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Sample records for absorbance values measured

  1. Establishing traceability of photometric absorbance values for accurate measurements of the haemoglobin concentration in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, K.; Wolf, H. U.; Heuck, C.; Kammel, M.; Kummrow, A.; Neukammer, J.

    2013-10-01

    Haemoglobin concentration in blood is one of the most frequently measured analytes in laboratory medicine. Reference and routine methods for the determination of the haemoglobin concentration in blood are based on the conversion of haeme, haemoglobin and haemiglobin species into uniform end products. The total haemoglobin concentration in blood is measured using the absorbance of the reaction products. Traceable absorbance measurement values on the highest metrological level are a prerequisite for the calibration and evaluation of procedures with respect to their suitability for routine measurements and their potential as reference measurement procedures. For this purpose, we describe a procedure to establish traceability of spectral absorbance measurements for the haemiglobincyanide (HiCN) method and for the alkaline haematin detergent (AHD) method. The latter is characterized by a higher stability of the reaction product. In addition, the toxic hazard of cyanide, which binds to the iron ion of the haem group and thus inhibits the oxygen transport, is avoided. Traceability is established at different wavelengths by applying total least-squares analysis to derive the conventional quantity values for the absorbance from the measured values. Extrapolation and interpolation are applied to get access to the spectral regions required to characterize the Q-absorption bands of the HiCN and AHD methods, respectively. For absorbance values between 0.3 and 1.8, the contributions of absorbance measurements to the total expanded uncertainties (95% level of confidence) of absorbance measurements range from 1% to 0.4%.

  2. Molar Absorptivity Measurements in Absorbing Solvents: Impact on Solvent Absorptivity Values.

    PubMed

    Bohman, Ariel; Arnold, Mark A

    2016-10-18

    Molar absorptivity is a fundamental molecular property that quantifies absorption strength as a function of wavelength. Absolute measurements of molar absorptivity demand accounting for all mechanisms of light attenuation, including reflective losses at interfaces associated with the sample. Ideally, such measurements are performed in nonabsorbing solvents and reflective losses can be determined in a straightforward manner from Fresnel equations or effectively accounted for by path length difference methods. At near-infrared wavelengths, however, many solvents, including water, are absorbing which complicates the quantification of reflective losses. Here, generalized equations are developed for calculating absolute molar absorptivities of neat liquids wherein the dependency of reflective loss on absorption properties of the liquid are considered explicitly. The resulting equations are used to characterize sensitivity of absolute molar absorptivity measurements for solvents to the absorption strength of the solvent as well as the path length of the measurement. Methods are derived from these equations to properly account for reflective losses in general and the effectiveness of these methods is demonstrated for absolute molar absorptivity measurements for water over the combination region (5000-4000 cm(-1)) of the near-infrared spectrum. Results indicate that ignoring solvent absorption effects can incorporate wide ranging systematic errors depending upon experimental conditions. As an example, systematic errors range from 0 to 10% for common conditions used in the measurement of absolute molar absorptivity of water over the combination region of the near-infrared spectrum.

  3. Method of absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas Vyankatrao; Zelepouga, Sergeui; Pratapas, John

    2013-09-17

    A method and apparatus for absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor in which a reference light intensity measurement is made on a non-absorbing reference fluid, a light intensity measurement is made on a sample fluid, and a measured light absorbance of the sample fluid is determined. A corrective light intensity measurement at a non-absorbing wavelength of the sample fluid is made on the sample fluid from which an absorbance correction factor is determined. The absorbance correction factor is then applied to the measured light absorbance of the sample fluid to arrive at a true or accurate absorbance for the sample fluid.

  4. DHCAL with minimal absorber: measurements with positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, B.; Neubüser, C.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Dotti, A.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H. L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schroeder, S.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kovalcuk, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Besson, D.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Corriveau, F.; Blazey, G. C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Zutshi, V.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-05-01

    In special tests, the active layers of the CALICE Digital Hadron Calorimeter prototype, the DHCAL, were exposed to low energy particle beams, without being interleaved by absorber plates. The thickness of each layer corresponded approximately to 0.29 radiation lengths or 0.034 nuclear interaction lengths, defined mostly by the copper and steel skins of the detector cassettes. This paper reports on measurements performed with this device in the Fermilab test beam with positrons in the energy range of 1 to 10 GeV. The measurements are compared to simulations based on GEANT4 and a standalone program to emulate the detailed response of the active elements.

  5. Absorber Alignment Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01

    As we pursue efforts to lower the capital and installation costs of parabolic trough solar collectors, it is essential to maintain high optical performance. While there are many optical tools available to measure the reflector slope errors of parabolic trough solar collectors, there are few tools to measure the absorber alignment. A new method is presented here to measure the absorber alignment in two dimensions to within 0.5 cm. The absorber alignment is measured using a digital camera and four photogrammetric targets. Physical contact with the receiver absorber or glass is not necessary. The alignment of the absorber is measured along its full length so that sagging of the absorber can be quantified with this technique. The resulting absorber alignment measurement provides critical information required to accurately determine the intercept factor of a collector.

  6. Measuring Nursing Care Value.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M; Harper, Ellen M

    2016-01-01

    The value of nursing care as well as the contribution of individual nurses to clinical outcomes has been difficult to measure and evaluate. Existing health care financial models hide the contribution of nurses; therefore, the link between the cost and quality o nursing care is unknown. New data and methods are needed to articulate the added value of nurses to patient care. The final results and recommendations of an expert workgroup tasked with defining and measuring nursing care value, including a data model to allow extraction of key information from electronic health records to measure nursing care value, are described. A set of new analytic metrics are proposed.

  7. Measurement and Simulation Results of Ti Coated Microwave Absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ding; McGinnis, Dave; /Fermilab

    1998-11-01

    When microwave absorbers are put in a waveguide, a layer of resistive coating can change the distribution of the E-M fields and affect the attenuation of the signal within the microwave absorbers. In order to study such effect, microwave absorbers (TT2-111) were coated with titanium thin film. This report is a document on the coating process and measurement results. The measurement results have been used to check the simulation results from commercial software HFSS (High Frequency Structure Simulator.)

  8. Techniques for measuring intercepted and absorbed PAR in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The quantity of radiation potentially available for photosynthesis that is captured by the crop is best described as absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR (APAR) is the difference between descending and ascending fluxes. The four components of APAR were measured above and within two planting densities of corn (Zea mays L.) and several methods of measuring and estimating APAR were examined. A line quantum sensor that spatially averages the photosynthetic photon flux density provided a rapid and portable method of measuring APAR. PAR reflectance from the soil (Typic Argiaquoll) surface decreased from 10% to less than 1% of the incoming PAR as the canopy cover increased. PAR reflectance from the canopy decreased to less than 3% at maximum vegetative cover. Intercepted PAR (1 - transmitted PAR) generally overestimated absorbed PAR by less than 4% throughout most of the growing season. Thus intercepted PAR appears to be a reasonable estimate of absorbed PAR.

  9. Measurements of Light Absorbing Particles on Tropical South American Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. G.; All, J.; Schwarz, J. P.; Arnott, W. P.; Warthon, J.; Andrade, M.; Celestian, A. J.; Hoffmann, D.; Cole, R. J.; Lapham, E.; Horodyskyj, U. N.; Froyd, K. D.; Liao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes have been losing mass rapidly in recent decades. In addition to the documented increase in temperature, increases in light absorbing particulates deposited on glaciers could be contributing to the observed glacier loss. Here we present results of measurements of light absorbing particles from glaciers in Peru and Bolivia. Samples have been collected by American Climber Science Program volunteers and scientists at altitudes up to 6770 meters. Collected snow samples were melted and filtered in the field. A new inexpensive technique, the Light Absorption Heating Method (LAHM) has been developed for analysis of light absorbing particles collected on filters. Results from LAHM analysis are calibrated using filters with known amounts of fullerene soot, a common industrial surrogate for black carbon (BC). For snow samples collected at the same field location LAHM analysis and measurements from the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) instrument are well correlated (r2 = 0.92). Co-located SP2 and LAHM filter analysis suggest that BC could be the dominant absorbing component of the light absorbing particles in some areas.

  10. Absorbed dose measurements on LDEF and comparisons with predictions.

    PubMed

    Benton, E V; Frank, A L; Benton, E R; Armstrong, T W; Colborn, B L

    1996-11-01

    The radiation environment on LDEF was monitored by cumulative absorbed dose measurements made with TLDs at different locations and shielding depths. The TLDs were included in four experiments: A0015(a) Biostack, P0004 Seeds in Space and P0006 Linear Energy Transfer Spectrum Measurements at the trailing edge (west side) of the satellite; M0004 Fiber Optics Data Link at the leading edge (east side); and A0015(b) Biostack at the Earth side. The shielding depths varied between 0.48 and 15.4 g/cm2, Al equivalent. Both the directional dependence of trapped protons incident on the satellite and the shielding thickness were reflected in absorbed dose values. The trapped proton anisotropy was measured by TLDs at the east and west sides of LDEF. At the east side doses ranged from 2.10 to 2.58 Gy under shielding of 2.90 to 1.37 g/cm2 (M0004) while on the west side doses ranged from 2.66 to 6.48 Gy under shielding of 15.4 to 0.48 g/cm2 (P0006). The west side doses were more than a factor of two higher, where the vertical shielding thicknesses to space were equal. Other west side doses of 3.04 to 4.49 Gy under shielding of 11.7 to 3.85 g/cm2 (A0015(a)) and 2.91 to 6.64 Gy under shielding of 11.1 to 0.48 g/cm2 (P0004) generally agreed with the P0006 results. The Earth side doses of 2.41 to 3.93 Gy under shielding of 10.0 to 1.66 g cm2 (A0015(b)) were intermediate between the east side and west side doses. Calculations utilizing a model of trapped proton spectra were performed by Watts et al. (1993) and comparisons of dose measurement and calculations may be found in a companion paper (Armstrong et al., 1996).

  11. Absorbed dose measurements on LDEF and comparisons with predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    The radiation environment on LDEF was monitored by cumulative absorbed dose measurements made with TLDs at different locations and shielding depths. The TLDs were included in four experiments: A0015(a) Biostack, P0004 Seeds in Space and P0006 Linear Energy Transfer Spectrum Measurements at the trailing edge (west side) of the satellite; M0004 Fiber Optics Data Link at the leading edge (east side); and A0015(b) Biostack at the Earth side. The shielding depths varied between 0.48 and 15.4 g/cm2, Al equivalent. Both the directional dependence of trapped protons incident on the satellite and the shielding thickness were reflected in absorbed dose values. The trapped proton anisotropy was measured by TLDs at the east and west sides of LDEF. At the east side doses ranged from 2.10 to 2.58 Gy under shielding of 2.90 to 1.37 g/cm2 (M0004) while on the west side doses ranged from 2.66 to 6.48 Gy under shielding of 15.4 to 0.48 g/cm2 (P0006). The west side doses were more than a factor of two higher, where the vertical shielding thicknesses to space were equal. Other west side doses of 3.04 to 4.49 Gy under shielding of 11.7 to 3.85 g/cm2 (A0015(a)) and 2.91 to 6.64 Gy under shielding of 11.1 to 0.48 g/cm2 (P0004) generally agreed with the P0006 results. The Earth side doses of 2.41 to 3.93 Gy under shielding of 10.0 to 1.66 g cm2 (A0015(b)) were intermediate between the east side and west side doses. Calculations utilizing a model of trapped proton spectra were performed by Watts et al. (1993) and comparisons of dose measurement and calculations may be found in a companion paper (Armstrong et al., 1996).

  12. Reference values for the production of the aqueous fraction of the tear film measured by the standardized endodontic absorbent paper point test in different exotic and laboratory animal species.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rogério R; Lima, Leandro; Przydzimirski, Andreise C; Montiani-Ferreira, Fabiano

    2014-01-01

    The aqueous fraction of the tear film and the horizontal palpebral fissure length (HPFL) were measured in exotic and laboratory animals, specifically saffron finches (Sicalis flaveola), chestnut-bellied seed-finches (Sporophila angolensis), red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans), rats (Rattus norvegicus) and mice (Mus musculus). These species possess small eyes making it difficult to perform the typical Schirmer tear test. Measurement of the aqueous fraction of the tear was performed using the standardized endodontic absorbent paper point tear test (PPTT), accomplished with manual restraint by a single operator. The following results were obtained: saffron finches (n = 42)-HPFL (4.46 ± 0.09 mm) and PPTT (5.10 ± 0.26 mm); chestnut-bellied seed-finches (n = 38)-HPFL (4.77 ± 0.05 mm) and PPTT (4.11 ± 0.34 mm); red-eared sliders (n = 56)-HPFL (8.59 ± 0.08 mm) and PPTT (8.79 ± 0.38 mm); rats (n = 60)-HPFL (6.45 ± 0.09 mm) and PTT (6.18 ± 2.06 mm); and mice (n = 22)-HPFL (3.59 ± 0.27 mm) and PPTT (4.39 ± 1.45 mm).

  13. A portable absorbed dose measuring instrument with gamma discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quam, W. M.; Wilde, W. I.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of an electronic instrument for measuring the radiation dose absorbed by tissues are presented. The detector is a sphere of tissue-equivalent plastic with a single wire located on a diameter of the sphere. The electronic circuits and method of operation of the detector are described. Advantages are the small size and easy portability plus ability to selectively measure neutron and gamma plus neutron events.

  14. Alternative Ear-Canal Measures Related to Absorbance

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Stephen T.; Stenfelt, Stefan; Schairer, Kim S.

    2013-01-01

    Several alternative ear-canal measures are similar to absorbance in their requirement for prior determination of a Thévenin-equivalent sound source. Examples are (1) sound intensity level (SIL), (2) forward-pressure level (FPL), (3) time-domain ear-canal reflectance (TDR), and (4) cochlear reflectance (CR). These four related measures are similar to absorbance in their utilization of wide-band stimuli and their focus on recording ear-canal sound pressure. The related measures differ from absorbance in how the ear-canal pressure is analyzed and in the type of information that is extracted from the recorded response. SIL and FPL have both been shown to be better as measures of sound level in the ear canal compared to sound pressure level (SPL) because they reduced calibration errors due to standing waves in studies of behavioral thresholds and otoacoustic emissions. TDR may be used to estimate ear-canal geometry and may have the potential to assess middle-ear pathology. CR reveals information about the inner ear that is similar to what is provided by other types of otoacoustic emissions and may have theoretical advantages that strengthen its interpretation. PMID:23900185

  15. Water-absorbing capacitor system for measuring relative humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Eric G. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus using a known water-absorbent polymer as a capacitor which is operated at a dc voltage for measuring relative humidity is presented. When formed as a layer between porous electrically-conductive electrodes and operated in an RC oscillator circuit, the oscillator frequency varies inversely with the partial pressure of the moisture to be measured. In a preferred embodiment, the capacitor is formed from Nafion and is operated at a low dc voltage with a resistor as an RC circuit in an RC oscillator. At the low voltage, the leakage current is proper for oscillation over a satisfactory range. The frequency of oscillation varies in an essentially linear fashion with relative humidity which is represented by the moisture being absorbed into the Nafion. The oscillation frequency is detected by a frequency detector.

  16. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a 60Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the

  17. Device for Measuring Heat Capacities of Microcalorimeter Absorber Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsubo, Vincent; Beall, James; Ullom, Joel

    2009-12-01

    We are developing a device for measuring the heat capacity of candidate absorber materials for gamma-ray microcalorimeters with the goal of finding materials with low heat capacity and high stopping power to improve detector efficiency. To date, only Sn has been effective as an absorber, and speculation is that other materials suffer from anomalously high heat capacities at low temperatures. The key component of the measurement device is a 17 mm×17 mm low heat capacity silicon platform suspended by Kevlar fibers designed for accepting 1 g to 2 g samples, and whose heat capacity can be characterized prior to attaching a sample. The platform has a thin film Pd/Au heater deposited directly on the silicon, and a semiconducting thermometer bonded to the surface. The heat capacity is determined from C = Gτ, where G is the in-situ measured conductance and x is the measured temperature decay time from a step change in applied heat. For a platform without samples, decay periods on the order of 0.3 to 0.05 seconds were measured. With samples, decay periods of several seconds are projected, allowing good resolution of the heat capacities. Several thermometers were tested in an effort to find one with the optimum characteristics for measuring platform temperatures. These included a commercial thick-film Ruthenium-oxide surface-mount resistor, a germanium NTD, and a zirconium oxy-nitride thin-film thermometer.

  18. Measured acoustic properties of variable and low density bulk absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, M. D.; Rice, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental data were taken to determine the acoustic absorbing properties of uniform low density and layered variable density samples using a bulk absober with a perforated plate facing to hold the material in place. In the layered variable density case, the bulk absorber was packed such that the lowest density layer began at the surface of the sample and progressed to higher density layers deeper inside. The samples were placed in a rectangular duct and measurements were taken using the two microphone method. The data were used to calculate specific acoustic impedances and normal incidence absorption coefficients. Results showed that for uniform density samples the absorption coefficient at low frequencies decreased with increasing density and resonances occurred in the absorption coefficient curve at lower densities. These results were confirmed by a model for uniform density bulk absorbers. Results from layered variable density samples showed that low frequency absorption was the highest when the lowest density possible was packed in the first layer near the exposed surface. The layers of increasing density within the sample had the effect of damping the resonances.

  19. Graphite calorimetry for absorbed dose measurements in heavy-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakama, M.; Kanai, T.; Fukumura, A.

    In order to sophisticate the radiotherapy high accuracy knowledge of the absorbed dose delivered to the patient is essential The main methods of absolute dosimetry are indicated as follows a Dosimetry by ion chamber b Fricke dosimetry and c Calorimetry The calorimetry is most direct method of dosimetry due to direct measurement of energy deposit in principle and no requirement of information of radiation fields for the calibration Many countries tend to adopt the calorimetry to determine the standard absorbed dose to water and become to be capable of deciding the absorbed dose in precision of about 0 6 for photon and electron beams Despite the recent progress of particle therapy the parameters such as w-value and stopping power ratio for ionization chambers in the particles is not obtained accurately Therefore that causes uncertainty in determination of the absolute dose For this reason we developed a graphite calorimeter to obtain high precision absorbed dose and reduce the uncertainty for various beams When the absorbed dose of 1 Gy is irradiated to the sensitive volume the temperature rise is about 1 4 milliKelvins The performance require the resolution of plus or minus 7 micro Kelvins to measure it in precision of plus or minus 0 5 The stability within several micro Kelvins per minute is necessary to obtain measurable background The miniature glass bead thermistors were embedded in the sensitive volume to perform active control of temperature The resistance change of these thermistors is approximately 0 68 Ohms and 488 micro Ohms at

  20. Measurement of EUV absorber and resist CD using spectroscopic ellipsometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyung M.; Tavassoli, Malahat; Yan, Pei-yang; Zhang, Guojing

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation of lithography process or stepper involves very large quantity of CD measurements and measurement time. In this paper, we report on an application of Scatterometry based metrology for evaluation of EUV photomask lithography. Measurements were made on mask level with Ellipsometric scatterometer for develop-check CD (DCCD) and final check CD (FCCD). Calculation of scatterometer profile information was performed with in-situ library-based rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) method. We characterized the CD uniformity (CDU) and metal film thickness uniformity. OCD results show that high precision CD measurement EUV absorber and resist is possible with this method. A series of simulations were also performed to investigate the feasibility of Ellipsometric scatterometry for various pitches/line CD sizes, down to 11nm half-pitch at 1x magnification. The data showed that Scatterometry provides a nondestructive and faster mean of characterizing mask CD performance for various EUV process generations.

  1. Scattering photoacoustic method in measurement of weakly absorbing turbid suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zuomin; Törmänen, Matti; Myllylä, Risto

    2006-08-01

    Conventional photoacoustic techniques in composition determination and biomedical diagnose and imaging are based on the optical absorption in target substance or objects from which the photons to be scattered are not concerned. It is obvious that the intensities of scattered lights closely relate to the property of the interrogated substance, therefore measuring the signals produced by them can give rise to more information of the substance. Based on this idea, a novel method entitled scattering photoacoustic (SPA) method is put forward to study weak absorption suspensions with highly scattering. In this method, a near infrared pulse laser irradiates the studied object which contacts with external absorbers, resulting the generation of a few photoacoustic signals; one is produced in the studied object as conventional case, others are in external absorbers which are produced by the scattered photons. All these signals are successively received by a piezoelectric detector with short damping period. Analyzing these signals is capable of determining reduced scattered coefficient and absorption coefficient, as well as acoustic attenuation of studied suspensions. Some measurement results in intralipid and fibre (paper pulp) suspensions are given rise to in the end.

  2. Damped Lyman-α Absorbers bias: measurement and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Rafòls, I.; Miralda-Escudé, J.; Font-Ribera, A.

    2017-03-01

    We present an update on the measurement of the Damped Lyman-α Absorbers (DLAs) bias from the cross-correlation of DLA and the Lyman-α forest. We also use an upgraded method to deal with the broadband function problems. In our analysis, we use of the final Data Release of BOSS. We find the bias of the DLA to be b_d = 1.90 plusmn;0.11. With the improved statistics, we explore the evolution of the DLA bias with column density and redshift. We find no clear evidence of any evolution in neither of them. This means that the dark matter halos hosting the DLA are essentially the same independently of the properties of the DLA.

  3. Light Absorbing Particle (LAP) Measurements in the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Raga, G. B.; Anderson, B.; Diskin, G.; Sachse, G.; Kok, G.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers the capabilities and design of the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP-2), and reviews its role on the Sage III Ozone Loss Validation Experiment (SOLVE II) field campaign during 2003. On SOLVE II the SP-2 was carried into the Arctic onboard a DC-8 aircraft, in order to determine the size distribution of light-absorbing and non light-absorbing particles in the stratosphere. Graphs and tables relate some of the results from SOLVE II.

  4. Measurement-based estimates of direct radiative effects of absorbing aerosols above clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Nan; Christopher, Sundar A.

    2015-07-01

    The elevated layers of absorbing smoke aerosols from western African (e.g., Gabon and Congo) biomass burning activities have been frequently observed above low-level stratocumulus clouds off the African coast, which presents an excellent natural laboratory for studying the effects of aerosols above clouds (AAC) on regional energy balance in tropical and subtropical environments. Using spatially and temporally collocated Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System data sets, the top-of-atmosphere shortwave aerosol direct shortwave radiative effects (ARE) of absorbing aerosols above low-level water clouds in the southeast Atlantic Ocean was examined in this study. The regional averaged instantaneous ARE has been estimated to be 36.7 ± 20.5 Wm-2 (regional mean ± standard deviation) along with a mean positive OMI Aerosol Index at 1.3 in August 2006 based on multisensors measurements. The highest magnitude of instantaneous ARE can even reach 138.2 Wm-2. We assess that the 660 nm cloud optical depth (COD) values of 8-12 is the critical value above (below) which aerosol absorption (scattering) effect dominates and further produces positive (negative) ARE values. The results further show that ARE values are more sensitive to aerosols above lower COD values than cases for higher COD values. This is among the first studies to provide quantitative estimates of shortwave ARE due to AAC events from an observational perspective.

  5. New procedure for direct measurements of absorbance of thin films of ultra-high absorbance UV blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Norman D.; Solsvik, A.; Murphy, L.; Stevenson, A.; O'Neill, M.; Moore, J.

    2005-06-01

    A novel method for the measurement of ultra-high absorbance liquids has been devised and details are given of a new ultra absorbance instrument developed specifically for these thin liquid film measurements. The instrument specifically constructed for monitoring and measuring sunscreen products has been tested using locally produced sunscreen products. This new approach has been made possible by the development of very accurate liquid micro-dispensers and details are given of the novel procedure to carry out these measurements. Detailed description of the apparatus construction is given with photographs of the apparatus. The work described is largely based on research and quality control measurements of Parasol suncare products. Results on the reproducibility of measurements taken with the UAI for a commercial range of factor 20 sunscreen liquid are given and these have been used to validate the performance of the instrument. It is believed that the absorbance measurements described here are perhaps the largest ever reported. In addition, the photostability of this product has been monitored in aging tests. Finally, some studies have been done on two other commercially available factor 20 products that show that these are significantly worse with regards to both protection from ageing and burn.

  6. Absorbed dose measurements on external surface of Kosmos-satellites with glass thermoluminescent detectors.

    PubMed

    Akatov YuA; Arkhangelsky, V V; Kovalev, E E; Spurny, F; Votochkova, I

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we present absorbed dose measurements with glass thermoluminescent detectors on external surface of satellites of Kosmos-serie flying in 1983-87. Experiments were performed with thermoluminescent aluminophosphate glasses of thicknesses 0.1, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, and 1 mm. They were exposed in sets of total thickness between 5 and 20 mm, which were protected against sunlight with thin aluminized foils. In all missions, extremely high absorbed dose values were observed in the first layers of detectors, up to the thickness of 0.2 to 0.5 gcm-2. These experimental results confirm that, during flights at 250 to 400 km, doses on the surface of the satellites are very high, due to the low energy component of the proton and electron radiation.

  7. Measurements of the Thermal Neutron Macroscopic Absorption Cross Section for Neutron Absorbing Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyani, Abouzar; Rostam, G. Gh.; Sadat Kiai, S. M.; Bakhsh, Hossin Jahan; Mahdavi, Farzad

    2011-12-01

    Objective of this study is measuring the macroscopic cross section of a neutron absorbing layer for thermal neutrons. For this purpose a neutron source and BF 3 detector have been applied. For measuring macroscopic cross section of thermal neutrons by the Formula, it is necessary to provide suitable geometric conditions in order to assume the production and build-up coefficient to be the unit value (=1). To fulfill required conditions for this assumption, surface of the detector is covered with a 2 mm thick layer of cadmium. Radiation window of the detector has a 3 cm diameter, situated directly in front of the source. By placing the cadmium cover over the detector, variation of values verses thickness of absorbent layer, renders linear function behavior, making it possible to measure the macroscopic cross section. The next stage is applying the MCNP code by simulating F1 tally and cosine-cards for calculating Total Macroscopic Cross-Section. Validation of this study is achieved through comparison of simulation by the MCNP code and results rendered by experiment measurements.

  8. Laser measurement of extinction coefficients of highly absorbing liquids. [airborne oil spill monitoring application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Kincaid, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    A coaxial dual-channel laser system has been developed for the measurement of extinction coefficients of highly absorbing liquids. An empty wedge-shaped sample cell is first translated laterally through a He-Ne laser beam to measure the differential thickness using interference fringes in reflection. The wedge cell is carefully filled with the oil sample and translated through the coaxially positioned dye laser beam for the differential attenuation or extinction measurement. Optional use of the instrumentation as a single-channel extinction measurement system and also as a refractometer is detailed. The system and calibration techniques were applied to the measurement of two crude oils whose extinction values were required to complete the analysis of airborne laser data gathered over four controlled spills.

  9. Verification of absorbed dose rates in reference beta radiation fields: Measurements with an extrapolation chamber and radiochromic film.

    PubMed

    Reynaldo, S R; Benavente, J A; Da Silva, T A

    2016-11-01

    Beta Secondary Standard 2 (BSS 2) provides beta radiation fields with certified values of absorbed dose to tissue and the derived operational radiation protection quantities. As part of the quality assurance, the reliability of the CDTN BSS2 system was verified through measurements in the (90)Sr/(90)Y and (85)Kr beta radiation fields. Absorbed dose rates and their angular variation were measured with a 23392 model PTW extrapolation chamber and with Gafchromic radiochromic films on a PMMA slab phantom. The feasibility of using both methods was analyzed.

  10. Response of Non-Linear Shock Absorbers-Boundary Value Problem Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. A.; Ahmed, U.; Uddin, M. S.

    2013-08-01

    A nonlinear boundary value problem of two degrees-of-freedom (DOF) untuned vibration damper systems using nonlinear springs and dampers has been numerically studied. As far as untuned damper is concerned, sixteen different combinations of linear and nonlinear springs and dampers have been comprehensively analyzed taking into account transient terms. For different cases, a comparative study is made for response versus time for different spring and damper types at three important frequency ratios: one at r = 1, one at r > 1 and one at r <1. The response of the system is changed because of the spring and damper nonlinearities; the change is different for different cases. Accordingly, an initially stable absorber may become unstable with time and vice versa. The analysis also shows that higher nonlinearity terms make the system more unstable. Numerical simulation includes transient vibrations. Although problems are much more complicated compared to those for a tuned absorber, a comparison of the results generated by the present numerical scheme with the exact one shows quite a reasonable agreement

  11. Technical description of parameters influencing the pH value of suspension absorbent used in flue gas desulfurization systems.

    PubMed

    Głomba, Michał

    2010-08-01

    As a result of the large limestone deposits available in Poland, the low cost of reagent acquisition for the largescale technological use and relatively well-documented processes of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies based on limestone sorbent slurry, wet scrubbing desulfurization is a method of choice in Poland for flue gas treatment in energy production facilities, including power plants and industrial systems. The efficiency of FGD using the above method depends on several technological and kinetic parameters, particularly on the pH value of the sorbent (i.e., ground limestone suspended in water). Consequently, many studies in Poland and abroad address the impact of various parameters on the pH value of the sorbent suspension, such as the average diameter of sorbent particles (related to the limestone pulverization degree), sorbent quality (in terms of pure calcium carbonate [CaCO3] content of the sorbent material), stoichiometric surfeit of CaCO3 in relation to sulfur dioxide (SO2) absorbed from flue gas circulating in the absorption node, time of absorption slurry retention in the absorber tank, chlorine ion concentration in sorbent slurry, and concentration of dissolved metal salts (Na, K, Mg, Fe, Al, and others). This study discusses the results of laboratory-scale tests conducted to establish the effect of the above parameters on the pH value of limestone slurry circulating in the SO2 absorption node. On the basis of the test results, a correlation equation was postulated to help maintain the desirable pH value at the design phase of the wet FGD process. The postulated equation displays good coincidence between calculated pH values and those obtained using laboratory measurements.

  12. Robust sensor for turbidity measurement from light scattering and absorbing liquids.

    PubMed

    Kontturi, Ville; Turunen, Petri; Uozumi, Jun; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2009-12-01

    Internationally standardized turbidity measurements for probing solid particles in liquid are problematic in the case of simultaneous light scattering and absorption. A method and a sensor to determine the turbidity in the presence of light absorption are presented. The developed sensor makes use of the total internal reflection of a laser beam at the liquid-prism interface, and the turbidity is assessed using the concept of laser speckle pattern. Using average filtering in speckle data analyzing the observed dynamic speckle pattern, which is due to light scattering from particles and the static speckle due to stray light of the sensor, can be separated from each other. Good correlation between the standard deviation of dynamic speckle and turbidity value for nonabsorbing and for absorbing liquids was observed. The sensor is suggested, for instance, for the measurement of ill-behaved as well as small-volume turbid liquids in both medicine and process industry.

  13. Valuing Learning: The Measurement Journey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Greg

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the money wasted on ineffective training programs and the resulting surge in interest among training professionals in conducting learning evaluation and return on investment (ROI) measurement. Describes Kirkpatrick's four-level evaluation concept; questions regarding measurement validity and reliability; and new developments in learning…

  14. A Novel, Real-Valued Genetic Algorithm for Optimizing Radar Absorbing Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, John Michael

    2004-01-01

    A novel, real-valued Genetic Algorithm (GA) was designed and implemented to minimize the reflectivity and/or transmissivity of an arbitrary number of homogeneous, lossy dielectric or magnetic layers of arbitrary thickness positioned at either the center of an infinitely long rectangular waveguide, or adjacent to the perfectly conducting backplate of a semi-infinite, shorted-out rectangular waveguide. Evolutionary processes extract the optimal physioelectric constants falling within specified constraints which minimize reflection and/or transmission over the frequency band of interest. This GA extracted the unphysical dielectric and magnetic constants of three layers of fictitious material placed adjacent to the conducting backplate of a shorted-out waveguide such that the reflectivity of the configuration was 55 dB or less over the entire X-band. Examples of the optimization of realistic multi-layer absorbers are also presented. Although typical Genetic Algorithms require populations of many thousands in order to function properly and obtain correct results, verified correct results were obtained for all test cases using this GA with a population of only four.

  15. SU-FF-T-390: In-Vivo Prostate Brachytherapy Absorbed Dose Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gueye, Paul; Velasco, Carlos; Keppel, Cynthia; Murphy, B; Sinesi, C

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: In-vivo prostate brachytherapy absorbed dosimetrydetector using scintillating fibers. Method and Materials: Five pairs of 85.5 {+-} 0.05 cm long blue shifted scintillating fibers (model BCF-10) with 1 mm{sup 2} cross sectional area were placed in a mixture of gelatin (368.6 {+-} 0.5 grams) and water (3.78 {+-} 0.025 liters) to measured the absorbed dose delivered by a 12 Ci {sup 192}Ir HDR source. The fibers were held by a 7 x 7 cm{sup 2} template grid and optically connected to a 16-channel multianode photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu, model H6568). Each pair consisted of one fiber 4 mm shorter than the other one to extract the dose by the subtraction method. A dose atlas was used for radiation delivered to the phantom. The plans followed delivered 5 and 7 Gy to a point located 2.0 centimeters away from the central dwelling positions. A total of 32 data points were acquired in a plan to assess the linearity and reproducibility of the measurements.Results: Reproducibility of the data was found to be within 5% and the overall accuracy of the system estimated to be {+-}5.5%. The linearity of the data for all 7 measureddose values (ranging from 0.6 to 7 Gy), gives a slope of 312 counts/Gy with a 1.4% relative deviation. Conclusion: This work indicates the possibility of measuring in real-time the dose effectively delivered to a biological system during prostate brachytherapy treatments. The availability of commercially thin (150 {micro}m) scintillating fibers opens the capability of using such system during clinical treatments (by embedding the fibers within the catheters) with the advantage of performing real-time adjustment of the dose delivery.

  16. Operator-valued measures and linear operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Marian

    2008-01-01

    We study operator-valued measures , where stands for the space of all continuous linear operators between real Banach spaces X and Y and [Sigma] is a [sigma]-algebra of sets. We extend the Bartle-Dunford-Schwartz theorem and the Orlicz-Pettis theorem for vector measures to the case of operator-valued measures. We generalize the classical Vitali-Hahn-Saks theorem to sets of operator-valued measures which are compact in the strong operator topology.

  17. Density measurement in air with saturable absorbing seed gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baganoff, D.

    1982-01-01

    Approaches which have the potential to make density measurements in a compressible flow, where one or more laser beams are used as probes, were investigated. Saturation in sulfur hexafluoride iodine and a crossed beam technique where one beam acts as a saturating beam and the other is at low intensity and acts as a probe beam are considered. It is shown that a balance between an increase in fluorescence intensity with increasing pressure from line broadening and the normal decrease in intensity with increasing pressure from quenching can be used to develop a linear relation between fluorescence intensity and number density and lead to a new density measurement scheme. The method is used to obtain a density image of the cross section of an iodine seeded underexpanded supersonic jet of nitrogen, by illuminating the cross section by a sheet of laser light.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation for the prediction of precision of absorbance measurements with a miniature CCD spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Tsaousoglou, E. P.; Bolis, S. D.

    2003-01-01

    The precision characteristics of the absorbance measurements obtained with a low-cost miniature spectrometer incorporating an array detector were evaluated. Uncertainties in absorbance measurements were due to a combination of non-uniform light intensity and detector response over the wavelength range examined (350-850 nm), in conjunction with the digitization of the intensity indications and the intrinsic noise of the detecting elements. The precision characteristics are presented as contour plots displaying the expected RSD% of absorbances on the absorbance versus wavelength plane. The minimum RSD% for the spectrometer configuration tested was observed within the 0.2-1.5 absorbance units and 500-750 nm wavelength range. Without invoking signal enhancement features of the data-acquisition program (scan average, higher integration times, smoothing based on averaging the signal detected by adjacent pixels), the attainable precision within this range was 0.4-0.8%. A computer program based on Monte Carlo simulations was developed for the prediction of absorbance precision characteristics under various conditions of measurements. PMID:18924714

  19. Density measurement in air with a saturable absorbing seed gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baganoff, D.

    1981-01-01

    Resonantly enhanced scattering from the iodine molecule is studied experimentally for the purpose of developing a scheme for the measurement of density in a gas dynamic flow. A study of the spectrum of iodine, the collection of saturation data in iodine, and the development of a mathematical model for correlating saturation effects were pursued for a mixture of 0.3 torr iodine in nitrogen and for mixture pressures up to one atmosphere. For the desired pressure range, saturation effects in iodine were found to be too small to be useful in allowing density measurements to be made. The effects of quenching can be reduced by detuning the exciting laser wavelength from the absorption line center of the iodine line used (resonant Raman scattering). The signal was found to be nearly independent of pressure, for pressures up to one atmosphere, when the excitation beam was detuned 6 GHz from line center for an isolated line in iodine. The signal amplitude was found to be nearly equal to the amplitude for fluorescence at atmospheric pressure, which indicates a density measurement scheme is possible.

  20. Dual photonic-electrochemical lab on a chip for online simultaneous absorbance and amperometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Ordeig, Olga; Ortiz, Pedro; Muñoz-Berbel, Xavier; Demming, Stefanie; Büttgenbach, Stephanus; Fernández-Sánchez, César; Llobera, Andreu

    2012-04-17

    A dual lab on a chip (DLOC) approach that enables simultaneous optical and electrochemical detection working in a continuous flow regime is presented. Both detection modes are integrated for the first time into a single detection volume and operate simultaneously with no evidence of cross-talk. The electrochemical cell was characterized amperometrically by measuring the current in ferrocyanide solutions at +0.4 V vs gold pseudoreference electrode, at a flow rate of 200 μL min(-1). The experimental results for ferrocyanide concentrations ranging from 0.005 to 2 mM were in good agreement with the values predicted by the Levich equation for a microelectrode inside a rectangular channel, with a sensitivity of 2.059 ± 0.004 μA mM(-1) and a limit of detection (LoD) of (2.303 ± 0.004) × 10(-3) mM. Besides, optical detection was evaluated by measuring the absorbance of ferricyanide solutions at 420 nm. The results obtained therein coincide with those predicted by the Beer-Lambert law for a range of ferricyanide concentrations from 0.005 to 0.3 mM and showed an estimated LoD of (0.553 ± 0.001) × 10(-3) mM. The DLOC was finally applied to the analysis of L-lactate via a bienzymatic reaction involving lactate oxidase (LOX) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Here, the consumption of the reagent of the reaction (ferrocyanide) was continuously monitored by amperometry whereas the product of the reaction (ferricyanide) was recorded by absorbance. The DLOC presented good performance in terms of sensitivity and limit of detection, comparable to other fluidic systems found in the literature. Additionally, the ability to simultaneously quantify enzymatic reagent consumption and product generation confers the DLOC a self-verifying capability which in turn enhances its robustness and reliability.

  1. Dependence of residual rotation measure on intervening Mg II absorbers at cosmic distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Ravi; Chand, Hum

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the dependence of residual rotation measure (RRM) on intervening absorption systems at cosmic distances by using a large sample of 539 Sloan Digital Sky survey quasars in conjunction with the available rotation measure catalogue at around 21 cm wavelength. We found an excess extragalactic contribution in the standard deviation of an observed RRM (σrrm) of about 8.11 ± 4.83 rad m-2 in our sample with an intervening Mg II absorber as compared to the sample without an Mg II absorber. Our results suggest that intervening absorbers could contribute to the enhancement of RRM at around 21 cm wavelength, as was found earlier for rotation measure measurements at around 6 cm wavelength.

  2. Measuring values with the Short Schwartz's Value Survey.

    PubMed

    Lindeman, Marjaana; Verkasalo, Markku

    2005-10-01

    The reliability and validity of the Short Schwartz's Value Survey (SSVS) was examined in 4 studies. In Study 1 (N = 670), we examined whether value scores obtained with the SSVS correlate with those obtained with Schwartz's Value Survey (SVS; Schwartz, 1992, 1996) and the Portrait Values Questionnaire (Schwartz et al., 2001) and whether the quasi-circular structure of values can be found with the SSVS. In Study 2 (N = 3,261), we replicated the quasi-circular structure in a more heterogeneous sample and assessed whether the SSVS can differentiate appropriately between gender, religiosity, students from different fields, and supporters of left- and right-wing political parties. In Study 3 (N = 112), we examined the test-retest reliability of the SSVS and in Study 4 (N = 38), time saving gained by the SSVS compared to the SVS. The results show that the new scale had good reliability and validity and that the values measured by the SSVS were arrayed on a circle identical to the theoretical structure of values. We also provided equations that can be used in future studies to measure individuals' scores on the 2 main value dimensions, Self-Transcendence and Conservation.

  3. Analysis and measurement of electromagnetic scattering by pyramidal and wedge absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, B. T.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1986-01-01

    By modifying the reflection coefficients in the Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction a solution that approximates the scattering from a dielectric wedge is found. This solution agrees closely with the exact solution of Rawlins which is only valid for a few minor cases. This modification is then applied to the corner diffraction coefficient and combined with an equivalent current and geometrical optics solutions to model scattering from pyramid and wedge absorbers. Measured results from 12 inch pyramid absorbers from 2 to 18 GHz are compared to calculations assuming the returns add incoherently and assuming the returns add coherently. The measured results tend to be between the two curves. Measured results from the 8 inch wedge absorber are also compared to calculations with the return being dominated by the wedge diffraction. The procedures for measuring and specifying absorber performance are discussed and calibration equations are derived to calculate a reflection coefficient or a reflectivity using a reference sphere. Shaping changes to the present absorber designs are introduced to improve performance based on both high and low frequency analysis. Some prototypes were built and tested.

  4. Efficient load measurements using singular value decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Kung; Balakrishnan, A. V.

    1988-01-01

    Various basic research was performed on efficient load measurement estimation techniques for aircraft structure analysis. An overview is presented of the load measurement problem. Two basic equivalent approaches to load measurement evaluations were considered. Under approach 1, the load values are modeled as depending linearly on the measured values. Under approach 2, the measured values depend linearly on the load values. By using the modern Singular Value Decomposition method, it was shown that under all conditions of the number of loads and number of gages, approach 1 is equivalent to approach 2. By using the conventional normal equation (linear regression) approach, approach 1 is only valid when the number of loads is equal to or greater than the number of gages, while approach 2 is the reverse. Furthermore, except for the case of the number of loads equals the number of gages, the load prediction formulas under the two approaches are not equivalent.

  5. MO-AB-BRA-03: Calorimetry-Based Absorbed Dose to Water Measurements Using Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Martinez, E; Malin, M; DeWerd, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Interferometry-based calorimetry is a novel technique to measure radiation-induced temperature changes allowing the measurement of absorbed dose to water (ADW). There are no mechanical components in the field. This technique also has the possibility of obtaining 2D dose distributions. The goal of this investigation is to calorimetrically-measure doses between 2.5 and 5 Gy over a single projection in a photon beam using interferometry and compare the results with doses calculated using the TG-51 linac calibration. Methods: ADW was determined by measuring radiation-induced phase shifts (PSs) of light passing through water irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam. A 9×9×9 cm{sup 3} glass phantom filled with water and placed in an arm of a Michelson interferometer was irradiated with 300, 400, 500 and 600 monitor units. The whole system was thermally insulated to achieve sufficient passive temperature control. The depth of measurement was 4.5 cm with a field size of 7×7 cm{sup 2}. The intensity of the fringe pattern was monitored with a photodiode and used to calculate the time-dependent PS curve. Data was acquired 60 s before and after the irradiation. The radiation-induced PS was calculated by taking the difference in the pre- and post-irradiation drifts extrapolated to the midpoint of the irradiation. Results were compared to computed doses. Results: Average comparison of calculated ADW values with interferometry-measured values showed an agreement to within 9.5%. k=1 uncertainties were 4.3% for calculations and 14.7% for measurements. The dominant source of uncertainty for the measurements was a temperature drift of about 30 µK/s caused by heat conduction from the interferometer’s surroundings. Conclusion: This work presented the first absolute ADW measurements using interferometry in the dose range of linac-based radiotherapy. Future work to improve measurements’ reproducibility includes the implementation of active thermal control techniques.

  6. Effects of Consecutive Wideband Tympanometry Trials on Energy Absorbance Measures of the Middle Ear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdiek, Laina M.; Sun, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) is a new technique for assessing middle ear transfer function. It includes energy absorbance (EA) measures and can be acquired with the ear canal pressure varied, known as "wideband tympanometry" (WBTymp). The authors of this study aimed to investigate effects of consecutive WBTymp testing on…

  7. On the use of a loudspeaker for measuring the viscoelastic properties of sound absorbing materials.

    PubMed

    Doutres, Olivier; Dauchez, Nicolas; Génevaux, Jean-Michel; Lemarquand, Guy

    2008-12-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility to use an electrodynamic loudspeaker to determine viscoelastic properties of sound-absorbing materials in the audible frequency range. The loudspeaker compresses the porous sample in a cavity, and a measurement of its electrical impedance allows one to determine the mechanical impedance of the sample: no additional sensors are required. Viscoelastic properties of the material are then estimated by inverting a 1D Biot model. The method is applied to two sound-absorbing materials (glass wool and polymer foam). Results are in good agreement with the classical compression quasistatic method.

  8. Determining the Absorbance Spectra of Photochromic Materials From Measured Spectrophotometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.

    1998-01-01

    If a two-state photochromic material is optically bleached, the absorbance spectrum data measured by a spectrophotometer is in general comprised of components from both the ground state and the upper state. Under general conditions, it may be difficult to extract the actual upper state spectrum from the spectrum of the bleached material. A simple algorithm is presented here for the recovery of the pure absorbance spectra of the upper state of a material such as bacteriorhodopsin, given single wavelength bleaching illumination, steady-state conditions, and accurate knowledge of phototransition rates and thermal decay rates.

  9. Measurement of absorbed dose during the phantom torso experiment on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semones, E.; Gibbons, F.; Golightly, M.; Weyland, M.; Johnson, A.; Smith, G.; Shelfer, T.; Zapp, N.

    The Phantom Torso Experiment (PTE) was flown on the International Space Station (ISS) during Increment 2 (April-August 2001). The experiment was located in the US Lab module Human Research Facility (HRF) rack. The objective of the passive dosimetry portion of the experiment was to measure spatial distributions of absorbed dose in the 34, 1 inch sections of a modified RandoTM phantom. In each section of the phantom, thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) were placed at various locations (depths) to provide the spatial measurement. TLDs were also located at several radiosensitive organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) and two locations on the surface (skin). Active silicon detectors were also placed at these organ locations to provide time resolved results of the absorbed dose rates. Using these detectors, it is possible to separate the trapped and galactic cosmic ray components of the absorbed dose. The TLD results of the spatial and organ dose measurements will be presented and comparisons of the TLD and silicon detector organ absorbed doses will be made.

  10. Ultrahigh precision nonlinear reflectivity measurement system for saturable absorber mirrors with self-referenced fluence characterization.

    PubMed

    Orsila, Lasse; Härkönen, Antti; Hyyti, Janne; Guina, Mircea; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2014-08-01

    Measurement of nonlinear optical reflectivity of saturable absorber devices is discussed. A setup is described that enables absolute accuracy of reflectivity measurements better than 0.3%. A repeatability within 0.02% is shown for saturable absorbers with few-percent modulation depth. The setup incorporates an in situ knife-edge characterization of beam diameters, making absolute reflectivity estimations and determination of saturation fluences significantly more reliable. Additionally, several measures are discussed to substantially improve the reliability of the reflectivity measurements. At its core, the scheme exploits the limits of state-of-the-art digital lock-in technology but also greatly benefits from a fiber-based master-oscillator power-amplifier source, the use of an integrating sphere, and simultaneous comparison with a linear reflectivity standard.

  11. A comparison between the technical absorbent and ventilated capsule methods for measuring local sweat rate.

    PubMed

    Morris, Nathan B; Cramer, Matthew N; Hodder, Simon G; Havenith, George; Jay, Ollie

    2013-03-15

    This study assessed the accuracy of the technical absorbent (TA) method for measuring local sweat rate (LSR) relative to the well-established ventilated capsule (VC) method during steady-state and nonsteady-state sweating using large and small sample surface areas on the forearm and midback. Forty participants (38 males and two females) cycled at 60% peak oxygen consumption for 75 min in either a temperate [22.3 ± 0.9°C, 32 ± 17% relative humidity (RH)] or warm (32.5 ± 0.8°C, 29 ± 7% RH) environment. Simultaneous bilateral comparisons of 5-min LSR measurements using the TA and VC methods were performed for the back and forearm after 10, 30, 50, and 70 min. LSR values, measured using the TA method, were highly correlated with the VC method at all time points, irrespective of sample surface area and body region (all P < 0.001). On average, ≈ 79% of the variability observed in LSR measured with the VC method was described by the TA method. The mean difference in absolute LSR using the TA method (TA-VC with 95% confidence intervals) was -0.23 [-0.30,-0.16], -0.11 [-0.21,0.00], -0.03 [-0.14,+0.08], and +0.02 [-0.07,+0.11] mg · cm(-2) · min(-1) after 10, 30, 50, and 70 min of exercise, respectively. Duplicate LSR measurements within each method during steady-state sweating were highly correlated (TA: r = 0.96, P < 0.001, n = 20; VC: r = 0.97, P < 0.001, n = 20) with a mean bias of +0.07 ± 0.14 and +0.01 ± 0.10 mg · cm(-2) · min(-1) for TA and VC methods, respectively. The mean smallest detectable difference in LSR was 0.12 and 0.05 mg · min(-1) · cm(-2) for TA and VC methods, respectively. These data support the TA method as a reliable alternative for measuring the rate of sweat appearance on the skin surface.

  12. Optical absorbance measurements and photoacoustic evaluation of freeze-thawed polyvinyl-alcohol vessel phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabul, M. U.; Heres, H. M.; Rutten, M.; van de Vosse, F.; Lopata, R.

    2015-03-01

    Multispectral photoacoustic (MPA) imaging is a promising tool for the diagnosis of atherosclerotic carotids. Excitation of different constituents of a plaque with different wavelengths of the light may provide morphological information to evaluate plaque vulnerability. Preclinical validation of in vivo photoacoustic (PA) imaging requires a comprehensive phantom study. In this study, the design of optically realistic vessel phantoms for photoacoustics was examined by characterizing their optical properties for different dye concentrations, and comparing those to PA measurements. Four different concentrations of Indian ink and molecular dye were added to a 15 wt% PVA and 1 wt% orgasol mixture. Next, the homogeneously mixed gels were subjected to five freeze - thaw cycles to increase the stiffness of vessel phantoms (rinner = 2:5mm, router = 4mm). For each cycle, the optical absorbance was measured between 400 nm 990 nm using a plate reader. Additionally, photoacoustic responses of each vessel phantom at 808 nm were tested with a novel, hand-held, integrated PA probe. Measurements show that the PA signal intensity increases with the optical absorber concentration (0.3 to 0.9) in close agreement with the absorbance measurements. The freeze - thaw process has no significant effect on PA intensity. However, the total attenuation of optical energy increases after each freeze-thaw cycle, which is primarily due to the increase in the scattering coefficient. In future work, the complexity of these phantoms will be increased to examine the feasibility of distinguishing different constituents with MPA imaging.

  13. Property Values as a Measure of Neighborhoods

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Tammy; Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M.; Ayers, Colby; Murdoch, James C.; Yin, Wenyuan; Pruitt, Sandi L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Researchers measuring relationships between neighborhoods and health have begun using property appraisal data as a source of information about neighborhoods. Economists have developed a rich tool kit to understand how neighborhood characteristics are quantified in appraisal values. This tool kit principally relies on hedonic (implicit) price models and has much to offer regarding the interpretation and operationalization of property appraisal data-derived neighborhood measures, which goes beyond the use of appraisal data as a measure of neighborhood socioeconomic status. Methods We develop a theoretically informed hedonic-based neighborhood measure using residuals of a hedonic price regression applied to appraisal data in a single metropolitan area. We describe its characteristics, reliability in different types of neighborhoods, and correlation with other neighborhood measures (i.e., raw neighborhood appraisal values, census block group poverty, and observed property characteristics). We examine the association between all neighborhood measures and body mass index. Results The hedonic-based neighborhood measure was correlated in the expected direction with block group poverty rate and observed property characteristics. The neighborhood measure and average raw neighborhood appraisal value, but not census block group poverty, were associated with individual body mass index. Conclusion We draw theoretically consistent methodology from the economics literature on hedonic price models to demonstrate how to leverage the implicit valuation of neighborhoods contained in publicly available appraisal data. Consistent measurement and application of the hedonic-based neighborhood measures in epidemiology will improve understanding of the relationships between neighborhoods and health. Researchers should proceed with a careful use of appraisal values utilizing theoretically informed methods such as this one. PMID:26928708

  14. Atomic Calculations and Laboratory Measurements Relevant to X-ray Warm Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, Tim; Bautista, M.; Palmeri, P.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the atomic calculations and the measurements from the laboratory that are relevant to our understanding of X-Ray Warm Absorbers. Included is a brief discussion of the theoretical and the experimental tools. Also included is a discussion of the challenges, and calculations relevant to dielectronic recombination, photoionization cross sections, and collisional ionization. A review of the models is included, and the sequence that the models were applied.

  15. [Absorbed dose conversion factors obtained from X-ray spectra measured at water phantom surface].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kiyoshi; Koyama, Masaki

    2005-03-20

    The absorbed dose conversion factor for X-rays at the water phantom surface has been obtained from the measured spectra. These measurements have been made at tube voltages of 60 kV to 120 kV and field sizes ranging from 5 x 5 cm(2) to 30 x 30 cm(2) with and without additional 2 mm aluminium filtration. A small silicon diode detector with little angular dependence was used for this measurement. The absorbed dose conversion factor obtained was 0.03-0.43% smaller than that obtained from the primary X-ray spectrum. The difference was large for high-voltage and heavily filtered X-rays. As field size increases, the conversion factor decreases, but the decrease is slight when field size exceeds 20 x 20 cm(2). The absorbed dose conversion factor obtained from the primary or surface X-ray spectrum is 0.4-1.8% larger than that obtained from the effective energy of primary X-rays. The difference is large in high-voltage X-rays and decreases slightly with increases in field size.

  16. Microdosimetric measurements for neutron-absorbed dose determination during proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; DeLuca, Paul M.; Thornton, Allan F.; Fitzek, Markus; Hecksel, Draik; Farr, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    This work presents microdosimetric measurements performed at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute in Bloomington, Indiana, USA. The measurements were done simulating clinical setups with a water phantom and for a variety of stopping targets. The water phantom was irradiated by a proton spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) and by a proton pencil beam. Stopping target measurements were performed only for the pencil beam. The targets used were made of polyethylene, brass and lead. The objective of this work was to determine the neutron-absorbed dose for a passive and active proton therapy delivery, and for the interactions of the proton beam with materials typically in the beam line of a proton therapy treatment nozzle. Neutron doses were found to be higher at 45° and 90° from the beam direction for the SOBP configuration by a factor of 1.1 and 1.3, respectively, compared with the pencil beam. Meanwhile, the pencil beam configuration produced neutron-absorbed doses 2.2 times higher at 0° than the SOBP. For stopping targets, lead was found to dominate the neutron-absorbed dose for most angles due to a large production of low-energy neutrons emitted isotropically. PMID:22334761

  17. Creating a culture for value measurement.

    PubMed

    Conger, Michelle; Knuth, Melissa; McDonald, Jody

    2014-08-01

    OSF HealthCare's executive dashboard provides: A detailed view of top-level measures to frame OSF's mission and vision for all stakeholders. An easily understood, holistic snapshot of performance An assessment of relationships among system goals, initiatives, and results. Explicit understanding of the organization's priority performance measures and the extent to which they need to improve. A vehicle for transitioning to a value-based business model.

  18. An international dosimetry exchange for boron neutron capture therapy. Part I: Absorbed dose measurements.

    PubMed

    Binns, P J; Riley, K J; Harling, O K; Kiger, W S; Munck af Rosenschöld, P M; Giusti, V; Capala, J; Sköld, K; Auterinen, I; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Uusi-Simola, J; Marek, M; Viererbl, L; Spurny, F

    2005-12-01

    An international collaboration was organized to undertake a dosimetry exchange to enable the future combination of clinical data from different centers conducting neutron capture therapy trials. As a first step (Part I) the dosimetry group from the Americas, represented by MIT, visited the clinical centers at Studsvik (Sweden), VTT Espoo (Finland), and the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) at Rez (Czech Republic). A combined VTT/NRI group reciprocated with a visit to MIT. Each participant performed a series of dosimetry measurements under equivalent irradiation conditions using methods appropriate to their clinical protocols. This entailed in-air measurements and dose versus depth measurements in a large water phantom. Thermal neutron flux as well as fast neutron and photon absorbed dose rates were measured. Satisfactory agreement in determining absorbed dose within the experimental uncertainties was obtained between the different groups although the measurement uncertainties are large, ranging between 3% and 30% depending upon the dose component and the depth of measurement. To improve the precision in the specification of absorbed dose amongst the participants, the individually measured dose components were normalized to the results from a single method. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 microg g(-1) that is typical of concentrations realized clinically with the boron delivery compound boronophenylalanine-fructose, systematic discrepancies in the specification of the total biologically weighted dose of up to 10% were apparent between the different groups. The results from these measurements will be used in future to normalize treatment plan calculations between the different clinical dosimetry protocols as Part II of this study.

  19. Diamond detector in absorbed dose measurements in high-energy linear accelerator photon and electron beams.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Binukumar, John Pichy; Al Amri, Iqbal; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Antony

    2016-03-08

    Diamond detectors (DD) are preferred in small field dosimetry of radiation beams because of small dose profile penumbras, better spatial resolution, and tissue-equivalent properties. We investigated a commercially available 'microdiamond' detector in realizing absorbed dose from first principles. A microdiamond detector, type TM 60019 with tandem electrometer is used to measure absorbed doses in water, nylon, and PMMA phantoms. With sensitive volume 0.004 mm3, radius 1.1mm, thickness 1 x10(-3) mm, the nominal response is 1 nC/Gy. It is assumed that the diamond detector could collect total electric charge (nC) developed during irradiation at 0 V bias. We found that dose rate effect is less than 0.7% for changing dose rate by 500 MU/min. The reproducibility in obtaining readings with diamond detector is found to be ± 0.17% (1 SD) (n = 11). The measured absorbed doses for 6 MV and 15 MV photons arrived at using mass energy absorption coefficients and stop-ping power ratios compared well with Nd, water calibrated ion chamber measured absorbed doses within 3% in water, PMMA, and nylon media. The calibration factor obtained for diamond detector confirmed response variation is due to sensitivity due to difference in manufacturing process. For electron beams, we had to apply ratio of electron densities of water to carbon. Our results qualify diamond dosimeter as a transfer standard, based on long-term stability and reproducibility. Based on micro-dimensions, we recommend these detectors for pretreatment dose verifications in small field irradiations like stereotactic treatments with image guidance.

  20. Measurements of the light-absorbing material inside cloud droplets and its effect on cloud albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Clarke, A. D.; Warren, Stephen G.; Radke, L. F.; Charleson, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    Most of the measurements of light-absorbing aerosol particles made previously have been in non-cloudy air and therefore provide no insight into aerosol effects on cloud properties. Here, researchers describe an experiment designed to measure light absorption exclusively due to substances inside cloud droplets, compare the results to related light absorption measurements, and evaluate possible effects on the albedo of clouds. The results of this study validate those of Twomey and Cocks and show that the measured levels of light-absorbing material are negligible for the radiative properties of realistic clouds. For the measured clouds, which appear to have been moderately polluted, the amount of elemental carbon (EC) present was insufficient to affect albedo. Much higher contaminant levels or much larger droplets than those measured would be necessary to significantly alter the radiative properties. The effect of the concentrations of EC actually measured on the albedo of snow, however, would be much more pronounced since, in contrast to clouds, snowpacks are usually optically semi-infinite and have large particle sizes.

  1. Measurements of light absorbing particulates on the glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. G.; All, J. D.; Schwarz, J. P.; Arnott, W. P.; Cole, R. J.; Lapham, E.; Celestian, A.

    2014-10-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes have been rapidly losing mass since the 1970s. In addition to the documented increase in air temperature, increases in light absorbing particulates deposited on glaciers could be contributing to the observed glacier loss. Here we report on measurements of light absorbing particulates sampled from glaciers during three surveys in the Cordillera Blanca in Peru. During three research expeditions in the dry seasons (May-August) of 2011, 2012 and 2013, two hundred and forty snow samples were collected from fifteen mountain peaks over altitudes ranging from 4800 to nearly 6800 m. Several mountains were sampled each of the three expeditions and some mountains were sampled multiple times during the same expedition. Collected snow samples were melted and filtered in the field then later analyzed using the Light Absorption Heating Method (LAHM), a new technique that measures the ability of particulates on filters to absorb visible light. LAHM results have been calibrated using filters with known amounts of fullerene soot, a common industrial surrogate for black carbon (BC). As sample filters often contain dust in addition to BC, results are presented in terms of effective Black Carbon (eBC). During the 2013 survey, snow samples were collected and kept frozen for analysis with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Calculated eBC mass from the filter analysis and the SP2 refractory Black Carbon (rBC) results were well correlated (r2 = 0.92). These results indicate that a substantial portion of the light absorbing particulates in the more polluted areas were likely BC. The three years of data show that glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains close to human population centers have substantially higher levels of eBC (as high as 70 ng g-1) than remote glaciers (as low as 2.0 ng g-1 eBC), indicating that population centers can influence local glaciers by sourcing BC.

  2. Measurements of light-absorbing particles on the glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. G.; All, J. D.; Schwarz, J. P.; Arnott, W. P.; Cole, R. J.; Lapham, E.; Celestian, A.

    2015-02-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes have been rapidly losing mass since the 1970s. In addition to the documented increase in temperature, increases in light-absorbing particles deposited on glaciers could be contributing to the observed glacier loss. Here we report on measurements of light-absorbing particles sampled from glaciers during three surveys in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains in Peru. During three research expeditions in the dry seasons (May-August) of 2011, 2012 and 2013, 240 snow samples were collected from 15 mountain peaks over altitudes ranging from 4800 to nearly 6800 m. Several mountains were sampled each of the 3 years and some mountains were sampled multiple times during the same year. Collected snow samples were melted and filtered in the field then later analyzed using the Light Absorption Heating Method (LAHM), a new technique that measures the ability of particles on filters to absorb visible light. LAHM results have been calibrated using filters with known amounts of fullerene soot, a common industrial surrogate for black carbon (BC). As sample filters often contain dust in addition to BC, results are presented in terms of effective black carbon (eBC). During the 2013 survey, snow samples were collected and kept frozen for analysis with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Calculated eBC mass from the LAHM analysis and the SP2 refractory black carbon (rBC) results were well correlated (r2 = 0.92). These results indicate that a substantial portion of the light-absorbing particles in the more polluted regions were likely BC. The 3 years of data show that glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains close to human population centers have substantially higher levels of eBC (as high as 70 ng g-1) than remote glaciers (as low as 2.0 ng g-1 eBC), indicating that population centers can influence local glaciers by sourcing BC.

  3. An overview of wideband immittance measurements techniques and terminology: You say absorbance, I say reflectance

    PubMed Central

    Rosowski, John J; Stenfelt, Stefan; Lilly, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the relationships among different acoustic measurements of the mobility of the tympanic membrane, including: impedance, admittance, reflectance and absorbance, which we group under the rubric of immittance measures. Each of these quantities is defined and related to the others. The relationship is most easily grasped in terms of a straight rigid ear canal of uniform area terminated by a uniform middle-ear immittance placed perpendicular to the long axis of the ear canal. Complications due to variations from this geometry are discussed. Different methods for measuring these quantities are described and the assumptions inherent within each method are made explicit. The benefits of wideband measurements of these quantities are described, as are the benefits and limitations of different components of immittance and reflectance/absorbance. While power reflectance (the square of the magnitude of pressure reflectance) is relatively invariant along the length of the ear canal, it has the disadvantage that it ignores phase information that may be useful in assessing the presence of acoustic leaks in ear-canal measurements and identifying other potential error sources. A combination of reflectance and impedance magnitude and angle give a more complete description of the middle ear from measurements in the ear canal. PMID:23900187

  4. Study of Fricke-gel dosimeter calibration for attaining precise measurements of the absorbed dose

    SciTech Connect

    Liosi, Giulia Maria; Benedini, Sara; Giacobbo, Francesca; Mariani, Mario; Gambarini, Grazia; Artuso, Emanuele; Gargano, Marco; Ludwig, Nicola; Carrara, Mauro; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2015-07-01

    A method has been studied for attaining, with good precision, absolute measurements of the spatial distribution of the absorbed dose by means of the Fricke gelatin Xylenol Orange dosimetric system. With this aim, the dose response to subsequent irradiations was analyzed. In fact, the proposed modality is based on a pre-irradiation of each single dosimeter in a uniform field with a known dose, in order to extrapolate a calibration image for a subsequent non-uniform irradiation with an un-known dose to be measured. (authors)

  5. Weak value measurement with an incoherent measuring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Wook; Lim, Hyang-Tag; Ra, Young-Sik; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2010-02-01

    In the Aharonov-Albert-Vaidman (AAV) weak measurement, it is assumed that the measuring device or the pointer is in a quantum mechanical pure state. In reality, however, it is often not the case. In this paper, we generalize the AAV weak measurement scheme to include more generalized situations in which the measuring device is in a mixed state. We also report an optical implementation of the weak value measurement in which the incoherent pointer is realized with the pseudo-thermal light. The theoretical and experimental results show that the measuring device under the influence of partial decoherence could still be used for amplified detection of minute physical changes and is applicable for implementing the weak value measurement for massive particles.

  6. Absorbed dose measurements for kV-cone beam computed tomography in image-guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hioki, Kazunari; Araki, Fujio; Ohno, Takeshi; Nakaguchi, Yuji; Tomiyama, Yuuki

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we develope a novel method to directly evaluate an absorbed dose-to-water for kilovoltage-cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Absorbed doses for the kV-CBCT systems of the Varian On-Board Imager (OBI) and the Elekta X-ray Volumetric Imager (XVI) were measured by a Farmer ionization chamber with a 60Co calibration factor. The chamber measurements were performed at the center and four peripheral points in body-type (30 cm diameter and 51 cm length) and head-type (16 cm diameter and 33 cm length) cylindrical water phantoms. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water by using a 60Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo (MC)-calculated beam quality conversion factor, kQ, for 60Co to kV-CBCT. The irradiation for OBI and XVI was performed with pelvis and head modes for the body- and the head-type phantoms, respectively. In addition, the dose distributions in the phantom for both kV-CBCT systems were calculated with MC method and were compared with measured values. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated at the center in the water phantom and compared with measured doses at four peripheral points. The measured absorbed doses at the center in the body-type phantom were 1.96 cGy for OBI and 0.83 cGy for XVI. The peripheral doses were 2.36-2.90 cGy for OBI and 0.83-1.06 cGy for XVI. The doses for XVI were lower up to approximately one-third of those for OBI. Similarly, the measured doses at the center in the head-type phantom were 0.48 cGy for OBI and 0.21 cGy for XVI. The peripheral doses were 0.26-0.66 cGy for OBI and 0.16-0.30 cGy for XVI. The calculated peripheral doses agreed within 3% in the pelvis mode and within 4% in the head mode with measured doses for both kV-CBCT systems. In addition, the absorbed dose determined in this study was approximately 4% lower than that in TG-61 but the absorbed dose by both methods was in agreement within their combined

  7. Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Munley, John T.; Nelson, Danny A.; Qiao, Hong; Phillips, Jon R.

    2012-07-17

    Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids, producing a small atomic uranium vapor plume. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. LAARS has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for U-235. The sample is scanned and assayed point-by-point at rates reaching 1 million measurements/hour, enabling LAARS to detect and analyze uranium in trace samples. The spectrometer is assembled using primarily commercially available components and features a compact design and automated analysis.Two specific gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) applications of the spectrometer are currently under development: 1) LAARS-Environmental Sampling (ES), which collects and analyzes aerosol particles for GCEP misuse detection and 2) LAARS-Destructive Assay (DA), which enables onsite enrichment DA sample collection and analysis for protracted diversion detection. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in GCEP safeguards verification.

  8. Measurements of Neutron-absorbing Elements on Mercury's Surface with the MESSENGER Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, David J.; Feldman, William C.; Goldsten, John O.; McCoy, Timothy J.; Blewett, David T.; Boynton, William V.; Evans, Larry G.; Nittler, Larry R.; Rhodes, Edgar A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2010-05-01

    The Neutron Spectrometer (NS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission has made measurements of cosmic-ray-generated thermal neutrons during each of MESSENGER's three Mercury flybys. These thermal neutron data have allowed us to make the first direct measurements of Mercury's surface elemental composition. Specifically, we show that Mercury's surface is enriched in neutron-absorbing elements and has a measured macroscopic neutron absorption cross section of (70-130) × 10^(-4) cm^2/g, which is similar to the neutron absorption of lunar basalts from Mare Fecunditatis. The expected neutron-absorbing elements are Fe and Ti, with possible trace amounts of Gd and Sm. Fe and Ti, in particular, are important for understanding Mercury's formation and how its surface may have changed over time through magmatic processes. With the neutron Doppler filter technique - a neutron energy separation technique based on spacecraft velocity - we demonstrate that Mercury's surface composition cannot be matched by prior models having characteristically low abundances of Fe, Ti, Gd, and Sm. While neutron spectroscopy alone cannot separate the relative contributions of individual neutron-absorbing elements, these results provide strong new constraints on the nature of Mercury's surface materials. For example, if all the measured neutron absorption were due to the presence of a Fe-Ti oxide and that oxide were ilmenite, then Mercury's surface would have an ilmenite content of 14 to 31 wt.%. This result is in agreement with the inference from color imaging and visible-near-infrared spectroscopy that Mercury's overall low reflectance is consistent with a surface composition that is enriched in Fe-Ti oxides. The incorporation of substantial Fe and Ti in oxides would imply that the oxygen fugacity of basalts on Mercury is at the upper range of oxygen fugacity inferred for basalts on the Moon.

  9. Measurement of total ultrasonic power using thermal expansion and change in buoyancy of an absorbing target

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, P. K. Kumar, Yudhisther; Gupta, Reeta; Jain, Anshul; Gohiya, Chandrashekhar

    2014-05-15

    The Radiation Force Balance (RFB) technique is well established and most widely used for the measurement of total ultrasonic power radiated by ultrasonic transducer. The technique is used as a primary standard for calibration of ultrasonic transducers with relatively fair uncertainty in the low power (below 1 W) regime. In this technique, uncertainty comparatively increases in the range of few watts wherein the effects such as thermal heating of the target, cavitations, and acoustic streaming dominate. In addition, error in the measurement of ultrasonic power is also caused due to movement of absorber at relatively high radiated force which occurs at high power level. In this article a new technique is proposed which does not measure the balance output during transducer energized state as done in RFB. It utilizes the change in buoyancy of the absorbing target due to local thermal heating. The linear thermal expansion of the target changes the apparent mass in water due to buoyancy change. This forms the basis for the measurement of ultrasonic power particularly in watts range. The proposed method comparatively reduces uncertainty caused by various ultrasonic effects that occur at high power such as overshoot due to momentum of target at higher radiated force. The functionality of the technique has been tested and compared with the existing internationally recommended RFB technique.

  10. Measurement of total ultrasonic power using thermal expansion and change in buoyancy of an absorbing target.

    PubMed

    Dubey, P K; Kumar, Yudhisther; Gupta, Reeta; Jain, Anshul; Gohiya, Chandrashekhar

    2014-05-01

    The Radiation Force Balance (RFB) technique is well established and most widely used for the measurement of total ultrasonic power radiated by ultrasonic transducer. The technique is used as a primary standard for calibration of ultrasonic transducers with relatively fair uncertainty in the low power (below 1 W) regime. In this technique, uncertainty comparatively increases in the range of few watts wherein the effects such as thermal heating of the target, cavitations, and acoustic streaming dominate. In addition, error in the measurement of ultrasonic power is also caused due to movement of absorber at relatively high radiated force which occurs at high power level. In this article a new technique is proposed which does not measure the balance output during transducer energized state as done in RFB. It utilizes the change in buoyancy of the absorbing target due to local thermal heating. The linear thermal expansion of the target changes the apparent mass in water due to buoyancy change. This forms the basis for the measurement of ultrasonic power particularly in watts range. The proposed method comparatively reduces uncertainty caused by various ultrasonic effects that occur at high power such as overshoot due to momentum of target at higher radiated force. The functionality of the technique has been tested and compared with the existing internationally recommended RFB technique.

  11. Measurement of total ultrasonic power using thermal expansion and change in buoyancy of an absorbing target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, P. K.; Kumar, Yudhisther; Gupta, Reeta; Jain, Anshul; Gohiya, Chandrashekhar

    2014-05-01

    The Radiation Force Balance (RFB) technique is well established and most widely used for the measurement of total ultrasonic power radiated by ultrasonic transducer. The technique is used as a primary standard for calibration of ultrasonic transducers with relatively fair uncertainty in the low power (below 1 W) regime. In this technique, uncertainty comparatively increases in the range of few watts wherein the effects such as thermal heating of the target, cavitations, and acoustic streaming dominate. In addition, error in the measurement of ultrasonic power is also caused due to movement of absorber at relatively high radiated force which occurs at high power level. In this article a new technique is proposed which does not measure the balance output during transducer energized state as done in RFB. It utilizes the change in buoyancy of the absorbing target due to local thermal heating. The linear thermal expansion of the target changes the apparent mass in water due to buoyancy change. This forms the basis for the measurement of ultrasonic power particularly in watts range. The proposed method comparatively reduces uncertainty caused by various ultrasonic effects that occur at high power such as overshoot due to momentum of target at higher radiated force. The functionality of the technique has been tested and compared with the existing internationally recommended RFB technique.

  12. Temperature measurements behind reflected shock waves in air. [radiometric measurement of gas temperature in self-absorbing gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bader, J. B.; Nerem, R. M.; Dann, J. B.; Culp, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    A radiometric method for the measurement of gas temperature in self-absorbing gases has been applied in the study of shock tube generated flows. This method involves making two absolute intensity measurements at identical wavelengths, but for two different pathlengths in the same gas sample. Experimental results are presented for reflected shock waves in air at conditions corresponding to incident shock velocities from 7 to 10 km/s and an initial driven tube pressure of 1 torr. These results indicate that, with this technique, temperature measurements with an accuracy of + or - 5 percent can be carried out. The results also suggest certain facility related problems.

  13. Valuing vaccines using value of statistical life measures.

    PubMed

    Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Jamison, Dean T; Krupnick, Alan J; Norheim, Ole F

    2014-09-03

    Vaccines are effective tools to improve human health, but resources to pursue all vaccine-related investments are lacking. Benefit-cost and cost-effectiveness analysis are the two major methodological approaches used to assess the impact, efficiency, and distributional consequences of disease interventions, including those related to vaccinations. Childhood vaccinations can have important non-health consequences for productivity and economic well-being through multiple channels, including school attendance, physical growth, and cognitive ability. Benefit-cost analysis would capture such non-health benefits; cost-effectiveness analysis does not. Standard cost-effectiveness analysis may grossly underestimate the benefits of vaccines. A specific willingness-to-pay measure is based on the notion of the value of a statistical life (VSL), derived from trade-offs people are willing to make between fatality risk and wealth. Such methods have been used widely in the environmental and health literature to capture the broader economic benefits of improving health, but reservations remain about their acceptability. These reservations remain mainly because the methods may reflect ability to pay, and hence be discriminatory against the poor. However, willingness-to-pay methods can be made sensitive to income distribution by using appropriate income-sensitive distributional weights. Here, we describe the pros and cons of these methods and how they compare against standard cost-effectiveness analysis using pure health metrics, such as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), in the context of vaccine priorities. We conclude that if appropriately used, willingness-to-pay methods will not discriminate against the poor, and they can capture important non-health benefits such as financial risk protection, productivity gains, and economic wellbeing.

  14. Measurement of photochemical quenching of absorbed quanta in photosystem I of intact leaves using simultaneous measurements of absorbance changes at 830 nm and thermal dissipation.

    PubMed

    Bukhov, Nikolai G; Carpentier, Robert

    2003-02-01

    The relationship between the redox state of the photosystem (PS) I primary donor, P700, and thermal energy dissipation in PSI were examined in intact leaves using simultaneous measurements of absorbance changes at 830 nm and variations of thermal emission monitored by photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy, respectively. A strict proportionality (close to a 1:1 ratio) was found between the magnitudes of P700 oxidation and a positive variable PA signal induced by far-red light of various irradiances under conditions favoring effective electron donation from PSII to PSI. The proportionality was observed also between the ratio of reduced P700 to the total P700 content and the ratio of the variable component to the total PA signal measured with modulated light of 695 nm. Those findings clearly revealed that in intact leaves, variable thermal dissipation in PSI is determined by the fraction of P700 in the reduced state. Diuron-treated leaves exposed to 45 degrees C in which PSI received electrons not from PSII, but from soluble reductants localized in the chloroplast stroma were also used. In such leaves, the linear relationship between the ratio of reduced P700 to the total P700 content and the ratio of the variable component to the total PA signal measured with modulated light of 700 nm has been found as well, but its slope was twice smaller than in untreated leaves. This is probably related to an increased contribution of thermal emission from inactive PSII to the steady-state level of the PA signal in diuron-treated leaves exposed to high temperatures. The results demonstrated that the yield of variable thermal dissipation is strictly dependent on the redox pressure applied to the photosystem. The above illustrates the strong photochemical energy quenching occurring when the reaction centers are in open state (reduced P700).

  15. Identification and measurement of neutron-absorbing elements on Mercury’s surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, David J.; Feldman, William C.; Goldsten, John O.; McCoy, Timothy J.; Blewett, David T.; Boynton, William V.; Evans, Larry G.; Nittler, Larry R.; Rhodes, Edgar A.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2010-09-01

    MESSENGER Neutron Spectrometer (NS) observations of cosmic-ray-generated thermal neutrons provide the first direct measurements of Mercury's surface elemental composition. Specifically, we show that Mercury's surface is enriched in neutron-absorbing elements and has a measured macroscopic neutron-absorption cross section of 45-81 × 10 -4 cm 2/g, a range similar to the neutron absorption of lunar basalts from Mare Crisium. The expected neutron-absorbing elements are Fe and Ti, with possible trace amounts of Gd and Sm. Fe and Ti, in particular, are important for understanding Mercury's formation and how its surface may have changed over time through magmatic processes. With neutron Doppler filtering - a neutron energy separation technique based on spacecraft velocity - we demonstrate that Mercury's surface composition cannot be matched by prior models, which have characteristically low abundances of Fe, Ti, Gd, and Sm. While neutron spectroscopy alone cannot separate the relative contributions of individual neutron-absorbing elements, these results provide strong new constraints on the nature of Mercury's surface materials. For example, if all the measured neutron absorption were due to the presence of an Fe-Ti oxide and that oxide were ilmenite, then Mercury's surface would have an ilmenite content of 7-18 wt.%. This result is in general agreement with the inference from color imaging and visible-near-infrared spectroscopy that Mercury's overall low reflectance is consistent with a surface composition that is enriched in Fe-Ti oxides. The incorporation of substantial Fe and Ti in oxides would imply that the oxygen fugacity of basalts on Mercury is at the upper range of oxygen fugacities inferred for basalts on the Moon.

  16. Measurements and calculations of the absorbed dose distribution around a 60Co source.

    PubMed

    Tiourina, T B; Dries, W J; van der Linden, P M

    1995-05-01

    The data from Meisberger et al. [Radiology 90, 953-957 (1968)] are often used as a basis for dose calculations in brachytherapy. In order to describe the absorbed dose in water around a brachytherapy point source, Meisberger provided a polynomial fit for different isotopes taking into account the effect of attenuation and scattering. The validity of the Meisberger coefficients is restricted to distances up to 10 cm from the source, which is regarded to be satisfactory for most brachytherapy applications. However, for more distant organs it may lead to errors in calculated absorbed dose. For this reason dose measurements have been performed in air and in water around a high activity 60Co source used in high dose rate brachytherapy. Measurements were carried out to distances of 20 cm, using ionization chambers. These data show that at a distance of about 15 cm the amount of scattered radiation virtually equals the amount of primary radiation. This emphasizes the contribution of scattered radiation to the dose in healthy tissue far from the target volume, even with relatively high energy photon radiation of 60Co. It is also shown that the Meisberger data as well as the approach of Van Kleffens and Star [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Phys. 5, 557-563 (1979)] lead to significant errors in absorbed dose between distances of 10 and 20 cm from the source. In addition to these measurements, the Monte Carlo code has been used to calculate separately primary dose and scattered dose from a cobalt point source. The calculated results agree with the experimental data within 1% for a most distant dose scoring region.

  17. A Comparison of Model Calculation and Measurement of Absorbed Dose for Proton Irradiation. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapp, N.; Semones, E.; Saganti, P.; Cucinotta, F.

    2003-01-01

    With the increase in the amount of time spent EVA that is necessary to complete the construction and subsequent maintenance of ISS, it will become increasingly important for ground support personnel to accurately characterize the radiation exposures incurred by EVA crewmembers. Since exposure measurements cannot be taken within the organs of interest, it is necessary to estimate these exposures by calculation. To validate the methods and tools used to develop these estimates, it is necessary to model experiments performed in a controlled environment. This work is such an effort. A human phantom was outfitted with detector equipment and then placed in American EMU and Orlan-M EVA space suits. The suited phantom was irradiated at the LLUPTF with proton beams of known energies. Absorbed dose measurements were made by the spaceflight operational dosimetrist from JSC at multiple sites in the skin, eye, brain, stomach, and small intestine locations in the phantom. These exposures are then modeled using the BRYNTRN radiation transport code developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, and the CAM (computerized anatomical male) human geometry model of Billings and Yucker. Comparisons of absorbed dose calculations with measurements show excellent agreement. This suggests that there is reason to be confident in the ability of both the transport code and the human body model to estimate proton exposure in ground-based laboratory experiments.

  18. Measuring best value from 'refurb' projects.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Grant

    2013-09-01

    Research at Aberdeen's Robert Gordon University has identified the requirement for the development of a 'Decision Support Model' to 'facilitate and measure the selection of main elements and sub-elements within refurbishment and maintenance projects'. One of the major drivers, explains Grant Wilson, a completing PhD researcher with the University's Institute for Innovation, Design and Sustainability (IDEAS), was to provide a mechanism via which NHS estates managers, design teams, and contractors, could 'evidence and demonstrate' that best value-for-money had been pursued, 'specific to the facility in question, and in the context of its unique business case requirements'.

  19. Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong; Phillips, Jon R.

    2012-07-01

    Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids producing a small plume containing uranium atoms. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for uranium. It is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. High speed sample scanning and pinpoint characterization allow measurements on millions of particles/hour to detect and analyze the enrichment of trace uranium in samples. The spectrometer is assembled using commercially available components at comparatively low cost, and features a compact and low power design. Future designs can be engineered for reliable, autonomous deployment within an industrial plant environment. Two specific applications of the spectrometer are under development: 1) automated unattended aerosol sampling and analysis and 2) on-site small sample destructive assay measurement. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) safeguards verification. The aerosol measurement instrument, LAARS-environmental sampling (ES), collects aerosol particles from the plant environment in a purpose-built rotating drum impactor and then uses LAARS-ES to quickly scan the surface of the impactor to measure the enrichments of the captured particles. The current approach to plant misuse detection involves swipe sampling and offsite analysis. Though this approach is very robust it generally requires several months to

  20. Dualex: A New Instrument for Field Measurements of Epidermal Ultraviolet Absorbance by Chlorophyll Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulas, Yves; Cerovic, Zoran G.; Cartelat, Aurélie; Moya, Ismaël

    2004-08-01

    Dualex (dual excitation) is a field-portable instrument, hereby described, for the assessment of polyphenolic compounds in leaves from the measurement of UV absorbance of the leaf epidermis by double excitation of chlorophyll fluorescence. The instrument takes advantage of a feedback loop that equalizes the fluorescence level induced by a reference red light to the UV-light-induced fluorescence level. This allows quick measurement from attached leaves even under field conditions. The use of light-emitting diodes and of a leaf-clip configuration makes Dualex a user-friendly instrument with potential applications in ecophysiological research, light climate analysis, agriculture, forestry, horticulture, pest management, selection of medicinal plants, and wherever accumulation of leaf polyphenolics is involved in plant responses to the environment.

  1. Concentration measurements of complex mixtures of broadband absorbers by widely tunable optical parametric oscillator laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruxton, K.; Macleod, N. A.; Weidmann, D.; Malcolm, G. P. A.; Maker, G. T.

    2012-11-01

    The ability to obtain accurate vapour parameter information from a compound's absorption spectrum is an essential data processing application in order to quantify the presence of an absorber. Concentration measurements can be required for a variety of applications including environmental monitoring, pipeline leak detection, surface contamination and breath analysis. This work demonstrates sensitive concentration measurements of complex mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using broadly tunable mid wave infrared (MWIR) laser spectroscopy. Due to the high absorption cross-sections, the MWIR spectral region is ideal to carry out sensitive concentration measurements of VOCs by tunable laser absorption spectroscopy (TLAS) methods. Absorption spectra of mixtures of VOCs were recorded using a MWIR optical parametric oscillator (OPO), with a tuning range covering 2.5 μm to 3.7 μm. The output of the MWIR OPO was coupled to a multi-pass astigmatic Herriott gas cell, maintained at atmospheric pressure that can provide up to 210 m of absorption path length, with the transmission output from the cell being monitored by a detector. The resulting spectra were processed by a concentration retrieval algorithm derived from the optimum estimation method, taking into account both multiple broadband absorbers and interfering molecules that exhibit narrow multi-line absorption features. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the concentration measurements and assess the capability of the spectral processor, experiments were conducted on calibrated VOCs vapour mixtures flowing through the spectroscopic cell with concentrations ranging from parts per billion (ppb) to parts per million (ppm). This work represents as a first step in an effort to develop and apply a similar concentration fitting algorithm to hyperspectral images in order to provide concentration maps of the spatial distribution of multi-species vapours. The reported functionality of the novel fitting algorithm

  2. Weak-value measurements can outperform conventional measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaña-Loaiza, Omar S.; Harris, Jérémie; Lundeen, Jeff S.; Boyd, Robert W.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we provide a simple, straightforward example of a specific situation in which weak-value amplification (WVA) clearly outperforms conventional measurement in determining the angular orientation of an optical component. We also offer a perspective reconciling the views of some theorists, who claim WVA to be inherently sub-optimal for parameter estimation, with the perspective of the many experimentalists and theorists who have used the procedure to successfully access otherwise elusive phenomena.

  3. Laser measurement of the spectral extinction coefficients of fluorescent, highly absorbing liquids. [crude petroleum oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.

    1982-01-01

    A conceptual method is developed to deduce rapidly the spectral extinction coefficient of fluorescent, highly absorbing liquids, such as crude or refined petroleum oils. The technique offers the advantage of only requiring one laser wavelength and a single experimental assembly and execution for any specific fluorescent liquid. The liquid is inserted into an extremely thin wedge-shaped cavity for stimulation by a laser from one side and flurescence measurement on the other side by a monochromator system. For each arbitrarily selected extinction wavelength, the wedge is driven slowly to increasing thicknesses until the fluorescence extinguishes. The fluorescence as a function of wedge thickness permits a determination of the extinction coefficient using an included theoretical model. When the monochromator is set to the laser emission wavelength, the extinction coefficient is determined using the usual on-wavelength signal extinction procedure.

  4. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) photonic microbioreactors based on segmented waveguides for local absorbance measurement.

    PubMed

    Demming, Stefanie; Vila-Planas, Jordi; Aliasghar Zadeh, Sobehir; Edlich, Astrid; Franco-Lara, Ezequiel; Radespiel, Rolf; Büttgenbach, Stephanus; Llobera, Andreu

    2011-02-01

    We present the development of microbioreactors (MBRs) based on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) segmented waveguides (SWG) for local absorbance measurements. Two different MBRs were studied, either using symmetric or asymmetric SWG (being defined as MBR-S and MBR-A, respectively). Their optical and fluidic performances were numerically analyzed, showing robustness from an optical point of view and distinct fluid flow profile. The optical characterization was done in two steps. Initially, the experimental limit of detection (LOD) and the sensitivity were determined for two different analytes (fluorescein and methylorange). With both systems, a similar limit of detection for both analytes was obtained, being in the micromolar level. Their sensitivities were 20.2±0.3 (×10⁻³) A.U./μM and 5.5±0.2 (×10⁻³) A.U./μM for fluorescein and methylorange, respectively. Once validated its applicability for local absorbance measurements, a continuous cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was done to test the viability of the proposed systems for photonic MBRs. Concretely, the cell growth was locally monitored inside the MBR during 33 h. Spectral analysis showed that the determination of the culture parameters were wavelength dependant, with a growth rate of 0.39±0.02 h⁻¹ and a doubling time of 1.65±0.09 h at an optimal wavelength of 469.9±0.3 nm. Besides the easy and monolithic integration of the SWG into poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic systems, the results presented here are very promising for the application in any disposable photonic lab-on-a-chip systems used for online analysis or photonic MBRs.

  5. Measurement of tear production using phenol red thread and standardized endodontic absorbent paper points in European pond turtles (Emys orbicularis).

    PubMed

    Rajaei, Seyed Mehdi; Mood, Maneli Ansari; Ghaffari, Masoud Selk; Williams, David L

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the aqueous fraction of the tear film using the phenol red thread test (PRTT) and paper point tear test (PPTT) in healthy adult European pond turtles (Emys orbicularis). Twenty-four healthy adult European pond turtles were studied. Measurement of tear secretion was performed using the PRTT and standardized endodontic absorbent PPTT. Horizontal palpebral fissure length (HPFL) was measured using digital calipers and was correlated with the weight of the animal. The mean ± SD PRTT, PPTT, and HPFL values for the left and right eyes were 5.12 ± 1.54 mm/15 sec and 4.62 ± 1.76 mm/15 sec; 4.50 ± 1.25 mm/1 min and 4.20 ± 1.53 mm/1 min; and 8.4 ± 0.6 mm and 8.3 ± 0.6 mm, respectively. No significant differences were detected between right and left eyes of individual turtles or between males and females in all tests. This study represents reference values of tear production in European pond turtles obtained from PRTT and PPTT methods and forms an important baseline study in defining the healthy chelonian ocular surface.

  6. Mass Measurement Using the Fixed Point of a Spring-Mass System with a Dynamic Vibration Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Satoru; Ishino, Yuji; Takasaki, Masaya; Mizuno, Takeshi

    A vibration-type measurement system characterized by the use of an undamped dynamic vibration absorber has been developed. However, inevitable damping in the absorber may cause measurement error. A new method of measuring mass is proposed to overcome this problem. The measurement system utilizes the fixed point of a mass-spring system with a dynamic vibration absorber so that the mass is estimated regardless of damping in the absorber. A phase-looked loop (PLL) is used to achieve tuning. The principle of measurement is described on the basis of a mathematical model. A measuring apparatus was designed and fabricated, and several of its basic characteristics were studied experimentally. Damping of the primary system was found to affect fixed point formation. By reducing the damping of the primary system by a voice coil motor, the measurement conditions were achieved. The efficacy of the apparatus was studied both analytically and experimentally. The measurement conditions were realized automatically by the PLL. Mass measurement was performed while the PLL was operated; the average measurement error was within 0.21 [%].

  7. Systematic characterization of spectral surface plasmon resonance sensors with absorbance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhi-Mei; Xia, Shanhong; Wei, Mingdeng; Matsuda, Hirofumi; Zhou, Haoshen

    2007-11-01

    Spectral surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors with absorbance measurement were prepared. Resonant wavelengths (λ R ) versus effective refractive indexes of the SPR mode were measured with different media in contact with the gold layer. An investigation into the refractive-index sensitivity of the sensor at a fixed angle reveals a linear dependence of λ R on the refractive index of the solution (nc), with Δλ R /Δnc=3553.6 nm in a small range of 1.333≤nc≤1.347. It was observed that the effective refractive index slowly decreases with increasing nc, attributable to wavelength-induced modulation of optical dielectric constant for the gold layer. Adsorption of bromothymol blue (BTB) on the gold layer leads to a redshift of Δλ R =3.7 nm, larger than Δλ R =2.5 nm induced by myoglobin (Mb) adsorption. On the basis of Fresnel equations, calculations with d~1 nm and n=1.69 for BTB and d~3 nm and n=1.40 for Mb also demonstrate that the SPR band shift induced by full-monolayer adsorption of BTB is larger than that for full-monolayer Mb adsorption. The combination of both measured and calculated results suggests that the contribution of the adlayer index of refraction to the sensitivity of the sensor is greater than that of the adlayer thickness.

  8. Estimation of the absorbed dose in radiation-processed food. 4. EPR measurements on eggshell

    SciTech Connect

    Desrosiers, M.F.; Le, F.G. ); Harewood, P.M.; Josephson, E.S. ); Montesalvo, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Fresh whole eggs treated with ionizing radiation for Salmonellae control testing. The eggshell was then removed and examined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine if EPR could be used to (1) distinguish irradiated from unirradiated eggs and (2) assess the absorbed dose. No EPR signals were detected in unirradiated eggs, while strong signals were measurable for more than 200 days after irradiation. Although a number of EPR signals were measured, the most intense resonance (g = 2.0019) was used for dosimetry throughout the study. This signal was observed to increase linearly with dose (up to [approximately]6 kGy), which decayed [approximately]20% within the first 5 days after irradiation and remained relatively constant thereafter. The standard added-dose method was used to assess, retrospectively, the dose to eggs processed at 0.2, 0.7, and 1.4 kGy. Relatively good results were obtained when measurement was made on the day the shell was reirradiated; with this procedure estimates were better for shell processed at the lower doses.

  9. Measurement of argon neutral velocity distribution functions near an absorbing boundary in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Zachary; Thompson, Derek; Good, Timothy; Scime, Earl

    2016-10-01

    Neutral particle distributions are critical to the study of plasma boundary interactions, where ion-neutral collisions, e.g. via charge exchange, may modify energetic particle populations impacting the boundary surface. Neutral particle behavior at absorbing boundaries thus underlies a number of important plasma physics issues, such as wall loading in fusion devices and anomalous erosion in Hall thruster channels. Neutral velocity distribution functions (NVDFs) are measured using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). Our LIF scheme excites the 1s4 non-metastable state of neutral argon with 667.913 nm photons. The subsequent decay emission at 750.590 nm is recorded synchronously with injection laser frequency. Measurements are performed near a grounded boundary immersed in a cylindrical helicon plasma, with the boundary plate oriented at an oblique angle to the magnetic field. NVDFs are recorded in multiple velocity dimensions and in a three-dimensional volume, enabling point-to-point comparisons with NVDF predictions from particle-in-cell models as well as comparisons with ion velocity distribution function measurements obtained in the same regions through Ar-II LIF. This work is supported by US National Science Foundation Grant Number PHYS-1360278.

  10. Measuring the Value Added of Management: A Knowledge Value Added Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-30

    Value Added Approach Presenter: Dr. Thomas J. Housel specializes in valuing intellectual capital , telecommunications, information technology, value...Value-Added methodology for objectively measuring the return generated by corporate knowledge assets/ intellectual capital . He received his PhD...measuring the value of intellectual capital has been featured in a Fortune cover story (October 3, 1994) and Investor’s Business Daily, numerous books

  11. Light-absorbing particles in snow and ice: Measurement and modeling of climatic and hydrological impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yun; Yasunari, Teppei J.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Flanner, Mark G.; Lau, William K. M.; Ming, Jing; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Mo; Warren, Stephen G.; Zhang, Rudong

    2015-01-01

    Light absorbing particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, brown carbon, and dust) influence water and energy budgets of the atmosphere and snowpack in multiple ways. In addition to their effects associated with atmospheric heating by absorption of solar radiation and interactions with clouds, LAP in snow on land and ice can reduce the surface reflectance (a.k.a., surface darkening), which is likely to accelerate the snow aging process and further reduces snow albedo and increases the speed of snowpack melt. LAP in snow and ice (LAPSI) has been identified as one of major forcings affecting climate change, e.g. in the fourth and fifth assessment reports of IPCC. However, the uncertainty level in quantifying this effect remains very high. In this review paper, we document various technical methods of measuring LAPSI and review the progress made in measuring the LAPSI in Arctic, Tibetan Plateau and other mid-latitude regions. We also report the progress in modeling the mass concentrations, albedo reduction, radiative forcing, and climatic and hydrological impact of LAPSI at global and regional scales. Finally we identify some research needs for reducing the uncertainties in the impact of LAPSI on global and regional climate and the hydrological cycle.

  12. Light-absorbing Particles in Snow and Ice: Measurement and Modeling of Climatic and Hydrological Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yun; Yasunari, Teppei J.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Flanner, M. G.; Lau, William K.; Ming, J.; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Mo; Warren, Stephen G.; Zhang, Rudong

    2015-01-01

    Light absorbing particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, brown carbon, and dust) influence water and energy budgets of the atmosphere and snowpack in multiple ways. In addition to their effects associated with atmospheric heating by absorption of solar radiation and interactions with clouds, LAP in snow on land and ice can reduce the surface reflectance (a.k.a., surface darkening), which is likely to accelerate the snow aging process and further reduces snow albedo and increases the speed of snowpack melt. LAP in snow and ice (LAPSI) has been identified as one of major forcings affecting climate change, e.g. in the fourth and fifth assessment reports of IPCC. However, the uncertainty level in quantifying this effect remains very high. In this review paper, we document various technical methods of measuring LAPSI and review the progress made in measuring the LAPSI in Arctic, Tibetan Plateau and other mid-latitude regions. We also report the progress in modeling the mass concentrations, albedo reduction, radiative forcing, andclimatic and hydrological impact of LAPSI at global and regional scales. Finally we identify some research needs for reducing the uncertainties in the impact of LAPSI on global and regional climate and the hydrological cycle.

  13. Measurement of absorbed dose-to-water for an HDR {sup 192}Ir source with ionization chambers in a sandwich setup

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, Fujio; Kouno, Tomohiro; Ohno, Takeshi; Kakei, Kiyotaka; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki; Kawamura, Shinji

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: In this study, a dedicated device for ion chamber measurements of absorbed dose-to-water for a Nucletron microSelectron-v2 HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source is presented. The device uses two ionization chambers in a so-called sandwich assembly. Using this setup and by taking the average reading of the two chambers, any dose error due to difficulties in absolute positioning (centering) of the source in between the chambers is cancelled to first order. The method's accuracy was examined by comparing measurements with absorbed dose-to-water determination based on the AAPM TG-43 protocol.Methods: The optimal source-to-chamber distance (SCD) for {sup 192}Ir dosimetry was determined from ion chamber measurements in a water phantom. The {sup 192}Ir source was sandwiched between two Exradin A1SL chambers (0.057 cm{sup 3}) at the optimal SCD separation. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water using a {sup 60}Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo-calculated beam quality conversion factor, k{sub Q}, for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir. An uncertainty estimate of the proposed method was determined based on reproducibility of measurements at different institutions for the same type of source.Results: The optimal distance for the A1SL chamber measurements was determined to be 5 cm from the {sup 192}Ir source center, considering the depth dependency of k{sub Q} for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir and the chamber positioning. The absorbed dose to water measured at (5 cm, 90°) on the transverse axis was 1.3% lower than TG-43 values and its reproducibility and overall uncertainty were 0.8% and 1.7%, respectively. The measurement doses at anisotropic points agreed within 1.5% with TG-43 values.Conclusions: The ion chamber measurement of absorbed dose-to-water with a sandwich method for the {sup 192}Ir source provides a more accurate, direct, and reference dose compared to the dose-to-water determination based on air-kerma strength in the TG-43 protocol

  14. Absorbed photon dose measurement and calculation for some patient organs examined by computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shousha, Hany A.

    Patient doses from computed tomography (CT) examinations are usually expressed in terms of dose index, organ doses, and effective dose. The CT dose index (CTDI) can be measured free-in-air or in a CT dosimetry phantom. Organ doses can be measured directly in anthropomorphic Rando phantoms using thermoluminescent detectors. Organ doses can also be calculated by the Monte Carlo method utilizing measured CTDI values. In this work, organ doses were assessed for three main CT examinations: head, chest, and abdomen, using the different mentioned methods. Results of directly measured doses were compared with calculated doses for different organs in the study, and also compared with published international studies.

  15. Measuring the Dollar Value of Volunteering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ironmonger, Duncan

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of sample surveys to estimate the amount of time spent volunteering. States that it is necessary to estimate the number of hours involved and to establish an appropriate value per hour. (SK)

  16. Instrumentation and method for measuring NIR light absorbed in tissue during MR imaging in medical NIRS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myllylä, Teemu S.; Sorvoja, Hannu S. S.; Nikkinen, Juha; Tervonen, Osmo; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Myllylä, Risto A.

    2011-07-01

    Our goal is to provide a cost-effective method for examining human tissue, particularly the brain, by the simultaneous use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Due to its compatibility requirements, MRI poses a demanding challenge for NIRS measurements. This paper focuses particularly on presenting the instrumentation and a method for the non-invasive measurement of NIR light absorbed in human tissue during MR imaging. One practical method to avoid disturbances in MR imaging involves using long fibre bundles to enable conducting the measurements at some distance from the MRI scanner. This setup serves in fact a dual purpose, since also the NIRS device will be less disturbed by the MRI scanner. However, measurements based on long fibre bundles suffer from light attenuation. Furthermore, because one of our primary goals was to make the measuring method as cost-effective as possible, we used high-power light emitting diodes instead of more expensive lasers. The use of LEDs, however, limits the maximum output power which can be extracted to illuminate the tissue. To meet these requirements, we improved methods of emitting light sufficiently deep into tissue. We also show how to measure NIR light of a very small power level that scatters from the tissue in the MRI environment, which is characterized by strong electromagnetic interference. In this paper, we present the implemented instrumentation and measuring method and report on test measurements conducted during MRI scanning. These measurements were performed in MRI operating rooms housing 1.5 Tesla-strength closed MRI scanners (manufactured by GE) in the Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology at the Oulu University Hospital.

  17. A Deep Search For Faint Galaxies Associated With Very Low-redshift C IV Absorbers. II. Program Design, Absorption-line Measurements, and Absorber Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchett, Joseph N.; Tripp, Todd M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Werk, Jessica K.; Tumlinson, Jason; O'Meara, John M.; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Katz, Neal; Willmer, C. N. A.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the evolution of metal-enriched gas over recent cosmic epochs as well as to characterize the diffuse, ionized, metal-enriched circumgalactic medium, we have conducted a blind survey for C iv absorption systems in 89 QSO sightlines observed with the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. We have identified 42 absorbers at z < 0.16, comprising the largest uniform blind sample size to date in this redshift range. Our measurements indicate an increasing C iv absorber number density per comoving path length (d{N}/{dX}= 7.5 ± 1.1) and modestly increasing mass density relative to the critical density of the universe (ΩC iv = 10.0 ± 1.5 × 10-8) from z ˜ 1.5 to the present epoch, consistent with predictions from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Furthermore, the data support a functional form for the column density distribution function that deviates from a single power law, also consistent with independent theoretical predictions. As the data also probe heavy element ions in addition to C iv at the same redshifts, we identify, measure, and search for correlations between column densities of these species where components appear to be aligned in velocity. Among these ion-ion correlations, we find evidence for tight correlations between C ii and Si ii, C ii and Si iii, and C iv and Si iv, suggesting that these pairs of species arise in similar ionization conditions. However, the evidence for correlations decreases as the difference in ionization potential increases. Finally, when controlling for observational bias, we find only marginal evidence for a correlation (86.8% likelihood) between the Doppler line width b(C iv) and column density N(C iv).

  18. Cultural Value, Measurement and Policy Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Dave

    2015-01-01

    No matter what the national context, the question of how to understand the impact of government programmes, particularly in terms of value for money, has emerged as a complex problem to be solved by social scientific management. This article engages with these trends in two ways. It focuses on the UK to understand how these tools and technologies…

  19. Test Scaling and Value-Added Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballou, Dale

    2009-01-01

    Conventional value-added assessment requires that achievement be reported on an interval scale. While many metrics do not have this property, application of item response theory (IRT) is said to produce interval scales. However, it is difficult to confirm that the requisite conditions are met. Even when they are, the properties of the data that…

  20. Absorbed dose measurements of a handheld 50 kVP X-ray source in water with thermoluminescence dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Soares, Christopher; Drupieski, Chris; Wingert, Brian; Pritchett, Garey; Pagonis, Vasilis; O'Brien, Michelle; Sliski, Alan; Bilski, Pawel; Olko, Pawel

    2006-01-01

    Absorbed dose rate measurements of a 50 kV(p) handheld X-ray probe source in a water phantom are described. The X-ray generator is capable of currents of up to 40 microA, and is designed for cranial brachytherapy and intraoperative applications with applicators. The measurements were performed in a computer-controlled water phantom in which both the source and the detectors are mounted. Two different LiF thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) phosphors were employed for the measurements, MTS-N (LiF:Mg,Ti) and MCP-N (LiF:Mg,Cu,P). Two small ionisation chambers (0.02 and 0.0053 cm(3)) were also employed. The TLDs and chambers were positioned in watertight mounts made of water-equivalent plastic. The chambers were calibrated in terms of air-kerma rate, and conventional protocols were used to convert the measurements to absorbed dose rate. The TLDs were calibrated at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in terms of absorbed dose rate using a (60)Co teletherapy beam and narrow-spectrum X-ray beams. For the latter, absorbed dose was inferred from air-kerma rate using calculated air-kerma-to-dose conversion factors. The reference points of the various detectors were taken as the center of the TLD volumes and the entrance windows of the ionisation chambers. Measurements were made at distances of 3-45 mm from the detector reference point to the source center. In addition, energy dependence of response measurements of the TLDs used was made using NIST reference narrow spectrum X-ray beams. Measurement results showed reasonable agreement in absorbed dose rate determined from the energy dependence corrected TLD readings and from the ionisation chambers. Volume averaging effects of the TLDs at very close distances to the source were also evident.

  1. Postselected weak measurement beyond the weak value

    SciTech Connect

    Geszti, Tamas

    2010-04-15

    Closed expressions are derived for the quantum measurement statistics of pre- and postselected Gaussian particle beams. The weakness of the preselection step is shown to compete with the nonorthogonality of postselection in a transparent way. The approach is shown to be useful in analyzing postselection-based signal amplification, allowing measurements to be extended far beyond the range of validity of the well-known Aharonov-Albert-Vaidman limit. Additionally, the present treatment connects postselected weak measurement to the topic of phase-contrast microscopy.

  2. Specific ultra-violet absorbance as an indicator measurement of merucry sources in an Adirondack River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.; Aiken, George R.; Bradley, Paul M.; Journey, Celeste; Schelker, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    The Adirondack region of New York has been identified as a hot spot where high methylmercury concentrations are found in surface waters and biota, yet mercury (Hg) concentrations vary widely in this region. We collected stream and groundwater samples for Hg and organic carbon analyses across the upper Hudson River, a 493 km2 basin in the central Adirondacks to evaluate and model the sources of variation in filtered total Hg (FTHg) concentrations. Variability in FTHg concentrations during the growing seasons (May-Oct) of 2007-2009 in Fishing Brook, a 66-km2 sub-basin, was better explained by specific ultra-violet absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA254), a measure of organic carbon aromaticity, than by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, a commonly used Hg indicator. SUVA254 was a stronger predictor of FTHg concentrations during the growing season than during the dormant season. Multiple linear regression models that included SUVA254 values and DOC concentrations could explain 75 % of the variation in FTHg concentrations on an annual basis and 84 % during the growing season. A multiple linear regression landscape modeling approach applied to 27 synoptic sites across the upper Hudson basin found that higher SUVA254 values are associated with gentler slopes, and greater riparian area, and lower SUVA254 values are associated with an increasing influence of open water. We hypothesize that the strong Hg?SUVA254 relation in this basin reflects distinct patterns of FTHg and SUVA254 that are characteristic of source areas that control the mobilization of Hg to surface waters, and that the seasonal influence of these source areas varies in this heterogeneous basin landscape.

  3. Holdings as a Measure of Journal Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Danny P.; Boyce, Bert R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a study that compared holdings figures from the OCLC database to productivity measures from the "Journal Citation Reports" section of "Science Citation Index" and publisher circulation figures to determine whether there is a systematic relationship between easily gathered holdings and circulation figures and less…

  4. Quantitative angle-resolved small-spot reflectance measurements on plasmonic perfect absorbers: impedance matching and disorder effects.

    PubMed

    Tittl, Andreas; Harats, Moshe G; Walter, Ramon; Yin, Xinghui; Schäferling, Martin; Liu, Na; Rapaport, Ronen; Giessen, Harald

    2014-10-28

    Plasmonic devices with absorbance close to unity have emerged as essential building blocks for a multitude of technological applications ranging from trace gas detection to infrared imaging. A crucial requirement for such elements is the angle independence of the absorptive performance. In this work, we develop theoretically and verify experimentally a quantitative model for the angular behavior of plasmonic perfect absorber structures based on an optical impedance matching picture. To achieve this, we utilize a simple and elegant k-space measurement technique to record quantitative angle-resolved reflectance measurements on various perfect absorber structures. Particularly, this method allows quantitative reflectance measurements on samples where only small areas have been nanostructured, for example, by electron-beam lithography. Combining these results with extensive numerical modeling, we find that matching of both the real and imaginary parts of the optical impedance is crucial to obtain perfect absorption over a large angular range. Furthermore, we successfully apply our model to the angular dispersion of perfect absorber geometries with disordered plasmonic elements as a favorable alternative to current array-based designs.

  5. Detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 using immunomagnetic separation and absorbance measurement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongcheng; Li, Yanbin

    2002-11-01

    An assay system for detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was developed based on immunomagnetic separation of the target pathogen from samples and absorbance measurement of p-nitrophenol at 400 nm from p-nitrophenyl phosphate hydrolysis by alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1) on the "sandwich" structure complexes (antibodies coated onto micromagnetic beads--E. coli O157:H7-antibodies conjugated with the enzyme) formed on the microbead surface. The effects of immunoreaction time, phosphate buffer concentration, pH and temperature on the immunomagnetic separation of E. coli O157:H7 from samples were determined and the conditions used for the separation were 1-h reaction time, 1.0 x 10(-2) M PBS, pH 8.0 and 33 degrees C in this system. The effects of MgCl(2) concentration, Tris buffer concentration, pH and temperature on the activity of alkaline phosphatase conjugated on the immuno-"sandwich" structure complexes were investigated after immunomagnetic separation of the target pathogen and the conditions used for the enzymatic amplification were 1.0 x 10(-4) M MgCl(2), 1.0 M Tris buffer, pH 8.0, 28 degrees C and 30-min reaction time during the assay. The selectivity of the system was examined and no interference from the other pathogens including Salmonella typhimurium, Campylobacter jejuni and Listeria monocytogenes was observed. Its working range was from 3.2 x 10(2) to 3.2 x 10(4) CFU/ml, and the relative standard deviation was 2.5-9.9%. The total detection time was less than 2 h.

  6. Using optoacoustic imaging for measuring the temperature dependence of Grüneisen parameter in optically absorbing solutions

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Elena; Ermilov, Sergey; Su, Richard; Nadvoretskiy, Vyacheslav; Conjusteau, André; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Grüneisen parameter is a key temperature-dependent physical characteristic responsible for thermoelastic efficiency of materials. We propose a new methodology for accurate measurements of temperature dependence of Grüneisen parameter in optically absorbing solutions. We use two-dimensional optoacoustic (OA) imaging to improve accuracy of measurements. Our approach eliminates contribution of local optical fluence and absorbance. To validate the proposed methodology, we studied temperature dependence of aqueous cupric sulfate solutions in the range from 22 to 4°C. Our results for the most diluted salt perfectly matched known temperature dependence for the Grüneisen parameter of water. We also found that Grüneisen-temperature relationship for cupric sulfate exhibits linear trend with respect to the concentration. In addition to accurate measurements of Grüneisen changes with temperature, the developed technique provides a basis for future high precision OA temperature monitoring in live tissues. PMID:24150350

  7. Field trials measuring the effects of ultraviolet-absorbing greenhouse plastic films on insect populations.

    PubMed

    Costa, H S; Robb, K L; Wilen, C A

    2002-02-01

    Field studies were conducted to compare insect population levels in greenhouse crops covered with plastics that block the transmission of UV light in two wavelength ranges. Crops grown in greenhouses under a plastic that blocked UV light at wavelengths of 380 nm and below had lower numbers of aphids and thrips compared with a plastic that blocked UV light at wavelengths of 360 nm and below. This is consistent with the results found for thrips in previous studies using small, completely enclosed tunnels with no plant material. The effects were not as dramatic in the commercial greenhouses, perhaps due to unfiltered light entering through the open sides of those greenhouses. There was no reduction in greenhouse whitefly, Trialeurodes vaporariorum Westwood, populations under the <380 UV-absorbing plastic compared to <360 nm UV-absorbing plastic in these field trials. This is inconsistent with results found in small, completely enclosed tunnels, where sticky traps caught a significantly higher proportion (95 +/- 2%) of released greenhouse whiteflies inside tunnels covered with <360 nm absorbing plastic compared with the <380 nm absorbing plastic. The results of these studies suggest that the type of greenhouse plastic used in a structure can affect population levels of some insect species, and may be useful tools in developing integrated pest management programs for insect management. The design of the greenhouse and amount of unfiltered light that enters the system appear to be important factors in determining the level of effect.

  8. Cultural Values Predicting Acculturation Orientations: Operationalizing a Quantitative Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehala, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes that acculturation orientations are related to two sets of cultural values: utilitarianism (Ut) and traditionalism (Tr). While utilitarian values enhance assimilation, traditional values support language and identity maintenance. It is proposed that the propensity to either end of this value opposition can be measured by an…

  9. Electromagnetic scattering by pyramidal and wedge absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, Brian T.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1988-01-01

    Electromagnetic scattering from pyramidal and wedge absorbers used to line the walls of modern anechoic chambers is measured and compared with theoretically predicted values. The theoretical performance for various angles of incidence is studied. It is shown that a pyramidal absorber scatters electromagnetic energy more as a random rough surface does. The apparent reflection coefficient from an absorber wall illuminated by a plane wave can be much less than the normal absorber specifications quoted by the manufacturer. For angles near grazing incidence, pyramidal absorbers give a large backscattered field from the pyramid side-faces or edges. The wedge absorber was found to give small backscattered fields for near-grazing incidence. Based on this study, some new guidelines for the design of anechoic chambers are advocated because the specular scattering models used at present do not appear valid for pyramids that are large compared to the wavelength.

  10. All-fiber wavelength-tunable picosecond nonlinear reflectivity measurement setup for characterization of semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viskontas, K.; Rusteika, N.

    2016-09-01

    Semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) is the key component for many passively mode-locked ultrafast laser sources. Particular set of nonlinear parameters is required to achieve self-starting mode-locking or avoid undesirable q-switch mode-locking for the ultra-short pulse laser. In this paper, we introduce a novel all-fiber wavelength-tunable picosecond pulse duration setup for the measurement of nonlinear properties of saturable absorber mirrors at around 1 μm center wavelength. The main advantage of an all-fiber configuration is the simplicity of measuring the fiber-integrated or fiber-pigtailed saturable absorbers. A tunable picosecond fiber laser enables to investigate the nonlinear parameters at different wavelengths in ultrafast regime. To verify the capability of the setup, nonlinear parameters for different SESAMs with low and high modulation depth were measured. In the operating wavelength range 1020-1074 nm, <1% absolute nonlinear reflectivity accuracy was demonstrated. Achieved fluence range was from 100 nJ/cm2 to 2 mJ/cm2 with corresponding intensity from 10 kW/cm2 to 300 MW/cm2.

  11. Absorbed dose measurements in dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA).

    PubMed

    Bezakova, E; Collins, P J; Beddoe, A H

    1997-02-01

    In this study a predominantly film dosimetric method was used to measure the effective dose from posteroanterior (PA) lumbar spine and proximal femur scans performed on a Lunar DPX-L machine. Because of the very low dose rate in scanning mode, the depth dose data were determined using a stationary detector configuration. The characteristic curve for the film (Kodak TMAT-H) was obtained and depth dose measurements were made using slabs of "solid water". The film was calibrated using a superficial X-ray unit (calibrated against a standard traceable to a national standard). To assess the change in film response with beam hardening at depth, the film was exposed to calibration beams of different half value layer (HVL). The HVL of the DXA beam was determined for surface and depth doses using aluminium filters and a diamond detector (an energy independent device). All measurements were performed three times. Beam size was measured using film, and the scan areas and times were determined by scanning phantoms. The dose from a scan was calculated using Dsc = DTscAb/Asc, where D = dose rate (stationary), Tsc = scan time, Ab = beam area, and Asc = scan area. Organ doses were determined using an anatomical atlas and ICRP 23 female reference. All film measurements had good precision (coefficient of variation < 4%). There was little variation in film sensitivity with change in HVL (< 1% change for the first three HVLs) and consequently no corrections were applied to the depth dose data. Skin entrance dose was 11.5 microGy. Effective dose in females was 0.19 microSv for the PA lumbar spine. For the proximal femur scan, the effective dose was 0.14 microSv (ovaries included) and 0.023 microSv (ovaries excluded) for pre-menopausal and pos-menopausal women, respectively.

  12. Diversifying natural resources value measurements: The Trinity River study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, J.G.; Douglas, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    An interdisciplinary team set out to establish the economic and social values of the Trinity River in northern California. This information was intended to support the Secretary of the Interior's decision on allocation of Trinity River flows. This team set out to measure the values of Trinity River flows, fishery resources, and recreation amenities in several different ways. A survey was mailed to users of the Trinity River. This single instrument included economic measures (willingness-to-pay and costs incurred in visiting) and social-psychological measures (importance, satisfaction, and water allocation preferences). A closely related survey measured several of these same values among west coast regional households. The results of these surveys were compiled, and the measured economic and social values were compared. We found that integrating economic and social value information provides a greater depth of understanding of the resource's value. In addition, this integration provides a more in-depth understanding through the quantitative and qualitative results that emerge.

  13. Thermal Lens Phenomenon Studied by the Z-Scan Technique: Measurement of the Thermal Conductivity of Highly Absorbing Colloidal Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehnem, A. L.; Espinosa, D.; Gonçalves, E. S.; Figueiredo Neto, A. M.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the thermal lens phenomenon in high-absorbing colloidal systems, studied by using the Z-scan technique. The characteristics of the experimental setup to avoid undesirable effects are presented, in particular when pulsed laser beam is used. We show that a cumulative effect may appear in the experiment with chopped laser beams and compromise the results obtained with this technique. This artefact is more significative when colloidal suspensions are investigated. These materials have different characteristic times of heat and mass diffusion, which must be carefully considered to choose the appropriate time interval for the laser pulse and the time between pulses. Two experimental cases with a chopped laser beam, with and without a shutter, are discussed. The sample employed is a magnetic colloidal suspension (a ferrofluid). This sample has magnetic nanoparticles electrically charged in an aqueous solution with free ions and counter ions. Besides the thermal lens effect, charge and mass diffusion may take place when the sample is illuminated by the Gaussian beam, which imposes a thermal gradient on it. The results show that, with the experimental setup without a shutter, the sample does not achieve a complete relaxation between two laser pulses. This generates a measurable cumulative effect after the sample is illuminated during a relatively long period of time. A time modulation with longer time interval between chopped pulses allows the complete relaxation of the sample. This procedure is important for the correct analysis of the thermal lens effect. Reliable values of the thermal conductivity of the sample in different temperatures are obtained and discussed.

  14. Spectrophotometry of Thin Films of Light-Absorbing Particles.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Johnson, Andrew J; Marinopoulos, Ioannis; Crowther, Jonathan M; Thompson, Michael A

    2017-04-06

    Thin films of dispersions of light-absorbing solid particles or emulsions containing a light-absorbing solute all have a nonuniform distribution of light-absorbing species throughout the sample volume. This results in nonuniform light absorption over the illuminated area, which causes the optical absorbance, as measured using a conventional specular UV-vis spectrophotometer, to deviate from the Beer-Lambert relationship. We have developed a theoretical model to account for the absorbance properties of such films, which are shown to depend on the size and volume fraction of the light-absorbing particles plus other sample variables. We have compared model predictions with measured spectra for samples consisting of emulsions containing a dissolved light-absorbing solute. Using no adjustable parameters, the model successfully predicts the behavior of nonuniform, light-absorbing emulsion films with varying values of droplet size, volume fraction, and other parameters.

  15. Influence of extraction solvent on antioxidant capacity value of oleaster measured by ORAC method.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Gorkem; Sogut, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) is a widely used hydrogen atom transfer-based method which measures the antioxidant capacity of natural products. ORAC values of oleaster (Elaeagnus angustifolia L.), which was extracted with ethanol/acetone (7:3, v/v), ethanol/water (1:1, v/v) and methanol/water (1:1, v/v) in order to evaluate the effects of solvent type on antioxidant capacity, were examined. In general, results revealed that ethanol/water extracts exhibited better antioxidant capacity values. Furthermore, results obtained by using ORAC-eosin y (ORAC-EY), one of the widely used derivative of fluorescein (FL), as a fluorescent probe were compared with those obtained by using ORAC-FL. According to the results, ORAC-EY values were found to be compatible with ORAC-FL values.

  16. Theory of photoselection by intense light pulses. Influence of reorientational dynamics and chemical kinetics on absorbance measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, A; Szabo, A

    1993-01-01

    The theory of absorbance measurements on a system (e.g., chromophore(s) in a protein) that undergoes a sequence of reactions initiated by a linearly polarized light pulse is developed for excitation pulses of arbitrary intensity. This formalism is based on a set of master equations describing the time evolution of the orientational distribution function of the various species resulting from excitation, reorientational dynamics, and chemical kinetics. For intense but short excitation pulses, the changes in absorbance (for arbitrary polarization directions of the excitation and probe pulses) and the absorption anisotropy are expressed in terms of reorientational correlation functions. The influence of the internal motions of the chromophore as well as the overall motions of the molecules is considered. When the duration of the excitation pulse is long compared to the time-scale of internal motions but comparable to the overall correlation time of the molecule that is reorienting isotropically, the problem of calculating the changes in absorbance is reduced to the solution of a set of first-order coupled differential equations. Emphasis is placed on obtaining explicit results for quantities that are measured in photolysis and fluorescence experiments so as to facilitate the analysis of experimental data. PMID:8471729

  17. Measuring industrial energy efficiency: Physical volume versus economic value

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.L.; Niefer, M.J.; Roop, J.M.

    1996-12-01

    This report examines several different measures of industrial output for use in constructing estimates of industrial energy efficiency and discusses some reasons for differences between the measures. Estimates of volume-based measures of output, as well as 3 value-based measures of output (value of production, value of shipments, and value added), are evaluated for 15 separate 4-digit industries. Volatility, simple growth rate, and trend growth rate estimates are made for each industry and each measure of output. Correlations are made between the volume- and value-based measures of output. Historical energy use data are collected for 5 of the industries for making energy- intensity estimates. Growth rates in energy use, energy intensity, and correlations between volume- and value-based measures of energy intensity are computed. There is large variability in growth trend estimates both long term and from year to year. While there is a high correlation between volume- and value-based measures of output for a few industries, typically the correlation is low, and this is exacerbated for estimates of energy intensity. Analysis revealed reasons for these low correlations. It appears that substantial work must be done before reliable measures of trends in the energy efficiency of industry can be accurately characterized.

  18. Simulation and measurement of optimized microwave reflectivity for carbon nanotube absorber by controlling electromagnetic factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Danfeng; Hao, Zhifeng; Qian, Yannan; Huang, Yinxin; Bizeng; Yang, Zhenda; Qibai, Wu

    2017-03-28

    Heat-treatments may change the defect and surface organic groups of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and lead to significant changes in the microwave electromagnetic parameter of CNTs. In this paper, the effect of heat-treatment time and temperature on the complex dielectric constant and permeability as well as the microwave reflectivity of CNTs was investigated. The experimental results indicated that the microwave absorption property of CNTs arises mainly from the high permittivity and consequent dielectric loss. Moreover, the heat-treatment resulted in increased dielectric constant of CNTs and significant improvement of the microwave absorption at frequency values of 2-18 GHz. The microwave reflectivity of CNT composites with a coating thickness of 3 mm was simulated by using the electromagnetic parameters. The absorption peak of CNTs treated at 700 °C had an amplitude of R = -48 dB, which occurred at 9 GHz. Below -10 dB, the composites treated at 900 °C had a bandwidth of 7 GHz. The position of the absorption peak concurred with the measured results. The results indicated that the microwave-absorption properties can be modified by adjusting heat-treatment temperature and time.

  19. Evaluating a novel application of optical fibre evanescent field absorbance: rapid measurement of red colour in winegrape homogenates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lye, Peter G.; Bradbury, Ronald; Lamb, David W.

    Silica optical fibres were used to measure colour (mg anthocyanin/g fresh berry weight) in samples of red wine grape homogenates via optical Fibre Evanescent Field Absorbance (FEFA). Colour measurements from 126 samples of grape homogenate were compared against the standard industry spectrophotometric reference method that involves chemical extraction and subsequent optical absorption measurements of clarified samples at 520 nm. FEFA absorbance on homogenates at 520 nm (FEFA520h) was correlated with the industry reference method measurements of colour (R2 = 0.46, n = 126). Using a simple regression equation colour could be predicted with a standard error of cross-validation (SECV) of 0.21 mg/g, with a range of 0.6 to 2.2 mg anthocyanin/g and a standard deviation of 0.33 mg/g. With a Ratio of Performance Deviation (RPD) of 1.6, the technique when utilizing only a single detection wavelength, is not robust enough to apply in a diagnostic sense, however the results do demonstrate the potential of the FEFA method as a fast and low-cost assay of colour in homogenized samples.

  20. A Framework to Measure the Value of Public Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Peter D; Neumann, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Objective To develop a framework that public health practitioners could use to measure the value of public health services. Data Sources Primary data were collected from August 2006 through March 2007. We interviewed (n=46) public health practitioners in four states, leaders of national public health organizations, and academic researchers. Study Design Using a semi-structured interview protocol, we conducted a series of qualitative interviews to define the component parts of value for public health services and identify methodologies used to measure value and data collected. Data Collection/Extraction Methods The primary form of analysis is descriptive, synthesizing information across respondents as to how they measure the value of their services. Principal Findings Our interviews did not reveal a consensus on how to measure value or a specific framework for doing so. Nonetheless, the interviews identified some potential strategies, such as cost accounting and performance-based contracting mechanisms. The interviews noted implementation barriers, including limits to staff capacity and data availability. Conclusions We developed a framework that considers four component elements to measure value: external factors that must be taken into account (i.e., mandates); key internal actions that a local health department must take (i.e., staff assessment); using appropriate quantitative measures; and communicating value to elected officials and the public. PMID:19686250

  1. Measuring Incompatible Observables by Exploiting Sequential Weak Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piacentini, F.; Avella, A.; Levi, M. P.; Gramegna, M.; Brida, G.; Degiovanni, I. P.; Cohen, E.; Lussana, R.; Villa, F.; Tosi, A.; Zappa, F.; Genovese, M.

    2016-10-01

    One of the most intriguing aspects of quantum mechanics is the impossibility of measuring at the same time observables corresponding to noncommuting operators, because of quantum uncertainty. This impossibility can be partially relaxed when considering joint or sequential weak value evaluation. Indeed, weak value measurements have been a real breakthrough in the quantum measurement framework that is of the utmost interest from both a fundamental and an applicative point of view. In this Letter, we show how we realized for the first time a sequential weak value evaluation of two incompatible observables using a genuine single-photon experiment. These (sometimes anomalous) sequential weak values revealed the single-operator weak values, as well as the local correlation between them.

  2. Measuring the Value Added of Management: A Knowledge Value Added Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-31

    intellectual capital and knowledge value measurement. He is currently a tenured Full Professor for the Information Sciences (Systems) Department at...in 1986. His work on measuring the value of intellectual capital has been featured in a Fortune cover story (October 3, 1994), Investor’s Business...Daily, numerous books, professional periodicals, and academic journals (most recently in the Journal of Intellectual Capital , 2, 2005). Thomas Housel

  3. Measuring Teacher Quality with Value-Added Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marder, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Using computers to evaluate teachers based on student test scores is more difficult than it seems. Value-added modeling is a genuinely serious attempt to grapple with the difficulties. Value-added modeling carries the promise of measuring teacher quality automatically and objectively, and improving school systems at minimal cost. The essence of…

  4. Measuring Social Studies Achievement: A Matter of Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Richard J.

    Questions as to whether measurement can provide a universally applicable set of criteria for making value judgments in the social sciences are raised. Four assumptions about education, experience, reality, and value formation were identified to provide a fuller reference point for social science educators when they are viewing current standardized…

  5. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shinpei Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-26

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF{sub 2} etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  6. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF2 etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  7. Measurement Theory Based on the Truth Values Violates Local Realism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the violation factor of the Bell-Mermin inequality. Until now, we use an assumption that the results of measurement are ±1. In this case, the maximum violation factor is 2( n-1)/2. The quantum predictions by n-partite Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state violate the Bell-Mermin inequality by an amount that grows exponentially with n. Recently, a new measurement theory based on the truth values is proposed (Nagata and Nakamura, Int. J. Theor. Phys. 55:3616, 2016). The values of measurement outcome are either +1 or 0. Here we use the new measurement theory. We consider multipartite GHZ state. It turns out that the Bell-Mermin inequality is violated by the amount of 2( n-1)/2. The measurement theory based on the truth values provides the maximum violation of the Bell-Mermin inequality.

  8. Measuring outcomes and efficiency in medicare value-based purchasing.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Christopher P; Higgins, Aparna R; Ritter, Grant A

    2009-01-01

    The Medicare program may soon adopt value-based purchasing (VBP), in which hospitals could receive incentives that are conditional on meeting specified performance objectives. The authors advocate for a market-oriented framework and direct measures of system-level value that are focused on better outcomes and lower total cost of care. They present a multidimensional framework for measuring outcomes of care and a method to adjust incentive payments based on efficiency. Incremental reforms based on VBP could provoke transformational changes in total patient care by linking payments to value related to the whole patient experience, recognizing shared accountability among providers.

  9. Measurement of the Q value of an acoustic resonator.

    PubMed

    Biwa, Tetsushi; Ueda, Yuki; Nomura, Hiroshi; Mizutani, Uichiro; Yazaki, Taichi

    2005-08-01

    A cylindrical acoustic resonator was externally driven at the first resonance frequency by a compression driver. The acoustic energy stored in the resonator and the power dissipated per unit time were evaluated through the simultaneous measurements of acoustic pressure and velocity, in order to determine the Q value of the resonator. The resulting Q value, being employed as a measure of the damping in a resonator, was obtained as 36. However, the Q value determined from a frequency response curve known as a conventional technique turned out to be 25, which is 30% less than that obtained in the present method. By further applying these two methods in the case of a resonator having an acoustic load inside, we present an accurate measurement of the Q value of the resonator by making full use of its definition.

  10. Laser heating of an absorbing and conducting media applied to laser flash property measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gritzo, L.A.; Anderson, E.E.

    1993-12-31

    The laser flash technique is widely used for determining the thermal diffusivity of a sample. In this work, the temperature distribution throughout the sample is investigated, identifying localized, highly-heated regions near the front surface of the sample as a function of: (1) pulse duration, (2) incident beam uniformity, and (3) sample opacity. These high-temperature regions result in an increase in the uncertainty due to temperature-dependent properties, an increase in the heat loss from the sample, and an increased risk of sample damage. The temperature within a semi-transparent media is also investigated in order to establish a regime for which the media can reasonably be considered as opaque. This analysis illustrates that, for same total energy deposition, treatment of the incident energy as a continuous heat source, as opposed to an infinitesimal pulse of energy, results in a factor of 2 increase in the front surface temperature during heating. Also, for the same total energy deposition and approximate beam size, use of a Gaussian intensity distribution increases the front surface temperature during heating by more than a factor of 2 as compared to the use of a uniform temperature distribution. By analyzing the front surface temperature of an absorbing and conducting semi-transparent sample subjected to a Gaussian intensity distribution, it is concluded that the media can be treated as opaque, (i.e. the energy can be applied as a boundary condition) for {var_epsilon} = kd > 50, where k is the extinction coefficient and d is the beam diameter. For materials with a sufficiently small absorption coefficient and thermal diffusivity, a closed-form solution suitable for design use is presented for the front-surface temperature at a location coincident with the beam centerline.

  11. Realization of a measurement of a ``weak value''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, N. W. M.; Story, J. G.; Hulet, Randall G.

    1991-03-01

    We present the first realization of a measurement of a ``weak value,'' a concept recently introduced by Aharonov, Albert, and Vaidman (AAV). Our experiment uses a birefringent crystal to separate the two linear-polarization components of a laser beam by a distance small compared to the laser-beam waist. This ``weak measurement'' is followed by a strong measurement which translates the centroid of the beam by a distance far larger than the birefringence-induced separation. In addition, we present data corresponding to orthogonal initial and final states, for which the weak value is not defined. This interference effect may have application in the amplification and detection of weak effects.

  12. Redox potential - field measurements - meassured vs. expected values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavělová, Monika; Kovář, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Oxidation and reduction (redox) potential is an important and theoretically very well defined parameter and can be calculated accurately. Its value is determinative for management of many electrochemical processes, chemical redox technologies as well as biotechnologies. To measure the redox value that would correspond with the accuracy level of theoretical calculations in field or operational conditions is however nearly impossible. Redox is in practice measured using combined argentochloride electrode with subsequent value conversion to standard hydrogen electrode (EH). Argentochloride electrode does not allow for precise calibration. Prior to the measurement the accuracy of measurement of particular electrode can only be verified in comparative/control solution with value corresponding with oxic conditions (25°C: +220 mV argentochloride electrode, i.e.. +427 mV after conversion to EH). A commercial product of stabile comparative solution for anoxic conditions is not available and therefore not used in every day practice - accuracy of negative redox is not verified. In this presentation results of two tests will be presented: a) monitoring during dynamic groundwater sampling from eight monitoring wells at a site contaminated by chlorinated ethenes (i.e. post-oxic to anoxic conditions) and b) laboratory test of groundwater contaminated by arsenic from two sites during reaction with highly oxidized compounds of iron (ferrates) - i.e. strongly oxic conditions. In both tests a simultaneous measurement by four argentochloride electrodes was implemented - all four electrodes were prior to the test maintained expertly. The redox values of testing electrodes in a comparative solution varied by max. 6 mV. The redox values measured by four electrodes in both anoxic and oxic variant varied by tens to a hundred mV, while with growing time of test the variance of measured redox values increased in both oxic and anoxic variant. Therefore the interpretation of measured redox

  13. Quantitation of absorbed or deposited materials on a substrate that measures energy deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grant, Patrick G.; Bakajin, Olgica; Vogel, John S.; Bench, Graham

    2005-01-18

    This invention provides a system and method for measuring an energy differential that correlates to quantitative measurement of an amount mass of an applied localized material. Such a system and method remains compatible with other methods of analysis, such as, for example, quantitating the elemental or isotopic content, identifying the material, or using the material in biochemical analysis.

  14. English Value-Added Measures: Examining the Limitations of School Performance Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Value-added "Progress" measures are to be introduced for all English schools in 2016 as "headline" measures of school performance. This move comes despite research highlighting high levels of instability in value-added measures and concerns about the omission of contextual variables in the planned measure. This article studies…

  15. A fibre optic scintillator dosemeter for absorbed dose measurements of low-energy X-ray-emitting brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Sliski, Alan; Soares, Christopher; Mitch, Michael G

    2006-01-01

    A newly developed dosemeter using a 0.5 mm diameter x 0.5 mm thick cylindrical plastic scintillator coupled to the end of a fibre optic cable is capable of measuring the absorbed dose rate in water around low-activity, low-energy X-ray emitters typically used in prostate brachytherapy. Recent tests of this dosemeter showed that it is possible to measure the dose rate as a function of distance in water from 2 to 30 mm of a (103)Pd source of air-kerma strength 3.4 U (1 U = 1 microGy m(2) h(-1)), or 97 MBq (2.6 mCi) apparent activity, with good signal-to-noise ratio. The signal-to-noise ratio is only dependent on the integration time and background subtraction. The detector volume is enclosed in optically opaque, nearly water-equivalent materials so that there is no polar response other than that due to the shape of the scintillator volume chosen, in this case cylindrical. The absorbed dose rate very close to commercial brachytherapy sources can be mapped in an automated water phantom, providing a 3-D dose distribution with sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The sensitive volume of the detector is 0.5 mm from the end of the optically opaque waterproof housing, enabling measurements at very close distances to sources. The sensitive detector electronics allow the measurement of very low dose rates, as exist at centimeter distances from these sources. The detector is also applicable to mapping dose distributions from more complex source geometries such as eye applicators for treating macular degeneration.

  16. Antioxidant activity of the giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai measured by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity and hydroxyl radical averting capacity methods.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuki; Maeda, Toshimichi; Hasegawa, Yoshiro; Tokunaga, Takushi; Ogawa, Shinya; Fukuda, Kyoko; Nagatsuka, Norie; Nagao, Keiko; Ueno, Shunshiro

    2011-01-01

    The giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai (reaching sizes of up to 2 m diameter and 150 kg), which forms dense blooms, has caused extensive damage to fisheries by overloading trawl nets, while its toxic nematocysts cause dermatological symptoms. Giant jellyfish are currently discarded on the grounds of pest control. However, the giant jellyfish is considered to be edible and is part of Chinese cuisine. Therefore, we investigated whether any benefits for human health may be derived from consumption of the jellyfish in order to formulate medicated diets. Antioxidant activity of Nemopilema nomurai was measured using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and hydroxyl radical averting capacity (HORAC) methods. Based on the results, the ORAC value of the giant jellyfish freeze-dried sample was 541 µmol trolox equivalent (TE)/100 g and the HORAC value was 3,687 µmol gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/100 g. On the other hand, the IC50 value of hydroxyl radical scavenging activity measured by using the electron spin resonance method was 3.3%. In conclusion, the results suggest that the freeze-dried powder of the giant jellyfish Nemopilema nomurai is a potentially beneficial food for humans.

  17. Heisenberg's uncertainty principle for simultaneous measurement of positive-operator-valued measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyadera, Takayuki; Imai, Hideki

    2008-11-01

    A limitation on simultaneous measurement of two arbitrary positive-operator-valued measures is discussed. In general, simultaneous measurement of two noncommutative observables is only approximately possible. Following Werner’s formulation, we introduce a distance between observables to quantify an accuracy of measurement. We derive an inequality that relates the achievable accuracy with noncommutativity between two observables. As a byproduct a necessary condition for two positive-operator-valued measures to be simultaneously measurable is obtained.

  18. Measurements of Absorbing Aerosols Using in Situ and Remote Sensing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, J. V.; Martins, J. V.; Kaufman, Y.; Artaxo, P.; Andrea, C.; Yamasoe, M.; Remer, L.

    2001-12-01

    Reliable measurements of light absorption by aerosol particles are essential for an accurate assessment of the climate radiative forcing by aerosol particles. Depending on the absorption properties, the radiative forcing of the aerosols may change from a cooling to a heating effect. New techniques for the remote sensing of aerosol absorption over land and ocean are developed and applied in combination with in situ measurements for validation and addition of complementary information. Spectral measurements show the effects of aerosols on absorption of light from the UV to the near infrared. Depending on particle size and structure, there is a significant absorption component that must be accounted for the radiative forcing in the near infrared. Remote sensing results from MODIS and from the CLAMS field experiment, as well as in situ validation data will be discussed.

  19. Measurement of wavelength-dependent extinction to distinguish between absorbing and nonabsorbing aerosol particulates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portscht, R.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of spectral transmission factors in smoky optical transmission paths reveal a difference between wavelength exponents of the extinction cross section of high absorption capacity and those of low absorption capacity. A theoretical explanation of this behavior is presented. In certain cases, it is possible to obtain data on the absorption index of aerosol particles in the optical path by measuring the spectral decadic extinction coefficient at, at least, two wavelengths. In this manner it is possible, for instance, to distinguish smoke containing soot from water vapor.

  20. Simulation and Measurement of Absorbed Dose from 137 Cs Gammas Using a Si Timepix Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoffle, Nicholas; Pinsky, Lawrence; Empl, Anton; Semones, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The TimePix readout chip is a hybrid pixel detector with over 65k independent pixel elements. Each pixel contains its own circuitry for charge collection, counting logic, and readout. When coupled with a Silicon detector layer, the Timepix chip is capable of measuring the charge, and thus energy, deposited in the Silicon. Measurements using a NIST traceable 137Cs gamma source have been made at Johnson Space Center using such a Si Timepix detector, and this data is compared to simulations of energy deposition in the Si layer carried out using FLUKA.

  1. Measurement of LINAC 90 degrees head leakage radiation TVL values.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuofeng; Mutic, Sasa; Low, Daniel

    2006-09-01

    One of the key components in modern LINAC room shielding design is the amount of 90 degrees head leakage radiation levels. With the general clinical acceptance of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique, accurate knowledge of this quantity has become even more important. Measurement of 90 degrees head leakage radiation of medical linear accelerators can be technically challenging due to the low dose rate causing poor signal-to-noise ratios in most detectors. 90 degrees leakage tenth-value layer (TVL) values in concrete have not been reported for the Elekta linear accelerators. This report describes our measurements of 90 degrees leakage TVL values for 6, 10, and 18 MV x-ray beams for an Elekta Precise Treatment System. A large-volume (1000 cm3) unpressurized ionization chamber and a high sensitivity electrometer, together with a separate chamber bias power supply, were used in these measurements in order to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. A lead enclosure, of minimum thickness 10 cm, was constructed inside the treatment room to house the ion chamber to reduce the influence of room-scattered radiation. A square aperture of 10 X 10 cm2 area was left in the shield and aimed towards the accelerator head. Measurements were performed with the chamber placed at approximately 2 m from the accelerator isocenter. Concrete slabs with individual dimensions of approximately 40 X 40 cm2 cross-sectional area and 5 cm thickness were placed between the accelerator head and the ion chamber for these measurements. The measurements were performed with total concrete thickness of up to 80 cm, so that values up to the third TVL were measured. These measurements showed thatthe first concrete TVL values are 22, 23, and 28 cm (8.6, 9.1, and 10.5 in.) for 6, 10, and 18 MV beams, while the average of the first 3 TVL's were 25, 26, and 29 cm (9.9, 10.2, and 11.5 in.). Measured values agreed to within 10% of previously reported values for Varian linear accelerators for

  2. Factors that introduce intrasubject variability into ear-canal absorbance measurements.

    PubMed

    Voss, Susan E; Stenfelt, Stefan; Neely, Stephen T; Rosowski, John J

    2013-07-01

    Wideband immittance measures can be useful in analyzing acoustic sound flow through the ear and also have diagnostic potential for the identification of conductive hearing loss as well as causes of conductive hearing loss. To interpret individual measurements, the variability in test–retest data must be described and quantified. Contributors to variability in ear-canal absorbance–based measurements are described in this article. These include assumptions related to methodologies and issues related to the probe fit within the ear and potential acoustic leaks. Evidence suggests that variations in ear-canal cross-sectional area or measurement location are small relative to variability within a population. Data are shown to suggest that the determination of the Thévenin equivalent of the ER-10C probe introduces minimal variability and is independent of the foam ear tip itself. It is suggested that acoustic leaks in the coupling of the ear tip to the ear canal lead to substantial variations and that this issue needs further work in terms of potential criteria to identify an acoustic leak. In addition, test–retest data from the literature are reviewed.

  3. The Valued Living Questionnaire: Defining and Measuring Valued Action within a Behavioral Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kelly G.; Sandoz, Emily K.; Kitchens, Jennifer; Roberts, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    A number of cognitive-behavior therapies now strongly emphasize particular behavioral processes as mediators of clinical change specific to that therapy. This shift in emphasis calls for the development of measures sensitive to changes in the therapies' processes. Among these is acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), which posits valued living…

  4. Kinetic coupling between electron and proton transfer in cytochrome c oxidase: simultaneous measurements of conductance and absorbance changes.

    PubMed Central

    Adelroth, P; Sigurdson, H; Hallén, S; Brzezinski, P

    1996-01-01

    Bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase is an electron-current driven proton pump. To investigate the mechanism by which this pump operates it is important to study individual electron- and proton-transfer reactions in the enzyme, and key reactions in which they are kinetically and thermodynamically coupled. In this work, we have simultaneously measured absorbance changes associated with electron-transfer reactions and conductance changes associated with protonation reactions following pulsed illumination of the photolabile complex of partly reduced bovine cytochrome c oxidase and carbon monoxide. Following CO dissociation, several kinetic phases in the absorbance changes were observed with time constants ranging from approximately 3 microseconds to several milliseconds, reflecting internal electron-transfer reactions within the enzyme. The data show that the rate of one of these electron-transfer reactions, from cytochrome a3 to a on a millisecond time scale, is controlled by a proton-transfer reaction. These results are discussed in terms of a model in which cytochrome a3 interacts electrostatically with a protonatable group, L, in the vicinity of the binuclear center, in equilibrium with the bulk through a proton-conducting pathway, which determines the rate of proton transfer (and indirectly also of electron transfer). The interaction energy of cytochrome a3 with L was determined independently from the pH dependence of the extent of the millisecond-electron transfer and the number of protons released, as determined from the conductance measurements. The magnitude of the interaction energy, 70 meV (1 eV = 1.602 x 10(-19) J), is consistent with a distance of 5-10 A between cytochrome a3 and L. Based on the recently determined high-resolution x-ray structures of bovine and a bacterial cytochrome c oxidase, possible candidates for L and a physiological role for L are discussed. PMID:8901574

  5. [Measurement of blood pressure variability and the clinical value].

    PubMed

    Kékes, Ede; Kiss, István

    2014-10-19

    Authors have collected and analyzed literature data on blood pressure variability. They present the methods of blood pressure variability measurement, clinical value and relationships with target organ damages and risk of presence of cardiovascular events. They collect data about the prognostic value of blood pressure variability and the effects of different antihypertensive drugs on blood pressure variability. They underline that in addition to reduction of blood pressure to target value, it is essential to influence blood pressure fluctuation and decrease blood pressure variability, because blood pressure fluctuation presents a major threat for the hypertensive subjects. Data from national studies are also presented. They welcome that measurement of blood pressure variability has been included in international guidelines.

  6. Bayes' theorem application in the measure information diagnostic value assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzechowski, Piotr D.; Makal, Jaroslaw; Nazarkiewicz, Andrzej

    2006-03-01

    The paper presents Bayesian method application in the measure information diagnostic value assessment that is used in the computer-aided diagnosis system. The computer system described here has been created basing on the Bayesian Network and is used in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) diagnosis. The graphic diagnostic model enables to juxtapose experts' knowledge with data.

  7. Against Journal Articles for Measuring Value in University Output

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mbali, C.

    2010-01-01

    The following lines of arguments against the metrics of journal articles is developed: (1) Textual output should no longer be main valued output; (2) Digitalization enables other ways of advancing knowledge; (3) Measures by journal article favours the disciplines of Natural Science and Engineering (NSE) and moulds other disciplines of Social…

  8. Measuring and Communicating the Value Created by an Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, W. Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers a different perspective in measuring the value created by an organization. It does so in the context of an undergraduate course in managerial accounting. In order to break down the functional silo approach to problem solving that has become the model of traditional business education, applications of shadow accounting, the…

  9. Using Value-Added Measures of Teacher Quality. Brief 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanushek, Eric A.; Rivkin, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    Extensive education research on the contribution of teachers to student achievement produces two generally accepted results. First, teacher quality varies substantially as measured by the value added to student achievement or future academic attainment or earnings. Second, variables often used to determine entry into the profession and…

  10. Measuring the strategic value of information technology investments

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, K.W.

    1994-08-01

    Value is often perceived differently by the proponents of new information technologies and those who allocate resources and define priorities. Such differences often become a roadblock to meeting true business needs. Project justifications regularly rely on calculated cost savings, which rarely measure the full benefit of new technologies. In fact, if cost savings provide a complete picture, then the organization is probably just automating routine clerical operations and has abandoned efforts that would provide significant strategic value. Strategic value is not limited to financial calculations, but includes quality, time and risk criteria. This paper describes approaches for measuring strategic value that can provide organizations with proven techniques to improve performance, reengineer processes, benchmark performance against other suppliers, identify outsourcing opportunities, or defend themselves from pressures to outsource. Many organizations respond to tightening budgets by cutting overhead. These measurement approaches can demonstrate how overhead is critical to organizational effectiveness and how cost savings can be found, instead, by measurably improving performance throughout the organization. Finally, the paper describes efforts underway within the Department of Energy and at the Hanford Site to implement the approaches described in this paper.

  11. Direct measurements and modeling of gradient-aligned cross-field ion flows near an absorbing boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. S.; Siddiqui, M. Umair; McIlvain, J. S.; Short, Z. D.; Scime, E. E.; Aguirre, E. M.; Henriquez, M. F.; McKee, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    Direct measurements of cross-field ion transport near boundaries are sought for validating transport models in magnetically confined plasmas. Using laser-induced fluorescence, we measured ion flows normal to an absorbing boundary that was aligned to be parallel to a uniform axial magnetic field in a helicon plasma. We used Langmuir and emissive probes to measure local density, temperature and plasma potential profiles in the same region. We then scanned ion-neutral collisionality by varying the ratio of the ion gyro-radius, ρi, and ion-neutral collision length, λ, over the range 0.34 <=ρi / λ <= 1.60. Classical diffusion along density and potential gradients is sufficient to describe flow profiles for most cases but did not describe measurements well for 0.44 <=ρi / λ <= 0.65. In these cases, cross-sections ~3 times the classical prediction produced acceptable fits, and flow to the boundary was enhanced significantly. These enhanced flow cases exhibit spectra with low-frequency electrostatic fluctuations (f <10 kHz) that are not observed in data described well by a classical diffusion model. This work is supported by US National Science Foundation grant number PHY-1360278.

  12. Development and characterization of an interferometer for calorimeter-based absorbed dose to water measurements in a medical linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Martinez, Everardo; Malin, Martha J.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2016-11-01

    The quantity of relevance for external beam radiotherapy is absorbed dose to water (ADW). An interferometer was built, characterized, and tested to measure ADW within the dose range of interest for external beam radiotherapy using the temperature dependence of the refractive index of water. The interferometer was used to measure radiation-induced phase shifts of a laser beam passing through a (10 × 10 × 10) cm3 water-filled glass phantom, irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam from a medical linear accelerator. The field size was (7 × 7) cm2 and the dose was measured at a depth of 5 cm in the water phantom. The intensity of the interference pattern was measured with a photodiode and was used to calculate the time-dependent phase shift curve. The system was thermally insulated to achieve temperature drifts of less than 1.5 mK/min. Data were acquired 60 s before and after the irradiation. The radiation-induced phase shifts were calculated by taking the difference in the pre- and post-irradiation drifts extrapolated to the midpoint of the irradiation. For 200, 300, and 400 monitor units, the measured doses were 1.6 ± 0.3, 2.6 ± 0.3, and 3.1 ± 0.3 Gy, respectively. Measurements agreed within the uncertainty with dose calculations performed with a treatment planning system. The estimated type-A, k = 1 uncertainty in the measured doses was 0.3 Gy which is an order of magnitude lower than previously published interferometer-based ADW measurements.

  13. Development and characterization of an interferometer for calorimeter-based absorbed dose to water measurements in a medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Flores-Martinez, Everardo; Malin, Martha J; DeWerd, Larry A

    2016-11-01

    The quantity of relevance for external beam radiotherapy is absorbed dose to water (ADW). An interferometer was built, characterized, and tested to measure ADW within the dose range of interest for external beam radiotherapy using the temperature dependence of the refractive index of water. The interferometer was used to measure radiation-induced phase shifts of a laser beam passing through a (10 × 10 × 10) cm(3) water-filled glass phantom, irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam from a medical linear accelerator. The field size was (7 × 7) cm(2) and the dose was measured at a depth of 5 cm in the water phantom. The intensity of the interference pattern was measured with a photodiode and was used to calculate the time-dependent phase shift curve. The system was thermally insulated to achieve temperature drifts of less than 1.5 mK/min. Data were acquired 60 s before and after the irradiation. The radiation-induced phase shifts were calculated by taking the difference in the pre- and post-irradiation drifts extrapolated to the midpoint of the irradiation. For 200, 300, and 400 monitor units, the measured doses were 1.6 ± 0.3, 2.6 ± 0.3, and 3.1 ± 0.3 Gy, respectively. Measurements agreed within the uncertainty with dose calculations performed with a treatment planning system. The estimated type-A, k = 1 uncertainty in the measured doses was 0.3 Gy which is an order of magnitude lower than previously published interferometer-based ADW measurements.

  14. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  15. Measurement and Simulation of Thermal Conductivity of Hafnium-Aluminum Thermal Neutron Absorber Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillen, Donna Post; Harris, William H.

    2016-09-01

    A metal matrix composite (MMC) material composed of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) intermetallic particles in an aluminum matrix has been identified as a promising material for fast flux irradiation testing applications. This material can filter thermal neutrons while simultaneously providing high rates of conductive cooling for experiment capsules. The purpose of this work is to investigate effects of Hf-Al material composition and neutron irradiation on thermophysical properties, which were measured before and after irradiation. When performing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) on the irradiated specimens, a large exotherm corresponding to material annealment was observed. Therefore, a test procedure was developed to perform DSC and laser flash analysis (LFA) to obtain the specific heat and thermal diffusivity of pre- and post-annealment specimens. This paper presents the thermal properties for three states of the MMC material: (1) unirradiated, (2) as-irradiated, and (3) irradiated and annealed. Microstructure-property relationships were obtained for the thermal conductivity. These relationships are useful for designing components from this material to operate in irradiation environments. The ability of this material to effectively conduct heat as a function of temperature, volume fraction Al3Hf, radiation damage, and annealing is assessed using the MOOSE suite of computational tools.

  16. Multispectral metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Grant, J; McCrindle, I J H; Li, C; Cumming, D R S

    2014-03-01

    We present the simulation, implementation, and measurement of a multispectral metamaterial absorber (MSMMA) and show that we can realize a simple absorber structure that operates in the mid-IR and terahertz (THz) bands. By embedding an IR metamaterial absorber layer into a standard THz metamaterial absorber stack, a narrowband resonance is induced at a wavelength of 4.3 μm. This resonance is in addition to the THz metamaterial absorption resonance at 109 μm (2.75 THz). We demonstrate the inherent scalability and versatility of our MSMMA by describing a second device whereby the MM-induced IR absorption peak frequency is tuned by varying the IR absorber geometry. Such a MSMMA could be coupled with a suitable sensor and formed into a focal plane array, enabling multispectral imaging.

  17. A new optical method coupling light polarization and Vis-NIR spectroscopy to improve the measured absorbance signal's quality of soil samples.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobrecht, Alexia; Bendoula, Ryad; Roger, Jean-Michel; Bellon-Maurel, Véronique

    2014-05-01

    Visible - Near-infrared spectroscopy (Vis-NIRS) is now commonly used to measure different physical and chemical parameters of soils, including carbon content. However, prediction model accuracy is insufficient for Vis-NIRS to replace routine laboratory analysis. One of the biggest issues this technique is facing up to is light scattering due to soil particles. It causes departure in the assumed linear relationship between the Absorbance spectrum and the concentration of the chemicals of interest as stated by Beer-Lambert's Law, which underpins the calibration models. Therefore it becomes essential to improve the metrological quality of the measured signal in order to optimize calibration as light/matter interactions are at the basis of the resulting linear modeling. Optics can help to mitigate scattering effect on the signal. We put forward a new optical setup coupling linearly polarized light with a Vis-NIR spectrometer to free the measured spectra from multi-scattering effect. The corrected measured spectrum was then used to compute an Absorbance spectrum of the sample, using Dahm's Equation in the frame of the Representative Layer Theory. This method has been previously tested and validated on liquid (milk+ dye) and powdered (sand + dye) samples showing scattering (and absorbing) properties. The obtained Absorbance was a very good approximation of the Beer-Lambert's law absorbance. Here, we tested the method on a set of 54 soil samples to predict Soil Organic Carbon content. In order to assess the signal quality improvement by this method, we built and compared calibration models using Partial Least Square (PLS) algorithm. The prediction model built from new Absorbance spectrum outperformed the model built with the classical Absorbance traditionally obtained with Vis-NIR diffuse reflectance. This study is a good illustration of the high influence of signal quality on prediction model's performances.

  18. Reference value sensitivity of measures of unfair health inequality

    PubMed Central

    García-Gómez, Pilar; Schokkaert, Erik; Van Ourti, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Most politicians and ethical observers are not interested in pure health inequalities, as they want to distinguish between different causes of health differences. Measures of “unfair” inequality - direct unfairness and the fairness gap, but also the popular standardized concentration index - therefore neutralize the effects of what are considered to be “legitimate” causes of inequality. This neutralization is performed by putting a subset of the explanatory variables at reference values, e.g. their means. We analyze how the inequality ranking of different policies depends on the specific choice of reference values. We show with mortality data from the Netherlands that the problem is empirically relevant and we suggest a statistical method for fixing the reference values. PMID:24954998

  19. Uncertainty relations for positive-operator-valued measures

    SciTech Connect

    Massar, Serge

    2007-10-15

    How much unavoidable randomness is generated by a positive-operator-valued measure (POVM)? We address this question using two complementary approaches. First, we study the variance of a real variable associated with the POVM outcomes. In this context we introduce an uncertainty operator which measures how much additional noise is introduced by carrying out a POVM rather than a von Neumann measurement. We illustrate this first approach by studying the variances of joint estimates of {sigma}{sub x} and {sigma}{sub z} for spin-1/2 particles. We show that for unbiased measurements the sum of these variances is lower bounded by 1. In our second approach we study the entropy of the POVM outcomes. In particular, we try to establish lower bounds on the entropy of the POVM outcomes. We illustrate this second approach by examples.

  20. Comparison of dose at an interventional reference point between the displayed estimated value and measured value.

    PubMed

    Chida, Koichi; Inaba, Yohei; Morishima, Yoshiaki; Taura, Masaaki; Ebata, Ayako; Yanagawa, Isao; Takeda, Ken; Zuguchi, Masayuki

    2011-07-01

    Today, interventional radiology (IR) X-ray units are required for display of doses at an interventional reference point (IRP) for the operator (IR physician). The dose displayed at the IRP (the reference dose) of an X-ray unit has been reported to be helpful for characterizing patient exposure in real time. However, no detailed report has evaluated the accuracy of the reference doses displayed on X-ray equipment. Thus, in this study, we compared the displayed reference dose to the actual measured value in many IR X-ray systems. Although the displayed reference doses of many IR X-ray systems agreed with the measured actual values within approximately 15%, the doses of a few IR units were not close. Furthermore, some X-ray units made in Japan displayed reference doses quite different from the actual measured value, probably because the reference point of these units differs from the International Electrotechnical Commission standard. Thus, IR physicians should pay attention to the location of the IRP of the displayed reference dose in Japan. Furthermore, physicians should be aware of the accuracy of the displayed reference dose of the X-ray system that they use for IR. Thus, regular checks of the displayed reference dose of the X-ray system are important.

  1. Weak values in continuous weak measurements of qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lupei; Liang, Pengfei; Li, Xin-Qi

    2015-07-01

    For continuous weak measurements of qubits, we obtain exact expressions for weak values (WVs) from the postselection restricted average of measurement outputs, by using both the quantum-trajectory equation (QTE) and the quantum Bayesian approach. The former is applicable to short-time weak measurement, while the latter can relax the measurement strength to finite. We find that even in the "very" weak limit the result can be essentially different from the one originally proposed by Aharonov, Albert, and Vaidman (AAV), in the sense that our result incorporates nonperturbative correction which could be important when the AAV WV is large. Within the Bayesian framework, we obtain also elegant expressions for finite measurement strength and find that the amplifier's noise in quantum measurement has no effect on the WVs. In particular, we obtain very useful results for homodyne measurement in a circuit-QED system, which allows for measuring the real and imaginary parts of the AAV WV by simply tuning the phase of the local oscillator. This advantage can be exploited as an efficient state-tomography technique.

  2. Defining and Computing a Value Based Cyber-Security Measure

    SciTech Connect

    Aissa, Anis Ben; Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Frederick T; Mili, Ali

    2011-01-01

    In past work, we presented a value based measure of cybersecurity that quantifies the security of a system in concrete terms, specifically, in terms of how much each system stakeholder stands to lose (in dollars per hour of operation) as a result of security threats and system vulnerabilities\\; our metric varies according to the stakes that each stakeholder has in meeting each security requirement. In this paper we discuss the specification and design of a system that collects, updates and maintains all the information that pertains to estimating our cybersecurity measure, and offers stakeholders quantitative means to make security-related decisions.

  3. Defining and Computing a Valued Based Cyber-Security Measure

    SciTech Connect

    Aissa, Anis Ben; Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Frederick T; Mili, Ali

    2012-01-01

    In earlier work, we presented a value based measure of cybersecurity that quantifies the security of a system in concrete terms, specifically, in terms of how much each system stakeholder stands to lose (in dollars per hour of operation) as a result of security threats and system vulnerabilities; our metric varies according to the stakes that each stakeholder has in meeting each security requirement. In this paper, we discuss the specification and design of a system that collects, updates, and maintains all the information that pertains to estimating our cybersecurity measure, and offers stakeholders quantitative means to make security-related decisions.

  4. Appropriate Measures of Effectiveness: Teacher Evaluations and Value-Added Measures in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covington, Azure Camille

    2016-01-01

    The increased use of value-added measures is a result of policymakers viewing traditional measures of teacher effectiveness as obsolete and unrelated to student achievement. Additionally, literature lacks substantial findings examining the relationship between principal observation ratings and a teacher's value-added scores based on the…

  5. Ferroelectrics based absorbing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jianping; Sadaune, Véronique; Burgnies, Ludovic; Lippens, Didier

    2014-07-01

    We show that ferroelectrics-based periodic structure made of BaSrTiO3 (BST) cubes, arrayed onto a metal plate with a thin dielectric spacer film exhibit a dramatic enhancement of absorbance with value close to unity. The enhancement is found around the Mie magnetic resonance of the Ferroelectrics cubes with the backside metal layer stopping any transmitted waves. It also involves quasi-perfect impedance matching resulting in reflection suppression via simultaneous magnetic and electrical activities. In addition, it was shown numerically the existence of a periodicity optimum, which is explained from surface waves analysis along with trade-off between the resonance damping and the intrinsic loss of ferroelectrics cubes. An experimental verification in a hollow waveguide configuration with a good comparison with full-wave numerical modelling is at last reported by measuring the scattering parameters of single and dual BST cubes schemes pointing out coupling effects for densely packed structures.

  6. Absorbed dose evaluation of Auger electron-emitting radionuclides: impact of input decay spectra on dose point kernels and S-values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falzone, Nadia; Lee, Boon Q.; Fernández-Varea, José M.; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Stuchbery, Andrew E.; Kibédi, Tibor; Vallis, Katherine A.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of decay data provided by the newly developed stochastic atomic relaxation model BrIccEmis on dose point kernels (DPKs - radial dose distribution around a unit point source) and S-values (absorbed dose per unit cumulated activity) of 14 Auger electron (AE) emitting radionuclides, namely 67Ga, 80mBr, 89Zr, 90Nb, 99mTc, 111In, 117mSn, 119Sb, 123I, 124I, 125I, 135La, 195mPt and 201Tl. Radiation spectra were based on the nuclear decay data from the medical internal radiation dose (MIRD) RADTABS program and the BrIccEmis code, assuming both an isolated-atom and condensed-phase approach. DPKs were simulated with the PENELOPE Monte Carlo (MC) code using event-by-event electron and photon transport. S-values for concentric spherical cells of various sizes were derived from these DPKs using appropriate geometric reduction factors. The number of Auger and Coster–Kronig (CK) electrons and x-ray photons released per nuclear decay (yield) from MIRD-RADTABS were consistently higher than those calculated using BrIccEmis. DPKs for the electron spectra from BrIccEmis were considerably different from MIRD-RADTABS in the first few hundred nanometres from a point source where most of the Auger electrons are stopped. S-values were, however, not significantly impacted as the differences in DPKs in the sub-micrometre dimension were quickly diminished in larger dimensions. Overestimation in the total AE energy output by MIRD-RADTABS leads to higher predicted energy deposition by AE emitting radionuclides, especially in the immediate vicinity of the decaying radionuclides. This should be taken into account when MIRD-RADTABS data are used to simulate biological damage at nanoscale dimensions.

  7. Absorbed dose evaluation of Auger electron-emitting radionuclides: impact of input decay spectra on dose point kernels and S-values.

    PubMed

    Falzone, Nadia; Lee, Boon Q; Fernández-Varea, José M; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Stuchbery, Andrew E; Kibédi, Tibor; Vallis, Katherine A

    2017-03-21

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of decay data provided by the newly developed stochastic atomic relaxation model BrIccEmis on dose point kernels (DPKs - radial dose distribution around a unit point source) and S-values (absorbed dose per unit cumulated activity) of 14 Auger electron (AE) emitting radionuclides, namely (67)Ga, (80m)Br, (89)Zr, (90)Nb, (99m)Tc, (111)In, (117m)Sn, (119)Sb, (123)I, (124)I, (125)I, (135)La, (195m)Pt and (201)Tl. Radiation spectra were based on the nuclear decay data from the medical internal radiation dose (MIRD) RADTABS program and the BrIccEmis code, assuming both an isolated-atom and condensed-phase approach. DPKs were simulated with the PENELOPE Monte Carlo (MC) code using event-by-event electron and photon transport. S-values for concentric spherical cells of various sizes were derived from these DPKs using appropriate geometric reduction factors. The number of Auger and Coster-Kronig (CK) electrons and x-ray photons released per nuclear decay (yield) from MIRD-RADTABS were consistently higher than those calculated using BrIccEmis. DPKs for the electron spectra from BrIccEmis were considerably different from MIRD-RADTABS in the first few hundred nanometres from a point source where most of the Auger electrons are stopped. S-values were, however, not significantly impacted as the differences in DPKs in the sub-micrometre dimension were quickly diminished in larger dimensions. Overestimation in the total AE energy output by MIRD-RADTABS leads to higher predicted energy deposition by AE emitting radionuclides, especially in the immediate vicinity of the decaying radionuclides. This should be taken into account when MIRD-RADTABS data are used to simulate biological damage at nanoscale dimensions.

  8. Accuracy and optimal timing of activity measurements in estimating the absorbed dose of radioiodine in the treatment of Graves' disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, S.; Horowitz, J.; Traino, A. C.; Chipkin, S. R.; Hollot, C. V.; Chait, Y.

    2011-02-01

    Calculation of the therapeutic activity of radioiodine 131I for individualized dosimetry in the treatment of Graves' disease requires an accurate estimate of the thyroid absorbed radiation dose based on a tracer activity administration of 131I. Common approaches (Marinelli-Quimby formula, MIRD algorithm) use, respectively, the effective half-life of radioiodine in the thyroid and the time-integrated activity. Many physicians perform one, two, or at most three tracer dose activity measurements at various times and calculate the required therapeutic activity by ad hoc methods. In this paper, we study the accuracy of estimates of four 'target variables': time-integrated activity coefficient, time of maximum activity, maximum activity, and effective half-life in the gland. Clinical data from 41 patients who underwent 131I therapy for Graves' disease at the University Hospital in Pisa, Italy, are used for analysis. The radioiodine kinetics are described using a nonlinear mixed-effects model. The distributions of the target variables in the patient population are characterized. Using minimum root mean squared error as the criterion, optimal 1-, 2-, and 3-point sampling schedules are determined for estimation of the target variables, and probabilistic bounds are given for the errors under the optimal times. An algorithm is developed for computing the optimal 1-, 2-, and 3-point sampling schedules for the target variables. This algorithm is implemented in a freely available software tool. Taking into consideration 131I effective half-life in the thyroid and measurement noise, the optimal 1-point time for time-integrated activity coefficient is a measurement 1 week following the tracer dose. Additional measurements give only a slight improvement in accuracy.

  9. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  10. Defining and Computing a Valued Based Cyber Security Measure

    SciTech Connect

    Aissa, Anis Ben; Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Frederick T; Mili, Ali

    2011-01-01

    In earlier works (Ben-Aissa et al. 2010; Abercrombie et al. 2008; Sheldon et al. 2009), we presented a value based measure of cybersecurity that quantifies the security of a system in concrete terms, specifically, in terms of how much each system stakeholder stands to lose (in dollars per hour of operation) as a result of security threats and system vulnerabilities; our metric varies according to the stakes that each stakeholder has in meeting each security requirement. In this paper, we discuss the specification and design of a system that collects, updates, and maintains all the information that pertains to estimating our cybersecurity measure, and offers stakeholders quantitative means to make security-related decisions.

  11. SU-E-T-516: Measurement of the Absorbed Dose Rate in Water Under Reference Conditions in a CyberKnife Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon-Martinez, N; Hernandez-Guzman, A; Gomez-Munoz, A; Massillon-JL, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to measure the absorbed-dose-rate in a CyberKnife unit reference-field (6cm diameter) using three ionization chambers (IC) following the new IAEA/AAPM formalism and Gafchromic film (MD-V3-55 and EBT3) protocol according to our work reported previously. Methods: The absorbed-dose-rates were measured at 90cm and 70cm SSD in a 10cmx10cm field and at 70cm SSD in a 5.4cmx5.4cm equivalent to 6cm diameter field using a linac Varian iX. All measurements were performed at 10cm depth in water. The correction factors that account for the difference between the IC response on the reference field and the CyberKnife reference field, k-(Q-msr,Q)^(f-msr,f-ref), were evaluated and Gafchromic film were calibrated using the results obtained above. Under the CyberKnife reference conditions, the factors were used to measure the absorbed-dose-rate with IC according to the new formalism and the calibrated film was irradiated in water. The film calibration curve was used to evaluate the absorbed-dose-rate in the CyberKnife unit. Results: Difference up to 2.56% is observed between dose-rate measured with IC in the reference 10cmx10cm field, depending where the chamber was calibrated, which was not reflected in the correction factor k-(Q-msr,Q)^(f-msr,f-ref ) where variations of ~0.15%-0.5% were obtained. Within measurements uncertainties, maximum difference of 1.8% on the absorbed-dose-rate in the CyberKnife reference field is observed between all IC and the films Conclusion: Absorbed-dose-rate to water was measured in a CyberKnife reference field with acceptable accuracy (combined uncertainties ~1.32%-1.73%, k=1) using three IC and films. The MD-V3-55 film as well as the new IAEA/AAPM formalism can be considered as a suitable dosimetric method to measure absorbed-dose-rate to water in small and non-standard CyberKnife fields used in clinical treatments However, the EBT3 film is not appropriated due to the high uncertainty provided (combined uncertainty ~9%, k=1

  12. Absorbance changes of carotenoids in different solvents.

    PubMed

    Zang, L Y; Sommerburg, O; van Kuijk, F J

    1997-01-01

    Carotenoids are typically measured in tissues with the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and quantitation is usually done by calibrating with stock solutions in solvents. Four carotenoids including lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene and beta-carotene were dissolved in hexane and methanol respectively, and their absorbance characteristics were compared. Lutein shows absorbance spectra that are almost independent of solvents at various concentrations. Spectra of zeaxanthin, lycopene and beta-carotene were found to be more solvent-dependent. The absorbance of zeaxanthin at lambda max is about approximately 2 times larger in methanol than in hexane at the higher concentrations, and increased non-linearly with increasing concentration in hexane. The absorbance of lycopene at lambda max in hexane is approximately 4 fold larger than in methanol, but the absorbance of the methanol sample can be recovered by re-extracting this sample in hexane. The absorbance of beta-carotene in hexane is larger than in methanol, and increased linearly with increasing concentration. But beta-carotene showed a non-linear concentration effect in methanol. There are very small variations in lambda max for all four carotenoids between hexane and methanol, due to differences in molar extinction coefficients. The non-linear concentration effects for these carotenoids are probably due to differences in solubility leading to the formation of microcrystals. Thus, care should be taken with quantitation of tissue carotenoid values, when they depend on measurement of concentrations in stock solutions.

  13. Organ/Tissue absorbed doses measured with a human phantom torso in the 9th Shuttle-Mir Mission (STS-91).

    PubMed

    Yasuda, H; Komiyama, T; Fujitaka, K

    1999-09-01

    Organ/Tissue absorbed doses were measured with a life-size human phantom torso in the 9th Shuttle/Mir Mission (STS-91) from June 2 to 12, 1998. This is the first attempt to measure directly organ/tissue doses over a whole human body in space. The absorbed dose was measured by combination of two integrating detectors: thermo- luminescent dosemeter of Mg2SiO4: Tb (TDMS) and plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD). Both detectors were calibrated on ground using high-energy charged-particle beams. The detectors were packed in 59 cases of tissue-equivalent resin; and put into the positions of radiologically important organs and tissues in the phantom. Efficiency reductions of TDMS for high-LET particles were corrected based on the LET-differential particle fluence of space radiation measured with PNTDs. The accumulated absorbed doses during this 9.8-days mission at low-earth orbit (400 km x 51.6 degrees) ranged from 1.6 mGy at colon to 2.6 mGy at bone surface (shoulder) with a variation factor of 1.6. The absorbed doses at some internal organs were higher than the skin dose. This fact is important from the viewpoint of radiological protection for astronauts.

  14. Measuring Success in Health Care Value-Based Purchasing Programs

    PubMed Central

    Damberg, Cheryl L.; Sorbero, Melony E.; Lovejoy, Susan L.; Martsolf, Grant R.; Raaen, Laura; Mandel, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Value-based purchasing (VBP) refers to a broad set of performance-based payment strategies that link financial incentives to health care providers' performance on a set of defined measures in an effort to achieve better value. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is advancing the implementation of VBP across an array of health care settings in the Medicare program in response to requirements in the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, and policymakers are grappling with many decisions about how best to design and implement VBP programs so that they are successful in achieving stated goals. This article summarizes the current state of knowledge about VBP based on a review of the published literature, a review of publicly available documentation from VBP programs, and discussions with an expert panel composed of VBP program sponsors, health care providers and health systems, and academic researchers with VBP evaluation expertise. Three types of VBP models were the focus of the review: (1) pay-for-performance programs, (2) accountable care organizations, and (3) bundled payment programs. The authors report on VBP program goals and what constitutes success; the evidence on the impact of these programs; factors that characterize high– and low–performing providers in VBP programs; the measures, incentive structures, and benchmarks used by VBP programs; evidence on spillover effects and unintended consequences; and gaps in the knowledge base. PMID:28083347

  15. Economic value of norovirus outbreak control measures in healthcare settings.

    PubMed

    Lee, B Y; Wettstein, Z S; McGlone, S M; Bailey, R R; Umscheid, C A; Smith, K J; Muder, R R

    2011-04-01

    Although norovirus is a significant cause of nosocomial viral gastroenteritis, the economic value of hospital outbreak containment measures following identification of a norovirus case is currently unknown. We developed computer simulation models to determine the potential cost-savings from the hospital perspective of implementing the following norovirus outbreak control interventions: (i) increased hand hygiene measures, (ii) enhanced disinfection practices, (iii) patient isolation, (iv) use of protective apparel, (v) staff exclusion policies, and (vi) ward closure. Sensitivity analyses explored the impact of varying intervention efficacy, number of initial norovirus cases, the norovirus reproductive rate (R(0)), and room, ward size, and occupancy. Implementing increased hand hygiene, using protective apparel, staff exclusion policies or increased disinfection separately or in bundles provided net cost-savings, even when the intervention was only 10% effective in preventing further norovirus transmission. Patient isolation or ward closure was cost-saving only when transmission prevention efficacy was very high (≥ 90%), and their economic value decreased as the number of beds per room and the number of empty beds per ward increased. Increased hand hygiene, using protective apparel or increased disinfection practices separately or in bundles are the most cost-saving interventions for the control and containment of a norovirus outbreak.

  16. Spectral dilation of L(B,H)-valued measures and its application to stationary dilation for Banach space valued processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miamee, A. G.

    1989-01-01

    Let B be a Banach space and H and K to Hilbert spaces. The spectral dilation of L(B,H)-valued measures is studied and it is shown that the recent results of Makagon and Salehi (1986) and Rosenberg (1982) on the dilation of L(K,H)-valued measures can be extended to hold for the general Banach space setting of L(B,H)-valued measures. These L(B,H)-valued measures are closely connected to the Banach space valued processes. This connection is recalled and as application of spectral dilation of L(B,H)-valued measures the well known stationary dilation results for scalar valued processes is extended to the case of Banach space valued processes.

  17. Spectral dilation of L(B,H)-valued measures and its application to stationary dilation for Banach space valued processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miamee, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    Let B be a Banach space and H and K two Hilbert spaces. The spectral dilation of L(B,H)-valued measures is studied and it is shown that the recent results of Makagon and Salehi (1986) and Rosenberg (1982) on the dilation of L(K,H)-valued measures can be extended to hold for the general Banach space setting of L(B,H)-valued measures. These L(B,H)-valued measures are closely connected to the Banach space valued processes. This connection is recalled and as application of spectral dilation of L(B,H)-valued measures the well known stationary dilation results for scalar valued processes is extended to the case of Banach space valued processes.

  18. Reference Values for Body Composition and Anthropometric Measurements in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Diana A.; Dawson, John A.; Matias, Catarina N.; Rocha, Paulo M.; Minderico, Cláudia S.; Allison, David B.; Sardinha, Luís B.; Silva, Analiza M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the importance of body composition in athletes, reference sex- and sport-specific body composition data are lacking. We aim to develop reference values for body composition and anthropometric measurements in athletes. Methods Body weight and height were measured in 898 athletes (264 female, 634 male), anthropometric variables were assessed in 798 athletes (240 female and 558 male), and in 481 athletes (142 female and 339 male) with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). A total of 21 different sports were represented. Reference percentiles (5th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 95th) were calculated for each measured value, stratified by sex and sport. Because sample sizes within a sport were often very low for some outcomes, the percentiles were estimated using a parametric, empirical Bayesian framework that allowed sharing information across sports. Results We derived sex- and sport-specific reference percentiles for the following DXA outcomes: total (whole body scan) and regional (subtotal, trunk, and appendicular) bone mineral content, bone mineral density, absolute and percentage fat mass, fat-free mass, and lean soft tissue. Additionally, we derived reference percentiles for height-normalized indexes by dividing fat mass, fat-free mass, and appendicular lean soft tissue by height squared. We also derived sex- and sport-specific reference percentiles for the following anthropometry outcomes: weight, height, body mass index, sum of skinfold thicknesses (7 skinfolds, appendicular skinfolds, trunk skinfolds, arm skinfolds, and leg skinfolds), circumferences (hip, arm, midthigh, calf, and abdominal circumferences), and muscle circumferences (arm, thigh, and calf muscle circumferences). Conclusions These reference percentiles will be a helpful tool for sports professionals, in both clinical and field settings, for body composition assessment in athletes. PMID:24830292

  19. Measure Your Gradient”: A New Way to Measure Gradients in High Performance Liquid Chromatography by Mass Spectrometric or Absorbance Detection

    PubMed Central

    Magee, Megan H.; Manulik, Joseph C.; Barnes, Brian B.; Abate-Pella, Daniel; Hewitt, Joshua T.; Boswell, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    The gradient produced by an HPLC is never the same as the one it is programmed to produce, but non-idealities in the gradient can be taken into account if they are measured. Such measurements are routine, yet only one general approach has been described to make them: both HPLC solvents are replaced with water, solvent B is spiked with 0.1% acetone, and the gradient is measured by UV absorbance. Despite the widespread use of this procedure, we found a number of problems and complications with it, mostly stemming from the fact that it measures the gradient under abnormal conditions (e.g. both solvents are water). It is also generally not amenable to MS detection, leaving those with only an MS detector no way to accurately measure their gradients. We describe a new approach called “Measure Your Gradient” that potentially solves these problems. One runs a test mixture containing 20 standards on a standard stationary phase and enters their gradient retention times into open-source software available at www.measureyourgradient.org. The software uses the retention times to back-calculate the gradient that was truly produced by the HPLC. Here we present a preliminary investigation of the new approach. We found that gradients measured this way are comparable to those measured by a more accurate, albeit impractical, version of the conventional approach. The new procedure worked with different gradients, flow rates, column lengths, inner diameters, on two different HPLCs, and with six different batches of the standard stationary phase. PMID:25441073

  20. Oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) of cyclodextrin-solubilized flavonoids, resveratrol and astaxanthin as measured with the ORAC-EPR method

    PubMed Central

    Sueishi, Yoshimi; Ishikawa, Misa; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Endoh, Nobuyuki; Oowada, Shigeru; Shimmei, Masashi; Fujii, Hirotada; Kotake, Yashige

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we proposed an oxygen radical absorbance capacity method that directly quantifies the antioxidant’s scavenging capacity against free radicals and evaluated the radical scavenging abilities for water soluble antioxidant compounds. In this study, we determined the radical scavenging abilities of lipophilic antioxidants which were solubilized by cyclodextrin in water. Commonly employed fluorescence-based method measures the antioxidant’s protection capability for the fluorescent probe, while we directly quantify free-radical level using electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping technique. In addition, the spin trapping-based method adopted controlled UV-photolysis of azo-initiator for free radical generation, but in fluorescence-based method, thermal decomposition of azo-initiator was utilized. We determined the radical scavenging abilities of seven well-known lipophilic antioxidants (five flavonoids, resveratrol and astaxanthin), using methylated β-cyclodextrin as a solubilizer. The results indicated that the agreement between spin trapping-based and fluorescence-based values was only fair partly because of a large variation in the previous fluorescence-based data. Typical radical scavenging abilities in trolox equivalent unit are: catechin 0.96; epicatechin 0.94; epigallocatechin gallate 1.3; kaempferol 0.37; myricetin 3.2; resveratrol 0.64; and astaxanthin 0.28, indicating that myricetin possesses the highest antioxidant capacity among the compounds tested. We sorted out the possible causes of the deviation between the two methods. PMID:22448093

  1. Long-term stability of liquid ionization chambers with regard to their qualification as local reference dosimeters for low dose-rate absorbed dose measurements in water.

    PubMed

    Bahar-Gogani, J; Grindborg, J E; Johansson, B E; Wickman, G

    2001-03-01

    The long-term sensitivity and calibration stability of liquid ionization chambers (LICs) has been studied at a local and a secondary standards dosimetry laboratory over a period of 3 years. The chambers were transported several times by mail between the two laboratories for measurements. The LICs used in this work are designed for absorbed dose measurements in the dose rate region of 0.1-100 mGy min(-1) and have a liquid layer thickness of 1 mm and a sensitive volume of 16.2 mm3. The liquids used as sensitive media in the chambers are mixtures of isooctane (C8H18) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH3)4) in different proportions (about 2 to 1). Operating at a polarizing voltage of 300 V the leakage current of the chambers was stable and never exceeded 3% of the observable current at a dose rate of about 1 mGy min(-1). The volume sensitivity of the chambers was measured to be of the order of 10(-9) C Gy(-1) mm3. No systematic changes in the absorbed dose to water calibration was observed for any of the chambers during the test period (sigma < 0.2%). Variations in chamber dose response with small changes in the polarizing voltage as well as sensitivity changes with accumulated absorbed dose were also investigated. Measurements showed that the LIC response varies by 0.15% per 1% change in applied voltage around 300 V. No significant change could be observed in the LIC sensitivity after a single absorbed dose of 15 kGy. The results indicate that the LIC can be made to serve as a calibration transfer instrument and a reference detector for absorbed dose to water determinations providing good precision and long-term reproducibility.

  2. The Bungee Jumper: A Comparison of Predicted and Measured Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biezeveld, Hubert

    2003-04-01

    The greater-than-g acceleration of a bungee jumper discussed in a previous article in this journal by Kagan and Kott led to many lively discussions among Dutch physics teachers. These inspired me to look for an inexpensive experimental setup, suitable for use in a high school physics class, that can be used to confirm that indeed the acceleration is greater than g. In this paper I describe an exercise to compare the predicted and the measured graphs for the displacement y(t) of the jumper and the force Fb(t) exerted by the bungee on the bridge to which it is fastened. In my apparatus, the "bungee" consists of a light chain and the "jumper" is a small piece of brass. Data collection and the calculation of predicted values were carried out using Coach.2 The analysis reliably leads to the conclusion that the acceleration of the falling jumper does indeed exceed g.

  3. Finite Orthoalgebras without Two-valued Probability Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ruuge, Artur E.

    2007-02-21

    The Kochen-Specker theorem in quantum mechanics motivates the following combinatorial problem: how to construct a finite orthoalgebra which does not admit a two-valued probability measure? For example, the so-called 'Penrose's dodecahedron' (a projective configuration in C4) generates such an orthoalgebra. In this report one describes a new infinite family of examples of atomic coherent orthoalgebras with the mentioned properties which is intimately related to the geometry of the group's E8. The important features of the construction are the following: (1) the atomic elements are naturally indexed by the elements of a disjoint union of linear manifolds of codimension 1 of an N-dimensional vector space over F2; (2) the description of the orthogonality relation involves a pair of Z/2Z-valued functions on Z/4Z; (3) the symmetry of the construction is described in terms of an extension of GL(N, F2); (4) the whole construction works only if N is divisible by 4 (a phenomenon of periodicity)

  4. Measurement of /sup 2/H/sub 2/O by IR absorbance in doubly labeled H/sub 2/O studies of energy expenditure

    SciTech Connect

    Karasov, W.H.; Han, L.R.; Munger, J.C.

    1988-07-01

    The energy expenditure of animals in their natural surroundings can be determined by measuring the turnover in body water of isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen. We evaluated the use of infrared spectrophotometry for measuring /sup 2/H/sub 2/O in small (20-microliters) water samples also labeled with 18O. For /sup 2/H/sub 2/O over the enrichment range of 0.1-1 atom%, there was a linear relationship between infrared absorbance and /sup 2/H/sub 2/O enrichment. /sup 2/H/sub 2/O enrichments could be measured with a precision and accuracy of less than or equal to 1%, using this relationship. The presence of /sup 18/O in water samples in enrichments of up to 1 atom% had no significant effect on measurement of /sup 2/H/sub 2/O by infrared absorbance. We measured the simultaneous turnover rates of /sup 2/H/sub 2/O and /sup 3/H in mice and turtles also labeled with 18O. Our results validated the use of infrared absorbance in doubly labeled water measures of energy expenditure and indicated that the fractionation factors in vivo for /sup 2/H/sub 2/O and /sup 3/H do not differ.

  5. Synthesis of UV-absorbing and fluorescent carrier ampholyte mixtures and their application for the determination of the operational pH values of buffering membranes used in isoelectric trapping separations.

    PubMed

    North, Robert; Hwang, Ann; Lalwani, Sanjiv; Shave, Evan; Vigh, Gyula

    2006-10-20

    Success in isoelectric trapping separations critically depends on the knowledge of the accurate operational pH value of the buffering membranes used. Currently, due to a lack of easy, rapid, accurate methods that can be used for the post-synthesis determination of the operational pH value of a buffering membrane, only nominal pH values calculated from the amounts of the reagents used in the synthesis of the membranes and their acid-base dissociation constants are available. To rectify this problem, UV-absorbing and fluorescent carrier ampholyte mixtures were prepared by alkylating pentaethylenehexamine with a chromophore and a fluorophore, followed by Michael addition of acrylic acid and itaconic acid to the resulting oligoamine. Carrier ampholyte mixtures, with evenly distributed absorbance values across the 3value of the most basic UV-absorbing or fluorescent carrier ampholyte collected in the anodic separation compartment, determined by full-column imaging capillary isoelectric focusing analysis, indicates the operational pH value of the separation membrane.

  6. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  7. Liquid Cryogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Baynham, D.E.; Bish, P.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Cummings, M.A.; Green,M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivaniouchenkov, I.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.Q.; Zisman, M.S.

    2005-08-20

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will test ionization cooling of muons. In order to have effective ionization cooling, one must use an absorber that is made from a low-z material. The most effective low z materials for ionization cooling are hydrogen, helium, lithium hydride, lithium and beryllium, in that order. In order to measure the effect of material on cooling, several absorber materials must be used. This report describes a liquid-hydrogen absorber that is within a pair of superconducting focusing solenoids. The absorber must also be suitable for use with liquid helium. The following absorber components are discussed in this report; the absorber body, its heat exchanger, the hydrogen system, and the hydrogen safety. Absorber cooling and the thin windows are not discussed here.

  8. Fractional absorption of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa) and calcium carbonate measured by a dual stable-isotope method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the use of stable isotopes, this study aimed to compare the bioavailability of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa), obtained from oyster shell powder heated to a high temperature, with an additional heated seaweed component (Heated Algal Ingredient, HAI), with that of calcium carbonate. In ...

  9. Measurement of the light absorbing properties of diesel exhaust particles using a three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuesong; Nakayama, Tomoki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Inomata, Satoshi; Tonokura, Kenichi; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2014-09-01

    Diesel-exhaust particles (DEP) are one of the main anthropogenic sources of black carbon (BC) and organic matter (OM). Understanding the optical properties of DEP, including the enhancement of light absorption by BC due to coating and light absorption by OM, is important for evaluating the climate impact of DEP. In this study, a three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (405, 532, and 781 nm) was used to investigate the wavelength-dependent optical properties of DEP emitted from a diesel engine vehicle running on a chassis dynamometer in transient driving mode (JE-05) and at a constant speed (either idling or driving at 70 km/h). Optical properties were measured after passing the diluted exhaust through a heater, set at 20, 47, or 300 °C (transient driving mode) or between 20 and 400 °C (constant driving mode). The OM accounted for, on average, ∼40 and ∼35% of the total mass concentration of DEP during the transient and constant driving modes, respectively. In transient driving mode, enhancements of scattering coefficients at 20 and 47 °C, and of the mass concentration of organics, were observed during the high-speed driving period (∼80 km/h) corresponding to driving on a highway. No difference was observed in the absorption coefficients between heated and unheated particles at 781 nm for either the transient (including the high-speed driving period) or constant driving modes. These results indicate a lack of enhancement due to the lensing effect, possibly because the BC was mainly mixed externally with the OM or because it was located at the edges of particles under these experimental conditions. Contributions to total light absorption at 405 nm by the OM were estimated by comparing the wavelength dependence of the absorption coefficients with and without heating. A significant contribution by light-absorbing OM (20 ± 7%) to total light absorption at 405 nm was observed during the high-speed driving period of the JE-05 mode, while the

  10. The Study and Measurement of Values and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerlinger, Fred N.

    The author defines values, attitudes, and beliefs according to their relation to referents. A referent is a construct standing for a set or category of social objects, ideas, or behaviors that is the focus of an attitude. Attitudes and values are belief systems. Beliefs are enduring cognitions about referents; beliefs reflect the value and…

  11. Combining linear polarization spectroscopy and the Representative Layer Theory to measure the Beer-Lambert law absorbance of highly scattering materials.

    PubMed

    Gobrecht, Alexia; Bendoula, Ryad; Roger, Jean-Michel; Bellon-Maurel, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Visible and Near Infrared (Vis-NIR) Spectroscopy is a powerful non destructive analytical method used to analyze major compounds in bulk materials and products and requiring no sample preparation. It is widely used in routine analysis and also in-line in industries, in-vivo with biomedical applications or in-field for agricultural and environmental applications. However, highly scattering samples subvert Beer-Lambert law's linear relationship between spectral absorbance and the concentrations. Instead of spectral pre-processing, which is commonly used by Vis-NIR spectroscopists to mitigate the scattering effect, we put forward an optical method, based on Polarized Light Spectroscopy to improve the absorbance signal measurement on highly scattering samples. This method selects part of the signal which is less impacted by scattering. The resulted signal is combined in the Absorption/Remission function defined in Dahm's Representative Layer Theory to compute an absorbance signal fulfilling Beer-Lambert's law, i.e. being linearly related to concentration of the chemicals composing the sample. The underpinning theories have been experimentally evaluated on scattering samples in liquid form and in powdered form. The method produced more accurate spectra and the Pearson's coefficient assessing the linearity between the absorbance spectra and the concentration of the added dye improved from 0.94 to 0.99 for liquid samples and 0.84-0.97 for powdered samples.

  12. The LNE-LNHB water calorimeter for primary measurement of absorbed dose at low depth in water: application to medium-energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Rapp, B; Perichon, N; Denoziere, M; Daures, J; Ostrowsky, A; Bordy, J-M

    2013-05-07

    Water calorimeters are used to establish absorbed dose standards in several national metrology laboratories involved in ionizing radiation dosimetry. These calorimeters have been first used in high-energy photons of (60)Co or accelerator beams, where the depth of measurement in water is large (5 or 10 cm). The LNE-LNHB laboratory has developed a specific calorimeter which makes measurements at low depth in water (down to 0.5 cm) easier, in order to fulfil the reference conditions required by the international dosimetry protocols for medium-energy x-rays. This new calorimeter was first used to measure the absorbed dose rate in water at a depth of 2 cm for six medium-energy x-ray reference beams with a tube potential from 80 to 300 kV. The relative combined standard uncertainty obtained on the absorbed dose rate to water is lower than 0.8%. An overview of the design of the calorimeter is given, followed by a detailed description of the calculation of the correction factors and the calorimetric measurements.

  13. A graphite calorimeter for absolute measurements of absorbed dose to water: application in medium-energy x-ray filtered beams.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M; Pimpinella, M; Quini, M; D'Arienzo, M; Astefanoaei, I; Loreti, S; Guerra, A S

    2016-02-21

    The Italian National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology (ENEA-INMRI) has designed and built a graphite calorimeter that, in a water phantom, has allowed the determination of the absorbed dose to water in medium-energy x-rays with generating voltages from 180 to 250 kV. The new standard is a miniaturized three-bodies calorimeter, with a disc-shaped core of 21 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness weighing 1.134 g, sealed in a PMMA waterproof envelope with air-evacuated gaps. The measured absorbed dose to graphite is converted into absorbed dose to water by means of an energy-dependent conversion factor obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. Heat-transfer correction factors were determined by FEM calculations. At a source-to-detector distance of 100 cm, a depth in water of 2 g cm(-2), and at a dose rate of about 0.15 Gy min(-1), results of calorimetric measurements of absorbed dose to water, D(w), were compared to experimental determinations, D wK, obtained via an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of air kerma, according to established dosimetry protocols. The combined standard uncertainty of D(w) and D(wK) were estimated as 1.9% and 1.7%, respectively. The two absorbed dose to water determinations were in agreement within 1%, well below the stated measurement uncertainties. Advancements are in progress to extend the measurement capability of the new in-water-phantom graphite calorimeter to other filtered medium-energy x-ray qualities and to reduce the D(w) uncertainty to around 1%. The new calorimeter represents the first implementation of in-water-phantom graphite calorimetry in the kilovoltage range and, allowing independent determinations of D(w), it will contribute to establish a robust system of absorbed dose to water primary standards for medium-energy x-ray beams.

  14. Surface Modification of Polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Thin-Film Solar Cell Absorber Surfaces for PEEM Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wilks, R. G.; Contreras, M. A.; Lehmann, S.; Herrero-Albillos, J.; Bismaths, L. T.; Kronast, F.; Noufi, R.; Bar, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a thorough examination of the {micro}m-scale topography of Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2} ('CIGSe') thin-film solar cell absorbers using different microscopy techniques. We specifically focus on the efficacy of preparing smooth sample surfaces - by etching in aqueous bromine solution - for a spatially resolved study of their chemical and electronic structures using photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM). The etching procedure is shown to reduce the CIGSe surface roughness from ca. 40 to 25 nm after 40s etching, resulting in an increase in the quality of the obtained PEEM images. Furthermore we find that the average observed grain size at the etched surfaces appears larger than at the unetched surfaces. Using a liftoff procedure, it is additionally shown that the backside of the absorber is flat but finely patterned, likely due to being grown on the finely-structured Mo back contact.

  15. Measurement and modeling of high-linearity modified uni-traveling carrier photodiode with highly-doped absorber.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huapu; Li, Zhi; Beling, Andreas; Campbell, Joe C

    2009-10-26

    The third-order intermodulation distortions of InGaAs/InP modified uni-traveling carrier photodiodes with a highly-doped p-type absorber are characterized. The third-order local intercept point is 55 dBm at low frequency (< 3 GHz) and remains as high as 47.5 dBm up to 20 GHz. The frequency characteristics of the OIP3 are well explained by an equivalent circuit model.

  16. [Measurement and analysis of anatomical parameter values in tree shrews].

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Zhang, Rong-Ping; Li, Jin-Tao; He, Bao-Li; Zhen, Hong; Wang, Li-Mei; Jiao, Jian-Lin

    2013-04-01

    Anatomical parameter values in tree shrews are major biological characteristic indicators in laboratory animals. Body size, bones and mammilla, organ weights, coefficient intestinal canal and other anatomical data were measured and analyzed in laboratory domesticated tree shrews (7 to 9 months of age). Measurement of 31 anatomical parameters showed that body height, width of the right ear, ileum and colon had significant differences between males and females (P<0.05). Highly significant differences were also found in body slanting length, chest depth, torso length, left and right forelimb length, right hind limb length, left and right ear length, left ear width, keel bone length, left and right tibia length, duodenum and jejunum (P<0.01). With body length as the dependent variable, and tail length, torso length, right and left forelimb length, and left and right hind limb length as independent variables for stepwise regression analysis, the regression equation for body length = 13.90 + tail length × 0.16. The results of 37 organs weights between female and male tree shrews showed very significant differences (P<0.01) for weight of heart, lungs, spleen, left and right kidney, bladder, left and right hippocampus, left submandibular gland, and left and right thyroid gland, as well as significant (P<0.05) differences in the small intestine, right submandibular gland, and left adrenal gland. The coefficient of heart, lung, stomach, bladder, small and large intestine, brain, right hippocampus, and left adrenal gland showed highly significant differences (P<0.01), while differences in the right kidney, left hippocampus, left submandibular gland, right adrenal gland, and left and right thyroid gland were significant (P<0.05). With animal weight as the dependent variable and indicators of heart, lung, liver, spleen, left and right kidney and brain as independent variables for stepwise regression analysis, the regression equation showed that weight = 62.73 + left kidney

  17. Absorbency properties of different brands of standardized endodontic paper points.

    PubMed

    Pumarola-Suñé, J; Solá-Vicens, L; Sentís-Vilalta, J; Canalda-Sahli, C; Brau-Aguadé, E

    1998-12-01

    A comparative study of the absorbency properties of different endodontic paper points has been conducted. Twenty standardized absorbent paper points, size 30, from 13 bands (Dentaline, Zipperer, Kerr, Diadent, Roeko novo, Roeko color, Maillefer, P.D., Schein, Spectrapoint, Proclinic, Euronda, and Alpro) of 12 manufacturers were tested. Each dry paper point was weighted using an electronic laboratory balance. A length of 16 mm from the tip was then lowered in distilled water for 5 s, the paper point was weighted again, and the difference between both measurements was taken as the value of the fluid absorbed. Diadent, Kerr, and Dentalite showed significantly higher absorbencies (p < 0.05) than standardized paper points of the remaining brands. The study demonstrates a wide variation in the absorbency properties of this dental accessory.

  18. Mixing states of light-absorbing particles measured using a transmission electron microscope and a single-particle soot photometer in Tokyo, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Kouji; Moteki, Nobuhiro; Kondo, Yutaka; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2016-08-01

    Light-absorbing atmospheric aerosols such as carbonaceous particles influence the climate through absorbing sunlight. The mixing states of these aerosol particles affect their optical properties. This study examines the changes in the mixing states and abundance of strongly light absorbing carbonaceous particles by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and single-particle soot photometer (SP2), as well as of iron oxide particles, in Tokyo, Japan. TEM and SP2 use fundamentally different detection techniques for the same light-absorbing particles. TEM allows characterization of the morphological, chemical, and structural features of individual particles, whereas SP2 optically measures the number, size, and mixing states of black carbon (BC). A comparison of the results obtained using these two techniques indicates that the peaks of high soot (nanosphere soot (ns-soot)) concentration periods agree with those of the BC concentrations determined by SP2 and that the high Fe-bearing particle fraction periods measured by TEM agree with that of high number concentrations of iron oxide particles measured using SP2 during the first half of the observation campaign. The results also show that the changes in the ns-soot/BC mixing states primarily correlate with the air mass sources, wind speed, precipitation, and photochemical processes. Nano-sized, aggregated, iron oxide particles mixed with other particles were commonly observed by using TEM during the high iron oxide particle periods. We conclude that although further quantitative comparison between TEM and SP2 data will be needed, the morphologically and optically defined ns-soot and BC, respectively, are essentially the same substance and that their mixing states are generally consistent across the techniques.

  19. Measuring Strategic Value-Drivers for Managing Intellectual Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bose, S.; Oh, K. B.

    2004-01-01

    In an evolving business environment characterised by globalisation and a challenging competitive paradigm, it is imperative for strategic management processes to focus on the financial perspectives of value and risk in intellectual capital to create sustainability in long-term value. This paper presents the key issues pertaining to the strategic…

  20. Identifying, Measuring and Monitoring Value during Project Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliniotou, Maria

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the findings of the research done by Loughborough University in conjunction with ten construction industry collaborators in an attempt to identify what construction professionals mean by value. The aim of the research is to establish a common approach to identify value in projects and to monitor its development throughout the…

  1. OVI absorbers in SDSS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Stephan

    with the ubiquitous Lya forest lines, and estimate the success rate of retrieving each individual candidate as a function of its redshift, the emission redshift of the quasar, the strength of the absorber and the measured S/N of the spectrum by modelling typical Ly forest spectra. These correction factors allow us to derive the 'incompleteness and S/N corrected' redshift number densities of O VI absorbers. We can place a secure lower limit for the contribution of O VI to the closure mass density at the redshifts probed here: O OV I (2.8 < z < 3.2) >= 1.9 × 10 - 8 h -1 . We show that the strong lines we probe account for over 65% of the mass in the O VI absorbers; the weak absorbers, while dominant in line number density, do not contribute significantly to the mass density. Making a conservative assumption about the ionisation fraction, [Special characters omitted.] , and adopting the Anders & Grevesse (1989) solar abundance values, we derive the mean metallicty of the gas probed in our search : z(2.8 < z < 3.2) >= 3.6 × 10 -4 h , in good agreement with other studies. These results demonstrate that large spectroscopic datasets such as SDSS can play an important role in QSO absorption line studies, in spite of the relatively low resolution. Lastly, we have performed a stacking analysis whereby we shift individual spectra back to the rest-frame of the absorber candidate, and derive a mean absorption spectrum for various subsamples. Besides further validating the reality of the absorbers themselves, i.e. ruling out spurious interlopers and other misclassifications, we can use these stacked spectra for a variety of purposes. First of all, we can judge the effects of additional cut criteria like a minimal strength for associated CIV absorption, and hence produce cleaner and better defined subsamples, increasing the strength of future proposals for high-resolution studies. Secondly, the stack itself contains valuable information about the gas probed in our search. We have

  2. Intensity-Value Corrections for Integrating Sphere Measurements of Solid Samples Measured Behind Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Redding, Rebecca L.; Su, Yin-Fong; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Myers, Tanya L.; Stephan, Eric G.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate and calibrated directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra of solids are important for both in situ and remote sensing. Many solids are in the form of powders or granules and to measure their diffuse reflectance spectra in the laboratory, it is often necessary to place the samples behind a transparent medium such as glass for the ultraviolet (UV), visible, or near-infrared spectral regions. Using both experimental methods and a simple optical model, we demonstrate that glass (fused quartz in our case) leads to artifacts in the reflectance values. We report our observations that the measured reflectance values, for both hemispherical and diffuse reflectance, are distorted by the additional reflections arising at the air–quartz and sample–quartz interfaces. The values are dependent on the sample reflectance and are offset in intensity in the hemispherical case, leading to measured values up to ~6% too high for a 2% reflectance surface, ~3.8% too high for 10% reflecting surfaces, approximately correct for 40–60% diffuse-reflecting surfaces, and ~1.5% too low for 99% reflecting Spectralon® surfaces. For the case of diffuse-only reflectance, the measured values are uniformly too low due to the polished glass, with differences of nearly 6% for a 99% reflecting matte surface. The deviations arise from the added reflections from the quartz surfaces, as verified by both theory and experiment, and depend on sphere design. Finally, empirical correction factors were implemented into post-processing software to redress the artifact for hemispherical and diffuse reflectance data across the 300–2300 nm range.

  3. Intensity-value corrections for integrating sphere measurements of solid samples measured behind glass.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy J; Bernacki, Bruce E; Redding, Rebecca L; Su, Yin-Fong; Brauer, Carolyn S; Myers, Tanya L; Stephan, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and calibrated directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra of solids are important for both in situ and remote sensing. Many solids are in the form of powders or granules and to measure their diffuse reflectance spectra in the laboratory, it is often necessary to place the samples behind a transparent medium such as glass for the ultraviolet (UV), visible, or near-infrared spectral regions. Using both experimental methods and a simple optical model, we demonstrate that glass (fused quartz in our case) leads to artifacts in the reflectance values. We report our observations that the measured reflectance values, for both hemispherical and diffuse reflectance, are distorted by the additional reflections arising at the air-quartz and sample-quartz interfaces. The values are dependent on the sample reflectance and are offset in intensity in the hemispherical case, leading to measured values up to ~6% too high for a 2% reflectance surface, ~3.8% too high for 10% reflecting surfaces, approximately correct for 40-60% diffuse-reflecting surfaces, and ~1.5% too low for 99% reflecting Spectralon® surfaces. For the case of diffuse-only reflectance, the measured values are uniformly too low due to the polished glass, with differences of nearly 6% for a 99% reflecting matte surface. The deviations arise from the added reflections from the quartz surfaces, as verified by both theory and experiment, and depend on sphere design. Empirical correction factors were implemented into post-processing software to redress the artifact for hemispherical and diffuse reflectance data across the 300-2300 nm range.

  4. Calibration of GafChromic EBT3 for absorbed dose measurements in 5 MeV proton beam and {sup 60}Co γ-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Vadrucci, M. Ronsivalle, C.; Marracino, F.; Montereali, R. M.; Picardi, L.; Piccinini, M.; Vincenti, M. A.; Esposito, G.; De Angelis, C.; Cherubini, R.; Pimpinella, M.

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To study EBT3 GafChromic film in low-energy protons, and for comparison purposes, in a reference {sup 60}Co beam in order to use it as a calibrated dosimetry system in the proton irradiation facility under construction within the framework of the Oncological Therapy with Protons (TOP)-Intensity Modulated Proton Linear Accelerator for RadioTherapy (IMPLART) Project at ENEA-Frascati, Italy. Methods: EBT3 film samples were irradiated at the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare—Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy, with a 5 MeV proton beam generated by a 7 MV Van de Graaff CN accelerator. The nominal dose rates used were 2.1 Gy/min and 40 Gy/min. The delivered dose was determined by measuring the particle fluence and the energy spectrum in air with silicon surface barrier detector monitors. A preliminary study of the EBT3 film beam quality dependence in low-energy protons was conducted by passively degrading the beam energy. EBT3 films were also irradiated at ENEA-National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology with gamma radiation produced by a {sup 60}Co source characterized by an absorbed dose to water rate of 0.26 Gy/min as measured by a calibrated Farmer type ionization chamber. EBT3 film calibration curves were determined by means of a set of 40 film pieces irradiated to various doses ranging from 0.5 Gy to 30 Gy absorbed dose to water. An EPSON Expression 11000XL color scanner in transmission mode was used for film analysis. Scanner response stability, intrafilm uniformity, and interfilm reproducibility were verified. Optical absorption spectra measurements were performed on unirradiated and irradiated EBT3 films to choose the most sensitive color channel to the dose range used. Results: EBT3 GafChromic films show an under response up to about 33% for low-energy protons with respect to {sup 60}Co gamma radiation, which is consistent with the linear energy transfer dependence already observed with higher energy protons, and a negligible dose

  5. Temperature dependence of the absorbance of alkaline solutions of 4-nitrophenyl phosphate--a potential source of error in the measurement of alkaline phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Burtis, C A; Seibert, L E; Baird, M A; Sampson, E J

    1977-09-01

    The absorbance of an alkaline solution of 4-nitrophenyl phosphate is a function of temperature. Quantitative evaluation of this phenomenon indicates that it (a) depends on the concentration of the compound and is independent of source, buffer concentration, and pH above 9.0; (b) is reversible; (c) is not a result of alkaline hydrolysis or 4-nitrophenol contamination; and (d) correlates with a temperature-induced shift of its absorbance spectrum. The phenomenon may represent a potential analytical problem in methods for alkaline phosphatase in which this compound is the substrate. If thermal equilibrium is not reached and maintained during an alkaline phosphatase assay, the thermochromic response will be included in the measured rate. The magnitude of this error depends on the thermal response and control characteristics of each particular instrument and the reaction conditions under which such an analysis is performed.

  6. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshida, M.; Green, Michael A.; Kuno, Y.; Lau, Wing

    2010-05-30

    Liquid hydrogen absorbers for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) have been developed, and the first absorber has been tested at KEK. In the preliminary test at KEK we have successfully filled the absorber with {approx}2 liters of liquid hydrogen. The measured hydrogen condensation speed was 2.5 liters/day at 1.0 bar. No hydrogen leakage to vacuum was found between 300 K and 20 K. The MICE experiment includes three AFC (absorber focusing coil) modules, each containing a 21 liter liquid hydrogen absorber made of aluminum. The AFC module has safety windows to separate its vacuum from that of neighboring modules. Liquid hydrogen is supplied from a cryocooler with cooling power 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The first absorber will be assembled in the AFC module and installed in MICE at RAL.

  7. Direct measurement of absorbed dose to water in HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy: Water calorimetry, ionization chamber, Gafchromic film, and TG-43

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfehnia, Arman; Kawrakow, Iwan; Seuntjens, Jan

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Gafchromic film and ionometric calibration procedures for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources in terms of dose rate to water are presented and the experimental results are compared to the TG-43 protocol as well as with the absolute dose measurement results from a water calorimetry-based primary standard. Methods: EBT-1 Gafchromic films, an A1SL Exradin miniature Shonka thimble type chamber, and an SI HDR 1000 Plus well-type chamber (Standard Imaging, Inc., Middleton, WI) with an ADCL traceable S{sub k} calibration coefficient (following the AAPM TG-43 protocol) were used. The Farmer chamber and Gafchromic film measurements were performed directly in water. All results were compared to direct and absolute absorbed dose to water measurements from a 4 deg. C stagnant water calorimeter. Results: Based on water calorimetry, the authors measured the dose rate to water to be 361{+-}7 {mu}Gy/(h U) at a 55 mm source-to-detector separation. The dose rate normalized to air-kerma strength for all the techniques agree with the water calorimetry results to within 0.83%. The overall 1-sigma uncertainty on water calorimetry, ionization chamber, Gafchromic film, and TG-43 dose rate measurement amounts to 1.90%, 1.44%, 1.78%, and 2.50%, respectively. Conclusions: This work allows us to build a more realistic uncertainty estimate for absorbed dose to water determination using the TG-43 protocol. Furthermore, it provides the framework necessary for a shift from indirect HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy dosimetry to a more accurate, direct, and absolute measurement of absorbed dose to water.

  8. Measuring the value of older people's production: a diary study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The productive capacity of retired people is usually not valued. However, some retirees produce much more than we might expect. This diary-based study identifies the activities of older people, and suggests some value mechanisms. One question raised is whether it is possible to scale up this diary study into a larger representative study. Methods Diaries kept for one week were collected among 23 older people in the north of Sweden. The texts were analysed with a grounded theory approach; an interplay between ideas and empirical data. Results Some productive activities of older people must be valued as the opportunity cost of time or according to the market value, and others must be valued with the replacement cost. In order to make the choice between these methods, it is important to consider the societal entitlement. When there is no societal entitlement, the first or second method must be used; and when it exists, the third must be used. Conclusions An explicit investigation of the content of the entitlement is needed to justify the choice of valuation method for each activity. In a questionnaire addressing older people's production, each question must be adjusted to the type of production. In order to fully understand this production, it is important to consider the degree of free choice to conduct an activity, as well as health-related quality of life. PMID:22230745

  9. Calibration method for a photoacoustic system for real time source apportionment of light absorbing carbonaceous aerosol based on size distribution measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, Noemi; Ajtai, Tibor; Pinter, Mate; Orvos, Peter I.; Szabo, Gabor; Bozoki, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we introduce a calibration method with which sources of light absorbing carbonaceous particulate matter (LAC) can be apportioned in real time based on multi wavelength optical absorption measurements with a photoacoustic system. The method is primary applicable in wintry urban conditions when LAC is dominated by traffic and biomass burning. The proposed method was successfully tested in a field campaign in the city center of Szeged, Hungary during winter time where the dominance of traffic and wood burning aerosol has been experimentally demonstrated earlier. With the help of the proposed calibration method a relationship between the measured Aerosol Angström Exponent (AAE) and the number size distribution can be deduced. Once the calibration curve is determined, the relative strength of the two pollution sources can be deduced in real time as long as the light absorbing fraction of PM is exclusively related to traffic and wood burning. This assumption is indirectly confirmed in the presented measurement campaign by the fact that the measured size distribution is composed of two unimodal size distributions identified to correspond to traffic and wood burning aerosols. The proposed method offers the possibility of replacing laborious chemical analysis with simple in-situ measurement of aerosol size distribution data.

  10. Accounting for People: Can Business Measure Human Value?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workforce Economics, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Traditional business practice undervalues human capital, and most conventional accounting models reflect this inclination. The argument for more explicit measurements of human resources is simple: Improved measurement of human resources will lead to more rational and productive choices about managing human resources. The business community is…

  11. Can Value-Added Measures of Teacher Performance Be Trusted?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Reckase, Mark D.; Wooldridge, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate whether commonly used value-added estimation strategies produce accurate estimates of teacher effects under a variety of scenarios. We estimate teacher effects in simulated student achievement data sets that mimic plausible types of student grouping and teacher assignment scenarios. We find that no one method accurately captures…

  12. EURAMET.RI(I)-S7 comparison of alanine dosimetry systems for absorbed dose to water measurements in gamma- and x-radiation at radiotherapy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Tristan; Anton, Mathias; Sharpe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The National Physical Laboratory (NPL), the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB) are involved in the European project 'External Beam Cancer Therapy', a project of the European Metrology Research Programme. Within this project, the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/alanine dosimetric method has been chosen for performing measurements in small fields such as those used in IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy). In this context, these three National Metrology Institutes (NMI) wished to compare the result of their alanine dosimetric systems (detector, modus operandi etc) at radiotherapy dose levels to check their consistency. This EURAMET.RI(I)-S7 comparison has been performed with the support of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) which collected and distributed the results as a neutral organization, to ensure the comparison was 'blind'. Irradiations have been made under reference conditions by each laboratory in a 60Co beam and in an accelerator beam (10 MV or 12 MV) in a water phantom of 30 cm × 30 cm × 30 cm in a square field of 10 cm × 10 cm at the reference depth. Irradiations have been performed at known values of absorbed dose to water (Dw) within 10% of nominal doses of 5 Gy and 10 Gy, i.e. between 4.5 Gy and 5.5 Gy and between 9 Gy and 11 Gy, respectively. Each participant read out their dosimeters and assessed the doses using their own protocol (calibration curve, positioning device etc) as this comparison aims at comparing the complete dosimetric process. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the EPR/alanine dosimetry systems operated by National Metrology Institutes as a method of assuring therapy level doses with the accuracy required. The maximum deviation in the ratio of measured to applied dose is less than 1%. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key

  13. Seeking value in Medicare: performance measurement for clinical professionals.

    PubMed

    Sprague, Lisa

    2013-10-30

    The Medicare program, despite its reputation of being a bill payer with little regard to the worth of the services it buys, has begun to put in place a range of programs aimed at assessing quality and value, with more to come. Attention to resource use and cost is nascent. The issues are complex, and it is no surprise that there is a level of contention between providers and regulators, even though both profess commitment to improved quality. This paper summarizes the quality and value programs that apply to physicians and other clinical professionals, as well as programs designed to encourage the adoption of technology to support quality improvement. Participation in all is voluntary. However, a decision not to participate increasingly carries a financial penalty, as Congress (and, by extension, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or HHS) tries to encourage behavior it cannot force.

  14. Establishing Genotypic Cutoff Values To Measure Antimicrobial Resistance in Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Gregory H; Zhao, Shaohua; Li, Cong; Ayers, Sherry; Sabo, Jonathan L; Lam, Claudia; Miller, Ron A; McDermott, Patrick F

    2017-03-01

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) has transformed our understanding of antimicrobial resistance, helping us to better identify and track the genetic mechanisms underlying phenotypic resistance. Previous studies have demonstrated high correlations between phenotypic resistance and the presence of known resistance determinants. However, there has never been a large-scale assessment of how well resistance genotypes correspond to specific MICs. We performed antimicrobial susceptibility testing and WGS of 1,738 nontyphoidal Salmonella strains to correlate over 20,000 MICs with resistance determinants. Using these data, we established what we term genotypic cutoff values (GCVs) for 13 antimicrobials against Salmonella For the drugs we tested, we define a GCV as the highest MIC of isolates in a population devoid of known acquired resistance mechanisms. This definition of GCV is distinct from epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs or ECOFFs), which currently differentiate wild-type from non-wild-type strains based on MIC distributions alone without regard to genetic information. Due to the large number of isolates involved, we observed distinct MIC distributions for isolates with different resistance gene alleles, including for ciprofloxacin and tetracycline, suggesting the potential to predict MICs based on WGS data alone.

  15. High resolution redox potential measurements: techniques, interpretation and value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorenhout, Michel; van der Geest, Harm G.

    2013-04-01

    The ongoing improvement of techniques for the in situ measurement of redox potentials has led to a large number of studies on redox variability in various environments. These studies originate from a wide array of scientific disciplines, amongst which ecology (sediment biogeochemistry), environmental chemistry (degradation studies) and archaeology (in situ preservation). To gain insight in the potential applications, this paper presents three examples of studies in which a newly developed measurement technique was used in soils and where spatial and temporal variation plays an important role. The first one is a microcosm study on the effects of biota on the dynamics of redox conditions in the toplayer of aquatic sediments, showing that the presence of microbiota has a direct influence on biogeochemical parameters. The second is the study of the redox potential in the world heritage site of Bryggen (Bergen, NO) that is under threat of oxidation. The oxidation, caused by a lowered groundwater table, causes soil degradation and unstable conditions for the monumental buildings of the Medieval site. The third study shows variability in a sandy flood plain in Bangladesh, where redox processes dictate the environmental behaviour of Arsenic. This toxic metal is present in many wells used for drinking water, but shows very local variation in dissolution dynamics. In these three studies, continuous measurements of (changes in) redox conditions revealed a strong variability in these systems and consequences for the interpretation of single point measurements or low frequency sampling campaigns are discussed. In these and many other cases, the continuous measurement of the redox potential in soil media will aid in the understanding of the system under study.

  16. Managing Complex IT Security Processes with Value Based Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Frederick T; Mili, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Current trends indicate that IT security measures will need to greatly expand to counter the ever increasingly sophisticated, well-funded and/or economically motivated threat space. Traditional risk management approaches provide an effective method for guiding courses of action for assessment, and mitigation investments. However, such approaches no matter how popular demand very detailed knowledge about the IT security domain and the enterprise/cyber architectural context. Typically, the critical nature and/or high stakes require careful consideration and adaptation of a balanced approach that provides reliable and consistent methods for rating vulnerabilities. As reported in earlier works, the Cyberspace Security Econometrics System provides a comprehensive measure of reliability, security and safety of a system that accounts for the criticality of each requirement as a function of one or more stakeholders interests in that requirement. This paper advocates a dependability measure that acknowledges the aggregate structure of complex system specifications, and accounts for variations by stakeholder, by specification components, and by verification and validation impact.

  17. Measuring the Value of Mortality Risk Reductions in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Tekeşin, Cem; Ara, Shihomi

    2014-01-01

    The willingness to pay (WTP) for mortality risk reduction from four causes (lung cancer, other type of cancer, respiratory disease, traffic accident) are estimated using random parameter logit model with data from choice experiment for three regions in Turkey. The value of statistical life (VSL) estimated for Afsin-Elbistan, Kutahya-Tavsanli, Ankara and the pooled case are found as 0.56, 0.35, 0.46 and 0.49 million Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) adjusted 2012 US dollars (USD). Different types of risk cause different VSL estimates and we found the lung cancer premium of 213% against traffic accident. The effects of one-year-delayed provision of risk-reduction service are the reduction of WTP by 482 TL ($318 in PPP adjusted USD) per person on average, and the disutility from status-quo (zero risk reduction) against alternative is found to be 891 TL ($589 in PPP adjusted USD) per person on average. Senior discounts of VSL are partially determined by status-quo preference and the amount of discount decreases once the status-quo bias is removed. The peak VSL is found to be for the age group 30–39 and the average VSL for the age group is 0.8 million PPP adjusted USD). Turkey’s compliance to European Union (EU) air quality standard will cause welfare gains of total 373 million PPP adjusted USD for our study areas in terms of reduced number of premature mortality. PMID:25000150

  18. ESTIMATED NEPTUNIUM SEDIMENT SORPTION VALUES AS A FUNCTION OF PH AND MEASURED BARIUM AND RADIUM KD VALUES

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.

    2011-01-13

    The objective of this document is to provide traceability and justification for a select few new geochemical data used in the Special Analysis entitled 'Special Analysis for the Dose Assessment of the Final Inventories in Center Slit Trenches One through Five'. Most values used in the Special Analysis came from the traditional geochemical data package, however, some recent laboratory measurements have made it possible to estimate barium K{sub d} values. Additionally, some recent calculations were made to estimate neptunium K{sub d} values as a function of pH. The assumptions, justifications, and calculations needed to generate these new values are presented in this document, and the values are summarized.

  19. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure. PMID:26828999

  20. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    DOE PAGES

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; ...

    2016-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Moreover, our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributionsmore » to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.« less

  1. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Moreover, our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.

  2. Relating costs to the user value of farmland biodiversity measurements.

    PubMed

    Targetti, S; Herzog, F; Geijzendorffer, I R; Pointereau, P; Viaggi, D

    2016-01-01

    The impact of agricultural management on global biodiversity highlights the need for farm-scale monitoring programmes capable of determining the performance of agriculture practices. Yet the identification of appropriate indicators is a challenging process and one that involves considering a number of different aspects and requirements. Besides the attention given to scientific effectiveness, relevant but less studied issues related to biodiversity measurements include the economic feasibility of monitoring programmes and the relevance of indicators for different end-users. In this paper, we combine an analytic assessment of costs and a stakeholder-based evaluation of the usefulness of a set of biodiversity-related parameters (habitat mapping, vegetation, bees, earthworms, spiders, and a farmer questionnaire) tested for scientific consistency in 12 European case studies and on more than 14,000 ha of farmland. The results point to the possibility of meeting the expectations of different end-users (administrators, farmers and consumers) with a common indicator set. Combining costs and usefulness also suggests the possibility of designing more efficient monitoring approaches involving private agencies and networks of volunteers and farmers for the field data collection at different stages of a monitoring programme. Although complex, such an approach would make it possible to enhance the effectiveness of available funds for farmland biodiversity monitoring.

  3. Measuring Children's Environmental Attitudes and Values in Northwest Mexico: Validating a Modified Version of Measures to Test the Model of Ecological Values (2-MEV)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneller, A. J.; Johnson, B.; Bogner, F. X.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the validation process of measuring children's attitudes and values toward the environment within a Mexican sample. We applied the Model of Ecological Values (2-MEV), which has been shown to be valid and reliable in 20 countries, including one Spanish speaking culture. Items were initially modified to fit the regional dialect,…

  4. Implementing Value-Added Measures of School Effectiveness: Getting the Incentives Right.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladd, Helen F.; Walsh, Randall P.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluates value-added approach to measuring school effectiveness in North and South Carolina. Finds that value-added approach favors high-achievement schools, with large percentage of students from high-SES backgrounds. Discusses statistical problems in measuring value added. Concludes teachers' and administrators' avoidance of low-achievement,…

  5. Examining the Perceived Value of Integration of Earned Value Management with Risk Management-Based Performance Measurement Baseline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Akhtar H.

    2014-01-01

    Many projects fail despite the use of evidence-based project management practices such as Performance Measurement Baseline (PMB), Earned Value Management (EVM) and Risk Management (RM). Although previous researchers have found that integrated project management techniques could be more valuable than the same techniques used by themselves, these…

  6. PHITS simulations of the Protective curtain experiment onboard the Service module of ISS: Comparison with absorbed doses measured with TLDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploc, Ondřej; Sihver, Lembit; Kartashov, Dmitry; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Tolochek, Raisa

    2013-12-01

    "Protective curtain" was the physical experiment onboard the International Space Station (ISS) aimed on radiation measurement of the dose - reducing effect of the additional shielding made of hygienic water-soaked wipes and towels placed on the wall in the crew cabin of the Service module Zvezda. The measurements were performed with 12 detector packages composed of thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) and plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) placed at the Protective curtain, so that they created pairs of shielded and unshielded detectors.

  7. Complex fuzzy set-valued complex fuzzy measures and their properties.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shengquan; Li, Shenggang

    2014-01-01

    Let F*(K) be the set of all fuzzy complex numbers. In this paper some classical and measure-theoretical notions are extended to the case of complex fuzzy sets. They are fuzzy complex number-valued distance on F*(K), fuzzy complex number-valued measure on F*(K), and some related notions, such as null-additivity, pseudo-null-additivity, null-subtraction, pseudo-null-subtraction, autocontionuous from above, autocontionuous from below, and autocontinuity of the defined fuzzy complex number-valued measures. Properties of fuzzy complex number-valued measures are studied in detail.

  8. The INCA Project II. Measurements of the neutron yield from a lead absorber for pion and proton projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    INCA Collaboration

    1999-08-01

    As a part of the program of development of a new instrument called Ionization- Neutron Calorimeter (INCA) aimed at studying primary cosmic radiation, exp erimental data on average values and fluctuations of the neutron yield from a 60-cm-thick lead target are obtained. The target was exposed to pion and proton accelerator b eams with energies of 4 and 70 GeV, resp ectively, and to an electron beam with an energy of 200 to 550 MeV. The exp erimental data obtained well agree with the results of a simulation by the SHIELD code used for development of INCA elements. It is shown that the same particle energy, the average neutron yield for electron pro jectiles is by the factor of approximately 50 lower than for hadrons.

  9. Desorption of hydrophobic compounds from laboratory-spiked sediments measured by Tenax absorbent and matrix solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    You, Jing; Pehkonen, Sari; Landrum, Peter F; Lydy, Michael J

    2007-08-15

    Tenax extraction and matrix solid-phase microextraction (matrix-SPME) were used to study desorption of hydrophobic contaminants (HOC) from sediments. 14C-labeled hexachlorobiphenyl, DDE, permethrin, chlorpyrifos, and phenanthrene were individually spiked into sediments differing in physical characteristics. Sequestration of the HOCs into sediment was observed for all compounds, and desorption was described by rapid, slow, and very slow rates. The freely dissolved HOC concentration in the sediment porewater was estimated by matrix-SPME, and serial sampling was used to ensure equilibrium was achieved among sediment, porewater and matrix-SPME fiber. Differences in partitioning of the HOCs between sediment and porewater for the different sediments were reduced by replacing the HOC concentration in sediment with the rapidly desorbing fraction. The significantly lower porewater concentration determined from matrix-SPME, than predicted from equilibrium partitioning theory (EPT), showed that only a small fraction of sediment HOCs were available for equilibrium and the predictability of EPT can be improved with the consideration of sequestration in sediment. A good correlation was noted between sediment concentration in the rapidly desorbing fraction measured by Tenax extraction, and SPME fiber concentration as determined by matrix-SPME. Thus, the two methods both tracked the readily desorbed contaminant equally well though Tenax extraction measures the accessible pool, and matrix-SPME measures the chemical activity of the HOCs.

  10. Measuring the value of nonwage employee benefits: building a model of the relation between benefit satisfaction and value.

    PubMed

    Weathington, Bart L; Jones, Allan P

    2006-11-01

    Researchers have commonly assumed benefits that employees view as more valuable have a greater influence on their attitudes and behaviors. Researchers have used 2 common methods to measure benefit value: attaching a monetary value to benefits and using self-reports of benefit importance. The present authors propose that the 2 approaches are conceptually distinct and have different implications. They use a social exchange perspective to justify this distinction and integrate both approaches and benefit satisfaction into a more comprehensive model of benefit perception. Results suggest that both measures have practical applications depending on the nature of the exchange relationship between the organization and employees. However, this relationship depends on the specific benefit and on employee satisfaction with that benefit. Some benefits lend themselves to a monetary estimate, whereas others lend themselves more to a nonmonetary valuation.

  11. Measuring daily Value-at-Risk of SSEC index: A new approach based on multifractal analysis and extreme value theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yu; Chen, Wang; Lin, Yu

    2013-05-01

    Recent studies in the econophysics literature reveal that price variability has fractal and multifractal characteristics not only in developed financial markets, but also in emerging markets. Taking high-frequency intraday quotes of the Shanghai Stock Exchange Component (SSEC) Index as example, this paper proposes a new method to measure daily Value-at-Risk (VaR) by combining the newly introduced multifractal volatility (MFV) model and the extreme value theory (EVT) method. Two VaR backtesting techniques are then employed to compare the performance of the model with that of a group of linear and nonlinear generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (GARCH) models. The empirical results show the multifractal nature of price volatility in Chinese stock market. VaR measures based on the multifractal volatility model and EVT method outperform many GARCH-type models at high-risk levels.

  12. Measurement of nicotine and cotinine in human milk by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet absorbance detection.

    PubMed

    Page-Sharp, Madhu; Hale, Thomas W; Hackett, L Peter; Kristensen, Judith H; Ilett, Kenneth F

    2003-10-25

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) assay for the determination of nicotine and cotinine in human milk was developed using an extraction by liquid-liquid partition combined with back extraction into acid, and followed by reverse-phase chromatography with UV detection of analytes. The assay was linear up to 500 microg/l for both nicotine and cotinine. Intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) were <10% (25-500 microg/l) for both nicotine and cotinine. Limits of quantitation (LOQ) were 10 and 12 microg/l for nicotine and cotinine, respectively, while the limits of detection (LOD) were 8 and 10 microg/l for nicotine and cotinine, respectively. The mean recoveries were 79-93% (range 25-500 microg/l) for nicotine and 78-89% (range 25-500 microg/l) for cotinine. The amount of fat in the milk did not affect the recovery. We found that this method was sensitive and reliable in measuring nicotine and cotinine concentrations in milk from a nursing mother who participated in a trial of the nicotine patch for smoking cessation.

  13. An Independent Measurement of the Incidence of Mg II Absorbers along Gamma-Ray Burst Sight Lines: The End of the Mystery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchiara, A.; Prochaska, J. X.; Zhu, G.; Ménard, B.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Fox, D. B.; Chen, H.-W.; Cooksey, K. L.; Cenko, S. B.; Perley, D.; Bloom, J. S.; Berger, E.; Tanvir, N. R.; D'Elia, V.; Lopez, S.; Chornock, R.; de Jaeger, T.

    2013-08-01

    In 2006, Prochter et al. reported a statistically significant enhancement of very strong Mg II absorption systems intervening the sight lines to gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) relative to the incidence of such absorption along quasar sight lines. This counterintuitive result has inspired a diverse set of astrophysical explanations (e.g., dust, gravitational lensing) but none of these has obviously resolved the puzzle. Using the largest set of GRB afterglow spectra available, we reexamine the purported enhancement. In an independent sample of GRB spectra with a survey path three times larger than Prochter et al., we measure the incidence per unit redshift of >=1 Å rest-frame equivalent width Mg II absorbers at z ≈ 1 to be l(z) = 0.18 ± 0.06. This is fully consistent with current estimates for the incidence of such absorbers along quasar sight lines. Therefore, we do not confirm the original enhancement and suggest those results suffered from a statistical fluke. Signatures of the original result do remain in our full sample (l(z) shows an ≈1.5 enhancement over l(z)QSO), but the statistical significance now lies at ≈90% c.l. Restricting our analysis to the subset of high-resolution spectra of GRB afterglows (which overlaps substantially with Prochter et al.), we still reproduce a statistically significant enhancement of Mg II absorption. The reason for this excess, if real, is still unclear since there is no connection between the rapid afterglow follow-up process with echelle (or echellette) spectrographs and the detectability of strong Mg II doublets. Only a larger sample of such high-resolution data will shed some light on this matter.

  14. AN INDEPENDENT MEASUREMENT OF THE INCIDENCE OF Mg II ABSORBERS ALONG GAMMA-RAY BURST SIGHT LINES: THE END OF THE MYSTERY?

    SciTech Connect

    Cucchiara, A.; Prochaska, J. X.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Fox, D. B.; Chen, H.-W.; Cooksey, K. L.; Cenko, S. B.; Bloom, J. S.; Perley, D.; Berger, E.; Chornock, R.; Tanvir, N. R.; D'Elia, V.; Lopez, S.; De Jaeger, T.

    2013-08-20

    In 2006, Prochter et al. reported a statistically significant enhancement of very strong Mg II absorption systems intervening the sight lines to gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) relative to the incidence of such absorption along quasar sight lines. This counterintuitive result has inspired a diverse set of astrophysical explanations (e.g., dust, gravitational lensing) but none of these has obviously resolved the puzzle. Using the largest set of GRB afterglow spectra available, we reexamine the purported enhancement. In an independent sample of GRB spectra with a survey path three times larger than Prochter et al., we measure the incidence per unit redshift of {>=}1 A rest-frame equivalent width Mg II absorbers at z Almost-Equal-To 1 to be l(z) = 0.18 {+-} 0.06. This is fully consistent with current estimates for the incidence of such absorbers along quasar sight lines. Therefore, we do not confirm the original enhancement and suggest those results suffered from a statistical fluke. Signatures of the original result do remain in our full sample (l(z) shows an Almost-Equal-To 1.5 enhancement over l(z){sub QSO}), but the statistical significance now lies at Almost-Equal-To 90% c.l. Restricting our analysis to the subset of high-resolution spectra of GRB afterglows (which overlaps substantially with Prochter et al.), we still reproduce a statistically significant enhancement of Mg II absorption. The reason for this excess, if real, is still unclear since there is no connection between the rapid afterglow follow-up process with echelle (or echellette) spectrographs and the detectability of strong Mg II doublets. Only a larger sample of such high-resolution data will shed some light on this matter.

  15. Assessment of organ absorbed doses and estimation of effective doses from pediatric anthropomorphic phantom measurements for multi-detector row CT with and without automatic exposure control.

    PubMed

    Brisse, Hervé J; Robilliard, Magalie; Savignoni, Alexia; Pierrat, Noelle; Gaboriaud, Geneviève; De Rycke, Yann; Neuenschwander, Sylvia; Aubert, Bernard; Rosenwald, Jean-Claude

    2009-10-01

    This study was designed to measure organ absorbed doses from multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) on pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms, calculate the corresponding effective doses, and assess the influence of automatic exposure control (AEC) in terms of organ dose variations. Four anthropomorphic phantoms (phantoms represent the equivalent of a newborn, 1-, 5-, and 10-y-old child) were scanned with a four-channel MDCT coupled with a z-axis-based AEC system. Two CT torso protocols were compared: a first protocol without AEC and constant tube current-time product and a second protocol with AEC using age-adjusted noise indices. Organ absorbed doses were monitored by thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF: Mg, Cu, P). Effective doses were calculated according to the tissue weighting factors of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (). For fixed mA acquisitions, organ doses normalized to the volume CT dose index in a 16-cm head phantom (CTDIvol16) ranged from 0.6 to 1.5 and effective doses ranged from 8.4 to 13.5 mSv. For the newborn-equivalent phantom, the AEC-modulated scan showed almost no significant dose variation compared to the fixed mA scan. For the 1-, 5- and 10-y equivalent phantoms, the use of AEC induced a significant dose decrease on chest organs (ranging from 61 to 31% for thyroid, 37 to 21% for lung, 34 to 17% for esophagus, and 39 to 10% for breast). However, AEC also induced a significant dose increase (ranging from 28 to 48% for salivary glands, 22 to 51% for bladder, and 24 to 70% for ovaries) related to the high density of skull base and pelvic bones. These dose increases should be considered before using AEC as a dose optimization tool in children.

  16. COSMIC DUST IN Mg II ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, Brice; Fukugita, Masataka

    2012-08-01

    Mg II absorbers induce reddening on background quasars. We measure this effect and infer the cosmic density of dust residing in these systems to be {Omega} Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, in units of the critical density of the universe, which is comparable to the amount of dust found in galactic disks or about half the amount inferred to exist outside galaxies. We also estimate the neutral hydrogen abundance in Mg II clouds to be {Omega} Almost-Equal-To 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, which is approximately 5% of hydrogen in stars in galaxies. This implies a dust-to-gas mass ratio for Mg II clouds of about 1/100, which is similar to the value for normal galaxies. This would support the hypothesis of the outflow origin of Mg II clouds, which are intrinsically devoid of stars and hence have no sources of dust. Considerations of the dust abundance imply that the presence of Mg II absorbers around galaxies lasts effectively for a few Gyr. High-redshift absorbers allow us to measure the rest-frame extinction curve to 900 A, at which the absorption by the Lyman edge dominates over scattering by dust in the extinction opacity.

  17. A high absorbance material for solar collectors' applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, A. I.; Maldonado, R. D.; Díaz, E. A.; Montalvo, A. I.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we proposed a low cost material to be used as an excellent absorber for solar collectors, to increase its thermal efficiency by the high capacity to absorb solar radiation. The material, known as "smoke black" (soot) can be obtained by the incomplete combustion of organic materials, such as the oxygen-acetylene, paraffin, or candles. A comparative analysis between the optical properties (reflectance, absorbance, and emissivity) measured on three covered copper surfaces (without paint, with a commercial matte black paint, and with smoke black) shows amazing optical results for the smoke black. Reflectance values of the smoke black applied over copper surfaces improves 56 times the values obtained from commercial black paints. High values of emissivity (E=0.9988) were measured on the surface covered with smoke black by spectrophotometry in the UV-VIS range, which represents about 7% of increment as compared with the value obtained for commercial black paints (E=0.938). The proposed high absorbance material can be easily applied on any kind of surfaces at low cost.

  18. Lies, Damned Lies, and Health Inequality Measurements: Understanding the Value Judgments.

    PubMed

    Kjellsson, Gustav; Gerdtham, Ulf-G; Petrie, Dennis

    2015-09-01

    Measuring and monitoring socioeconomic health inequalities are critical for understanding the impact of policy decisions. However, the measurement of health inequality is far from value neutral, and one can easily present the measure that best supports one's chosen conclusion or selectively exclude measures. Improving people's understanding of the often implicit value judgments is therefore important to reduce the risk that researchers mislead or policymakers are misled. While the choice between relative and absolute inequality is already value laden, further complexities arise when, as is often the case, health variables have both a lower and upper bound, and thus can be expressed in terms of either attainments or shortfalls, such as for mortality/survival.We bring together the recent parallel discussions from epidemiology and health economics regarding health inequality measurement and provide a deeper understanding of the different value judgments within absolute and relative measures expressed both in attainments and shortfalls, by graphically illustrating both hypothetical and real examples. We show that relative measures in terms of attainments and shortfalls have distinct value judgments, highlighting that for health variables with two bounds the choice is no longer only between an absolute and a relative measure but between an absolute, an attainment- relative and a shortfall-relative one. We illustrate how these three value judgments can be combined onto a single graph which shows the rankings according to all three measures, and illustrates how the three measures provide ethical benchmarks against which to judge the difference in inequality between populations.

  19. Measurement of the depth distribution of average LET and absorbed dose inside a water-filled phantom on board space station MIR.

    PubMed

    Berger, T; Hajek, M; Schoner, W; Fugger, M; Vana, N; Noll, M; Ebner, R; Akatov, Y; Shurshakov, V; Arkhangelsky, V

    2001-01-01

    The Atominstitute of the Austrian Universities developed the HTR-method for determination of absorbed dose and "averaged" linear energy transfer (LET) in mixed radiation fields. The method was applied with great success during several space missions (e.g. STS-60, STS-63, BION-10 and BION-11) and on space station MIR in the past 10 years. It utilises the changes of peak height ratios in LiF thermoluminescent glowcurves in dependence on the LET. Due to the small size of these dosemeters the HTR-method can be used also for measurements inside tissue equivalent phantoms. A water filled phantom with a diameter of 35 cm containing four channels where dosemeters can be exposed in different depths was developed by the Institute for Biomedical Problems. This opens the possibility to measure the depth distribution of the average LET and the dose equivalent simultaneously. During phase 1 dosemeters were exposed for 271 days (05.1997-02.1998) in 6 different depths inside the phantom, which was positioned in the commander cabin. In phase 2 dosemeters were exposed in 2 channels in 6 different depths for 102 days (05.1998-08.1998) in the board engineer cabin, following an exposure in different channels in 3 different depths for 199 days (08.1998- 02.1999) in the Modul KWANT 2.

  20. A review of measurement and modeling of Light-absorbing Particles in Snow and Ice and their climatic and hydrological impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Y.; Doherty, S. J.; Lau, W. K. M.; Ming, J.; Wang, H.; Warren, S. G.; Yasunari, T. J.; Zhang, R.; Flanner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Light absorbing particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, brown carbon, and dust) influence water and energy budgets of the atmosphere and snowpack in multiple ways. In addition to their effects associated with atmospheric heating by absorption of solar radiation and interactions with clouds, LAP in snow on land and ice can reduce the surface reflectance , which is likely to accelerate the snow aging process and further reduces snow albedo and increases the speed of snowpack melt. LAP in snow and ice (LAPSI) has been identified as one of major forcings affecting climate change, e.g. in the fourth and fifth assessment reports of IPCC. However, the uncertainty level in quantifying this effect remains very high. In this talk, we document various technical methods of measuring LAPSI and review the progress made in measuring the LAPSI in Arctic, Tibetan Plateau and other mid-latitude regions. We also report the progress in modeling the concentrations, albedo reduction, radiative forcing, and climatic and hydrological impact of LAPSI at global and regional scales. Finally we identify some research needs for reducing the uncertainties in the impact of LAPSI on global and regional climate and the hydrological cycle.

  1. Value, Impact, and the Transcendent Library: Progress and Pressures in Performance Measurement and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Town, J. Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Libraries are under pressure to prove their worth and may not have achieved this fully successfully. There is a resultant growing requirement for value and impact measurement in academic and research libraries. This essay reviews the natural history of library performance measurement and suggests that proof of worth will be measured by the…

  2. Alternative Approaches for Measuring Values: Direct and Indirect Assessments in Performance Prediction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumford, Michael D.; Connelly, Mary Shane; Helton, Whitney B.; Van Doorn, Judy R.; Osburn, Holly K.

    2002-01-01

    Undergraduates (n=195) completed direct and indirect measures of values before working on entrepreneurial, consulting, and marketing tasks. Regression analysis showed both types of measures were effective predictors. Indirect measures yielded better prediction and better discrimination of cross-task performance differences. (Contains 55…

  3. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Enz, Glenn L.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  4. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  5. Airborne aldehydes in cabin-air of commercial aircraft: Measurement by HPLC with UV absorbance detection of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Wolfgang; Beckmann, Bibiana; Wrbitzky, Renate

    2016-04-15

    This paper presents the strategy and results of in-flight measurements of airborne aldehydes during normal operation and reported "smell events" on commercial aircraft. The aldehyde-measurement is a part of a large-scale study on cabin-air quality. The aims of this study were to describe cabin-air quality in general and to detect chemical abnormalities during the so-called "smell-events". Adsorption and derivatization of airborne aldehydes on 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine coated silica gel (DNPH-cartridge) was applied using tailor-made sampling kits. Samples were collected with battery supplied personal air sampling pumps during different flight phases. Furthermore, the influence of ozone was investigated by simultaneous sampling with and without ozone absorption unit (ozone converter) assembled to the DNPH-cartridges and found to be negligible. The method was validated for 14 aldehydes and found to be precise (RSD, 5.5-10.6%) and accurate (recovery, 98-103 %), with LOD levels being 0.3-0.6 μg/m(3). According to occupational exposure limits (OEL) or indoor air guidelines no unusual or noticeable aldehyde pollution was observed. In total, 353 aldehyde samples were taken from two types of aircraft. Formaldehyde (overall average 5.7 μg/m(3), overall median 4.9 μg/m(3), range 0.4-44 μg/m(3)), acetaldehyde (overall average 6.5 μg/m(3), overall median 4.6, range 0.3-90 μg/m(3)) and mostly very low concentrations of other aldehydes were measured on 108 flights. Simultaneous adsorption and derivatization of airborne aldehydes on DNPH-cartridges to the Schiff bases and their HPLC analysis with UV absorbance detection is a useful method to measure aldehydes in cabin-air of commercial aircraft.

  6. Metrics for assessing the quality of value sets in clinical quality measures

    PubMed Central

    Winnenburg, Rainer; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the quality of value sets in clinical quality measures, both individually and as a population of value sets. Materials and methods: The concepts from a given value set are expected to be rooted by one or few ancestor concepts and the value set is expected to contain all the descendants of its root concepts and only these descendants. (1) We assessed the completeness and correctness of individual value sets by comparison to the extension derived from their roots. (2) We assessed the non-redundancy of value sets for the entire population of value sets (within a given code system) using the Jaccard similarity measure. Results: We demonstrated the utility of our approach on some cases of inconsistent value sets and produced a list of 58 potentially duplicate value sets from the current set of clinical quality measures for the 2014 Meaningful Use criteria. Conclusion: These metrics are easy to compute and provide compact indicators of the completeness, correctness, and non-redundancy of value sets. PMID:24551422

  7. Inferring Absorbing Organic Carbon Content from AERONET Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arola, A.; Schuster, G.; Myhre, G.; Kazadzis, S.; Dey, S.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    Black carbon, light-absorbing organic carbon (often called brown carbon) and mineral dust are the major light-absorbing aerosols. Currently the sources and formation of brown carbon aerosol in particular are not well understood. In this study we estimated globally the amount of light absorbing organic carbon and black carbon from AERONET measurements. We find that the columnar absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon) levels in biomass burning regions of South-America and Africa are relatively high (about 15-20 magnesium per square meters during biomass burning season), while the concentrations are significantly lower in urban areas in US and Europe. However, we estimated significant absorbing organic carbon amounts from the data of megacities of newly industrialized countries, particularly in India and China, showing also clear seasonality with peak values up to 30-35 magnesium per square meters during the coldest season, likely caused by the coal and biofuel burning used for heating. We also compared our retrievals with the modeled organic carbon by global Oslo CTM for several sites. Model values are higher in biomass burning regions than AERONET-based retrievals, while opposite is true in urban areas in India and China.

  8. Partial-measurement backaction and nonclassical weak values in a superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Groen, J P; Ristè, D; Tornberg, L; Cramer, J; de Groot, P C; Picot, T; Johansson, G; DiCarlo, L

    2013-08-30

    We realize indirect partial measurement of a transmon qubit in circuit quantum electrodynamics by interaction with an ancilla qubit and projective ancilla measurement with a dedicated readout resonator. Accurate control of the interaction and ancilla measurement basis allows tailoring the measurement strength and operator. The tradeoff between measurement strength and qubit backaction is characterized through the distortion of a qubit Rabi oscillation imposed by ancilla measurement in different bases. Combining partial and projective qubit measurements, we provide the solid-state demonstration of the correspondence between a nonclassical weak value and the violation of a Leggett-Garg inequality.

  9. A portable, non-focusing optics spectrophotometer (NoFOSpec) for measurements of steady-state absorbance changes in intact plants.

    PubMed

    Sacksteder, C A; Jacoby, M E; Kramer, D M

    2001-01-01

    Kinetically-resolved absorbance measurements during extended, or steady-state illumination are typically hindered by large, light-induced changes in the light-scattering properties of the material. In this work, a new type of portable spectrophotometer, the Non-Focusing Optical Spectrophotometer (NoFOSpec), is introduced, which reduces interference from light-scattering changes and is in a form suitable for fieldwork. The instrument employs a non-focusing optical component, called a compound parabolic concentrator (CPC), to simultaneously concentrate and homogeneously diffuse measuring and actinic light (from light-emitting diode sources) onto the leaf sample. Light passing through the sample is then collected and processed using a subsequent series of CPCs leading to a photodiode detector. The instrument is designed to be compact, lightweight and rugged for field work. The pulsed measuring beam allows for high sensitivity (typically < 100 ppm noise) and time resolution ( approximately 10 mus) measurements in the visible and near infrared spectral regions. These attributes allow high-resolution measurements of signals associated with energization of the thylakoid membrane (the electrochromic shifting of carotenoid pigments), as well as electron transfer, e.g., the 820-nm changes associated with electron transfer through Photosystem I (PS I). In addition, the instrument can be used as a kinetic fluorimeter, e.g., to measure saturation-pulse fluorescence changes indicative of Photosystem II (PS II) quantum efficiency. The instrument is demonstrated by estimating electron and proton fluxes through the photosynthetic apparatus in an intact tobacco leaf, using respectively the saturation-pulse fluorescence changes and dark-interval relaxation kinetics (DIRK) of the electrochromic shift. A linear relationship was found, confirming our earlier results with the laboratory-based diffused-optics flash spectrophotometer, indicating a constant H(+)/e(-) stoichiometry for

  10. Method and apparatus for real-time measurement of fuel gas compositions and heating values

    DOEpatents

    Zelepouga, Serguei; Pratapas, John M.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Jangale, Vilas V.

    2016-03-22

    An exemplary embodiment can be an apparatus for real-time, in situ measurement of gas compositions and heating values. The apparatus includes a near infrared sensor for measuring concentrations of hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide, a mid infrared sensor for measuring concentrations of carbon monoxide and a semiconductor based sensor for measuring concentrations of hydrogen gas. A data processor having a computer program for reducing the effects of cross-sensitivities of the sensors to components other than target components of the sensors is also included. Also provided are corresponding or associated methods for real-time, in situ determination of a composition and heating value of a fuel gas.

  11. Absorbencies of six different rodent beddings: commercially advertised absorbencies are potentially misleading.

    PubMed

    Burn, C C; Mason, G J

    2005-01-01

    Moisture absorbency is one of the most important characteristics of rodent beddings for controlling bacterial growth and ammonia production. However, bedding manufacturers rarely provide information on the absorbencies of available materials, and even when they do, absorption values are usually expressed per unit mass of bedding. Since beddings are usually placed into cages to reach a required depth rather than a particular mass, their volumetric absorbencies are far more relevant. This study therefore compared the saline absorbencies of sawdust, aspen woodchips, two virgin loose pulp beddings (Alpha-Dri and Omega-Dri), reclaimed wood pulp (Tek-Fresh), and corncob, calculated both by volume and by mass. Absorbency per unit volume correlated positively with bedding density, while absorbency per unit mass correlated negatively. Therefore, the relative absorbencies of the beddings were almost completely reversed depending on how absorbency was calculated. By volume, corncob was the most absorbent bedding, absorbing about twice as much saline as Tek-Fresh, the least absorbent bedding. Conversely, when calculated by mass, Tek-Fresh appeared to absorb almost three times as much saline as the corncob. Thus, in practical terms the most absorbent bedding here was corncob, followed by the loose pulp beddings; and this is generally supported by their relatively low ammonia production as seen in previous studies. Many factors other than absorbency determine whether a material is suitable as a rodent bedding, and they are briefly mentioned here. However, manufacturers should provide details of bedding absorbencies in terms of volume, in order to help predict the relative absorbencies of the beddings in practical situations.

  12. Consistency between Self-Reported and Recorded Values for Clinical Measures

    PubMed Central

    III, Joseph Thomas; Paulet, Mindy; Rajpura, Jigar R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated consistency between self-reported values for clinical measures and recorded clinical measures. Methods. Self-reported values were collected for the clinical measures: systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, glucose level, height, weight, and cholesterol from health risk assessments completed by enrollees in a privately insured cohort. Body mass index (BMI) was computed from reported height and weight. Practitioner recorded values for the clinical measures were obtained from health screenings. We used bivariate Pearson correlation analysis and descriptive statistics to evaluate consistency between self-reported data and recorded clinic measurements. Results. There was high correlation between self-reported clinical values and recorded clinical measures for diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.91, P = <0.0001), systolic blood pressure (r = 0.93, P = <0.0001), cholesterol (r = 0.97, P = <0.0001), body mass index (r = 0.96, P = <0.0001), glucose (r = 0.96, P = <0.0001), weight (r = 0.98, P = <0.0001), and height (r = 0.89, P = <0.0001). Conclusions. Self-reported clinical values for each of the eight clinical measures examined had good consistency with practitioner recorded data. PMID:26942034

  13. New population based reference values for spinal mobility measures based on the NHANES 2009–10

    PubMed Central

    Assassi, Shervin; Weisman, Michael H.; Lee, MinJae; Savage, Laurie; Diekman, Laura; Graham, Tiffany A.; Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Schall, Joan I.; Gensler, Lianne S.; Deodhar, Atul A.; Clegg, Daniel O.; Colbert, Robert A.; Reveille, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report population based percentile reference values for selected spinal mobility measures in a nationally representative sample of 5103 U.S. adults ages 20–69 years examined in the 2009–10 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Methods Occiput-to-Wall Distance (OWD), Thoracic Expansion (TE), and Anterior Lumbar Flexion (ALF – modified Schober test) were measured by trained examiners in a standardized fashion. TE was measured at the xyphosternal level while the lower reference point for ALF was a line marked at the level of the superior margin of the lateral iliac crests. We report reference values based on the 95th percentile of OWD and 5th percentile of TE and ALF measurements, as well as other summary statistics for these measures in the study population. Results An OWD of more than zero was present in 3.8 % of participants while 8.8% of participants had out of range values for TE based the commonly used threshold of 2.5 cm. The 95th percentile of OWD measurement was zero while the 5th percentile measurements for TE and ALF were 1.9 and 2 cm, respectively. The spinal measures were significantly associated with gender, age, ethnicity, height, and body mass index. Exclusion of individuals with severe obesity (BMI > 35) changed the proposed reference values for TE and ALF to 2.2 and 1.9 cm, respectively. Conclusion We verified the reference value of zero for OWD. Using the reported population based percentile values, new reference values for TE and the ALF can be derived. PMID:24782356

  14. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Ronald J.

    1987-09-22

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  15. Shock absorber control system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Y.; Ohira, M.; Ushida, M.; Miyagawa, T.; Shimodaira, T.

    1987-01-13

    A shock absorber control system is described for controlling a dampening force of a shock absorber of a vehicle comprising: setting means for setting a desired dampening force changeable within a predetermined range; drive means for driving the shock absorber to change the dampening force of the shock absorber linearly; control means for controlling the drive means in accordance with the desired dampening force when the setting of the desired dampening force has been changed; detecting means for detecting an actual dampening force of the shock absorber; and correcting means for correcting the dampening force of the shock absorber by controlling the drive means in accordance with a difference between the desired dampening force and the detected actual dampening force.

  16. CPCs with segmented absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Keita, M.; Robertson, H.S. )

    1991-01-01

    One of the most promising means of improving the performance of solar thermal collectors is to reduce the energy lost by the hot absorber. One way to do this, not currently part of the technology, is to recognize that since the absorber is usually not irradiated uniformly, it is therefore possible to construct an absorber of thermally isolated segments, circulate the fluid in sequence from low to high irradiance segments, and reduce loss by improving effective concentration. This procedure works even for ideal concentrators, without violating Winston's theorem. Two equivalent CPC collectors with single and segmented absorber were constructed and compared under actual operating conditions. The results showed that the daily thermal efficiency of the collector with segmented absorber is higher (about 13%) than that of the collector with nonsegmented absorber.

  17. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Guillen, Donna P [Idaho Falls, ID; Longhurst, Glen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Porter, Douglas L [Idaho Falls, ID; Parry, James R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  18. Measuring δ(13)C values of atmospheric acetaldehyde via sodium bisulfite adsorption and cysteamine derivatisation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Songjun; Chen, Mei; Wen, Sheng; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2012-01-01

    δ(13)C values of gaseous acetaldehyde were measured by gas chromatograph-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-C-IRMS) via sodium bisulfite (NaHSO(3)) adsorption and cysteamine derivatisation. Gaseous acetaldehyde was collected via NaHSO(3)-coated Sep-Pak(®) silica gel cartridge, then derivatised with cysteamine, and then the δ(13)C value of the acetaldehyde-cysteamine derivative was measured by GC-C-IRMS. Using two acetaldehydes with different δ(13)C values, derivatisation experiments were carried out to cover concentrations between 0.009×10(-3) and 1.96×10(-3) mg·l(-1)) of atmospheric acetaldehyde, and then δ(13)C fractionation was evaluated in the derivatisation of acetaldehyde based on stoichiometric mass balance after measuring the δ(13)C values of acetaldehyde, cysteamine and the acetaldehyde-cysteamine derivative. δ(13)C measurements in the derivertisation process showed good reproducibility (<0.5 ‰) for gaseous acetaldehyde. The differences between predicted and measured δ(13)C values were 0.04-0.31 ‰ for acetaldehyde-cysteamine derivative, indicating that the derivatisation introduces no isotope fractionation for gaseous acetaldehyde, and obtained δ(13)C values of acetaldehyde in ambient air at the two sites were distinct (-34.00 ‰ at an urban site versus-31.00 ‰ at a forest site), implying potential application of the method to study atmospheric acetaldehyde.

  19. Value-Added Measures for Schools in England: Looking inside the "Black Box" of Complex Metrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Anthony; Downey, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Value-added measures can be used to allocate funding to schools, to identify those institutions in need of special attention and to underpin government guidance on targets. In England, there has been a tendency to include in these measures an ever-greater number of contextualising variables and to develop ever-more complex models that encourage…

  20. Validity of a Wearable Accelerometer Device to Measure Average Acceleration Values During High-Speed Running.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jeremy P; Hopkinson, Trent L; Wundersitz, Daniel W T; Serpell, Benjamin G; Mara, Jocelyn K; Ball, Nick B

    2016-11-01

    Alexander, JP, Hopkinson, TL, Wundersitz, DWT, Serpell, BG, Mara, JK, and Ball, NB. Validity of a wearable accelerometer device to measure average acceleration values during high-speed running. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3007-3013, 2016-The aim of this study was to determine the validity of an accelerometer to measure average acceleration values during high-speed running. Thirteen subjects performed three sprint efforts over a 40-m distance (n = 39). Acceleration was measured using a 100-Hz triaxial accelerometer integrated within a wearable tracking device (SPI-HPU; GPSports). To provide a concurrent measure of acceleration, timing gates were positioned at 10-m intervals (0-40 m). Accelerometer data collected during 0-10 m and 10-20 m provided a measure of average acceleration values. Accelerometer data was recorded as the raw output and filtered by applying a 3-point moving average and a 10-point moving average. The accelerometer could not measure average acceleration values during high-speed running. The accelerometer significantly overestimated average acceleration values during both 0-10 m and 10-20 m, regardless of the data filtering technique (p < 0.001). Body mass significantly affected all accelerometer variables (p < 0.10, partial η = 0.091-0.219). Body mass and the absence of a gravity compensation formula affect the accuracy and practicality of accelerometers. Until GPSports-integrated accelerometers incorporate a gravity compensation formula, the usefulness of any accelerometer-derived algorithms is questionable.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Value-Added Data Products (Including Evaluated Data Sets)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Many of the scientific needs of the ARM Program are met through the analysis and processing of existing data products into "value-added" products or VAPs. Despite extensive instrumentation deployed at the ARM sites, there will always be quantities of interest that are either impractical or impossible to measure directly or routinely. Physical models using ARM instrument data as inputs are implemented as VAPs and can help fill some of the unmet measurement needs of the Program. Conversely, ARM produces some VAPs not in order to fill unmet measurement needs, but instead to improve the quality of existing measurements. In addition, when more than one measurement is available, ARM also produces "best estimate" VAPs. A special class of VAP called a Quality Measurement Experiment (QME) adds value to the input data streams by providing for continuous assessment of the quality of the input data. [taken from http://www.arm.gov/data/vaps_all.php] One of the ARM data centers, the External Data Center or XDC at Brookhaven National Laboratory, also adds value to ARM information by identifying sources and acquiring external data to augment the data being generated within the program. These external data sets are converted, processed, and carefully evaluated for their value to the overall ARM program. /. Data Plots are also value-added products from ARM.

  2. Bridging particle and wave sensitivity in a configurable detector of positive operator-valued measures.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Graciana; Lundeen, Jeff S; Branderhorst, Matthijs P A; Coldenstrodt-Ronge, Hendrik B; Smith, Brian J; Walmsley, Ian A

    2009-02-27

    We report an optical detector with tunable positive operator-valued measures. The device is based on a combination of weak-field homodyne techniques and photon-number-resolving detection. The resulting positive operator-valued measures can be continuously tuned from Fock-state projectors to a variety of phase-dependent quantum-state measurements by adjusting different system parameters such as local oscillator coupling, amplitude, and phase, allowing thus not only detection but also preparation of exotic quantum states. Experimental tomographic reconstructions of classical benchmark states are presented as a demonstration of the detector capabilities.

  3. Delta K measurements with synthetic aperture radar data. [micirowavelength difference values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. W.; Jackson, P. L.; Klooster, A.

    1985-01-01

    Delta K measurements are obtained from the interference of two electromagnetic waves of different frequencies. Constructive interference occurs when 2pi phase differences between the two frequencies correspond to a surface wavelength. Previous Delta K measurements have used two discrete frequencies for this purpose. Range pulses and Doppler signatures of a synthetic aperture radar system were filtered to obtain a sequence of Delta K values. Those Delta K values which correspond to the wavelengths of known surfaces show maximum constructive interference. SAR data can therefore be used for Delta K measurements, indicating the possibility of selective Delta K filtering during data gathering.

  4. On set-valued functionals: Multivariate risk measures and Aumann integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ararat, Cagin

    In this dissertation, multivariate risk measures for random vectors and Aumann integrals of set-valued functions are studied. Both are set-valued functionals with values in a complete lattice of subsets of Rm. Multivariate risk measures are considered in a general d-asset financial market with trading opportunities in discrete time. Specifically, the following features of the market are incorporated in the evaluation of multivariate risk: convex transaction costs modeled by solvency regions, intermediate trading constraints modeled by convex random sets, and the requirement of liquidation into the first m ≤ d of the assets. It is assumed that the investor has a "pure" multivariate risk measure R on the space of m-dimensional random vectors which represents her risk attitude towards the assets but does not take into account the frictions of the market. Then, the investor with a d-dimensional position minimizes the set-valued functional R over all m-dimensional positions that she can reach by trading in the market subject to the frictions described above. The resulting functional Rmar on the space of d-dimensional random vectors is another multivariate risk measure, called the market-extension of R. A dual representation for R mar that decomposes the effects of R and the frictions of the market is proved. Next, multivariate risk measures are studied in a utility-based framework. It is assumed that the investor has a complete risk preference towards each individual asset, which can be represented by a von Neumann-Morgenstern utility function. Then, an incomplete preference is considered for multivariate positions which is represented by the vector of the individual utility functions. Under this structure, multivariate shortfall and divergence risk measures are defined as the optimal values of set minimization problems. The dual relationship between the two classes of multivariate risk measures is constructed via a recent Lagrange duality for set optimization. In

  5. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  6. Disturbance in weak measurements and the difference between quantum and classical weak values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipsen, Asger C.

    2015-06-01

    The role of measurement-induced disturbance in weak measurements is of central importance for the interpretation of the weak value. Uncontrolled disturbance can interfere with the postselection process and make the weak value dependent on the details of the measurement process. Here we develop the concept of a generalized weak measurement for classical and quantum mechanics. The two cases appear remarkably similar, but we point out some important differences. A priori it is not clear what the correct notion of disturbance should be in the context of weak measurements. We consider three different notions and get three different results: (1) For a "strong" definition of disturbance, we find that weak measurements are disturbing. (2) For a weaker definition we find that a general class of weak measurements is nondisturbing, but that one gets weak values which depend on the measurement process. (3) Finally, with respect to an operational definition of the "degree of disturbance," we find that the AAV weak measurements are the least disturbing, but that the disturbance is always nonzero.

  7. The measured energy value of pistachio nuts in the human diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have suggested that lipid from nuts is more poorly absorbed than that from other food sources. If lipid from nuts is poorly absorbed, then the metabolizable energy contained in the nuts is less than that predicted by the Atwater general factor for fat of 37 kJ(9 kcal)/g. A crossov...

  8. A summary of the measured pK values of the ionizable groups in folded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Grimsley, Gerald R; Scholtz, J Martin; Pace, C Nick

    2009-01-01

    We tabulated 541 measured pK values reported in the literature for the Asp, Glu, His, Cys, Tyr, and Lys side chains, and the C and N termini of 78 folded proteins. The majority of these values are for the Asp, Glu, and His side chains. The average pK values are Asp 3.5 ± 1.2 (139); Glu 4.2 ± 0.9 (153); His 6.6 ± 1.0 (131); Cys 6.8 ± 2.7 (25); Tyr 10.3 ± 1.2 (20); Lys 10.5 ± 1.1 (35); C-terminus 3.3 ± 0.8 (22) and N-terminus 7.7 ± 0.5 (16). We compare these results with the measured pK values of these groups in alanine pentapeptides, and comment on our overall findings. PMID:19177368

  9. Comparison of measurement- and proxy-based Vs30 values in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yong, Alan K.

    2016-01-01

    This study was prompted by the recent availability of a significant amount of openly accessible measured VS30 values and the desire to investigate the trend of using proxy-based models to predict VS30 in the absence of measurements. Comparisons between measured and model-based values were performed. The measured data included 503 VS30 values collected from various projects for 482 seismographic station sites in California. Six proxy-based models—employing geologic mapping, topographic slope, and terrain classification—were also considered. Included was a new terrain class model based on the Yong et al. (2012) approach but recalibrated with updated measured VS30 values. Using the measured VS30 data as the metric for performance, the predictive capabilities of the six models were determined to be statistically indistinguishable. This study also found three models that tend to underpredict VS30 at lower velocities (NEHRP Site Classes D–E) and overpredict at higher velocities (Site Classes B–C).

  10. Sound propagation in woods. Comparative analysis between in situ measurements, laboratory measurements and the values predicted by a theoretical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrero Fernandez, Ana Isabel

    This PhD Thesis studies sound propagation outdoors and the potential effect of trees on such propagation. In the first part of the thesis, seven different types of grounds (sand, grass, concrete...) are characterised from an acoustical point of view. In order to determine the ground impedance of each type of ground, it was necessary to determine the flow resistivity by means of an indirect method. In this method the flow resistivity values are chosen so as to give the best fit between experimental values and the values given by a theoretical propagation model. This first part includes a comparative analysis of sound attenuation over two very similar types of grounds, one with trees and the other one without trees. It is observed that at high frequencies sound attenuation in the case of ground with trees (wood) is higher. In the second part of this work, the theoretical outdoor sound propagation model NORD 2000, which has been developed by a group of scientists in the Scandinavian countries, is described and then validated. This model takes into account the source characteristics, the geometric divergence, atmospheric absorption, ground effects and the scattering produced by obstacles such as trees, houses... In order to validate this theoretical model, we have compared the predictions given by the model under many different circumstances with the values measured in situ in different types of woods and also with the values measured in a scaled model in laboratory, using different trees density, trunk diameters... From a deep analysis of all the set of comparisons it was concluded that the theoretical model NORD 2000 agrees very well with the experimental values both measured in situ and in laboratory (scale model) at low and medium frequencies. At high frequencies there are some discrepancies between the model and the experimental values.

  11. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  12. The measurement of personal values in survey research: a test of alternative rating procedures.

    PubMed

    McCarty, J A; Shrum, L J

    2000-01-01

    When survey researchers are interested in measuring the personal values of respondents, they often use a rating rather than a ranking method because it is easier and faster to administer and yields data that are amenable to parametric statistical analyses. However, because personal values are inherently positive constructs, respondents often exhibit little differentiation among the values and end-pile their ratings toward the positive end of the scale. Such lack of differentiation may potentially affect the statistical properties of the values and the ability to detect relationships with other variables. Two experiments were conducted via mail surveys to general population samples to test alternative rating methods designed to increase differentiation and reduce end-piling in the rating of personal values. The results suggest that a procedure in which respondents first pick their most and least important values, then rate them (most-least), provides more differentiation and less end-piling than a simple rating procedure (rate-only). Increased differentiation for the most-least method influenced the fit of latent structure and resulted in more robust relations between the values ratings and other criterion variables. These results generalized across type of values scale, number of values rated, and number of rating points.

  13. Orthogonality Measure on the Torus for Vector-Valued Jack Polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkl, Charles F.

    2016-03-01

    For each irreducible module of the symmetric group on N objects there is a set of parametrized nonsymmetric Jack polynomials in N variables taking values in the module. These polynomials are simultaneous eigenfunctions of a commutative set of operators, self-adjoint with respect to certain Hermitian forms. These polynomials were studied by the author and J.-G. Luque using a Yang-Baxter graph technique. This paper constructs a matrix-valued measure on the N-torus for which the polynomials are mutually orthogonal. The construction uses Fourier analysis techniques. Recursion relations for the Fourier-Stieltjes coefficients of the measure are established, and used to identify parameter values for which the construction fails. It is shown that the absolutely continuous part of the measure satisfies a first-order system of differential equations.

  14. Dollar$ & $en$e. Part IV: Measuring the value of people, structural, and customer capital.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, I

    2001-01-01

    In Part I of this series, I introduced the concept of memes (1). Memes are ideas or concepts, the information world equivalent of genes. The goal of this series of articles is to infect you with my memes, so that you will assimilate, translate, and express them. We discovered that no matter what our area of expertise or "-ology," we all are in the information business. Our goal is to be in the wisdom business. We saw that when we convert raw data into wisdom we are moving along a value chain. Each step in the chain adds a different amount of value to the final product: timely, relevant, accurate, and precise knowledge which can then be applied to create the ultimate product in the value chain: wisdom. In Part II of this series, I infected you with a set of memes for measuring the cost of adding value (2). In Part III of this series, I infected you with a new set of memes for measuring the added value of knowledge, i.e., intellectual capital (3). In Part IV of this series, I will infect you with memes for measuring the value of people, structural, and customer capital.

  15. [Gas Concentration Measurement Based on the Integral Value of Absorptance Spectrum].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-jun; Tao, Shao-hua; Yang, Bing-chu; Deng, Hong-gui

    2015-12-01

    The absorptance spectrum of a gas is the basis for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the gas by the law of the Lambert-Beer. The integral value of the absorptance spectrum is an important parameter to describe the characteristics of the gas absorption. Based on the measured absorptance spectrum of a gas, we collected the required data from the database of HIT-RAN, and chose one of the spectral lines and calculated the integral value of the absorptance spectrum in the frequency domain, and then substituted the integral value into Lambert-Beer's law to obtain the concentration of the detected gas. By calculating the integral value of the absorptance spectrum we can avoid the more complicated calculation of the spectral line function and a series of standard gases for calibration, so the gas concentration measurement will be simpler and faster. We studied the changing trends of the integral values of the absorptance spectrums versus temperature. Since temperature variation would cause the corresponding variation in pressure, we studied the changing trends of the integral values of the absorptance spectrums versus both the pressure not changed with temperature and changed with the temperature variation. Based on the two cases, we found that the integral values of the absorptance spectrums both would firstly increase, then decrease, and finally stabilize with temperature increasing, but the ranges of specific changing trend were different in the two cases. In the experiments, we found that the relative errors of the integrated values of the absorptance spectrum were much higher than 1% and still increased with temperature when we only considered the change of temperature and completely ignored the pressure affected by the temperature variation, and the relative errors of the integrated values of the absorptance spectrum were almost constant at about only 1% when we considered that the pressure were affected by the temperature variation. As the integral value

  16. Weak Value Amplification Can Outperform Conventional Measurement in the Presence of Detector Saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Jérémie; Boyd, Robert W.; Lundeen, Jeff S.

    2017-02-01

    Weak value amplification (WVA) is a technique by which one can magnify the apparent strength of a measurement signal. Some have claimed that WVA can outperform more conventional measurement schemes in parameter estimation. Nonetheless, a significant body of theoretical work has challenged this perspective, suggesting WVA to be fundamentally suboptimal. Optimal measurements may not be practical, however. Two practical considerations that have been conjectured to afford a benefit to WVA over conventional measurement are certain types of noise and detector saturation. Here, we report a theoretical study of the role of saturation and pixel noise in WVA-based measurement, in which we carry out a Bayesian analysis of the Fisher information available using a saturable, pixelated, digitized, and/or noisy detector. We draw two conclusions: first, that saturation alone does not confer an advantage to the WVA approach over conventional measurement, and second, that WVA can outperform conventional measurement when saturation is combined with intrinsic pixel noise and/or digitization.

  17. How Can Value-Added Measures Be Used for Teacher Improvement? What We Know Series: Value-Added Methods and Applications. Knowledge Brief 13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeb, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    The question for this brief is whether education leaders can use value-added measures as tools for improving schooling and, if so, how to do this. Districts, states, and schools can, at least in theory, generate gains in educational outcomes for students using value-added measures in three ways: creating information on effective programs, making…

  18. [Absorbed doses in dental radiology].

    PubMed

    Bianchi, S D; Roccuzzo, M; Albrito, F; Ragona, R; Anglesio, S

    1996-01-01

    The growing use of dento-maxillo-facial radiographic examinations has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies on dosimetry. A thorough review of the literature is presented in this article. Most studies were carried out on tissue equivalent skull phantoms, while only a few were in vivo. The aim of the present study was to evaluate in vivo absorbed doses during Orthopantomography (OPT). Full Mouth Periapical Examination (FMPE) and Intraoral Tube Panoramic Radiography (ITPR). Measurements were made on 30 patients, reproducing clinical conditions, in 46 anatomical sites, with 24 intra- and 22 extra-oral thermoluminiscent dosimeters (TLDS). The highest doses were measured, in orthopantomography, at the right mandibular angle (1899 mu Gy) in FMPE on the right naso-labial fold (5640 mu Gy and in ITPR on the palatal surface of the left second upper molar (1936 mu Gy). Intraoral doses ranged from 21 mu Gy, in orthopantomography, to 4494 mu Gy in FMPE. Standard errors ranged from 142% in ITPR to 5% in orthopantomography. The highest rate of standard errors was found in FMPE and ITPR. The data collected in this trial are in agreement with others in major literature reports. Disagreements are probably due to different exam acquisition and data collections. Such differences, presented comparison in several sites, justify lower doses in FMPE and ITPR. Advantages and disadvantages of in vivo dosimetry of the maxillary region are discussed, the former being a close resemblance to clinical conditions of examination and the latter the impossibility of collecting values in depth of tissues. Finally, both ITPR and FMPE required lower doses than expected, and can be therefore reconsidered relative to their radiation risk.

  19. Internal absorber solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Sletten, Carlyle J.; Herskovitz, Sheldon B.; Holt, F. S.; Sletten, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Thin solar collecting panels are described made from arrays of small rod collectors consisting of a refracting dielectric rod lens with an absorber imbedded within it and a reflecting mirror coated on the back side of the dielectric rod. Non-tracking collector panels on vertical walls or roof tops receive approximately 90% of solar radiation within an acceptance zone 60.degree. in elevation angle by 120.degree. or more in the azimuth sectors with a collector concentration ratio of approximately 3.0. Miniaturized construction of the circular dielectric rods with internal absorbers reduces the weight per area of glass, plastic and metal used in the collector panels. No external parts or insulation are needed as heat losses are low due to partial vacuum or low conductivity gas surrounding heated portions of the collector. The miniature internal absorbers are generally made of solid copper with black selective surface and the collected solar heat is extracted at the collector ends by thermal conductivity along the absorber rods. Heat is removed from end fittings by use of liquid circulants. Several alternate constructions are provided for simplifying collector panel fabrication and for preventing the thermal expansion and contraction of the heated absorber or circulant tubes from damaging vacuum seals. In a modified version of the internal absorber collector, oil with temperature dependent viscosity is pumped through a segmented absorber which is now composed of closely spaced insulated metal tubes. In this way the circulant is automatically diverted through heated portions of the absorber giving higher collector concentration ratios than theoretically possible for an unsegmented absorber.

  20. Detection of Organic Compounds in Water by an Optical Absorbance Method

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chihoon; Eom, Joo Beom; Jung, Soyoun; Ji, Taeksoo

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an optical method which allows determination of the organic compound concentration in water by measurement of the UV (ultraviolet) absorption at a wavelength of 250 nm~300 nm. The UV absorbance was analyzed by means of a multiple linear regression model for estimation of the total organic carbon contents in water, which showed a close correlation with the UV absorbance, demonstrating a high adjusted coefficient of determination, 0.997. The comparison of the TOC (total organic carbon) concentrations for real samples (tab water, sea, and river) calculated from the UV absorbance spectra, and those measured by a conventional TOC analyzer indicates that the higher the TOC value the better the agreement. This UV absorbance method can be easily configured for real-time monitoring water pollution, and built into a compact system applicable to industry areas. PMID:26742043

  1. Measuring JHH values with a selective constant-time 2D NMR protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-11-01

    Proton-proton scalar couplings play important roles in molecule structure elucidation. However, measurements of JHH values in complex coupled spin systems remain challenging. In this study, we develop a selective constant-time (SECT) 2D NMR protocol with which scalar coupling networks involving chosen protons can be revealed, and corresponding JHH values can be measured through doublets along the F1 dimension. All JHH values within a network of n fully coupled protons can be separately determined with (n - 1) SECT experiments. Additionally, the proposed pulse sequence possesses satisfactory sensitivity and handy implementation. Therefore, it will interest scientists who intend to address structural analyzes of molecules with overcrowded spectra, and may greatly facilitate the applications of scalar-coupling constants in molecule structure studies.

  2. Measuring the Value of Public Health Systems: The Disconnect Between Health Economists and Public Health Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Peter D.; Palmer, Jennifer A.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated ways of defining and measuring the value of services provided by governmental public health systems. Our data sources included literature syntheses and qualitative interviews of public health professionals. Our examination of the health economic literature revealed growing attempts to measure value of public health services explicitly, but few studies have addressed systems or infrastructure. Interview responses demonstrated no consensus on metrics and no connection to the academic literature. Key challenges for practitioners include developing rigorous, data-driven methods and skilled staff; being politically willing to base allocation decisions on economic evaluation; and developing metrics to capture “intangibles” (e.g., social justice and reassurance value). Academic researchers evaluating the economics of public health investments should increase focus on the working needs of public health professionals. PMID:18923123

  3. Value-Based Health Care for Chronic Care: Aligning Outcomes Measurement with the Patient Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Helena Hvitfeldt; Essén, Anna; Ernestam, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Value-based health care is increasingly used for developing health care services by relating patient outcomes to costs. A hierarchical value scorecard for creating outcome measurements has been suggested: the 3-tier model. The objective of this study was to test the model against the patient's view of value in a chronic care setting. Methods: Semistructured interviews with 22 persons with rheumatoid arthritis were conducted, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Themes were extracted, and the model was critically applied and revised. Results: The study validates existing dimensions in the model but suggests adding information, social health, predictability, and continuity to make it more useful and representative of patients' preferences. Conclusion: Although the model aims to focus on outcomes relevant to patients, it lacks dimensions important to individuals with rheumatoid arthritis. The data illustrate difficulties in finding patients' preferred outcomes and imply tactics for arriving at meaningful measurements. PMID:27749717

  4. Lipid-absorbing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Wallace, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The removal of bile acids and cholesterol by polymeric absorption is discussed in terms of micelle-polymer interaction. The results obtained with a polymer composed of 75 parts PEO and 25 parts PB plus curing ingredients show an absorption of 305 to 309%, based on original polymer weight. Particle size effects on absorption rate are analyzed. It is concluded that crosslinked polyethylene oxide polymers will absorb water, crosslinked polybutadiene polymers will absorb lipids; neither polymer will absorb appreciable amounts of lipids from micellar solutions of lipids in water.

  5. Electromagnetic power absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaki, R. S. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A structure is presented with a surface portion of dielectric material which passes electromagnetic radiation and with a portion below the surface which includes material that absorbs the radiation, the face of the structure being formed with numerous steep ridges. The steepness of the dielectric material results in a high proportion of the electromagnetic energy passing through the surface for absorption by the absorbing material under the surface. A backing of aluminum or other highly heat-conductive and reflective material lies under the face and has very steep protuberances supporting the absorbing and dielectric materials.

  6. Measuring Staff Perceptions of University Identity and Activities: The Mission and Values Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Joseph R.; Velcoff, Jessica

    2006-01-01

    Higher education institutions need to ascertain whether their stakeholders understand the school's mission, vision, and values. In the present study, the psychometric properties of a mission identity and activity measure were investigated with two staff samples. Using a principal component factor analysis (varimax rotation), respondents in Sample…

  7. Measuring the Value of Succession Planning and Management: A Qualitative Study of Multinational Companies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yeonsoo

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes a model for planning and operating an effective succession planning and management (SP&M) program and measuring its value. The nature of the research is exploratory, following a qualitative approach using in-depth interviews. Representatives of multinational companies interviewed for this study revealed that succession…

  8. Operational link between mutually unbiased bases and symmetric informationally complete positive operator-valued measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneduci, Roberto; Bullock, Thomas J.; Busch, Paul; Carmeli, Claudio; Heinosaari, Teiko; Toigo, Alessandro

    2013-09-01

    We exhibit an operational connection between mutually unbiased bases and symmetric informationally complete positive operator-valued measures. Assuming that the latter exists, we show that there is a strong link between these two structures in all prime power dimensions. We also demonstrate that a similar link cannot exist in dimension 6.

  9. Test Scaling and Value-Added Measurement. Working Paper 2008-23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballou, Dale

    2008-01-01

    As currently practiced, value-added assessment relies on a strong assumption about the scales used to measure student achievement, namely that these are interval scales, with equal-sized gains at all points on the scale representing the same increment of learning. Many of the metrics in which test results are expressed do not have this property…

  10. Sentinels Guarding the Grail: Value-Added Measurement and the Quest for Education Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Rachael; Lester, Jessica Nina

    2013-01-01

    Since the beginning of the federal Race To The Top grant competition, Value-Added Measurement (VAM) has captured the attention of the American public through high-profile media representations of the tool and the controversy that surrounds it. In this paper, we build upon investigations of constructions of VAM in the media and present a discourse…

  11. An assessment of the Value of Certain Measuring Devices for Identifying Creative Writing Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, J. Lewis

    The purposes of this study were to assess the individual and relative value of seven types of measuring devices for identifying students with creative writing ability, also to determine which of the devices comprised the best small predictor battery for indicating creative talent. Of the nearly thirty "predictor" variable scores derived from the…

  12. Value-Added Measures in Education: What Every Educator Needs to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Douglas N.

    2011-01-01

    In "Value-Added Measures in Education", Douglas N. Harris takes on one of the most hotly debated topics in education. Drawing on his extensive work with schools and districts, he sets out to help educators and policymakers understand this innovative approach to assessment and the issues associated with its use. Written in straightforward language…

  13. A new precision experiment to measure the muon g-2 value

    SciTech Connect

    May, M.

    1988-01-01

    A new measurement of the g-2 value of the muon with a sensitivity of .35 parts per million is being prepared at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternate Gradient Synchrotron (BNL AGS). The weak interaction contributes significantly to the magnetic moment anomaly at the planned level of sensitivity. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Effects of caffeine on fractional flow reserve values measured using intravenous adenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Masafumi; Chikamori, Taishiro; Uchiyama, Takashi; Kimura, Yo; Hijikata, Nobuhiro; Ito, Ryosuke; Yuhara, Mikio; Sato, Hideaki; Kobori, Yuichi; Yamashina, Akira

    2017-01-21

    We investigated the effects of caffeine intake on fractional flow reserve (FFR) values measured using intravenous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) before cardiac catheterization. Caffeine is a competitive antagonist for adenosine receptors; however, it is unclear whether this antagonism affects FFR values. Patients were evenly randomized into 2 groups preceding the FFR study. In the caffeine group (n = 15), participants were given coffee containing 222 mg of caffeine 2 h before the catheterization. In the non-caffeine group (n = 15), participants were instructed not to take any caffeine-containing drinks or foods for at least 12 h before the catheterization. FFR was performed in patients with more than intermediate coronary stenosis using the intravenous infusion of ATP at 140 μg/kg/min (normal dose) and 170 μg/kg/min (high dose), and the intracoronary infusion of papaverine. FFR was followed for 30 s after maximal hyperemia. In the non-caffeine group, the FFR values measured with ATP infusion were not significantly different from those measured with papaverine infusion. However, in the caffeine group, the FFR values were significantly higher after ATP infusion than after papaverine infusion (P = 0.002 and P = 0.007, at normal and high dose ATP vs. papaverine, respectively). FFR values with ATP infusion were significantly increased 30 s after maximal hyperemia (P = 0.001 and P < 0.001 for normal and high dose ATP, respectively). The stability of the FFR values using papaverine showed no significant difference between the 2 groups. Caffeine intake before the FFR study affected FFR values and their stability. These effects could not be reversed by an increased ATP dose.

  15. At the core. A system measures the level of employee commitment to its core values.

    PubMed

    Solbach, M T; Atchison, T A; Ryan, K E

    1990-12-01

    Corporate culture has been described as the shared values that drive employee satisfaction and enhance employee commitment to the organization. Therefore system leaders must know the strength of their corporate culture. Sisters of St. Francis Health Services, Inc. (SFHS), wanted to measure whether it had a strong corporate culture based on its stated values. Executives, managers, and physicians completed surveys that assessed employee job satisfaction, commitment to the organization, and perceived strength of the system's culture. The survey achieved a 68 percent response rate. SFHS learned that it had a strong culture based on tradition and that special and unique core corporate values define "systemness" throughout its different facilities. Although each facility serves significantly different functions, leaders throughout the system make everyday decisions using the same core corporate values.

  16. An evaluation of a new instrument to measure organisational safety culture values and practices.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cabrera, D; Hernández-Fernaud, E; Isla-Díaz, R

    2007-11-01

    The main aim of this research is to evaluate a safety culture measuring instrument centred upon relevant organisational values and practices related to the safety management system. Seven dimensions that reflect underlying safety meanings are proposed. A second objective is to explore the four cultural orientations in the field of safety arising from the competing values framework. The study sample consisted of 299 participants from five companies in different sectors. The results show six dimensions of organisational values and practices and different company profiles in the organisations studied. The four cultural orientations proposed by the competing values framework are not confirmed. Nevertheless, a coexistence of diverse cultural orientations or paradoxes in the companies is observed.

  17. Two-qubit Bell inequality for which positive operator-valued measurements are relevant

    SciTech Connect

    Vertesi, T.; Bene, E.

    2010-12-15

    A bipartite Bell inequality is derived which is maximally violated on the two-qubit state space if measurements describable by positive operator valued measure (POVM) elements are allowed, rather than restricting the possible measurements to projective ones. In particular, the presented Bell inequality requires POVMs in order to be maximally violated by a maximally entangled two-qubit state. This answers a question raised by N. Gisin [in Quantum Reality, Relativistic Causality, and Closing the Epistemic Circle: Essays in Honour of Abner Shimony, edited by W. C. Myrvold and J. Christian (Springer, The Netherlands, 2009), pp. 125-138].

  18. Behavioral economic measures of alcohol reward value as problem severity indicators in college students.

    PubMed

    Skidmore, Jessica R; Murphy, James G; Martens, Matthew P

    2014-06-01

    The aims of the current study were to examine the associations among behavioral economic measures of alcohol value derived from 3 distinct measurement approaches, and to evaluate their respective relations with traditional indicators of alcohol problem severity in college drinkers. Five behavioral economic metrics were derived from hypothetical demand curves that quantify reward value by plotting consumption and expenditures as a function of price, another metric measured proportional behavioral allocation and enjoyment related to alcohol versus other activities, and a final metric measured relative discretionary expenditures on alcohol (RDEA). The sample included 207 heavy-drinking college students (53% female) who were recruited through an on-campus health center or university courses. Factor analysis revealed that the alcohol valuation construct comprises 2 factors: 1 factor that reflects participants' levels of alcohol price sensitivity (demand persistence), and a second factor that reflects participants' maximum consumption and monetary and behavioral allocation toward alcohol (amplitude of demand). The demand persistence and behavioral allocation metrics demonstrated the strongest and most consistent multivariate relations with alcohol-related problems, even when controlling for other well-established predictors. The results suggest that behavioral economic indices of reward value show meaningful relations with alcohol problem severity in young adults. Despite the presence of some gender differences, these measures appear to be useful problem indicators for men and women.

  19. New measurements of W-values for protons and alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Giesen, U; Beck, J

    2014-10-01

    The increasing importance of ion beams in cancer therapy and the lack of experimental data for W-values for protons and heavy ions in air require new measurements. A new experimental set-up was developed at PTB and consistent measurements of W-values in argon, nitrogen and air for protons and alpha particles with energies from 0.7 to 3.5 MeV u(-1) at PTB, and for carbon ions between 3.6 and 7.0 MeV u(-1) at GSI were carried out. This publication concentrates on the measurements with protons and alpha particles at PTB. The experimental methods and the determination of corrections for recombination effects, beam-induced background radiation and additional effects are presented.

  20. Sex Differences and Representative Values for 6 Lower Extremity Alignment Measures

    PubMed Central

    Medina McKeon, Jennifer M; Hertel, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Context: A discrepancy in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury rates exists between men and women. Structural differences between the sexes often are implicated as a factor in this discrepancy. Researchers anecdotally assume that men and women tend to display different normative values for certain lower extremity alignments, but published information about these values is limited. Objective: To evaluate the effect of sex on 6 measures of lower extremity alignment and to report representative values of these measures from a sample of active adults and elite athletes. Design: Descriptive cohort design. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 118 healthy adults (57 men: age  =  21.1 ± 3.0 years, height  =  179.1 ± 7.3 cm, mass  =  79.8 ± 13.0 kg; 61 women: age  =  20.0 ± 1.6 years, height  =  167.7 ± 6.7 cm, mass  =  62.7 ± 5.5 kg) volunteered. Main Outcome Measure(s): Six common measures of lower extremity posture (navicular drop, tibial varum, quadriceps angle, genu recurvatum, anterior pelvic tilt, femoral anteversion) were collected using established methods. One measurement was taken for each participant for each lower extremity alignment. We measured the right lower extremity only. Results: Compared with men, women demonstrated larger quadriceps angles, more genu recurvatum, greater anterior pelvic tilt, and more femoral anteversion. Conclusions: We observed differences between men and women for 4 of the 6 lower extremity alignments that we measured. Future researchers should focus on identifying how sex and skeletal alignment affect biomechanical performance of functional tasks and what these differences specifically mean regarding the discrepancy in anterior cruciate ligament injury rates between the sexes. PMID:19478840

  1. Freshwater DOM quantity and quality from a two-component model of UV absorbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Heather T.; Tipping, Edward; Koprivnjak, Jean-Francois; Miller, Matthew P.; Cookson, Brenda; Hamilton-Taylor, John

    2012-01-01

    We present a model that considers UV-absorbing dissolved organic matter (DOM) to consist of two components (A and B), each with a distinct and constant spectrum. Component A absorbs UV light strongly, and is therefore presumed to possess aromatic chromophores and hydrophobic character, whereas B absorbs weakly and can be assumed hydrophilic. We parameterised the model with dissolved organic carbon concentrations [DOC] and corresponding UV spectra for c. 1700 filtered surface water samples from North America and the United Kingdom, by optimising extinction coefficients for A and B, together with a small constant concentration of non-absorbing DOM (0.80 mg DOC L-1). Good unbiased predictions of [DOC] from absorbance data at 270 and 350 nm were obtained (r2 = 0.98), the sum of squared residuals in [DOC] being reduced by 66% compared to a regression model fitted to absorbance at 270 nm alone. The parameterised model can use measured optical absorbance values at any pair of suitable wavelengths to calculate both [DOC] and the relative amounts of A and B in a water sample, i.e. measures of quantity and quality. Blind prediction of [DOC] was satisfactory for 9 of 11 independent data sets (181 of 213 individual samples).

  2. "Smart" Electromechanical Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, Lebarian; Glenn, Dean C.; Carroll, Monty B.

    1989-01-01

    Shock-absorbing apparatus includes electromechanical actuator and digital feedback control circuitry rather than springs and hydraulic damping as in conventional shock absorbers. Device not subject to leakage and requires little or no maintenance. Attenuator parameters adjusted in response to sensory feedback and predictive algorithms to obtain desired damping characteristic. Device programmed to decelerate slowly approaching vehicle or other large object according to prescribed damping characteristic.

  3. Electrostatic forces in two lysozymes: calculations and measurements of histidine pKa values.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Nakamura, H; Wada, A

    1992-08-01

    In order to examine the electrostatic forces in globular proteins, pKa values and their ionic strength dependence of His residues of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and human lysozyme (HUML) were measured, and they were compared with those calculated numerically. pKa values of His residues in HEWL, HUML, and short oligopeptides were determined from chemical shift changes of His side chains by 1H-nmr measurements. The associated changes in pKa values in HEWL and HUML were calculated by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equations numerically for macroscopic dielectric models. The calculated pKa changes and their ionic strength dependence agreed fairly well with the observed ones. The contribution from each residue of each alpha-helix dipole to the pKa values and their ionic strength dependence was analyzed using Green's reciprocity theorem. The results indicate that (1) the pKa of His residues are largely affected by surrounding ionized and polar groups; (2) the ionic strength dependence of the pKa values is determined by the overall charge distributions and their accessibilities to solvent; and (3) alpha-helix dipoles make a significant contribution to the pKa, when the His residue is close to the helix terminus and not fully exposed to the solvent.

  4. Measurement of individual intracellular pH and membrane potential values in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavik, Jan; Lanz, Edvard; Cimprich, Petr

    1999-07-01

    It was assumed that each cell is a homogeneous suspension may have a slightly different pH and membrane potential. A wide range of pH-sensitive fluorescent dyes BCECF, SNARF, FITC, carboxyfluorescein, fluorescein and pyranine have been carefully tested for the accuracy and reliability of their pH-response inside living cells. The intracellular milieu was simulated by a series of mineral buffers with addition of proteins. The pH values have been determined from the excitation ratios 490/435 nm for BCECF, FITC, carboxyfluorescein and fluorescein, and 450/400 nm for pyranine, emission ratios 518/529 nm for BCECF and 635/590 nm for SNARF. The spectrally determined values were then compared with the pH values of buffers measured by a glass electrode. Using the data from the calibration procedure, we evaluated individual intracellular pH values of a large number of cells within one cell population. The confocal ratio fluorescence microscopy revealed pH maps from which both cytoplasmic and vacuolar pH values could be determine, flow cytometry gave enormous amount of average intracellular pH values of individual cells of a whole cell population. Each cell population exhibited significant differences in both cytoplasmic pH values among individual cells. The pH distribution of a typical cell population appeared to fit a Gaussian curve. In yeast it was a Gaussian curve with half- width values around 0.4 pH unit. The men pH values depended on the growth phase, H-ATPase activity and external pH values. The preliminary result with the new membrane potential dye tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester indicated that similarly to pH values, there is a heterogeneity in membrane potential values among cell sin one cell population. The data presented above suggest that each ell behaves as an individual with an individual set up of its metabolism. This 'fine tuning' of the metabolism result in slightly higher or lower pH or membrane potential values that can be detected by fluorescence

  5. Measuring the value of groundwater and other forms of natural capital.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Eli P; Abbott, Joshua K; Bayham, Jude; Boone, Whitney; Haacker, Erin M K; Pfeiffer, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Valuing natural capital is fundamental to measuring sustainability. The United Nations Environment Programme, World Bank, and other agencies have called for inclusion of the value of natural capital in sustainability metrics, such as inclusive wealth. Much has been written about the importance of natural capital, but consistent, rigorous valuation approaches compatible with the pricing of traditional forms of capital have remained elusive. We present a guiding quantitative framework enabling natural capital valuation that is fully consistent with capital theory, accounts for biophysical and economic feedbacks, and can guide interdisciplinary efforts to measure sustainability. We illustrate this framework with an application to groundwater in the Kansas High Plains Aquifer, a rapidly depleting asset supporting significant food production. We develop a 10-y time series (1996-2005) of natural capital asset prices that accounts for technological, institutional, and physical changes. Kansas lost approximately $110 million per year (2005 US dollars) of capital value through groundwater withdrawal and changes in aquifer management during the decade spanning 1996-2005. This annual loss in wealth is approximately equal to the state's 2005 budget surplus, and is substantially more than investments in schools over this period. Furthermore, real investment in agricultural capital also declined over this period. Although Kansas' depletion of water wealth is substantial, it may be tractably managed through careful groundwater management and compensating investments in other natural and traditional assets. Measurement of natural capital value is required to inform management and ongoing investments in natural assets.

  6. Measuring the value of groundwater and other forms of natural capital

    PubMed Central

    Fenichel, Eli P.; Abbott, Joshua K.; Bayham, Jude; Boone, Whitney; Haacker, Erin M. K.; Pfeiffer, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Valuing natural capital is fundamental to measuring sustainability. The United Nations Environment Programme, World Bank, and other agencies have called for inclusion of the value of natural capital in sustainability metrics, such as inclusive wealth. Much has been written about the importance of natural capital, but consistent, rigorous valuation approaches compatible with the pricing of traditional forms of capital have remained elusive. We present a guiding quantitative framework enabling natural capital valuation that is fully consistent with capital theory, accounts for biophysical and economic feedbacks, and can guide interdisciplinary efforts to measure sustainability. We illustrate this framework with an application to groundwater in the Kansas High Plains Aquifer, a rapidly depleting asset supporting significant food production. We develop a 10-y time series (1996−2005) of natural capital asset prices that accounts for technological, institutional, and physical changes. Kansas lost approximately $110 million per year (2005 US dollars) of capital value through groundwater withdrawal and changes in aquifer management during the decade spanning 1996–2005. This annual loss in wealth is approximately equal to the state’s 2005 budget surplus, and is substantially more than investments in schools over this period. Furthermore, real investment in agricultural capital also declined over this period. Although Kansas’ depletion of water wealth is substantial, it may be tractably managed through careful groundwater management and compensating investments in other natural and traditional assets. Measurement of natural capital value is required to inform management and ongoing investments in natural assets. PMID:26858431

  7. Weak values and weak coupling maximizing the output of weak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Di Lorenzo, Antonio

    2014-06-15

    In a weak measurement, the average output 〈o〉 of a probe that measures an observable A{sup -hat} of a quantum system undergoing both a preparation in a state ρ{sub i} and a postselection in a state E{sub f} is, to a good approximation, a function of the weak value A{sub w}=Tr[E{sub f}A{sup -hat} ρ{sub i}]/Tr[E{sub f}ρ{sub i}], a complex number. For a fixed coupling λ, when the overlap Tr[E{sub f}ρ{sub i}] is very small, A{sub w} diverges, but 〈o〉 stays finite, often tending to zero for symmetry reasons. This paper answers the questions: what is the weak value that maximizes the output for a fixed coupling? What is the coupling that maximizes the output for a fixed weak value? We derive equations for the optimal values of A{sub w} and λ, and provide the solutions. The results are independent of the dimensionality of the system, and they apply to a probe having a Hilbert space of arbitrary dimension. Using the Schrödinger–Robertson uncertainty relation, we demonstrate that, in an important case, the amplification 〈o〉 cannot exceed the initial uncertainty σ{sub o} in the observable o{sup -hat}, we provide an upper limit for the more general case, and a strategy to obtain 〈o〉≫σ{sub o}. - Highlights: •We have provided a general framework to find the extremal values of a weak measurement. •We have derived the location of the extremal values in terms of preparation and postselection. •We have devised a maximization strategy going beyond the limit of the Schrödinger–Robertson relation.

  8. A Research on Performance Measurement Based on Economic Valued-Added Comprehensive Scorecard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qin; Zhang, Xiaomei

    With the development of economic, the traditional performance mainly rely on financial indicators could not satisfy the need of work. In order to make the performance measurement taking the best services for business goals, this paper proposed Economic Valued-Added Comprehensive Scorecard based on research of shortages and advantages of EVA and BSC .We used Analytic Hierarchy Process to build matrix to solve the weighting of EVA Comprehensive Scorecard. At last we could find the most influence factors for enterprise value forming the weighting.

  9. Standardizing 25-hydroxyvitamin D values from the Canadian Health Measures Survey123

    PubMed Central

    Sarafin, Kurtis; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramón; Tian, Lu; Phinney, Karen W; Tai, Susan; Camara, Johanna E; Merkel, Joyce; Green, Evan; Sempos, Christopher T; Brooks, Stephen PJ

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) is an ongoing cross-sectional national survey that includes a measure of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] by immunoassay. For cycles 1 and 2, the collection period occurred approximately every 2 y, with a new sample of ∼5600 individuals. Objective: The goal was to standardize the original 25(OH)D CHMS values in cycles 1 and 2 to the internationally recognized reference measurement procedures (RMPs) developed by the US National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) and Ghent University, Belgium. Design: Standardization was accomplished by using a 2-step procedure. First, serum samples corresponding to the original plasma samples were remeasured by using the currently available immunoassay method. Second, 50 serum samples with known 25(OH)D values assigned by the NIST and Ghent reference method laboratories were measured by using the currently available immunoassay method. The mathematical models for each step—i.e., 1) YCurrent = XOriginal and 2) YNIST-Ghent = XCurrent —were estimated by using Deming regression, and the 2 models were solved to obtain a single equation for converting the “original” values to NIST-Ghent RMP values. Results: After standardization (cycles 1 and 2 combined), the percentage of Canadians with 25(OH)D values <40 nmol/L increased from 16.4% (original) to 19.4% (standardized), and values <50 nmol/L increased from 29.0% (original) to 36.8% (standardized). The 25(OH)D standardized distributions (cycles 1 and 2 analyzed separately) were similar across age and sex groups; slightly higher values were associated with cycle 2 in the young and old. This finding contrasts with the original data, which indicated that cycle 2 values were lower for all age groups. Conclusion: The shifts in 25(OH)D distribution brought about by standardization indicate its importance in drawing correct conclusions about potential population deficiencies and insufficiencies and in permitting the

  10. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  11. Inferring runoff generation processes through high resolution spatial and temporal UV-Vis absorbance measurements in a mountainous headwater catchment in Southern Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windhorst, David; Schob, Sarah; Zang, Carina; Crespo, Patricio; Breuer, Lutz

    2015-04-01

    The alpine grassland páramo - typically occurring in the headwater catchments of the Andes - plays an important role in flow regulation, hydropower generation and local water supply. However, hydrological and hydro-biogeochemical processes in the páramo and their potential reactions to climate and land use change are largely unknown. Therefore, we used a UV-Vis absorbance spectrometer to investigate fluxes of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), turbidity and nitrate (NO3-N) in a small headwater catchment (91.31 km²) in the páramo in south Ecuador on a 5 min temporal and 100 m spatial resolution to gain first insights in its hydrological functioning. Spatial sampling was realized during three snapshot sampling campaigns along the 14.2 km long stream between October 2013 and January 2014, while temporal sampling took place at a permanent sampling site within the catchment between February and June 2014. To identify the runoff generation processes the spatial patterns have been associated with local site specific (e.g. fish ponds) and sub-catchment wide (e.g. land use) characteristics. Storm flow events within the time series allowed to further study temporal changes and rotational patterns of concentration-discharge relations (hysteresis). In total, 35 events were identified to be suitable for analyzing hysteresis effects of BOD, COD, and turbidity. Nitrate concentrations could be studied for 20 events. Regardless of the flow conditions nitrate leaching increased with a growing share of non-native pine forests or pastures in the study area. During low flow conditions, the high water holding capacity of the upstream páramo areas ensured a continuous supply of BOD to the stream. Pasture and pine forest sites, mostly occurring in the downstream section of the stream, contributed to BOD only during discharge events. Contradicting the expectations the trout farms along the lower part of the streams had a relatively closed nutrient cycle and

  12. Smart absorbing property of composites with MWCNTs and carbonyl iron as the filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yonggang; Yuan, Liming; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Deyuan

    2013-10-01

    A smart absorbing composite was prepared by mixing silicone rubber, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and flaky carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) in a two-roll mixer. The complex permittivity and permeability of composites with variable compression strain was measured by the transmission method and dc electric conductivity was measured by the standard four-point contact method, then the reflection loss (RL) could be calculated to evaluate the microwave absorbing ability. The results showed that the applied compression strain made the complex permittivity decrease but not obviously due to the broken original conductive network. The enforcement of the strain on the complex permeability was attributed to the orientation of flaky CIPs. With the compressing strain applied on the composites with thickness 1 mm or 1.5 mm, the RL value decreased (minimum -13.2 dB and -25.1 dB) and the absorbing band (RL<-10 dB) was widened (5.2-10.6 GHz and 4.0-8.4 GHz). While as the composite thickness decreased caused by the compression strain, the RL value still decreased (minimum -12.4 dB and -18.6 dB) and the absorbing band was also broadened (6.5-10.7 GHz and 4.4-10.0 GHz). Thus the smart absorbing property was effective on preparing absorbers with wide absorption band and high absorption ratio.

  13. Health Value Added (HVA): linking strategy, performance, and measurement in healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Nurit L; Kokia, Ehud; Shemer, Joshua

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes "Health Value Added"--an innovative model that links performance measurement to strategy in health maintenance organizations. The HVA model was developed by Maccabi Healthcare Services, Israel's second largest HMO, with the aim of focusing all its activities on providing high quality care within budgetary and regulatory constraints. HVA draws upon theory and practice from strategic management and performance measurement in order to assess an HMO's ability to improve the health of its members. The model consists of four interrelated levels--mission, goals, systems, and resources--and builds on the existence of advanced computerized information systems that make comprehensive measurements available to decision makers in real time. HVA enables management to evaluate overall organizational performance as well as the performance of semi-autonomous units. In simple terms, the sophisticated use of performance measures can help healthcare organizations obtain more health for the same money.

  14. Added value measures in education show genetic as well as environmental influence.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Claire M A; Asbury, Kathryn; Dale, Philip S; Plomin, Robert

    2011-02-02

    Does achievement independent of ability or previous attainment provide a purer measure of the added value of school? In a study of 4000 pairs of 12-year-old twins in the UK, we measured achievement with year-long teacher assessments as well as tests. Raw achievement shows moderate heritability (about 50%) and modest shared environmental influences (25%). Unexpectedly, we show that for indices of the added value of school, genetic influences remain moderate (around 50%), and the shared (school) environment is less important (about 12%). The pervasiveness of genetic influence in how and how much children learn is compatible with an active view of learning in which children create their own educational experiences in part on the basis of their genetic propensities.

  15. Minimal sufficient positive-operator valued measure on a separable Hilbert space

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramochi, Yui

    2015-10-15

    We introduce a concept of a minimal sufficient positive-operator valued measure (POVM), which is the least redundant POVM among the POVMs that have the equivalent information about the measured quantum system. Assuming the system Hilbert space to be separable, we show that for a given POVM, a sufficient statistic called a Lehmann-Scheffé-Bahadur statistic induces a minimal sufficient POVM. We also show that every POVM has an equivalent minimal sufficient POVM and that such a minimal sufficient POVM is unique up to relabeling neglecting null sets. We apply these results to discrete POVMs and information conservation conditions proposed by the author.

  16. Accuracy, Precision, Sensitivity, and Specificity of Noninvasive ICP Absolute Value Measurements.

    PubMed

    Krakauskaite, Solventa; Petkus, Vytautas; Bartusis, Laimonas; Zakelis, Rolandas; Chomskis, Romanas; Preiksaitis, Aidanas; Ragauskas, Arminas; Matijosaitis, Vaidas; Petrikonis, Kestutis; Rastenyte, Daiva

    2016-01-01

    An innovative absolute intracranial pressure (ICP) value measurement method has been validated by multicenter comparative clinical studies. The method is based on two-depth transcranial Doppler (TCD) technology and uses intracranial and extracranial segments of the ophthalmic artery as pressure sensors. The ophthalmic artery is used as a natural pair of "scales" that compares ICP with controlled pressure Pe, which is externally applied to the orbit. To balance the scales, ICP = Pe a special two-depth TCD device was used as a pressure balance indicator. The proposed method is the only noninvasive ICP measurement method that does not need patient-specific calibration.

  17. Can the reinforcing value of food be measured in bulimia nervosa?

    PubMed

    Schebendach, Janet; Broft, Allegra; Foltin, Richard W; Walsh, B Timothy

    2013-03-01

    Binge eating is a core clinical feature of bulimia nervosa (BN). Enhanced reinforcing value of food may play a role in this behavioral disturbance, but a systematic behavioral assessment of objective measures of the rewarding value of binge eating is lacking. The purpose of this study was to quantify the reinforcing value of food in BN patients as compared with normal controls. A progressive ratio (PR) computerized work task was completed under binge and non-binge instruction. The task consisted of 12 trials. The first trial required 50 keyboard taps to earn one portion of yogurt shake, and subsequent trials required progressive work increments of 200 taps for each additional portion. Completion of all 12 trials required 13,800 taps to earn 2100ml of shake. The breakpoint, defined as the largest ratio completed before a participant stopped working, was the measure of reinforcing efficacy. Ten patients and 10 controls completed the experiment. Under binge instruction, patients completed more trials and taps, and had a higher breakpoint than controls. The non-binge instruction yielded opposite findings; compared to controls, patients completed fewer trials and taps, and had a lower breakpoint. These results support the feasibility and potential utility of a PR task to quantify the reinforcing value of food in patients with BN.

  18. Standard systems for measurement of pK values and ionic mobilities: 2. Univalent weak bases.

    PubMed

    Slampová, Andrea; Krivánková, Ludmila; Gebauer, Petr; Bocek, Petr

    2009-04-24

    This paper contributes to the methodology of measuring pK values and ionic mobilities by capillary zone electrophoresis by introducing the principle of constant ionic strength and minimum interaction of analytes with counterionic components and presenting a standard system of cationic buffers for measurements of weak bases. The system is designed so that all buffers comprise the same concentration of Cl(-) present as the only counter anion. This minimizes problems caused by interactions between the counterion and the analytes which may otherwise bring biased values of obtained effective mobilities. Further, the buffer system provides constant and accurately known ionic strength for an entire set of measurements. When additionally all measurements are performed with constant Joule heating, one correction for ionic strength and temperature is then needed for the obtained set of experimental data. This considerably facilitates their evaluation and regression analysis as the corrections for ionic strength and Joule heating need not be implemented in the computation software and may be applied only once to the final regression results. An experimental example of the proposed methodology is presented and the reliability and the advantages of the proposed system are shown, where the known problematic groups of amines and pyridine were measured with high accuracy and without any notice of anomalous behavior.

  19. Weak-strong uniqueness for measure-valued solutions of some compressible fluid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwiazda, Piotr; Świerczewska-Gwiazda, Agnieszka; Wiedemann, Emil

    2015-10-01

    We prove weak-strong uniqueness in the class of admissible measure-valued solutions for the isentropic Euler equations in any space dimension and for the Savage-Hutter model of granular flows in one and two space dimensions. For the latter system, we also show the complete dissipation of momentum in finite time, thus rigorously justifying an assumption that has been made in the engineering and numerical literature.

  20. An Intercomparison of Lidar Ozone and Temperature Measurements From the SOLVE Mission With Predicted Model Values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burris, John; McGee, Thomas J.; Hoegy, Walt; Lait, Leslie; Sumnicht, Grant; Twigg, Larry; Heaps, William

    2000-01-01

    Temperature profiles acquired by Goddard Space Flight Center's AROTEL lidar during the SOLVE mission onboard NASA's DC-8 are compared with predicted values from several atmospheric models (DAO, NCEP and UKMO). The variability in the differences between measured and calculated temperature fields was approximately 5 K. Retrieved temperatures within the polar vortex showed large regions that were significantly colder than predicted by the atmospheric models.

  1. Picoradian deflection measurement with an interferometric quasi-autocollimator using weak value amplification.

    PubMed

    Turner, Matthew D; Hagedorn, Charles A; Schlamminger, Stephan; Gundlach, Jens H

    2011-04-15

    We present an "interferometric quasi-autocollimator" that employs weak value amplification to measure angular deflections of a target mirror. The device has been designed to be insensitive to all translations of the target. We present a conceptual explanation of the amplification effect used by the device. An implementation of the device demonstrates sensitivities better than 10 picoradians per root hertz between 10 and 200 Hz.

  2. Measurements of Sc I gf-values. [absorption spectroscopy using heat pipe oven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Reeves, E. M.; Tomkins, F. S.

    1976-01-01

    Absolute gf-values were obtained for 98 transitions in neutral scandium by the hook method using an inductively coupled heat-pipe oven. Of the 98 lines, 51 are classified, 33 are unclassified lines that occur in pairs with the lower energy level identified, and 14 are unclassified but are believed to originate from one of the two lower levels of the ground state. The results are compared with semiempirical and other measurement results in the literature.

  3. Measuring Value Added in Higher Education: A Proposed Methodology for Developing a Performance Indicator Based on the Economic Value Added to Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    The 2003 UK higher education White Paper suggested that the sector needed to re-examine the potential of the value added concept. This paper describes a possible methodology for developing a performance indicator based on the economic value added to graduates. The paper examines how an entry-quality-adjusted measure of a graduate's…

  4. Extending monetary values to broader performance and impact measures: Transportation applications and lessons for other fields.

    PubMed

    Weisbrod, Glen; Lynch, Teresa; Meyer, Michael

    2009-11-01

    This article examines recent progress at assigning monetary values to what are normally considered "hard to quantify" benefits of transportation projects. It focuses on three types of impacts - environmental quality, health and wider economic impacts - to examine how transportation project evaluation methods have evolved in recent years and how they compare to methods used for evaluation of non-transportation programs. Examples of recent practice are provided to show how transport agencies are continuing to refine performance measures to include broader impacts in project evaluation. A classification is provided to distinguish direct traveler effects from indirect effects on non-travelers, a step important to maximize coverage and minimize double-counting of impacts. For each type of impact, the paper discusses the range of variation in monetized values and shows that the variation is due less to imprecision in measurement than to fundamental issues about whether to use damage compensation, impact avoidance costs, stated preferences or behavioral valuation perspectives to define those values. Case studies as diverse as Australian roads, Wisconsin energy programs and Appalachian economic development programs are used to show how common methods are evolving among transport and non-transport agencies to improve impact measurement and its use in project evaluation.

  5. Using Effort to Measure Reward Value of Faces in Children with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, Louise; Pellicano, Elizabeth; Rhodes, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    According to one influential account, face processing atypicalities in autism reflect reduced reward value of faces, which results in limited attention to faces during development and a consequent failure to acquire face expertise. Surprisingly, however, there is a paucity of work directly investigating the reward value of faces for individuals with autism and the evidence for diminished face rewards in this population remains equivocal. In the current study, we measured how hard children with autism would work to view faces, using an effortful key-press sequence, and whether they were sensitive to the differential reward value of attractive and unattractive faces. Contrary to expectations, cognitively able children with autism did not differ from typically developing children of similar age and ability in their willingness to work to view faces. Moreover, the effort expended was strongly positively correlated with facial attractiveness ratings in both groups of children. There was also no evidence of atypical reward values for other, less social categories (cars and inverted faces) in the children with autism. These results speak against the possibility that face recognition difficulties in autism are explained by atypical reward value of faces. PMID:24236140

  6. CBF measured by Xe-CT: approach to analysis and normal values.

    PubMed

    Yonas, H; Darby, J M; Marks, E C; Durham, S R; Maxwell, C

    1991-09-01

    Normal reference values and a practical approach to CBF analysis are needed for routine clinical analysis and interpretation of xenon-enhanced computed tomography (CT) CBF studies. We measured CBF in 67 normal individuals with the GE 9800 CT scanner adapted for CBF imaging with stable Xe. CBF values for vascular territories were systematically analyzed using the clustering of contiguous 2-cm circular regions of interest (ROIs) placed within the cortical mantle and basal ganglia. Mixed cortical flows averaged 51 +/- 10ml.100g-1.min-1. High and low flow compartments, sampled by placing 5-mm circular ROIs in regions containing the highest and lowest flow values in each hemisphere, averaged 84 +/- 14 and 20 +/- 5 ml.100 g-1.min-1, respectively. Mixed cortical flow values as well as values within the high flow compartment demonstrated significant decline with age; however, there were no significant age-related changes in the low flow compartment. The clustering of systematically placed cortical and subcortical ROIs has provided a normative data base for Xe-CT CBF and a flexible and uncomplicated method for the analysis of CBF maps generated by Xe-enhanced CT.

  7. CBF measured by Xe-CT: Approach to analysis and normal values

    SciTech Connect

    Yonas, H.; Darby, J.M.; Marks, E.C.; Durham, S.R.; Maxwell, C. )

    1991-09-01

    Normal reference values and a practical approach to CBF analysis are needed for routine clinical analysis and interpretation of xenon-enhanced computed tomography (CT) CBF studies. The authors measured CBF in 67 normal individuals with the GE 9800 CT scanner adapted for CBF imaging with stable Xe. CBF values for vascular territories were systematically analyzed using the clustering of contiguous 2-cm circular regions of interest (ROIs) placed within the cortical mantle and basal ganglia. Mixed cortical flows averaged 51 {plus minus} 10ml.100g-1.min-1. High and low flow compartments, sampled by placing 5-mm circular ROIs in regions containing the highest and lowest flow values in each hemisphere, averaged 84 {plus minus} 14 and 20 {plus minus} 5 ml.100 g-1.min-1, respectively. Mixed cortical flow values as well as values within the high flow compartment demonstrated significant decline with age; however, there were no significant age-related changes in the low flow compartment. The clustering of systematically placed cortical and subcortical ROIs has provided a normative data base for Xe-CT CBF and a flexible and uncomplicated method for the analysis of CBF maps generated by Xe-enhanced CT.

  8. 36 CFR 223.64 - Appraisal on a lump-sum value or rate per unit of measure basis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... costs or selling values subsequent to the rate redetermination which reduce conversion value to less... or rate per unit of measure basis. 223.64 Section 223.64 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST... Contracts Appraisal and Pricing § 223.64 Appraisal on a lump-sum value or rate per unit of measure...

  9. Unidirectional perfect absorber

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Wang, P.; Song, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices. PMID:27615125

  10. Shock absorber servicing tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepler, Jack L. (Inventor); Hill, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A tool to assist in the servicing of a shock absorber wherein the shock absorber is constructed of a pair of aligned gas and liquid filled chambers. Each of the chambers is separated by a movable separator member. Maximum efficiency of the shock absorber is achieved in the locating of a precise volume of gas within the gas chamber and a precise volume of liquid within the liquid chamber. The servicing tool of this invention employs a rod which is to connect with the separator and by observation of the position of the rod with respect to the gauge body, the location of the separator is ascertained even though it is not directly observable.

  11. Unidirectional perfect absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Wang, P.; Song, Z.

    2016-09-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices.

  12. The weak measurement process and the weak value of spin for metastable helium 23S1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monachello, Vincenzo; Barker, Peter; Flack, Robert; Hiley, Basil

    2016-05-01

    An experiment is being designed and constructed in order to measure the weak value of spin for an atomic system. The principle of the ``weak measurement'' process was first proposed by Aharonov, Albert and Vaidman, and describes a scenario in which a system is weakly coupled to a pointer between well-defined pre- and post-selected states. This experiment will utilise a pulsed supersonic beam of spin-1 metastable Helium (He*) atoms in the 23S1 state. The spin of the pre-selected He* atoms will be weakly coupled to its centre-of-mass. During its flight, the atomic beam will be prepared in a desired quantum state and travel through two inhomogeneous magnets (weak and strong) which both comprise the ``weak measurement'' process. The deviation of the post-selected ms = + 1 state as measured using a micro-channel plate, phosphor screen and CCD camera setup will allow for the determination of the weak value of spin. This poster will report on the methods used and the experimental realisation.

  13. Dynamic testing of airplane shock-absorbing struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, P; Thome, W

    1932-01-01

    Measurement of perpendicular impacts of a landing gear with different shock-absorbing struts against the drum testing stand. Tests were made with pneumatic shock absorbers having various degrees of damping, liquid shock absorbers, steel-spring shock absorbers and rigid struts. Falling tests and rolling tests. Maximum impact and gradual reduction of the impacts in number and time in the falling tests. Maximum impact and number of weaker impacts in rolling tests.

  14. Electromagnetic Wave Absorbing Properties of Amorphous Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tingkai; Hou, Cuilin; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhu, Ruoxing; She, Shengfei; Wang, Jungao; Li, Tiehu; Liu, Zhifu; Wei, Bingqing

    2014-07-01

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) with diameters in the range of 7-50 nm were used as absorber materials for electromagnetic waves. The electromagnetic wave absorbing composite films were prepared by a dip-coating method using a uniform mixture of rare earth lanthanum nitrate doped ACNTs and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The microstructures of ACNTs and ACNT/PVC composites were characterized using transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction, and their electromagnetic wave absorbing properties were measured using a vector-network analyzer. The experimental results indicated that the electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of ACNTs are superior to multi-walled CNTs, and greatly improved by doping 6 wt% lanthanum nitrate. The reflection loss (R) value of a lanthanum nitrate doped ACNT/PVC composite was -25.02 dB at 14.44 GHz, and the frequency bandwidth corresponding to the reflector loss at -10 dB was up to 5.8 GHz within the frequency range of 2-18 GHz.

  15. Electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of amorphous carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tingkai; Hou, Cuilin; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhu, Ruoxing; She, Shengfei; Wang, Jungao; Li, Tiehu; Liu, Zhifu; Wei, Bingqing

    2014-07-10

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) with diameters in the range of 7-50 nm were used as absorber materials for electromagnetic waves. The electromagnetic wave absorbing composite films were prepared by a dip-coating method using a uniform mixture of rare earth lanthanum nitrate doped ACNTs and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The microstructures of ACNTs and ACNT/PVC composites were characterized using transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction, and their electromagnetic wave absorbing properties were measured using a vector-network analyzer. The experimental results indicated that the electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of ACNTs are superior to multi-walled CNTs, and greatly improved by doping 6 wt% lanthanum nitrate. The reflection loss (R) value of a lanthanum nitrate doped ACNT/PVC composite was -25.02 dB at 14.44 GHz, and the frequency bandwidth corresponding to the reflector loss at -10 dB was up to 5.8 GHz within the frequency range of 2-18 GHz.

  16. Electromagnetic Wave Absorbing Properties of Amorphous Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tingkai; Hou, Cuilin; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhu, Ruoxing; She, Shengfei; Wang, Jungao; Li, Tiehu; Liu, Zhifu; Wei, Bingqing

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) with diameters in the range of 7–50 nm were used as absorber materials for electromagnetic waves. The electromagnetic wave absorbing composite films were prepared by a dip-coating method using a uniform mixture of rare earth lanthanum nitrate doped ACNTs and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The microstructures of ACNTs and ACNT/PVC composites were characterized using transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction, and their electromagnetic wave absorbing properties were measured using a vector-network analyzer. The experimental results indicated that the electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of ACNTs are superior to multi-walled CNTs, and greatly improved by doping 6 wt% lanthanum nitrate. The reflection loss (R) value of a lanthanum nitrate doped ACNT/PVC composite was −25.02 dB at 14.44 GHz, and the frequency bandwidth corresponding to the reflector loss at −10 dB was up to 5.8 GHz within the frequency range of 2–18 GHz. PMID:25007783

  17. Improved Correction of IR Loss in Diffuse Shortwave Measurements: An ARM Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Younkin, K; Long, CN

    2003-11-01

    Simple single black detector pyranometers, such as the Eppley Precision Spectral Pyranometer (PSP) used by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, are known to lose energy via infrared (IR) emission to the sky. This is especially a problem when making clear-sky diffuse shortwave (SW) measurements, which are inherently of low magnitude and suffer the greatest IR loss. Dutton et al. (2001) proposed a technique using information from collocated pyrgeometers to help compensate for this IR loss. The technique uses an empirically derived relationship between the pyrgeometer detector data (and alternatively the detector data plus the difference between the pyrgeometer case and dome temperatures) and the nighttime pyranometer IR loss data. This relationship is then used to apply a correction to the diffuse SW data during daylight hours. We developed an ARM value-added product (VAP) called the SW DIFF CORR 1DUTT VAP to apply the Dutton et al. correction technique to ARM PSP diffuse SW measurements.

  18. Design of a nonlinear torsional vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Ammaar Bin

    larger than that in the latter. A nonlinear absorber design has been proposed comprising of thin beams as elastic elements. The geometric configuration of the proposed design has been shown to provide cubic stiffness nonlinearity in torsion. The values of design variables, namely the strength of nonlinearity alpha and torsional stiffness kalpha, were obtained by optimizing dimensions and material properties of the beams for a maximum vibration energy dissipation in the nonlinear absorber. A parametric study has also been conducted to analyze the effect of the magnitude of excitation provided to the system on the performance of a nonlinear absorber. It has been shown that the nonlinear absorber turns out to be more effective in terms of energy dissipation as compared to a linear absorber with an increase in the excitation level applied to the system.

  19. Shock Absorbing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-01-01

    A lightweight, inexpensive shock-absorbing system, developed by Langley Research Center 20 years ago, is now in service as safety device for an automated railway at Duke University Medical Center. The transportation system travels at about 25 miles per hour, carrying patients, visitors, staff and cargo. At the end of each guideway of the system are "frangible," (breakable) tube "buffers." If a slowing car fails to make a complete stop at the terminal, it would bump and shatter the tubes, absorbing energy that might otherwise jolt the passengers or damage the vehicle.

  20. Value of apparent diffusion coefficient measurement for discrimination of focal benign and malignant hepatic masses.

    PubMed

    Kilickesmez, O; Bayramoglu, S; Inci, E; Cimilli, T

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) to discriminate benign and malignant focal lesions of the liver using parallel imaging technique. A total of 77 patients and 65 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. DW-MRI was performed with b-factors of 0, 500 and 1000 s/mm(2), and the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) values of the normal liver and the lesions were calculated. The mean ADC value of the focal liver lesions were as follows: simple cysts (3.16 +/- 0.18 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s), hydatid cysts (2.58 +/- 0.53 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s), hemangiomas (1.97 +/- 0.49 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s), metastases (1.14 +/- 0.41 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s) and hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) (1.15 +/- 0.36 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s). The mean ADC values of all the disease groups were statistically significant when compared with the mean ADC value of the normal liver (1.56 +/- 0.14 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s), (P < 0.01). There were also statistically significant differences among the ADC values of hemangiomas and HCC metastases (P < 0.01), and simple and hydatid cysts (P < 0.008). However, there was no statistically significant difference between HCC and metastases. The present study showed that ADC measurement has the potential to differentiate benign and malignant focal hepatic lesions. We propose to add DW sequence in the MR protocol for the detection and quantitative discrimination of hepatic pathologies.

  1. Non-invasive blood pressure measurement: values, problems and applicability in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Mietsch, M; Einspanier, A

    2015-07-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus, C. j.) is an established primate model in biomedical research and for human-related diseases. Monitoring of cardiovascular parameters including blood pressure (BP) is important for the health surveillance of these experimental animals and the quantification of diseases or pharmaceutical substances influencing BP. Measurement guidelines for C. j. do not exist yet; therefore, the present study was carried out to establish a practicable protocol based on recommendations of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM). Furthermore, BP data of 49 marmosets (13.8-202.4 months of age) were obtained via high-definition oscillometry to further knowledge of physiological parameters and gender-related differences in this primate. The thighs proved to be the most suitable measurement localization, since systolic values were less variable (left 4.03 ± 2.90%, right 5.96 ± 2.77%) compared with the tail (12.7 ± 6.96%). BP values were similar in the morning and in the afternoon (P > 0.05). Data were highly reproducible within and between several sessions on three consecutive days (P > 0.05) as well as over the course of 20 months (P > 0.05). Furthermore, the measurement time for females was significantly shorter than for males (5:14 ± 1:59 min versus 6:50 ± 1:58 min, P = 0.007). Measurement recommendations for the common marmoset were successfully established. Standardized values enabled a reliable comparison of BP parameters, e.g. for cardiovascular, toxicological or metabolic research.

  2. Measuring the nose in septorhinoplasty patients: ultrasonographic standard values and clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Stenner, Markus; Koopmann, Mario; Rudack, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    Although septorhinoplasty is the most commonly performed operation in plastic surgery, and the surgical plan as well as its outcome is directly related to the configuration of the anatomical structures in the nose, these are not routinely assessed preoperatively. The aim of our study was to evaluate the nasal soft tissue and cartilaginous structures by means of high-resolution ultrasonography to set up clinical correlations and standard values. We examined 44 patients before septorhinoplasty by high-resolution ultrasonography in noncontact mode. All pictures were quantitatively evaluated by measuring 13 lengths and 4 ratios. All patients underwent a rhinomanometry measuring the nasal air flow. Besides others, men as well as older patients have a significantly thicker alar cartilage. Patients with thinner alar cartilages have a significantly smaller interdomal distance as well as significantly thinner upper lateral cartilages. The soft tissue above the bony dorsum was significantly thicker in older patients. Younger patients have significantly thicker soft tissue in relation to their cartilage. Patients with thicker soft tissue and thinner cartilage have a smaller tip. The interdomal distance and the thickness of the cartilaginous septum significantly correlated with the nasal air flow. We set up standard values of nasal structures in septorhinoplasty patients which can be used as reference values. By judging cartilage and soft tissue characteristics preoperatively, relevant factors for distinct procedures could be analyzed and the surgical steps can be better planned. Visualization by ultrasonography enables the surgeon to achieve treatment goals in a more predictable fashion.

  3. Attenuation of external Bremsstrahlung in metallic absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Dhaliwal, A.S.; Powar, M.S.; Singh, M. )

    1990-12-01

    In this paper attenuation of bremsstrahlung from {sup 147}Pm and {sup 170}Tm beta emitters has been studied in aluminum, copper, tin, and lead metallic absorbers. Bremsstrahlung spectra and mass attenuation coefficients for monoenergetic gamma rays are used to calculate theoretical attenuation curves. Magnetic deflection and beta stopping techniques are used to measure the integral bremsstrahlung intensities above 30 keV in different target thicknesses. Comparison of measured and calculated attenuation curves shows a good agreement for various absorbers, thus providing a test of this technique, which may be useful in understanding bremsstrahlung intensity buildup and in the design of optimum shielding for bremsstrahlung sources. It is found that the absorption of bremsstrahlung in metallic absorbers does not obey an exponential law and that absorbers act as energy filters.

  4. Comparison of the calculated absorbed dose using the Cadplan™ treatment planning software and Tld-100 measurements in an Alderson-Rando phantom for a bronchogenic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gutiérrez Castillo, J. G.; Álvarez Romero, J. T. E-mail: fisarmandotorres@gmail.com Calderón, A. Torres E-mail: fisarmandotorres@gmail.com M, V. Tovar E-mail: fisarmandotorres@gmail.com

    2014-11-07

    To verify the accuracy of the absorbed doses D calculated by a TPS Cadplan for a bronchogenic treatment (in an Alderson-Rando phantom) are chosen ten points with the following D's and localizations. Point 1, posterior position on the left edge with 136.4 Gy. Points: 2, 3 and 4 in the left lung with 104.9, 104.3 and 105.8 Gy, respectively; points 5 and 6 at the mediastinum with 192.4 and 173.5 Gy; points 7, 8 and 9 in the right lung with 105.8, 104.2 and 104.7 Gy, and 10 at posterior position on right edge with 143.7 Gy. IAEA type capsules with TLD 100 powder are placed, planned and irradiated. The evaluation of the absorbed dose is carried out a curve of calibration for the LiF response (nC) {sup vs} {sup DW}, to several cavity theories. The traceability for the DW is obtained with a secondary standard calibrated at the NRC (Canada). The dosimetric properties for the materials considered are determined from the Hounsfield numbers reported by the TPS. The stopping power ratios are calculated for nominal spectrum to 6 MV photons. The percent variations among the planned and determined D in all the cases they are < ± 3%.

  5. Prognostic Value of Epicardial Fat Volume Measurements by Computed Tomography: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Spearman, James V.; Renker, Matthias; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Krazinski, Aleksander W.; Herbert, Teri L.; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Nietert, Paul J.; Meinel, Felix G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To perform a systematic review of the growing body of literature evaluating the prognostic value of epicardial fat volume (EFV) quantified by cross-sectional imaging for adverse clinical outcomes. Methods Two independent reviewers performed systematic searches on both PubMed and Scopus using search terms developed with a medical librarian. Peer-reviewed articles were selected based on the inclusion of outcome data, utilization of epicardial fat volume and sufficient reporting for analysis. Results A total of 411 studies were evaluated with 9 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. In all, the studies evaluated 10,252 patients. All 9 studies were based on CT measurements. Seven studies evaluated the prognostic value of EFV unadjusted for calcium score, and 6 of these studies found a significant association between EFV and clinical outcomes. Seven studies evaluated the incremental value of EFV beyond calcium scoring, and 6 of these studies found a significant association. Conclusions The majority of studies suggest that EFV quantification is significantly associated with clinical outcomes and provides incremental prognostic value over coronary artery calcium scoring. Future research should use a binary cut-off of 125mL for evaluation of EFV to provide consistency with other research. PMID:25925354

  6. The equivalence of two phylogenetic biodiversity measures: the Shapley value and Fair Proportion index.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Klaas

    2013-11-01

    Most biodiversity conservation programs are forced to prioritise species in order to allocate their funding. This paper contains a mathematical proof that provides biological support for one common approach based on phylogenetic indices. Phylogenetic trees describe the evolutionary relationships between a group of taxa. Two indices for computing the distinctiveness of each taxon in a phylogenetic tree are considered here-the Shapley value and the Fair Proportion index. These indices provide a measure of the importance of each taxon for overall biodiversity and have been used to prioritise taxa for conservation. The Shapley value is the biodiversity contribution a taxon is expected to make if all taxa are equally likely to become extinct. This interpretation makes it appealing to use the Shapley value in biodiversity conservation applications. The Fair Proportion index lacks a convenient interpretation, however it is significantly easier to calculate and understand. It has been empirically observed that there is a high correlation between the two indices. This paper shows the mathematical basis for this correlation and proves that as the number of taxa increases, the indices become equivalent. Consequently in biodiversity prioritisation the simpler Fair Proportion index can be used whilst retaining the appealing interpretation of the Shapley value.

  7. Direct measurement of large-scale quantum states via expectation values of non-Hermitian matrices

    PubMed Central

    Bolduc, Eliot; Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In quantum mechanics, predictions are made by way of calculating expectation values of observables, which take the form of Hermitian operators. Non-Hermitian operators, however, are not necessarily devoid of physical significance, and they can play a crucial role in the characterization of quantum states. Here we show that the expectation values of a particular set of non-Hermitian matrices, which we call column operators, directly yield the complex coefficients of a quantum state vector. We provide a definition of the state vector in terms of measurable quantities by decomposing these column operators into observables. The technique we propose renders very-large-scale quantum states significantly more accessible in the laboratory, as we demonstrate by experimentally characterizing a 100,000-dimensional entangled state. This represents an improvement of two orders of magnitude with respect to previous phase-and-amplitude characterizations of discrete entangled states. PMID:26780858

  8. Thermal and optical analysis of selective absorber coatings based on soot for applications in solar cookers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servín, H.; Peña, M.; Sobral, H.; González, M.

    2017-01-01

    The thermal and optical properties of selective absorber coatings of a solar cooker have been investigated. Coatings have been prepared using soot from pine resin, wood stove and sugarcane, previously separated by size. Results show that the cooking power and the overall efficiency of these pots are higher than others painted with black primer. Besides, by using an integrating sphere, the diffuse reflectance of absorbers has been obtained. Lower values of the reflectance have been measured for the pots covered with soot, showing a high correlation with the results achieved from the thermal tests, considering the measurement errors.

  9. Measurement of pKa values of newly synthesized heteroarylaminoethanols by CZE.

    PubMed

    Lisková, Anna; Slampová, Andrea

    2007-04-01

    Heteroarylaminoethanol derivates are drugs which affect sympathetic nervous system and are used for medications of hypertension. In solutions they behave like weak bases and their pK(a) values represent important information on their potential biological uptake, pharmacological activity and in vivo biodisponsibility. This article brings the measurement of pK(a) values of the series of seven new important heteroarylaminoethanols, compounds with potential vasodilating, beta-adrenolytic and antioxidant activity, by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with diode-array detection. It has been shown that capillary zone electrophoresis measurements of pK(a) can be easily performed with very small quantities of studied substances, and, due to CZE separation power, the purity of samples is not of key importance. Moreover, the CZE method is fast and reliable, providing that suitable operational conditions are selected. The method is based on the measurement of the effective mobility curves within a suitable pH range and related regression analysis where pK(BH)(+) and electrophoretic mobility of BH(+) are explicitly involved. The selection of sufficient operational buffers is of key importance for accurate and reproducible results, and, this article brings step by step the consideration procedure involved in this process. Further, this paper brings principles of least square regression analysis of non-linear function corresponding to exact explicit formula for mobility curve of monovalent weak base.

  10. Solar concentrator/absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Tiesenhausen, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Collector/energy converter, consisting of dual-slope optical concentrator and counterflow thermal energy absorber, is attached to multiaxis support structure. Efficient over wide range of illumination levels, device may be used to generate high temperature steam, serve as solar powered dryer, or power absorption cycle cooler.

  11. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  12. Shock Absorbing Helmets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a description of helmets used by football players that offer three times the shock-absorbing capacity of earlier types. An interior padding for the helmets, composed of Temper Foam, first used by NASA's Ames Research Center in the design of aircraft seats is described.

  13. Social value orientation: theoretical and measurement issues in the study of social preferences.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Ryan O; Ackermann, Kurt A

    2014-02-01

    What motivates people when they make decisions and how those motivations are potentially entangled with concerns for others are central topics for the social, cognitive, and behavioral sciences. According to the postulate of narrow self-interest, decision makers have the goal of maximizing personal payoffs and are wholly indifferent to the consequences for others. The postulate of narrow self-interest-which has been influential in economics, psychology, and sociology-is precise and powerful but is often simply wrong. Its inadequacy is well known and efforts have been made to develop reliable and valid measurement methods to quantify the more nuanced social preferences that people really have. In this paper, we report on the emergence and development of the predominant conceptualization of social preferences in psychology: social value orientation (SVO). Second, we discuss the relationship between measurement and theory development of the SVO construct. We then provide an overview of the literature regarding measurement methods that have been used to assess individual variations in social preferences. We conclude with a comparative evaluation of the various measures and provide suggestions regarding the measures' constructive use in building psychologically realistic theories of people's social preferences.

  14. Radar Absorbing Materials for Cube Stealth Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, D.; Pastore, R.; Vricella, A.; Marchetti, M.

    A Cube Stealth Satellite is proposed for potential applications in defense system. Particularly, the faces of the satellite exposed to the Earth are made of nanostructured materials able to absorb radar surveillance electromagnetic waves, conferring stealth capability to the cube satellite. Microwave absorbing and shielding material tiles are proposed using composite materials consisting in epoxy-resin and carbon nanotubes filler. The electric permittivity of the composite nanostructured materials is measured and discussed. Such data are used by the modeling algorithm to design the microwave absorbing and the shielding faces of the cube satellite. The electromagnetic modeling takes into account for several incidence angles (0-80°), extended frequency band (2-18 GHz), and for the minimization of the electromagnetic reflection coefficient. The evolutionary algorithm used for microwave layered microwave absorber modeling is the recently developed Winning Particle Optimization. The mathematical model of the absorbing structure is finally experimentally validated by comparing the electromagnetic simulation to the measurement of the manufactured radar absorber tile. Nanostructured composite materials manufacturing process and electromagnetic reflection measurements methods are described. Finally, a finite element method analysis of the electromagnetic scattering by cube stealth satellite is performed.

  15. Measure Valued Solutions to the Spatially Homogeneous Boltzmann Equation Without Angular Cutoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Yoshinori; Wang, Shuaikun; Yang, Tong

    2016-12-01

    A uniform approach is introduced to study the existence of measure valued solutions to the homogeneous Boltzmann equation for both hard potential with finite energy, and soft potential with finite or infinite energy, by using Toscani metric. Under the non-angular cutoff assumption on the cross-section, the solutions obtained are shown to be in the Schwartz space in the velocity variable as long as the initial data is not a single Dirac mass without any extra moment condition for hard potential, and with the boundedness on moments of any order for soft potential.

  16. Geometric approach to extend Landau-Pollak uncertainty relations for positive operator-valued measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosyk, G. M.; Zozor, S.; Portesi, M.; Osán, T. M.; Lamberti, P. W.

    2014-11-01

    We provide a twofold extension of Landau-Pollak uncertainty relations for mixed quantum states and for positive operator-valued measures, by recourse to geometric considerations. The generalization is based on metrics between pure states, having the form of a function of the square of the inner product between the states. The triangle inequality satisfied by such metrics plays a crucial role in our derivation. The usual Landau-Pollak inequality is thus a particular case (derived from Wootters metric) of the family of inequalities obtained, and, moreover, we show that it is the most restrictive relation within the family.

  17. A hydraulic absorber for wideband vibration reduction in ship hulls

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, W.J.; Lee, Y.J. . Dept. of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    A vibration reduction of ship hulls by an active absorber system is proposed. In the scheme, a tuned mass is moved according to the hull vibration as measured by a multi-mode sensing system in order to generate a suitable active force for vibration reduction of hull girder. In order to supply the large amount of required power, a hydraulic servo system is implemented. Then the dynamic characteristic of the hydraulic system is considered for system design. Based on stochastic theory and optimal theory, the control law of the system is derived in order to approach the optimal level of vibration reduction. A 10-t absorber is applied to a 87,000-t oil tanker to demonstrate the feasibility of this scheme. The results show that the multi-peak values of resonance are suppressed in frequency response. Moreover, the vibration excited by propeller and engine is reduced to an extremely efficient level by this scheme.

  18. The clinical value of faecal calprotectin and lactoferrin measurement in postoperative Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Most patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) ultimately require one or more operations over their lifetime. Nevertheless, surgery is not a cure and postoperative CD recurrence is common. Ileocolonoscopy has been considered to be the gold standard in the diagnosis and monitoring of postoperative recurrence in patients with CD. However, endoscopy is a time-consuming and invasive procedure. Simple and non-invasive methods for the detection of postoperative recurrence are desirable. Faecal inflammatory biomarkers such as calprotectin and lactoferrin provide an accurate and non-invasive diagnostic and monitoring modality for inflammatory bowel disease. However, there have been limited data on the role of faecal biomarkers in the postoperative setting. Recently, several studies evaluated the value of faecal calprotectin and lactoferrin measurement after surgery for CD. This review was conducted to assess the role of faecal calprotectin and lactoferrin measurements in patients with postoperative CD. PMID:25653853

  19. A comparison of airborne wake vortex detection measurements with values predicted from potential theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Eric C.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of flight measurements made near a wake vortex was conducted to explore the feasibility of providing a pilot with useful wake avoidance information. The measurements were made with relatively low cost flow and motion sensors on a light airplane flying near the wake vortex of a turboprop airplane weighing approximately 90000 lbs. Algorithms were developed which removed the response of the airplane to control inputs from the total airplane response and produced parameters which were due solely to the flow field of the vortex. These parameters were compared with values predicted by potential theory. The results indicated that the presence of the vortex could be detected by a combination of parameters derived from the simple sensors. However, the location and strength of the vortex cannot be determined without additional and more accurate sensors.

  20. Sensitivity to Prior and Reliability Measurements for Value of Geophysical Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainor, W. J.; Caers, J.; Mukerji, T.

    2009-12-01

    To ensure the sustainability of groundwater resources, actions that require spatial decisions may need to be taken although much spatial uncertainty about the aquifer flow properties exists. Geophysical data may be critical to reduce this uncertainty but may be too expensive. Therefore, the value of information (VOI) of such data needs to be assessed before proceeding with the actual survey. We present an example where the decision is whether existing contaminant sources must be relocated by identifying critical surface recharge locations. Hence assessing the aquifer vulnerability is critical. From decision analysis theory, VOI equals value with information minus the prior value. Estimating VOI requires several components. The prior geological uncertainty and a measure for information reliability are two components crucial in the VOI metric. The goal of this work is to assess the sensitivity of VOI to these two components. To address the prior geological uncertainty realistically, multiple-point geostatistical algorithms (ie snesim) stochastically model the patterns of the interpreted geological depositional system (represented by the training image). For this example study, geological concepts for glacial buried valleys are used to develop training images of the valleys. Since properties such as valley width, length and direction are not well known, many possible alternative training images can be built. To assess the most important geological components impacting aquifer vulnerability, we apply a novel distance-based clustering technique to rank the various geological factors. Secondly, to compute VOI, a measure of reliability for the proposed geophysical measurement is needed. For this example, three types of datasets collected in Denmark (in a buried valley system) are used: transient electromagnetic (TEM), DC resistivity and driller’s log. Bayesian calibration is performed to obtain likelihood and posterior functions of electrical resistivity and lithology

  1. Realising the Real Benefits of Outsourcing: Measurement Excellence and Its Importance in Achieving Long Term Value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshri, Ilan; Kotlarsky, Julia

    These days firms are, more than ever, pressed to demonstrate returns on their investment in outsourcing. While the initial returns can always be associated with one-off cost cutting, outsourcing arrangements are complex, often involving inter-related high-value activities, which makes the realisation of long-term benefits from outsourcing ever more challenging. Executives in client firms are no longer satisfied with the same level of service delivery through the outsourcing lifecycle. They seek to achieve business transformation and innovation in their present and future services, beyond satisfying service level agreements (SLAs). Clearly the business world is facing a new challenge: an outsourcing delivery system of high-value activities that demonstrates value over time and across business functions. However, despite such expectations, many client firms are in the dark when trying to measure and quantify the return on outsourcing investments: results of this research show that less than half of all CIOs and CFOs (43%) have attempted to calculate the financial impact of outsourcing to their bottom line, indicating that the financial benefits are difficult to quantify (51%).

  2. Measurement of the solar heat gain coefficient and U value of windows with insect screens

    SciTech Connect

    Brunger, A.; Dubrous, F.M.; Harrison, S.

    1999-07-01

    Energy ratings are currently being used in a number of countries to assist in the selection of windows and doors based on energy performance. Developed for simple comparison purposes, these rating numbers do not take into account window removable attachments such as insect screens that are, nevertheless, widely used. Research was carried out to assess the effect of insect screens on the heat gains and losses of windows. The work reported in this paper deals with the effect of one screen type on the performance of a base-case, double-glazed window. Using an indoor solar simulator facility, measurements of the window solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) and U value were made for different screen attachment configurations and climatic conditions. Results with the sample window tested indicate that insect screens placed on the outdoor side can reduce its SHGC by 46% with only a 7% reduction in its U value (0.19 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}C), and that insect screens placed on the indoor side can reduce its SHGC by 15% while reducing its U value by 14% (0.38 W/m{sup 2}{center_dot}C).

  3. CBF and CBV measurements by USPIO bolus tracking: reproducibility and comparison with Gd-based values.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, C Z; Ostergaard, L; Vestergaard-Poulsen, P; Røhl, L; Bjørnerud, A; Gyldensted, C

    1999-02-01

    The authors measured cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) by bolus tracking of a novel ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) contrast agent (NC100150) and compared absolute and relative perfusion measurements with those obtained by a standard gadolinium-based contrast agent. They found a linear correlation between the two methods. A dose of 0.4 mg Fe/kg body weight was found to produce a signal drop similar to that of a standard 0.2 mmol/kg gadodiamide injection using spin-echo echoplanar imaging (SE-EPI) at 1.0 T. The measurements showed a high degree of reproducibility of repeated absolute as well as relative CBF and CBV values, lending further hope to the possibility of using magnetic resonance bolus tracking for routine CBF and CBV measurements. Finally, the authors present their initial experience with high-resolution, non-EPI CBV maps obtained from steady-state levels of an intravascular superparamagnetic contrast agent.

  4. Traceable measurement and uncertainty analysis of the gross calorific value of methane determined by isoperibolic calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haloua, F.; Foulon, E.; Allard, A.; Hay, B.; Filtz, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    As methane is the major component of natural gas and non-conventional gases as biogas or mine gases, its energy content has to be measured accurately regardless of its production site for fiscal trading of transported and distributed natural gas. The determination of calorific value of fuel gases with the lowest uncertainty can only be performed by direct method with a reference gas calorimeter. To address this point, LNE developed a few years ago an isoperibolic reference gas calorimeter according to the Rossini’s principle. The energy content Hs of methane of purity 99.9995% has been measured to 55 507.996 kJ kg-1 (890.485 kJ mol-1) with an expanded relative uncertainty of 0.091% (coverage factor k  =  2.101 providing a level of confidence of approximately 95%). These results are based on ten repeated measurements and on the uncertainty assessment performed in accordance with the guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM). The experimental setup and the results are reported here and for the first time, the fully detailed uncertainty calculation is exposed.

  5. Construction of extremal local positive-operator-valued measures under symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Virmani, S.; Plenio, M.B.

    2003-06-01

    We study the local implementation of positive-operator-valued measures (POVMs) when we require only the faithful reproduction of the statistics of the measurement outcomes for all initial states. We first demonstrate that any POVM with separable elements can be implemented by a separable superoperator, and develop techniques for calculating the extreme points of POVMs under a certain class of constraint that includes separability and positive partial transposition. As examples we consider measurements that are invariant under various symmetry groups (Werner, isotropic, Bell diagonal, local orthogonal), and demonstrate that in these cases separability of the POVM elements is equivalent to implementability via local operations and classical communication (LOCC). We also calculate the extrema of these classes of measurement under the groups that we consider, and give explicit LOCC protocols for attaining them. These protocols are hence optimal methods for locally discriminating between states of these symmetries. One of many interesting consequences is that the best way to locally discriminate Bell-diagonal mixed states is to perform a two-outcome POVM using local von Neumann projections. This is true regardless of the cost function, the number of states being discriminated, or the prior probabilities. Our results give the first cases of local mixed-state discrimination that can be analyzed quantitatively in full, and may have application to other problems such as demonstrations of nonlocality, experimental entanglement witnesses, and perhaps even entanglement distillation.

  6. Metrological traceability of the measured values of properties of engineering materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roebben, G.; Linsinger, T.; Lamberty, A.; Emons, H.

    2010-04-01

    Global comparability of the measured values of material properties is based on some fundamental metrological concepts. These concepts are either already widely implemented in current procedures for materials testing or they are being further developed and increasingly accepted and used. An important aspect of the comparability of measurement results is metrological traceability. This paper aims at illustrating with practical examples how to apply the concept of metrological traceability as defined in ISO/IEC Guide 99:2007, known also as the VIM (International Vocabulary of Metrology), in the field of engineering material properties. VIM distinguishes three different types of references for traceability: either to a system of units, such as the SI, to a measurement procedure or to a physical measurement standard. For each approach, an example is given in the field of engineering material properties, including appropriate traceability statements and means to achieve the traceability. The role of certified reference materials is highlighted, as well as practical consequences of traceability requirements for the design of reference material certification projects.

  7. Maximal aerobic capacity in ageing subjects: actual measurements versus predicted values.

    PubMed

    Pistea, Cristina; Lonsdorfer, Evelyne; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Oswald, Monique; Enache, Irina; Charloux, Anne

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of selection of reference values on the categorisation of measured maximal oxygen consumption (V'O2peak) as "normal" or "abnormal" in an ageing population. We compared measured V'O2peak with predicted values and the lower limit of normal (LLN) calculated with five equations. 99 (58 males and 41 females) disease-free subjects aged ≥70 years completed an incremental maximal exercise test on a cycle ergometer. Mean V'O2peak was 1.88 L·min(-1) in men and 1.26 L·min(-1) in women. V'O2peak ranged from 89% to 108% of predicted in men, and from 88% to 164% of predicted in women, depending on the reference equation used. The proportion of subjects below the LLN ranged from 5% to 14% in men and 0-22% in women, depending on the reference equation. The LLN was lacking in one study, and was unsuitable for women in another. Most LLNs ranged between 53% and 73% of predicted. Therefore, choosing an 80% cut-off leads to overestimation of the proportion of "abnormal" subjects. To conclude, the proportion of subjects aged ≥70 years with a "low" V'O2peak differs markedly according to the chosen reference equations. In clinical practice, it is still relevant to test a sample of healthy volunteers and select the reference equations that better characterise this sample.

  8. The Measurement of Subjective Value and Its Relation to Contingent Valuation and Environmental Public Goods

    PubMed Central

    Khaw, Mel W.; Grab, Denise A.; Livermore, Michael A.; Vossler, Christian A.; Glimcher, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental public goods—including national parks, clean air/water, and ecosystem services—provide substantial benefits on a global scale. These goods have unique characteristics in that they are typically “nonmarket” goods, with values from both use and passive use that accrue to a large number of individuals both in current and future generations. In this study, we test the hypothesis that neural signals in areas correlated with subjective valuations for essentially all other previously studied categories of goods (ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum) also correlate with environmental valuations. We use contingent valuation (CV) as our behavioral tool for measuring valuations of environmental public goods. CV is a standard stated preference approach that presents survey respondents with information on an issue and asks questions that help policymakers determine how much citizens are willing to pay for a public good or policy. We scanned human subjects while they viewed environmental proposals, along with three other classes of goods. The presentation of all four classes of goods yielded robust and similar patterns of temporally synchronized brain activation within attentional networks. The activations associated with the traditional classes of goods replicate previous correlations between neural activity in valuation areas and behavioral preferences. In contrast, CV-elicited values for environmental proposals did not correlate with brain activity at either the individual or population level. For a sub-population of participants, CV-elicited values were correlated with activity within the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, a region associated with cognitive control and shifting decision strategies. The results show that neural activity associated with the subjective valuation of environmental proposals differs profoundly from the neural activity associated with previously examined goods and preference measures. PMID:26221734

  9. Octanol/water partition coefficients of phthalate esters: A comparison of measured, estimated, and computed values

    SciTech Connect

    Ellington, J.; Floyd, T.

    1995-12-31

    Reliable octanol/water partition coefficients (K{sub ow}) of nine dialkyl phthalate esters are needed in an ongoing benthic organisms toxicity testing program. The equilibrium distribution of an organic chemical between water and octanol (K{sub ow}) is a physical constant that can be used to calculate both bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) and equilibrium constants for sediment-organic carbon partitioning (K{sub oc}). The log K{sub ow}s reported in the literature for a single chemical often span several orders of magnitude. For example, the reported log K{sub ow}s of bis(2-ethylehxyl) phthalate range from a low of 5.11 to a high of 9.61. The log K{sub ow}s of the dialkyl phthalate esters in this study were expected to range from < 2 (dimethyl) to > 8 (didecyl). The slow-stir method as described by de Bruijn has been shown to avoid emulsion formation and allow measure of K{sub ow}s of chemicals with log K{sub ow} > 6. In addition to measurement by the slow-stir method the K{sub ow}s were also determined by a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) estimation method and calculated by a computer based program that was designed to calculate physical/chemical properties (SPARC). The greatest difference between the slow-stir and SPARC K{sub ow} values was 0.19 with the other differences less than 0.1 log units. All the HPLC estimated values were at least 0.7 log units lower than the slow-stir value. For example, the log K{sub ow}s determined for dibutly phthalate by the slow-stir, SPARC, and HPLC methods were 4.50 {+-} 0.03, 4.61, and 4.00, respectively.

  10. Value of in vivo electrophysiological measurements to evaluate canine small bowel autotransplants.

    PubMed Central

    Meijssen, M A; Heineman, E; de Bruin, R W; Veeze, H J; Bijman, J; de Jonge, H R; ten Kate, F J; Marquet, R L; Molenaar, J C

    1991-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a non-invasive method for in vivo measurement of the transepithelial potential difference in the canine small bowel and to evaluate this parameter in small bowel autotransplants. In group 0 (control group, n = 4), two intestinal loops were created without disturbing their vascular, neural, and lymphatic supplies. In group I (successful autotransplants, n = 11), two heterotopic small bowel loops were constructed. Long term functional sequelae of vascular, neural, and lymphatic division were studied. Group II (n = 6) consisted of dogs with unsuccessful autotransplants suffering thrombosis of the vascular anastomosis, which resulted in ischaemic small bowel autografts. In group I, values of spontaneous transepithelial potential difference, an index of base line active electrolyte transport, were significantly lower compared with group 0 (p less than 0.05), probably as a result of denervation of the autotransplants. Both theophylline and glucose stimulated potential difference responses, measuring cyclic adenosine monophosphate mediated chloride secretion and sodium coupled glucose absorption respectively, showed negative luminal values in group I at all time points after transplantation. These transepithelial potential difference responses diminished progressively with time. From day 21 onwards both theophylline and glucose stimulated potential difference responses were significantly less than the corresponding responses at day seven (p less than 0.05). Morphometric analysis showed that the reduction of transepithelial potential difference responses preceded degenerative mucosal changes in the heterotopic small bowel autografts. In group II, potential difference responses to theophylline and glucose showed positive luminal values (p<0.01 v group I), probably as a result of passive potassium effusion from necrotic enterocytes. Images Figure 3 PMID:1752464

  11. The Measurement of Subjective Value and Its Relation to Contingent Valuation and Environmental Public Goods.

    PubMed

    Khaw, Mel W; Grab, Denise A; Livermore, Michael A; Vossler, Christian A; Glimcher, Paul W

    2015-01-01

    Environmental public goods--including national parks, clean air/water, and ecosystem services--provide substantial benefits on a global scale. These goods have unique characteristics in that they are typically "nonmarket" goods, with values from both use and passive use that accrue to a large number of individuals both in current and future generations. In this study, we test the hypothesis that neural signals in areas correlated with subjective valuations for essentially all other previously studied categories of goods (ventromedial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum) also correlate with environmental valuations. We use contingent valuation (CV) as our behavioral tool for measuring valuations of environmental public goods. CV is a standard stated preference approach that presents survey respondents with information on an issue and asks questions that help policymakers determine how much citizens are willing to pay for a public good or policy. We scanned human subjects while they viewed environmental proposals, along with three other classes of goods. The presentation of all four classes of goods yielded robust and similar patterns of temporally synchronized brain activation within attentional networks. The activations associated with the traditional classes of goods replicate previous correlations between neural activity in valuation areas and behavioral preferences. In contrast, CV-elicited values for environmental proposals did not correlate with brain activity at either the individual or population level. For a sub-population of participants, CV-elicited values were correlated with activity within the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, a region associated with cognitive control and shifting decision strategies. The results show that neural activity associated with the subjective valuation of environmental proposals differs profoundly from the neural activity associated with previously examined goods and preference measures.

  12. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. The objective of this task is to quantify lifetimes through measurement of the optical and mechanical stability of candidate polymeric glazing and absorber materials. Polycarbonate sheet glazings, as proposed by two industry partners, have been tested for resistance to UV radiation with three complementary methods. Incorporation of a specific 2-mil thick UV-absorbing screening layer results in glazing lifetimes of at least 15 years; improved screens promise even longer lifetimes. Proposed absorber materials were tested for creep and embrittlement under high temperature, and appear adequate for planned ICS absorbers.

  13. Perfect terahertz absorber using fishnet based metafilm

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu; Chen, Houtong; Taylor, Antoinette; Smirnova, E I; O' Hara, John F

    2009-01-01

    We present a perfect terahertz (THz) absorber working for a broad-angle of incidence. The two fold symmetry of rectangular fishnet structure allows either complete absorption or mirror like reflection depending on the polarization of incident the THz beam. Metamaterials enable the ability to control the electromagnetic wave in a unique fashion by designing the permittivity or permeability of composite materials with desired values. Although the initial idea of metamaterials was to obtain a negative index medium, however, the evolution of metamaterials (MMs) offers a variety of practically applicable devices for controlling electromagnetic wave such as tunable filters, modulators, phase shifters, compact antenna, absorbers, etc. Terahertz regime, a crucial domain of the electromagnetic wave, is suffering from the scarcity of the efficient devices and might take the advantage of metamaterials. Here, we demonstrate design, fabrication, and characterization of a terahertz absorber based on a simple fishnet metallic film separated from a ground mirror plane by a dielectric spacer. Such absorbers are in particular important for bolometric terahertz detectors, high sensitivity imaging, and terahertz anechoic chambers. Recently, split-ring-resonators (SRR) have been employed for metamaterial-based absorbers at microwave and THz frequencies. The experimental demonstration reveals that such absorbers have absorptivity close to unity at resonance frequencies. However, the downside of these designs is that they all employ resonators of rather complicated shape with many fine parts and so they are not easy to fabricate and are sensitive to distortions.

  14. Determination of decay coefficients for combustors with acoustic absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. E.; Espander, W. R.; Baer, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical technique for the calculation of linear decay coefficients in combustors with acoustic absorbers is presented. Tuned circumferential slot acoustic absorbers were designed for the first three transverse modes of oscillation, and decay coefficients for these absorbers were found as a function of backing distance for seven different chamber configurations. The effectiveness of the absorbers for off-design values of the combustion response and acoustic mode is also investigated. Results indicate that for tuned absorbers the decay coefficient increases approximately as the cube of the backing distance. For most off-design situations the absorber still provides a damping effect. However, if an absorber designed for some higher mode of oscillation is used to damp lower mode oscillations, a driving effect is frequently found.

  15. A new methodology for phase-locking value: a measure of true dynamic functional connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Tianhu; Bae, K. Ty; Roberts, Timothy P. L.

    2012-03-01

    Phase-Locking value (PLV) is used to measure phase synchrony of narrowband signals, therefore, it is able to provide a measure of dynamic functional connectivity (DFC) of brain interactions. Currently used PLV methods compute the convolution of the signal at the target frequency with a complex Gabor wavelet centered at that frequency. The phase of this convolution is extracted for all time-bins over trials for a pair of neural signals. These time-bins set a limit on the temporal resolution for PLV, hence, for DFC. Therefore, these methods cannot provide a true DFC in a strict sense. PLV is defined as the absolute value of the characteristic function of the difference of instantaneous phases (IP) of two analytic signals evaluated at s = 1. It is a function of the time. For the narrowband signal in the stationary Gaussian white noise, we investigated statistics of (i) its phase, (ii) the maximum likelihood estimate of its phase, and (iii) the phase-lock loop (PLL) measurement of its phase, derived the analytic form of the probability density function (pdf) of the difference of IP, and expressed this pdf in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of signals. PLV is finally given by analytic formulas in terms of SNRs of a pair of neural signals under investigation. In this new approach, SNR, hence PLV, is evaluated at any time instant over repeated trials. Thus, the new approach can provide a true DFC via PLV. This paper presents detailed derivations of this approach and results obtained by using simulations for magnetoencephalography (MEG) data.

  16. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-01-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  17. Apollo couch energy absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, C. J.; Drexel, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Load attenuators for the Apollo spacecraft crew couch and its potential applications are described. Energy absorption is achieved through friction and cyclic deformation of material. In one concept, energy absorption is accomplished by rolling a compressed ring of metal between two surfaces. In another concept, energy is absorbed by forcing a plastically deformed washer along a rod. Among the design problems that had to be solved were material selection, fatigue life, ring slippage, lubrication, and friction loading.

  18. Comparison between three methods to value lower tear meniscus measured by image software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Resúa, Carlos; Pena-Verdeal, Hugo; Lira, Madalena; Oliveira, M. Elisabete Real; Giráldez, María. Jesús; Yebra-Pimentel, Eva

    2013-11-01

    To measure different parameters of lower tear meniscus height (TMH) by using photography with open software of measurement. TMH was addressed from lower eyelid to the top of the meniscus (absolute TMH) and to the brightest meniscus reflex (reflex TMH). 121 young healthy subjects were included in the study. The lower tear meniscus was videotaped by a digital camera attached to a slit lamp. Three videos were recorded in central meniscus portion on three different methods: slit lamp without fluorescein instillation, slit lamp with fluorescein instillation and TearscopeTM without fluorescein instillation. Then, a masked observed obtained an image from each video and measured TMH by using open source software of measurement based on Java (NIH ImageJ). Absolute central (TMH-CA), absolute with fluorescein (TMH-F) and absolute using the Tearscope (TMH-Tc) were compared each other as well as reflex central (TMH-CR) and reflex Tearscope (TMH-TcR). Mean +/- S.D. values of TMH-CA, TMH-CR, TMH-F, TMH-Tc and TMH-TcR of 0.209 +/- 0.049, 0.139 +/- 0.031, 0.222 +/- 0.058, 0.175 +/- 0.045 and 0.109 +/- 0.029 mm, respectively were found. Paired t-test was performed for the relationship between TMH-CA - TMH-CR, TMH-CA - TMH-F, TMH-CA - TMH-Tc, TMH-F - TMH-Tc, TMH-Tc - TMH-TcR and TMH-CR - TMH-TcR. In all cases, it was found a significant difference between both variables (all p < 0.008). This study showed a useful tool to objectively measure TMH by photography. Eye care professionals should maintain the same TMH parameter in the follow-up visits, due to the difference between them.

  19. A Novel Scoring System to Measure Radiographic Abnormalities and Related Spirometric Values in Cured Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Báez-Saldaña, Renata; López-Arteaga, Yesenia; Bizarrón-Muro, Alma; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; Mongua-Rodríguez, Norma; García-García, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite chemotherapy, patients with cured pulmonary tuberculosis may result in lung functional impairment. Objective To evaluate a novel scoring system based on the degree of radiographic abnormalities and related spirometric values in patients with cured pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods One hundred and twenty seven patients with cured pulmonary tuberculosis were prospectively enrolled in a referral hospital specializing in respiratory diseases. Spirometry was performed and the extent of radiographic abnormalities was evaluated twice by each of two readers to generate a novel quantitative score. Scoring reproducibility was analyzed by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and the Bland-Altman method. Multiple linear regression models were performed to assess the association of the extent of radiographic abnormalities with spirometric values. Results The intra-observer agreement for scoring of radiographic abnormalities (SRA) showed an ICC of 0.81 (CI:95%, 0.67–0.95) and 0.78 (CI:95%, 0.65–0.92), for reader 1 and 2, respectively. Inter-observer reproducibility for the first measurement was 0.83 (CI:95%, 0.71–0.95), and for the second measurement was 0.74 (CI:95%, 0.58–0.90). The Bland-Altman analysis of the intra-observer agreement showed a mean bias of 0.87% and -0.55% and an inter-observer agreement of -0.35% and -1.78%, indicating a minor average systematic variability. After adjustment for age, gender, height, smoking status, pack-years of smoking, and degree of dyspnea, the scoring degree of radiographic abnormalities was significantly and negatively associated with absolute and percent predicted values of FVC: -0.07 (CI:95%, -0.01 to -0.04); -2.48 (CI:95%, -3.45 to -1.50); and FEV1 -0.07 (CI:95%, -0.10 to -0.05); -2.92 (CI:95%, -3.87 to -1.97) respectively, in the patients studied. Conclusion The extent of radiographic abnormalities, as evaluated through our novel scoring system, was inversely associated with spirometric values, and

  20. Effect of sampling location on L* values and pH measurements and their relationship in broiler breast fillets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lightness (CIELAB L*) and pH values are the most widely measured quality indicators for broiler breast fillets (pectoralis major). Measurement of L* values with a spectrophotometer can be done through Specular Component Included (SCI) or Specular Component Excluded (SCE) modes. The intra-fillet loca...

  1. Is Log Ratio a Good Value for Measuring Return in Stock Investments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ultsch, Alfred

    Measuring the rate of return is an important issue for theory and practice of investments in the stock market. A common measure for rate of return is the logarithm of the ratio of successive prices (LogRatio). In this paper it is shown that LogRatio as well as arithmetic return rate (Ratio) have several disadvantages. As an alternative relative differences (RelDiff) are proposed to measure return. The stability against numerical and rounding errors of RelDiff is much better than for LogRatios and Ratio). RelDiff values are identical to LogRatios and Return for small absolutes. The usage of RelDiff maps returns to a finite range. For most subsequent analyses this is a big advantage. The usefulness of the approach is demonstrated on daily return rates of a large set of actual stocks. It is shown that returns can be modeled with a very simple mixture of distributions in great precision using Relative differences.

  2. Enhancement mechanism of the additional absorbent on the absorption of the absorbing composite using a type-based mixing rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yonggang; Yuan, Liming; Zhang, Deyuan

    2016-04-01

    A silicone rubber composite filled with carbonyl iron particles and four different carbonous materials (carbon black, graphite, carbon fiber or multi-walled carbon nanotubes) was prepared using a two-roller mixture. The complex permittivity and permeability were measured using a vector network analyzer at the frequency of 2-18 GHz. Then a type-based mixing rule based on the dielectric absorbent and magnetic absorbent was proposed to reveal the enhancing mechanism on the permittivity and permeability. The enforcement effect lies in the decreased percolation threshold and the changing pending parameter as the carbonous materials were added. The reflection loss (RL) result showed the added carbonous materials enhanced the absorption in the lower frequency range, the RL decrement value being about 2 dB at 4-5 GHz with a thickness of 1 mm. All the added carbonous materials reinforced the shielding effectiveness (SE) of the composites. The maximum increment value of the SE was about 3.23 dB at 0.5 mm and 4.65 dB at 1 mm, respectively. The added carbonous materials could be effective additives for enforcing the absorption and shielding property of the absorbers.

  3. Mechanical device for determining the stiffness and the viscous friction coefficient of shock absorber elements modelled by bond graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibănescu, R.; Ibănescu, M.

    2016-11-01

    The present paper presents a mechanical device for the assessment of the fundamental parameters of a shock absorber: the spring stiffness and the viscous friction coefficient, without disassembling the absorber. The device produces an oscillatory motion of the shock absorber and can measure its amplitude and angular velocities. The dynamic model of the system, consisting of the mechanical device and the shock absorber, is performed by using the bond- graph method. Based on this model, the motion equations are obtained, which by integration lead to the motion law. The two previously mentioned parameters are determined by using this law and the measured values of two amplitudes and of their corresponding angular velocities. They result as solutions of a system of two non-linear algebraic equations.

  4. A sensitive, high resolution magic angle turning experiment for measuring chemical shift tensor principal values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderman, D. W.

    1998-12-01

    A sensitive, high-resolution 'FIREMAT' two-dimensional (2D) magic-angle-turning experiment is described that measures chemical shift tensor principal values in powdered solids. The spectra display spinning-sideband patterns separated by their isotropic shifts. The new method's sensitivity and high resolution in the isotropic-shift dimension result from combining the 5pi magic-angle-turning pulse sequence, an extension of the pseudo-2D sideband-suppression data rearrangement, and the TIGER protocol for processing 2D data. TPPM decoupling is used to enhance resolution. The method requires precise synchronization of the pulses and sampling to the rotor position. It is shown that the technique obtains 35 natural-abundance 13C tensors from erythromycin in 19 hours, and high quality naturalabundance 15N tensors from eight sites in potassium penicillin V in three days on a 400MHz spectrometer.

  5. Photon extremity absorbed dose and kerma conversion coefficients for calibration geometries.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G; Hertel, N E

    2007-02-01

    Absorbed dose and dose equivalent conversion coefficients are routinely used in personnel dosimetry programs. These conversion coefficients can be applied to particle fluences or to measured air kerma values to determine appropriate operational monitoring quantities such as the ambient dose equivalent or personal dose equivalent for a specific geometry. For personnel directly handling materials, the absorbed dose to the extremities is of concern. This work presents photon conversion coefficients for two extremity calibration geometries using finger and wrist/arm phantoms described in HPS N13.32. These conversion coefficients have been calculated as a function of photon energy in terms of the kerma and the absorbed dose using Monte Carlo techniques and the calibration geometries specified in HPS N13.32. Additionally, kerma and absorbed dose conversion coefficients for commonly used x-ray spectra and calibration source fields are presented. The kerma values calculated in this work for the x-ray spectra and calibration sources compare well to those listed in HPS N13.32. The absorbed dose values, however, differ significantly for higher energy photons because charged particle equilibrium conditions have not been satisfied for the shallow depth. Thus, the air-kerma-to-dose and exposure-to-dose conversion coefficients for Cs and Co listed in HPS N13.32 overestimate the absorbed dose to the extremities. Applying the conversion coefficients listed in HPS N13.32 for Cs, for example, would result in an overestimate of absorbed dose of 62% for the finger phantom and 55% for the wrist phantom.

  6. Improvement of Absorber's Performance by a Surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Nobuya; Nomura, Tomohiro; Iyota, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Ryuichiro

    Effects of an addition of surfactant to a lithium bromide aqueous solution have been investigated experimentally. N-octanol was used as a surfactant. The Marangoni convection occurred at/beneath the solution surface in the very beginning of steam absorption was observed both by a real-time type laser holographic visualization and by temperature measurements with extremely fine gauge thermocouples. Generation and growth of the Marangoni convection were both observed and evaluated quantitatively by the flow visualization. Furthermore, solution's surface temperatures with and without addition of the surfactant were measured minutely. Cell's formation pattern and migration speed at the surface were measured varying the initial surfactant's concentration ranging from 0 to 50000 ppm and the shallow liquid layer thickness ranging from 2 to 5 mm. And spacio-temporal scales of the Marangoni convection were determined. Also solution temperature changes at the surface were compared. Temperature increases when the surfactant was added to its solubility limit became almost double than that case of no surfactant. From these temperature differences, effects of the surfactant on absorber's performances were estimated by a calculation quantitatively with diffusion coefficient as an evaluation value.

  7. Comparing results of an exact vs. an approximate (Bayesian) measurement invariance test: a cross-country illustration with a scale to measure 19 human values.

    PubMed

    Cieciuch, Jan; Davidov, Eldad; Schmidt, Peter; Algesheimer, René; Schwartz, Shalom H

    2014-01-01

    One of the most frequently used procedures for measurement invariance testing is the multigroup confirmatory factor analysis (MGCFA). Muthén and Asparouhov recently proposed a new approach to test for approximate rather than exact measurement invariance using Bayesian MGCFA. Approximate measurement invariance permits small differences between parameters otherwise constrained to be equal in the classical exact approach. However, extant knowledge about how results of approximate measurement invariance tests compare to the results of the exact measurement invariance test is missing. We address this gap by comparing the results of exact and approximate cross-country measurement invariance tests of a revised scale to measure human values. Several studies that measured basic human values with the Portrait Values Questionnaire (PVQ) reported problems of measurement noninvariance (especially scalar noninvariance) across countries. Recently Schwartz et al. proposed a refined value theory and an instrument (PVQ-5X) to measure 19 more narrowly defined values. Cieciuch et al. tested its measurement invariance properties across eight countries and established exact scalar measurement invariance for 10 of the 19 values. The current study applied the approximate measurement invariance procedure on the same data and established approximate scalar measurement invariance even for all 19 values. Thus, the first conclusion is that the approximate approach provides more encouraging results for the usefulness of the scale for cross-cultural research, although this finding needs to be generalized and validated in future research using population data. The second conclusion is that the approximate measurement invariance is more likely than the exact approach to establish measurement invariance, although further simulation studies are needed to determine more precise recommendations about how large the permissible variance of the priors may be.

  8. Maximal aerobic capacity in ageing subjects: actual measurements versus predicted values

    PubMed Central

    Pistea, Cristina; Lonsdorfer, Evelyne; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Oswald, Monique; Enache, Irina

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of selection of reference values on the categorisation of measured maximal oxygen consumption (V′O2peak) as “normal” or “abnormal” in an ageing population. We compared measured V′O2peak with predicted values and the lower limit of normal (LLN) calculated with five equations. 99 (58 males and 41 females) disease-free subjects aged ≥70 years completed an incremental maximal exercise test on a cycle ergometer. Mean V′O2peak was 1.88 L·min−1 in men and 1.26 L·min−1 in women. V′O2peak ranged from 89% to 108% of predicted in men, and from 88% to 164% of predicted in women, depending on the reference equation used. The proportion of subjects below the LLN ranged from 5% to 14% in men and 0–22% in women, depending on the reference equation. The LLN was lacking in one study, and was unsuitable for women in another. Most LLNs ranged between 53% and 73% of predicted. Therefore, choosing an 80% cut-off leads to overestimation of the proportion of “abnormal” subjects. To conclude, the proportion of subjects aged ≥70 years with a “low” V′O2peak differs markedly according to the chosen reference equations. In clinical practice, it is still relevant to test a sample of healthy volunteers and select the reference equations that better characterise this sample. PMID:27730176

  9. Measuring the Value of Earth Observation Information with the Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernknopf, R.; Kuwayama, Y.; Brookshire, D.; Macauley, M.; Zaitchik, B.; Pesko, S.; Vail, P.

    2014-12-01

    Determining how much to invest in earth observation technology depends in part on the value of information (VOI) that can be derived from the observations. We design a framework and then evaluate the value-in-use of the NASA Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) for regional water use and reliability in the presence of drought. As a technology that allows measurement of water storage, the GRACE Data Assimilation System (DAS) provides information that is qualitatively different from that generated by other water data sources. It provides a global, reproducible grid of changes in surface and subsurface water resources on a frequent and regular basis. Major damages from recent events such as the 2012 Midwest drought and the ongoing drought in California motivate the need to understand the VOI from remotely sensed data such as that derived from GRACE DAS. Our conceptual framework models a dynamic risk management problem in agriculture. We base the framework on information from stakeholders and subject experts. The economic case for GRACE DAS involves providing better water availability information. In the model, individuals have a "willingness to pay" (wtp) for GRACE DAS - essentially, wtp is an expression of savings in reduced agricultural input costs and for costs that are influenced by regional policy decisions. Our hypothesis is that improvements in decision making can be achieved with GRACE DAS measurements of water storage relative to data collected from groundwater monitoring wells and soil moisture monitors that would be relied on in the absence of GRACE DAS. The VOI is estimated as a comparison of outcomes. The California wine grape industry has features that allow it to be a good case study and a basis for extrapolation to other economic sectors. We model water use in this sector as a sequential decision highlighting the attributes of GRACE DAS input as information for within-season production decisions as well as for longer-term water reliability.

  10. Absorber for terahertz radiation management

    SciTech Connect

    Biallas, George Herman; Apeldoorn, Cornelis; Williams, Gwyn P.; Benson, Stephen V.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Heckman, John D.

    2015-12-08

    A method and apparatus for minimizing the degradation of power in a free electron laser (FEL) generating terahertz (THz) radiation. The method includes inserting an absorber ring in the FEL beam path for absorbing any irregular THz radiation and thus minimizes the degradation of downstream optics and the resulting degradation of the FEL output power. The absorber ring includes an upstream side, a downstream side, and a plurality of wedges spaced radially around the absorber ring. The wedges form a scallop-like feature on the innermost edges of the absorber ring that acts as an apodizer, stopping diffractive focusing of the THz radiation that is not intercepted by the absorber. Spacing between the scallop-like features and the shape of the features approximates the Bartlett apodization function. The absorber ring provides a smooth intensity distribution, rather than one that is peaked on-center, thereby eliminating minor distortion downstream of the absorber.

  11. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan [El Cerrito, CA; Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Lee, Chuck K [Hayward, CA; Walker, Jeffrey [Gaithersburg, MD; Russell, Paige [Las Vegas, NV; Kirkwood, Jon [Saint Leonard, MD; Yang, Nancy [Lafayette, CA; Champagne, Victor [Oxford, PA

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  12. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  13. RANS Simulation of the Heave Response of a Two-Body Floating Point Wave Absorber: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y.; Li, Y.

    2011-03-01

    A preliminary study on a two-body floating wave absorbers is presented in this paper. A Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes computational method is applied for analyzing the hydrodynamic heave response of the absorber in operational wave conditions. The two-body floating wave absorber contains a float section and a submerged reaction section. For validation purposes, our model is first assumed to be locked. The two sections are forced to move together with each other. The locked single body model is used in a heave decay test, where the RANS result is validated with the experimental measurement. For the two-body floating point absorber simulation, the two sections are connected through a mass-spring-damper system, which is applied to simulate the power take-off mechanism under design wave conditions. Overall, the details of the flow around the absorber and its nonlinear interaction with waves are investigated, and the power absorption efficiency of the two-body floating wave absorber in waves with a constant value spring-damper system is examined.

  14. Measuring the value of treatment to patients: patient-reported outcomes in drug development.

    PubMed

    Willke, Richard J

    2008-02-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) can be important measures of the impact and value of new drug treatments to patients. Recently, both multisector stakeholder groups and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration have carefully considered and issued guidance on best practices for the use of PROs in measuring treatment impact. When best practices are followed and PRO data are appropriately included in drug development strategy and clinical trials, these data can be part of the evidence submitted for drug approval and included in drug labeling. One study showed that PRO data were included in 30% of a sample of new drug labels and were more concentrated in certain therapeutic areas, such as anti-inflammatory agents, vaccines, gastrointestinal agents, and respiratory and urologic agents. PRO data included in labeling, or generated in a similar scientific manner, may often then be used in other communication vehicles, such as formulary submission dossiers, journal or direct-to-consumer advertisements, publications, or continuing medical education. Meaningful and reliable PRO results regarding the effects of new treatments on how patients feel and function provide useful information to those who must make decisions about the availability and utilization of such treatments.

  15. [Attempt to adapt measurement of serum iron levels to the Centrifichem with a direct method using bathophenanthroline sulfonate-guanidine. Value and limits].

    PubMed

    Plomteux, G; Vernet-Nyssen, M; Charlier, C; Paris, M

    1987-01-01

    The authors have studied a direct automated colorimetric determination of iron serum on Centrifichem. Accuracy and linearity are the same than these obtained by the SFBC recommended method. Precision is poor: the coefficient of variation is about 15% for low values. No alteration in the absorbance is recognized by bilirubin, even in the serum which contains 342 mumol.l-1 of bilirubin. The value of serum iron increases significantly as hemoglobin and copper are added to the serum.

  16. Solar radiation absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.; Whitehead, Harlan D.

    1977-01-01

    Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

  17. Determination of threshold value of soil water content for field and vegetable plants with lysimeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoblauch, S.

    2009-04-01

    Both the potential water consumption of plants and their ability to withdraw soil water are necessary in order to estimate actual evapotranspiration and to predict irrigation timing and amount. In relating to root water uptake the threshold value at which plants reducing evapotranspiration is an important parameter. Since transpiration is linearly correlated to dry matter production, under the condition that the AET/PET-Quotient is smaller than 1.0 (de Wit 1958, Tanner & Sinclair 1983), the dry matter production begins to decline too. Plants respond to drought with biochemical, physiological and morphological modifications in order to avoid damages, for instance by increasing the root water uptake. The objective of the study is to determine threshold values of soil water content and pressure head respectively for different field and vegetable plants with lysimeter measurements and to derive so called reduction functions. Both parameter, potenzial water demand in several growth stages and threshold value of soil water content or pressure head can be determined with weighable field lysimeter. The threshold value is reached, when the evapotranspiration under natural rainfall condition (AET) drop clearly (0.8 PET) below the value under well watered condition (PET). Basis for the presented results is the lysimeter plant Buttelstedt of the Thuringian State Institute of Agriculture. It consist of two lysimeter cellars, each with two weighable monolithic lysimeters. The lysimeter are 2.5 m deep with a surface area of 2 m2 to allow a non-restrictive root growth and to arrange a representative number of plants. The weighing accuracy amounts to 0.05 mm. The percolating water is collected by ceramic suction cups with suction up to 0.3 MPa at a depth of 2.3 m. The soil water content is measured by using neutron probe. One of the two lysimeter cellars represents the will irrigated, the other one the non irrigated and/or reduced irrigated part of field. The soil is a Haplic

  18. Reference dosimetry at the Australian Synchrotron's imaging and medical beamline using free-air ionization chamber measurements and theoretical predictions of air kerma rate and half value layer

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Rogers, Peter A. W.; Stevenson, Andrew W.; Hall, Christopher J.; Lye, Jessica E.; Nordstroem, Terese; Midgley, Stewart M.; Lewis, Robert A.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Novel, preclinical radiotherapy modalities are being developed at synchrotrons around the world, most notably stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy and microbeam radiotherapy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. The imaging and medical beamline (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron has recently become available for preclinical radiotherapy and imaging research with clinical trials, a distinct possibility in the coming years. The aim of this present study was to accurately characterize the synchrotron-generated x-ray beam for the purposes of air kerma-based absolute dosimetry. Methods: The authors used a theoretical model of the energy spectrum from the wiggler source and validated this model by comparing the transmission through copper absorbers (0.1-3.0 mm) against real measurements conducted at the beamline. The authors used a low energy free air ionization chamber (LEFAC) from the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency and a commercially available free air chamber (ADC-105) for the measurements. The dimensions of these two chambers are different from one another requiring careful consideration of correction factors. Results: Measured and calculated half value layer (HVL) and air kerma rates differed by less than 3% for the LEFAC when the ion chamber readings were corrected for electron energy loss and ion recombination. The agreement between measured and predicted air kerma rates was less satisfactory for the ADC-105 chamber, however. The LEFAC and ADC measurements produced a first half value layer of 0.405 {+-} 0.015 and 0.412 {+-} 0.016 mm Cu, respectively, compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.427 {+-} 0.012 mm Cu. The theoretical model based upon a spectrum calculator derived a mean beam energy of 61.4 keV with a first half value layer of approximately 30 mm in water. Conclusions: The authors showed in this study their ability to verify the predicted air kerma rate and x-ray attenuation

  19. In-situ measurements of light-absorbing impurities in snow of glacier on Mt. Yulong and implications for radiative forcing estimates.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hewen; Kang, Shichang; Shi, Xiaofei; Paudyal, Rukumesh; He, Yuanqing; Li, Gang; Wang, Shijin; Pu, Tao; Shi, Xiaoyi

    2017-03-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) or the third polar cryosphere borders geographical hotspots for discharges of black carbon (BC). BC and dust play important roles in climate system and Earth's energy budget, particularly after they are deposited on snow and glacial surfaces. BC and dust are two kinds of main light-absorbing impurities (LAIs) in snow and glaciers. Estimating concentrations and distribution of LAIs in snow and glacier ice in the TP is of great interest because this region is a global hotspot in geophysical research. Various snow samples, including surface aged-snow, superimposed ice and snow meltwater samples were collected from a typical temperate glacier on Mt. Yulong in the snow melt season in 2015. The samples were determined for BC, Organic Carbon (OC) concentrations using an improved thermal/optical reflectance (DRI Model 2001) method and gravimetric method for dust concentrations. Results indicated that the LAIs concentrations were highly elevation-dependent in the study area. Higher contents and probably greater deposition at relative lower elevations (generally <5000masl) of the glacier was observed. Temporal difference of LAIs contents demonstrated that LAIs in snow of glacier gradually increased as snow melting progressed. Evaluations of the relative absorption of BC and dust displayed that the impact of dust on snow albedo and radiative forcing (RF) is substantially larger than BC, particularly when dust contents are higher. This was verified by the absorption factor, which was <1.0. In addition, we found the BC-induced albedo reduction to be in the range of 2% to nearly 10% during the snow melting season, and the mean snow albedo reduction was 4.63%, hence for BC contents ranging from 281 to 894ngg(-1) in snow of a typical temperate glacier on Mt. Yulong, the associated instantaneous RF will be 76.38-146.96Wm(-2). Further research is needed to partition LAIs induced glacial melt, modeling researches in combination with long-term in

  20. The value of body weight measurement to assess dehydration in children.

    PubMed

    Pruvost, Isabelle; Dubos, François; Chazard, Emmanuel; Hue, Valérie; Duhamel, Alain; Martinot, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Dehydration secondary to gastroenteritis is one of the most common reasons for office visits and hospital admissions. The indicator most commonly used to estimate dehydration status is acute weight loss. Post-illness weight gain is considered as the gold-standard to determine the true level of dehydration and is widely used to estimate weight loss in research. To determine the value of post-illness weight gain as a gold standard for acute dehydration, we conducted a prospective cohort study in which 293 children, aged 1 month to 2 years, with acute diarrhea were followed for 7 days during a 3-year period. The main outcome measures were an accurate pre-illness weight (if available within 8 days before the diarrhea), post-illness weight, and theoretical weight (predicted from the child's individual growth chart). Post-illness weight was measured for 231 (79%) and both theoretical and post-illness weights were obtained for 111 (39%). Only 62 (21%) had an accurate pre-illness weight. The correlation between post-illness and theoretical weight was excellent (0.978), but bootstrapped linear regression analysis showed that post-illness weight underestimated theoretical weight by 0.48 kg (95% CI: 0.06-0.79, p<0.02). The mean difference in the fluid deficit calculated was 4.0% of body weight (95% CI: 3.2-4.7, p<0.0001). Theoretical weight overestimated accurate pre-illness weight by 0.21 kg (95% CI: 0.08-0.34, p = 0.002). Post-illness weight underestimated pre-illness weight by 0.19 kg (95% CI: 0.03-0.36, p = 0.02). The prevalence of 5% dehydration according to post-illness weight (21%) was significantly lower than the prevalence estimated by either theoretical weight (60%) or clinical assessment (66%, p<0.0001).These data suggest that post-illness weight is of little value as a gold standard to determine the true level of dehydration. The performance of dehydration signs or scales determined by using post-illness weight as a gold standard has to be reconsidered.

  1. The value of FeNO measurement in childhood asthma: uncertainties and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Giuliana; Malizia, Velia; Antona, Roberta; Corsello, Giovanni; La Grutta, Stefania

    2013-07-31

    Asthma is considered an heterogeneous disease, requiring multiple biomarkers for diagnosis and management. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide in exhaled breath (FeNO) was the first useful non-invasive marker of airway inflammation in asthma and still is the most widely used. The non-invasive nature and the relatively easy use of FeNO technique make it an interesting tool to monitor airway inflammation and rationalize corticosteroid therapy in asthmatic patients, together with the traditional clinical tools (history, physical examination and lung function tests), even if some controversies have been published regarding the use of FeNO to support the management of asthma in children. The problem of multiple confounding factors and overlap between healthy and asthmatic populations preclude the routine application of FeNO reference values in clinical practice and suggest that it would be better to consider an individual "best", taking into account the context in which the measurement is obtained and the clinical history of the patient. Besides, there is still disagreement about the role of FeNO as a marker of asthma control, due to the complexity of balance among the different items involved in its determination and the lack of homogeneity in the population groups studied in the few studies conducted so far. Heterogeneity of problematic severe asthma greatly limits utility of FeNO alone as a biomarker of inflammation to optimize the disease management on an individual basis. None of the studies conducted so far demonstrated that the use of FeNO was better than current asthma guidelines in controlling asthma exacerbations. In summary, there is a large variation in FeNO levels between individuals, which may reflect the natural heterogeneity in baseline epithelial nitric oxide synthase activity and/or the contribution of other noneosinophilic factors to epithelial nitric oxide synthase activity. FeNO is a promising biomarker, but at present some limits are highlighted. We

  2. [The diagnostic value of the radioimmunological estimation of prostatic acid phosphatase. Comparative value of the measurement of enzyme activity (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tellier, J L; Chatal, J F; Bourdin, S; Auvigne, J; Etienne, P; Faye, R

    1981-01-01

    Radioimmunological estimation of prostatic acid phosphatase was carried out in 72 reference subjects, 46 patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy, 106 patients with untreated prostatic carcinoma and 25 patients with a carcinoma of some other origin. The mean concentration in non-acidified serum was 1.3 +/- 0.4 (M +/- SD) ng/ml for the reference group and 1.6 +/- 0.8 ng/ml for the benign hypertrophy group. The upper limit of discriminatory values for the diagnosis of prostatic carcinoma was fixed at 3 ng/ml. Taking this value, the overall percentage of positive results for carcinoma of the prostate was 61% (65/106). The number of cases with a value greater than 3 ng/ml was 3/18 (17%) for stage A, 8/27 (30%) for stage B, 7/13 (54%) for stage C and 47/48 (98%) for stage D. 8% (2/25) of carcinomas of another origin gave a positive result. The results of estimation using the radioimmunological technique were compared with those obtained by the measurement of enzyme activity using para nitro-phenyl phosphate as a substrate in 34 untreated prostatic carcinomas (all stages mixed together). When measurements by both techniques were carried out under the same ideal conditions using fresh sera as soon as possible after the blood was drawn, the result was abnormal in 10 cases out of 12 (83%) for the radioimmunological method and in 8 cases out of 12 (67%) for the measurement of enzyme activity. By contrast, under routine conditions, the positive percentage figures were 77% (17/22) for the radioimmunological technique and only 36% (8/22) for the measurement of enzyme activity. It would thus appear that radioimmunological measurement is more reliable than the measurement of enzyme activity.

  3. Measurement of plasma histamine: description of an improved method and normal values

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, J.; Warren, K.; Merlin, S.; Metcalfe, D.D.; Kaliner, M.

    1982-08-01

    The single isotopic-enzymatic assay of histamine was modified to increase its sensitivity and to facilitate measurement of plasma histamine levels. The modification involved extracting /sup 3/H-1-methylhistamine (generated by the enzyme N-methyltransferase acting on histamine in the presence of S-(methyl-/sup 3/H)-adenosyl-L-methionine) into chloroform and isolating the /sup 3/H-1-methylhistamine by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). The TLC was developed in acetone:ammonium hydroxide (95:10), and the methylhistamine spot (Rf . 0.50) was identified with an o-phthalaldehyde spray, scraped from the plate, and assayed in a scintillation counter. The assay in plasma demonstrated a linear relationship from 200 to 5000 pg histamine/ml. Plasma always had higher readings than buffer, and dialysis of plasma returned these values to the same level as buffer, suggesting that the baseline elevations might be attributable to histamine. However, all histamine standard curves were run in dialyzed plasma to negate any additional influences plasma might exert on the assay. The arithmetic mean (+/- SEM) in normal plasma histamine was 318.4 +/- 25 pg/ml (n . 51), and the geometric mean was 280 +/- 35 pg/ml. Plasma histamine was significantly elevated by infusion of histamine at 0.05 to 1.0 micrograms/kg/min or by cold immersion of the hand of a cold-urticaria patient. Therefore this modified isotopic-enzymatic assay of histamine is extremely sensitive, capable of measuring fluctuations in plasma histamine levels within the normal range, and potentially useful in analysis of the role histamine plays in human physiology.

  4. Investigation of the value of a photographic tool to measure self-perception of enamel opacities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The standard measurement of oral conditions that are mainly of cosmetic concern can be carried out by a trained clinical professional, or they can be assessed and reported by the individuals who may have the condition or be aware of others who have it. Enamel opacities of anterior teeth are examples of such a condition. At a public health level the interest is only about opacities that are of aesthetic concern, so the need for an index that records opacities that the public perceive to be a problem is clear. Measurement methods carried out by highly trained professionals, using unnatural conditions are not indicated at this level. This study reports on the testing of a novel epidemiological tool that aims to report on the prevalence and impact of self-perceived enamel opacities in a population of young adolescents. Methods A dental health survey was carried out using a random sample of 12-year-old school pupils during 2008/09 by Primary Care Organisations (PCOs) in England. This included the use of a novel self-perception tool which aimed to measure individual’s self-perception of the presence and impact of enamel opacities to produce population measures. This tool comprised questions asking about the presence of white marks on their teeth and whether these marks bothered the volunteers and a sheet of grouped photographs of anterior teeth showing opacities ranging from TF 0, TF 1–2 to TF 2–3. Volunteers were asked which of the groups of photographs looked more like their own teeth. Examining teams from a convenience sample of 3 PCOs from this survey agreed to undertake additional measurements to assess the value of the self-perception tool. Volunteer pupils were asked the questions on a second occasion, some time after the first and clinical examiners recorded their assessments of the most closely matching set of photographs of the volunteers on two occasions. Results The tool was feasible to use, with 74% of pupils making a response to the first

  5. Ancilla dimensions needed to carry out positive-operator-valued measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Pingxing; Bergou, Janos A.; Zhu Shiyao; Guo Guangcan

    2007-12-15

    To implement a positive-operator-valued measurement (POVM), which is defined on the d{sub S}-dimensional Hilbert space of a physical system, one has to extend the Hilbert space to include d{sub A} additional dimensions (called the ancilla). This is done via either the tensor product extension (TPE) or the direct sum extension (DSE). The implementation of a POVM utilizes the available resources more efficiently if it requires fewer additional dimensions. To determine how to implement a POVM with the least additional dimensions is, therefore, an important task in quantum information. We have determined the necessary and sufficient (hence minimal) number of the additional dimensions needed to implement the same POVM by the TPE and the DSE, respectively. If the POVM has n elements and r{sub i} is the rank of the ith element, then the dimension of the minimal ancilla is d{sub A}={sigma}{sub i=1}{sup n}r{sub i}-d{sub S} for the DSE implementation, and this represents a lower bound for the added dimensions in the TPE implementation. In the proof, we explicitly construct the DSE implementation of a general POVM with elements of arbitrary rank. As an example, we determine d{sub A} for the unambiguous discrimination of N linearly independent states and provide the full DSE implementation of a state-discriminating POVM for N=2.

  6. Judging Surgical Research: How Should We Evaluate Performance and Measure Value?

    PubMed Central

    Souba, Wiley W.; Wilmore, Douglas W.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To establish criteria to evaluate performance in surgical research, and to suggest strategies to optimize research in the future. Summary Background Data Research is an integral component of the academic mission, focusing on important clinical problems, accounting for surgical advances, and providing training and mentoring for young surgeons. With constraints on healthcare resources, there is increasing pressure to generate clinical revenues at the expense of the time and effort devoted to surgical research. An approach that would assess the value of research would allow prioritization of projects. Further, alignment of high-priority research projects with clinical goals would optimize research gains and maximize the clinical enterprise. Methods The authors reviewed performance criteria applied to industrial research and modified these criteria to apply to surgical research. They reviewed several programs that align research objectives with clinical goals. Results Performance criteria were categorized along several dimensions: internal measures (quality, productivity, innovation, learning, and development), customer satisfaction, market share, and financial indices (cost and profitability). A “report card” was proposed to allow the assessment of research in an individual department or division. Conclusions The department’s business strategy can no longer be divorced from its research strategy. Alignment between research and clinical goals will maximize the department’s objectives but will create the need to modify existing hierarchical structures and reward systems. Such alignment appears to be the best way to ensure the success of surgical research in the future. PMID:10862192

  7. Phase-space representations of symmetric informationally complete positive-operator-valued-measure fiducial states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraceno, Marcos; Ermann, Leonardo; Cormick, Cecilia

    2017-03-01

    The problem of finding symmetric informationally complete positive-operator-valued-measures (SIC-POVMs) has been solved numerically for all dimensions d up to 67 [A. J. Scott and M. Grassl, J. Math. Phys. 51, 042203 (2010), 10.1063/1.3374022], but a general proof of existence is still lacking. For each dimension, it was shown that it is possible to find a SIC-POVM that is generated from a fiducial state upon application of the operators of the Heisenberg-Weyl group. We draw on the numerically determined fiducial states to study their phase-space features, as displayed by the characteristic function and the Wigner, Bargmann, and Husimi representations, adapted to a Hilbert space of finite dimension. We analyze the phase-space localization of fiducial states, and observe that the SIC-POVM condition is equivalent to a maximal delocalization property. Finally, we explore the consequences in phase space of the conjectured Zauner symmetry. In particular, we construct a Hermitian operator commuting with this symmetry that leads to a representation of fiducial states in terms of eigenfunctions with definite semiclassical features.

  8. A Practical Measure of Student Motivation: Establishing Validity Evidence for the Expectancy-Value-Cost Scale in Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosovich, Jeff J.; Hulleman, Chris S.; Barron, Kenneth E.; Getty, Steve

    2015-01-01

    We present validity evidence for the Expectancy-Value-Cost (EVC) Scale of student motivation. Using a brief, 10-item scale, we measured middle school students' expectancy, value, and cost for their math and science classes in the Fall and Winter of the same academic year. Confirmatory factor analyses supported the three-factor structure of the EVC…

  9. Dual broadband metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ju; Yoo, Young Joon; Kim, Ki Won; Rhee, Joo Yull; Kim, Yong Hwan; Lee, YoungPak

    2015-02-23

    We propose polarization-independent and dual-broadband metamaterial absorbers at microwave frequencies. This is a periodic meta-atom array consisting of metal-dielectric-multilayer truncated cones. We demonstrate not only one broadband absorption from the fundamental magnetic resonances but additional broadband absorption in high-frequency range using the third-harmonic resonance, by both simulation and experiment. In simulation, the absorption was over 90% in 3.93-6.05 GHz, and 11.64-14.55 GHz. The corresponding experimental absorption bands over 90% were 3.88-6.08 GHz, 9.95-10.46 GHz and 11.86-13.84 GHz, respectively. The origin of absorption bands was elucidated. Furthermore, it is independent of polarization angle owing to the multilayered circular structures. The design is scalable to smaller size for the infrared and the visible ranges.

  10. THz-metamaterial absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuong Pham, Van; Park, J. W.; Vu, Dinh Lam; Zheng, H. Y.; Rhee, J. Y.; Kim, K. W.; Lee, Y. P.

    2013-03-01

    An ultrabroad-band metamaterial absorber was investigated in mid-IR regime based on a similar model in previous work. The high absorption of metamaterial was obtained in a band of 8-11.7 THz with energy loss distributed in SiO2, which is appropriate potentially for solar-cell applications. A perfect absorption peak was provided by using a sandwich structure with periodical anti-dot pattern in the IR region, getting closed to visible-band metamaterials. The dimensional parameters were examined for the corresponding fabrication. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology, 30 October-2 November, 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  11. Oxalate: Effect on calcium absorbability

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, R.P.; Weaver, C.M. )

    1989-10-01

    Absorption of calcium from intrinsically labeled Ca oxalate was measured in 18 normal women and compared with absorption of Ca from milk in these same subjects, both when the test substances were ingested in separate meals and when ingested together. Fractional Ca absorption from oxalate averaged 0.100 +/- 0.043 when ingested alone and 0.140 +/- 0.063 when ingested together with milk. Absorption was, as expected, substantially lower than absorption from milk (0.358 +/- 0.113). Nevertheless Ca oxalate absorbability in these women was higher than we had previously found for spinach Ca. When milk and Ca oxalate were ingested together, there was no interference of oxalate in milk Ca absorption and no evidence of tracer exchange between the two labeled Ca species.

  12. Evaluation of the Acoustic Measurement Capability of the NASA Langley V/STOL Wind Tunnel Open Test Section with Acoustically Absorbent Ceiling and Floor Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theobald, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    The single source location used for helicopter model studies was utilized in a study to determine the distances and directions upstream of the model accurate at which measurements of the direct acoustic field could be obtained. The method used was to measure the decrease of sound pressure levels with distance from a noise source and thereby determine the Hall radius as a function of frequency and direction. Test arrangements and procedures are described. Graphs show the normalized sound pressure level versus distance curves for the glass fiber floor treatment and for the foam floor treatment.

  13. Warm Absorber Diagnostics of AGN Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, Timothy

    Warm absorbers and related phenomena are observable manifestations of outflows or winds from active galactic nuclei (AGN) that have great potential value. Understanding AGN outflows is important for explaining the mass budgets of the central accreting black hole, and also for understanding feedback and the apparent co-evolution of black holes and their host galaxies. In the X-ray band warm absorbers are observed as photoelectric absorption and resonance line scattering features in the 0.5-10 keV energy band; the UV band also shows resonance line absorption. Warm absorbers are common in low luminosity AGN and they have been extensively studied observationally. They may play an important role in AGN feedback, regulating the net accretion onto the black hole and providing mechanical energy to the surroundings. However, fundamental properties of the warm absorbers are not known: What is the mechanism which drives the outflow?; what is the gas density in the flow and the geometrical distribution of the outflow?; what is the explanation for the apparent relation between warm absorbers and the surprising quasi-relativistic 'ultrafast outflows' (UFOs)? We propose a focused set of model calculations that are aimed at synthesizing observable properties of warm absorber flows and associated quantities. These will be used to explore various scenarios for warm absorber dynamics in order to answer the questions in the previous paragraph. The guiding principle will be to examine as wide a range as possible of warm absorber driving mechanisms, geometry and other properties, but with as careful consideration as possible to physical consistency. We will build on our previous work, which was a systematic campaign for testing important class of scenarios for driving the outflows. We have developed a set of tools that are unique and well suited for dynamical calculations including radiation in this context. We also have state-of-the-art tools for generating synthetic spectra, which are

  14. Fine-Structure Measurements of Oxygen A Band Absorbance for Estimating the Thermodynamic Average Temperature of the Earth's Atmosphere: An Experiment in Physical and Environmental Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myrick, M. L.; Greer, A. E.; Nieuwland, A.; Priore, R. J.; Scaffidi, J.; Andreatta, Daniele; Colavita, Paula

    2006-01-01

    The experiment describe the measures of the A band transitions of atmospheric oxygen, a rich series of rotation-electronic absorption lines falling in the deep red portion of the optical spectrum and clearly visible owing to attenuation of solar radiation. It combines pure physical chemistry with analytical and environmental science and provides a…

  15. METHOD 415.3 - MEASUREMENT OF TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON, DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON AND SPECIFIC UV ABSORBANCE AT 254 NM IN SOURCE WATER AND DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    2.0 SUMMARY OF METHOD

    2.1 In both TOC and DOC determinations, organic carbon in the water sample is oxidized to form carbon dioxide (CO2), which is then measured by a detection system. There are two different approaches for the oxidation of organic carbon in water sample...

  16. A Method for Determining Pseudo-measurement State Values for Topology Observability of State Estimation in Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urano, Shoichi; Mori, Hiroyuki

    This paper proposes a new technique for determining of state values in power systems. Recently, it is useful for carrying out state estimation with data of PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit). The authors have developed a method for determining state values with artificial neural network (ANN) considering topology observability in power systems. ANN has advantage to approximate nonlinear functions with high precision. The method evaluates pseudo-measurement state values of the data which are lost in power systems. The method is successfully applied to the IEEE 14-bus system.

  17. Predictive value of traction force measurement in vacuum extraction: Development of a multivariate prognostic model

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, Kristina; Yousaf, Khurram; Ranstam, Jonas; Westgren, Magnus; Ajne, Gunilla

    2017-01-01

    Objective To enable early prediction of strong traction force vacuum extraction. Design Observational cohort. Setting Karolinska University Hospital delivery ward, tertiary unit. Population and sample size Term mid and low metal cup vacuum extraction deliveries June 2012—February 2015, n = 277. Methods Traction forces during vacuum extraction were collected prospectively using an intelligent handle. Levels of traction force were analysed pairwise by subjective category strong versus non-strong extraction, in order to define an objective predictive value for strong extraction. Statistical analysis A logistic regression model based on the shrinkage and selection method lasso was used to identify the predictive capacity of the different traction force variables. Predictors Total (time force integral, Newton minutes) and peak traction (Newton) force in the first to third pull; difference in traction force between the second and first pull, as well as the third and first pull respectively. Accumulated traction force at the second and third pull. Outcome Subjectively categorized extraction as strong versus non-strong. Results The prevalence of strong extraction was 26%. Prediction including the first and second pull: AUC 0,85 (CI 0,80–0,90); specificity 0,76; sensitivity 0,87; PPV 0,56; NPV 0,94. Prediction including the first to third pull: AUC 0,86 (CI 0,80–0,91); specificity 0,87; sensitivity 0,70; PPV 0,65; NPV 0,89. Conclusion Traction force measurement during vacuum extraction can help exclude strong category extraction from the second pull. From the third pull, two-thirds of strong extractions can be predicted. PMID:28257459

  18. Absorber Materials at Room and Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    F. Marhauser, T.S. Elliott, A.T. Wu, E.P. Chojnacki, E. Savrun

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported on investigations of RF absorber materials at cryogenic temperatures conducted at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The work was initiated to find a replacement material for the 2 Kelvin low power waveguide Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorbers employed within the original cavity cryomodules of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). This effort eventually led to suitable candidates as reported in this paper. Furthermore, though constrained by small funds for labor and resources, we have analyzed a variety of lossy ceramic materials, several of which could be usable as HOM absorbers for both normal conducting and superconducting RF structures, e.g. as loads in cavity waveguides and beam tubes either at room or cryogenic temperatures and, depending on cooling measures, low to high operational power levels.

  19. Electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Heppner, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary designs were generated for two electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber concepts. Initially, an electrochemically regenerable absorption bed concept was designed. This concept incorporated the required electrochemical regeneration components in the absorber design, permitting the absorbent to be regenerated within the absorption bed. This hardware was identified as the electrochemical absorber hardware. The second hardware concept separated the functional components of the regeneration and absorption process. This design approach minimized the extravehicular activity component volume by eliminating regeneration hardware components within the absorber. The electrochemical absorber hardware was extensively characterized for major operating parameters such as inlet carbon dioxide partial pressure, process air flow rate, operational pressure, inlet relative humidity, regeneration current density and absorption/regeneration cycle endurance testing.

  20. Broadband patterned magnetic microwave absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Wu, Tianlong; Wang, Wei; Guan, Jianguo; Zhai, Pengcheng

    2014-07-28

    It is a tough task to greatly improve the working bandwidth for the traditional flat microwave absorbers because of the restriction of available material parameters. In this work, a simple patterning method is proposed to drastically broaden the absorption bandwidth of a conventional magnetic absorber. As a demonstration, an ultra-broadband microwave absorber with more than 90% absorption in the frequency range of 4–40 GHz is designed and experimentally realized, which has a thin thickness of 3.7 mm and a light weight equivalent to a 2-mm-thick flat absorber. In such a patterned absorber, the broadband strong absorption is mainly originated from the simultaneous incorporation of multiple λ/4 resonances and edge diffraction effects. This work provides a facile route to greatly extend the microwave absorption bandwidth for the currently available absorbing materials.

  1. Preliminary Evaluation of the Values Tracker: A Two-Item Measure of Engagement in Valued Activities in Those With Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Pielech, Melissa; Bailey, Robert W; McEntee, Mindy L; Ashworth, Julie; Levell, Jayne; Sowden, Gail; Vowles, Kevin E

    2016-01-01

    Engagement in valued activities is an important outcome, particularly in treatments that aim to enhance quality of life in those with chronic conditions. The present study describes the initial evaluation of the Values Tracker (VT), a two-item measure of values engagement, in 302 treatment-seeking adults with chronic pain. Hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to examine the utility of the VT in the statistical prediction of pain-related functioning, after controlling for demographic variables, pain intensity, and pain-related distress. Across analyses, pain intensity accounted for significant variance (range ΔR2 = .06-.09) with pain-related distress adding additional unique variance (range ΔR2 = .07-.19). The VT accounted for additional unique variance (range ΔR2 = .02-.17) for all variables with the exception of physical disability. These findings provide initial support for the utility of the VT in those with chronic pain. Given the VT's brevity, it may be particularly useful for tracking changes in engagement in values across sessions.

  2. Kinetic modeling of dissolution and crystallization of slurries with attenuated total reflectance UV-visible absorbance and near-infrared reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chun H; Billeter, Julien; McNally, Mary Ellen P; Hoffman, Ronald M; Gemperline, Paul J

    2013-06-04

    Slurries are often used in chemical and pharmaceutical manufacturing processes but present challenging online measurement and monitoring problems. In this paper, a novel multivariate kinetic modeling application is described that provides calibration-free estimates of time-resolved profiles of the solid and dissolved fractions of a substance in a model slurry system. The kinetic model of this system achieved data fusion of time-resolved spectroscopic measurements from two different kinds of fiber-optic probes. Attenuated total reflectance UV-vis (ATR UV-vis) and diffuse reflectance near-infrared (NIR) spectra were measured simultaneously in a small-scale semibatch reactor. A simplified comprehensive kinetic model was then fitted to the time-resolved spectroscopic data to determine the kinetics of crystallization and the kinetics of dissolution for online monitoring and quality control purposes. The parameters estimated in the model included dissolution and crystal growth rate constants, as well as the dissolution rate order. The model accurately estimated the degree of supersaturation as a function of time during conditions when crystallization took place and accurately estimated the degree of undersaturation during conditions when dissolution took place.

  3. The Value-Added of Primary Schools: What Is It Really Measuring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    This paper compares the official value-added scores in 2005 for all primary schools in three adjacent Local Educational Authorities (LEAs) in England with the raw-score Key Stage 2 (KS2) results for the same schools. The correlation coefficient for the raw- and value-added scores of these 457 schools is around +0.75. Scatterplots show that there…

  4. Measuring the Value Added by Technical Documentation: A Review of Research and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, Jay

    1998-01-01

    Reviews existing work on establishing value of technical documentation to determine its principles. States that value can be returned by reducing internal investment, increasing sales, and reducing after-sales costs. Argues that further research will improve the understanding of information as the product itself, rather than simply a supporting…

  5. Defining and Delivering Measurable Value: A Mega Thinking and Planning Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Roger

    2005-01-01

    Mega planning has a primary focus on adding value for all stakeholders. It is realistic, practical, and ethical. Denning and then achieving sustained organizational success is possible. It relies on three basic elements: (1) "A societal value-added "frame of mind" or paradigm": your perspective about your organization, people, and our world. It…

  6. The vexing problem of defining the meaning, role and measurement of values in treatment decision-making.

    PubMed

    Charles, Cathy; Gafni, Amiram

    2014-03-01

    Two international movements, evidence-based medicine (EBM) and shared decision-making (SDM) have grappled for some time with issues related to defining the meaning, role and measurement of values/preferences in their respective models of treatment decision-making. In this article, we identify and describe unresolved problems in the way that each movement addresses these issues. The starting point for this discussion is that at least two essential ingredients are needed for treatment decision-making: research information about treatment options and their potential benefits and risks; and the values/preferences of participants in the decision-making process. Both the EBM and SDM movements have encountered difficulties in defining the meaning, role and measurement of values/preferences in treatment decision-making. In the EBM model of practice, there is no clear and consistent definition of patient values/preferences and no guidance is provided on how to integrate these into an EBM model of practice. Methods advocated to measure patient values are also problematic. Within the SDM movement, patient values/preferences tend to be defined and measured in a restrictive and reductionist way as patient preferences for treatment options or attributes of options, while broader underlying value structures are ignored. In both models of practice, the meaning and expected role of physician values in decision-making are unclear. Values clarification exercises embedded in patient decision aids are suggested by SDM advocates to identify and communicate patient values/preferences for different treatment outcomes. Such exercises have the potential to impose a particular decision-making theory and/or process onto patients, which can change the way they think about and process information, potentially impeding them from making decisions that are consistent with their true values. The tasks of clarifying the meaning, role and measurement of values/preferences in treatment decision

  7. When it comes to measuring value, few HMOs can make the grade.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, S

    2001-01-01

    Like all organizations, managed care organizations (MCOs) must deliver value to customers, and to be sure of keeping them, ensure those customers know they have gained value. MCOs can choose any mix of insurance, protection, or experience value from particular encounters with customers, or durable value from their relationship with customers. Many have done a good job of tracking and enabling employers to appreciate the impact they have had on business performance, but few have done the same for the health and quality-of-life they deliver to consumers. MCOs already participate in the delivery of significant and enduring life value to consumers. It makes sense to track and remind consumers of the positive differences MCOs make, and thereby obtain member satisfaction, retention, and loyalty benefits, as well as image improvements for managed care as a whole. Some simple and inexpensive options for both tracking and reminding consumers are offered for consideration, including personalized annual health reports.

  8. Development of FeCoB/Graphene Oxide based microwave absorbing materials for X-Band region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sukanta; Chandra Nayak, Ganesh; Sahu, S. K.; Oraon, Ramesh

    2015-06-01

    This work explored the microwave absorption capability of Graphene Oxide and Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB for stealth technology. Epoxy based microwave absorbing materials were prepared with 30% loading of Graphene Oxide, FeCoB alloy and Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB. Graphene Oxide and FeCoB were synthesized by Hummer's and Co-precipitation methods, respectively. The filler particles were characterized by FESEM, XRD and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer techniques. Permittivity, permeability and reflection loss values of the composite absorbers were measured with vector network analyzer which showed a reflection loss value of -7.86 dB, at 10.72 GHz, for single layered Graphene Oxide/Epoxy based microwave absorbers which can be correlated to the absorption of about 83.97% of the incident microwave energy. Reflection loss value of FeCoB/Epoxy based microwave absorber showed -13.30 dB at 11.67 GHz, which corresponded to maximum absorption of 93.8%. However, reflection loss values of Graphene Oxide coated with FeCoB/Epoxy based single-layer absorber increased to -22.24 dB at 12.4 GHz which corresponds to an absorption of 99% of the incident microwave energy.

  9. Effect of the bio-absorbent on the microwave absorption property of the flaky CIPs/rubber absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yang; Xu, Yonggang; Cai, Jun; Yuan, Liming; Zhang, Deyuan

    2015-09-01

    Microwave absorbing composites filled with flaky carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) and the bio-absorbent were prepared by using a two-roll mixer and a vulcanizing machine. The electromagnetic (EM) parameters were measured by a vector network analyzer and the reflection loss (RL) was measured by the arch method in the frequency range of 1-4 GHz. The uniform dispersion of the absorbents was verified by comparing the calculated RL with the measured one. The results confirm that as the bio-absorbent was added, the permittivity was increased due to the volume content of absorbents, and the permeability was enlarged owing to the volume content of CIPs and interactions between the two absorbents. The composite filled with bio-absorbents achieved an excellent absorption property at a thickness of 1 mm (minimum RL reaches -7.8 dB), and as the RL was less than -10 dB the absorption band was widest (2.1-3.8 GHz) at a thickness of 2 mm. Therefore, the bio-absorbent is a promising additive candidate on fabricating microwave absorbing composites with a thinner thickness and wider absorption band.

  10. Value-Added and Other Methods for Measuring School Performance: An Analysis of Performance Measurement Strategies in Teacher Incentive Fund Proposals. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In "Value-Added and Other Methods for Measuring School Performance: An Analysis of Performance Measurement Strategies in Teacher Incentive Fund Proposals"--a paper presented at the February 2008 National Center on Performance Incentives research to policy conference--Robert Meyer and Michael Christian examine select performance-pay plans…

  11. Using value-based total cost of ownership (TCO) measures to inform subsystem trade-offs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radziwill, Nicole M.; DuPlain, Ronald F.

    2010-07-01

    Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) is a metric from management accounting that helps expose both the direct and indirect costs of a business decision. However, TCO can sometimes be too simplistic for "make vs. buy" decisions (or even choosing between competing design alternatives) when value and extensibility are more critical than total cost. A three-dimensional value-based TCO, which was developed to clarify product decisions for an observatory prior to Final Design Review (FDR), will be presented in this session. This value-based approach incorporates priority of requirements, satisfiability of requirements, and cost, and can be easily applied in any environment.

  12. Quantum measurement and the first law of thermodynamics: the energy cost of measurement is the work value of the acquired information.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Kurt

    2012-10-01

    The energy cost of measurement is an important fundamental question, and may have profound implications for quantum technologies. In the context of Maxwell's demon, it is often stated that measurement has no minimum energy cost, while information has a work value. However, as we elucidate, the first of these statements does not refer to the cost paid by the measuring device. Here we show that it is only when a measuring device has access to a zero-temperature reservoir-that is, never-that measurement requires no energy. To obtain a given amount of information, all measuring devices must pay a cost equal to that which a heat engine would pay to obtain the equivalent work value of that information.

  13. Bias and spread in extreme value theory measurements of probability of error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    Extreme value theory is examined to explain the cause of the bias and spread in performance of communications systems characterized by low bit rates and high data reliability requirements, for cases in which underlying noise is Gaussian or perturbed Gaussian. Experimental verification is presented and procedures that minimize these effects are suggested. Even under these conditions, however, extreme value theory test results are not particularly more significant than bit error rate tests.

  14. Measuring Values-Based Environmental Concerns in Children: An Environmental Motives Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruni, Coral M.; Chance, Randie C.; Schultz, P. Wesley

    2012-01-01

    The Environmental Motives Scale (EMS) was developed to measure an individual's concerns about environmental issues. The measure provides subscale scores for egoistic, social-altruistic, and biospheric concerns. Prior studies have shown a good fit for the 3-factor structure, but the measure has yet to be used with children. In this paper we report…

  15. Photochromic And Thermochromic Pigments For Solar Absorbing-Reflecting Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novinson, Thomas

    1987-11-01

    Both photochromic and thermochromic compounds were synthesized and physical measurements were made to determine coefficients of relectance, absorbance and emission. The most interesting group of thermochromic compounds are related to silver tctraiodomercurate and the most interesting photochromic compounds are substituted benzoindolinopyrospirans. The synthesis and optical reflectance and absorbance properties of other classes of compounds are also reported.

  16. Difference between the maximum empirical and field measured peak Watt values of thermal power system under highly sufficient solar conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhussain, O. A.; Abdel-Magid, T. I. M.

    2016-08-01

    Mono-Crystalline solar cell module is experimentally conducted in Khartoum, Sudan to study the difference between maximum empirical value of peak Watt and maximum value of thermal power produced in field under highly sufficient solar conditions. Field measurements are recorded for incident solar radiation, produced voltage, current and temperature at several time intervals during sun shine period. The thermal power system has been calculated using fundamental principles of heat transfer. The study shows that solar power for considered module could not attain the empirical peak power irrespective to maximum value of direct incident solar radiation and maximum temperature gained. A loss of about 6% of power can be considered as the difference between field measurements and the manufacturer's indicated empirical value. Solar cell exhibits 94% efficiency in comparison with manufacturer's provided data, and is 3'% more efficient in thermal energy production than in electrical power extraction for hot-dry climate conditions.

  17. What Value "Value Added"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Two quantitative measures of school performance are currently used, the average points score (APS) at Key Stage 2 and value-added (VA), which measures the rate of academic improvement between Key Stage 1 and 2. These figures are used by parents and the Office for Standards in Education to make judgements and comparisons. However, simple…

  18. Energy absorber for the CETA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J.

    1994-01-01

    The energy absorber that was developed for the CETA (Crew Equipment and Translation Aid) on Space Station Freedom is a metal on metal frictional type and has a load regulating feature that prevents excessive stroking loads from occurring while in operation. This paper highlights some of the design and operating aspects and the testing of this energy absorber.

  19. Improvement Of The Helmholtz Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Duane L.

    1992-01-01

    Helmholtz-resonator system improved to enable it to absorb sound at more than one frequency without appreciable loss of effectiveness at primary frequency. Addition of annular cavities enables absorption of sound at harmonic frequencies in addition to primary frequency. Improved absorber designed for use on structures of high transmission loss. Applied to such machines as fixed-speed engines and fans.

  20. Metal-shearing energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, R. J.; Wittrock, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Device, consisting of tongue of thin aluminum alloy strip, pull tab, slotted steel plate which serves as cutter, and steel buckle, absorbs mechanical energy when its ends are subjected to tensile loading. Device is applicable as auxiliary shock absorbing anchor for automobile and airplane safety belts.

  1. Optimization and engineering of microwave absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuo-Liang

    1998-12-01

    In this thesis, a concerted effort has been made to study and evaluate the individual electromagnetic properties of the absorbing components including carbon black, conducting fibers, metal flakes, magnetic materials such as carbonyl iron, ferrite and the chiral type of micro- carbon coil. The study of the electromagnetic properties covers functions such as dielectric dissipation, random scattering effect at low and high frequencies, magnetic dissipation at high frequencies and also the effect of chirality for different angles of incidence. The results of these studies have been used in the design, engineering and optimization of the microwave absorbers. The objective of this thesis is to identify the absorption mechanism of each of various type of fillers and to study the synergic effect arising from a combination of these in a non-metallic host medium. This will help us in producing microwave absorbers suitable for broad band application with the advantages of light weight, having high strength and possessing good chemical resistance. The results from experimental measurements of various material combinations have been greatly influenced by the theoretical understanding of the absorption mechanism. Design of microwave absorbers is governed by the requirement of the users as well as the characteristics of the objects (targets) inferred by theoretical understanding and experimental data to arrive at the right formula. Finally a detailed quality control program has to be charted out reflecting both the electromagnetic as well as mechanical properties. This is done by carrying out the tests systematically on small samples and then proceeding to practical absorbers making use of the data compiled earlier on smaller samples. In this thesis, to modify all dielectric absorbing components including micro-carbon chirals to reduce the sensitivity of absorption for different incident angles is unprecedented topic.

  2. Absorber topography dependence of phase edge effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanker, Aamod; Sczyrba, Martin; Connolly, Brid; Waller, Laura; Neureuther, Andy

    2015-10-01

    Mask topography contributes to phase at the wafer plane, even for OMOG binary masks currently in use at the 22nm node in deep UV (193nm) lithography. Here, numerical experiments with rigorous FDTD simulation are used to study the impact of mask 3D effects on aerial imaging, by varying the height of the absorber stack and its sidewall angle. Using a thin mask boundary layer model to fit to rigorous simulations it is seen that increasing the absorber thickness, and hence the phase through the middle of a feature (bulk phase) monotonically changes the wafer-plane phase. Absorber height also influences best focus, revealed by an up/down shift in the Bossung plot (linewidth vs. defocus). Bossung plot tilt, however, responsible for process window variability at the wafer, is insensitive to changes in the absorber height (and hence also the bulk phase). It is seen to depend instead on EM edge diffraction from the thick mask edge (edge phase), but stays constant for variations in mask thickness within a 10% range. Both bulk phase and edge phase are also independent of sidewall angle fluctuation, which is seen to linearly affect the CD at the wafer, but does not alter wafer phase or the defocus process window. Notably, as mask topography varies, the effect of edge phase can be replicated by a thin mask model with 8nm wide boundary layers, irrespective of absorber height or sidewall angle. The conclusions are validated with measurements on phase shifting masks having different topographic parameters, confirming the strong dependence of phase variations at the wafer on bulk phase of the mask absorber.

  3. Metamaterial Absorber Based Multifunctional Sensor Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Z.; Mamedov, A. M.; Ozbay, E.

    2017-02-01

    In this study metamaterial based (MA) absorber sensor, integrated with an X-band waveguide, is numerically and experimentally suggested for important application including pressure, density sensing and marble type detecting applications based on rectangular split ring resonator, sensor layer and absorber layer that measures of changing in the dielectric constant and/or the thickness of a sensor layer. Changing of physical, chemical or biological parameters in the sensor layer can be detected by measuring the resonant frequency shifting of metamaterial absorber based sensor. Suggested MA based absorber sensor can be used for medical, biological, agricultural and chemical detecting applications in microwave frequency band. We compare the simulation and experimentally obtained results from the fabricated sample which are good agreement. Simulation results show that the proposed structure can detect the changing of the refractive indexes of different materials via special resonance frequencies, thus it could be said that the MA-based sensors have high sensitivity. Additionally due to the simple and tiny structures it could be adapted to other electronic devices in different sizes.

  4. Measuring the Return on Investment and Real Option Value of Weather Sensor Bundles for Air Force Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    qÜáêíÉÉåíÜ=^ååì~ä= ^Åèìáëáíáçå=oÉëÉ~êÅÜ= póãéçëáìã= tÉÇåÉëÇ~ó=pÉëëáçåë= sçäìãÉ=f= = Measuring the Return on Investment and Real Option Value of Weather Sensor ...Maryland Peter Sandborn, Professor, University of Maryland Measuring the Return on Investment and Real Option Value of Weather Sensor Bundles for...35 - Measuring the Return on Investment and Real Option Value of Weather Sensor Bundles for Air Force Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Thomas J. Housel

  5. Perceived value of stroke outcome measures across the post-acute care continuum: a qualitative case study.

    PubMed

    Danzl, Megan M; Hunter, Elizabeth G

    2013-04-01

    Connecting the continuum of post-acute care stroke services may be important for easing patients' transition between settings and facilitating recovery and community reintegration. The use of outcome measures is suggested as one means of connecting the continuum. The purpose of this qualitative case study is to describe administrators' and physiotherapists' perceived value of an outcomes program across the post-acute care stroke continuum at a rehabilitation hospital. Data were collected through individual interviews and focus groups with 18 participants. Three themes emerged on the value of the outcomes program: 1) enhanced communication; 2) supports clinical decision-making; and 3) value of objective data. These findings lend support for the use of standardized outcome measures by physiotherapists in stroke rehabilitation. Findings from this study may be useful for organizations and physiotherapists who wish to integrate outcome measures into practice.

  6. Electrical injuries. Biological values measurements as a prediction factor of local evolution in electrocutions lesions

    PubMed Central

    Teodoreanu, R; Popescu, SA; Lascar, I

    2014-01-01

    . Despite the efforts we have made, the lack of blood and its derivatives or simply the negligence in patient monitoring, allowed the decrease, even transient of the Hb level, sometimes only for a few hours, but enough to allow the deepening of the ischemic lesions. Excisions were carried out in all the patients in emergency or even amputations of the extremities, with the wish to limit the extension of the ischemic lesions and the resorption of cell degradation products. The amputations performed in emergency did not always represent a saving solution; however, they remained the most effective measures when they were carried out immediately after the accident and obviously in viable tissue. The increase of CK is not an indicative factor itself in making re-excisions but orients the therapeutic approach, the utilization of the dialysis when the values do not decrease by treatment for renal support and the forcing of diuresis is required. The normalization of CK indicates the time when we can start the covering of the defects resulted as a consequence of the excisions. The level of the leukocytes represents both a prognostic factor and an indicative factor for the re-excision of the ischemic areas. An increased level under antibiotic therapy signifies either an incomplete excision or the contamination with flora resisting to the antibiotic that has been used. In the light of findings in the caring of the patients with electrocutions, I propose several caring/assessment protocols for the severe electrically injured patient. PMID:25408731

  7. SU-E-I-19: CTDI Values for All Protocols: Using the Ratio of the DLP Measured in CTDI Phantoms to the Measured Air Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Raterman, G; Gauntt, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To propose a method other than CTDI phantom measurements for routine CT dosimetry QA. This consists of taking a series of air exposure measurements and calculating a factor for converting from this exposure measurement to the protocol's associated head or body CTDI value using DLP. The data presented are the ratios of phantom DLP to air exposure ratios for different scanners, as well as error in the displayed CTDI. Methods: For each scanner, the CTDI is measured at all available tube voltages using both the head and body phantoms. Then, the exposure is measured using a pencil chamber in air at isocenter. A ratio of phantom DLP to exposure in air for a given protocol may be calculated and used for converting a simple air dose measurement to a head or body CTDI value. For our routine QA, the exposure in air for different collimations, mAs, and kVp is measured, and displayed CTDI is recorded. Therefore, the ratio calculated may convert these exposures to CTDI values that may then be compared to the displayed CTDI for a large range of acquisition parameter combinations. Results: It was found that all scanners tend to have a ratio factor that slightly increases with kVp. Also, Philips scanners appear to have less of a dependence on kVp; whereas, GE scanners have a lower ratio at lower kVp. The use of air exposure times the DLP conversion yielded CTDI values that were less than 10% different from the displayed CTDI on several scanners. Conclusion: This method may be used as a primary method for CT dosimetry QA. As a result of the ease of measurement, a dosimetry metric specific to that scanner may be calculated for a wide variety of CT protocols, which could also be used to monitor display CTDI value accuracy.

  8. Improved estimates of the radiation absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Martin; Minarik, David; Johansson, Lennart; Mattsson, Sören; Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid

    2014-05-07

    Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) have been calculated as a function of the content in the urinary bladder in order to allow more realistic calculations of the absorbed dose to the bladder wall. The SAFs were calculated using the urinary bladder anatomy from the ICRP male and female adult reference computational phantoms. The urinary bladder and its content were approximated by a sphere with a wall of constant mass, where the thickness of the wall depended on the amount of urine in the bladder. SAFs were calculated for males and females with 17 different urinary bladder volumes from 10 to 800 mL, using the Monte Carlo computer program MCNP5, at 25 energies of mono-energetic photons and electrons ranging from 10 KeV to 10 MeV. The decay was assumed to be homogeneously distributed in the urinary bladder content and the urinary bladder wall, and the mean absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall was calculated. The Monte Carlo simulations were validated against measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeters. The SAFs obtained for a urine volume of 200 mL were compared to the values calculated for the urinary bladder wall using the adult reference computational phantoms. The mean absorbed dose to the urinary wall from (18)F-FDG was found to be 77 µGy/MBq formales and 86 µGy/MBq for females, while for (99m)Tc-DTPA the mean absorbed doses were 80 µGy/MBq for males and 86 µGy/MBq for females. Compared to calculations using a constant value of the SAF from the adult reference computational phantoms, the mean absorbed doses to the bladder wall were 60% higher for (18)F-FDG and 30% higher for (99m)Tc-DTPA using the new SAFs.

  9. Absorbed Dose Determination Using Experimental and Analytical Predictions of X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Carruth, Ralph (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Electron beam welding in a vacuum is a technology that NASA is investigating as a joining technique for manufacture of space structures. This investigation characterizes the x-ray environment due to operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool and provides recommendations for adequate shielding for astronauts performing the in-vacuum electron beam welding. NASA, in a joint venture with the Russian Space Agency, was scheduled to perform a series of welding in space experiments on board the U.S. Space Shuttle. This series of experiments was named the international space welding experiment (ISWE). The hardware associated with the ISWE was leased to NASA by the Paton Welding Institute (PWI) in Ukraine for ground-based welding experiments in preparation for flight. Two ground tests were scheduled, using the ISWE electron beam welding tool, to characterize the radiation exposure to an astronaut during the operation of the ISWE. These radiation exposure tests used thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's) shielded with material currently used by astronauts during extravehicular activities to measure the radiation dose. The TLD's were exposed to x-ray radiation generated by operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. This investigation was the first known application of TLD's to measure absorbed dose from x rays of energy less than 10 keV. The ISWE hardware was returned to Ukraine before the issue of adequate shielding for the astronauts was completely verified. Therefore, alternate experimental and analytical methods were developed to measure and predict the x-ray spectral and intensity distribution generated by ISWE electron beam impact with metal. These x-ray spectra were normalized to an equivalent ISWE exposure, then used to calculate the absorbed radiation dose to astronauts. These absorbed dose values were compared to TLD measurements obtained during actual operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. The calculated absorbed dose

  10. The Promise and Peril of Using Value-Added Modeling to Measure Teacher Effectiveness. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RAND Corporation, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Value-added modeling offers the possibility of estimating the effects of teachers and schools on student performance, a potentially important contribution in the current environment of concern for accountability in education. These techniques, however, are susceptible to a number of sources of bias, depending on decisions about how the modeling is…

  11. Measuring the Economic Value of the Electronic Scientific Information Services in Portuguese Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melo, Luiza Baptista; Pires, Cesaltina Pacheco

    2011-01-01

    This article has three main objectives: i) to describe the use patterns of electronic and traditional resources in Portuguese academic libraries; ii) to estimate the value of the Portuguese electronic scientific information consortium b-on by using two alternative valuation methodologies; iii) to relate the use patterns with the valuation of b-on.…

  12. On the Practices and Challenges of Measuring Higher Education Value Added: The Case of Colombia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shavelson, Richard J.; Domingue, Benjamin W.; Mariño, Julián P.; Molina Mantilla, Adriana; Morales Forero, Andrés; Wiley, Edward E.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the nature of higher education are leading towards increased interest in the assessment of student learning. This study considers an attempt to apply value-added models for the purposes of comparing student learning across institutions, taking care to discuss special considerations inherent to the application of these models to higher…

  13. An Evaluation of Empirical Bayes' Estimation of Value- Added Teacher Performance Measures. Working Paper #31. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Maxfield, Michelle; Reckase, Mark D.; Thompson, Paul; Wooldridge, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    Empirical Bayes' (EB) estimation is a widely used procedure to calculate teacher value-added. It is primarily viewed as a way to make imprecise estimates more reliable. In this paper we review the theory of EB estimation and use simulated data to study its ability to properly rank teachers. We compare the performance of EB estimators with that of…

  14. An Evaluation of Empirical Bayes's Estimation of Value-Added Teacher Performance Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Maxfield, Michelle; Reckase, Mark D.; Thompson, Paul N.; Wooldridge, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Empirical Bayes's (EB) estimation has become a popular procedure used to calculate teacher value added, often as a way to make imprecise estimates more reliable. In this article, we review the theory of EB estimation and use simulated and real student achievement data to study the ability of EB estimators to properly rank teachers. We compare the…

  15. Can Value-Added Measures of Teacher Performance Be Trusted? Working Paper #18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarino, Cassandra M.; Reckase, Mark D.; Woolridge, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate whether commonly used value-added estimation strategies can produce accurate estimates of teacher effects. We estimate teacher effects in simulated student achievement data sets that mimic plausible types of student grouping and teacher assignment scenarios. No one method accurately captures true teacher effects in all scenarios,…

  16. Individual, Country and Societal Cluster Differences on Measures of Personality, Attitudes, Values, and Social Norms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stankov, Lazar

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated cross-cultural differences on 38 subscales from 4 major domains--personality, social attitudes, values, and social norms. These scales were administered to participants who took the Test of English as a Foreign Language[TM] (TOEFL[R], N = 1,600) and U.S. college students (N = 429). Total variability of each subscale was…

  17. The Value of International Experiences for Business Students: Measuring Business Student Attitudes toward Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffron, Sean; Maresco, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    The value of an international experience--especially for students of business--continues to be an area of focus at colleges and universities. Students across all disciplines within the business curriculum: accounting, economics, finance, management, marketing, or sport management are expected by employers to possess knowledge of, and appreciation…

  18. Measuring School and Teacher Value Added in DC, 2011-2012 School Year: Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenberg, Eric; Hock, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the value-added models used as part of teacher evaluation systems in the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) and in eligible DC charter schools participating in "Race to the Top." The authors estimated: (1) teacher effectiveness in DCPS and eligible DC charter schools during the 2011-2012 school year; and (2)…

  19. Estimation of actual evapotranspiration using measured and calculated values of bulk surface resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently the United Nations-Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) recommends using the Penman-Monteith method for estimating ET over all other meteorological methods. The principal limitation of using the generalized form of the Penman-Monteith equation is in obtaining accurate values for the bu...

  20. The Assessment of ITT Standard One, "Professional Values and Practice": Measuring Performance, or What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    The paper considers data in one Higher Education Institution (HEI) from written reports and from interviews with trainee teachers and their teachers charged with the assessment of one training standard for secondary Initial Teacher Training in England: "Professional Values and Practice." It explores the extent to which four elements of…

  1. Timing the warm absorber in NGC 4051

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C. V.; Uttley, P.; Costantini, E.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated, using spectral-timing analysis, the characterization of highly ionized outflows in Seyfert galaxies, the so-called warm absorbers. Here, we present our results of the extensive 600 ks of XMM-Newton archival observations of the bright and highly variable Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051 whose spectrum has revealed a complex multicomponent wind. Making use of both RGS and EPIC-pn data, we performed a detailed analysis through a time-dependent photoionization code in combination with spectral and Fourier spectral-timing techniques. The source light curves and the warm absorber parameters obtained from the data were used to simulate the response of the gas to variations in the ionizing flux of the central source. The resulting time variable spectra were employed to predict the effects of the warm absorber on the time lags and coherence of the energy dependent light curves. We have found that, in the absence of any other lag mechanisms, a warm absorber with the characteristics of the one observed in NGC 4051, is able to produce soft lags, up to 100 s, on timescales of hours. The time delay is associated with the response of the gas to changes in the ionizing source, either by photoionization or radiative recombination, which is dependent on its density. The range of radial distances that, under our assumptions, yield longer time delays are distances r 0.3-1.0 × 1016 cm, and hence gas densities n 0.4-3.0 × 107 cm-3. Since these ranges are comparable to the existing estimates of the location of the warm absorber in NGC 4051, we suggest that it is likely that the observed X-ray time lags may carry a signature of the warm absorber response time to changes in the ionizing continuum. Our results show that the warm absorber in NGC 4051 does not introduce lags on the short timescales associated with reverberation, but will likely modify the hard continuum lags seen on longer timescales, which in this source have been measured to be on the order of 50 s. Hence, these

  2. Automated measurement of bone-mineral-density (BMD) values of vertebral bones based on X-ray torso CT images.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Hayashi, T; Chen, H; Hara, T; Yokoyama, R; Kanematsu, M; Hoshi, H; Fujita, H

    2009-01-01

    Bone is one of the most important anatomical structures in humans and osteoporosis is one of the major public health concerns in the world. Osteoporosis is a main target disease of bone, which can be detected by medical image techniques. The purpose of this study is to develop a fully automated computer scheme to measure bone-mineral-density (BMD) values for vertebral trabecular bones. This scheme will aid osteoporosis diagnosis performed using computer tomography (CT) images. This scheme includes the following processing steps: segmentation of the bone region, recognition of the skeletal structures and measurement of the BMD value in vertebral trabecular bone of each vertebral body. The proposed scheme was applied to 20 X-ray torso CT cases to measure the BMD values for vertebral trabecular bones. The experimental results show that the mean and standard deviation of the difference between the BMD values measured by using the proposed method and those measured using a manual segmentation method were 6.93 mg/cm(3) and 6.82 mg/cm(3) respectively. The accuracy of the proposed scheme satisfied the requirement for a computer-aided system used in osteoporosis diagnosis.

  3. Experimental Demonstration of Direct Path State Characterization by Strongly Measuring Weak Values in a Matter-Wave Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denkmayr, Tobias; Geppert, Hermann; Lemmel, Hartmut; Waegell, Mordecai; Dressel, Justin; Hasegawa, Yuji; Sponar, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    A method was recently proposed and experimentally realized for characterizing a quantum state by directly measuring its complex probability amplitudes in a particular basis using so-called weak values. Recently, Vallone and Dequal [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 040502 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.040502] showed theoretically that weak measurements are not a necessary condition to determine the weak value. Here, we report a measurement scheme used in a matter-wave interferometric experiment in which the neutron path system's quantum state was characterized via direct measurements, using both strong and weak interactions. Experimental evidence is given that strong interactions outperform weak ones for tomographic accuracy. Our results are not limited to neutron interferometry, but can be used in a wide range of quantum systems.

  4. Oxygen-radical absorbance capacity assay for antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Cao, G; Alessio, H M; Cutler, R G

    1993-03-01

    A relatively simple but sensitive and reliable method of quantitating the oxygen-radical absorbing capacity (ORAC) of antioxidants in serum using a few microliter is described. In this assay system, beta-phycoerythrin (beta-PE) is used as an indicator protein, 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) as a peroxyl radical generator, and 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid (Trolox, a water-soluble vitamin E analogue) as a control standard. Results are expressed as ORAC units, where 1 ORAC unit equals the net protection produced by 1 microM Trolox. The uniqueness of this assay is that total antioxidant capacity of a sample is estimated by taking the oxidation reaction to completion. At this point all of the nonprotein antioxidants (which include alpha-tocopherol, vitamin C, beta-carotene, uric acid, and bilirubin) and most of the albumin in the sample are oxidized by the peroxyl radical. Results are quantified by measuring the protection produced by antioxidants. This solves many problems associated with kinetics or lag-time measurements. A linear correlation of ORAC value with concentration of serum. Trolox, vitamin C, uric acid, and bovine albumin is demonstrated. The coefficient of variation within a run is found to be about 2% and from run to run about 5%. Trolox, alpha-tocopherol, vitamin C, beta-carotene, uric acid, and bilirubin completely protect beta-PE from oxidation, while bovine albumin protects beta-PE only partially. On a molar basis, the relative peroxyl radical absorbance capacity of Trolox, alpha-tocopherol acid succinate, uric acid, bilirubin, and vitamin C is 1:1:0.92:0.84:0.52. Bovine albumin per unit weight has a lower peroxyl absorbing capacity than these antioxidants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Absorbent product to absorb fluids. [for collection of human wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Correale, J. V. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A multi-layer absorbent product for use in contact with the skin to absorb fluids is discussed. The product utilizes a water pervious facing layer for contacting the skin, overlayed by a first fibrous wicking layer, the wicking layer preferably being of the one-way variety in which fluid or liquid is moved away from the facing layer. The product further includes a first container section defined by inner and outer layer of a water pervious wicking material between which is disposed a first absorbent mass. A second container section defined by inner and outer layers between which is disposed a second absorbent mass and a liquid impermeable/gas permeable layer. Spacesuit applications are discussed.

  6. The value of volume and growth measurements in timber sales management of the National Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lietzke, K. R.

    1977-01-01

    This paper summarizes work performed in the estimation of gross social value of timber volume and growth rate information used in making regional harvest decisions in the National Forest System. A model was developed to permit parametric analysis. The problem is formulated as one of finding optimal inventory holding patterns. Public timber management differs from other inventory holding problems in that the inventory, itself, generates value over time in providing recreational, aesthetic and environmental goods. 'Nontimber' demand estimates are inferred from past Forest Service harvest and sales levels. The solution requires a description of the harvest rates which maintain the optimum inventory level. Gross benefits of the Landsat systems are estimated by comparison with Forest Service information gathering models. Gross annual benefits are estimated to be $5.9 million for the MSS system and $7.2 million for the TM system.

  7. Measuring the value of air quality: application of the spatial hedonic model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Gyu; Cho, Seong-Hoon; Lambert, Dayton M; Roberts, Roland K

    2010-03-01

    This study applies a hedonic model to assess the economic benefits of air quality improvement following the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment at the county level in the lower 48 United States. An instrumental variable approach that combines geographically weighted regression and spatial autoregression methods (GWR-SEM) is adopted to simultaneously account for spatial heterogeneity and spatial autocorrelation. SEM mitigates spatial dependency while GWR addresses spatial heterogeneity by allowing response coefficients to vary across observations. Positive amenity values of improved air quality are found in four major clusters: (1) in East Kentucky and most of Georgia around the Southern Appalachian area; (2) in a few counties in Illinois; (3) on the border of Oklahoma and Kansas, on the border of Kansas and Nebraska, and in east Texas; and (4) in a few counties in Montana. Clusters of significant positive amenity values may exist because of a combination of intense air pollution and consumer awareness of diminishing air quality.

  8. Measuring Environmental Value in Nonmonetary Terms: A Review of Common Practices and Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    EL CR-14-1 4 also contributed to the motivation of private conservancies to invest in the protection of native biodiversity through property and...1 8 in NRC (2005), Freeman (2003), and, specifically with respect to biodiversity , Barbier et al. (1995). Each category and subcategory of value... biodiversity conservancies as reservoirs of both known and unknown biodiversity that deserve protection in their own right to sustain all species

  9. Drag measurements of two thin wing sections at different index values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1927-01-01

    It is stated that the index value 6000, as found in normal tests of wing sections with a 20 cm chord, falls in the same region where the transition of laminar to turbulent flow takes place on thin flat plates. It is to be expected that slightly cambered, thin wing sections will behave similarly. The following test of two such wing sections were made for the purpose of verifying this supposition.

  10. Measurement of Nuclear Reaction Q-values with High Accuracy: 7Li(p, n)7Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. E.; Barker, P. H.; Lovelock, D. M. J.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is described for the measurement of nuclear reaction Q-values with an accuracy of a few parts in 105, in which the ultimate reference is a one-volt standard. As a test of the technique the accurately known threshold energy of the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction, 1880.51 +/- 0.08 keV, has been remeasured. The value found using the present technique is 1880.443 +/- 0.020 keV, in good agreement with previous values. An attempt to see evidence for atomic excitation effects in the 27A1(p,n)27Si reaction is also discussed. This yielded a new value of 5803.73 +/- 0.12 keV for the threshold of this reaction, again in a good agreement with, but more accurate than, previous values. Further test measurements are summarized. The main application of the technique, in measurements related to the theory of weak interactions, is discussed briefly and the results obtained to date are presented.

  11. The relation of local measures of Hubble's constant to its global value

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Edwin L.; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1992-01-01

    The distributions of fractional deviations of local values form global H0 that observers with perfect distance data would find if they surveyed specified volumes of the universe are examined here using new very large scale calculations of cold dark matter (CDM) and primordial isocurvature baryonic (PIB) scenarios for the origin of structure. It is found that the expected deviations due to large-scale motions are larger than quoted observational errors unless very large volumes are surveyed. Even perfect sampling and distances of all galaxies within a sphere extending out to the distances of the Virgo and Coma clusters would leave 45 percent and 3 percent rms uncertainties, respectively, in the global value of H0 in the CDM model. It is shown that the local versus global error in an H0 determination can be roughly estimated by the angular variance seen over the sky in the expansion rate, and that a very rough correction from the local to the global H0 value can be derived.

  12. Normal 2-Dimensional Strain Values of the Left Ventricle: A Substudy of the Normal Echocardiographic Measurements in Korean Population Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyeong; Lee, Ju-Hee; Lee, Sang Yeub; Choi, Jin-Oh; Shin, Mi-Seung; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Jung, Hae Ok; Park, Jeong Rang; Sohn, Il Suk; Kim, Hyungseop; Park, Seong-Mi; Yoo, Nam Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Lee, Mi-Rae; Park, Jin-Sun; Shim, Chi Young; Kim, Dae-Hee; Shin, Dae-Hee; Shin, Gil Ja; Shin, Sung Hee; Kim, Kye Hun; Kim, Woo-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Background It is important to understand the distribution of 2-dimensional strain values in normal population. We performed a multicenter trial to measure normal echocardiographic values in the Korean population. Methods This was a substudy of the Normal echOcardiogRaphic Measurements in KoreAn popuLation (NORMAL) study. Echocardiographic specialists measured frequently used echocardiographic indices in healthy people according to a standardized method at 23 different university hospitals. The strain values were analyzed from digitally stored images. Results Of a total of 1003 healthy participants in NORMAL study, 2-dimensional strain values were measured in 501 subjects (265 females, mean age 47 ± 15 years old) with echocardiographic images only by GE echocardiographic machines. Interventricular septal thickness, left ventricular (LV) posterior wall thickness, systolic and diastolic LV dimensions, and LV ejection fraction were 7.5 ± 1.0 mm, 7.4 ± 1.0 mm, 29.9 ± 2.8 mm, 48.9 ± 3.6 mm, and 62 ± 4%, respectively. LV longitudinal systolic strain (LS) values of apical 4-chamber (A4C) view, apical 3-chamber (A3C) view, apical 2-chamber (A2C) view, and LV global LS (LVGLS) were −20.1 ± 2.3, −19.9 ± 2.7, −21.2 ± 2.6, and −20.4 ± 2.2%, respectively. LV longitudinal systolic strain rate (LVLSR) values of the A4C view, A3C view, A2C view, and LV global LSR (LVGLSR) were −1.18 ± 0.18, −1.20 ± 0.21, −1.25 ± 0.21, and −1.21 ± 0.21−s, respectively. Females had lower LVGLS (−21.2 ± 2.2% vs. −19.5 ± 1.9%, p < 0.001) and LVGLSR (−1.25 ± 0.18−s vs. −1.17 ± 0.15−s, p < 0.001) values than males. Conclusion We measured LV longitudinal strain and strain rate values in the normal Korean population. Since considerable gender differences were observed, normal echocardiographic cutoff values should be differentially applied based on sex. PMID:28090256

  13. An introduction to absorbent dressings.

    PubMed

    Jones, Menna Lloyd

    2014-12-01

    Exudate bathes the wound bed with a serous fluid that contains essential components that promote wound healing. However, excess exudate is often seen as a challenge for clinicians. Absorbent dressings are often used to aid in the management of exudate, with the aim of providing a moist but unmacerated environment. With so many different types of absorbent dressings available today-alongside making a holistic assessment-it is essential that clinicians also have the knowledge and skill to select the most appropriate absorbent dressing for a given patient.

  14. Self-Regulating Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J.

    1995-01-01

    Mechanical shock absorber keeps frictional damping force within tolerable limit. Its damping force does not increase with coefficient of friction between energy-absorbing components; rather, frictional damping force varies only slightly. Relatively insensitive to manufacturing variations and environmental conditions altering friction. Does not exhibit high breakaway friction and consequent sharp increase followed by sharp decrease in damping force at beginning of stroking. Damping force in absorber does not vary appreciably with speed of stroking. In addition, not vulnerable to leakage of hydraulic fluid.

  15. Correlation between environmental relative moldiness index (ERMI) values in French dwellings and other measures of fungal contamination

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI) is a DNA-based metric developed to describe the fungal contamination in US dwellings. Our goal was to determine if the ERMI values in dwellings in north western France were correlated with other measures of fungal contamination. D...

  16. Inter-Method Reliability of School Effectiveness Measures: A Comparison of Value-Added and Regression Discontinuity Estimates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Value-added (VA) measures are currently the predominant approach used to compare the effectiveness of schools. Recent educational effectiveness research, however, has developed alternative approaches including the regression discontinuity (RD) design, which also allows estimation of absolute school effects. Initial research suggests RD is a viable…

  17. Measurement of T2 value by using 3.0T MRI for patient with ankle arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae Ouk

    2013-01-01

    This study intended to evaluate shape of ankle joint cartilage and damage to the ankle joint cartilage by measuring changes in T2 value of cartilage of healthy people without ankle arthritis and patients with ankle arthritis. The multi-echo technique was used for 20 healthy persons who had no ankle arthritis in the past or in the present clinically and 20 patients who were examined to have ankle arthritis in order to obtain T2 map image of knee joint cartilage. We divided the talotibial joint into medial position, middle position and lateral position to calculate the mean values of T2 in 18 spots that included anterior part, middle part and posterior part of cartilage of neck bone and ankle bone. Mean T2 values were measured in the healthy people group and the ankle arthritis patient group. According to the measurement results, the mean T2 value of the ankle arthritis patient group was measured to be higher than that of the healthy people group.

  18. Validation of the Consumer Values versus Perceived Product Attributes Model Measuring the Purchase of Athletic Team Merchandise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Donghun; Byon, Kevin K.; Schoenstedt, Linda; Johns, Gary; Bussell, Leigh Ann; Choi, Hwansuk

    2012-01-01

    Various consumer values and perceived product attributes trigger consumptive behaviors of athletic team merchandise (Lee, Trail, Kwon, & Anderson, 2011). Likewise, using a principal component analysis technique on a student sample, a measurement scale was proposed that consisted of nine factors affecting the purchase of athletic team…

  19. The Stability of Value-Added Measures of Teacher Quality and Implications for Teacher Compensation Policy. Brief 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sass, Tim R.

    2008-01-01

    There is little doubt that teacher quality is a key determinant of student achievement, but finding ways to identify and reward the best teachers has proven illusive. This research brief considers the stability of value-added measures of teacher effectiveness over time and the resulting implications for the design and implementation of…

  20. Semi-quantitative Strain Ratio Determined Using Different Measurement Methods: Comparison of Strain Ratio Values and Diagnostic Performance Using One- versus Two-Region-of-Interest Measurement.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung Hyun; Song, Mi Kyung; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2017-02-24

    We evaluated the agreement and diagnostic performance of strain ratio values using measurements made with one and two user-defined regions of interest (ROIs) on breast elastography. Two hundred forty-three breast masses of 226 women (mean age: 48.2 y) were included. Ultrasonography (US) and elastography images of the masses were recorded. Strain ratio was measured twice on the same elastography image; strain ratio 1, applying one ROI at the target mass for measurement, and strain ratio 2, applying one ROI at the target mass and another ROI as reference strain. The two strain ratio measurements were in substantial agreement, with an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.655 (95% confidence interval: 0.577-0.722). Specificity, positive predictive value and accuracy (cutoffs: 2.66 and 2.35) were significantly improved for US combined with the two strain ratio measurements (all p values < 0.05). Strain ratios measured using one or two user-defined ROIs were in substantial agreement, both contributing to the improved diagnostic performance of breast US.

  1. [Measurement of effective energy and entrance surface dose using fluorescent glass dosimeter in interventional radiology procedures: make of half-value layer measurement instrument and IVR-phantom].

    PubMed

    Iida, Hiroji; Noto, Kimiya; Takata, Tadanori; Chabatake, Mitsuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki

    2010-05-20

    In interventional radiology (IVR) procedures, automatic brightness control (ABC) is helpful in maintaining good image quality by adjusting kV and/or mA based on the subject's thickness. However, it was difficult to measure effective energy using half-value layer (HVL). We investigated the usefulness of measuring effective energy and entrance surface dose using a fluorescent glass dosimeter in IVR procedures, and we made an HVL folder and IVR-phantom for that purpose. Effective energy measured using the HVL folder correlated well with reference ionization dosimeter (y=0.992x, r=0.963). The result indicated that the present method using an HVL folder and IVR-phantom provides accurate measurements of effective energy and entrance surface dose in IVR procedures. In conclusion, the present measurement method may be useful for quality control of IVR equipment. In addition, the development of this measurement technique may be useful for comparisons of exposure levels in different hospitals.

  2. Long-term Validation of Cloud-droplet Number Concentration Value Added Product (NDROP VAP) Retrieved from Surface Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, K. S. S.; Riihimaki, L.; Comstock, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Sivaraman, C.; Shi, Y.; McFarquhar, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    A new cloud-droplet number concentration (NDROP) Value Added Product (VAP) has been produced at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site for the 13 years from January 1998 to January 2011. The droplet number concentration values are retrieved from surface radiometer measurements of cloud optical depth from the multi-filter rotating shadow-band radiometer (MFRSR) and liquid water path from the microwave radiometer (MWR). We validate the NDROP VAP with in situ aircraft measurements from the Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer probe during the long-term aircraft field campaign, Routine ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO). The NDROP VAP considers entrainment effects rather than assuming an adiabatic cloud, which improves the values of the NDROP VAP by reducing the magnitude of cloud-droplet number concentration. The NDROP VAP captures the primary mode of in situ measured droplet number concentration, but produces too wide a distribution due to too frequent high cloud-droplet number concentrations. The large droplet number concentration error corresponds to errors in the MWR retrievals at low liquid water paths due to the limitations of the instrument. Modification of the NDROP VAP through the diagnosed liquid water path, which is constrained by the coordinated solution using cloud optical depth and cloud-droplet effective radius retrievals, alleviates this problem, leading to better agreement with in situ measurements.

  3. Relax and refill: xylem rehydration prior to hydraulic measurements favours embolism repair in stems and generates artificially low PLC values.

    PubMed

    Trifilò, Patrizia; Raimondo, Fabio; Lo Gullo, Maria A; Barbera, Piera M; Salleo, Sebastiano; Nardini, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    Diurnal changes in percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity (PLC), with recorded values being higher at midday than on the following morning, have been interpreted as evidence for the occurrence of cycles of xylem conduits' embolism and repair. Recent reports have suggested that diurnal PLC changes might arise as a consequence of an experimental artefact, that is, air entry into xylem conduits upon cutting stems, even if under water, while under substantial tension generated by transpiration. Rehydration procedures prior to hydraulic measurements have been recommended to avoid this artefact. In the present study, we show that xylem rehydration prior to hydraulic measurements might favour xylem refilling and embolism repair, thus leading to PLC values erroneously lower than those actually experienced by transpiring plants. When xylem tension relaxation procedures were performed on stems where refilling mechanisms had been previously inhibited by mechanical (girdling) or chemical (orthovanadate) treatment, PLC values measured in stems cut under native tension were the same as those measured after sample rehydration/relaxation. Our data call for renewed attention to the procedures of sample collection in the field and transport to the laboratory, and suggest that girdling might be a recommendable treatment prior to sample collection for PLC measurements.

  4. Black carbon and other light-absorbing aerosols in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Doherty, S. J.; Warren, S. G.; Fu, Q.

    2011-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and mineral dust are the most important light-absorbing aerosols (LAA) in snow. The physical, chemical and optical properties of these aerosols differ greatly; the different spectral dependences of their light-absorption can be used to quantify their concentrations in snow. A field campaign was conducted in January and February of 2010 to measure the LAA in snow across northern China. About 400 snow samples were collected at 46 sites in 6 provinces (Huang et al. 2011). Light absorption by mineral dust is due to iron oxides, so iron was determined by chemical analysis of filters and meltwater. To obtain concentrations of the absorbers, BC, OC, and Fe were assumed to have mass absorption cross-sections at 550 nm of 6.3, 0.3, and 0.9 m2/g respectively, and absorption Ångstrom exponents of 1.1, 6, and 3. The lowest values of all LAA are in the remote northeast, at latitude 51°N on the border of Siberia.Median values in surface snow there are 75 ppb BC, 150 ppb OC, and 45 ppb Fe. Farther south, in the industrial northeast, median values are 1000 ppb BC, 4200 ppb OC, and 500 ppb Fe. The grassland of Inner Mongolia is dominated by OC in soil dust of local origin: 560 ppb BC, 8000 ppb OC, 430 ppb Fe. In the Qilian Mountains at the northern boundary of the Tibetan Plateau the surface snow has 70 ppb BC, 2800 ppb OC, and 550 ppb Fe. The fraction of light absorption due to Fe is ~30% in the Qilian Mountains. Elsewhere BC and OC dominate the absorption, so Fe contributes <10% even though the Fe concentrations are as high as the Qilian values.

  5. A Century of Grading Research: Meaning and Value in the Most Common Educational Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookhart, Susan M.; Guskey, Thomas R.; Bowers, Alex J.; McMillan, James H.; Smith, Jeffrey K.; Smith, Lisa F.; Stevens, Michael T.; Welsh, Megan E.

    2016-01-01

    Grading refers to the symbols assigned to individual pieces of student work or to composite measures of student performance on report cards. This review of over 100 years of research on grading considers five types of studies: (a) early studies of the reliability of grades, (b) quantitative studies of the composition of K-12 report card grades,…

  6. Educator Evaluation Policy That Incorporates EVAAS Value-Added Measures: Undermined Intentions and Exacerbated Inequities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, policies in forty states and D.C. incorporate student growth measures--estimates of student progress attributed to educators--into educator evaluation. The federal government positions such policies as levers for ensuring that more students are taught by effective teachers and that effective educators are more equitably…

  7. The Meaningful Activity Participation Assessment: A Measure of Engagement in Personally Valued Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eakman, Aaron M.; Carlson, Mike E.; Clark, Florence A.

    2010-01-01

    The Meaningful Activity Participation Assessment (MAPA), a recently developed 28-item tool designed to measure the meaningfulness of activity, was tested in a sample of 154 older adults. The MAPA evidenced a sufficient level of internal consistency and test-retest reliability and correlated as theoretically predicted with the Life Satisfaction…

  8. Valuing and Revaluing Education: What Can We Learn about Measurement from the South African Poor?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reflects on the identification of relevant aspects of education for measurement purposes. It begins by reviewing some detailed lists of educational capabilities from disparate literatures. It then considers how ordinary South Africans perceive education by drawing on two open-ended surveys, and attempts to reconcile their views with…

  9. Measuring School and Teacher Value Added for IMPACT and TEAM in DC Public Schools. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenberg, Eric; Hock, Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    The District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) has incorporated measures of school and teacher effectiveness, based on student test score growth, into a new teacher assessment system known as IMPACT. Implemented for the first time during the 2009-2010 school year, IMPACT is an assessment system with significant consequences. Prior to the start of…

  10. Measuring Our Success: How to Gauge the "Value Added" by an Independent School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulla, John; Jorgenson, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Having addressed variations of the question--How can a school's success be "measured"?--with mixed results across a collective five decades of service to boards, John Gulla and Olaf Jorgenson endeavored to develop a more helpful answer. To this end, they queried 200-plus leaders of California Association of Independent Schools…

  11. Can reliable values of Young's modulus be deduced from Fisher's (1971) spinning lens measurements?

    PubMed

    Burd, H J; Wilde, G S; Judge, S J

    2006-04-01

    The current textbook view of the causes of presbyopia rests very largely on a series of experiments reported by R.F. Fisher some three decades ago, and in particular on the values of lens Young's modulus inferred from the deformation caused by spinning excised lenses about their optical axis (Fisher 1971) We studied the extent to which inferred values of Young's modulus are influenced by assumptions inherent in the mathematical procedures used by Fisher to interpret the test and we investigated several alternative interpretation methods. The results suggest that modelling assumptions inherent in Fisher's original method may have led to systematic errors in the determination of the Young's modulus of the cortex and nucleus. Fisher's conclusion that the cortex is stiffer than the nucleus, particularly in middle age, may be an artefact associated with these systematic errors. Moreover, none of the models we explored are able to account for Fisher's claim that the removal of the capsule has only a modest effect on the deformations induced in the spinning lens.

  12. Reliability of health utility measures and a test of values clarification.

    PubMed

    Shiell, Alan; Hawe, Penelope; Fletcher, Megan

    2003-04-01

    This study examines the test-retest reliability of two methods of establishing health preference weights and assesses the effectiveness of a brief values-clarification exercise. Survey participants were randomly allocated to one of two groups and received either a standard protocol for eliciting health preferences (comparison group) or an augmented protocol designed to encourage reflection and deliberation (intervention group). Preferences were elicited on three occasions over 5 weeks. The results show that the two valuation methods each had acceptable levels of test-retest reliability. No significant differences were found in preference weights over time or between intervention and comparison groups. The values-clarification exercise had some impact on individual answers, but the changes cancelled each other out at the group level. There was no discernable intervention effect at the group level. It is premature to draw conclusions from one study about why, or even how, a person's valuations might change over time, but our results support the use of current valuation techniques for group-level analyses.

  13. Spontaneous emission and absorber theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegg, David T.

    1997-01-01

    One of the long term interests of George Series was the construction of a theory of spontaneous emission which does not involve field quantisation. His approach was written in terms of atomic operators only and he drew a parallel with the Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory of radiation. By making a particular extra postulate, he was able to obtain the correct spontaneous emission rate and the Lamb shift reasonably simply and directly. An examination of his approach indicates that this postulate is physically reasonable and the need for it arises because quantisation in his theory occurs after the response of the absorber has been accounted for by means of the radiative reaction field. We review briefly an alternative absorber theory approach to spontaneous emission based on the direct action between the emitting atom and a quantised absorber, and outline some applications to more recent effects of interest in quantum optics.

  14. Guided tissue regeneration. Absorbable barriers.

    PubMed

    Wang, H L; MacNeil, R L

    1998-07-01

    Over the past 15 years, techniques aimed at regeneration of lost periodontal tissue have become widely used and accepted in clinical practice. Among these techniques are those which use the principles of guided tissue regeneration (GTR), wherein barriers (i.e., membranes) are used to control cell and tissue repopulation of the periodontal wound. A variety of non-absorbable and absorbable barriers have been developed and used for this purpose, with a trend in recent years toward increased use of absorbable GTR materials. This article describes the evolution of absorbable barrier materials and overview materials available for clinical use today. In addition, advantages and disadvantages of these materials are discussed, as well as possible new developments in barrier-based GTR therapy.

  15. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, W.H.

    1984-10-16

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system. 9 figs.

  16. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, William H.

    1984-01-01

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system.

  17. Diagnostic values of thyroglobulin measurement in fine-needle aspiration of lymph nodes in patients with thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Pak, Kyoungjune; Suh, Sunghwan; Hong, Hyunsook; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Hahn, Seo Kyung; Kang, Keon Wook; Kim, E Edmund; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key

    2015-05-01

    We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of measuring the concentration of thyroglobulin (Tg) in the washout fluid of the needle aspiration (FNA-Tg). We performed a systematic search of MEDLINE (inception to October 2013) and EMBASE (inception to October 2013) for English publications using keywords "thyroid", "aspiration", "washout", and "thyroglobulin". All searches were limited to human studies. We included studies of FNA-Tg measurement in the washout fluid rinsed with 1 ml of normal saline. Eight studies including 843 lymph nodes (LNs) were eligible for this study. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of preoperative studies are 0.89 [95 % CI 0.82-0.95], 0.60 [0.49-0.70], and those of postoperative studies are 1.0 [0.83-1.0], 1.0 [0.92-1.0]. To determine best cutoffs from each preoperative and postoperative study, the distance between the point (0, 1) and each observed cutoff values (1-specificity, sensitivity) was calculated, and the distance is minimal when the cutoff value of 32.04 for preoperative studies and of 0.9 for postoperative one are selected. FNA-Tg can be used for both preoperative and postoperative evaluation of LN metastasis. Although the cutoff values for the FNA-Tg has not been standardized, preoperative values of 32.04 ng/ml and postoperative values of 0.9 ng/ml are recommended for identifying neck LN metastasis.

  18. [The value of urine cystein proteinase and serum CA125 measurement in monitoring the treatment of malignant ovarian tumor].

    PubMed

    Gao, G; Peng, Z; He, B

    1996-09-01

    Urine cystein proteinase (UCP) and serum CA125 were measured in 40 patients with malignant ovarian tumor (malignant group), 40 patients with benign ovarian tumor (benign group), and 40 normal control (normal group). 28 patients in the malignant group underwent UCP and CA125 measurement pre-operation, post-operation, and during three courses of chemotherapy. The enzyme activity of UCP in the malignant group was significantly higher than that in the benign and normal groups (P < 0.05 or 0.01). The values of UCP in patients with malignant tumor of stages II-IV were significantly higher compared with those of stages I-II (P < 0.01, 0.05). The activity of UCP was elevated pre-operation, post-operation, and was much higher on the seventh day postoperation. After the seventh day, UCP activity decreased gradually. Serum CA125 was also detected pre-operation, at 7.30 and 60 days post-operation. The levels of UCP and CA125 pre-operation and 30, 60 days post-operation in the patients whose residual carcinoma lesions were > 2 cm in diameter were apparantly higher than those with no residual lesions (P < 0.05). UCP and CA125 values were measured in six patients before relaparotomy. The sensitivity, specificity, accuaracy, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for UCP assay are 980%, 100%, 83%, 100% and 50% and those for CA125 assay are 40%, 100%, 80%, 100%, and 25%, respectively.

  19. Perfect selective metamaterial solar absorbers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Liping

    2013-11-04

    In this work, we numerically investigate the radiative properties of metamaterial nanostructures made of two-dimensional tungsten gratings on a thin dielectric spacer and an opaque tungsten film from UV to mid-infrared region as potential selective solar absorbers. The metamaterial absorber with single-sized tungsten patches exhibits high absorptance in the visible and near-infrared region due to several mechanisms such as surface plasmon polaritons, magnetic polaritons, and intrinsic bandgap absorption of tungsten. Geometric effects on the resonance wavelengths and the absorptance spectra are studied, and the physical mechanisms are elucidated in detail. The absorptance could be further enhanced in a broader spectral range with double-sized metamaterial absorbers. The total solar absorptance of the optimized metamaterial absorbers at normal incidence could be more than 88%, while the total emittance is less than 3% at 100°C, resulting in total photon-to-heat conversion efficiency of 86% without any optical concentration. Moreover, the metamaterial solar absorbers exhibit quasi-diffuse behaviors as well as polarization independence. The results here will facilitate the design of novel highly efficient solar absorbers to enhance the performance of various solar energy conversion systems.

  20. The Meaningful Activity Participation Assessment: a measure of engagement in personally valued activities.

    PubMed

    Eakman, Aaron M; Carlson, Mike E; Clark, Florence A

    2010-01-01

    The Meaningful Activity Participation Assessment (MAPA), a recently developed 28-item tool designed to measure the meaningfulness of activity, was tested in a sample of 154 older adults. The MAPA evidenced a sufficient level of internal consistency and test-retest reliability and correlated as theoretically predicted with the Life Satisfaction Index-Z, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, the Engagement in Meaningful Activities Survey, the Purpose in Life Test, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Inventory and the Rand SF-36v2 Health Survey subscales. Zero-order correlations consistently demonstrated meaningful relationships between the MAPA and scales of psychosocial well-being and health-related quality of life. Results from multiple regression analyses further substantiated these findings, as greater meaningful activity participation was associated with better psychological well-being and health-related quality of life. The MAPA appears to be a reliable and valid measure of meaningful activity, incorporating both subjective and objective indicators of activity engagement.