance (RFB) technique is well established and most widely used for the measurement of total ultrasonic power radiated by ultrasonic transducer. The technique is used as a primary standard for calibration of ultrasonic transducers with relatively fair uncertainty in the low power (below 1 W) regime. In this technique, uncertainty comparatively increases in the range of few watts wherein the effects such as thermal heating of the target, cavitations, and acoustic streaming dominate. In addition, error in the measurement of ultrasonic power is also caused due to movement of absorber at relatively high radiated force which occurs at high power level. In this article a new technique is proposed which does not measure the balance output during transducer energized state as done in RFB. It utilizes the change in buoyancy of the absorbing target due to local thermal heating. The linear thermal expansion of the target changes the apparent mass in water due to buoyancy change. This forms the basis for the measurement of ultrasonic power particularly in watts range. The proposed method comparatively reduces uncertainty caused by various ultrasonic effects that occur at high power such as overshoot due to momentum of target at higher radiated force. The functionality of the technique has been tested and compared with the existing internationally recommended RFB technique.

  14. A Comparison of Model Calculation and Measurement of Absorbed Dose for Proton Irradiation. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapp, N.; Semones, E.; Saganti, P.; Cucinotta, F.

    2003-01-01

    With the increase in the amount of time spent EVA that is necessary to complete the construction and subsequent maintenance of ISS, it will become increasingly important for ground support personnel to accurately characterize the radiation exposures incurred by EVA crewmembers. Since exposure measurements cannot be taken within the organs of interest, it is necessary to estimate these exposures by calculation. To validate the methods and tools used to develop these estimates, it is necessary to model experiments performed in a controlled environment. This work is such an effort. A human phantom was outfitted with detector equipment and then placed in American EMU and Orlan-M EVA space suits. The suited phantom was irradiated at the LLUPTF with proton beams of known energies. Absorbed dose measurements were made by the spaceflight operational dosimetrist from JSC at multiple sites in the skin, eye, brain, stomach, and small intestine locations in the phantom. These exposures are then modeled using the BRYNTRN radiation transport code developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, and the CAM (computerized anatomical male) human geometry model of Billings and Yucker. Comparisons of absorbed dose calculations with measurements show excellent agreement. This suggests that there is reason to be confident in the ability of both the transport code and the human body model to estimate proton exposure in ground-based laboratory experiments.

  15. Valuing vaccines using value of statistical life measures.

    PubMed

    Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Jamison, Dean T; Krupnick, Alan J; Norheim, Ole F

    2014-09-01

    Vaccines are effective tools to improve human health, but resources to pursue all vaccine-related investments are lacking. Benefit-cost and cost-effectiveness analysis are the two major methodological approaches used to assess the impact, efficiency, and distributional consequences of disease interventions, including those related to vaccinations. Childhood vaccinations can have important non-health consequences for productivity and economic well-being through multiple channels, including school attendance, physical growth, and cognitive ability. Benefit-cost analysis would capture such non-health benefits; cost-effectiveness analysis does not. Standard cost-effectiveness analysis may grossly underestimate the benefits of vaccines. A specific willingness-to-pay measure is based on the notion of the value of a statistical life (VSL), derived from trade-offs people are willing to make between fatality risk and wealth. Such methods have been used widely in the environmental and health literature to capture the broader economic benefits of improving health, but reservations remain about their acceptability. These reservations remain mainly because the methods may reflect ability to pay, and hence be discriminatory against the poor. However, willingness-to-pay methods can be made sensitive to income distribution by using appropriate income-sensitive distributional weights. Here, we describe the pros and cons of these methods and how they compare against standard cost-effectiveness analysis using pure health metrics, such as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), in the context of vaccine priorities. We conclude that if appropriately used, willingness-to-pay methods will not discriminate against the poor, and they can capture important non-health benefits such as financial risk protection, productivity gains, and economic wellbeing.

  16. Valuing vaccines using value of statistical life measures.

    PubMed

    Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Jamison, Dean T; Krupnick, Alan J; Norheim, Ole F

    2014-09-01

    Vaccines are effective tools to improve human health, but resources to pursue all vaccine-related investments are lacking. Benefit-cost and cost-effectiveness analysis are the two major methodological approaches used to assess the impact, efficiency, and distributional consequences of disease interventions, including those related to vaccinations. Childhood vaccinations can have important non-health consequences for productivity and economic well-being through multiple channels, including school attendance, physical growth, and cognitive ability. Benefit-cost analysis would capture such non-health benefits; cost-effectiveness analysis does not. Standard cost-effectiveness analysis may grossly underestimate the benefits of vaccines. A specific willingness-to-pay measure is based on the notion of the value of a statistical life (VSL), derived from trade-offs people are willing to make between fatality risk and wealth. Such methods have been used widely in the environmental and health literature to capture the broader economic benefits of improving health, but reservations remain about their acceptability. These reservations remain mainly because the methods may reflect ability to pay, and hence be discriminatory against the poor. However, willingness-to-pay methods can be made sensitive to income distribution by using appropriate income-sensitive distributional weights. Here, we describe the pros and cons of these methods and how they compare against standard cost-effectiveness analysis using pure health metrics, such as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), in the context of vaccine priorities. We conclude that if appropriately used, willingness-to-pay methods will not discriminate against the poor, and they can capture important non-health benefits such as financial risk protection, productivity gains, and economic wellbeing. PMID:25045822

  17. Extreme value theory for singular measures.

    PubMed

    Lucarini, Valerio; Faranda, Davide; Turchetti, Giorgio; Vaienti, Sandro

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we perform an analytical and numerical study of the extreme values of specific observables of dynamical systems possessing an invariant singular measure. Such observables are expressed as functions of the distance of the orbit of initial conditions with respect to a given point of the attractor. Using the block maxima approach, we show that the extremes are distributed according to the generalised extreme value distribution, where the parameters can be written as functions of the information dimension of the attractor. The numerical analysis is performed on a few low dimensional maps. For the Cantor ternary set and the Sierpinskij triangle, which can be constructed as iterated function systems, the inferred parameters show a very good agreement with the theoretical values. For strange attractors like those corresponding to the Lozi and Hènon maps, a slower convergence to the generalised extreme value distribution is observed. Nevertheless, the results are in good statistical agreement with the theoretical estimates. It is apparent that the analysis of extremes allows for capturing fundamental information of the geometrical structure of the attractor of the underlying dynamical system, the basic reason being that the chosen observables act as magnifying glass in the neighborhood of the point from which the distance is computed.

  18. Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong; Phillips, Jon R.

    2012-07-01

    Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids producing a small plume containing uranium atoms. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for uranium. It is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. High speed sample scanning and pinpoint characterization allow measurements on millions of particles/hour to detect and analyze the enrichment of trace uranium in samples. The spectrometer is assembled using commercially available components at comparatively low cost, and features a compact and low power design. Future designs can be engineered for reliable, autonomous deployment within an industrial plant environment. Two specific applications of the spectrometer are under development: 1) automated unattended aerosol sampling and analysis and 2) on-site small sample destructive assay measurement. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) safeguards verification. The aerosol measurement instrument, LAARS-environmental sampling (ES), collects aerosol particles from the plant environment in a purpose-built rotating drum impactor and then uses LAARS-ES to quickly scan the surface of the impactor to measure the enrichments of the captured particles. The current approach to plant misuse detection involves swipe sampling and offsite analysis. Though this approach is very robust it generally requires several months to

  19. Dualex: A New Instrument for Field Measurements of Epidermal Ultraviolet Absorbance by Chlorophyll Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulas, Yves; Cerovic, Zoran G.; Cartelat, Aurélie; Moya, Ismaël

    2004-08-01

    Dualex (dual excitation) is a field-portable instrument, hereby described, for the assessment of polyphenolic compounds in leaves from the measurement of UV absorbance of the leaf epidermis by double excitation of chlorophyll fluorescence. The instrument takes advantage of a feedback loop that equalizes the fluorescence level induced by a reference red light to the UV-light-induced fluorescence level. This allows quick measurement from attached leaves even under field conditions. The use of light-emitting diodes and of a leaf-clip configuration makes Dualex a user-friendly instrument with potential applications in ecophysiological research, light climate analysis, agriculture, forestry, horticulture, pest management, selection of medicinal plants, and wherever accumulation of leaf polyphenolics is involved in plant responses to the environment.

  20. Measuring best value from 'refurb' projects.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Grant

    2013-09-01

    Research at Aberdeen's Robert Gordon University has identified the requirement for the development of a 'Decision Support Model' to 'facilitate and measure the selection of main elements and sub-elements within refurbishment and maintenance projects'. One of the major drivers, explains Grant Wilson, a completing PhD researcher with the University's Institute for Innovation, Design and Sustainability (IDEAS), was to provide a mechanism via which NHS estates managers, design teams, and contractors, could 'evidence and demonstrate' that best value-for-money had been pursued, 'specific to the facility in question, and in the context of its unique business case requirements'. PMID:24137994

  1. Laser measurement of the spectral extinction coefficients of fluorescent, highly absorbing liquids. [crude petroleum oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.

    1982-01-01

    A conceptual method is developed to deduce rapidly the spectral extinction coefficient of fluorescent, highly absorbing liquids, such as crude or refined petroleum oils. The technique offers the advantage of only requiring one laser wavelength and a single experimental assembly and execution for any specific fluorescent liquid. The liquid is inserted into an extremely thin wedge-shaped cavity for stimulation by a laser from one side and flurescence measurement on the other side by a monochromator system. For each arbitrarily selected extinction wavelength, the wedge is driven slowly to increasing thicknesses until the fluorescence extinguishes. The fluorescence as a function of wedge thickness permits a determination of the extinction coefficient using an included theoretical model. When the monochromator is set to the laser emission wavelength, the extinction coefficient is determined using the usual on-wavelength signal extinction procedure.

  2. Millimeter wave complex dielectric permittivity and complex magnetic permeability measurements of absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachov, Igor Ivanovich

    2000-09-01

    This dissertation presents new methods for characterization of materials in the millimeter wave range. Historically, this has been the most difficult part of the electromagnetic spectrum for accurate measurements of material properties. New instrumentation has now been developed for operation in this frequency band. The new techniques developed in the course of this work allowed precise measurement of dielectric properties as well as the separation of magnetic properties from dielectric in the millimeter wave range. A new quasi-optical spectrometer with a waveguide reference channel has been designed and built for the precision measurement of the real part of dielectric permittivity of medium and highly absorbing materials over an extended W-band frequency range (70-118 GHz). A new method of phase measurement with this unique unbalanced quasi-optical waveguide bridge spectrometer has been developed. The phase of the electromagnetic wave transmitted through the specimen can be measured accurately, leading to the determination of the real part of the complex dielectric permittivity of moderate and highly absorbing dielectric materials with high precision. A simple quasi-optical transmission configuration of the spectrometer, a single free space channel provides the transmittance data with a high resolution from which the spectra of the imaginary part of dielectric permittivity of materials are evaluated accurately. A backward wave oscillator (BWO) is used as the source of tunable coherent radiation for the spectrometer. The high output power of the BWO and the high sensitivity of the receiver system, which employs a specially constructed liquid helium cooled InSb detector, enable adequate sensitivity in transmission for highly absorbing materials. Systematic study of dielectric and magnetic properties of various materials has been performed with the quasi-optical free space method in the millimeter wave range from 34GHz to 117GHz for the first time. Specific results

  3. Measurement of tear production using phenol red thread and standardized endodontic absorbent paper points in European pond turtles (Emys orbicularis).

    PubMed

    Rajaei, Seyed Mehdi; Mood, Maneli Ansari; Ghaffari, Masoud Selk; Williams, David L

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the aqueous fraction of the tear film using the phenol red thread test (PRTT) and paper point tear test (PPTT) in healthy adult European pond turtles (Emys orbicularis). Twenty-four healthy adult European pond turtles were studied. Measurement of tear secretion was performed using the PRTT and standardized endodontic absorbent PPTT. Horizontal palpebral fissure length (HPFL) was measured using digital calipers and was correlated with the weight of the animal. The mean ± SD PRTT, PPTT, and HPFL values for the left and right eyes were 5.12 ± 1.54 mm/15 sec and 4.62 ± 1.76 mm/15 sec; 4.50 ± 1.25 mm/1 min and 4.20 ± 1.53 mm/1 min; and 8.4 ± 0.6 mm and 8.3 ± 0.6 mm, respectively. No significant differences were detected between right and left eyes of individual turtles or between males and females in all tests. This study represents reference values of tear production in European pond turtles obtained from PRTT and PPTT methods and forms an important baseline study in defining the healthy chelonian ocular surface.

  4. Analysis of reflectance spectra of UV-absorbing aerosol scenes measured by SCIAMACHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, M.; Stammes, P.; Aben, E. A. A.

    2007-01-01

    Reflectance spectra from 280-1750 nm of typical desert dust aerosol (DDA) and biomass burning aerosol (BBA) scenes over oceans are presented, measured by the space-borne spectrometer Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY). DDA and BBA are both UV-absorbing aerosols, but their effect on the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance is different due to differences in the way mineral aerosols and smoke reflect and absorb radiation. Mineral aerosols are typically large, inert particles, found in warm, dry continental air. Smoke particles, on the other hand, are usually small particles, although often clustered, chemically very active and highly variable in composition. Moreover, BBA are hygroscopic and over oceans BBA were invariably found in cloudy scenes. TOA reflectance spectra of typical DDA and BBA scenes were analyzed, using radiative transfer simulations, and compared. The DDA spectrum was successfully simulated using a layer with a bimodal size distribution of mineral aerosols in a clear sky. The spectrum of the BBA scene, however, was determined by the interaction between cloud droplets and smoke particles, as is shown by simulations with a model of separate aerosol and cloud layers and models with internally and externally mixed aerosol/cloud layers. The occurrence of clouds in smoke scenes when sufficient water vapor is present usually prevents the detection of optical properties of these aerosol plumes using space-borne sensors. However, the Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI), a UV color index, is not sensitive to scattering aerosols and clouds and can be used to detect these otherwise obscured aerosol plumes over clouds. The amount of absorption of radiation can be expressed using the absorption optical thickness. The absorption optical thickness in the DDA case was 0.42 (340 nm) and 0.14 (550 nm) for an aerosol layer of optical thickness 1.74 (550 nm). In the BBA case the absorption optical thickness was 0.18 (340 nm) and 0

  5. "Measure Your Gradient": a new way to measure gradients in high performance liquid chromatography by mass spectrometric or absorbance detection.

    PubMed

    Magee, Megan H; Manulik, Joseph C; Barnes, Brian B; Abate-Pella, Daniel; Hewitt, Joshua T; Boswell, Paul G

    2014-11-21

    The gradient produced by an HPLC is never the same as the one it is programmed to produce, but non-idealities in the gradient can be taken into account if they are measured. Such measurements are routine, yet only one general approach has been described to make them: both HPLC solvents are replaced with water, solvent B is spiked with 0.1% acetone, and the gradient is measured by UV absorbance. Despite the widespread use of this procedure, we found a number of problems and complications with it, mostly stemming from the fact that it measures the gradient under abnormal conditions (e.g. both solvents are water). It is also generally not amenable to MS detection, leaving those with only an MS detector no way to accurately measure their gradients. We describe a new approach called "Measure Your Gradient" that potentially solves these problems. One runs a test mixture containing 20 standards on a standard stationary phase and enters their gradient retention times into open-source software available at www.measureyourgradient.org. The software uses the retention times to back-calculate the gradient that was truly produced by the HPLC. Here we present a preliminary investigation of the new approach. We found that gradients measured this way are comparable to those measured by a more accurate, albeit impractical, version of the conventional approach. The new procedure worked with different gradients, flow rates, column lengths, inner diameters, on two different HPLCs, and with six different batches of the standard stationary phase.

  6. Estimation of the absorbed dose in radiation-processed food. 4. EPR measurements on eggshell

    SciTech Connect

    Desrosiers, M.F.; Le, F.G. ); Harewood, P.M.; Josephson, E.S. ); Montesalvo, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Fresh whole eggs treated with ionizing radiation for Salmonellae control testing. The eggshell was then removed and examined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine if EPR could be used to (1) distinguish irradiated from unirradiated eggs and (2) assess the absorbed dose. No EPR signals were detected in unirradiated eggs, while strong signals were measurable for more than 200 days after irradiation. Although a number of EPR signals were measured, the most intense resonance (g = 2.0019) was used for dosimetry throughout the study. This signal was observed to increase linearly with dose (up to [approximately]6 kGy), which decayed [approximately]20% within the first 5 days after irradiation and remained relatively constant thereafter. The standard added-dose method was used to assess, retrospectively, the dose to eggs processed at 0.2, 0.7, and 1.4 kGy. Relatively good results were obtained when measurement was made on the day the shell was reirradiated; with this procedure estimates were better for shell processed at the lower doses.

  7. Influence of Diffraction Effects on the Result of Measuring the Absorption Coefficient of Ultrasound in Weakly Absorbing Liquids by the Pulse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatsky, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the problem of the influence of diffraction effects on the result of measuring the absorption coefficient of ultrasound in weakly absorbing liquids by the pulse method. Diffraction attenuation of an ultrasonic signal in a measuring cell using solid-state delay lines is calculated. It is shown that the use of delay lines of the ultrasonic signal leads to a considerable distortion of the measured absorption coefficient in the low-frequency range from the true value and can either overestimate or underestimate the results.

  8. Light-absorbing Particles in Snow and Ice: Measurement and Modeling of Climatic and Hydrological Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yun; Yasunari, Teppei J.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Flanner, M. G.; Lau, William K.; Ming, J.; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Mo; Warren, Stephen G.; Zhang, Rudong

    2015-01-01

    Light absorbing particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, brown carbon, and dust) influence water and energy budgets of the atmosphere and snowpack in multiple ways. In addition to their effects associated with atmospheric heating by absorption of solar radiation and interactions with clouds, LAP in snow on land and ice can reduce the surface reflectance (a.k.a., surface darkening), which is likely to accelerate the snow aging process and further reduces snow albedo and increases the speed of snowpack melt. LAP in snow and ice (LAPSI) has been identified as one of major forcings affecting climate change, e.g. in the fourth and fifth assessment reports of IPCC. However, the uncertainty level in quantifying this effect remains very high. In this review paper, we document various technical methods of measuring LAPSI and review the progress made in measuring the LAPSI in Arctic, Tibetan Plateau and other mid-latitude regions. We also report the progress in modeling the mass concentrations, albedo reduction, radiative forcing, andclimatic and hydrological impact of LAPSI at global and regional scales. Finally we identify some research needs for reducing the uncertainties in the impact of LAPSI on global and regional climate and the hydrological cycle.

  9. Measurement of absorbed dose-to-water for an HDR {sup 192}Ir source with ionization chambers in a sandwich setup

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, Fujio; Kouno, Tomohiro; Ohno, Takeshi; Kakei, Kiyotaka; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki; Kawamura, Shinji

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: In this study, a dedicated device for ion chamber measurements of absorbed dose-to-water for a Nucletron microSelectron-v2 HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source is presented. The device uses two ionization chambers in a so-called sandwich assembly. Using this setup and by taking the average reading of the two chambers, any dose error due to difficulties in absolute positioning (centering) of the source in between the chambers is cancelled to first order. The method's accuracy was examined by comparing measurements with absorbed dose-to-water determination based on the AAPM TG-43 protocol.Methods: The optimal source-to-chamber distance (SCD) for {sup 192}Ir dosimetry was determined from ion chamber measurements in a water phantom. The {sup 192}Ir source was sandwiched between two Exradin A1SL chambers (0.057 cm{sup 3}) at the optimal SCD separation. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water using a {sup 60}Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo-calculated beam quality conversion factor, k{sub Q}, for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir. An uncertainty estimate of the proposed method was determined based on reproducibility of measurements at different institutions for the same type of source.Results: The optimal distance for the A1SL chamber measurements was determined to be 5 cm from the {sup 192}Ir source center, considering the depth dependency of k{sub Q} for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir and the chamber positioning. The absorbed dose to water measured at (5 cm, 90°) on the transverse axis was 1.3% lower than TG-43 values and its reproducibility and overall uncertainty were 0.8% and 1.7%, respectively. The measurement doses at anisotropic points agreed within 1.5% with TG-43 values.Conclusions: The ion chamber measurement of absorbed dose-to-water with a sandwich method for the {sup 192}Ir source provides a more accurate, direct, and reference dose compared to the dose-to-water determination based on air-kerma strength in the TG-43 protocol

  10. Instrumentation and method for measuring NIR light absorbed in tissue during MR imaging in medical NIRS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myllylä, Teemu S.; Sorvoja, Hannu S. S.; Nikkinen, Juha; Tervonen, Osmo; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Myllylä, Risto A.

    2011-07-01

    Our goal is to provide a cost-effective method for examining human tissue, particularly the brain, by the simultaneous use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Due to its compatibility requirements, MRI poses a demanding challenge for NIRS measurements. This paper focuses particularly on presenting the instrumentation and a method for the non-invasive measurement of NIR light absorbed in human tissue during MR imaging. One practical method to avoid disturbances in MR imaging involves using long fibre bundles to enable conducting the measurements at some distance from the MRI scanner. This setup serves in fact a dual purpose, since also the NIRS device will be less disturbed by the MRI scanner. However, measurements based on long fibre bundles suffer from light attenuation. Furthermore, because one of our primary goals was to make the measuring method as cost-effective as possible, we used high-power light emitting diodes instead of more expensive lasers. The use of LEDs, however, limits the maximum output power which can be extracted to illuminate the tissue. To meet these requirements, we improved methods of emitting light sufficiently deep into tissue. We also show how to measure NIR light of a very small power level that scatters from the tissue in the MRI environment, which is characterized by strong electromagnetic interference. In this paper, we present the implemented instrumentation and measuring method and report on test measurements conducted during MRI scanning. These measurements were performed in MRI operating rooms housing 1.5 Tesla-strength closed MRI scanners (manufactured by GE) in the Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology at the Oulu University Hospital.

  11. A Deep Search For Faint Galaxies Associated With Very Low-redshift C IV Absorbers. II. Program Design, Absorption-line Measurements, and Absorber Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchett, Joseph N.; Tripp, Todd M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Werk, Jessica K.; Tumlinson, Jason; O'Meara, John M.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Katz, Neal; Willmer, C. N. A.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the evolution of metal-enriched gas over recent cosmic epochs as well as to characterize the diffuse, ionized, metal-enriched circumgalactic medium, we have conducted a blind survey for C iv absorption systems in 89 QSO sightlines observed with the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. We have identified 42 absorbers at z < 0.16, comprising the largest uniform blind sample size to date in this redshift range. Our measurements indicate an increasing C iv absorber number density per comoving path length (d{N}/{dX}= 7.5 ± 1.1) and modestly increasing mass density relative to the critical density of the universe (ΩC iv = 10.0 ± 1.5 × 10-8) from z ˜ 1.5 to the present epoch, consistent with predictions from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Furthermore, the data support a functional form for the column density distribution function that deviates from a single power law, also consistent with independent theoretical predictions. As the data also probe heavy element ions in addition to C iv at the same redshifts, we identify, measure, and search for correlations between column densities of these species where components appear to be aligned in velocity. Among these ion-ion correlations, we find evidence for tight correlations between C ii and Si ii, C ii and Si iii, and C iv and Si iv, suggesting that these pairs of species arise in similar ionization conditions. However, the evidence for correlations decreases as the difference in ionization potential increases. Finally, when controlling for observational bias, we find only marginal evidence for a correlation (86.8% likelihood) between the Doppler line width b(C iv) and column density N(C iv).

  12. Screening and monitoring microbial xenobiotics’ biodegradation by rapid, inexpensive and easy to perform microplate UV-absorbance measurements

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Evaluation of xenobiotics biodegradation potential, shown here for benzotriazoles (corrosion inhibitors) and sulfamethoxazole (sulfonamide antibiotic) by microbial communities and/or pure cultures normally requires time intensive and money consuming LC/GC methods that are, in case of laboratory setups, not always needed. Results The usage of high concentrations to apply a high selective pressure on the microbial communities/pure cultures in laboratory setups, a simple UV-absorbance measurement (UV-AM) was developed and validated for screening a large number of setups, requiring almost no preparation and significantly less time and money compared to LC/GC methods. This rapid and easy to use method was evaluated by comparing its measured values to LC-UV and GC-MS/MS results. Furthermore, its application for monitoring and screening unknown activated sludge communities (ASC) and mixed pure cultures has been tested and approved to detect biodegradation of benzotriazole (BTri), 4- and 5-tolyltriazole (4-TTri, 5-TTri) as well as SMX. Conclusions In laboratory setups, xenobiotics concentrations above 1.0 mg L-1 without any enrichment or preparation could be detected after optimization of the method. As UV-AM does not require much preparatory work and can be conducted in 96 or even 384 well plate formats, the number of possible parallel setups and screening efficiency was significantly increased while analytic and laboratory costs were reduced to a minimum. PMID:24558966

  13. Mechanism and elimination of a water vapor interference in the measurement of ozone by UV absorbance.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kevin L; Birks, John W

    2006-10-15

    A water vapor interference in ozone measurements by UV absorption was investigated using four different ozone monitors (TEI models 49 and 49C, Dasibi model 1003-AH, and a 2B Technologies model 202 prototype). In the extreme case of step changes between 0 and 90% relative humidity (RH), a large interference in the range of tens to hundreds of ppbv was found for all instruments tested, with the magnitude and sign depending on the manufacturer and model. Considering that water vapor does not absorb at the wavelength of the Hg lamp (253.7 nm) used in these instruments, another explanation is required. Based on experimental evidence and theoretical considerations, we conclude that the water vapor interference is caused by humidity effects on the transmission of uncollimated UV light through the detection cell. The ozone scrubber acts as a water reservoir, either adding or removing water from the air sample, thereby modulating the detector signal and producing a positive or negative offset. It was found for the 2B Technologies ozone monitor that use of a 1-m length of Nafion tubing just prior to the entrance to the detection cell reduces the water vapor interference to negligible levels (+/- 2 ppbv for step changes between 0 and 90% RH) while quantitatively passing ozone. PMID:17120566

  14. Measurement of absorbed dose to water around an electronic brachytherapy source. Comparison of two dosimetry systems: lithium formate EPR dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolfsson, Emelie; White, Shane; Landry, Guillaume; Lund, Eva; Gustafsson, Håkan; Verhaegen, Frank; Reniers, Brigitte; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun

    2015-05-01

    Interest in high dose rate (HDR) electronic brachytherapy operating at 50 kV is increasing. For quality assurance it is important to identify dosimetry systems that can measure the absorbed doses in absolute terms which is difficult in this energy region. In this work a comparison is made between two dosimetry systems, EPR lithium formate dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film. Both types of dosimeters were irradiated simultaneously in a PMMA phantom using the Axxent EBS. Absorbed dose to water was determined at distances of 10 mm, 30 mm and 50 mm from the EBS. Results were traceable to different primary standards as regards to absorbed dose to water (EPR) and air kerma (EBT2). Monte Carlo simulations were used in absolute terms as a third estimate of absorbed dose to water. Agreement within the estimated expanded (k = 2) uncertainties (5% (EPR), 7% (EBT2)) was found between the results at 30 mm and 50 mm from the x-ray source. The same result was obtained in 4 repetitions of irradiation, indicating high precision in the measurements with both systems. At all distances, agreement between EPR and Monte Carlo simulations was shown as was also the case for the film measurements at 30mm and 50mm. At 10mm the geometry for the film measurements caused too large uncertainty in measured values depending on the exact position (within sub-mm distances) of the EBS and the 10 mm film results were exculded from comparison. This work has demonstrated good performance of the lithium formate EPR dosimetry system in accordance with earlier experiments at higher photon energies (192Ir HDR brachytherapy). It was also highlighted that there might be issues regarding the energy dependence and intrinsic efficiency of the EBT2 film that need to be considered for measurements using low energy sources.

  15. Measurements of a prototype synchrotron radiation pumped absorber for future light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.S.; Foerster, C.L.; Halama, H.; Lanni, C.

    1988-01-01

    In the new generation of advanced synchrotron light sources, the conventional concept of distributed pumping is no longer suitable for removing the gas load caused by photon stimulated desorption (PSD). A new concept using a combination of photon absorber and pumping station has been designed, constructed, and installed in the U1OB beam line at the VUV ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The system consists of an electrically insulated water cooled copper block, a titanium sublimation pump, calibrated BA gauges, a calibrated RGA, and a known conductance. A photon beam 10 milliradian wide and 3.26 milliradian high, having critical energy of 500 eV, is directed on the absorber. PSD yield is studied as a function of total beam dose and absorber surface preparation. The results from this experiment, pump characteristics, design of an absorber pump for future light sources, and the pressure improvement factors will be presented. 5 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Measured Wavelength-Dependent Absorption Enhancement of Internally Mixed Black Carbon with Absorbing and Nonabsorbing Materials.

    PubMed

    You, Rian; Radney, James G; Zachariah, Michael R; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2016-08-01

    Optical absorption spectra of laboratory generated aerosols consisting of black carbon (BC) internally mixed with nonabsorbing materials (ammonium sulfate, AS, and sodium chloride, NaCl) and BC with a weakly absorbing brown carbon surrogate derived from humic acid (HA) were measured across the visible to near-IR (550 to 840 nm). Spectra were measured in situ using a photoacoustic spectrometer and step-scanning a supercontinuum laser source with a tunable wavelength and bandwidth filter. BC had a mass-specific absorption cross section (MAC) of 7.89 ± 0.25 m(2) g(-1) at λ = 550 nm and an absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) of 1.03 ± 0.09 (2σ). For internally mixed BC, the ratio of BC mass to the total mass of the mixture was chosen as 0.13 to mimic particles observed in the terrestrial atmosphere. The manner in which BC mixed with each material was determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). AS/BC and HA/BC particles were fully internally mixed, and the BC was both internally and externally mixed for NaCl/BC particles. The AS/BC, NaCl/BC, and HA/BC particles had AAEs of 1.43 ± 0.05, 1.34 ± 0.06, and 1.91 ± 0.05, respectively. The observed absorption enhancement of mixed BC relative to the pure BC was wavelength dependent for AS/BC and decreased from 1.5 at λ = 550 nm with increasing wavelength while the NaCl/BC enhancement was essentially wavelength independent. For HA/BC, the enhancement ranged from 2 to 3 and was strongly wavelength dependent. Removal of the HA absorption contribution to enhancement revealed that the enhancement was ≈1.5 and independent of wavelength. PMID:27359341

  17. Specific ultra-violet absorbance as an indicator measurement of merucry sources in an Adirondack River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.; Aiken, George R.; Bradley, Paul M.; Journey, Celeste A.; Schelker, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    The Adirondack region of New York has been identified as a hot spot where high methylmercury concentrations are found in surface waters and biota, yet mercury (Hg) concentrations vary widely in this region. We collected stream and groundwater samples for Hg and organic carbon analyses across the upper Hudson River, a 493 km2 basin in the central Adirondacks to evaluate and model the sources of variation in filtered total Hg (FTHg) concentrations. Variability in FTHg concentrations during the growing seasons (May-Oct) of 2007-2009 in Fishing Brook, a 66-km2 sub-basin, was better explained by specific ultra-violet absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA254), a measure of organic carbon aromaticity, than by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, a commonly used Hg indicator. SUVA254 was a stronger predictor of FTHg concentrations during the growing season than during the dormant season. Multiple linear regression models that included SUVA254 values and DOC concentrations could explain 75 % of the variation in FTHg concentrations on an annual basis and 84 % during the growing season. A multiple linear regression landscape modeling approach applied to 27 synoptic sites across the upper Hudson basin found that higher SUVA254 values are associated with gentler slopes, and greater riparian area, and lower SUVA254 values are associated with an increasing influence of open water. We hypothesize that the strong Hg?SUVA254 relation in this basin reflects distinct patterns of FTHg and SUVA254 that are characteristic of source areas that control the mobilization of Hg to surface waters, and that the seasonal influence of these source areas varies in this heterogeneous basin landscape.

  18. Cultural Value, Measurement and Policy Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Dave

    2015-01-01

    No matter what the national context, the question of how to understand the impact of government programmes, particularly in terms of value for money, has emerged as a complex problem to be solved by social scientific management. This article engages with these trends in two ways. It focuses on the UK to understand how these tools and technologies…

  19. Detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 using immunomagnetic separation and absorbance measurement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongcheng; Li, Yanbin

    2002-11-01

    An assay system for detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was developed based on immunomagnetic separation of the target pathogen from samples and absorbance measurement of p-nitrophenol at 400 nm from p-nitrophenyl phosphate hydrolysis by alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1) on the "sandwich" structure complexes (antibodies coated onto micromagnetic beads--E. coli O157:H7-antibodies conjugated with the enzyme) formed on the microbead surface. The effects of immunoreaction time, phosphate buffer concentration, pH and temperature on the immunomagnetic separation of E. coli O157:H7 from samples were determined and the conditions used for the separation were 1-h reaction time, 1.0 x 10(-2) M PBS, pH 8.0 and 33 degrees C in this system. The effects of MgCl(2) concentration, Tris buffer concentration, pH and temperature on the activity of alkaline phosphatase conjugated on the immuno-"sandwich" structure complexes were investigated after immunomagnetic separation of the target pathogen and the conditions used for the enzymatic amplification were 1.0 x 10(-4) M MgCl(2), 1.0 M Tris buffer, pH 8.0, 28 degrees C and 30-min reaction time during the assay. The selectivity of the system was examined and no interference from the other pathogens including Salmonella typhimurium, Campylobacter jejuni and Listeria monocytogenes was observed. Its working range was from 3.2 x 10(2) to 3.2 x 10(4) CFU/ml, and the relative standard deviation was 2.5-9.9%. The total detection time was less than 2 h.

  20. Quantitative angle-resolved small-spot reflectance measurements on plasmonic perfect absorbers: impedance matching and disorder effects.

    PubMed

    Tittl, Andreas; Harats, Moshe G; Walter, Ramon; Yin, Xinghui; Schäferling, Martin; Liu, Na; Rapaport, Ronen; Giessen, Harald

    2014-10-28

    Plasmonic devices with absorbance close to unity have emerged as essential building blocks for a multitude of technological applications ranging from trace gas detection to infrared imaging. A crucial requirement for such elements is the angle independence of the absorptive performance. In this work, we develop theoretically and verify experimentally a quantitative model for the angular behavior of plasmonic perfect absorber structures based on an optical impedance matching picture. To achieve this, we utilize a simple and elegant k-space measurement technique to record quantitative angle-resolved reflectance measurements on various perfect absorber structures. Particularly, this method allows quantitative reflectance measurements on samples where only small areas have been nanostructured, for example, by electron-beam lithography. Combining these results with extensive numerical modeling, we find that matching of both the real and imaginary parts of the optical impedance is crucial to obtain perfect absorption over a large angular range. Furthermore, we successfully apply our model to the angular dispersion of perfect absorber geometries with disordered plasmonic elements as a favorable alternative to current array-based designs. PMID:25251075

  1. Enhanced Measurements of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) for Water Quality Analysis using a New Simultaneous Absorbance and Fluorescence Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Water quality, with respect to suspended particles and dissolved organic and inorganic compounds, is now recognized as one of the top global environmental concerns. Contemporary research indicates fluorescence spectral analyses coupled with UV-VIS absorbance assays have the potential, especially when combined and coordinated, to facilitate rapid, robust quantification of a wide range of compounds, including interactions among them. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) collected over the UV-VIS region provide a wealth of information on chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). CDOM includes humic and fulvic acid, chlorophyll, petroleum, protein, amino acid, quinone, fertilizer, pesticide, sewage and numerous other compound classes. Analysis of the EEMs using conventional and multivariate techniques, including primarily parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), provides information about many types of CDOM relevant to carbon cycling and pollution of fresh, marine and drinking water sources. Of critical concern also are the CDOM interactions with, and optical activities of, dissolved inorganic compounds. Many of the inorganic compounds and oxygen demand parameters can be analyzed with a wide range of UV-VIS absorbance assays. The instrument is designed and optimized for high UV throughput and low stray light performance. The sampling optics are optimized for both fluorescence and absorbance detection with the same sample. Both EEM and absorbance measurements implement NIST traceable instrument correction and calibration routines. The fluorescence detection utilizes a high dynamic range CCD coupled to a high-resolution spectrograph while absorbance utilizes diode based detection with a high dynamic range and extremely low-stray light specifications. The CDOM analysis is facilitated by a transfer of the data and model information with the PARAFAC routine. The EEM analysis software package facilitates coordinated correction of and correlation with the

  2. Postselected weak measurement beyond the weak value

    SciTech Connect

    Geszti, Tamas

    2010-04-15

    Closed expressions are derived for the quantum measurement statistics of pre- and postselected Gaussian particle beams. The weakness of the preselection step is shown to compete with the nonorthogonality of postselection in a transparent way. The approach is shown to be useful in analyzing postselection-based signal amplification, allowing measurements to be extended far beyond the range of validity of the well-known Aharonov-Albert-Vaidman limit. Additionally, the present treatment connects postselected weak measurement to the topic of phase-contrast microscopy.

  3. Roof Integrated Solar Absorbers: The Measured Performance of ''Invisible'' Solar Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Colon, C. J.; Merrigan, T.

    2001-10-19

    The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), with the support of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has investigated the thermal performance of solar absorbers that are an integral, yet indistinguishable, part of a building's roof. The first roof-integrated solar absorber (RISA) system was retrofitted into FSEC's Flexible Roof Facility in Cocoa, Florida, in September 1998. This ''proof-of-concept'' system uses the asphalt shingle roof surface and the plywood decking under the shingles as an unglazed solar absorber. Data was gathered for a one-year period on the system performance. In Phase 2, two more RISA prototypes were constructed and submitted for testing. The first used the asphalt shingles on the roof surface with the tubing mounted on the underside of the plywood decking. The second prototype used metal roofing panels over a plywood substrate and placed the polymer tubing between the plywood decking and the metal roofing. This paper takes a first look at the thermal performance results for the ''invisible'' solar absorbers that use the actual roof surface of a building for solar heat collection.

  4. Frequency-selective absorbance detection: Refractive index and turbidity compensation with dual-wavelength measurement.

    PubMed

    Eom, In-Yong; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2006-06-15

    A frequency-selective absorbance detection approach and its applications are described. First, a digital signal processor-lock-in amplifier (DSP-LIA)-based absorbance detector was evaluated. Compared to a simple operational amplifier (TL082CP)-based detector, the DSP-LIA-based detector showed lower noise levels, but the relative advantage was reduced under very low photocurrent levels (down to few nA). A 7cm pathlength flow cell with this commercial LIA-based detector exhibited excellent Beer's law linearity (r(2)=0.9999) and a noise level of 7 micro absorbance units (muAU). The limit of detection (LOD, S/N=3) for methyl orange (MO) was 7nM with this detector. Finally, as a more affordable alternative to an LIA, a balanced demodulator integrated circuit chip was used to fabricate a dual wavelength-frequency-selective LED-based absorbance detector. This device successfully compensated refractive index (RI) effect and turbidity effect in test flow systems. The LOD for MO with this system was 8nM.

  5. Valuing compassion through definition and measurement.

    PubMed

    Dewar, Belinda; Pullin, Simon; Tocheris, Ria

    2011-02-01

    The Leadership in Compassionate Care programme aims to embed compassionate care in practice and education. This article describes a project within the programme that explores with staff, patients and families the meaning of compassion and how this can be measured. The project has involved developing practice statements from noticing the aspects of compassionate care that work well. Staff were provided with support to consider, develop and implement actions that would help ensure consistency in developing compassionate care.

  6. Measuring the value of customer retention

    SciTech Connect

    Monts, K.; Bonevac, B.; Lauer, J.; Tessema, D.

    1997-05-01

    Competition will require changes in how market research is conducted and how customers are pursued. The question remains: How does one approach customer retention in a way that provides meaningful guidelines? The conventional wisdom is that {open_quotes}the business of business is selling.{close_quotes} There is some truth to this, but the key question today is: What bearing does this have on how to run a business in a competitive environment? A recent article in the Harvard Business Review noted that, {open_quotes}Increasingly, companies are less focused on selling products and more interested in keeping customers.{close_quotes} Indeed, some observers have posited a natural societal evolutionary trend toward a shift of emphasis toward customer retention vis-a-vis customer acquisition, as a consequence of the primary marketing communication technology shifting from {open_quotes}broadcast{close_quotes} (where messages are sent out to inchoate masses) to {open_quotes}interactive{close_quotes} (where relationships are cultivated with precisely defined market niches or individual customers). The business of growing a business, then, can be framed as a matter of getting customers and keeping them so as to grow the value of the customer base to its fullest potential. In these terms, setting a marketing budget becomes the task of balancing what is spent on customer acquisition with what is spent on retention.

  7. All-fiber wavelength-tunable picosecond nonlinear reflectivity measurement setup for characterization of semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viskontas, K.; Rusteika, N.

    2016-09-01

    Semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) is the key component for many passively mode-locked ultrafast laser sources. Particular set of nonlinear parameters is required to achieve self-starting mode-locking or avoid undesirable q-switch mode-locking for the ultra-short pulse laser. In this paper, we introduce a novel all-fiber wavelength-tunable picosecond pulse duration setup for the measurement of nonlinear properties of saturable absorber mirrors at around 1 μm center wavelength. The main advantage of an all-fiber configuration is the simplicity of measuring the fiber-integrated or fiber-pigtailed saturable absorbers. A tunable picosecond fiber laser enables to investigate the nonlinear parameters at different wavelengths in ultrafast regime. To verify the capability of the setup, nonlinear parameters for different SESAMs with low and high modulation depth were measured. In the operating wavelength range 1020-1074 nm, <1% absolute nonlinear reflectivity accuracy was demonstrated. Achieved fluence range was from 100 nJ/cm2 to 2 mJ/cm2 with corresponding intensity from 10 kW/cm2 to 300 MW/cm2.

  8. Cultural Values Predicting Acculturation Orientations: Operationalizing a Quantitative Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehala, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes that acculturation orientations are related to two sets of cultural values: utilitarianism (Ut) and traditionalism (Tr). While utilitarian values enhance assimilation, traditional values support language and identity maintenance. It is proposed that the propensity to either end of this value opposition can be measured by an…

  9. Thermal Lens Phenomenon Studied by the Z-Scan Technique: Measurement of the Thermal Conductivity of Highly Absorbing Colloidal Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehnem, A. L.; Espinosa, D.; Gonçalves, E. S.; Figueiredo Neto, A. M.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the thermal lens phenomenon in high-absorbing colloidal systems, studied by using the Z-scan technique. The characteristics of the experimental setup to avoid undesirable effects are presented, in particular when pulsed laser beam is used. We show that a cumulative effect may appear in the experiment with chopped laser beams and compromise the results obtained with this technique. This artefact is more significative when colloidal suspensions are investigated. These materials have different characteristic times of heat and mass diffusion, which must be carefully considered to choose the appropriate time interval for the laser pulse and the time between pulses. Two experimental cases with a chopped laser beam, with and without a shutter, are discussed. The sample employed is a magnetic colloidal suspension (a ferrofluid). This sample has magnetic nanoparticles electrically charged in an aqueous solution with free ions and counter ions. Besides the thermal lens effect, charge and mass diffusion may take place when the sample is illuminated by the Gaussian beam, which imposes a thermal gradient on it. The results show that, with the experimental setup without a shutter, the sample does not achieve a complete relaxation between two laser pulses. This generates a measurable cumulative effect after the sample is illuminated during a relatively long period of time. A time modulation with longer time interval between chopped pulses allows the complete relaxation of the sample. This procedure is important for the correct analysis of the thermal lens effect. Reliable values of the thermal conductivity of the sample in different temperatures are obtained and discussed.

  10. Theory, performance, and measured results with an improved absorbed dose water calorimeter. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Domen, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of this calorimeter is mainly the result of the low thermal diffusivity of water that retards a temperature change at a point along a temperature profile. The temperature change is sensed by two calibrated thermistors sandwiched between two polyethylene films that electrically insulate the thermistors from water. The product of the temperature rise and the specific heat of water gives the combined effect of the absorbed dose and any heat defect. Temperature drifts are quickly controlled by making slight changes in electrical power dissipated in the water. Compared to solid-bodied calorimeters requiring vacuum systems, it was easy to construct, to get into operation, and to operate.

  11. Diversifying natural resources value measurements: The Trinity River study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, J.G.; Douglas, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    An interdisciplinary team set out to establish the economic and social values of the Trinity River in northern California. This information was intended to support the Secretary of the Interior's decision on allocation of Trinity River flows. This team set out to measure the values of Trinity River flows, fishery resources, and recreation amenities in several different ways. A survey was mailed to users of the Trinity River. This single instrument included economic measures (willingness-to-pay and costs incurred in visiting) and social-psychological measures (importance, satisfaction, and water allocation preferences). A closely related survey measured several of these same values among west coast regional households. The results of these surveys were compiled, and the measured economic and social values were compared. We found that integrating economic and social value information provides a greater depth of understanding of the resource's value. In addition, this integration provides a more in-depth understanding through the quantitative and qualitative results that emerge.

  12. Development of a method for measuring water absorbency or release of food during mastication.

    PubMed

    Narita, Kazuyoshi; Hayashi, Masahiro; Masunaga, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Water release or absorption of food is related to ease of swallowing for individuals with difficulties in mastication or swallowing. The aim of this study was to establish methods to mechanically measure and predict water releasing or absorptive tendency during mastication. There were ten ingredients used. Six, Japanese radish, carrot, potato, salmon, chicken, and scallops were typically heated. The remaining four, apple, bread, cookies and kamaboko were used as is. Eight grams of water was added to 8 g of the ingredient, which was blended for 1 s in a mixer. After blending, the mixture was centrifuged or compressed using a texture analyzer machine. Ingredients were weighed before and after processing without water, and the percent increase in weight was calculated using the weight of the ingredients. Results demonstrated that three ingredients (Japanese radish, carrot, apple), which have strong tendencies for releasing, showed lower percent increases in weight, while two ingredients (cookies, bread), which have strong tendencies for water absorption, showed higher percent weight increases. The other five ingredients (potato, kamaboko, salmon, chicken, and scallops), which have no water releasing or absorption tendencies, showed mid-value percent increases in weight. The tendencies using all treatment methods were the same as during mastication. The percent increase in weight using two processing methods strongly correlated with increased rates of mastication, and demonstrated uncertainty equal to that of mastication. These methods may be helpful in establishing an index for ease of swallowing for classified diets in patients with dysphagia. PMID:26339565

  13. Developing a Measure of Value in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Ken Lee, K H; Matthew Austin, J; Pronovost, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    There is broad support to pay for value, rather than volume, for health care in the United States. Despite the support, practical approaches for measuring value remain elusive. Value is commonly defined as quality divided by costs, where quality reflects patient outcomes and costs are the total costs for providing care, whether these be costs related to an episode, a diagnosis, or per capita. Academicians have proposed a conceptual approach to measure value, in which we measure outcomes important to patients and costs using time-driven activity-based costing. This approach is conceptually sound, but has significant practical challenges. In our commentary, we describe how health care can use existing quality measures and cost accounting data to measure value. Although not perfect, we believe this approach is practical, valid, and scalable and can establish the foundation for future work in this area. PMID:27325323

  14. Developing a Measure of Value in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Ken Lee, K H; Matthew Austin, J; Pronovost, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    There is broad support to pay for value, rather than volume, for health care in the United States. Despite the support, practical approaches for measuring value remain elusive. Value is commonly defined as quality divided by costs, where quality reflects patient outcomes and costs are the total costs for providing care, whether these be costs related to an episode, a diagnosis, or per capita. Academicians have proposed a conceptual approach to measure value, in which we measure outcomes important to patients and costs using time-driven activity-based costing. This approach is conceptually sound, but has significant practical challenges. In our commentary, we describe how health care can use existing quality measures and cost accounting data to measure value. Although not perfect, we believe this approach is practical, valid, and scalable and can establish the foundation for future work in this area.

  15. Measuring industrial energy efficiency: Physical volume versus economic value

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.L.; Niefer, M.J.; Roop, J.M.

    1996-12-01

    This report examines several different measures of industrial output for use in constructing estimates of industrial energy efficiency and discusses some reasons for differences between the measures. Estimates of volume-based measures of output, as well as 3 value-based measures of output (value of production, value of shipments, and value added), are evaluated for 15 separate 4-digit industries. Volatility, simple growth rate, and trend growth rate estimates are made for each industry and each measure of output. Correlations are made between the volume- and value-based measures of output. Historical energy use data are collected for 5 of the industries for making energy- intensity estimates. Growth rates in energy use, energy intensity, and correlations between volume- and value-based measures of energy intensity are computed. There is large variability in growth trend estimates both long term and from year to year. While there is a high correlation between volume- and value-based measures of output for a few industries, typically the correlation is low, and this is exacerbated for estimates of energy intensity. Analysis revealed reasons for these low correlations. It appears that substantial work must be done before reliable measures of trends in the energy efficiency of industry can be accurately characterized.

  16. Evaluating a novel application of optical fibre evanescent field absorbance: rapid measurement of red colour in winegrape homogenates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lye, Peter G.; Bradbury, Ronald; Lamb, David W.

    Silica optical fibres were used to measure colour (mg anthocyanin/g fresh berry weight) in samples of red wine grape homogenates via optical Fibre Evanescent Field Absorbance (FEFA). Colour measurements from 126 samples of grape homogenate were compared against the standard industry spectrophotometric reference method that involves chemical extraction and subsequent optical absorption measurements of clarified samples at 520 nm. FEFA absorbance on homogenates at 520 nm (FEFA520h) was correlated with the industry reference method measurements of colour (R2 = 0.46, n = 126). Using a simple regression equation colour could be predicted with a standard error of cross-validation (SECV) of 0.21 mg/g, with a range of 0.6 to 2.2 mg anthocyanin/g and a standard deviation of 0.33 mg/g. With a Ratio of Performance Deviation (RPD) of 1.6, the technique when utilizing only a single detection wavelength, is not robust enough to apply in a diagnostic sense, however the results do demonstrate the potential of the FEFA method as a fast and low-cost assay of colour in homogenized samples.

  17. Secondary neutron dose measurement for proton eye treatment using an eye snout with a borated neutron absorber

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We measured and assessed ways to reduce the secondary neutron dose from a system for proton eye treatment. Methods Proton beams of 60.30 MeV were delivered through an eye-treatment snout in passive scattering mode. Allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39) etch detectors were used to measure the neutron dose in the external field at 0.00, 1.64, and 6.00 cm depths in a water phantom. Secondary neutron doses were measured and compared between those with and without a high-hydrogen–boron-containing block. In addition, the neutron energy and vertices distribution were obtained by using a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation. Results The ratio of the maximum neutron dose equivalent to the proton absorbed dose (H(10)/D) at 2.00 cm from the beam field edge was 8.79 ± 1.28 mSv/Gy. The ratio of the neutron dose equivalent to the proton absorbed dose with and without a high hydrogen-boron containing block was 0.63 ± 0.06 to 1.15 ± 0.13 mSv/Gy at 2.00 cm from the edge of the field at depths of 0.00, 1.64, and 6.00 cm. Conclusions We found that the out-of-field secondary neutron dose in proton eye treatment with an eye snout is relatively small, and it can be further reduced by installing a borated neutron absorbing material. PMID:23866307

  18. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF2 etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  19. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shinpei Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-26

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF{sub 2} etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  20. Laser heating of an absorbing and conducting media applied to laser flash property measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gritzo, L.A.; Anderson, E.E.

    1993-12-31

    The laser flash technique is widely used for determining the thermal diffusivity of a sample. In this work, the temperature distribution throughout the sample is investigated, identifying localized, highly-heated regions near the front surface of the sample as a function of: (1) pulse duration, (2) incident beam uniformity, and (3) sample opacity. These high-temperature regions result in an increase in the uncertainty due to temperature-dependent properties, an increase in the heat loss from the sample, and an increased risk of sample damage. The temperature within a semi-transparent media is also investigated in order to establish a regime for which the media can reasonably be considered as opaque. This analysis illustrates that, for same total energy deposition, treatment of the incident energy as a continuous heat source, as opposed to an infinitesimal pulse of energy, results in a factor of 2 increase in the front surface temperature during heating. Also, for the same total energy deposition and approximate beam size, use of a Gaussian intensity distribution increases the front surface temperature during heating by more than a factor of 2 as compared to the use of a uniform temperature distribution. By analyzing the front surface temperature of an absorbing and conducting semi-transparent sample subjected to a Gaussian intensity distribution, it is concluded that the media can be treated as opaque, (i.e. the energy can be applied as a boundary condition) for {var_epsilon} = kd > 50, where k is the extinction coefficient and d is the beam diameter. For materials with a sufficiently small absorption coefficient and thermal diffusivity, a closed-form solution suitable for design use is presented for the front-surface temperature at a location coincident with the beam centerline.

  1. The Valued Living Questionnaire for Alcohol Use: Measuring value-behavior discrepancy in college student drinking.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mary Beth; Meier, Ellen; Lombardi, Nathaniel; Leavens, Eleanor L; Grant, DeMond M; Leffingwell, Thad R

    2016-09-01

    Developing discrepancy between one's values and behaviors is theoretically important in motivating change; however, existing studies lack a validated measure of value-behavior discrepancy for alcohol misuse. The current studies aimed to modify Wilson & DuFrene (2008) Valued Living Questionnaire (VLQ) to assess consistency of alcohol use with important values. In Study 1, the initial factor structure and test-retest reliability of the VLQ for Alcohol Use (VLQ-A) was tested in a sample of college students who regularly drink alcohol (N = 150). Results guided modifications to the measure. In Study 2, the revised measure's factor structure and predictive validity were tested with a second sample of college students who drink alcohol (N = 222). In both studies, exploratory factor analysis supported a unidimensional factor structure. Perceived discrepancy between alcohol use and important values predicted greater readiness to change, while perceived consistency between alcohol use and important values predicted more frequent heavy episodic drinking. Certain values were more useful in predicting outcomes than others. Alcohol use (heavy vs. moderate drinking) did not moderate outcomes. The VLQ-A is a brief and reliable self-report measure of perceived discrepancy between drinking behaviors and important values that may increase readiness to change. Future research examining the generalizability of findings to various samples and the efficacy of the VLQ-A as a supplement to brief interventions is warranted. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27537000

  2. Colloid osmotic pressure: its measurement and clinical value.

    PubMed Central

    Morissette, M. P.

    1977-01-01

    Plasma colloid osmotic pressure (COP) is an important determinant in the appearance of edema. The development of a simple technique for COP measurement, based on an electronic pressure transducer and a semipermeable membrane system, has led to an appreciation of the value of COP determinations in clinical practice. In a steady state the measured COP replicates the value computed from serum proteins. In pathologic sera a derived value is unreliable. The normal human plasma COP averages 25.4 mm Hg. This value tends to decrease with age, is lower in females and is also lower in subjects at bed rest. As a clinical tool COP measurement represents an unduplicated contribution to the differential diagnosis of pulmonary edema. In critically ill patients COP measurement represents a reliable predictor of survival. PMID:851930

  3. Measuring Social Studies Achievement: A Matter of Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Richard J.

    Questions as to whether measurement can provide a universally applicable set of criteria for making value judgments in the social sciences are raised. Four assumptions about education, experience, reality, and value formation were identified to provide a fuller reference point for social science educators when they are viewing current standardized…

  4. Quantitation of absorbed or deposited materials on a substrate that measures energy deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grant, Patrick G.; Bakajin, Olgica; Vogel, John S.; Bench, Graham

    2005-01-18

    This invention provides a system and method for measuring an energy differential that correlates to quantitative measurement of an amount mass of an applied localized material. Such a system and method remains compatible with other methods of analysis, such as, for example, quantitating the elemental or isotopic content, identifying the material, or using the material in biochemical analysis.

  5. Measurement of wavelength-dependent extinction to distinguish between absorbing and nonabsorbing aerosol particulates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portscht, R.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of spectral transmission factors in smoky optical transmission paths reveal a difference between wavelength exponents of the extinction cross section of high absorption capacity and those of low absorption capacity. A theoretical explanation of this behavior is presented. In certain cases, it is possible to obtain data on the absorption index of aerosol particles in the optical path by measuring the spectral decadic extinction coefficient at, at least, two wavelengths. In this manner it is possible, for instance, to distinguish smoke containing soot from water vapor.

  6. Simulation and Measurement of Absorbed Dose from 137 Cs Gammas Using a Si Timepix Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoffle, Nicholas; Pinsky, Lawrence; Empl, Anton; Semones, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The TimePix readout chip is a hybrid pixel detector with over 65k independent pixel elements. Each pixel contains its own circuitry for charge collection, counting logic, and readout. When coupled with a Silicon detector layer, the Timepix chip is capable of measuring the charge, and thus energy, deposited in the Silicon. Measurements using a NIST traceable 137Cs gamma source have been made at Johnson Space Center using such a Si Timepix detector, and this data is compared to simulations of energy deposition in the Si layer carried out using FLUKA.

  7. Factors that introduce intrasubject variability into ear-canal absorbance measurements.

    PubMed

    Voss, Susan E; Stenfelt, Stefan; Neely, Stephen T; Rosowski, John J

    2013-07-01

    Wideband immittance measures can be useful in analyzing acoustic sound flow through the ear and also have diagnostic potential for the identification of conductive hearing loss as well as causes of conductive hearing loss. To interpret individual measurements, the variability in test–retest data must be described and quantified. Contributors to variability in ear-canal absorbance–based measurements are described in this article. These include assumptions related to methodologies and issues related to the probe fit within the ear and potential acoustic leaks. Evidence suggests that variations in ear-canal cross-sectional area or measurement location are small relative to variability within a population. Data are shown to suggest that the determination of the Thévenin equivalent of the ER-10C probe introduces minimal variability and is independent of the foam ear tip itself. It is suggested that acoustic leaks in the coupling of the ear tip to the ear canal lead to substantial variations and that this issue needs further work in terms of potential criteria to identify an acoustic leak. In addition, test–retest data from the literature are reviewed.

  8. Measurement Theory in Deutsch's Algorithm Based on the Truth Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji; Nakamura, Tadao

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new measurement theory, in qubits handling, based on the truth values, i.e., the truth T (1) for true and the falsity F (0) for false. The results of measurement are either 0 or 1. To implement Deutsch's algorithm, we need both observability and controllability of a quantum state. The new measurement theory can satisfy these two. Especially, we systematically describe our assertion based on more mathematical analysis using raw data in a thoughtful experiment.

  9. Redox potential - field measurements - meassured vs. expected values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavělová, Monika; Kovář, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Oxidation and reduction (redox) potential is an important and theoretically very well defined parameter and can be calculated accurately. Its value is determinative for management of many electrochemical processes, chemical redox technologies as well as biotechnologies. To measure the redox value that would correspond with the accuracy level of theoretical calculations in field or operational conditions is however nearly impossible. Redox is in practice measured using combined argentochloride electrode with subsequent value conversion to standard hydrogen electrode (EH). Argentochloride electrode does not allow for precise calibration. Prior to the measurement the accuracy of measurement of particular electrode can only be verified in comparative/control solution with value corresponding with oxic conditions (25°C: +220 mV argentochloride electrode, i.e.. +427 mV after conversion to EH). A commercial product of stabile comparative solution for anoxic conditions is not available and therefore not used in every day practice - accuracy of negative redox is not verified. In this presentation results of two tests will be presented: a) monitoring during dynamic groundwater sampling from eight monitoring wells at a site contaminated by chlorinated ethenes (i.e. post-oxic to anoxic conditions) and b) laboratory test of groundwater contaminated by arsenic from two sites during reaction with highly oxidized compounds of iron (ferrates) - i.e. strongly oxic conditions. In both tests a simultaneous measurement by four argentochloride electrodes was implemented - all four electrodes were prior to the test maintained expertly. The redox values of testing electrodes in a comparative solution varied by max. 6 mV. The redox values measured by four electrodes in both anoxic and oxic variant varied by tens to a hundred mV, while with growing time of test the variance of measured redox values increased in both oxic and anoxic variant. Therefore the interpretation of measured redox

  10. Measuring intestinal fluid transport in vitro: Gravimetric method versus non-absorbable marker.

    PubMed

    Whittamore, Jonathan M; Genz, Janet; Grosell, Martin; Wilson, Rod W

    2016-04-01

    The gut sac is a long-standing, widely used in vitro preparation for studying solute and water transport, and calculation of these fluxes requires an accurate assessment of volume. This is commonly determined gravimetrically by measuring the change in mass over time. While convenient this likely under-estimates actual net water flux (Jv) due to tissue edema. We evaluated whether the popular in vivo volume marker [(14)C]-PEG 4000, offers a more representative measure of Jvin vitro. We directly compared these two methods in five teleost species (toadfish, flounder, rainbow trout, killifish and tilapia). Net fluid absorption by the toadfish intestine based on PEG was significantly higher, by almost 4-fold, compared to gravimetric measurements, compatible with the latter under-estimating Jv. Despite this, PEG proved inconsistent for all of the other species frequently resulting in calculation of net secretion, in contrast to absorption seen gravimetrically. Such poor parallelism could not be explained by the absorption of [(14)C]-PEG (typically <1%). We identified a number of factors impacting the effectiveness of PEG. One was adsorption to the surface of sample tubes. While it was possible to circumvent this using unlabelled PEG 4000, this had a deleterious effect on PEG-based Jv. We also found sequestration of PEG within the intestinal mucus. In conclusion, the short-comings associated with the accurate representation of Jv by gut sac preparations are not overcome by [(14)C]-PEG. The gravimetric method therefore remains the most reliable measure of Jv and we urge caution in the use of PEG as a volume marker. PMID:26794612

  11. [A kind of method for measuring absorbance spectrum with dual beam light and one detector].

    PubMed

    Wen, X; Lin, L; Wu, Y

    1998-10-01

    A kind of method of measuring spectral transmittivity with source compensated is introduced in this paper. It detects simultaneously intensity of source and transmission light with dual light road and one detector by means of the characters of selective frequence amplifing and coherent detection of a lock-in amplifier. The experimental result shows that the method is excellent on overcoming shake of a source and improving signal-to-noise ratio.

  12. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle for simultaneous measurement of positive-operator-valued measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyadera, Takayuki; Imai, Hideki

    2008-11-01

    A limitation on simultaneous measurement of two arbitrary positive-operator-valued measures is discussed. In general, simultaneous measurement of two noncommutative observables is only approximately possible. Following Werner’s formulation, we introduce a distance between observables to quantify an accuracy of measurement. We derive an inequality that relates the achievable accuracy with noncommutativity between two observables. As a byproduct a necessary condition for two positive-operator-valued measures to be simultaneously measurable is obtained.

  13. Measurements of absorbed heat flux and water-side heat transfer coefficient in water wall tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taler, Jan; Taler, Dawid; Kowal, Andrzej

    2011-04-01

    The tubular type instrument (flux tube) was developed to identify boundary conditions in water wall tubes of steam boilers. The meter is constructed from a short length of eccentric tube containing four thermocouples on the fire side below the inner and outer surfaces of the tube. The fifth thermocouple is located at the rear of the tube on the casing side of the water-wall tube. The boundary conditions on the outer and inner surfaces of the water flux-tube are determined based on temperature measurements at the interior locations. Four K-type sheathed thermocouples of 1 mm in diameter, are inserted into holes, which are parallel to the tube axis. The non-linear least squares problem is solved numerically using the Levenberg-Marquardt method. The heat transfer conditions in adjacent boiler tubes have no impact on the temperature distribution in the flux tubes.

  14. A summary of measurements of permittivities and permeabilities of some microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurgeon, W. A.; Elrayess, M.; Dorsey, P.; Vittoria, C.

    1990-05-01

    This report presents results of measurements of permittivities and permeabilities of assorted materials collected by the U.S. Army Office of Low Observables Technology and Applications (LOTA), and by the U.S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory (MTL). The samples fell into the following categories: (1) Pure materials (Teflon, plexiglasses and casting plastic); (2) Metal-coated microspheres; (3) Carbospheres, both uncoated and metal coated; (4) Ferrites; (5) Magnetic metal flake; (6) Ceramic matrix composites; and (7) A standard paint. The data and its limitations and plans for additional testing are presented in the text. The most interesting results were obtained for a Rockwell Ferrite and for a 50/50 ferronickel flake which showed magnetic loss from 2 to 18 GHz.

  15. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  16. Measurement and Simulation of Thermal Conductivity of Hafnium-Aluminum Thermal Neutron Absorber Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillen, Donna Post; Harris, William H.

    2016-09-01

    A metal matrix composite (MMC) material composed of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) intermetallic particles in an aluminum matrix has been identified as a promising material for fast flux irradiation testing applications. This material can filter thermal neutrons while simultaneously providing high rates of conductive cooling for experiment capsules. The purpose of this work is to investigate effects of Hf-Al material composition and neutron irradiation on thermophysical properties, which were measured before and after irradiation. When performing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) on the irradiated specimens, a large exotherm corresponding to material annealment was observed. Therefore, a test procedure was developed to perform DSC and laser flash analysis (LFA) to obtain the specific heat and thermal diffusivity of pre- and post-annealment specimens. This paper presents the thermal properties for three states of the MMC material: (1) unirradiated, (2) as-irradiated, and (3) irradiated and annealed. Microstructure-property relationships were obtained for the thermal conductivity. These relationships are useful for designing components from this material to operate in irradiation environments. The ability of this material to effectively conduct heat as a function of temperature, volume fraction Al3Hf, radiation damage, and annealing is assessed using the MOOSE suite of computational tools.

  17. Recommendations for Evaluating and Selecting Appropriately Valued Outcome Measures.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The changing healthcare environment has essentially mandated that outcome scores play an increasing role in orthopaedic research and clinical care. Value is defined as the best outcome at the lowest cost. The reasoning behind the collection of outcome scores can be examined from several perspectives. The process of selecting an appropriate outcome measure involves analyzing its psychometrics in addition to other aspects, such as responsiveness, reliability, validity, and the ability to detect change in a reasonable manner. A minimal clinically important difference measures clinical change, and a minimal detectable change measures statistical change. Orthopaedic surgeons are most interested in minimal clinically important differences because they indicate meaningful clinical changes. Guidelines for selecting appropriately valued outcome measures include the consideration of patient-reported outcomes, proper psychometrics, validated scores, and cost effectiveness.

  18. Recommendations for Evaluating and Selecting Appropriately Valued Outcome Measures.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    The changing healthcare environment has essentially mandated that outcome scores play an increasing role in orthopaedic research and clinical care. Value is defined as the best outcome at the lowest cost. The reasoning behind the collection of outcome scores can be examined from several perspectives. The process of selecting an appropriate outcome measure involves analyzing its psychometrics in addition to other aspects, such as responsiveness, reliability, validity, and the ability to detect change in a reasonable manner. A minimal clinically important difference measures clinical change, and a minimal detectable change measures statistical change. Orthopaedic surgeons are most interested in minimal clinically important differences because they indicate meaningful clinical changes. Guidelines for selecting appropriately valued outcome measures include the consideration of patient-reported outcomes, proper psychometrics, validated scores, and cost effectiveness. PMID:27049224

  19. The Valued Living Questionnaire: Defining and Measuring Valued Action within a Behavioral Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kelly G.; Sandoz, Emily K.; Kitchens, Jennifer; Roberts, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    A number of cognitive-behavior therapies now strongly emphasize particular behavioral processes as mediators of clinical change specific to that therapy. This shift in emphasis calls for the development of measures sensitive to changes in the therapies' processes. Among these is acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), which posits valued living…

  20. Filter-free integrated sensor array based on luminescence and absorbance measurements using ring-shaped organic photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Abel, Tobias; Sagmeister, Martin; Lamprecht, Bernhard; Kraker, Elke; Köstler, Stefan; Ungerböck, Birgit; Mayr, Torsten

    2012-12-01

    An optical waveguiding sensor array featuring monolithically integrated organic photodiodes as integrated photo-detector, which simplifies the readout system by minimizing the required parts, is presented. The necessity of any optical filters becomes redundant due to the proposed platform geometry, which discriminates between excitation light and sensing signal. The sensor array is capable of measuring luminescence or absorption, and both sensing geometries are based on the identical substrate. It is demonstrated that background light is virtually non-existent. All sensing and waveguide layers, as well as in- and out-coupling elements are assembled by conventional screen-printing techniques. Organic photodiodes are integrated by layer-by-layer vacuum deposition onto glass or common polymer foils. The universal and simple applicability of this sensor chip is demonstrated by sensing schemes for four different analytes. Relative humidity, oxygen, and carbon dioxide are measured in gas phase using luminescence-based sensor schemes; the latter two analytes are also measured by absorbance-based sensor schemes. Furthermore, oxygen and pH in aqueous media were enabled. The consistency of calibration characteristics extending over different sensor chips is verified.

  1. [Measurement of blood pressure variability and the clinical value].

    PubMed

    Kékes, Ede; Kiss, István

    2014-10-19

    Authors have collected and analyzed literature data on blood pressure variability. They present the methods of blood pressure variability measurement, clinical value and relationships with target organ damages and risk of presence of cardiovascular events. They collect data about the prognostic value of blood pressure variability and the effects of different antihypertensive drugs on blood pressure variability. They underline that in addition to reduction of blood pressure to target value, it is essential to influence blood pressure fluctuation and decrease blood pressure variability, because blood pressure fluctuation presents a major threat for the hypertensive subjects. Data from national studies are also presented. They welcome that measurement of blood pressure variability has been included in international guidelines.

  2. How to Use Value-Added Measures Right

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Carlo, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Value-added models are a specific type of "growth model," a diverse group of statistical techniques to isolate a teacher's impact on his or her students' testing progress while controlling for other measurable factors, such as student and school characteristics, that are outside that teacher's control. Opponents, including many teachers, argue…

  3. Measuring and Communicating the Value Created by an Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, W. Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers a different perspective in measuring the value created by an organization. It does so in the context of an undergraduate course in managerial accounting. In order to break down the functional silo approach to problem solving that has become the model of traditional business education, applications of shadow accounting, the…

  4. Measuring the strategic value of information technology investments

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, K.W.

    1994-08-01

    Value is often perceived differently by the proponents of new information technologies and those who allocate resources and define priorities. Such differences often become a roadblock to meeting true business needs. Project justifications regularly rely on calculated cost savings, which rarely measure the full benefit of new technologies. In fact, if cost savings provide a complete picture, then the organization is probably just automating routine clerical operations and has abandoned efforts that would provide significant strategic value. Strategic value is not limited to financial calculations, but includes quality, time and risk criteria. This paper describes approaches for measuring strategic value that can provide organizations with proven techniques to improve performance, reengineer processes, benchmark performance against other suppliers, identify outsourcing opportunities, or defend themselves from pressures to outsource. Many organizations respond to tightening budgets by cutting overhead. These measurement approaches can demonstrate how overhead is critical to organizational effectiveness and how cost savings can be found, instead, by measurably improving performance throughout the organization. Finally, the paper describes efforts underway within the Department of Energy and at the Hanford Site to implement the approaches described in this paper.

  5. Against Journal Articles for Measuring Value in University Output

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mbali, C.

    2010-01-01

    The following lines of arguments against the metrics of journal articles is developed: (1) Textual output should no longer be main valued output; (2) Digitalization enables other ways of advancing knowledge; (3) Measures by journal article favours the disciplines of Natural Science and Engineering (NSE) and moulds other disciplines of Social…

  6. Valuing Informal Care Experience: Does Choice of Measure Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentzakis, Emmanouil; McNamee, Paul; Ryan, Mandy; Sutton, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Well-being equations are often estimated to generate monetary values for non-marketed activities. In such studies, utility is often approximated by either life satisfaction or General Health Questionnaire scores. We estimate and compare monetary valuations of informal care for the first time in the UK employing both measures, using longitudinal…

  7. Bayes' theorem application in the measure information diagnostic value assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzechowski, Piotr D.; Makal, Jaroslaw; Nazarkiewicz, Andrzej

    2006-03-01

    The paper presents Bayesian method application in the measure information diagnostic value assessment that is used in the computer-aided diagnosis system. The computer system described here has been created basing on the Bayesian Network and is used in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) diagnosis. The graphic diagnostic model enables to juxtapose experts' knowledge with data.

  8. A new optical method coupling light polarization and Vis-NIR spectroscopy to improve the measured absorbance signal's quality of soil samples.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobrecht, Alexia; Bendoula, Ryad; Roger, Jean-Michel; Bellon-Maurel, Véronique

    2014-05-01

    Visible - Near-infrared spectroscopy (Vis-NIRS) is now commonly used to measure different physical and chemical parameters of soils, including carbon content. However, prediction model accuracy is insufficient for Vis-NIRS to replace routine laboratory analysis. One of the biggest issues this technique is facing up to is light scattering due to soil particles. It causes departure in the assumed linear relationship between the Absorbance spectrum and the concentration of the chemicals of interest as stated by Beer-Lambert's Law, which underpins the calibration models. Therefore it becomes essential to improve the metrological quality of the measured signal in order to optimize calibration as light/matter interactions are at the basis of the resulting linear modeling. Optics can help to mitigate scattering effect on the signal. We put forward a new optical setup coupling linearly polarized light with a Vis-NIR spectrometer to free the measured spectra from multi-scattering effect. The corrected measured spectrum was then used to compute an Absorbance spectrum of the sample, using Dahm's Equation in the frame of the Representative Layer Theory. This method has been previously tested and validated on liquid (milk+ dye) and powdered (sand + dye) samples showing scattering (and absorbing) properties. The obtained Absorbance was a very good approximation of the Beer-Lambert's law absorbance. Here, we tested the method on a set of 54 soil samples to predict Soil Organic Carbon content. In order to assess the signal quality improvement by this method, we built and compared calibration models using Partial Least Square (PLS) algorithm. The prediction model built from new Absorbance spectrum outperformed the model built with the classical Absorbance traditionally obtained with Vis-NIR diffuse reflectance. This study is a good illustration of the high influence of signal quality on prediction model's performances.

  9. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  10. Ultrasensitive Beam Deflection Measurement via Interferometric Weak Value Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, P. Ben; Starling, David J.; Jordan, Andrew N.; Howell, John C.

    2009-05-01

    We report on the use of an interferometric weak value technique to amplify very small transverse deflections of an optical beam. By entangling the beam's transverse degrees of freedom with the which-path states of a Sagnac interferometer, it is possible to realize an optical amplifier for polarization independent deflections. The theory for the interferometric weak value amplification method is presented along with the experimental results, which are in good agreement. Of particular interest, we measured the angular deflection of a mirror down to 400{+-}200 frad and the linear travel of a piezo actuator down to 14{+-}7 fm.

  11. Accuracy and optimal timing of activity measurements in estimating the absorbed dose of radioiodine in the treatment of Graves' disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, S.; Horowitz, J.; Traino, A. C.; Chipkin, S. R.; Hollot, C. V.; Chait, Y.

    2011-02-01

    Calculation of the therapeutic activity of radioiodine 131I for individualized dosimetry in the treatment of Graves' disease requires an accurate estimate of the thyroid absorbed radiation dose based on a tracer activity administration of 131I. Common approaches (Marinelli-Quimby formula, MIRD algorithm) use, respectively, the effective half-life of radioiodine in the thyroid and the time-integrated activity. Many physicians perform one, two, or at most three tracer dose activity measurements at various times and calculate the required therapeutic activity by ad hoc methods. In this paper, we study the accuracy of estimates of four 'target variables': time-integrated activity coefficient, time of maximum activity, maximum activity, and effective half-life in the gland. Clinical data from 41 patients who underwent 131I therapy for Graves' disease at the University Hospital in Pisa, Italy, are used for analysis. The radioiodine kinetics are described using a nonlinear mixed-effects model. The distributions of the target variables in the patient population are characterized. Using minimum root mean squared error as the criterion, optimal 1-, 2-, and 3-point sampling schedules are determined for estimation of the target variables, and probabilistic bounds are given for the errors under the optimal times. An algorithm is developed for computing the optimal 1-, 2-, and 3-point sampling schedules for the target variables. This algorithm is implemented in a freely available software tool. Taking into consideration 131I effective half-life in the thyroid and measurement noise, the optimal 1-point time for time-integrated activity coefficient is a measurement 1 week following the tracer dose. Additional measurements give only a slight improvement in accuracy.

  12. Notes on the Measurement of pH Values

    SciTech Connect

    Carranza, R M; Rebak, R B

    2005-05-05

    The original definition of pH is: pH = -log a{sub H}. Where a{sub H} is the (relative) hydrogen ion activity. However, a single ion activity cannot be measured. Activities of individual ionic species are necessarily conventional. The pH number, of course, has in itself little absolute significance. As the negative of the logarithm of a product of a concentration (c or m) and an activity coefficient (y or {gamma}), it acquires its magnitude from the numerical scale adopted for the latter. Experimental pH measurements are nonetheless widely applied to the determination of thermodynamic equilibrium data such as pK values, on the assumption that they represent -log a{sub H} (or paH). The single ion activity coefficient approaches unity as the ionic strength goes to zero, so that activity becomes m or c and paH becomes pmH or pcH. pH is therefore defined operationally in terms of the operation or method used to measure it, that is, by means of a cell called an operational cell. The cell is standardized by solutions of assigned pH value (Reference Value pH Standard, Primary pH Standards and Operational Standards). Such standard reference solutions are buffer solutions whose pH values are assigned from measurements on cells with or without liquid junction. It must be emphasized that the definition of pH scale is quite different from the measurement of pH with glass-reference electrode-pH meter assemblies, where several standards are used in order to take into account possible deficiencies in the electrode and meter performance.

  13. Defining and Computing a Valued Based Cyber-Security Measure

    SciTech Connect

    Aissa, Anis Ben; Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Frederick T; Mili, Ali

    2012-01-01

    In earlier work, we presented a value based measure of cybersecurity that quantifies the security of a system in concrete terms, specifically, in terms of how much each system stakeholder stands to lose (in dollars per hour of operation) as a result of security threats and system vulnerabilities; our metric varies according to the stakes that each stakeholder has in meeting each security requirement. In this paper, we discuss the specification and design of a system that collects, updates, and maintains all the information that pertains to estimating our cybersecurity measure, and offers stakeholders quantitative means to make security-related decisions.

  14. Defining and Computing a Value Based Cyber-Security Measure

    SciTech Connect

    Aissa, Anis Ben; Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Frederick T; Mili, Ali

    2011-01-01

    In past work, we presented a value based measure of cybersecurity that quantifies the security of a system in concrete terms, specifically, in terms of how much each system stakeholder stands to lose (in dollars per hour of operation) as a result of security threats and system vulnerabilities\\; our metric varies according to the stakes that each stakeholder has in meeting each security requirement. In this paper we discuss the specification and design of a system that collects, updates and maintains all the information that pertains to estimating our cybersecurity measure, and offers stakeholders quantitative means to make security-related decisions.

  15. Measuring the total value of a river cleanup.

    PubMed

    Alam, M K; Marinova, D

    2003-01-01

    The paper estimates the total value for the community of the cleanup of the Buriganga River. Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh, was developed on the bank of the Buriganga River in the early 1600s. The river is now near dead mainly due to human interventions. The paper develops a hypothetical cleanup programme to improve the water quality, which will help the overall environment in and around the river. The value of this programme is estimated within the framework of total economic value; non-marketed benefits are measured through a contingent valuation survey and marketed benefits are estimated using market and shadow prices. The findings of the survey suggest that not only are a significant proportion of the residents willing to pay for the cleanup programme, but many are also willing to contribute in non-monetary ways (mainly their time). When the latter contribution is monetised, it represents 60% of the total value for the non-marketed benefits. The marketed benefits are estimated to represent 58% of the overall value of the cleanup programme (18.6 million US dollars/year). A failure to account for all benefits could lead to a gross underestimation of the desirability of providing public funding for the cleanup of dying rivers. PMID:14653645

  16. Measuring Nursing Value from the Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M; Harper, Ellen M

    2016-01-01

    We report the findings of a big data nursing value expert group made up of 14 members of the nursing informatics, leadership, academic and research communities within the United States tasked with 1. Defining nursing value, 2. Developing a common data model and metrics for nursing care value, and 3. Developing nursing business intelligence tools using the nursing value data set. This work is a component of the Big Data and Nursing Knowledge Development conference series sponsored by the University Of Minnesota School Of Nursing. The panel met by conference calls for fourteen 1.5 hour sessions for a total of 21 total hours of interaction from August 2014 through May 2015. Primary deliverables from the bit data expert group were: development and publication of definitions and metrics for nursing value; construction of a common data model to extract key data from electronic health records; and measures of nursing costs and finance to provide a basis for developing nursing business intelligence and analysis systems. PMID:27332163

  17. Measurement and global analysis of the absorbance changes in the photocycle of the photoactive yellow protein from Ectothiorhodospira halophila.

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, W D; van Stokkum, I H; van Ramesdonk, H J; van Brederode, M E; Brouwer, A M; Fitch, J C; Meyer, T E; van Grondelle, R; Hellingwerf, K J

    1994-01-01

    The photocycle of the photoactive yellow protein (PYP) from Ectothiorhodospira halophila was examined by time-resolved difference absorption spectroscopy in the wavelength range of 300-600 nm. Both time-gated spectra and single wavelength traces were measured. Global analysis of the data established that in the time domain between 5 ns and 2 s only two intermediates are involved in the room temperature photocycle of PYP, as has been proposed before (Meyer T.E., E. Yakali, M. A. Cusanovich, and G. Tollin. 1987. Biochemistry. 26:418-423; Meyer, T. E., G. Tollin, T. P. Causgrove, P. Cheng, and R. E. Blankenship. 1991. Biophys. J. 59:988-991). The first, red-shifted intermediate decays biexponentially (60% with tau = 0.25 ms and 40% with tau = 1.2 ms) to a blue-shifted intermediate. The last step of the photocycle is the biexponential (93% with tau = 0.15 s and 7% with tau = 2.0 s) recovery to the ground state of the protein. Reconstruction of the absolute spectra of these photointermediates yielded absorbance maxima of about 465 and 355 nm for the red- and blue-shifted intermediate with an epsilon max at about 50% and 40% relative to the epsilon max of the ground state. The quantitative analysis of the photocycle in PYP described here paves the way to a detailed biophysical analysis of the processes occurring in this photoreceptor molecule. PMID:7819501

  18. A graphite calorimeter for absolute measurements of absorbed dose to water: application in medium-energy x-ray filtered beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, M.; Pimpinella, M.; Quini, M.; D'Arienzo, M.; Astefanoaei, I.; Loreti, S.; Guerra, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    The Italian National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology (ENEA-INMRI) has designed and built a graphite calorimeter that, in a water phantom, has allowed the determination of the absorbed dose to water in medium-energy x-rays with generating voltages from 180 to 250 kV. The new standard is a miniaturized three-bodies calorimeter, with a disc-shaped core of 21 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness weighing 1.134 g, sealed in a PMMA waterproof envelope with air-evacuated gaps. The measured absorbed dose to graphite is converted into absorbed dose to water by means of an energy-dependent conversion factor obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. Heat-transfer correction factors were determined by FEM calculations. At a source-to-detector distance of 100 cm, a depth in water of 2 g cm-2, and at a dose rate of about 0.15 Gy min-1, results of calorimetric measurements of absorbed dose to water, D w, were compared to experimental determinations, D wK, obtained via an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of air kerma, according to established dosimetry protocols. The combined standard uncertainty of D w and D wK were estimated as 1.9% and 1.7%, respectively. The two absorbed dose to water determinations were in agreement within 1%, well below the stated measurement uncertainties. Advancements are in progress to extend the measurement capability of the new in-water-phantom graphite calorimeter to other filtered medium-energy x-ray qualities and to reduce the D w uncertainty to around 1%. The new calorimeter represents the first implementation of in-water-phantom graphite calorimetry in the kilovoltage range and, allowing independent determinations of D w, it will contribute to establish a robust system of absorbed dose to water primary standards for medium-energy x-ray beams.

  19. Preprocessing and parameterizing bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements by singular value decomposition.

    PubMed

    Nejadgholi, Isar; Caytak, Herschel; Bolic, Miodrag; Batkin, Izmail; Shirmohammadi, Shervin

    2015-05-01

    In several applications of bioimpedance spectroscopy, the measured spectrum is parameterized by being fitted into the Cole equation. However, the extracted Cole parameters seem to be inconsistent from one measurement session to another, which leads to a high standard deviation of extracted parameters. This inconsistency is modeled with a source of random variations added to the voltage measurement carried out in the time domain. These random variations may originate from biological variations that are irrelevant to the evidence that we are investigating. Yet, they affect the voltage measured by using a bioimpedance device based on which magnitude and phase of impedance are calculated.By means of simulated data, we showed that Cole parameters are highly affected by this type of variation. We further showed that singular value decomposition (SVD) is an effective tool for parameterizing bioimpedance measurements, which results in more consistent parameters than Cole parameters. We propose to apply SVD as a preprocessing method to reconstruct denoised bioimpedance measurements. In order to evaluate the method, we calculated the relative difference between parameters extracted from noisy and clean simulated bioimpedance spectra. Both mean and standard deviation of this relative difference are shown to effectively decrease when Cole parameters are extracted from preprocessed data in comparison to being extracted from raw measurements.We evaluated the performance of the proposed method in distinguishing three arm positions, for a set of experiments including eight subjects. It is shown that Cole parameters of different positions are not distinguishable when extracted from raw measurements. However, one arm position can be distinguished based on SVD scores. Moreover, all three positions are shown to be distinguished by two parameters, R0/R∞ and Fc, when Cole parameters are extracted from preprocessed measurements. These results suggest that SVD could be considered as an

  20. SU-E-T-516: Measurement of the Absorbed Dose Rate in Water Under Reference Conditions in a CyberKnife Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon-Martinez, N; Hernandez-Guzman, A; Gomez-Munoz, A; Massillon-JL, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to measure the absorbed-dose-rate in a CyberKnife unit reference-field (6cm diameter) using three ionization chambers (IC) following the new IAEA/AAPM formalism and Gafchromic film (MD-V3-55 and EBT3) protocol according to our work reported previously. Methods: The absorbed-dose-rates were measured at 90cm and 70cm SSD in a 10cmx10cm field and at 70cm SSD in a 5.4cmx5.4cm equivalent to 6cm diameter field using a linac Varian iX. All measurements were performed at 10cm depth in water. The correction factors that account for the difference between the IC response on the reference field and the CyberKnife reference field, k-(Q-msr,Q)^(f-msr,f-ref), were evaluated and Gafchromic film were calibrated using the results obtained above. Under the CyberKnife reference conditions, the factors were used to measure the absorbed-dose-rate with IC according to the new formalism and the calibrated film was irradiated in water. The film calibration curve was used to evaluate the absorbed-dose-rate in the CyberKnife unit. Results: Difference up to 2.56% is observed between dose-rate measured with IC in the reference 10cmx10cm field, depending where the chamber was calibrated, which was not reflected in the correction factor k-(Q-msr,Q)^(f-msr,f-ref ) where variations of ~0.15%-0.5% were obtained. Within measurements uncertainties, maximum difference of 1.8% on the absorbed-dose-rate in the CyberKnife reference field is observed between all IC and the films Conclusion: Absorbed-dose-rate to water was measured in a CyberKnife reference field with acceptable accuracy (combined uncertainties ~1.32%-1.73%, k=1) using three IC and films. The MD-V3-55 film as well as the new IAEA/AAPM formalism can be considered as a suitable dosimetric method to measure absorbed-dose-rate to water in small and non-standard CyberKnife fields used in clinical treatments However, the EBT3 film is not appropriated due to the high uncertainty provided (combined uncertainty ~9%, k=1

  1. Ultra-low Q values for neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Joachim; Merle, Alexander; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.

    2009-11-01

    We investigate weak nuclear decays with extremely small kinetic energy release (Q value) and thus extremely good sensitivity to the absolute neutrino mass scale. In particular, we consider decays into excited daughter states, and we show that partial ionization of the parent atom can help to tune Q values to << 1 keV. We discuss several candidate isotopes undergoing {beta}{sup {+-}}, bound state {beta}, or electron capture decay, and come to the conclusion that a neutrino mass measurement using low-Q decays might only be feasible if no ionization is required, and if future improvements in isotope production technology, nuclear mass spectroscopy, and atomic structure calculations are possible. Experiments using ions, however, are extremely challenging due to the large number of ions that must be stored. New precision data on nuclear excitation levels could help to identify further isotopes with low-Q decay modes and possibly less challenging requirements.

  2. Ion chamber absorbed dose calibration coefficients, N{sub D,w}, measured at ADCLs: Distribution analysis and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B. R.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To analyze absorbed dose calibration coefficients, N{sub D,w}, measured at accredited dosimetry calibration laboratories (ADCLs) for client ionization chambers to study (i) variability among N{sub D,w} coefficients for chambers of the same type calibrated at each ADCL to investigate ion chamber volume fluctuations and chamber manufacturing tolerances; (ii) equivalency of ion chamber calibration coefficients measured at different ADCLs by intercomparing N{sub D,w} coefficients for chambers of the same type; and (iii) the long-term stability of N{sub D,w} coefficients for different chamber types by investigating repeated chamber calibrations. Methods: Large samples of N{sub D,w} coefficients for several chamber types measured over the time period between 1998 and 2014 were obtained from the three ADCLs operating in the United States. These are analyzed using various graphical and numerical statistical tests for the four chamber types with the largest samples of calibration coefficients to investigate (i) and (ii) above. Ratios of calibration coefficients for the same chamber, typically obtained two years apart, are calculated to investigate (iii) above and chambers with standard deviations of old/new ratios less than 0.3% meet stability requirements for accurate reference dosimetry recommended in dosimetry protocols. Results: It is found that N{sub D,w} coefficients for a given chamber type compared among different ADCLs may arise from differing probability distributions potentially due to slight differences in calibration procedures and/or the transfer of the primary standard. However, average N{sub D,w} coefficients from different ADCLs for given chamber types are very close with percent differences generally less than 0.2% for Farmer-type chambers and are well within reported uncertainties. Conclusions: The close agreement among calibrations performed at different ADCLs reaffirms the Calibration Laboratory Accreditation Subcommittee process of ensuring

  3. Measure Your Gradient”: A New Way to Measure Gradients in High Performance Liquid Chromatography by Mass Spectrometric or Absorbance Detection

    PubMed Central

    Magee, Megan H.; Manulik, Joseph C.; Barnes, Brian B.; Abate-Pella, Daniel; Hewitt, Joshua T.; Boswell, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    The gradient produced by an HPLC is never the same as the one it is programmed to produce, but non-idealities in the gradient can be taken into account if they are measured. Such measurements are routine, yet only one general approach has been described to make them: both HPLC solvents are replaced with water, solvent B is spiked with 0.1% acetone, and the gradient is measured by UV absorbance. Despite the widespread use of this procedure, we found a number of problems and complications with it, mostly stemming from the fact that it measures the gradient under abnormal conditions (e.g. both solvents are water). It is also generally not amenable to MS detection, leaving those with only an MS detector no way to accurately measure their gradients. We describe a new approach called “Measure Your Gradient” that potentially solves these problems. One runs a test mixture containing 20 standards on a standard stationary phase and enters their gradient retention times into open-source software available at www.measureyourgradient.org. The software uses the retention times to back-calculate the gradient that was truly produced by the HPLC. Here we present a preliminary investigation of the new approach. We found that gradients measured this way are comparable to those measured by a more accurate, albeit impractical, version of the conventional approach. The new procedure worked with different gradients, flow rates, column lengths, inner diameters, on two different HPLCs, and with six different batches of the standard stationary phase. PMID:25441073

  4. Defining and Computing a Valued Based Cyber Security Measure

    SciTech Connect

    Aissa, Anis Ben; Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Frederick T; Mili, Ali

    2011-01-01

    In earlier works (Ben-Aissa et al. 2010; Abercrombie et al. 2008; Sheldon et al. 2009), we presented a value based measure of cybersecurity that quantifies the security of a system in concrete terms, specifically, in terms of how much each system stakeholder stands to lose (in dollars per hour of operation) as a result of security threats and system vulnerabilities; our metric varies according to the stakes that each stakeholder has in meeting each security requirement. In this paper, we discuss the specification and design of a system that collects, updates, and maintains all the information that pertains to estimating our cybersecurity measure, and offers stakeholders quantitative means to make security-related decisions.

  5. Measuring energy efficiency in economics: Shadow value approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademvatani, Asgar

    For decades, academic scholars and policy makers have commonly applied a simple average measure, energy intensity, for studying energy efficiency. In contrast, we introduce a distinctive marginal measure called energy shadow value (SV) for modeling energy efficiency drawn on economic theory. This thesis demonstrates energy SV advantages, conceptually and empirically, over the average measure recognizing marginal technical energy efficiency and unveiling allocative energy efficiency (energy SV to energy price). Using a dual profit function, the study illustrates how treating energy as quasi-fixed factor called quasi-fixed approach offers modeling advantages and is appropriate in developing an explicit model for energy efficiency. We address fallacies and misleading results using average measure and demonstrate energy SV advantage in inter- and intra-country energy efficiency comparison. Energy efficiency dynamics and determination of efficient allocation of energy use are shown through factors impacting energy SV: capital, technology, and environmental obligations. To validate the energy SV, we applied a dual restricted cost model using KLEM dataset for the 35 US sectors stretching from 1958 to 2000 and selected a sample of the four sectors. Following the empirical results, predicted wedges between energy price and the SV growth indicate a misallocation of energy use in stone, clay and glass (SCG) and communications (Com) sectors with more evidence in the SCG compared to the Com sector, showing overshoot in energy use relative to optimal paths and cost increases from sub-optimal energy use. The results show that energy productivity is a measure of technical efficiency and is void of information on the economic efficiency of energy use. Decomposing energy SV reveals that energy, capital and technology played key roles in energy SV increases helping to consider and analyze policy implications of energy efficiency improvement. Applying the marginal measure, we also

  6. Spectral dilation of L(B,H)-valued measures and its application to stationary dilation for Banach space valued processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miamee, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    Let B be a Banach space and H and K two Hilbert spaces. The spectral dilation of L(B,H)-valued measures is studied and it is shown that the recent results of Makagon and Salehi (1986) and Rosenberg (1982) on the dilation of L(K,H)-valued measures can be extended to hold for the general Banach space setting of L(B,H)-valued measures. These L(B,H)-valued measures are closely connected to the Banach space valued processes. This connection is recalled and as application of spectral dilation of L(B,H)-valued measures the well known stationary dilation results for scalar valued processes is extended to the case of Banach space valued processes.

  7. Reference Values for Body Composition and Anthropometric Measurements in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Diana A.; Dawson, John A.; Matias, Catarina N.; Rocha, Paulo M.; Minderico, Cláudia S.; Allison, David B.; Sardinha, Luís B.; Silva, Analiza M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the importance of body composition in athletes, reference sex- and sport-specific body composition data are lacking. We aim to develop reference values for body composition and anthropometric measurements in athletes. Methods Body weight and height were measured in 898 athletes (264 female, 634 male), anthropometric variables were assessed in 798 athletes (240 female and 558 male), and in 481 athletes (142 female and 339 male) with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). A total of 21 different sports were represented. Reference percentiles (5th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 95th) were calculated for each measured value, stratified by sex and sport. Because sample sizes within a sport were often very low for some outcomes, the percentiles were estimated using a parametric, empirical Bayesian framework that allowed sharing information across sports. Results We derived sex- and sport-specific reference percentiles for the following DXA outcomes: total (whole body scan) and regional (subtotal, trunk, and appendicular) bone mineral content, bone mineral density, absolute and percentage fat mass, fat-free mass, and lean soft tissue. Additionally, we derived reference percentiles for height-normalized indexes by dividing fat mass, fat-free mass, and appendicular lean soft tissue by height squared. We also derived sex- and sport-specific reference percentiles for the following anthropometry outcomes: weight, height, body mass index, sum of skinfold thicknesses (7 skinfolds, appendicular skinfolds, trunk skinfolds, arm skinfolds, and leg skinfolds), circumferences (hip, arm, midthigh, calf, and abdominal circumferences), and muscle circumferences (arm, thigh, and calf muscle circumferences). Conclusions These reference percentiles will be a helpful tool for sports professionals, in both clinical and field settings, for body composition assessment in athletes. PMID:24830292

  8. Measurement of /sup 2/H/sub 2/O by IR absorbance in doubly labeled H/sub 2/O studies of energy expenditure

    SciTech Connect

    Karasov, W.H.; Han, L.R.; Munger, J.C.

    1988-07-01

    The energy expenditure of animals in their natural surroundings can be determined by measuring the turnover in body water of isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen. We evaluated the use of infrared spectrophotometry for measuring /sup 2/H/sub 2/O in small (20-microliters) water samples also labeled with 18O. For /sup 2/H/sub 2/O over the enrichment range of 0.1-1 atom%, there was a linear relationship between infrared absorbance and /sup 2/H/sub 2/O enrichment. /sup 2/H/sub 2/O enrichments could be measured with a precision and accuracy of less than or equal to 1%, using this relationship. The presence of /sup 18/O in water samples in enrichments of up to 1 atom% had no significant effect on measurement of /sup 2/H/sub 2/O by infrared absorbance. We measured the simultaneous turnover rates of /sup 2/H/sub 2/O and /sup 3/H in mice and turtles also labeled with 18O. Our results validated the use of infrared absorbance in doubly labeled water measures of energy expenditure and indicated that the fractionation factors in vivo for /sup 2/H/sub 2/O and /sup 3/H do not differ.

  9. Liquid Cryogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Baynham, D.E.; Bish, P.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Cummings, M.A.; Green,M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivaniouchenkov, I.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.Q.; Zisman, M.S.

    2005-08-20

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will test ionization cooling of muons. In order to have effective ionization cooling, one must use an absorber that is made from a low-z material. The most effective low z materials for ionization cooling are hydrogen, helium, lithium hydride, lithium and beryllium, in that order. In order to measure the effect of material on cooling, several absorber materials must be used. This report describes a liquid-hydrogen absorber that is within a pair of superconducting focusing solenoids. The absorber must also be suitable for use with liquid helium. The following absorber components are discussed in this report; the absorber body, its heat exchanger, the hydrogen system, and the hydrogen safety. Absorber cooling and the thin windows are not discussed here.

  10. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  11. Fractional absorption of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa) and calcium carbonate measured by a dual stable-isotope method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the use of stable isotopes, this study aimed to compare the bioavailability of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa), obtained from oyster shell powder heated to a high temperature, with an additional heated seaweed component (Heated Algal Ingredient, HAI), with that of calcium carbonate. In ...

  12. Measurement of the light absorbing properties of diesel exhaust particles using a three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuesong; Nakayama, Tomoki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Inomata, Satoshi; Tonokura, Kenichi; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2014-09-01

    Diesel-exhaust particles (DEP) are one of the main anthropogenic sources of black carbon (BC) and organic matter (OM). Understanding the optical properties of DEP, including the enhancement of light absorption by BC due to coating and light absorption by OM, is important for evaluating the climate impact of DEP. In this study, a three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (405, 532, and 781 nm) was used to investigate the wavelength-dependent optical properties of DEP emitted from a diesel engine vehicle running on a chassis dynamometer in transient driving mode (JE-05) and at a constant speed (either idling or driving at 70 km/h). Optical properties were measured after passing the diluted exhaust through a heater, set at 20, 47, or 300 °C (transient driving mode) or between 20 and 400 °C (constant driving mode). The OM accounted for, on average, ∼40 and ∼35% of the total mass concentration of DEP during the transient and constant driving modes, respectively. In transient driving mode, enhancements of scattering coefficients at 20 and 47 °C, and of the mass concentration of organics, were observed during the high-speed driving period (∼80 km/h) corresponding to driving on a highway. No difference was observed in the absorption coefficients between heated and unheated particles at 781 nm for either the transient (including the high-speed driving period) or constant driving modes. These results indicate a lack of enhancement due to the lensing effect, possibly because the BC was mainly mixed externally with the OM or because it was located at the edges of particles under these experimental conditions. Contributions to total light absorption at 405 nm by the OM were estimated by comparing the wavelength dependence of the absorption coefficients with and without heating. A significant contribution by light-absorbing OM (20 ± 7%) to total light absorption at 405 nm was observed during the high-speed driving period of the JE-05 mode, while the

  13. Combining linear polarization spectroscopy and the Representative Layer Theory to measure the Beer-Lambert law absorbance of highly scattering materials.

    PubMed

    Gobrecht, Alexia; Bendoula, Ryad; Roger, Jean-Michel; Bellon-Maurel, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Visible and Near Infrared (Vis-NIR) Spectroscopy is a powerful non destructive analytical method used to analyze major compounds in bulk materials and products and requiring no sample preparation. It is widely used in routine analysis and also in-line in industries, in-vivo with biomedical applications or in-field for agricultural and environmental applications. However, highly scattering samples subvert Beer-Lambert law's linear relationship between spectral absorbance and the concentrations. Instead of spectral pre-processing, which is commonly used by Vis-NIR spectroscopists to mitigate the scattering effect, we put forward an optical method, based on Polarized Light Spectroscopy to improve the absorbance signal measurement on highly scattering samples. This method selects part of the signal which is less impacted by scattering. The resulted signal is combined in the Absorption/Remission function defined in Dahm's Representative Layer Theory to compute an absorbance signal fulfilling Beer-Lambert's law, i.e. being linearly related to concentration of the chemicals composing the sample. The underpinning theories have been experimentally evaluated on scattering samples in liquid form and in powdered form. The method produced more accurate spectra and the Pearson's coefficient assessing the linearity between the absorbance spectra and the concentration of the added dye improved from 0.94 to 0.99 for liquid samples and 0.84-0.97 for powdered samples. PMID:25467494

  14. Combining linear polarization spectroscopy and the Representative Layer Theory to measure the Beer-Lambert law absorbance of highly scattering materials.

    PubMed

    Gobrecht, Alexia; Bendoula, Ryad; Roger, Jean-Michel; Bellon-Maurel, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Visible and Near Infrared (Vis-NIR) Spectroscopy is a powerful non destructive analytical method used to analyze major compounds in bulk materials and products and requiring no sample preparation. It is widely used in routine analysis and also in-line in industries, in-vivo with biomedical applications or in-field for agricultural and environmental applications. However, highly scattering samples subvert Beer-Lambert law's linear relationship between spectral absorbance and the concentrations. Instead of spectral pre-processing, which is commonly used by Vis-NIR spectroscopists to mitigate the scattering effect, we put forward an optical method, based on Polarized Light Spectroscopy to improve the absorbance signal measurement on highly scattering samples. This method selects part of the signal which is less impacted by scattering. The resulted signal is combined in the Absorption/Remission function defined in Dahm's Representative Layer Theory to compute an absorbance signal fulfilling Beer-Lambert's law, i.e. being linearly related to concentration of the chemicals composing the sample. The underpinning theories have been experimentally evaluated on scattering samples in liquid form and in powdered form. The method produced more accurate spectra and the Pearson's coefficient assessing the linearity between the absorbance spectra and the concentration of the added dye improved from 0.94 to 0.99 for liquid samples and 0.84-0.97 for powdered samples.

  15. Arthrometric Measurement of Ankle-Complex Motion: Normative Values

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Neil A.; Kovaleski, John E.; Heitman, Robert J.; Gurchiek, Larry R.; Gubler-Hanna, Coral

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Context: Valid and reliable measurements of ankle-complex motion have been reported using the Hollis Ankle Arthrometer. No published normative data of ankle-complex motion obtained from ankle arthrometry are available for use as a reference for clinical decision making. Objective: To describe the distribution variables of ankle-complex motion in uninjured ankles and to establish normative reference values for use in research and to assist in clinical decision making. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Both ankles of 50 men and 50 women (age = 21.78 ± 2.0 years [range, 19–25 years]) were tested. Intervention(s): Each ankle underwent anteroposterior (AP) and inversion-eversion (I-E) loading using an ankle arthrometer. Main Outcome Measure(s): Recorded anterior, posterior, and total AP displacement (millimeters) at 125 N and inversion, eversion, and total I-E rotation (degrees) at 4 Nm. Results: Women had greater ankle-complex motion for all variables except for posterior displacement. Total AP displacement of the ankle complex was 18.79 ± 4.1 mm for women and 16.70 ± 4.8 mm for men (U = 3742.5, P < .01). Total I-E rotation of the ankle complex was 42.10° ± 9.0° for women and 34.13° ± 10.1° for men (U = 2807, P < .001). All variables were normally distributed except for anterior displacement, inversion rotation, eversion rotation, and total I-E rotation in the women's ankles and eversion rotation in the men's ankles; these variables were skewed positively. Conclusions: Our study increases the available database on ankle-complex motion, and it forms the basis of norm-referenced clinical comparisons and the basis on which quantitative definitions of ankle pathologic conditions can be developed. PMID:21391797

  16. Surface Modification of Polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Thin-Film Solar Cell Absorber Surfaces for PEEM Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wilks, R. G.; Contreras, M. A.; Lehmann, S.; Herrero-Albillos, J.; Bismaths, L. T.; Kronast, F.; Noufi, R.; Bar, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a thorough examination of the {micro}m-scale topography of Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2} ('CIGSe') thin-film solar cell absorbers using different microscopy techniques. We specifically focus on the efficacy of preparing smooth sample surfaces - by etching in aqueous bromine solution - for a spatially resolved study of their chemical and electronic structures using photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM). The etching procedure is shown to reduce the CIGSe surface roughness from ca. 40 to 25 nm after 40s etching, resulting in an increase in the quality of the obtained PEEM images. Furthermore we find that the average observed grain size at the etched surfaces appears larger than at the unetched surfaces. Using a liftoff procedure, it is additionally shown that the backside of the absorber is flat but finely patterned, likely due to being grown on the finely-structured Mo back contact.

  17. The effect of multiple scattering on radiative transmission measurements in a two-dimensional absorbing-scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, W. W.; Dunaway, W.

    1985-06-01

    A successive approximation procedure is developed to determine the scattering correction to the Beer-Lambert law in the evaluation of geometric mean transmittance in a general multi-dimensional absorbing and scattering medium. At each step of the approximation, the evaluation of an upper and lower bound of the scattering correction requires only a single integral over the volume of the scattering medium. This represents a great reduction in mathematical complexity compared to the direct numerical approach. First-order results for a two-dimensional rectangular absorbing and scattering medium are presented. They are shown to be quite accurate in the optically thin limit and useful for engineering application for media with arbitrary optical thickness. Some interesting conclusions concerning the qualitative physical behavior of the scattering correction are also generated.

  18. Dobson spectrophotometer total ozone measurement errors caused by interfering absorbing species such as SO2, NO2, and photochemically produced O3 in polluted air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komhyr, W. D.; Evans, R. D.

    1980-02-01

    Total ozone measurements made with Dobson spectrophotometers in polluted air are subject to errors caused by interfering trace gas species that absorb solar ultraviolet radiation. While such interference is probably non-existent or small at the majority of Dobson instrument stations throughout the world, errors of up to 25% and 5%, resulting from absorption by SO2 and NO2 respectively, may occur occasionally at a few stations located in extremely polluted atmospheres. Interference by other absorbers, including N2O5, H2O2, HNO3, acetyldehyde, acetone, and acrolein has been found to be negligible. Ozone produced photochemically in polluted near-surface air may occasionally constitute from 5% to 10% of the atmospheric total ozone column. Such ozone interferes with measurements of atmospheric background total ozone.

  19. A graphite calorimeter for absolute measurements of absorbed dose to water: application in medium-energy x-ray filtered beams.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M; Pimpinella, M; Quini, M; D'Arienzo, M; Astefanoaei, I; Loreti, S; Guerra, A S

    2016-02-21

    The Italian National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology (ENEA-INMRI) has designed and built a graphite calorimeter that, in a water phantom, has allowed the determination of the absorbed dose to water in medium-energy x-rays with generating voltages from 180 to 250 kV. The new standard is a miniaturized three-bodies calorimeter, with a disc-shaped core of 21 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness weighing 1.134 g, sealed in a PMMA waterproof envelope with air-evacuated gaps. The measured absorbed dose to graphite is converted into absorbed dose to water by means of an energy-dependent conversion factor obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. Heat-transfer correction factors were determined by FEM calculations. At a source-to-detector distance of 100 cm, a depth in water of 2 g cm(-2), and at a dose rate of about 0.15 Gy min(-1), results of calorimetric measurements of absorbed dose to water, D(w), were compared to experimental determinations, D wK, obtained via an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of air kerma, according to established dosimetry protocols. The combined standard uncertainty of D(w) and D(wK) were estimated as 1.9% and 1.7%, respectively. The two absorbed dose to water determinations were in agreement within 1%, well below the stated measurement uncertainties. Advancements are in progress to extend the measurement capability of the new in-water-phantom graphite calorimeter to other filtered medium-energy x-ray qualities and to reduce the D(w) uncertainty to around 1%. The new calorimeter represents the first implementation of in-water-phantom graphite calorimetry in the kilovoltage range and, allowing independent determinations of D(w), it will contribute to establish a robust system of absorbed dose to water primary standards for medium-energy x-ray beams. PMID:26841127

  20. Fluorescence monitor method for measuring effective absorption coefficients of molecular rovibronic transitions using tunable dye laser excitation: The case of absorber linewidth narrower than the laser linewidth applied to H/sub 2/CO

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, P.W.; Garland, N.L.; Howard, W.E. III; Lee, E.K.C.

    1980-10-01

    A technique for measuring ''effective'' absorption coefficients is described. It circumvents deviations from Beer's law caused when the excitation source bandwidth is larger than the absorber bandwidth. The technique employs a fluorescence cell placed after an absorption cell to selectively monitor absorption in the center region of the source line. Model calculations relating the fluorescence intensity to source and absorber line shapes indicate that this method should yield linear Beer's law plots for moderate values of k/sub 0/Nl and ..cap alpha.., where ..cap alpha.. is the ratio of the source bandwidth to the absorber bandwidth. This technique has been applied to a number of single rotational levels in the 4/sup 1//sub 0/ transition of the H/sub 2/CO A /sup 1/A/sub 2/reverse arrowX /sup 1/A/sub 1/ system using pulsed, tunable dye laser excitation. The effective absorption coefficients determined experimentally have been compared to the theoretically calculated absorption coefficients.

  1. Mixing states of light-absorbing particles measured using a transmission electron microscope and a single-particle soot photometer in Tokyo, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Kouji; Moteki, Nobuhiro; Kondo, Yutaka; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2016-08-01

    Light-absorbing atmospheric aerosols such as carbonaceous particles influence the climate through absorbing sunlight. The mixing states of these aerosol particles affect their optical properties. This study examines the changes in the mixing states and abundance of strongly light absorbing carbonaceous particles by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and single-particle soot photometer (SP2), as well as of iron oxide particles, in Tokyo, Japan. TEM and SP2 use fundamentally different detection techniques for the same light-absorbing particles. TEM allows characterization of the morphological, chemical, and structural features of individual particles, whereas SP2 optically measures the number, size, and mixing states of black carbon (BC). A comparison of the results obtained using these two techniques indicates that the peaks of high soot (nanosphere soot (ns-soot)) concentration periods agree with those of the BC concentrations determined by SP2 and that the high Fe-bearing particle fraction periods measured by TEM agree with that of high number concentrations of iron oxide particles measured using SP2 during the first half of the observation campaign. The results also show that the changes in the ns-soot/BC mixing states primarily correlate with the air mass sources, wind speed, precipitation, and photochemical processes. Nano-sized, aggregated, iron oxide particles mixed with other particles were commonly observed by using TEM during the high iron oxide particle periods. We conclude that although further quantitative comparison between TEM and SP2 data will be needed, the morphologically and optically defined ns-soot and BC, respectively, are essentially the same substance and that their mixing states are generally consistent across the techniques.

  2. The Measurement of Values: Behavioral Science and Philosophical Approaches. Modern Concepts of Philosophy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handy, Rollo

    The work of behavioral scientists and philosophers on value measurement is discussed, including a review of issues, controversies, and several attempts to measure values. The author points out vast disagreement in existing literature about value measurement, definitions of measurement and values in general, and the meaning of the scientific…

  3. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshida, M.; Green, Michael A.; Kuno, Y.; Lau, Wing

    2010-05-30

    Liquid hydrogen absorbers for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) have been developed, and the first absorber has been tested at KEK. In the preliminary test at KEK we have successfully filled the absorber with {approx}2 liters of liquid hydrogen. The measured hydrogen condensation speed was 2.5 liters/day at 1.0 bar. No hydrogen leakage to vacuum was found between 300 K and 20 K. The MICE experiment includes three AFC (absorber focusing coil) modules, each containing a 21 liter liquid hydrogen absorber made of aluminum. The AFC module has safety windows to separate its vacuum from that of neighboring modules. Liquid hydrogen is supplied from a cryocooler with cooling power 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The first absorber will be assembled in the AFC module and installed in MICE at RAL.

  4. Direct measurement of absorbed dose to water in HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy: Water calorimetry, ionization chamber, Gafchromic film, and TG-43

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfehnia, Arman; Kawrakow, Iwan; Seuntjens, Jan

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Gafchromic film and ionometric calibration procedures for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources in terms of dose rate to water are presented and the experimental results are compared to the TG-43 protocol as well as with the absolute dose measurement results from a water calorimetry-based primary standard. Methods: EBT-1 Gafchromic films, an A1SL Exradin miniature Shonka thimble type chamber, and an SI HDR 1000 Plus well-type chamber (Standard Imaging, Inc., Middleton, WI) with an ADCL traceable S{sub k} calibration coefficient (following the AAPM TG-43 protocol) were used. The Farmer chamber and Gafchromic film measurements were performed directly in water. All results were compared to direct and absolute absorbed dose to water measurements from a 4 deg. C stagnant water calorimeter. Results: Based on water calorimetry, the authors measured the dose rate to water to be 361{+-}7 {mu}Gy/(h U) at a 55 mm source-to-detector separation. The dose rate normalized to air-kerma strength for all the techniques agree with the water calorimetry results to within 0.83%. The overall 1-sigma uncertainty on water calorimetry, ionization chamber, Gafchromic film, and TG-43 dose rate measurement amounts to 1.90%, 1.44%, 1.78%, and 2.50%, respectively. Conclusions: This work allows us to build a more realistic uncertainty estimate for absorbed dose to water determination using the TG-43 protocol. Furthermore, it provides the framework necessary for a shift from indirect HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy dosimetry to a more accurate, direct, and absolute measurement of absorbed dose to water.

  5. The impact of microwave absorber and radome geometries on GNSS measurements of station coordinates and atmospheric water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, T.; Elgered, G.; Johansson, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    We have used microwave absorbing material in different geometries around ground-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) antennas in order to mitigate multipath effects on the estimates of station coordinates and atmospheric water vapour. The influence of a hemispheric radome - of the same type as in the Swedish GPS network SWEPOS - was also investigated. Two GNSS stations at the Onsala Space Observatory were used forming a 12 m baseline. GPS data from October 2008 to November 2009 were analyzed by the GIPSY/OASIS II software using the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) processing strategy for five different elevation cutoff angles from 5° to 25°. We found that the use of the absorbing material decreases the offset in the estimated vertical component of the baseline from ˜27 mm to ˜4 mm when the elevation cutoff angle varies from 5° to 20°. The horizontal components are much less affected. The corresponding offset in the estimates of the atmospheric Integrated Water Vapour (IWV) decreases from ˜1.6 kg/m2 to ˜0.3 kg/m2. Changes less than 5 mm in the offsets in the vertical component of the baseline are seen for all five elevation cutoff angle solutions when the antenna was covered by a hemispheric radome. Using the radome affects the IWV estimates less than 0.4 kg/m2 for all different solutions. IWV comparisons between a Water Vapour Radiometer (WVR) and the GPS data give consistent results.

  6. Measuring Strategic Value-Drivers for Managing Intellectual Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bose, S.; Oh, K. B.

    2004-01-01

    In an evolving business environment characterised by globalisation and a challenging competitive paradigm, it is imperative for strategic management processes to focus on the financial perspectives of value and risk in intellectual capital to create sustainability in long-term value. This paper presents the key issues pertaining to the strategic…

  7. Identifying, Measuring and Monitoring Value during Project Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliniotou, Maria

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the findings of the research done by Loughborough University in conjunction with ten construction industry collaborators in an attempt to identify what construction professionals mean by value. The aim of the research is to establish a common approach to identify value in projects and to monitor its development throughout the…

  8. The Measurement of Values: Effects of Different Assessment Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feather, N. T.

    1973-01-01

    Rating and pair-comparison procedures for assessing the importance of terminal and instrumental values were compared with the standard ranking procedure developed by Rokeach. Effects of order of presentation of of the value sets were also investigated. Neither procedure nor order had replicable effect though some sex differences were apparent. (TO)

  9. Intensity-Value Corrections for Integrating Sphere Measurements of Solid Samples Measured Behind Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Redding, Rebecca L.; Su, Yin-Fong; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Myers, Tanya L.; Stephan, Eric G.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate and calibrated directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra of solids are important for both in situ and remote sensing. Many solids are in the form of powders or granules and to measure their diffuse reflectance spectra in the laboratory, it is often necessary to place the samples behind a transparent medium such as glass for the ultraviolet (UV), visible, or near-infrared spectral regions. Using both experimental methods and a simple optical model, we demonstrate that glass (fused quartz in our case) leads to artifacts in the reflectance values. We report our observations that the measured reflectance values, for both hemispherical and diffuse reflectance, are distorted by the additional reflections arising at the air–quartz and sample–quartz interfaces. The values are dependent on the sample reflectance and are offset in intensity in the hemispherical case, leading to measured values up to ~6% too high for a 2% reflectance surface, ~3.8% too high for 10% reflecting surfaces, approximately correct for 40–60% diffuse-reflecting surfaces, and ~1.5% too low for 99% reflecting Spectralon® surfaces. For the case of diffuse-only reflectance, the measured values are uniformly too low due to the polished glass, with differences of nearly 6% for a 99% reflecting matte surface. The deviations arise from the added reflections from the quartz surfaces, as verified by both theory and experiment, and depend on sphere design. Finally, empirical correction factors were implemented into post-processing software to redress the artifact for hemispherical and diffuse reflectance data across the 300–2300 nm range.

  10. Calibration method for a photoacoustic system for real time source apportionment of light absorbing carbonaceous aerosol based on size distribution measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, Noemi; Ajtai, Tibor; Pinter, Mate; Orvos, Peter I.; Szabo, Gabor; Bozoki, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we introduce a calibration method with which sources of light absorbing carbonaceous particulate matter (LAC) can be apportioned in real time based on multi wavelength optical absorption measurements with a photoacoustic system. The method is primary applicable in wintry urban conditions when LAC is dominated by traffic and biomass burning. The proposed method was successfully tested in a field campaign in the city center of Szeged, Hungary during winter time where the dominance of traffic and wood burning aerosol has been experimentally demonstrated earlier. With the help of the proposed calibration method a relationship between the measured Aerosol Angström Exponent (AAE) and the number size distribution can be deduced. Once the calibration curve is determined, the relative strength of the two pollution sources can be deduced in real time as long as the light absorbing fraction of PM is exclusively related to traffic and wood burning. This assumption is indirectly confirmed in the presented measurement campaign by the fact that the measured size distribution is composed of two unimodal size distributions identified to correspond to traffic and wood burning aerosols. The proposed method offers the possibility of replacing laborious chemical analysis with simple in-situ measurement of aerosol size distribution data.

  11. EURAMET.RI(I)-S7 comparison of alanine dosimetry systems for absorbed dose to water measurements in gamma- and x-radiation at radiotherapy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Tristan; Anton, Mathias; Sharpe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The National Physical Laboratory (NPL), the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB) are involved in the European project 'External Beam Cancer Therapy', a project of the European Metrology Research Programme. Within this project, the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/alanine dosimetric method has been chosen for performing measurements in small fields such as those used in IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy). In this context, these three National Metrology Institutes (NMI) wished to compare the result of their alanine dosimetric systems (detector, modus operandi etc) at radiotherapy dose levels to check their consistency. This EURAMET.RI(I)-S7 comparison has been performed with the support of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) which collected and distributed the results as a neutral organization, to ensure the comparison was 'blind'. Irradiations have been made under reference conditions by each laboratory in a 60Co beam and in an accelerator beam (10 MV or 12 MV) in a water phantom of 30 cm × 30 cm × 30 cm in a square field of 10 cm × 10 cm at the reference depth. Irradiations have been performed at known values of absorbed dose to water (Dw) within 10% of nominal doses of 5 Gy and 10 Gy, i.e. between 4.5 Gy and 5.5 Gy and between 9 Gy and 11 Gy, respectively. Each participant read out their dosimeters and assessed the doses using their own protocol (calibration curve, positioning device etc) as this comparison aims at comparing the complete dosimetric process. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the EPR/alanine dosimetry systems operated by National Metrology Institutes as a method of assuring therapy level doses with the accuracy required. The maximum deviation in the ratio of measured to applied dose is less than 1%. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key

  12. Absorbed dose water calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Domen, S.R.

    1982-01-26

    An absorbed dose water calorimeter that takes advantage of the low thermal diffusivity of water and the water-imperviousness of polyethylene film. An ultra-small bead thermistor is sandwiched between two thin polyethylene films stretched between insulative supports in a water bath. The polyethylene films insulate the thermistor and its leads, the leads being run out from between the films in insulated sleeving and then to junctions to form a wheatstone bridge circuit. Convection barriers may be provided to reduce the effects of convection from the point of measurement. Controlled heating of different levels in the water bath is accomplished by electrical heater circuits provided for controlling temperature drift and providing adiabatic operation of the calorimeter. The absorbed dose is determined from the known specific heat of water and the measured temperature change.

  13. Measuring the value of older people's production: a diary study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The productive capacity of retired people is usually not valued. However, some retirees produce much more than we might expect. This diary-based study identifies the activities of older people, and suggests some value mechanisms. One question raised is whether it is possible to scale up this diary study into a larger representative study. Methods Diaries kept for one week were collected among 23 older people in the north of Sweden. The texts were analysed with a grounded theory approach; an interplay between ideas and empirical data. Results Some productive activities of older people must be valued as the opportunity cost of time or according to the market value, and others must be valued with the replacement cost. In order to make the choice between these methods, it is important to consider the societal entitlement. When there is no societal entitlement, the first or second method must be used; and when it exists, the third must be used. Conclusions An explicit investigation of the content of the entitlement is needed to justify the choice of valuation method for each activity. In a questionnaire addressing older people's production, each question must be adjusted to the type of production. In order to fully understand this production, it is important to consider the degree of free choice to conduct an activity, as well as health-related quality of life. PMID:22230745

  14. Measuring the Economic Value of Pre-MBA Work Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeaple, Ronald N.; Johnston, Mark W.; Whittingham, Keith L.

    2010-01-01

    Pre-MBA work experience is required for admission to many graduate schools of business. In the present study, MBA graduates with a wide range of pre-MBA work experience were surveyed to assess the economic value of such work experience. No evidence was found of a systematic financial advantage to students from working for several years before…

  15. Can Value-Added Measures of Teacher Performance Be Trusted?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Reckase, Mark D.; Wooldridge, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate whether commonly used value-added estimation strategies produce accurate estimates of teacher effects under a variety of scenarios. We estimate teacher effects in simulated student achievement data sets that mimic plausible types of student grouping and teacher assignment scenarios. We find that no one method accurately captures…

  16. Reliability and Validity in Measuring the Value Added of Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Grift, Wim

    2009-01-01

    Instability in the school population between school entrance and school leaving is not "just a problem of missing data" but often the visible result of the educational problems in some schools and is, therefore, not merely to be treated as missing data but as indicator for the quality of educational processes. Even the most superior value-added…

  17. Accounting for People: Can Business Measure Human Value?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workforce Economics, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Traditional business practice undervalues human capital, and most conventional accounting models reflect this inclination. The argument for more explicit measurements of human resources is simple: Improved measurement of human resources will lead to more rational and productive choices about managing human resources. The business community is…

  18. Estimation of monthly values of atmospheric turbidity using measured values of global irradiation and estimated values from CSR and Yang Hybrid models. Study case: Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Germán A.

    2011-05-01

    For ten sites in Argentina, monthly average Ångström turbidity coefficient β values were estimated using mean monthly global solar irradiation values measured at these sites from the former Argentinean radiometric network REDSOL. The values of the horizontal direct and diffuse components of the global irradiation were estimated using the Yang Hybrid model (YHM) and, to determine the representativeness of those results, they were compared to values from the SWERA database which uses the CSR model, developed by NREL, to make estimates. An inconsistency in the estimated values of the diffuse component was detected, therefore a new expression for that component was proposed, generating a corrected version of the YHM (CYHM). The turbidity coefficient β is considered an independent variable in the equation that estimates the direct transmittance and the values that forces an exact correlation between the measured monthly average global irradiance values with those estimated with the CYHM are considered representative for each site since the RMSE between the monthly global irradiation values of SWERA and CYHM is 11.7%, this value being very close to that found by the designers of the CSR model (10%) when they tested it with meteorological data from USA. The monthly average value estimates of turbidity coefficient β show expected behavior, with values varying according to the season of the year.

  19. Seeking value in Medicare: performance measurement for clinical professionals.

    PubMed

    Sprague, Lisa

    2013-10-30

    The Medicare program, despite its reputation of being a bill payer with little regard to the worth of the services it buys, has begun to put in place a range of programs aimed at assessing quality and value, with more to come. Attention to resource use and cost is nascent. The issues are complex, and it is no surprise that there is a level of contention between providers and regulators, even though both profess commitment to improved quality. This paper summarizes the quality and value programs that apply to physicians and other clinical professionals, as well as programs designed to encourage the adoption of technology to support quality improvement. Participation in all is voluntary. However, a decision not to participate increasingly carries a financial penalty, as Congress (and, by extension, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or HHS) tries to encourage behavior it cannot force.

  20. Seeking value in Medicare: performance measurement for clinical professionals.

    PubMed

    Sprague, Lisa

    2013-10-30

    The Medicare program, despite its reputation of being a bill payer with little regard to the worth of the services it buys, has begun to put in place a range of programs aimed at assessing quality and value, with more to come. Attention to resource use and cost is nascent. The issues are complex, and it is no surprise that there is a level of contention between providers and regulators, even though both profess commitment to improved quality. This paper summarizes the quality and value programs that apply to physicians and other clinical professionals, as well as programs designed to encourage the adoption of technology to support quality improvement. Participation in all is voluntary. However, a decision not to participate increasingly carries a financial penalty, as Congress (and, by extension, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or HHS) tries to encourage behavior it cannot force. PMID:24312987

  1. [Measuring the intracoronary pressure gradient--value and methodologic limitations].

    PubMed

    Sievert, H; Kaltenbach, M

    1987-06-01

    Measurements of pressure gradients were performed in a fluid-filled model. The hydrostatically regulated perfusion pressure, as well as the diameter of the tube segments and the regulation of the flow by peripheral resistance, were comparable to conditions in human coronary arteries. Pressure gradients above 20 mm Hg were only measured with a reduction in cross-sectional area of more than 90%. Even after increasing the flow four-fold, which corresponds to the human coronary flow reserve, as well as after probing the stenosis with different catheters (2F-5F), gradients greater than 20 mm Hg were only recorded with high-grade stenoses (more than 80% reduction in cross-sectional area). The findings in this model demonstrate that measurement of pressure gradients allows only a quantitative differentiation between high-grade (greater than 80%) and low-grade (less than 80%) stenoses. The catheter itself can substantially contribute to the gradient by vessel obstruction, depending on the diameter of the catheter and of the coronary vessel. A quantitative assessment of the stenosis therefore requires knowledge of the pre- and post-stenotic vessel diameter as well as of the catheter diameter. However, pressure measurements during transluminal coronary angioplasty should not be abandoned. They can be useful to aid catheter positioning and to estimate dilatation efficacy. Moreover, measurement of coronary capillary wedge pressure during balloon expansion provides valuable information about the extent of collateralisation. PMID:2957862

  2. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure. PMID:26828999

  3. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul K; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J M; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R; Luk, Ting S; Taylor, Antoinette J; Dalvit, Diego A R; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.

  4. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    DOE PAGES

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Moreover, our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributionsmore » to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.« less

  5. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul K; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J M; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R; Luk, Ting S; Taylor, Antoinette J; Dalvit, Diego A R; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure. PMID:26828999

  6. [Value of electronic measuring instruments for optimizing functional TMJ diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Zimmer, B; Keese, E; Kubein-Meesenburg, D

    1989-09-01

    In order to get additional information about the significance of electronic axiographic recordings in TMJ-diagnosis, 34 patients, who showed 47 clicking TMJs, were examined by use of an electronic axiographic instrument (SAS-system). The frequency of the detected findings emphasize the value of electronic axiographic devices for differential diagnosis. In detail the following conclusions could be drawn: examination of different types of movement is recommended because clicking must not exist in all types, recording in more than one plane is necessary in order to detect the (prevailing) plane of dislocation, a magnification of tracings provides addition information concerning different types of clicking.

  7. High resolution redox potential measurements: techniques, interpretation and value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorenhout, Michel; van der Geest, Harm G.

    2013-04-01

    The ongoing improvement of techniques for the in situ measurement of redox potentials has led to a large number of studies on redox variability in various environments. These studies originate from a wide array of scientific disciplines, amongst which ecology (sediment biogeochemistry), environmental chemistry (degradation studies) and archaeology (in situ preservation). To gain insight in the potential applications, this paper presents three examples of studies in which a newly developed measurement technique was used in soils and where spatial and temporal variation plays an important role. The first one is a microcosm study on the effects of biota on the dynamics of redox conditions in the toplayer of aquatic sediments, showing that the presence of microbiota has a direct influence on biogeochemical parameters. The second is the study of the redox potential in the world heritage site of Bryggen (Bergen, NO) that is under threat of oxidation. The oxidation, caused by a lowered groundwater table, causes soil degradation and unstable conditions for the monumental buildings of the Medieval site. The third study shows variability in a sandy flood plain in Bangladesh, where redox processes dictate the environmental behaviour of Arsenic. This toxic metal is present in many wells used for drinking water, but shows very local variation in dissolution dynamics. In these three studies, continuous measurements of (changes in) redox conditions revealed a strong variability in these systems and consequences for the interpretation of single point measurements or low frequency sampling campaigns are discussed. In these and many other cases, the continuous measurement of the redox potential in soil media will aid in the understanding of the system under study.

  8. Malingering intellectual disability: the value of available measures and methods.

    PubMed

    Salekin, Karen L; Doane, Bridget M

    2009-01-01

    Atkins v. Virginia (2002) is a case that has changed the landscape in relation to the assessment of malingering in a legal context. This landmark decision abolished the death penalty for defendants found to have intellectual disability (ID; formally known as mental retardation), but limitations in our assessment techniques lead to questions regarding the veracity of ID claims. In fact, Justice Scalia noted with clarity that concerns exist regarding the ability of individuals to feign ID and to do so successfully. At the time of writing, little empirical research has been completed, but that which exists demonstrates an overall lack of validity for traditional measures of cognitive malingering for use with this population. This manuscript provides an overview of the utility of many of the traditional measures of malingering for use with an ID population and serves as a call for research in this very important area.

  9. Membrane Capacitance Measurements Revisited: Dependence of Capacitance Value on Measurement Method in Nonisopotential Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Gladis; Taylor, Adam L.; Patel, Arif; Pineda, Arlene; Khalil, Christopher; Nadim, Farzan

    2009-01-01

    During growth or degeneration neuronal surface area can change dramatically. Measurements of membrane protein concentration, as in ion channel or ionic conductance density, are often normalized by membrane capacitance, which is proportional to the surface area, to express changes independently from cell surface variations. Several electrophysiological protocols are used to measure cell capacitance, all based on the assumption of membrane isopotentiality. Yet, most neurons violate this assumption because of their complex anatomical structure, raising the question of which protocol yields measurements that are closest to the actual total membrane capacitance. We measured the capacitance of identified neurons from crab stomatogastric ganglia using three different protocols: the current-clamp step, the voltage-clamp step, and the voltage-clamp ramp protocols. We observed that the current-clamp protocol produced significantly higher capacitance values than those of either voltage-clamp protocol. Computational models of various anatomical complexities suggest that the current-clamp protocol can yield accurate capacitance estimates. In contrast, the voltage-clamp protocol estimates rapidly deteriorate as isopotentiality is reduced. We provide a mathematical description of these results by analyzing a simple two-compartment model neuron to facilitate an intuitive understanding of these methods. Together, the experiments, modeling, and mathematical analysis indicate that accurate total membrane capacitance measurements cannot be obtained with voltage-clamp protocols in nonisopotential neurons. Furthermore, although current-clamp steps can theoretically yield accurate measurements, experimentalists should be aware of limitations imposed by step duration and numerical errors during fitting procedures to obtain the membrane time constant. PMID:19571202

  10. ESTIMATED NEPTUNIUM SEDIMENT SORPTION VALUES AS A FUNCTION OF PH AND MEASURED BARIUM AND RADIUM KD VALUES

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.

    2011-01-13

    The objective of this document is to provide traceability and justification for a select few new geochemical data used in the Special Analysis entitled 'Special Analysis for the Dose Assessment of the Final Inventories in Center Slit Trenches One through Five'. Most values used in the Special Analysis came from the traditional geochemical data package, however, some recent laboratory measurements have made it possible to estimate barium K{sub d} values. Additionally, some recent calculations were made to estimate neptunium K{sub d} values as a function of pH. The assumptions, justifications, and calculations needed to generate these new values are presented in this document, and the values are summarized.

  11. [Value of Pressure Measurements: Methods and Sources of Errors].

    PubMed

    Rüfer, F

    2016-07-01

    Tonometry is still an essential component of diagnostic testing in glaucoma. Functional and morphological investigations can provide very detailed information about the extent of glaucomatous damage. They are useful in the early detection of glaucoma damage; when damage is manifest, they are useful in estimating the rate of progression in follow-up studies. In contrast, tonometric procedures are much less perfect and sensitive and provide no information at all about the extent of glaucoma damage. However, they often provide the first evidence that glaucoma may be present at all and they are the decisive parameter in controlling surgical or medical treatment to reduce pressure, as the reduction in intraocular pressure (IOD) is still the most common approach in treating glaucoma - in spite of our awareness of numerous other risk factors for glaucoma. There is no reason to doubt that reducing IOD is an effective therapy in many forms of glaucoma, as this has been demonstrated in numerous large epidemiological studies. Tonometric procedures have become more precise in recent years. Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT) and pneumatonometry are widely used. There are also some areas for which the rarer forms of tonometry can be recommended. Procedures for quasi-continuous pressure measurements and, in the future, these may replace the current approach of measuring IOD at discrete time points. There are a variety of snares in clinical practice, which may lead to misinterpretation and wrong therapeutic decisions, so that these must be repeatedly emphasised. PMID:27130978

  12. PHITS simulations of the Protective curtain experiment onboard the Service module of ISS: Comparison with absorbed doses measured with TLDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploc, Ondřej; Sihver, Lembit; Kartashov, Dmitry; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Tolochek, Raisa

    2013-12-01

    "Protective curtain" was the physical experiment onboard the International Space Station (ISS) aimed on radiation measurement of the dose - reducing effect of the additional shielding made of hygienic water-soaked wipes and towels placed on the wall in the crew cabin of the Service module Zvezda. The measurements were performed with 12 detector packages composed of thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) and plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) placed at the Protective curtain, so that they created pairs of shielded and unshielded detectors.

  13. Relating costs to the user value of farmland biodiversity measurements.

    PubMed

    Targetti, S; Herzog, F; Geijzendorffer, I R; Pointereau, P; Viaggi, D

    2016-01-01

    The impact of agricultural management on global biodiversity highlights the need for farm-scale monitoring programmes capable of determining the performance of agriculture practices. Yet the identification of appropriate indicators is a challenging process and one that involves considering a number of different aspects and requirements. Besides the attention given to scientific effectiveness, relevant but less studied issues related to biodiversity measurements include the economic feasibility of monitoring programmes and the relevance of indicators for different end-users. In this paper, we combine an analytic assessment of costs and a stakeholder-based evaluation of the usefulness of a set of biodiversity-related parameters (habitat mapping, vegetation, bees, earthworms, spiders, and a farmer questionnaire) tested for scientific consistency in 12 European case studies and on more than 14,000 ha of farmland. The results point to the possibility of meeting the expectations of different end-users (administrators, farmers and consumers) with a common indicator set. Combining costs and usefulness also suggests the possibility of designing more efficient monitoring approaches involving private agencies and networks of volunteers and farmers for the field data collection at different stages of a monitoring programme. Although complex, such an approach would make it possible to enhance the effectiveness of available funds for farmland biodiversity monitoring.

  14. Relating costs to the user value of farmland biodiversity measurements.

    PubMed

    Targetti, S; Herzog, F; Geijzendorffer, I R; Pointereau, P; Viaggi, D

    2016-01-01

    The impact of agricultural management on global biodiversity highlights the need for farm-scale monitoring programmes capable of determining the performance of agriculture practices. Yet the identification of appropriate indicators is a challenging process and one that involves considering a number of different aspects and requirements. Besides the attention given to scientific effectiveness, relevant but less studied issues related to biodiversity measurements include the economic feasibility of monitoring programmes and the relevance of indicators for different end-users. In this paper, we combine an analytic assessment of costs and a stakeholder-based evaluation of the usefulness of a set of biodiversity-related parameters (habitat mapping, vegetation, bees, earthworms, spiders, and a farmer questionnaire) tested for scientific consistency in 12 European case studies and on more than 14,000 ha of farmland. The results point to the possibility of meeting the expectations of different end-users (administrators, farmers and consumers) with a common indicator set. Combining costs and usefulness also suggests the possibility of designing more efficient monitoring approaches involving private agencies and networks of volunteers and farmers for the field data collection at different stages of a monitoring programme. Although complex, such an approach would make it possible to enhance the effectiveness of available funds for farmland biodiversity monitoring. PMID:26457535

  15. Measuring Children's Environmental Attitudes and Values in Northwest Mexico: Validating a Modified Version of Measures to Test the Model of Ecological Values (2-MEV)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneller, A. J.; Johnson, B.; Bogner, F. X.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the validation process of measuring children's attitudes and values toward the environment within a Mexican sample. We applied the Model of Ecological Values (2-MEV), which has been shown to be valid and reliable in 20 countries, including one Spanish speaking culture. Items were initially modified to fit the regional…

  16. Examining the Perceived Value of Integration of Earned Value Management with Risk Management-Based Performance Measurement Baseline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Akhtar H.

    2014-01-01

    Many projects fail despite the use of evidence-based project management practices such as Performance Measurement Baseline (PMB), Earned Value Management (EVM) and Risk Management (RM). Although previous researchers have found that integrated project management techniques could be more valuable than the same techniques used by themselves, these…

  17. Underwater acoustic omnidirectional absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naify, Christina J.; Martin, Theodore P.; Layman, Christopher N.; Nicholas, Michael; Thangawng, Abel L.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2014-02-01

    Gradient index media, which are designed by varying local element properties in given geometry, have been utilized to manipulate acoustic waves for a variety of devices. This study presents a cylindrical, two-dimensional acoustic "black hole" design that functions as an omnidirectional absorber for underwater applications. The design features a metamaterial shell that focuses acoustic energy into the shell's core. Multiple scattering theory was used to design layers of rubber cylinders with varying filling fractions to produce a linearly graded sound speed profile through the structure. Measured pressure intensity agreed with predicted results over a range of frequencies within the homogenization limit.

  18. The Use of Standardized Residuals to Derive Value-Added Measures of School Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schagen, Ian

    2006-01-01

    Measures of school performance based on pupil attainment are becoming more sophisticated, with DfES piloting "contextualized value-added" measures. However, most such measures are based on simple sums of residuals about "expected" values, but it is clear from national data that distributions of performance are not symmetrical and of constant…

  19. In situ UV-VIS-NIR absorbing properties of atmospheric aerosol particles: estimates of the imaginary refractive index and comparison with columnar values.

    PubMed

    Mogo, S; Cachorro, V E; de Frutos, A M

    2012-11-30

    In this work, a novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction of in situ collected samples. Samples of atmospheric particulate matter were collected in El Arenosillo, southern Spain, on polycarbonate filters during summer 2004 as part of an aerosol characterization campaign. These samples were analyzed for the volumetric absorption coefficient in the 320-800 nm spectral region and an estimation of the effective imaginary refractive index was made. The values of the imaginary part of the complex refractive index ranged between 0.0009-0.0215 at 800 nm and 0.0015-0.0114 at 320 nm. Little dependence on the wavelength was observed. Several intense and long lasting desert outbreaks were registered during the campaign and the complex refractive index almost doubles its value during these dust events. Finally, we present a comparison of data obtained in situ with columnar data obtained from the AERONET network. A correlation factor of 0.64 was obtained between both data, which gives an idea of how accurately the in situ ground data represent the total column.

  20. Absorbed in the task: Personality measures predict engagement during task performance as tracked by error negativity and asymmetrical frontal activity.

    PubMed

    Tops, Mattie; Boksem, Maarten A S

    2010-12-01

    We hypothesized that interactions between traits and context predict task engagement, as measured by the amplitude of the error-related negativity (ERN), performance, and relative frontal activity asymmetry (RFA). In Study 1, we found that drive for reward, absorption, and constraint independently predicted self-reported persistence. We hypothesized that, during a prolonged monotonous task, absorption would predict initial ERN amplitudes, constraint would delay declines in ERN amplitudes and deterioration of performance, and drive for reward would predict left RFA when a reward could be obtained. Study 2, employing EEG recordings, confirmed our predictions. The results showed that most traits that have in previous research been related to ERN amplitudes have a relationship with the motivational trait persistence in common. In addition, trait-context combinations that are likely associated with increased engagement predict larger ERN amplitudes and RFA. Together, these results support the hypothesis that engagement may be a common underlying factor predicting ERN amplitude.

  1. The challenge of measuring community values in ways appropriate for setting health care priorities.

    PubMed

    Ubel, Peter A

    1999-09-01

    The move from a notion that community values ought to play a role in health care decision making to the creation of health care policies that in some way reflect such values is a challenging one. No single method will adequately measure community values in a way appropriate for setting health care priorities. Consequently, multiple methods to measure community values should be employed, thereby allowing the strengths and weaknesses of the various methods to complement each other. A preliminary research agenda to bring together empirical research on community values with more traditional research on health care ethics is outlined, with the goal of identifying and measuring acceptable community values that are relatively consistent across measurement methods and, ultimately, developing ways to incorporate these values into health care priority decision making.

  2. AN INDEPENDENT MEASUREMENT OF THE INCIDENCE OF Mg II ABSORBERS ALONG GAMMA-RAY BURST SIGHT LINES: THE END OF THE MYSTERY?

    SciTech Connect

    Cucchiara, A.; Prochaska, J. X.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Fox, D. B.; Chen, H.-W.; Cooksey, K. L.; Cenko, S. B.; Bloom, J. S.; Perley, D.; Berger, E.; Chornock, R.; Tanvir, N. R.; D'Elia, V.; Lopez, S.; De Jaeger, T.

    2013-08-20

    In 2006, Prochter et al. reported a statistically significant enhancement of very strong Mg II absorption systems intervening the sight lines to gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) relative to the incidence of such absorption along quasar sight lines. This counterintuitive result has inspired a diverse set of astrophysical explanations (e.g., dust, gravitational lensing) but none of these has obviously resolved the puzzle. Using the largest set of GRB afterglow spectra available, we reexamine the purported enhancement. In an independent sample of GRB spectra with a survey path three times larger than Prochter et al., we measure the incidence per unit redshift of {>=}1 A rest-frame equivalent width Mg II absorbers at z Almost-Equal-To 1 to be l(z) = 0.18 {+-} 0.06. This is fully consistent with current estimates for the incidence of such absorbers along quasar sight lines. Therefore, we do not confirm the original enhancement and suggest those results suffered from a statistical fluke. Signatures of the original result do remain in our full sample (l(z) shows an Almost-Equal-To 1.5 enhancement over l(z){sub QSO}), but the statistical significance now lies at Almost-Equal-To 90% c.l. Restricting our analysis to the subset of high-resolution spectra of GRB afterglows (which overlaps substantially with Prochter et al.), we still reproduce a statistically significant enhancement of Mg II absorption. The reason for this excess, if real, is still unclear since there is no connection between the rapid afterglow follow-up process with echelle (or echellette) spectrographs and the detectability of strong Mg II doublets. Only a larger sample of such high-resolution data will shed some light on this matter.

  3. Measuring daily Value-at-Risk of SSEC index: A new approach based on multifractal analysis and extreme value theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yu; Chen, Wang; Lin, Yu

    2013-05-01

    Recent studies in the econophysics literature reveal that price variability has fractal and multifractal characteristics not only in developed financial markets, but also in emerging markets. Taking high-frequency intraday quotes of the Shanghai Stock Exchange Component (SSEC) Index as example, this paper proposes a new method to measure daily Value-at-Risk (VaR) by combining the newly introduced multifractal volatility (MFV) model and the extreme value theory (EVT) method. Two VaR backtesting techniques are then employed to compare the performance of the model with that of a group of linear and nonlinear generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) models. The empirical results show the multifractal nature of price volatility in Chinese stock market. VaR measures based on the multifractal volatility model and EVT method outperform many GARCH-type models at high-risk levels.

  4. Measuring the value of nonwage employee benefits: building a model of the relation between benefit satisfaction and value.

    PubMed

    Weathington, Bart L; Jones, Allan P

    2006-11-01

    Researchers have commonly assumed benefits that employees view as more valuable have a greater influence on their attitudes and behaviors. Researchers have used 2 common methods to measure benefit value: attaching a monetary value to benefits and using self-reports of benefit importance. The present authors propose that the 2 approaches are conceptually distinct and have different implications. They use a social exchange perspective to justify this distinction and integrate both approaches and benefit satisfaction into a more comprehensive model of benefit perception. Results suggest that both measures have practical applications depending on the nature of the exchange relationship between the organization and employees. However, this relationship depends on the specific benefit and on employee satisfaction with that benefit. Some benefits lend themselves to a monetary estimate, whereas others lend themselves more to a nonmonetary valuation. PMID:18341232

  5. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Enz, Glenn L.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  6. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  7. A review of measurement and modeling of Light-absorbing Particles in Snow and Ice and their climatic and hydrological impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Y.; Doherty, S. J.; Lau, W. K. M.; Ming, J.; Wang, H.; Warren, S. G.; Yasunari, T. J.; Zhang, R.; Flanner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Light absorbing particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, brown carbon, and dust) influence water and energy budgets of the atmosphere and snowpack in multiple ways. In addition to their effects associated with atmospheric heating by absorption of solar radiation and interactions with clouds, LAP in snow on land and ice can reduce the surface reflectance , which is likely to accelerate the snow aging process and further reduces snow albedo and increases the speed of snowpack melt. LAP in snow and ice (LAPSI) has been identified as one of major forcings affecting climate change, e.g. in the fourth and fifth assessment reports of IPCC. However, the uncertainty level in quantifying this effect remains very high. In this talk, we document various technical methods of measuring LAPSI and review the progress made in measuring the LAPSI in Arctic, Tibetan Plateau and other mid-latitude regions. We also report the progress in modeling the concentrations, albedo reduction, radiative forcing, and climatic and hydrological impact of LAPSI at global and regional scales. Finally we identify some research needs for reducing the uncertainties in the impact of LAPSI on global and regional climate and the hydrological cycle.

  8. Lies, Damned Lies, and Health Inequality Measurements: Understanding the Value Judgments.

    PubMed

    Kjellsson, Gustav; Gerdtham, Ulf-G; Petrie, Dennis

    2015-09-01

    Measuring and monitoring socioeconomic health inequalities are critical for understanding the impact of policy decisions. However, the measurement of health inequality is far from value neutral, and one can easily present the measure that best supports one's chosen conclusion or selectively exclude measures. Improving people's understanding of the often implicit value judgments is therefore important to reduce the risk that researchers mislead or policymakers are misled. While the choice between relative and absolute inequality is already value laden, further complexities arise when, as is often the case, health variables have both a lower and upper bound, and thus can be expressed in terms of either attainments or shortfalls, such as for mortality/survival.We bring together the recent parallel discussions from epidemiology and health economics regarding health inequality measurement and provide a deeper understanding of the different value judgments within absolute and relative measures expressed both in attainments and shortfalls, by graphically illustrating both hypothetical and real examples. We show that relative measures in terms of attainments and shortfalls have distinct value judgments, highlighting that for health variables with two bounds the choice is no longer only between an absolute and a relative measure but between an absolute, an attainment- relative and a shortfall-relative one. We illustrate how these three value judgments can be combined onto a single graph which shows the rankings according to all three measures, and illustrates how the three measures provide ethical benchmarks against which to judge the difference in inequality between populations.

  9. Airborne aldehydes in cabin-air of commercial aircraft: Measurement by HPLC with UV absorbance detection of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Wolfgang; Beckmann, Bibiana; Wrbitzky, Renate

    2016-04-15

    This paper presents the strategy and results of in-flight measurements of airborne aldehydes during normal operation and reported "smell events" on commercial aircraft. The aldehyde-measurement is a part of a large-scale study on cabin-air quality. The aims of this study were to describe cabin-air quality in general and to detect chemical abnormalities during the so-called "smell-events". Adsorption and derivatization of airborne aldehydes on 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine coated silica gel (DNPH-cartridge) was applied using tailor-made sampling kits. Samples were collected with battery supplied personal air sampling pumps during different flight phases. Furthermore, the influence of ozone was investigated by simultaneous sampling with and without ozone absorption unit (ozone converter) assembled to the DNPH-cartridges and found to be negligible. The method was validated for 14 aldehydes and found to be precise (RSD, 5.5-10.6%) and accurate (recovery, 98-103 %), with LOD levels being 0.3-0.6 μg/m(3). According to occupational exposure limits (OEL) or indoor air guidelines no unusual or noticeable aldehyde pollution was observed. In total, 353 aldehyde samples were taken from two types of aircraft. Formaldehyde (overall average 5.7 μg/m(3), overall median 4.9 μg/m(3), range 0.4-44 μg/m(3)), acetaldehyde (overall average 6.5 μg/m(3), overall median 4.6, range 0.3-90 μg/m(3)) and mostly very low concentrations of other aldehydes were measured on 108 flights. Simultaneous adsorption and derivatization of airborne aldehydes on DNPH-cartridges to the Schiff bases and their HPLC analysis with UV absorbance detection is a useful method to measure aldehydes in cabin-air of commercial aircraft.

  10. Airborne aldehydes in cabin-air of commercial aircraft: Measurement by HPLC with UV absorbance detection of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Wolfgang; Beckmann, Bibiana; Wrbitzky, Renate

    2016-04-15

    This paper presents the strategy and results of in-flight measurements of airborne aldehydes during normal operation and reported "smell events" on commercial aircraft. The aldehyde-measurement is a part of a large-scale study on cabin-air quality. The aims of this study were to describe cabin-air quality in general and to detect chemical abnormalities during the so-called "smell-events". Adsorption and derivatization of airborne aldehydes on 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine coated silica gel (DNPH-cartridge) was applied using tailor-made sampling kits. Samples were collected with battery supplied personal air sampling pumps during different flight phases. Furthermore, the influence of ozone was investigated by simultaneous sampling with and without ozone absorption unit (ozone converter) assembled to the DNPH-cartridges and found to be negligible. The method was validated for 14 aldehydes and found to be precise (RSD, 5.5-10.6%) and accurate (recovery, 98-103 %), with LOD levels being 0.3-0.6 μg/m(3). According to occupational exposure limits (OEL) or indoor air guidelines no unusual or noticeable aldehyde pollution was observed. In total, 353 aldehyde samples were taken from two types of aircraft. Formaldehyde (overall average 5.7 μg/m(3), overall median 4.9 μg/m(3), range 0.4-44 μg/m(3)), acetaldehyde (overall average 6.5 μg/m(3), overall median 4.6, range 0.3-90 μg/m(3)) and mostly very low concentrations of other aldehydes were measured on 108 flights. Simultaneous adsorption and derivatization of airborne aldehydes on DNPH-cartridges to the Schiff bases and their HPLC analysis with UV absorbance detection is a useful method to measure aldehydes in cabin-air of commercial aircraft. PMID:26376451

  11. Inferring Absorbing Organic Carbon Content from AERONET Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arola, A.; Schuster, G.; Myhre, G.; Kazadzis, S.; Dey, S.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    Black carbon, light-absorbing organic carbon (often called brown carbon) and mineral dust are the major light-absorbing aerosols. Currently the sources and formation of brown carbon aerosol in particular are not well understood. In this study we estimated globally the amount of light absorbing organic carbon and black carbon from AERONET measurements. We find that the columnar absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon) levels in biomass burning regions of South-America and Africa are relatively high (about 15-20 magnesium per square meters during biomass burning season), while the concentrations are significantly lower in urban areas in US and Europe. However, we estimated significant absorbing organic carbon amounts from the data of megacities of newly industrialized countries, particularly in India and China, showing also clear seasonality with peak values up to 30-35 magnesium per square meters during the coldest season, likely caused by the coal and biofuel burning used for heating. We also compared our retrievals with the modeled organic carbon by global Oslo CTM for several sites. Model values are higher in biomass burning regions than AERONET-based retrievals, while opposite is true in urban areas in India and China.

  12. Measuring the Variability of Data from Other Values in the Set

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dustin L.; Scariano, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Students have intuitive notions of the meaning of variability; some may see variability as how values in a set vary from each other. This article provides a measure of variability that is based on that conception. We introduce this new measure and a method for calculating it. Finally, we prove that this measure is equivalent to the population…

  13. Measuring Value in Health Care: The Times, They Are A Changin'.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Steven E

    2016-01-01

    Policy makers struggle to measure value in health care, and yet there is the recurring question: Is our present system of quality metrics too costly and burdensome? We need to develop measures promoting shared accountability across settings and providers, identify and develop meaningful outcome measures, and reduce the burden on providers of data collection. PMID:27422952

  14. Modelling Absorbent Phenomena of Absorbent Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayeb, S.; Ladhari, N.; Ben Hassen, M.; Sakli, F.

    Absorption, retention and strike through time, as evaluating criteria of absorbent structures quality were studied. Determination of influent parameters on these criteria were realized by using the design method of experimental sets. In this study, the studied parameters are: Super absorbent polymer (SAP)/fluff ratio, compression and the porosity of the non woven used as a cover stock. Absorption capacity and retention are mostly influenced by SAP/fluff ratio. However, strike through time is affected by compression. Thus, a modelling of these characteristics in function of the important parameter was established.

  15. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Guillen, Donna P.; Longhurst, Glen R.; Porter, Douglas L.; Parry, James R.

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  16. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Ronald J.

    1987-09-22

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  17. Metrics for assessing the quality of value sets in clinical quality measures

    PubMed Central

    Winnenburg, Rainer; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the quality of value sets in clinical quality measures, both individually and as a population of value sets. Materials and methods: The concepts from a given value set are expected to be rooted by one or few ancestor concepts and the value set is expected to contain all the descendants of its root concepts and only these descendants. (1) We assessed the completeness and correctness of individual value sets by comparison to the extension derived from their roots. (2) We assessed the non-redundancy of value sets for the entire population of value sets (within a given code system) using the Jaccard similarity measure. Results: We demonstrated the utility of our approach on some cases of inconsistent value sets and produced a list of 58 potentially duplicate value sets from the current set of clinical quality measures for the 2014 Meaningful Use criteria. Conclusion: These metrics are easy to compute and provide compact indicators of the completeness, correctness, and non-redundancy of value sets. PMID:24551422

  18. Patients’ perceived value of pharmacy quality measures: a mixed-methods study

    PubMed Central

    Shiyanbola, Olayinka O; Mort, Jane R

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe patients’ perceived value and use of quality measures in evaluating and choosing community pharmacies. Design Focus group methodology was combined with a survey tool. During the focus groups, participants assessed the value of the Pharmacy Quality Alliance's quality measures in evaluating and choosing a pharmacy. Also, participants completed questionnaires rating their perceived value of quality measures in evaluating a pharmacy (1 being low value and 5 being high) or choosing a pharmacy (yes/no). Thematic analysis and descriptive statistics were used to analyse the focus groups and surveys, respectively. Setting Semistructured focus groups were conducted in a private meeting space of an urban and a rural area of a Mid-western State in the USA. Participants Thirty-four adults who filled prescription medications in community pharmacies for a chronic illness were recruited in community pharmacies, senior centres and public libraries. Results While comments indicated that all measures were important, medication safety measures (eg, drug-drug interactions) were valued more highly than others. Rating of quality measure utility in evaluating a pharmacy ranged from a mean of 4.88 (‘drug-drug interactions’) to a mean of 4.0 (‘absence of controller therapy for patients with asthma’). Patients were hesitant to use quality information in choosing a pharmacy (depending on the participant's location) but might consider if moving to a new area or having had a negative pharmacy experience. Use of select quality measures to choose a pharmacy ranged from 97.1% of participants using ‘drug-drug interactions’ (medication safety measure) to 55.9% using ‘absence of controller therapy for patients with asthma’. Conclusions The study participants valued quality measures in evaluating and selecting a community pharmacy, with medication safety measures valued highest. The participants reported that the quality measures would not typically cause a

  19. Different Tests, Different Answers: The Stability of Teacher Value-Added Estimates across Outcome Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papay, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, educational researchers and practitioners have turned to value-added models to evaluate teacher performance. Although value-added estimates depend on the assessment used to measure student achievement, the importance of outcome selection has received scant attention in the literature. Using data from a large, urban school district, I…

  20. Method and apparatus for real-time measurement of fuel gas compositions and heating values

    DOEpatents

    Zelepouga, Serguei; Pratapas, John M.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Jangale, Vilas V.

    2016-03-22

    An exemplary embodiment can be an apparatus for real-time, in situ measurement of gas compositions and heating values. The apparatus includes a near infrared sensor for measuring concentrations of hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide, a mid infrared sensor for measuring concentrations of carbon monoxide and a semiconductor based sensor for measuring concentrations of hydrogen gas. A data processor having a computer program for reducing the effects of cross-sensitivities of the sensors to components other than target components of the sensors is also included. Also provided are corresponding or associated methods for real-time, in situ determination of a composition and heating value of a fuel gas.

  1. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  2. Validation of a questionnaire measure of the relative reinforcing value of food.

    PubMed

    Goldfield, Gary S; Epstein, Leonard H; Davidson, Martin; Saad, Frances

    2005-06-01

    The traditional method of measuring the relative reinforcing value of food provides subjects a choice of food and non-food alternatives, and defines the relative reinforcing value of food based on the allocation of responses for the two alternatives as the schedules of reinforcement for the alternatives change. Greater allocation of responses for one alternative versus another reflects the relative reinforcing value of the alternatives. This method was designed for laboratory use, but methods are needed to extend measurement of reinforcing value to applied research environments. Two experiments were conducted to assess the validity of a questionnaire measure of the relative reinforcing value of food in normal weight university samples. Study 1 (n=39) assessed the relationship between the relative reinforcing value of snack food versus fruits and vegetables (condition 1) or enjoyable sedentary behaviors (condition 2) as measured by the questionnaire and standardized computerized concurrent schedules criterion. A significant relationship (Pearson r=0.49, p<0.01; Guttman's MU2=0.69) across the two conditions between the two methods of measuring food reinforcement was observed. Experiment 2 (n=10) utilized a within-subject counterbalanced design to manipulate food deprivation and hunger levels to determine if food deprivation increased the reinforcing value of snack food as measured by the questionnaire to provide an index of validity of the questionnaire. Results showed that food deprivation increased the relative reinforcing value of snack food. Results from both studies suggest that the questionnaire has good validity, and may represent an efficient and reliable method of assessing the relative reinforcing value of food.

  3. Consistency between Self-Reported and Recorded Values for Clinical Measures

    PubMed Central

    III, Joseph Thomas; Paulet, Mindy; Rajpura, Jigar R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated consistency between self-reported values for clinical measures and recorded clinical measures. Methods. Self-reported values were collected for the clinical measures: systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, glucose level, height, weight, and cholesterol from health risk assessments completed by enrollees in a privately insured cohort. Body mass index (BMI) was computed from reported height and weight. Practitioner recorded values for the clinical measures were obtained from health screenings. We used bivariate Pearson correlation analysis and descriptive statistics to evaluate consistency between self-reported data and recorded clinic measurements. Results. There was high correlation between self-reported clinical values and recorded clinical measures for diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.91, P = <0.0001), systolic blood pressure (r = 0.93, P = <0.0001), cholesterol (r = 0.97, P = <0.0001), body mass index (r = 0.96, P = <0.0001), glucose (r = 0.96, P = <0.0001), weight (r = 0.98, P = <0.0001), and height (r = 0.89, P = <0.0001). Conclusions. Self-reported clinical values for each of the eight clinical measures examined had good consistency with practitioner recorded data. PMID:26942034

  4. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  5. Acoustical model of a Shoddy fibre absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, John Peter

    ) Characterization testing yields specific values for intrinsic material parameters that allow for comparison to other porous materials. Individual parameter relations allow users to substitute measured or theoretical values as needed. A new empirical acoustical model is proposed to describe the behaviour of Shoddy-based fibre absorbers. The model requires knowledge of the bulk density only. This parameter is easily measured making application of the model elementary. Mots-clés : Shoddy, porous, fibre, recycled, absorption, model, acoustic.

  6. Absorbing Outflows in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, Smita

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this program was a comprehensive multiwavelength study of absorption phenomena in active galactic nuclei (AGN). These include a variety of associated absorption systems: X-ray warm absorbers, X-ray cold absorbers. UV absorbers with high ionization lines, MgII absorbers, red quasars and BALQSOs. The aim is to determine the physical conditions in the absorbing outflows, study their inter-relations and their role in AGN. We designed several observing programs to achieve this goal: X-ray spectroscopy, UV spectroscopy, FLAY spectroscopy and X-ray imaging. We were very successful towards achieving the goal over the five year period as shown through following observing programs and papers. Copies of a few papers are attached with this report.

  7. Using Value-Added Models to Measure Teacher Effects on Students' Motivation and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruzek, Erik A.; Domina, Thurston; Conley, AnneMarie M.; Duncan, Greg J.; Karabenick, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Value-added (VA) models measure teacher contributions to student learning and are increasingly employed in educational reform efforts. Using data from 35 seventh-grade teachers and 2,026 students across seven schools, we employ VA methods to measure teacher contributions to students' motivational orientations (mastery and performance achievement…

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Value-Added Data Products (Including Evaluated Data Sets)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Many of the scientific needs of the ARM Program are met through the analysis and processing of existing data products into "value-added" products or VAPs. Despite extensive instrumentation deployed at the ARM sites, there will always be quantities of interest that are either impractical or impossible to measure directly or routinely. Physical models using ARM instrument data as inputs are implemented as VAPs and can help fill some of the unmet measurement needs of the Program. Conversely, ARM produces some VAPs not in order to fill unmet measurement needs, but instead to improve the quality of existing measurements. In addition, when more than one measurement is available, ARM also produces "best estimate" VAPs. A special class of VAP called a Quality Measurement Experiment (QME) adds value to the input data streams by providing for continuous assessment of the quality of the input data. [taken from http://www.arm.gov/data/vaps_all.php] One of the ARM data centers, the External Data Center or XDC at Brookhaven National Laboratory, also adds value to ARM information by identifying sources and acquiring external data to augment the data being generated within the program. These external data sets are converted, processed, and carefully evaluated for their value to the overall ARM program. /. Data Plots are also value-added products from ARM.

  9. Bridging particle and wave sensitivity in a configurable detector of positive operator-valued measures.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Graciana; Lundeen, Jeff S; Branderhorst, Matthijs P A; Coldenstrodt-Ronge, Hendrik B; Smith, Brian J; Walmsley, Ian A

    2009-02-27

    We report an optical detector with tunable positive operator-valued measures. The device is based on a combination of weak-field homodyne techniques and photon-number-resolving detection. The resulting positive operator-valued measures can be continuously tuned from Fock-state projectors to a variety of phase-dependent quantum-state measurements by adjusting different system parameters such as local oscillator coupling, amplitude, and phase, allowing thus not only detection but also preparation of exotic quantum states. Experimental tomographic reconstructions of classical benchmark states are presented as a demonstration of the detector capabilities.

  10. Applicability of International and DOE Target Values to ALD Destructive Measurement Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, M.K.

    2002-12-19

    International Target values and target value applicability are a function of the nuclear material processing campaign or application for which the accountability measurement method is being applied. Safeguarding significant quantities of nuclear-grade materials requires that accountability measurements be as accurate, precise, and representative as practically possible. In general, the ITV provides a benchmark for determining generic acceptability of the performance of the various accountability measurement methods, since it represents a performance level that is accepted as highly reliable. There are cases where it is acceptable to select alternative accountability methods not specifically referenced by the ITV, or to use the recognized measurement method, even though the uncertainties are greater than the target values.

  11. The VALS: A new tool to measure people's general valued attributes of landscapes.

    PubMed

    Kendal, Dave; Ford, Rebecca M; Anderson, Nerida M; Farrar, Alison

    2015-11-01

    Research on values for natural areas has largely focussed on theoretical concerns such as distinguishing different kinds of values held by people. However practice, policymaking, planning and management is typically focused on more tangible valued attributes of the landscape such as biodiversity and recreation infrastructure that can be manipulated by management actions. There is a need for valid psychometric measures of such values that are suited to informing land management policies. A Valued Attributes of Landscape Scale (VALS) was developed, derived from a document analysis of values expressed in public land policy documents. The validity of the VALS was tested in an online survey comparing values across one of three randomly presented landscape contexts in Victoria, Australia: all publicly managed natural land, coastal areas, and large urban parks. A purposive snowball sample was used to recruit participants with a range of views and professional experience with land management, including members of the urban public. Factor analysis of responses (n = 646) separated concepts relating to natural attributes, social functions, the experience of being in natural areas, cultural attributes and productive uses. Relative importance of valued attribute factors was similar across all landscape contexts, although there were small but significant differences in the way people valued social functions (higher in urban parks) and productive uses (lower in urban parks). We conclude that the concept of valued attributes is useful for linking theoretical understandings of people's environmental values to the way values are considered by land managers, and that these attributes can be measured using the VALS instrument to produce data that should be useful for the policy and planning of natural resources. PMID:26321532

  12. The VALS: A new tool to measure people's general valued attributes of landscapes.

    PubMed

    Kendal, Dave; Ford, Rebecca M; Anderson, Nerida M; Farrar, Alison

    2015-11-01

    Research on values for natural areas has largely focussed on theoretical concerns such as distinguishing different kinds of values held by people. However practice, policymaking, planning and management is typically focused on more tangible valued attributes of the landscape such as biodiversity and recreation infrastructure that can be manipulated by management actions. There is a need for valid psychometric measures of such values that are suited to informing land management policies. A Valued Attributes of Landscape Scale (VALS) was developed, derived from a document analysis of values expressed in public land policy documents. The validity of the VALS was tested in an online survey comparing values across one of three randomly presented landscape contexts in Victoria, Australia: all publicly managed natural land, coastal areas, and large urban parks. A purposive snowball sample was used to recruit participants with a range of views and professional experience with land management, including members of the urban public. Factor analysis of responses (n = 646) separated concepts relating to natural attributes, social functions, the experience of being in natural areas, cultural attributes and productive uses. Relative importance of valued attribute factors was similar across all landscape contexts, although there were small but significant differences in the way people valued social functions (higher in urban parks) and productive uses (lower in urban parks). We conclude that the concept of valued attributes is useful for linking theoretical understandings of people's environmental values to the way values are considered by land managers, and that these attributes can be measured using the VALS instrument to produce data that should be useful for the policy and planning of natural resources.

  13. On set-valued functionals: Multivariate risk measures and Aumann integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ararat, Cagin

    In this dissertation, multivariate risk measures for random vectors and Aumann integrals of set-valued functions are studied. Both are set-valued functionals with values in a complete lattice of subsets of Rm. Multivariate risk measures are considered in a general d-asset financial market with trading opportunities in discrete time. Specifically, the following features of the market are incorporated in the evaluation of multivariate risk: convex transaction costs modeled by solvency regions, intermediate trading constraints modeled by convex random sets, and the requirement of liquidation into the first m ≤ d of the assets. It is assumed that the investor has a "pure" multivariate risk measure R on the space of m-dimensional random vectors which represents her risk attitude towards the assets but does not take into account the frictions of the market. Then, the investor with a d-dimensional position minimizes the set-valued functional R over all m-dimensional positions that she can reach by trading in the market subject to the frictions described above. The resulting functional Rmar on the space of d-dimensional random vectors is another multivariate risk measure, called the market-extension of R. A dual representation for R mar that decomposes the effects of R and the frictions of the market is proved. Next, multivariate risk measures are studied in a utility-based framework. It is assumed that the investor has a complete risk preference towards each individual asset, which can be represented by a von Neumann-Morgenstern utility function. Then, an incomplete preference is considered for multivariate positions which is represented by the vector of the individual utility functions. Under this structure, multivariate shortfall and divergence risk measures are defined as the optimal values of set minimization problems. The dual relationship between the two classes of multivariate risk measures is constructed via a recent Lagrange duality for set optimization. In

  14. Evaluation of algorithms for calculating bioimpedance phase angle values from measured whole-body impedance modulus.

    PubMed

    Nordbotten, Bernt J; Tronstad, Christian; Martinsen, Ørjan G; Grimnes, Sverre

    2011-07-01

    This paper addresses the problem of calculating the bioimpedance phase angle from measurements of impedance modulus. A complete impedance measurement was performed on altogether 20 healthy persons using a Solatron 1260/1294 system. The obtained impedance modulus (absolute impedance value) values were used to calculate the Cole parameters and from them the phase angles. In addition, the phase angles were also calculated using a Kramers-Kronig approach. A correlation analysis for all subjects at each frequency (5, 50, 100 and 200 kHz) for both methods gave R(2) values ranging from 0.7 to 0.96 for the Cole approach and from 0.83 to 0.96 for the Kramers-Kronig approach; thus, both methods gave good results compared with the complete measurement results. From further statistical significance testing of the absolute value of the difference between measured and calculated phase angles, it was found that the Cole equation method gave significantly better agreement for the 50 and 100 kHz frequencies. In addition, the Cole equation method gives the four Cole parameters (R(0), R(∞), τ(z) and α) using measurements at frequencies up to 200 kHz while the Kramers-Kronig method used frequencies up to 500 kHz to reduce the effect of truncation on the calculated results. Both methods gave results that can be used for further bioimpedance calculations, thus improving the application potential of bioimpedance measurement results obtained using relatively inexpensive and portable measurement equipment.

  15. Internal absorber solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Sletten, Carlyle J.; Herskovitz, Sheldon B.; Holt, F. S.; Sletten, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Thin solar collecting panels are described made from arrays of small rod collectors consisting of a refracting dielectric rod lens with an absorber imbedded within it and a reflecting mirror coated on the back side of the dielectric rod. Non-tracking collector panels on vertical walls or roof tops receive approximately 90% of solar radiation within an acceptance zone 60.degree. in elevation angle by 120.degree. or more in the azimuth sectors with a collector concentration ratio of approximately 3.0. Miniaturized construction of the circular dielectric rods with internal absorbers reduces the weight per area of glass, plastic and metal used in the collector panels. No external parts or insulation are needed as heat losses are low due to partial vacuum or low conductivity gas surrounding heated portions of the collector. The miniature internal absorbers are generally made of solid copper with black selective surface and the collected solar heat is extracted at the collector ends by thermal conductivity along the absorber rods. Heat is removed from end fittings by use of liquid circulants. Several alternate constructions are provided for simplifying collector panel fabrication and for preventing the thermal expansion and contraction of the heated absorber or circulant tubes from damaging vacuum seals. In a modified version of the internal absorber collector, oil with temperature dependent viscosity is pumped through a segmented absorber which is now composed of closely spaced insulated metal tubes. In this way the circulant is automatically diverted through heated portions of the absorber giving higher collector concentration ratios than theoretically possible for an unsegmented absorber.

  16. Lipid-absorbing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Wallace, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The removal of bile acids and cholesterol by polymeric absorption is discussed in terms of micelle-polymer interaction. The results obtained with a polymer composed of 75 parts PEO and 25 parts PB plus curing ingredients show an absorption of 305 to 309%, based on original polymer weight. Particle size effects on absorption rate are analyzed. It is concluded that crosslinked polyethylene oxide polymers will absorb water, crosslinked polybutadiene polymers will absorb lipids; neither polymer will absorb appreciable amounts of lipids from micellar solutions of lipids in water.

  17. A summary of the measured pK values of the ionizable groups in folded proteins.

    PubMed

    Grimsley, Gerald R; Scholtz, J Martin; Pace, C Nick

    2009-01-01

    We tabulated 541 measured pK values reported in the literature for the Asp, Glu, His, Cys, Tyr, and Lys side chains, and the C and N termini of 78 folded proteins. The majority of these values are for the Asp, Glu, and His side chains. The average pK values are Asp 3.5 +/- 1.2 (139); Glu 4.2 +/- 0.9 (153); His 6.6 +/- 1.0 (131); Cys 6.8 +/- 2.7 (25); Tyr 10.3 +/- 1.2 (20); Lys 10.5 +/- 1.1 (35); C-terminus 3.3 +/- 0.8 (22) and N-terminus 7.7 +/- 0.5 (16). We compare these results with the measured pK values of these groups in alanine pentapeptides, and comment on our overall findings. PMID:19177368

  18. A summary of the measured pK values of the ionizable groups in folded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Grimsley, Gerald R; Scholtz, J Martin; Pace, C Nick

    2009-01-01

    We tabulated 541 measured pK values reported in the literature for the Asp, Glu, His, Cys, Tyr, and Lys side chains, and the C and N termini of 78 folded proteins. The majority of these values are for the Asp, Glu, and His side chains. The average pK values are Asp 3.5 ± 1.2 (139); Glu 4.2 ± 0.9 (153); His 6.6 ± 1.0 (131); Cys 6.8 ± 2.7 (25); Tyr 10.3 ± 1.2 (20); Lys 10.5 ± 1.1 (35); C-terminus 3.3 ± 0.8 (22) and N-terminus 7.7 ± 0.5 (16). We compare these results with the measured pK values of these groups in alanine pentapeptides, and comment on our overall findings. PMID:19177368

  19. Finite difference approximations for measure-valued solutions of a hierarchically size-structured population model.

    PubMed

    Ackleh, Azmy S; Chellamuthu, Vinodh K; Ito, Kazufumi

    2015-04-01

    We study a quasilinear hierarchically size-structured population model presented in [4]. In this model the growth, mortality and reproduction rates are assumed to depend on a function of the population density. In [4] we showed that solutions to this model can become singular (measure-valued) in finite time even if all the individual parameters are smooth. Therefore, in this paper we develop a first order finite difference scheme to compute these measure-valued solutions. Convergence analysis for this method is provided. We also develop a high resolution second order scheme to compute the measure-valued solution of the model and perform a comparative study between the two schemes. PMID:25811433

  20. [Gas Concentration Measurement Based on the Integral Value of Absorptance Spectrum].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-jun; Tao, Shao-hua; Yang, Bing-chu; Deng, Hong-gui

    2015-12-01

    The absorptance spectrum of a gas is the basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the gas by the law of the Lambert-Beer. The integral value of the absorptance spectrum is an important parameter to describe the characteristics of the gas absorption. Based on the measured absorptance spectrum of a gas, we collected the required data from the database of HIT-RAN, and chose one of the spectral lines and calculated the integral value of the absorptance spectrum in the frequency domain, and then substituted the integral value into Lambert-Beer's law to obtain the concentration of the detected gas. By calculating the integral value of the absorptance spectrum we can avoid the more complicated calculation of the spectral line function and a series of standard gases for calibration, so the gas concentration measurement will be simpler and faster. We studied the changing trends of the integral values of the absorptance spectrums versus temperature. Since temperature variation would cause the corresponding variation in pressure, we studied the changing trends of the integral values of the absorptance spectrums versus both the pressure not changed with temperature and changed with the temperature variation. Based on the two cases, we found that the integral values of the absorptance spectrums both would firstly increase, then decrease, and finally stabilize with temperature increasing, but the ranges of specific changing trend were different in the two cases. In the experiments, we found that the relative errors of the integrated values of the absorptance spectrum were much higher than 1% and still increased with temperature when we only considered the change of temperature and completely ignored the pressure affected by the temperature variation, and the relative errors of the integrated values of the absorptance spectrum were almost constant at about only 1% when we considered that the pressure were affected by the temperature variation. As the integral value

  1. [Gas Concentration Measurement Based on the Integral Value of Absorptance Spectrum].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-jun; Tao, Shao-hua; Yang, Bing-chu; Deng, Hong-gui

    2015-12-01

    The absorptance spectrum of a gas is the basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the gas by the law of the Lambert-Beer. The integral value of the absorptance spectrum is an important parameter to describe the characteristics of the gas absorption. Based on the measured absorptance spectrum of a gas, we collected the required data from the database of HIT-RAN, and chose one of the spectral lines and calculated the integral value of the absorptance spectrum in the frequency domain, and then substituted the integral value into Lambert-Beer's law to obtain the concentration of the detected gas. By calculating the integral value of the absorptance spectrum we can avoid the more complicated calculation of the spectral line function and a series of standard gases for calibration, so the gas concentration measurement will be simpler and faster. We studied the changing trends of the integral values of the absorptance spectrums versus temperature. Since temperature variation would cause the corresponding variation in pressure, we studied the changing trends of the integral values of the absorptance spectrums versus both the pressure not changed with temperature and changed with the temperature variation. Based on the two cases, we found that the integral values of the absorptance spectrums both would firstly increase, then decrease, and finally stabilize with temperature increasing, but the ranges of specific changing trend were different in the two cases. In the experiments, we found that the relative errors of the integrated values of the absorptance spectrum were much higher than 1% and still increased with temperature when we only considered the change of temperature and completely ignored the pressure affected by the temperature variation, and the relative errors of the integrated values of the absorptance spectrum were almost constant at about only 1% when we considered that the pressure were affected by the temperature variation. As the integral value

  2. Detection of Organic Compounds in Water by an Optical Absorbance Method

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chihoon; Eom, Joo Beom; Jung, Soyoun; Ji, Taeksoo

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an optical method which allows determination of the organic compound concentration in water by measurement of the UV (ultraviolet) absorption at a wavelength of 250 nm~300 nm. The UV absorbance was analyzed by means of a multiple linear regression model for estimation of the total organic carbon contents in water, which showed a close correlation with the UV absorbance, demonstrating a high adjusted coefficient of determination, 0.997. The comparison of the TOC (total organic carbon) concentrations for real samples (tab water, sea, and river) calculated from the UV absorbance spectra, and those measured by a conventional TOC analyzer indicates that the higher the TOC value the better the agreement. This UV absorbance method can be easily configured for real-time monitoring water pollution, and built into a compact system applicable to industry areas. PMID:26742043

  3. How Can Value-Added Measures Be Used for Teacher Improvement? What We Know Series: Value-Added Methods and Applications. Knowledge Brief 13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeb, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    The question for this brief is whether education leaders can use value-added measures as tools for improving schooling and, if so, how to do this. Districts, states, and schools can, at least in theory, generate gains in educational outcomes for students using value-added measures in three ways: creating information on effective programs, making…

  4. Craniofacial skeletal measurements based on computed tomography: Part II. Normal values and growth trends.

    PubMed

    Waitzman, A A; Posnick, J C; Armstrong, D C; Pron, G E

    1992-03-01

    Current diagnosis and surgical correction of craniofacial anomalies would benefit from accurate quantitative and standardized points of reference. A retrospective study was undertaken to define normal values for a series of craniofacial measurements and to evaluate the growth patterns of the craniofacial complex through axial computed tomography (CT). Fifteen measurements were taken from 542 CT scan series of skeletally normal subjects. The measurement values were then divided into 1-year age categories from 1 to 17 years, and into four age groups for those under 1 year of age. The normal range and growth pattern of measurement values for the cranial vault, orbital region, and upper midface are presented. The overall size of the cranio-orbito-zygomatic skeleton reaches more than 85 percent of adult size by age 5 years. The cranial vault grows rapidly in the first year of life but growth levels off early. The upper midface grows at a slower rate in infancy, but continues to grow later in childhood and early adolescence. Knowledge of the differential growth patterns and normal measurement values in the craniofacial region will help improve diagnostic accuracy, staging of reconstruction, precision of corrective surgery, and follow-up of patients. PMID:1571345

  5. Critical micelle concentration values for different surfactants measured with solid-phase microextraction fibers.

    PubMed

    Haftka, Joris J-H; Scherpenisse, Peter; Oetter, Günter; Hodges, Geoff; Eadsforth, Charles V; Kotthoff, Matthias; Hermens, Joop L M

    2016-09-01

    The amphiphilic nature of surfactants drives the formation of micelles at the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers were used in the present study to measure CMC values of 12 nonionic, anionic, cationic, and zwitterionic surfactants. The SPME-derived CMC values were compared to values determined using a traditional surface tension method. At the CMC of a surfactant, a break in the relationship between the concentration in SPME fibers and the concentration in water is observed. The CMC values determined with SPME fibers deviated by less than a factor of 3 from values determined with a surface tension method for 7 out of 12 compounds. In addition, the fiber-water sorption isotherms gave information about the sorption mechanism to polyacrylate-coated SPME fibers. A limitation of the SPME method is that CMCs for very hydrophobic cationic surfactants cannot be determined when the cation exchange capacity of the SPME fibers is lower than the CMC value. The advantage of the SPME method over other methods is that CMC values of individual compounds in a mixture can be determined with this method. However, CMC values may be affected by the presence of compounds with other chain lengths in the mixture because of possible mixed micelle formation. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2173-2181. © 2016 SETAC. PMID:26873883

  6. Positive-operator-valued measures in the Hamiltonian formulation of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenović, D.; Burić, N.; Popović, D. B.; Radonjić, M.; Prvanović, S.

    2015-06-01

    In the Hilbert space formulation of quantum mechanics, ideal measurements of physical variables are discussed using the spectral theory of Hermitian operators and the corresponding projector-valued measures (PVMs). However, more general types of measurements require the treatment in terms of positive-operator-valued measures (POVMs). In the Hamiltonian formulation of quantum mechanics, canonical coordinates are related to PVM. In this paper the results of an analysis of various aspects of applications of POVMs in the Hamiltonian formulation are reported. Several properties of state parameters and quantum observables given by POVMs or represented in an overcomplete basis, including the general Hamiltonian treatment of the Neumark extension, are presented. An analysis of the phase operator, given by the corresponding POVMs, in the Hilbert space and the Hamiltonian frameworks is also given.

  7. Uncertainty of measurement or of mean value for the reliable classification of contaminated land.

    PubMed

    Boon, Katy A; Ramsey, Michael H

    2010-12-15

    Classification of contaminated land is important for risk assessment and so it is vital to understand and quantify all of the uncertainties that are involved in the assessment of contaminated land. This paper uses a case study to compare two methods for assessing the uncertainty in site investigations (uncertainty of individual measurements, including that from sampling, and uncertainty of the mean value of all measurements within an area) and how the different methods affect the decisions made about a site. Using the 'uncertainty of the mean value' there is shown to be no significant possibility of 'significant harm' under UK guidance at one particular test site, but if you consider the 'uncertainty of the measurements' a significant proportion (50%) of the site is shown to be possibly contaminated. This raises doubts as to whether the current method using 'uncertainty of the mean' is sufficiently robust, and suggests that 'uncertainty of measurement' information may be preferable, or at least beneficial when used in conjunction.

  8. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  9. Some results on Tsallis entropy measure and k-record values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vikas

    2016-11-01

    Extensive or non-extensive statistical mechanics arise from the additive or non-additivity of the corresponding entropy measures. Non-additive entropy measures are important for many applications. In this article, we consider and study a non-additive Tsallis entropy for k-record statistics from some continuous probability models. Furthermore, we prove a characterization result for the Tsallis entropy of k-record values. At the end, we study Tsallis residual entropy for k-record statistics.

  10. Informational power of the Hoggar symmetric informationally complete positive operator-valued measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymusiak, Anna; Słomczyński, Wojciech

    2016-07-01

    We compute the informational power for the Hoggar symmetric informationally complete positive operator-valued measure (SIC-POVM) in dimension eight, i.e., the classical capacity of a quantum-classical channel generated by this measurement. We show that the states constituting a maximally informative ensemble form a twin Hoggar SIC-POVM being the image of the original one under a conjugation.

  11. Freshwater DOM quantity and quality from a two-component model of UV absorbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Heather T.; Tipping, Edward; Koprivnjak, Jean-Francois; Miller, Matthew P.; Cookson, Brenda; Hamilton-Taylor, John

    2012-01-01

    We present a model that considers UV-absorbing dissolved organic matter (DOM) to consist of two components (A and B), each with a distinct and constant spectrum. Component A absorbs UV light strongly, and is therefore presumed to possess aromatic chromophores and hydrophobic character, whereas B absorbs weakly and can be assumed hydrophilic. We parameterised the model with dissolved organic carbon concentrations [DOC] and corresponding UV spectra for c. 1700 filtered surface water samples from North America and the United Kingdom, by optimising extinction coefficients for A and B, together with a small constant concentration of non-absorbing DOM (0.80 mg DOC L-1). Good unbiased predictions of [DOC] from absorbance data at 270 and 350 nm were obtained (r2 = 0.98), the sum of squared residuals in [DOC] being reduced by 66% compared to a regression model fitted to absorbance at 270 nm alone. The parameterised model can use measured optical absorbance values at any pair of suitable wavelengths to calculate both [DOC] and the relative amounts of A and B in a water sample, i.e. measures of quantity and quality. Blind prediction of [DOC] was satisfactory for 9 of 11 independent data sets (181 of 213 individual samples).

  12. Structured Metal Film as Perfect Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiang; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu

    2014-03-01

    With standing U-shaped resonators, fish-spear-like resonator has been designed for the first time as the building block to assemble perfect absorbers. The samples have been fabricated with two-photon polymerization process and FTIR measurement results support the effectiveness of the perfect absorber design. In such a structure the polarization-dependent resonance occurs between the tines of the spears instead of the conventional design where the resonance occurs between the metallic layers separated by a dielectric interlayer. The incident light neither transmits nor reflects back which results in unit absorbance. The power of light is trapped between the tines of spears and finally be absorbed. The whole structure is covered with a continuous metallic layer with good thermo-conductance, which provides an excellent approach to deal with heat dissipation, is enlightening in exploring metamaterial absorbers.

  13. Measuring JHH values with a selective constant-time 2D NMR protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-11-01

    Proton-proton scalar couplings play important roles in molecule structure elucidation. However, measurements of JHH values in complex coupled spin systems remain challenging. In this study, we develop a selective constant-time (SECT) 2D NMR protocol with which scalar coupling networks involving chosen protons can be revealed, and corresponding JHH values can be measured through doublets along the F1 dimension. All JHH values within a network of n fully coupled protons can be separately determined with (n - 1) SECT experiments. Additionally, the proposed pulse sequence possesses satisfactory sensitivity and handy implementation. Therefore, it will interest scientists who intend to address structural analyzes of molecules with overcrowded spectra, and may greatly facilitate the applications of scalar-coupling constants in molecule structure studies.

  14. Value-Based Health Care for Chronic Care: Aligning Outcomes Measurement with the Patient Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Helena Hvitfeldt; Essén, Anna; Ernestam, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Value-based health care is increasingly used for developing health care services by relating patient outcomes to costs. A hierarchical value scorecard for creating outcome measurements has been suggested: the 3-tier model. The objective of this study was to test the model against the patient's view of value in a chronic care setting. Methods: Semistructured interviews with 22 persons with rheumatoid arthritis were conducted, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Themes were extracted, and the model was critically applied and revised. Results: The study validates existing dimensions in the model but suggests adding information, social health, predictability, and continuity to make it more useful and representative of patients' preferences. Conclusion: Although the model aims to focus on outcomes relevant to patients, it lacks dimensions important to individuals with rheumatoid arthritis. The data illustrate difficulties in finding patients' preferred outcomes and imply tactics for arriving at meaningful measurements. PMID:27749717

  15. Measurement of 13C chemical shift tensor principal values with a magic-angle turning experiment.

    PubMed

    Hu, J Z; Orendt, A M; Alderman, D W; Pugmire, R J; Ye, C; Grant, D M

    1994-08-01

    The magic-angle turning (MAT) experiment introduced by Gan is developed into a powerful and routine method for measuring the principal values of 13C chemical shift tensors in powdered solids. A large-volume MAT probe with stable rotation frequencies down to 22 Hz is described. A triple-echo MAT pulse sequence is introduced to improve the quality of the two-dimensional baseplane. It is shown that measurements of the principal values of chemical shift tensors in complex compounds can be enhanced by using either short contact times or dipolar dephasing pulse sequences to isolate the powder patterns from protonated or non-protonated carbons, respectively. A model compound, 1,2,3-trimethoxybenzene, is used to demonstrate these techniques, and the 13C principal values in 2,3-dimethylnaphthalene and Pocahontas coal are reported as typical examples.

  16. Measuring Teacher Effectiveness Using Value-Added Models of High School Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawade, Nandita G.; Meyer, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    This article uses empirical data to consider the consequences of particular characteristics of instruction and testing in high school for the modeling and estimation of value-added measures of school or teacher effectiveness. Unlike Mathematics and Reading for most elementary and middle school grades, there is a lack of annual testing of students…

  17. Refining the Measure and Dimensions of Social Values of Older People (SVOP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Eunkyung; Kolomer, Stacey R.

    2007-01-01

    Older persons are living longer and healthier and, thus, are capable of being more productive and less dependent. Despite this trend, young people persistently hold the age-old negative stereotypes about older persons. The goals of this study were to develop a valid, reliable measure of social values of older people and to assess its utility as…

  18. Sentinels Guarding the Grail: Value-Added Measurement and the Quest for Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Rachael; Lester, Jessica Nina

    2013-01-01

    Since the beginning of the federal Race To The Top grant competition, Value-Added Measurement (VAM) has captured the attention of the American public through high-profile media representations of the tool and the controversy that surrounds it. In this paper, we build upon investigations of constructions of VAM in the media and present a discourse…

  19. Measuring the Value of Succession Planning and Management: A Qualitative Study of Multinational Companies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yeonsoo

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes a model for planning and operating an effective succession planning and management (SP&M) program and measuring its value. The nature of the research is exploratory, following a qualitative approach using in-depth interviews. Representatives of multinational companies interviewed for this study revealed that succession…

  20. Measuring Staff Perceptions of University Identity and Activities: The Mission and Values Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Joseph R.; Velcoff, Jessica

    2006-01-01

    Higher education institutions need to ascertain whether their stakeholders understand the school's mission, vision, and values. In the present study, the psychometric properties of a mission identity and activity measure were investigated with two staff samples. Using a principal component factor analysis (varimax rotation), respondents in Sample…

  1. Start a New Fire: Measuring the Value of Academic Libraries in Undergraduate Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menchaca, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, fundamental changes in information distribution, in the general economy, and in the behaviors of faculty, students, and library staff have problematized the question of an academic library's value and how it can be measured. This article reviews those changes and, drawing on research linked to the Collegiate Learning…

  2. Measuring the weak value of momentum in a double slit atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, J.; Edmunds, P. D.; Barker, P. F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the development of an experiment to measure the weak value of the transverse momentum operator (local momentum [1]) of cold atoms passing through a matter- wave interferometer. The results will be used to reconstruct the atom's average trajectories. We describe our progress towards this goal using laser cooled argon atoms.

  3. Value-Added Measures in Education: What Every Educator Needs to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Douglas N.

    2011-01-01

    In "Value-Added Measures in Education", Douglas N. Harris takes on one of the most hotly debated topics in education. Drawing on his extensive work with schools and districts, he sets out to help educators and policymakers understand this innovative approach to assessment and the issues associated with its use. Written in straightforward language…

  4. Inferring runoff generation processes through high resolution spatial and temporal UV-Vis absorbance measurements in a mountainous headwater catchment in Southern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windhorst, David; Schob, Sarah; Zang, Carina; Crespo, Patricio; Breuer, Lutz

    2015-04-01

    The alpine grassland páramo - typically occurring in the headwater catchments of the Andes - plays an important role in flow regulation, hydropower generation and local water supply. However, hydrological and hydro-biogeochemical processes in the páramo and their potential reactions to climate and land use change are largely unknown. Therefore, we used a UV-Vis absorbance spectrometer to investigate fluxes of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), turbidity and nitrate (NO3-N) in a small headwater catchment (91.31 km²) in the páramo in south Ecuador on a 5 min temporal and 100 m spatial resolution to gain first insights in its hydrological functioning. Spatial sampling was realized during three snapshot sampling campaigns along the 14.2 km long stream between October 2013 and January 2014, while temporal sampling took place at a permanent sampling site within the catchment between February and June 2014. To identify the runoff generation processes the spatial patterns have been associated with local site specific (e.g. fish ponds) and sub-catchment wide (e.g. land use) characteristics. Storm flow events within the time series allowed to further study temporal changes and rotational patterns of concentration-discharge relations (hysteresis). In total, 35 events were identified to be suitable for analyzing hysteresis effects of BOD, COD, and turbidity. Nitrate concentrations could be studied for 20 events. Regardless of the flow conditions nitrate leaching increased with a growing share of non-native pine forests or pastures in the study area. During low flow conditions, the high water holding capacity of the upstream páramo areas ensured a continuous supply of BOD to the stream. Pasture and pine forest sites, mostly occurring in the downstream section of the stream, contributed to BOD only during discharge events. Contradicting the expectations the trout farms along the lower part of the streams had a relatively closed nutrient cycle and

  5. An evaluation of a new instrument to measure organisational safety culture values and practices.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cabrera, D; Hernández-Fernaud, E; Isla-Díaz, R

    2007-11-01

    The main aim of this research is to evaluate a safety culture measuring instrument centred upon relevant organisational values and practices related to the safety management system. Seven dimensions that reflect underlying safety meanings are proposed. A second objective is to explore the four cultural orientations in the field of safety arising from the competing values framework. The study sample consisted of 299 participants from five companies in different sectors. The results show six dimensions of organisational values and practices and different company profiles in the organisations studied. The four cultural orientations proposed by the competing values framework are not confirmed. Nevertheless, a coexistence of diverse cultural orientations or paradoxes in the companies is observed.

  6. An evaluation of a new instrument to measure organisational safety culture values and practices.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cabrera, D; Hernández-Fernaud, E; Isla-Díaz, R

    2007-11-01

    The main aim of this research is to evaluate a safety culture measuring instrument centred upon relevant organisational values and practices related to the safety management system. Seven dimensions that reflect underlying safety meanings are proposed. A second objective is to explore the four cultural orientations in the field of safety arising from the competing values framework. The study sample consisted of 299 participants from five companies in different sectors. The results show six dimensions of organisational values and practices and different company profiles in the organisations studied. The four cultural orientations proposed by the competing values framework are not confirmed. Nevertheless, a coexistence of diverse cultural orientations or paradoxes in the companies is observed. PMID:17920844

  7. Two-qubit Bell inequality for which positive operator-valued measurements are relevant

    SciTech Connect

    Vertesi, T.; Bene, E.

    2010-12-15

    A bipartite Bell inequality is derived which is maximally violated on the two-qubit state space if measurements describable by positive operator valued measure (POVM) elements are allowed, rather than restricting the possible measurements to projective ones. In particular, the presented Bell inequality requires POVMs in order to be maximally violated by a maximally entangled two-qubit state. This answers a question raised by N. Gisin [in Quantum Reality, Relativistic Causality, and Closing the Epistemic Circle: Essays in Honour of Abner Shimony, edited by W. C. Myrvold and J. Christian (Springer, The Netherlands, 2009), pp. 125-138].

  8. Behavioral Economic Measures of Alcohol Reward Value as Problem Severity Indicators in College Students

    PubMed Central

    Skidmore, Jessica R.; Murphy, James G.; Martens, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the current study were to examine the associations among behavioral economic measures of alcohol value derived from three distinct measurement approaches, and to evaluate their respective relations with traditional indicators of alcohol problem severity in college drinkers. Five behavioral economic metrics were derived from hypothetical demand curves that quantify reward value by plotting consumption and expenditures as a function of price, another metric measured proportional behavioral allocation and enjoyment related to alcohol versus other activities, and a final metric measured relative discretionary expenditures on alcohol. The sample included 207 heavy drinking college students (53% female) who were recruited through an on-campus health center or university courses. Factor analysis revealed that the alcohol valuation construct comprises two factors: one factor that reflects participants’ levels of alcohol price sensitivity (demand persistence), and a second factor that reflects participants’ maximum consumption and monetary and behavioral allocation towards alcohol (amplitude of demand). The demand persistence and behavioral allocation metrics demonstrated the strongest and most consistent multivariate relations with alcohol-related problems, even when controlling for other well-established predictors. The results suggest that behavioral economic indices of reward value show meaningful relations with alcohol problem severity in young adults. Despite the presence of some gender differences, these measures appear to be useful problem indicators for men and women. PMID:24749779

  9. Behavioral economic measures of alcohol reward value as problem severity indicators in college students.

    PubMed

    Skidmore, Jessica R; Murphy, James G; Martens, Matthew P

    2014-06-01

    The aims of the current study were to examine the associations among behavioral economic measures of alcohol value derived from 3 distinct measurement approaches, and to evaluate their respective relations with traditional indicators of alcohol problem severity in college drinkers. Five behavioral economic metrics were derived from hypothetical demand curves that quantify reward value by plotting consumption and expenditures as a function of price, another metric measured proportional behavioral allocation and enjoyment related to alcohol versus other activities, and a final metric measured relative discretionary expenditures on alcohol (RDEA). The sample included 207 heavy-drinking college students (53% female) who were recruited through an on-campus health center or university courses. Factor analysis revealed that the alcohol valuation construct comprises 2 factors: 1 factor that reflects participants' levels of alcohol price sensitivity (demand persistence), and a second factor that reflects participants' maximum consumption and monetary and behavioral allocation toward alcohol (amplitude of demand). The demand persistence and behavioral allocation metrics demonstrated the strongest and most consistent multivariate relations with alcohol-related problems, even when controlling for other well-established predictors. The results suggest that behavioral economic indices of reward value show meaningful relations with alcohol problem severity in young adults. Despite the presence of some gender differences, these measures appear to be useful problem indicators for men and women.

  10. New measurements of W-values for protons and alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Giesen, U; Beck, J

    2014-10-01

    The increasing importance of ion beams in cancer therapy and the lack of experimental data for W-values for protons and heavy ions in air require new measurements. A new experimental set-up was developed at PTB and consistent measurements of W-values in argon, nitrogen and air for protons and alpha particles with energies from 0.7 to 3.5 MeV u(-1) at PTB, and for carbon ions between 3.6 and 7.0 MeV u(-1) at GSI were carried out. This publication concentrates on the measurements with protons and alpha particles at PTB. The experimental methods and the determination of corrections for recombination effects, beam-induced background radiation and additional effects are presented.

  11. Measuring the value of groundwater and other forms of natural capital.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Eli P; Abbott, Joshua K; Bayham, Jude; Boone, Whitney; Haacker, Erin M K; Pfeiffer, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Valuing natural capital is fundamental to measuring sustainability. The United Nations Environment Programme, World Bank, and other agencies have called for inclusion of the value of natural capital in sustainability metrics, such as inclusive wealth. Much has been written about the importance of natural capital, but consistent, rigorous valuation approaches compatible with the pricing of traditional forms of capital have remained elusive. We present a guiding quantitative framework enabling natural capital valuation that is fully consistent with capital theory, accounts for biophysical and economic feedbacks, and can guide interdisciplinary efforts to measure sustainability. We illustrate this framework with an application to groundwater in the Kansas High Plains Aquifer, a rapidly depleting asset supporting significant food production. We develop a 10-y time series (1996-2005) of natural capital asset prices that accounts for technological, institutional, and physical changes. Kansas lost approximately $110 million per year (2005 US dollars) of capital value through groundwater withdrawal and changes in aquifer management during the decade spanning 1996-2005. This annual loss in wealth is approximately equal to the state's 2005 budget surplus, and is substantially more than investments in schools over this period. Furthermore, real investment in agricultural capital also declined over this period. Although Kansas' depletion of water wealth is substantial, it may be tractably managed through careful groundwater management and compensating investments in other natural and traditional assets. Measurement of natural capital value is required to inform management and ongoing investments in natural assets.

  12. The QCRad Value Added Product: Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control Testing, Including Climatology Configurable Limits

    SciTech Connect

    Long, CN; Shi, Y

    2006-09-01

    This document describes the QCRad methodology, which uses climatological analyses of the surface radiation measurements to define reasonable limits for testing the data for unusual data values. The main assumption is that the majority of the climatological data are “good” data, which for field sites operated with care such as those of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a reasonable assumption. Data that fall outside the normal range of occurrences are labeled either “indeterminate” (meaning that the measurements are possible, but rarely occurring, and thus the values cannot be identified as good) or “bad” depending on how far outside the normal range the particular data reside. The methodology not only sets fairly standard maximum and minimum value limits, but also compares what we have learned about the behavior of these instruments in the field to other value-added products (VAPs), such as the Diffuse infrared (IR) Loss Correction VAP (Younkin and Long 2004) and the Best Estimate Flux VAP (Shi and Long 2002).

  13. Measuring the value of groundwater and other forms of natural capital.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Eli P; Abbott, Joshua K; Bayham, Jude; Boone, Whitney; Haacker, Erin M K; Pfeiffer, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Valuing natural capital is fundamental to measuring sustainability. The United Nations Environment Programme, World Bank, and other agencies have called for inclusion of the value of natural capital in sustainability metrics, such as inclusive wealth. Much has been written about the importance of natural capital, but consistent, rigorous valuation approaches compatible with the pricing of traditional forms of capital have remained elusive. We present a guiding quantitative framework enabling natural capital valuation that is fully consistent with capital theory, accounts for biophysical and economic feedbacks, and can guide interdisciplinary efforts to measure sustainability. We illustrate this framework with an application to groundwater in the Kansas High Plains Aquifer, a rapidly depleting asset supporting significant food production. We develop a 10-y time series (1996-2005) of natural capital asset prices that accounts for technological, institutional, and physical changes. Kansas lost approximately $110 million per year (2005 US dollars) of capital value through groundwater withdrawal and changes in aquifer management during the decade spanning 1996-2005. This annual loss in wealth is approximately equal to the state's 2005 budget surplus, and is substantially more than investments in schools over this period. Furthermore, real investment in agricultural capital also declined over this period. Although Kansas' depletion of water wealth is substantial, it may be tractably managed through careful groundwater management and compensating investments in other natural and traditional assets. Measurement of natural capital value is required to inform management and ongoing investments in natural assets. PMID:26858431

  14. Measuring the value of groundwater and other forms of natural capital

    PubMed Central

    Fenichel, Eli P.; Abbott, Joshua K.; Bayham, Jude; Boone, Whitney; Haacker, Erin M. K.; Pfeiffer, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Valuing natural capital is fundamental to measuring sustainability. The United Nations Environment Programme, World Bank, and other agencies have called for inclusion of the value of natural capital in sustainability metrics, such as inclusive wealth. Much has been written about the importance of natural capital, but consistent, rigorous valuation approaches compatible with the pricing of traditional forms of capital have remained elusive. We present a guiding quantitative framework enabling natural capital valuation that is fully consistent with capital theory, accounts for biophysical and economic feedbacks, and can guide interdisciplinary efforts to measure sustainability. We illustrate this framework with an application to groundwater in the Kansas High Plains Aquifer, a rapidly depleting asset supporting significant food production. We develop a 10-y time series (1996−2005) of natural capital asset prices that accounts for technological, institutional, and physical changes. Kansas lost approximately $110 million per year (2005 US dollars) of capital value through groundwater withdrawal and changes in aquifer management during the decade spanning 1996–2005. This annual loss in wealth is approximately equal to the state’s 2005 budget surplus, and is substantially more than investments in schools over this period. Furthermore, real investment in agricultural capital also declined over this period. Although Kansas’ depletion of water wealth is substantial, it may be tractably managed through careful groundwater management and compensating investments in other natural and traditional assets. Measurement of natural capital value is required to inform management and ongoing investments in natural assets. PMID:26858431

  15. Quality, Safety, Value: From Theory to Practice Management What Should We Measure?

    PubMed

    Shore, Benjamin J; Murphy, Robert F; Hogue, Grant D

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 35 years the health care community and in particular orthopaedic surgery, has undergone a transformation from retrospective case-series-based expert opinion to randomized prospective clinical trials. During this transition, orthopaedic surgeons have become very skilled in the measurement of physician-derived outcomes (radiographic angles, complications, recurrences, and mortality); however, these are not patient-centered outcomes and they are of little importance to our patients' satisfaction. Moving forward outcome measurement needs to be restructured to focus more on patient-reported outcomes. This paper outlines why outcome measurement is important, reviews outcome strategies that have been used historically, introduces a new outcome measurement tool and identifies strategies for future implementation and measurement of health care quality and value within pediatric orthopaedics.

  16. Unidirectional perfect absorber

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Wang, P.; Song, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices. PMID:27615125

  17. Unidirectional perfect absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Wang, P.; Song, Z.

    2016-09-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices.

  18. Unidirectional perfect absorber.

    PubMed

    Jin, L; Wang, P; Song, Z

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices. PMID:27615125

  19. Mechanical energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An energy absorbing system for controlling the force where a moving object engages a stationary stop and where the system utilized telescopic tubular members, energy absorbing diaphragm elements, force regulating disc springs, and a return spring to return the telescoping member to its start position after stroking is presented. The energy absorbing system has frusto-conical diaphragm elements frictionally engaging the shaft and are opposed by a force regulating set of disc springs. In principle, this force feedback mechanism serves to keep the stroking load at a reasonable level even if the friction coefficient increases greatly. This force feedback device also serves to desensitize the singular and combined effects of manufacturing tolerances, sliding surface wear, temperature changes, dynamic effects, and lubricity.

  20. Unidirectional perfect absorber.

    PubMed

    Jin, L; Wang, P; Song, Z

    2016-09-12

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices.

  1. Weak values and weak coupling maximizing the output of weak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Di Lorenzo, Antonio

    2014-06-15

    In a weak measurement, the average output 〈o〉 of a probe that measures an observable A{sup -hat} of a quantum system undergoing both a preparation in a state ρ{sub i} and a postselection in a state E{sub f} is, to a good approximation, a function of the weak value A{sub w}=Tr[E{sub f}A{sup -hat} ρ{sub i}]/Tr[E{sub f}ρ{sub i}], a complex number. For a fixed coupling λ, when the overlap Tr[E{sub f}ρ{sub i}] is very small, A{sub w} diverges, but 〈o〉 stays finite, often tending to zero for symmetry reasons. This paper answers the questions: what is the weak value that maximizes the output for a fixed coupling? What is the coupling that maximizes the output for a fixed weak value? We derive equations for the optimal values of A{sub w} and λ, and provide the solutions. The results are independent of the dimensionality of the system, and they apply to a probe having a Hilbert space of arbitrary dimension. Using the Schrödinger–Robertson uncertainty relation, we demonstrate that, in an important case, the amplification 〈o〉 cannot exceed the initial uncertainty σ{sub o} in the observable o{sup -hat}, we provide an upper limit for the more general case, and a strategy to obtain 〈o〉≫σ{sub o}. - Highlights: •We have provided a general framework to find the extremal values of a weak measurement. •We have derived the location of the extremal values in terms of preparation and postselection. •We have devised a maximization strategy going beyond the limit of the Schrödinger–Robertson relation.

  2. Strength Measurements in Acute Hamstring Injuries: Intertester Reliability and Prognostic Value of Handheld Dynamometry.

    PubMed

    Reurink, Gustaaf; Goudswaard, Gert Jan; Moen, Maarten H; Tol, Johannes L; Verhaar, Jan A N; Weir, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Cohort study, repeated measures. Background Although hamstring strength measurements are used for assessing prognosis and monitoring recovery after hamstring injury, their actual clinical relevance has not been established. Handheld dynamometry (HHD) is a commonly used method of measuring muscle strength. The reliability of HHD has not been determined in athletes with acute hamstring injuries. Objectives To determine the intertester reliability and the prognostic value of hamstring HHD strength measurement in acute hamstring injuries. Methods We measured knee flexion strength with HHD in 75 athletes at 2 visits, at baseline (within 5 days of hamstring injury) and follow-up (5 to 7 days after the baseline measurement). We assessed isometric hamstring strength in 15° and 90° of knee flexion. Reliability analysis testing was performed by 2 testers independently at the follow-up visit. We recorded the time needed to return to play (RTP) up to 6 months following baseline. Results The intraclass correlation coefficients of the strength measurements in injured hamstrings were between 0.75 and 0.83. There was a statistically significant but weak correlation between the time to RTP and the strength deficit at 15° of knee flexion measured at baseline (Spearman r = 0.25, P = .045) and at the follow-up visit (Spearman r = 0.26, P = .034). Up to 7% of the variance in time to RTP is explained by this strength deficit. None of the other strength variables were significantly correlated with time to RTP. Conclusion Hamstring strength can be reliably measured with HHD in athletes with acute hamstring injuries. The prognostic value of strength measurements is limited, as there is only a weak association between the time to RTP and hamstring strength deficit after acute injury. Level of Evidence Prognosis, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):689-696. Epub 12 May 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6363.

  3. A Research on Performance Measurement Based on Economic Valued-Added Comprehensive Scorecard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qin; Zhang, Xiaomei

    With the development of economic, the traditional performance mainly rely on financial indicators could not satisfy the need of work. In order to make the performance measurement taking the best services for business goals, this paper proposed Economic Valued-Added Comprehensive Scorecard based on research of shortages and advantages of EVA and BSC .We used Analytic Hierarchy Process to build matrix to solve the weighting of EVA Comprehensive Scorecard. At last we could find the most influence factors for enterprise value forming the weighting.

  4. Ultraviolet absorbance screening for DNAPL site compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Misquitta, N.; Foster, D.; Coll, F.; Brourman, M.

    1997-12-31

    The UV Absorbance Effectiveness Demonstration was developed to evaluate the feasibility of using UV absorbance as a surrogate for oil & grease methods of measuring the concentration of coal tar-related constituents in groundwater. Since the current oil & grease method via Freon{reg_sign} extraction is being phased out, a new alternative oil & grease method using a hexane extraction will be introduced in the near future. A secondary objective of this evaluation was to compare the two oil & grease methods, as they relate to facility groundwater, in order to demonstrate the overall robustness of UV absorbance as a surrogate for oil & grease analysis, regardless of the method of extraction.

  5. Review and assessment of measured values of the nonlinear refractive-index coefficient of fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Milam, D.

    1998-01-01

    The literature describes more than 30 measurements, at wavelengths between 249 and 1550 nm, of the absolute value of the nonlinear refractive-index coefficient of fused silica. Results of these experiments were assessed and best currently available values were selected for the wavelengths of 351, 527, and 1053 nm. The best values are (3.6{plus_minus}0.64){times}10{sup {minus}16} cm{sup 2}/W at 351 nm, (3.0{plus_minus}0.35){times}10{sup {minus}16} cm{sup 2}/W at 527 nm, and (2.74{plus_minus}0.17){times}10{sup {minus}16} cm{sup 2}/W at 1053 nm. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  6. Electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of amorphous carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tingkai; Hou, Cuilin; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhu, Ruoxing; She, Shengfei; Wang, Jungao; Li, Tiehu; Liu, Zhifu; Wei, Bingqing

    2014-07-10

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) with diameters in the range of 7-50 nm were used as absorber materials for electromagnetic waves. The electromagnetic wave absorbing composite films were prepared by a dip-coating method using a uniform mixture of rare earth lanthanum nitrate doped ACNTs and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The microstructures of ACNTs and ACNT/PVC composites were characterized using transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction, and their electromagnetic wave absorbing properties were measured using a vector-network analyzer. The experimental results indicated that the electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of ACNTs are superior to multi-walled CNTs, and greatly improved by doping 6 wt% lanthanum nitrate. The reflection loss (R) value of a lanthanum nitrate doped ACNT/PVC composite was -25.02 dB at 14.44 GHz, and the frequency bandwidth corresponding to the reflector loss at -10 dB was up to 5.8 GHz within the frequency range of 2-18 GHz.

  7. Electromagnetic Wave Absorbing Properties of Amorphous Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tingkai; Hou, Cuilin; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhu, Ruoxing; She, Shengfei; Wang, Jungao; Li, Tiehu; Liu, Zhifu; Wei, Bingqing

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) with diameters in the range of 7–50 nm were used as absorber materials for electromagnetic waves. The electromagnetic wave absorbing composite films were prepared by a dip-coating method using a uniform mixture of rare earth lanthanum nitrate doped ACNTs and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The microstructures of ACNTs and ACNT/PVC composites were characterized using transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction, and their electromagnetic wave absorbing properties were measured using a vector-network analyzer. The experimental results indicated that the electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of ACNTs are superior to multi-walled CNTs, and greatly improved by doping 6 wt% lanthanum nitrate. The reflection loss (R) value of a lanthanum nitrate doped ACNT/PVC composite was −25.02 dB at 14.44 GHz, and the frequency bandwidth corresponding to the reflector loss at −10 dB was up to 5.8 GHz within the frequency range of 2–18 GHz. PMID:25007783

  8. Added value measures in education show genetic as well as environmental influence.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Claire M A; Asbury, Kathryn; Dale, Philip S; Plomin, Robert

    2011-02-02

    Does achievement independent of ability or previous attainment provide a purer measure of the added value of school? In a study of 4000 pairs of 12-year-old twins in the UK, we measured achievement with year-long teacher assessments as well as tests. Raw achievement shows moderate heritability (about 50%) and modest shared environmental influences (25%). Unexpectedly, we show that for indices of the added value of school, genetic influences remain moderate (around 50%), and the shared (school) environment is less important (about 12%). The pervasiveness of genetic influence in how and how much children learn is compatible with an active view of learning in which children create their own educational experiences in part on the basis of their genetic propensities.

  9. Data analysis of Q-value measurements for double-electron capture with SHIPTRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Christian; Blaum, Klaus; Block, Michael; Droese, Christian; Eliseev, Sergey; Goncharov, Mikhail; Herfurth, Frank; Ramirez, Enrique Minaya; Nesterenko, Dmitry Alexandrovich; Novikov, Yuri Nikolaevich; Schweikhard, Lutz

    2013-07-01

    A measurement campaign has been carried out for the search for resonantly enhanced neutrinoless double-electron-capture transitions by the determination of the Q ɛɛ -values with the SHIPTRAP Penning-trap mass spectrometer. The Q ɛɛ -values have been determined by measuring the cyclotron-frequency ratios of the mother and daughter nuclides of the transitions. This article describes the experimental approach and the data analysis by the example of neutrinoless double-electron capture in 152Gd. Various effects as, e.g., temporal fluctuations and spatial inhomogeneity of the magnetic field, or the variation of the ion number in the trap were found not to affect the frequency ratio on the 1 ppb-level, which is the present statistical uncertainty.

  10. The current state of nursing performance measurement, public reporting, and value-based purchasing.

    PubMed

    Kurtzman, Ellen T; Dawson, Ellen M; Johnson, Jean E

    2008-08-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a substantial investment in holding health care providers accountable for the quality of care provided in hospitals and other settings of care. This investment has been realized through the proliferation of national policies that address performance measurement, public reporting, and value-based purchasing. Although nurses represent the largest segment of the health care workforce and despite their acknowledged role in patient safety and health care outcomes, they have been largely absent from policy setting in these areas. This article provides an analysis of current nursing performance measurement and public reporting initiatives and presents a summary of emerging trends in value-based purchasing, with an emphasis on activities in the United States. The article synthesizes issues of relevance to advancing the current climate for nursing quality and concludes with key issues for future policy setting.

  11. Attenuation of external Bremsstrahlung in metallic absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Dhaliwal, A.S.; Powar, M.S.; Singh, M. )

    1990-12-01

    In this paper attenuation of bremsstrahlung from {sup 147}Pm and {sup 170}Tm beta emitters has been studied in aluminum, copper, tin, and lead metallic absorbers. Bremsstrahlung spectra and mass attenuation coefficients for monoenergetic gamma rays are used to calculate theoretical attenuation curves. Magnetic deflection and beta stopping techniques are used to measure the integral bremsstrahlung intensities above 30 keV in different target thicknesses. Comparison of measured and calculated attenuation curves shows a good agreement for various absorbers, thus providing a test of this technique, which may be useful in understanding bremsstrahlung intensity buildup and in the design of optimum shielding for bremsstrahlung sources. It is found that the absorption of bremsstrahlung in metallic absorbers does not obey an exponential law and that absorbers act as energy filters.

  12. Can the reinforcing value of food be measured in bulimia nervosa?

    PubMed

    Schebendach, Janet; Broft, Allegra; Foltin, Richard W; Walsh, B Timothy

    2013-03-01

    Binge eating is a core clinical feature of bulimia nervosa (BN). Enhanced reinforcing value of food may play a role in this behavioral disturbance, but a systematic behavioral assessment of objective measures of the rewarding value of binge eating is lacking. The purpose of this study was to quantify the reinforcing value of food in BN patients as compared with normal controls. A progressive ratio (PR) computerized work task was completed under binge and non-binge instruction. The task consisted of 12 trials. The first trial required 50 keyboard taps to earn one portion of yogurt shake, and subsequent trials required progressive work increments of 200 taps for each additional portion. Completion of all 12 trials required 13,800 taps to earn 2100ml of shake. The breakpoint, defined as the largest ratio completed before a participant stopped working, was the measure of reinforcing efficacy. Ten patients and 10 controls completed the experiment. Under binge instruction, patients completed more trials and taps, and had a higher breakpoint than controls. The non-binge instruction yielded opposite findings; compared to controls, patients completed fewer trials and taps, and had a lower breakpoint. These results support the feasibility and potential utility of a PR task to quantify the reinforcing value of food in patients with BN.

  13. Minimal sufficient positive-operator valued measure on a separable Hilbert space

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramochi, Yui

    2015-10-15

    We introduce a concept of a minimal sufficient positive-operator valued measure (POVM), which is the least redundant POVM among the POVMs that have the equivalent information about the measured quantum system. Assuming the system Hilbert space to be separable, we show that for a given POVM, a sufficient statistic called a Lehmann-Scheffé-Bahadur statistic induces a minimal sufficient POVM. We also show that every POVM has an equivalent minimal sufficient POVM and that such a minimal sufficient POVM is unique up to relabeling neglecting null sets. We apply these results to discrete POVMs and information conservation conditions proposed by the author.

  14. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  15. Solar concentrator/absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Tiesenhausen, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Collector/energy converter, consisting of dual-slope optical concentrator and counterflow thermal energy absorber, is attached to multiaxis support structure. Efficient over wide range of illumination levels, device may be used to generate high temperature steam, serve as solar powered dryer, or power absorption cycle cooler.

  16. Comparison of the calculated absorbed dose using the Cadplan™ treatment planning software and Tld-100 measurements in an Alderson-Rando phantom for a bronchogenic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gutiérrez Castillo, J. G.; Álvarez Romero, J. T. E-mail: fisarmandotorres@gmail.com Calderón, A. Torres E-mail: fisarmandotorres@gmail.com M, V. Tovar E-mail: fisarmandotorres@gmail.com

    2014-11-07

    To verify the accuracy of the absorbed doses D calculated by a TPS Cadplan for a bronchogenic treatment (in an Alderson-Rando phantom) are chosen ten points with the following D's and localizations. Point 1, posterior position on the left edge with 136.4 Gy. Points: 2, 3 and 4 in the left lung with 104.9, 104.3 and 105.8 Gy, respectively; points 5 and 6 at the mediastinum with 192.4 and 173.5 Gy; points 7, 8 and 9 in the right lung with 105.8, 104.2 and 104.7 Gy, and 10 at posterior position on right edge with 143.7 Gy. IAEA type capsules with TLD 100 powder are placed, planned and irradiated. The evaluation of the absorbed dose is carried out a curve of calibration for the LiF response (nC) {sup vs} {sup DW}, to several cavity theories. The traceability for the DW is obtained with a secondary standard calibrated at the NRC (Canada). The dosimetric properties for the materials considered are determined from the Hounsfield numbers reported by the TPS. The stopping power ratios are calculated for nominal spectrum to 6 MV photons. The percent variations among the planned and determined D in all the cases they are < ± 3%.

  17. Comparison of the calculated absorbed dose using the Cadplan™ treatment planning software and Tld-100 measurements in an Alderson-Rando phantom for a bronchogenic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez Castillo, J. G.; Álvarez Romero, J. T.; Torres Calderón, A.; Tovar, M. V.

    2014-11-01

    To verify the accuracy of the absorbed doses D calculated by a TPS Cadplan for a bronchogenic treatment (in an Alderson-Rando phantom) are chosen ten points with the following D's and localizations. Point 1, posterior position on the left edge with 136.4 Gy. Points: 2, 3 and 4 in the left lung with 104.9, 104.3 and 105.8 Gy, respectively; points 5 and 6 at the mediastinum with 192.4 and 173.5 Gy; points 7, 8 and 9 in the right lung with 105.8, 104.2 and 104.7 Gy, and 10 at posterior position on right edge with 143.7 Gy. IAEA type capsules with TLD 100 powder are placed, planned and irradiated. The evaluation of the absorbed dose is carried out a curve of calibration for the LiF response (nC) vs DW, to several cavity theories. The traceability for the DW is obtained with a secondary standard calibrated at the NRC (Canada). The dosimetric properties for the materials considered are determined from the Hounsfield numbers reported by the TPS. The stopping power ratios are calculated for nominal spectrum to 6 MV photons. The percent variations among the planned and determined D in all the cases they are < ± 3%.

  18. Measurements of Sc I gf-values. [absorption spectroscopy using heat pipe oven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Reeves, E. M.; Tomkins, F. S.

    1976-01-01

    Absolute gf-values were obtained for 98 transitions in neutral scandium by the hook method using an inductively coupled heat-pipe oven. Of the 98 lines, 51 are classified, 33 are unclassified lines that occur in pairs with the lower energy level identified, and 14 are unclassified but are believed to originate from one of the two lower levels of the ground state. The results are compared with semiempirical and other measurement results in the literature.

  19. Picoradian deflection measurement with an interferometric quasi-autocollimator using weak value amplification.

    PubMed

    Turner, Matthew D; Hagedorn, Charles A; Schlamminger, Stephan; Gundlach, Jens H

    2011-04-15

    We present an "interferometric quasi-autocollimator" that employs weak value amplification to measure angular deflections of a target mirror. The device has been designed to be insensitive to all translations of the target. We present a conceptual explanation of the amplification effect used by the device. An implementation of the device demonstrates sensitivities better than 10 picoradians per root hertz between 10 and 200 Hz.

  20. An Intercomparison of Lidar Ozone and Temperature Measurements From the SOLVE Mission With Predicted Model Values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burris, John; McGee, Thomas J.; Hoegy, Walt; Lait, Leslie; Sumnicht, Grant; Twigg, Larry; Heaps, William

    2000-01-01

    Temperature profiles acquired by Goddard Space Flight Center's AROTEL lidar during the SOLVE mission onboard NASA's DC-8 are compared with predicted values from several atmospheric models (DAO, NCEP and UKMO). The variability in the differences between measured and calculated temperature fields was approximately 5 K. Retrieved temperatures within the polar vortex showed large regions that were significantly colder than predicted by the atmospheric models.

  1. CBF measured by Xe-CT: Approach to analysis and normal values

    SciTech Connect

    Yonas, H.; Darby, J.M.; Marks, E.C.; Durham, S.R.; Maxwell, C. )

    1991-09-01

    Normal reference values and a practical approach to CBF analysis are needed for routine clinical analysis and interpretation of xenon-enhanced computed tomography (CT) CBF studies. The authors measured CBF in 67 normal individuals with the GE 9800 CT scanner adapted for CBF imaging with stable Xe. CBF values for vascular territories were systematically analyzed using the clustering of contiguous 2-cm circular regions of interest (ROIs) placed within the cortical mantle and basal ganglia. Mixed cortical flows averaged 51 {plus minus} 10ml.100g-1.min-1. High and low flow compartments, sampled by placing 5-mm circular ROIs in regions containing the highest and lowest flow values in each hemisphere, averaged 84 {plus minus} 14 and 20 {plus minus} 5 ml.100 g-1.min-1, respectively. Mixed cortical flow values as well as values within the high flow compartment demonstrated significant decline with age; however, there were no significant age-related changes in the low flow compartment. The clustering of systematically placed cortical and subcortical ROIs has provided a normative data base for Xe-CT CBF and a flexible and uncomplicated method for the analysis of CBF maps generated by Xe-enhanced CT.

  2. Radar Absorbing Materials for Cube Stealth Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, D.; Pastore, R.; Vricella, A.; Marchetti, M.

    A Cube Stealth Satellite is proposed for potential applications in defense system. Particularly, the faces of the satellite exposed to the Earth are made of nanostructured materials able to absorb radar surveillance electromagnetic waves, conferring stealth capability to the cube satellite. Microwave absorbing and shielding material tiles are proposed using composite materials consisting in epoxy-resin and carbon nanotubes filler. The electric permittivity of the composite nanostructured materials is measured and discussed. Such data are used by the modeling algorithm to design the microwave absorbing and the shielding faces of the cube satellite. The electromagnetic modeling takes into account for several incidence angles (0-80°), extended frequency band (2-18 GHz), and for the minimization of the electromagnetic reflection coefficient. The evolutionary algorithm used for microwave layered microwave absorber modeling is the recently developed Winning Particle Optimization. The mathematical model of the absorbing structure is finally experimentally validated by comparing the electromagnetic simulation to the measurement of the manufactured radar absorber tile. Nanostructured composite materials manufacturing process and electromagnetic reflection measurements methods are described. Finally, a finite element method analysis of the electromagnetic scattering by cube stealth satellite is performed.

  3. The weak measurement process and the weak value of spin for metastable helium 23S1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monachello, Vincenzo; Barker, Peter; Flack, Robert; Hiley, Basil

    2016-05-01

    An experiment is being designed and constructed in order to measure the weak value of spin for an atomic system. The principle of the ``weak measurement'' process was first proposed by Aharonov, Albert and Vaidman, and describes a scenario in which a system is weakly coupled to a pointer between well-defined pre- and post-selected states. This experiment will utilise a pulsed supersonic beam of spin-1 metastable Helium (He*) atoms in the 23S1 state. The spin of the pre-selected He* atoms will be weakly coupled to its centre-of-mass. During its flight, the atomic beam will be prepared in a desired quantum state and travel through two inhomogeneous magnets (weak and strong) which both comprise the ``weak measurement'' process. The deviation of the post-selected ms = + 1 state as measured using a micro-channel plate, phosphor screen and CCD camera setup will allow for the determination of the weak value of spin. This poster will report on the methods used and the experimental realisation.

  4. Improved Correction of IR Loss in Diffuse Shortwave Measurements: An ARM Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Younkin, K; Long, CN

    2003-11-01

    Simple single black detector pyranometers, such as the Eppley Precision Spectral Pyranometer (PSP) used by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, are known to lose energy via infrared (IR) emission to the sky. This is especially a problem when making clear-sky diffuse shortwave (SW) measurements, which are inherently of low magnitude and suffer the greatest IR loss. Dutton et al. (2001) proposed a technique using information from collocated pyrgeometers to help compensate for this IR loss. The technique uses an empirically derived relationship between the pyrgeometer detector data (and alternatively the detector data plus the difference between the pyrgeometer case and dome temperatures) and the nighttime pyranometer IR loss data. This relationship is then used to apply a correction to the diffuse SW data during daylight hours. We developed an ARM value-added product (VAP) called the SW DIFF CORR 1DUTT VAP to apply the Dutton et al. correction technique to ARM PSP diffuse SW measurements.

  5. A hydraulic absorber for wideband vibration reduction in ship hulls

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, W.J.; Lee, Y.J. . Dept. of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    A vibration reduction of ship hulls by an active absorber system is proposed. In the scheme, a tuned mass is moved according to the hull vibration as measured by a multi-mode sensing system in order to generate a suitable active force for vibration reduction of hull girder. In order to supply the large amount of required power, a hydraulic servo system is implemented. Then the dynamic characteristic of the hydraulic system is considered for system design. Based on stochastic theory and optimal theory, the control law of the system is derived in order to approach the optimal level of vibration reduction. A 10-t absorber is applied to a 87,000-t oil tanker to demonstrate the feasibility of this scheme. The results show that the multi-peak values of resonance are suppressed in frequency response. Moreover, the vibration excited by propeller and engine is reduced to an extremely efficient level by this scheme.

  6. Reconceptualizing 'effectiveness' in environmental projects: can we measure values-related achievements?

    PubMed

    Harder, Marie K; Velasco, Ismael; Burford, Gemma; Podger, Dimity; Janoušková, Svatava; Piggot, Georgia; Hoover, Elona

    2014-06-15

    There have been recent calls for a shift to an evidence-based paradigm in environmental management, grounded in systematic monitoring and evaluation, but achieving this will be complex and difficult. Evaluating the educational components of environmental initiatives presents particular challenges, because these programs often have multiple concurrent goals and may value 'human outcomes', such as value change, which are intangible and difficult to quantify. This paper describes a fresh approach based on co-creating an entirely new values-based assessment framework with expert practitioners worldwide. We first discuss the development of a generic framework of 'Proto-Indicators' (reference criteria constituting prototypes for measurable indicators), and then demonstrate its application within a reforestation project in Mexico where indicators and assessment tools were localized to enhance context-relevance. Rigorously derived using unitary validity, with an emphasis on relevance, practicability and logical consistency from user perspectives, this framework represents a step-wise advance in the evaluation of non-formal EE/ESD programs. This article also highlights three important principles with broader implications for evaluation, valuation and assessment processes within environmental management: namely peer-elicitation, localizability, and an explicit focus on ethical values. We discuss these principles in relation to the development of sustainability indicators at local and global levels, especially in relation to post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals.

  7. Prognostic Value of Epicardial Fat Volume Measurements by Computed Tomography: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, James V.; Renker, Matthias; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Krazinski, Aleksander W.; Herbert, Teri L.; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Nietert, Paul J.; Meinel, Felix G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To perform a systematic review of the growing body of literature evaluating the prognostic value of epicardial fat volume (EFV) quantified by cross-sectional imaging for adverse clinical outcomes. Methods Two independent reviewers performed systematic searches on both PubMed and Scopus using search terms developed with a medical librarian. Peer-reviewed articles were selected based on the inclusion of outcome data, utilization of epicardial fat volume and sufficient reporting for analysis. Results A total of 411 studies were evaluated with 9 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. In all, the studies evaluated 10,252 patients. All 9 studies were based on CT measurements. Seven studies evaluated the prognostic value of EFV unadjusted for calcium score, and 6 of these studies found a significant association between EFV and clinical outcomes. Seven studies evaluated the incremental value of EFV beyond calcium scoring, and 6 of these studies found a significant association. Conclusions The majority of studies suggest that EFV quantification is significantly associated with clinical outcomes and provides incremental prognostic value over coronary artery calcium scoring. Future research should use a binary cut-off of 125mL for evaluation of EFV to provide consistency with other research. PMID:25925354

  8. Value-Added Measures of Education Performance: Clearing Away the Smoke and Mirrors. Policy Brief 10-4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Douglas N.

    2010-01-01

    In this policy brief, the author explores the problems with attainment measures when it comes to evaluating performance at the school level, and explores the best uses of value-added measures. These value-added measures, the author writes, are useful for sorting out-of-school influences from school influences or from teacher performance, giving…

  9. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-01-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  10. Direct measurement of large-scale quantum states via expectation values of non-Hermitian matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolduc, Eliot; Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In quantum mechanics, predictions are made by way of calculating expectation values of observables, which take the form of Hermitian operators. Non-Hermitian operators, however, are not necessarily devoid of physical significance, and they can play a crucial role in the characterization of quantum states. Here we show that the expectation values of a particular set of non-Hermitian matrices, which we call column operators, directly yield the complex coefficients of a quantum state vector. We provide a definition of the state vector in terms of measurable quantities by decomposing these column operators into observables. The technique we propose renders very-large-scale quantum states significantly more accessible in the laboratory, as we demonstrate by experimentally characterizing a 100,000-dimensional entangled state. This represents an improvement of two orders of magnitude with respect to previous phase-and-amplitude characterizations of discrete entangled states.

  11. Measuring Contingent Values for Wetlands: Effects of Information About Related Environmental Goods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, John C.; Blomquist, Glenn C.

    1991-10-01

    A model of contingent market behavior is developed which emphasizes the role of household information about wetlands and related environmental goods. Information is acquired through previous experience with wetlands and through the contingent market. Households which are unaware of substitute or complement environmental goods when participating in contingent markets may overstate or understate willingness to pay values. This paper estimates willingness to pay for preservation of the Clear Creek wetland in western Kentucky when faced with surface coal mining. We test for the effects of explicit information about related environmental goods on contingent values by measuring the difference in stated willingness to pay. Willingness to pay for preservation of the Clear Creek wetland decreases with information about surface coal mine lake reclamation and, in the initial, independent format increases with information about a nearby publicly owned, wetland area. These findings suggest that the lack of explicit information about related environmental goods in contingent markets can contribute to a misstatement of willingness to pay.

  12. Direct measurement of large-scale quantum states via expectation values of non-Hermitian matrices

    PubMed Central

    Bolduc, Eliot; Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In quantum mechanics, predictions are made by way of calculating expectation values of observables, which take the form of Hermitian operators. Non-Hermitian operators, however, are not necessarily devoid of physical significance, and they can play a crucial role in the characterization of quantum states. Here we show that the expectation values of a particular set of non-Hermitian matrices, which we call column operators, directly yield the complex coefficients of a quantum state vector. We provide a definition of the state vector in terms of measurable quantities by decomposing these column operators into observables. The technique we propose renders very-large-scale quantum states significantly more accessible in the laboratory, as we demonstrate by experimentally characterizing a 100,000-dimensional entangled state. This represents an improvement of two orders of magnitude with respect to previous phase-and-amplitude characterizations of discrete entangled states. PMID:26780858

  13. Direct measurement of large-scale quantum states via expectation values of non-Hermitian matrices.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Eliot; Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In quantum mechanics, predictions are made by way of calculating expectation values of observables, which take the form of Hermitian operators. Non-Hermitian operators, however, are not necessarily devoid of physical significance, and they can play a crucial role in the characterization of quantum states. Here we show that the expectation values of a particular set of non-Hermitian matrices, which we call column operators, directly yield the complex coefficients of a quantum state vector. We provide a definition of the state vector in terms of measurable quantities by decomposing these column operators into observables. The technique we propose renders very-large-scale quantum states significantly more accessible in the laboratory, as we demonstrate by experimentally characterizing a 100,000-dimensional entangled state. This represents an improvement of two orders of magnitude with respect to previous phase-and-amplitude characterizations of discrete entangled states. PMID:26780858

  14. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. The objective of this task is to quantify lifetimes through measurement of the optical and mechanical stability of candidate polymeric glazing and absorber materials. Polycarbonate sheet glazings, as proposed by two industry partners, have been tested for resistance to UV radiation with three complementary methods. Incorporation of a specific 2-mil thick UV-absorbing screening layer results in glazing lifetimes of at least 15 years; improved screens promise even longer lifetimes. Proposed absorber materials were tested for creep and embrittlement under high temperature, and appear adequate for planned ICS absorbers.

  15. Identification of Inhibitor Concentrations to Efficiently Screen and Measure Inhibition Ki Values against Solute Carrier Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaowan; Polli, James

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to identify inhibitor concentrations to efficiently screen and measure inhibition Ki values of solute carrier (SLC) transporters. The intestinal bile acid transporter and its native substrate taurocholate were used as a model system. Inhibition experiments were conducted using 27 compounds. For each compound, the inhibition constant Ki was obtained from the comprehensive inhibition profile, and referred as the reference Ki. Ki values were also estimated from various partial profiles and were compared to the reference Ki. A screening Ki was estimated from one data point and also compared to the reference Ki. Results indicate that Ki can be accurately measured using an inhibitor concentration range of only 0-Ki via five different inhibitor concentrations. Additionally, a screening concentration of 10-fold the substrate affinity Kt for potent inhibitors (Ki < 20Kt) and 100-fold Kt for nonpotent inhibitors (Ki > 20Kt) provided an accurate Ki estimation. Results were validated through inhibition studies of two other SLC transporters. In conclusion, experimental conditions to screen and measure accurate transporter inhibition constant Ki are suggested where a low range of inhibitor concentrations can be used. This approach is advantageous in that minimal compound is needed to perform studies and accommodates compounds with low aqueous solubility. PMID:20553862

  16. Perfect terahertz absorber using fishnet based metafilm

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu; Chen, Houtong; Taylor, Antoinette; Smirnova, E I; O' Hara, John F

    2009-01-01

    We present a perfect terahertz (THz) absorber working for a broad-angle of incidence. The two fold symmetry of rectangular fishnet structure allows either complete absorption or mirror like reflection depending on the polarization of incident the THz beam. Metamaterials enable the ability to control the electromagnetic wave in a unique fashion by designing the permittivity or permeability of composite materials with desired values. Although the initial idea of metamaterials was to obtain a negative index medium, however, the evolution of metamaterials (MMs) offers a variety of practically applicable devices for controlling electromagnetic wave such as tunable filters, modulators, phase shifters, compact antenna, absorbers, etc. Terahertz regime, a crucial domain of the electromagnetic wave, is suffering from the scarcity of the efficient devices and might take the advantage of metamaterials. Here, we demonstrate design, fabrication, and characterization of a terahertz absorber based on a simple fishnet metallic film separated from a ground mirror plane by a dielectric spacer. Such absorbers are in particular important for bolometric terahertz detectors, high sensitivity imaging, and terahertz anechoic chambers. Recently, split-ring-resonators (SRR) have been employed for metamaterial-based absorbers at microwave and THz frequencies. The experimental demonstration reveals that such absorbers have absorptivity close to unity at resonance frequencies. However, the downside of these designs is that they all employ resonators of rather complicated shape with many fine parts and so they are not easy to fabricate and are sensitive to distortions.

  17. Social value orientation: theoretical and measurement issues in the study of social preferences.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Ryan O; Ackermann, Kurt A

    2014-02-01

    What motivates people when they make decisions and how those motivations are potentially entangled with concerns for others are central topics for the social, cognitive, and behavioral sciences. According to the postulate of narrow self-interest, decision makers have the goal of maximizing personal payoffs and are wholly indifferent to the consequences for others. The postulate of narrow self-interest-which has been influential in economics, psychology, and sociology-is precise and powerful but is often simply wrong. Its inadequacy is well known and efforts have been made to develop reliable and valid measurement methods to quantify the more nuanced social preferences that people really have. In this paper, we report on the emergence and development of the predominant conceptualization of social preferences in psychology: social value orientation (SVO). Second, we discuss the relationship between measurement and theory development of the SVO construct. We then provide an overview of the literature regarding measurement methods that have been used to assess individual variations in social preferences. We conclude with a comparative evaluation of the various measures and provide suggestions regarding the measures' constructive use in building psychologically realistic theories of people's social preferences. PMID:24065346

  18. The value of ETCO2 measurement for COPD patients in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Mutlu; Goksu, Erkan; Eray, Oktay; Isik, Soner; Sayrac, Ali Vefa; Yigit, Ozlem Erken; Rinnert, Stephan

    2011-02-01

    We aimed to determine the value of sidestream end-tidal carbon dioxide (SS-ETCO2) measurement in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the emergency department. Cross-sectional associations between ETCO2 and PaCO2 were examined in the study. This prospective cross-sectional study has been carried out over a 3-month period in a tertiary care university hospital emergency department with an annual census of 75 000 visits. During the study period, simultaneous SS-ETCO2 measurement using a Medlab Cap 10 sidestream capnograph was performed on every COPD patient requiring arterial blood gas analysis. The demographics, diagnosis, vital signs, laboratory test results and clinical outcomes of the patients were recorded. SS-ETCO2 measurement and arterial blood gas analysis were carried out on 118 patients. Mean arterial PCO2 levels were 43.24±14.73 and mean ETCO2 levels were 34.23±10.86 mmHg. Agreement between PCO2 and ETCO2 measurements was 8.4 mmHg and a precision of 11.1 mmHg.As there is only a moderate correlation between PCO2 and ETCO2 levels in COPD patients, ETCO2 measurement should not be considered as a part of the decision-making process to predict PaCO2 level in COPD patients. PMID:20224417

  19. Social value orientation: theoretical and measurement issues in the study of social preferences.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Ryan O; Ackermann, Kurt A

    2014-02-01

    What motivates people when they make decisions and how those motivations are potentially entangled with concerns for others are central topics for the social, cognitive, and behavioral sciences. According to the postulate of narrow self-interest, decision makers have the goal of maximizing personal payoffs and are wholly indifferent to the consequences for others. The postulate of narrow self-interest-which has been influential in economics, psychology, and sociology-is precise and powerful but is often simply wrong. Its inadequacy is well known and efforts have been made to develop reliable and valid measurement methods to quantify the more nuanced social preferences that people really have. In this paper, we report on the emergence and development of the predominant conceptualization of social preferences in psychology: social value orientation (SVO). Second, we discuss the relationship between measurement and theory development of the SVO construct. We then provide an overview of the literature regarding measurement methods that have been used to assess individual variations in social preferences. We conclude with a comparative evaluation of the various measures and provide suggestions regarding the measures' constructive use in building psychologically realistic theories of people's social preferences.

  20. Student-Valued Measurable Teaching Behaviors of Award-Winning Pharmacy Preceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Carmen; Patel, Mitul; Mac, Chi; Krueger, Janelle; Danielson, Jennifer; Weber, Stanley S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To identify specific preceptor teaching-coaching, role modeling, and facilitating behaviors valued by pharmacy students and to develop measures of those behaviors that can be used for an experiential education quality assurance program. Methods. Using a qualitative research approach, we conducted a thematic analysis of student comments about excellent preceptors to identify behaviors exhibited by those preceptors. Identified behaviors were sorted according to the preceptor’s role as role model, teacher/coach, or learning facilitator; measurable descriptors for each behavior were then developed. Results. Data analysis resulted in identification of 15 measurable behavior themes, the most frequent being: having an interest in student learning and success, making time for students, and displaying a positive preceptor attitude. Measureable descriptors were developed for 5 role-modeling behaviors, 6 teaching-coaching behaviors, and 4 facilitating behaviors. Conclusion. Preceptors may need to be evaluated in their separate roles as teacher-coach, role model, and learning facilitator. The developed measures in this report could be used in site quality evaluation. PMID:26889063

  1. Endoreduplicative standards for calibration of flow cytometric C-Value measurements.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, David W

    2014-04-01

    It has been estimated that there are, globally, as many as 400,000 species of the angiosperms (the flowering plants). Of these, a minimal proportion has been characterized at the cytological level. Urgency is required in initiating a systematic and comprehensive census, due to species extinction as a consequence of anthropogenic activities. Fundamental to eukaryotes is the 2C-value, the amount of DNA contained within the nucleus of the unreduced gametes. Flow cytometry provides an ideal method for determining C-values, but the values archived in the Kew Plant C-value Database represent <2% of these species. Complicating the issue is a proliferation of different, and inconsistent standards for C-value measurements utilizing flow cytometry, and variability associated with different instrument platforms and using different staining procedures. In previous work, the use of flow cytometry for analysis of plant nuclear DNA contents for species spanning much of the range of genome sizes found in the angiosperms was described. For this work, an endoreduplicative species (Arabidopsis thaliana L.) was particularly helpful as an internal standard for genome size calibration. Such a standard is compromised if it overlaps in DNA content than that of the species whose genome size is sought. This report describes the use of a second species displaying endoreduplication, Capsicum annuum L., for similar standardization. The results (a) indicate accurate reporting of nuclear DNA contents across a range 0.32-423.68 pg, (b) confirm that endoreduplication increases nuclear DNA contents by complete replication of the genome, and (c) provide a means for quality control of linearity in instrumentation over defined dynamic ranges.

  2. Geometric approach to extend Landau-Pollak uncertainty relations for positive operator-valued measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosyk, G. M.; Zozor, S.; Portesi, M.; Osán, T. M.; Lamberti, P. W.

    2014-11-01

    We provide a twofold extension of Landau-Pollak uncertainty relations for mixed quantum states and for positive operator-valued measures, by recourse to geometric considerations. The generalization is based on metrics between pure states, having the form of a function of the square of the inner product between the states. The triangle inequality satisfied by such metrics plays a crucial role in our derivation. The usual Landau-Pollak inequality is thus a particular case (derived from Wootters metric) of the family of inequalities obtained, and, moreover, we show that it is the most restrictive relation within the family.

  3. Determination of decay coefficients for combustors with acoustic absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. E.; Espander, W. R.; Baer, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical technique for the calculation of linear decay coefficients in combustors with acoustic absorbers is presented. Tuned circumferential slot acoustic absorbers were designed for the first three transverse modes of oscillation, and decay coefficients for these absorbers were found as a function of backing distance for seven different chamber configurations. The effectiveness of the absorbers for off-design values of the combustion response and acoustic mode is also investigated. Results indicate that for tuned absorbers the decay coefficient increases approximately as the cube of the backing distance. For most off-design situations the absorber still provides a damping effect. However, if an absorber designed for some higher mode of oscillation is used to damp lower mode oscillations, a driving effect is frequently found.

  4. Analog of Formula of Total Probability for Quantum Observables Represented by Positive Operator Valued Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2016-09-01

    We represent Born's rule as an analog of the formula of total probability (FTP): the classical formula is perturbed by an additive interference term. In this note we consider practically the most general case: generalized quantum observables given by positive operator valued measures and measurement feedback on states described by atomic instruments. This representation of Born's rule clarifies the probabilistic structure of quantum mechanics (QM). The probabilistic counterpart of QM can be treated as the probability update machinery based on the special generalization of classical FTP. This is the essence of the Växjö interpretation of QM: statistical realist contextual and local interpretation. We analyze the origin of the additional interference term in quantum FTP by considering the contextual structure of the two slit experiment which was emphasized by R. Feynman.

  5. A comparison of airborne wake vortex detection measurements with values predicted from potential theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Eric C.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of flight measurements made near a wake vortex was conducted to explore the feasibility of providing a pilot with useful wake avoidance information. The measurements were made with relatively low cost flow and motion sensors on a light airplane flying near the wake vortex of a turboprop airplane weighing approximately 90000 lbs. Algorithms were developed which removed the response of the airplane to control inputs from the total airplane response and produced parameters which were due solely to the flow field of the vortex. These parameters were compared with values predicted by potential theory. The results indicated that the presence of the vortex could be detected by a combination of parameters derived from the simple sensors. However, the location and strength of the vortex cannot be determined without additional and more accurate sensors.

  6. Correlation Between Immersion Profile and Measured Value of Fixed-Point Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulgat, O. S.; Fuksov, V. M.; Ivanova, A. G.; Gerasimov, S. F.; Pokhodun, A. I.

    2014-04-01

    Assessment of thermal immersion effects in the melting and freezing points defined by the International Temperature Scale of 1990 is one of the vital issues of modern thermometry. In documents of the Consultative Committee for Thermometry, the deviation of the experimental immersion profile from the theoretical value of the hydrostatic effect at a height of about 3 cm to 5 cm from the thermometer well bottom is used for the estimation of the uncertainty due to unwanted thermal effects. This estimation assumes the occurrence of solely the hydrostatic effect all along the height of the well inner wall. Real distortions of the temperature gradient at the bottom and at the top part of the well caused by the change of heat-exchange conditions are not taken into account. To define more precisely the temperature gradient along the height of the well, a miniature PRT with a 30 mm sensitive element and a sheath length and diameter of about 60 mm and 6 mm, respectively, were used. Also, the measurements of fixed-points temperature at noticeably different slopes of immersion profiles due to variations of the thermometer heat exchange and phase transition realization conditions were produced by means of a standard platinum resistance thermometer (SPRT). The measurements were carried out at the tin and zinc freezing points. The immersion curves measured with a miniature thermometer demonstrated an increase of the temperature during its lifting in the first 1 cm to 3 cm above the bottom of the well. The measurement results at the zinc freezing point by means of the SPRT have not confirmed the correlation between the immersion curves, the received value of the Zn freezing temperature, and the estimation of its uncertainty.

  7. Enhancement mechanism of the additional absorbent on the absorption of the absorbing composite using a type-based mixing rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yonggang; Yuan, Liming; Zhang, Deyuan

    2016-04-01

    A silicone rubber composite filled with carbonyl iron particles and four different carbonous materials (carbon black, graphite, carbon fiber or multi-walled carbon nanotubes) was prepared using a two-roller mixture. The complex permittivity and permeability were measured using a vector network analyzer at the frequency of 2-18 GHz. Then a type-based mixing rule based on the dielectric absorbent and magnetic absorbent was proposed to reveal the enhancing mechanism on the permittivity and permeability. The enforcement effect lies in the decreased percolation threshold and the changing pending parameter as the carbonous materials were added. The reflection loss (RL) result showed the added carbonous materials enhanced the absorption in the lower frequency range, the RL decrement value being about 2 dB at 4-5 GHz with a thickness of 1 mm. All the added carbonous materials reinforced the shielding effectiveness (SE) of the composites. The maximum increment value of the SE was about 3.23 dB at 0.5 mm and 4.65 dB at 1 mm, respectively. The added carbonous materials could be effective additives for enforcing the absorption and shielding property of the absorbers.

  8. Realising the Real Benefits of Outsourcing: Measurement Excellence and Its Importance in Achieving Long Term Value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshri, Ilan; Kotlarsky, Julia

    These days firms are, more than ever, pressed to demonstrate returns on their investment in outsourcing. While the initial returns can always be associated with one-off cost cutting, outsourcing arrangements are complex, often involving inter-related high-value activities, which makes the realisation of long-term benefits from outsourcing ever more challenging. Executives in client firms are no longer satisfied with the same level of service delivery through the outsourcing lifecycle. They seek to achieve business transformation and innovation in their present and future services, beyond satisfying service level agreements (SLAs). Clearly the business world is facing a new challenge: an outsourcing delivery system of high-value activities that demonstrates value over time and across business functions. However, despite such expectations, many client firms are in the dark when trying to measure and quantify the return on outsourcing investments: results of this research show that less than half of all CIOs and CFOs (43%) have attempted to calculate the financial impact of outsourcing to their bottom line, indicating that the financial benefits are difficult to quantify (51%).

  9. Measurement of the solar heat gain coefficient and U value of windows with insect screens

    SciTech Connect

    Brunger, A.; Dubrous, F.M.; Harrison, S.

    1999-07-01

    Energy ratings are currently being used in a number of countries to assist in the selection of windows and doors based on energy performance. Developed for simple comparison purposes, these rating numbers do not take into account window removable attachments such as insect screens that are, nevertheless, widely used. Research was carried out to assess the effect of insect screens on the heat gains and losses of windows. The work reported in this paper deals with the effect of one screen type on the performance of a base-case, double-glazed window. Using an indoor solar simulator facility, measurements of the window solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) and U value were made for different screen attachment configurations and climatic conditions. Results with the sample window tested indicate that insect screens placed on the outdoor side can reduce its SHGC by 46% with only a 7% reduction in its U value (0.19 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}C), and that insect screens placed on the indoor side can reduce its SHGC by 15% while reducing its U value by 14% (0.38 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}C).

  10. Absorber for terahertz radiation management

    DOEpatents

    Biallas, George Herman; Apeldoorn, Cornelis; Williams, Gwyn P.; Benson, Stephen V.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Heckman, John D.

    2015-12-08

    A method and apparatus for minimizing the degradation of power in a free electron laser (FEL) generating terahertz (THz) radiation. The method includes inserting an absorber ring in the FEL beam path for absorbing any irregular THz radiation and thus minimizes the degradation of downstream optics and the resulting degradation of the FEL output power. The absorber ring includes an upstream side, a downstream side, and a plurality of wedges spaced radially around the absorber ring. The wedges form a scallop-like feature on the innermost edges of the absorber ring that acts as an apodizer, stopping diffractive focusing of the THz radiation that is not intercepted by the absorber. Spacing between the scallop-like features and the shape of the features approximates the Bartlett apodization function. The absorber ring provides a smooth intensity distribution, rather than one that is peaked on-center, thereby eliminating minor distortion downstream of the absorber.

  11. Effects of protein leakage on online monitoring of ultraviolet absorbance in spent dialysate.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Ken-Ichiro; Hirakawa, Shinya; Murakami, Jun; Akiba, Takashi; Mineshima, Michio

    2016-09-01

    Recently, dialysis dose during hemodialysis treatment has been monitored by measuring the concentration of urea-like solutes such as uric acid in spent dialysate using near-ultraviolet (UV) light. The measured absorbance has been shown to have a good correlation with the time course of urea level even if the absorbance does not result from urea. However, the spent dialysate includes various solutes such as uric acid and albumin as well as unknown solutes that also absorb UV light. The effects of these solutes on monitored absorbance values are not clear. In this study, we evaluated the effect of protein leakage on data from the UV monitoring of spent dialysate. Albumin leakage in the earlier stage of the treatment may result in an increase in absorbance greater than the expected value. As a result, there is a possibility that the dialysis dose is overestimated. On the other hand, the quantity of albumin leakage could be estimated by a spent dialysate monitoring technique combined with a protein removal process.

  12. Comparison Between Measured and Calculated Free Calcium Values at Different Serum Albumin Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Altaf Ahmad; Goyal, Bela; Datta, Sudip Kumar; Ikkurthi, Saidaiah; Pal, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Free ionic calcium is the metabolically active component of total calcium (TCa) in blood. However, most laboratories report TCa levels that are dependent on serum albumin concentration. Hence, several formulae have evolved to calculate free calcium levels from TCa after adjustment for albumin. However, free calcium can directly be measured using direction selective electrodes rather than spectrophotometric methods used in autoanalyzers. Objectives: This study compares the levels of free calcium obtained by measurement by direct ion selective electrode (ISE) and the one calculated as a function of TCa by formulae. Materials and Methods: A total of 254 serum samples submitted to clinical biochemistry laboratory of a tertiary care hospital were analyzed for total protein, albumin, and TCa by standard spectrophotometric methods and for free calcium by direct ISE. Three commonly used formulae viz. Orrell, Berry et al. and Payne et al. were used to calculate adjusted TCa. Calculated free calcium was obtained by taking 50% of these values. Results: A significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed between calculated free calcium by all the three formulae and measured free calcium estimated by direct ISE using paired t-test and Bland–Altman plots. Conclusion: Formulae for predicting free calcium by estimating TCa and albumin lacks consistency in prediction and free calcium should be evaluated by direct measurement. PMID:27365914

  13. Traceable measurement and uncertainty analysis of the gross calorific value of methane determined by isoperibolic calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haloua, F.; Foulon, E.; Allard, A.; Hay, B.; Filtz, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    As methane is the major component of natural gas and non-conventional gases as biogas or mine gases, its energy content has to be measured accurately regardless of its production site for fiscal trading of transported and distributed natural gas. The determination of calorific value of fuel gases with the lowest uncertainty can only be performed by direct method with a reference gas calorimeter. To address this point, LNE developed a few years ago an isoperibolic reference gas calorimeter according to the Rossini’s principle. The energy content Hs of methane of purity 99.9995% has been measured to 55 507.996 kJ kg-1 (890.485 kJ mol-1) with an expanded relative uncertainty of 0.091% (coverage factor k  =  2.101 providing a level of confidence of approximately 95%). These results are based on ten repeated measurements and on the uncertainty assessment performed in accordance with the guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM). The experimental setup and the results are reported here and for the first time, the fully detailed uncertainty calculation is exposed.

  14. Construction of extremal local positive-operator-valued measures under symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Virmani, S.; Plenio, M.B.

    2003-06-01

    We study the local implementation of positive-operator-valued measures (POVMs) when we require only the faithful reproduction of the statistics of the measurement outcomes for all initial states. We first demonstrate that any POVM with separable elements can be implemented by a separable superoperator, and develop techniques for calculating the extreme points of POVMs under a certain class of constraint that includes separability and positive partial transposition. As examples we consider measurements that are invariant under various symmetry groups (Werner, isotropic, Bell diagonal, local orthogonal), and demonstrate that in these cases separability of the POVM elements is equivalent to implementability via local operations and classical communication (LOCC). We also calculate the extrema of these classes of measurement under the groups that we consider, and give explicit LOCC protocols for attaining them. These protocols are hence optimal methods for locally discriminating between states of these symmetries. One of many interesting consequences is that the best way to locally discriminate Bell-diagonal mixed states is to perform a two-outcome POVM using local von Neumann projections. This is true regardless of the cost function, the number of states being discriminated, or the prior probabilities. Our results give the first cases of local mixed-state discrimination that can be analyzed quantitatively in full, and may have application to other problems such as demonstrations of nonlocality, experimental entanglement witnesses, and perhaps even entanglement distillation.

  15. The Measurement of Subjective Value and Its Relation to Contingent Valuation and Environmental Public Goods.

    PubMed

    Khaw, Mel W; Grab, Denise A; Livermore, Michael A; Vossler, Christian A; Glimcher, Paul W

    2015-01-01

    Environmental public goods--including national parks, clean air/water, and ecosystem services--provide substantial benefits on a global scale. These goods have unique characteristics in that they are typically "nonmarket" goods, with values from both use and passive use that accrue to a large number of individuals both in current and future generations. In this study, we test the hypothesis that neural signals in areas correlated with subjective valuations for essentially all other previously studied categories of goods (ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum) also correlate with environmental valuations. We use contingent valuation (CV) as our behavioral tool for measuring valuations of environmental public goods. CV is a standard stated preference approach that presents survey respondents with information on an issue and asks questions that help policymakers determine how much citizens are willing to pay for a public good or policy. We scanned human subjects while they viewed environmental proposals, along with three other classes of goods. The presentation of all four classes of goods yielded robust and similar patterns of temporally synchronized brain activation within attentional networks. The activations associated with the traditional classes of goods replicate previous correlations between neural activity in valuation areas and behavioral preferences. In contrast, CV-elicited values for environmental proposals did not correlate with brain activity at either the individual or population level. For a sub-population of participants, CV-elicited values were correlated with activity within the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, a region associated with cognitive control and shifting decision strategies. The results show that neural activity associated with the subjective valuation of environmental proposals differs profoundly from the neural activity associated with previously examined goods and preference measures.

  16. The Measurement of Subjective Value and Its Relation to Contingent Valuation and Environmental Public Goods

    PubMed Central

    Khaw, Mel W.; Grab, Denise A.; Livermore, Michael A.; Vossler, Christian A.; Glimcher, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental public goods—including national parks, clean air/water, and ecosystem services—provide substantial benefits on a global scale. These goods have unique characteristics in that they are typically “nonmarket” goods, with values from both use and passive use that accrue to a large number of individuals both in current and future generations. In this study, we test the hypothesis that neural signals in areas correlated with subjective valuations for essentially all other previously studied categories of goods (ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum) also correlate with environmental valuations. We use contingent valuation (CV) as our behavioral tool for measuring valuations of environmental public goods. CV is a standard stated preference approach that presents survey respondents with information on an issue and asks questions that help policymakers determine how much citizens are willing to pay for a public good or policy. We scanned human subjects while they viewed environmental proposals, along with three other classes of goods. The presentation of all four classes of goods yielded robust and similar patterns of temporally synchronized brain activation within attentional networks. The activations associated with the traditional classes of goods replicate previous correlations between neural activity in valuation areas and behavioral preferences. In contrast, CV-elicited values for environmental proposals did not correlate with brain activity at either the individual or population level. For a sub-population of participants, CV-elicited values were correlated with activity within the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, a region associated with cognitive control and shifting decision strategies. The results show that neural activity associated with the subjective valuation of environmental proposals differs profoundly from the neural activity associated with previously examined goods and preference measures. PMID:26221734

  17. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  18. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C.; Lee, Chuck K.; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  19. Estimation of utility values from visual analog scale measures of health in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Oddershede, Lars; Andreasen, Jan Jesper; Ehlers, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In health economic evaluations, mapping can be used to estimate utility values from other health outcomes in order to calculate quality adjusted life-years. Currently, no methods exist to map visual analog scale (VAS) scores to utility values. This study aimed to develop and propose a statistical algorithm for mapping five dimensions of health, measured on VASs, to utility scores in patients suffering from cardiovascular disease. Methods Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting at Aalborg University Hospital in Denmark were asked to score their health using the five VAS items (mobility, self-care, ability to perform usual activities, pain, and presence of anxiety or depression) and the EuroQol 5 Dimensions questionnaire. Regression analysis was used to estimate four mapping models from patients’ age, sex, and the self-reported VAS scores. Prediction errors were compared between mapping models and on subsets of the observed utility scores. Agreement between predicted and observed values was assessed using Bland–Altman plots. Results Random effects generalized least squares (GLS) regression yielded the best results when quadratic terms of VAS scores were included. Mapping models fitted using the Tobit model and censored least absolute deviation regression did not appear superior to GLS regression. The mapping models were able to explain approximately 63%–65% of the variation in the observed utility scores. The mean absolute error of predictions increased as the observed utility values decreased. Conclusion We concluded that it was possible to predict utility scores from VAS scores of the five dimensions of health used in the EuroQol questionnaires. However, the use of the mapping model may be inappropriate in more severe conditions. PMID:24453497

  20. Solar radiation absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.; Whitehead, Harlan D.

    1977-01-01

    Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

  1. A new methodology for phase-locking value: a measure of true dynamic functional connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Tianhu; Bae, K. Ty; Roberts, Timothy P. L.

    2012-03-01

    Phase-Locking value (PLV) is used to measure phase synchrony of narrowband signals, therefore, it is able to provide a measure of dynamic functional connectivity (DFC) of brain interactions. Currently used PLV methods compute the convolution of the signal at the target frequency with a complex Gabor wavelet centered at that frequency. The phase of this convolution is extracted for all time-bins over trials for a pair of neural signals. These time-bins set a limit on the temporal resolution for PLV, hence, for DFC. Therefore, these methods cannot provide a true DFC in a strict sense. PLV is defined as the absolute value of the characteristic function of the difference of instantaneous phases (IP) of two analytic signals evaluated at s = 1. It is a function of the time. For the narrowband signal in the stationary Gaussian white noise, we investigated statistics of (i) its phase, (ii) the maximum likelihood estimate of its phase, and (iii) the phase-lock loop (PLL) measurement of its phase, derived the analytic form of the probability density function (pdf) of the difference of IP, and expressed this pdf in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of signals. PLV is finally given by analytic formulas in terms of SNRs of a pair of neural signals under investigation. In this new approach, SNR, hence PLV, is evaluated at any time instant over repeated trials. Thus, the new approach can provide a true DFC via PLV. This paper presents detailed derivations of this approach and results obtained by using simulations for magnetoencephalography (MEG) data.

  2. Comparison between three methods to value lower tear meniscus measured by image software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Resúa, Carlos; Pena-Verdeal, Hugo; Lira, Madalena; Oliveira, M. Elisabete Real; Giráldez, María. Jesús; Yebra-Pimentel, Eva

    2013-11-01

    To measure different parameters of lower tear meniscus height (TMH) by using photography with open software of measurement. TMH was addressed from lower eyelid to the top of the meniscus (absolute TMH) and to the brightest meniscus reflex (reflex TMH). 121 young healthy subjects were included in the study. The lower tear meniscus was videotaped by a digital camera attached to a slit lamp. Three videos were recorded in central meniscus portion on three different methods: slit lamp without fluorescein instillation, slit lamp with fluorescein instillation and TearscopeTM without fluorescein instillation. Then, a masked observed obtained an image from each video and measured TMH by using open source software of measurement based on Java (NIH ImageJ). Absolute central (TMH-CA), absolute with fluorescein (TMH-F) and absolute using the Tearscope (TMH-Tc) were compared each other as well as reflex central (TMH-CR) and reflex Tearscope (TMH-TcR). Mean +/- S.D. values of TMH-CA, TMH-CR, TMH-F, TMH-Tc and TMH-TcR of 0.209 +/- 0.049, 0.139 +/- 0.031, 0.222 +/- 0.058, 0.175 +/- 0.045 and 0.109 +/- 0.029 mm, respectively were found. Paired t-test was performed for the relationship between TMH-CA - TMH-CR, TMH-CA - TMH-F, TMH-CA - TMH-Tc, TMH-F - TMH-Tc, TMH-Tc - TMH-TcR and TMH-CR - TMH-TcR. In all cases, it was found a significant difference between both variables (all p < 0.008). This study showed a useful tool to objectively measure TMH by photography. Eye care professionals should maintain the same TMH parameter in the follow-up visits, due to the difference between them.

  3. A Novel Scoring System to Measure Radiographic Abnormalities and Related Spirometric Values in Cured Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Báez-Saldaña, Renata; López-Arteaga, Yesenia; Bizarrón-Muro, Alma; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; Mongua-Rodríguez, Norma; García-García, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite chemotherapy, patients with cured pulmonary tuberculosis may result in lung functional impairment. Objective To evaluate a novel scoring system based on the degree of radiographic abnormalities and related spirometric values in patients with cured pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods One hundred and twenty seven patients with cured pulmonary tuberculosis were prospectively enrolled in a referral hospital specializing in respiratory diseases. Spirometry was performed and the extent of radiographic abnormalities was evaluated twice by each of two readers to generate a novel quantitative score. Scoring reproducibility was analyzed by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and the Bland-Altman method. Multiple linear regression models were performed to assess the association of the extent of radiographic abnormalities with spirometric values. Results The intra-observer agreement for scoring of radiographic abnormalities (SRA) showed an ICC of 0.81 (CI:95%, 0.67–0.95) and 0.78 (CI:95%, 0.65–0.92), for reader 1 and 2, respectively. Inter-observer reproducibility for the first measurement was 0.83 (CI:95%, 0.71–0.95), and for the second measurement was 0.74 (CI:95%, 0.58–0.90). The Bland-Altman analysis of the intra-observer agreement showed a mean bias of 0.87% and -0.55% and an inter-observer agreement of -0.35% and -1.78%, indicating a minor average systematic variability. After adjustment for age, gender, height, smoking status, pack-years of smoking, and degree of dyspnea, the scoring degree of radiographic abnormalities was significantly and negatively associated with absolute and percent predicted values of FVC: -0.07 (CI:95%, -0.01 to -0.04); -2.48 (CI:95%, -3.45 to -1.50); and FEV1 -0.07 (CI:95%, -0.10 to -0.05); -2.92 (CI:95%, -3.87 to -1.97) respectively, in the patients studied. Conclusion The extent of radiographic abnormalities, as evaluated through our novel scoring system, was inversely associated with spirometric values, and

  4. Effect of sampling location on L* values and pH measurements and their relationship in broiler breast fillets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lightness (CIELAB L*) and pH values are the most widely measured quality indicators for broiler breast fillets (pectoralis major). Measurement of L* values with a spectrophotometer can be done through Specular Component Included (SCI) or Specular Component Excluded (SCE) modes. The intra-fillet loca...

  5. RANS Simulation of the Heave Response of a Two-Body Floating Point Wave Absorber: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y.; Li, Y.

    2011-03-01

    A preliminary study on a two-body floating wave absorbers is presented in this paper. A Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes computational method is applied for analyzing the hydrodynamic heave response of the absorber in operational wave conditions. The two-body floating wave absorber contains a float section and a submerged reaction section. For validation purposes, our model is first assumed to be locked. The two sections are forced to move together with each other. The locked single body model is used in a heave decay test, where the RANS result is validated with the experimental measurement. For the two-body floating point absorber simulation, the two sections are connected through a mass-spring-damper system, which is applied to simulate the power take-off mechanism under design wave conditions. Overall, the details of the flow around the absorber and its nonlinear interaction with waves are investigated, and the power absorption efficiency of the two-body floating wave absorber in waves with a constant value spring-damper system is examined.

  6. Hydrogel/fiber optic sensor for distributed measurement of humidity and pH value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLean, Alistair; Michie, W. Craig; Pierce, S. Gareth; Thursby, Graham; Culshaw, Brian; Moran, Chris; Graham, Neil B.

    1998-07-01

    The combination of chemically sensitive, swellable polymer materials with novel optical fiber cable designs to transduce the swelling activity into microbend loss enables a simple yet powerful sensor to be produced. Interrogating such cables with standard optical time domain reflectoctrometry (OTDR) instruments allows particular chemicals of interest to be detected and located along a cable which may extend to several kilometers. We report here on a sensor cable which uses a water swellable material, a hydrogel, to detect positions of water ingress, relative humidity level or pH value. In direct water ingress tests, wet sensor lengths as small as 5 cm in several hundreds of meters have been detected using conventional OTDRs. Following a review of the sensor design, we present the results of an investigation of the mechanical interaction between the hydrogel polymer and the optical fiber within the sensor. The behavior of the sensor is then characterized within environments of different relative humidity levels from 70 percent to 100 percent at temperatures ranging from 0 to 60 degrees C. The sensor was initially designed for applications within civil engineering but can be applied to a much broader range of measurement requirements, for example soil moisture measurement. We will report details on experimental observations on concrete cure within reinforcing tendon ducts and soil humidity measurements within different soil types.

  7. Is Log Ratio a Good Value for Measuring Return in Stock Investments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ultsch, Alfred

    Measuring the rate of return is an important issue for theory and practice of investments in the stock market. A common measure for rate of return is the logarithm of the ratio of successive prices (LogRatio). In this paper it is shown that LogRatio as well as arithmetic return rate (Ratio) have several disadvantages. As an alternative relative differences (RelDiff) are proposed to measure return. The stability against numerical and rounding errors of RelDiff is much better than for LogRatios and Ratio). RelDiff values are identical to LogRatios and Return for small absolutes. The usage of RelDiff maps returns to a finite range. For most subsequent analyses this is a big advantage. The usefulness of the approach is demonstrated on daily return rates of a large set of actual stocks. It is shown that returns can be modeled with a very simple mixture of distributions in great precision using Relative differences.

  8. Deterministic Positive Operator Valued Measurements Performed Onto Remote Qubits via Partially Entangled States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, LiBing; Lu, Hong

    2015-03-01

    We show how a remote positive operator valued measurement (POVM) can be implemented deterministically by using partially entangled state(s). Firstly, we present a theoretical scheme for implementing deterministically a remote and controlled POVM onto any one of N qubits via a partially entangled ( N + 1)-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state, in which ( N - 1) administrators are included. Then, we design another scheme for implementing deterministically a POVM onto N remote qubits via N partially entangled qubit pairs. Our schemes have been designed for obtaining the optimal success probabilities: i.e. they are identical to those in the ordinary, local, POVMs. In these schemes, the POVM dictates the amount of entanglement needed. The fact that such overall treatment can save quantum resources is notable.

  9. Dispositional resistance to change: measurement equivalence and the link to personal values across 17 nations.

    PubMed

    Oreg, Shaul; Bayazit, Mahmut; Vakola, Maria; Arciniega, Luis; Armenakis, Achilles; Barkauskiene, Rasa; Bozionelos, Nikos; Fujimoto, Yuka; González, Luis; Han, Jian; Hrebícková, Martina; Jimmieson, Nerina; Kordacová, Jana; Mitsuhashi, Hitoshi; Mlacic, Boris; Feric, Ivana; Topic, Marina Kotrla; Ohly, Sandra; Saksvik, Per Oystein; Hetland, Hilde; Saksvik, Ingvild; van Dam, Karen

    2008-07-01

    The concept of dispositional resistance to change has been introduced in a series of exploratory and confirmatory analyses through which the validity of the Resistance to Change (RTC) Scale has been established (S. Oreg, 2003). However, the vast majority of participants with whom the scale was validated were from the United States. The purpose of the present work was to examine the meaningfulness of the construct and the validity of the scale across nations. Measurement equivalence analyses of data from 17 countries, representing 13 languages and 4 continents, confirmed the cross-national validity of the scale. Equivalent patterns of relationships between personal values and RTC across samples extend the nomological net of the construct and provide further evidence that dispositional resistance to change holds equivalent meanings across nations. PMID:18642996

  10. A sensitive, high resolution magic angle turning experiment for measuring chemical shift tensor principal values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderman, D. W.

    1998-12-01

    A sensitive, high-resolution 'FIREMAT' two-dimensional (2D) magic-angle-turning experiment is described that measures chemical shift tensor principal values in powdered solids. The spectra display spinning-sideband patterns separated by their isotropic shifts. The new method's sensitivity and high resolution in the isotropic-shift dimension result from combining the 5pi magic-angle-turning pulse sequence, an extension of the pseudo-2D sideband-suppression data rearrangement, and the TIGER protocol for processing 2D data. TPPM decoupling is used to enhance resolution. The method requires precise synchronization of the pulses and sampling to the rotor position. It is shown that the technique obtains 35 natural-abundance 13C tensors from erythromycin in 19 hours, and high quality naturalabundance 15N tensors from eight sites in potassium penicillin V in three days on a 400MHz spectrometer.

  11. Quantum Tasks with Non-maximally Quantum Channels via Positive Operator-Valued Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jia-Yin; Luo, Ming-Xing; Mo, Zhi-Wen

    2013-01-01

    By using a proper positive operator-valued measure (POVM), we present two new schemes for probabilistic transmission with non-maximally four-particle cluster states. In the first scheme, we demonstrate that two non-maximally four-particle cluster states can be used to realize probabilistically sharing an unknown three-particle GHZ-type state within either distant agent's place. In the second protocol, we demonstrate that a non-maximally four-particle cluster state can be used to teleport an arbitrary unknown multi-particle state in a probabilistic manner with appropriate unitary operations and POVM. Moreover the total success probability of these two schemes are also worked out.

  12. The use of footwear insulation values measured on a thermal foot model.

    PubMed

    Kuklane, Kalev

    2004-01-01

    The use of physiological data from human tests in modelling should consider background data, such as activity, environmental factors and clothing insulation on the whole body. The present paper focuses on local thermal comfort of feet with special attention on the effects of physical changes of footwear thermal properties. An alternative test method is available for footwear thermal testing besides the standard method. The possibility to use insulation values acquired on a thermal foot model in practice is shown here. The paper describes the correlation between cold and pain sensations, and foot skin temperatures of the subjects and relates these to insulation measured on a thermal foot model. Recommendations are made for footwear choice according to environmental temperature.

  13. Prediction of breeding values for tenderness of market animals from measurements on bulls.

    PubMed

    Barkhouse, K L; Van Vleck, L D; Cundiff, L V; Koohmaraie, M; Lunstra, D D; Crouse, J D

    1996-11-01

    Data were tenderness measures on steaks from 237 bulls (Group II) slaughtered after producing freezable semen and on 1,431 related steers and heifers (market animals, Group I) from Angus, Hereford, Pinzgauer, Brahman, and Sahiwal crosses from the Germ Plasm Evaluation project at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center. Tenderness was assessed through Warner-Bratzler Shear Force (SF), taste panel tenderness (TPT), marbling score (MS), and myofibrillar fragmentation index (MFI). For all traits, as fraction Bos indicus inheritance increased, implied tenderness decreased. Heritability estimates were generally not significantly different from zero. Genetic correlations generally indicated favorable associations among the traits. The range in predicted breeding values of bulls for market animal tenderness was small and from -.34 to .32 kg for market animal shear force. Because of low estimates of heritability for SF or TPT, results from this experiment indicate that selection based on tenderness of steaks sampled from intact or late castrate males slaughtered following collection of freezable quality semen would not be very effective in improving average tenderness of steaks from steers of heifer progeny. If a mean of heritability estimates reported in the literature of .27 for shear value was assumed for market steer and heifer progeny instead of .02 as found in the present study, then selection based on estimates of shear force in young bulls would be relatively more effective in improving shear force of market progeny. PMID:8923175

  14. Comparing results of an exact vs. an approximate (Bayesian) measurement invariance test: a cross-country illustration with a scale to measure 19 human values.

    PubMed

    Cieciuch, Jan; Davidov, Eldad; Schmidt, Peter; Algesheimer, René; Schwartz, Shalom H

    2014-01-01

    One of the most frequently used procedures for measurement invariance testing is the multigroup confirmatory factor analysis (MGCFA). Muthén and Asparouhov recently proposed a new approach to test for approximate rather than exact measurement invariance using Bayesian MGCFA. Approximate measurement invariance permits small differences between parameters otherwise constrained to be equal in the classical exact approach. However, extant knowledge about how results of approximate measurement invariance tests compare to the results of the exact measurement invariance test is missing. We address this gap by comparing the results of exact and approximate cross-country measurement invariance tests of a revised scale to measure human values. Several studies that measured basic human values with the Portrait Values Questionnaire (PVQ) reported problems of measurement noninvariance (especially scalar noninvariance) across countries. Recently Schwartz et al. proposed a refined value theory and an instrument (PVQ-5X) to measure 19 more narrowly defined values. Cieciuch et al. tested its measurement invariance properties across eight countries and established exact scalar measurement invariance for 10 of the 19 values. The current study applied the approximate measurement invariance procedure on the same data and established approximate scalar measurement invariance even for all 19 values. Thus, the first conclusion is that the approximate approach provides more encouraging results for the usefulness of the scale for cross-cultural research, although this finding needs to be generalized and validated in future research using population data. The second conclusion is that the approximate measurement invariance is more likely than the exact approach to establish measurement invariance, although further simulation studies are needed to determine more precise recommendations about how large the permissible variance of the priors may be.

  15. Comparing results of an exact vs. an approximate (Bayesian) measurement invariance test: a cross-country illustration with a scale to measure 19 human values

    PubMed Central

    Cieciuch, Jan; Davidov, Eldad; Schmidt, Peter; Algesheimer, René; Schwartz, Shalom H.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most frequently used procedures for measurement invariance testing is the multigroup confirmatory factor analysis (MGCFA). Muthén and Asparouhov recently proposed a new approach to test for approximate rather than exact measurement invariance using Bayesian MGCFA. Approximate measurement invariance permits small differences between parameters otherwise constrained to be equal in the classical exact approach. However, extant knowledge about how results of approximate measurement invariance tests compare to the results of the exact measurement invariance test is missing. We address this gap by comparing the results of exact and approximate cross-country measurement invariance tests of a revised scale to measure human values. Several studies that measured basic human values with the Portrait Values Questionnaire (PVQ) reported problems of measurement noninvariance (especially scalar noninvariance) across countries. Recently Schwartz et al. proposed a refined value theory and an instrument (PVQ-5X) to measure 19 more narrowly defined values. Cieciuch et al. tested its measurement invariance properties across eight countries and established exact scalar measurement invariance for 10 of the 19 values. The current study applied the approximate measurement invariance procedure on the same data and established approximate scalar measurement invariance even for all 19 values. Thus, the first conclusion is that the approximate approach provides more encouraging results for the usefulness of the scale for cross-cultural research, although this finding needs to be generalized and validated in future research using population data. The second conclusion is that the approximate measurement invariance is more likely than the exact approach to establish measurement invariance, although further simulation studies are needed to determine more precise recommendations about how large the permissible variance of the priors may be. PMID:25249996

  16. Comparing results of an exact vs. an approximate (Bayesian) measurement invariance test: a cross-country illustration with a scale to measure 19 human values.

    PubMed

    Cieciuch, Jan; Davidov, Eldad; Schmidt, Peter; Algesheimer, René; Schwartz, Shalom H

    2014-01-01

    One of the most frequently used procedures for measurement invariance testing is the multigroup confirmatory factor analysis (MGCFA). Muthén and Asparouhov recently proposed a new approach to test for approximate rather than exact measurement invariance using Bayesian MGCFA. Approximate measurement invariance permits small differences between parameters otherwise constrained to be equal in the classical exact approach. However, extant knowledge about how results of approximate measurement invariance tests compare to the results of the exact measurement invariance test is missing. We address this gap by comparing the results of exact and approximate cross-country measurement invariance tests of a revised scale to measure human values. Several studies that measured basic human values with the Portrait Values Questionnaire (PVQ) reported problems of measurement noninvariance (especially scalar noninvariance) across countries. Recently Schwartz et al. proposed a refined value theory and an instrument (PVQ-5X) to measure 19 more narrowly defined values. Cieciuch et al. tested its measurement invariance properties across eight countries and established exact scalar measurement invariance for 10 of the 19 values. The current study applied the approximate measurement invariance procedure on the same data and established approximate scalar measurement invariance even for all 19 values. Thus, the first conclusion is that the approximate approach provides more encouraging results for the usefulness of the scale for cross-cultural research, although this finding needs to be generalized and validated in future research using population data. The second conclusion is that the approximate measurement invariance is more likely than the exact approach to establish measurement invariance, although further simulation studies are needed to determine more precise recommendations about how large the permissible variance of the priors may be. PMID:25249996

  17. Maximal aerobic capacity in ageing subjects: actual measurements versus predicted values

    PubMed Central

    Pistea, Cristina; Lonsdorfer, Evelyne; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Oswald, Monique; Enache, Irina

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of selection of reference values on the categorisation of measured maximal oxygen consumption (V′O2peak) as “normal” or “abnormal” in an ageing population. We compared measured V′O2peak with predicted values and the lower limit of normal (LLN) calculated with five equations. 99 (58 males and 41 females) disease-free subjects aged ≥70 years completed an incremental maximal exercise test on a cycle ergometer. Mean V′O2peak was 1.88 L·min−1 in men and 1.26 L·min−1 in women. V′O2peak ranged from 89% to 108% of predicted in men, and from 88% to 164% of predicted in women, depending on the reference equation used. The proportion of subjects below the LLN ranged from 5% to 14% in men and 0–22% in women, depending on the reference equation. The LLN was lacking in one study, and was unsuitable for women in another. Most LLNs ranged between 53% and 73% of predicted. Therefore, choosing an 80% cut-off leads to overestimation of the proportion of “abnormal” subjects. To conclude, the proportion of subjects aged ≥70 years with a “low” V′O2peak differs markedly according to the chosen reference equations. In clinical practice, it is still relevant to test a sample of healthy volunteers and select the reference equations that better characterise this sample. PMID:27730176

  18. Measuring the Value of Earth Observation Information with the Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernknopf, R.; Kuwayama, Y.; Brookshire, D.; Macauley, M.; Zaitchik, B.; Pesko, S.; Vail, P.

    2014-12-01

    Determining how much to invest in earth observation technology depends in part on the value of information (VOI) that can be derived from the observations. We design a framework and then evaluate the value-in-use of the NASA Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) for regional water use and reliability in the presence of drought. As a technology that allows measurement of water storage, the GRACE Data Assimilation System (DAS) provides information that is qualitatively different from that generated by other water data sources. It provides a global, reproducible grid of changes in surface and subsurface water resources on a frequent and regular basis. Major damages from recent events such as the 2012 Midwest drought and the ongoing drought in California motivate the need to understand the VOI from remotely sensed data such as that derived from GRACE DAS. Our conceptual framework models a dynamic risk management problem in agriculture. We base the framework on information from stakeholders and subject experts. The economic case for GRACE DAS involves providing better water availability information. In the model, individuals have a "willingness to pay" (wtp) for GRACE DAS - essentially, wtp is an expression of savings in reduced agricultural input costs and for costs that are influenced by regional policy decisions. Our hypothesis is that improvements in decision making can be achieved with GRACE DAS measurements of water storage relative to data collected from groundwater monitoring wells and soil moisture monitors that would be relied on in the absence of GRACE DAS. The VOI is estimated as a comparison of outcomes. The California wine grape industry has features that allow it to be a good case study and a basis for extrapolation to other economic sectors. We model water use in this sector as a sequential decision highlighting the attributes of GRACE DAS input as information for within-season production decisions as well as for longer-term water reliability.

  19. Precise dispersion equations of absorbing filter glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichel, S.; Biertümpfel, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    The refractive indices versus wavelength of optical transparent glasses are measured at a few wavelengths only. In order to calculate the refractive index at any wavelength, a so-called Sellmeier series is used as an approximation of the wavelength dependent refractive index. Such a Sellmeier representation assumes an absorbing free (= loss less) material. In optical transparent glasses this assumption is valid since the absorption of such transparent glasses is very low. However, optical filter glasses have often a rather high absorbance in certain regions of the spectrum. The exact description of the wavelength dependent function of the refractive index is essential for an optimized design for sophisticated optical applications. Digital cameras use an IR cut filter to ensure good color rendition and image quality. In order to reduce ghost images by reflections and to be nearly angle independent absorbing filter glass is used, e.g. blue glass BG60 from SCHOTT. Nowadays digital cameras improve their performance and so the IR cut filter needs to be improved and thus the accurate knowledge of the refractive index (dispersion) of the used glasses must be known. But absorbing filter glass is not loss less as needed for a Sellmeier representation. In addition it is very difficult to measure it in the absorption region of the filter glass. We have focused a lot of effort on measuring the refractive index at specific wavelength for absorbing filter glass - even in the absorption region. It will be described how to do such a measurement. In addition we estimate the use of a Sellmeier representation for filter glasses. It turns out that in most cases a Sellmeier representation can be used even for absorbing filter glasses. Finally Sellmeier coefficients for the approximation of the refractive index will be given for different filter glasses.

  20. Dual broadband metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ju; Yoo, Young Joon; Kim, Ki Won; Rhee, Joo Yull; Kim, Yong Hwan; Lee, YoungPak

    2015-02-23

    We propose polarization-independent and dual-broadband metamaterial absorbers at microwave frequencies. This is a periodic meta-atom array consisting of metal-dielectric-multilayer truncated cones. We demonstrate not only one broadband absorption from the fundamental magnetic resonances but additional broadband absorption in high-frequency range using the third-harmonic resonance, by both simulation and experiment. In simulation, the absorption was over 90% in 3.93-6.05 GHz, and 11.64-14.55 GHz. The corresponding experimental absorption bands over 90% were 3.88-6.08 GHz, 9.95-10.46 GHz and 11.86-13.84 GHz, respectively. The origin of absorption bands was elucidated. Furthermore, it is independent of polarization angle owing to the multilayered circular structures. The design is scalable to smaller size for the infrared and the visible ranges.

  1. Absorber coatings' degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    This report is intended to document some of the Los Alamos efforts that have been carried out under the Department of Energy (DOE) Active Heating and Cooling Materials Reliability, Maintainability, and Exposure Testing program. Funding for these activities is obtained directly from DOE although they represent a variety of projects and coordination with other agencies. Major limitations to the use of solar energy are the uncertain reliability and lifetimes of solar systems. This program is aimed at determining material operating limitations, durabilities, and failure modes such that materials improvements can be made and lifetimes can be extended. Although many active and passive materials and systems are being studied at Los Alamos, this paper will concentrate on absorber coatings and degradation of these coatings.

  2. Determination of threshold value of soil water content for field and vegetable plants with lysimeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoblauch, S.

    2009-04-01

    Both the potential water consumption of plants and their ability to withdraw soil water are necessary in order to estimate actual evapotranspiration and to predict irrigation timing and amount. In relating to root water uptake the threshold value at which plants reducing evapotranspiration is an important parameter. Since transpiration is linearly correlated to dry matter production, under the condition that the AET/PET-Quotient is smaller than 1.0 (de Wit 1958, Tanner & Sinclair 1983), the dry matter production begins to decline too. Plants respond to drought with biochemical, physiological and morphological modifications in order to avoid damages, for instance by increasing the root water uptake. The objective of the study is to determine threshold values of soil water content and pressure head respectively for different field and vegetable plants with lysimeter measurements and to derive so called reduction functions. Both parameter, potenzial water demand in several growth stages and threshold value of soil water content or pressure head can be determined with weighable field lysimeter. The threshold value is reached, when the evapotranspiration under natural rainfall condition (AET) drop clearly (0.8 PET) below the value under well watered condition (PET). Basis for the presented results is the lysimeter plant Buttelstedt of the Thuringian State Institute of Agriculture. It consist of two lysimeter cellars, each with two weighable monolithic lysimeters. The lysimeter are 2.5 m deep with a surface area of 2 m2 to allow a non-restrictive root growth and to arrange a representative number of plants. The weighing accuracy amounts to 0.05 mm. The percolating water is collected by ceramic suction cups with suction up to 0.3 MPa at a depth of 2.3 m. The soil water content is measured by using neutron probe. One of the two lysimeter cellars represents the will irrigated, the other one the non irrigated and/or reduced irrigated part of field. The soil is a Haplic

  3. Reference dosimetry at the Australian Synchrotron's imaging and medical beamline using free-air ionization chamber measurements and theoretical predictions of air kerma rate and half value layer

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Rogers, Peter A. W.; Stevenson, Andrew W.; Hall, Christopher J.; Lye, Jessica E.; Nordstroem, Terese; Midgley, Stewart M.; Lewis, Robert A.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Novel, preclinical radiotherapy modalities are being developed at synchrotrons around the world, most notably stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy and microbeam radiotherapy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. The imaging and medical beamline (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron has recently become available for preclinical radiotherapy and imaging research with clinical trials, a distinct possibility in the coming years. The aim of this present study was to accurately characterize the synchrotron-generated x-ray beam for the purposes of air kerma-based absolute dosimetry. Methods: The authors used a theoretical model of the energy spectrum from the wiggler source and validated this model by comparing the transmission through copper absorbers (0.1-3.0 mm) against real measurements conducted at the beamline. The authors used a low energy free air ionization chamber (LEFAC) from the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency and a commercially available free air chamber (ADC-105) for the measurements. The dimensions of these two chambers are different from one another requiring careful consideration of correction factors. Results: Measured and calculated half value layer (HVL) and air kerma rates differed by less than 3% for the LEFAC when the ion chamber readings were corrected for electron energy loss and ion recombination. The agreement between measured and predicted air kerma rates was less satisfactory for the ADC-105 chamber, however. The LEFAC and ADC measurements produced a first half value layer of 0.405 {+-} 0.015 and 0.412 {+-} 0.016 mm Cu, respectively, compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.427 {+-} 0.012 mm Cu. The theoretical model based upon a spectrum calculator derived a mean beam energy of 61.4 keV with a first half value layer of approximately 30 mm in water. Conclusions: The authors showed in this study their ability to verify the predicted air kerma rate and x-ray attenuation

  4. On the definition of absorbed dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grusell, Erik

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: The quantity absorbed dose is used extensively in all areas concerning the interaction of ionizing radiation with biological organisms, as well as with matter in general. The most recent and authoritative definition of absorbed dose is given by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) in ICRU Report 85. However, that definition is incomplete. The purpose of the present work is to give a rigorous definition of absorbed dose. Methods: Absorbed dose is defined in terms of the random variable specific energy imparted. A random variable is a mathematical function, and it cannot be defined without specifying its domain of definition which is a probability space. This is not done in report 85 by the ICRU, mentioned above. Results: In the present work a definition of a suitable probability space is given, so that a rigorous definition of absorbed dose is possible. This necessarily includes the specification of the experiment which the probability space describes. In this case this is an irradiation, which is specified by the initial particles released and by the material objects which can interact with the radiation. Some consequences are discussed. Specific energy imparted is defined for a volume, and the definition of absorbed dose as a point function involves the specific energy imparted for a small mass contained in a volume surrounding the point. A possible more precise definition of this volume is suggested and discussed. Conclusions: The importance of absorbed dose motivates a proper definition, and one is given in the present work. No rigorous definition has been presented before.

  5. Evaluation of the Acoustic Measurement Capability of the NASA Langley V/STOL Wind Tunnel Open Test Section with Acoustically Absorbent Ceiling and Floor Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theobald, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    The single source location used for helicopter model studies was utilized in a study to determine the distances and directions upstream of the model accurate at which measurements of the direct acoustic field could be obtained. The method used was to measure the decrease of sound pressure levels with distance from a noise source and thereby determine the Hall radius as a function of frequency and direction. Test arrangements and procedures are described. Graphs show the normalized sound pressure level versus distance curves for the glass fiber floor treatment and for the foam floor treatment.

  6. Warm Absorber Diagnostics of AGN Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, Timothy

    Warm absorbers and related phenomena are observable manifestations of outflows or winds from active galactic nuclei (AGN) that have great potential value. Understanding AGN outflows is important for explaining the mass budgets of the central accreting black hole, and also for understanding feedback and the apparent co-evolution of black holes and their host galaxies. In the X-ray band warm absorbers are observed as photoelectric absorption and resonance line scattering features in the 0.5-10 keV energy band; the UV band also shows resonance line absorption. Warm absorbers are common in low luminosity AGN and they have been extensively studied observationally. They may play an important role in AGN feedback, regulating the net accretion onto the black hole and providing mechanical energy to the surroundings. However, fundamental properties of the warm absorbers are not known: What is the mechanism which drives the outflow?; what is the gas density in the flow and the geometrical distribution of the outflow?; what is the explanation for the apparent relation between warm absorbers and the surprising quasi-relativistic 'ultrafast outflows' (UFOs)? We propose a focused set of model calculations that are aimed at synthesizing observable properties of warm absorber flows and associated quantities. These will be used to explore various scenarios for warm absorber dynamics in order to answer the questions in the previous paragraph. The guiding principle will be to examine as wide a range as possible of warm absorber driving mechanisms, geometry and other properties, but with as careful consideration as possible to physical consistency. We will build on our previous work, which was a systematic campaign for testing important class of scenarios for driving the outflows. We have developed a set of tools that are unique and well suited for dynamical calculations including radiation in this context. We also have state-of-the-art tools for generating synthetic spectra, which are

  7. The value of FeNO measurement in childhood asthma: uncertainties and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Giuliana; Malizia, Velia; Antona, Roberta; Corsello, Giovanni; La Grutta, Stefania

    2013-07-31

    Asthma is considered an heterogeneous disease, requiring multiple biomarkers for diagnosis and management. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide in exhaled breath (FeNO) was the first useful non-invasive marker of airway inflammation in asthma and still is the most widely used. The non-invasive nature and the relatively easy use of FeNO technique make it an interesting tool to monitor airway inflammation and rationalize corticosteroid therapy in asthmatic patients, together with the traditional clinical tools (history, physical examination and lung function tests), even if some controversies have been published regarding the use of FeNO to support the management of asthma in children. The problem of multiple confounding factors and overlap between healthy and asthmatic populations preclude the routine application of FeNO reference values in clinical practice and suggest that it would be better to consider an individual "best", taking into account the context in which the measurement is obtained and the clinical history of the patient. Besides, there is still disagreement about the role of FeNO as a marker of asthma control, due to the complexity of balance among the different items involved in its determination and the lack of homogeneity in the population groups studied in the few studies conducted so far. Heterogeneity of problematic severe asthma greatly limits utility of FeNO alone as a biomarker of inflammation to optimize the disease management on an individual basis. None of the studies conducted so far demonstrated that the use of FeNO was better than current asthma guidelines in controlling asthma exacerbations. In summary, there is a large variation in FeNO levels between individuals, which may reflect the natural heterogeneity in baseline epithelial nitric oxide synthase activity and/or the contribution of other noneosinophilic factors to epithelial nitric oxide synthase activity. FeNO is a promising biomarker, but at present some limits are highlighted. We

  8. The value of body weight measurement to assess dehydration in children.

    PubMed

    Pruvost, Isabelle; Dubos, François; Chazard, Emmanuel; Hue, Valérie; Duhamel, Alain; Martinot, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Dehydration secondary to gastroenteritis is one of the most common reasons for office visits and hospital admissions. The indicator most commonly used to estimate dehydration status is acute weight loss. Post-illness weight gain is considered as the gold-standard to determine the true level of dehydration and is widely used to estimate weight loss in research. To determine the value of post-illness weight gain as a gold standard for acute dehydration, we conducted a prospective cohort study in which 293 children, aged 1 month to 2 years, with acute diarrhea were followed for 7 days during a 3-year period. The main outcome measures were an accurate pre-illness weight (if available within 8 days before the diarrhea), post-illness weight, and theoretical weight (predicted from the child's individual growth chart). Post-illness weight was measured for 231 (79%) and both theoretical and post-illness weights were obtained for 111 (39%). Only 62 (21%) had an accurate pre-illness weight. The correlation between post-illness and theoretical weight was excellent (0.978), but bootstrapped linear regression analysis showed that post-illness weight underestimated theoretical weight by 0.48 kg (95% CI: 0.06-0.79, p<0.02). The mean difference in the fluid deficit calculated was 4.0% of body weight (95% CI: 3.2-4.7, p<0.0001). Theoretical weight overestimated accurate pre-illness weight by 0.21 kg (95% CI: 0.08-0.34, p = 0.002). Post-illness weight underestimated pre-illness weight by 0.19 kg (95% CI: 0.03-0.36, p = 0.02). The prevalence of 5% dehydration according to post-illness weight (21%) was significantly lower than the prevalence estimated by either theoretical weight (60%) or clinical assessment (66%, p<0.0001).These data suggest that post-illness weight is of little value as a gold standard to determine the true level of dehydration. The performance of dehydration signs or scales determined by using post-illness weight as a gold standard has to be reconsidered.

  9. METHOD 415.3 - MEASUREMENT OF TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON, DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON AND SPECIFIC UV ABSORBANCE AT 254 NM IN SOURCE WATER AND DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    2.0 SUMMARY OF METHOD

    2.1 In both TOC and DOC determinations, organic carbon in the water sample is oxidized to form carbon dioxide (CO2), which is then measured by a detection system. There are two different approaches for the oxidation of organic carbon in water sample...

  10. Velocity measurements comparison of water and pentane travelling in capillary optical fibers coated respectively with a xerogel and a poly(dimethylsiloxane) absorbing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Serge; Paré, Claude; Proulx, Antoine; Grenier, Paul; Matejec, Vlastimil

    2009-06-01

    An analysis of the optical signal transmitted by a polarimetric sensor developed for the measurement of velocities of fluids in a capillary optical fiber is presented. It allows one to determine whether a fluid is moving in the vapor or the liquid phase.

  11. Fine-Structure Measurements of Oxygen A Band Absorbance for Estimating the Thermodynamic Average Temperature of the Earth's Atmosphere: An Experiment in Physical and Environmental Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myrick, M. L.; Greer, A. E.; Nieuwland, A.; Priore, R. J.; Scaffidi, J.; Andreatta, Daniele; Colavita, Paula

    2006-01-01

    The experiment describe the measures of the A band transitions of atmospheric oxygen, a rich series of rotation-electronic absorption lines falling in the deep red portion of the optical spectrum and clearly visible owing to attenuation of solar radiation. It combines pure physical chemistry with analytical and environmental science and provides a…

  12. Broadband patterned magnetic microwave absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Wu, Tianlong; Wang, Wei; Guan, Jianguo; Zhai, Pengcheng

    2014-07-28

    It is a tough task to greatly improve the working bandwidth for the traditional flat microwave absorbers because of the restriction of available material parameters. In this work, a simple patterning method is proposed to drastically broaden the absorption bandwidth of a conventional magnetic absorber. As a demonstration, an ultra-broadband microwave absorber with more than 90% absorption in the frequency range of 4–40 GHz is designed and experimentally realized, which has a thin thickness of 3.7 mm and a light weight equivalent to a 2-mm-thick flat absorber. In such a patterned absorber, the broadband strong absorption is mainly originated from the simultaneous incorporation of multiple λ/4 resonances and edge diffraction effects. This work provides a facile route to greatly extend the microwave absorption bandwidth for the currently available absorbing materials.

  13. Electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Heppner, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary designs were generated for two electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber concepts. Initially, an electrochemically regenerable absorption bed concept was designed. This concept incorporated the required electrochemical regeneration components in the absorber design, permitting the absorbent to be regenerated within the absorption bed. This hardware was identified as the electrochemical absorber hardware. The second hardware concept separated the functional components of the regeneration and absorption process. This design approach minimized the extravehicular activity component volume by eliminating regeneration hardware components within the absorber. The electrochemical absorber hardware was extensively characterized for major operating parameters such as inlet carbon dioxide partial pressure, process air flow rate, operational pressure, inlet relative humidity, regeneration current density and absorption/regeneration cycle endurance testing.

  14. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  15. On the air-entry value of porous media: New insights from measurements, imaging and pore scale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Peter; Hoogland, Frouke; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    The air entry value is the capillary pressure associated with the formation of a continuous gas phase, hence marking the onset of unsaturated conditions in a porous medium. Near the air-entry value, transport properties change abruptly hence the importance of reliable determination of this value for modeling processes in the vadose zone. Typically, air entry value is inferred from the soil water characteristics of a porous sample subjected to step-wise increase in applied suction. This procedure is laborious and may require long equilibration times, and is difficult to apply for coarse media. We present an alternative and simpler method to deduce air entry-value from continuous evaporation from an initially saturated porous sample. As water evaporates and menisci form and penetrate the surface, the capillary pressure (measured with a tensiometer at any depth) abruptly changes and marks the macroscopic air entry value. This value remains remarkably constant during evaporation and receding drying front (after accounting for hydrostatic front position). We present experimental results from different porous media confirming that air-entry values deduced from soil water characteristics and evaporation experiments are similar. We employed pore scale imaging and network modeling to confirm that the air-entry value corresponds to the critical path that is needed to form a continuous air phase and its macroscopic value remains stable at a drying front that traverses a uniform porous medium. For layered media, corresponding adjustments in air entry values and air invasion patterns have been predicted and measured.

  16. Establishing Common Cost Measures to Evaluate the Economic Value of Patient Navigation Programs

    PubMed Central

    Whitley, Elizabeth; Valverde, Patricia; Wells, Kristen; Williams, Loretta; Teschner, Taylor; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina

    2011-01-01

    Background Patient navigation is an intervention aimed at reducing barriers to healthcare for underserved populations as a means to reduce cancer health disparities. Despite the proliferation of patient navigation programs across the United States, information related to the economic impact and sustainability of these programs is lacking. Method Following a review of the relevant literature, the Health Services Research (HSR) cost workgroup of the American Cancer Society National Patient Navigator Leadership Summit met to examine cost data relevant to assessing the economic impact of patient navigation and to propose common cost metrics. Results Recognizing that resources available for data collection, management and analysis vary, five categories of core and optional cost measures were identified related to patient navigator programs, including, program costs, human capital costs, direct medical costs, direct non-medical costs and indirect costs. Conclusion(s) Information demonstrating economic as well as clinical value is necessary to make decisions about sustainability of patient navigation programs. Adoption of these common cost metrics are recommended to promote understanding of the economic impact of patient navigation and comparability across diverse patient navigation programs. PMID:21780096

  17. Implementation of Positive Operator-Valued Measure in Passive Faraday Mirror Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Long; Gao, Ming; Ma, Zhi

    2015-03-01

    Passive Faraday-mirror (PFM) attack is based on imperfect Faraday mirrors in practical quantum cryptography systems and a set of three-dimensional Positive Operator-Valued Measure (POVM) operators plays an important role in this attack. In this paper, we propose a simple scheme to implement the POVM in PFM attack on an Faraday-Michelson quantum cryptography system. Since the POVM can not be implemented directly with previous methods, in this scheme it needs to expand the states sent by Alice and the POVM operators in the attack into four-dimensional Hilbert space first, without changing the attacking effect by calculation. Based on the methods proposed by Ahnert and Payne, the linear-optical setup for implementing the POVM operators is derived. At last, the complete setup for realizing the PFM attack is presented with all parameters. Furthermore, our scheme can also be applied to realize PFM attack on a plug-and-play system by changing the parameters in the setup. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 61472446, U1204602, and National High Technology Research and Development Program of China under Grant No. 2011AA010803, and the Open Project Program of the State Key Laboratory of Mathematical Engineering and Advanced Computing under Grant No. 2013A14

  18. Judging Surgical Research: How Should We Evaluate Performance and Measure Value?

    PubMed Central

    Souba, Wiley W.; Wilmore, Douglas W.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To establish criteria to evaluate performance in surgical research, and to suggest strategies to optimize research in the future. Summary Background Data Research is an integral component of the academic mission, focusing on important clinical problems, accounting for surgical advances, and providing training and mentoring for young surgeons. With constraints on healthcare resources, there is increasing pressure to generate clinical revenues at the expense of the time and effort devoted to surgical research. An approach that would assess the value of research would allow prioritization of projects. Further, alignment of high-priority research projects with clinical goals would optimize research gains and maximize the clinical enterprise. Methods The authors reviewed performance criteria applied to industrial research and modified these criteria to apply to surgical research. They reviewed several programs that align research objectives with clinical goals. Results Performance criteria were categorized along several dimensions: internal measures (quality, productivity, innovation, learning, and development), customer satisfaction, market share, and financial indices (cost and profitability). A “report card” was proposed to allow the assessment of research in an individual department or division. Conclusions The department’s business strategy can no longer be divorced from its research strategy. Alignment between research and clinical goals will maximize the department’s objectives but will create the need to modify existing hierarchical structures and reward systems. Such alignment appears to be the best way to ensure the success of surgical research in the future. PMID:10862192

  19. Investigation of the value of a photographic tool to measure self-perception of enamel opacities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The standard measurement of oral conditions that are mainly of cosmetic concern can be carried out by a trained clinical professional, or they can be assessed and reported by the individuals who may have the condition or be aware of others who have it. Enamel opacities of anterior teeth are examples of such a condition. At a public health level the interest is only about opacities that are of aesthetic concern, so the need for an index that records opacities that the public perceive to be a problem is clear. Measurement methods carried out by highly trained professionals, using unnatural conditions are not indicated at this level. This study reports on the testing of a novel epidemiological tool that aims to report on the prevalence and impact of self-perceived enamel opacities in a population of young adolescents. Methods A dental health survey was carried out using a random sample of 12-year-old school pupils during 2008/09 by Primary Care Organisations (PCOs) in England. This included the use of a novel self-perception tool which aimed to measure individual’s self-perception of the presence and impact of enamel opacities to produce population measures. This tool comprised questions asking about the presence of white marks on their teeth and whether these marks bothered the volunteers and a sheet of grouped photographs of anterior teeth showing opacities ranging from TF 0, TF 1–2 to TF 2–3. Volunteers were asked which of the groups of photographs looked more like their own teeth. Examining teams from a convenience sample of 3 PCOs from this survey agreed to undertake additional measurements to assess the value of the self-perception tool. Volunteer pupils were asked the questions on a second occasion, some time after the first and clinical examiners recorded their assessments of the most closely matching set of photographs of the volunteers on two occasions. Results The tool was feasible to use, with 74% of pupils making a response to the first

  20. A Practical Measure of Student Motivation: Establishing Validity Evidence for the Expectancy-Value-Cost Scale in Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosovich, Jeff J.; Hulleman, Chris S.; Barron, Kenneth E.; Getty, Steve

    2015-01-01

    We present validity evidence for the Expectancy-Value-Cost (EVC) Scale of student motivation. Using a brief, 10-item scale, we measured middle school students' expectancy, value, and cost for their math and science classes in the Fall and Winter of the same academic year. Confirmatory factor analyses supported the three-factor structure of the EVC…

  1. Plants absorb heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, J.

    1995-02-01

    Decontamination of heavy metals-polluted soils remains one of the most intractable problems of cleanup technology. Currently available techniques include extraction of the metals by physical and chemical means, such as acid leaching and electroosmosis, or immobilization by vitrification. There are presently no techniques for cleanup which are low cost and retain soil fertility after metals removal. But a solution to the problem could be on the horizon. A small but growing number of plants native to metalliferous soils are known to be capable of accumulating extremely high concentrations of metals in their aboveground portions. These hyperaccumulators, as they are called, contain up to 1,000 times larger metal concentrations in their aboveground parts than normal species. Their distribution is global, including many different families of flowering plants of varying growth forms, from herbaceous plants to trees. Hyperaccumulators absorb metals they do not need for their own nutrition. The metals are accumulated in the leaf and stem vacuoles, and to a lesser extent in the roots.

  2. Red bone marrow doses, integral absorbed doses, and somatically effective dose equivalent from four maxillary occlusal projections

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, T.I.; Wohni, T.

    1984-02-01

    Phantom measurements of red bone marrow (RBM) doses, integral absorbed doses, and somatically effective dose equivalent (SEDE) from four different maxillary occlusal projections are presented. For each projection, different combinations of focus-skin distances and tube potentials were compared with regard to the patient's radiation load. The axial incisal view produced the highest patient exposures, with a maximum red bone marrow dose of 122.5 microGy/exposure, integral absorbed dose of 8.6 mJ/exposure, and SEDE values of 39.6 microSv/exposure. The corresponding values from the frontal, lateral occlusal, and tuber views ranged between 4% and 44% of the axial incisal view values for the integral absorbed dose and SEDE values, and between 0.3% and 3% for the red bone marrow doses. Increasing the focus-skin distance from 17.5 cm to 27 cm is accompanied by a 24% to 30% reduction in integral absorbed dose. Increasing the tube potential from 50 kV to 65 kV likewise results in a 23% reduction in absorbed energy.

  3. Development of FeCoB/Graphene Oxide based microwave absorbing materials for X-Band region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sukanta; Chandra Nayak, Ganesh; Sahu, S. K.; Oraon, Ramesh

    2015-06-01

    This work explored the microwave absorption capability of Graphene Oxide and Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB for stealth technology. Epoxy based microwave absorbing materials were prepared with 30% loading of Graphene Oxide, FeCoB alloy and Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB. Graphene Oxide and FeCoB were synthesized by Hummer's and Co-precipitation methods, respectively. The filler particles were characterized by FESEM, XRD and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer techniques. Permittivity, permeability and reflection loss values of the composite absorbers were measured with vector network analyzer which showed a reflection loss value of -7.86 dB, at 10.72 GHz, for single layered Graphene Oxide/Epoxy based microwave absorbers which can be correlated to the absorption of about 83.97% of the incident microwave energy. Reflection loss value of FeCoB/Epoxy based microwave absorber showed -13.30 dB at 11.67 GHz, which corresponded to maximum absorption of 93.8%. However, reflection loss values of Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB/Epoxy based single-layer absorber increased to -22.24 dB at 12.4 GHz which corresponds to an absorption of 99% of the incident microwave energy.

  4. Optical measurement of the pH value of intransparent samples under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, M.; Wierschem, A.; Rauh, C.; Delgado, A.

    2015-04-01

    We present a method to optically study the pH value of intransparent media under pressure. To this end, we prepare and use immobilized pH-value indicators. The indicators are brought into contact to the medium and their optical signal is read out in reflection with a spectrometer. The pH value and pressure response of the indicator were calibrated with imidazole buffers. As an example for its applicability to foodstuff, we study the pressure-induced pH-value change of fat and meat pastes.

  5. Hydraulic shock absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.

    1987-03-03

    This patent describes a hydraulic shock absorber including a piston reciprocating in a cylinder, a piston upper chamber and a piston lower chamber which are oil-tightly separated by the piston, piston ports formed through the piston in a circle for communicating the piston upper chamber with the piston lower chamber, and return ports formed outside of the piston ports in a circle for communicating the piston upper chamber with the piston lower chamber. It also includes a sheet ring-like non-return valve provided above the piston and fitted to a piston rod, valve holes formed through the non-return valve in opposed relation with the piston ports. A ring-like non-return valve stopper fixed to the piston rod on an upper side of the non-return valve with a small spaced defined between the non-return valve and the non-return valve stopper, and a spring is interposed between the non-return valve and the non-return valve stopper for normally urging the non-return valve to an upper surface of the piston. Movement of the piston to the piston upper chamber allows oil to flow from the piston upper chamber through the piston ports to the piston lower chamber, while the return ports are closed by the non-return valve to generate a vibration damping force by resistance upon pass of the oil through the piston parts. The improvement described here comprises a groove formed in an upper surface of the piston facing the non-return valve and aligned with the valve holes, the groove being in the circle where the piston ports lie and being in communication with the piston ports.

  6. Metal-shearing energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, R. J.; Wittrock, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Device, consisting of tongue of thin aluminum alloy strip, pull tab, slotted steel plate which serves as cutter, and steel buckle, absorbs mechanical energy when its ends are subjected to tensile loading. Device is applicable as auxiliary shock absorbing anchor for automobile and airplane safety belts.

  7. The broadband dynamic vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. B.; Nissen, J.-C.

    1982-08-01

    The limited effectiveness of the linear passive dynamic vibration absorber is described. This is followed by an analysis producing the response of a primary system when a non-linear softening Belleville spring is used in the absorber. It is shown that the suppression bandwidth can be doubled by this means.

  8. An evaluation of the seasonal added value of downscaling over the United States using new verification measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Haan, Laurel L.; Kanamitsu, Masao; De Sales, Fernando; Sun, Liqiang

    2015-10-01

    Two separate dynamically downscaled ensembles are used to assess the added value of downscaling over the continental United States on a seasonal timescale. One data set is from a 55-year continuous run forced with observed sea surface temperatures. The other data set has downscaling results from seven regional models for 21 winters forced from a single coupled global model. The second data set, known as the Multi-RCM Ensemble Downscaling (MRED) project was used as a collection of individual models as well as a multi-model ensemble. The data was first tested for the potential loss of small-scale details due to averaging, and it was found that the number of small-scale details is not reduced when averaging over several models or several years. The added value of the downscaling was then calculated by standard measures, including climatology and correlation, as well as two newer measures: the added value index (AVI) and fraction skill score (FSS). The additional verification measures provided more information about the added value than was found with the standard measures. In general, more added value was found with the multi-model ensemble than with individual models. While it was clear that the added value was dependent on the forcing model, regional model, season, variable, and region, there were some areas where the downscale consistently added value, particularly near the coast and in topographically interesting areas.

  9. Preliminary Evaluation of the Values Tracker: A Two-Item Measure of Engagement in Valued Activities in Those With Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Pielech, Melissa; Bailey, Robert W; McEntee, Mindy L; Ashworth, Julie; Levell, Jayne; Sowden, Gail; Vowles, Kevin E

    2016-01-01

    Engagement in valued activities is an important outcome, particularly in treatments that aim to enhance quality of life in those with chronic conditions. The present study describes the initial evaluation of the Values Tracker (VT), a two-item measure of values engagement, in 302 treatment-seeking adults with chronic pain. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to examine the utility of the VT in the statistical prediction of pain-related functioning, after controlling for demographic variables, pain intensity, and pain-related distress. Across analyses, pain intensity accounted for significant variance (range ΔR2 = .06-.09) with pain-related distress adding additional unique variance (range ΔR2 = .07-.19). The VT accounted for additional unique variance (range ΔR2 = .02-.17) for all variables with the exception of physical disability. These findings provide initial support for the utility of the VT in those with chronic pain. Given the VT's brevity, it may be particularly useful for tracking changes in engagement in values across sessions. PMID:26611467

  10. The thermal instability of the warm absorber in NGC 3783

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goosmann, R. W.; Holczer, T.; Mouchet, M.; Dumont, A.-M.; Behar, E.; Godet, O.; Gonçalves, A. C.; Kaspi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The X-ray absorption spectra of active galactic nuclei frequently show evidence of winds with velocities in the order of 103 km s-1 extending up to 104 km s-1 in the case of ultra-fast outflows. At moderate velocities, these winds are often spectroscopically explained by assuming a number of absorbing clouds along the line of sight. In some cases it was shown that the absorbing clouds are in pressure equilibrium with each other. Aims: We assume a photo-ionized medium with a uniform total (gas+radiation) pressure. The irradiation causes the wind to be radiation pressure compressed (RPC). We attempt to reproduce the observed spectral continuum shape, ionic column densities, and X-ray absorption measure distribution (AMD) of the extensively observed warm absorber in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 3783. Methods: We compare the observational characteristics derived from the 900 ks Chandra observation to radiative transfer computations in pressure equilibrium using the radiative transfer code titan. We explore different values of the ionization parameter ξ of the incident flux and adjust the hydrogen-equivalent column density, NH0, of the warm absorber to match the observed soft X-ray continuum. From the resulting models we derive the column densities for a broad range of ionic species of iron and neon and a theoretical AMD that we compare to the observations. Results: We find an extension of the degeneracy between ξ and NH0 for the constant pressure models previously discussed for NGC 3783. Including the ionic column densities of iron and neon in the comparison between observations and data we conclude that a range of ionization parameters between 4000 and 8000 erg cm s-1 is preferred. For the first time, we present theoretical AMDs for a constant pressure wind in NGC 3783 that correctly reproduces the observed level and is in approximate agreement with the observational appearance of an instability region. Conclusions: Using a variety of observational indicators, we

  11. Absorber topography dependence of phase edge effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanker, Aamod; Sczyrba, Martin; Connolly, Brid; Waller, Laura; Neureuther, Andy

    2015-10-01

    Mask topography contributes to phase at the wafer plane, even for OMOG binary masks currently in use at the 22nm node in deep UV (193nm) lithography. Here, numerical experiments with rigorous FDTD simulation are used to study the impact of mask 3D effects on aerial imaging, by varying the height of the absorber stack and its sidewall angle. Using a thin mask boundary layer model to fit to rigorous simulations it is seen that increasing the absorber thickness, and hence the phase through the middle of a feature (bulk phase) monotonically changes the wafer-plane phase. Absorber height also influences best focus, revealed by an up/down shift in the Bossung plot (linewidth vs. defocus). Bossung plot tilt, however, responsible for process window variability at the wafer, is insensitive to changes in the absorber height (and hence also the bulk phase). It is seen to depend instead on EM edge diffraction from the thick mask edge (edge phase), but stays constant for variations in mask thickness within a 10% range. Both bulk phase and edge phase are also independent of sidewall angle fluctuation, which is seen to linearly affect the CD at the wafer, but does not alter wafer phase or the defocus process window. Notably, as mask topography varies, the effect of edge phase can be replicated by a thin mask model with 8nm wide boundary layers, irrespective of absorber height or sidewall angle. The conclusions are validated with measurements on phase shifting masks having different topographic parameters, confirming the strong dependence of phase variations at the wafer on bulk phase of the mask absorber.

  12. The Value-Added of Primary Schools: What Is It Really Measuring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    This paper compares the official value-added scores in 2005 for all primary schools in three adjacent Local Educational Authorities (LEAs) in England with the raw-score Key Stage 2 (KS2) results for the same schools. The correlation coefficient for the raw- and value-added scores of these 457 schools is around +0.75. Scatterplots show that there…

  13. Measuring the Value Added by Technical Documentation: A Review of Research and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, Jay

    1998-01-01

    Reviews existing work on establishing value of technical documentation to determine its principles. States that value can be returned by reducing internal investment, increasing sales, and reducing after-sales costs. Argues that further research will improve the understanding of information as the product itself, rather than simply a supporting…

  14. Value-Added Models and the Measurement of Teacher Productivity. CALDER Working Paper No. 54

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Douglas; Sass, Tim; Semykina, Anastasia

    2010-01-01

    Research on teacher productivity, and recently developed accountability systems for teachers, rely on value-added models to estimate the impact of teachers on student performance. The authors test many of the central assumptions required to derive value-added models from an underlying structural cumulative achievement model and reject nearly all…

  15. The vexing problem of defining the meaning, role and measurement of values in treatment decision-making.

    PubMed

    Charles, Cathy; Gafni, Amiram

    2014-03-01

    Two international movements, evidence-based medicine (EBM) and shared decision-making (SDM) have grappled for some time with issues related to defining the meaning, role and measurement of values/preferences in their respective models of treatment decision-making. In this article, we identify and describe unresolved problems in the way that each movement addresses these issues. The starting point for this discussion is that at least two essential ingredients are needed for treatment decision-making: research information about treatment options and their potential benefits and risks; and the values/preferences of participants in the decision-making process. Both the EBM and SDM movements have encountered difficulties in defining the meaning, role and measurement of values/preferences in treatment decision-making. In the EBM model of practice, there is no clear and consistent definition of patient values/preferences and no guidance is provided on how to integrate these into an EBM model of practice. Methods advocated to measure patient values are also problematic. Within the SDM movement, patient values/preferences tend to be defined and measured in a restrictive and reductionist way as patient preferences for treatment options or attributes of options, while broader underlying value structures are ignored. In both models of practice, the meaning and expected role of physician values in decision-making are unclear. Values clarification exercises embedded in patient decision aids are suggested by SDM advocates to identify and communicate patient values/preferences for different treatment outcomes. Such exercises have the potential to impose a particular decision-making theory and/or process onto patients, which can change the way they think about and process information, potentially impeding them from making decisions that are consistent with their true values. The tasks of clarifying the meaning, role and measurement of values/preferences in treatment decision

  16. When it comes to measuring value, few HMOs can make the grade.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, S

    2001-01-01

    Like all organizations, managed care organizations (MCOs) must deliver value to customers, and to be sure of keeping them, ensure those customers know they have gained value. MCOs can choose any mix of insurance, protection, or experience value from particular encounters with customers, or durable value from their relationship with customers. Many have done a good job of tracking and enabling employers to appreciate the impact they have had on business performance, but few have done the same for the health and quality-of-life they deliver to consumers. MCOs already participate in the delivery of significant and enduring life value to consumers. It makes sense to track and remind consumers of the positive differences MCOs make, and thereby obtain member satisfaction, retention, and loyalty benefits, as well as image improvements for managed care as a whole. Some simple and inexpensive options for both tracking and reminding consumers are offered for consideration, including personalized annual health reports. PMID:11252390

  17. Using a sensitivity study to facilitate the design of a multi-electrode array to measure six cardiac conductivity values.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Barbara M

    2013-07-01

    When using the bidomain model to model the electrical activity of the heart, there are potentially six cardiac conductivity values involved: conductivity values in directions along and normal to the cardiac fibres with a sheet, as well as a conductivity value in the normal direction between the sheets, and these occur for both the extracellular and intracellular domains in the model. To date it has been common to assume that the two normal direction conductivity values are the same. However, recent work has demonstrated that six cardiac conductivity values, rather than four, are necessary for accurate modelling, which can then facilitate understanding of cardiovascular disease. To design a method to determine these conductivities, it is also necessary to design a suitable multi-electrode array, which can be used, in conjunction with an inversion technique, to retrieve conductivity values from measurements of potential made on the array. This work uses the results of a study, into the sensitivity of the measuring potentials to variability in the input conductivities, to facilitate the design of an array that could be used to retrieve six cardiac conductivity values, as well as fibre rotation angle. It is found that if an electrode in the array has a much lower value of potential than the other electrodes, then it tends to be much more sensitive to the input conductivities than the other electrodes. It also appears that inclusion of this type of electrode in the set of measuring electrodes is essential for accurately retrieving conductivity values. This technique is used to identify electrodes to be included in the array and using the final design it is demonstrated, using synthetic values of potential, that the six cardiac conductivity values, and the fibre rotation angle, can be retrieved very accurately.

  18. A gridded ionization chamber with a movable cathode for precise measurements of W-values in highly purified rare gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shinichi; Miyajima, Mitsuhiro; Katoh, Kazuaki; Takebe, Masahiro; Seto, Kunio

    1987-04-01

    A single gridded ionization chamber with a movable cathode was constructed in order to measure W-values in highly purified rare gases without ambiguity. The chamber gases were continuously purified with a purifier filled with many pellets of titanium-barium getter. The purifier proved to be so powerful as to reduce impurities in rare gases to the level of 1 ppb or less. Performance tests of the chamber were made by measurements of W-values of argon-methane mixtures relative to that of argon. The measurements were made with a precision of ±0.14%.

  19. The Thermochemical Measurements on Rubidium Compounds: A Comparison of Measured Values with Those Predicted from the NBS Tables of Chemical and Thermodynamic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, V. B.; Evans, W. H.; Nuttall, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents the assessed thermochemical measurements on rubidium compounds upon which the property values, Δf H0, Δf G0, S0, C0p, and H0(T)-H0(0) at 298.15 K and Δf H0(0 K) recommended in the ``NBS Tables of Chemical Thermodynamic Properties'' are based. Included in this set of thermochemical measurements, or thermochemical reaction catalog, is a comparison of the observed values for the processes in question with those predicted (calculated) from the recommended property values in the forementioned tables. The evaluator's initially assigned uncertainties on the experimental measurements and final estimated reliabilities on the recommended process values are given. This paper illustrates the evaluation procedure used in preparing the full set of recommended data in the ``NBS Tables of Chemical Thermodynamic Properties''.

  20. Value-Added and Other Methods for Measuring School Performance: An Analysis of Performance Measurement Strategies in Teacher Incentive Fund Proposals. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In "Value-Added and Other Methods for Measuring School Performance: An Analysis of Performance Measurement Strategies in Teacher Incentive Fund Proposals"--a paper presented at the February 2008 National Center on Performance Incentives research to policy conference--Robert Meyer and Michael Christian examine select performance-pay plans used by…

  1. Development of singlet oxygen absorption capacity (SOAC) assay method. 3. Measurements of the SOAC values for phenolic antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kazuo; Ouchi, Aya; Takahashi, Shingo; Aizawa, Koichi; Inakuma, Takahiro; Terao, Junji; Nagaoka, Shin-ichi

    2012-08-15

    Measurements of the singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) quenching rates (k(Q) (S)) and the relative singlet oxygen absortpion capacity (SOAC) values were performed for 16 phenolic antioxidants (tocopherol derivatives, ubiquinol-10, caffeic acids, and catechins) and vitamin C in ethanol/chloroform/D(2)O (50:50:1, v/v/v) solution at 35 °C. It has been clarified that the SOAC method is useful to evaluate the (1)O(2)-quenching activity of lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidants having 5 orders of magnitude different rate constants from 1.38 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1) for lycopene to 2.71 × 10(5) for ferulic acid. The logarithms of the k(Q) (S) and the SOAC values for phenolic antioxidants were found to correlate well with their peak oxidation potentials (E(p)); the antioxidants that have smaller E(p) values show higher reactivities. In previous works, measurements of the k(Q) (S) values for many phenolic antioxidants were performed in ethanol. Consequently, measurements of the k(Q) (S) and relative SOAC values were performed for eight carotenoids in ethanol to investigate the effect of solvent on the (1)O(2)-quenching rate. The k(Q) (S) values for phenolic antioxidants and carotenoids in ethanol were found to correlate linearly with the k(Q) (S) values in ethanol/chloroform/D(2)O solution with a gradient of 1.79, except for two catechins. As the relative rate constants (k(Q)(AO) (S)/k(Q)(α-Toc) (S)) of antioxidants (AO) are equal to the relative SOAC values, the SOAC values do not depend on the kinds of solvent used, if α-tocopherol is used as a standard compound. In fact, the SOAC values obtained for carotenoids in mixed solvent agreed well with the corresponding ones in ethanol. PMID:22823146

  2. Bias and spread in extreme value theory measurements of probability of error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    Extreme value theory is examined to explain the cause of the bias and spread in performance of communications systems characterized by low bit rates and high data reliability requirements, for cases in which underlying noise is Gaussian or perturbed Gaussian. Experimental verification is presented and procedures that minimize these effects are suggested. Even under these conditions, however, extreme value theory test results are not particularly more significant than bit error rate tests.

  3. Absorbent product to absorb fluids. [for collection of human wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Correale, J. V. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A multi-layer absorbent product for use in contact with the skin to absorb fluids is discussed. The product utilizes a water pervious facing layer for contacting the skin, overlayed by a first fibrous wicking layer, the wicking layer preferably being of the one-way variety in which fluid or liquid is moved away from the facing layer. The product further includes a first container section defined by inner and outer layer of a water pervious wicking material between which is disposed a first absorbent mass. A second container section defined by inner and outer layers between which is disposed a second absorbent mass and a liquid impermeable/gas permeable layer. Spacesuit applications are discussed.

  4. Measuring Values-Based Environmental Concerns in Children: An Environmental Motives Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruni, Coral M.; Chance, Randie C.; Schultz, P. Wesley

    2012-01-01

    The Environmental Motives Scale (EMS) was developed to measure an individual's concerns about environmental issues. The measure provides subscale scores for egoistic, social-altruistic, and biospheric concerns. Prior studies have shown a good fit for the 3-factor structure, but the measure has yet to be used with children. In this paper we report…

  5. Improved estimates of the radiation absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Martin; Minarik, David; Johansson, Lennart; Mattsson, Sören; Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid

    2014-05-01

    Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) have been calculated as a function of the content in the urinary bladder in order to allow more realistic calculations of the absorbed dose to the bladder wall. The SAFs were calculated using the urinary bladder anatomy from the ICRP male and female adult reference computational phantoms. The urinary bladder and its content were approximated by a sphere with a wall of constant mass, where the thickness of the wall depended on the amount of urine in the bladder. SAFs were calculated for males and females with 17 different urinary bladder volumes from 10 to 800 mL, using the Monte Carlo computer program MCNP5, at 25 energies of mono-energetic photons and electrons ranging from 10 KeV to 10 MeV. The decay was assumed to be homogeneously distributed in the urinary bladder content and the urinary bladder wall, and the mean absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall was calculated. The Monte Carlo simulations were validated against measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeters. The SAFs obtained for a urine volume of 200 mL were compared to the values calculated for the urinary bladder wall using the adult reference computational phantoms. The mean absorbed dose to the urinary wall from 18F-FDG was found to be 77 µGy/MBq formales and 86 µGy/MBq for females, while for 99mTc-DTPA the mean absorbed doses were 80 µGy/MBq for males and 86 µGy/MBq for females. Compared to calculations using a constant value of the SAF from the adult reference computational phantoms, the mean absorbed doses to the bladder wall were 60% higher for 18F-FDG and 30% higher for 99mTc-DTPA using the new SAFs.

  6. Estimating Time-Varying PCB Exposures Using Person-Specific Predictions to Supplement Measured Values: A Comparison of Observed and Predicted Values in Two Cohorts of Norwegian Women

    PubMed Central

    Nøst, Therese Haugdahl; Breivik, Knut; Wania, Frank; Rylander, Charlotta; Odland, Jon Øyvind; Sandanger, Torkjel Manning

    2015-01-01

    , Rylander C, Odland JØ, Sandanger TM. 2016. Estimating time-varying PCB exposures using person-specific predictions to supplement measured values: a comparison of observed and predicted values in two cohorts of Norwegian women. Environ Health Perspect 124:299–305; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409191 PMID:26186800

  7. Absorbed Dose Determination Using Experimental and Analytical Predictions of X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Carruth, Ralph (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Electron beam welding in a vacuum is a technology that NASA is investigating as a joining technique for manufacture of space structures. This investigation characterizes the x-ray environment due to operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool and provides recommendations for adequate shielding for astronauts performing the in-vacuum electron beam welding. NASA, in a joint venture with the Russian Space Agency, was scheduled to perform a series of welding in space experiments on board the U.S. Space Shuttle. This series of experiments was named the international space welding experiment (ISWE). The hardware associated with the ISWE was leased to NASA by the Paton Welding Institute (PWI) in Ukraine for ground-based welding experiments in preparation for flight. Two ground tests were scheduled, using the ISWE electron beam welding tool, to characterize the radiation exposure to an astronaut during the operation of the ISWE. These radiation exposure tests used thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's) shielded with material currently used by astronauts during extravehicular activities to measure the radiation dose. The TLD's were exposed to x-ray radiation generated by operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. This investigation was the first known application of TLD's to measure absorbed dose from x rays of energy less than 10 keV. The ISWE hardware was returned to Ukraine before the issue of adequate shielding for the astronauts was completely verified. Therefore, alternate experimental and analytical methods were developed to measure and predict the x-ray spectral and intensity distribution generated by ISWE electron beam impact with metal. These x-ray spectra were normalized to an equivalent ISWE exposure, then used to calculate the absorbed radiation dose to astronauts. These absorbed dose values were compared to TLD measurements obtained during actual operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. The calculated absorbed dose

  8. What Value "Value Added"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Two quantitative measures of school performance are currently used, the average points score (APS) at Key Stage 2 and value-added (VA), which measures the rate of academic improvement between Key Stage 1 and 2. These figures are used by parents and the Office for Standards in Education to make judgements and comparisons. However, simple…

  9. Self-Regulating Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J.

    1995-01-01

    Mechanical shock absorber keeps frictional damping force within tolerable limit. Its damping force does not increase with coefficient of friction between energy-absorbing components; rather, frictional damping force varies only slightly. Relatively insensitive to manufacturing variations and environmental conditions altering friction. Does not exhibit high breakaway friction and consequent sharp increase followed by sharp decrease in damping force at beginning of stroking. Damping force in absorber does not vary appreciably with speed of stroking. In addition, not vulnerable to leakage of hydraulic fluid.

  10. Difference between the maximum empirical and field measured peak Watt values of thermal power system under highly sufficient solar conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhussain, O. A.; Abdel-Magid, T. I. M.

    2016-08-01

    Mono-Crystalline solar cell module is experimentally conducted in Khartoum, Sudan to study the difference between maximum empirical value of peak Watt and maximum value of thermal power produced in field under highly sufficient solar conditions. Field measurements are recorded for incident solar radiation, produced voltage, current and temperature at several time intervals during sun shine period. The thermal power system has been calculated using fundamental principles of heat transfer. The study shows that solar power for considered module could not attain the empirical peak power irrespective to maximum value of direct incident solar radiation and maximum temperature gained. A loss of about 6% of power can be considered as the difference between field measurements and the manufacturer's indicated empirical value. Solar cell exhibits 94% efficiency in comparison with manufacturer's provided data, and is 3'% more efficient in thermal energy production than in electrical power extraction for hot-dry climate conditions.

  11. Preparation of nanosize polyaniline and its utilization for microwave absorber.

    PubMed

    Abbas, S M; Dixit, A K; Chatterjee, R; Goel, T C

    2007-06-01

    Polyaniline powder in nanosize has been synthesized by chemical oxidative route. XRD, FTIR, and TEM were used to characterize the polyaniline powder. Crytallite size was estimated from XRD profile and also ascertained by TEM in the range of 15 to 20 nm. The composite absorbers have been prepared by mixing different ratios of polyaniline into procured polyurethane (PU) binder. The complex permittivity (epsilon' - jepsilon") and complex permeability (mu' - jmu") were measured in X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz) using Agilent network analyzer (model PNA E8364B) and its software module 85071 (version 'E'). Measured values of these parameters were used to determine the reflection loss at different frequencies and sample thicknesses, based on a model of a single layered plane wave absorber backed by a perfect conductor. An optimized polyaniline/PU ratio of 3:1 has given a minimum reflection loss of -30 dB (99.9% power absorption) at the central frequency 10 GHz and the bandwidth (full width at half minimum) of 4.2 GHz over whole X-band (8.2 to 12.4 GHz) in a sample thickness of 3.0 mm. The prepared composites can be fruitfully utilized for suppression of electromagnetic interference (EMI) and reduction of radar signatures (stealth technology).

  12. Calculation of dehydration absorbers based on improved phase equilibrium data

    SciTech Connect

    Oi, L.E.

    1999-07-01

    Dehydration using triethylene glycol (TEG) as an absorbent, is a standard process for natural gas treating. New and more accurate TEG/water equilibrium data have been measured between 1980 and 1990. However, this has not influenced much on the design methods of dehydration absorbers. Inaccurate equilibrium data have been extensively used in design calculations. When using data from a common source like Worley, an overall bubble cap tray efficiency between 25--40% has normally been recommended. This has resulted in a quite satisfactory and consistent design method. It is obvious that newer equilibrium data (Herskowitz, Parrish, Bestani) are more accurate. However, to achieve an improved design method, column efficiencies consistent with the new equilibrium data must be recommended. New equilibrium data have been correlated to an activity coefficient model for the liquid phase and combined with an equation of state for the gas phase. Performance data from the North Sea offshore platform Gullfaks C (drying 4--5 MMscmd) have been measured. The bubble cap column has been simulated, and the tray efficiency has been adjusted to fit the performance data. Tray efficiencies calculated with new equilibrium data are higher than 50%. Calculated tray efficiency values are dependent on the equilibrium data used. There are still uncertainties in equilibrium data for the TEC/water/natural gas system. When using accurate equilibrium data, an overall bubble cap tray efficiency of 40--50% and a Murphree efficiency of 55--70% can be expected at normal absorption conditions.

  13. Impact of the point spread function on maximum standardized uptake value measurements in patients with pulmonary cancer.

    PubMed

    Gellee, S; Page, J; Sanghera, B; Payoux, P; Wagner, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) from fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scans is a semi quantitative measure that is increasingly used in the clinical practice for diagnostic and therapeutic response assessment purposes. Technological advances such as the implementation of the point spread function (PSF) in the reconstruction algorithm have led to higher signal to noise ratio and increased spatial resolution. The impact on SUVmax measurements has not been studied in clinical setting. We studied the impact of PSF on SUVmax in 30 consecutive lung cancer patients. SUVmax values were measured on PET-computed tomography (CT) scans reconstructed iteratively with and without PSF (respectively high-definition [HD] and non-HD). HD SUVmax values were significantly higher than non-HD SUVmax. There was excellent correlation between HD and non-HD values. Details of reconstruction and PSF implementation in particular have important consequences on SUV values. Nuclear Medicine physicians and radiologists should be aware of the reconstruction parameters of PET-CT scans when they report or rely on SUV measurements. PMID:25191128

  14. Electrical injuries. Biological values measurements as a prediction factor of local evolution in electrocutions lesions

    PubMed Central

    Teodoreanu, R; Popescu, SA; Lascar, I

    2014-01-01

    . Despite the efforts we have made, the lack of blood and its derivatives or simply the negligence in patient monitoring, allowed the decrease, even transient of the Hb level, sometimes only for a few hours, but enough to allow the deepening of the ischemic lesions. Excisions were carried out in all the patients in emergency or even amputations of the extremities, with the wish to limit the extension of the ischemic lesions and the resorption of cell degradation products. The amputations performed in emergency did not always represent a saving solution; however, they remained the most effective measures when they were carried out immediately after the accident and obviously in viable tissue. The increase of CK is not an indicative factor itself in making re-excisions but orients the therapeutic approach, the utilization of the dialysis when the values do not decrease by treatment for renal support and the forcing of diuresis is required. The normalization of CK indicates the time when we can start the covering of the defects resulted as a consequence of the excisions. The level of the leukocytes represents both a prognostic factor and an indicative factor for the re-excision of the ischemic areas. An increased level under antibiotic therapy signifies either an incomplete excision or the contamination with flora resisting to the antibiotic that has been used. In the light of findings in the caring of the patients with electrocutions, I propose several caring/assessment protocols for the severe electrically injured patient. PMID:25408731

  15. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, William H.

    1984-01-01

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system.

  16. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, W.H.

    1984-10-16

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system. 9 figs.

  17. Estimation of actual evapotranspiration using measured and calculated values of bulk surface resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently the United Nations-Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) recommends using the Penman-Monteith method for estimating ET over all other meteorological methods. The principal limitation of using the generalized form of the Penman-Monteith equation is in obtaining accurate values for the bu...

  18. Determining the Predictive Value of Selected Measures for First Grade Reading Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Bob Gene

    This study investigated the predictive value of certain tests in relationship to first grade reading success. The Metropolitan Readiness Test, Naming Letters Test, Light Response Test, and Matching Symbol Test were administered to 70 first grade students during the first two weeks of school. The Teacher's Reading Readiness Rating Scale was filled…

  19. Using Mandated Speed Limits to Measure the Value of a Statistical Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashenfelter, Orley; Greenstone, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In 1987 the federal government permitted states to raise the speed limit on their rural interstate roads, but not on their urban interstate roads, from 55 mph to 65 mph. Since the states that adopted the higher speed limit must have valued the travel hours they saved more than the fatalities incurred, this institutional change provides an…

  20. Can Value-Added Measures of Teacher Performance Be Trusted? Working Paper #18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Reckase, Mark D.; Woolridge, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate whether commonly used value-added estimation strategies can produce accurate estimates of teacher effects. We estimate teacher effects in simulated student achievement data sets that mimic plausible types of student grouping and teacher assignment scenarios. No one method accurately captures true teacher effects in all scenarios,…

  1. The Value of International Experiences for Business Students: Measuring Business Student Attitudes toward Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffron, Sean; Maresco, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    The value of an international experience--especially for students of business--continues to be an area of focus at colleges and universities. Students across all disciplines within the business curriculum: accounting, economics, finance, management, marketing, or sport management are expected by employers to possess knowledge of, and appreciation…

  2. Measuring School and Teacher Value Added in DC, 2011-2012 School Year. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenberg, Eric; Hock, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    In this report, the authors describe the value-added models used as part of teacher evaluation systems in the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) and in eligible DC charter schools participating in Race to the Top. They estimated (1) teacher effectiveness in DCPS and eligible DC charter schools during the 2011-2012 school year; and (2)…

  3. Measuring School and Teacher Value Added in DC, 2011-2012 School Year: Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenberg, Eric; Hock, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the value-added models used as part of teacher evaluation systems in the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) and in eligible DC charter schools participating in "Race to the Top." The authors estimated: (1) teacher effectiveness in DCPS and eligible DC charter schools during the 2011-2012 school year; and (2)…

  4. Measuring Value Added Effects across Schools: Should Schools Be Compared in Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeves, John P.; Hungi, Njora; Afrassa, Tilahun

    2005-01-01

    This article traces the evolution of a quest for solving the problems involved in the analysis of multilevel data and the estimation of the value added effects of schools in influencing educational outcomes. The authors report the findings of two studies that followed several cohorts of students that were tested at two grade levels (Grade 3 and…

  5. On the Practices and Challenges of Measuring Higher Education Value Added: The Case of Colombia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shavelson, Richard J.; Domingue, Benjamin W.; Mariño, Julián P.; Molina Mantilla, Adriana; Morales Forero, Andrés; Wiley, Edward E.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the nature of higher education are leading towards increased interest in the assessment of student learning. This study considers an attempt to apply value-added models for the purposes of comparing student learning across institutions, taking care to discuss special considerations inherent to the application of these models to higher…

  6. An Evaluation of Empirical Bayes' Estimation of Value- Added Teacher Performance Measures. Working Paper #31. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Maxfield, Michelle; Reckase, Mark D.; Thompson, Paul; Wooldridge, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Empirical Bayes' (EB) estimation is a widely used procedure to calculate teacher value-added. It is primarily viewed as a way to make imprecise estimates more reliable. In this paper we review the theory of EB estimation and use simulated data to study its ability to properly rank teachers. We compare the performance of EB estimators with that of…

  7. An Evaluation of Empirical Bayes's Estimation of Value-Added Teacher Performance Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Maxfield, Michelle; Reckase, Mark D.; Thompson, Paul N.; Wooldridge, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Empirical Bayes's (EB) estimation has become a popular procedure used to calculate teacher value added, often as a way to make imprecise estimates more reliable. In this article, we review the theory of EB estimation and use simulated and real student achievement data to study the ability of EB estimators to properly rank teachers. We compare the…

  8. The Promise and Peril of Using Value-Added Modeling to Measure Teacher Effectiveness. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RAND Corporation, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Value-added modeling offers the possibility of estimating the effects of teachers and schools on student performance, a potentially important contribution in the current environment of concern for accountability in education. These techniques, however, are susceptible to a number of sources of bias, depending on decisions about how the modeling is…

  9. Measuring the Economic Value of the Electronic Scientific Information Services in Portuguese Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melo, Luiza Baptista; Pires, Cesaltina Pacheco

    2011-01-01

    This article has three main objectives: i) to describe the use patterns of electronic and traditional resources in Portuguese academic libraries; ii) to estimate the value of the Portuguese electronic scientific information consortium b-on by using two alternative valuation methodologies; iii) to relate the use patterns with the valuation of b-on.…

  10. Value-Added and Observational Measures Used in the Teacher Evaluation Process: A Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerere, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Scores from value-added models (VAMs), as used for educational accountability, represent the educational effect teachers have on their students. The use of these scores in teacher evaluations for high-stakes decision making is new for the State of Florida. Validity evidence that supports or questions the use of these scores is critically needed.…

  11. An absorbed dose calorimeter for IMRT dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duane, S.; Aldehaybes, M.; Bailey, M.; Lee, N. D.; Thomas, C. G.; Palmans, H.

    2012-10-01

    A new calorimeter for dosimetry in small and complex fields has been built. The device is intended for the direct determination of absorbed dose to water in moderately small fields and in composite fields such as IMRT treatments, and as a transfer instrument calibrated against existing absorbed dose standards in conventional reference conditions. The geometry, materials and mode of operation have been chosen to minimize detector perturbations when used in a water phantom, to give a reasonably isotropic response and to minimize the effects of heat transfer when the calorimeter is used in non-reference conditions in a water phantom. The size of the core is meant to meet the needs of measurement in IMRT treatments and is comparable to the size of the air cavity in a type NE2611 ionization chamber. The calorimeter may also be used for small field dosimetry. Initial measurements in reference conditions and in an IMRT head and neck plan, collapsed to gantry angle zero, have been made to estimate the thermal characteristics of the device, and to assess its performance in use. The standard deviation (estimated repeatability) of the reference absorbed dose measurements was 0.02 Gy (0.6%).

  12. Measuring the subjective value of risky and ambiguous options using experimental economics and functional MRI methods.

    PubMed

    Levy, Ifat; Rosenberg Belmaker, Lior; Manson, Kirk; Tymula, Agnieszka; Glimcher, Paul W

    2012-09-19

    Most of the choices we make have uncertain consequences. In some cases the probabilities for different possible outcomes are precisely known, a condition termed "risky". In other cases when probabilities cannot be estimated, this is a condition described as "ambiguous". While most people are averse to both risk and ambiguity(1,2), the degree of those aversions vary substantially across individuals, such that the subjective value of the same risky or ambiguous option can be very different for different individuals. We combine functional MRI (fMRI) with an experimental economics-based method(3 )to assess the neural representation of the subjective values of risky and ambiguous options(4). This technique can be now used to study these neural representations in different populations, such as different age groups and different patient populations. In our experiment, subjects make consequential choices between two alternatives while their neural activation is tracked using fMRI. On each trial subjects choose between lotteries that vary in their monetary amount and in either the probability of winning that amount or the ambiguity level associated with winning. Our parametric design allows us to use each individual's choice behavior to estimate their attitudes towards risk and ambiguity, and thus to estimate the subjective values that each option held for them. Another important feature of the design is that the outcome of the chosen lottery is not revealed during the experiment, so that no learning can take place, and thus the ambiguous options remain ambiguous and risk attitudes are stable. Instead, at the end of the scanning session one or few trials are randomly selected and played for real money. Since subjects do not know beforehand which trials will be selected, they must treat each and every trial as if it and it alone was the one trial on which they will be paid. This design ensures that we can estimate the true subjective value of each option to each subject. We

  13. Making an honest measurement scale out of the oxygen isotope delta-values.

    PubMed

    Gat, Joel R; DeBievre, Paul

    2002-01-01

    The differential measurement of the abundance of oxygen isotopes based on reference materials, such as VSMOW for the case of water, was used because the precision of the absolute mass-spectrometric determination of the abundance fell short of the differences to be measured. Since then these measurements have been much improved, so that a calibration scheme of the oxygen isotope abundance in water, carbonates, silica, phosphates, sulfates, nitrates and organic materials is suggested, based on an accredited primary standard of oxygen in air and using standard fluorination and O(2) to CO(2) conversion techniques. PMID:12442297

  14. The Properties of Ly-Alpha Absorbers at Redshifts Between 0.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannuzi, Buell

    2000-07-01

    We propose to use STIS to obtain new Echelle resolution {10 km/ sec} spectra of three bright quasars which, when combined with archived and scheduled observations, will be used to characterize the properties of Ly-Alpha absorbers in the redshift range 0.9measured sample of approximately 300 Ly-Alpha absorbers, comparable in size to some of the samples being used successfully to characterize the properties of absorbers at higher redshifts, is the immediate objective of this program. The physical characteristics of the final sample will be compared to the expected properties derived from analysis of the ever increasing number of simulations of the IGM and Ly-Alpha absorbers at z 1 {e.g., Zhang et al. 1997; Dave et al. 1998; Riediger et al. 1998; and Theuns et al. 1998}. While the simulations have all managed to reproduce the general observed properties of z 3 absorbers, they make different predictions for these properties at z 1. These differences arise because the expansion history of the universe and the rate of structure formation depend on the values of Omega and Lambda, and both affect the evolution of statistical properties of the absorbers. More broadly, comparison between the properties at z 1 and those at higher redshifts can test whether structure in the Ly-Alpha forest is evolving in the manner predicted by gravitational instability theories.

  15. Angular solar absorptance of absorbers used in solar thermal collectors.

    PubMed

    Tesfamichael, T; Wäckelgård, E

    1999-07-01

    The optical characterization of solar absorbers for thermal solar collectors is usually performed by measurement of the spectral reflectance at near-normal angle of incidence and calculation of the solar absorptance from the measured reflectance. The solar absorptance is, however, a function of the angle of incidence of the light impinging on the absorber. The total reflectance of two types of commercial solar-selective absorbers, nickel-pigmented anodized aluminum, and sputtered nickel nickel oxide coated aluminum are measured at angles of incidence from 5 to 80 in the wavelength range 300-2500 nm by use of an integrating sphere. From these measurements the angular integrated solar absorptance is determined. Experimental data are compared with theoretical calculations, and it is found that optical thin-film interference effects can explain the significant difference in solar absorptance at higher angles for the two types of absorbers.

  16. The value of volume and growth measurements in timber sales management of the National Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lietzke, K. R.

    1977-01-01

    This paper summarizes work performed in the estimation of gross social value of timber volume and growth rate information used in making regional harvest decisions in the National Forest System. A model was developed to permit parametric analysis. The problem is formulated as one of finding optimal inventory holding patterns. Public timber management differs from other inventory holding problems in that the inventory, itself, generates value over time in providing recreational, aesthetic and environmental goods. 'Nontimber' demand estimates are inferred from past Forest Service harvest and sales levels. The solution requires a description of the harvest rates which maintain the optimum inventory level. Gross benefits of the Landsat systems are estimated by comparison with Forest Service information gathering models. Gross annual benefits are estimated to be $5.9 million for the MSS system and $7.2 million for the TM system.

  17. LISN: Measurement of TEC values, and TID characteristics over South and Central America (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valladares, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Low-latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) is a distributed observatory designed to provide the climatology and weather of the low latitude ionosphere over the South American continent. Presently, the LISN observatory consists of 47 GPS receivers able to transmit TEC and scintillation values to a central server in a real-time basis. Historical TEC values from these receivers and from about 300 other GPSs that operated in South and Central America between 2008 and 2012 were used to derive regional maps of TEC and TIDs. A prominent feature of the TEC maps is the intense day-to-day variability that is observed during all seasons and under quiet and active magnetic conditions. To assess the TEC dependencies a non-linear least-square fit was conducted to simultaneously extract the solar flux, magnetic and seasonal variability for each square cell of the TEC maps and for each 30-min local time sector. It was found that TEC values and the anomaly intensity increase as a function of the solar flux. The latitudinal separation increases with magnetic activity, and TEC values in Central America become the largest when Kp is equal to 5o or more. TIDs are seen quite frequently over the Caribbean region and in the northern part of South America. To calculate the TIDs travel velocities, their propagation direction, and the scale-size of the disturbances a multi-site multi-dimension cross-correlation method was applied to the TEC database. Phase velocities of order 150 m/s and scale sizes between 100 and 400 km were typically observed. This paper will present the morphology and statistics of TIDs as a function of latitude, longitude, local time and season. It is also introduced the results of an investigation to correlate the appearance, phase velocity and angle of propagation of TIDs and tropospheric phenomena observed with the TRMM satellite.

  18. The relation of local measures of Hubble's constant to its global value

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Edwin L.; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1992-01-01

    The distributions of fractional deviations of local values form global H0 that observers with perfect distance data would find if they surveyed specified volumes of the universe are examined here using new very large scale calculations of cold dark matter (CDM) and primordial isocurvature baryonic (PIB) scenarios for the origin of structure. It is found that the expected deviations due to large-scale motions are larger than quoted observational errors unless very large volumes are surveyed. Even perfect sampling and distances of all galaxies within a sphere extending out to the distances of the Virgo and Coma clusters would leave 45 percent and 3 percent rms uncertainties, respectively, in the global value of H0 in the CDM model. It is shown that the local versus global error in an H0 determination can be roughly estimated by the angular variance seen over the sky in the expansion rate, and that a very rough correction from the local to the global H0 value can be derived.

  19. Evaluating Congruence Between Laboratory LOINC Value Sets for Quality Measures, Public Health Reporting, and Mapping Common Tests

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianmin; Finnell, John T.; Vreeman, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory test results are important for secondary data uses like quality measures and public health reporting, but mapping local laboratory codes to LOINC is a challenge. We evaluated the congruence between laboratory LOINC value sets for quality measures, public health reporting, and mapping common tests. We found a modest proportion of the LOINC codes from the Value Set Authority Center (VSAC) were present in the LOINC Top 2000 Results (16%) and the Reportable Condition Mapping Table (52%), and only 25 terms (3%) were shared with the Notifiable Condition Detector Top 129. More than a third of the VSAC Quality LOINCs were unique to that value set. A relatively small proportion of the VSAC Quality LOINCs were used by our hospital laboratories. Our results illustrate how mapping based only on test frequency might hinder these secondary uses of laboratory test results. PMID:24551424

  20. Measurement of T2 value by using 3.0T MRI for patient with ankle arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae Ouk

    2013-01-01

    This study intended to evaluate shape of ankle joint cartilage and damage to the ankle joint cartilage by measuring changes in T2 value of cartilage of healthy people without ankle arthritis and patients with ankle arthritis. The multi-echo technique was used for 20 healthy persons who had no ankle arthritis in the past or in the present clinically and 20 patients who were examined to have ankle arthritis in order to obtain T2 map image of knee joint cartilage. We divided the talotibial joint into medial position, middle position and lateral position to calculate the mean values of T2 in 18 spots that included anterior part, middle part and posterior part of cartilage of neck bone and ankle bone. Mean T2 values were measured in the healthy people group and the ankle arthritis patient group. According to the measurement results, the mean T2 value of the ankle arthritis patient group was measured to be higher than that of the healthy people group.

  1. Validation of the Consumer Values versus Perceived Product Attributes Model Measuring the Purchase of Athletic Team Merchandise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Donghun; Byon, Kevin K.; Schoenstedt, Linda; Johns, Gary; Bussell, Leigh Ann; Choi, Hwansuk

    2012-01-01

    Various consumer values and perceived product attributes trigger consumptive behaviors of athletic team merchandise (Lee, Trail, Kwon, & Anderson, 2011). Likewise, using a principal component analysis technique on a student sample, a measurement scale was proposed that consisted of nine factors affecting the purchase of athletic team merchandise.…

  2. Correlation between environmental relative moldiness index (ERMI) values in French dwellings and other measures of fungal contamination

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) is a DNA-based metric developed to describe the fungal contamination in US dwellings. Our goal was to determine if the ERMI values in dwellings in north western France were correlated with other measures of fungal contamination. D...

  3. 36 CFR 223.64 - Appraisal on a lump-sum value or rate per unit of measure basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER Timber Sale.... Timber may be appraised and sold at a lump-sum value or at a rate per unit of measure which rate may be... cutting of the timber; (b) Variance between advertised rates and rates redetermined by appraisal at...

  4. 36 CFR 223.64 - Appraisal on a lump-sum value or rate per unit of measure basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER, SPECIAL FOREST PRODUCTS, AND FOREST BOTANICAL PRODUCTS Timber Sale Contracts Appraisal and Pricing § 223.64 Appraisal on a lump-sum value or rate per unit of measure basis. Timber may be appraised and sold at a lump-sum...

  5. Theoretical value of Newtonian constant G confirmed by the International Bureau of Weights & Measures in Paris, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omerbashich, Mensur

    2015-01-01

    World oldest authority for scientific constants and the keeper of the original metre standard, the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM) in Paris, France has accomplished a historic confirmation of the Omerbashich's (first-ever) scientific prediction of value of the Newtonian gravitational constant G.

  6. Effectiveness Measures for Cross-Sectional Studies: A Comparison of Value-Added Models and Contextualised Attainment Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenkeit, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Educational effectiveness research often appeals to "value-added models (VAM)" to gauge the impact of schooling on student learning net of the effect of student background variables. A huge amount of cross-sectional studies do not, however, meet VAM's requirement for longitudinal data. "Contextualised attainment models (CAM)" measure the influence…

  7. Calirimeter/absorber optimization for a RHIC dimuon experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aronson, S.H.; Murtagh, M.J.; Starks, M.; Liu, X.T.; Petitt, G.A.; Zhang, Z.; Ewell, L.A.; Hill, J.C.; Wohn, F.K.; Costales, J.B.; Namboodiri, M.N., Sangster, T.C.; Thomas, J.H.; Gavron, A.; Waters, L.; Kehoe, W.L.; Steadman, S.G.; Awes, T.C.; Obenshain, F.E.; Saini, S.; Young, G.R.; Chang, J.; Fung, S.Y.; Kang, J.H.; Kreke, J.; He, Xiaochun, Sorensen, S.P.; Cornell, E.C.; Maguire, C.F.

    1991-12-31

    The RD-10 R&D effort on calorimeter/absorber optimization for a RHIC experiment had an extended run in 1991 using the A2 test beam at the AGS. Measurements were made of the leakage of particles behind various model hadron calorimeters. Behavior of the calorimeter/absorber as a muon-identifier was studied. First comparisons of results from test measurements to calculated results using the GHEISHA code were made

  8. Thermally induced nonlinear optical absorption in metamaterial perfect absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Guddala, Sriram Kumar, Raghwendra; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-03-16

    A metamaterial perfect absorber consisting of a tri-layer (Al/ZnS/Al) metal-dielectric-metal system with top aluminium nano-disks was fabricated by laser-interference lithography and lift-off processing. The metamaterial absorber had peak resonant absorbance at 1090 nm and showed nonlinear absorption for 600ps laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength. A nonlinear saturation of reflectance was measured to be dependent on the average laser power incident and not the peak laser intensity. The nonlinear behaviour is shown to arise from the heating due to the absorbed radiation and photo-thermal changes in the dielectric properties of aluminium. The metamaterial absorber is seen to be damage resistant at large laser intensities of 25 MW/cm{sup 2}.

  9. Thermally induced nonlinear optical absorption in metamaterial perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guddala, Sriram; Kumar, Raghwendra; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-03-01

    A metamaterial perfect absorber consisting of a tri-layer (Al/ZnS/Al) metal-dielectric-metal system with top aluminium nano-disks was fabricated by laser-interference lithography and lift-off processing. The metamaterial absorber had peak resonant absorbance at 1090 nm and showed nonlinear absorption for 600ps laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength. A nonlinear saturation of reflectance was measured to be dependent on the average laser power incident and not the peak laser intensity. The nonlinear behaviour is shown to arise from the heating due to the absorbed radiation and photo-thermal changes in the dielectric properties of aluminium. The metamaterial absorber is seen to be damage resistant at large laser intensities of 25 MW/cm2.

  10. Measuring value for money: a scoping review on economic evaluation of health information systems

    PubMed Central

    Bassi, Jesdeep; Lau, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore how key components of economic evaluations have been included in evaluations of health information systems (HIS), to determine the state of knowledge on value for money for HIS, and provide guidance for future evaluations. Materials and methods We searched databases, previously collected papers, and references for relevant papers published from January 2000 to June 2012. For selection, papers had to: be a primary study; involve a computerized system for health information processing, decision support, or management reporting; and include an economic evaluation. Data on study design and economic evaluation methods were extracted and analyzed. Results Forty-two papers were selected and 33 were deemed high quality (scores ≥8/10) for further analysis. These included 12 economic analyses, five input cost analyses, and 16 cost-related outcome analyses. For HIS types, there were seven primary care electronic medical records, six computerized provider order entry systems, five medication management systems, five immunization information systems, four institutional information systems, three disease management systems, two clinical documentation systems, and one health information exchange network. In terms of value for money, 23 papers reported positive findings, eight were inconclusive, and two were negative. Conclusions We found a wide range of economic evaluation papers that were based on different assumptions, methods, and metrics. There is some evidence of value for money in selected healthcare organizations and HIS types. However, caution is needed when generalizing these findings. Better reporting of economic evaluation studies is needed to compare findings and build on the existing evidence base we identified. PMID:23416247

  11. Challenges in Measuring Cost and Value in Oncology: Making It Personal.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peter P

    2016-01-01

    Oncology patients often find themselves facing an incurable disease with limited treatment options and increasing patient fragility. The importance of patient preferences and values increases in shared decision making especially when the cost of cancer care is continuing its steep rise. As our understanding of cancer systems biology increases, we are justifiably optimistic about therapeutic improvements but recognize that this has complicated the traditional Food and Drug Administration approval of drug indications based on organ-specific cancer for a particular drug. Dynamic and agile clinical guidelines that reflect a rapidly changing knowledge base for decision-making support are needed. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has been working on three initiatives to tackle these complex issues. The first initiative is ASCO's collaboration with other international organizations to create a framework to assess drugs for the World Health Organization's Essential Medicines List, including nongenerics. The second initiative aims to define clinically meaningful outcomes as precision medicine expands the definition of cancers, leading to increased demand for the use of targeted drugs as single agents or in combination. The third initiative is ASCO's value framework, published in 2015, focusing on patient-physician shared decision making. The framework incorporates three parameters: 1) the meaningfulness of the clinical benefit, 2) the toxicity of the treatment, and 3) the patient's financial out-of-pocket cost. ASCO is concerned about the rising cost of cancer care when the clinical complexity and the pace of change in oncology are accelerating, and it is committed to help improve patient outcomes and value in cancer care as well as to engage the broader health care community in a process of collaborative improvement. PMID:27565267

  12. HORMONE MEASUREMENT GUIDELINES: Tracing lipid metabolism: the value of stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Umpleby, A Margot

    2015-09-01

    Labelling molecules with stable isotopes to create tracers has become a gold-standard method to study the metabolism of lipids and lipoproteins in humans. There are a range of techniques which use stable isotopes to measure fatty acid flux and oxidation, hepatic fatty synthesis, cholesterol absorption and synthesis and lipoprotein metabolism in humans. Stable isotope tracers are safe to use, enabling repeated studies to be undertaken and allowing studies to be undertaken in children and pregnant women. This review provides details of the most appropriate tracers to use, the techniques which have been developed and validated for measuring different aspects of lipid metabolism and some of the limitations of the methodology.

  13. Relax and refill: xylem rehydration prior to hydraulic measurements favours embolism repair in stems and generates artificially low PLC values.

    PubMed

    Trifilò, Patrizia; Raimondo, Fabio; Lo Gullo, Maria A; Barbera, Piera M; Salleo, Sebastiano; Nardini, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    Diurnal changes in percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity (PLC), with recorded values being higher at midday than on the following morning, have been interpreted as evidence for the occurrence of cycles of xylem conduits' embolism and repair. Recent reports have suggested that diurnal PLC changes might arise as a consequence of an experimental artefact, that is, air entry into xylem conduits upon cutting stems, even if under water, while under substantial tension generated by transpiration. Rehydration procedures prior to hydraulic measurements have been recommended to avoid this artefact. In the present study, we show that xylem rehydration prior to hydraulic measurements might favour xylem refilling and embolism repair, thus leading to PLC values erroneously lower than those actually experienced by transpiring plants. When xylem tension relaxation procedures were performed on stems where refilling mechanisms had been previously inhibited by mechanical (girdling) or chemical (orthovanadate) treatment, PLC values measured in stems cut under native tension were the same as those measured after sample rehydration/relaxation. Our data call for renewed attention to the procedures of sample collection in the field and transport to the laboratory, and suggest that girdling might be a recommendable treatment prior to sample collection for PLC measurements.

  14. Long-term Validation of Cloud-droplet Number Concentration Value Added Product (NDROP VAP) Retrieved from Surface Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, K. S. S.; Riihimaki, L.; Comstock, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Sivaraman, C.; Shi, Y.; McFarquhar, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    A new cloud-droplet number concentration (NDROP) Value Added Product (VAP) has been produced at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site for the 13 years from January 1998 to January 2011. The droplet number concentration values are retrieved from surface radiometer measurements of cloud optical depth from the multi-filter rotating shadow-band radiometer (MFRSR) and liquid water path from the microwave radiometer (MWR). We validate the NDROP VAP with in situ aircraft measurements from the Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer probe during the long-term aircraft field campaign, Routine ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO). The NDROP VAP considers entrainment effects rather than assuming an adiabatic cloud, which improves the values of the NDROP VAP by reducing the magnitude of cloud-droplet number concentration. The NDROP VAP captures the primary mode of in situ measured droplet number concentration, but produces too wide a distribution due to too frequent high cloud-droplet number concentrations. The large droplet number concentration error corresponds to errors in the MWR retrievals at low liquid water paths due to the limitations of the instrument. Modification of the NDROP VAP through the diagnosed liquid water path, which is constrained by the coordinated solution using cloud optical depth and cloud-droplet effective radius retrievals, alleviates this problem, leading to better agreement with in situ measurements.

  15. [Differences in Measured Values among Homogenous Assay Reagents of LDL-C in LP-X Positive Serum Samples].

    PubMed

    Abe, Misako; Kurosawa, Hideo; Sato, Ryo; Ito, Kumie; Tomono, Yoshiharu; Manita, Daisuke; Hirowatari, Yuji; Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    The LDL-C level measures with homogeneous (direct) assays in almost of clinical laboratories. Several reports however showed differences in measured values among the assay reagents. We investigated the differences in LDL-C values among direct assays and Friedewald formula (F-f) in 58 LP-X positive serum samples from jaundice patients by comparing LDL-C values measured by anion-exchange chromatography (AEX-HPLC), largely comparable to ultracentrifugation method. Changes in LDL-C values during the treatment of 8 patients were also investigated. Direct assay reagents from Sekisui Medical (S-r), Denka-Seiken (D-r), Wako Chemical (W-r), and Kyowa Medics (K-r) were used for comparison. F-f, S-r, and D-r correlated with AEX-HPLC with r values < 0.6 while W-r and K-r correlated with AEX-HPLC with r-vales > 0.6. Two samples in which F-f values provided 500 mg/dL plus bias to AEX-HPLC (LDL-C value of 220 mg/dL) demonstrated increased levels of IDL-C before treatment. LDL-C values (S-r and D-r) of the 2 samples were relatively high and near to F-f data while LDL-C values (W-r and K-r) were relatively low and close to AEX-HPLC data. The jaundice treatment decreased LDL-C values (S-r and D-r) and converged to 220 mg/dL, indicating that S-r and D-r might react markedly to IDL. These changes were consistent with decreases in serum free cholesterol and phospholipid in support of LP-X. By contrast, W-r and K-r data showed upward tendency and also converged to 220 mg/dL. These results suggest that LDL-C direct assay reagents would be classified into 2 groups with respect to the reagent reactivity to LP-X. PMID:26524853

  16. Measurement of patient-derived utility values for periodontal health using a multi-attribute scale.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, C A; Brickley, M R; McAndrew, R

    1996-09-01

    Periodontal health states are difficult to quantify and no formal scale quantifying patients' utilities for periodontal health states exits. Multi-attribute utility (MAU) techniques were used to develop such a scale. The MAU scale may be used to quantify patients' assessment of their current periodontal health and that of possible treatment outcomes. Such data, combined with probability values in formal decision analysis techniques would result in improved rationality of treatment planning for periodontal disease. 20 patients attending for routine undergraduate care were interviewed. Data from these interviews were sorted into groups of common interest (domains). Intra-domain health statements were complied from the interview content. 21 patients ranked the intra-domain statements on a scale of 0-100. This same group of patients also performed an inter-domain weighting. Mean results showed that patients were 2X as concerned with how they felt and with the prognosis of possible outcomes, than with how they looked and what facts they knew about their oral health. However, the real value of utilities research lies in application of individual results to treatment planning as there is a wide range of opinion regarding outcome health states. PMID:8891929

  17. Nuclear space-valued stochastic differential equations driven by Poisson random measures

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, J.

    1992-01-01

    The thesis is devoted primarily to the study of stochastic differential equations on duals of nuclear spaces driven by Poisson random measures. The existence of a weak solution is obtained by the Galerkin method and the uniqueness is established by implementing the Yamada-Watanabe argument in the present setup. When the magnitudes of the driving terms are small enough and the Poisson streams occur frequently enough, it is proved that the stochastic differential equations mentioned above can be approximated by diffusion equations. Finally, the author considers a system of interacting stochastic differential equations driven by Poisson random measures. Let (X[sup n][sub i](t), [center dot][center dot][center dot], X[sup n][sub n](t)) be the solution of this system and consider the empirical measures [zeta]n([omega],B) [identical to] (1/n) (sum of j=1 to n) [delta]x[sup n][sub j]([center dot],[omega])(B) (n[>=]1). It is provided that [zeta][sub n] converges in distribution to a non-random measure which is the unique solution of a McKean-Vlasov equation. The above problems are motivated by applications to neurophysiology, in particular, to the fluctuation of voltage potentials of spatially distributed neurons and to the study of asymptotic behavior of large systems of interacting neurons.

  18. Measuring School and Teacher Value Added for IMPACT and TEAM in DC Public Schools. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenberg, Eric; Hock, Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    The District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) has incorporated measures of school and teacher effectiveness, based on student test score growth, into a new teacher assessment system known as IMPACT. Implemented for the first time during the 2009-2010 school year, IMPACT is an assessment system with significant consequences. Prior to the start of…

  19. The Meaningful Activity Participation Assessment: A Measure of Engagement in Personally Valued Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eakman, Aaron M.; Carlson, Mike E.; Clark, Florence A.

    2010-01-01

    The Meaningful Activity Participation Assessment (MAPA), a recently developed 28-item tool designed to measure the meaningfulness of activity, was tested in a sample of 154 older adults. The MAPA evidenced a sufficient level of internal consistency and test-retest reliability and correlated as theoretically predicted with the Life Satisfaction…

  20. A wormhole-like porous carbon/magnetic particles composite as an efficient broadband electromagnetic wave absorber.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiyong; Liu, Tao; Chen, Zheng; Wang, Yan; Wei, Wei; Yue, Xigui; Jiang, Zhenhua

    2016-04-28

    A method combining liquid-liquid phase separation and the pyrolysis process has been developed to fabricate the wormhole-like porous carbon/magnetic nanoparticles composite with a pore size of about 80 nm (WPC/MNPs-80). In this work, the porous structure was designed to enhance interaction between the electromagnetic (EM) wave and the absorber, while the magnetic nanoparticles were used to bring about magnetic loss ability. The structure, morphology, porosity and magnetic properties of WPC/MNPs-80 were investigated in detail. To evaluate its EM wave attenuation performance, the EM parameters of the absorber and wax composite were measured at 2-18 GHz. WPC/MNPs-80 has an excellent EM wave absorbency with a wide absorption band at a relatively low loading and thin absorber thickness. At the absorber thickness of 1.5 and 2.0 mm, minimum RL values of -29.2 and -47.9 dB were achieved with the RL below -10 dB in 12.8-18 and 9.2-13.3 GHz, respectively. The Co and Fe nanoparticles derived from the chemical reduction of Co0.2Fe2.8O4 can enhance the graphitization process of carbon and thus improve dielectric loss ability. Polarizations in the nanocomposite absorber also play an important role in EM wave absorption. Thus, EM waves can be effectively attenuated by dielectric loss and magnetic loss through multiple reflections and absorption in the porous structure. WPC/MNPs-80 could be an excellent absorber for EM wave attenuation; and the design strategy could be extended as a general method to synthesize other high-performance absorbers.

  1. A wormhole-like porous carbon/magnetic particles composite as an efficient broadband electromagnetic wave absorber.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiyong; Liu, Tao; Chen, Zheng; Wang, Yan; Wei, Wei; Yue, Xigui; Jiang, Zhenhua

    2016-04-28

    A method combining liquid-liquid phase separation and the pyrolysis process has been developed to fabricate the wormhole-like porous carbon/magnetic nanoparticles composite with a pore size of about 80 nm (WPC/MNPs-80). In this work, the porous structure was designed to enhance interaction between the electromagnetic (EM) wave and the absorber, while the magnetic nanoparticles were used to bring about magnetic loss ability. The structure, morphology, porosity and magnetic properties of WPC/MNPs-80 were investigated in detail. To evaluate its EM wave attenuation performance, the EM parameters of the absorber and wax composite were measured at 2-18 GHz. WPC/MNPs-80 has an excellent EM wave absorbency with a wide absorption band at a relatively low loading and thin absorber thickness. At the absorber thickness of 1.5 and 2.0 mm, minimum RL values of -29.2 and -47.9 dB were achieved with the RL below -10 dB in 12.8-18 and 9.2-13.3 GHz, respectively. The Co and Fe nanoparticles derived from the chemical reduction of Co0.2Fe2.8O4 can enhance the graphitization process of carbon and thus improve dielectric loss ability. Polarizations in the nanocomposite absorber also play an important role in EM wave absorption. Thus, EM waves can be effectively attenuated by dielectric loss and magnetic loss through multiple reflections and absorption in the porous structure. WPC/MNPs-80 could be an excellent absorber for EM wave attenuation; and the design strategy could be extended as a general method to synthesize other high-performance absorbers. PMID:27072200

  2. Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment (CARE)

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric

    2015-12-23

    During Project DE-FE0007528, CARE (Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment), Neumann Systems Group (NSG) designed, installed and tested a 0.5MW NeuStream® carbon dioxide (CO2) capture system using the patented NeuStream® absorber equipment and concentrated (6 molal) piperazine (PZ) as the solvent at Colorado Springs Utilities’ (CSU’s) Martin Drake pulverized coal (PC) power plant. The 36 month project included design, build and test phases. The 0.5MW NeuStream® CO2 capture system was successfully tested on flue gas from both coal and natural gas combustion sources and was shown to meet project objectives. Ninety percent CO2 removal was achieved with greater than 95% CO2product purity. The absorbers tested support a 90% reduction in absorber volume compared to packed towers and with an absorber parasitic power of less than 1% when configured for operation with a 550MW coal plant. The preliminary techno-economic analysis (TEA) performed by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) predicted an over-the-fence cost of $25.73/tonne of CO2 captured from a sub-critical PC plant.

  3. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  4. Nonventing, Regenerable, Lightweight Heat Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    A lightweight, regenerable heat absorber (RHA), developed for rejecting metabolic heat from a space suit, may also be useful on Earth for short-term cooling of heavy protective garments. Unlike prior space-suit-cooling systems, a system that includes this RHA does not vent water. The closed system contains water reservoirs, tubes through which water is circulated to absorb heat, an evaporator, and an absorber/radiator. The radiator includes a solution of LiCl contained in a porous material in titanium tubes. The evaporator cools water that circulates through a liquid-cooled garment. Water vapor produced in the evaporator enters the radiator tubes where it is absorbed into the LiCl solution, releasing heat. Much of the heat of absorption is rejected to the environment via the radiator. After use, the RHA is regenerated by heating it to a temperature of 100 C for about 2 hours to drive the absorbed water back to the evaporator. A system including a prototype of the RHA was found to be capable of maintaining a temperature of 20 C while removing heat at a rate of 200 W for 6 hours.

  5. Investigations on Absorber Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Marhauser, Frank; Elliott, Thomas; Rimmer, Robert

    2009-05-01

    In the framework of the 12 GeV upgrade project for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) improvements are being made to refurbish cryomodules housing Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's (JLab) original 5-cell cavities. Recently we have started to look into a possible simplification of the existing Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorber design combined with the aim to find alternative material candidates. The absorbers are implemented in two HOM-waveguides immersed in the helium bath and operate at 2 K temperature. We have built a cryogenic setup to perform measurements on sample load materials to investigate their lossy characteristics and variations from room temperature down to 2 K. Initial results are presented in this paper.

  6. Imaging highly absorbing nanoparticles using photothermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lussier, Simon-Alexandre; Moradi, Hamid; Price, Alain; Murugkar, Sangeeta

    2015-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (NPs) have tremendous potential in biomedicine. They can be used as absorbing labels inside living cells for the purpose of biomedical imaging, biosensing as well as for photothermal therapy. We demonstrate photothermal imaging of highly-absorbing particles using a pump-probe setup. The photothermal signal is recovered by heterodyne detection, where the excitation pump laser is at 532 nm and the probe laser is at 638 nm. The sample is moved by a scanning stage. Proof of concept images of red polystyrene microspheres and gold nanoparticles are obtained with this home-built multimodal microscope. The increase in temperature at the surface of the gold NPs, due to the pump laser beam, can be directly measured by means of this photothermal microscope and then compared with the results from theoretical predictions. This technique will be useful for characterization of nanoparticles of different shapes, sizes and materials that are used in cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  7. The Reproducibility and Absolute Values of Echocardiographic Measurements of Left Ventricular Size and Function in Children are Algorithm Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Margossian, Renee; Chen, Shan; Sleeper, Lynn A.; Tani, Lloyd Y.; Shirali, Girish; Golding, Fraser; Tierney, Elif Seda Selamet; Altmann, Karen; Campbell, Michael J.; Szwast, Anita; Sharkey, Angela; Radojewski, Elizabeth; Colan, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Several quantification algorithms for measuring left ventricular (LV) size and function are used in clinical and research settings. We investigated the effect of the measurement algorithm and beat averaging on the reproducibility of measurements of the LV and assessed the magnitude of agreement among the algorithms in children with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Methods Echocardiograms were obtained on 169 children from 8 clinical centers. Inter- and intra-reader reproducibility were assessed on measurements of LV volumes using biplane Simpson, modified Simpson (MS), and 5/6 x area x length (5/6AL) algorithms. Percent error (%error) was calculated as the inter- or intra-reader difference / mean x 100. Single beat measurements and the 3-beat average (3BA) were compared. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to assess agreement. Results Single beat inter-reader reproducibility was lowest (%error was highest) using biplane Simpson; 5/6AL and MS were similar but significantly better than biplane Simpson (p<.05). Single beat intra-reader reproducibility was highest using 5/6AL (p<.05). 3BA improved reproducibility for almost all measures (p<.05). Reproducibility in both single and 3BA values fell with greater LV dilation and systolic dysfunction (p<.05). ICCs were > 0.95 across measures, although absolute volume and mass values were systematically lower for biplane Simpson compared to MS and to 5/6AL. Conclusions The reproducibility of LV size and function measurements in children with DCM is highest using the 5/6AL algorithm, and can be further improved by using 3BA. However, values derived from different algorithms are not interchangeable. PMID:25728351

  8. [QUALITY MEASURES IN MEDICINE-- A PLEA FOR NEW, VALUE BASED THINKING].

    PubMed

    Fisher, Menachem; Wagner, Oded; Keinarl, Talia; Solt, Ido

    2015-09-01

    Quality is an important and basic conduct of complex systems in general and health systems in particular. Quality is a cornerstone of medicine, necessary in the eyes of the community of consumers, caregivers, and the systems that manage both. In Israel, the Ministry of Health has set the quality issue on the agenda of healthcare organizations in all existing frameworks. In this article we seek to offer an acceptable alternative perspective, in examining the quality of public health. We suggest highlighting the ethical aspect of medical care, while reducing the quantitative monitoring component of existing quality metrics. Relying solely on indices has negative effects that might cause damage. The proposed alternative focuses on the personal responsibility of health care providers, using. values and moral reasonin. PMID:26665750

  9. Hospital value-based purchasing (VBP) program: measurement of quality and enforcement of quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Szablowski, Katarzyna M

    2014-01-01

    VBP program is a novel medicare payment estimatin tool used to encourage clinical care quality improvement as well as improvement of patient experience as a customer of a health care system. The program utilizes well established tools of measuring clinical care quality and patient satisfaction such as the hospital IQR program and HCAHPS survey to estimate Medicare payments and encourage hospitals to continuosly improve the level of care they provide. PMID:24600783

  10. Hospital value-based purchasing (VBP) program: measurement of quality and enforcement of quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Szablowski, Katarzyna M

    2014-01-01

    VBP program is a novel medicare payment estimatin tool used to encourage clinical care quality improvement as well as improvement of patient experience as a customer of a health care system. The program utilizes well established tools of measuring clinical care quality and patient satisfaction such as the hospital IQR program and HCAHPS survey to estimate Medicare payments and encourage hospitals to continuosly improve the level of care they provide.

  11. Increasing NDVI values in northern Alaska: studies that mix shrub density, spectral and CO2 exchange measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson-Smith, A.; Lewis, A.; Sullivan, P.; Welker, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Delineating the mechanisms and consequences of changes in tundra landscapes is central to predicting the functional ecology of Alaska in the 21st Century. Evidence has been mounting during the last decade that shrub communities are expanding in the Arctic and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values which measure surface greenness are rising. Several studies have suggested that NDVI increases are being driven by increases in shrub abundance. While it is clear that NDVI has increased across vegetation types, it is not clear that NDVI values are increasing in moist acidic tundra (MAT), the most extensive vegetation type in arctic Alaska and the one most likely to be changed by global warming. The MAT is important to large mammal herbivores such as caribou which provide subsistence for indigenous people. The focus of this research was to determine what rising NDVI values actually mean in the MAT. The degree to which tundra community composition affects NDVI is still very poorly understood. In order to clarify the role of shrub encroachment per se as opposed to other functional groups in driving increases in NDVI, we measured functional group composition in moist acidic tundra in conjunction with hand-held measures of NDVI and direct CO2 exchange measurements to explicitly link spectral properties, shrub, graminoid and bryophyte density and trace gas feedbacks to atmospheric chemistry. Point frame data shows a shrub coverage of Betula nana (Dwarf Birch) and Salix pulchra (Diamond Leaf Willow) combined of 5% to 35% in MAT. Our results seem to indicate that high shrub density (>30%) corresponds to peak season NDVI values greater than .75 whereas low shrub density correspond to values below .65 (R2=.66). Furthermore, NDVI is closely correlated with canopy leaf area and greater leaf area is associated with higher rates of gross and net ecosystem CO2 uptake.

  12. Diagnostic Value of Measuring Platelet Von Willebrand Factor in Von Willebrand Disease

    PubMed Central

    Casonato, Alessandra; Cattini, Maria Grazia; Daidone, Viviana; Pontara, Elena; Bertomoro, Antonella; Prandoni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD) may be caused by an impaired von Willebrand factor (VWF) synthesis, its increased clearance or abnormal function, or combinations of these factors. It may be difficult to recognize the different contributions of these anomalies. Here we demonstrate that VWD diagnostics gains from measuring platelet VWF, which can reveal a defective VWF synthesis. Measuring platelet VWF revealed that: severe type 1 VWD always coincided with significantly lower platelet and plasma VWF levels, whereas mild forms revealed low plasma VWF levels associated with low or normal platelet VWF levels, and the latter were associated with a slightly shorter VWF survival; type Vicenza (the archetype VWD caused by a reduced VWF survival) featured normal platelet VWF levels despite significantly reduced plasma VWF levels; type 2B patients could have either normal platelet VWF levels associated with abnormal multimer patterns, or reduced platelet VWF levels associated with normal multimer patterns; type 2A patients could have reduced or normal platelet VWF levels, the former associated mainly with type 2A-I, the latter with type 2A-II; plasma and platelet VWF levels were normal in type 2N, except when the defect was associated with a quantitative VWF mutation. Our findings show that measuring platelet VWF helps to characterize VWD, especially the ambiguous phenotypes, shedding light on the mechanisms underlying the disorder. PMID:27532107

  13. Calculation of RABBIT and Simulator Worth in the HFIR Hydraulic Tube and Comparison with Measured Values

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, CO

    2005-09-08

    To aid in the determinations of reactivity worths for target materials in a proposed High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) target configuration containing two additional hydraulic tubes, the worths of cadmium rabbits within the current hydraulic tube were calculated using a reference model of the HFIR and the MCNP5 computer code. The worths were compared to measured worths for both static and ejection experiments. After accounting for uncertainties in the calculations and the measurements, excellent agreement between the two was obtained. Computational and measurement limitations indicate that accurate estimation of worth is only possible when the worth exceeds 10 cents. Results indicate that MCNP5 and the reactor model can be used to predict reactivity worths of various samples when the expected perturbations are greater than 10 cents. The level of agreement between calculation and experiment indicates that the accuracy of such predictions would be dependent solely on the quality of the nuclear data for the materials to be irradiated. Transients that are approximated by ''piecewise static'' computational models should likewise have an accuracy that is dependent solely on the quality of the nuclear data.

  14. In-vivo measurement of intrauterine gases and acid-base values early in human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jauniaux, E; Watson, A; Ozturk, O; Quick, D; Burton, G

    1999-11-01

    A new multiparameter sensor that combines electrochemical and fibre-optic technology was used for continuous in-vivo investigation of pH, carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO(2)), oxygen partial pressure (PO(2)), bicarbonate concentration (HCO(3)(-)), base excess, and oxygen saturation (O(2)Sat) early in human pregnancy. The sensor was inserted into the amniotic cavity and the placental bed of 16 pregnancies at 10-15 weeks gestation, before termination under general anaesthesia. Amniotic fluid and retroplacental blood from the same site were also aspirated and analysed by means of cartridges and a portable blood gas analyser. Eleven series of measurements were obtained. The variation in measurements over the 5 min of monitoring was Measurements of PO(2) in both the amniotic cavity and the placental bed and of pH in the placental bed were higher using the cartridges than in vivo. The results indicated that in-vivo monitoring of fetoplacental gas and acid-base with a sensor is stable and accurate. Such technology will be helpful in improving our understanding of the fetoplacental metabolism in normal and complicated pregnancies. PMID:10548645

  15. Matrix measure method for global exponential stability of complex-valued recurrent neural networks with time-varying delays.

    PubMed

    Gong, Weiqiang; Liang, Jinling; Cao, Jinde

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, based on the matrix measure method and the Halanay inequality, global exponential stability problem is investigated for the complex-valued recurrent neural networks with time-varying delays. Without constructing any Lyapunov functions, several sufficient criteria are obtained to ascertain the global exponential stability of the addressed complex-valued neural networks under different activation functions. Here, the activation functions are no longer assumed to be derivative which is always demanded in relating references. In addition, the obtained results are easy to be verified and implemented in practice. Finally, two examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  16. Highly ionised absorbers at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, Jacqueline; Herbert-Fort, Stéphane

    2005-03-01

    We build a sample of O VI absorption systems in the redshift range 2.0 ≲ z ≲ 2.6 using high spectral resolution data of ten quasars from the VLT-UVES large programme. We investigate the existence of a metal-rich O VI population and define observational criteria for this class of absorbers under the assumption of photoionisation. The low temperatures of nearly half of all O VI absorbers, implied by their line widths, are too low for collisional ionisation to be a dominant process. We estimate the oxygen abundance under the assumption of photoionisation; a striking result is the bimodal distribution of [o/h] with median values close to 0.01 and 0.5 solar for the metal-poor and metal-rich populations, respectively. Using the line widths to fix the temperature or assuming a constant, low gas density does not drastically change the metallicities of the metal-rich population. We present the first estimate of the O VI column density distribution. Assuming a single power-law distribution, f(n) ∝ n-α, yields α ˜ 1.7 and a normalisation of f(n) =2.3× 10-13 at log n(O VI) ˜ 13.5, both with a ˜30% uncertainty. The value of α is similar to that found for C IV surveys, whereas the normalisation factor is about ten times higher. We use f(n) to derive the number density per unit z and cosmic density ωb(O VI), selecting a limited column density range not strongly affected by incompleteness or sample variance. Comparing our results with those obtained at z˜0.1 for a similar range of column densities implies some decline of dn/dz with z. The cosmic O VI density derived from f(n), ωb(O VI)≈ (3.5± 3.20.9) × 10-7, is 2.3 times higher than the value estimated using the observed O VI sample (of which the metal-rich population contributes ˜35%), easing the problem of missing metals at high z (˜ 1/4 of the produced metals) but not solving it. We find that the majori ty of the metal-rich absorbers are located within ˜ 450 km s-1 of strong Ly-α lines and show that

  17. Further insight into the incremental value of new markers: the interpretation of performance measures and the importance of clinical context.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Kathleen F; Bansal, Aasthaa; Pepe, Margaret S

    2012-09-15

    In this issue of the Journal, Pencina and et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2012;176(6):492-494) examine the operating characteristics of measures of incremental value. Their goal is to provide benchmarks for the measures that can help identify the most promising markers among multiple candidates. They consider a setting in which new predictors are conditionally independent of established predictors. In the present article, the authors consider more general settings. Their results indicate that some of the conclusions made by Pencina et al. are limited to the specific scenarios the authors considered. For example, Pencina et al. observed that continuous net reclassification improvement was invariant to the strength of the baseline model, but the authors of the present study show this invariance does not hold generally. Further, they disagree with the suggestion that such invariance would be desirable for a measure of incremental value. They also do not see evidence to support the claim that the measures provide complementary information. In addition, they show that correlation with baseline predictors can lead to much bigger gains in performance than the conditional independence scenario studied by Pencina et al. Finally, the authors note that the motivation of providing benchmarks actually reinforces previous observations that the problem with these measures is they do not have useful clinical interpretations. If they did, researchers could use the measures directly and benchmarks would not be needed.

  18. Uncertainties of organ-absorbed doses to patients from 18f-choline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. B.; Janzen, T.; Zankl, M.; Giussani, A.; Hoeschen, C.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation doses of radiopharmaceuticals to patients in nuclear medicine are, as the standard method, estimated by the administered activity, medical imaging (e.g. PET imaging), compartmental modeling and Monte Carlo simulation of radiation with reference digital human phantoms. However, in each of the contributing terms, individual uncertainty due to measurement techniques, patient variability and computation methods may propagate to the uncertainties of the calculated organ doses to the individual patient. To evaluate the overall uncertainties and the quality assurance of internal absorbed doses, a method was developed within the framework of the MADEIRA Project (Minimizing Activity and Dose with Enhanced Image quality by Radiopharmaceutical Administrations) to quantitatively analyze the uncertainties in each component of the organ absorbed doses after administration of 18F-choline to prostate cancer patients undergoing nuclear medicine diagnostics. First, on the basis of the organ PET and CT images of the patients as well as blood and urine samples, a model structure of 18F-choline was developed and the uncertainties of the model parameters were determined. Second, the model parameter values were sampled and biokinetic modeling using these sampled parameter values were performed. Third, the uncertainties of the new specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values derived with different phantoms representing individual patients were presented. Finally, the uncertainties of absorbed doses to the patients were calculated by applying the ICRP/ICRU adult male reference computational phantom. In addition to the uncertainty analysis, the sensitivity of the model parameters on the organ PET images and absorbed doses was indicated by coupling the model input and output using regression and partial correlation analysis. The results showed that the uncertainty factors of absorbed dose to patients are in most cases less than a factor of 2 without taking into account the uncertainties

  19. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Hamby, Jr., Clyde; Akerman, M. Alfred; Seals, Roland D.

    1993-01-01

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000.degree. C. to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm.sup.3.

  20. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Hamby, C. Jr.; Akerman, M.A.; Seals, R.D.

    1993-09-07

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, is prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000 C to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm[sup 3]. 9 figures.