Science.gov

Sample records for absorbed carbon fourteen

  1. Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment (CARE)

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric

    During Project DE-FE0007528, CARE (Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment), Neumann Systems Group (NSG) designed, installed and tested a 0.5MW NeuStream® carbon dioxide (CO 2) capture system using the patented NeuStream® absorber equipment and concentrated (6 molal) piperazine (PZ) as the solvent at Colorado Springs Utilities’ (CSU’s) Martin Drake pulverized coal (PC) power plant. The 36 month project included design, build and test phases. The 0.5MW NeuStream® CO 2 capture system was successfully tested on flue gas from both coal and natural gas combustion sources and was shown to meet project objectives. Ninety percent CO 2 removal was achieved with greater thanmore » 95% CO 2product purity. The absorbers tested support a 90% reduction in absorber volume compared to packed towers and with an absorber parasitic power of less than 1% when configured for operation with a 550MW coal plant. The preliminary techno-economic analysis (TEA) performed by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) predicted an over-the-fence cost of $25.73/tonne of CO 2 captured from a sub-critical PC plant.« less

  2. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in a...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of an...

  4. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in a...

  5. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of an...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of an...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a device that is intended for medical purposes and that is used in a...

  8. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a devic...

  9. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868.5300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a...

  10. 21 CFR 868.5300 - Carbon dioxide absorbent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorbent. 868.5300 Section 868.5300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5300 Carbon dioxide absorbent. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorbent is a...

  11. 21 CFR 868.5310 - Carbon dioxide absorber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carbon dioxide absorber. 868.5310 Section 868.5310 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5310 Carbon dioxide absorber. (a) Identification. A carbon dioxide absorber is a devic...

  12. Tuning Organic Carbon Dioxide Absorbents for Carbonation and Decarbonation

    PubMed Central

    Rajamanickam, Ramachandran; Kim, Hyungsoo; Park, Ji-Woong

    2015-01-01

    The reaction of carbon dioxide with a mixture of a superbase and alcohol affords a superbase alkylcarbonate salt via a process that can be reversed at elevated temperatures. To utilize the unique chemistry of superbases for carbon capture technology, it is essential to facilitate carbonation and decarbonation at desired temperatures in an easily controllable manner. Here, we demonstrate that the thermal stabilities of the alkylcarbonate salts of superbases in organic solutions can be tuned by adjusting the compositions of hydroxylic solvent and polar aprotic solvent mixtures, thereby enabling the best possible performances to be obtained from the various carbon dioxide capture agents based on these materials. The findings provides valuable insights into the design and optimization of organic carbon dioxide absorbents. PMID:26033537

  13. Light absorbing carbon emissions from commercial shipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lack, Daniel; Lerner, Brian; Granier, Claire; Baynard, Tahllee; Lovejoy, Edward; Massoli, Paola; Ravishankara, A. R.; Williams, Eric

    2008-07-01

    Extensive measurements of the emission of light absorbing carbon aerosol (LAC) from commercial shipping are presented. Vessel emissions were sampled using a photoacoustic spectrometer in the Gulf of Mexico region. The highest emitters (per unit fuel burnt) are tug boats, thus making significant contributions to local air quality in ports. Emission of LAC from cargo and non cargo vessels in this study appears to be independent of engine load. Shipping fuel consumption data (2001) was used to calculate a global LAC contribution of 133(+/-27) Ggyr-1, or ~1.7% of global LAC. This small fraction could have disproportionate effects on both air quality near port areas and climate in the Arctic if direct emissions of LAC occur in that region due to opening Arctic sea routes. The global contribution of this LAC burden was investigated using the MOZART model. Increases of 20-50 ng m-3 LAC (relative increases up to 40%) due to shipping occur in the tropical Atlantic, Indonesia, central America and the southern regions of South America and Africa.

  14. [Study on absorbing volatile oil with mesoporous carbon].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong-mei; Jia, Xiao-bin; Zhang, Zhen-hai; Sun, E; Yang Nan

    2014-11-01

    Clove oil and turmeric oil were absorbed by mesoporous carbon. The absorption ratio of mesoporous carbon to volatile oil was optimized with the eugenol yield and curcumol yield as criteria Curing powder was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning calorietry (DSC). The effects of mesoporous carbon on dissolution in vitro and thermal stability of active components were studied. They reached high adsorption rate when the absorption ratio of mesoporous carbon to volatile oil was 1:1. When volatile oil was absorbed, dissolution rate of active components had a little improvement and their thermal stability improved after volatile oil was absorbed by the loss rate decreasing more than 50%. Absorbing herbal volatile oil with mesoporous carbon deserves further studying.

  15. Inferring Absorbing Organic Carbon Content from AERONET Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arola, A.; Schuster, G.; Myhre, G.; Kazadzis, S.; Dey, S.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2011-01-01

    Black carbon, light-absorbing organic carbon (often called brown carbon) and mineral dust are the major light-absorbing aerosols. Currently the sources and formation of brown carbon aerosol in particular are not well understood. In this study we estimated globally the amount of light absorbing organic carbon and black carbon from AERONET measurements. We find that the columnar absorbing organic carbon (brown carbon) levels in biomass burning regions of South-America and Africa are relatively high (about 15-20 magnesium per square meters during biomass burning season), while the concentrations are significantly lower in urban areas in US and Europe. However, we estimated significant absorbing organic carbon amounts from the data of megacities of newly industrialized countries, particularly in India and China, showing also clear seasonality with peak values up to 30-35 magnesium per square meters during the coldest season, likely caused by the coal and biofuel burning used for heating. We also compared our retrievals with the modeled organic carbon by global Oslo CTM for several sites. Model values are higher in biomass burning regions than AERONET-based retrievals, while opposite is true in urban areas in India and China.

  16. Carbon nanotube coatings as chemical absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Andresen, Brian D.; Alcaraz, Armando

    2004-06-15

    Airborne or aqueous organic compound collection using carbon nanotubes. Exposure of carbon nanotube-coated disks to controlled atmospheres of chemical warefare (CW)-related compounds provide superior extraction and retention efficiencies compared to commercially available airborne organic compound collectors. For example, the carbon nanotube-coated collectors were four (4) times more efficient toward concentrating dimethylmethyl-phosphonate (DMMP), a CW surrogate, than Carboxen, the optimized carbonized polymer for CW-related vapor collections. In addition to DMMP, the carbon nanotube-coated material possesses high collection efficiencies for the CW-related compounds diisopropylaminoethanol (DIEA), and diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP).

  17. Development of a prototype regenerable carbon dioxide absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onischak, M.

    1976-01-01

    Design information was obtained for a new, regenerable carbon dioxide control system for extravehicular activity life support systems. Solid potassium carbonate was supported in a thin porous sheet form and fabricated into carbon dioxide absorber units. Carbon dioxide and water in the life support system atmosphere react with the potassium carbonate and form potassium bicarbonate. The bicarbonate easily reverts to the carbonate by heating to 150 deg C. The methods of effectively packing the sorbent material into EVA-sized units and the effects of inlet concentrations, flowrate, and temperature upon performance were investigated. The cycle life of the sorbent upon the repeated thermal regenerations was demonstrated through 90 cycles.

  18. Mechanical and microwave absorbing properties of carbon-filled polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Kucerová, Z; Zajícková, L; Bursíková, V; Kudrle, V; Eliás, M; Jasek, O; Synek, P; Matejková, J; Bursík, J

    2009-01-01

    Polyurethane (PU) matrix composites were prepared with various carbon fillers at different filler contents in order to investigate their structure, mechanical and microwave absorbing properties. As fillers, flat carbon microparticles, carbon microfibers and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were used. The microstructure of the composite was examined by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Mechanical properties, namely universal hardness, plastic hardness, elastic modulus and creep were assessed by means of depth sensing indentation test. Mechanical properties of PU composite filled with different fillers were investigated and the composite always exhibited higher hardness, elastic modulus and creep resistance than un-filled PU. Influence of filler shape, content and dispersion was also investigated.

  19. Absorber modeling for NGCC carbon capture with aqueous piperazine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Freeman, Brice; Hao, Pingjiao; Rochelle, Gary T

    2016-10-20

    A hybrid system combining amine scrubbing with membrane technology for carbon capture from natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants is proposed in this paper. In this process, the CO 2 in the flue gas can be enriched from 4% to 18% by the membrane, and the amine scrubbing system will have lower capture costs. Aqueous piperazine (PZ) is chosen as the solvent. Different direct contact cooler (DCC) options, multiple absorber operating conditions, optimal intercooling designs, and different cooling options have been evaluated across a wide range of inlet CO 2 . Amine scrubbing without DCC is a superior design for NGCC carbon capture. Pump-around cooling at the bottom of the absorber can effectively manage the temperature of the hot flue gas, and still be effective for CO 2 absorption. The absorber gas inlet must be designed to avoid excessive localized temperature and solvent evaporation. When the inlet CO 2 increases from 4% to 18%, total absorber CAPEX decreases by 60%; another 10% of the total absorber CAPEX can be saved by eliminating the DCC. In-and-out intercooling works well for high CO 2 , while pump-around intercooling is more effective for low CO 2 . Dry cooling requires more packing and energy but appears to be technically and economically feasible if cooling water availability is limited.

  20. Hollow carbon spheres in microwaves: Bio inspired absorbing coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychanok, D.; Li, S.; Sanchez-Sanchez, A.; Gorokhov, G.; Kuzhir, P.; Ogrin, F. Y.; Pasc, A.; Ballweg, T.; Mandel, K.; Szczurek, A.; Fierro, V.; Celzard, A.

    2016-01-01

    The electromagnetic response of a heterostructure based on a monolayer of hollow glassy carbon spheres packed in 2D was experimentally surveyed with respect to its response to microwaves, namely, the Ka-band (26-37 GHz) frequency range. Such an ordered monolayer of spheres mimics the well-known "moth-eye"-like coating structures, which are widely used for designing anti-reflective surfaces, and was modelled with the long-wave approximation. Based on the experimental and modelling results, we demonstrate that carbon hollow spheres may be used for building an extremely lightweight, almost perfectly absorbing, coating for Ka-band applications.

  1. Electromagnetic Wave Absorbing Properties of Amorphous Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tingkai; Hou, Cuilin; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhu, Ruoxing; She, Shengfei; Wang, Jungao; Li, Tiehu; Liu, Zhifu; Wei, Bingqing

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) with diameters in the range of 7–50 nm were used as absorber materials for electromagnetic waves. The electromagnetic wave absorbing composite films were prepared by a dip-coating method using a uniform mixture of rare earth lanthanum nitrate doped ACNTs and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The microstructures of ACNTs and ACNT/PVC composites were characterized using transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction, and their electromagnetic wave absorbing properties were measured using a vector-network analyzer. The experimental results indicated that the electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of ACNTs are superior to multi-walled CNTs, and greatly improved by doping 6 wt% lanthanum nitrate. The reflection loss (R) value of a lanthanum nitrate doped ACNT/PVC composite was −25.02 dB at 14.44 GHz, and the frequency bandwidth corresponding to the reflector loss at −10 dB was up to 5.8 GHz within the frequency range of 2–18 GHz. PMID:25007783

  2. Electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of amorphous carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tingkai; Hou, Cuilin; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhu, Ruoxing; She, Shengfei; Wang, Jungao; Li, Tiehu; Liu, Zhifu; Wei, Bingqing

    2014-07-10

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) with diameters in the range of 7-50 nm were used as absorber materials for electromagnetic waves. The electromagnetic wave absorbing composite films were prepared by a dip-coating method using a uniform mixture of rare earth lanthanum nitrate doped ACNTs and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The microstructures of ACNTs and ACNT/PVC composites were characterized using transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction, and their electromagnetic wave absorbing properties were measured using a vector-network analyzer. The experimental results indicated that the electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of ACNTs are superior to multi-walled CNTs, and greatly improved by doping 6 wt% lanthanum nitrate. The reflection loss (R) value of a lanthanum nitrate doped ACNT/PVC composite was -25.02 dB at 14.44 GHz, and the frequency bandwidth corresponding to the reflector loss at -10 dB was up to 5.8 GHz within the frequency range of 2-18 GHz.

  3. Development of a prototype regeneration carbon dioxide absorber. [for use in EVA conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, P. S.; Baker, B. S.

    1977-01-01

    A prototype regenerable carbon dioxide absorber was developed to maintain the environmental quality of the portable life support system. The absorber works on the alkali metal carbonate-bicarbonate solid-gas reaction to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The prototype sorber module was designed, fabricated, and tested at simulated extravehicular activity conditions to arrive at optimum design. The unit maintains sorber outlet concentration below 5 mm Hg. An optimization study was made with respect to heat transfer, temperature control, sorbent utilization, sorber life and regenerability, and final size of the module. Important parameters influencing the capacity of the final absorber unit were identified and recommendations for improvement were made.

  4. Performance of a new carbon dioxide absorbent, Yabashi lime® as compared to conventional carbon dioxide absorbent during sevoflurane anesthesia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Kei; Atiba, Ayman; Nagase, Kiyoshi; Ogawa, Shizuko; Miwa, Takashi; Katsumata, Teruya; Ueno, Hiroshi; Uzuka, Yuji

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, we compare a new carbon dioxide (CO2) absorbent, Yabashi lime(®) with a conventional CO2 absorbent, Sodasorb(®) as a control CO2 absorbent for Compound A (CA) and Carbon monoxide (CO) productions. Four dogs were anesthetized with sevoflurane. Each dog was anesthetized with four preparations, Yabashi lime(®) with high or low-flow rate of oxygen and control CO2 absorbent with high or low-flow rate. CA and CO concentrations in the anesthetic circuit, canister temperature and carbooxyhemoglobin (COHb) concentration in the blood were measured. Yabashi lime(®) did not produce CA. Control CO2 absorbent generated CA, and its concentration was significantly higher in low-flow rate than a high-flow rate. CO was generated only in low-flow rate groups, but there was no significance between Yabashi lime(®) groups and control CO2 absorbent groups. However, the CO concentration in the circuit could not be detected (≤5ppm), and no change was found in COHb level. Canister temperature was significantly higher in low-flow rate groups than high-flow rate groups. Furthermore, in low-flow rate groups, the lower layer of canister temperature in control CO2 absorbent group was significantly higher than Yabashi lime(®) group. CA and CO productions are thought to be related to the composition of CO2 absorbent, flow rate and canister temperature. Though CO concentration is equal, it might be safer to use Yabashi lime(®) with sevoflurane anesthesia in dogs than conventional CO2 absorbent at the point of CA production.

  5. Carbon dioxide absorbent and method of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert James; O'Brien, Michael Joseph

    2014-06-10

    In accordance with one aspect, the present invention provides a composition which contains the amino-siloxane structures I, or III, as described herein. The composition is useful for the capture of carbon dioxide from process streams. In addition, the present invention provides methods of preparing the amino-siloxane composition. Another aspect of the present invention provides methods for reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in a process stream employing the amino-siloxane compositions of the invention, as species which react with carbon dioxide to form an adduct with carbon dioxide.

  6. Carbon dioxide absorbent and method of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert James; O'Brien, Michael Joseph

    2015-12-29

    In accordance with one aspect, the present invention provides a composition which contains the amino-siloxane structures I, or III, as described herein. The composition is useful for the capture of carbon dioxide from process streams. In addition, the present invention provides methods of preparing the amino-siloxane composition. Another aspect of the present invention provides methods for reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in a process stream employing the amino-siloxane compositions of the invention, as species which react with carbon dioxide to form an adduct with carbon dioxide.

  7. Development of a prototype regenerable carbon dioxide absorber for portable life support systems. [for astronaut EVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onischak, M.; Baker, B.

    1977-01-01

    The design and development of a prototype carbon dioxide absorber using potassium carbonate (K2CO3) is described. Absorbers are constructed of thin, porous sheets of supported K2CO3 that are spirally wound to form a cylindrical reactor. Axial gas passages are formed between the porous sheets by corrugated screen material. Carbon dioxide and water in an enclosed life support system atmosphere react with potassium carbonate to form potassium bicarbonate. The potassium carbonate is regenerated by heating the potassium bicarbonate to 150 C at ambient pressure. The extravehicular mission design conditions are for one man for 8 h. Results are shown for a subunit test module investigating the effects of heat release, length-to-diameter ratio, and active cooling upon performance. The most important effect upon carbon dioxide removal is the temperature of the potassium carbonate.

  8. Carbon dioxide absorbent and method of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Robert James [Niskayuna, NY; Lewis, Larry Neil [Scotia, NY; O'Brien, Michael Joseph [Clifton Park, NY; Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev [Latham, NY; Kniajanski, Sergei [Clifton Park, NY; Lam, Tunchiao Hubert [Clifton Park, NY; Lee, Julia Lam [Niskayuna, NY; Rubinsztajn, Malgorzata Iwona [Ballston Spa, NY

    2011-10-04

    In accordance with one aspect, the present invention provides an amino-siloxane composition comprising at least one of structures I, II, III, IV or V said compositions being useful for the capture of carbon dioxide from gas streams such as power plant flue gases. In addition, the present invention provides methods of preparing the amino-siloxane compositions are provided. Also provided are methods for reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in a process stream employing the amino-siloxane compositions of the invention as species which react with carbon dioxide to form an adduct with carbon dioxide. The reaction of the amino-siloxane compositions provided by the present invention with carbon dioxide is reversible and thus, the method provides for multicycle use of said compositions.

  9. Light absorbing organic carbon from prescribed and laboratory biomass burning and gasoline vehicle emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The light absorption of carbonaceous aerosols plays an important role in the atmospheric radiation balance. Light-absorbing organic carbon (OC), also called brown carbon (BrC), from laboratory-based biomass burning (BB) has been studied intensively to understand the contribution ...

  10. Carbon Dioxide Absorbers: An Engaging Experiment for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ticich, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    A simple and direct method for measuring the absorption of carbon dioxide by two different substances is described. Lithium hydroxide has been used for decades to remove the gas from enclosed living spaces, such as spacecraft and submarines. The ratio of the mass of carbon dioxide absorbed to the mass of lithium hydroxide used obtained from this…

  11. Freeze-Dried Carbon Nanotube Aerogels for High-Frequency Absorber Applications.

    PubMed

    Anoshkin, Ilya V; Campion, James; Lioubtchenko, Dmitri V; Oberhammer, Joachim

    2018-06-13

    A novel technique for millimeter wave absorber material embedded in a metal waveguide is proposed. The absorber material is a highly porous carbon nanotube (CNT) aerogel prepared by a freeze-drying technique. CNT aerogel structures are shown to be good absorbers with a low reflection coefficient, less than -12 dB at 95 GHz. The reflection coefficient of the novel absorber is 3-4 times lower than that of commercial absorbers with identical geometry. Samples prepared by freeze-drying at -25 °C demonstrate resonance behavior, while those prepared at liquid nitrogen temperature (-196 °C) exhibit a significant decrease in reflection coefficient, with no resonant behavior. CNT absorbers of identical volume based on wet-phase drying preparation show significantly worse performance than the CNT aerogel absorbers prepared by freeze-drying. Treatment of the freeze-dried CNT aerogel with n- and p-dopants (monoethanolamine and iodine vapors, respectively) shows remarkable improvement in the performance of the waveguide embedded absorbers, reducing the reflection coefficient by 2 dB across the band.

  12. Liquid carbon dioxide absorbents, methods of using the same, and related system

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Robert James; Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev; Rubinsztajn, Malgorzata Iwona

    A carbon dioxide absorbent composition is described, including (i) a liquid, nonaqueous silicon-based material, functionalized with one or more groups that either reversibly react with CO 2 or have a high-affinity for CO 2, and (ii) a hydroxy-containing solvent that is capable of dissolving both the silicon-based material and a reaction product of the silicon-based material and CO 2. The absorbent may be utilized in methods to reduce carbon dioxide in an exhaust gas, and finds particular utility in power plants.

  13. Liquid carbon dioxide absorbents, methods of using the same, and related systems

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Michael Joseph; Perry, Robert James; Lam, Tunchiao Hubert; Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev; Kniajanski, Sergei; Lewis, Larry Neil; Rubinsztajn, Malgorzata Iwona; Hancu, Dan

    2016-09-13

    A carbon dioxide absorbent composition is described, including (i) a liquid, nonaqueous silicon-based material, functionalized with one or more groups that either reversibly react with CO.sub.2 or have a high-affinity for CO.sub.2; and (ii) a hydroxy-containing solvent that is capable of dissolving both the silicon-based material and a reaction product of the silicon-based material and CO.sub.2. The absorbent may be utilized in methods to reduce carbon dioxide in an exhaust gas, and finds particular utility in power plants.

  14. Optimization on microwave absorbing properties of carbon nanotubes and magnetic oxide composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingdong, Chen; Huangzhong, Yu; Xiaohua, Jie; Yigang, Lu

    2018-03-01

    Based on the physical principle of interaction between electromagnetic field and the electromagnetic medium, the relationship between microwave absorbing coefficient (MAC) and the electromagnetic parameters of materials was established. With the composite materials of nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and paraffin as an example, optimization on absorbing properties of CNTs/magnetic oxide composite materials was studied at the frequency range of 2-18 GHz, and a conclusion is drawn that the MAC is the biggest at the same frequency, when the CNTs is 10 wt% in the composite materials. Through study on the relationship between complex permeability and MAC, another interesting conclusion is drawn that MAC is obviously affected by the real part of complex permeability, and increasing real part of complex permeability is beneficial for improving absorbing properties. The conclusion of this paper can provide a useful reference for the optimization research on the microwave absorbing properties of CNTs/ferrite composite materials.

  15. A black body absorber from vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kohei; Ishii, Juntaro; Kishida, Hideo; Hayamizu, Yuhei; Yasuda, Satoshi; Futaba, Don N.; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Among all known materials, we found that a forest of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes behaves most similarly to a black body, a theoretical material that absorbs all incident light. A requirement for an object to behave as a black body is to perfectly absorb light of all wavelengths. This important feature has not been observed for real materials because materials intrinsically have specific absorption bands because of their structure and composition. We found a material that can absorb light almost perfectly across a very wide spectral range (0.2–200 μm). We attribute this black body behavior to stem from the sparseness and imperfect alignment of the vertical single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:19339498

  16. Simulating Carbon Flux Dynamics with the Product of PAR Absorbed by Chlorophyll (fAPARchl)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, T.; Zhang, Q.

    2016-12-01

    A common way to estimate the gross primary production (GPP) is to use the fraction of photosynthetically radiation (PAR) absorbed by vegetation (FPAR). However, only the PAR absorbed by chlorophyll of the canopy, not the PAR absorbed by the foliage or by the entire canopy, is used for photosynthesis. MODIS fAPARchl product, which refers to the fraction of PAR absorbed by chlorophyll of the canopy, is derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface reflectance by using an advanced leaf-canopy-soil-water-snow coupled radiative transfer model PROSAIL4. PROSAIL4 can retrieve surface water cover fraction, snow cover fraction, and physiologically active canopy chemistry components (chlorophyll concentration and water content), fraction of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by a canopy (fAPARcanopy), fraction of PAR absorbed by photosynthetic vegetation (PV) component (mainly chlorophyll) throughout the canopy (fAPARPV, i.e., fAPARchl) and fraction of PAR absorbed by non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV) component of the canopy (fAPARNPV). We have successfully retrieved these vegetation parameters for selected areas with PROSAIL4 and the MODIS images, or simulated spectrally MODIS-like images. In this study, the product of PAR absorbed by chlorophyll (fAPARchl) has been used to simulate carbon flux over different kinds of vegetation types. The results show that MODIS fAPARchl product has the ability to better characterize phenology than current phenology model in the Community Land Model and it also will likely be able to increase the accuracy of carbon fluxes simulations.

  17. Laminated and Two-Dimensional Carbon-Supported Microwave Absorbers Derived from MXenes.

    PubMed

    Han, Meikang; Yin, Xiaowei; Li, Xinliang; Anasori, Babak; Zhang, Litong; Cheng, Laifei; Gogotsi, Yury

    2017-06-14

    Microwave absorbers with layered structures that can provide abundant interfaces are highly desirable for enhancing electromagnetic absorbing capability and decreasing the thickness. The atomically thin layers of two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal carbides (MXenes) make them a convenient precursor for synthesis of other 2D and layered structures. Here, laminated carbon/TiO 2 hybrid materials composed of well-aligned 2D carbon sheets with embedded TiO 2 nanoparticles were synthesized and showed excellent microwave absorption. Disordered 2D carbon layers with an unusual structure were obtained by annealing multilayer Ti 3 C 2 MXene in a CO 2 atmosphere. The minimum reflection coefficient of laminated carbon/TiO 2 composites reaches -36 dB, and the effective absorption bandwidth ranges from 3.6 to 18 GHz with the tunable thickness from 1.7 to 5 mm. The effective absorption bandwidth covers the whole Ku band (12.4-18 GHz) when the thickness of carbon/TiO 2 /paraffin composite is 1.7 mm. This study is expected to pave the way to the synthesis of carbon-supported absorbing materials using a large family of 2D carbides.

  18. Effects of morphology on the radiative properties of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosols with different aging status.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tianhai; Wu, Yu; Chen, Hao

    2014-06-30

    Light absorbing carbon aerosols play a substantial role in climate change through radiative forcing, which is the dominant absorber of solar radiation. Radiative properties of light absorbing carbon aerosols are strongly dependent on the morphological factors and the mixing mechanism of black carbon with other aerosol components. This study focuses on the morphological effects on the optical properties of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosols using the numerically exact superposition T-matrix method. Three types aerosols with different aging status such as freshly emitted BC particles, thinly coated light absorbing carbon aerosols, heavily coated light absorbing carbon aerosols are studied. Our study showed that morphological factors change with the aging of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosols to result in a dramatic change in their optical properties. The absorption properties of light absorbing carbon aerosols can be enhanced approximately a factor of 2 at 0.67 um, and these enhancements depend on the morphological factors. A larger shell/core diameter ratio of volume-equivalent shell-core spheres (S/C), which indicates the degree of coating, leads to stronger absorption. The enhancement of absorption properties accompanies a greater enhancement of scattering properties, which is reflected in an increase in single scattering albedo (SSA). The enhancement of single scattering albedo due to the morphological effects can reach a factor of 3.75 at 0.67 μm. The asymmetry parameter has a similar yet smaller enhancement. Moreover, the corresponding optical properties of shell-and-core model determined by using Lorenz -Mie solutions are presented for comparison. We found that the optical properties of internally mixed light absorbing carbon aerosol can differ fundamentally from those calculated for the Mie theory shell-and-core model, particularly for thinly coated light absorbing carbon aerosols. Our studies indicate that the complex morphology

  19. Webinar Presentation: Black Carbon and Other Light-absorbing Particles in Snow in Central North America and North China

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation, Black Carbon and Other Light-absorbing Particles in Snow in Central North America and North China, was given at the STAR Black Carbon 2016 Webinar Series: Accounting for Impact, Emissions, and Uncertainty held on Nov. 7, 2016.

  20. Thermally Resilient, Broadband Optical Absorber from UV to IR Derived from Carbon Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Coles, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Optical absorber coatings have been developed from carbon-based paints, metal blacks, or glassy carbon. However, such materials are not truly black and have poor absorption characteristics at longer wavelengths. The blackness of such coatings is important to increase the accuracy of calibration targets used in radiometric imaging spectrometers since blackbody cavities are prohibitively large in size. Such coatings are also useful potentially for thermal detectors, where a broadband absorber is desired. Au-black has been a commonly used broadband optical absorber, but it is very fragile and can easily be damaged by heat and mechanical vibration. An optically efficient, thermally rugged absorber could also be beneficial for thermal solar cell applications for energy harnessing, particularly in the 350-2,500 nm spectral window. It has been demonstrated that arrays of vertically oriented carbon nanotubes (CNTs), specifically multi-walled-carbon- nanotubes (MWCNTs), are an exceptional optical absorber over a broad range of wavelengths well into the infrared (IR). The reflectance of such arrays is 100x lower compared to conventional black materials, such as Au black in the spectral window of 350-2,500 nm. Total hemispherical measurements revealed a reflectance of approximately equal to 1.7% at lambda approximately equal to 1 micrometer, and at longer wavelengths into the infrared (IR), the specular reflectance was approximately equal to 2.4% at lambda approximately equal to 7 micrometers. The previously synthesized CNTs for optical absorber applications were formed using water-assisted thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD), which yields CNT lengths in excess of 100's of microns. Vertical alignment, deemed to be a critical feature in enabling the high optical absorption from CNT arrays, occurs primarily via the crowding effect with thermal CVD synthesized CNTs, which is generally not effective in aligning CNTs with lengths less than 10 m. Here it has been shown that the

  1. Preparation and microwave absorbing properties of carbon/cobalt ferromagnetic composites.

    PubMed

    Li, Wangchang; Qiao, Xiaojing; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Shuman; Ren, Qingguo

    2013-02-01

    Carbon/cobalt ferromagnetic light composites with high performance of microwave absorbing properties were prepared by hydrothermal method using starch and hollow cobalt ferrites. It was concluded that after carbonization the spinel structure ferrites changed to Co3Fe7 alloys and the temperature of graphitization was significantly decreased for the catalytic of CoFe2O4/Co3Fe7. The increase of carbon content, and exist of CoFe2O4/Co3Fe7 heightened the microwave absorbing properties. Electromagnetic parameters were tested with 40% of the titled materials and 60% of paraffin wax composites by using HP8722ES vector network analyzer. The reflection was also simulated through transmission line theory. The microwave absorbers exhibited a maximum reflection loss -43 dB and the electromagnetic wave absorption less than -10 dB was found to exceed 3.0 GHz between 11.6 GHz and 15 GHz for an absorber thickness of 2 mm.

  2. Generation of an ultrafast femtosecond soliton fiber laser by carbon nanotube as saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, M. A. M.; Ahmad, H.; Harun, S. W.; Bidin, N.; Krishnan, G.

    2018-05-01

    This paper reports the demonstration of ultrafast fiber laser in a simple erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser that employed a carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film saturable absorber (SA) to generate a stable soliton pulse. The repetition rate of 10.8 MHz pulse consistently achieved has narrowest pulse width of 640 fs and 1555.78 nm central wavelength for an hour operation in room temperature. This proposed setup has the capability for reliable and stable system features.

  3. Refractive Index and Absorption Attribution of Highly Absorbing Brown Carbon Aerosols from an Urban Indian City-Kanpur.

    PubMed

    Shamjad, P M; Tripathi, S N; Thamban, Navaneeth M; Vreeland, Heidi

    2016-11-24

    Atmospheric aerosols influence Earth's radiative balance, having both warming and cooling effects. Though many aerosols reflect radiation, carbonaceous aerosols such as black carbon and certain organic carbon species known as brown carbon have the potential to warm the atmosphere by absorbing light. Black carbon absorbs light over the entire solar spectrum whereas brown carbon absorbs near-UV wavelengths and, to a lesser extent, visible light. In developing countries, such as India, where combustion sources are prolific, the influence of brown carbon on absorption may be significant. In order to better characterize brown carbon, we present experimental and modeled absorption properties of submicron aerosols measured in an urban Indian city (Kanpur). Brown carbon here is found to be fivefold more absorbing at 365 nm wavelength compared to previous studies. Results suggest ~30% of total absorption in Kanpur is attributed to brown carbon, with primary organic aerosols contributing more than secondary organics. We report the spectral brown carbon refractive indices along with an experimentally constrained estimate of the influence of aerosol mixing state on absorption. We conclude that brown carbon in Kanpur is highly absorbing in nature and that the mixing state plays an important role in light absorption from volatile species.

  4. Refractive Index and Absorption Attribution of Highly Absorbing Brown Carbon Aerosols from an Urban Indian City-Kanpur

    PubMed Central

    Shamjad, P. M.; Tripathi, S. N.; Thamban, Navaneeth M.; Vreeland, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence Earth’s radiative balance, having both warming and cooling effects. Though many aerosols reflect radiation, carbonaceous aerosols such as black carbon and certain organic carbon species known as brown carbon have the potential to warm the atmosphere by absorbing light. Black carbon absorbs light over the entire solar spectrum whereas brown carbon absorbs near-UV wavelengths and, to a lesser extent, visible light. In developing countries, such as India, where combustion sources are prolific, the influence of brown carbon on absorption may be significant. In order to better characterize brown carbon, we present experimental and modeled absorption properties of submicron aerosols measured in an urban Indian city (Kanpur). Brown carbon here is found to be fivefold more absorbing at 365 nm wavelength compared to previous studies. Results suggest ~30% of total absorption in Kanpur is attributed to brown carbon, with primary organic aerosols contributing more than secondary organics. We report the spectral brown carbon refractive indices along with an experimentally constrained estimate of the influence of aerosol mixing state on absorption. We conclude that brown carbon in Kanpur is highly absorbing in nature and that the mixing state plays an important role in light absorption from volatile species. PMID:27883083

  5. Multiwavelength absorbance of filter deposits for determination of environmental tobacco smoke and black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawless, Phil A.; Rodes, Charles E.; Ensor, David S.

    A multiwavelength optical absorption technique has been developed for Teflon filters used for personal exposure sampling with sufficient sensitivity to allow apportionments of environmental tobacco smoke and soot (black) carbon to be made. Measurements on blank filters show that the filter material itself contributes relatively little to the total absorbance and filters from the same lot have similar characteristics; this makes retrospective analysis of filters quite feasible. Using an integrating sphere radiometer and multiple wavelengths to provide specificity, the determination of tobacco smoke and carbon with reasonable accuracy is possible on filters not characterized before exposure. This technique provides a low cost, non-destructive exposure assessment alternative to both standard thermo-gravimetric elemental carbon evaluations on quartz filters and cotinine analyses from urine or saliva samples. The method allows the same sample filter to be used for assessment of mass, carbon, and tobacco smoke without affecting the deposit.

  6. Light-Absorbing Brown Carbon Aerosol Constituents from Combustion of Indonesian Peat and Biomass.

    PubMed

    Budisulistiorini, Sri Hapsari; Riva, Matthieu; Williams, Michael; Chen, Jing; Itoh, Masayuki; Surratt, Jason D; Kuwata, Mikinori

    2017-04-18

    Light-absorbing brown carbon (BrC) constituents of organic aerosol (OA) have been shown to significantly absorb ultraviolet (UV) and visible light and thus impact radiative forcing. However, molecular identification of the BrC constituents is still limited. In this study, we characterize BrC constituents at the molecular level in (i) aerosols emitted by combustion of peat, fern/leaf, and charcoal from Indonesia and (ii) ambient aerosols collected in Singapore during the 2015 haze episode. Aerosols were analyzed using ultra performance liquid chromatography instrument interfaced to a diode array detector and electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer operated in the negative ion mode. In the laboratory-generated aerosols, we identified 41 compounds that can potentially absorb near-UV and visible wavelengths, such as oxygenated-conjugated compounds, nitroaromatics, and S-containing compounds. The sum of BrC constituents in peat, fern/leaf, and charcoal burning aerosols are 16%, 35%, and 28% of the OA mass, respectively, giving an average contribution of 24%. On average, the BrC constituents account for 0.4% of the ambient OA mass; however, large uncertainties in mass closure remain because of the lack of authentic standards. This study highlights the potential of light-absorbing BrC OA constituents from peat, fern/leaf, and charcoal burning and their importance in the atmosphere.

  7. Lightweight and efficient microwave absorbing materials based on walnut shell-derived nano-porous carbon.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xu; Wang, Lixi; Zhu, Hongli; Guan, Yongkang; Zhang, Qitu

    2017-06-08

    Lightweight microwave absorbing materials have drawn tremendous attention. Herein, nano-porous biomass carbon materials have been prepared by carbonization with a subsequent potassium hydroxide activation of walnut shells and the microwave absorption properties have also been investigated. The obtained samples have large specific surface areas with numerous micropores and nanopores. The sample activated at 600 °C with a specific surface area of 736.2 m 2 g -1 exhibits the most enhanced microwave absorption performance. It has the maximum reflection loss of -42.4 dB at 8.88 GHz and the effective absorption bandwidth (reflection loss below -10 dB) is 1.76 GHz (from 8.08 GHz to 9.84 GHz), corresponding to a thickness of 2 mm. Additionally, the effective absorption bandwidth can reach 2.24 GHz (from 10.48 GHz to 12.72 GHz) when the absorber thickness is 1.5 mm. Three-dimensional porous architecture, interfacial polarization relaxation loss, and the dipolar relaxation loss make a great contribution to the excellent microwave absorption performance. In contrast, the non-activated sample with lower specific surface area (435.3 m 2 g -1 ) has poor microwave absorption performance due to a poor dielectric loss capacity. This comparison highlights the role of micropores and nanopores in improving the dielectric loss property of porous carbon materials. To sum up, porous biomass carbon has great potential to become lightweight microwave absorbers. Moreover, KOH is an efficient activation agent in the fabrication of carbonaceous materials.

  8. Enhanced microwave absorbing performance of CoNi alloy nanoparticles anchored on a spherical carbon monolith.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Hu, Changwen; Cao, Minhua

    2013-05-28

    CoNi alloy nanoparticles anchored on a spherical carbon monolith (CoNi-C) were prepared by a solvothermal route and subsequent heat treatment without any templates. Their permittivity and permeability behaviors were studied in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz. The CoNi-C composites showed the best microwave absorbing performances compared to those of Co-C and Ni-C. The maximum reflection loss of the CoNi-C nanocomposites can reach -50.2 dB at 7.7 GHz with samples of 4 mm in thickness, better than that of the Ni-C composites, while the Co-C composites showed almost no absorption at all. The absorption mechanism of the three absorbents was also discussed.

  9. High Power Q-Switched Thulium Doped Fibre Laser using Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite Saturable Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Chernysheva, Maria; Mou, Chengbo; Arif, Raz; AlAraimi, Mohammed; Rümmeli, Mark; Turitsyn, Sergei; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser (TDFL) with a ‘Yin-Yang’ all-fibre cavity scheme based on a combination of nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) and nonlinear amplified loop mirror (NALM). Unidirectional lasing operation has been achieved without any intracavity isolator. By using a carbon nanotube polymer composite based saturable absorber (SA), we demonstrated the laser output power of ~197 mW and pulse energy of 1.7 μJ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output power from a nanotube polymer composite SA based Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser. PMID:27063511

  10. Stable optical soliton in the ring-cavity fiber system with carbon nanotube as saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bang-Qing; Ma, Yu-Lan; Yang, Tie-Mei

    2018-01-01

    Main attention focuses on the theoretical study of the ring-cavity fiber laser system with carbon nanotubes (CNT) as saturable absorber (SA). The system is modelled as a non-standard Schrödinger equation with the coefficients blended real and imaginary numbers. New stable exact soliton solution is constructed by the bilinear transformation method for the system. The influences of the key parameters related to CNTs and SA on the optical pulse soliton are discussed in simulation. The soliton amplitude and phase can be tuned by choosing suitable parameters.

  11. Models for integrated and differential scattering optical properties of encapsulated light absorbing carbon aggregates.

    PubMed

    Kahnert, Michael; Nousiainen, Timo; Lindqvist, Hannakaisa

    2013-04-08

    Optical properties of light absorbing carbon (LAC) aggregates encapsulated in a shell of sulfate are computed for realistic model geometries based on field measurements. Computations are performed for wavelengths from the UV-C to the mid-IR. Both climate- and remote sensing-relevant optical properties are considered. The results are compared to commonly used simplified model geometries, none of which gives a realistic representation of the distribution of the LAC mass within the host material and, as a consequence, fail to predict the optical properties accurately. A new core-gray shell model is introduced, which accurately reproduces the size- and wavelength dependence of the integrated and differential optical properties.

  12. Novel radiator for carbon dioxide absorbents in low-flow anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Go; Mitsui, Takanori; Kakinuma, Takayasu; Ogihara, Yukihiko; Matsumoto, Shohei; Isshiki, Atsushi; Yasuo, Watanabe

    2003-01-01

    During long-term low-flow sevoflurane anesthesia, dew formation and the generation of compound A are increased in the anesthesia circuit because of elevated soda lime temperature. The object of this study was to develop a novel radiator for carbon dioxide absorbents used for long durations of low-flow sevoflurane anesthesia. Eleven female swine were divided into two groups comprising a "radiator" group (n = 5) that used a novel radiator for carbon dioxide absorbents and a "control" group (n = 6) that used a conventional canister. Anesthesia was maintained with N2O, O2, and sevoflurane, and low-flow anesthesia was performed with fresh gas flow at 0.6 L/min for 12 hr. In the "control" group, the soda lime temperature reached more than 40 degrees C and soda lime dried up with severe dew formation in the inspiratory valve. In the "radiator" group, the temperature of soda lime stayed at 30 degrees C, and the water content of soda lime was retained with no dew formation in the inspiratory valve. In addition, compound A concentration was reduced. In conclusion, radiation of soda lime reduced the amounts of condensation formed and the concentration of compound A in the anesthetic circuit, and allowed long term low-flow anesthesia without equipment malfunction.

  13. Spatiotemporal variability of light-absorbing carbon concentration in a residential area impacted by woodsmoke.

    PubMed

    Krecl, Patricia; Johansson, Christer; Ström, Johan

    2010-03-01

    Residential wood combustion (RWC) is responsible for 33% of the total carbon mass emitted in Europe. With the new European targets to increase the use of renewable energy, there is a growing concern that the population exposure to woodsmoke will also increase. This study investigates observed and simulated light-absorbing carbon mass (MLAC) concentrations in a residential neighborhood (Lycksele, Sweden) where RWC is a major air pollution source during winter. The measurement analysis included descriptive statistics, correlation coefficient, coefficient of divergence, linear regression, concentration roses, diurnal pattern, and weekend versus weekday concentration ratios. Hourly RWC and road traffic contributions to MLAC were simulated with a Gaussian dispersion model to assess whether the model was able to mimic the observations. Hourly mean and standard deviation concentrations measured at six sites ranged from 0.58 to 0.74 microg m(-3) and from 0.59 to 0.79 microg m(-3), respectively. The temporal and spatial variability decreased with increasing averaging time. Low-wind periods with relatively high MLAC concentrations correlated more strongly than high-wind periods with low concentrations. On average, the model overestimated the observations by 3- to 5-fold and explained less than 10% of the measured hourly variability at all sites. Large residual concentrations were associated with weak winds and relatively high MLAC loadings. The explanation of the observed variability increased to 31-45% when daily mean concentrations were compared. When the contribution from the boilers within the neighborhood was excluded from the simulations, the model overestimation decreased to 16-71%. When assessing the exposure to light-absorbing carbon particles using this type of model, the authors suggest using a longer averaging period (i.e., daily concentrations) in a larger area with an updated and very detailed emission inventory.

  14. Light-absorbing organic carbon from prescribed and laboratory biomass burning and gasoline vehicle emissions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mingjie; Hays, Michael D; Holder, Amara L

    2017-08-04

    Light-absorbing organic carbon (OC), also termed brown carbon (BrC), from laboratory-based biomass burning (BB) has been studied intensively to understand the contribution of BB to radiative forcing. However, relatively few measurements have been conducted on field-based BB and even fewer measurements have examined BrC from anthropogenic combustion sources like motor vehicle emissions. In this work, the light absorption of methanol-extractable OC from prescribed and laboratory BB and gasoline vehicle emissions was examined using spectrophotometry. The light absorption of methanol extracts showed a strong wavelength dependence for both BB and gasoline vehicle emissions. The mass absorption coefficients at 365 nm (MAC 365 , m 2 g -1 C) - used as a measurement proxy for BrC - were significantly correlated (p < 0.05) to the elemental carbon (EC)/OC ratios when examined by each BB fuel type. No significant correlation was observed when pooling fuels, indicating that both burn conditions and fuel types may impact BB BrC characteristics. The average MAC 365 of gasoline vehicle emission samples is 0.62 ± 0.76 m 2  g -1 C, which is similar in magnitude to the BB samples (1.27 ± 0.76 m 2  g -1 C). These results suggest that in addition to BB, gasoline vehicle emissions may also be an important BrC source in urban areas.

  15. Electromagnetic wave absorption properties of cement based composites using helical carbon fibers as absorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shuai; Wang, Jing; Wang, Wufeng; Hou, Guoyan; Li, Bin; Shui, Zhonghe; Ji, Zhijiang

    2018-02-01

    In order to develop a cement based composites with high electromagnetic (EM) wave absorbing performance, helical carbon fibers (HCFs) were added into the cement matrix as an absorbent. The reflection loss (RL) of the prepared HCFs/cement based composites was studied by arched testing method in the frequency ranges of 1-8 GHz and 8-18 GHz. The results show that the EM wave absorption properties of the cement based composites can be evidently enhanced by the addition of HCFs. The composites with 1.5% HCFs exhibits optimum EM wave absorption performance in the frequency range of 1-8 GHz. However, in 8-18 GHz frequency range, the EM wave absorption performance of the cement composites with 1% HCFs is much better than others. The RL values of the prepared HCFs/cement based composites are less than -5 dB in the whole testing frequency regions, which can be attributed to the strong dielectric loss ability and unique chiral structure of HCFs.

  16. Calcium absorbability from milk products, an imitation milk, and calcium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Recker, R.R.; Bammi, A.; Barger-Lux, M.J.

    Whole milk, chocolate milk, yogurt, imitation milk (prepared from dairy and nondairy products), cheese, and calcium carbonate were labeled with /sup 45/Ca and administered as a series of test meals to 10 healthy postmenopausal women. Carrier Ca content of the test meals was held constant at 250 mg and subjects fasted before each meal. The absorbability of Ca from the six sources was compared by measuring fractional absorption by the double isotope method. The mean absorption values for all six sources were tightly clustered between 21 and 26% and none was significantly different from the others using one-way analysis ofmore » variance. We conclude that none of the sources was significantly superior or inferior to the others.« less

  17. Enhanced absorption in a reverse saturable absorbing dye blended with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Webster, Scott; Reyes-Reyes, Marisol; Williams, Richard; Carroll, David L

    2008-12-01

    Using nonlinear absorption at 532 nm in the nanosecond temporal regime, we have measured the low fluence nonlinear transmittance properties of the reverse saturable absorbing carbocyanine dye, 1,1',3,3,3',3'-hexamethylindotricarbocyanine iodide (HITCI), blended with well dispersed carbon nanotubes. The nonlinear optical properties of the blends are strongly dependent on the ratio of dye to nanotubes in solution. In the case where the nanotubes per dye molecule ratio is large, we see a distinctive enhancement in optical fluence limiting properties of the system, suggesting enhanced absorption of the excited states. However, when the nanotube to dye ratio decreases, the system's response is dominated by the behavior of the dye. We suggest that this can be understood as a two component system in which sensitized dye molecules associated with the nanotubes have an effectively different optical cross-section from the dye molecules far from the nanotubes. From classical antennae considerations, this is expected.

  18. All-polarization maintaining erbium fiber laser based on carbon nanowalls saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, Shintaro; Izawa, Jun; Kawaguchi, Norihito

    2018-02-01

    We report a soliton mode locked femtosecond oscillation with all-polarization maintaining erbuim doped fiber laser based on Carbon Nanowalls saturable absorber (CNWs SA). To improve the stability and the capability of the oscillator, the all-polarization maintaining(all-PM) fiber is generally used since PM fiber is tolerant of stretches and bends. The saturable absorber is an optical device that placed in a laser cavity to suppress continuous wave operation to promote cooperation between many modes to sustain ultrashort pulse operation. We apply CNWs for the material of SAs in our oscillator. CNWs are one of the nanocarbon materials, which are a high-aspect-ratio structure in the cross-section, where, although their width and height range in a few micrometers, the thickness is as small as ten nanometers or so. A sheet of CNWs is made up of nano-size graphite grain aggregates. Then CNWs structure is expected to have a high absorption to the incident light and large modulation depth due to a small number of carbon layers as well as CNT and Graphene. With this all-PM fiber laser oscillator based on CNWs SA, the soliton mode-locked laser oscillated with 66.3MHz repetition frequency and its spectrum width is 5.6nm in FWHM. Average output power is 8.1mW with 122.5mW laser diode pump power. In addition, the laser amplification system with erbium-doped fiber is constructed and amplifies the femtosecond pulse laser into 268.2mW and 3000mW pumping power.

  19. Low-loss saturable absorbers based on tapered fibers embedded in carbon nanotube/polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Amos; Al Araimi, Mohammed; Dmitriev, Artemiy; Lutsyk, Petro; Li, Shen; Mou, Chengbo; Rozhin, Alexey; Sumetsky, Misha; Turitsyn, Sergei

    2017-12-01

    The emergence of low-dimensional materials has opened new opportunities in the fabrication of compact nonlinear photonic devices. Single-walled carbon nanotubes were among the first of those materials to attract the attention of the photonics community owing to their high third order susceptibility, broadband operation, and ultrafast response. Saturable absorption, in particular, has become a widespread application for nanotubes in the mode-locking of a fiber laser where they are used as nonlinear passive amplitude modulators to initiate pulsed operation. Numerous approaches have been proposed for the integration of nanotubes in fiber systems; these can be divided into those that rely on direct interaction (where the nanotubes are sandwiched between fiber connectors) and those that rely on lateral interaction with the evanescence field of the propagating wave. Tapered fibers, in particular, offer excellent flexibility to adjust the nonlinearity of nanotube-based devices but suffer from high losses (typically exceeding 50%) and poor saturable to non-saturable absorption ratios (typically above 1:5). In this paper, we propose a method to fabricate carbon nanotube saturable absorbers with controllable saturation power, low-losses (as low as 15%), and large saturable to non-saturable loss ratios approaching 1:1. This is achieved by optimizing the procedure of embedding tapered fibers in low-refractive index polymers. In addition, this study sheds light in the operation of these devices, highlighting a trade-off between losses and saturation power and providing guidelines for the design of saturable absorbers according to their application.

  20. 1 Mixing state and absorbing properties of black carbon during Arctic haze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanatta, Marco; Gysel, Martin; Eleftheriadis, Kosas; Laj, Paolo; Hans-Werner, Jacobi

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic atmosphere is periodically affected by the Arctic haze occurring in spring. One of its particulate components is the black carbon (BC), which is considered to be an important contributor to climate change in the Arctic region. Beside BC-cloud interaction and albedo reduction of snow, BC may influence Arctic climate interacting directly with the solar radiation, warming the corresponding aerosol layer (Flanner, 2013). Such warming depends on BC atmospheric burden and also on the efficiency of BC to absorb light, in fact the light absorption is enhanced by mixing of BC with other atmospheric non-absorbing materials (lensing effect) (Bond et al., 2013). The BC reaching the Arctic is evilly processed, due to long range transport. Aging promote internal mixing and thus absorption enhancement. Such modification of mixing and is quantification after long range transport have been observed in the Atlantic ocean (China et al., 2015) but never investigated in the Arctic. During field experiments conducted at the Zeppelin research site in Svalbard during the 2012 Arctic spring, we investigated the relative precision of different BC measuring techniques; a single particle soot photometer was then used to assess the coating of Arctic black carbon. This allowed quantifying the absorption enhancement induced by internal mixing via optical modelling; the optical assessment of aged black carbon in the arctic will be of major interest for future radiative forcing assessment.Optical characterization of the total aerosol indicated that in 2012 no extreme smoke events took place and that the aerosol population was dominated by fine and non-absorbing particles. Low mean concentration of rBC was found (30 ng m-3), with a mean mass equivalent diameter above 200 nm. rBC concentration detected with the continuous soot monitoring system and the single particle soot photometer was agreeing within 15%. Combining absorption coefficient observed with an aethalometer and rBC mass

  1. Solar Photothermal Disinfection using Broadband-Light Absorbing Gold Nanoparticles and Carbon Black.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Stephanie; Li, Chuanhao; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2018-01-02

    A simple heat treatment, perhaps the most globally recognized point-of-use water sterilization method, is seemingly effective against all major pathogens of concern, but bulk water boiling is not energy efficient or sustainable. Herein, we present the first application of solar-to-thermal converting nanomaterials for the direct inactivation of bacteria and viruses in drinking water through the application of Au nanorods, carbon black, and Au nanorod-carbon black composite materials as light absorbers. With broad absorption bands spanning the visible and near-infrared wavelengths, at sufficient concentrations, these nanoparticles induce multiple scattering events, increasing photon absorption probability and concentrating the light within a small spatial domain, leading to localized, intense heating that inactivates microorganisms in close proximity. Moving toward practical device design, we have developed a facile silane immobilization approach to fabricate films with densely packed layers of photothermal nanomaterials. Our results suggest that upon irraditaion with simulated solar light, these films can thermally inactivate bacteria and viruses, as demonstrated through the inactivation of surrogate organisms Escherichia coli K-12, and bacteriophages MS2 and PR772.

  2. Fractional absorption of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa) and calcium carbonate measured by a dual stable-isotope method

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With the use of stable isotopes, this study aimed to compare the bioavailability of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa), obtained from oyster shell powder heated to a high temperature, with an additional heated seaweed component (Heated Algal Ingredient, HAI), with that of calcium carbonate. In ...

  3. Measured Wavelength-Dependent Absorption Enhancement of Internally Mixed Black Carbon with Absorbing and Nonabsorbing Materials.

    PubMed

    You, Rian; Radney, James G; Zachariah, Michael R; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2016-08-02

    Optical absorption spectra of laboratory generated aerosols consisting of black carbon (BC) internally mixed with nonabsorbing materials (ammonium sulfate, AS, and sodium chloride, NaCl) and BC with a weakly absorbing brown carbon surrogate derived from humic acid (HA) were measured across the visible to near-IR (550 to 840 nm). Spectra were measured in situ using a photoacoustic spectrometer and step-scanning a supercontinuum laser source with a tunable wavelength and bandwidth filter. BC had a mass-specific absorption cross section (MAC) of 7.89 ± 0.25 m(2) g(-1) at λ = 550 nm and an absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) of 1.03 ± 0.09 (2σ). For internally mixed BC, the ratio of BC mass to the total mass of the mixture was chosen as 0.13 to mimic particles observed in the terrestrial atmosphere. The manner in which BC mixed with each material was determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). AS/BC and HA/BC particles were fully internally mixed, and the BC was both internally and externally mixed for NaCl/BC particles. The AS/BC, NaCl/BC, and HA/BC particles had AAEs of 1.43 ± 0.05, 1.34 ± 0.06, and 1.91 ± 0.05, respectively. The observed absorption enhancement of mixed BC relative to the pure BC was wavelength dependent for AS/BC and decreased from 1.5 at λ = 550 nm with increasing wavelength while the NaCl/BC enhancement was essentially wavelength independent. For HA/BC, the enhancement ranged from 2 to 3 and was strongly wavelength dependent. Removal of the HA absorption contribution to enhancement revealed that the enhancement was ≈1.5 and independent of wavelength.

  4. Fe-, Co-, and Ni-Loaded Porous Activated Carbon Balls as Lightweight Microwave Absorbents.

    PubMed

    Li, Guomin; Wang, Liancheng; Li, Wanxi; Xu, Yao

    2015-11-16

    Porous activated carbon ball (PACB) composites impregnated with iron, cobalt, nickel and/or their oxides were synthesized through a wet chemistry method involving PACBs as the carrier to load Fe(3+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) ions and a subsequent carbothermal reduction at different annealing temperatures. The results show that the pyrolysis products of nitrates and/or the products from the carbothermal reduction are embedded in the pores of the PACBs, with different distributions, resulting in different crystalline phases. The as-prepared PACB composites possessed high specific surface areas of 791.2-901.5 m(2)  g(-1) and low densities of 1.1-1.3 g cm(-3). Minimum reflection loss (RL) values of -50.1, -20.6, and -20.4 dB were achieved for Fe-PACB (annealed at 500 °C), Co-PACB (annealed at 800 °C), and Ni-PACB (annealed at 800 °C) composites, respectively. Moreover, the influence of the amount of the magnetic components in the PACB composites on the microwave-absorbing performances was investigated, further confirming that the dielectric loss was the primary contributor to microwave absorption. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Important role of calcium chloride in preventing carbon monoxide generation during desflurane degradation with alkali hydroxide-free carbon dioxide absorbents.

    PubMed

    Ando, Takahiro; Mori, Atsushi; Ito, Rie; Nishiwaki, Kimitoshi

    2017-12-01

    We investigated whether calcium chloride (CaCl 2 ), a supplementary additive in carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) absorbents, could affect carbon monoxide (CO) production caused by desflurane degradation, using a Japanese alkali-free CO 2 absorbent Yabashi Lime ® -f (YL-f), its CaCl 2 -free and 1% CaCl 2 -added derivatives, and other commercially available alkali-free absorbents with or without CaCl 2 . The reaction between 1 L of desflurane gas (3-10%) and 20 g of desiccated specimen was performed in an artificial closed-circuit anesthesia system for 3 min at 20 or 40 °C. The CO concentration was measured using a gas chromatograph equipped with a semiconductor sensor detector. The systems were validated by detecting dose-dependent CO production with an alkali hydroxide-containing CO 2 absorbent, Sodasorb ® . Compared with YL-f, the CaCl 2 -free derivative caused the production of significantly more CO, while the 1% CaCl 2 -added derivative caused the production of a comparable amount of CO. These phenomena were confirmed using commercially available absorbents AMSORB ® PLUS, an alkali-free absorbent with CaCl 2 , and LoFloSorb™, an alkali-free absorbent without CaCl 2 . These results suggest that CaCl 2 plays an important role in preventing CO generation caused by desflurane degradation with alkali hydroxide-free CO 2 absorbents like YL-f.

  6. Light-absorbing carbon from prescribed and laboratory biomass burning and gasoline vehicle emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbonaceous aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and can directly affect Earth’s climate by absorbing and scattering incoming solar radiation. Both field and laboratory measurements have confirmed that biomass burning (BB) is an important primary source of light absorbing o...

  7. One-dimensional carbon nanotube@barium titanate@polyaniline multiheterostructures for microwave absorbing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Qing-Qing; Zhu, Yao-Feng; Yu, Lu-Jun; Fu, Ya-Qin

    2015-04-01

    Multiple-phase nanocomposites filled with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been developed for their significant potential in microwave attenuation. The introduction of other phases onto the CNTs to achieve CNT-based heterostructures has been proposed to obtain absorbing materials with enhanced microwave absorption properties and broadband frequency due to their different loss mechanisms. The existence of polyaniline (PANI) as a coating with controllable electrical conductivity can lead to well-matched impedance. In this work, a one-dimensional CNT@BaTiO3@PANI heterostructure composite was fabricated. The fabrication processes involved coating of an acid-modified CNT with BaTiO3 (CNT@BaTiO3) through a sol-gel technique followed by combustion and the formation of CNT@BaTiO3@PANI nanohybrids by in situ polymerization of an aniline monomer in the presence of CNT@BaTiO3, using ammonium persulfate as an oxidant and HCl as a dopant. The as-synthesized CNT@BaTiO3@PANI composites with heterostructures were confirmed by various morphological and structural characterization techniques, as well as conductivity and microwave absorption properties. The measured electromagnetic parameters showed that the CNT@BaTiO3@PANI composites exhibited excellent microwave absorption properties. The minimum reflection loss of the CNT@BaTiO3@PANI composites with 20 wt % loadings in paraffin wax reached -28.9 dB (approximately 99.87% absorption) at 10.7 GHz with a thickness of 3 mm, and a frequency bandwidth less than -20 dB was achieved from 10 to 15 GHz. This work demonstrated that the CNT@BaTiO3@PANI heterostructure composite can be potentially useful in electromagnetic stealth materials, sensors, and electronic devices.

  8. One-dimensional carbon nanotube@barium titanate@polyaniline multiheterostructures for microwave absorbing application.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qing-Qing; Zhu, Yao-Feng; Yu, Lu-Jun; Fu, Ya-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-phase nanocomposites filled with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been developed for their significant potential in microwave attenuation. The introduction of other phases onto the CNTs to achieve CNT-based heterostructures has been proposed to obtain absorbing materials with enhanced microwave absorption properties and broadband frequency due to their different loss mechanisms. The existence of polyaniline (PANI) as a coating with controllable electrical conductivity can lead to well-matched impedance. In this work, a one-dimensional CNT@BaTiO3@PANI heterostructure composite was fabricated. The fabrication processes involved coating of an acid-modified CNT with BaTiO3 (CNT@BaTiO3) through a sol-gel technique followed by combustion and the formation of CNT@BaTiO3@PANI nanohybrids by in situ polymerization of an aniline monomer in the presence of CNT@BaTiO3, using ammonium persulfate as an oxidant and HCl as a dopant. The as-synthesized CNT@BaTiO3@PANI composites with heterostructures were confirmed by various morphological and structural characterization techniques, as well as conductivity and microwave absorption properties. The measured electromagnetic parameters showed that the CNT@BaTiO3@PANI composites exhibited excellent microwave absorption properties. The minimum reflection loss of the CNT@BaTiO3@PANI composites with 20 wt % loadings in paraffin wax reached -28.9 dB (approximately 99.87% absorption) at 10.7 GHz with a thickness of 3 mm, and a frequency bandwidth less than -20 dB was achieved from 10 to 15 GHz. This work demonstrated that the CNT@BaTiO3@PANI heterostructure composite can be potentially useful in electromagnetic stealth materials, sensors, and electronic devices.

  9. Development of the electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber for portable life support system application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Heppner, D. B.; Marshall, R. D.; Quattrone, P. D.

    1979-01-01

    As the length of manned space missions increase, more ambitious extravehicular activities (EVAs) are required. For the projected longer mission the use of expendables in the portable life support system (PLSS) will become prohibited due to high launch weight and volume requirements. Therefore, the development of a regenerable CO2 absorber for the PLSS application is highly desirable. The paper discusses the concept, regeneration mechanism, performance, system design, and absorption/regeneration cycle testing of a most promising concept known as ERCA (Electrochemically Regenerable CO2 Absorber). This concept is based on absorbing CO2 into an alkaline absorbent similar to LiOH. The absorbent is an aqueous solution supported in a porous matrix which can be electrochemically regenerated on board the primary space vehicle. With the metabolic CO2 recovery the ERCA concept results in a totally regenerable CO2 scrubber. The ERCA test hardware has passed 200 absorption/regeneration cycles without performance degradation.

  10. A promising lightweight multicomponent microwave absorber based on doped barium hexaferrite/calcium titanate/multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afghahi, Seyyed Salman Seyyed; Jafarian, Mojtaba; Atassi, Yomen

    2016-07-01

    We present the design of a microwave absorber in the X band based on ternary nanocomposite of doped barium hexaferrite (Ba-M)/calcium titanate (CTO)/multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in epoxy matrix. The hydrothermal method has been used to synthesize Ba-M and CTO nanopowder. The phase identification has been investigated using XRD patterns. Scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, vibrating sample magnetometer, and vector network analyzer are used to analyze the morphology of the different components and the magnetic, electromagnetic, and microwave absorption properties of the final composite absorbers, respectively. As far as we know, the design of this type of multicomponent microwave absorber has not been investigated before. The results reveal that the combination of these three components with their different loss mechanisms has a synergistic effect that enhances the attenuation properties of the final composite. The absorber of only 2.5-mm thickness and 35 wt% of loading ratio exhibits a minimum reflection loss of -43 dB at 10.2 GHz with a bandwidth of 3.6 GHz, while the corresponding absorber based on pure (Ba-M) shows a minimum reflection loss of -34 dB at 9.8 GHz with a bandwidth of 0.256 GHz and a thickness of 4 mm.

  11. Evaluation of specific ultraviolet absorbance as an indicator of the chemical composition and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weishaar, J.L.; Aiken, George R.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Fram, Miranda S.; Fujii, Roger; Mopper, K.

    2003-01-01

    Specific UV absorbance (SUVA) is defined as the UV absorbance of a water sample at a given wavelength normalized for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration. Our data indicate that SUVA, determined at 254 nm, is strongly correlated with percent aromaticity as determined by 13C NMR for 13 organic matter isolates obtained from a variety of aquatic environments. SUVA, therefore, is shown to be a useful parameter for estimating the dissolved aromatic carbon content in aquatic systems. Experiments involving the reactivity of DOC with chlorine and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), however, show a wide range of reactivity for samples with similar SUVA values. These results indicate that, while SUVA measurements are good predictors of general chemical characteristics of DOC, they do not provide information about reactivity of DOC derived from different types of source materials. Sample pH, nitrate, and iron were found to influence SUVA measurements.

  12. Low threshold linear cavity mode-locked fiber laser using microfiber-based carbon nanotube saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, K. Y.; Ng, E. K.; Abu Bakar, M. H.; Abas, A. F.; Alresheedi, M. T.; Yusoff, Z.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2018-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a linear cavity mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser in C-band wavelength region. The passive mode-locking is achieved using a microfiber-based carbon nanotube saturable absorber. The carbon nanotube saturable absorber has low saturation fluence of 0.98 μJ/cm2. Together with the linear cavity architecture, the fiber laser starts to produce soliton pulses at low pump power of 22.6 mW. The proposed fiber laser generates fundamental soliton pulses with a center wavelength, pulse width, and repetition rate of 1557.1 nm, 820 fs, and 5.41 MHz, respectively. This mode-locked laser scheme presents a viable option in the development of low threshold ultrashort pulse system for deployment as a seed laser.

  13. Predicting trace organic compound breakthrough in granular activated carbon using fluorescence and UV absorbance as surrogates.

    PubMed

    Anumol, Tarun; Sgroi, Massimiliano; Park, Minkyu; Roccaro, Paolo; Snyder, Shane A

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the applicability of bulk organic parameters like dissolved organic carbon (DOC), UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV254), and total fluorescence (TF) to act as surrogates in predicting trace organic compound (TOrC) removal by granular activated carbon in water reuse applications. Using rapid small-scale column testing, empirical linear correlations for thirteen TOrCs were determined with DOC, UV254, and TF in four wastewater effluents. Linear correlations (R(2) > 0.7) were obtained for eight TOrCs in each water quality in the UV254 model, while ten TOrCs had R(2) > 0.7 in the TF model. Conversely, DOC was shown to be a poor surrogate for TOrC breakthrough prediction. When the data from all four water qualities was combined, good linear correlations were still obtained with TF having higher R(2) than UV254 especially for TOrCs with log Dow>1. Excellent linear relationship (R(2) > 0.9) between log Dow and the removal of TOrC at 0% surrogate removal (y-intercept) were obtained for the five neutral TOrCs tested in this study. Positively charged TOrCs had enhanced removals due to electrostatic interactions with negatively charged GAC that caused them to deviate from removals that would be expected with their log Dow. Application of the empirical linear correlation models to full-scale samples provided good results for six of seven TOrCs (except meprobamate) tested when comparing predicted TOrC removal by UV254 and TF with actual removals for GAC in all the five samples tested. Surrogate predictions using UV254 and TF provide valuable tools for rapid or on-line monitoring of GAC performance and can result in cost savings by extended GAC run times as compared to using DOC breakthrough to trigger regeneration or replacement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The physical properties of black carbon and other light-absorbing material emitted from prescribed fires in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMeeking, G. R.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Yokelson, R. J.; Sullivan, A. P.; Lee, T.; Collett, J. L.; Fortner, E.; Onasch, T. B.; Akagi, S. K.; Taylor, J.; Coe, H.

    2012-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol emitted from fires absorbs light, leading to visibility degradation as well as regional and global climate impacts. Fires also emit a wide range of trace gases and particulates that can interact with emitted BC and alter its optical properties and atmospheric lifetime. Non-BC particulate species emitted by fires can also scatter and absorb light, leading to additional effects on visibility. Recent work has shown that certain organic species can absorb light strongly at shorter wavelengths, giving it a brown or yellow color. This material has been classified as brown carbon, though it is not yet well defined. Land managers must find a balance between the negative impacts of prescribed fire emissions on visibility and air quality and the need to prevent future catastrophic wildfire as well as manage ecosystems for habitat restoration or other purposes. This decision process requires accurate assessments of the visibility impacts of fire emissions, including BC and brown carbon, which in turn depend on their optical properties. We present recent laboratory and aircraft measurements of black carbon and aerosol optical properties emitted from biomass burning. All measurement campaigns included a single particle soot photometer (SP2) instrument capable of providing size-resolved measurements of BC mass and number distributions and mixing state, which are needed to separate the BC and brown carbon contributions to total light absorption. The laboratory experiments also included a three-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer that provided accurate measurements of aerosol light absorption. The laboratory systems also characterized emissions after they had been treated with a thermal denuder to remove semi-volatile coatings, allowing an assessment of the role of non-BC coatings on bulk aerosol optical properties. Emissions were also aged in an environmental smog chamber to examine the role of secondary aerosol production on aerosol optical properties.

  15. Thermally-Resilient, Broadband Optical Absorber from UV-to-IR Derived from Carbon Nanostructures and Method of Making the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor); Coles, James B. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A monolithic optical absorber and methods of making same. The monolithic optical absorber uses an array of mutually aligned carbon nanotubes that are grown using a PECVD growth process and a structure that includes a conductive substrate, a refractory template layer and a nucleation layer. Monolithic optical absorbers made according to the described structure and method exhibit high absorptivity, high site densities (greater than 10.sup.9 nanotubes/cm.sup.2), very low reflectivity (below 1%), and high thermal stability in air (up to at least 400.degree. C.). The PECVD process allows the application of such absorbers in a wide variety of end uses.

  16. Secondary brown carbon - Formation of light-absorbing compounds in atmospheric particulates from selected dicarbonyls and amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, Christopher; Filippi, Alexander; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    One of the main open questions regarding organic compounds in atmospheric chemistry today is related to the formation of optically-active compounds and the occurrence of so called brown carbon (Andreae and Gelencsér, 2006). While organic compounds in ambient fine particles for decades have been assumed to not absorb solar radiation, thus resulting in a net cooling effect on climate (IPCC, 2007), it is now generally accepted that a continuum of light-absorbing carbonaceous species is present in fine aerosols (Pöschl, 2003). In this study, light-absorbing compounds from reactions between dicarbonyl compounds, i.e., glyoxal, methylglyoxal, acetylacetone, 2,3-butanedione, 2,5-hexanedione, and glutaraldehyde, and amine species, i.e., ammonia and glycine, were investigated at atmospherically relevant concentrations in bulk solution experiments mimicking atmospheric particulates. Product analyses were performed using UV/Vis spectrophotometry and (ultra) high performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detection and ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS), as well as ultra-high resolution (Orbitrap) mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-HRMS/MS). We demonstrate that light-absorbing compounds are formed from a variety of atmospherically relevant dicarbonyls via particle phase reactions with amine nucleophiles. Single dicarbonyl and mixed dicarbonyl experiments were performed and products were analyzed. The reaction products are suggested to be cyclic nitrogen containing compounds such as imidazoles or dihydropyridines as well as open chain compounds resulting from aldol condensation reactions. Further, the reactive turnover was found to be higher at increasing pH values. The aforementioned processes may be of higher relevance in regions with high aerosol pH, e.g., resulting from high ammonia emissions as for example in northern India (Clarisse et al., 2009). References Andreae, M.O., and Gelencsér, A. (2006): Black carbon or brown carbon? The nature of light-absorbing

  17. Carbon dioxide absorber and regeneration assemblies useful for power plant flue gas

    DOEpatents

    Vimalchand, Pannalal; Liu, Guohai; Peng, Wan Wang

    2012-11-06

    Disclosed are apparatus and method to treat large amounts of flue gas from a pulverized coal combustion power plant. The flue gas is contacted with solid sorbents to selectively absorb CO.sub.2, which is then released as a nearly pure CO.sub.2 gas stream upon regeneration at higher temperature. The method is capable of handling the necessary sorbent circulation rates of tens of millions of lbs/hr to separate CO.sub.2 from a power plant's flue gas stream. Because pressurizing large amounts of flue gas is cost prohibitive, the method of this invention minimizes the overall pressure drop in the absorption section to less than 25 inches of water column. The internal circulation of sorbent within the absorber assembly in the proposed method not only minimizes temperature increases in the absorber to less than 25.degree. F., but also increases the CO.sub.2 concentration in the sorbent to near saturation levels. Saturating the sorbent with CO.sub.2 in the absorber section minimizes the heat energy needed for sorbent regeneration. The commercial embodiments of the proposed method can be optimized for sorbents with slower or faster absorption kinetics, low or high heat release rates, low or high saturation capacities and slower or faster regeneration kinetics.

  18. Superb electromagnetic wave-absorbing composites based on large-scale graphene and carbon nanotube films.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinsong; Lu, Weibang; Suhr, Jonghwan; Chen, Hang; Xiao, John Q; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2017-05-24

    Graphene has sparked extensive research interest for its excellent physical properties and its unique potential for application in absorption of electromagnetic waves. However, the processing of stable large-scale graphene and magnetic particles on a micrometer-thick conductive support is a formidable challenge for achieving high reflection loss and impedance matching between the absorber and free space. Herein, a novel and simple approach for the processing of a CNT film-Fe 3 O 4 -large scale graphene composite is studied. The Fe 3 O 4 particles with size in the range of 20-200 nm are uniformly aligned along the axial direction of the CNTs. The composite exhibits exceptionally high wave absorption capacity even at a very low thickness. Minimum reflection loss of -44.7 dB and absorbing bandwidth of 4.7 GHz at -10 dB are achieved in composites with one-layer graphene in six-layer CNT film-Fe 3 O 4 prepared from 0.04 M FeCl 3 . Microstructural and theoretical studies of the wave-absorbing mechanism reveal a unique Debye dipolar relaxation with an Eddy current effect in the absorbing bandwidth.

  19. The effects of emission control strategies on light-absorbing carbon emissions from a modern heavy-duty diesel engine.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael A; Olson, Michael R; Liu, Z Gerald; Schauer, James J

    2015-06-01

    Control of atmospheric black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) has been proposed as an important pathway to climate change mitigation, but sources of BC and BrC are still not well understood. In order to better identify the role of modern heavy-duty diesel engines on the production of BC and BrC, emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine operating with different emission control strategies were examined using a source dilution sampling system. The effect of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particulate filter (DPF) on light-absorbing carbon (LAC) was evaluated at three steady-state engine operation modes: idle, 50% speed and load, and 100% speed and load. LAC was measured with four different engine configurations: engine out, DOC out, DPF out, and engine out with an altered combustion calibration. BC and BrC emission rates were measured with the Aethalometer (AE-31). EC and BC emission rates normalized to the mass of CO₂emitted increased with increasing engine speed and load. Emission rates normalized to brake-specific work did not exhibit similar trends with speed and load, but rather the highest emission rate was measured at idle. EC and OC emissions were reduced by 99% when the DOC and DPF architecture was applied. The application of a DPF was equally effective at removing 99% of the BC fraction of PM, proving to be an important control strategy for both LAC and PM. BC emissions were unexpectedly increased across the DOC, seemingly due to a change aerosol optical properties. Removal of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) flow due to simulated EGR cooler failure caused a large increase in OC and BrC emission rates at idle, but had limited influence during high load operation. LAC emissions proved to be sensitive to the same control strategies effective at controlling the total mass of diesel PM. In the context of black carbon emissions, very small emission rates of brown carbon were measured over a range of control technologies and engine operating

  20. Optical properties of light absorbing carbon aggregates mixed with sulfate: assessment of different model geometries for climate forcing calculations.

    PubMed

    Kahnert, Michael; Nousiainen, Timo; Lindqvist, Hannakaisa; Ebert, Martin

    2012-04-23

    Light scattering by light absorbing carbon (LAC) aggregates encapsulated into sulfate shells is computed by use of the discrete dipole method. Computations are performed for a UV, visible, and IR wavelength, different particle sizes, and volume fractions. Reference computations are compared to three classes of simplified model particles that have been proposed for climate modeling purposes. Neither model matches the reference results sufficiently well. Remarkably, more realistic core-shell geometries fall behind homogeneous mixture models. An extended model based on a core-shell-shell geometry is proposed and tested. Good agreement is found for total optical cross sections and the asymmetry parameter. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  1. Your Choice at Fourteen Plus. A New Guide for the Fourteen Year-Old.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthew, Veronica; Smith, Michael

    Part of The Careers Research and Advisory Centre Choice Series, this book is written for fourteen year-old or fourteen plus students in England who, for the first time, have a choice in the selection of their school subjects. It covers topics such as decision-making, maintaining a well-balanced educational schedule, and preparing for examinations…

  2. Cheyletiella dermatitis: a report of fourteen cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, B W

    1991-02-01

    Cheyletiella dermatitis is an infrequently reported eruption caused by an ectoparasite whose normal hosts are household pets. Fourteen cases, documented over an eight-year period, are reported. All cases were found in one practice in a small community. Typical patients are female, aged forty years or younger, who experience pruritic papules in the winter months. Cheyletiella dermatitis is not a rare problem.

  3. Particles of spilled oil-absorbing carbon in contact with water

    DOEpatents

    Muradov, Nazim [Melbourne, FL

    2011-03-29

    Hydrogen generator coupled to or integrated with a fuel cell for portable power applications. Hydrogen is produced via thermocatalytic decomposition (cracking, pyrolysis) of hydrocarbon fuels in oxidant-free environment. The apparatus can utilize a variety of hydrocarbon fuels, including natural gas, propane, gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel, crude oil (including sulfurous fuels). The hydrogen-rich gas produced is free of carbon oxides or other reactive impurities, so it could be directly fed to any type of a fuel cell. The catalysts for hydrogen production in the apparatus are carbon-based or metal-based materials and doped, if necessary, with a sulfur-capturing agent. Additionally disclosed are two novel processes for the production of two types of carbon filaments, and a novel filamentous carbon product. Carbon particles with surface filaments having a hydrophobic property of oil film absorption, compositions of matter containing those particles, and a system for using the carbon particles for cleaning oil spills.

  4. Investigation of the Emissivity and Suitability of a Carbon Thin Film for Terahertz Absorbers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    Carbonization In order to verify whether the carbon soot coated THz sensor produces sufficient spectral emissivity for IR-based readout, dummy test...ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) The main goal of this work is to optimize the emissivity of terahertz (THz) thermal sensors by deposition of a carbon thin...film. Previously, these thermal sensors were designed to detect THz radiation utilizing metamaterials in a complicated optical probing scheme. We

  5. Microwave absorption properties of a wave-absorbing coating employing carbonyl-iron powder and carbon black

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lidong; Duan, Yuping; Ma, Lixin; Liu, Shunhua; Yu, Zhen

    2010-11-01

    To prevent serious electromagnetic interference, a single-layer wave-absorbing coating employing complex absorbents composed of carbonyl-iron powder (CIP) and carbon black (CB) with epoxy resin as matrix was prepared. The morphologies of CIP and CB were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), respectively. The electromagnetic parameters of CIP and CB were measured in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz by transmission/reflection technology, and the electromagnetic loss mechanisms of the two particles were discussed, respectively. The microwave absorption properties of the coatings were investigated by measuring reflection loss (RL) using arch method. The effects of CIP ratio, CB content and thickness on the microwave absorption properties were discussed, respectively. The results showed that the higher thickness, CIP or CB content could make the absorption band shift towards the lower frequency range. Significantly, the wave-absorbing coating could be applied in different frequency ranges according to actual demand by controlling the content of CIP or CB in composites.

  6. Carbon nanotube scaffolds with controlled porosity as electromagnetic absorbing materials in the gigahertz range.

    PubMed

    González, M; Crespo, M; Baselga, J; Pozuelo, J

    2016-05-19

    Control of the microscopic structure of CNT nanocomposites allows modulation of the electromagnetic shielding in the gigahertz range. The porosity of CNT scaffolds has been controlled by two freezing protocols and a subsequent lyophilization step: fast freezing in liquid nitrogen and slow freezing at -20 °C. Mercury porosimetry shows that slowly frozen specimens present a more open pore size (100-150 μm) with a narrow distribution whereas specimens frozen rapidly show a smaller pore size and a heterogeneous distribution. 3D-scaffolds containing 3, 4, 6 and 7% CNT were infiltrated with epoxy and specimens with 2, 5 and 8 mm thicknesses were characterized in the GHz range. Samples with the highest pore size and porosity presented the lowest reflected power (about 30%) and the highest absorbed power (about 70%), which allows considering them as electromagnetic radiation absorbing materials.

  7. 40 CFR 63.990 - Absorbers, condensers, and carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... adsorber is used, an integrating regeneration stream flow monitoring device having an accuracy of ±10 percent or better, capable of recording the total regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording the carbon bed...

  8. 40 CFR 63.990 - Absorbers, condensers, and carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... adsorber is used, an integrating regeneration stream flow monitoring device having an accuracy of ±10 percent or better, capable of recording the total regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording the carbon bed...

  9. 40 CFR 63.990 - Absorbers, condensers, and carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... adsorber is used, an integrating regeneration stream flow monitoring device having an accuracy of ±10 percent or better, capable of recording the total regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording the carbon bed...

  10. 40 CFR 63.990 - Absorbers, condensers, and carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... adsorber is used, an integrating regeneration stream flow monitoring device having an accuracy of ±10 percent or better, capable of recording the total regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording the carbon bed...

  11. 40 CFR 63.990 - Absorbers, condensers, and carbon adsorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... adsorber is used, an integrating regeneration stream flow monitoring device having an accuracy of ±10 percent or better, capable of recording the total regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording the carbon bed...

  12. Low threshold L-band mode-locked ultrafast fiber laser assisted by microfiber-based carbon nanotube saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, K. Y.; Ng, E. K.; Abu Bakar, M. H.; Abas, A. F.; Alresheedi, M. T.; Yusoff, Z.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate a passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser in L-band wavelength region with low mode-locking threshold employing a 1425 nm pump wavelength. The mode-locking regime is generated by microfiber-based saturable absorber using carbon nanotube-polymer composite in a ring cavity. This carbon nanotube saturable absorber shows saturation intensity of 9 MW/cm2. In this work, mode-locking laser threshold is observed at 36.4 mW pump power. At the maximum pump power of 107.6 mW, we obtain pulse duration at full-width half-maximum point of 490 fs and time bandwidth product of 0.33, which corresponds to 3-dB spectral bandwidth of 5.8 nm. The pulse repetition rate remains constant throughout the experiment at 5.8 MHz due to fixed cavity length of 35.5 m. Average output power and pulse energy of 10.8 mW and 1.92 nJ are attained respectively through a 30% laser output extracted from the mode-locked cavity. This work highlights the feasibility of attaining a low threshold mode-locked laser source to be employed as seed laser in L-band wavelength region.

  13. Reducing uncertainties associated with filter-based optical measurements of light absorbing carbon particles with chemical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engström, J. E.; Leck, C.

    2011-08-01

    The presented filter-based optical method for determination of soot (light absorbing carbon or Black Carbon, BC) can be implemented in the field under primitive conditions and at low cost. This enables researchers with small economical means to perform monitoring at remote locations, especially in the Asia where it is much needed. One concern when applying filter-based optical measurements of BC is that they suffer from systematic errors due to the light scattering of non-absorbing particles co-deposited on the filter, such as inorganic salts and mineral dust. In addition to an optical correction of the non-absorbing material this study provides a protocol for correction of light scattering based on the chemical quantification of the material, which is a novelty. A newly designed photometer was implemented to measure light transmission on particle accumulating filters, which includes an additional sensor recording backscattered light. The choice of polycarbonate membrane filters avoided high chemical blank values and reduced errors associated with length of the light path through the filter. Two protocols for corrections were applied to aerosol samples collected at the Maldives Climate Observatory Hanimaadhoo during episodes with either continentally influenced air from the Indian/Arabian subcontinents (winter season) or pristine air from the Southern Indian Ocean (summer monsoon). The two ways of correction (optical and chemical) lowered the particle light absorption of BC by 63 to 61 %, respectively, for data from the Arabian Sea sourced group, resulting in median BC absorption coefficients of 4.2 and 3.5 Mm-1. Corresponding values for the South Indian Ocean data were 69 and 97 % (0.38 and 0.02 Mm-1). A comparison with other studies in the area indicated an overestimation of their BC levels, by up to two orders of magnitude. This raises the necessity for chemical correction protocols on optical filter-based determinations of BC, before even the sign on the

  14. Method 415.3, Rev. 1.2: Determination of Total Organic Carbon and Specific UV Absorbance at 254 nm in Source Water and Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    This method provides procedures for the determination of total organic carbon (TOC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and UV absorption at 254 nm (UVA) in source waters and drinking waters. The DOC and UVA determinations are used in the calculation of the Specific UV Absorbance (S...

  15. Carbon nanotube scaffolds with controlled porosity as electromagnetic absorbing materials in the gigahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M.; Crespo, M.; Baselga, J.; Pozuelo, J.

    2016-05-01

    Control of the microscopic structure of CNT nanocomposites allows modulation of the electromagnetic shielding in the gigahertz range. The porosity of CNT scaffolds has been controlled by two freezing protocols and a subsequent lyophilization step: fast freezing in liquid nitrogen and slow freezing at -20 °C. Mercury porosimetry shows that slowly frozen specimens present a more open pore size (100-150 μm) with a narrow distribution whereas specimens frozen rapidly show a smaller pore size and a heterogeneous distribution. 3D-scaffolds containing 3, 4, 6 and 7% CNT were infiltrated with epoxy and specimens with 2, 5 and 8 mm thicknesses were characterized in the GHz range. Samples with the highest pore size and porosity presented the lowest reflected power (about 30%) and the highest absorbed power (about 70%), which allows considering them as electromagnetic radiation absorbing materials.Control of the microscopic structure of CNT nanocomposites allows modulation of the electromagnetic shielding in the gigahertz range. The porosity of CNT scaffolds has been controlled by two freezing protocols and a subsequent lyophilization step: fast freezing in liquid nitrogen and slow freezing at -20 °C. Mercury porosimetry shows that slowly frozen specimens present a more open pore size (100-150 μm) with a narrow distribution whereas specimens frozen rapidly show a smaller pore size and a heterogeneous distribution. 3D-scaffolds containing 3, 4, 6 and 7% CNT were infiltrated with epoxy and specimens with 2, 5 and 8 mm thicknesses were characterized in the GHz range. Samples with the highest pore size and porosity presented the lowest reflected power (about 30%) and the highest absorbed power (about 70%), which allows considering them as electromagnetic radiation absorbing materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Scheme of hydrogenated derivative of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (HDGEBA) and m-xylylenediamine; X-ray diffractograms of pristine CNT

  16. Remote sensing of soot carbon - Part 1: Distinguishing different absorbing aerosol species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, G. L.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a method of using the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) size distributions and complex refractive indices to retrieve the relative proportion of carbonaceous aerosols and free iron minerals (hematite and goethite). We assume that soot carbon has a spectrally flat refractive index and enhanced imaginary indices at the 440 nm wavelength are caused by brown carbon or hematite. Carbonaceous aerosols can be separated from dust in imaginary refractive index space because 95 % of biomass burning aerosols have imaginary indices greater than 0.0042 at the 675-1020 nm wavelengths, and 95 % of dust has imaginary refractive indices of less than 0.0042 at those wavelengths. However, mixtures of these two types of particles can not be unambiguously partitioned on the basis of optical properties alone, so we also separate these particles by size. Regional and seasonal results are consistent with expectations. Monthly climatologies of fine mode soot carbon are less than 1.0 % by volume for West Africa and the Middle East, but the southern African and South American biomass burning sites have peak values of 3.0 and 1.7 %. Monthly averaged fine mode brown carbon volume fractions have a peak value of 5.8 % for West Africa, 2.1 % for the Middle East, 3.7 % for southern Africa, and 5.7 % for South America. Monthly climatologies of free iron volume fractions show little seasonal variability, and range from about 1.1 to 1.7 % for coarse mode aerosols in all four study regions. Finally, our sensitivity study indicates that the soot carbon retrieval is not sensitive to the component refractive indices or densities assumed for carbonaceous and free iron aerosols, and the retrieval differs by only 15.4 % when these parameters are altered from our chosen baseline values. The total uncertainty of retrieving soot carbon mass is ˜ 50 % (when uncertainty in the AERONET product and mixing state is included in the analysis).

  17. Fingerprinting Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) Sources with Specific UV Absorbance (SUVA) and Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Verseveld, W. J.; Lajtha, K.; McDonnell, J. J.

    2007-12-01

    DOC is an important water quality constituent because it is an important food source for stream biota, it plays a significant role in metal toxicity and transport, and protects aquatic organisms by absorbing visible and UV light. However, sources of stream DOC and changes in DOC quality at storm and seasonal scales remain poorly understood. We characterized DOC concentrations and SUVA (as an indicator of aromaticity) at the plot, hillslope and catchment scale during and between five storm events over the period Fall 2004 until Spring 2005, in WS10, H.J. Andrews, Oregon, USA. This study site has hillslopes that issue directly into the stream. This enabled us to compare a trenched hillslope response to the stream response without the influence of a riparian zone. The main result of this study was that SUVA in addition to DOC was needed to fingerprint sources of DOC. Stream water and lateral subsurface flow showed a clockwise DOC and SUVA hysteresis pattern. Both organic horizon water and transient groundwater were characterized by high DOC concentrations and SUVA values, while DOC concentrations and SUVA values in soil water decreased with depth in the soil profile. This indicates transient groundwater was an important contributor to high DOC concentrations and SUVA values during storm events. During the falling limb of the hydrograph deep soil water and seepage groundwater based on SUVA values contributed significantly to lateral subsurface flow and stream water. Preliminary results showed that fluorescence of stream water and lateral subsurface flow continuously measured with a fluorometer was significantly related to UV-absorbance during a December storm event. Finally, SUVA of lateral subsurface flow was lower than SUVA of stream water at the seasonal scale, indicating a difference in mixing of water sources at the hillslope and catchment scale. Overall, our results show that SUVA and fluorescence are useful tracers for fingerprinting DOC sources.

  18. Revealing the nature of morphological changes in carbon nanotube-polymer saturable absorber under high-power laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chernysheva, Maria; Araimi, Mohammed Al; Rance, Graham A; Weston, Nicola J; Shi, Baogui; Saied, Sayah; Sullivan, John L; Marsh, Nicholas; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2018-05-10

    Composites of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and water-soluble polymers (WSP) are the focus of significant worldwide research due to a number of applications in biotechnology and photonics, particularly for ultrashort pulse generation. Despite the unique possibility of constructing non-linear optical SWNT-WSP composites with controlled optical properties, their thermal degradation threshold and limit of operational power remain unexplored. In this study, we discover the nature of the SWNT-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) film thermal degradation and evaluate the modification of the composite properties under continuous high-power ultrashort pulse laser operation. Using high-precision optical microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy, we have examined SWNT-PVA films before and after continuous laser radiation exposure (up to 40 hours) with a maximum optical fluence of 2.3 mJ·cm -2 . We demonstrate that high-intensity laser radiation results in measurable changes in the composition and morphology of the SWNT-PVA film due to efficient heat transfer from SWNTs to the polymer matrix. The saturable absorber modification does not affect the laser operational performance. We anticipate our work to be a starting point for more sophisticated research aimed at the enhancement of SWNT-PVA films fabrication for their operation as reliable saturable absorbers in high-power ultrafast lasers.

  19. Radiative Absorption by Light Absorbing Carbon: Uncertainty, Temporal and Spatial Variation in a Typical Polluted City in Yangtze River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Zhao, Y.; Lyu, R.

    2017-12-01

    The optical properties of light absorbing carbon (LAC) in atmospheric aerosols, including their uncertainties, temporal change and spatial pattern were studied at suburban, urban and industrial sites in Nanjing, a typical polluted city in Yangtze River Delta (YRD). The optical properties of black carbon (BC) and the uncertainty in radiative absorption of BC were quantified combining cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) and thermal-optical techniques. It was found that applying a constant value from previous studies for multiple scattering factor could not well represent the actual absorption characteristics of aerosols in Nanjing. The relative deviation between calculated and measured absorption coefficient of BC was up to 56 ± 34%. A significant positive correlation (R2=0.95) was found between multiple scattering factor (C*) and the mixing state of EC (ECopt/EC) within the ECopt/EC ranged 0.43 0.92 (C*=1.64(ECopt/EC)+1.47, 0.43opt/EC<0.57; C*=6.42(ECopt/EC)-1.39, 0.57opt/EC<0.92). However, C* were not linearly correlated with ECopt/EC when the ratios were below 0.43 or above 0.92. The content of isoprene from biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) was higher in summer (5.8%) than that in autumn (0.5%). Brown carbon (BrC) associated with anthropogenic precursors was stronger in light absorption than that from biogenic sources, thus precursors of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was probably the main reason for seasonal variation in MAE of BrC. At industrial site, linear positive correlation (R=0.87) was found between measured MSOC and secondary organic carbon (SOC), suggesting SOA formation was the major source of MSOC in this area. The lower MAE values of MSOC indicated that BrC generated from secondary sources might demonstrate weaker light absorbing ability than that from primary emissions. Furthermore, quantitative analysis showed that MAE BrC, 365 reduced by 0.26 m2/g when SOC increased by 1μgC/m3. This study provided insights into a more comprehensive

  20. Development Radar Absorber Material using Rice Husk Carbon for Anechoic Chamber Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulpadrianto, Z.; Yohandri, Y.; Putra, A.

    2018-04-01

    The developments of radar technology in Indonesia are very strategic due to the vast territory and had a high-level cloud cover more than 55% of the time. The objective of this research is to develop radar technology facility in Indonesia using local natural resources. The target of this research is to present a low cost and satisfy quality of anechoic chambers. Anechoic chamber is a space designed to avoid reflection of EM waves from outside or from within the room. The reflection coefficient of the EM wave is influenced by the medium imposed by the EM wave. In laboratory experimental research has been done the development of material radar absorber using rice husk. The rice husk is activated using HCl and KOH by stirring using a magnetic stirrer for 1 Hours. The results of rice husk activation were measured using a Vector Network Analyzer by varying the thickness of the ingredients and the concentration of the activation agent. The VNA measurement is obtained reflection coefficient of -12dB and. -6.22dB for 1M HCL and KOH at thickness 10mm, respectively.

  1. Hollow mesoporous carbon as a near-infrared absorbing carrier compared with mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for chemo-photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian; Yan, Yue; Lin, Yuanzhe; Jiao, Jian; Wang, Da; Di, Donghua; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Tongying; Zhao, Qinfu; Wang, Siling

    2017-05-15

    In this study, hollow mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (HMCN) and mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (MCN) were used as near-infrared region (NIR) nanomaterials and drug nanocarriers were prepared using different methods. A comparison between HMCN and MCN was performed with regard to the NIR-induced photothermal effect and drug loading efficiency. The results of NIR-induced photothermal effect test demonstrated that HMCN-COOH had a better photothermal conversion efficacy than MCN-COOH. Given the prominent photothermal effect of HMCN-COOH in vitro, the chemotherapeutic drug DOX was chosen as a model drug to further evaluate the drug loading efficiencies and NIR-triggered drug release behaviors of the nanocarriers. The drug loading efficiency of DOX/HMCN-COOH was found to be up to 76.9%, which was higher than that of DOX/MCN-COOH. In addition, the use of an 808nm NIR laser markedly increased the release of DOX from both carbon carriers in pH 5.0 PBS and pH 7.4 PBS. Cellular photothermal tests involving A549 cells demonstrated that HMCN-COOH had a much higher photothermal efficacy than MCN-COOH. Cell viability experiments and flow cytometry were performed to evaluate the therapeutic effect of DOX/HMCN-COOH and the results obtained demonstrated that DOX/HMCN-COOH had a synergistic therapeutic effect in cancer treatment involving a combination of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hydrocarbon pyrolysis reactor experimentation and modeling for the production of solar absorbing carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederickson, Lee Thomas

    Much of combustion research focuses on reducing soot particulates in emissions. However, current research at San Diego State University (SDSU) Combustion and Solar Energy Laboratory (CSEL) is underway to develop a high temperature solar receiver which will utilize carbon nanoparticles as a solar absorption medium. To produce carbon nanoparticles for the small particle heat exchange receiver (SPHER), a lab-scale carbon particle generator (CPG) has been built and tested. The CPG is a heated ceramic tube reactor with a set point wall temperature of 1100-1300°C operating at 5-6 bar pressure. Natural gas and nitrogen are fed to the CPG where natural gas undergoes pyrolysis resulting in carbon particles. The gas-particle mixture is met downstream with dilution air and sent to the lab scale solar receiver. To predict soot yield and general trends in CPG performance, a model has been setup in Reaction Design CHEMKIN-PRO software. One of the primary goals of this research is to accurately measure particle properties. Mean particle diameter, size distribution, and index of refraction are calculated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and a Diesel Particulate Scatterometer (DPS). Filter samples taken during experimentation are analyzed to obtain a particle size distribution with SEM images processed in ImageJ software. These results are compared with the DPS, which calculates the particle size distribution and the index of refraction from light scattering using Mie theory. For testing with the lab scale receiver, a particle diameter range of 200-500 nm is desired. Test conditions are varied to understand effects of operating parameters on particle size and the ability to obtain the size range. Analysis of particle loading is the other important metric for this research. Particle loading is measured downstream of the CPG outlet and dilution air mixing point. The air-particle mixture flows through an extinction tube where opacity of the mixture is measured with a 532 nm

  3. UV-visible absorbance spectroscopy as a proxy for peatland dissolved organic carbon (DOC) quantity and quality: considerations on wavelength and absorbance degradation.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Mike; Evans, Chris D; Fenner, Nathalie; Freeman, Chris; Gough, Rachel; Jones, Timothy G; Lebron, Inma

    2014-05-01

    Absorbance in the UV or visible spectrum (UV-vis) is commonly used as a proxy for DOC concentrations in waters draining upland catchments. To determine the appropriateness of different UV-vis measurements we used surface and pore water samples from two Welsh peatlands in four different experiments: (i) an assessment of single wavelength proxies (1 nm increments between 230-800 nm) for DOC concentration demonstrated that 254 nm was more accurate than 400 nm. The highest R(2) values between absorbance and DOC concentration were generated using 263 nm for one sample set (R(2) = 0.91), and 230 nm for the other three sample sets (respective R(2) values of 0.86, 0.81, and 0.93). (ii) A comparison of different DOC concentration proxies, including single wavelength proxies, a two wavelength model, a proxy using phenolic concentration, and a proxy using the area under a UV spectrum at 250-350 nm. It was found that both a single wavelength proxy (≤263 nm) and a two wavelength model performed well for both pore water and surface water. (iii) An evaluation of the E2 : E3, E2 : E4, E4 : E6 ratios, and SUVA (absorbance at 254 nm normalised to DOC concentration) as indicators of DOC quality showed that the E4 : E6 ratio was subject to extensive variation over time, and was highly correlated between surface water and pore water, suggesting that it is a useful metric to determine temporal changes in DOC quality. (iv) A repeated weekly analysis over twelve weeks showed no consistent change in UV-vis absorbance, and therefore an inferred lack of degradation of total DOC in samples that were filtered and stored in the dark at 4 °C.

  4. Low temperature preparation of highly fluorinated multiwalled carbon nanotubes activated by Fe3O4 towards enhanced microwave absorbing property.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yichun; Zhang, Cheng; Huang, Benyuan; Li, Yulong; Lai, Wenchuan; Wang, Xu; Liu, Xiangyang

    2018-06-11

    Conventional approach to preparation highly fluorinated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) always need high temperature. This paper presents a catalytic tactic realizing effective fluorination of MWNCTs at room temperature (RT). Fe3O4@MWCNTs composites with Fe3O4 loaded on MWCNTs were firstly prepared through solvothermal method, which is followed by fluorination treatment at RT. The attachment of Fe3O4 changes the charge distribution and dramatically improves the fluorination activity of MWCNTs. Consequently, the fluorine content of fluorinated Fe3O4@MWCNTs (F-Fe3O4@MWCNTs) can reach up to 17.13 at% (almost 6 times that of the unloaded sample) only after room temperature of fluorination, which lead to obvious decrease of permittivity. Besides, the partial fluorination of Fe3O4 brings about abnormal enhanced permeability due to strengthened exchange resonance. Benefiting from the lower permittivity and higher permeability, F-Fe3O4@CNTs composite exhibit increased impedance matching. As a result, F-Fe3O4@CNTs behave good microwave absorption property with minimal reflection loss -45 dB at 2.61 mm when filler content is 13 wt%. The efficient absorption bandwidth (<-10 dB) reaches 4.1 GHz when the thickness is 2.5 mm. This work illustrates a novel catalytic approach to prepare highly fluorinated MWCNTs as promising microwave absorbers, and the design concept can also be extended to the fluorination of other carbon materials. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  5. Properties of black carbon and other insoluble light-absorbing particles in seasonal snow of northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Wei; Wang, Xin; Wei, Hailun; Zhou, Yue; Shi, Jinsen; Hu, Zhiyuan; Jin, Hongchun; Chen, Quanliang

    2017-05-01

    A large field campaign was conducted and 284 snow samples were collected at 38 sites in Xinjiang Province and 6 sites in Qinghai Province across northwestern China from January to February 2012. A spectrophotometer combined with chemical analysis was used to measure the insoluble light-absorbing particles (ILAPs) and chemical components in seasonal snow. The results indicate that the cleanest snow was found in northeastern Xinjiang along the border of China, and it presented an estimated black carbon (CBCest) of approximately 5 ng g-1. The dirtiest snow presented a CBCest of approximately 450 ng g-1 near industrial cities in Xinjiang. Overall, the CBCest of most of the snow samples collected in this campaign was in the range of 10-150 ng g-1. Vertical variations in the snowpack ILAPs indicated a probable shift in emission sources with the progression of winter. An analysis of the fractional contributions to absorption implied that organic carbon (OC) dominated the 450 nm absorption in Qinghai, while the contributions from BC and OC were comparable in Xinjiang. Finally, a positive matrix factorization (PMF) model was run to explore the sources of particulate light absorption, and the results indicated an optimal three-factor/source solution that included industrial pollution, biomass burning, and soil dust.

  6. ACOSS Fourteen (Active Control of Space Structures)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    M ^^^——^^^^ ACOSS FOURTEEN (ACTIVE CONTROL OF SPACE STRUCTURES) Robert J . Benhabib Henry K. Flashner Frank C. Tung Contractor: TRW...PMJILUIJIJ.IIJIIIJI’I.I J I ! ’i-’-ummwmwMu», "»,-’■ m «mpiiw WJPWI» on UJ <_) O cc Q- (_1 a o a. oo I 5 < 3 in ai c 0 in LU c...1 S- s_ a: 1^3 >+- 𔃺 c ■ ^—v O) 0) OJ >—< ( J M - C r? s- s- T3 OO 0 E ■f— a. O S- +.) i i. 0) 0 OJ 03 c _a OJ cn =3 O e 3 01

  7. Spotting high-z molecular absorbers using neutral carbon. Results from a complete spectroscopic survey with the VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noterdaeme, P.; Ledoux, C.; Zou, S.; Petitjean, P.; Srianand, R.; Balashev, S.; López, S.

    2018-04-01

    While molecular quasar absorption systems provide unique probes of the physical and chemical properties of the gas as well as original constraints on fundamental physics and cosmology, their detection remains challenging. Here we present the results from a complete survey for molecular gas in thirty-nine absorption systems selected solely upon the detection of neutral carbon lines in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra, without any prior knowledge of the atomic or molecular gas content. H2 is found in all twelve systems (including seven new detections) where the corresponding lines are covered by the instrument setups and measured to have logN(H2) ≳ 18, indicating a self-shielded regime. We also report seven CO detections (7/39) down to logN(CO) 13.5, including a new one, and put stringent constraints on N(CO) for the remaining 32 systems. N(CO) and N(C I) are found to be strongly correlated with N(CO)/N(C I) 1/10. This suggests that the C I-selected absorber population is probing gas deeper than the H I–H2 transition in which a substantial fraction of the total hydrogen in the cloud is in the form of H2. We conclude that targeting C I-bearing absorbers is a very efficient way to find high-metallicity molecular absorbers. However, probing the molecular content in lower-metallicity regimes as well as high-column-density neutral gas remains to be undertaken to unravel the processes of gas conversion in normal high-z galaxies. Based on observations and archival data from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) prog. IDs 060.A-9024, 072.A-0346, 278.A-5062, 080.A-0482, 080.A-0795, 081.A-0242, 081.A-0334, 082.A-0544, 082.A-0569, 083.A-0454, 084.A-0699, 086.A-0074 and 086.A-0643 using the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) and X-shooter at the Very Large Telescope (VLT), on Cerro Paranal, Chile.

  8. Characterization of metal oxide absorbents for regenerative carbon dioxide and water vapor removal for advanced portable life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kast, Timothy P.; Nacheff-Benedict, Maurena S.; Chang, Craig H.; Cusick, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Characterization of the performance of a silver-oxide-based absorbent in terms of its ability to remove both gaseous CO2 and water vapor in an astronaut portable life support systems (PLSS) is discussed. Attention is focused on regeneration of the absorbent from the carbonite state of the oxide state, preconditioning of the absorbent using a humidified gas stream, and absorption breakthrough testing. Based on the results of bench-scale experiments, a test plan is carried out to further characterize the silver-oxide-based absorbent on a larger scale; it calls for examination of the absorbent in both an adiabatic packed bed and a near-isothermal cooled bed configuration. It is demonstrated that the tested absorbent can be utilized in a way that removes substantial amounts of CO2 and water vapor during an 8-hour extravehicular activity mission, and that applying the absorbent to PLSS applications can simplify the ventilation loop.

  9. In Situ Preparation of Cobalt Nanoparticles Decorated in N-Doped Carbon Nanofibers as Excellent Electromagnetic Wave Absorbers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huihui; Li, Yajing; Yuan, Mengwei; Sun, Genban; Li, Huifeng; Ma, Shulan; Liao, Qingliang; Zhang, Yue

    2018-06-21

    Electrospinning and annealing methods are applied to prepare cobalt nanoparticles decorated in N-doped carbon nanofibers (Co/N-C NFs) with solid and macroporous structures. In detail, the nanocomposites are synthesized by carbonization of as-electrospun polyacrylonitrile/cobalt acetylacetonate nanofibers in an argon atmosphere. The solid Co/N-C NFs have lengths up to dozens of microns with an average diameter of ca. 500 nm and possess abundant cobalt nanoparticles on both the surface and within the fibers, and the cobalt nanoparticle size is about 20 nm. The macroporous Co/N-C NFs possess a hierarchical pore structure, and there are macropores (500 nm) and mesopores (2-50 nm) existing in this material. The saturation magnetization ( M s ) and coercivity ( H c ) of the solid Co/N-C NFs are 28.4 emu g -1 and 661 Oe, respectively, and those of the macroporous Co/N-C NFs are 23.3 emu g -1 and 580 Oe, respectively. The solid Co/N-C NFs exhibit excellent electromagnetic wave absorbability, and a minimum reflection loss (RL) value of -25.7 dB is achieved with a matching thickness of 2 mm for solid Co/N-C NFs when the filler loading is 5 wt %, and the effective bandwidth (RL ≤ -10 dB) is 4.3 GHz. Moreover, the effective microwave absorption can be achieved in the whole range of 1-18 GHz by adjusting the thickness of the sample layer and content of the dopant sample.

  10. X Ray Mask Of Gold-Carbon Mixture Absorber On BCN Compound Substrate Fabricated By Plasma Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiyer, Chandrasekhar R.; Itoh, Satoshi; Yamada, Hitomi; Morita, Shinzo; Hattori, Shuzo

    1988-06-01

    X-ray mask fabrication based on BCN compound membrane and gold containing polymeric carbon ( Au-C ) absorber by totally dry processes is proposed. The Au-C films were depo-sited by plasma polymerization of propylene or styrene monomers and co-evaporation of gold. These films have 2 to 5 times higher etching rate than that of pure gold for 09 RIE, depending on the Au content. The stress in the films could be reduced to 1.9 E 7 N/m2 by annealing. The BCN films were deposited on silicon wafers by rf (13.56 MHz) plasma CVD with diborane, methane and nitrogen as source gases at typical deposition rate of 30 nm/min. The optical (633nm) and X ray (Pd L~) transparencies were nearly 80% for film thickness of 6 um. Patterning of Au-C was achieved by using tungsten as intermediate layer and PMMA electron beam resist. CF4 RIE was used to etch the tungsten layer which in turn acted as mask for the gold carbide 02 RIE. The process parameters and the characteristics of the Au-C and BCN films are presented.

  11. High-power Q-switched erbium-ytterbium codoped fiber laser using multiwalled carbon nanotubes saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ab Razak, Mohd Zulhakimi; Saleh, Zatul Saliza; Ahmad, Fauzan; Anyi, Carol Livan; Harun, Sulaiman W.; Arof, Hamzah

    2016-10-01

    Due to an enormous potential of pulsed lasers in applications such as manufacturing, metrology, environmental sensing, and biomedical diagnostics, a high-power and stable Q-switched erbium-ytterbium codoped double-clad fiber laser (EYDFL) incorporating of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) saturable absorber (SA) made based on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) with a 3∶2 ratio is demonstrated. The SA was fabricated by mixing a dilute PVA solution with an MWCNTs homogeneous solution. Subsequently, the mixture was sonicated and centrifuged to produce a homogeneous suspension that was left to dry at room temperature to form the MWCNTs-PVA film. The SA was formed by inserting the film between a pair of FC/PC fiber connectors. Then, it was integrated into the EYDFL's ring cavity, which uses a 5-m-long erbium-ytterbium codoped fiber (EYDF). The lasing threshold for the Q-switched EYDFL was at 330 mW. At the maximum available pump power of 900 mW, the proposed EYDFL produced Q-switched pulses with a repetition rate of 74.85 kHz, pulsewidth of ˜3.6 μs, and an average output power of about 5 mW. The maximum energy per pulse of ˜85 nJ was obtained at pump power of ˜700 mW with peak power of 21 mW.

  12. Utilization of waste bittern from saltern as a source for magnesium and an absorbent for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Na, Choon-Ki; Park, Hyunju; Jho, Eun Hea

    2017-10-01

    During solar salt production, large quantities of bittern, a liquid by-product containing high inorganic substance concentrations, are produced. The purpose of this research was to examine the utilization of waste bittern generated from salterns as a source for Mg production and as an absorbent for carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture. The study was conducted in a sequential two-step process. At NaOH/Mg molar ratios of 2.70-2.75 and pH 9.5-10.0, > 99% Mg precipitation from the bittern was achieved. After washing with water, 100-120 g/L of precipitate containing 94% Mg(OH) 2 was recovered from the bittern. At the optimum NH 4 OH concentration of 5%, 120 g of sodium bicarbonate precipitate per liter of bittern were recovered, which was equivalent to 63 g CO 2 captured per liter of bittern. These results can be used to support the use of bittern as a resource and reduce economic losses during solar salt production.

  13. Sub-200 femtosecond dispersion-managed soliton ytterbium-doped fiber laser based on carbon nanotubes saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lei; Guo, Hongyu; Wang, Yonggang; Sun, Jiang; Lin, Qimeng; Bai, Yang; Bai, Jintao

    2018-04-02

    Ultrafast fiber laser light sources attract enormous interest due to the booming applications they are enabling, including long-distance communication, optical metrology, detecting technology of infra-biophotons, and novel material processing. In this paper, we demonstrate 175 fs dispersion-managed soliton (DMS) mode-locked ytterbium-doped fiber (YDF) laser based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) saturable absorber (SA). The output DMSs have been achieved with repetition rate of 21.2 MHz, center wavelength of 1025.5 nm, and a spectral width of 32.7 nm. The operation directly pulse duration of 300 fs for generated pulse is the reported shortest pulse width for broadband SA based YDF lasers. By using an external grating-based compressor, the pulse duration could be compressed down to 175 fs. To the best of our knowledge, it is the shortest pulse duration obtained directly from YDF laser based on broadband SAs. In this paper, SWCNTs-SA has been utilized as the key optical component (mode locker) and the grating pair providing negative dispersion acts as the dispersion controller.

  14. Carbon Dioxide Absorbents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1950-05-17

    boiling points should be investigated to dotermine the effect of certain structures on the behavior of amines. Only amines which are commercially...ALKANOL ALIPHATIC AMINIES (Contd.) Alkanol Tertiary Amines 141 2-Dinaethylethanolamine (CH3 )2N02 1401 142 2- Diethylethanolamine (02115) 2N0C2 40 143... Diethylethanolamine (C2115)2NC2 1401 143 Triethanolamine (C211401),3N- 144 Ethyl Diethanolamine C2H5N(C2 1401)2 145 Methyl Diethanolamine CH3N(C H401)9

  15. [Presence of the trace elements from carbon dioxide absorbent containing lime using a circular apparatus during general anesthesia. ].

    PubMed

    Macheta, A; Słodowski, W; Kocot, M; Muszyński, T; Rokita, E; Andres, J

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate release of the trace elements from carbon dioxide absorbent containing soda lime during general anesthesia. We compared two suppliers Polish "Polfa" and German "Dräger". Following trace elements were evaluated: chromium, copper, zinc, cadmium, lead, nickel in soda lime. In blood of the patients we evaluated: copper, zinc, lead, cadmium, bromine, rubidium, iron, mercury. Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was used to measure concentrations of the elements. Probes of soda lime were analyzed before anesthesia (Polfa, Dräger), 6 hr after the use (Polfa only) and after 10 weeks (Dräger only). 10 patients were divided in two equal groups, one was anesthetized using soda lime from Polfa and another one from Dräger. Blood samples were taken before anesthesia, immediately after and the next day. Mean values of the concentrations of the elements in soda lime coming from Polfa ranged from 0.20 ppm (nickel) to 7.19 ppm (zinc). In Dräger the measurements were from 0.22 ppm (nickel) to 3.70 ppm (zinc). Mean concentrations of trace elements in blood samples were between 0.20 ppm (lead) and 487 ppm (iron) for the patients anesthetized with Polfa soda lime. In Dräger the measurements ranged from 0.15 ppm (lead) to 485 ppm (iron). Concentrations of cadmium and mercury were below the method's limit. Mean values were almost the same in all time points. Statistical analysis was done using paired t-tests. Values of P < 0.05 were consider significant. We concluded that there were no statistically significant differences between examined groups. Thus, we can say that trace elements were not released from soda lime and concentrations of examined elements in patients' blood were not affected by general anesthesia.

  16. Solar radiation absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.; Whitehead, Harlan D.

    1977-01-01

    Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

  17. Postural stabilizing effect of alfacalcidol and active absorbable algal calcium (AAA Ca) compared with calcium carbonate assessed by computerized posturography.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takuo; Nakamura, Shoji; Ohue, Mutsumi; Fujii, Yoshio; Miyauchi, Akimitsu; Takagi, Yasuyuki; Tsugeno, Hirofumi

    2007-01-01

    Sway and postural instability have drawn attention as a risk factor for osteoporotic fracture, in addition to low bone mineral density (BMD) and poor bone quality. In view of the fracture-reducing effect of alfacalcidol and active absorbable algal calcium (AAA Ca) not readily explained by rather mild increases of BMD, attempts were made to evaluate postural stabilizing effect of alfacalcidol, AAA Ca, and calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) by computerized posturography. Track of the gravity center was analyzed to calculate parameters related to tract length, track range, and track density to express the degree of sway before and after supplementation in 126 subjects ranging in age between 20 and 81 years randomly divided into four groups. Supplementation with AAA Ca containing 900 mg elemental Ca (group A), no calcium (group B), CaCO(3) also containing 900 mg elemental Ca (group C), or alfacalcidol (group D) continued daily for 12 months. For each parameter, the ratio closed eye value/open eye value (Romberg ratio) was calculated to detect aggravation of sway by eye closure. Age, parameters of Ca and P, and proportions of subjects with fracture and those with low BMD showed no marked deviation among the groups. With eyes open, significant decreases of a track range parameter (REC) from group B was noted in groups A (P = 0.0397) and D (P = 0.0296), but not in group C according to multiple comparison by Scheffe, indicating superior postural stabilizing effect of A and D over C. In the first 2 months, a significant fall was already evident in REC from group B in group D (P = 0.0120) with eyes open. Paired comparison of sway parameters before and after supplementation revealed a significant increase of track density parameter (LNGA), indicating sway control efficiency and a significant decrease of REC in groups A and D compared to group B with eyes open. With eyes closed, only group A showed a significant improvement from group B (P = 0.0456; Fig. 1), with a significant

  18. Construction and Passive Q-Switching of a Ring-Cavity Erbium-Doped Fiber Laser Using Carbon Nanotubes as a Saturable Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Austin Murphy

    The purpose of this thesis is to design, build, test, and achieve pulsed operation of a ring-cavity erbium-doped fiber laser using carbon nanotubes as a saturable absorber. The erbium-doped fiber is characterized first, cross-sections are calculated, and the gain value is determined. Subsequently, the ring cavity is constructed and the laser is operated in the continuous wave regime. Much time is then spent trying to characterize and utilize the carbon nanotubes successfully. Many dispersions are made using multiple solvents and dispersing media, various images are taken with both scanning electron and Raman microscopy, and attempts at purification are made. Saturable absorbers are then created both by coating the end facet of a fiber with a dispersion containing carbon nanotubes and by inserting a fabricated poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) polymer composite film between two fiber end facets. Once inserted into the cavity, the saturable absorbers passively Q-switch the laser in three distinct cases. A fiber end facet coating of SWCNTs dispersed into isopropanol produced pulses with duration of 17.45 +/- 0.11 micros and 2.74 +/- 0.14 micros, with repetition rates of 25.36 +/- 0.53 kHz and 37.77 +/- 0.33 kHz, respectively. A second fiber end facet coating of SWCNTs dispersed into dimethylformamide (DMF) produced pulses with duration of 12.28 +/- 1.08 micros and 3.58 +/- 0.12 micros, with repetition rates of 25.13 +/- 0.63 kHz and 26.46 +/- 0.13 kHz, respectively. The PMMA plus SWCNT polymer composite film produced pulses of 0.716 +/- 0.007 micros duration and 142.8 +/- 1 kHz repetition rate.

  19. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Hamby, Jr., Clyde; Akerman, M. Alfred; Seals, Roland D.

    1993-01-01

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000.degree. C. to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm.sup.3.

  20. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Hamby, C. Jr.; Akerman, M.A.; Seals, R.D.

    1993-09-07

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, is prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000 C to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm[sup 3]. 9 figures.

  1. Uphill energy transfer from long-wavelength absorbing chlorophylls to PS II in Ostreobium sp. is functional in carbon assimilation.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Christian; Jakob, Torsten

    2006-03-01

    From the algal genus Ostrobium two species are known which express a chlorophyll antenna absorbing between 710 and 725 nm to a different extent. In a comparative study with these two species it is shown that quanta absorbed by this long wavelength antenna can be transferred to PS II leading to significant PS II-related electron transfer. It is documented that under monochromatic far red light illumination growth continues with rather high efficiency. The data show that the uphill-energy transfer to PS II reduces the quantum yield under white light significantly. It is discussed that this strategy of energy conversion might play a role in special environments where far red light is the predominant energy source.

  2. 40 CFR 65.153 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers, and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., an organic monitoring device capable of providing a continuous record, or an integrating regeneration... regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle, and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device capable of recording the carbon-bed temperature after each regeneration and within 15...

  3. 40 CFR 65.153 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers, and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., an organic monitoring device capable of providing a continuous record, or an integrating regeneration... regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle, and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device capable of recording the carbon-bed temperature after each regeneration and within 15...

  4. 40 CFR 65.153 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers, and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., an organic monitoring device capable of providing a continuous record, or an integrating regeneration... regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle, and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device capable of recording the carbon-bed temperature after each regeneration and within 15...

  5. 40 CFR 65.153 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers, and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., an organic monitoring device capable of providing a continuous record, or an integrating regeneration... regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle, and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device capable of recording the carbon-bed temperature after each regeneration and within 15...

  6. 40 CFR 65.153 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers, and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., an organic monitoring device capable of providing a continuous record, or an integrating regeneration... regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle, and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device capable of recording the carbon-bed temperature after each regeneration and within 15...

  7. METHOD 415.3 - MEASUREMENT OF TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON, DISSOLVED ORGANIC CARBON AND SPECIFIC UV ABSORBANCE AT 254 NM IN SOURCE WATER AND DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    2.0 SUMMARY OF METHOD

    2.1 In both TOC and DOC determinations, organic carbon in the water sample is oxidized to form carbon dioxide (CO2), which is then measured by a detection system. There are two different approaches for the oxidation of organic carbon in water sample...

  8. Three-Dimensional Hierarchical MoS2 Nanosheets/Ultralong N-Doped Carbon Nanotubes as High-Performance Electromagnetic Wave Absorbing Material.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lianlian; Zhang, Shen; Yan, Feng; Li, Chunyan; Zhu, Chunling; Zhang, Xitian; Chen, Yujin

    2018-04-25

    Here, we report a simple method to grow thin MoS 2 nanosheets (NSs) on the ultralong nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes through anion-exchange reaction. The MoS 2 NSs are grown on ultralong nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube surfaces, leading to an interesting three-dimensional hierarchical structure. The fabricated hybrid nanotubes have a length of approximately 100 μm, where the MoS 2 nanosheets have a thickness of less than 7.5 nm. The hybrid nanotubes show excellent electromagnetic wave attenuation performance, with the effective absorption bandwidth of 5.4 GHz at the thicknesses of 2.5 mm, superior to the pure MoS 2 nanosheets and the MoS 2 nanosheets grown on the short N-doped carbon nanotube surfaces. The experimental results indicate that the direct growth of MoS 2 on the ultralong nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube surfaces is a key factor for the enhanced electromagnetic wave attenuation property. The results open the avenue for the development of ultralong transition metal dichalcogenides for electromagnetic wave absorbers.

  9. Single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide-based saturable absorbers for low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohui; Wu, Kan; Sun, Zhipei; Meng, Bo; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Yishan; Yu, Xuechao; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Shum, Perry Ping; Wang, Qi Jie

    2016-01-01

    Low phase noise mode-locked fiber laser finds important applications in telecommunication, ultrafast sciences, material science, and biology, etc. In this paper, two types of carbon nano-materials, i.e. single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) and graphene oxide (GO), are investigated as efficient saturable absorbers (SAs) to achieve low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers. Various properties of these wall-paper SAs, such as saturable intensity, optical absorption and degree of purity, are found to be key factors determining the performance of the ultrafast pulses. Reduced-noise femtosecond fiber lasers based on such carbon-based SAs are experimentally demonstrated, for which the phase noise has been reduced by more than 10 dB for SWNT SAs and 8 dB for GO SAs at 10 kHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the relationship between different carbon material based SAs and the phase noise of mode-locked lasers. This work paves the way to generate high-quality low phase noise ultrashort pulses in passively mode-locked fiber lasers. PMID:27126900

  10. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  11. 40 CFR 63.993 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... providing a continuous record or an integrating regeneration stream flow monitoring device having an accuracy of ±10 percent or better, capable of recording the total regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording...

  12. 40 CFR 63.993 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... providing a continuous record or an integrating regeneration stream flow monitoring device having an accuracy of ±10 percent or better, capable of recording the total regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording...

  13. 40 CFR 63.993 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... providing a continuous record or an integrating regeneration stream flow monitoring device having an accuracy of ±10 percent or better, capable of recording the total regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording...

  14. 40 CFR 63.993 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... providing a continuous record or an integrating regeneration stream flow monitoring device having an accuracy of ±10 percent or better, capable of recording the total regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording...

  15. 40 CFR 63.993 - Absorbers, condensers, carbon adsorbers and other recovery devices used as final recovery devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... providing a continuous record or an integrating regeneration stream flow monitoring device having an accuracy of ±10 percent or better, capable of recording the total regeneration stream mass or volumetric flow for each regeneration cycle; and a carbon-bed temperature monitoring device, capable of recording...

  16. Thermal conversion of an Fe₃O₄@metal-organic framework: a new method for an efficient Fe-Co/nanoporous carbon microwave absorbing material.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingmiao; Ji, Guangbin; Liu, Wei; Quan, Bin; Liang, Xiaohui; Shang, Chaomei; Cheng, Yan; Du, Youwei

    2015-08-14

    A novel FeCo nanoparticle embedded nanoporous carbon composite (Fe-Co/NPC) was synthesized via in situ carbonization of dehydro-ascorbic acid (DHAA) coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulated in a metal-organic framework (zeolitic imidazolate framework-67, ZIF-67). The molar ratio of Fe/Co significantly depends on the encapsulated content of Fe3O4 in ZIF-67. The composites filled with 50 wt% of the Fe-Co/NPC-2.0 samples in paraffin show a maximum reflection loss (RL) of -21.7 dB at a thickness of 1.2 mm; in addition, a broad absorption bandwidth for RL < -10 dB which covers from 12.2 to 18 GHz can be obtained, and its minimum reflection loss and bandwidth (RL values exceeding -10 dB) are far greater than those of commercial carbonyl iron powder under a very low thickness (1-1.5 mm). This study not only provides a good reference for future preparation of carbon-based lightweight microwave absorbing materials but also broadens the application of such kinds of metal-organic frameworks.

  17. Synthesis and characterizations of Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoparticles/carbon nanotube composite as an efficient absorber material for solar cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S.; Sa, K.; Alam, I.; Mahakul, P. C.; Raiguru, J.; Subramanyam, B. V. R. S.; Mahanandia, P.

    2018-05-01

    In this energy crisis era, the urgent calls for clean energy converter realizes the importance of photovoltaic device, which offers the highest probability of delivering a sustainable way of harvesting solar energy. The active absorber layer has its significance towards the performance of photovoltaic device by absorbing solar light and creating electron-hole pair inside layer. Being a direct p-type semiconductor, Cu2ZnSnS4 generally referred as CZTS has emerged as potential absorber towards photovoltaics application in recent decades as it offers the advantage of tunable band gap near optimal region ˜1.45-1.65 eV favorably match the solar spectrum and a high absorption coefficient ˜104 cm-1. The further improvement in the performance of CZTS based photovoltaics has involved the use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Semiconductors hybridized with carbonaceous materials (CNTs) have been the center of attraction in the scientific community with beneficial contribution in enhancing optoelectronic properties. The incorporation of CNTs shows effectiveness in charge carrier transfer pathways which ultimately could enhance the photo conversion efficiency (PCE) of photovoltaic device cell (PVC). Here, a facile hydrothermal one-pot synthesis of CZTS nanoparticles and MWCNTs composite towards photovoltaics application is reported. The phase and structural analysis of CZTS nanoparticles as well as CZTS/MWCNTs composite is done by XRD. From FERSEM and TEM (LRTEM & HRTEM) analysis the CZTS nanoparticles decorated over the surface of MWCNTs is confirmed. The optical band gap of CZTS/MWCNTs composite is estimated to be 1.62 eV from UV-Visible spectra.

  18. Passively Q-switched of EDFL employing multi-walled carbon nanotubes with diameter less than 8 nm as saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur Fatin Zuikafly, Siti; Ahmad, Fauzan; Haniff Ibrahim, Mohd; Wadi Harun, Sulaiman

    2017-11-01

    The paper demonstrates passively Q-switched erbium-doped fiber laser implementing multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) based saturable absorber. The paper is the first to report the use of the MWCNTs with diameter less than 8 nm as typically, the diameter used is 10 to 20 nm. The MWCNTs is incorporated with water soluble host polymer, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to produce a MWCNTs polymer composite thin film which is then sandwiched between two fiber connectors. The fabricated SA is employed in the laser experimental setup in ring cavity. The Q-switching regime started at threshold pump power of 103 mW and increasable to 215 mW. The stable pulse train from 41.6 kHz to 76.92 kHz with maximum average output power and pulse energy of 0.17 mW and 3.39 nJ are produced. The shortest pulse width of 1.9 μs is obtained in the proposed experimental work, making it the lowest pulse width ever reported using MWCNTs-based saturable absorber.

  19. Repetition frequency scaling of an all-polarization maintaining erbium-doped mode-locked fiber laser based on carbon nanotubes saturable absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Sotor, J., E-mail: jaroslaw.sotor@pwr.edu.pl; Sobon, G.; Abramski, K. M.

    We demonstrate an all-polarization maintaining (PM), mode-locked erbium (Er)-doped fiber laser based on a carbon nanotubes (CNT) saturable absorber (SA). The laser resonator was maximally simplified by using only one passive hybrid component and a pair of fiber connectors with deposited CNTs. The repetition frequency (F{sub rep}) of such a cost-effective and self-starting mode-locked laser was scaled from 54.3 MHz to 358.6 MHz. The highest F{sub rep} was obtained when the total cavity length was shortened to 57 cm. The laser allows ultrashort pulse generation with the duration ranging from 240 fs to 550 fs. Because the laser components were based on PMmore » fibers the laser was immune to the external perturbations and generated laniary polarized light with the degree of polarization (DOP) of 98.7%.« less

  20. 29 CFR 570.119 - Fourteen-year minimum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... occupations other than manufacturing and mining, the Secretary is authorized to issue regulations or orders... Subpart C of this part. 29-30 [Reserved] (a) Manufacturing, mining, or processing occupations; (b... of the user, the revised text is set forth as follows: § 570.119 Fourteen-year minimum. With respect...

  1. Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Westendorf, Tiffany; Caraher, Joel; Chen, Wei

    2015-03-31

    The objective of this project is to design and build a bench-scale process for a novel phase-changing aminosilicone-based CO2-capture solvent. The project will establish scalability and technical and economic feasibility of using a phase-changing CO2-capture absorbent for post-combustion capture of CO2 from coal-fired power plants with 90% capture efficiency and 95% CO2 purity at a cost of $40/tonne of CO2 captured by 2025 and a cost of <$10/tonne of CO2 captured by 2035. In the first budget period of this project, the bench-scale phase-changing CO2 capture process was designed using data and operating experience generated under a previous project (ARPA-emore » project DE-AR0000084). Sizing and specification of all major unit operations was completed, including detailed process and instrumentation diagrams. The system was designed to operate over a wide range of operating conditions to allow for exploration of the effect of process variables on CO2 capture performance.« less

  2. The type of carbon dioxide absorbent has no relation to the concentration of carbon monoxide in the breathing circuit during low-flow isoflurane anaesthesia in smoking and non-smoking subjects.

    PubMed

    Yamakage, M; Yoshida, S I; Iwasaki, S; Mizu-Uchi, M; Namiki, A

    2004-04-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) in the anaesthetic circuit and of arterial carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb) during low-flow isoflurane anaesthesia in smoking and non-smoking subjects using three kinds of cardon dioxide (CO2) absorbent. Thirty smoking and 30 non-smoking subjects were selected for this study, and these two groups were each divided into three groups according to the type of CO2 absorbent used (Wakolime A, Drägersorb Free, and Amsorb). Anaesthesia was maintained with 1.0% isoflurane and nitrous oxide (1. 0 l min(-1))/oxygen (1.0 l min(-1)). Concentrations of CO in the inspired breathing circuit and concentrations of arterial COHb were measured at 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 hours after exposure to isoflurane. In the smoking groups there were no significant differences in CO concentrations in the circuit between the groups and the CO concentrations did not change significantly during the study period. There were also no significant differences in the arterial COHb values between the groups and the COHb concentrations remained constant. There was a significant linear correlation between the concentrations of CO and COHb (r=0.86, n =30, P<0.001). In the non-smoking groups all of the parameters remained constant at low levels that were independent of the type of CO2 absorbents tested. The major source for increased intraoperative CO exposure is related to the patient's smoking status, and the type of CO2 absorbent used has no relation to an increase in CO concentration in the breathing circuit.

  3. Q-switched erbium doped fiber laser based on single and multiple walled carbon nanotubes embedded in polyethylene oxide film as saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. H. M.; Ali, N. M.; Salleh, Z. S.; Rahman, A. A.; Harun, S. W.; Manaf, M.; Arof, H.

    2015-01-01

    A passive, stable and low cost Q-switched Erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) is demonstrated using both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), which are embedded in polyethylene oxide (PEO) film as a saturable absorber (SA). The film is sandwiched between two FC/PC fiber connectors and integrated into the laser cavity for Q-switching pulse generation operating at wavelength of 1533.6 nm. With SWCNTs, the laser produces a stable pulse train with repetition rate and pulse width ranging from 9.52 to 33.33 kHz and 16.8 to 8.0 μs while varying the 980 nm pump power from 48.5 mW to 100.4 mW. On the other hand, with MWCNTs, the repetition rate and pulse width can be tuned in a wider range of 6.12-33.62 kHz and 9.5- 4.2 μs, respectively as the pump power increases from 37.9 to 120.6 mW. The MWCNTs produce the pulse train at a lower threshold and attain a higher repetition rate compared to the SWCNTs. This is due to thicker carbon nanotubes layer of the MWCNTs which provides more absorption and consequently higher damage threshold. The Q-switched EDFL produces the highest pulse energy of 531 nJ at pump power of 37.9 mW with the use of MWCNTs-PEO SA.

  4. Carbon-coated CoFe–CoFe2O4 composite particles with high and dual-band electromagnetic wave absorbing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Zhen-Jie; Jiang, Jian-Tang; Chen, Na; Gong, Yuan-Xun; Zhen, Liang

    2018-07-01

    SiO2 and TiO2, as conventional dielectric shells of ferromagnetic/dielectric composite particles, can protect ferromagnetic particles from aggregation and oxidation, but contribute little to electromagnetic loss. In this work, we designed nano-assembled CoFe–CoFe2O4@C composite particles, in which ferrites with high permeability were dielectric elements and carbon was introduced as protective layers, aiming for high-efficiency microwave absorption. These assembled particles with different CoFe contents were prepared through solvothermal methods and subsequent hydrogen-thermal reduction. CoFe nanoparticles were dispersed on a CoFe2O4 matrix via an in situ reduction transformation from CoFe2O4 to CoFe. The microstructure evolution of composite particles and corresponding electromagnetic properties tailoring were investigated. The content and size of CoFe as well as the porosity of composite particles increase gradually as the annealing temperature increases. A maximum reflection loss (RL max) of –71.73 dB is observed at 4.78 GHz in 3.4 mm thick coating using particles annealed at 500 °C as fillers. The coating presents double-band absorbing characteristics, as broad effective absorption bandwidth with RL > 5 (ERL 5) and high RL max are observed in both S-C and X-Ku bands. The tunability as well as the assembled characteristic of the electromagnetic property that endued from the composite structure contributes to the excellent electromagnetic wave absorbing performances.

  5. Carbon-coated CoFe-CoFe2O4 composite particles with high and dual-band electromagnetic wave absorbing properties.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhen-Jie; Jiang, Jian-Tang; Chen, Na; Gong, Yuan-Xun; Zhen, Liang

    2018-07-27

    SiO 2 and TiO 2 , as conventional dielectric shells of ferromagnetic/dielectric composite particles, can protect ferromagnetic particles from aggregation and oxidation, but contribute little to electromagnetic loss. In this work, we designed nano-assembled CoFe-CoFe 2 O 4 @C composite particles, in which ferrites with high permeability were dielectric elements and carbon was introduced as protective layers, aiming for high-efficiency microwave absorption. These assembled particles with different CoFe contents were prepared through solvothermal methods and subsequent hydrogen-thermal reduction. CoFe nanoparticles were dispersed on a CoFe 2 O 4 matrix via an in situ reduction transformation from CoFe 2 O 4 to CoFe. The microstructure evolution of composite particles and corresponding electromagnetic properties tailoring were investigated. The content and size of CoFe as well as the porosity of composite particles increase gradually as the annealing temperature increases. A maximum reflection loss (RL max ) of -71.73 dB is observed at 4.78 GHz in 3.4 mm thick coating using particles annealed at 500 °C as fillers. The coating presents double-band absorbing characteristics, as broad effective absorption bandwidth with RL > 5 (ERL 5 ) and high RL max are observed in both S-C and X-K u bands. The tunability as well as the assembled characteristic of the electromagnetic property that endued from the composite structure contributes to the excellent electromagnetic wave absorbing performances.

  6. Fabrication of nano-Fe3O4 3D structure on carbon fibers as a microwave absorber and EMI shielding composite by modified EPD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholampoor, Mahdi; Movassagh-Alanagh, Farid; Salimkhani, Hamed

    2017-02-01

    Recently, electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials have absorbed a lot of attention due to a growing need for application in the area of electronic and wireless devices. In this study, a carbon-based EMI shielding composite was fabricated by electrophoretic deposition of Fe3O4 nano-particles on carbon fibers (CFs) as a 3D structure incorporated with an epoxy resin. Co-precipitation method was employed to synthesize Fe3O4 nano-particles. This as-synthesized Fe3O4 nano-powder was then successfully deposited on CFs using a modified multi-step electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method. The results of structural studies showed that the Fe3O4 nano-particles (25 nm) were successfully and uniformly deposited on CFs. The measured magnetic properties of as-synthesized Fe3O4 nano-powder and nano-Fe3O4/CFs composite showed that the saturation magnetization of bare Fe3O4 was decreased from Ms = 72.3 emu/g to Ms = 33.1 emu/g for nano-Fe3O4/CFs composite and also corecivity of Fe3O4 was increased from Hc = 4.9 Oe to Hc = 168 Oe for composite. The results of microwave absorption tests revealed that the reflection loss (RL) of an epoxy-based nano-Fe3O4/CFs composite are significantly influenced by layer thickness. The maximum RL value of -10.21 dB at 10.12 GHz with an effective absorption bandwidth about 2 GHz was obtained for the sample with the thickness of 2 mm. It also exhibited an EMI shielding performance of -23 dB for whole the frequency range of 8.2-12.4 GHz.

  7. All-fiber mode-locked laser oscillator with pulse energy of 34 nJ using a single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hwanseong; Choi, Sun Young; Rotermund, Fabian; Cha, Yong-Ho; Jeong, Do-Young; Yeom, Dong-Il

    2014-09-22

    We demonstrate a dissipative soliton fiber laser with high pulse energy (>30 nJ) based on a single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber (SWCNT-SA). In-line SA that evanescently interacts with the high quality SWCNT/polymer composite film was fabricated under optimized conditions, increasing the damage threshold of the saturation fluence of the SA to 97 mJ/cm(2). An Er-doped mode-locked all-fiber laser operating at net normal intra-cavity dispersion was built including the fabricated in-line SA. The laser stably delivers linearly chirped pulses with a pulse duration of 12.7 ps, and exhibits a spectral bandwidth of 12.1 nm at the central wavelength of 1563 nm. Average power of the laser output is measured as 335 mW at an applied pump power of 1.27 W. The corresponding pulse energy is estimated to be 34 nJ at the fundamental repetition rate of 9.80 MHz; this is the highest value, to our knowledge, reported in all-fiber Er-doped mode-locked laser using an SWCNT-SA.

  8. Absorption Ångström exponents of aerosols and light absorbing carbon (LAC) obtained from in situ data in Covilhã, central Portugal.

    PubMed

    Mogo, S; Cachorro, V E; de Frutos, A; Rodrigues, A

    2012-12-01

    A field campaign was conducted from October 2009 to July 2010 at Covilhã, a small town located in the region of Beira Interior (Portugal) in the interior of the Iberian Peninsula. The ambient light-absorption coefficient, σ(a) (522 nm), obtained from a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), presented a daily mean value of 12.1 Mm⁻¹ (StD = 7.3 Mm⁻¹). The wavelength dependence of aerosol light absorption is investigated through the Ångström parameter, α(a). The α(a) values for the pair of wavelengths 470-660 nm ranged from 0.86 to 1.47 during the period of measurements. The PSAP data were used to infer the mass of light absorbing carbon (LAC) and the daily mean varied from 0.1 to 6.8 μg m⁻³. A detailed study of special events with different aerosol characteristics is carried out and, to support data interpretation, air masses trajectory analysis is performed.

  9. UV254 absorbance as real-time monitoring and control parameter for micropollutant removal in advanced wastewater treatment with powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Johannes; Massa, Lukas; Sperlich, Alexander; Gnirss, Regina; Jekel, Martin

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the applicability of UV absorbance measurements at 254 nm (UVA254) to serve as a simple and reliable surrogate parameter to monitor and control the removal of organic micropollutants (OMPs) in advanced wastewater treatment applying powdered activated carbon (PAC). Correlations between OMP removal and corresponding UVA254 reduction were determined in lab-scale adsorption batch tests and successfully applied to a pilot-scale PAC treatment stage to predict OMP removals in aggregate samples with good accuracy. Real-time UVA254 measurements were utilized to evaluate adapted PAC dosing strategies and proved to be effective for online monitoring of OMP removal. Furthermore, active PAC dosing control according to differential UVA254 measurements was implemented and tested. While precise removal predictions based on real-time measurements were not accurate for all OMPs, UVA254-controlled dynamic PAC dosing was capable of achieving stable OMP removals. UVA254 can serve as an effective surrogate parameter for OMP removal in technical PAC applications. Even though the applicability as control parameter to adjust PAC dosing to water quality changes might be limited to applications with fast response between PAC adjustment and adsorptive removal (e.g. direct filtration), UVA254 measurements can also be used to monitor the adsorption efficiency in more complex PAC applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Vibrational population relaxation of carbon monoxide in the heme pocket of photolyzed carbonmonoxy myoglobin: Comparison of time-resolved mid-IR absorbance experiments and molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Sagnella, Diane E.; Straub, John E.; Jackson, Timothy A.; Lim, Manho; Anfinrud, Philip A.

    1999-01-01

    The vibrational energy relaxation of carbon monoxide in the heme pocket of sperm whale myoglobin was studied by using molecular dynamics simulation and normal mode analysis methods. Molecular dynamics trajectories of solvated myoglobin were run at 300 K for both the δ- and ɛ-tautomers of the distal His-64. Vibrational population relaxation times of 335 ± 115 ps for the δ-tautomer and 640 ± 185 ps for the ɛ-tautomer were estimated by using the Landau–Teller model. Normal mode analysis was used to identify those protein residues that act as the primary “doorway” modes in the vibrational relaxation of the oscillator. Although the CO relaxation rates in both the ɛ- and δ-tautomers are similar in magnitude, the simulations predict that the vibrational relaxation of the CO is faster in the δ-tautomer with the distal His playing an important role in the energy relaxation mechanism. Time-resolved mid-IR absorbance measurements were performed on photolyzed carbonmonoxy hemoglobin (Hb13CO). From these measurements, a T1 time of 600 ± 150 ps was determined. The simulation and experimental estimates are compared and discussed. PMID:10588704

  11. Panel Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MECHEL, F. P.

    2001-11-01

    A plane wave is incident on a simply supported elastic plate covering a back volume; the arrangement is surrounded by a hard baffle wall. The plate may be porous with a flow friction resistance; the back volume may be filled either with air or with a porous material. The back volume may be bulk reacting (i.e., with sound propagation parallel to the plate) or locally reacting. Since this arrangement is of some importance in room acoustics, Cremer in his book about room acoustics [1] has presented an approximate analysis. However, Cremer's analysis uses a number of assumptions which make his solution, in his own estimate, unsuited for low frequencies, where, on the other hand, the arrangement mainly is applied. This paper presents a sound field description which uses modal analysis. It is applicable not only in the far field, but also near the absorber. Further, approximate solutions are derived, based on simplifying assumptions like Cremer has used. The modal analysis solution is of interest not only as a reference for approximations but also for practical applications, because the aspect of computing time becomes more and more unimportant (the 3D-plots presented below for the sound field were evaluated with modal analysis in about 6 s).

  12. Large-area surveys for black carbon and other light-absorbing impurities in snow: Arctic, Antarctic, North America, China (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, S. G.; Doherty, S. J.; Hegg, D.; Dang, C.; Zhang, R.; Grenfell, T. C.; Brandt, R. E.; Clarke, A. D.; Zatko, M.

    2013-12-01

    Absorption of radiation by ice is extremely weak at visible and near-UV wavelengths, so small amounts of light-absorbing impurities (LAI) in snow can dominate the absorption of sunlight at these wavelengths, reducing the albedo relative to that of pure snow and leading to earlier snowmelt. Snow samples were collected in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Svalbard, Norway, Russia, and the Arctic Ocean, on tundra, glaciers, ice caps, sea ice, and frozen lakes, and in boreal forests. Snow was collected mostly in spring, when the entire winter snowpack was accessible for sampling. Snow was also collected at 67 sites in western North America. Expeditions from Lanzhou University obtained black carbon (BC) amounts at 84 sites in northeast and northwest China. BC was measured at 3 locations on the Antarctic Plateau, and at 5 sites on East Antarctic sea ice. The snow is melted and filtered; the filters are analyzed in a spectrophotometer. Median BC mixing ratios in snow range over 4 orders of magnitude from 0.2 ng/g in Antarctica to 1000 ng/g in northeast China. Chemical analyses, input to a receptor model, indicate that the major source of BC in most of the Arctic is biomass burning, but industrial sources dominate in Svalbard and the central Arctic Ocean. Non-BC impurities, principally brown (organic) carbon, are typically responsible for ~40% of the visible and ultraviolet absorption. In northeast China BC is the dominant LAI, but in Inner Mongolia soil dominates. When the snow surface layer melts, much of the BC is left at the top of the snowpack rather than carried away in meltwater, thus causing a positive feedback on snowmelt. This process was quantified through field studies in Greenland, Alaska, and Norway, where we found that only 10-30% of the BC is removed with meltwater. The BC content of the Arctic atmosphere has declined markedly since 1989, according to the continuous measurements of near-surface air in Canada, Alaska, and Svalbard. Correspondingly, our recent BC

  13. Effect of weight fraction of carbon black and number of plies of E-glass fiber to reflection loss of E-glass/ripoxy composite for radar absorbing structure (RAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widyastuti, Ramadhan, Rizal; Ardhyananta, Hosta; Zainuri, Mochamad

    2013-09-01

    Nowadays, studies on investigating radar absorbing structure (RAS) using fiber reinforced polymeric (FRP) composite materials are becoming popular research field because the electromagnetic properties of FRP composites can be tailored effectively by just adding some electromagnetic powders, such as carbon black, ferrite, carbonyl iron, and etc., to the matrix of composites. The RAS works not only as a load bearing structure to hold the antenna system, but also has the important function of absorbing the in-band electromagnetic wave coming from the electromagnetic energy of tracking systems. In this study, E-glass fiber reinforced ripoxy resin composite was fabricated by blending the conductive carbon black (Ketjenblack EC300J) with the binder matrix of the composite material and maximizing the coefficient of absorption more than 90% (more than -10 dB) within the X-band frequency (8 - 12 GHz). It was measured by electrical conductivity (LCR meter) and vector network analyzer (VNA). Finally, the composite RAS with 0.02 weight fraction of carbon black and 4 plies of E-glass fiber showed thickness of 2.1 mm, electrical conductivity of 8.33 × 10-6 S/m, and maximum reflection loss of -27.123 dB, which can absorb more than 90% of incident EM wave throughout the entire X-band frequency range, has been developed.

  14. Airsacculitis in fourteen juvenile southern Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii).

    PubMed

    Lawson, Becki; Garriga, Rosa; Galdikas, Biruté M F

    2006-06-01

    Airsacculitis is a clinical condition which has been reported in a range of primates species, including orangutans. This report describes the occurence and management of airsacculitis in fourteen juvenile Southern Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii) that presented beween January 1st 1999 and January 31st 2001 at the Orangutan Care Center and Quarantine (OCC&Q), Kalimantan Tengah, Indonesia (S 2 degrees 43' 49.2"; E 111 degrees 38' 54.2"). Details of the signalment, clinical history, presenting clinical signs, clinicopathological findings and bacterial isolates in each case were reviewed. Cough, halitosis and nasal discharge were the most frequently observed clinical signs. A range of Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from infected air sacs, including Pseudomonas sp., Enterobacter sp. and Klebsiella pneumoniae. A simple drainage and lavage technique was used in cases where surgical intervention was indicated, in combination with local and systemic antibiotic therapy. The importance of early diagnosis, prompt management and antibiotic selection, based on bacterial culture and sensitivity profiles, is outlined.

  15. Photometric Study of Fourteen Low-mass Binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Korda, D.; Zasche, P.; Wolf, M.

    2017-07-01

    New CCD photometric observations of fourteen short-period low-mass eclipsing binaries (LMBs) in the photometric filters I, R, and V were used for a light curve analysis. A discrepancy remains between observed radii and those derived from the theoretical modeling for LMBs, in general. Mass calibration of all observed LMBs was performed using only the photometric indices. The light curve modeling of these selected systems was completed, yielding the new derived masses and radii for both components. We compared these systems with the compilation of other known double-lined LMB systems with uncertainties of masses and radii less then 5%, which includesmore » 66 components of binaries where both spectroscopy and photometry were combined together. All of our systems are circular short-period binaries, and for some of them, the photospheric spots were also used. A purely photometric study of the light curves without spectroscopy seems unable to achieve high enough precision and accuracy in the masses and radii to act as meaningful test of the M–R relation for low-mass stars.« less

  16. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  17. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  18. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Enz, Glenn L.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  19. Real Time Monitoring of Dissolved Organic Carbon Concentration and Disinfection By-Product Formation Potential in a Surface Water Treatment Plant with Simulaneous UV-VIS Absorbance and Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    This study describes a method based on simultaneous absorbance and fluorescence excitation-emission mapping for rapidly and accurately monitoring dissolved organic carbon concentration and disinfection by-product formation potential for surface water sourced drinking water treatment. The method enables real-time monitoring of the Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC), absorbance at 254 nm (UVA), the Specific UV Absorbance (SUVA) as well as the Simulated Distribution System Trihalomethane (THM) Formation Potential (SDS-THMFP) for the source and treated water among other component parameters. The method primarily involves Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC) decomposition of the high and lower molecular weight humic and fulvic organic component concentrations. The DOC calibration method involves calculating a single slope factor (with the intercept fixed at 0 mg/l) by linear regression for the UVA divided by the ratio of the high and low molecular weight component concentrations. This method thus corrects for the changes in the molecular weight component composition as a function of the source water composition and coagulation treatment effects. The SDS-THMFP calibration involves a multiple linear regression of the DOC, organic component ratio, chlorine residual, pH and alkalinity. Both the DOC and SDS-THMFP correlations over a period of 18 months exhibited adjusted correlation coefficients with r2 > 0.969. The parameters can be reported as a function of compliance rules associated with required % removals of DOC (as a function of alkalinity) and predicted maximum contaminant levels (MCL) of THMs. The single instrument method, which is compatible with continuous flow monitoring or grab sampling, provides a rapid (2-3 minute) and precise indicator of drinking water disinfectant treatability without the need for separate UV photometric and DOC meter measurements or independent THM determinations.

  20. Solar sustained plasma/absorber conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, R. J.; Krascella, N. L.; Kendall, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    A space power system concept was evaluated which uses concentrated solar energy to heat a working fluid to temperatures as high as 4000 K. The high temperature working fluid could be used for efficient electric power production in advanced thermal or magnetohydrodynamic conversion cycles. Energy absorber configurations utilizing particles or cesium vapor absorber material were investigaed. Results of detailed radiant heat transfer calculations indicated approximately 86 percent of the incident solar energy could be absorbed within a 12-cm-dia flowing stream of gas borne carbon particles. Calculated total energy absorption in the cesium vapor seeded absorber configuration ranged from 34 percent to 64 percent of the incident solar energy. Solar flux concentration ratios of between approximately 3000 and 10,000 will be required to sustain absorber temperatures in the range from 3000 K to 4000 K.

  1. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Ronald J.

    1987-09-22

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  2. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Guillen, Donna P [Idaho Falls, ID; Longhurst, Glen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Porter, Douglas L [Idaho Falls, ID; Parry, James R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  3. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  4. Surface-enhanced resonant Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) of single-walled carbon nanotubes absorbed on the Ag-coated anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, X. Y.; Zhou, Z. P.; Tan, P. H.; Song, L.; Liu, L. F.; Zhao, X. W.; Luo, S. D.; Yan, X. Q.; Liu, D. F.; Wang, J. X.; Gao, Y.; Zhang, Z. X.; Yuan, H. J.; Zhou, W. Y.; Xie, S. S.

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we developed a new kind of substrate, the silver-coated anodic aluminum oxide (AAO), to investigate the characters of surface-enhanced resonant Raman scattering (SERRS) of the dilute single-walled carbon nanotubes. Homogeneous Ag-coated AAO substrate was obtained by decomposing the AgNO 3 on the surface of AAO. single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were directly grown onto this substrate through floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition method (CVD). SERRS of SWNTs was carried out using several different wavelength lasers. The bands coming from metallic SWNTs were significantly enhanced. The two SERRS mechanisms, the “electromagnetic” and “chemical” mechanism, were mainly responsible for the experiment results.

  5. Modeling the Absorbing Aerosol Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Joyce; Zhang, Sophia

    2003-01-01

    We propose a scheme to model the absorbing aerosol index and improve the biomass carbon inventories by optimizing the difference between TOMS aerosol index (AI) and modeled AI with an inverse model. Two absorbing aerosol types are considered, including biomass carbon and mineral dust. A priori biomass carbon source was generated by Liousse et al [1996]. Mineral dust emission is parameterized according to surface wind and soil moisture using the method developed by Ginoux [2000]. In this initial study, the coupled CCM1 and GRANTOUR model was used to determine the aerosol spatial and temporal distribution. With modeled aerosol concentrations and optical properties, we calculate the radiance at the top of the atmosphere at 340 nm and 380 nm with a radiative transfer model. The contrast of radiance at these two wavelengths will be used to calculate AI. Then we compare the modeled AI with TOMS AI. This paper reports our initial modeling for AI and its comparison with TOMS Nimbus 7 AI. For our follow-on project we will model the global AI with aerosol spatial and temporal distribution recomputed from the IMPACT model and DAO GEOS-1 meteorology fields. Then we will build an inverse model, which applies a Bayesian inverse technique to optimize the agreement of between model and observational data. The inverse model will tune the biomass burning source strength to reduce the difference between modelled AI and TOMS AI. Further simulations with a posteriori biomass carbon sources from the inverse model will be carried out. Results will be compared to available observations such as surface concentration and aerosol optical depth.

  6. Internal absorber solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Sletten, Carlyle J.; Herskovitz, Sheldon B.; Holt, F. S.; Sletten, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Thin solar collecting panels are described made from arrays of small rod collectors consisting of a refracting dielectric rod lens with an absorber imbedded within it and a reflecting mirror coated on the back side of the dielectric rod. Non-tracking collector panels on vertical walls or roof tops receive approximately 90% of solar radiation within an acceptance zone 60.degree. in elevation angle by 120.degree. or more in the azimuth sectors with a collector concentration ratio of approximately 3.0. Miniaturized construction of the circular dielectric rods with internal absorbers reduces the weight per area of glass, plastic and metal used in the collector panels. No external parts or insulation are needed as heat losses are low due to partial vacuum or low conductivity gas surrounding heated portions of the collector. The miniature internal absorbers are generally made of solid copper with black selective surface and the collected solar heat is extracted at the collector ends by thermal conductivity along the absorber rods. Heat is removed from end fittings by use of liquid circulants. Several alternate constructions are provided for simplifying collector panel fabrication and for preventing the thermal expansion and contraction of the heated absorber or circulant tubes from damaging vacuum seals. In a modified version of the internal absorber collector, oil with temperature dependent viscosity is pumped through a segmented absorber which is now composed of closely spaced insulated metal tubes. In this way the circulant is automatically diverted through heated portions of the absorber giving higher collector concentration ratios than theoretically possible for an unsegmented absorber.

  7. Lipid-absorbing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Wallace, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The removal of bile acids and cholesterol by polymeric absorption is discussed in terms of micelle-polymer interaction. The results obtained with a polymer composed of 75 parts PEO and 25 parts PB plus curing ingredients show an absorption of 305 to 309%, based on original polymer weight. Particle size effects on absorption rate are analyzed. It is concluded that crosslinked polyethylene oxide polymers will absorb water, crosslinked polybutadiene polymers will absorb lipids; neither polymer will absorb appreciable amounts of lipids from micellar solutions of lipids in water.

  8. Aldehyde-containing urea-absorbing polysaccharides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, W. A.; Hsu, G. C.; Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A novel aldehyde containing polymer (ACP) is prepared by reaction of a polysaccharide with periodate to introduce aldehyde groups onto the C2 - C3 carbon atoms. By introduction of ether and ester groups onto the pendant primary hydroxyl solubility characteristics are modified. The ACP is utilized to absorb nitrogen bases such as urea in vitro or in vivo.

  9. "Smart" Electromechanical Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, Lebarian; Glenn, Dean C.; Carroll, Monty B.

    1989-01-01

    Shock-absorbing apparatus includes electromechanical actuator and digital feedback control circuitry rather than springs and hydraulic damping as in conventional shock absorbers. Device not subject to leakage and requires little or no maintenance. Attenuator parameters adjusted in response to sensory feedback and predictive algorithms to obtain desired damping characteristic. Device programmed to decelerate slowly approaching vehicle or other large object according to prescribed damping characteristic.

  10. Transformation of molecular weight distributions of dissolved organic carbon and UV-absorbing compounds at full-scale wastewater-treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Esparza-Soto, Mario; Fox, Peter; Westerhoff, Paul

    2006-03-01

    The molecular-weight distribution (MWD) of wastewater dissolved-organic carbon (DOC) was determined in samples from seven full-scale wastewater-treatment plants (WWTPs) that use different biological treatments (air activated sludge [air-AS], pure-oxygen AS [O2-AS], and trickling filters). The research objective was to determine how different biological treatments influenced the MWD of wastewater DOC. Primary sedimentation effluent DOC from most of the WWTPs exhibited a skewed distribution toward the low-molecular-weight fraction (MWF) (40 to 50%, < 0.5 K Daltons [KDa]). The Air-AS effluent DOC exhibited a centrally clustered distribution, with the majority of DOC in the intermediate MWF (0.5 to 3 KDa). The O2-AS effluent DOC exhibited a skewed distribution toward the high MWF (> 3 KDa). The removal of DOC by air- and O2-AS bacteria followed trends predicted by a macromolecule degradation model. Trickling-filter effluent DOC exhibited a skewed distribution toward the high MWF (50% DOC, > 3 KDa).

  11. Dinuclear PhotoCORMs: Dioxygen-Assisted Carbon Monoxide Uncaging from Long-Wavelength-Absorbing Metal-Metal-Bonded Carbonyl Complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Pierri, Agustin E; Huang, Po-Ju; Wu, Guang; Iretskii, Alexei V; Ford, Peter C

    2017-06-05

    We describe a new strategy for triggering the photochemical release of caged carbon monoxide (CO) in aerobic media using long-wavelength visible and near-infrared (NIR) light. The dinuclear rhenium-manganese carbonyl complexes (CO) 5 ReMn(CO) 3 (L), where L = phenanthroline (1), bipyridine (2), biquinoline (3), or phenanthrolinecarboxaldehyde (4), each show a strong metal-metal-bond-to-ligand (σ MM → π L *) charge-transfer absorption band at longer wavelengths. Photolysis with deep-red (1 and 2) or NIR (3 and 4) light leads to homolytic cleavage of the Re-Mn bonds to give mononuclear metal radicals. In the absence of trapping agents, these radicals primarily recombine to reform dinuclear complexes. In oxygenated media, however, the radicals react with dioxygen to form species much more labile toward CO release via secondary thermal and/or photochemical reactions. Conjugation of 4, with an amine-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) oligomer, gives a water-soluble derivative with similar photochemistry. In this context, we discuss the potential applications of these dinuclear complexes as visible/NIR-light-photoactivated CO-releasing moieties (photoCORMs).

  12. The advantage of hollow mesoporous carbon as a near-infrared absorbing drug carrier in chemo-photothermal therapy compared with IR-820.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qinfu; Wang, Xiudan; Yan, Yue; Wang, Da; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we synthesized a kind of hollow mesoporous carbon (HMC) as near-infrared (NIR) nanomaterial and made a comparison between HMC and IR-820 commercially available in terms of heat generation properties and thermal stability exposed under NIR laser irradiation. The NIR-induced photothermal tests indicated that HMC had excellent heat generating capacity and remained stable after exposed to NIR laser irradiation for several times. On the contrary, the IR-820 was thermal unstable and degraded completely after exposed to NIR laser irradiation for only one time. The anticancer drug DOX was chosen as a model drug to evaluate the loading capacity and release properties of carboxylated HMC (HMC-COOH). The drug loading efficiency of HMC-COOH could reach to 39.7%. In vitro release results indicated that the release rate of DOX was markedly increased under NIR laser irradiation both in pH5.0 and pH7.4 PBS. Cell viability experiments indicated that HMC-COOH/DOX has a synergistic therapeutic effect by combination of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy. This present research demonstrated that HMC could be employed as NIR-adsorbing agents as well as drug carriers to load lots of drug, realizing the synergistic treatment of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Shock absorber servicing tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepler, Jack L. (Inventor); Hill, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A tool to assist in the servicing of a shock absorber wherein the shock absorber is constructed of a pair of aligned gas and liquid filled chambers. Each of the chambers is separated by a movable separator member. Maximum efficiency of the shock absorber is achieved in the locating of a precise volume of gas within the gas chamber and a precise volume of liquid within the liquid chamber. The servicing tool of this invention employs a rod which is to connect with the separator and by observation of the position of the rod with respect to the gauge body, the location of the separator is ascertained even though it is not directly observable.

  14. Mechanical energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An energy absorbing system for controlling the force where a moving object engages a stationary stop and where the system utilized telescopic tubular members, energy absorbing diaphragm elements, force regulating disc springs, and a return spring to return the telescoping member to its start position after stroking is presented. The energy absorbing system has frusto-conical diaphragm elements frictionally engaging the shaft and are opposed by a force regulating set of disc springs. In principle, this force feedback mechanism serves to keep the stroking load at a reasonable level even if the friction coefficient increases greatly. This force feedback device also serves to desensitize the singular and combined effects of manufacturing tolerances, sliding surface wear, temperature changes, dynamic effects, and lubricity.

  15. Climate change reduces the capacity of northern peatlands to absorb the atmospheric carbon dioxide: The different responses of bogs and fens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianghua; Roulet, Nigel T.

    2014-10-01

    The carbon (C) storage of northern peatlands is equivalent to ~34-46% of the ~795 T g C currently held in the atmosphere as CO2. Most studies report that northern peatlands are a sink of between 20 and 60 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1. Since peatland hydrology and biogeochemistry are very closely related to climate, there is concern whether northern peatlands will continue to function as C sinks with climate change. We used a coupled land surface scheme and peatland C model, called CLASS3W-MWM, to examine the sensitivity of peatland C to climate change. Based on the data available to constrain our model, we simulated the C dynamics of the Mer Bleue (MB) bog in eastern Canada and the Degerö Stormyr (DS) poor fen in northern Sweden for four Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) climate change scenarios, i.e., A1B, A2, B1, and Commit, over four time periods, i.e., present day, 2030, 2060, and 2100. When the simulated future C fluxes were compared to the baseline fluxes under the present climate conditions, we found that fens were much more sensitive to climate change than bogs. Gross primary production (GPP) at MB significantly increased by 4-44% up to 2100 for all scenarios except Commit. GPP at DS significantly decreased by 34-39% for A1B and A2, and slightly increased by 6-10% for B1 and Commit. Total ecosystem respiration (TER) significantly increased by 7-57% for MB and 4-34% for DS up to 2100 for all scenarios except Commit. Net ecosystem production (NEP), therefore, significantly decreased. The bog, however, was still a C sink up to 2100, though much reduced, but the fen switched to a C source for A1B and A2 scenarios. Additional experiments where we climatically transplanted the study peatlands or forced vegetation changes when the fen became too dry showed similar but less dramatic results as the standard runs. Our results indicate that northern peatlands should be included in the C-coupled climate model to fully understand the response of C cycling in

  16. Shock Absorbing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A lightweight, inexpensive shock-absorbing system, developed by Langley Research Center 20 years ago, is now in service as safety device for an automated railway at Duke University Medical Center. The transportation system travels at about 25 miles per hour, carrying patients, visitors, staff and cargo. At the end of each guideway of the system are "frangible," (breakable) tube "buffers." If a slowing car fails to make a complete stop at the terminal, it would bump and shatter the tubes, absorbing energy that might otherwise jolt the passengers or damage the vehicle.

  17. 78 FR 19075 - Identification of One Individual, Fourteen Entities, and Eight Vessels Pursuant to the Iranian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... and fourteen entities identified as the Government of Iran, and eight vessels identified as the property of the Government of Iran under the Iranian Transactions and Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part... President issued Executive Order 13599, ``Blocking Property of the Government of Iran and Iranian Financial...

  18. Discovering the Meaning of Unity of Purpose: A Case Study of Fourteen Accelerated Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Betty M.; Dell, Geralyn L.

    This paper presents findings of a study that examined how teachers restructuring schools came to understand the meaning of the term "unity of purpose." Fourteen Louisiana schools, comprised primarily of high-risk student populations, implemented the accelerated-schools model of restructuring. The accelerated school model is based on…

  19. Shock Absorbing Helmets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a description of helmets used by football players that offer three times the shock-absorbing capacity of earlier types. An interior padding for the helmets, composed of Temper Foam, first used by NASA's Ames Research Center in the design of aircraft seats is described.

  20. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  1. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure. PMID:26828999

  2. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul K; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J M; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R; Luk, Ting S; Taylor, Antoinette J; Dalvit, Diego A R; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.

  3. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    DOE PAGES

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; ...

    2016-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Moreover, our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributionsmore » to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.« less

  4. Apollo couch energy absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, C. J.; Drexel, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Load attenuators for the Apollo spacecraft crew couch and its potential applications are described. Energy absorption is achieved through friction and cyclic deformation of material. In one concept, energy absorption is accomplished by rolling a compressed ring of metal between two surfaces. In another concept, energy is absorbed by forcing a plastically deformed washer along a rod. Among the design problems that had to be solved were material selection, fatigue life, ring slippage, lubrication, and friction loading.

  5. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-01-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  6. Absorber for terahertz radiation management

    DOEpatents

    Biallas, George Herman; Apeldoorn, Cornelis; Williams, Gwyn P.; Benson, Stephen V.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Heckman, John D.

    2015-12-08

    A method and apparatus for minimizing the degradation of power in a free electron laser (FEL) generating terahertz (THz) radiation. The method includes inserting an absorber ring in the FEL beam path for absorbing any irregular THz radiation and thus minimizes the degradation of downstream optics and the resulting degradation of the FEL output power. The absorber ring includes an upstream side, a downstream side, and a plurality of wedges spaced radially around the absorber ring. The wedges form a scallop-like feature on the innermost edges of the absorber ring that acts as an apodizer, stopping diffractive focusing of the THz radiation that is not intercepted by the absorber. Spacing between the scallop-like features and the shape of the features approximates the Bartlett apodization function. The absorber ring provides a smooth intensity distribution, rather than one that is peaked on-center, thereby eliminating minor distortion downstream of the absorber.

  7. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan [El Cerrito, CA; Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Lee, Chuck K [Hayward, CA; Walker, Jeffrey [Gaithersburg, MD; Russell, Paige [Las Vegas, NV; Kirkwood, Jon [Saint Leonard, MD; Yang, Nancy [Lafayette, CA; Champagne, Victor [Oxford, PA

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  8. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  9. Absorber for solar power.

    PubMed

    Powell, W R

    1974-10-01

    A simple, economical absorber utilizing a new principle of operation to achieve very low reradiation losses while generating temperatures limited by material properties of quartz is described. Its performance is analyzed and indicates approximately 90% thermal efficiency and 73% conversion efficiency for an earth based unit with moderately concentrated (~tenfold) sunlight incident. It is consequently compatible with the most economic of concentrator mirrors (stamped) or mirrors deployable in space. Space applications are particularly attractive, as temperatures significantly below 300 K are possible and permit even higher conversion efficiency.

  10. Metamaterial electromagnetic wave absorbers.

    PubMed

    Watts, Claire M; Liu, Xianliang; Padilla, Willie J

    2012-06-19

    The advent of negative index materials has spawned extensive research into metamaterials over the past decade. Metamaterials are attractive not only for their exotic electromagnetic properties, but also their promise for applications. A particular branch-the metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA)-has garnered interest due to the fact that it can achieve unity absorptivity of electromagnetic waves. Since its first experimental demonstration in 2008, the MPA has progressed significantly with designs shown across the electromagnetic spectrum, from microwave to optical. In this Progress Report we give an overview of the field and discuss a selection of examples and related applications. The ability of the MPA to exhibit extreme performance flexibility will be discussed and the theory underlying their operation and limitations will be established. Insight is given into what we can expect from this rapidly expanding field and future challenges will be addressed. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Performance evaluation of CFRP-rubber shock absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamanna, Giuseppe; Sepe, Raffaele

    2014-05-01

    In the present work a numerical investigation on the energy absorbing capability of dedicated structural components made of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer and an emulsion polymerised styrene butadiene rubber is reported. The shock absorbers are devices designed to absorb large amounts of energy by sacrificing their own structural integrity. Their aim is to cushion the effects of an impact phenomenon with the intent to preserve other structures from global failure or local damaging. Another important role of shock absorbers is reducing the peak of the acceleration showed during an impact phenomenon. This effect is of considerable interest in the case of vehicles to preserve passengers' safety. Static and dynamic numerical results are compared with experimental ones in terms of mean crushing forces, energy and peak crushing. The global performance of the absorbers has been evaluated by referencing to a proposed quality index.

  12. Performance evaluation of CFRP-rubber shock absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Lamanna, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.lamanna@unina2.it; Sepe, Raffaele, E-mail: giuseppe.lamanna@unina2.it

    2014-05-15

    In the present work a numerical investigation on the energy absorbing capability of dedicated structural components made of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer and an emulsion polymerised styrene butadiene rubber is reported. The shock absorbers are devices designed to absorb large amounts of energy by sacrificing their own structural integrity. Their aim is to cushion the effects of an impact phenomenon with the intent to preserve other structures from global failure or local damaging. Another important role of shock absorbers is reducing the peak of the acceleration showed during an impact phenomenon. This effect is of considerable interest in themore » case of vehicles to preserve passengers’ safety. Static and dynamic numerical results are compared with experimental ones in terms of mean crushing forces, energy and peak crushing. The global performance of the absorbers has been evaluated by referencing to a proposed quality index.« less

  13. Absorbable Antimicrobial Battlefield Hemostat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    to graphene sheet and carbon nanotubes . Coupled with ABTS, the GQDs can be used for the detection of hydrogen peroxide with the limit of detection......dressing could be made of any material that is compatible to our coating solvent. Examples include gelatin based and cellulose based substrates. The

  14. Experimental use of new absorbable tracheal stent.

    PubMed

    Schopf, Luciano F; Fraga, José Carlos; Porto, Rodrigo; Santos, Luis A; Marques, Douglas R; Sanchez, Paulo R; Meyer, Fabíola S; Ulbrich, Jane M

    2017-11-16

    Silicone and metallic stents are not effective in children with tracheobronchial stenosis or tracheomalacia. Herein, we aimed to evaluate the clinical manifestations and histological reaction of rabbit trachea to the presence of a new poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) with polyisoprene (PLGA/PI) polymer absorbable stent. Fourteen adult white rabbits (weight, 3.0-3.5kg) were randomly assigned to three groups: Group I (n=6): PLGA/PI spiral stent; Group II (n=6): PLGA/PI fragment; and Group III (n=2): controls. After a longitudinal incision on three cervical tracheal rings, the stents and fragments were inserted into the trachea and fixed onto the lateral wall with nonabsorbable sutures. The stented group showed significantly more stridor at rest (p=0.0041), agitation (p=0.014), and use of accessory muscles (p=0.0002) and required more emergency endoscopies than the fragment group. Further, it showed significantly more remarkable histological inflammatory damage than the fragment and control groups (p=0.002). The new PLGA/PI polymeric stent implanted into the trachea of rabbits caused more clinical manifestations and histologically verified inflammatory reaction than the PLGA/PI polymeric fragment. Future studies should be aimed at reducing the stent-wall thickness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reflection measurements of microwave absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Dirk E.; van der Neut, Cornelis A.

    1988-12-01

    A swept-frequency interferometer is described for making rapid, real-time assessments of localized inhomogeneities in planar microwave absorber panels. An aperture-matched exponential horn is used to reduce residual reflections in the system to about -37 dB. This residual reflection is adequate for making comparative measurements on planar absorber panels whose reflectivities usually fall in the -15 to -25 dB range. Reflectivity measurements on a variety of planar absorber panels show that multilayer Jaumann absorbers have the greatest inhomogeneity, while honeycomb absorbers generally have excellent homogeneity within a sheet and from sheet to sheet. The test setup is also used to measure the center frequencies of resonant absorbers. With directional couplers and aperture-matched exponential horns, the technique can be easily applied in the standard 2 to 40 GHz waveguide bands.

  16. Enhancement mechanism of the additional absorbent on the absorption of the absorbing composite using a type-based mixing rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yonggang; Yuan, Liming; Zhang, Deyuan

    2016-04-01

    A silicone rubber composite filled with carbonyl iron particles and four different carbonous materials (carbon black, graphite, carbon fiber or multi-walled carbon nanotubes) was prepared using a two-roller mixture. The complex permittivity and permeability were measured using a vector network analyzer at the frequency of 2-18 GHz. Then a type-based mixing rule based on the dielectric absorbent and magnetic absorbent was proposed to reveal the enhancing mechanism on the permittivity and permeability. The enforcement effect lies in the decreased percolation threshold and the changing pending parameter as the carbonous materials were added. The reflection loss (RL) result showed the added carbonous materials enhanced the absorption in the lower frequency range, the RL decrement value being about 2 dB at 4-5 GHz with a thickness of 1 mm. All the added carbonous materials reinforced the shielding effectiveness (SE) of the composites. The maximum increment value of the SE was about 3.23 dB at 0.5 mm and 4.65 dB at 1 mm, respectively. The added carbonous materials could be effective additives for enforcing the absorption and shielding property of the absorbers.

  17. Fourteen polymorphic microsatellite markers for the threatened Arnica montana (Asteraceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Duwe, Virginia K.; Ismail, Sascha A.; Buser, Andres; Sossai, Esther; Borsch, Thomas; Muller, Ludo A. H.

    2015-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed to investigate population genetic structure in the threatened species Arnica montana. • Methods and Results: Fourteen microsatellite markers with di-, tetra-, and hexanucleotide repeat motifs were developed for A. montana using 454 pyrosequencing without and with library-enrichment methods, resulting in 56,545 sequence reads and 14,467 sequence reads, respectively. All loci showed a high level of polymorphism, with allele numbers ranging from four to 11 in five individuals from five populations (25 samples) and an expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.192 to 0.648 across the loci. • Conclusions: This set of microsatellite markers is the first one described for A. montana and will facilitate conservation genetic applications as well as the understanding of phylogeographic patterns in this species. PMID:25606354

  18. Cypress pollen: botanic aspects in fourteen cypress species and prospects for research.

    PubMed

    Raddi, P; Moricca, S; Andréoli, C

    2000-03-01

    The two Research Institutes, the CNR (National Research Institute, Italy) and the INRA (Institut National de Recherche Agronomique, France) which have been collaborating on the problem of cypress canker from Seiridium cardinale since 1975 in the context of EU projects, have measured in the SEM the pollen size of fourteen species of cypress, determining the differences between the maximum diameter of 100 granules per species and noting differences in pollen colour. A research strategy based on the use of material previously selectively bred for canker resistance is proposed to maintain the cypress in its Mediterranean habitat with a reduced risk of pollinosis. For the success of the project it is stressed that close collaboration between Forest research institutions and the medical profession will be necessary.

  19. Review of the Berosus Leach of Venezuela (Coleoptera, Hydrophilidae, Berosini) with description of fourteen new species

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Adriana; Short, Andrew E. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The species of the water scavenger beetle genus Berosus Leach occurring in Venezuela are reviewed. Thirty-six species are recorded, including fifteen new species, fourteen of which are described here as new: Berosus aragua sp. n., Berosus asymmetricus sp. n., Berosus capanaparo sp. n., Berosus castaneus sp. n., Berosus corozo sp. n., Berosus ebeninus sp. n., Berosus garciai sp. n., Berosus humeralis sp. n., Berosus jolyi sp. n., Berosus llanensis sp. n., Berosus megaphallus sp. n., Berosus ornaticollis sp. n., Berosus repertus sp. n., and Berosus tramidrum sp. n. The fifteenth new species, known from a single female, is left undescribed pending the collection of males. Twelve species are recorded from Venezuela for the first time: Berosus ambogynus Mouchamps, Berosus consobrinus Knisch, Berosus elegans Knisch, Berosus geayi d’Orchymont, Berosus ghanicus d’Orchymont, Berosus guyanensis Queney, Berosus holdhausi Knisch, Berosus marquardti Knisch, Berosus olivae Queney, Berosus reticulatus Knisch, Berosus wintersteineri Knisch, and Berosus zimmermanni Knisch. PMID:22811607

  20. Polyphenol content and antioxidant activity of fourteen wild edible fruits from Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Lamien-Meda, Aline; Lamien, Charles Euloge; Compaoré, Moussa M Y; Meda, Roland N T; Kiendrebeogo, Martin; Zeba, Boukare; Millogo, Jeanne F; Nacoulma, Odile G

    2008-03-06

    A total of fourteen (14) species of wild edible fruits from Burkina Faso were analyzed for their phenolic and flavonoid contents, and their antioxidant activities using the DPPH, FRAP and ABTS methods. The data obtained show that the total phenolic and total flavonoid levels were significantly higher in the acetone than in the methanol extracts.Detarium microcarpum fruit had the highest phenolic and the highest flavonoid content,followed by that of Adansonia digitata, Ziziphus mauritiana, Ximenia americana and Lannea microcarpa. Significant amounts of total phenolics were also detected in the other fruit species in the following order of decreasing levels: Tamarindus indica > Sclerocaryabirrea > Dialium guineense > Gardenia erubescens > Diospyros mespiliformis > Parkiabiglobosa > Ficus sycomorus > Vitellaria paradoxa. Detarium microcarpum fruit also showed the highest antioxidant activity using the three antioxidant assays. Fruits with high antioxidant activities were also found to possess high phenolic and flavonoid contents. There was a strong correlation between total phenolic and flavonoid levels and antioxidant activities.

  1. Human fatalities from wild elephant attacks--a study of fourteen cases.

    PubMed

    Das, Sobhan Kr; Chattopadhyay, Saurabh

    2011-05-01

    Human-wild elephant conflicts are frequently reported from various parts of the country. Encroaching of animal habitat by human civilization is a primary reason for this. The present study comprises of fourteen autopsy cases conducted at the department of Forensic Medicine, B.S Medical College, Bankura, West Bengal, India over a period of three years. The study attempts to find out the nature of injuries caused by wild elephant attack and the common factors contributing to human-wild elephant conflict so that vulnerable population can be cautioned to avoid conflicts. A distinct seasonal as well as diurnal variation of attack incidences was noted. Attacks were sudden and unprovoked. Killer elephants were wild tuskers in all the cases. Victims were from the low socioeconomic group and the cause of death was due to trampling on the vital organs like chest and head. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  2. Energy absorber for the CETA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J.

    1994-01-01

    The energy absorber that was developed for the CETA (Crew Equipment and Translation Aid) on Space Station Freedom is a metal on metal frictional type and has a load regulating feature that prevents excessive stroking loads from occurring while in operation. This paper highlights some of the design and operating aspects and the testing of this energy absorber.

  3. Metal-shearing energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, R. J.; Wittrock, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Device, consisting of tongue of thin aluminum alloy strip, pull tab, slotted steel plate which serves as cutter, and steel buckle, absorbs mechanical energy when its ends are subjected to tensile loading. Device is applicable as auxiliary shock absorbing anchor for automobile and airplane safety belts.

  4. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  5. Absorbent product to absorb fluids. [for collection of human wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Correale, J. V. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A multi-layer absorbent product for use in contact with the skin to absorb fluids is discussed. The product utilizes a water pervious facing layer for contacting the skin, overlayed by a first fibrous wicking layer, the wicking layer preferably being of the one-way variety in which fluid or liquid is moved away from the facing layer. The product further includes a first container section defined by inner and outer layer of a water pervious wicking material between which is disposed a first absorbent mass. A second container section defined by inner and outer layers between which is disposed a second absorbent mass and a liquid impermeable/gas permeable layer. Spacesuit applications are discussed.

  6. Self-Regulating Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J.

    1995-01-01

    Mechanical shock absorber keeps frictional damping force within tolerable limit. Its damping force does not increase with coefficient of friction between energy-absorbing components; rather, frictional damping force varies only slightly. Relatively insensitive to manufacturing variations and environmental conditions altering friction. Does not exhibit high breakaway friction and consequent sharp increase followed by sharp decrease in damping force at beginning of stroking. Damping force in absorber does not vary appreciably with speed of stroking. In addition, not vulnerable to leakage of hydraulic fluid.

  7. Innovative Anti Crash Absorber for a Crashworthy Landing Gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guida, Michele; Marulo, Francesco; Montesarchio, Bruno; Bruno, Massimiliano

    2014-06-01

    This paper defines an innovative concept to anti-crash absorber in composite material to be integrated on the landing gear as an energy-absorbing device in crash conditions to absorb the impact energy. A composite cylinder tube in carbon fiber material is installed coaxially to the shock absorber cylinder and, in an emergency landing gear condition, collapses in order to enhance the energy absorption performance of the landing system. This mechanism has been developed as an alternative solution to a high-pressure chamber installed on the Agusta A129 CBT helicopter, which can be considered dangerous when the helicopter operates in hard and/or crash landing. The characteristics of the anti-crash device are presented and the structural layout of a crashworthy landing gear adopting the developed additional energy absorbing stage is outlined. Experimental and numerical results relevant to the material characterization and the force peaks evaluation of the system development are reported. The anti-crash prototype was designed, analysed, optimized, made and finally the potential performances of a landing gear with the additional anti-crash absorber system are tested by drop test and then correlated with a similar test without the anti-crash system, showing that appreciable energy absorbing capabilities and efficiencies can be obtained in crash conditions.

  8. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, William H.

    1984-01-01

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system.

  9. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, W.H.

    1984-10-16

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system. 9 figs.

  10. Future of American oil: the experts testify. [Fourteen professors, economists, ang financial experts

    SciTech Connect

    Wyman, H. Jr.; Markun, P.M.

    In this volume, the American Petroleum Institute has gathered from the record the Congressional testimony of fourteen authorities on two burning issues that deeply affect the petroleum industry. One is a bill to legalize divestiture/dismemberment of integrated oil companies of the United States--to limit these companies to just one aspect of petroleum development: exploration/production, transportation, refining, or marketing. The other proposal would prevent the oil companies, the nation's most experienced energy producers, from participating in developing other sources of energy. Ten testimonies on vertical divestiture are included: Legal Consequences of Dismemberment, Bator, Peter A.; The Energy Crisis and the Oilmore » Industry, Erickson, Edward W.; The Effect of Petroleum Divestiture on Price and Supply, Friedman, Barry A.; Twenty Years of Chaos, Gary, Raymond B.; International Aspects of Divestiture, Jacoby, Neil H.; Competition in the Petroleum Industry, Mancke, Richard B.; The Case for Vertical Integration, Mitchell, Edward J.; Pipelines: The Cost of Capital, Myers, Stewart C.; Vertical Integration into Oil Pipelines, Swenson, Gary L.; and Financing the Oil Industry, Wilson, Wallace W. Six testimonials on horizontal divestiture are entitled: Public Policy and the Monopoly Myth, Erickson, Edward W.; Justice Looks at Energy Diversification, Kauper, Thomas E.; Horizontal Diversification by Oil Companies, Moore, Thomas Gale; Oil Companies in the Coal Industry, Moyer, Reed; Oil Companies in the Uranium Industry, Ray, Dixy Lee; and Who's Mining the Coal, Wilson, Wallace W. (MCW)« less

  11. European VLBI network observations of fourteen GHz-peaked-spectrum radio sources at 5 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, L.; Reynolds, C.; Strom, R. G.; Dallacasa, D.

    2006-08-01

    We present the results of EVN polarization observations of fourteen GHz-Peaked-Spectrum (GPS) radio sources at 5 GHz. These sources were selected from bright GPS source samples and we aimed at finding Compact Symmetric Objects (CSOs). We have obtained full polarization 5 GHz VLBI observations of 14 sources providing information on their source structure and spectral indices. The results show that two core-jet sources 1433-040 and DA193, out of 14 GPS sources, exhibit integrated fractional polarizations of 3.6% and 1.0% respectively. The other 12 sources have no clear detection of pc-scale polarization. The results confirm that the GPS sources generally have very low polarization at 5 GHz. The sources 1133+432, 1824+271 and 2121-014 are confirmed as CSOs. Three new CSOs 0914+114, 1518+046 and 2322-040 (tentative) have been classified on the basis of 5 GHz images and spectral indices. The sources 1333+589, 1751+278 and 2323+790 can be classified either as compact doubles, and then they are likely CSO candidates or core-jet sources; further observations are needed for an appropriate classification; 0554-026, 1433-040 and 1509+054 are core-jet sources. In addition, we estimate that a component in the jet of quasar DA193 has superluminal motion of 3.3±0.6 h-1 c in 5.5 years.

  12. Fourteen short tandem repeat loci Y chromosome haplotypes: Genetic analysis in populations from northern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Palha, Teresinha; Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Elzemar; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Andrea; Santos, Sidney

    2012-05-01

    Fourteen Y-STR loci (DYS458, DYS439, Y-GATA H4, DYS576, DYS447, DYS460, DYS456, YGATA A10, DYS437, DYS449, DYS570, DYS635 or Y-GATA C4, DYS448 and DYS438) were analysed in 873 males from eight northern Brazil populations: Belém (N=400), Santarém (N=69), Manaus (N=75), Macapá (N=65), Palmas (N=30), Rio Branco (N=32), Porto Velho (N=135) and Boa Vista (N=67). A total of 871 different haplotypes were identified, of which 869 were unique. The panel's estimated total haplotype diversity (HD) is 0.9988, and its discrimination capacity (DC) is 0.9980. The lowest estimates of genetic diversity correspond to markers Y-GATA H4 (0.550) and DYS460 (0.581), and the greatest (above 0.700) to markers DYS458, DYS576, DYS447, YS449, DYS570 and DYS635. The genetic parameters obtained were higher for the 14-Y-STR panel than that for the minimum haplotype set (HD=0.9969; DC=0.76) and the parameters were similar to those obtained with the panel of 17 YSTR of YHRD (HD=0.9987; DC=0. 9870). The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) indicated that most of the genetic variance is found within populations and a smaller, but significant part, is found among populations (R(ST)=0.027, p value=0.009). The data when compared with those from African, Amerindian and European populations have shown no significant genetic distance between northern Brazil populations and Europeans, but there is a significant genetic distance when compared to Africans and Amerindians. The discrimination capacity of the markers shows a high potential for forensic analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Expression of fourteen novel obesity-related genes in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Peter M; Heid, Iris; Buechler, Christa; Steege, Andreas; Resch, Markus; Birner, Christoph; Endemann, Dierk H; Riegger, Guenter A; Luchner, Andreas

    2012-07-13

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are useful to reveal an association between single nucleotide polymorphisms and different measures of obesity. A multitude of new loci has recently been reported, but the exact function of most of the according genes is not known. The aim of our study was to start elucidating the function of some of these genes. We performed an expression analysis of fourteen genes, namely BDNF, ETV5, FAIM2, FTO, GNPDA2, KCTD15, LYPLAL1, MCR4, MTCH2, NEGR1, NRXN3, TMEM18, SEC16B and TFAP2B, via real-time RT-PCR in adipose tissue of the kidney capsule, the mesenterium and subcutaneum as well as the hypothalamus of obese Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and Zucker lean (ZL) rats at an age of 22 weeks. All of our target genes except for SEC16B showed the highest expression in the hypothalamus. This suggests a critical role of these obesity-related genes in the central regulation of energy balance. Interestingly, the expression pattern in the hypothalamus showed no differences between obese ZDF and lean ZL rats. However, LYPLAL1, TFAP2B, SEC16B and FAIM2 were significantly lower expressed in the kidney fat of ZDF than ZL rats. NEGR1 was even lower expressed in subcutaneous and mesenterial fat, while MTCH2 was higher expressed in the subcutaneous and mesenterial fat of ZDF rats. The expression pattern of the investigated obesity genes implies for most of them a role in the central regulation of energy balance, but for some also a role in the adipose tissue itself. For the development of the ZDF phenotype peripheral rather than central mechanisms of the investigated genes seem to be relevant.

  14. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shinpei, E-mail: Ogawa.Shimpei@eb.MitsubishiElectric.co.jp; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi

    2015-01-26

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved bymore » isotropic XeF{sub 2} etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.« less

  15. Better Absorbents for Ammonia Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Malmali, Mahdi; Le, Giang; Hendrickson, Jennifer

    Making ammonia from renewable wind energy at a competitive price may be possible if the conventional ammonia condenser is replaced with an ammonia absorber. Such a process change requires an ammonia selective absorbent. Supported metal halide sorbents for this separation display outstanding dynamic capacity close to their equilibrium thermodynamic limits. Alkaline earth chlorides and bromides supported on silica and zeolite Y are the most promising. MgCl 2 and CaBr 2 at 40% loading on silica show capacities of 60-70 mg NH3/gsorbent at 150 °C and 4 bar. Overall, cations with smaller atomic numbers show more affinity to ammonia; bromides holdmore » ammonia more strongly than chlorides. Different solvents and metal halide mixtures do not show significant changes in the absorption capacity. Finally, these absorbents can be incorporated into ammonia reaction-absorption syntheses to achieve faster production rates.« less

  16. Better Absorbents for Ammonia Separation

    DOE PAGES

    Malmali, Mahdi; Le, Giang; Hendrickson, Jennifer; ...

    2018-03-30

    Making ammonia from renewable wind energy at a competitive price may be possible if the conventional ammonia condenser is replaced with an ammonia absorber. Such a process change requires an ammonia selective absorbent. Supported metal halide sorbents for this separation display outstanding dynamic capacity close to their equilibrium thermodynamic limits. Alkaline earth chlorides and bromides supported on silica and zeolite Y are the most promising. MgCl 2 and CaBr 2 at 40% loading on silica show capacities of 60-70 mg NH3/gsorbent at 150 °C and 4 bar. Overall, cations with smaller atomic numbers show more affinity to ammonia; bromides holdmore » ammonia more strongly than chlorides. Different solvents and metal halide mixtures do not show significant changes in the absorption capacity. Finally, these absorbents can be incorporated into ammonia reaction-absorption syntheses to achieve faster production rates.« less

  17. Low temperature selective absorber research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzenberg, S. A.; Silberglitt, R.

    1982-04-01

    Research carried out since 1979 on selective absorbers is surveyed, with particular attention given to the low-temperature coatings seen as promising for flat plate and evacuated tube applications. The most thoroughly investigated absorber is black chrome, which is highly selective and is the most durable low-temperature absorber. It is believed that other materials, because of their low cost and lower content of strategic materials, may eventually supplant black chrome. Among these candidates are chemically converted black nickel; anodically oxidized nickel, zinc, and copper composites; and nickel or other low-cost multilayer coatings. In reviewing medium and high-temperature research, black chrome, multilayer coatings and black cobalt are seen as best medium-temperature candidates. For high temperatures, an Al2O3/Pt-Al203 multilayer composite or the zirconium diboride coating is preferred.

  18. Commander Lousma stows trash bags in middeck CO2 Absorber Stowage volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Commander Lousma uses his body as a zero gravity garbage compactor to stow plastic bags full of empty containers and trash in the Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Absorber Stowage volume in front of the airlock hatch.

  19. Croconic acid - An absorber in the Venus clouds?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Karen K.; Wolff, Andrew R.; Travis, Larry D.

    1989-01-01

    The absorbing species responsible for the UV cloud features and pale yellow hue of the Venus clouds is presently suggested to be the carbon monoxide-polymer croconic acid, which strongly absorbs in the blue and near-UV. Laboratory absorption-coefficient measurements of a dilute solution of croconic acid in sulfuric acid are used as the bases of cloud-scattering models; the Venus planetary albedo's observed behavior in the blue and near-UV are noted to be qualitatively reproduced. Attention is given to a plausible croconic acid-production mechanism for the Venus cloudtop region.

  20. Qualitative Analysis of Fourteen White Solids and Two Mixtures Using Household Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver-Hoyo, Maria; Allen, DeeDee; Solomon, Sally; Brook, Bryan; Ciraolo, Justine; Daly, Shawn; Jackson, Leia

    2001-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which students identify 11 white solids readily available in drugstores and supermarkets. Investigates solubility, pH, copper reduction, evolution of carbon dioxide bubbles, formation of starch-iodine complex, and formation of an insoluble hydroxide. (YDS)

  1. Adaptive inertial shock-absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraj, Rami; Holnicki-Szulc, Jan; Knap, Lech; Seńko, Jarosław

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces and discusses a new concept of impact absorption by means of impact energy management and storage in dedicated rotating inertial discs. The effectiveness of the concept is demonstrated in a selected case-study involving spinning management, a recently developed novel impact-absorber. A specific control technique performed on this device is demonstrated to be the main source of significant improvement in the overall efficiency of impact damping process. The influence of various parameters on the performance of the shock-absorber is investigated. Design and manufacturing challenges and directions of further research are formulated.

  2. Counterflow absorber for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    An air-cooled, vertical tube absorber for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. Strong absorbent solution is supplied to the top of the absorber and refrigerant vapor is supplied to the bottom of the absorber to create a direct counterflow of refrigerant vapor and absorbent solution in the absorber. The refrigeration system is designed so that the volume flow rate of refrigerant vapor in the tubes of the absorber is sufficient to create a substantially direct counterflow along the entire length of each tube in the absorber. This provides several advantages for the absorber such as higher efficiency and improved heat transfer characteristics, and allows improved purging of non-condensibles from the absorber.

  3. Oil and fat absorbing polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for forming a solid network polymer having a minimal amount of crosslinking for use in absorbing fats and oils. The polymer remains solid at a swelling ratio in oil or fat of at least ten and provides an oil absorption greater than 900 weight percent.

  4. Determination of fourteen sunscreen agents in cosmetics using high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chang, N I; Yoo, M Y; Lee, S H

    2015-04-01

    Commercial sunscreens consist of various compounds ranging from inorganic mineral pigments to organic chemical absorbents to achieve the required degree of protection against sunlight. However, the UV radiation screening ingredients have side effects. In this study, therefore, to ensure compliance with the maximum permissible chemical concentrations in sunscreen cosmetic products, a simultaneous and improved determination method for sunscreen chemicals was assessed. Waters 2690 separations module HPLC system equipped with a Waters 486 tunable absorbance detector (UV-visible detector) has been employed and optimized to detect 14 compounds. For the separation, a Waters C18 column (5 μm, 4.6 mm i.d. 150 mm) and 1% of 0.1 M phosphoric acid in ethanol (solvent A) and in distilled water (solvent B) as mobile phases were used. The correlation coefficients of 14 standard mixture solutions exceeded 0.9993 in the range 2.5-200 μg mL(-1). The intra- and interday recovery and precision (relative standard deviation) of the method were 90.91-109.98% and within 10%, respectively, indicating that the developed method could provide reliable, precise and reproducible data. The detection limit was determined to be 0.01-1.99 μg mL(-1), and the quantization limit was determined to be 0.02-6.02 μg mL(-1), which were relatively lower than previous studies. This method was highly optimized in terms of selectivity, reproducibility and efficiency for the detection of 14 compounds. The validation data indicated that the improved method was quite suitable for their quantitative analysis of commercial product samples. Therefore, this method was applied to the determination of 14 compounds in commercial sunscreen cosmetic products. We verified that the amounts of sunscreen ingredients in the five currently sold sunscreens were >0.5% and within the designated limit, which means those could produce the safe and desired sunscreen effects on the skin. The present method could be applied to

  5. [Study of new blended chemical absorbents to absorb CO2].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Lian; Fang, Meng-Xiang; Yan, Shui-Ping; Luo, Zhong-Yang; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2007-11-01

    Three kinds of blended absorbents were investigated on bench-scale experimental bench according to absorption rate and regeneration grade to select a reasonable additive concentration. The results show that, among methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and piperazine (PZ) mixtures, comparing MDEA : PZ = 1 : 0.4 (m : m) with MDEA : PZ = 1 : 0.2 (m : m), the absorption rate is increased by about 70% at 0.2 mol x mol(-1). When regeneration lasting for 40 min, regeneration grade of blended absorbents with PZ concentration of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 is decreased to 83.06%, 77.77% and 76.67% respectively while 91.04% for PZ concentration of 0. MDEA : PZ = 1 : 0.4(m : m) is a suitable ratio for MDEA/PZ mixtures as absorption and regeneration properties of the blended absorbents are all improved. The aqueous blends with 10% primary amines and 2% tertiary amines could keep high CO2 absorption rate, and lower regeneration energy consumption. Adding 2% 2-Amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP) to 10% diethanolamine (DEA), the blended amine solvents have an advantage in absorption and regeneration properties over other DEA/AMP mixtures. Blended solvents, which consist of a mixture of primary amines with a small amount of tertiary amines, have the highest absorption rate among the three. And mixed absorbents of secondary amines and a small amount of sterically hindered amines have the best regeneration property. To combine absorption and regeneration properties, blends with medium activator addition to tertiary amines are competitive.

  6. [Elastic sliding central medullary nailing with osteogenesis imperfecta. Fourteen cases at eight years follow-up].

    PubMed

    Boutaud, B; Laville, J-M

    2004-06-01

    Elastic sliding centromedullary nailing (ESCN) proposed by Métaizeau in 1987 for the prevention and treatment of limb fractures in osteogenesis imperfecta has never been evaluated. A multicentric serie was studied in order to evaluate results of these procedure. Thirty-six ESCN procedures were performed in fourteen patients. Percutaneous pinning was used for the femur and distal tibia and arthrotomy for the distal femur as needed and in all cases for the proximal tibia. The pins were bent in compliance with the principles of the ESCN system. The ends of the pins were bent back to form a U pushed into the epiphysis. Reaxing osteotomies required minimal incisions. Age at the first procedure, the number of procedures and complications, and time between procedures were recorded. Pin overlap and the angle formed were also recorded. Pin gliding was evaluated. Ability to walk with or without assistance was noted. The medullary canal measured 4 to 10 mm. The first procedure was performed at a mean age of four years (range 15 days to 10 years). Follow-up was eight years (range 1-12). There were 2.5 procedures per patient (range 1-5). Pins had to be changed in 75% of the bone segments. Mean time between two procedures was 3.2 years. There were no cases of defective sliding or infection. There were four cases of secondary fracture with a mean 30% pin overlap, two pin migrations, one nonunion, and one shortening. The majority of the complications occurred after the age of five years. At last follow-up, three patients could not walk, four walked with aids, and eight without aids. The advantages of the technique (size of the pins, nailing without reaming, pin sliding in all cases, low cost) must not overshadow the drawbacks (risk of pin deformation and migration, secondary fracture). Secondary fractures might be limited by discrete valgus of the femoral shaft and preventive pin change when the angle formed approaches 30 degrees and when there is only 30% overlap left. Use of

  7. Identification of a testis-enriched heat shock protein and fourteen members of Hsp70 family in the swamp eel.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Luo, Majing; Yi, Minhan; Sheng, Yue; Cheng, Yibin; Zhou, Rongjia; Cheng, Hanhua

    2013-01-01

    Gonad differentiation is one of the most important developmental events in vertebrates. Some heat shock proteins are associated with gonad development. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in the teleost fish and its roles in sex differentiation are poorly understood. We have identified a testis-enriched heat shock protein Hspa8b2 in the swamp eel using Western blot analysis and Mass Spectrometry (MS). Fourteen Hsp70 family genes were further identified in this species based on transcriptome information. The phylogenetic tree of Hsp70 family was constructed using the Maximum Likelihood method and their expression patterns in the swamp eel gonads were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). There are fourteen gene members in the Hsp70 family in the swamp eel genome. Hsp70 family, particularly Hspa8, has expanded in the species. One of the family members Hspa8b2 is predominantly expressed in testis of the swamp eel.

  8. Fourteen-year survival of Pseudomonas cepacia in a salts solution preserved with benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed Central

    Geftic, S G; Heymann, H; Adair, F W

    1979-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas cepacia that survived for 14 years (1963 to 1977) as a contaminant in an inorganic salt solution which contained commercial 0.05% benzalkonium chloride (CBC) as an antimicrobial preservative, was compared to a recent clinical isolate of P. cepacia. Ammonium acetate was present in the concentrated stock CBC solution, and served as a carbon and nitrogen source for growth when carried over into the salts solution with the CBC. The isolate's resistance to pure benzalkonium chloride was increased step-wise to a concentration of 16%. Plate counts showed 4 x 10(3) colony-forming units per ml in the salts solution. Comparison of growth rates, mouse virulence, antibiotics resistance spectra, and substrate requirements disclosed no differences between the contaminant and a recently isolated clinical strain of P. cepacia. The results indicate that it is critical that pharmaceutical solutions containing benzalkonium chloride as an antimicrobial preservative be formulated without extraneous carbon and nitrogen sources or be preserved with additional antimicrobial agents. PMID:453827

  9. Measurements of Light Absorbing Particles on Tropical South American Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. G.; All, J.; Schwarz, J. P.; Arnott, W. P.; Warthon, J.; Andrade, M.; Celestian, A. J.; Hoffmann, D.; Cole, R. J.; Lapham, E.; Horodyskyj, U. N.; Froyd, K. D.; Liao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes have been losing mass rapidly in recent decades. In addition to the documented increase in temperature, increases in light absorbing particulates deposited on glaciers could be contributing to the observed glacier loss. Here we present results of measurements of light absorbing particles from glaciers in Peru and Bolivia. Samples have been collected by American Climber Science Program volunteers and scientists at altitudes up to 6770 meters. Collected snow samples were melted and filtered in the field. A new inexpensive technique, the Light Absorption Heating Method (LAHM) has been developed for analysis of light absorbing particles collected on filters. Results from LAHM analysis are calibrated using filters with known amounts of fullerene soot, a common industrial surrogate for black carbon (BC). For snow samples collected at the same field location LAHM analysis and measurements from the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) instrument are well correlated (r2 = 0.92). Co-located SP2 and LAHM filter analysis suggest that BC could be the dominant absorbing component of the light absorbing particles in some areas.

  10. Digital Alloy Absorber for Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    In order to increase the spectral response range and improve the mobility of the photo-generated carriers (e.g. in an nBn photodetector), a digital alloy absorber may be employed by embedding one (or fraction thereof) to several monolayers of a semiconductor material (insert layers) periodically into a different host semiconductor material of the absorber layer. The semiconductor material of the insert layer and the host semiconductor materials may have lattice constants that are substantially mismatched. For example, this may performed by periodically embedding monolayers of InSb into an InAsSb host as the absorption region to extend the cutoff wavelength of InAsSb photodetectors, such as InAsSb based nBn devices. The described technique allows for simultaneous control of alloy composition and net strain, which are both key parameters for the photodetector operation.

  11. Acoustic Properties of Absorbent Asphalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trematerra, Amelia; Lombardi, Ilaria

    2017-08-01

    Road traffic is one of the greater cause of noise pollution in urban centers; a prolonged exposure to this source of noise disturbs populations subjected to it. In this paper is reported a study on the absorbent coefficients of asphalt. The acoustic measurements are carried out with a impedance tube (tube of Kundt). The sample are measured in three conditions: with dry material (traditional), “wet” asphalt and “dirty” asphalt.

  12. PT-symmetric laser absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Longhi, Stefano

    2010-09-15

    In a recent work, Y. D. Chong et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 053901 (2010)] proposed the idea of a coherent perfect absorber (CPA) as the time-reversed counterpart of a laser, in which a purely incoming radiation pattern is completely absorbed by a lossy medium. The optical medium that realizes CPA is obtained by reversing the gain with absorption, and thus it generally differs from the lasing medium. Here it is shown that a laser with an optical medium that satisfies the parity-time (PT) symmetry condition {epsilon}(-r)={epsilon}*(r) for the dielectric constant behaves simultaneously as a laser oscillator (i.e., it canmore » emit outgoing coherent waves) and as a CPA (i.e., it can fully absorb incoming coherent waves with appropriate amplitudes and phases). Such a device can thus be referred to as a PT-symmetric CPA laser. The general amplification or absorption features of the PT CPA laser below lasing threshold driven by two fields are determined.« less

  13. Energy-Absorbing, Lightweight Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waydo, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Improved energy-absorbing wheels are under development for use on special-purpose vehicles that must traverse rough terrain under conditions (e.g., extreme cold) in which rubber pneumatic tires would fail. The designs of these wheels differ from those of prior non-pneumatic energy-absorbing wheels in ways that result in lighter weights and more effective reduction of stresses generated by ground/wheel contact forces. These wheels could be made of metals and/or composite materials to withstand the expected extreme operating conditions. As shown in the figure, a wheel according to this concept would include an isogrid tire connected to a hub via spring rods. The isogrid tire would be a stiff, lightweight structure typically made of aluminum. The isogrid aspect of the structure would both impart stiffness and act as a traction surface. The hub would be a thin-walled body of revolution having a simple or compound conical or other shape chosen for structural efficiency. The spring rods would absorb energy and partially isolate the hub and the supported vehicle from impact loads. The general spring-rod configuration shown in the figure was chosen because it would distribute contact and impact loads nearly evenly around the periphery of the hub, thereby helping to protect the hub against damage that would otherwise be caused by large loads concentrated onto small portions of the hub.

  14. Shock absorber operates over wide range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creasy, W. K.; Jones, J. C.

    1965-01-01

    Piston-type hydraulic shock absorber, with a metered damping system, operates over a wide range of kinetic energy loading rates. It is used for absorbing shock and vibration on mounted machinery and heavy earth-moving equipment.

  15. Revised (Mixed-Effects) Estimation for Forest Burning Emissions of Gases and Smoke, Fire/Emission Factor Typologies, and Potential Remote Sensing Classification of Types for Use in Ozone and Absorbing-Carbon Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatfield, R. B.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.

    2014-12-01

    We summarize recent progress (a) in correcting biomass burning emissions factors deduced from airborne sampling of forest fire plumes, (b) in understanding the variability in reactivity of the fresh plumes sampled in ARCTAS (2008), DC3 (2012), and SEAC4RS (2013) airborne missions, and (c) in a consequent search for remotely sensed quantities that help classify forest-fire plumes. Particle properties, chemical speciation, and smoke radiative properties are related and mutually informative, as pictures below suggest (slopes of lines of same color are similar). (a) Mixed-effects (random-effects) statistical modeling provides estimates of both emission factors and a reasonable description of carbon-burned simultaneously. Different fire plumes will have very different contributions to volatile organic carbon reactivity; this may help explain differences of free NOx(both gas- and particle-phase), and also of ozone production, that have been noted for forest-fire plumes in California. Our evalualations check or correct emission factors based on sequential measurements (e.g., the Normalized Ratio Enhancement and similar methods). We stress the dangers of methods relying on emission-ratios to CO. (b) This work confirms and extends many reports of great situational variability in emissions factors. VOCs vary in OH reactivity and NOx-binding. Reasons for variability are not only fuel composition, fuel condition, etc, but are confused somewhat by rapid transformation and mixing of emissions. We use "unmixing" (distinct from mixed-effects) statistics and compare briefly to approaches like neural nets. We focus on one particularly intense fire the notorious Yosemite Rim Fire of 2013. In some samples, NOx activity was not so surpressed by binding into nitrates as in other fires. While our fire-typing is evolving and subject to debate, the carbon-burned Δ(CO2+CO) estimates that arise from mixed effects models, free of confusion by background-CO2 variation, should provide a solid

  16. Molecular, seasonal, and spatial distributions of organic aerosols from fourteen Chinese cities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gehui; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Lee, Shuncheng; Ho, Kinfai; Cao, Junji

    2006-08-01

    Organic aerosols were studied at the molecular level in 14 coastal and inland mega-cities in China during winter and summer 2003. They are characterized by the abundant presence of n-alkanes (annual average, 340 ng m(-3)), fatty acids (769 ng m(-3)), sugars (412 ng m(-3)), and phthalates (387 ng m(-3)). In contrast, fatty alcohols, polyols/polyacids, lignin and resin products, sterols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and hopanes were detected as relatively minor components. n-Alkanes show a weak odd/even carbon predominance (CPI = 1.1) and PAHs show a predominance of benzo(b)fluoranthene, suggesting a serious contribution from fossil fuel (mainly coal) combustion. Their concentrations (except for phthalates and polyols/polyacids) were 2-15 times higher in winter than summer due to a significant usage of coal burning and an enhancement of atmospheric inversion layers. Phthalates were found to be more abundant in summer than winter, probably due to enhanced vaporization from plastics followed by adsorptive deposition on the pre-existing particles. Concentrations of total quantified compounds are extremely high (approximately 10 microg m(-3)) in the midwest (Chongqing and Xi'an) where active industrialization/urbanization is going on. This study shows that concentrations of the compounds detected are 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than those reported from developed countries.

  17. Advanced EMU electrochemically regenerable CO2 and moisture absorber module breadboard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Sudar, M.; Chang, B. J.

    1988-01-01

    The applicability of the Electrochemically Regenerable Carbon Dioxide and Moisture Absorption Technology to the advanced extravehicular mobility unit was demonstrated by designing, fabricating, and testing a breadboard Absorber Module and an Electrochemical Regenerator. Test results indicated that the absorber module meets or exceeds the carbon dioxide removal requirements specified for the design and can meet the moisture removal requirement when proper cooling is provided. CO2 concentration in the vent gas stream was reduced from 0.52 to 0.027 kPa (3.9 to 0.20 mm Hg) for the full five hour test period. Vent gas dew point was reduced from inlet values of 294 K (69 F) to 278 K (41 F) at the outlet. The regeneration of expended absorbent was achieved by the electrochemical method employed in the testing. An absorbent bed using microporous hydrophobic membrane sheets with circulating absorbent is shown to be the best approach to the design of an Absorber Module based on sizing and performance. Absorber Module safety design, comparison of various absorbents and their characteristics, moisture absorption and cooling study and subsystem design and operation time-lining study were also performed.

  18. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, D.C.

    1987-11-20

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compound of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved. 2 figs.

  19. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-01-01

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  20. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-02-06

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  1. Marine Gastrotricha of the Near East: 1. Fourteen new species of Macrodasyida and a redescription of Dactylopodola agadasys Hochberg, 2003

    PubMed Central

    Hummon, William D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The near eastern geographical region is almost devoid of reports of macrodasyidan gastrotrichs, the exceptions themselves being part of this study. Here, as Part 1 are described fourteen new Macrodasyida from countries of the Near East (Cyprus, Egypt and Israel, representing both the Mediterranean and the Red Seas), and a redescription of the previously described Dactylopodolidae: Dactylopodola agadasys Hochberg, 2002. The new species are: Cephalodasyidae (2) - Cephalodasys dolichosomus; Cephalodasys saegailus; Dactylopodolidae (1) Dendrodasys rubomarinus; Macrodasyidae (5) - Macrodasys imbricatus; Macrodasys macrurus; Macrodasys nigrocellus; Macrodasys scleracrus; Urodasys toxostylus; Thaumastodermatidae(4) - Tetranchyroderma corallium; Tetranchyroderma rhopalotum; Tetranchyroderma sinaiensis; Tetranchyroderma xenodactylum; Turbanellidae(2) - Paraturbanella levantia; Turbanella erythrothalassia - spp. n. PMID:21594074

  2. Fundamental optical properties of linear and cyclic alkanes: VUV absorbance and index of refraction.

    PubMed

    Costner, Elizabeth A; Long, Brian K; Navar, Carlos; Jockusch, Steffen; Lei, Xuegong; Zimmerman, Paul; Campion, Alan; Turro, Nicholas J; Willson, C Grant

    2009-08-20

    VUV absorbance and index of refraction data for a series of linear and cyclic alkanes have been collected in order to understand the relationship between the electronic excitation wavelength (or absorbance edge), index of refraction, and molecular structure. The absorbance edge and index for a homologous series of both linear and cyclic alkanes increase with increasing carbon number. The optical properties of complex cycloalkanes do not vary predictably with increasing carbon number but instead depend on variations in the hydrocarbon structure in addition to hydrocarbon size. An understanding of the fundamental optical properties of this class of compounds is directly applicable to the identification of a high index and low-absorbance fluid for 193 nm immersion lithography.

  3. Multifunctional Space Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Hodgson, Ed; Izenson, Mike; Chen, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    A system for non-venting thermal control for spacesuits was built by integrating two previously developed technologies, namely NASA's Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare's flexible version of the Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator (LCAR). This SEAR system was tested in relevant thermal vacuum conditions. These tests show that a 1 sq m radiator having about three times as much absorption media as in the test article would be required to support a 7 hour spacewalk. The serial flow arrangement of the LCAR of the flexible version proved to be inefficient for venting non-condensable gas (NCG). A different LCAR packaging arrangement was conceived wherein the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) housing would be made with a high-strength carbon fiber composite honeycomb, the cells of which would be filled with the chemical absorption media. This new packaging reduce the mass and volume impact of the SEAR on the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) compared to the flexible design. A 0.2 sq m panel with flight-like honeycomb geometry is being constructed and will be tested in thermal and thermal vacuum conditions. Design analyses forecast improved system performance and improved NCG control. A flight-like regeneration system also is also being built and tested. Design analyses for the structurally integrated prototype as well as the earlier test data show that SEAR is not only practical for spacesuits but also has useful applications in spacecraft thermal control.

  4. Space Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Stephan, Ryan; Hodgson, Ed; Izenson, Mike; Chen, Weibo

    2012-01-01

    A system for non-venting thermal control for spacesuits was built by integrating two previously developed technologies, namely NASA s Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare s flexible version of the Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator (LCAR). This SEAR system was tested in relevant thermal vacuum conditions. These tests show that a 1 m2 radiator having about three times as much absorption media as in the test article would be required to support a 7 hour spacewalk. The serial flow arrangement of the LCAR of the flexible version proved to be inefficient for venting non-condensable gas (NCG). A different LCAR packaging arrangement was conceived wherein the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) housing would be made with a high-strength carbon fiber composite honeycomb, the cells of which would be filled with the chemical absorption media. This new packaging reduces the mass and volume impact of the SEAR on the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) compared to the flexible design. A 0.2 sq m panel with flight-like honeycomb geometry is being constructed and will be tested in thermal and thermal vacuum conditions. Design analyses forecast improved system performance and improved NCG control. A flight-like regeneration system also is also being built and tested. Design analyses for the structurally integrated prototype as well as the earlier test data show that SEAR is not only practical for spacesuits but also has useful applications in spacecraft thermal control.

  5. Energy-Absorbing Beam Member

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An energy-absorbing (EA) beam member and having a cell core structure is positioned in an aircraft fuselage proximate to the floor of the aircraft. The cell core structure has a length oriented along a width of the fuselage, a width oriented along a length of the fuselage, and a depth extending away from the floor. The cell core structure also includes cell walls that collectively define a repeating conusoidal pattern of alternating respective larger and smaller first and second radii along the length of the cell core structure. The cell walls slope away from a direction of flight of the aircraft at a calibrated lean angle. An EA beam member may include the cell core structure and first and second plates along the length of the cell core structure on opposite edges of the cell material.

  6. Directionally Antagonistic Graphene Oxide-Polyurethane Hybrid Aerogel as a Sound Absorber.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Jieun; Lee, Hyeongrae; Kang, Yeonjune; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2018-06-21

    Innovative sound absorbers, the design of which is based on carbon nanotubes and graphene derivatives, could be used to make more efficient sound absorbing materials because of their excellent intrinsic mechanical and chemical properties. However, controlling the directional alignments of low-dimensional carbon nanomaterials, such as restacking, alignment, and dispersion, has been a challenging problem when developing sound absorbing forms. Herein, we present the directionally antagonistic graphene oxide-polyurethane hybrid aerogel we developed as a sound absorber, the physical properties of which differ according to the alignment of the microscopic graphene oxide sheets. This porous graphene sound absorber has a microporous hierarchical cellular structure with adjustable stiffness and improved sound absorption performance, thereby overcoming the restrictions of both geometric and function-orientated functions. Furthermore, by controlling the inner cell size and aligned structure of graphene oxide layers in this study, we achieved remarkable improvement of the sound absorption performance at low frequency. This improvement is attributed to multiple scattering of incident and reflection waves on the aligned porous surfaces, and air-viscous resistance damping inside interconnected structures between the urethane foam and the graphene oxide network. Two anisotropic sound absorbers based on the directionally antagonistic graphene oxide-polyurethane hybrid aerogels were fabricated. They show remarkable differences owing to the opposite alignment of graphene oxide layers inside the polyurethane foam and are expected to be appropriate for the engineering design of sound absorbers in consideration of the wave direction.

  7. Long term measurements of light absorbing particles on tropical glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. G.; Sanchez Rodriguez, W.; Arnott, W. P.; All, J.; Schwarz, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    We present results of six years of measurements of light absorbing particles (LAP) on glaciers of the Cordillera Blanca mountain range in Peru. Tropical glaciers are important sources of water for human consumption, agriculture, and hydroelectric power in the region. Regular measurements in the dry season show that light absorbing particle concentrations are generally low (equivalent to the absorption equivalent of 5-30 nanograms of black carbon per gram of snow) during non-El Nino years while values increase substantially during the recent El Nino. Two years of monthly measurements at two glaciers show that fresh snow LAP concentration are very low while LAP levels increase dramatically during snow-less periods.

  8. Laser pushing or pulling of absorbing airborne particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chuji, E-mail: cw175@msstate.edu; Gong, Zhiyong; Pan, Yong-Le

    2016-07-04

    A single absorbing particle formed by carbon nanotubes in the size range of 10–50 μm is trapped in air by a laser trapping beam and concurrently illuminated by another laser manipulating beam. When the trapping beam is terminated, the movement of the particle controlled by the manipulating beam is investigated. We report our observations of light-controlled pushing and pulling motions. We show that the movement direction has little relationship with the particle size and manipulating beam's parameters but is dominated by the particle's orientation and morphology. With this observation, the controllable optical manipulation is now able to be generalized to arbitrarymore » particles, including irregularly shaped absorbing particles that are shown in this work.« less

  9. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  10. Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE): emissions of trace gases and light-absorbing carbon from wood and dung cooking fires, garbage and crop residue burning, brick kilns, and other sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockwell, Chelsea E.; Christian, Ted J.; Goetz, J. Douglas; Jayarathne, Thilina; Bhave, Prakash V.; Praveen, Puppala S.; Adhikari, Sagar; Maharjan, Rashmi; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Saikawa, Eri; Blake, Donald R.; Simpson, Isobel J.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Panday, Arnico K.

    2016-09-01

    The Nepal Ambient Monitoring and Source Testing Experiment (NAMaSTE) campaign took place in and around the Kathmandu Valley and in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) of southern Nepal during April 2015. The source characterization phase targeted numerous important but undersampled (and often inefficient) combustion sources that are widespread in the developing world such as cooking with a variety of stoves and solid fuels, brick kilns, open burning of municipal solid waste (a.k.a. trash or garbage burning), crop residue burning, generators, irrigation pumps, and motorcycles. NAMaSTE produced the first, or rare, measurements of aerosol optical properties, aerosol mass, and detailed trace gas chemistry for the emissions from many of the sources. This paper reports the trace gas and aerosol measurements obtained by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, whole-air sampling (WAS), and photoacoustic extinctiometers (PAX; 405 and 870 nm) based on field work with a moveable lab sampling authentic sources. The primary aerosol optical properties reported include emission factors (EFs) for scattering and absorption coefficients (EF Bscat, EF Babs, in m2 kg-1 fuel burned), single scattering albedos (SSAs), and absorption Ångström exponents (AAEs). From these data we estimate black and brown carbon (BC, BrC) emission factors (g kg-1 fuel burned). The trace gas measurements provide EFs (g kg-1) for CO2, CO, CH4, selected non-methane hydrocarbons up to C10, a large suite of oxygenated organic compounds, NH3, HCN, NOx, SO2, HCl, HF, etc. (up to ˜ 80 gases in all). The emissions varied significantly by source, and light absorption by both BrC and BC was important for many sources. The AAE for dung-fuel cooking fires (4.63 ± 0.68) was significantly higher than for wood-fuel cooking fires (3.01 ± 0.10). Dung-fuel cooking fires also emitted high levels of NH3 (3.00 ± 1.33 g kg-1), organic acids (7.66 ± 6.90 g kg-1), and HCN (2.01 ± 1.25 g kg-1), where the latter could

  11. Absorbent product and articles made therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Correale, J. V. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A multilayer absorbent product for use in contact with the skin to absorb fluids is described. The product has a water pervious facing layer for contacting the skin, and a first fibrous wicking layer overlaying the water pervious layer. A first container section is defined by inner and outer layers of a water pervious wicking material in between a first absorbent mass and a second container section defined by inner and outer layers of a water pervious wicking material between what is disposed a second absorbent mass, and a liquid impermeable/gas permeable layer overlaying the second fibrous wicking layer.

  12. Fourteen new species, one new genus, and eleven new country or state records for New World Lamiinae (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae).

    PubMed

    Martins, Ubirajara R; Santos-Silva, Antonio; Galileo, Maria Helena M

    2015-06-26

    Fourteen new species and one new genus are described from the New World in Lamiinae (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae): Bisaltes (Bisaltes) lingafelteri sp. nov., Trestonia skelleyi sp. nov. and Psapharochrus langeri sp. nov. from Bolivia; Eupogonius azteca sp. nov., Aegomorphus mexicanus sp. nov., Lamacoscylus albatus sp. nov., Lamacoscylus obscurus sp. nov. and Piruanycha wappesi sp. nov. from Mexico; Dolichestola egeri sp. nov. and Wappesellus cavus gen. nov., sp. nov. from Brazil (Rondônia); Scleronotus virgatus sp. nov. from Venezuela; Oreodera casariae sp. nov. from Panama; Alampyris bicolor sp. nov. from Costa Rica; and Emphytoeciosoma flava sp. nov. from Peru. Additionally, eleven new country/state records are established in Lamiinae: three for Peru; three for Bolivia; one for Mexico; one for Uruguay; and two for Brazil (Rondônia) (state records). Bisaltes (Bisaltes) lingafelteri, Eupogonius azteca, Aegomorphus mexicanus, Lamacoscylus albatus, Lamacoscylus obscurus, Piruanycha wappesi, Scleronotus virgatus, Alampyris bicolor, Emphytoeciosoma flava and Wappesellus are included in new or known keys.

  13. Synthetic, Spectroscopic and Biocidal Aspects of Heterobimetallic Complexes Comprising Platinum(II) and a Group Four or Fourteen Element

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kripa

    2000-01-01

    Heterobimetallic complexes with varying amines have been synthesized by the reaction of [Pt(C2H8N2)2]Cl2 with group four or fourteen organometallic dichlorides, viz., R2MCl2 and Cp2M'Cl2 in a 1:2 molar ratio in MeOH (where M=Si or Sn, M'= Ti or Zr and R=Ph or Me). These complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, molecular weight determinations, magnetic measurements, conductance, IR, 1H NMR and electronic spectra. The spectral data suggest a square planar geometry for all the complexes. Conductivity data suggest that they behave as electrolytes. These monometallic precursors along with their complexes have been screened in vitro against a number of pathogenic fungi and bacteria to assess their growth inhibiting potential. PMID:18475917

  14. [Analysis of fourteen French national programmes on physical activity and sports as determinants of health from 2001 to 2006].

    PubMed

    Bréchat, Pierre-Henri; Vogel, Thomas; Berthel, Marc; Kaltenbach, Georges; Le Divenah, Aude; Segouin, Christophe; Rymer, Roland; Lonsdorfer, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity and sports are considered as one of the determinants of health. The aim of this study is to review the rationale for the formulation of this public health issue and its integration in national action plans. The study shows that fourteen national programmes were drafted and implemented between 2001 and 2006 by seven institutions. The research methodology was based on crossing data obtained from semi-directed interviews and documents regarding the design, implementation and follow-up of these programmes. For the conditions of the success, the fourteen actions scored an average of 175.0 +/- 66.9 out of 300%. Public health actors and professionals must be given more opportunities to involve themselves and engage in developing stronger relationships and linkages, in particular with the institutional and community settings. In general, the most invested parts of a programme are the structural and operational aspects of activities. Six significant points surfaced from the study: consideration of drug use as an addictive behaviour; recognition of the psychological stress of professional athletes; acknowledgment of youth as being at high risk for doping behaviour; integration of the concept that physical activity and sports must take the benefit/risk perspective into account; and the necessity to promote health. Through the exchange of numerous local and regional experiences, an optimisation of their synergistic connections was made possible on a continuum extending from "health promotion through physical activity and sports" to "prevention of drug-use and doping behaviours". Professionals have been able to develop actions in the above-mentioned domains across this continuum that have, to date, remained isolated. Proposals are made to strengthen these dynamics. Other health determinants and public health priorities could be investigated with the same methodology.

  15. Laser fabrication of perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizeikis, V.; Faniayeu, I.

    2018-01-01

    We describe design and characterization of electromagnetic metasurfaces consisting of sub-wavelength layers of artificially structured 3D metallic elements arranged into two-dimensional arrays. Such metasurfaces allow novel ways to control propagation, absorption, emission, and polarization state of electromagnetic waves, but their practical realization using traditional planar micro-/nano-fabrication techniques is extremely difficult at infra- red frequencies, where unit cell size must be reduced to few micrometers. We have addressed this challenge by using femtosecond direct laser write (DLW) technique as a high-resolution patterning tool for the fabrication of dielectric templates, followed by a simple metallization process. Functional metasurfaces consisting of metallic helices and vertical split-ring resonators that can be used as perfect absorbers and polarization converters at infra- red frequencies were obtained and characterized experimentally and theoretically. In the future they may find applications in narrow-band infra-red detectors and emitters, spectral filters, and combined into multi-functional, multi-layered structures.

  16. Device for absorbing mechanical shock

    DOEpatents

    Newlon, Charles E.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

  17. Device for absorbing mechanical shock

    DOEpatents

    Newlon, C.E.

    1979-08-29

    This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

  18. Photocurable acrylic composition, and U.V. curing with development of U.V. absorber

    DOEpatents

    McKoy, Vincent B.; Gupta, Amitava

    1992-01-01

    In-situ development of an ultraviolet absorber is provided by a compound such as a hydroxy-phenyl-triazole containing a group which protects the absorber during actinically activated polymerization by light at first frequency. After polymerization the protective group is removed by actinic reaction at a second frequency lower than the first frequency. The protective group is formed by replacing the hydrogen of the hydroxyl group with an acyl group containing 1 to 3 carbon atoms or an acryloxy group of the formula: ##STR1## where R.sup.1 is either an alkyl containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms or --CH.dbd.CH.sub.2.

  19. Fourteen Writing Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Thomas; Broemmel, Amy

    2006-01-01

    Any science teacher who wants his or her students to be engaged in real science is going to engage them in real science writing. Writing in science should begin with clear, imaginative writing purposes and stimuli that are then scaffolded in such a way that students are able to find an organizational structure for their writing. Writing fluency is…

  20. Fourteen Beautiful People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doviak, Joan

    Brief biographies are given of 14 Mexican Americans who are representative of the accomplishments of the Mexican American community in the United States in such areas as sports, politics, labor, and entertainment. These particular Mexican Americans were selected because they are either internationally famous or because of what they represent in…

  1. Fourteen Times the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-08-01

    ESO HARPS Instrument Discovers Smallest Ever Extra-Solar Planet Summary A European team of astronomers [1] has discovered the lightest known planet orbiting a star other than the sun (an "exoplanet"). The new exoplanet orbits the bright star mu Arae located in the southern constellation of the Altar. It is the second planet discovered around this star and completes a full revolution in 9.5 days. With a mass of only 14 times the mass of the Earth, the new planet lies at the threshold of the largest possible rocky planets, making it a possible super Earth-like object. Uranus, the smallest of the giant planets of the Solar System has a similar mass. However Uranus and the new exoplanet differ so much by their distance from the host star that their formation and structure are likely to be very different. This discovery was made possible by the unprecedented accuracy of the HARPS spectrograph on ESO's 3.6-m telescope at La Silla, which allows radial velocities to be measured with a precision better than 1 m/s. It is another clear demonstration of the European leadership in the field of exoplanet research. PR Photo 25a/04: The HARPS Spectrograph and the 3.6m Telescope PR Photo 25b/04: Observed Velocity Variation of mu Arae (3.6m/HARPS, 1.2m Swiss/CORALIE, AAT/UCLES) PR Photo 25c/04: Velocity Variation of mu Arae Observed by HARPS (3.6m/HARPS) PR Photo 25d/04: "Velocity Curve" of mu Arae A unique planet hunting machine ESO PR Photo 25a/04 ESO PR Photo 25a/04 The HARPS Spectrograph and the 3.6m Telescope [Preview - JPEG: 602 x 400 pix - 211k] [Normal - JPEG: 1202 x 800 pix - 645k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 25a/04 represents a montage of the HARPS spectrograph and the 3.6m telescope at La Silla. The upper left shows the dome of the telescope, while the upper right illustrates the telescope itself. The HARPS spectrograph is shown in the lower image during laboratory tests. The vacuum tank is open so that some of the high-precision components inside can be seen. Since the first detection in 1995 of a planet around the star 51 Peg by Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz from the Geneva Observatory (Switzerland), astronomers have learned that our Solar System is not unique, as more than 120 giant planets orbiting other stars were discovered mostly by radial-velocity surveys (cf. ESO PR 13/00, ESO PR 07/01, and ESO PR 03/03). This fundamental observational method is based on the detection of variations in the velocity of the central star, due to the changing direction of the gravitational pull from an (unseen) exoplanet as it orbits the star. The evaluation of the measured velocity variations allows to deduce the planet's orbit, in particular the period and the distance from the star, as well as a minimum mass [2]. The continued quest for exoplanets requires better and better instrumentation. In this context, ESO undoubtedly took the leadership with the new HARPS spectrograph (High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher) of the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory (see ESO PR 06/03). Offered in October 2003 to the research community in the ESO member countries, this unique instrument is optimized to detect planets in orbit around other stars ("exoplanets") by means of accurate (radial) velocity measurements with an unequalled precision of 1 metre per second. HARPS was built by a European Consortium [3] in collaboration with ESO. Already from the beginning of its operation, it has demonstrated its very high efficiency. By comparison with CORALIE, another well known planet-hunting optimized spectrograph installed on the Swiss-Euler 1.2-m telescope at La Silla (cf ESO PR 18/98, 12/99, 13/00), the typical observation times have been reduced by a factor one hundred and the accuracy of the measurements has been increased by a factor ten. These improvements have opened new perspectives in the search for extra-solar planets and have set new standards in terms of instrumental precision. The planetary system around mu Arae The star mu Arae is about 50 light years away. This solar-like star is located in the southern constellation Ara (the Altar) and is bright enough (5th magnitude) to be observed with the unaided eye. Mu Arae was already known to harbour a Jupiter-sized planet with a 650 days orbital period. Previous observations also hinted at the presence of another companion (a planet or a star) much further away. The new measurements obtained by the astronomers on this object, combined with data from other teams confirm this picture. But as François Bouchy, member of the team, states: "Not only did the new HARPS measurements confirm what we previously believed to know about this star but they also showed that an additional planet on short orbit was present. And this new planet appears to be the smallest yet discovered around a star other than the sun. This makes mu Arae a very exciting planetary system." "Listening" to the star ESO PR Photo 25b/04 ESO PR Photo 25b/04 Observed Velocity Variation of mu Arae [Preview - JPEG: 440 x 400 pix - 98k] [Normal - JPEG: 879 x 800 pix - 230k] ESO PR Photo 25c/04 ESO PR Photo 25c/04 Velocity Variation of mu Arae Observed by HARPS [Preview - JPEG: 460 x 400 pix - 90k] [Normal - JPEG: 919 x 800 pix - 215k] Captions: ESO PR Photo 25b/04 shows the measurements of the radial velocity of the star mu Arae obtained by HARPS on the ESO 3.6m telescope at La Silla (green triangles), CORALIE on the Swiss Leonhard Euler 1.2m telescope also on La Silla (red dots) and UCLES on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (blue circles). The solid line shows the best fit to the measurements, assuming the existence of two planets and an additional long-period companion. The fact that the line happens to have a given width is related to the existence of the newly found short period planet. The data shown span the interval from July 1998 to August 2004. ESO PR Photo 25c/04 illustrates the high-quality radial velocity measurements obtained with HARPS. Here also, the solid line shows the best fit to the measurements, assuming the existence of two planets. The data were obtained over a time span of 80 days and the first points shown are the data from the 8 nights in June. Note that the full span of the vertical axis is only 40 m/s! Error bars indicate the accuracy of the measurements. The lower part of the diagram displays the deviation of the measurements from the best fit. ESO PR Photo 25d/04 ESO PR Photo 25d/04 Observed Velocity Variation of mu Arae [Preview - JPEG: 440 x 400 pix - 78k] [Normal - JPEG: 879 x 800 pix - 171k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 25d/04 displays the HARPS radial velocity measurements phase-folded with the orbital period of the newly found exoplanet (9.5 days). The measurements have been corrected from the effect of the two longer period companions. The semi-amplitude of the curve is less than 5 m/s! Coupled with the 9.5 days orbital period, this implies a minimum mass for the newly discovered planet of 14 times the mass of the Earth. During 8 nights in June 2004, mu Arae was repeatedly observed and its radial velocity measured by HARPS to obtain information on the interior of the star. This so-called astero-seismology technique (see ESO PR 15/01) studies the small acoustic waves which make the surface of the star periodically pulsate in and out. By knowing the internal structure of the star, the astronomers aimed at understanding the origin of the unusual amount of heavy elements observed in its stellar atmosphere. This unusual chemical composition could provide unique information to the planet formation history. Says Nuno Santos, another member of the team: "To our surprise, the analysis of the new measurements revealed a radial velocity variation with a period of 9.5 days on top of the acoustic oscillation signal!" This discovery has been made possible thanks to the large number of measurements obtained during the astero-seimology campaign. From this date, the star, that was also part of the HARPS consortium survey programme, was regularly monitored with a careful observation strategy to reduce the "seismic noise" of the star. These new data confirmed both the amplitude and the periodicity of the radial velocity variations found during the 8 nights in June. The astronomers were left with only one convincing explanation to this periodic signal: a second planet orbits mu Arae and accomplishes a full revolution in 9.5 days. But this was not the only surprise: from the radial velocity amplitude, that is the size of the wobble induced by the gravitational pull of the planet on the star, the astronomers derived a mass for the planet of only 14 times the mass of the Earth! This is about the mass of Uranus, the smallest of the giant planets in the solar system. The newly found exoplanet therefore sets a new record in the smallest planet discovered around a solar type star. At the boundary The mass of this planet places it at the boundary between the very large earth-like (rocky) planets and giant planets. As current planetary formation models are still far from being able to account for all the amazing diversity observed amongst the extrasolar planets discovered, astronomers can only speculate on the true nature of the present object. In the current paradigm of giant planet formation, a core is formed first through the accretion of solid "planetesimals". Once this core reaches a critical mass, gas accumulates in a "runaway" fashion and the mass of the planet increases rapidly. In the present case, this later phase is unlikely to have happened for otherwise the planet would have become much more massive. Furthermore, recent models having shown that migration shortens the formation time, it is unlikely that the present object has migrated over large distances and remained of such small mass. This object is therefore likely to be a planet with a rocky (not an icy) core surrounded by a small (of the order of a tenth of the total mass) gaseous envelope and would therefore qualify as a "super-Earth". Further Prospects The HARPS consortium, led by Michel Mayor (Geneva Observatory, Switzerland), has been granted 100 observing nights per year during a 5-year period at the ESO 3.6-m telescope to perform one of the most ambitious systematic searches for exoplanets so far implemented worldwide. To this aim, the consortium repeatedly measures velocities of hundreds of stars that may harbour planetary systems. The detection of this new light planet after less than 1 year of operation demonstrates the outstanding potential of HARPS for detecting rocky planets on short orbits. Further analysis shows that performances achieved with HARPS make possible the detection of big "telluric" planets with only a few times the mass of the Earth. Such a capability is a major improvement compared to past planet surveys. Detection of such rocky objects strengthens the interest of future transit detections from space with missions like COROT, Eddington and KEPLER that shall be able to measure their radius. More information The research described in this Press release has been submitted for publication to the leading astrophysical journal "Astronomy and Astrophysics". A preprint is available as a postscript file at http://www.oal.ul.pt/~nuno/. Notes [1]: The team is composed of Nuno Santos (Centro de Astronomia e Astrofisica da Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal), François Bouchy and Jean-Pierre Sivan (Laboratoire d'astrophysique de Marseille, France), Michel Mayor, Francesco Pepe, Didier Queloz, Stéphane Udry, and Christophe Lovis (Observatoire de l'Université de Genève, Switzerland), Sylvie Vauclair, Michael Bazot (Toulouse, France), Gaspare Lo Curto and Dominique Naef (ESO), Xavier Delfosse (LAOG, Grenoble, France), Willy Benz and Christoph Mordasini (Physikalisches Institut der Universität Bern, Switzerland), and Jean-Louis Bertaux (Service d'Aéronomie de Verrière-le-Buisson, Paris, France). [2] A fundamental limitation of the radial-velocity method is the unknown of the inclination of the planetary orbit that only allows the determination of a lower mass limit for the planet. However, statistical considerations indicate that in most cases, the true mass will not be much higher than this value. The mass units for the exoplanets used in this text are 1 Jupiter mass = 22 Uranus masses = 318 Earth masses; 1 Uranus mass = 14.5 Earth masses. [3] HARPS has been designed and built by an international consortium of research institutes, led by the Observatoire de Genève (Switzerland) and including Observatoire de Haute-Provence (France), Physikalisches Institut der Universität Bern (Switzerland), the Service d'Aeronomie (CNRS, France), as well as ESO La Silla and ESO Garching.

  2. A Flexible Metamaterial Terahertz Perfect Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. R.; Zheng, Y. W.; Qin, L. M.; Wei, G. C.; Qin, Z. P.; Zhang, N. G.; Liu, K.; Li, S. Z.; Wang, S. X.

    2017-12-01

    We designed a THz matematerial absorber using metallic wires (MWs) and split resonant rings (SRRs). This matematerial absorber exhibits perfect absorption which up to 96% at 4.03 THz and is capable of wrapped around objects because of flexible polyimide dielectric substrate.

  3. Highly efficient special sound absorbing solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ionescu, M.; Petre-Lazar, S.

    1974-01-01

    Highly efficient special sound absorbing structures with the following criteria are considered: (1) A distribution surface of the sound absorbing material greater than that of the building element on which the structure is placed; (2) The highest possible absorption coefficient in the widest possible frequency band; and (3) adaptability to different construction and aesthetic conditions.

  4. Gold absorbing film for a composite bolometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragovan, M.; Moseley, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    The principles governing the design of metal films are reviewed, with attention also given to the choice of metals. A description is then given of the characteristics of a bolometer with a gold absorbing film. It is demonstrated that gold is effective as an absorbing film for a millimeter bolometer operated at 1.5 K. At 1.5 K, gold is significantly better than bismuth since gold has a lower heat capacity for the absorbing film. At 0.3 K, gold and bismuth are both suitable. It is pointed out that at temperatures below 0.3 K, a superconducting absorbing film can have a heat capacity low enough not to dominate the heat capacity of the detector; for this reason, it may give better performance than a nonsuperconducting absorbing film.

  5. Structured Metal Film as Perfect Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiang; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu

    2014-03-01

    With standing U-shaped resonators, fish-spear-like resonator has been designed for the first time as the building block to assemble perfect absorbers. The samples have been fabricated with two-photon polymerization process and FTIR measurement results support the effectiveness of the perfect absorber design. In such a structure the polarization-dependent resonance occurs between the tines of the spears instead of the conventional design where the resonance occurs between the metallic layers separated by a dielectric interlayer. The incident light neither transmits nor reflects back which results in unit absorbance. The power of light is trapped between the tines of spears and finally be absorbed. The whole structure is covered with a continuous metallic layer with good thermo-conductance, which provides an excellent approach to deal with heat dissipation, is enlightening in exploring metamaterial absorbers.

  6. Carbon particles

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  7. Design of a nonlinear torsional vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Ammaar Bin

    Tuned mass dampers (TMD) utilizing linear spring mechanisms to mitigate destructive vibrations are commonly used in practice. A TMD is usually tuned for a specific resonant frequency or an operating frequency of a system. Recently, nonlinear vibration absorbers attracted attention of researchers due to some potential advantages they possess over the TMDs. The nonlinear vibration absorber, or the nonlinear energy sink (NES), has an advantage of being effective over a broad range of excitation frequencies, which makes it more suitable for systems with several resonant frequencies, or for a system with varying excitation frequency. Vibration dissipation mechanism in an NES is passive and ensures that there is no energy backflow to the primary system. In this study, an experimental setup of a rotational system has been designed for validation of the concept of nonlinear torsional vibration absorber with geometrically induced cubic stiffness nonlinearity. Dimensions of the primary system have been optimized so as to get the first natural frequency of the system to be fairly low. This was done in order to excite the dynamic system for torsional vibration response by the available motor. Experiments have been performed to obtain the modal parameters of the system. Based on the obtained modal parameters, the design optimization of the nonlinear torsional vibration absorber was carried out using an equivalent 2-DOF modal model. The optimality criterion was chosen to be maximization of energy dissipation in the nonlinear absorber attached to the equivalent 2-DOF system. The optimized design parameters of the nonlinear absorber were tested on the original 5-DOF system numerically. A comparison was made between the performance of linear and nonlinear absorbers using the numerical models. The comparison showed the superiority of the nonlinear absorber over its linear counterpart for the given set of primary system parameters as the vibration energy dissipation in the former is

  8. Thin film absorber for a solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, William G.

    1985-01-01

    This invention pertains to energy absorbers for solar collectors, and more particularly to high performance thin film absorbers. The solar collectors comprising the absorber of this invention overcome several problems seen in current systems, such as excessive hardware, high cost and unreliability. In the preferred form, the apparatus features a substantially rigid planar frame with a thin film window bonded to one planar side of the frame. An absorber in accordance with the present invention is comprised of two thin film layers that are sealed perimetrically. In a preferred embodiment, thin film layers are formed from a metal/plastic laminate. The layers define a fluid-tight planar envelope of large surface area to volume through which a heat transfer fluid flows. The absorber is bonded to the other planar side of the frame. The thin film construction of the absorber assures substantially full envelope wetting and thus good efficiency. The window and absorber films stress the frame adding to the overall strength of the collector.

  9. Vibration analysis on compact car shock absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, W. H.; Cheah, J. X.; Lam, C. K.; Lim, E. A.; Chuah, H. G.; Khor, C. Y.

    2017-10-01

    Shock absorber is a part of the suspension system which provides comfort experience while driving. Resonance, a phenomenon where forced frequency is coinciding with the natural frequency has significant effect on the shock absorber itself. Thus, in this study, natural frequencies of the shock absorber in a 2 degree-of-freedom system were investigated using Wolfram Mathematica 11, CATIA, and ANSYS. Both theoretical and simulation study how will the resonance affect the car shock absorber. The parametric study on the performance of shock absorber also had been conducted. It is found that the failure tends to occur on coil sprung of the shock absorber before the body of the shock absorber is fail. From mathematical modelling, it can also be seen that higher vibration level occurred on un-sprung mass compare to spring mass. This is due to the weight of sprung mass which could stabilize as compared with the weight of un-sprung mass. Besides that, two natural frequencies had been obtained which are 1.0 Hz and 9.1 Hz for sprung mass and un-sprung mass respectively where the acceleration is recorded as maximum. In conclusion, ANSYS can be used to validate with theoretical results with complete model in order to match with mathematical modelling.

  10. Freshwater DOM quantity and quality from a two-component model of UV absorbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Heather T.; Tipping, Edward; Koprivnjak, Jean-Francois; Miller, Matthew P.; Cookson, Brenda; Hamilton-Taylor, John

    2012-01-01

    We present a model that considers UV-absorbing dissolved organic matter (DOM) to consist of two components (A and B), each with a distinct and constant spectrum. Component A absorbs UV light strongly, and is therefore presumed to possess aromatic chromophores and hydrophobic character, whereas B absorbs weakly and can be assumed hydrophilic. We parameterised the model with dissolved organic carbon concentrations [DOC] and corresponding UV spectra for c. 1700 filtered surface water samples from North America and the United Kingdom, by optimising extinction coefficients for A and B, together with a small constant concentration of non-absorbing DOM (0.80 mg DOC L-1). Good unbiased predictions of [DOC] from absorbance data at 270 and 350 nm were obtained (r2 = 0.98), the sum of squared residuals in [DOC] being reduced by 66% compared to a regression model fitted to absorbance at 270 nm alone. The parameterised model can use measured optical absorbance values at any pair of suitable wavelengths to calculate both [DOC] and the relative amounts of A and B in a water sample, i.e. measures of quantity and quality. Blind prediction of [DOC] was satisfactory for 9 of 11 independent data sets (181 of 213 individual samples).

  11. Molecular epidemiology and evolution of avian infectious bronchitis virus in Spain over a fourteen-year period.

    PubMed

    Dolz, Roser; Pujols, Joan; Ordóñez, German; Porta, Ramon; Majó, Natàlia

    2008-04-25

    An in-depth molecular study of infectious bronchitis viruses (IBV) with particular interest in evolutionary aspects of IBV in Spain was carried out in the present study based on the S1 gene molecular characterization of twenty-six Spanish strains isolated over a fourteen-year period. Four genotypes were identified based on S1 gene sequence analyses and phylogenetic studies. A drastic virus population shift was demonstrated along time and the novel Italy 02 serotype was shown to have displaced the previous predominant serotype 4/91 in the field. Detailed analyses of synonymous to non-synonymous ratio of the S1 gene sequences of this new serotype Italy 02 suggested positive selection pressures might have contributed to the successful establishment of Italy 02 serotype in our country. In addition, differences on the fitness abilities of new emergent genotypes were indicated. Furthermore, intergenic sequences (IGs)-like motifs within S1 gene sequences of IBV isolates were suggested to enhance the recombination abilities of certain serotypes.

  12. Anti-bacterial activity and brine shrimp lethality bioassay of methanolic extracts of fourteen different edible vegetables from Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, M. Obayed; Haque, Mahmuda; Urmi, Kaniz Fatima; Zulfiker, Abu Hasanat Md.; Anita, Elichea Synthi; Begum, Momtaj; Hamid, Kaiser

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial and cytotoxic activity of fourteen different edible vegetables methanolic extract from Bangladesh. Methods The antibacterial activity was evaluated using disc diffusion assay method against 12 bacteria (both gram positive and gram negative). The plant extracts were also screened for cytotoxic activity using the brine shrimp lethality bioassay method and the lethal concentrations (LC50) were determined at 95% confidence intervals by analyzing the data on a computer loaded with “Finney Programme”. Results All the vegetable extracts showed low to elevated levels of antibacterial activity against most of the tested strains (zone of inhibition=5-28 mm). The most active extract against all bacterial strains was from Xanthium indicum which showed remarkable antibacterial activity having the diameter of growth inhibition zone ranging from 12 to 28 mm followed by Alternanthera sessilis (zone of inhibition=6-21 mm). All extracts exhibited considerable general toxicity towards brine shrimps. The LC50 value of the tested extracts was within the range of 8.447 to 60.323 µg/mL with respect to the positive control (vincristine sulphate) which was 0.91 µg/mL. Among all studied extracts, Xanthium indicum displayed the highest cytotoxic effect with LC50 value of 8.447 µg/mL. Conclusions The results of the present investigation suggest that most of the studied plants are potentially good source of antibacterial and anticancer agents. PMID:23570009

  13. Fourteen coprophilous species of Psathyrella identified in the Nordic countries using morphology and nuclear rDNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Ellen; Orstadius, Leif

    2008-10-01

    Psathyrella species growing on dung or occasionally on dung in the Nordic countries were studied using morphological characters and nu-rDNA sequence data and type collections were examined when available. Fourteen species capable of growing on dung were identified. Descriptions are given of all dung-inhabiting species and to a lesser extent of the species occasionally growing on dung. Three new species are described: Psathyrella fimiseda, P. merdicola, and P. scatophila. P. stercoraria is described as a new species in order to validate the name. A key to the coprophilous species in Europe including the species described by Peck & Smith from North America is provided. The phylogenetic analyses recovered four major supported clades within Psathyrellaceae corresponding to Parasola, Coprinopsis, Lacrymaria/Spadiceae pro parte, and Psathyrella. The status of Coprinellus was ambiguous. The current morphology-based infrageneric classification of Psathyrella was not supported by the phylogenetic analyses and a coprophilous habit has apparently evolved on multiple occasions. Three new combinations are proposed: Parasola conopilus, Coprinopsis marcescibilis, and Coprinopsis pannucioides.

  14. Mixed-reproductive strategies, competitive mating-type distribution and life cycle of fourteen black morel species.

    PubMed

    Du, Xi-Hui; Zhao, Qi; Xia, En-Hua; Gao, Li-Zhi; Richard, Franck; Yang, Zhu L

    2017-05-04

    Morchella species are well known world-round as popular and prized edible fungi due to their unique culinary flavor. Recently, several species have been successfully cultivated in China. However, their reproductive modes are still unknown, and their basic biology needs to be elucidated. Here, we use the morel genome information to investigate mating systems and life cycles of fourteen black morel species. Mating type-specific primers were developed to screen and genotype ascospores, hymenia and stipes from 223 ascocarps of the 14 species from Asia and Europe. Our data indicated that they are all heterothallic and their life cycles are predominantly haploid, but sterile haploid fruiting also exists. Ascospores in all species are mostly haploid, homokaryotic, and multinuclear, whereas aborted ascospores without any nuclei were also detected. Interestingly, we monitored divergent spatial distribution of both mating types in natural morel populations and cultivated sites, where the fertile tissue of fruiting bodies usually harbored both mating types, whereas sterile tissue of wild morels constantly had one MAT allele, while the sterile tissue of cultivated strains always exhibited both MAT alleles. Furthermore, MAT1-1-1 was detected significantly more commonly than MAT1-2-1 in natural populations, which strongly suggested a competitive advantage for MAT1-1 strains.

  15. Evaluation of carcinogenic potential of the herbicide glyphosate, drawing on tumor incidence data from fourteen chronic/carcinogenicity rodent studies.

    PubMed

    Greim, Helmut; Saltmiras, David; Mostert, Volker; Strupp, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Abstract Glyphosate, an herbicidal derivative of the amino acid glycine, was introduced to agriculture in the 1970s. Glyphosate targets and blocks a plant metabolic pathway not found in animals, the shikimate pathway, required for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in plants. After almost forty years of commercial use, and multiple regulatory approvals including toxicology evaluations, literature reviews, and numerous human health risk assessments, the clear and consistent conclusions are that glyphosate is of low toxicological concern, and no concerns exist with respect to glyphosate use and cancer in humans. This manuscript discusses the basis for these conclusions. Most toxicological studies informing regulatory evaluations are of commercial interest and are proprietary in nature. Given the widespread attention to this molecule, the authors gained access to carcinogenicity data submitted to regulatory agencies and present overviews of each study, followed by a weight of evidence evaluation of tumor incidence data. Fourteen carcinogenicity studies (nine rat and five mouse) are evaluated for their individual reliability, and select neoplasms are identified for further evaluation across the data base. The original tumor incidence data from study reports are presented in the online data supplement. There was no evidence of a carcinogenic effect related to glyphosate treatment. The lack of a plausible mechanism, along with published epidemiology studies, which fail to demonstrate clear, statistically significant, unbiased and non-confounded associations between glyphosate and cancer of any single etiology, and a compelling weight of evidence, support the conclusion that glyphosate does not present concern with respect to carcinogenic potential in humans.

  16. Absorbing Aerosols Workshop, January 20-21, 2016

    SciTech Connect

    Nasiri, Shaima; Williamson, Ashley; Cappa, Christopher D.

    2016-07-01

    A workshop was held at DOE Headquarters on January 20-21, 2016 during which experts within and outside DOE were brought together to identify knowledge gaps in modeling and measurement of the contribution of absorbing aerosols (AA) to radiative forcing. Absorbing aerosols refer to those aerosols that absorb light, whereby they both reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface (direct effect) and heat their surroundings. By doing so, they modify the vertical distribution of heat in the atmosphere and affect atmospheric thermodynamics and stability, possibly hastening cloud drop evaporation, and thereby affecting cloud amount, formation, dissipation and, ultimately, precipitation. Depositionmore » of AA on snow and ice reduces surface albedo leading to accelerated melt. The most abundant AA type is black carbon (BC), which results from combustion of fossil fuel and biofuel. The other key AA types are brown carbon (BrC), which also results from combustion of fossil fuel and biofuel, and dust (crustal material). Each of these sources may result from, and be strongly influenced by, anthropogenic activities. The properties and amounts of AA depend upon various factors, primarily fuel source and burn conditions (e.g., internal combustion engine, flaming or smoldering wildfire), vegetation type (in the case of BC and BrC), and in the case of dust, soil type and ground cover (i.e., vegetation, snow, etc.). After emission, AA undergo chemical processing in the atmosphere that affects their physical and chemical properties. Thus, attribution of sources of AA, and understanding processes AA undergo during their atmospheric lifetimes, are necessary to understand how they will behave in a changing climate.« less

  17. Lidar remote sensing of laser-induced incandescence on light absorbing particles in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Miffre, Alain; Anselmo, Christophe; Geffroy, Sylvain; Fréjafon, Emeric; Rairoux, Patrick

    2015-02-09

    Carbon aerosol is now recognized as a major uncertainty on climate change and public health, and specific instruments are required to address the time and space evolution of this aerosol, which efficiently absorbs light. In this paper, we report an experiment, based on coupling lidar remote sensing with Laser-Induced-Incandescence (LII), which allows, in agreement with Planck's law, to retrieve the vertical profile of very low thermal radiation emitted by light-absorbing particles in an urban atmosphere over several hundred meters altitude. Accordingly, we set the LII-lidar formalism and equation and addressed the main features of LII-lidar in the atmosphere by numerically simulating the LII-lidar signal. We believe atmospheric LII-lidar to be a promising tool for radiative transfer, especially when combined with elastic backscattering lidar, as it may then allow a remote partitioning between strong/less light absorbing carbon aerosols.

  18. Sellers works at the CO2 Absorber Panel Door in the MDDK during STS-132

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-05-15

    S132-E-007167 (15 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Piers Sellers, STS-132 mission specialist, works at the Carbon Dioxide absorber panel door on the middeck of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Atlantis during Flight Day 2 activities. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  19. Design of a magnetorheological automotive shock absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindler, Jason E.; Dimock, Glen A.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2000-06-01

    Double adjustable shock absorbers allow for independent adjustment of the yield force and post-yield damping in the force versus velocity response. To emulate the performance of a conventional double adjustable shock absorber, a magnetorheological (MR) automotive shock absorber was designed and fabricated at the University of Maryland. Located in the piston head, an applied magnetic field between the core and flux return increases the force required for a given piston rod velocity. Between the core and flux return, two different shaped gaps meet the controllable performance requirements of a double adjustable shock. A uniform gap between the core and the flux return primarily adjusts the yield force of the shock absorber, while a non-uniform gap allows for control of the post-yield damping. Force measurements from sinusoidal displacement cycles, recorded on a mechanical damper dynamometer, validate the performance of uniform and non- uniform gaps for adjustment of the yield force and post-yield damping, respectively.

  20. Stress absorbing membrane innerlayer : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1985-04-01

    The westbound lanes of the South Baker Interchange-Encina Interchange Section of I-84 were overlayed in 1977. A stress absorbing membrane innerlayer (SAMI), was included in this overlay as an experimental feature. This report is the final evaluation ...

  1. Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Wright, Richard N.; Swank, William D.; Lister, Tedd E.; Pinhero, Patrick J.

    2007-10-23

    A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

  2. Energy absorber uses expanded coiled tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. F.

    1972-01-01

    Mechanical shock mitigating device, based on working material to its failure point, absorbs mechanical energy by bending or twisting tubing. It functions under axial or tangential loading, has no rebound, is area independent, and is easy and inexpensive to build.

  3. Phase Space Exchange in Thick Wedge Absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David

    The problem of phase space exchange in wedge absorbers with ionization cooling is discussed. The wedge absorber exchanges transverse and longitudinal phase space by introducing a position-dependent energy loss. In this paper we note that the wedges used with ionization cooling are relatively thick, so that single wedges cause relatively large changes in beam phase space. Calculation methods adapted to such “thick wedge” cases are presented, and beam phase-space transformations through such wedges are discussed.

  4. Non-absorbed Antibiotics for IBS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-16

    absorbed antibiotic rifaximin for nonconstipated irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This effort adds to the body of literature from other, smaller studies that...have demonstrated clinical efficacy for IBS with rifaximin . Non-absorbed antibiotics have been endorsed by the American College of Gastroenterology... rifaximin 400 mg three times daily for 10 days or placebo. During the initial 2 weeks of therapy and the subsequent 10 weeks of follow-up rifaximin

  5. A Wedge Absorber Experiment at MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David; Mohayai, Tanaz; Rogers, Chris

    2017-05-01

    Emittance exchange mediated by wedge absorbers is required for longitudinal ionization cooling and for final transverse emittance minimization for a muon collider. A wedge absorber within the MICE beam line could serve as a demonstration of the type of emittance exchange needed for 6-D cooling, including the configurations needed for muon colliders, as well as configurations for low-energy muon sources. Parameters for this test are explored in simulation and possible experimental configurations with simulated results are presented.

  6. Evaluation of carcinogenic potential of the herbicide glyphosate, drawing on tumor incidence data from fourteen chronic/carcinogenicity rodent studies

    PubMed Central

    Greim, Helmut; Saltmiras, David; Mostert, Volker; Strupp, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Glyphosate, an herbicidal derivative of the amino acid glycine, was introduced to agriculture in the 1970s. Glyphosate targets and blocks a plant metabolic pathway not found in animals, the shikimate pathway, required for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in plants. After almost forty years of commercial use, and multiple regulatory approvals including toxicology evaluations, literature reviews, and numerous human health risk assessments, the clear and consistent conclusions are that glyphosate is of low toxicological concern, and no concerns exist with respect to glyphosate use and cancer in humans. This manuscript discusses the basis for these conclusions. Most toxicological studies informing regulatory evaluations are of commercial interest and are proprietary in nature. Given the widespread attention to this molecule, the authors gained access to carcinogenicity data submitted to regulatory agencies and present overviews of each study, followed by a weight of evidence evaluation of tumor incidence data. Fourteen carcinogenicity studies (nine rat and five mouse) are evaluated for their individual reliability, and select neoplasms are identified for further evaluation across the data base. The original tumor incidence data from study reports are presented in the online data supplement. There was no evidence of a carcinogenic effect related to glyphosate treatment. The lack of a plausible mechanism, along with published epidemiology studies, which fail to demonstrate clear, statistically significant, unbiased and non-confounded associations between glyphosate and cancer of any single etiology, and a compelling weight of evidence, support the conclusion that glyphosate does not present concern with respect to carcinogenic potential in humans. PMID:25716480

  7. Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    DOEpatents

    Novick, Scott; Alvizo, Oscar

    2013-01-15

    The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

  8. Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    DOEpatents

    Novick, Scott J; Alvizo, Oscar

    2013-10-29

    The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

  9. On the definition of absorbed dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grusell, Erik

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: The quantity absorbed dose is used extensively in all areas concerning the interaction of ionizing radiation with biological organisms, as well as with matter in general. The most recent and authoritative definition of absorbed dose is given by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) in ICRU Report 85. However, that definition is incomplete. The purpose of the present work is to give a rigorous definition of absorbed dose. Methods: Absorbed dose is defined in terms of the random variable specific energy imparted. A random variable is a mathematical function, and it cannot be defined without specifying its domain of definition which is a probability space. This is not done in report 85 by the ICRU, mentioned above. Results: In the present work a definition of a suitable probability space is given, so that a rigorous definition of absorbed dose is possible. This necessarily includes the specification of the experiment which the probability space describes. In this case this is an irradiation, which is specified by the initial particles released and by the material objects which can interact with the radiation. Some consequences are discussed. Specific energy imparted is defined for a volume, and the definition of absorbed dose as a point function involves the specific energy imparted for a small mass contained in a volume surrounding the point. A possible more precise definition of this volume is suggested and discussed. Conclusions: The importance of absorbed dose motivates a proper definition, and one is given in the present work. No rigorous definition has been presented before.

  10. Innovative energy absorbing devices based on composite tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Chandrashekhar

    Analytical and experimental study of innovative load limiting and energy absorbing devices are presented here. The devices are based on composite tubes and can be categorized in to two groups based upon the energy absorbing mechanisms exhibited by them, namely: foam crushing and foam fracturing. The device based on foam crushing as the energy absorbing mechanism is composed of light weight elastic-plastic foam filling inside an angle ply composite tube. The tube is tailored to have a high Poisson’s ratio (>20). Upon being loaded the device experiences large transverse contraction resulting in rapid decrease in diameter. At a certain axial load the foam core begins to crush and energy is dissipated. This device is termed as crush tube device. The device based upon foam shear fracture as the energy absorbing mechanism involves an elastic-plastic core foam in annulus of two concentric extension-twist coupled composite tubes with opposite angles of fibers. The core foam is bonded to the inner and outer tube walls. Upon being loaded axially, the tubes twist in opposite directions and fracture the core foam in out of plane shear and thus dissipate the energy stored. The device is termed as sandwich core device (SCD). The devices exhibit variations in force-displacement characteristics with changes in design and material parameters, resulting in wide range of energy absorption capabilities. A flexible matrix composite system was selected, which was composed of high stiffness carbon fibers as reinforcements in relatively low stiffness polyurethane matrix, based upon large strain to failure capabilities and large beneficial elastic couplings. Linear and non-linear analytical models were developed encapsulating large deformation theory of the laminated composite shells (using non-linear strain energy formulation) to the fracture mechanics of core foam and elastic-plastic deformation theory of the foam filling. The non-linear model is capable of including material and

  11. Initial Costs vs. Operational Costs. A Study of Building Improvement Projects in Fourteen Schools in the School District of Greenville County, South Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Tak Cheung

    To determine whether initial facility improvement costs were paid back by the reduced operational costs resulting from the improvement projects, this study examined the relationship between initial costs and operational costs of fourteen school buildings improved during the 1978-79 school year in Greenville County, South Carolina. With energy…

  12. Strain Gage Measurements of Aft Nacelle Shock Absorbers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ENGINE NACELLES, SHOCK ABSORBERS ), (* SHOCK ABSORBERS , STRESSES), SURFACE TO SURFACE MISSILES, LAUNCHING, STRAIN GAGES, COMPRESSIVE PROPERTIES, CALIBRATION, STRAIN(MECHANICS), FAILURE, GROUND SUPPORT EQUIPMENT.

  13. Method of absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor

    DOEpatents

    Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas Vyankatrao; Zelepouga, Sergeui; Pratapas, John

    2013-09-17

    A method and apparatus for absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor in which a reference light intensity measurement is made on a non-absorbing reference fluid, a light intensity measurement is made on a sample fluid, and a measured light absorbance of the sample fluid is determined. A corrective light intensity measurement at a non-absorbing wavelength of the sample fluid is made on the sample fluid from which an absorbance correction factor is determined. The absorbance correction factor is then applied to the measured light absorbance of the sample fluid to arrive at a true or accurate absorbance for the sample fluid.

  14. Computed a multiple band metamaterial absorber and its application based on the figure of merit value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Sheng, Yuping; Jun, Wang

    2018-01-01

    A high performed multiple band metamaterial absorber is designed and computed through the software Ansofts HFSS 10.0, which is constituted with two kinds of separated metal particles sub-structures. The multiple band absorption property of the metamaterial absorber is based on the resonance of localized surface plasmon (LSP) modes excited near edges of metal particles. The damping constant of gold layer is optimized to obtain a near-perfect absorption rate. Four kinds of dielectric layers is computed to achieve the perfect absorption perform. The perfect absorption perform of the metamaterial absorber is enhanced through optimizing the structural parameters (R = 75 nm, w = 80 nm). Moreover, a perfect absorption band is achieved because of the plasmonic hybridization phenomenon between LSP modes. The designed metamaterial absorber shows high sensitive in the changed of the refractive index of the liquid. A liquid refractive index sensor strategy is proposed based on the computed figure of merit (FOM) value of the metamaterial absorber. High FOM values (116, 111, and 108) are achieved with three liquid (Methanol, Carbon tetrachloride, and Carbon disulfide).

  15. Warm Absorber Diagnostics of AGN Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, Timothy

    Warm absorbers and related phenomena are observable manifestations of outflows or winds from active galactic nuclei (AGN) that have great potential value. Understanding AGN outflows is important for explaining the mass budgets of the central accreting black hole, and also for understanding feedback and the apparent co-evolution of black holes and their host galaxies. In the X-ray band warm absorbers are observed as photoelectric absorption and resonance line scattering features in the 0.5-10 keV energy band; the UV band also shows resonance line absorption. Warm absorbers are common in low luminosity AGN and they have been extensively studied observationally. They may play an important role in AGN feedback, regulating the net accretion onto the black hole and providing mechanical energy to the surroundings. However, fundamental properties of the warm absorbers are not known: What is the mechanism which drives the outflow?; what is the gas density in the flow and the geometrical distribution of the outflow?; what is the explanation for the apparent relation between warm absorbers and the surprising quasi-relativistic 'ultrafast outflows' (UFOs)? We propose a focused set of model calculations that are aimed at synthesizing observable properties of warm absorber flows and associated quantities. These will be used to explore various scenarios for warm absorber dynamics in order to answer the questions in the previous paragraph. The guiding principle will be to examine as wide a range as possible of warm absorber driving mechanisms, geometry and other properties, but with as careful consideration as possible to physical consistency. We will build on our previous work, which was a systematic campaign for testing important class of scenarios for driving the outflows. We have developed a set of tools that are unique and well suited for dynamical calculations including radiation in this context. We also have state-of-the-art tools for generating synthetic spectra, which are

  16. Absorber arc mitigation during CHI on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, D.; Bell, M. G.; Roquemore, A. L.; Raman, R.; Nelson, B. A.; Jarboe, T. R.

    2009-11-01

    A method of non-inductive startup, referred to as transient coaxial helicity injection (CHI), was successfully developed on the Helicity Injected Torus (HIT-II) experiment and employed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). This technique has produced 160 kA of plasma current on closed flux surfaces. Over 100 kA of the CHI current has been coupled to inductively driven current ramp-up. In transient CHI, a voltage is applied across the insulating gap separating the inner and outer vacuum vessel and gas is introduced at the lower gap (the injector). The resulting current in the injector follows the helical magnetic field connecting the electrodes, forms a toroidal current and expands into the vacuum vessel. At higher CHI current, the poloidal field due to the plasma can connect the inner and outer vessels at the insulating gap at the top (called the absorber) of NSTX and lower the impedance there. This results in arcs in the absorber which are a source of impurities and which reduce the desired current in the injector. Two coils installed in the absorber will be used to reduce the magnetic field across the absorber gap and mitigate the absorber arcs.

  17. Identifying the perfect absorption of metamaterial absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, G.; Schalch, J.; Zhao, X.; Zhang, J.; Averitt, R. D.; Zhang, X.

    2018-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the conditions that result in unity absorption in metamaterial absorbers to guide the design and optimization of this important class of functional electromagnetic composites. Multilayer absorbers consisting of a metamaterial layer, dielectric spacer, and ground plane are specifically considered. Using interference theory, the dielectric spacer thickness and resonant frequency for unity absorption can be numerically determined from the functional dependence of the relative phase shift of the total reflection. Further, using transmission line theory in combination with interference theory we obtain analytical expressions for the unity absorption resonance frequency and corresponding spacer layer thickness in terms of the bare resonant frequency of the metamaterial layer and metallic and dielectric losses within the absorber structure. These simple expressions reveal a redshift of the unity absorption frequency with increasing loss that, in turn, necessitates an increase in the thickness of the dielectric spacer. The results of our analysis are experimentally confirmed by performing reflection-based terahertz time-domain spectroscopy on fabricated absorber structures covering a range of dielectric spacer thicknesses with careful control of the loss accomplished through water absorption in a semiporous polyimide dielectric spacer. Our findings can be widely applied to guide the design and optimization of the metamaterial absorbers and sensors.

  18. Reflection by absorbing periodically stratified media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekner, John

    2014-03-01

    Existing theory gives the optical properties of a periodically stratified medium in terms of a two by two matrix. This theory is valid also for absorbing media, because the matrix remains unimodular. The main effect of absorption is that the reflection (of either polarization) becomes independent of the number of periods N, and of the substrate properties, provided N exceeds a certain value which depends on the absorption. The s and p reflections are then given by simple formulae. The stop-band structure, which gives total reflection in bands of frequency and angle of incidence in the non-absorbing case, remains influential in weakly absorbing media, causing strong variations in reflectivity. The theory is applied to the frequency dependence of the normal-incidence reflectivity of a quarter-wave stack in which the high-index and low-index layers both absorb weakly. Analytical expressions are obtained for the frequency at which the reflectivity is maximum, the maximum reflectivity, and also for the reflectivity at the band edges of the stop band of the non-absorbing stack.

  19. Forest Carbon Uptake and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zobitz, John

    2013-01-01

    Using the fundamental theorem of calculus and numerical integration, we investigate carbon absorption of ecosystems with measurements from a global database. The results illustrate the dynamic nature of ecosystems and their ability to absorb atmospheric carbon.

  20. The 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory, antioxidant, antimycobacterial activity and cytotoxicity of fourteen ethnomedicinally used African spices and culinary herbs.

    PubMed

    Dzoyem, Jean Paul; Kuete, Victor; McGaw, Lyndy J; Eloff, Jacobus N

    2014-10-28

    Culinary herbs and spices are widely used ethnomedically across Africa. They are traditionally employed in the treatment of several ailments including inflammation disorders, pain alleviation and infectious diseases. Pharmacological studies are necessary to provide a scientific basis to substantiate their traditional use and safety. In this study, the 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory, antioxidant, antimycobacterial and the cytotoxic activities, total phenolic and flavonoid contents of fourteen edible plants were investigated. The 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity was evaluated by the ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) assay method. The antioxidant activity was determined using free-radical scavenging assays. The antimycobacterial activity was determined by a broth microdilution method against three species of mycobacteria: Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium aurum and Mycobacterium fortuitum using tetrazolium violet as growth indicator. The cytotoxicity was assessed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay on Vero monkey kidney cells. All the extracts tested had some 15-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity ranging from 32.9 to 78.64%. Adansonia digitata (fruit) had the highest antioxidant capacity (IC₅₀ values of 8.15 μg/mL and 9.16 μg/mL in the DPPH and ABTS assays respectively; TEAC of 0.75 in the FRAP assay) along with the highest amount of total phenolics (237.68 mg GAE/g) and total flavonoids (16.14 mg E/g). There were good correlations between DPPH and ABTS values (R(2) 0.98) and between total phenolics and total flavonoids (R(2) 0.94). Tamarindus indica had significant antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium aurum (MIC 78 μg/mL). As could be expected with edible plants, all the extracts had a relatively low cytotoxicity with LC₅₀ values higher than 102 μg/mL with the exception of the two Aframomum species (33 and 74 μg/mL). This study provides scientific support for some of the the traditional uses

  1. Smart absorbing property of composites with MWCNTs and carbonyl iron as the filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yonggang; Yuan, Liming; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Deyuan

    2013-10-01

    A smart absorbing composite was prepared by mixing silicone rubber, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and flaky carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) in a two-roll mixer. The complex permittivity and permeability of composites with variable compression strain was measured by the transmission method and dc electric conductivity was measured by the standard four-point contact method, then the reflection loss (RL) could be calculated to evaluate the microwave absorbing ability. The results showed that the applied compression strain made the complex permittivity decrease but not obviously due to the broken original conductive network. The enforcement of the strain on the complex permeability was attributed to the orientation of flaky CIPs. With the compressing strain applied on the composites with thickness 1 mm or 1.5 mm, the RL value decreased (minimum -13.2 dB and -25.1 dB) and the absorbing band (RL<-10 dB) was widened (5.2-10.6 GHz and 4.0-8.4 GHz). While as the composite thickness decreased caused by the compression strain, the RL value still decreased (minimum -12.4 dB and -18.6 dB) and the absorbing band was also broadened (6.5-10.7 GHz and 4.4-10.0 GHz). Thus the smart absorbing property was effective on preparing absorbers with wide absorption band and high absorption ratio.

  2. Properties of CGM-Absorbing Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamill, Colin; Conway, Matthew; Apala, Elizabeth; Scott, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    We extend the results of a study of the sightlines of 45 low-redshift quasars (0.06 < z < 0.85) observed by HST/COS that lie within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We have used photometric data from the SDSS DR12, along with the known absorption characteristics of the intergalactic medium and circumgalactic medium, to identify the most probable galaxy matches to absorbers in the spectroscopic dataset. Here, we use photometric data and measured galaxy parameters from SDSS DR12 to examine the distributions of galaxy properties such as virial radius, morphology, and position angle among those that match to absorbers within a specific range of impact parameters. We compare those distributions to galaxies within the same impact parameter range that are not matched to any absorber in the HST/COS spectrum in order to investigate global properties of the circumgalactic medium.

  3. A wideband absorber for television studios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, M. D. M.

    The acoustic treatment in BBC television has taken various forms to date, all of which have been relatively expensive, some of which provide inadequate absorption. An investigation has been conducted into the possibilities of producing a new type of wideband absorber which would be more economic, also taking installation time into account, than earlier designs. This Report describes the absorption coefficient measurements made on various combinations of materials, from which a wideband sound absorber has been developed. The absorber works efficiently between 50 Hz and 10 kHz, is simple and easy to construct using readily available materials, and is fire resistant. The design lends itself, if necessary, to on-site fine tuning, and savings in the region of 50 percent can be achieved in terms of cost and space with respect to previous designs.

  4. Perfect narrow band absorber for sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shiwen; Zhao, Jun; Zuo, Duluo; Wang, Xinbing

    2016-05-02

    We design and numerically investigate a perfect narrow band absorber based on a metal-metal-dielectric-metal structure which consists of periodic metallic nanoribbon arrays. The absorber presents an ultra narrow absorption band of 1.11 nm with a nearly perfect absorption of over 99.9% in the infrared region. For oblique incidence, the absorber shows an absorption more than 95% for a wide range of incident angles from 0 to 50°. Structure parameters to the influence of the performance are investigated. The structure shows high sensing performance with a high sensitivity of 1170 nm/RIU and a large figure of merit of 1054. The proposed structure has great potential as a biosensor.

  5. Translatory shock absorber for attitude sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L.; Morgan, I. T., Jr.; Kirby, C. A. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A translatory shock absorber is provided for mounting an attitude sensor thereon for isolating a sensor from translatory vibrations. The translatory shock absorber includes a hollow block structure formed as one piece to form a parallelogram. The absorber block structure includes a movable top plate for supporting the attitude sensor and a fixed base plate with opposed side plates interposed between. At the junctions of the side plates, and the base and top plates, there are provided grooves which act as flexible hinges for attenuating translatory vibrations. A damping material is supported on a pedestal which is carried on the base plate between the side plates thereof. The top of the damping material rests against the bottom surface of the top plate for eliminating the resonant peaks of vibration.

  6. Optical analysis of solar energy tubular absorbers.

    PubMed

    Saltiel, C; Sokolov, M

    1982-11-15

    The energy absorbed by a solar energy tubular receiver element for a single incident ray is derived. Two types of receiver elements were analyzed: (1) an inner tube with an absorbing coating surrounded by a semitransparent cover tube, and (2) a semitransparent inner tube filled with an absorbing fluid surrounded by a semitransparent cover tube. The formation of ray cascades in the semitransparent tubes is considered. A numerical simulation to investigate the influence of the angle of incidence, sizing, thickness, and coefficient of extinction of the tubes was performed. A comparison was made between receiver elements with and without cover tubes. Ray tracing analyses in which rays were followed within the tubular receiver element as well as throughout the rest of the collector were performed for parabolic and circular trough concentrating collectors.

  7. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurementsmore » of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.« less

  8. Optical Properties and Aging of Light Absorbing Secondary Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jiumeng; Lin, Peng; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-10-14

    The light-absorbing organic aerosol (OA), commonly referred to as “brown carbon (BrC)”, has attracted considerable attention in recent years because of its potential to affect atmospheric radiation balance, especially in the ultraviolet region and thus impact photochemical processes. A growing amount of data has indicated that BrC is prevalent in the atmosphere, which has motivated numerous laboratory and field studies; however, our understanding of the relationship between the chemical composition and optical properties of BrC remains limited. We conducted chamber experiments to investigate the effect of various VOC precursors, NOx concentrations, photolysis time and relative humidity (RH) on the lightmore » absorption of selected secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Light absorption of chamber generated SOA samples, especially aromatic SOA, was found to increase with NOx concentration, at moderate RH, and for the shortest photolysis aging times. The highest mass absorption coefficients (MAC) value is observed from toluene SOA products formed under high NOx conditions at moderate RH, in which nitro-aromatics were previously identified as the major light absorbing compounds. BrC light absorption is observed to decrease with photolysis time, correlated with a decline of the organonitrate fraction of SOA. SOA formed from mixtures of aromatics and isoprene absorb less visible and UV light than SOA formed from aromatic precursors alone on a mass basis. However, the mixed-SOA absorption was underestimated when optical properties were predicted using a two-product SOA formation model, as done in many current climate models. Further investigation, including analysis on detailed mechanisms, are required to explain the discrepancy.« less

  9. Optimization of Perfect Absorbers with Multilayer Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li Voti, Roberto

    2018-02-01

    We study wide-angle and broadband perfect absorbers with compact multilayer structures made of a sequence of ITO and TiN layers deposited onto a silver thick layer. An optimization procedure is introduced for searching the optimal thicknesses of the layers so as to design a perfect broadband absorber from 400 nm to 750 nm, for a wide range of angles of incidence from 0{°} to 50{°}, for both polarizations and with a low emissivity in the mid-infrared. We eventually compare the performances of several optimal structures that can be very promising for solar thermal energy harvesting and collectors.

  10. Shock-Absorbent Ball-Screw Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirr, Otto A., Jr.; Meneely, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Actuator containing two ball screws in series employs Belleville springs to reduce impact loads, thereby increasing life expectancy. New application of springs increases reliability of equipment in which ball screws commonly used. Set of three springs within lower screw of ball-screw mechanism absorbs impacts that result when parts reach their upper and lower limits of movement. Mechanism designed with Belleville springs as shock-absorbing elements because springs have good energy-to-volume ratio and easily stacked to attain any stiffness and travel.

  11. Silver oxide sorbent for carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.

    1974-01-01

    Material can be regenerated at least 20 times by heating at 250 C. Sorbent is compatible with environment of high humidity; up to 20% by weight of carbon dioxide can be absorbed. Material is prepared from silver carbonate, potassium hydroxide or carbonate, and sodium silicate.

  12. Determination of Fluorine in Fourteen Microanalytical Geologic Reference Materials using SIMS, EPMA, and Proton Induced Gamma Ray Emission (PIGE) Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggino, S. N.; Hervig, R. L.

    2010-12-01

    Fluorine (F) is a volatile constituent of magmas and hydrous minerals, and trace amounts of F are incorporated into nominally anhydrous minerals such as olivine and clinopyroxene. Microanalytical techniques are routinely used to measure trace amounts of F at both high sensitivity and high spatial resolution in glasses and crystals. However, there are few well-established F concentrations for the glass standards routinely used in microanalytical laboratories, particularly standards of low silica, basaltic composition. In this study, we determined the F content of fourteen commonly used microanalytical glass standards of basaltic, intermediate, and rhyolitic composition. To serve as calibration standards, five basaltic glasses with ~0.2 to 2.5 wt% F were synthesized and characterized. A natural tholeiite from the East Pacific Rise was mixed with variable amounts of CaF2. The mixture was heated in a 1 atmosphere furnace to 1440 °C at fO2 = NNO for 30 minutes and quenched in water. Portions of the run products were studied by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The EPMA used a 15 µm diameter defocused electron beam with a 15 kV accelerating voltage and a 25 nA primary current, a TAP crystal for detecting FKα X-rays, and Biotite 3 as the F standard. The F contents by EPMA agreed with the F added to the basalts after correction for mass loss during melting. The SIMS analyses used a primary beam of 16O- and detection of low-energy negative ions (-5 kV) at a mass resolution that resolved 18OH. Both microanalytical techniques confirmed homogeneity, and the SIMS calibration defined by EPMA shows an excellent linear trend with backgrounds of 2 ppm or less. Analyses of basaltic glass standards based on our synthesized calibration standards gave the following F contents and 2σ errors (ppm): ALV-519 = 83 ± 3; BCR-2G = 359 ± 6; BHVO-2G = 322 ± 15; GSA-1G = 10 ± 1; GSC-1G = 11 ± 1; GSD-1G = 19 ± 2; GSE-1G = 173 ± 1; KL2G (MPI

  13. Composition for absorbing hydrogen from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Lee, Myung W.

    1999-01-01

    A hydrogen storage composition is provided which defines a physical sol-gel matrix having an average pore size of less than 3.5 angstroms which effectively excludes gaseous metal hydride poisons while permitting hydrogen gas to enter. The composition is useful for separating hydrogen gas from diverse gas streams which may have contaminants that would otherwise render the hydrogen absorbing material inactive.

  14. Tunable metamaterial dual-band terahertz absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, C. Y.; Li, Z. Z.; Guo, Z. H.; Yue, J.; Luo, Q.; Yao, G.; Ji, J.; Rao, Y. K.; Li, R. K.; Li, D.; Wang, H. X.; Yao, J. Q.; Ling, F. R.

    2015-11-01

    We report a design of a temperature controlled tunable dual band terahertz absorber. The compact single unit cell consists of two nested closed square ring resonators and a layer metallic separated by a substrate strontium titanate (STO) dielectric layer. It is found that the absorber has two distinctive absorption peaks at frequencies 0.096 THz and 0.137 THz, whose peaks are attained 97% and 75%. Cooling the absorber from 400 K to 250 K causes about 25% and 27% shift compared to the resonance frequency of room temperature, when we cooling the temperature to 150 K, we could attained both the two tunabilities exceeding 53%. The frequency tunability is owing to the variation of the dielectric constant of the low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrate. The mechanism of the dual band absorber is attributed to the overlapping of dual resonance frequencies, and could be demonstrated by the distributions of the electric field. The method opens up avenues for designing tunable terahertz devices in detection, imaging, and stealth technology.

  15. The design of broadband radar absorbing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suk, Go H.

    1990-09-01

    There has been a growing and widespread interest in radar absorbing material technology. As the name implies, radar absorbing materials or RAM's are coatings whose electric and magnetic properties have been selected to allow the absorption of microwave energy at discrete or broadband frequencies. In military applications low radar cross section (RCS) of a vehicle may be required in order to escape detection while a covert mission is being carried on. These requirements have led to the very low observable or stealth technology that reduces the probability of detection of an aircraft. The design of radar absorbing materials is limited by constraints on the allowable volume and weight of the surface coating, and it is difficult to design a broadband radar absorbing structure in limited volume. This thesis investigates the use of lossy dielectric materials of high dielectric permittivity in multilayer composites for the production of low radar cross section (RCS). The analysis is done by computing the plane wave reflection coefficient at the exterior surface of the composite coating by means of a computer program which selects layer parameters which determine low reflection coefficients for electromagnetic radiation under constraint of limited layer thickness as well as maximum frequency bandwidth.

  16. Review of Plasmonic Nanocomposite Metamaterial Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Hedayati, Mehdi Keshavarz; Faupel, Franz; Elbahri, Mady

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic metamaterials are artificial materials typically composed of noble metals in which the features of photonics and electronics are linked by coupling photons to conduction electrons of metal (known as surface _lasmon). These rationally designed structures have spurred interest noticeably since they demonstrate some fascinating properties which are unattainable with naturally occurring materials. Complete absorption of light is one of the recent exotic properties of plasmonic metamaterials which has broadened its application area considerably. This is realized by designing a medium whose impedance matches that of free space while being opaque. If such a medium is filled with some lossy medium, the resulting structure can absorb light totally in a sharp or broad frequency range. Although several types of metamaterials perfect absorber have been demonstrated so far, in the current paper we overview (and focus on) perfect absorbers based on nanocomposites where the total thickness is a few tens of nanometer and the absorption band is broad, tunable and insensitive to the angle of incidence. The nanocomposites consist of metal nanoparticles embedded in a dielectric matrix with a high filling factor close to the percolation threshold. The filling factor can be tailored by the vapor phase co-deposition of the metallic and dielectric components. In addition, novel wet chemical approaches are discussed which are bio-inspired or involve synthesis within levitating Leidenfrost drops, for instance. Moreover, theoretical considerations, optical properties, and potential application of perfect absorbers will be presented. PMID:28788511

  17. Multiobjective Topology Optimization of Energy Absorbing Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    absorbing liner for equestrian helmets. Part I: layered foam liner . Mater Des 30(9):3405–3413 Sethian J, Wiegmann A (2000) Structural boundary design via...Army Research Laboratory Wildman RA, Weile DS (2007) Geometry reconstruction of conduct- ing cylinders using genetic programming. IEEE Trans Antennas

  18. Integrated tuned vibration absorbers: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Gardonio, Paolo; Zilletti, Michele

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a simulation study on two integrated tuned vibration absorbers (TVAs) designed to control the global flexural vibration of lightly damped thin structures subject to broad frequency band disturbances. The first one consists of a single axial switching TVA composed by a seismic mass mounted on variable axial spring and damper elements so that the characteristic damping and natural frequency of the absorber can be switched iteratively to control the resonant response of three flexural modes of the hosting structure. The second one consists of a single three-axes TVA composed by a seismic mass mounted on axial and rotational springs and dampers, which are arranged in such a way that the suspended mass is characterized by uncoupled heave and pitch-rolling vibrations. In this case the three damping and natural frequency parameters of the absorber are tuned separately to control three flexural modes of the hosting structure. The simulation study shows that the proposed single-unit absorbers produce, respectively, 5.3 and 8.7 dB reductions of the global flexural vibration of a rectangular plate between 20 and 120 Hz.

  19. Novel shock absorber features varying yield strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geier, D. J.

    1964-01-01

    A shock absorbent webbing of partially drawn synthetic strands is arranged in sections of varying density related to the varying mass of the human body. This is contoured to protect the body at points of contact, when subjected to large acceleration or deceleration forces.

  20. Shock absorber protects motive components against overloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Shock absorber with an output shaft, hollow gear, and a pair of springs forming a resilient driving connection between shaft and gear, operates when abnormally high torques are applied. This simple durable frictional device is valuable in rotating mechanisms subject to sudden overloads.

  1. How to build a molecular shock absorber.

    PubMed

    McGough, A

    1999-12-02

    Newly determined structures of the alpha-helical repeats that make up the key 'rod' domains of spectrin and alpha-actinin - which serve as spacers between their actin-binding domains - have provided important insights into how these proteins function as molecular shock absorbers in cells.

  2. Torus elements used in effective shock absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, P.; Platus, D. L.

    1966-01-01

    Energy absorbing device forces torus elements to revolve annularly between two concentric tubes when a load is applied to one tube. Interference forces can be varied by using torus elements of different thicknesses. The device operates repeatedly in compression or tension, and under problems of large onset rate tolerance or structural overload.

  3. Shock absorbing mount for electrical components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, R. F., Jr.; Mayne, R. C. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A shock mount for installing electrical components on circuit boards is described. The shock absorber is made of viscoelastic material which interconnects the electrical components. With this system, shocks imposed on one component of the circuit are not transmitted to other components. A diagram of a typical circuit is provided.

  4. Metamaterial Absorber Based Multifunctional Sensor Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Z.; Mamedov, A. M.; Ozbay, E.

    2017-02-01

    In this study metamaterial based (MA) absorber sensor, integrated with an X-band waveguide, is numerically and experimentally suggested for important application including pressure, density sensing and marble type detecting applications based on rectangular split ring resonator, sensor layer and absorber layer that measures of changing in the dielectric constant and/or the thickness of a sensor layer. Changing of physical, chemical or biological parameters in the sensor layer can be detected by measuring the resonant frequency shifting of metamaterial absorber based sensor. Suggested MA based absorber sensor can be used for medical, biological, agricultural and chemical detecting applications in microwave frequency band. We compare the simulation and experimentally obtained results from the fabricated sample which are good agreement. Simulation results show that the proposed structure can detect the changing of the refractive indexes of different materials via special resonance frequencies, thus it could be said that the MA-based sensors have high sensitivity. Additionally due to the simple and tiny structures it could be adapted to other electronic devices in different sizes.

  5. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  6. Neutron absorbers and methods of forming at least a portion of a neutron absorber

    DOEpatents

    Guillen, Donna P; Porter, Douglas L; Swank, W David; Erickson, Arnold W

    2014-12-02

    Methods of forming at least a portion of a neutron absorber include combining a first material and a second material to form a compound, reducing the compound into a plurality of particles, mixing the plurality of particles with a third material, and pressing the mixture of the plurality of particles and the third material. One or more components of neutron absorbers may be formed by such methods. Neutron absorbers may include a composite material including an intermetallic compound comprising hafnium aluminide and a matrix material comprising pure aluminum.

  7. Multi-Level Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of Two Composite Energy Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Annett, Martin S.; Seal, Michael D., II

    2015-01-01

    Two composite energy absorbers were developed and evaluated at NASA Langley Research Center through multi-level testing and simulation performed under the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) research program. A conical-shaped energy absorber, designated the conusoid, was evaluated that consisted of four layers of hybrid carbon-Kevlar plain weave fabric oriented at [+45 deg/-45 deg/-45 deg/+45 deg] with respect to the vertical, or crush, direction. A sinusoidal-shaped energy absorber, designated the sinusoid, was developed that consisted of hybrid carbon-Kevlar plain weave fabric face sheets, two layers for each face sheet oriented at +/-45deg with respect to the vertical direction and a closed-cell ELFOAM P200 polyisocyanurate (2.0-lb/cu ft) foam core. The design goal for the energy absorbers was to achieve average floor-level accelerations of between 25- and 40-g during the full-scale crash test of a retrofitted CH-46E helicopter airframe, designated TRACT 2. Variations in both designs were assessed through dynamic crush testing of component specimens. Once the designs were finalized, subfloor beams of each configuration were fabricated and retrofitted into a barrel section of a CH-46E helicopter. A vertical drop test of the barrel section was conducted onto concrete to evaluate the performance of the energy absorbers prior to retrofit into TRACT 2. The retrofitted airframe was crash tested under combined forward and vertical velocity conditions onto soil, which is characterized as a sand/clay mixture. Finite element models were developed of all test articles and simulations were performed using LS-DYNA, a commercial nonlinear explicit transient dynamic finite element code. Test-analysis results are presented for each energy absorber as comparisons of time-history responses, as well as predicted and experimental structural deformations and progressive damage under impact loading for each evaluation level.

  8. Porphyrin Based Near Infrared-Absorbing Materials for Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Qiwen

    photosynthesis. Photosynthesis uses light from the sun to drive a series of chemical reactions. Most natural photosynthetic systems utilize chlorophylls to absorb light energy and carry out photochemical charge separation that stores energy in the form of chemical bonds. The sun produces a broad spectrum of light output that ranges from gamma rays to radio waves. The entire visible range of light (400-700 nm) and some wavelengths in the NIR (700-1000 nm), are highly active in driving photosynthesis. Although the most familiar chlorophyll-containing organisms, such as plants, algae and cyanobacteria, cannot use light longer than 700 nm, anoxygenic bacterium containing bacteriochlorophylls can use the NIR part of the solar spectrum. No organism is known to utilize light of wavelength longer than about 1000 nm for photosynthesis. NIR light has a very low-energy content in each photon, so that large numbers of these low-energy photons would have to be used to drive the chemical reactions of photosynthesis. This is thermodynamically possible but would require a fundamentally different molecular mechanism that is more akin to a heat engine than to photochemistry. Early work on developing light absorbing materials for OPVs was inspired by photosynthesis in which light is absorbed by chlorophyll. Structurally related to chlorophyll is the porphyrin family, which has accordingly drawn much interest as the potential light absorbing component in OPV applications. In this dissertation, the design and detail studies of several porphyrin-based NIR absorbing materials, including pi--extended perylenyl porphryins and pyrazole-containing carbaporphyrins, as well as porphyrin modified single-walled carbon nanotube hybrids, will be presented, dedicating efforts to develop novel and application-oriented materials for efficient utilization of sustainable solar energy.

  9. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  10. Intrascleral outflow after deep sclerectomy with absorbable and non-absorbable implants in the rabbit eye.

    PubMed

    Kałużny, Jakub J; Grzanka, Dariusz; Wiśniewska, Halina; Niewińska, Alicja; Kałużny, Bartłomiej J; Grzanka, Alina

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of the study is an analysis of intrascleral drainage vessels formed in rabbits' eyes after non-penetrating deep sclerectomy (NPDS) with absorbable and non-absorbable implants, and comparison to eyes in which surgery was performed without implanted material. NPDS was carried out in 12 rabbits, with implantation of non-absorbable methacrylic hydrogel (N=10 eyes) or absorbable cross-linked sodium hyaluronate (N=6 eyes), or without any implant (N=8 eyes). All the animals were euthanized 1 year after surgery. Twenty-one eyeballs were prepared for light microscopy and 3 were prepared for transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. Aqueous humour pathways were stained with ferritin in 6 eyeballs. By light microscopy, small vessels adjacent to the areas of scarring were the most common abnormality. Vessel density was significantly higher in operated sclera compared to normal, healthy tissue, regardless of the type of implant used. The average vessel densities were 2.18±1.48 vessels/mm2 in non-implanted sclera, 2.34±1.69 vessels/mm2 in eyes with absorbable implants, and 3.64±1.78 vessels/mm2 in eyes with non-absorbable implants. Analysis of iron distribution in ferritin-injected eyes showed a positive reaction inside new aqueous draining vessels in all groups. TEM analysis showed that the ultrastructure of new vessels matched the features of the small veins. Aqueous outflow after NPDS can be achieved through the newly formed network of small intrascleral veins. Use of non-absorbable implants significantly increases vessel density in the sclera adjacent to implanted material compared to eyes in which absorbable implants or no implants were used.

  11. Factorial Based Response Surface Modeling with Confidence Intervals for Optimizing Thermal Optical Transmission Analysis of Atmospheric Black Carbon

    EPA Science Inventory

    We demonstrate how thermal-optical transmission analysis (TOT) for refractory light-absorbing carbon in atmospheric particulate matter was optimized with empirical response surface modeling. TOT employs pyrolysis to distinguish the mass of black carbon (BC) from organic carbon (...

  12. Removal of persistent organic pollutants from micro-polluted drinking water by triolein embedded absorbent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huijuan; Ru, Jia; Qu, Jiuhui; Dai, Ruihua; Wang, Zijian; Hu, Chun

    2009-06-01

    A new biomimetic absorbent, cellulose acetate (CA) embedded with triolein (CA-triolein), was prepared and applied for the removal of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from micro-polluted aqueous solution. The comparison of CA-triolein, CA and granular activated carbon (GAC) for dieldrin removal was investigated. Results showed that CA-triolein absorbent gave a lowest residual concentration after 24 h although GAC had high removal rate in the first 4 h adsorption. Then the removal efficiency of mixed POPs (e.g. aldrin, dieldrin, endrin and heptachlor epoxide), absorption isotherm, absorbent regeneration and initial column experiments of CA-triolein were studied in detail. The linear absorption isotherm and the independent absorption in binary isotherm indicated that the selected POPs are mainly absorbed onto CA-triolein absorbent by a partition mechanism. The absorption constant, K, was closely related to the hydrophobic property of the compound. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the absorption was spontaneous, with a high affinity and the absorption was an endothermic reaction. Rinsing with hexane the CA-triolein absorbent can be regenerated after absorption of POPs. No significant decrease in the dieldrin removal efficiency was observed even when the absorption-regeneration process was repeated for five times. The results of initial column experiments showed that the CA-triolein absorbent did not reach the breakthrough point at a breakthrough empty-bed volume (BV) of 3200 when the influent concentration was 1-1.5 microg/L and the empty-bed contact time (EBCT) was 20 min.

  13. On the radiative effects of light-absorbing impurities on snowpack evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, M.; Tuzet, F.; Lafaysse, M.; Arnaud, L.; Picard, G.; Lejeune, Y.; Lamare, M.; Morin, S.; Voisin, D.; Di Mauro, B.

    2017-12-01

    The presence of light absorbing impurities in snow strongly decreases snow reflectance leading to an increase in the amount of solar energy absorbed by the snowpack. This effect is also known as impurities direct radiative effect. The change in the amount of energy absorbed by the snowpack modifies the temperature profile inside the snowpack and in turn snow metamorphism (impurities indirect radiative effects). In this work, we used the detailed snowpack model SURFEX/ISBA-Crocus with an explicit representation of snow light-absorbing impurities content (Tuzet et al., 2017) fed by medium-resolution ALADIN-Climate atmospheric model to represent dust and black carbon atmospheric deposition fluxes. The model is used at two sites: Col de Porte (medium elevation site in the French Alps) and Torgnon (high elevation site in the Italian Alps). The simulations are compared to in-situ observations and used to quantify the effects of light-absorbing impurities on snow melt rate and timing. The respective parts of the direct and indirect radiative effects of light-absorbing impurities in snow are also computed for the two sites, emphasizing the need to account for the interactions between snow metamorphism and LAI radiative properties, to accurately predict the effects of light-absorbing impurities in snow. Moreover, we describe how automated hyperspectral reflectance can be used to estimate effective impurities surface content in snow. Finally we demonstrate how these reflectances measurements either from in situ or satellite data can be used via an assimilation scheme to constrain snowpack ensemble simulations and better predict the snowpack state and evolution.

  14. Optimization of sound absorbing performance for gradient multi-layer-assembled sintered fibrous absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Weiyong; Zhu, Jian

    2012-04-01

    The transfer matrix method, based on plane wave theory, of multi-layer equivalent fluid is employed to evaluate the sound absorbing properties of two-layer-assembled and three-layer-assembled sintered fibrous sheets (generally regarded as a kind of compound absorber or structures). Two objective functions which are more suitable for the optimization of sound absorption properties of multi-layer absorbers within the wider frequency ranges are developed and the optimized results of using two objective functions are also compared with each other. It is found that using the two objective functions, especially the second one, may be more helpful to exert the sound absorbing properties of absorbers at lower frequencies to the best of their abilities. Then the calculation and optimization of sound absorption properties of multi-layer-assembled structures are performed by developing a simulated annealing genetic arithmetic program and using above-mentioned objective functions. Finally, based on the optimization in this work the thoughts of the gradient design over the acoustic parameters- the porosity, the tortuosity, the viscous and thermal characteristic lengths and the thickness of each samples- of porous metals are put forth and thereby some useful design criteria upon the acoustic parameters of each layer of porous fibrous metals are given while applying the multi-layer-assembled compound absorbers in noise control engineering.

  15. Impedance matched thin metamaterials make metals absorbing.

    PubMed

    Mattiucci, N; Bloemer, M J; Aközbek, N; D'Aguanno, G

    2013-11-13

    Metals are generally considered good reflectors over the entire electromagnetic spectrum up to their plasma frequency. Here we demonstrate an approach to tailor their absorbing characteristics based on the effective metamaterial properties of thin, periodic metallo-dielectric multilayers by exploiting a broadband, inherently non-resonant, surface impedance matching mechanism. Based on this mechanism, we design, fabricate and test omnidirectional, thin (<1 micron), polarization independent, extremely efficient absorbers (in principle being capable to reach A > 99%) over a frequency range spanning from the UV to the IR. Our approach opens new venues to design cost effective materials for many applications such as thermo-photovoltaic energy conversion devices, light harvesting for solar cells, flat panel display, infrared detectors, stray light reduction, stealth and others.

  16. Investigations on Absorber Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Marhauser, Frank; Elliott, Thomas; Rimmer, Robert

    2009-05-01

    In the framework of the 12 GeV upgrade project for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) improvements are being made to refurbish cryomodules housing Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's (JLab) original 5-cell cavities. Recently we have started to look into a possible simplification of the existing Higher Order Mode (HOM) absorber design combined with the aim to find alternative material candidates. The absorbers are implemented in two HOM-waveguides immersed in the helium bath and operate at 2 K temperature. We have built a cryogenic setup to perform measurements on sample load materials to investigate their lossy characteristics and variationsmore » from room temperature down to 2 K. Initial results are presented in this paper.« less

  17. Absorbing Software Testing into the Scrum Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuomikoski, Janne; Tervonen, Ilkka

    In this paper we study, how to absorb software testing into the Scrum method. We conducted the research as an action research during the years 2007-2008 with three iterations. The result showed that testing can and even should be absorbed to the Scrum method. The testing team was merged into the Scrum teams. The teams can now deliver better working software in a shorter time, because testing keeps track of the progress of the development. Also the team spirit is higher, because the Scrum team members are committed to the same goal. The biggest change from test manager’s point of view was the organized Product Owner Team. Test manager don’t have testing team anymore, and in the future all the testing tasks have to be assigned through the Product Backlog.

  18. Brief review of emerging photovoltaic absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Zakutayev, Andriy

    Photovoltaic solar cells have recently made significant commercial progress and are on track toward meeting more than 1% of global energy demand. However, further research is needed on photovoltaic technologies that face no scalability constraints in generating more than 10% of the world's electricity. This 2017 article briefly reviews emerging photovoltaic absorber materials, focusing on research progress over the past 2-3 years. Particular emphasis is given to emerging solar cell absorbers -- for example, SnS, Sb 2Se 3, Cu 2SnS 3, and CuSbSe 2 -- related to established solar cell technologies such as CdTe, Cu(In,Ga)Se 2, and CH 3NH 3PbImore » 3. Lastly, the general publication and performance trends are discussed, and the promising future research directions are pointed out.« less

  19. Brief review of emerging photovoltaic absorbers

    DOE PAGES

    Zakutayev, Andriy

    2017-02-08

    Photovoltaic solar cells have recently made significant commercial progress and are on track toward meeting more than 1% of global energy demand. However, further research is needed on photovoltaic technologies that face no scalability constraints in generating more than 10% of the world's electricity. This 2017 article briefly reviews emerging photovoltaic absorber materials, focusing on research progress over the past 2-3 years. Particular emphasis is given to emerging solar cell absorbers -- for example, SnS, Sb 2Se 3, Cu 2SnS 3, and CuSbSe 2 -- related to established solar cell technologies such as CdTe, Cu(In,Ga)Se 2, and CH 3NH 3PbImore » 3. Lastly, the general publication and performance trends are discussed, and the promising future research directions are pointed out.« less

  20. Shock wave absorber having apertured plate

    DOEpatents

    Shin, Y.W.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

  1. Fault Detection for Automotive Shock Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Alcantara, Diana; Morales-Menendez, Ruben; Amezquita-Brooks, Luis

    2015-11-01

    Fault detection for automotive semi-active shock absorbers is a challenge due to the non-linear dynamics and the strong influence of the disturbances such as the road profile. First obstacle for this task, is the modeling of the fault, which has been shown to be of multiplicative nature. Many of the most widespread fault detection schemes consider additive faults. Two model-based fault algorithms for semiactive shock absorber are compared: an observer-based approach and a parameter identification approach. The performance of these schemes is validated and compared using a commercial vehicle model that was experimentally validated. Early results shows that a parameter identification approach is more accurate, whereas an observer-based approach is less sensible to parametric uncertainty.

  2. Infrared bolometers with silicon nitride micromesh absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, J. J.; Turner, A. D.; DelCastillo, H. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Lange, A. E.; Mauskopf, P. D.

    1996-01-01

    Sensitive far infrared and millimeter wave bolometers fabricated from a freestanding membrane of low stress silicon nitride are reported. The absorber, consisting of a metallized silicon nitride micromesh thermally isolated by radial legs of silicon nitride, is placed in an integrating cavity to efficiently couple to single mode or multiple mode infrared radiation. This structure provides low heat capacity, low thermal conduction and minimal cross section to energetic particles. A neutron transmutation doped Ge thermister is bump bonded to the center of the device and read out with evaporated Cr-Au leads. The limiting performance of the micromesh absorber is discussed and the recent results obtained from a 300 mK cold stage are summarized.

  3. Development of an innovative solar absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodchild, Gavin

    Solar thermal systems have great potential to replace or reduce the dependence of conventional fossil fuel based heating technologies required for space and water heating. Specifically solar domestic hot water systems can contribute 50-75% of the annual thermal load. To date residential users have been slow to purchase and install systems, primarily due to the large monetary investment required to purchase and install a system. Recent innovations in materials design and manufacturing techniques, offer opportunities for the development of absorber plate designs that have the potential to reduce cost, increase efficiency and reduce payback periods. Consequently, this design study was conducted in conjunction with industrial partners to develop an improved absorber based on roll bond manufacturing that can be produced at reduced cost with comparable or greater thermal efficiency.

  4. Shock wave absorber having apertured plate

    DOEpatents

    Shin, Yong W.; Wiedermann, Arne H.; Ockert, Carl E.

    1985-01-01

    The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

  5. Use of Wedge Absorbers in MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, D.; Summers, D.; Mohayai, T.

    2017-03-01

    Wedge absorbers are needed to obtain longitudinal cooling in ionization cooling. They also can be used to obtain emittance exchanges between longitudinal and transverse phase space. There can be large exchanges in emittance, even with single wedges. In the present note we explore the use of wedge absorbers in the MICE experiment to obtain transverse–longitudinal emittance exchanges within present and future operational conditions. The same wedge can be used to explore “direct” and “reverse” emittance exchange dynamics, where direct indicates a configuration that reduces momentum spread and reverse is a configuration that increases momentum spread. Analytical estimated and ICOOL andmore » G4BeamLine simulations of the exchanges at MICE parameters are presented. Large exchanges can be obtained in both reverse and direct configurations.« less

  6. Photocurable acrylic composition, and U. V. curing with development of U. V. absorber

    DOEpatents

    McKoy, V.B.; Gupta, A.

    1992-08-25

    In-situ development of an ultraviolet absorber is provided by a compound such as a hydroxy-phenyl-triazole containing a group which protects the absorber during actinically activated polymerization by light at first frequency. After polymerization the protective group is removed by actinic reaction at a second frequency lower than the first frequency. The protective group is formed by replacing the hydrogen of the hydroxyl group with an acyl group containing 1 to 3 carbon atoms or an acryloxy group of the formula shown in a figure where R[sup 1] is either an alkyl containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms or --CH[double bond]CH[sub 2]. 2 figs.

  7. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Duoss, Eric

    2018-01-16

    Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  8. Lightweight Energy Absorbers for Blast Containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balles, Donald L.; Ingram, Thomas M.; Novak, Howard L.; Schricker, Albert F.

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic-energy-absorbing liners made of aluminum foam have been developed to replace solid lead liners in blast containers on the aft skirt of the solid rocket booster of the space shuttle. The blast containers are used to safely trap the debris from small explosions that are initiated at liftoff to sever frangible nuts on hold-down studs that secure the spacecraft to a mobile launch platform until liftoff.

  9. Tech Transfer Webinar: Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Duoss, Eric

    2018-01-16

    A new material has been designed and manufactured at LLNL that can absorb mechanical energy--a cushion--while also providing protection against sheering. This ordered cellular material is 3D printed using direct ink writing techniques under development at LLNL. It is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  10. Precision Controlled Carbon Materials for Next-Generation Optoelectronic and Photonic Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2018-01-08

    absorbers. Semiconducting nanotubes are strong, dye-like absorbers with bandgaps tunable to the ideal for single-junction solar PV ~1.3 eV or deeper...semiconducting carbon nanotube-based photovoltaic solar cells and photodetectors; (2) high-performance carbon nanotube electronics; (3) stretchable...photovoltaic solar cells and photodetectors Semiconducting carbon nanotubes are attractive absorbers for photovoltaic and photodetector devices. The

  11. Microscopic modeling of nitride intersubband absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montano, Ines; Allerman, A. A.; Wierer, J. J.; Moseley, M.; Skogen, E. J.; Tauke-Pedretti, A.; Vawter, G. A.

    III-nitride intersubband structures have recently attracted much interest because of their potential for a wide variety of applications ranging from electro-optical modulators to terahertz quantum cascade lasers. To overcome present simulation limitations we have developed a microscopic absorbance simulator for nitride intersubband devices. Our simulator calculates the band structure of nitride intersubband systems using a fully coupled 8x8 k.p Hamiltonian and determines the material response of a single period in a density-matrix-formalism by solving the Heisenberg equation including many-body and dephasing contributions. After calculating the polarization due to intersubband transitions in a single period, the resulting absorbance of a superlattice structure including radiative coupling between the different periods is determined using a non-local Green's-function formalism. As a result our simulator allows us to predict intersubband absorbance of superlattice structures with microscopically determined lineshapes and linewidths accounting for both many-body and correlation contributions. This work is funded by Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory Directed Research and Development program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin.

  12. Development of monofilar rotor hub vibration absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duh, J.; Miao, W.

    1983-01-01

    A design and ground test program was conducted to study the performance of the monofilar absorber for vibration reduction on a four-bladed helicopter. A monofilar is a centrifugal tuned two degree-of-freedom rotor hub absorber that provides force attenuation at two frequencies using the same dynamic mass. Linear and non-linear analyses of the coupled monofilar/airframe system were developed to study tuning and attenuation characteristics. Based on the analysis, a design was fabricated and impact bench tests verified the calculated non-rotating natural frequencies and mode shapes. Performance characteristics were measured using a rotating absorber test facility. These tests showed significant attenuation of fixed-system 4P hub motions due to 3P inplane rotating-system hub forces. In addition, detuning effects of the 3P monofilar modal response were small due to the nonlinearities and tuning pin slippage. However, attenuation of 4P hub motions due to 5P inplane hub forces was poor. The performance of the 5P monofilar modal response was degraded by torsional motion of the dynamic mass relative to the support arm which resulted in binding of the dynamic components. Analytical design studies were performed to evaluate this torsional motion problem. An alternative design is proposed which may alleviate the torsional motion of the dynamic mass.

  13. Shock wave absorber having a deformable liner

    DOEpatents

    Youngdahl, C.K.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Shin, Y.W.; Kot, C.A.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    This invention discloses a shock wave absorber for a piping system carrying liquid. The absorber has a plastically deformable liner defining the normal flow boundary for an axial segment of the piping system, and a nondeformable housing is spaced outwardly from the liner so as to define a gas-tight space therebetween. The flow capacity of the liner generally corresponds to the flow capacity of the piping system line, but the liner has a noncircular cross section and extends axially of the piping system line a distance between one and twenty times the diameter thereof. Gas pressurizes the gas-tight space equal to the normal liquid pressure in the piping system. The liner has sufficient structural capacity to withstand between one and one-half and two times this normal liquid pressures; but at greater pressures it begins to plastically deform initially with respect to shape to a more circular cross section, and then with respect to material extension by circumferentially stretching the wall of the liner. A high energy shock wave passing through the liner thus plastically deforms the liner radially into the gas space and progressively also as needed in the axial direction of the shock wave to minimize transmission of the shock wave beyond the absorber.

  14. SINIS bolometer with a suspended absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, M.; Edelman, V.; Mahashabde, S.; Fominsky, M.; Lemzyakov, S.; Chekushkin, A.; Yusupov, R.; Winkler, D.; Yurgens, A.

    2018-03-01

    We have developed a Superconductor-Insulator-Normal Metal-Insulator-Superconductor (SINIS) bolometer with a suspended normal metal bridge. The suspended bridge acts as a bolometric absorber with reduced heat losses to the substrate. Such bolometers were characterized at 100-350 mK bath temperatures and electrical responsivity of over 109 V/W was measured by dc heating the absorber through additional contacts. Suspended bolometers were also integrated in planar twin-slot and log-periodic antennas for operation in the submillimetre-band of radiation. The measured voltage response to radiation at 300 GHz and at 100 mK bath temperature is 3*108 V/W and a current response is 1.1*104 A/W which corresponds to a quantum efficiency of ~15 electrons per photon. An important feature of such suspended bolometers is the thermalization of electrons in the absorber heated by optical radiation, which in turn provides better quantum efficiency. This has been confirmed by comparison of bolometric response to dc and rf heating. We investigate the performance of direct SN traps and NIS traps with a tunnel barrier between the superconductor and normal metal trap. Increasing the volume of superconducting electrode helps to reduce overheating of superconductor. Influence of Andreev reflection and Kapitza resistance, as well as electron-phonon heat conductivity and thermal conductivity of N-wiring are estimated for such SINIS devices.

  15. Heaving buoys, point absorbers and arrays.

    PubMed

    Falnes, Johannes; Hals, Jørgen

    2012-01-28

    Absorption of wave energy may be considered as a phenomenon of interference between incident and radiated waves generated by an oscillating object; a wave-energy converter (WEC) that displaces water. If a WEC is very small in comparison with one wavelength, it is classified as a point absorber (PA); otherwise, as a 'quasi-point absorber'. The latter may be a dipole-mode radiator, for instance an immersed body oscillating in the surge mode or pitch mode, while a PA is so small that it should preferably be a source-mode radiator, for instance a heaving semi-submerged buoy. The power take-off capacity, the WEC's maximum swept volume and preferably also its full physical volume should be reasonably matched to the wave climate. To discuss this matter, two different upper bounds for absorbed power are applied in a 'Budal diagram'. It appears that, for a single WEC unit, a power capacity of only about 0.3 MW matches well to a typical offshore wave climate, and the full physical volume has, unfortunately, to be significantly larger than the swept volume, unless phase control is used. An example of a phase-controlled PA is presented. For a sizeable wave-power plant, an array consisting of hundreds, or even thousands, of mass-produced WEC units is required.

  16. Timing the warm absorber in NGC4051

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C.; Uttley, P.; Costantini, E.

    2015-07-01

    In this work we have combined spectral and timing analysis in the characterization of highly ionized outflows in Seyfert galaxies, the so-called warm absorbers. Here, we present our results on the extensive ˜600ks of XMM-Newton archival observations of the bright and highly variable Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC4051, whose spectrum has revealed a complex multi-component wind. Working simultaneously with RGS and PN data, we have performed a detailed analysis using a time-dependent photoionization code in combination with spectral and Fourier timing techniques. This method allows us to study in detail the response of the gas due to variations in the ionizing flux of the central source. As a result, we will show the contribution of the recombining gas to the time delays of the most highly absorbed energy bands relative to the continuum (Silva, Uttley & Costantini in prep.), which is also vital information for interpreting the continuum lags associated with propagation and reverberation effects in the inner emitting regions. Furthermore, we will illustrate how this powerful method can be applied to other sources and warm-absorber configurations, allowing for a wide range of studies.

  17. Wide band cryogenic ultra-high vacuum microwave absorber

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, I.E.

    1992-05-12

    An absorber waveguide assembly for absorbing higher order modes of microwave energy under cryogenic ultra-high vacuum conditions, that absorbs wide-band multi-mode energy. The absorber is of a special triangular shape, made from flat tiles of silicon carbide and aluminum nitride. The leading sharp end of the absorber is located in a corner of the waveguide and tapers to a larger cross-sectional area whose center is located approximately in the center of the wave guide. The absorber is relatively short, being of less height than the maximum width of the waveguide. 11 figs.

  18. Wide band cryogenic ultra-high vacuum microwave absorber

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, Isidoro E.

    1992-01-01

    An absorber wave guide assembly for absorbing higher order modes of microwave energy under cryogenic ultra-high vacuum conditions, that absorbs wide-band multi-mode energy. The absorber is of a special triangular shape, made from flat tiles of silicon carbide and aluminum nitride. The leading sharp end of the absorber is located in a corner of the wave guide and tapers to a larger cross-sectional area whose center is located approximately in the center of the wave guide. The absorber is relatively short, being of less height than the maximum width of the wave guide.

  19. Electromagnetic scattering from microwave absorbers - Laboratory verification of the coupled wave theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Jackson, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    W-band measurements of the bistatic scattering function of some common microwave absorbing structures, including periodic wedge-type and pyramid-type iron-epoxy calibration loads and flat carbon-foam 'Echosorb' samples, were made using a network analyzer interface to a focused-lens scattering range. Swept frequency measurements over the 75-100 GHz band revealed specular and Bragg reflection characteristics in the measured data.

  20. Carbon Dioxide Absorption Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A carbon dioxide absorption heat pump cycle is disclosed using a high pressure stage and a super-critical cooling stage to provide a non-toxic system. Using carbon dioxide gas as the working fluid in the system, the present invention desorbs the CO2 from an absorbent and cools the gas in the super-critical state to deliver heat thereby. The cooled CO2 gas is then expanded thereby providing cooling and is returned to an absorber for further cycling. Strategic use of heat exchangers can increase the efficiency and performance of the system.

  1. Modeling the Effect of Polychromatic Light in Quantitative Absorbance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rachel; Cantrell, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory experiment is conducted to give the students practical experience with the principles of electronic absorbance spectroscopy. This straightforward approach creates a powerful tool for exploring many of the aspects of quantitative absorbance spectroscopy.

  2. Impacts of Snow Darkening by Absorbing Aerosols on Eurasian Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Kyu-Myong; Lau, William K M.; Yasunari, Teppei J.; Kim, Maeng-Ki; Koster, Randal D.

    2016-01-01

    The deposition of absorbing aerosols on snow surfaces reduces snow-albedo and allows snowpack to absorb more sunlight. This so-called snow darkening effect (SDE) accelerates snow melting and leads to surface warming in spring. To examine the impact of SDE on weather and climate during late spring and early summer, two sets of NASA GEOS-5 model simulations with and without SDE are conducted. Results show that SDE-induced surface heating is particularly pronounced in Eurasian regions where significant depositions of dust transported from the North African deserts, and black carbon from biomass burning from Asia and Europe occur. In these regions, the surface heating due to SDE increases surface skin temperature by 3-6 degrees Kelvin near the snowline in spring. Surface energy budget analysis indicates that SDE-induced excess heating is associated with a large increase in surface evaporation, subsequently leading to a significant reduction in soil moisture, and increased risks of drought and heat waves in late spring to early summer. Overall, we find that rainfall deficit combined with SDE-induced dry soil in spring provide favorable condition for summertime heat waves over large regions of Eurasia. Increased frequency of summer heat waves with SDE and the region of maximum increase in heat-wave frequency are found along the snow line, providing evidence that early snowmelt by SDE may increase the risks of extreme summer heat wave. Our results suggest that climate models that do not include SDE may significantly underestimate the effect of global warming over extra-tropical continental regions.

  3. Dynamic testing of airplane shock-absorbing struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, P; Thome, W

    1932-01-01

    Measurement of perpendicular impacts of a landing gear with different shock-absorbing struts against the drum testing stand. Tests were made with pneumatic shock absorbers having various degrees of damping, liquid shock absorbers, steel-spring shock absorbers and rigid struts. Falling tests and rolling tests. Maximum impact and gradual reduction of the impacts in number and time in the falling tests. Maximum impact and number of weaker impacts in rolling tests.

  4. An Energy Absorber for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Bob; Laurence, Lora

    2000-01-01

    The energy absorber described herein is similar in size and shape to an automotive shock absorber, requiring a constant, high load to compress over the stroke, and self-resetting with a small load. The differences in these loads over the stroke represent the energy absorbed by the device, which is dissipated as friction. This paper describes the evolution of the energy absorber, presents the results of testing performed, and shows the sensitivity of this device to several key design variables.

  5. Burnable absorber arrangement for fuel bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Crowther, R.L.; Townsend, D.B.

    1986-12-16

    This patent describes a boiling water reactor core whose operation is characterized by a substantial proportion of steam voids with concomitantly reduced moderation toward the top of the core when the reactor is in its hot operating condition. The reduced moderation leads to slower burnup and greater conversion ratio in an upper core region so that when the reactor is in its cold shut down condition the resulting relatively increased moderation in the upper core region is accompanied by a reactivity profile that peaks in the upper core region. A fuel assembly is described comprising; a component of fissile materialmore » distributed over a substantial axial extent of the fuel assembly; and a component of neutron absorbing material having an axial distribution characterized by an enhancement in an axial zone of the fuel assembly, designated the cold shutdown control zone, corresponding to at least a portion of the axial region of the core when the cold shutdown reactivity peaks. The aggregate amount of neutron absorbing material in the cold shutdown zone of the fuel assembly is greater than the aggregate amount of neutron absorbing material in the axial zones of the fuel assembly immediately above and immediately below the cold shutdown control zone whereby the cold shutdown reactivity peak is reduced relative to the cold shutdown reactivity in the zones immediately above and immediately below the cold shutdown control zone. The cold shutdown zone has an axial extent measured from the bottom of the fuel assembly in the range between 68-88 percent of the height of the fissile material in the fuel assembly.« less

  6. About sound mufflers sound-absorbing panels aircraft engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudarev, A. S.; Bulbovich, R. V.; Svirshchev, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    The article provides a formula for calculating the frequency of sound absorbed panel with a perforated wall. And although the sound absorbing structure is a set of resonators Helmholtz, not individual resonators should be considered in acoustic calculations, and all the perforated wall panel. The analysis, showing how the parameters affect the size and sound-absorbing structures in the absorption rate.

  7. 21 CFR 880.5300 - Medical absorbent fiber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical absorbent fiber. 880.5300 Section 880.5300...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5300 Medical absorbent fiber. (a) Identification. A medical absorbent fiber is a device...

  8. 21 CFR 880.5300 - Medical absorbent fiber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical absorbent fiber. 880.5300 Section 880.5300...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Therapeutic Devices § 880.5300 Medical absorbent fiber. (a) Identification. A medical absorbent fiber is a device...

  9. DHCAL with minimal absorber: measurements with positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, B.; Neubüser, C.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Dotti, A.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Brianne, E.; Ebrahimi, A.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Irles, A.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morgunov, V.; Provenza, A.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Schuwalow, S.; Tran, H. L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Schroeder, S.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kovalcuk, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; van Doren, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Hirai, H.; Sudo, Y.; Suehara, T.; Sumida, H.; Takada, S.; Tomita, T.; Yoshioka, T.; Bilokin, S.; Bonis, J.; Cornebise, P.; Pöschl, R.; Richard, F.; Thiebault, A.; Zerwas, D.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Besson, D.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Markin, O.; Popova, E.; Gabriel, M.; Goecke, P.; Kiesling, C.; van der Kolk, N.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Corriveau, F.; Blazey, G. C.; Dyshkant, A.; Francis, K.; Zutshi, V.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Ieki, S.; Kamiya, Y.; Ootani, W.; Shibata, N.; Jeans, D.; Komamiya, S.; Nakanishi, H.

    2016-05-01

    In special tests, the active layers of the CALICE Digital Hadron Calorimeter prototype, the DHCAL, were exposed to low energy particle beams, without being interleaved by absorber plates. The thickness of each layer corresponded approximately to 0.29 radiation lengths or 0.034 nuclear interaction lengths, defined mostly by the copper and steel skins of the detector cassettes. This paper reports on measurements performed with this device in the Fermilab test beam with positrons in the energy range of 1 to 10 GeV. The measurements are compared to simulations based on GEANT4 and a standalone program to emulate the detailed response of the active elements.

  10. Cu-In Halide Perovskite Solar Absorbers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin-Gang; Yang, Dongwen; Sun, Yuanhui; Li, Tianshu; Zhang, Lijun; Yu, Liping; Zunger, Alex

    2017-05-17

    The long-term chemical instability and the presence of toxic Pb in otherwise stellar solar absorber APbX 3 made of organic molecules on the A site and halogens for X have hindered their large-scale commercialization. Previously explored ways to achieve Pb-free halide perovskites involved replacing Pb 2+ with other similar M 2+ cations in ns 2 electron configuration, e.g., Sn 2+ or by Bi 3+ (plus Ag + ), but unfortunately this showed either poor stability (M = Sn) or weakly absorbing oversized indirect gaps (M = Bi), prompting concerns that perhaps stability and good optoelectronic properties might be contraindicated. Herein, we exploit the electronic structure underpinning of classic Cu[In,Ga]Se 2 (CIGS) chalcopyrite solar absorbers to design Pb-free halide perovskites by transmuting 2Pb to the pair [B IB + C III ] such as [Cu + Ga] or [Ag + In] and combinations thereof. The resulting group of double perovskites with formula A 2 BCX 6 (A = K, Rb, Cs; B = Cu, Ag; C = Ga, In; X = Cl, Br, I) benefits from the ionic, yet narrow-gap character of halide perovskites, and at the same time borrows the advantage of the strong Cu(d)/Se(p) → Ga/In(s/p) valence-to-conduction-band absorption spectra known from CIGS. This constitutes a new group of CuIn-based Halide Perovskite (CIHP). Our first-principles calculations guided by such design principles indicate that the CIHPs class has members with clear thermodynamic stability, showing direct band gaps, and manifesting a wide-range of tunable gap values (from zero to about 2.5 eV) and combination of light electron and heavy-light hole effective masses. Materials screening of candidate CIHPs then identifies the best-of-class Rb 2 [CuIn]Cl 6 , Rb 2 [AgIn]Br 6 , and Cs 2 [AgIn]Br 6 , having direct band gaps of 1.36, 1.46, and 1.50 eV, and theoretical spectroscopic limited maximal efficiency comparable to chalcopyrites and CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 . Our finding offers a new routine for designing new-type Pb-free halide perovskite solar

  11. Ply-tear webbing energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, G. W. H.

    1972-01-01

    Ply-tear webbing is essentially two plain webbings that are bound together by a portion of the warps and that can be torn apart and do work by breaking the binders. Nylon webbing were woven to range in tear force from 1 to 10 kilonewtons. This force is substantially independent of speed, which was as high as 100 m/sec in some cases. A specific energy absorption of 90 J/g was achieved in the dry state. However, lower rated webbings that absorb approximately 40 J/g are recommended for use in practice where it is acceptable.

  12. Piston-rotaxanes as molecular shock absorbers.

    PubMed

    Sevick, E M; Williams, D R M

    2010-04-20

    We describe the thermomechanical response of a new molecular system that behaves as a shock absorber. The system consists of a rodlike rotaxane connected to a piston and tethered to a surface. The response of this system is dominated by the translational entropy of the rotaxane rings and can be calculated exactly. The force laws are contrasted with those for a rigid rod and a polymer. In some cases, the rotaxanes undergo a sudden transition to a tilted state when compressed. These piston-rotaxanes provide a potential motif for the design of a new class of materials with a novel thermomechanical response.

  13. Development of absorbing aerosol index simulator based on TM5-M7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiyunting; van Velthoven, Peter; Veefkind, Pepijn

    2017-04-01

    Aerosols alter the Earth's radiation budget directly by scattering and absorbing solar and thermal radiation, or indirectly by perturbing clouds formation and lifetime. These mechanisms offset the positive radiative forcing ascribed to greenhouse gases. In particular, absorbing aerosols such as black carbon and dust strongly enhance global warming. To quantify the impact of absorbing aerosol on global radiative forcing is challenging. In spite of wide spatial and temporal coverage space-borne instruments (we will use the Ozone Monitoring Instrument, OMI) are unable to derive complete information on aerosol distribution, composition, etc. The retrieval of aerosol optical properties also partly depends on additional information derived from other measurements or global atmospheric chemistry models. Common quantities of great interest presenting the amount of absorbing aerosol are AAOD (absorbing aerosol optical depth), the extinction due to absorption of aerosols under cloud free conditions; and AAI (absorbing aerosol index), a measure of aerosol absorption more directly derivable from UV band observations than AAOD. When comparing model simulations and satellite observations, resemblance is good in terms of the spatial distribution of both parameters. However, the quantitative discrepancy is considerable, indicating possible underestimates of simulated AAI by a factor of 2 to 3. Our research, hence, has started by evaluating to what extent aerosol models, such as our TM5-M7 model, represent the satellite measurements and by identifying the reasons for discrepancies. As a next step a transparent methodology for the comparison between model simulations and satellite observations is under development in the form of an AAI simulator based on TM5-M7.

  14. Measurements of light-absorbing particles on the glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. G.; All, J. D.; Schwarz, J. P.; Arnott, W. P.; Cole, R. J.; Lapham, E.; Celestian, A.

    2015-02-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes have been rapidly losing mass since the 1970s. In addition to the documented increase in temperature, increases in light-absorbing particles deposited on glaciers could be contributing to the observed glacier loss. Here we report on measurements of light-absorbing particles sampled from glaciers during three surveys in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains in Peru. During three research expeditions in the dry seasons (May-August) of 2011, 2012 and 2013, 240 snow samples were collected from 15 mountain peaks over altitudes ranging from 4800 to nearly 6800 m. Several mountains were sampled each of the 3 years and some mountains were sampled multiple times during the same year. Collected snow samples were melted and filtered in the field then later analyzed using the Light Absorption Heating Method (LAHM), a new technique that measures the ability of particles on filters to absorb visible light. LAHM results have been calibrated using filters with known amounts of fullerene soot, a common industrial surrogate for black carbon (BC). As sample filters often contain dust in addition to BC, results are presented in terms of effective black carbon (eBC). During the 2013 survey, snow samples were collected and kept frozen for analysis with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Calculated eBC mass from the LAHM analysis and the SP2 refractory black carbon (rBC) results were well correlated (r2 = 0.92). These results indicate that a substantial portion of the light-absorbing particles in the more polluted regions were likely BC. The 3 years of data show that glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains close to human population centers have substantially higher levels of eBC (as high as 70 ng g-1) than remote glaciers (as low as 2.0 ng g-1 eBC), indicating that population centers can influence local glaciers by sourcing BC.

  15. Measurements of light absorbing particulates on the glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. G.; All, J. D.; Schwarz, J. P.; Arnott, W. P.; Cole, R. J.; Lapham, E.; Celestian, A.

    2014-10-01

    Glaciers in the tropical Andes have been rapidly losing mass since the 1970s. In addition to the documented increase in air temperature, increases in light absorbing particulates deposited on glaciers could be contributing to the observed glacier loss. Here we report on measurements of light absorbing particulates sampled from glaciers during three surveys in the Cordillera Blanca in Peru. During three research expeditions in the dry seasons (May-August) of 2011, 2012 and 2013, two hundred and forty snow samples were collected from fifteen mountain peaks over altitudes ranging from 4800 to nearly 6800 m. Several mountains were sampled each of the three expeditions and some mountains were sampled multiple times during the same expedition. Collected snow samples were melted and filtered in the field then later analyzed using the Light Absorption Heating Method (LAHM), a new technique that measures the ability of particulates on filters to absorb visible light. LAHM results have been calibrated using filters with known amounts of fullerene soot, a common industrial surrogate for black carbon (BC). As sample filters often contain dust in addition to BC, results are presented in terms of effective Black Carbon (eBC). During the 2013 survey, snow samples were collected and kept frozen for analysis with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Calculated eBC mass from the filter analysis and the SP2 refractory Black Carbon (rBC) results were well correlated (r2 = 0.92). These results indicate that a substantial portion of the light absorbing particulates in the more polluted areas were likely BC. The three years of data show that glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca Mountains close to human population centers have substantially higher levels of eBC (as high as 70 ng g-1) than remote glaciers (as low as 2.0 ng g-1 eBC), indicating that population centers can influence local glaciers by sourcing BC.

  16. Multiple-Path-Length Optical Absorbance Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An optical absorbance cell that offers a selection of multiple optical path lengths has been developed as part of a portable spectrometric instrument that measures absorption spectra of small samples of water and that costs less than does a conventional, non-portable laboratory spectrometer. The instrument is intended, more specifically, for use in studying colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in seawater, especially in coastal regions. Accurate characterization of CDOM is necessary for building bio-optical mathematical models of seawater. The multiple path lengths of the absorption cell afford a wide range of sensitivity needed for measuring the optical absorbances associated with the wide range of concentrations of CDOM observed in nature. The instrument operates in the wavelength range of 370 to 725 nm. The major subsystems of the instrument (see figure) include a color-balanced light source; the absorption cell; a peristaltic pump; a high-precision, low-noise fiber optic spectrometer; and a laptop or other personal computer. A fiber-optic cable transmits light from the source to the absorption cell. Other optical fibers transmit light from the absorption cell to the spectrometer,

  17. Smart skin spiral antenna with chiral absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1995-05-01

    Recently there has been considerable interest toward designing 'smart skins' for aircraft. The smart skin is a composite layer which may contain conformal radars, conformal microstrip antennas or spiral antennas for electromagnetic applications. These embedded antennas will give rise to very low radar cross section (RCS) or can be completely 'hidden' to tracking radar. In addition, they can be used to detect, monitor or even jam other unwanted electromagnetic field signatures. This paper is designed to address some technical advances made to reduce the size of spiral antennas using tunable dielectric materials and chiral absorbers. The purpose is to design, develop and fabricate a thin, wideband, conformal spiral antenna architecture that is structurally integrable and which uses advanced Penn State dielectric and absorber materials to achieve wideband ground planes, and together with low RCS. Traditional practice has been to design radome and antenna as separate entities and then resolve any interface problems during an integration phase. A structurally integrable conformal antenna, however, demands that the functional components be highly integrated both conceptually and in practice. Our concept is to use the lower skin of the radome as a substrate on which the radiator can be made using standard photolithography, thick film or LTCC techniques.

  18. Possible Quantum Absorber Effects in Cortical Synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kämpf, Uwe

    The Wheeler-Feynman transactional "absorber" approach was proposed originally to account for anomalous resonance coupling between spatio-temporally distant measurement partners in entangled quantum states of so-called Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradoxes, e.g. of spatio-temporal non-locality, quantum teleportation, etc. Applied to quantum brain dynamics, however, this view provides an anticipative resonance coupling model for aspects of cortical synchronization and recurrent visual action control. It is proposed to consider the registered activation patterns of neuronal loops in so-called synfire chains not as a result of retarded brain communication processes, but rather as surface effects of a system of standing waves generated in the depth of visual processing. According to this view, they arise from a counterbalance between the actual input's delayed bottom-up data streams and top-down recurrent information-processing of advanced anticipative signals in a Wheeler-Feynman-type absorber mode. In the framework of a "time-loop" model, findings about mirror neurons in the brain cortex are suggested to be at least partially associated with temporal rather than spatial mirror functions of visual processing, similar to phase conjugate adaptive resonance-coupling in nonlinear optics.

  19. Wave energy extraction by coupled resonant absorbers.

    PubMed

    Evans, D V; Porter, R

    2012-01-28

    In this article, a range of problems and theories will be introduced that will build towards a new wave energy converter (WEC) concept, with the acronym 'ROTA' standing for resonant over-topping absorber. First, classical results for wave power absorption for WECs constrained to operate in a single degree of freedom will be reviewed and the role of resonance in their operation highlighted. Emphasis will then be placed on how the introduction of further resonances can improve power take-off characteristics by extending the range of frequencies over which the efficiency is close to a theoretical maximum. Methods for doing this in different types of WECs will be demonstrated. Coupled resonant absorbers achieve this by connecting a WEC device equipped with its own resonance (determined from a hydrodynamic analysis) to a new system having separate mass/spring/damper characteristics. It is shown that a coupled resonant effect can be realized by inserting a water tank into a WEC, and this idea forms the basis of the ROTA device. In essence, the idea is to exploit the coupling between the natural sloshing frequencies of the water in the internal tank and the natural resonance of a submerged buoyant circular cylinder device that is tethered to the sea floor, allowing a rotary motion about its axis of attachment.

  20. Absorbing boundary layers for spin wave micromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkat, G.; Fangohr, H.; Prabhakar, A.

    2018-03-01

    Micromagnetic simulations are used to investigate the effects of different absorbing boundary layers (ABLs) on spin waves (SWs) reflected from the edges of a magnetic nano-structure. We define the conditions that a suitable ABL must fulfill and compare the performance of abrupt, linear, polynomial and tan hyperbolic damping profiles in the ABL. We first consider normal incidence in a permalloy stripe and propose a transmission line model to quantify reflections and calculate the loss introduced into the stripe due to the ABL. We find that a parabolic damping profile absorbs the SW energy efficiently and has a low reflection coefficient, thus performing much better than the commonly used abrupt damping profile. We then investigated SWs that are obliquely incident at 26.6 °, 45 ° and 63.4 ° on the edge of a yttrium-iron-garnet film. The parabolic damping profile again performs efficiently by showing a high SW energy transfer to the ABL and a low reflected SW amplitude.

  1. Spacesuit Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgson, Ed; Izenson, Mike; Chan, Weibo; Bue, Grant C.

    2012-01-01

    For decades advanced spacesuit developers have pursued a regenerable, robust nonventing system for heat rejection. Toward this end, this paper investigates linking together two previously developed technologies, namely NASA s Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare s Lithium Chloride Absorber Radiator (LCAR). Heat from a liquid cooled garment is transported to SWME that provides cooling through evaporation. This water vapor is then captured by solid LiCl in the LCAR with a high enthalpy of absorption, resulting in sufficient temperature lift to reject heat to space by radiation. After the sortie, the LCAR would be heated up and dried in a regenerator to drive off and recover the absorbed evaporant. A engineering development prototype was built and tested in vacuum conditions at a sink temperature of 250 K. The LCAR was able to stably reject 75 W over a 7-hour period. A conceptual design of a full-scale radiator is proposed. Excess heat rejection above 240 W would be accomplished through venting of the evaporant. Loop closure rates were predicted for various exploration environment scenarios.

  2. Thermodynamic assessment of microencapsulated sodium carbonate slurry for carbon capture

    DOE PAGES

    Stolaroff, Joshuah K.; Bourcier, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Micro-encapsulated Carbon Sorbents (MECS) are a new class of carbon capture materials consisting of a CO₂- absorbing liquid solvent contained within solid, CO₂-permeable, polymer shells. MECS enhance the rate of CO₂ absorption for solvents with slow kinetics and prevent solid precipitates from scaling and fouling equipment, two factors that have previously limited the use of sodium carbonate solution for carbon capture. Here, we examine the thermodynamics of sodium carbonate slurries for carbon capture. We model the vapour-liquid-solid equilibria of sodium carbonate and find several features that can contribute to an energy-efficient capture process: very high CO₂ pressures in stripping conditions,more » relatively low water vapour pressures in stripping conditions, and good swing capacity. The potential energy savings compared with an MEA system are discussed.« less

  3. Frequency Tuning of Vibration Absorber Using Topology Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harel, Swapnil Subhash

    A tuned mass absorber is a system for reducing the amplitude in one oscillator by coupling it to a second oscillator. If tuned correctly, the maximum amplitude of the first oscillator in response to a periodic driver will be lowered, and much of the vibration will be 'transferred' to the second oscillator. The tuned vibration absorber (TVA) has been utilized for vibration control purposes in many sectors of Civil/Automotive/Aerospace Engineering for many decades since its inception. Time and again we come across a situation in which a vibratory system is required to run near resonance. In the past, approaches have been made to design such auxiliary spring mass tuned absorbers for the safety of the structures. This research focuses on the development and optimization of continuously tuned mass absorbers as a substitute to the discretely tuned mass absorbers (spring- mass system). After conducting the study of structural behavior, the boundary condition and frequency to which the absorber is to be tuned are determined. The Modal analysis approach is used to determine mode shapes and frequencies. The absorber is designed and optimized using the topology optimization tool, which simultaneously designs, optimizes and tunes the absorber to the desired frequency. The tuned, optimized absorber, after post processing, is attached to the target structure. The number of the absorbers are increased to amplify bandwidth and thereby upgrade the safety of structure for a wide range of frequency. The frequency response analysis is carried out using various combinations of structure and number of absorber cell.

  4. Determination of decay coefficients for combustors with acoustic absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, C. E.; Espander, W. R.; Baer, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical technique for the calculation of linear decay coefficients in combustors with acoustic absorbers is presented. Tuned circumferential slot acoustic absorbers were designed for the first three transverse modes of oscillation, and decay coefficients for these absorbers were found as a function of backing distance for seven different chamber configurations. The effectiveness of the absorbers for off-design values of the combustion response and acoustic mode is also investigated. Results indicate that for tuned absorbers the decay coefficient increases approximately as the cube of the backing distance. For most off-design situations the absorber still provides a damping effect. However, if an absorber designed for some higher mode of oscillation is used to damp lower mode oscillations, a driving effect is frequently found.

  5. Container and method for absorbing and reducing hydrogen concentration

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, George G.; Lee, Myung W.; Heung, Leung K.

    2001-01-01

    A method for absorbing hydrogen from an enclosed environment comprising providing a vessel; providing a hydrogen storage composition in communication with a vessel, the hydrogen storage composition further comprising a matrix defining a pore size which permits the passage of hydrogen gas while blocking the passage of gaseous poisons; placing a material within the vessel, the material evolving hydrogen gas; sealing the vessel; and absorbing the hydrogen gas released into the vessel by the hydrogen storage composition. A container for absorbing evolved hydrogen gas comprising: a vessel having an interior and adapted for receiving materials which release hydrogen gas; a hydrogen absorbing composition in communication with the interior, the composition defining a matrix surrounding a hydrogen absorber, the matrix permitting the passage of hydrogen gas while excluding gaseous poisons; wherein, when the vessel is sealed, hydrogen gas, which is released into the vessel interior, is absorbed by the hydrogen absorbing composition.

  6. A shock absorber model for structure-borne noise analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaziz, Marouane; Nacivet, Samuel; Thouverez, Fabrice

    2015-08-01

    Shock absorbers are often responsible for undesirable structure-borne noise in cars. The early numerical prediction of this noise in the automobile development process can save time and money and yet remains a challenge for industry. In this paper, a new approach to predicting shock absorber structure-borne noise is proposed; it consists in modelling the shock absorber and including the main nonlinear phenomena responsible for discontinuities in the response. The model set forth herein features: compressible fluid behaviour, nonlinear flow rate-pressure relations, valve mechanical equations and rubber mounts. The piston, base valve and complete shock absorber model are compared with experimental results. Sensitivity of the shock absorber response is evaluated and the most important parameters are classified. The response envelope is also computed. This shock absorber model is able to accurately reproduce local nonlinear phenomena and improves our state of knowledge on potential noise sources within the shock absorber.

  7. Composite neutron absorbing coatings for nuclear criticality control

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Richard N.; Swank, W. David; Mizia, Ronald E.

    2005-07-19

    Thermal neutron absorbing composite coating materials and methods of applying such coating materials to spent nuclear fuel storage systems are provided. A composite neutron absorbing coating applied to a substrate surface includes a neutron absorbing layer overlying at least a portion of the substrate surface, and a corrosion resistant top coat layer overlying at least a portion of the neutron absorbing layer. An optional bond coat layer can be formed on the substrate surface prior to forming the neutron absorbing layer. The neutron absorbing layer can include a neutron absorbing material, such as gadolinium oxide or gadolinium phosphate, dispersed in a metal alloy matrix. The coating layers may be formed by a plasma spray process or a high velocity oxygen fuel process.

  8. Impedance approach to designing efficient vibration energy absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrovnitskii, Y. I.; Morozov, K. D.; Tomilina, T. M.

    2017-03-01

    The concept introduced previously by the authors on the best sound absorber having the maximum allowable efficiency in absorbing the energy of an incident sound field has been extended to arbitrary linear elastic media and structures. Analytic relations have been found for the input impedance characteristics that the best vibrational energy absorber should have. The implementation of these relations is the basis of the proposed impedance method of designing efficient vibration and noise absorbers. We present the results of a laboratory experiment that confirms the validity of the obtained theoretical relations, and we construct the simplest best vibration absorber. We also calculate the parameters and demonstrate the efficiency of a dynamic vibration absorber as the best absorber.

  9. Electrical tree initiation in polyethylene absorbing Penning gas

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, N.; Tohyama, N.; Sato, H.

    1996-12-31

    Ac tree initiation voltage was examined in untreated LDPE, vacuum degassed LDPE and LDPE absorbing He gas (He gas was absorbed after vacuum degassing). The authors have already reported that vacuum degassed LDPE shows much higher tree initiation voltage than untreated one because of absence of oxygen. Therefore they expected that LDPE absorbing He shows the same property with vacuum degassed LDPE. However tree initiation voltage of LDPE absorbing He is as low as that of untreated LDPE. LDPE absorbing Ar gas shows the same tendency. He or Ar gas does not change so much impulse tree initiation voltage. LDPEmore » absorbing He was not well dyed with methylene blue after ac voltage application, which indicates that active oxidation does not occur. Low ac tree initiation voltage in LDPE absorbing He or Ar may be caused by Penning ionization in free volume.« less

  10. Method of absorbing UF.sub.6 from gaseous mixtures in alkamine absorbents

    DOEpatents

    Lafferty, Robert H.; Smiley, Seymour H.; Radimer, Kenneth J.

    1976-04-06

    A method of recovering uranium hexafluoride from gaseous mixtures employing as an absorbent a liquid composition at least one of the components of which is chosen from the group consisting of ethanolamine, diethanolamine, and 3-methyl-3-amino-propane-diol-1,2.

  11. Applicability of Fluorescence and Absorbance Spectroscopy to Estimate Organic Pollution in Rivers

    PubMed Central

    Knapik, Heloise Garcia; Fernandes, Cristovão Vicente Scapulatempo; de Azevedo, Júlio Cesar Rodrigues; do Amaral Porto, Monica Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article explores the applicability of fluorescence and absorbance spectroscopy for estimating organic pollution in polluted rivers. The relationship between absorbance, fluorescence intensity, dissolved organic carbon, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and other water quality parameters were used to characterize and identify the origin and the spatial variability of the organic pollution in a highly polluted watershed. Analyses were performed for the Iguassu River, located in southern Brazil, with area about 2,700 km2 and ∼3 million inhabitants. Samples were collect at six monitoring sites covering 107 km of the main river. BOD, COD, nitrogen, and phosphorus concentration indicates a high input of sewage to the river. Specific absorbance at 254 and 285 nm (SUVA254 and A285/COD) did not show significant variation between sites monitored, indicating the presence of both dissolved compounds found in domestic effluents and humic and fulvic compounds derived from allochthonous organic matter. Correlations between BOD and tryptophan-like fluorescence peak (peak T2, r=0.7560, and peak T1, r=0.6949) and tyrosine-like fluorescence peak (peak B, r=0.7321) indicated the presence of labile organic matter and thus confirmed the presence of sewage in the river. Results showed that fluorescence and absorbance spectroscopy provide useful information on pollution in rivers from critical watersheds and together are a robust method that is simpler and more rapid than traditional methods employed by regulatory agencies. PMID:25469076

  12. Radiative forcing by light-absorbing aerosols of pyrogenetic iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Ito, Akinori; Lin, Guangxing; Penner, Joyce E

    2018-05-09

    Iron (Fe) oxides in aerosols are known to absorb sun light and heat the atmosphere. However, the radiative forcing (RF) of light-absorbing aerosols of pyrogenetic Fe oxides is ignored in climate models. For the first time, we use a global chemical transport model and a radiative transfer model to estimate the RF by light-absorbing aerosols of pyrogenetic Fe oxides. The model results suggest that strongly absorbing Fe oxides (magnetite) contribute a RF that is about 10% of the RF due to black carbon (BC) over East Asia. The seasonal average of the RF due to dark Fe-rich mineral particles over East Asia (0.4-1.0 W m -2 ) is comparable to that over major biomass burning regions. This additional warming effect is amplified over polluted regions where the iron and steel industries have been recently developed. These findings may have important implications for the projection of the climate change, due to the rapid growth in energy consumption of the heavy industry in newly developing countries.

  13. Ultrahigh-throughput–directed enzyme evolution by absorbance-activated droplet sorting (AADS)

    PubMed Central

    Gielen, Fabrice; Hours, Raphaelle; Emond, Stephane; Fischlechner, Martin; Schell, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Ultrahigh-throughput screening, in which members of enzyme libraries compartmentalized in water-in-oil emulsion droplets are assayed, has emerged as a powerful format for directed evolution and functional metagenomics but is currently limited to fluorescence readouts. Here we describe a highly efficient microfluidic absorbance-activated droplet sorter (AADS) that extends the range of assays amenable to this approach. Using this module, microdroplets can be sorted based on absorbance readout at rates of up to 300 droplets per second (i.e., >1 million droplets per hour). To validate this device, we implemented a miniaturized coupled assay for NAD+-dependent amino acid dehydrogenases. The detection limit (10 μM in a coupled assay producing a formazan dye) enables accurate kinetic readouts sensitive enough to detect a minimum of 1,300 turnovers per enzyme molecule, expressed in a single cell, and released by lysis within a droplet. Sorting experiments showed that the AADS successfully enriched active variants up to 2,800-fold from an overwhelming majority of inactive ones at ∼100 Hz. To demonstrate the utility of this module for protein engineering, two rounds of directed evolution were performed to improve the activity of phenylalanine dehydrogenase toward its native substrate. Fourteen hits showed increased activity (improved >4.5-fold in lysate; kcat increased >2.7-fold), soluble protein expression levels (up 60%), and thermostability (Tm, 12 °C higher). The AADS module makes the most widely used optical detection format amenable to screens of unprecedented size, paving the way for the implementation of chromogenic assays in droplet microfluidics workflows. PMID:27821774

  14. Black phosphorus saturable absorber for ultrashort pulse generation

    SciTech Connect

    Sotor, J., E-mail: jaroslaw.sotor@pwr.edu.pl; Sobon, G.; Abramski, K. M.

    Low-dimensional materials, due to their unique and versatile properties, are very interesting for numerous applications in electronics and optoelectronics. Recently rediscovered black phosphorus, with a graphite-like layered structure, can be effectively exfoliated up to the single atomic layer called phosphorene. Contrary to graphene, it possesses a direct band gap controllable by the number of stacked atomic layers. For those reasons, black phosphorus is now intensively investigated and can complement or replace graphene in various photonics and electronics applications. Here, we demonstrate that black phosphorus can serve as a broadband saturable absorber and can be used for ultrashort optical pulse generation.more » The mechanically exfoliated ∼300 nm thick layers of black phosphorus were transferred onto the fiber core, and under pulsed excitation at 1560 nm wavelength, its transmission increases by 4.6%. We have demonstrated that the saturable absorption of black phosphorus is polarization sensitive. The fabricated device was used to mode-lock an Er-doped fiber laser. The generated optical solitons with the 10.2 nm bandwidth and 272 fs duration were centered at 1550 nm. The obtained results unambiguously show that black phosphorus can be effectively used for ultrashort pulse generation with performances similar or even better than currently used graphene or carbon nanotubes. This application of black phosphorus proves its great potential to future practical use in photonics.« less

  15. Photochemical aging of light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol material.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Moussa, Samar G; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-04-11

    Dark reactions of methylglyoxal with NH4(+) in aqueous aerosols yield light-absorbing and surface-active products that can influence the physical properties of the particles. Little is known about how the product mixture and its optical properties will change due to photolysis as well as oxidative aging by O3 and OH in the atmosphere. Here, we report the results of kinetics and product studies of the photochemical aging of aerosols formed by atomizing aqueous solutions of methylglyoxal and ammonium sulfate. Experiments were performed using aerosol flow tube reactors coupled with an aerosol chemical ionization mass spectrometer (Aerosol-CIMS) for monitoring gas- and particle-phase compositions. Particles were also impacted onto quartz windows in order to assess changes in their UV-visible absorption upon oxidation. Photooxidation of the aerosols leads to the formation of small, volatile organic acids including formic acid, acetic acid, and glyoxylic acid. The atmospheric lifetime of these species during the daytime is predicted to be on the order of minutes, with photolysis being an important mechanism of degradation. The lifetime with respect to O3 oxidation was observed to be on the order of hours. O3 oxidation also leads to a net increase in light absorption by the particles due to the formation of additional carbonyl compounds. Our results are consistent with field observations of high brown carbon absorption in the early morning.

  16. Skin interaction with absorbent hygiene products.

    PubMed

    Runeman, Bo

    2008-01-01

    Skin problems due to the use of absorbent hygiene products, such as diapers, incontinence pads, and feminine sanitary articles, are mostly due to climate or chafing discomfort. If these conditions are allowed to prevail, these may develop into an irritant contact dermatitis and eventually superficial skin infections. Skin humidity and aging skin are among the most significant predisposing and aggravating factors for dermatitis development. Improved product design features are believed to explain the decline in observed diaper dermatitis among infants. Where adult incontinence-related skin problems are concerned, it is very important to apply a holistic perspective to understand the influences due to the individual's incontinence level and skin condition, as well as the hygiene and skin care measures provided. Individuals with frail, sensitive skin or with skin diseases may preferably have to use high-quality products, equipped with superabsorbent polymers and water vapor-permeable back sheets, to minimize the risk of skin complications.

  17. Electronic and thermally tunable infrared metamaterial absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrekenhamer, David; Miragliotta, Joseph A.; Brinkley, Matthew; Fan, Kebin; Peng, Fenglin; Montoya, John A.; Gauza, Sebastian; Wu, Shin-Tson; Padilla, Willie J.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we report a computational and experimental study using tunable infrared (IR) metamaterial absorbers (MMAs) to demonstrate frequency tunable (7%) and amplitude modulation (61%) designs. The dynamic tuning of each structure was achieved through the addition of an active material—liquid crystals (LC) or vanadium dioxide (VO2)-within the unit cell of the MMA architecture. In both systems, an applied stimulus (electric field or temperature) induced a dielectric change in the active material and subsequent variation in the absorption and reflection properties of the MMA in the mid- to long-wavelength region of the IR (MWIR and LWIR, respectively). These changes were observed to be reversible for both systems and dynamic in the LC-based structure.

  18. Electromagnetic radiation absorbers and modulators comprising polyaniline

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, Arthur J.; Ginder, John M.; Roe, Mitchell G.; Hajiseyedjavadi, Hamid

    1992-01-01

    A composition for absorbing electromagnetic radiation, wherein said electromagnetic radiation possesses a wavelength generally in the range of from about 1000 Angstroms to about 50 meters, wherein said composition comprises a polyaniline composition of the formula ##STR1## where y can be equal to or greater than zero, and R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are independently selected from the group containing of H, --OCH.sub.3, --CH.sub.3, --F, --Cl, --Br, --I, NR.sup.3 .sub.2, --NHCOR.sup.3, --OH, --O.sup.-, SR.sup.3, --OCOR.sup.3, --NO.sub.2, --COOH, --COOR.sup.3, --COR.sup.3, --CHO, and --CN, where R.sup.3 is a C.sub.1 to C.sub.8 alkyl, aryl or aralkyl group.

  19. Modelling and validation of electromechanical shock absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonoli, Andrea; Amati, Nicola; Girardello Detoni, Joaquim; Galluzzi, Renato; Gasparin, Enrico

    2013-08-01

    Electromechanical vehicle suspension systems represent a promising substitute to conventional hydraulic solutions. However, the design of electromechanical devices that are able to supply high damping forces without exceeding geometric dimension and mass constraints is a difficult task. All these challenges meet in off-road vehicle suspension systems, where the power density of the dampers is a crucial parameter. In this context, the present paper outlines a particular shock absorber configuration where a suitable electric machine and a transmission mechanism are utilised to meet off-road vehicle requirements. A dynamic model is used to represent the device. Subsequently, experimental tests are performed on an actual prototype to verify the functionality of the damper and validate the proposed model.

  20. Ultrathin microwave absorber based on metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. J.; Yoo, Y. J.; Hwang, J. S.; Lee, Y. P.

    2016-11-01

    We suggest that ultrathin broadband metamaterial is a perfect absorber in the microwave regime by utilizing the properties of a resistive sheet and metamaterial. Meta-atoms are composed of four-leaf clover-shape metallic patterns and a metal plane separated by three intermediate resistive sheet layers between four dielectric layers. We interpret the absorption mechanism of the broadband by using the distribution of surface currents at specific frequencies. The simulated absorption was over 99% in 1.8-4.2 GHz. The corresponding experimental absorption was also over 99% in 2.62-4.2 GHz; however, the absorption was slightly lower than 99% in 1.8-2.62 GHz because of the sheet resistance and the changed values for the dielectric constant. Furthermore, it is independent of incident angle. The results of this research indicate the possibility of applications, due to the suppression of noxious exposure, in cell phones, computers and microwave equipments.

  1. Ultrathin microwave metamaterial absorber utilizing embedded resistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Ju; Hwang, Ji Sub; Yoo, Young Joon; Khuyen, Bui Xuan; Rhee, Joo Yull; Chen, Xianfeng; Lee, YoungPak

    2017-10-01

    We numerically and experimentally studied an ultrathin and broadband perfect absorber by enhancing the bandwidth with embedded resistors into the metamaterial structure, which is easy to fabricate in order to lower the Q-factor and by using multiple resonances with the patches of different sizes. We analyze the absorption mechanism in terms of the impedance matching with the free space and through the distribution of surface current at each resonance frequency. The magnetic field, induced by the antiparallel surface currents, is formed strongly in the direction opposite to the incident electromagnetic wave, to cancel the incident wave, leading to the perfect absorption. The corresponding experimental absorption was found to be higher than 97% in 0.88-3.15 GHz. The agreement between measurement and simulation was good. The aspects of our proposed structure can be applied to future electronic devices, for example, advanced noise-suppression sheets in the microwave regime.

  2. Flexible thin broadband microwave absorber based on a pyramidal periodic structure of lossy composite.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yixing; Yuan, Xujin; Wang, Changxian; Chen, Mingji; Tang, Liqun; Fang, Daining

    2018-06-15

    Microwave absorber with broadband absorption and thin thickness is one of the main research interests in this field. A flexible ultrathin and broadband microwave absorber comprising multiwall carbon nanotubes, spherical carbonyl iron, and silicone rubber is fabricated in a newly proposed pyramidal spatial periodic structure (SPS). The SPS with equivalent thickness of 3.73 mm covers the -10  dB and -15  dB absorption bandwidth in the frequency range 2-40 GHz and 10-40 GHz, respectively. The excellent absorption performance is achieved by concentration and dissipation of the electromagnetic field inside different parts of the magnetic-dielectric lossy protrusions in different frequency ranges.

  3. Frequency-dependent absorbance of broadband terahertz wave in dense plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yan; Qi, Binbin; Jiang, Xiankai; Zhu, Zhi; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhu, Yiming

    2018-05-01

    Due to the ability of accurate fingerprinting and low-ionization for different substances, terahertz (THz) technology has a lot of crucial applications in material analysis, information transfer, and safety inspection, etc. However, the spectral characteristic of atmospheric gas and ionized gas has not been widely investigated, which is important for the remote sensing application. Here, in this paper, we investigate the absorbance of broadband terahertz wave in dense plasma sheet generated by femtosecond laser pulses. It was found that as the terahertz wave transmits through the plasma sheet formed, respectively, in carbon dioxide, oxygen, argon and nitrogen, spectrum presents completely different and frequency-dependent absorbance. The reasons for these absorption peaks are related to the molecular polarity, electric charge, intermolecular and intramolecular interactions, and collisional absorption of gas molecules. These results have significant implications for the remote sensing of gas medium.

  4. Ultrasensitive sensing with three-dimensional terahertz metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Siyu; Yan, Fengping; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Hong; Hou, Yafei

    2018-05-01

    Planar metasurfaces and metamaterial absorbers have shown great promise for label-free sensing applications at microwaves, optical and terahertz frequencies. The realization of high-quality-factor resonance in these structures is of significant interest to enhance the sensing sensitivities to detect minute frequency shifts. We propose and demonstrate in this manuscript an ultrasensitive terahertz metamaterial absorber sensor based on a three-dimensional split ring resonator absorber with a high quality factor of 60.09. The sensing performance of the proposed absorber sensor was systematically investigated through detailed numerical calculations and a maximum refractive index sensitivity of 34.40% RIU‑1 was obtained. Furthermore, the absorber sensor can maintain a high sensitivity for a wide range of incidence angles up to 60° under TM polarization incidence. These findings would improve the design flexibility of the absorber sensors and further open up new avenues to achieve ultrasensitive sensing in the terahertz regime.

  5. Top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing affected by brown carbon in the upper troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuzhong; Forrister, Haviland; Liu, Jiumeng; Dibb, Jack; Anderson, Bruce; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Perring, Anne E.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Wang, Yuhang; Nenes, Athanasios; Weber, Rodney J.

    2017-07-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols affect the global radiative balance by absorbing and scattering radiation, which leads to warming or cooling of the atmosphere, respectively. Black carbon is the main light-absorbing component. A portion of the organic aerosol known as brown carbon also absorbs light. The climate sensitivity to absorbing aerosols rapidly increases with altitude, but brown carbon measurements are limited in the upper troposphere. Here we present aircraft observations of vertical aerosol distributions over the continental United States in May and June 2012 to show that light-absorbing brown carbon is prevalent in the troposphere, and absorbs more short-wavelength radiation than black carbon at altitudes between 5 and 12 km. We find that brown carbon is transported to these altitudes by deep convection, and that in-cloud heterogeneous processing may produce brown carbon. Radiative transfer calculations suggest that brown carbon accounts for about 24% of combined black and brown carbon warming effect at the tropopause. Roughly two-thirds of the estimated brown carbon forcing occurs above 5 km, although most brown carbon is found below 5 km. The highest radiative absorption occurred during an event that ingested a wildfire plume. We conclude that high-altitude brown carbon from biomass burning is an unappreciated component of climate forcing.

  6. Vertical-plane pendulum absorbers for minimizing helicopter vibratory loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amer, K. B.; Neff, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The use of pendulum dynamic absorbers mounted on the blade root and operating in the vertical plane to minimize helicopter vibratory loads was discussed. A qualitative description was given of the concept of the dynamic absorbers and some results of analytical studies showing the degree of reduction in vibratory loads attainable are presented. Operational experience of vertical plane dynamic absorbers on the OH-6A helicopter is also discussed.

  7. Protecting the surface of a light absorber in a photoanode

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Shu; Lewis, Nathan S.

    A photoanode includes a passivation layer on a light absorber. The passivation layer is more resistant to corrosion than the light absorber. The photoanode includes a surface modifying layer that is location on the passivation layer such that the passivation layer is between the light absorber and the surface modifying layer. The surface modifying layer reduces a resistance of the passivation layer to conduction of holes out of the passivation layer.

  8. Impact Testing and Simulation of a Sinusoid Foam Sandwich Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L; Littell, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    A sinusoidal-shaped foam sandwich energy absorber was developed and evaluated at NASA Langley Research Center through multi-level testing and simulation performed under the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) research project. The energy absorber, designated the "sinusoid," consisted of hybrid carbon- Kevlar® plain weave fabric face sheets, two layers for each face sheet oriented at +/-45deg with respect to the vertical or crush direction, and a closed-cell ELFOAM(TradeMark) P200 polyisocyanurate (2.0-lb/ft3) foam core. The design goal for the energy absorber was to achieve an average floor-level acceleration of between 25- and 40-g during the full-scale crash test of a retrofitted CH-46E helicopter airframe, designated TRACT 2. Variations in the design were assessed through quasi-static and dynamic crush testing of component specimens. Once the design was finalized, a 5-ft-long subfloor beam was fabricated and retrofitted into a barrel section of a CH-46E helicopter. A vertical drop test of the barrel section was conducted onto concrete to evaluate the performance of the energy absorber prior to retrofit into TRACT 2. Finite element models were developed of all test articles and simulations were performed using LSDYNA ®, a commercial nonlinear explicit transient dynamic finite element code. Test analysis results are presented for the sinusoid foam sandwich energy absorber as comparisons of load-displacement and acceleration-time-history responses, as well as predicted and experimental structural deformations and progressive damage for each evaluation level (component testing through barrel section drop testing).

  9. Microscopic analysis of saturable absorbers: Semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors versus graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Hader, J.; Moloney, J. V.; College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721

    2016-02-07

    Fully microscopic many-body calculations are used to study the influence of strong sub-picosecond pulses on the carrier distributions and corresponding optical response in saturable absorbers used for mode-locking—semiconductor (quantum well) saturable absorber mirrors (SESAMs) and single layer graphene based saturable absorber mirrors (GSAMs). Unlike in GSAMs, the saturation fluence and recovery time in SESAMs show a strong spectral dependence. While the saturation fluence in the SESAM is minimal at the excitonic bandgap, the optimal recovery time and least pulse distortion due to group delay dispersion are found for excitation higher in the first subband. For excitation near the SESAM bandgap,more » the saturation fluence is about one tenth of that in the GSAM. At energies above the bandgap, the fluences in both systems become similar. A strong dependence of the saturation fluence on the pulse width in both systems is caused by carrier relaxation during the pulse. The recovery time in graphene is found to be about two to four times faster than that in the SESAMs. The occurrence of negative differential transmission in graphene is shown to be caused by dopant related carriers. In SESAMs, a negative differential transmission is found when exciting below the excitonic resonance where excitation induced dephasing leads to an enhancement of the absorption. Comparisons of the simulation data to the experiment show a very good quantitative agreement.« less

  10. NASA's Bio-Inspired Acoustic Absorber Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Transportation noise pollutes our worlds cities, suburbs, parks, and wilderness areas. NASAs fundamental research in aviation acoustics is helping to find innovative solutions to this multifaceted problem. NASA is learning from nature to develop the next generation of quiet aircraft.The number of road vehicles and airplanes has roughly tripled since the 1960s. Transportation noise is audible in nearly all the counties across the US. Noise can damage your hearing, raise your heart rate and blood pressure, disrupt your sleep, and make communication difficult. Noise pollution threatens wildlife when it prevents animals from hearing prey, predators, and mates. Noise regulations help drive industry to develop quieter aircraft. Noise standards for aircraft have been developed by the International Civil Aviation Organization and adopted by the US Federal Aviation Administration. The US National Park Service is working with the Federal Aviation Administration to try to balance the demand for access to the parks and wilderness areas with preservation of the natural soundscape. NASA is helping by conceptualizing quieter, more efficient aircraft of the future and performing the fundamental research to make these concepts a reality someday. Recently, NASA has developed synthetic structures that can absorb sound well over a wide frequency range, and particularly below 1000 Hz, and which mimic the acoustic performance of bundles of natural reeds. We are adapting these structures to control noise on aircraft, and spacecraft. This technology might be used in many other industrial or architectural applications where acoustic absorbers have tight constraints on weight and thickness, and may be exposed to high temperatures or liquids. Information about this technology is being made available through reports and presentations available through the NASA Technical Report Server, http:ntrs.nasa.gov. Organizations who would like to collaborate with NASA or commercialize NASAs technology

  11. Acoustic absorbance measurements in neonates exposed to smoking during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Beatriz Paloma Corrêa; Roque, Nayara Michelle Costa de Freitas; Gamero, Marcella Scigliano; Durante, Alessandra Spada

    2017-04-01

    To analyze acoustic absorbance using wideband tympanometry in neonates exposed to passive smoking during pregnancy. A study comprising 54 neonates in the control group (CG - unexposed) and 19 in the study group (SG - exposed) was carried out. Subjects were submitted to the wideband tympanometry test and subsequent analysis of absorbance of 17 frequencies. Low frequencies had a lower level of absorbance compared to high frequencies for both ambient and peak pressures, with no difference between the groups. No effect of passive smoking on acoustic absorbance measurements in neonates was observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Wideband Aural Acoustic Absorbance Predicts Conductive Hearing Loss in Children

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Douglas H.; Sanford, Chris A.; Ellison, John C.; Fitzpatrick, Denis F.; Gorga, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study tested the hypothesis that wideband aural absorbance predicts conductive hearing loss (CHL) in children medically classified as having otitis media with effusion. Design Absorbance was measured in the ear canal over frequencies from 0.25 to 8 kHz at ambient pressure or as a swept tympanogram. CHL was defined using criterion air-bone gaps of 20, 25 and 30 dB at octaves from 0.25 to 4 kHz. A likelihood-ratio predictor of CHL was constructed across frequency for ambient absorbance and across frequency and pressure for absorbance tympanometry. Performance was evaluated at individual frequencies and for any frequency at which a CHL was present. Study Sample Absorbance and conventional 226-Hz tympanograms were measured in children of age 3 to 8 years with CHL and with normal hearing. Results Absorbance was smaller at frequencies above 0.7 kHz in the CHL group than the control group. Based on the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, wideband absorbance in ambient and tympanometric tests were significantly better predictors of CHL than tympanometric width, the best 226-Hz predictor. Accuracies of ambient and tympanometric wideband absorbance did not differ. Conclusions Absorbance accurately predicted CHL in children and was more accurate than conventional 226-Hz tympanometry. PMID:23072655

  13. Dual band metamaterial perfect absorber based on artificial dielectric "molecules".

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Lan, Chuwen; Li, Bo; Zhao, Qian; Zhou, Ji

    2016-07-13

    Dual band metamaterial perfect absorbers with two absorption bands are highly desirable because of their potential application areas such as detectors, transceiver system, and spectroscopic imagers. However, most of these dual band metamaterial absorbers proposed were based on resonances of metal patterns. Here, we numerically and experimentally demonstrate a dual band metamaterial perfect absorber composed of artificial dielectric "molecules" with high symmetry. The artificial dielectric "molecule" consists of four "atoms" of two different sizes corresponding to two absorption bands with near unity absorptivity. Numerical and experimental absorptivity verify that the dual-band metamaterial absorber is polarization insensitive and can operate in wide-angle incidence.

  14. Optimal active vibration absorber: Design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina; Juang, Jer-Nan; Sulla, Jeffrey L.

    1992-01-01

    An optimal active vibration absorber can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability and control for large flexible space structures with collocated sensors/actuators. The active vibration absorber is a second-order dynamic system which is designed to suppress any unwanted structural vibration. This can be designed with minimum knowledge of the controlled system. Two methods for optimizing the active vibration absorber parameters are illustrated: minimum resonant amplitude and frequency matched active controllers. The Controls-Structures Interaction Phase-1 Evolutionary Model at NASA LaRC is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the active vibration absorber for vibration suppression. Performance is compared numerically and experimentally using acceleration feedback.

  15. Ku-band electromagnetic wave absorbing properties of polysiloxane derived Si-O-C bulk ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Donghai; Li, Zipei; Xiao, Guoqing; Yang, Shaoyu

    2018-02-01

    The bulk Si-O-C ceramics were prepared by polymer derived ceramics (PDCs) route using polysiloxane as precursor and their properties were investigated for electromagnetic wave absorbing in the frequency range of 12.4-18 GHz (Ku-band). It was found that the catalytic pyrolysis can enhance substantially the absorbing properties by in situ formation of turbostratic carbon network, ordered carbon, and multi-wall carbon nanotubes. The matching thickness of sample containing 1.5 wt% FeCl3 (FPSO-1.5) is 2.2 mm, and its reflection loss exceeds -10 dB in the whole Ku-band with an absorption peak of -35.48 dB at 14.16 GHz. For sample containing 1.5 wt% FeCl3, its absorption peak increases to -15.78 dB, but its matching thickness decreases significantly to 2.2 mm. The polymer derived Si-O-C ceramics could be used as excellent electromagnetic functional devices working in harsh environments.

  16. A variable passive low-frequency absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric R.; Gade, Anders Christian

    2005-04-01

    Multi-purpose concert halls face a dilemma. They can host classical music concerts, rock concerts and spoken word performances in a matter of a short period. These different performance types require significantly different acoustic conditions in order to provide the best sound quality to both the performers and the audience. A recommended reverberation time for classical music may be in the range of 1.5-2 s for empty halls, where rock music sounds best with a reverberation time around 0.8-1 s. Modern rhythmic music often contains high levels of sound energy in the low frequency bands but still requires a high definition for good sound quality. Ideally, the absorption of the hall should be adjustable in all frequency bands in order to provide good sound quality for all types of performances. The mid and high frequency absorption is easily regulated, but adjusting the low-frequency absorption has typically been too expensive or requires too much space to be practical for multi-purpose halls. Measurements were made on a variable low-frequency absorber to develop a practical solution to the dilemma. The paper will present the results of the measurements as well as a possible design.

  17. Absorbing multicultural states in the Axelrod model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Federico; Redner, Sidney

    2005-03-01

    We determine the ultimate fate of a limit of the Axelrod model that consists of a population of leftists, centrists, and rightists. In an elemental interaction between agents, a centrist and a leftist can both become centrists or both become leftists with equal rates (similarly for a centrist and a rightist), but leftists and rightists do not interact. This interaction is applied repeatedly until the system can no longer evolve. The constraint between extremists can lead to a frustrated final state where the system consists of only leftists and rightists. In the mean field limit, we can view the evolution of the system as the motion of a random walk in the 3-dimensional space whose coordinates correspond to the density of each species. We find the exact final state probabilities and the time to reach consensus by solving for the first-passage probability of the random walk to the corresponding absorbing boundaries. The extension to a larger number of states will be discussed. This approach is a first step towards the analytic solution of Axelrod-like models.

  18. Spacesuit Evaporator-Absorber-Radiator (SEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant C.; Hodgson, Ed; Izenso, Mike; Chan, Weibo; Cupples, Scott

    2011-01-01

    For decades advanced spacesuit developers have pursued a regenerable, robust non-venting system for heat rejection. Toward this end, this paper investigates linking together two previously developed technologies, namely NASA's Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator (SWME), and Creare's lithium chloride Heat Pump Radiator (HPR). Heat from a liquid cooled garment is transported to SWME that provides cooling through evaporation. The SEAR is evacuated at the onset of operations and thereafter, the water vapor absorption rate of the HPR maintains a low pressure environment for the SWME to evaporate effectively. This water vapor captured by solid LiCl in the HPR with a high enthalpy of absorption, results in sufficient temperature lift to reject most of the heat to space by radiation. After the sortie, the HPR would be heated up in a regenerator to drive off and recover the absorbed evaporant. A one-fourth scale prototype was built and tested in vacuum conditions at a sink temperature of 250 K. The HPR was able to stably reject 60 W over a 7-hour period. A conceptual design of a full-scale radiator is proposed. Excess heat rejection above 240 W would be accomplished through venting of the evaporant. Loop closure rates were predicted for various exploration environment scenarios.

  19. Experimental investigation of a nanofluid absorber employed in a low-profile, concentrated solar thermal collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiyuan; Zheng, Cheng; Mesgari, Sara; Hewakuruppu, Yasitha L.; Hjerrild, Natasha; Crisostomo, Felipe; Morrison, Karl; Woffenden, Albert; Rosengarten, Gary; Scott, Jason A.; Taylor, Robert A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies [1-3] have demonstrated that nanotechnology, in the form of nanoparticles suspended in water and organic liquids, can be employed to enhance solar collection via direct volumetric absorbers. However, current nanofluid solar collector experimental studies are either relevant to low-temperature flat plate solar collectors (<100 °C) [4] or higher temperature (>100 °C) indoor laboratory-scale concentrating solar collectors [1, 5]. Moreover, many of these studies involve in thermal properties of nanofluid (such as thermal conductivity) enhancement in solar collectors by using conventional selective coated steel/copper tube receivers [6], and no full-scale concentrating collector has been tested at outdoor condition by employing nanofluid absorber [2, 6]. Thus, there is a need of experimental researches to evaluate the exact performance of full-scale concentrating solar collector by employing nanofluids absorber at outdoor condition. As reported previously [7-9], a low profile (<10 cm height) solar thermal concentrating collector was designed and analysed which can potentially supply thermal energy in the 100-250 °C range (an application currently met by gas and electricity). The present study focuses on the design and experimental investigation of a nanofluid absorber employed in this newly designed collector. The nanofluid absorber consists of glass tubes used to contain chemically functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) dispersed in DI water. MWCNTs (average diameter of 6-13 nm and average length of 2.5-20 μm) were functionalized by potassium persulfate as an oxidant. The nanofluids were prepared with a MCWNT concentration of 50 +/- 0.1 mg/L to form a balance between solar absorption depth and viscosity (e.g. pumping power). Moreover, experimentally comparison of the thermal efficiency between two receivers (a black chrome-coated copper tube versus a MWCNT nanofluid contained within a glass tubetube) is investigated. Thermal

  20. In-pore exchange and diffusion of carbonate solvent mixtures in nanoporous carbon

    DOE PAGES

    Alam, Todd M.; Osborn Popp, Thomas M.

    2016-06-04

    High resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) 1H NMR spectroscopy has been used to resolve different surface and in-pore solvent environments of ethylene carbonate (EC) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) mixtures absorbed within nanoporous carbon (NPC). Two dimensional (2D) 1H HRMAS NMR exchange measurements revealed that the inhomogeneous broadened in-pore resonances have pore-to-pore exchange rates on the millisecond timescale. Pulsed-field gradient (PFG) NMR diffusometry revealed the in-pore self-diffusion constants for both EC and DMC were reduced by up to a factor of five with respect to the diffusion in the non-absorbed solvent mixtures.

  1. Comparison of artificial absorbing boundaries for acoustic wave equation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yingjie; Song, Hanjie; Zhang, Jinhai; Yao, Zhenxing

    2017-12-01

    Absorbing boundary conditions are necessary in numerical simulation for reducing the artificial reflections from model boundaries. In this paper, we overview the most important and typical absorbing boundary conditions developed throughout history. We first derive the wave equations of similar methods in unified forms; then, we compare their absorbing performance via theoretical analyses and numerical experiments. The Higdon boundary condition is shown to be the best one among the three main absorbing boundary conditions that are based on a one-way wave equation. The Clayton and Engquist boundary is a special case of the Higdon boundary but has difficulty in dealing with the corner points in implementaion. The Reynolds boundary does not have this problem but its absorbing performance is the poorest among these three methods. The sponge boundary has difficulties in determining the optimal parameters in advance and too many layers are required to achieve a good enough absorbing performance. The hybrid absorbing boundary condition (hybrid ABC) has a better absorbing performance than the Higdon boundary does; however, it is still less efficient for absorbing nearly grazing waves since it is based on the one-way wave equation. In contrast, the perfectly matched layer (PML) can perform much better using a few layers. For example, the 10-layer PML would perform well for absorbing most reflected waves except the nearly grazing incident waves. The 20-layer PML is suggested for most practical applications. For nearly grazing incident waves, convolutional PML shows superiority over the PML when the source is close to the boundary for large-scale models. The Higdon boundary and hybrid ABC are preferred when the computational cost is high and high-level absorbing performance is not required, such as migration and migration velocity analyses, since they are not as sensitive to the amplitude errors as the full waveform inversion.

  2. Complex absorbing potential based Lorentzian fitting scheme and time dependent quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hang; Kwok, Yanho; Jiang, Feng; Zheng, Xiao; Chen, GuanHua

    2014-10-28

    Based on the complex absorbing potential (CAP) method, a Lorentzian expansion scheme is developed to express the self-energy. The CAP-based Lorentzian expansion of self-energy is employed to solve efficiently the Liouville-von Neumann equation of one-electron density matrix. The resulting method is applicable for both tight-binding and first-principles models and is used to simulate the transient currents through graphene nanoribbons and a benzene molecule sandwiched between two carbon-atom chains.

  3. HOLLOW CARBON ARC DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-10-11

    A device is described for producing an energetic, direct current, hollow, carbon-arc discharge in an evacuated container and within a strong magnetic field. Such discharges are particularly useful not only in dissociation and ionization of high energy molecular ion beams, but also in acting as a shield or barrier against the instreaming of lowenergy neutral particles into a plasma formed within the hollow discharge when it is used as a dissociating mechanism for forming the plasma. There is maintained a predetermined ratio of gas particles to carbon particles released from the arc electrodes during operation of the discharge. The carbon particles absorb some of the gas particles and are pumped along and by the discharge out of the device, with the result that smaller diffusion pumps are required than would otherwise be necessary to dispose of the excess gas.

  4. Carbon-particle generator

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, A.J.

    1982-09-29

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  5. Orbiting Carbon Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Human impact on the environment has produced measurable changes in the geological record since the late 1700s. Anthropogenic emissions of CO2 today may cause the global climate to depart for its natural behavior for many millenia. CO2 is the primary anthropogenic driver of climate change. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory goals are to help collect measurements of atmospheric CO2, answering questions such as why the atmospheric CO2 buildup varies annually, the roles of the oceans and land ecosystems in absorbing CO2, the roles of North American and Eurasian sinks and how these carbon sinks respond to climate change. The present carbon cycle, CO2 variability, and climate uncertainties due atmospheric CO2 uncertainties are highlighted in this presentation.

  6. An Absorbing Look at Terry-Cloth Towels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Richard; Everett, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a lesson where students explore the absorbency of several towels with different weaves and weights. The lesson follows the 5E learning-cycle model and incorporates engineering in the sense of product testing with a focus on the relationship between the weave of a towel and its absorbency. The National Science Education…

  7. Nylon shock absorber prevents injury to parachute jumpers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Nylon shock absorbers reduce the canopy-opening shock of a parachute to a level that protects the wearer from injury. A shock absorber is mounted on each of the four risers between the shroud lines and the harness. Because of their size and location, they pose no problem in repacking the chute and harness after a jump.

  8. Design and Development of Variable-Load Energy Absorbers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-16

    Three concepts were developed and/or tested: a wire - bending mechanism, a tube-constricting mechanism, and a hydraulic energy absorber. Preliminary full...scale working models of the wire - bending mechanism and the tube-constricting mechanisms were built and tested. The hydraulic energy absorber was

  9. Self-Alining End Supports for Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfaro-Bou, E.; Eichelberger, C. P.; Fasanella, E.

    1986-01-01

    Simple devices stabilize axially-loaded compressive members. Energyabsorbing column held by two end supports, which stabilize column and tolerate misalinement. Column absorbs excess load by collapsing lengthwise. Self-alining supports small, lightweight, and almost maintenance-free. Their use eliminates alinement problem, opening up more applications and providing higher reliability for compressively-loaded energy absorbers.

  10. 14 CFR 27.475 - Tires and shock absorbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tires and shock absorbers. 27.475 Section 27.475 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Ground Loads § 27.475 Tires and shock absorbers. Unless otherwise prescribed...

  11. 14 CFR 29.475 - Tires and shock absorbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tires and shock absorbers. 29.475 Section 29.475 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Ground Loads § 29.475 Tires and shock absorbers. Unless otherwise...

  12. 21 CFR 880.6025 - Absorbent tipped applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... stick. The device is used to apply medications to, or to take specimens from, a patient. (b...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6025 Absorbent tipped applicator. (a) Identification. An absorbent tipped applicator is a...

  13. 21 CFR 878.4490 - Absorbable hemostatic agent and dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Absorbable hemostatic agent and dressing. 878.4490 Section 878.4490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4490 Absorbable...

  14. 21 CFR 878.4830 - Absorbable surgical gut suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Absorbable surgical gut suture. 878.4830 Section 878.4830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4830 Absorbable...

  15. 21 CFR 878.4490 - Absorbable hemostatic agent and dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Absorbable hemostatic agent and dressing. 878.4490 Section 878.4490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4490 Absorbable...

  16. 21 CFR 878.4755 - Absorbable lung biopsy plug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Absorbable lung biopsy plug. 878.4755 Section 878.4755 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4755 Absorbable lung biopsy...

  17. 21 CFR 878.4490 - Absorbable hemostatic agent and dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Absorbable hemostatic agent and dressing. 878.4490 Section 878.4490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4490 Absorbable...

  18. 21 CFR 878.4490 - Absorbable hemostatic agent and dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Absorbable hemostatic agent and dressing. 878.4490 Section 878.4490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4490 Absorbable...

  19. 21 CFR 878.4830 - Absorbable surgical gut suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Absorbable surgical gut suture. 878.4830 Section 878.4830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4830 Absorbable...

  20. 21 CFR 878.4830 - Absorbable surgical gut suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Absorbable surgical gut suture. 878.4830 Section 878.4830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4830 Absorbable...

  1. 21 CFR 878.4490 - Absorbable hemostatic agent and dressing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Absorbable hemostatic agent and dressing. 878.4490 Section 878.4490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4490 Absorbable...

  2. 21 CFR 878.4830 - Absorbable surgical gut suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Absorbable surgical gut suture. 878.4830 Section 878.4830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4830 Absorbable...

  3. Shock-absorbing caster wheel is simple and compact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindley, R. J.

    1968-01-01

    Compact shock-absorbing caster wheel mitigates or absorbs shock by a compressible tire which deforms into a cavity between its inner edge and the wheel hub. A tee-shaped annular ring embedded in the tire distributes loads more uniformly throughout both wheel and tire.

  4. Physically absorbable reagents-collectors in elementary flotation

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Kondrat'ev; I.G. Bochkarev

    2007-09-15

    Based on the reviewed researches held at the Institute of Mining, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, the effect of physically absorbable reagents-collectors on formation of a flotation complex and its stability in turbulent pulp flows in flotation machines of basic types is considered. The basic requirements for physically absorbable reagents-collectors at different flotation stages are established.

  5. 40 CFR 65.150 - Absorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... control device on a Group 1 process vent or a high-throughput transfer rack with an absorber used as a... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Absorbers used as control devices. 65... (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Closed Vent Systems, Control Devices, and Routing to a Fuel Gas...

  6. 40 CFR 65.150 - Absorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... control device on a Group 1 process vent or a high-throughput transfer rack with an absorber used as a... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Absorbers used as control devices. 65... (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Closed Vent Systems, Control Devices, and Routing to a Fuel Gas...

  7. 40 CFR 65.150 - Absorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... control device on a Group 1 process vent or a high-throughput transfer rack with an absorber used as a... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Absorbers used as control devices. 65... (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Closed Vent Systems, Control Devices, and Routing to a Fuel Gas...

  8. 21 CFR 878.4830 - Absorbable surgical gut suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Absorbable surgical gut suture. 878.4830 Section 878.4830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... surgical gut suture. (a) Identification. An absorbable surgical gut suture, both plain and chromic, is an...

  9. Why Muscle is an Efficient Shock Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Kopylova, Galina V.; Fernandez, Manuel; Narayanan, Theyencheri

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscles power body movement by converting free energy of ATP hydrolysis into mechanical work. During the landing phase of running or jumping some activated skeletal muscles are subjected to stretch. Upon stretch they absorb body energy quickly and effectively thus protecting joints and bones from impact damage. This is achieved because during lengthening, skeletal muscle bears higher force and has higher instantaneous stiffness than during isometric contraction, and yet consumes very little ATP. We wish to understand how the actomyosin molecules change their structure and interaction to implement these physiologically useful mechanical and thermodynamical properties. We monitored changes in the low angle x-ray diffraction pattern of rabbit skeletal muscle fibers during ramp stretch compared to those during isometric contraction at physiological temperature using synchrotron radiation. The intensities of the off-meridional layer lines and fine interference structure of the meridional M3 myosin x-ray reflection were resolved. Mechanical and structural data show that upon stretch the fraction of actin-bound myosin heads is higher than during isometric contraction. On the other hand, the intensities of the actin layer lines are lower than during isometric contraction. Taken together, these results suggest that during stretch, a significant fraction of actin-bound heads is bound non-stereo-specifically, i.e. they are disordered azimuthally although stiff axially. As the strong or stereo-specific myosin binding to actin is necessary for actin activation of the myosin ATPase, this finding explains the low metabolic cost of energy absorption by muscle during the landing phase of locomotion. PMID:24465673

  10. Thermally induced nonlinear optical absorption in metamaterial perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guddala, Sriram; Kumar, Raghwendra; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-03-01

    A metamaterial perfect absorber consisting of a tri-layer (Al/ZnS/Al) metal-dielectric-metal system with top aluminium nano-disks was fabricated by laser-interference lithography and lift-off processing. The metamaterial absorber had peak resonant absorbance at 1090 nm and showed nonlinear absorption for 600ps laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength. A nonlinear saturation of reflectance was measured to be dependent on the average laser power incident and not the peak laser intensity. The nonlinear behaviour is shown to arise from the heating due to the absorbed radiation and photo-thermal changes in the dielectric properties of aluminium. The metamaterial absorber is seen to be damage resistant at large laser intensities of 25 MW/cm2.

  11. Exploring the relationship between skin property and absorbent pad environment.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, Yoshie; Nakagami, Gojiro; Sanada, Hiromi; Oba, Miho; Fujikawa, Junko; Konya, Chizuko; Sugama, Junko

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the related factors of skin lesions found in the surrounding environment of absorbent pads by clinical investigation. Most older patients with incontinence use absorbent products, therefore causing many patients to have skin lesion in the absorbent pad area. To prevent these skin lesions from occurring, it is necessary to examine the absorbent pad environment of clinical patients since there are many contributing factors that complicate the pathophysiology in this area. A cross-sectional design was used. One hundred older Japanese patients with faecal and/or urinary incontinence using diapers and absorbent pads participated. Excluding blanchable erythema, the presence of skin lesions in the absorbent pad area was confirmed. Skin pH, hydration level and bacterial cultures were used to assess the skin property. Absorbent pad environment and patient demographics were also investigated. The overall prevalence of skin lesions was 36%. Forty percent of the skin lesions were contact dermatitis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that only the presence of diarrhoea independently affected contact dermatitis. There was a significant relationship between contact dermatitis and the use of absorbent pads when the patient had diarrhoea. Although the factors related to skin lesions in the absorbent pad area are complexly intertwined, this study was the first to be able to determine diarrhoea as one specific factor in clinical setting. This finding suggests that the presence of diarrhoea is significantly related with contact dermatitis. Therefore, when a patient has diarrhoea, health-care professionals should immediately implement a preventative care program which includes careful skin observation and improved skin care. It is also necessary to develop a more effective absorbent pad to protect the skin of incontinent patients who suffer from the irritating effects of liquid stool.

  12. Design Study of the Absorber Detector of a Compton Camera for On-Line Control in Ion Beam Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, M.-H.; Dahoumane, M.; Dauvergne, D.; De Rydt, M.; Dedes, G.; Freud, N.; Krimmer, J.; Letang, J. M.; Lojacono, X.; Maxim, V.; Montarou, G.; Ray, C.; Roellinghoff, F.; Testa, E.; Walenta, A. H.

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this study is to tune the design of the absorber detector of a Compton camera for prompt γ-ray imaging during ion beam therapy. The response of the Compton camera to a photon point source with a realistic energy spectrum (corresponding to the prompt γ-ray spectrum emitted during the carbon irradiation of a water phantom) is studied by means of Geant4 simulations. Our Compton camera consists of a stack of 2 mm thick silicon strip detectors as a scatter detector and of a scintillator plate as an absorber detector. Four scintillators are considered: LYSO, NaI, LaBr3 and BGO. LYSO and BGO appear as the most suitable materials, due to their high photo-electric cross-sections, which leads to a high percentage of fully absorbed photons. Depth-of-interaction measurements are shown to have limited influence on the spatial resolution of the camera. In our case, the thickness which gives the best compromise between a high percentage of photons that are fully absorbed and a low parallax error is about 4 cm for the LYSO detector and 4.5 cm for the BGO detector. The influence of the width of the absorber detector on the spatial resolution is not very pronounced as long as it is lower than 30 cm.

  13. Development and characterization of fourteen novel microsatellite markers for the chestnut short-tailed fruit bat (Carollia castanea), and cross-amplification to related species.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Katherine A; Waits, Lisette P; Hohenlohe, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Rapid anthropogenic land use change threatens the primary habitat of the Chestnut short-tailed bat (Carollia castanea) throughout much of its range. Information on population genetic structure can inform management strategies for this widespread frugivorous bat, and effective protection of C. castanea will also benefit the more than 20 mutualistic plant species of which this bat is the primary seed disperser. To facilitate understanding of population genetic structure in this species, fourteen novel microsatellite markers were developed using restriction-site-associated DNA libraries and Illumina sequencing and tested on 28 individuals from 13 locations in Costa Rica. These are the first microsatellite markers developed for C. castanea. All loci were polymorphic, with number of alleles ranging from 2-11 and average observed heterozygosity of 0.631. Markers were also cross-amplified in three additional frugivorous bat species threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation: Sowell's short-tailed bat (Carollia sowelli), Seba's short-tailed bat (Carollia perspicillata), and the Jamaican fruit bat (Artibeus jamaicensis), and 10, 11, and 8 were polymorphic, respectively.

  14. Kevlar based nanofibrous particles as robust, effective and recyclable absorbents for water purification.

    PubMed

    Nie, Chuanxiong; Peng, Zihang; Yang, Ye; Cheng, Chong; Ma, Lang; Zhao, Changsheng

    2016-11-15

    Developing robust and recyclable absorbents for water purification is of great demand to control water pollution and to provide sustainable water resources. Herein, for the first time, we reported the fabrication of Kevlar nanofiber (KNF) based composite particles for water purification. Both the KNF and KNF-carbon nanotube composite particles can be produced in large-scale by automatic injection of casting solution into ethanol. The resulted nanofibrous particles showed high adsorption capacities towards various pollutants, including metal ions, phenylic compounds and various dyes. Meanwhile, the adsorption process towards dyes was found to fit well with the pseudo-second-order model, while the adsorption speed was controlled by intraparticle diffusion. Furthermore, the adsorption capacities of the nanofibrous particles could be easily recovered by washing with ethanol. In general, the KNF based particles integrate the advantages of easy production, robust and effective adsorption performances, as well as good recyclability, which can be used as robust absorbents to remove toxic molecules and forward the application of absorbents in water purification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Microwave absorbance properties of zirconium–manganese substituted cobalt nanoferrite as electromagnetic (EM) wave absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Kishwar, E-mail: kknano@hotmail.com; Rehman, Sarish

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • Good candidates for EM materials with low reflectivity. • Good candidates for broad bandwidth at microwave frequency. • Microwave absorbing bandwidth was modulated simply by manipulating the Zr–Mn. • Higher the Zr–Mn content, the higher absorption rates for the electromagnetic radiation. • The predicted reflection loss shows that this can be used for thin ferrite absorber. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline Zr–Mn (x) substituted Co ferrite having chemical formula CoFe{sub 2−2x}Zr{sub x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.1–0.4) was prepared by co-precipitation technique. Combining properties such as structural, electrical, magnetic and reflection loss characteristics. Crystal structure and surface morphology of themore » calcined samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). By using two point probe homemade resistivity apparatus to find resistivity of the sample. Electromagnetic (EM) properties are measured through RF impedance/materials analyzer over 1 MHz–3 GHz. The room-temperature dielectric measurements show dispersion behavior with increasing frequency from 100 Hz to 3 MHz. Magnetic properties confirmed relatively strong dependence of saturation magnetization on Zr–Mn composition. Curie temperature is also found to decrease linearly with addition of Zr–Mn. Furthermore, comprehensive analysis of microwave reflection loss (RL) is carried out as a function of substitution, frequency, and thickness. Composition accompanying maximum microwave absorption is suggested.« less

  16. The Interior Analysis and 3-D Reconstruction of Internally-Mixed Light-Absorbing Atmospheric Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conny, J. M.; Collins, S. M.; Anderson, I.; Herzing, A.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon-containing atmospheric particles may either absorb solar or outgoing long-wave radiation or scatter solar radiation, and thus, affect Earth’s radiative balance in multiple ways. Light-absorbing carbon that is common in urban air particles such as industrial coke dust, road dust, and diesel soot, often exists in the same particle with other phases that contain, for example, aluminum, calcium, iron, and sulfur. While the optical properties of atmospheric particles in general depend on overall particle size and shape, the inhomogeneity of chemical phases within internally-mixed particles may also greatly affect particle optical properties. In this study, a series of microscopic approaches were used to identify individual light-absorbing coarse-mode particles and to assess their interior structure and composition. Particle samples were collected in 2004 from one of the U.S. EPA’s Los Angeles Particulate Matter Supersites, and were likely affected substantially by road dust and construction dust. First, bright-field and dark-field light microscopy and computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used to distinguish predominantly light-absorbing carbonaceous particles from other particle types such as mineral dust, sea salt, and brake wear. Second, high-resolution SEM-EDX elemental mapping of individual carbonaceous particles was used to select particles with additional elemental phases that exhibited spatial inhomogeneity. Third, focused ion-beam SEM (FIB-SEM) with EDX was used to slice through selected particles to expose interior surfaces and to determine the spatial distribution of element phases throughout the particles. Fourth, study of the interior phases of a particle was augmented by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of a thin section of the particle prepared by FIB-SEM. Here, electron energy loss spectroscopy with TEM was used to study chemical bonding in the carbonaceous phase

  17. Disturbance of light-absorbing aerosols on the albedo in a winter snowpack of Central Tibet.

    PubMed

    Ming, Jing; Wang, Pengling; Zhao, Shuyu; Chen, Pengfei

    2013-08-01

    A field observation on the albedo of the snowpack in Central Tibet was conducted in the Nam Co region in the winter of 2011. Snow properties, including grain size and density, were measured in the field, and surface-layer snow samples (down to 5 cm) were collected. The average concentrations of black carbon and dust were 72 ppbm (close to that in the glaciers of Mt. Nyainqentanglha) and 120 ppmm, respectively. Inverse trends were found to exist between the albedo of the snowpack and light-absorbing aerosols (LAAs) as well as grain size growth. Modeling showed that black carbon, dust, and grain growth in the winter snowpack can reduce the broadband albedo by 11%, 28%, and 61%, respectively.

  18. Influence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) volume percentage on the magnetic and microwave absorbing properties of BaMg{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}TiFe{sub 10}O{sub 19}/MWCNTs nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Reza Shams; Moradi, Mahmood, E-mail: moradi@susc.ac.ir; Institute of Nanotechnology, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71454

    2016-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Reflection losses of (a) doped barium hexaferrite, BaMg{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}TiFe{sub 10}O{sub 19}, sample and their nanocomposites with (b) 4 vol. (c) 8 vol. and (d) 12 vol.% of MWCNTs are presented. - Highlights: • BaMg{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}TiFe{sub 10}O{sub 19}/MWCNTs nanocomposites were synthesized. • The structural, magnetic and microwave absorption properties were investigated. • The microwave absorption is strongly influenced by volume percentage of MWCNTs. • The nanocomposite with 8 vol.% of MWCNTs can be proposed as a wideband absorber. - Abstract: In this study BaMg{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5}TiFe{sub 10}O{sub 19}/MWCNTs nanocomposites with different amount of MWCNTs (0, 4, 8more » and 12 vol.%) were synthesized. Here, the X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to demonstrate the structural and morphological characteristics of the prepared samples. XRD along with FTIR examinations exhibited that the nanocomposites were successfully synthesized. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) showed the relatively strong dependence of saturation magnetization and coercivity on the volume percentage of MWCNTs. The microwave evaluation also confirmed that the complex permittivity of nanocomposites could be enhanced by adding MWCNTs. Finally, the nanocomposite with 8% vol. of MWCNTs exhibited the best microwave absorption performance among the samples.« less

  19. Simulation, fabrication and characterization of THz metamaterial absorbers.

    PubMed

    Grant, James P; McCrindle, Iain J H; Cumming, David R S

    2012-12-27

    Metamaterials (MM), artificial materials engineered to have properties that may not be found in nature, have been widely explored since the first theoretical(1) and experimental demonstration(2) of their unique properties. MMs can provide a highly controllable electromagnetic response, and to date have been demonstrated in every technologically relevant spectral range including the optical(3), near IR(4), mid IR(5) , THz(6) , mm-wave(7) , microwave(8) and radio(9) bands. Applications include perfect lenses(10), sensors(11), telecommunications(12), invisibility cloaks(13) and filters(14,15). We have recently developed single band(16), dual band(17) and broadband(18) THz metamaterial absorber devices capable of greater than 80% absorption at the resonance peak. The concept of a MM absorber is especially important at THz frequencies where it is difficult to find strong frequency selective THz absorbers(19). In our MM absorber the THz radiation is absorbed in a thickness of ~ λ/20, overcoming the thickness limitation of traditional quarter wavelength absorbers. MM absorbers naturally lend themselves to THz detection applications, such as thermal sensors, and if integrated with suitable THz sources (e.g. QCLs), could lead to compact, highly sensitive, low cost, real time THz imaging systems.

  20. Radiative forcing and rapid adjustment of absorbing aerosols in the Pearl River Delta Region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Yim, S. H. L.; Lau, G.

    2016-12-01

    Part of organic carbon defined as brown carbon (BrC) has been found to absorb solar radiation, especially in near-ultraviolet and blue bands, but their radiation impact is far less understood than black carbon (BC). Rapid adjustment thought to occur within a few weeks, induced by aerosol radiative effect and thereby alter cloud cover or other climate components. These effects are particularly pronounced for absorbing aerosols. The data gathered is from an online coupled model, WRF-Chem. A two-simulation test is conducted from July 8 to July 15. The baseline simulation doesn't account for aerosol-radiation interactions, whereas the sensitivity run includes it. The differences between these two simulations represent total effects of the aerosol instantaneous radiative forcing and subsequent rapid adjustment. In Figure 1, without cloud effect (clear sky), at the top of atmosphere (TOA), the SW radiation changes are negative in the PRD region, representing an overall cooling effect of aerosols. However, in the atmosphere (ATM), aerosols heat the atmosphere by absorbing incoming solar radiation with an average of 2.4 W/m2 (Table 1). After including rapid adjustment (all sky), the radiation change pattern becomes significantly different, especially at TOA and surface (SFC). This may be caused by cloud cover change due to rapid adjustment. The magnitude of SW radiation changes for all sky at all levels is smaller than that for clear sky. This result suggests the rapid adjustment counteracts the instantaneous radiative forcing of aerosols. At TOA, the cooling effect of the aerosol is 74% lower for all sky compared with clear sky, highlighting an overall warming effect of rapid adjustment in the PRD region. Aerosol-induced changes (W/m2) TOA ATM SFC Clear Sky -9.2 2.4 -11.6 All Sky -2.4 1.9 -4.3 Table 1. Aerosol-induced averaged changes in shortwave radiation due to aerosol-radiation interactions in the Pearl River Delta. The test shows the rapid adjustment of aerosols

  1. CaCu3Ti4O12 particles and MWCNT-filled microwave absorber with improved microwave absorption by FSS incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Yuchang; Yang, Zhaoning; Wen, Qinlong; Luo, Fa

    2016-07-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs)- and CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) particle-filled epoxy microwave absorbing coatings were prepared, and their electromagnetic properties and reflection loss (RL) were investigated in the frequency range 8.2-12.4 GHz. The microstructures of these coatings exhibit a uniform dispersion of MWCNTs and CCTO particles in the matrix. The value and frequency dependency of complex permittivity of such coatings enhanced with increasing MWCNT content. Frequency-selective surface was used to improve their microwave absorption (both the operating bandwidth and minimum RL) without increasing the absorber thickness. Such absorber showed high microwave absorbing performance, and the bandwidth of the RL below -8 dB (more than 84.1 % absorption) can be obtained in the whole X-band with a thickness of 1.5 mm.

  2. Diamond detector in absorbed dose measurements in high‐energy linear accelerator photon and electron beams

    PubMed Central

    Binukumar, John Pichy; Amri, Iqbal Al; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Antony

    2016-01-01

    Diamond detectors (DD) are preferred in small field dosimetry of radiation beams because of small dose profile penumbras, better spatial resolution, and tissue‐equivalent properties. We investigated a commercially available ‘microdiamond’ detector in realizing absorbed dose from first principles. A microdiamond detector, type TM 60019 with tandem electrometer is used to measure absorbed doses in water, nylon, and PMMA phantoms. With sensitive volume 0.004 mm3, radius 1.1 mm, thickness 1×10−3mm, the nominal response is 1 nC/Gy. It is assumed that the diamond detector could collect total electric charge (nC) developed during irradiation at 0 V bias. We found that dose rate effect is less than 0.7% for changing dose rate by 500 MU/min. The reproducibility in obtaining readings with diamond detector is found to be ±0.17% (1 SD) (n=11). The measured absorbed doses for 6 MV and 15 MV photons arrived at using mass energy absorption coefficients and stopping power ratios compared well with Nd, water calibrated ion chamber measured absorbed doses within 3% in water, PMMA, and nylon media. The calibration factor obtained for diamond detector confirmed response variation is due to sensitivity due to difference in manufacturing process. For electron beams, we had to apply ratio of electron densities of water to carbon. Our results qualify diamond dosimeter as a transfer standard, based on long‐term stability and reproducibility. Based on micro‐dimensions, we recommend these detectors for pretreatment dose verifications in small field irradiations like stereotactic treatments with image guidance. PACS number(s): 87.56.Da PMID:27074452

  3. Diamond detector in absorbed dose measurements in high-energy linear accelerator photon and electron beams.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Binukumar, John Pichy; Al Amri, Iqbal; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Antony

    2016-03-08

    Diamond detectors (DD) are preferred in small field dosimetry of radiation beams because of small dose profile penumbras, better spatial resolution, and tissue-equivalent properties. We investigated a commercially available 'microdiamond' detector in realizing absorbed dose from first principles. A microdiamond detector, type TM 60019 with tandem electrometer is used to measure absorbed doses in water, nylon, and PMMA phantoms. With sensitive volume 0.004 mm3, radius 1.1mm, thickness 1 x10(-3) mm, the nominal response is 1 nC/Gy. It is assumed that the diamond detector could collect total electric charge (nC) developed during irradiation at 0 V bias. We found that dose rate effect is less than 0.7% for changing dose rate by 500 MU/min. The reproducibility in obtaining readings with diamond detector is found to be ± 0.17% (1 SD) (n = 11). The measured absorbed doses for 6 MV and 15 MV photons arrived at using mass energy absorption coefficients and stop-ping power ratios compared well with Nd, water calibrated ion chamber measured absorbed doses within 3% in water, PMMA, and nylon media. The calibration factor obtained for diamond detector confirmed response variation is due to sensitivity due to difference in manufacturing process. For electron beams, we had to apply ratio of electron densities of water to carbon. Our results qualify diamond dosimeter as a transfer standard, based on long-term stability and reproducibility. Based on micro-dimensions, we recommend these detectors for pretreatment dose verifications in small field irradiations like stereotactic treatments with image guidance.

  4. HS 1603+3820 and its Warm Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikołajuk, M.; Różańska, A.; Czerny, B.; Dobrzycki, A.

    2009-07-01

    We use photoionization codes CLOUDY and TITAN to obtain physical conditions in the absorbing medium close to the nucleus of a distant quasar (z = 2.54) HS 1603+3820. We found that the total column density of this Warm Absorber is 2 x 1022 cm-2. Due to the softness of the quasars spectrum the modelling allowed us also to determine uniquely the volume hydrogen density of this warm gas (n = 1010 cm-3) which combined with the other quasar parameters leads to a distance determination to the Warm Absorber from the central source which is ~ 1.5 x 1016 cm.

  5. Applying an overstress principle in accelerated testing of absorbing mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyss, V. G.; Sergaeva, M. Yu; Sergaev, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    The relevance of using overstress test as a forced one to determine the pneumatic absorber lifespan was studied. The obtained results demonstrated that at low load overstress the relative error for the absorber lifespan evaluation is no more than 3%. This means that the test results spread has almost no effect on the lifespan evaluation, and this effect is several times less than that at high load overstress tests. Accelerated testing of absorbers with low load overstress is more acceptable since the relative error for the lifespan evaluation is negligible.

  6. Development of sampling calorimeter with segmented lead glass absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, R.; Takeshita, T.; Itoh, H.; Kanzaki, I.

    2018-02-01

    Sampling calorimeter is indispensable for physics measurement at collider experiment with PFA. Uncertainty of deposit energy at absorber layer degrades energy resolution. This problem will be solved by using lead glass as absorber, which is clear and heavy. High energy particles produce Cherenkov lights whose light yield corresponds to the track length in the lead glass. This information from the absorber will improve the energy resolution of the calorimeter. Performance of this calorimeter prototype tested for electrons at ELPH beam at Tohoku University has been described. We discuss the problems and its capabilities.

  7. Optimization of the acoustic absorption coefficients of certain functional absorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pocsa, V.; Biborosch, L.; Veres, A.; Halpert, E.; Lorian, R.; Botos, T.

    1974-01-01

    The sound absorption coefficients of some functional absorbents (mineral wool plates) are determined by the reverberation chamber method. The influence of the angle of inclination of the sound absorbing material with respect to the surface to be treated is analyzed as well as the influence of the covering index, defined as the ratio of the designed area of a plate and the area of the treated surface belonging to another plate. As compared with the conventional method of applying sound-absorbing plates, the analyzed structures have a higher technological and economical efficiency. The optimum structure corresponds to an angle of inclination of 15 deg and a covering index of 0.8.

  8. FLUX-TRAP REACTOR WITH ABSORBER IN THE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Ergen, W.K.

    1958-03-01

    An idealized flux-trap reactor is modified by the insertion of absorber. It is shown that, for appreciable absorption, a flux depression results, and the remaining flux is proportional to the diffusion constant D times the center flux in the nonabsorption case. This factor D just cancels the factor 1/D in the expression for this center flux so that the flux in the case with absorber is independent of D. In the case with absorber the advantage of Be and BeO largely disappears. (auth)

  9. Automated Absorber Attachment for X-ray Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S.; Allen, Christine; Kilbourne, Caroline; Miller, Timothy M.; Costen, Nick; Schulte, Eric; Moseley, Samuel J.

    2007-01-01

    Our goal is to develop a method for the automated attachment of large numbers of absorber tiles to large format detector arrays. This development includes the fabrication of high quality, closely spaced HgTe absorber tiles that are properly positioned for pick-and-place by our FC150 flip chip bonder. The FC150 also transfers the appropriate minute amount of epoxy to the detectors for permanent attachment of the absorbers. The success of this development will replace an arduous, risky and highly manual task with a reliable, high-precision automated process.

  10. Towards Perfectly Absorbing Boundary Conditions for Euler Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. Ehtesham; Hu, Fang Q.; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the effectiveness of absorbing layers as non-reflecting computational boundaries for the Euler equations. The absorbing-layer equations are simply obtained by splitting the governing equations in the coordinate directions and introducing absorption coefficients in each split equation. This methodology is similar to that used by Berenger for the numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. Specifically, we apply this methodology to three physical problems shock-vortex interactions, a plane free shear flow and an axisymmetric jet- with emphasis on acoustic wave propagation. Our numerical results indicate that the use of absorbing layers effectively minimizes numerical reflection in all three problems considered.

  11. X-band microwave absorbing characteristics of multicomponent composites with magnetodielectric fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afghahi, Seyyed Salman Seyyed; Jafarian, Mojtaba; Stergiou, Charalampos A.

    2016-12-01

    We have studied the microwave absorbing performance in the X-band (8-12.4 GHz) of epoxy composites filled with magnetic and dielectric oxides and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. To this end, pure cobalt-substituted Ba-hexaferrite and calcium titanate were synthesized with the hydrothermal method in the form of nanosized powder. Moreover, the produced powders were characterized in regard of their structural, morphological and static magnetic properties. For the electromagnetic investigation, composite samples were also prepared with various thicknesses up to 4 mm and two basic filler compositions; namely 30 wt% of BaCoFe11O19 and 30 wt% of the mixture BaCoFe11O19/CaTiO3/carbon nanotubes. The magnetic composites show strong but narrowband reflection losses up to 27.5 dB, whereas the magnetodielectric composites with maximum losses of 15.8 dB possess wider bandwidth of operation, due to improved impedance matching. Furthermore, the characteristic frequency of the maximum losses for these quarter-wavelength absorbers was verified to be in inverse proportion to the layer thickness. These findings are supported by reflectance measurements of the samples both in waveguide and free-space.

  12. Effects of Absorbing Aerosols on Accelerated Melting of Snowpack in the Tibetan-Himalayas Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2011-01-01

    The impacts of absorbing aerosol on melting of snowpack in the Hindu-Kush-Tibetan-Himalayas (HKTH) region are studied using NASA satellite and GEOS-5 GCM. Results from GCM experiments shows that a 8-10% in the rate of melting of snowpack over the western Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau can be attributed to the aerosol elevated-heat-pump (EHP) feedback effect (Lau et al. 2008), initiated by the absorption of solar radiation by absorbing aerosols accumulated over the Indo-Gangetic Plain and Himalayas foothills. On the other hand, deposition of black carbon on snow surface was estimated to give rise to a reduction in snow surface albedo of 2 - 5%, and an increased annual runoff of 9-24%. From case studies using satellite observations and re-analysis data, we find consistent signals of possible impacts of dust and black carbon aerosol in blackening snow surface, in accelerating spring melting of snowpack in the HKHT, and consequentially in influencing shifts in long-term Asian summer monsoon rainfall pattern.

  13. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2014-08-19

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  14. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2010-11-09

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  15. Highly stable beta-class carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    DOEpatents

    Alvizo, Oscar; Benoit, Mike; Novick, Scott

    2013-04-16

    The present disclosure relates to .beta.-class carbonic anhydrase polypeptides having improved properties including increased thermostability and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides formulations and uses of the polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering. Also provided are polynucleotides encoding the carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and host cells capable of expressing them.

  16. Highly stable beta-class carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    DOEpatents

    Alvizo, Oscar; Benoit, Michael R; Novick, Scott J

    2013-08-20

    The present disclosure relates to .beta.-class carbonic anhydrase polypeptides having improved properties including increased thermostability and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides formulations and uses of the polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering. Also provided are polynucleotides encoding the carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and host cells capable of expressing them.

  17. [Implementation of the program of "Collaborative Development of Advanced Practical Education to Train Pharmacists in Leadership" under the joint operation of the pharmaceutical departments in fourteen national universities].

    PubMed

    Hirata, Kazumasa; Tamura, Satoru; Kobayashi, Motomasa

    2012-01-01

    "Collaborative Development of Advanced Practical Education Program to Train Pharmacists with Leadership" applied jointly by the pharmaceutical departments of fourteen national universities was selected to receive the special expenditure support of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology for fiscal year 2010 under "the Training of Highly Skillful Professionals and Improvement of the Quality of the Function of Professional Education". This project is to promote the collaborative development of the educational program which will make it possible to further advance and substantiate the education of pharmacists in the six year course of the pharmaceutical department for the ultimate purpose to introduce pharmacists with leadership who can play an active role and fill in a leadership position in a wide range of responsibilities into the society which, more and more, has come to expect pharmacy to take the initiative in acting against health hazards caused by infections, foods and environmental pollution as well as to meet the diversification of healthcare. To be more specific, this project is to try and evaluate the following programs repeatedly based on the plan-do-check-act (PDCA) cycle: 1) Practical medical and pharmaceutical education program; 2) Program concerning research on long term themes and advanced education; 3) Program concerning training and education of SPs (standardized patients or simulated patients) and PBL (problem-based learning) tutorial education; and 4) Program concerning the method of evaluation of education. Through this repeated trial and evaluation, this project ultimately seeks to construct a highly effective practical educational program which integrates each university's achievements and educational attempts rich in originality.

  18. Magneto-rheological fluid shock absorbers for HMMWV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordaninejad, Faramarz; Kelso, Shawn P.

    2000-04-01

    This paper presents the development and evaluation of a controllable, semi-active magneto-rheological fluid (MRF) shock absorber for a High Mobility Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV). The University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) MRF damper is tailored for structures and ground vehicles that undergo a wide range of dynamic loading. It also has the capability for unique rebound and compression characteristics. The new MRF shock absorber emulates the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) shock absorber behavior in passive mode, and provides a wide controllable damping force range. A theoretical study is performed to evaluate the UNR MRF shock absorber. The Bingham plastic theory is employed to model the nonlinear behavior of the MR fluid. A fluid-mechanics-based theoretical model along with a three-dimensional finite element electromagnetic analysis is utilized to predict the MRF damper performance. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data and are demonstrated to be in excellent agreement.

  19. 86. Shock absorber, top of launch control center, southeast corner ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    86. Shock absorber, top of launch control center, southeast corner - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  20. 83. Shock absorber attaching "egg" to the launch control center, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    83. Shock absorber attaching "egg" to the launch control center, southwest corner - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  1. 21 CFR 880.5300 - Medical absorbent fiber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...'s body surface. Absorbent fibers intended solely for cosmetic purposes are not included in this generic device category. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  2. 21 CFR 880.5300 - Medical absorbent fiber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...'s body surface. Absorbent fibers intended solely for cosmetic purposes are not included in this generic device category. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  3. 21 CFR 880.5300 - Medical absorbent fiber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...'s body surface. Absorbent fibers intended solely for cosmetic purposes are not included in this generic device category. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the...

  4. Stretchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Liquid Metal-Filled Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyeongseob; Lee, Dongju; Eom, Seunghyun; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-01-01

    A stretchable metamaterial absorber is proposed in this study. The stretchability was achieved by liquid metal and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). To inject liquid metal, microfluidic channels were fabricated using PDMS powers and microfluidic-channel frames, which were built using a three-dimensional printer. A top conductive pattern and ground plane were designed after considering the easy injection of liquid metal. The proposed metamaterial absorber comprises three layers of PDMS substrate. The top layer is for the top conductive pattern, and the bottom layer is for the meandered ground plane. Flat PDMS layers were inserted between the top and bottom PDMS layers. The measured absorptivity of the fabricated absorber was 97.8% at 18.5 GHz, and the absorption frequency increased from 18.5 to 18.65 GHz as the absorber was stretched from its original length (5.2 cm) to 6.4 cm. PMID:27077861

  5. Broadband infrared metamaterial absorber based on anodic aluminum oxide template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jingfan; Qu, Shaobo; Ma, Hua; Wang, Jiafu; Yang, Shen; Pang, Yongqiang

    2018-05-01

    In this work, a broadband infrared metamaterial absorber is proposed based on trapezoid-shaped anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template. Unlike traditional metamaterial absorber constructed from metal-dielectric-metal sandwich structure, our proposed absorber is composed of trapezoid-shaped AAO template with metallic nanowires inside. The infrared absorption efficiency is numerically calculated and the mechanism analysis is given in the paper. Owing to the superposition of multiple resonances produced by the nanowires with different heights, the infrared metamatrial absorber can keep high absorption efficiency during broad working wavelength band from 3.4 μm to 6.1 μm. In addition, the resonance wavelength is associated with the height of nanowires, which indicates that the resonance wavelength can be modulated flexibly through changing the heights of nanowires. This kind of design can also be adapted to other wavelength regions.

  6. Wave Absorber with Fine Weatherability for Improving ETC Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Yu; Matsumoto, Kouta; Okada, Osamu; Hashimoto, Osamu

    Wave absorber of rubber sheet containing natural rubber and EPDM is designed, fabricated and measured for improving ETC environment. As a result, proposed absorption material has fine weatherability and wave absorption satisfied with ETC standard can be realized theoretically before and after the weatherability test if the thickness of absorber is fabricated at the ranging from 2.26mm to 2.52mm. Moreover, absorber sheet sample based on theoretical values is fabricated and are measured. As a result, 20dB or more is also confirmed at the incident angle ranging from 5 to 55 degrees experimentally. Therefore, the wave absorber with fine weatherability being satisfied with ETC standard can be realized.

  7. Liquid absorbent solutions for separating nitrogen from natural gas

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Dwayne T.; Babcock, Walter C.; Edlund, David J.; Lyon, David K.; Miller, Warren K.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrogen-absorbing and -desorbing compositions, novel ligands and transition metal complexes, and methods of using the same, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

  8. Two-dimensional QR-coded metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Sai; Ma, Hua; Wang, Jiafu; Pang, Yongqiang; Zhang, Jieqiu; Qu, Shaobo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the design of metamaterial absorbers is proposed based on QR coding and topology optimization. Such absorbers look like QR codes and can be recognized by decoding softwares as well as mobile phones. To verify the design, two lightweight wideband absorbers are designed, which can achieve wideband absorption above 90 % in 6.68-19.30 and 7.00-19.70 GHz, respectively. More importantly, polarization-independent absorption over 90 % can be maintained under incident angle within 55°. The QR code absorber not only can achieve wideband absorption, but also can carry information such as texts and Web sites. They are of important values in applications such identification and electromagnetic protection.

  9. Absorbing boundary conditions for second-order hyperbolic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Hong; Wong, Yau Shu

    1989-01-01

    A uniform approach to construct absorbing artificial boundary conditions for second-order linear hyperbolic equations is proposed. The nonlocal boundary condition is given by a pseudodifferential operator that annihilates travelling waves. It is obtained through the dispersion relation of the differential equation by requiring that the initial-boundary value problem admits the wave solutions travelling in one direction only. Local approximation of this global boundary condition yields an nth-order differential operator. It is shown that the best approximations must be in the canonical forms which can be factorized into first-order operators. These boundary conditions are perfectly absorbing for wave packets propagating at certain group velocities. A hierarchy of absorbing boundary conditions is derived for transonic small perturbation equations of unsteady flows. These examples illustrate that the absorbing boundary conditions are easy to derive, and the effectiveness is demonstrated by the numerical experiments.

  10. Broadband planar multilayered absorbers tuned by VO2 phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hao; Ji, Chunhui; Lu, Lulu; Li, Zhe; Li, Haoyang; Wang, Jun; Wu, Zhiming; Jiang, Yadong; Xu, Jimmy; Liu, Zhijun

    2017-08-01

    The metal-insulator transition makes vanadium dioxide an attractive material for developing reconfigurable optoelectronic components. Here we report on dynamically tunable broadband absorbers consisting of planar multilayered thin films. By thermally triggering the phase transition of vanadium dioxide, the effective impedance of multilayered structures is tuned in or out of the condition of impedance matching to free-space, leading to switchable broadband absorptions. Two types of absorbers are designed and demonstrated by using either the insulating or metallic state of vanadium dioxide at the impedance matched condition. The planar multilayered absorbers exhibit tunable absorption bands over the wavelength ranges of 5-9.3 μm and 3.9-8.2 μm, respectively. A large modulation depth up to 88% is measured. The demonstrated broadband absorbance tunability is of potential interest for reconfigurable bolometric sensing, camouflaging, and modulation of mid-infrared lights.

  11. 21 CFR 878.4840 - Absorbable polydioxanone surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4840 Absorbable... expected to occur, and ophthalmic surgery. It may be coated or uncoated, undyed or dyed, and with or...

  12. 21 CFR 878.4840 - Absorbable polydioxanone surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4840 Absorbable... expected to occur, and ophthalmic surgery. It may be coated or uncoated, undyed or dyed, and with or...

  13. 21 CFR 878.4840 - Absorbable polydioxanone surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4840 Absorbable... expected to occur, and ophthalmic surgery. It may be coated or uncoated, undyed or dyed, and with or...

  14. 21 CFR 878.4840 - Absorbable polydioxanone surgical suture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4840 Absorbable... expected to occur, and ophthalmic surgery. It may be coated or uncoated, undyed or dyed, and with or...

  15. Techniques for measuring intercepted and absorbed PAR in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The quantity of radiation potentially available for photosynthesis that is captured by the crop is best described as absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR (APAR) is the difference between descending and ascending fluxes. The four components of APAR were measured above and within two planting densities of corn (Zea mays L.) and several methods of measuring and estimating APAR were examined. A line quantum sensor that spatially averages the photosynthetic photon flux density provided a rapid and portable method of measuring APAR. PAR reflectance from the soil (Typic Argiaquoll) surface decreased from 10% to less than 1% of the incoming PAR as the canopy cover increased. PAR reflectance from the canopy decreased to less than 3% at maximum vegetative cover. Intercepted PAR (1 - transmitted PAR) generally overestimated absorbed PAR by less than 4% throughout most of the growing season. Thus intercepted PAR appears to be a reasonable estimate of absorbed PAR.

  16. Analysis of single-layer metamaterial absorber with reflection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Han; Tang, Ming-Chun; Hong, Jing-Song

    2015-04-01

    A reflection theory is employed to analyze a single-layered metamaterial absorber. With the necessary conditions for zero reflection, the permittivity and permeability as functions of absorptivity were obtained, which are suitable for analyzing the absorption properties of single-layered metamaterial absorber at both normal and oblique incidence cases. With the obtained expressions, it not only can explain why the absorption peaks monotonously decrease with increasing of the incident angles but also can explore the relationship between the absorptivity and spacer thickness of the dielectric slab. A Jerusalem cross metamaterial absorber was simulated and verified the validity of this proposed reflection theory. The main contribution of our work is that it can explain the physical mechanism of the various absorption peaks by using the analytical formula and highlights its potential guidance for designing and analyzing metamaterial absorbers in the future.

  17. Neutron absorbing room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber compositions

    DOEpatents

    Zoch, Harold L.

    1979-11-27

    A neutron absorbing composition comprising a one-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition or a two-component room temperature vulcanizable silicone rubber composition in which the composition contains from 25 to 300 parts by weight based on the base silanol or vinyl containing diorganopolysiloxane polymer of a boron compound or boron powder as the neutron absorbing ingredient. An especially useful boron compound in this application is boron carbide.

  18. Development of absorber coupled TES polarimeter at millimeter wavelengths.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Yefremenko, V.; Novosad, V.

    2009-06-01

    We report an absorber coupled TES bolometric polarimeter, consisting of an absorptive metal grid and a Mo/Au bi-layer TES on a suspended silicon nitride membrane disk. The electromagnetic design of the polarization sensitive absorbers, the heat transport modeling of the detector, the thermal response of the TES, and the micro-fabrication processes are presented. We also report the results of laboratory tests of a single pixel prototype detector, and compare with theoretical expectations.

  19. Light Absorbing Particle (LAP) Measurements in the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, D.; Raga, G. B.; Anderson, B.; Diskin, G.; Sachse, G.; Kok, G.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation covers the capabilities and design of the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP-2), and reviews its role on the Sage III Ozone Loss Validation Experiment (SOLVE II) field campaign during 2003. On SOLVE II the SP-2 was carried into the Arctic onboard a DC-8 aircraft, in order to determine the size distribution of light-absorbing and non light-absorbing particles in the stratosphere. Graphs and tables relate some of the results from SOLVE II.

  20. Novel Ultraviolet Light Absorbing Polymers For Optical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doddi, Namassivaya; Yamada, Akira; Dunks, Gary B.

    1988-07-01

    Ultraviolet light absorbing monomers have been developed that can be copolymerized with acrylates. The composition of the resultant stable copolymers can be adjusted to totally block the transmission of light below about 430 nm. Fabrication of lenses from the materials is accomplished by lathe cutting and injection molding procedures. These ultraviolet light absorbing materials are non-mutagenic and non-toxic and are currently being used in intraocular lenses.