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Sample records for absorbed dose buildup

  1. Assessment of indoor absorbed gamma dose rate from natural radionuclides in concrete by the method of build-up factors.

    PubMed

    Manić, Vesna; Nikezic, Dragoslav; Krstic, Dragana; Manić, Goran

    2014-12-01

    The specific absorbed gamma dose rates, originating from natural radionuclides in concrete, were calculated at different positions of a detection point inside the standard room, as well as inside an example room. The specific absorbed dose rates corresponding to a wall with arbitrary dimensions and thickness were also evaluated, and appropriate fitting functions were developed, enabling dose rate calculation for most realistic rooms. In order to make calculation simpler, the expressions fitting the exposure build-up factors for whole (238)U and (232)Th radionuclide series and (40)K were derived in this work, as well as the specific absorbed dose rates from a point source in concrete. Calculated values of the specific absorbed dose rates at the centre point of the standard room for (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K are in the ranges of previously obtained data.

  2. Absorbed dose water calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Domen, S.R.

    1982-01-26

    An absorbed dose water calorimeter that takes advantage of the low thermal diffusivity of water and the water-imperviousness of polyethylene film. An ultra-small bead thermistor is sandwiched between two thin polyethylene films stretched between insulative supports in a water bath. The polyethylene films insulate the thermistor and its leads, the leads being run out from between the films in insulated sleeving and then to junctions to form a wheatstone bridge circuit. Convection barriers may be provided to reduce the effects of convection from the point of measurement. Controlled heating of different levels in the water bath is accomplished by electrical heater circuits provided for controlling temperature drift and providing adiabatic operation of the calorimeter. The absorbed dose is determined from the known specific heat of water and the measured temperature change.

  3. Verification of IMRT dose calculations using AAA and PBC algorithms in dose buildup regions.

    PubMed

    Oinam, Arun S; Singh, Lakhwant

    2010-08-26

    The purpose of this comparative study was to test the accuracy of anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) and pencil beam convolution (PBC) algorithms of Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) for dose calculations in the low- and high-dose buildup regions. AAA and PBC algorithms were used to create two intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans of the same optimal fluence generated from a clinically simulated oropharynx case in an in-house fabricated head and neck phantom. The TPS computed buildup doses were compared with the corresponding measured doses in the phantom using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD 100). Analysis of dose distribution calculated using PBC and AAA shows an increase in gamma value in the dose buildup region indicating large dose deviation. For the surface areas of 1, 50 and 100 cm2, PBC overestimates doses as compared to AAA calculated value in the range of 1.34%-3.62% at 0.6 cm depth, 1.74%-2.96% at 0.4 cm depth, and 1.96%-4.06% at 0.2 cm depth, respectively. In high-dose buildup region, AAA calculated doses were lower by an average of -7.56% (SD = 4.73%), while PBC was overestimated by 3.75% (SD = 5.70%) as compared to TLD measured doses at 0.2 cm depth. However, at 0.4 and 0.6 cm depth, PBC overestimated TLD measured doses by 5.84% (SD = 4.38%) and 2.40% (SD = 4.63%), respectively, while AAA underestimated the TLD measured doses by -0.82% (SD = 4.24%) and -1.10% (SD = 4.14%) at the same respective depth. In low-dose buildup region, both AAA and PBC overestimated the TLD measured doses at all depths except -2.05% (SD = 10.21%) by AAA at 0.2 cm depth. The differences between AAA and PBC at all depths were statistically significant (p < 0.05) in high-dose buildup region, whereas it is not statistically significant in low-dose buildup region. In conclusion, AAA calculated the dose more accurately than PBC in clinically important high-dose buildup region at 0.4 cm and 0.6 cm depths. The use of an orfit cast increases the dose buildup

  4. Dose discrepancies in the buildup region and their impact on dose calculations for IMRT fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Moran, Jean M.; Chen Yu; Kulasekere, Ravi; Roberson, Peter L.

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: Dose accuracy in the buildup region for radiotherapy treatment planning suffers from challenges in both measurement and calculation. This study investigates the dosimetry in the buildup region at normal and oblique incidences for open and IMRT fields and assesses the quality of the treatment planning calculations. Methods: This study was divided into three parts. First, percent depth doses and profiles (for 5x5, 10x10, 20x20, and 30x30 cm{sup 2} field sizes at 0 deg., 45 deg., and 70 deg. incidences) were measured in the buildup region in Solid Water using an Attix parallel plate chamber and Kodak XV film, respectively. Second, the parameters in the empirical contamination (EC) term of the convolution/superposition (CVSP) calculation algorithm were fitted based on open field measurements. Finally, seven segmental head-and-neck IMRT fields were measured on a flat phantom geometry and compared to calculations using {gamma} and dose-gradient compensation (C) indices to evaluate the impact of residual discrepancies and to assess the adequacy of the contamination term for IMRT fields. Results: Local deviations between measurements and calculations for open fields were within 1% and 4% in the buildup region for normal and oblique incidences, respectively. The C index with 5%/1 mm criteria for IMRT fields ranged from 89% to 99% and from 96% to 98% at 2 mm and 10 cm depths, respectively. The quality of agreement in the buildup region for open and IMRT fields is comparable to that in nonbuildup regions. Conclusions: The added EC term in CVSP was determined to be adequate for both open and IMRT fields. Due to the dependence of calculation accuracy on (1) EC modeling, (2) internal convolution and density grid sizes, (3) implementation details in the algorithm, and (4) the accuracy of measurements used for treatment planning system commissioning, the authors recommend an evaluation of the accuracy of near-surface dose calculations as a part of treatment planning

  5. Dose discrepancies in the buildup region and their impact on dose calculations for IMRT fields

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Moran, Jean M.; Chen, Yu; Kulasekere, Ravi; Roberson, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Dose accuracy in the buildup region for radiotherapy treatment planning suffers from challenges in both measurement and calculation. This study investigates the dosimetry in the buildup region at normal and oblique incidences for open and IMRT fields and assesses the quality of the treatment planning calculations. Methods: This study was divided into three parts. First, percent depth doses and profiles (for 5×5, 10×10, 20×20, and 30×30 cm2 field sizes at 0°, 45°, and 70° incidences) were measured in the buildup region in Solid Water using an Attix parallel plate chamber and Kodak XV film, respectively. Second, the parameters in the empirical contamination (EC) term of the convolution∕superposition (CVSP) calculation algorithm were fitted based on open field measurements. Finally, seven segmental head-and-neck IMRT fields were measured on a flat phantom geometry and compared to calculations using γ and dose-gradient compensation (C) indices to evaluate the impact of residual discrepancies and to assess the adequacy of the contamination term for IMRT fields. Results: Local deviations between measurements and calculations for open fields were within 1% and 4% in the buildup region for normal and oblique incidences, respectively. The C index with 5%∕1 mm criteria for IMRT fields ranged from 89% to 99% and from 96% to 98% at 2 mm and 10 cm depths, respectively. The quality of agreement in the buildup region for open and IMRT fields is comparable to that in nonbuildup regions. Conclusions: The added EC term in CVSP was determined to be adequate for both open and IMRT fields. Due to the dependence of calculation accuracy on (1) EC modeling, (2) internal convolution and density grid sizes, (3) implementation details in the algorithm, and (4) the accuracy of measurements used for treatment planning system commissioning, the authors recommend an evaluation of the accuracy of near-surface dose calculations as a part of treatment planning commissioning

  6. Absorbed Dose and Dose Equivalent Calculations for Modeling Effective Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Andrew; Lee, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    While in orbit, Astronauts are exposed to a much higher dose of ionizing radiation than when on the ground. It is important to model how shielding designs on spacecraft reduce radiation effective dose pre-flight, and determine whether or not a danger to humans is presented. However, in order to calculate effective dose, dose equivalent calculations are needed. Dose equivalent takes into account an absorbed dose of radiation and the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation. This is important in preventing long-term, stochastic radiation effects in humans spending time in space. Monte carlo simulations run with the particle transport code FLUKA, give absorbed and equivalent dose data for relevant shielding. The shielding geometry used in the dose calculations is a layered slab design, consisting of aluminum, polyethylene, and water. Water is used to simulate the soft tissues that compose the human body. The results obtained will provide information on how the shielding performs with many thicknesses of each material in the slab. This allows them to be directly applicable to modern spacecraft shielding geometries.

  7. On the definition of absorbed dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grusell, Erik

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: The quantity absorbed dose is used extensively in all areas concerning the interaction of ionizing radiation with biological organisms, as well as with matter in general. The most recent and authoritative definition of absorbed dose is given by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) in ICRU Report 85. However, that definition is incomplete. The purpose of the present work is to give a rigorous definition of absorbed dose. Methods: Absorbed dose is defined in terms of the random variable specific energy imparted. A random variable is a mathematical function, and it cannot be defined without specifying its domain of definition which is a probability space. This is not done in report 85 by the ICRU, mentioned above. Results: In the present work a definition of a suitable probability space is given, so that a rigorous definition of absorbed dose is possible. This necessarily includes the specification of the experiment which the probability space describes. In this case this is an irradiation, which is specified by the initial particles released and by the material objects which can interact with the radiation. Some consequences are discussed. Specific energy imparted is defined for a volume, and the definition of absorbed dose as a point function involves the specific energy imparted for a small mass contained in a volume surrounding the point. A possible more precise definition of this volume is suggested and discussed. Conclusions: The importance of absorbed dose motivates a proper definition, and one is given in the present work. No rigorous definition has been presented before.

  8. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  9. Statistics of the doses absorbed by workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, A.

    1982-10-01

    A statistical analysis of the distribution of the doses by individual workers is presented to assess existing norms. A log-normal distribution is assumed for the individual doses. A reference distribution is introduced, characterized by log-normal distribution of annual doses, average 0,5 rem (10% of the limit) and 0.1% of the individuals that will absorb more than 5 rem. Expressions are given for the probability of finding a dose in a given interval and for the fraction of the collective dose due to doses from a given interval. An example using data from medical professions in the United States shows that the fraction of workers with annual doses larger than 5 rem is not contained within the 0.1% recommended limit, and that the level of risk is not uniform between professions.

  10. An absorbed dose calorimeter for IMRT dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duane, S.; Aldehaybes, M.; Bailey, M.; Lee, N. D.; Thomas, C. G.; Palmans, H.

    2012-10-01

    A new calorimeter for dosimetry in small and complex fields has been built. The device is intended for the direct determination of absorbed dose to water in moderately small fields and in composite fields such as IMRT treatments, and as a transfer instrument calibrated against existing absorbed dose standards in conventional reference conditions. The geometry, materials and mode of operation have been chosen to minimize detector perturbations when used in a water phantom, to give a reasonably isotropic response and to minimize the effects of heat transfer when the calorimeter is used in non-reference conditions in a water phantom. The size of the core is meant to meet the needs of measurement in IMRT treatments and is comparable to the size of the air cavity in a type NE2611 ionization chamber. The calorimeter may also be used for small field dosimetry. Initial measurements in reference conditions and in an IMRT head and neck plan, collapsed to gantry angle zero, have been made to estimate the thermal characteristics of the device, and to assess its performance in use. The standard deviation (estimated repeatability) of the reference absorbed dose measurements was 0.02 Gy (0.6%).

  11. Solar particle dose rate buildup and distribution in critical body organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwell, William; Weyland, Mark D.; Simonsen, Lisa C.

    1993-01-01

    Human body organs have varying degrees of radiosensitivity as evidenced by radioepidemiologic tables. The major critical organs for both the male and female that have been identified include the lung, thyroid, stomach, and breast (female). Using computerized anatomical models of the 50th percentile United States Air Force male and female, we present the self-shielding effects of these various body organs and how the shielding effects change as the location (dose point) in the body varies. Several major solar proton events from previous solar cycles and several events from the current 22nd solar cycle have been analyzed. The solar particle event rise time, peak intensity, and decay time vary considerably from event to event. Absorbed dose and dose equivalent rate calculations and organ risk assessment data are presented for each critical body organ. These data are compared with the current NASA astronaut dose limits as recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements.

  12. Evaluation of the buildup effect of an 192Ir high dose-rate brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Park, H C; Almond, P R

    1992-01-01

    The buildup effect of the 192Ir radioactive source employed as a gamma emitter of the Selectron high dose-rate (HDR) afterloader was evaluated by studying the ratio of exposure in water to exposure in air as a function of distance. In 1968, Meisberger et al. [Radiology 90, 953-957 (1968)] calculated a third-order polynomial fit to a selected average between measured and calculated values. The objective of this investigation, however, is to evaluate the factor for the 192Ir source configuration used in the HDR system, which was different from the source design used by Meisberger et al. This paper presents the measured ratio using an ionization chamber and the calculated ratio using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The experimental and theoretical results show only minor disagreement with the data of Meisberger et al. However, the results show significant disagreement when they are compared to the model developed by van Kleffens and Star [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 5 557-563 (1979)], which may indicate the need to reevaluate the algorithm presently employed in HDR treatment planning system. The comparison with other published data will be discussed.

  13. Determination of neutron absorbed doses in lithium aluminates.

    PubMed

    Delfín Loya, A; Carrera, L M; Ureña-Núñez, F; Palacios, O; Bosch, P

    2003-04-01

    Lithium-based ceramics have been proposed as tritium breeders for fusion reactors. The lithium aluminate (gamma phase) seems to be thermally and structurally stable, the damages produced by neutron irradiation depend on the absorbed dose. A method based on the measurement of neutron activation of foils through neutron capture has been developed to obtain the neutron absorbed dose in lithium aluminates irradiated in the thermal column facility and in the fixed irradiation system of a Triga Mark III Nuclear Reactor. PMID:12672632

  14. Neutron absorbed dose determination by calculations of recoil energy.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, F; Benabdesselam, M; Iacconi, P; Lapraz, D

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work is to calculate the absorbed dose to matter due to neutrons in the 5-150 MeV energy range. Materials involved in the calculations are Al2O3, CaSO4 and CaS, which may be used as dosemeters and have already been studied for their luminescent properties. The absorbed dose is assumed to be mainly due to the energy deposited by the recoils. Elastic reactions are treated with the ECIS code while for the non-elastic ones, a Monte Carlo code has been developed and allowed to follow the nucleus decay and to determine its characteristics (nature and energy). Finally, the calculations show that the absorbed dose is mainly due to non-elastic process and that above 20 MeV this dose decreases slightly with the neutron energy. PMID:15353750

  15. Absorbed dose from traversing spherically symmetric, Gaussian radioactive clouds.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J M; Poston, J W

    1999-06-01

    If a large radioactive cloud is produced, sampling may require that an airplane traverse the cloud. A method to predict the absorbed dose to the aircrew from penetrating the radioactive cloud is needed. Dose rates throughout spherically symmetric Gaussian clouds of various sizes, and the absorbed doses from traversing the clouds, were calculated. Cloud size is a dominant parameter causing dose to vary by orders of magnitude for a given dose rate measured at some distance. A method to determine cloud size, based on dose rate readings at two or more distances from the cloud center, was developed. This method, however, failed to resolve the smallest cloud sizes from measurements made at 1,000 m to 2,000 m from the cloud center.

  16. Absorbed dose to water reference dosimetry using solid phantoms in the context of absorbed-dose protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Seuntjens, Jan; Olivares, Marina; Evans, Michael; Podgorsak, Ervin

    2005-09-15

    For reasons of phantom material reproducibility, the absorbed dose protocols of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) (TG-51) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (TRS-398) have made the use of liquid water as a phantom material for reference dosimetry mandatory. In this work we provide a formal framework for the measurement of absorbed dose to water using ionization chambers calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water but irradiated in solid phantoms. Such a framework is useful when there is a desire to put dose measurements using solid phantoms on an absolute basis. Putting solid phantom measurements on an absolute basis has distinct advantages in verification measurements and quality assurance. We introduce a phantom dose conversion factor that converts a measurement made in a solid phantom and analyzed using an absorbed dose calibration protocol into absorbed dose to water under reference conditions. We provide techniques to measure and calculate the dose transfer from solid phantom to water. For an Exradin A12 ionization chamber, we measured and calculated the phantom dose conversion factor for six Solid Water{sup TM} phantoms and for a single Lucite phantom for photon energies between {sup 60}Co and 18 MV photons. For Solid Water{sup TM} of certified grade, the difference between measured and calculated factors varied between 0.0% and 0.7% with the average dose conversion factor being low by 0.4% compared with the calculation whereas for Lucite, the agreement was within 0.2% for the one phantom examined. The composition of commercial plastic phantoms and their homogeneity may not always be reproducible and consistent with assumed composition. By comparing measured and calculated phantom conversion factors, our work provides methods to verify the consistency of a given plastic for the purpose of clinical reference dosimetry.

  17. Evaluation of absorbed dose in Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaeva, Gayane; Djuraeva, Gulnara; Kim, Andrey; Koblik, Yuriy; Kulabdullaev, Gairatulla; Rakhmonov, Turdimukhammad; Saytjanov, Shavkat

    2015-02-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) is used for treatment of radioresistant malignant tumors. The absorbed dose in GdNCT can be divided into four primary dose components: thermal neutron, fast neutron, photon and natural gadolinium doses. The most significant is the dose created by natural gadolinium. The amount of gadolinium at the irradiated region is changeable and depends on the gadolinium delivery agent and on the structure of the location where the agent is injected. To de- fine the time dependence of the gadolinium concentration ρ(t) in the irradiated region the pharmacokinetics of gadolinium delivery agent (Magnevist) was studied at intratumoral injection in mice and intramuscular injection in rats. A polynomial approximation was applied to the experimental data and the influence of ρ(t) on the relative change of the absorbed dose of gadolinium was studied.

  18. Reduction of absorbed doses in radiography of the facial skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, P.; Kraepelien, T.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation absorbed doses from radiography of the paranasal sinuses and the facial skeleton were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) on a phantom head using high-sensitivity screens in an Orbix stand. The entrance doses to the skin of the head ranged from 0.31 to 2.9 mGy per exposure. The absorbed dose from a full series of sinus exposures averaged 0.33 mGy for the oral mucous membrane, 0.33 mGy for the maxillary sinus mucous membrane, 0.11 MgY for the parotid gland, 0.15 MgY for the submandibular gland, 0.61 mGy for the eye lens, and 0.75 mGy for the thyroid gland region. A leaded soft collar adapted to the thyroid region reduced the thyroid doses by more than one order of magnitude, but also reduced the image field.

  19. Space radiation absorbed dose distribution in a human phantom.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Atwell, W; Badavi, F F; Yang, T C; Cleghorn, T F

    2002-01-01

    The radiation risk to astronauts has always been based on measurements using passive thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The skin dose is converted to dose equivalent using an average radiation quality factor based on model calculations. The radiological risk estimates, however, are based on organ and tissue doses. This paper describes results from the first space flight (STS-91, 51.65 degrees inclination and approximately 380 km altitude) of a fully instrumented Alderson Rando phantom torso (with head) to relate the skin dose to organ doses. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose in 34 1-inch-thick sections measured using TLDs are described. There is about a 30% change in dose as one moves from the front to the back of the phantom body. Small active dosimeters were developed specifically to provide time-resolved measurements of absorbed dose rates and quality factors at five organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) inside the phantom. Using these dosimeters, it was possible to separate the trapped-proton and the galactic cosmic radiation components of the doses. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a charged-particle directional spectrometer (CPDS) were flown next to the phantom torso to provide data on the incident internal radiation environment. Accurate models of the shielding distributions at the site of the TEPC, the CPDS and a scalable Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model of the phantom torso were developed. These measurements provided a comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human phantom, and to assess the accuracy and validity of radiation transport models throughout the human body. The results show that for the conditions in the International Space Station (ISS) orbit during periods near the solar minimum, the ratio of the blood-forming organ dose rate to the skin absorbed dose rate is about 80%, and the ratio of the dose equivalents is almost one. The results show that the GCR model dose

  20. Space radiation absorbed dose distribution in a human phantom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Atwell, W.; Badavi, F. F.; Yang, T. C.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2002-01-01

    The radiation risk to astronauts has always been based on measurements using passive thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The skin dose is converted to dose equivalent using an average radiation quality factor based on model calculations. The radiological risk estimates, however, are based on organ and tissue doses. This paper describes results from the first space flight (STS-91, 51.65 degrees inclination and approximately 380 km altitude) of a fully instrumented Alderson Rando phantom torso (with head) to relate the skin dose to organ doses. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose in 34 1-inch-thick sections measured using TLDs are described. There is about a 30% change in dose as one moves from the front to the back of the phantom body. Small active dosimeters were developed specifically to provide time-resolved measurements of absorbed dose rates and quality factors at five organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) inside the phantom. Using these dosimeters, it was possible to separate the trapped-proton and the galactic cosmic radiation components of the doses. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a charged-particle directional spectrometer (CPDS) were flown next to the phantom torso to provide data on the incident internal radiation environment. Accurate models of the shielding distributions at the site of the TEPC, the CPDS and a scalable Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model of the phantom torso were developed. These measurements provided a comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human phantom, and to assess the accuracy and validity of radiation transport models throughout the human body. The results show that for the conditions in the International Space Station (ISS) orbit during periods near the solar minimum, the ratio of the blood-forming organ dose rate to the skin absorbed dose rate is about 80%, and the ratio of the dose equivalents is almost one. The results show that the GCR model dose

  1. Space radiation absorbed dose distribution in a human phantom.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Atwell, W; Badavi, F F; Yang, T C; Cleghorn, T F

    2002-01-01

    The radiation risk to astronauts has always been based on measurements using passive thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The skin dose is converted to dose equivalent using an average radiation quality factor based on model calculations. The radiological risk estimates, however, are based on organ and tissue doses. This paper describes results from the first space flight (STS-91, 51.65 degrees inclination and approximately 380 km altitude) of a fully instrumented Alderson Rando phantom torso (with head) to relate the skin dose to organ doses. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose in 34 1-inch-thick sections measured using TLDs are described. There is about a 30% change in dose as one moves from the front to the back of the phantom body. Small active dosimeters were developed specifically to provide time-resolved measurements of absorbed dose rates and quality factors at five organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) inside the phantom. Using these dosimeters, it was possible to separate the trapped-proton and the galactic cosmic radiation components of the doses. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a charged-particle directional spectrometer (CPDS) were flown next to the phantom torso to provide data on the incident internal radiation environment. Accurate models of the shielding distributions at the site of the TEPC, the CPDS and a scalable Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model of the phantom torso were developed. These measurements provided a comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human phantom, and to assess the accuracy and validity of radiation transport models throughout the human body. The results show that for the conditions in the International Space Station (ISS) orbit during periods near the solar minimum, the ratio of the blood-forming organ dose rate to the skin absorbed dose rate is about 80%, and the ratio of the dose equivalents is almost one. The results show that the GCR model dose

  2. Developability assessment of clinical drug products with maximum absorbable doses.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xuan; Rose, John P; Van Gelder, Jan

    2012-05-10

    Maximum absorbable dose refers to the maximum amount of an orally administered drug that can be absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract. Maximum absorbable dose, or D(abs), has proved to be an important parameter for quantifying the absorption potential of drug candidates. The purpose of this work is to validate the use of D(abs) in a developability assessment context, and to establish appropriate protocol and interpretation criteria for this application. Three methods for calculating D(abs) were compared by assessing how well the methods predicted the absorption limit for a set of real clinical candidates. D(abs) was calculated for these clinical candidates by means of a simple equation and two computer simulation programs, GastroPlus and an program developed at Eli Lilly and Company. Results from single dose escalation studies in Phase I clinical trials were analyzed to identify the maximum absorbable doses for these compounds. Compared to the clinical results, the equation and both simulation programs provide conservative estimates of D(abs), but in general D(abs) from the computer simulations are more accurate, which may find obvious advantage for the simulations in developability assessment. Computer simulations also revealed the complex behavior associated with absorption saturation and suggested in most cases that the D(abs) limit is not likely to be achieved in a typical clinical dose range. On the basis of the validation findings, an approach is proposed for assessing absorption potential, and best practices are discussed for the use of D(abs) estimates to inform clinical formulation development strategies.

  3. Evaluation of lens absorbed dose with Cone Beam IGRT procedures.

    PubMed

    Palomo, R; Pujades, M C; Gimeno-Olmos, J; Carmona, V; Lliso, F; Candela-Juan, C; Vijande, J; Ballester, F; Perez-Calatayud, J

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the absorbed dose to the eye lenses due to the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system used to accurately position the patient during head-and-neck image guided procedures. The on-board imaging (OBI) systems (v.1.5) of Clinac iX and TrueBeam (Varian) accelerators were used to evaluate the imparted dose to the eye lenses and some additional points of the head. All CBCT scans were acquired with the Standard-Dose Head protocol from Varian. Doses were measured using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) placed in an anthropomorphic phantom. TLDs were calibrated at the beam quality used to reduce their energy dependence. Average dose to the lens due to the OBI systems of the Clinac iX and the TrueBeam were 0.71  ±  0.07 mGy/CBCT and 0.70  ±  0.08 mGy/CBCT, respectively. The extra absorbed dose received by the eye lenses due to one CBCT acquisition with the studied protocol is far below the 500 mGy threshold established by ICRP for cataract formation (ICRP 2011 Statement on Tissue Reactions). However, the incremental effect of several CBCT acquisitions during the whole treatment should be taken into account. PMID:26457404

  4. Absorbed dose assessment in newborns during x-ray examinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taipe, Patricia K.; Berrocal, Mariella J.; Carita, Raúl F.

    2012-02-01

    Often a newborn presents breathing problems during the early days of life, i.e. bronchopneumonia, wich are caused in most of cases, by aspirating a mixture of meconium and amniotic fluid. In these cases, it is necessary to make use of a radiograph, requested by the physician to reach a diagnosis. This paper seeks to evaluate the absorbed doses in neonates undergoing a radiograph. For this reason we try to simulate the real conditions in a X-ray room from Lima hospitals. With this finality we perform a simulation made according a questionnaire related to technical data of X-ray equipment, distance between the source and the neonate, and its position to be irradiated. The information obtained has been used to determine the absorbed dose by infants, using the MCNP code. Finally, the results are compared with reference values of international health agencies.

  5. Reduction of absorbed doses in radiography of the facial skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, P.; Kraepelien, T.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation absorbed doses from radiography of the paranasal sinuses and the facial skeleton were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) on a phantom head using high-sensitivity screens in an Orbix stand. The entrance doses to the skin of the head ranged from 0.31 to 2.9 mGy per exposure. The absorbed dose from a full series of sinus exposures averaged 0.33 mGy for the oral mucous membrane, 0.33 mGy for the maxillary sinus mucous membrane, 0.11 mGy for the parotid gland, 0.15 mGy for the submandibular gland, 0.61 mGy for the eye lens, and 0.75 mGy for the thyroid gland region. A leaded soft collar adapted to the thyroid region reduced the thyroid doses by more than one order of magnitude, but also reduced the image field. The mean energy imparted from a full series of paranasal sinus projections was 4.8 mJ and from a total series of the facial skeleton, 7.9 mJ.

  6. The absorbed dose to blood from blood-borne activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänscheid, H.; Fernández, M.; Lassmann, M.

    2015-01-01

    The radiation absorbed dose to blood and organs from activity in the blood is relevant for nuclear medicine dosimetry and for research in biodosimetry. The present study provides coefficients for the average absorbed dose rates to the blood from blood-borne activity for radionuclides frequently used in targeted radiotherapy and in PET diagnostics. The results were deduced from published data for vessel radius-dependent dose rate coefficients and reasonable assumptions on the blood-volume distribution as a function of the vessel radius. Different parts of the circulatory system were analyzed separately. Vessel size information for heart chambers, aorta, vena cava, pulmonary artery, and capillaries was taken from published results of morphometric measurements. The remaining blood not contained in the mentioned vessels was assumed to reside in fractal-like vascular trees, the smallest branches of which are the arterioles or venules. The applied vessel size distribution is consistent with recommendations of the ICRP on the blood-volume distribution in the human. The resulting average absorbed dose rates to the blood per nuclear disintegration per milliliter (ml) of blood are (in 10-11 Gy·s-1·Bq-1·ml) Y-90: 5.58, I-131: 2.49, Lu-177: 1.72, Sm-153: 2.97, Tc-99m: 0.366, C-11: 4.56, F-18: 3.61, Ga-68: 5.94, I-124: 2.55. Photon radiation contributes 1.1-1.2·10-11 Gy·s-1·Bq-1·ml to the total dose rate for positron emitters but significantly less for the other nuclides. Blood self-absorption of the energy emitted by ß-particles in the whole blood ranges from 37% for Y-90 to 80% for Tc-99m. The correspondent values in vascular trees, which are important for the absorbed dose to organs, range from 30% for Y-90 to 82% for Tc-99m.

  7. Translucent poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel dosimeters for simultaneous dose buildup and monitoring during chest wall radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Eyadeh, Molham M; Weston, Mark A; Juhasz, Janos; Diamond, Kevin R

    2016-01-01

    Chest wall radiation therapy treatment delivery was monitored using a 5 mm thick radiochromic poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel that also provided buildup material. The cryogels were used to detect positioning errors and measure the impact of shifts for a chest wall treatment that was delivered to a RANDO phantom. The phantom was shifted by ± 2, ± 3, and ± 5 mm from the planned position in the anterior/posterior (A/P) direction; these shifts represent setup errors and the uncertainty associated with lung filling during breath-hold. The two-dimensional absolute dose distributions measured in the cryogel at the planned position were compared with the distributions at all shifts from this position using gamma analysis (3%/3 mm, 10% threshold). For shifts of ± 2, ± 3, and ± 5 mm the passing rates ranged from 94.3% to 95.6%, 74.0% to 78.8%, and 17.5% to 22.5%, respectively. These results are consistent with the same gamma analysis performed on dose planes calculated in the middle of the cryogel and on the phantom surface using our treatment plan-ning system, which ranged from 94.3% to 95.0%, 76.8% to 77.9%, and 23.5% to 24.3%, respectively. The Pinnacle dose planes were then scaled empirically and compared to the cryogel measurements. Using the same gamma metric, the pass rates ranged from 97.0% to 98.4%. The results of this study suggest that cryogels may be used as both a buildup material and to evaluate errors in chest wall treat-ment positioning during deep-inspiration breath-hold delivery. The cryogels are sensitive to A/P chest wall shifts of less than 3 mm, which potentially allows for the detection of clinically relevant errors. PMID:27685110

  8. Radiation environments and absorbed dose estimations on manned space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, S. B.; Atwell, W.; Beever, R.; Hardy, A.

    In order to make an assessment of radiation risk during manned missions in space, it is necessary first to have as accurate an estimation as possible of the radiation environment within the spacecraft to which the astronauts will be exposed. Then, with this knowledge and the inclusion of body self-shielding, estimations can be made of absorbed doses for various body organs (skin, eye, blood-forming organs, etc.). A review is presented of our present knowledge of the radiation environments and absorbed doses expected for several space mission scenarios selected for our development of the new radiation protection guidelines. The scenarios selected are a 90-day mission at an altitude (450 km) and orbital inclinations (28.5°, 57° and 90°) appropriate for NASA's Space Station, a 15-day sortie to geosynchronous orbit and a 90-day lunar mission. All scenarios chosen yielded dose equivalents between five and ten rem to the blood forming organs if no large solar particle event were encountered. Such particle events could add considerable exposure particularly to the skin and eye for all scenarios except the one at 28.5° orbital inclination.

  9. Strontium-89 therapy: measurement of absorbed dose to skeletal metastases.

    PubMed

    Blake, G M; Zivanovic, M A; Blaquiere, R M; Fine, D R; McEwan, A J; Ackery, D M

    1988-04-01

    We report measurements of absorbed dose to vertebral metastases in ten patients referred for 89Sr therapy for disseminated prostatic carcinoma. Patients received a tracer dose of 85Sr at the time of 89Sr treatment and metastatic strontium retention was monitored scintigraphically for 6 mo. Metastatic 85Sr activity corrected for tissue attenuation was measured using the conjugate view principle, with special care taken to eliminate errors due to the selection of the metastatic region of interest. Metastatic volume was determined from high resolution CT images, and density inferred from Hounsfield number using the QCT bone mineral calibration of Genant and Cann. The mean absorbed dose was 850 rad/mCi (23 cGy/MBq) with a range from 220-2260 rad/mCi (6 to 61 cGy/MBq). The wide range found was consistent with the variation expected to arise due to differences in strontium renal plasma clearance (range 0.1-11.81/day) and extent of skeletal metastatic disease (varying from two small metastases to a superscan on [99mTc]MDP images) among the patients studied. PMID:3351609

  10. Red bone marrow doses, integral absorbed doses, and somatically effective dose equivalent from four maxillary occlusal projections

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, T.I.; Wohni, T.

    1984-02-01

    Phantom measurements of red bone marrow (RBM) doses, integral absorbed doses, and somatically effective dose equivalent (SEDE) from four different maxillary occlusal projections are presented. For each projection, different combinations of focus-skin distances and tube potentials were compared with regard to the patient's radiation load. The axial incisal view produced the highest patient exposures, with a maximum red bone marrow dose of 122.5 microGy/exposure, integral absorbed dose of 8.6 mJ/exposure, and SEDE values of 39.6 microSv/exposure. The corresponding values from the frontal, lateral occlusal, and tuber views ranged between 4% and 44% of the axial incisal view values for the integral absorbed dose and SEDE values, and between 0.3% and 3% for the red bone marrow doses. Increasing the focus-skin distance from 17.5 cm to 27 cm is accompanied by a 24% to 30% reduction in integral absorbed dose. Increasing the tube potential from 50 kV to 65 kV likewise results in a 23% reduction in absorbed energy.

  11. Effect of the thermoplastic masks on dose distribution in the build-up region for photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Półtorak, Michał; Fujak, Edyta; Kukołowicz, Paweł

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of thermoplastic masks material (Klarity Medical&Equipment Co., Guangzhou, China) with different diameters of holes (ϕ 0.25 cm and ϕ 0.40 cm) on the dose distribution in the build-up region for photon beams. Measurements were made for external radiation beams produced by the linear accelerator (TrueBeam, Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA, USA) using the Markus parallel plane ionization chamber and the Unidos electrometer (both from PTW, Freiburg, Germany). Measurements were made in a solid water phantom for two photon energies 6 MV and 15 MV, at 90 cm source to skin distance, for four fields of 5 cm × 5 cm, 10 cm × 10 cm, 15 cm × 15 cm and 20 cm × 20 cm. Compared to the open field, the maximum dose with mask was closer to the surface of the phantom by about 1.4 mm and 1.2 mm for 6 MV and 15 MV X-Rays, respectively. The surface dose increase from 10% to 42% for 6 MV and from 5% to 28% for 15 MV X-Rays.

  12. Comparison of build-up region doses in oblique tangential 6 MV photon beams calculated by AAA and CCC algorithms in breast Rando phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunun, P.; Tangboonduangjit, P.; Dumrongkijudom, N.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the build-up region doses on breast Rando phantom surface with the bolus covered, the doses in breast Rando phantom and also the doses in a lung that is the heterogeneous region by two algorithms. The AAA in Eclipse TPS and the collapsed cone convolution algorithm in Pinnacle treatment planning system were used to plan in tangential field technique with 6 MV photon beam at 200 cGy total doses in Breast Rando phantom with bolus covered (5 mm and 10 mm). TLDs were calibrated with Cobalt-60 and used to measure the doses in irradiation process. The results in treatment planning show that the doses in build-up region and the doses in breast phantom were closely matched in both algorithms which are less than 2% differences. However, overestimate of doses in a lung (L2) were found in AAA with 13.78% and 6.06% differences at 5 mm and 10 mm bolus thickness, respectively when compared with CCC algorithm. The TLD measurements show the underestimate in buildup region and in breast phantom but the doses in a lung (L2) were overestimated when compared with the doses in the two plannings at both thicknesses of the bolus.

  13. Absorbed dose to water: Standards and traceability for radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    Although the need for appropriate quantities and units for ionizing radiation has existed since shortly after discovery of X-rays, the quantities and units in general use today were not completely formalized until about 15 years ago. The development of appropriate national and international standards have also been ongoing. For many years the quantity, exposure, measured in units of roentgen was the national standard and they were also the quantity and units in which radiotherapy was described. With the introduction of megavoltage X-ray and electron-beam equipment and the adoption of the quantity {open_quotes}absorbed-dose{close_quotes} measured in units of rad (or gray) different approaches to calibrating these beams were needed. This was especially the case since the national standard in terms of exposure at a maximum photon energy for {sup 60}Co gamma rays was only available. Since the late 1960s various machine calibration protocols have been published. These protocols have to accommodate changes in modality, energy, quantities and units between the national standard and the user. Because of this, a new definition of traceability is proposed to accommodate the present system. By recording all intercomparisons and parameters used, an auditable calibration chain can be maintained. Even with the introduction of calibration protocols based upon national absorbed dose standards, the proposed traceability definition will still be needed.

  14. Calculation of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent induced by medium energy neutrons and protons and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Bishop, B. L.

    1972-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have been carried out to determine the absorbed dose and dose equivalent for 592-MeV protons incident on a cylindrical phantom and for neutrons from 580-MeV proton-Be collisions incident on a semi-infinite phantom. For both configurations, the calculated depth dependence of the absorbed dose is in good agreement with experimental data.

  15. Absorbed dose and LET spectra measurements on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Csige, I.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Frigo, L. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Watts, J.; Harmon, A.

    1995-01-01

    Total absorbed doses measured with TLD's, linear energy transfer (LET) spectra measured with plastic track detectors, and low energy neutrons measured on LDEF have been compared with model calculations. The total absorbed doses measured in TLD's were higher than predicted in the calculations of Armstrong et al. and differ from the calculations of Atwell et al. LDEF LET spectra are dependent on detector orientation, shielding and experiment location. These factors need to be taken into account when modeling the LDEF LET spectra. LET spectra measured with plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD's) also deviate significantly from calculations especially for high LET particles (LET(sub infinity) H2O greater than 100keV/micron). Modeling efforts to date do not include the contribution of proton induced secondaries. Analysis of polycarbonate PNTD's from the West-side of LDEF has revealed a very high fluence of tracks (greater than 1 x 10(exp 7) tracks/cm(exp 2) under 2 gm/cm(exp 2) shielding). Fluence drops off rapidly as shielding depth increases. Tracks only form in the region of the detector closest to the surface, not in the bulk of the detector. To date no adequate explanation for this observation has been found. We plan to measure range distribution of very high LET (LET (sub infinity) H2O greater than 500 keV/micron) secondary particles produced in silicon wafer by high energy primary cosmic ray particles. Refinements of experimental techniques and model calculations are being carried out in order to understand existing discrepancies between experimental measurements and calculations.

  16. SU-E-T-184: Feasibility of Superabsorbent Polymers as a Buildup Material

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, T; Sheu, R; Lo, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of superabsorbent polymers as a buildup material for radiation therapy Methods: A standard bolus, a layered damp towel, and a superabsorbent polymer (SAP) phantom were created and scanned to compare the Hounsfield units of each buildup material. A single field plan was developed on Eclipse TPS with AAA dose calculation algorithm to examine dose buildup. Relative film dosimetery (EBT3) was performed to evaluate the surface dose with each buildup material. Each buildup material had an approximate thickness of 0.5 cm and 100 monitor units with 6MV were delivered with solid water placed underneath film to simulate backscatter and more realistic surface dose. Results: The average HU units of the bolus, wet towel, and SAP phantom were 75 (SD=3), -378 (SD=113), -198 (SD=45) respectively. AAA dose calculation demonstrated sufficient dose buildup in all three materials. The relative surfaces doses to film were 23.7% without buildup, 87.5% with 0.5 cm bolus, 92.4% for the SAP phantom, and 87.1% for the damp towel. Conclusion: We demonstrate that superabsorbent polymers can provide sufficient dose buildup. Furthermore, due to the form in which SAPs are traditionally manufactured, this material is less expensive conforms more easily to irregular surfaces than standard sheets of bolus. Also, as a substance which is designed to absorb and retain water efficiently, SAPs are much more comfortable and more consistent than damp towels.

  17. Angular absorbed dose dependence of internal radiation-generating devices in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bevelacqua, J J

    2012-01-01

    The angular dependence of the absorbed dose from internal radiation-generating devices located within a tumor mass is investigated. Given the systematics of proton and heavy-ion differential scattering cross sections, candidate internal radiation-generating devices will have a relatively constant absorbed dose output beyond a critical angle. Inside this angle, the absorbed dose output is suppressed because elastic and inelastic differential cross sections are peaked in the beam direction. This peaking increases in severity as the particle energy increases and suggests internal radiation-generating devices must have a limited rotation capability to compensate for the depression in the absorbed dose for angles near the beam direction.

  18. Absorbed dose rate in air in metropolitan Tokyo before the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Hosoda, M; Fukushi, M; Furukawa, M; Tokonami, S

    2015-11-01

    The monitoring of absorbed dose rate in air has been carried out continually at various locations in metropolitan Tokyo after the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. While the data obtained before the accident are needed to more accurately assess the effects of radionuclide contamination from the accident, detailed data for metropolitan Tokyo obtained before the accident have not been reported. A car-borne survey of the absorbed dose rate in air in metropolitan Tokyo was carried out during August to September 2003. The average absorbed dose rate in air in metropolitan Tokyo was 49±6 nGy h(-1). The absorbed dose rate in air in western Tokyo was higher compared with that in central Tokyo. Here, if the absorbed dose rate indoors in Tokyo is equivalent to that outdoors, the annual effective dose would be calculated as 0.32 mSv y(-1).

  19. Absorbed dose rate in air in metropolitan Tokyo before the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Hosoda, M; Fukushi, M; Furukawa, M; Tokonami, S

    2015-11-01

    The monitoring of absorbed dose rate in air has been carried out continually at various locations in metropolitan Tokyo after the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. While the data obtained before the accident are needed to more accurately assess the effects of radionuclide contamination from the accident, detailed data for metropolitan Tokyo obtained before the accident have not been reported. A car-borne survey of the absorbed dose rate in air in metropolitan Tokyo was carried out during August to September 2003. The average absorbed dose rate in air in metropolitan Tokyo was 49±6 nGy h(-1). The absorbed dose rate in air in western Tokyo was higher compared with that in central Tokyo. Here, if the absorbed dose rate indoors in Tokyo is equivalent to that outdoors, the annual effective dose would be calculated as 0.32 mSv y(-1). PMID:25944962

  20. Uncertainty analysis for absorbed dose from a brain receptor imaging agent

    SciTech Connect

    Aydogan, B.; Miller, L.F.; Sparks, R.B.; Stubbs, J.B.

    1999-01-01

    Absorbed dose estimates are known to contain uncertainties. A recent literature search indicates that prior to this study no rigorous investigation of uncertainty associated with absorbed dose has been undertaken. A method of uncertainty analysis for absorbed dose calculations has been developed and implemented for the brain receptor imaging agent {sup 123}I-IPT. The two major sources of uncertainty considered were the uncertainty associated with the determination of residence time and that associated with the determination of the S values. There are many sources of uncertainty in the determination of the S values, but only the inter-patient organ mass variation was considered in this work. The absorbed dose uncertainties were determined for lung, liver, heart and brain. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals of the organ absorbed dose distributions for each patient and for a seven-patient population group were determined by the ``Latin Hypercube Sampling`` method. For an individual patient, the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval of the absorbed dose was found to be about 2.5 times larger than the estimated mean absorbed dose. For the seven-patient population the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval of the absorbed dose distribution was around 45% more than the estimated population mean. For example, the 95% confidence interval of the population liver dose distribution was found to be between 1.49E+0.7 Gy/MBq and 4.65E+07 Gy/MBq with a mean of 2.52E+07 Gy/MBq. This study concluded that patients in a population receiving {sup 123}I-IPT could receive absorbed doses as much as twice as large as the standard estimated absorbed dose due to these uncertainties.

  1. Assessment of out-of-field absorbed dose and equivalent dose in proton fields

    SciTech Connect

    Clasie, Ben; Wroe, Andrew; Kooy, Hanne; Depauw, Nicolas; Flanz, Jay; Paganetti, Harald; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: In proton therapy, as in other forms of radiation therapy, scattered and secondary particles produce undesired dose outside the target volume that may increase the risk of radiation-induced secondary cancer and interact with electronic devices in the treatment room. The authors implement a Monte Carlo model of this dose deposited outside passively scattered fields and compare it to measurements, determine the out-of-field equivalent dose, and estimate the change in the dose if the same target volumes were treated with an active beam scanning technique. Methods: Measurements are done with a thimble ionization chamber and the Wellhofer MatriXX detector inside a Lucite phantom with field configurations based on the treatment of prostate cancer and medulloblastoma. The authors use a GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation, demonstrated to agree well with measurements inside the primary field, to simulate fields delivered in the measurements. The partial contributions to the dose are separated in the simulation by particle type and origin. Results: The agreement between experiment and simulation in the out-of-field absorbed dose is within 30% at 10-20 cm from the field edge and 90% of the data agrees within 2 standard deviations. In passive scattering, the neutron contribution to the total dose dominates in the region downstream of the Bragg peak (65%-80% due to internally produced neutrons) and inside the phantom at distances more than 10-15 cm from the field edge. The equivalent doses using 10 for the neutron weighting factor at the entrance to the phantom and at 20 cm from the field edge are 2.2 and 2.6 mSv/Gy for the prostate cancer and cranial medulloblastoma fields, respectively. The equivalent dose at 15-20 cm from the field edge decreases with depth in passive scattering and increases with depth in active scanning. Therefore, active scanning has smaller out-of-field equivalent dose by factors of 30-45 in the entrance region and this factor decreases with depth

  2. Measured absorbed dose rates from semi-infinite hemispherical volumes of 133Xe.

    PubMed

    Munyon, W J; Barber, D E; Howley, J R

    1986-07-01

    Surface absorbed dose rates from different hemispheric volumes of 133Xe have been measured directly with an extrapolation chamber. The results indicate that a linear relationship exists between the radius of the cloud volume and the surface absorbed dose rate for radii between 0 and 23 cm. If cloud volumes with radii larger than 23 cm are taken to be infinite with respect to the range of the charged particles emitted, the absorbed dose rate calculated based on that assumption will be within the uncertainty of any measurement of absorbed dose rate that might be made. For hemispheric volumes having radii less than or equal to 23 cm, the surface absorbed dose rate in tissue-equivalent material, in mGy h-1, is approximated (+/- 20%) by the product of [1.30 mGy h-1 cm-1 kBq-1 cm3] X [cloud radius, cm] X [cloud activity concentration, kBq cm-3].

  3. Angular distributions of absorbed dose of Bremsstrahlung and secondary electrons induced by 18-, 28- and 38-MeV electron beams in thick targets.

    PubMed

    Takada, Masashi; Kosako, Kazuaki; Oishi, Koji; Nakamura, Takashi; Sato, Kouichi; Kamiyama, Takashi; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki

    2013-03-01

    Angular distributions of absorbed dose of Bremsstrahlung photons and secondary electrons at a wide range of emission angles from 0 to 135°, were experimentally obtained using an ion chamber with a 0.6 cm(3) air volume covered with or without a build-up cap. The Bremsstrahlung photons and electrons were produced by 18-, 28- and 38-MeV electron beams bombarding tungsten, copper, aluminium and carbon targets. The absorbed doses were also calculated from simulated photon and electron energy spectra by multiplying simulated response functions of the ion chambers, simulated with the MCNPX code. Calculated-to-experimental (C/E) dose ratios obtained are from 0.70 to 1.57 for high-Z targets of W and Cu, from 15 to 135° and the C/E range from 0.6 to 1.4 at 0°; however, the values of C/E for low-Z targets of Al and C are from 0.5 to 1.8 from 0 to 135°. Angular distributions at the forward angles decrease with increasing angles; on the other hand, the angular distributions at the backward angles depend on the target species. The dependences of absorbed doses on electron energy and target thickness were compared between the measured and simulated results. The attenuation profiles of absorbed doses of Bremsstrahlung beams at 0, 30 and 135° were also measured.

  4. Simultaneous measurements of absorbed dose and linear energy transfer in therapeutic proton beams.

    PubMed

    Granville, Dal A; Sahoo, Narayan; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O

    2016-02-21

    The biological response resulting from proton therapy depends on both the absorbed dose in the irradiated tissue and the linear energy transfer (LET) of the beam. Currently, optimization of proton therapy treatment plans is based only on absorbed dose. However, recent advances in proton therapy delivery have made it possible to vary the LET distribution for potential therapeutic gain, leading to investigations of using LET as an additional parameter in plan optimization. Having a method to measure and verify both absorbed dose and LET as part of a quality assurance program would be ideal for the safe delivery of such plans. Here we demonstrated the potential of an optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique to simultaneously measure absorbed dose and LET. We calibrated the ratio of ultraviolet (UV) to blue emission intensities from Al2O3:C OSL detectors as a function of LET to facilitate LET measurements. We also calibrated the intensity of the blue OSL emission for absorbed dose measurements and introduced a technique to correct for the LET-dependent dose response of OSL detectors exposed to therapeutic proton beams. We demonstrated the potential of our OSL technique by using it to measure LET and absorbed dose under new irradiation conditions, including patient-specific proton therapy treatment plans. In the beams investigated, we found the OSL technique to measure dose-weighted LET within 7.9% of Monte Carlo-simulated values and absorbed dose within 2.5% of ionization chamber measurements.

  5. Simultaneous measurements of absorbed dose and linear energy transfer in therapeutic proton beams.

    PubMed

    Granville, Dal A; Sahoo, Narayan; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O

    2016-02-21

    The biological response resulting from proton therapy depends on both the absorbed dose in the irradiated tissue and the linear energy transfer (LET) of the beam. Currently, optimization of proton therapy treatment plans is based only on absorbed dose. However, recent advances in proton therapy delivery have made it possible to vary the LET distribution for potential therapeutic gain, leading to investigations of using LET as an additional parameter in plan optimization. Having a method to measure and verify both absorbed dose and LET as part of a quality assurance program would be ideal for the safe delivery of such plans. Here we demonstrated the potential of an optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique to simultaneously measure absorbed dose and LET. We calibrated the ratio of ultraviolet (UV) to blue emission intensities from Al2O3:C OSL detectors as a function of LET to facilitate LET measurements. We also calibrated the intensity of the blue OSL emission for absorbed dose measurements and introduced a technique to correct for the LET-dependent dose response of OSL detectors exposed to therapeutic proton beams. We demonstrated the potential of our OSL technique by using it to measure LET and absorbed dose under new irradiation conditions, including patient-specific proton therapy treatment plans. In the beams investigated, we found the OSL technique to measure dose-weighted LET within 7.9% of Monte Carlo-simulated values and absorbed dose within 2.5% of ionization chamber measurements. PMID:26859539

  6. Direct absorbed dose to water determination based on water calorimetry in scanning proton beam delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfehnia, A.; Clasie, B.; Chung, E.; Lu, H. M.; Flanz, J.; Cascio, E.; Engelsman, M.; Paganetti, H.; Seuntjens, J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this manuscript is to describe the direct measurement of absolute absorbed dose to water in a scanned proton radiotherapy beam using a water calorimeter primary standard. Methods: The McGill water calorimeter, which has been validated in photon and electron beams as well as in HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy, was used to measure the absorbed dose to water in double scattering and scanning proton irradiations. The measurements were made at the Massachusetts General Hospital proton radiotherapy facility. The correction factors in water calorimetry were numerically calculated and various parameters affecting their magnitude and uncertainty were studied. The absorbed dose to water was compared to that obtained using an Exradin T1 Chamber based on the IAEA TRS-398 protocol. Results: The overall 1-sigma uncertainty on absorbed dose to water amounts to 0.4% and 0.6% in scattered and scanned proton water calorimetry, respectively. This compares to an overall uncertainty of 1.9% for currently accepted IAEA TRS-398 reference absorbed dose measurement protocol. The absorbed dose from water calorimetry agrees with the results from TRS-398 well to within 1-sigma uncertainty. Conclusions: This work demonstrates that a primary absorbed dose standard based on water calorimetry is feasible in scattered and scanned proton beams.

  7. The changes in optical absorbance of ZrO2 thin film with the rise of the absorbed dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abayli, D.; Baydogan, N.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, zirconium oxide (ZrO2) thin film samples prepared by sol-gel method were irradiated using Co-60 radioisotope as gamma source. Then, it was investigated the ionizing effect on optical properties of ZrO2 thin film samples with the rise of the absorbed dose. The changes in the optical absorbance of ZrO2 thin films were determined by using optical transmittance and the reflectance measurements in the range between 190 - 1100 nm obtained from PG Instruments T80 UV-Vis spectrophotometer.

  8. Estimates of absorbed dose in different organs in children treated with radium for skin hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Lundell, M.

    1994-12-01

    Between 1930 and 1959, more than 10,000 infants were treated at Radiumhemmet, Stockholm, with radium ({sup 226}Ra) needles and/or tubes for hemangioma of the skin. Absorbed dose to the brain, eye lenses, parotid glands, thyroid gland, breast enlarge, lungs, stomach, intestine, ovaries, testicles and bone marrow were calculated for each individual. The mean absorbed dose to the different organs ranged from 0.06 to 0.48 Gy. The highest absorbed dose was given to the breast (maximum 47.7 Gy). There was a wide dose range for each organ which was due mainly to differences in the distance between the applicator and the organ. The absorbed dose to all organs decreased on average by 32% during the study period. This was due to a 25% decrease in the treatment time and a change in the distribution of the treatment sites. 17 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Measuring absorbed dose for i-CAT CBCT examinations in child, adolescent and adult phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Choi, E

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Design and construct child and adolescent head phantoms to measure the absorbed doses imparted during dental CBCT and compare with the absorbed dose measured in an adult phantom. Methods: A child phantom was developed to represent the smallest patients receiving CBCT, usually for craniofacial developmental concerns, and an adolescent phantom was developed to represent healthy orthodontic patients. Absorbed doses were measured using a thimble ionization chamber for the custom-built child and adolescent phantoms and compared with measurements using a commercially available adult phantom. Imaging was performed with an i-CAT Next Generation (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA) CBCT using two different fields of view covering the craniofacial complex (130 mm high) or maxilla/mandible (60 mm high). Results: Measured absorbed doses varied depending on the location of the ionization chamber within the phantoms. For CBCT images obtained using the same protocol for all phantoms, the highest absorbed dose was measured in all locations of the small child phantom. The lowest absorbed dose was measured in the adult phantom. Conclusions: Images were obtained with the same protocol for the adult, adolescent and child phantoms. A consistent trend was observed with the highest absorbed dose being measured in the smallest phantom (child), while the lowest absorbed dose was measured in the largest phantom (adult). This study demonstrates the importance of child-sizing the dose by using dedicated paediatric protocols optimized for the imaging task, which is critical as children are more sensitive to harmful effects of radiation and have a longer life-span post-irradiation for radiation-induced symptoms to develop than do adults. PMID:25785822

  10. SU-E-J-239: Influence of RF Coil Materials On Surface and Buildup Dose From a 6MV Photon Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ghila, A; Fallone, B; Rathee, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In order to perform real time tumour tracking using an integrated Linac-MR, images have to be acquired during irradiation. MRI uses RF coils in close proximity to the imaged volume. Given current RF coil designs this means that the high energy photons will be passing through the coil before reaching the patient. This study experimentally investigates the dose modifications that occur due to the presence of various RF coil materials in the treatment beam. Methods: Polycarbonate, copper or aluminum tape, and Teflon were used to emulate the base, conductor and cover respectively of a surface RF coil. These materials were placed at various distances from the surface of polystyrene or solid water phantoms which were irradiated in the presence of no magnetic field, a transverse 0.2T magnetic field, and a parallel 0.2T magnetic field. Percent depth doses were measured using ion chambers. Results: A significant increase in surface and buildup dose is observed. The surface dose is seen to decrease with an increasing separation between the emulated coil and the phantom surface, when no magnetic field is present. When a transverse magnetic field is applied the surface dose decreases faster with increasing separation, as some of the electrons created in the coil are curved away from the phantom’s surface. When a parallel field is present the surface dose stays approximately constant for small separations, only slightly decreasing for separations greater than 5cm, since the magnetic field focuses the electrons produced in the coil materials not allowing them to scatter. Conclusion: Irradiating a patient through an RF coil leads to an increase in the surface and buildup doses. Mitigating this increase is important for the successful clinical use of either a transverse or a parallel configuration Linac-MR unit. This project is partially supported by an operating grant from the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR MOP 93752)

  11. Genetic effects induced by neutrons in Drosophila melanogaster I. Determination of absorbed dose.

    PubMed

    Delfin, A; Paredes, L C; Zambrano, F; Guzmán-Rincón, J; Ureña-Nuñez, F

    2001-12-01

    A method to obtain the absorbed dose in Drosophila melanogaster irradiated in the thermal column facility of the Triga Mark III Reactor has been developed. The method is based on the measurements of neutron activation of gold foils produced by neutron capture to obtain the neutron fluxes. These fluxes, combined with the calculations of kinetic energy released per unit mass, enables one to obtain the absorbed doses in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:11761104

  12. Space Radiation Absorbed Dose Distribution in a Human Phantom Torso

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Yang, T.; Atwell, W.

    2000-01-01

    The flight of a human phantom torso with head that containing active dosimeters at 5 organ sites and 1400 TLDs distributed in 34 1" thick sections is described. Experimental dose rates and quality factors are compared with calculations for shielding distributions at the sites using the Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model. The measurements were complemented with those obtained from other instruments. These results have provided the most comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human and to assess the accuracy of radiation transport models and astronaut radiation risk.

  13. Graphite calorimetry for absorbed dose measurements in heavy-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakama, M.; Kanai, T.; Fukumura, A.

    In order to sophisticate the radiotherapy high accuracy knowledge of the absorbed dose delivered to the patient is essential The main methods of absolute dosimetry are indicated as follows a Dosimetry by ion chamber b Fricke dosimetry and c Calorimetry The calorimetry is most direct method of dosimetry due to direct measurement of energy deposit in principle and no requirement of information of radiation fields for the calibration Many countries tend to adopt the calorimetry to determine the standard absorbed dose to water and become to be capable of deciding the absorbed dose in precision of about 0 6 for photon and electron beams Despite the recent progress of particle therapy the parameters such as w-value and stopping power ratio for ionization chambers in the particles is not obtained accurately Therefore that causes uncertainty in determination of the absolute dose For this reason we developed a graphite calorimeter to obtain high precision absorbed dose and reduce the uncertainty for various beams When the absorbed dose of 1 Gy is irradiated to the sensitive volume the temperature rise is about 1 4 milliKelvins The performance require the resolution of plus or minus 7 micro Kelvins to measure it in precision of plus or minus 0 5 The stability within several micro Kelvins per minute is necessary to obtain measurable background The miniature glass bead thermistors were embedded in the sensitive volume to perform active control of temperature The resistance change of these thermistors is approximately 0 68 Ohms and 488 micro Ohms at

  14. Monte Carlo evaluations of the absorbed dose and quality dependence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in radiotherapy photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Shaowen; Wang Xuetao; Chen Lixin; Tang Qiang; Liu Xiaowei

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to evaluate the absorbed dose to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dosimeter at various depths of water phantom in radiotherapy photon beams by Monte Carlo simulation and evaluate the beam quality dependence. Methods: The simulations were done using EGSnrc. The cylindrical Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dosimeter ({Phi}4 mmx1 mm) was placed at the central axis of the water phantom ({Phi}16 cmx16 cm) at depths between 0.5 and 8 cm. The incident beams included monoenergetic photon beams ranging from 1 to 18 MeV, {sup 60}Co {gamma} beams, Varian 6 MV beams using phase space files based on a full simulation of the linac, and Varian beams between 4 and 24 MV using Mohan's spectra. The absorbed dose to the dosimeter and the water at the corresponding position in the absence of the dosimeter, as well as absorbed dose ratio factor f{sub md}, was calculated. Results: The results show that f{sub md} depends obviously on the photon energy at the shallow depths. However, as the depth increases, the change in f{sub md} becomes small, beyond the buildup region, the maximum discrepancy of f{sub md} to the average value is not more than 1%. Conclusions: These simulation results confirm the use of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dosimeter in radiotherapy photon beams and clearly indicate that more attention should be paid when using such a dosimeter in the buildup region of high-energy radiotherapy photon beams.

  15. Absorbed dose simulations in near-surface regions using high dose rate Iridium-192 sources applied for brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, E. S.; Zeituni, C. A.; Sakuraba, R. K.; Gonçalves, V. D.; Cruz, J. C.; Júnior, D. K.; Souza, C. D.; Rostelato, M. E. C. M.

    2014-02-01

    Brachytherapy treatment with Iridium-192 high dose rate (HDR) sources is widely used for various tumours and it could be developed in many anatomic regions. Iridium-192 sources are inserted inside or close to the region that will be treated. Usually, the treatment is performed in prostate, gynaecological, lung, breast and oral cavity regions for a better clinical dose coverage compared with other techniques, such as, high energy photons and Cobalt-60 machines. This work will evaluate absorbed dose distributions in near-surface regions around Ir-192 HDR sources. Near-surface dose measurements are a complex task, due to the contribution of beta particles in the near-surface regions. These dose distributions should be useful for non-tumour treatments, such as keloids, and other non-intracavitary technique. For the absorbed dose distribution simulations the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE with the general code penEasy was used. Ir-192 source geometry and a Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) tube, for beta particles shield were modelled to yield the percentage depth dose (PDD) on a cubic water phantom. Absorbed dose simulations were realized at the central axis to yield the Ir-192 dose fall-off along central axis. The results showed that more than 99.2% of the absorbed doses (relative to the surface) are deposited in 5 cm depth but with slower rate at higher distances. Near-surface treatments with Ir-192 HDR sources yields achievable measurements and with proper clinical technique and accessories should apply as an alternative for treatment of lesions where only beta sources were used.

  16. Absorbed dose calculations to blood and blood vessels for internally deposited radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G. ); Poston, J.W. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1991-05-01

    At present, absorbed dose calculations for radionuclides in the human circulatory system used relatively simple models and are restricted in their applications. To determine absorbed doses to the blood and to the surface of the blood vessel wall, EGS4 Monte Carlo calculations were performed. Absorbed doses were calculated for the blood and the blood vessel wall (lumen) for different blood vessels sizes. The radionuclides chosen for this study were those commonly used in nuclear medicine. No diffusion of the radionuclide into the blood vessel was assumed nor cross fire between vessel was assumed. Results are useful in assessing the dose in blood and blood vessel walls for different nuclear medicine procedures. 6 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Absorbed dose calculations to blood and blood vessels for internally deposited radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G.; Poston, J.W. Sr. )

    1991-05-01

    At present, absorbed dose calculations for radionuclides in the human circulatory system used relatively simple models and are restricted in their applications. To determine absorbed doses to the blood and to the surface of the blood vessel wall, EGS4 Monte Carlo calculations were performed. Absorbed doses were calculated for the blood and the blood vessel wall (lumen) for different blood vessels sizes. The radionuclides chosen for this study were those commonly used in nuclear medicine. No penetration of the radionuclide into the blood vessel was assumed nor was cross fire between the vessel assumed. The results are useful in assessing the dose to blood and blood vessel walls for different nuclear medicine procedures.

  18. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a 60Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the

  19. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a (60)Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the

  20. Estimating absorbed dose of pesticides in a field setting using biomonitoring data and pharmacokinetic models.

    PubMed

    Scher, Deanna P; Sawchuk, Ronald J; Alexander, Bruce H; Adgate, John L

    2008-01-01

    Linking biomarker data to pharmacokinetic (PK) models permits comparison of absorbed dose with a toxicological benchmark, which is an important step to understanding the health implications of pesticide exposure. The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the feasibility of reconstructing the absorbed dose of two pesticides using PK models developed from biomarker data in a study of occupational application of these compounds. Twenty-four-hour urine samples were collected from farmers 24 h before through 96 h after a typical application of chlorpyrifos or 2,4-D. PK models were used to link the amounts found in urine samples to absorbed dose. Modeled total body dose estimates (in micrograms) were compared to measured dose from time 0-96 h. Despite the complexities surrounding the interpretation of biomonitoring data from a field setting, the models developed as part of this analysis accurately estimated the absorbed dose of 2,4-D and chlorpyrifos when collection of urine samples was largely complete. Over half of the farmers were excluded from modeling due to suspected noncompliance with urine collection or confounding exposure events, which highlights the importance of these issues for designing and interpreting biomonitoring data in future studies. Further evaluation of PK models in scenarios using single void samples is warranted for improving field-based dose assessments.

  1. Absorbed Dose in the Uterus of a Three Months Pregnant Woman Due to 131I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega-Carrillo, Héctor René; Manzanares-Acuña, Eduardo; Hernández-Dávila, Víctor Martín; Arcos-Pichardo, Areli; Barquero, Raquel; Iñiguez, M. Pilar

    2006-09-01

    The use of 131I is widely used in diagnostic and treatment of patients. If the patient is pregnant the 131I presence in the thyroid it becomes a source of constant exposition to other organs and the fetus. In this study the absorbed dose in the uterus of a 3 months pregnant woman with 131I in her thyroid gland has been calculated. The dose was determined using Monte Carlo methods in which a detailed model of the woman has been developed. The dose was also calculated using a simple procedure that was refined including the photons' attenuation in the woman organs and body. To verify these results an experiment was carried out using a neck phantom with 131I. Comparing the results it was found that the simple calculation tend to overestimate the absorbed dose, by doing the corrections due to body and organs photon attenuation the dose is 0.14 times the Monte Carlo estimation.

  2. Absorbed XFEL Dose in the Components of the LCLS X-Ray Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, Stefan

    2010-12-03

    There is great concern that the short, intense XFEL pulse of the LCLS will damage the optics that will be placed into the beam. We have analyzed the extent of the problem by considering the anticipated materials and position of the optical components in the beam path, calculated the absorbed dose as a function of photon energy, and compared these doses with the expected doses required (i) to observe rapid degradation due to thermal fatigue, (ii) to reach the melting temperature, or (iii) to actually melt the material. We list the materials that are anticipated to be placed into the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) beam line, their positions, and the absorbed dose, and compare this dose with anticipated damage thresholds.

  3. Absorbed Dose in the Uterus of a Three Months Pregnant Woman Due to 131I

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene; Manzanares-Acuna, Eduardo; Hernandez-Davila, Victor Martin; Arcos-Pichardo, Areli; Barquero, Raquel; Iniguez, M. Pilar

    2006-09-08

    The use of 131I is widely used in diagnostic and treatment of patients. If the patient is pregnant the 131I presence in the thyroid it becomes a source of constant exposition to other organs and the fetus. In this study the absorbed dose in the uterus of a 3 months pregnant woman with 131I in her thyroid gland has been calculated. The dose was determined using Monte Carlo methods in which a detailed model of the woman has been developed. The dose was also calculated using a simple procedure that was refined including the photons' attenuation in the woman organs and body. To verify these results an experiment was carried out using a neck phantom with 131I. Comparing the results it was found that the simple calculation tend to overestimate the absorbed dose, by doing the corrections due to body and organs photon attenuation the dose is 0.14 times the Monte Carlo estimation.

  4. Air kerma and absorbed dose standards for reference dosimetry in brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in primary standards for the calibration of brachytherapy sources, with an emphasis on the currently most common photon-emitting radionuclides. The introduction discusses the need for reference dosimetry in brachytherapy in general. The following section focuses on the three main quantities, i.e. reference air kerma rate, air kerma strength and absorbed dose rate to water, which are currently used for the specification of brachytherapy photon sources and which can be realized with primary standards from first principles. An overview of different air kerma and absorbed dose standards, which have been independently developed by various national metrology institutes over the past two decades, is given in the next two sections. Other dosimetry techniques for brachytherapy will also be discussed. The review closes with an outlook on a possible transition from air kerma to absorbed dose to water-based calibrations for brachytherapy sources in the future. PMID:24814696

  5. Average fetal depth in utero: data for estimation of fetal absorbed radiation dose

    SciTech Connect

    Ragozzino, M.W.; Breckle, R.; Hill, L.M.; Gray, J.E.

    1986-02-01

    To estimate fetal absorbed dose from radiographic examinations, the depth from the anterior maternal surface to the midline of the fetal skull and abdomen was measured by ultrasound in 97 pregnant women. The relationships between fetal depth, fetal presentation, and maternal parameters of height, weight, anteroposterior (AP) thickness, gestational age, placental location, and bladder volume were analyzed. Maternal AP thickness (MAP) can be estimated from gestational age, maternal height, and maternal weight. Fetal midskull and abdominal depths were nearly equal. Fetal depth normalized to MAP was independent or nearly independent of maternal parameters and fetal presentation. These data enable a reasonable estimation of absorbed dose to fetal brain, abdomen, and whole body.

  6. Plasma Membrane Permeabilization by 60- and 600-ns Electric Pulses Is Determined by the Absorbed Dose

    PubMed Central

    Ibey, Bennett L.; Xiao, Shu; Schoenbach, Karl H.; Murphy, Michael R.; Pakhomov, Andrei G.

    2008-01-01

    We explored how the effect of plasma membrane permeabilization by nanosecond-duration electric pulses (nsEP) depends on the physical characteristics of exposure. The resting membrane resistance (Rm) and membrane potential (MP) were measured in cultured GH3 and CHO cells by conventional whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Intact cells were exposed to a single nsEP (60 or 600 ns duration, 0-22 kV/cm), followed by patch-clamp measurements after a 2-3 min delay. Consistent with earlier findings, nsEP caused long-lasting Rm decrease, accompanied by the loss of MP. The threshold for these effects was about 6 kV/cm for 60 ns pulses, and about 1 kV/cm for 600 ns pulses. Further analysis established that it was neither pulse duration nor the E-field amplitude per se, but the absorbed dose that determined the magnitude of the biological effect. In other words, exposure to nsEP at either pulse duration caused equal effects if the absorbed doses were equal. The threshold absorbed dose to produce plasma membrane effects in either GH3 or CHO cells at either pulse duration was found to be at or below 10 mJ/g. Despite being determined by the dose, the nsEP effect clearly is not thermal, as the maximum heating at the threshold dose is less than 0.01 °C. The use of the absorbed dose as a universal exposure metric may help to compare and quantify nsEP sensitivity of different cell types and of cells in different physiological conditions. The absorbed dose may also prove to be a more useful metric than the incident E-field in determining safety limits for high peak, lowaverage power EMF emissions. PMID:18839412

  7. Absorbed doses of lungs from radon retained in airway lumens of mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Sakoda, Akihiro; Ishimori, Yuu; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Kataoka, Takahiro; Mitsunobu, Fumihiro

    2013-08-01

    This paper provides absorbed doses arising from radon gas in air retained in lung airway lumens. Because radon gas exposure experiments often use small animals, the calculation was performed for mice and rats. For reference, the corresponding computations were also done for humans. Assuming that radon concentration in airway lumens is the same as that in the environment, its progeny's production in and clearance from airways were simulated. Absorbed dose rates were obtained for three lung regions and the whole lung, considering that secretory and basal cells are sensitive to radiation. The results showed that absorbed dose rates for all lung regions and whole lung generally increase from mice to rats to humans. For example, the dose rates for the whole lung were 25.4 in mice, 41.7 in rats, and 59.9 pGy (Bq m⁻³)⁻¹ h⁻¹ in humans. Furthermore, these values were also compared with lung dose rates from two other types of exposures, that is, due to inhalation of radon or its progeny, which were already reported. It was confirmed that the direct inhalation of radon progeny in the natural environment, which is known as a cause of lung cancer, results in the highest dose rates for all species. Based on the present calculations, absorbed dose rates of the whole lung from radon gas were lower by a factor of about 550 (mice), 200 (rats), or 70 (humans) than those from radon progeny inhalation. The calculated dose rate values are comparatively small. Nevertheless, the present study is considered to contribute to our understanding of doses from inhalation of radon and its progeny.

  8. Uncertainties of organ-absorbed doses to patients from 18f-choline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. B.; Janzen, T.; Zankl, M.; Giussani, A.; Hoeschen, C.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation doses of radiopharmaceuticals to patients in nuclear medicine are, as the standard method, estimated by the administered activity, medical imaging (e.g. PET imaging), compartmental modeling and Monte Carlo simulation of radiation with reference digital human phantoms. However, in each of the contributing terms, individual uncertainty due to measurement techniques, patient variability and computation methods may propagate to the uncertainties of the calculated organ doses to the individual patient. To evaluate the overall uncertainties and the quality assurance of internal absorbed doses, a method was developed within the framework of the MADEIRA Project (Minimizing Activity and Dose with Enhanced Image quality by Radiopharmaceutical Administrations) to quantitatively analyze the uncertainties in each component of the organ absorbed doses after administration of 18F-choline to prostate cancer patients undergoing nuclear medicine diagnostics. First, on the basis of the organ PET and CT images of the patients as well as blood and urine samples, a model structure of 18F-choline was developed and the uncertainties of the model parameters were determined. Second, the model parameter values were sampled and biokinetic modeling using these sampled parameter values were performed. Third, the uncertainties of the new specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values derived with different phantoms representing individual patients were presented. Finally, the uncertainties of absorbed doses to the patients were calculated by applying the ICRP/ICRU adult male reference computational phantom. In addition to the uncertainty analysis, the sensitivity of the model parameters on the organ PET images and absorbed doses was indicated by coupling the model input and output using regression and partial correlation analysis. The results showed that the uncertainty factors of absorbed dose to patients are in most cases less than a factor of 2 without taking into account the uncertainties

  9. Improved estimates of the radiation absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Martin; Minarik, David; Johansson, Lennart; Mattsson, Sören; Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid

    2014-05-01

    Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) have been calculated as a function of the content in the urinary bladder in order to allow more realistic calculations of the absorbed dose to the bladder wall. The SAFs were calculated using the urinary bladder anatomy from the ICRP male and female adult reference computational phantoms. The urinary bladder and its content were approximated by a sphere with a wall of constant mass, where the thickness of the wall depended on the amount of urine in the bladder. SAFs were calculated for males and females with 17 different urinary bladder volumes from 10 to 800 mL, using the Monte Carlo computer program MCNP5, at 25 energies of mono-energetic photons and electrons ranging from 10 KeV to 10 MeV. The decay was assumed to be homogeneously distributed in the urinary bladder content and the urinary bladder wall, and the mean absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall was calculated. The Monte Carlo simulations were validated against measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeters. The SAFs obtained for a urine volume of 200 mL were compared to the values calculated for the urinary bladder wall using the adult reference computational phantoms. The mean absorbed dose to the urinary wall from 18F-FDG was found to be 77 µGy/MBq formales and 86 µGy/MBq for females, while for 99mTc-DTPA the mean absorbed doses were 80 µGy/MBq for males and 86 µGy/MBq for females. Compared to calculations using a constant value of the SAF from the adult reference computational phantoms, the mean absorbed doses to the bladder wall were 60% higher for 18F-FDG and 30% higher for 99mTc-DTPA using the new SAFs.

  10. Diamond detector in absorbed dose measurements in high-energy linear accelerator photon and electron beams.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Binukumar, John Pichy; Al Amri, Iqbal; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Antony

    2016-01-01

    Diamond detectors (DD) are preferred in small field dosimetry of radiation beams because of small dose profile penumbras, better spatial resolution, and tissue-equivalent properties. We investigated a commercially available 'microdiamond' detector in realizing absorbed dose from first principles. A microdiamond detector, type TM 60019 with tandem electrometer is used to measure absorbed doses in water, nylon, and PMMA phantoms. With sensitive volume 0.004 mm3, radius 1.1mm, thickness 1 x10(-3) mm, the nominal response is 1 nC/Gy. It is assumed that the diamond detector could collect total electric charge (nC) developed during irradiation at 0 V bias. We found that dose rate effect is less than 0.7% for changing dose rate by 500 MU/min. The reproducibility in obtaining readings with diamond detector is found to be ± 0.17% (1 SD) (n = 11). The measured absorbed doses for 6 MV and 15 MV photons arrived at using mass energy absorption coefficients and stop-ping power ratios compared well with Nd, water calibrated ion chamber measured absorbed doses within 3% in water, PMMA, and nylon media. The calibration factor obtained for diamond detector confirmed response variation is due to sensitivity due to difference in manufacturing process. For electron beams, we had to apply ratio of electron densities of water to carbon. Our results qualify diamond dosimeter as a transfer standard, based on long-term stability and reproducibility. Based on micro-dimensions, we recommend these detectors for pretreatment dose verifications in small field irradiations like stereotactic treatments with image guidance. PMID:27074452

  11. A method to efficiently simulate absorbed dose in radio-sensitive instrumentation components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana Leitner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Components installed in tunnels of high-power accelerators are prone to radiation-induced damage and malfunction. Such machines are usually modeled in detail and the radiation cascades are transported through the three-dimensional models in Monte Carlo codes. Very often those codes are used to compute energy deposition in beam components or radiation fields to the public and the environment. However, sensitive components such as electronic boards or insulator cables are less easily simulated, as their small size makes dose scoring a (statistically) inefficient process. Moreover the process to decide their location is iterative, as in order to define where these will be safely installed, the dose needs to be computed, but to do so the location needs to be known. This note presents a different approach to indirectly asses the potential absorbed dose by certain components when those are installed within a given radiation field. The method consists first in finding the energy and particle-dependent absorbed dose to fluence response function, and then programming those in a radiation transport Monte Carlo code, so that fluences in vacuum/air can be automatically converted real-time into potential absorbed doses and then mapped in the same way as fluences or dose equivalent magnitudes.

  12. A Graphite Absorbed-Dose Calorimeter in the Quasi-Isothermal Mode of Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzani, J.; Duftschmid, K. E.; Strachotinsky, Ch; Leitner, A.

    1984-01-01

    A quasi-isothermal method of operating an absorbed-dose graphite calorimeter is described in theory and practice. In contrast with the well-known quasi-adiabatic operation, which entails temperature increases during measurements, in the quasi-isothermal mode the temperatures of the different graphite bodies remain constant except for small temperature drifts throughout the measurement. This implies that the temperature dependence of the specific heat of the absorber and of the sensitivity of the temperature sensor influence the absorbed-dose determination significantly less. The method is characterized by a power-compensating measuring principle which is illustrated with a 3-body graphite calorimeter. Comparisons of the quasi-isothermal with the quasi-adiabatic method of operation showed good agreement.

  13. Absorbed dose rates in tissue from prompt gamma emissions from near-thermal neutron absorption

    DOE PAGES

    Schwahn, Scott O.

    2015-10-01

    Prompt gamma emission data from the International Atomic Energy Agency s Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis database are analyzed to determine the absorbed dose rates in tissue to be expected when natural elements are exposed in a near-thermal neutron environment.

  14. Verification of absorbed dose using diodes in cobalt-60 radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Gadhi, Muhammad Asghar; Fatmi, Shahab; Chughtai, Gul M; Arshad, Muhammad; Shakil, Muhammad; Rahmani, Uzma Mahmood; Imran, Malik Younas; Buzdar, Saeed Ahmad

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this work was to enhance the quality and safety of dose delivery in the practice of radiation oncology. To achieve this goal, the absorbed dose verification program was initiated by using the diode in vivo dosimetry (IVD) system (for entrance and exit). This practice was implemented at BINO, Bahawalpur, Pakistan. Diodes were calibrated for making absorbed dose measurements. Various correction factors (SSD, dose non-linearity, field size, angle of incidence, and wedge) were determined for diode IVD system. The measurements were performed in phantom in order to validate the IVD procedure. One hundred and nineteen patients were monitored and 995 measurements were performed. For phantom, the percentage difference between measured and calculated dose for entrance setting remained within ±2% and for exit setting ±3%. For patient measurements, the percentage difference between measured and calculated dose remained within ±5% for entrance/open fields and ±7% for exit/wedge/oblique fields. One hundred and nineteen patients and 995 fields have been monitored during the period of 6 months. The analysis of all available measurements gave a mean percent deviation of ±1.19% and standard deviation of ±2.87%. Larger variations have been noticed in oblique, wedge and exit measurements. This investigation revealed that clinical dosimetry using diodes is simple, provides immediate results and is a useful quality assurance tool for dose delivery. It has enhanced the quality of radiation dose delivery and increased/improved the reliability of the radiation therapy practice in BINO.

  15. Fetus absorbed dose evaluation in head and neck radiotherapy procedures of pregnant patients.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Etieli C; da Rosa, Luiz Antonio R; Batista, Delano Valdivino S

    2015-06-01

    In this work the head and neck cancer treatment of a pregnant patient was experimentally simulated. A female anthropomorphic Alderson phantom was used and the absorbed dose to the fetus was evaluated protecting the patient's abdomen with a 7cm lead layer and using no abdomen shielding. The target volume dose was 50Gy. The fetus doses evaluated with and without the lead shielding were, respectively, 0.52±0.039 and 0.88±0.052cGy. PMID:25620113

  16. Reduced radiation-absorbed dose to tissues with partial panoramic radiography for evaluation of third molars.

    PubMed

    Kircos, L T; Eakle, W S; Smith, R A

    1986-05-01

    The radiation-absorbed doses from panoramic radiography, distal molar radiography, and a partial panoramic radiographic technique that exposes only the third molar region to radiation are compared. Doses of radiation to the submandibular salivary gland were comparable by all three techniques, but doses of radiation to the head and neck were reduced greatly by the partial panoramic radiographic technique. Partial panoramic radiography is a diagnostically satisfactory and a radiologically safer technique for evaluation of third molar pathosis than is panoramic or distal molar radiography. PMID:3458783

  17. Reduced radiation-absorbed dose to tissues with partial panoramic radiography for evaluation of third molars

    SciTech Connect

    Kircos, L.T.; Eakle, W.S.; Smith, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    The radiation-absorbed doses from panoramic radiography, distal molar radiography, and a partial panoramic radiographic technique that exposes only the third molar region to radiation are compared. Doses of radiation to the submandibular salivary gland were comparable by all three techniques, but doses of radiation to the head and neck were reduced greatly by the partial panoramic radiographic technique. Partial panoramic radiography is a diagnostically satisfactory and a radiologically safer technique for evaluation of third molar pathosis than is panoramic or distal molar radiography.

  18. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of absorbed dose in teeth from citizens of Ozyorsk.

    PubMed

    Wieser, A; Vasilenko, E; Aladova, E; Fattibene, P; Semiochkina, N; Smetanin, M

    2014-05-01

    In 1945, within the frame of the Uranium Project for the production of nuclear weapons, the Mayak nuclear facilities were constructed at the Lake Irtyash in the Southern Urals, Russia. The nuclear workers of the Mayak Production Association (MPA), who lived in the city of Ozyorsk, are the focus of epidemiological studies for the assessment of health risks due to protracted exposure to ionising radiation. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of absorbed dose in tooth enamel have already been used in the past, in an effort to validate occupational external doses that were evaluated in the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System. In the present study, 229 teeth of Ozyorsk citizens not employed at MPA were investigated for the assessment of external background exposure in Ozyorsk. The annually absorbed dose in tooth enamel from natural background radiation was estimated to be (0.7 ± 0.3) mGy. For citizens living in Ozyorsk during the time of routine noble gas releases of the MPA, which peaked in 1953, the average excess absorbed dose in enamel above natural background was (36 ± 29) mGy, which is consistent with the gamma dose obtained by model calculations. In addition, there were indications of possible accidental gaseous MPA releases that affected the population of Ozyorsk, during the early and late MPA operation periods, before 1951 and after 1960. PMID:24604722

  19. Uneven surface absorbed dose distribution in electron-accelerator irradiation of rubber items

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbunov, I.F.; Pashinin, V.I.; Vanyushkin, B.M.

    1988-02-01

    Electron accelerators for industrial use are equipped with scanning devices, where the scan frequency or linear velocity along the window may vary. In a flow technology, where the items are transported to the irradiation zone at a set rate, the speed of an item may be comparable with the scan speed, so there is substantial nonuniformity in the absorbed dose, which adversely affects the quality. We have examined the dose nonuniformity for long rubber items during vulcanization by means of LUE-8-5RV and ELV-2 accelerators. The absorbed dose is calculated for an elementary part along which the irradiation is uniform on the assumption that current density distribution in the unswept beam is uniform as a result of scattering in the foil.

  20. Pain and Mean Absorbed Dose to the Pubic Bone After Radiotherapy Among Gynecological Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Waldenstroem, Ann-Charlotte; Olsson, Caroline; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Dunberger, Gail; Lind, Helena; Al-Abany, Massoud; Palm, Asa; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Steineck, Gunnar

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the relationship between mean absorbed dose to the pubic bone after pelvic radiotherapy for gynecological cancer and occurrence of pubic bone pain among long-term survivors. Methods and Materials: In an unselected, population-based study, we identified 823 long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated with pelvic radiotherapy during 1991-2003. For comparison, we used a non-radiation-treated control population of 478 matched women from the Swedish Population Register. Pain, intensity of pain, and functional impairment due to pain in the pubic bone were assessed with a study-specific postal questionnaire. Results: We analyzed data from 650 survivors (participation rate 79%) with median follow-up of 6.3 years (range, 2.3-15.0 years) along with 344 control women (participation rate, 72 %). Ten percent of the survivors were treated with radiotherapy; ninety percent with surgery plus radiotherapy. Brachytherapy was added in 81%. Complete treatment records were recovered for 538/650 survivors, with dose distribution data including dose-volume histograms over the pubic bone. Pubic bone pain was reported by 73 survivors (11%); 59/517 (11%) had been exposed to mean absorbed external beam doses <52.5 Gy to the pubic bone and 5/12 (42%) to mean absorbed external beam doses {>=}52.5 Gy. Thirty-three survivors reported pain affecting sleep, a 13-fold increased prevalence compared with control women. Forty-nine survivors reported functional impairment measured as pain walking indoors, a 10-fold increased prevalence. Conclusions: Mean absorbed external beam dose above 52.5 Gy to the pubic bone increases the occurrence of pain in the pubic bone and may affect daily life of long-term survivors treated with radiotherapy for gynecological cancer.

  1. Graves' disease radioiodine-therapy: Choosing target absorbed doses for therapy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Willegaignon, J. Sapienza, M. T.; Coura-Filho, G. B.; Buchpiguel, C. A.; Watanabe, T.; Traino, A. C.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The precise determination of organ mass (m{sub th}) and total number of disintegrations within the thyroid gland (A{sup ~}) are essential for thyroid absorbed-dose calculations for radioiodine therapy. Nevertheless, these parameters may vary according to the method employed for their estimation, thus introducing uncertainty in the estimated thyroid absorbed dose and in any dose–response relationship derived using such estimates. In consideration of these points, thyroid absorbed doses for Graves’ disease (GD) treatment planning were calculated using different approaches to estimating the m{sub th} and the A{sup ~}. Methods: Fifty patients were included in the study. Thyroid{sup 131}I uptake measurements were performed at 2, 6, 24, 48, 96, and 220 h postadministration of a tracer activity in order to estimate the effective half-time (T{sub eff}) of {sup 131}I in the thyroid; the thyroid cumulated activity was then estimated using the T{sub eff} thus determined or, alternatively, calculated by numeric integration of the measured time-activity data. Thyroid mass was estimated by ultrasonography (USG) and scintigraphy (SCTG). Absorbed doses were calculated with the OLINDA/EXM software. The relationships between thyroid absorbed dose and therapy response were evaluated at 3 months and 1 year after therapy. Results: The average ratio (±1 standard deviation) betweenm{sub th} estimated by SCTG and USG was 1.74 (±0.64) and that between A{sup ~} obtained by T{sub eff} and the integration of measured activity in the gland was 1.71 (±0.14). These differences affect the calculated absorbed dose. Overall, therapeutic success, corresponding to induction of durable hypothyroidism or euthyroidism, was achieved in 72% of all patients at 3 months and in 90% at 1 year. A therapeutic success rate of at least 95% was found in the group of patients receiving doses of 200 Gy (p = 0.0483) and 330 Gy (p = 0.0131) when m{sub th} was measured by either USG or SCTG and A

  2. Microdosimetric measurements for neutron-absorbed dose determination during proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; DeLuca, Paul M.; Thornton, Allan F.; Fitzek, Markus; Hecksel, Draik; Farr, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    This work presents microdosimetric measurements performed at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute in Bloomington, Indiana, USA. The measurements were done simulating clinical setups with a water phantom and for a variety of stopping targets. The water phantom was irradiated by a proton spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) and by a proton pencil beam. Stopping target measurements were performed only for the pencil beam. The targets used were made of polyethylene, brass and lead. The objective of this work was to determine the neutron-absorbed dose for a passive and active proton therapy delivery, and for the interactions of the proton beam with materials typically in the beam line of a proton therapy treatment nozzle. Neutron doses were found to be higher at 45° and 90° from the beam direction for the SOBP configuration by a factor of 1.1 and 1.3, respectively, compared with the pencil beam. Meanwhile, the pencil beam configuration produced neutron-absorbed doses 2.2 times higher at 0° than the SOBP. For stopping targets, lead was found to dominate the neutron-absorbed dose for most angles due to a large production of low-energy neutrons emitted isotropically. PMID:22334761

  3. Absorbed Dose Determination Using Experimental and Analytical Predictions of X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Carruth, Ralph (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Electron beam welding in a vacuum is a technology that NASA is investigating as a joining technique for manufacture of space structures. This investigation characterizes the x-ray environment due to operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool and provides recommendations for adequate shielding for astronauts performing the in-vacuum electron beam welding. NASA, in a joint venture with the Russian Space Agency, was scheduled to perform a series of welding in space experiments on board the U.S. Space Shuttle. This series of experiments was named the international space welding experiment (ISWE). The hardware associated with the ISWE was leased to NASA by the Paton Welding Institute (PWI) in Ukraine for ground-based welding experiments in preparation for flight. Two ground tests were scheduled, using the ISWE electron beam welding tool, to characterize the radiation exposure to an astronaut during the operation of the ISWE. These radiation exposure tests used thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's) shielded with material currently used by astronauts during extravehicular activities to measure the radiation dose. The TLD's were exposed to x-ray radiation generated by operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. This investigation was the first known application of TLD's to measure absorbed dose from x rays of energy less than 10 keV. The ISWE hardware was returned to Ukraine before the issue of adequate shielding for the astronauts was completely verified. Therefore, alternate experimental and analytical methods were developed to measure and predict the x-ray spectral and intensity distribution generated by ISWE electron beam impact with metal. These x-ray spectra were normalized to an equivalent ISWE exposure, then used to calculate the absorbed radiation dose to astronauts. These absorbed dose values were compared to TLD measurements obtained during actual operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. The calculated absorbed dose

  4. An international dosimetry exchange for boron neutron capture therapy. Part I: Absorbed dose measurements.

    PubMed

    Binns, P J; Riley, K J; Harling, O K; Kiger, W S; Munck af Rosenschöld, P M; Giusti, V; Capala, J; Sköld, K; Auterinen, I; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Uusi-Simola, J; Marek, M; Viererbl, L; Spurny, F

    2005-12-01

    An international collaboration was organized to undertake a dosimetry exchange to enable the future combination of clinical data from different centers conducting neutron capture therapy trials. As a first step (Part I) the dosimetry group from the Americas, represented by MIT, visited the clinical centers at Studsvik (Sweden), VTT Espoo (Finland), and the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) at Rez (Czech Republic). A combined VTT/NRI group reciprocated with a visit to MIT. Each participant performed a series of dosimetry measurements under equivalent irradiation conditions using methods appropriate to their clinical protocols. This entailed in-air measurements and dose versus depth measurements in a large water phantom. Thermal neutron flux as well as fast neutron and photon absorbed dose rates were measured. Satisfactory agreement in determining absorbed dose within the experimental uncertainties was obtained between the different groups although the measurement uncertainties are large, ranging between 3% and 30% depending upon the dose component and the depth of measurement. To improve the precision in the specification of absorbed dose amongst the participants, the individually measured dose components were normalized to the results from a single method. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 microg g(-1) that is typical of concentrations realized clinically with the boron delivery compound boronophenylalanine-fructose, systematic discrepancies in the specification of the total biologically weighted dose of up to 10% were apparent between the different groups. The results from these measurements will be used in future to normalize treatment plan calculations between the different clinical dosimetry protocols as Part II of this study.

  5. Radiation absorbed dose estimates for [1-carbon-11]-glucose in adults: The effects of hyperinsulinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, W.J. |

    1996-10-01

    As preparation for studies of blood-brain glucose transport in diabetes mellitus, radiation absorbed dose estimates from intravenous administration of [1-{sup 11}C]-glucose for 24 internal organs, lens, blood and total body were calculated for three physiologic conditions: euinsulinemic euglycemia, hyperinsulinemic euglycemia and hyperinsulinemic hyperglycemia. Cumulated activities in blood, insulin-independent and insulin-dependent compartments were calculated from blood time-activity curves in normal human volunteers and macaques. Apportionment of cumulated activity to individual organs in insulin-dependent and insulin-independent compartments was based on previously published data. Absorbed doses were calculated with the computer program MIRDOSE 3 for the 70-kg adult phantom. S for blood was calculated separately. The heart wall, lungs and spleen were the organs receiving the highest dose. The effect of hyperinsulinemia was demonstrated by the increase in adsorbed dose to the muscle, heart and blood with a decrease to other internal organs. This effect was more pronounced during hyperinsulinemic hyperglycemia. Hyperinsulinemia produced a decrease in effective dose due to the decrease in cumulated activity in organs with specified weighting factors greater than 0.05. The effective dose per study for [1-{sup 11}C]-glucose is comparable to that reported for 2-deoxy-[2-{sup 18}F]-glucose. 43 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  6. Determination of the absorbed dose and the average LET of space radiation in dependence on shielding conditions.

    PubMed

    Vana, N; Schoner, W; Noll, M; Fugger, M; Akatov, Y; Shurshakov, V

    1999-01-01

    The HTR method, developed for determination of absorbed dose and average LET of mixed radiation fields in space, was applied during several space missions on space station MIR, space shuttles and satellites. The method utilises the changes of peak height ratios in the glow curves in dependence on the linear energy transfer LET. Due to the small size of the dosemeters the evaluation of the variation of absorbed dose and average LET in dependence on the position of the dosemeters inside the space station is possible. The dose and LET distribution was determined during the experiment ADLET where dosemeters were exposed in two positions with different shielding conditions and during two following experiments (MIR-95, MIR-96) using six positions inside the space station. The results were compared with the shielding conditions of the positions. Calculations of the absorbed dose were carried out for comparison. Results have shown that the average LET increases with increasing absorbing thickness while the absorbed dose decreases.

  7. The Fricke dosimeter as an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Gamal, Islam; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McEwen, Malcolm

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this project was to develop an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy based on the Fricke dosimeter. To achieve this within the framework of the existing TG-43 protocol, a determination of the absorbed dose to water at the reference position, D(r0,θ0), was undertaken. Prior to this investigation, the radiation chemical yield of the ferric ions (G-value) at the Ir-192 equivalent photon energy (0.380 MeV) was established by interpolating between G-values obtained for Co-60 and 250 kV x-rays. An irradiation geometry was developed with a cylindrical holder to contain the Fricke solution and allow irradiations in a water phantom to be conducted using a standard Nucletron microSelectron V2 HDR Ir-192 afterloader. Once the geometry and holder were optimized, the dose obtained with the Fricke system was compared to the standard method used in North America, based on air-kerma strength. Initial investigations focused on reproducible positioning of the ring-shaped holder for the Fricke solution with respect to the Ir-192 source and obtaining an acceptable type A uncertainty in the optical density measurements required to yield the absorbed dose. Source positioning was found to be reproducible to better than 0.3 mm, and a careful cleaning and control procedure reduced the variation in optical density reading due to contamination of the Fricke solution by the PMMA holder. It was found that fewer than 10 irradiations were required to yield a type A standard uncertainty of less than 0.5%. Correction factors to take account of the non-water components of the geometry and the volume averaging effect of the Fricke solution volume were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. A sensitivity analysis showed that the dependence on the input data used (e.g. interaction cross-sections) was small with a type B uncertainty for these corrections estimated to be 0.2%. The combined standard uncertainty in the determination of absorbed dose to water

  8. The Fricke dosimeter as an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    El Gamal, Islam; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McEwen, Malcolm

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this project was to develop an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy based on the Fricke dosimeter. To achieve this within the framework of the existing TG-43 protocol, a determination of the absorbed dose to water at the reference position, D(r0,θ0), was undertaken. Prior to this investigation, the radiation chemical yield of the ferric ions (G-value) at the Ir-192 equivalent photon energy (0.380 MeV) was established by interpolating between G-values obtained for Co-60 and 250 kV x-rays.An irradiation geometry was developed with a cylindrical holder to contain the Fricke solution and allow irradiations in a water phantom to be conducted using a standard Nucletron microSelectron V2 HDR Ir-192 afterloader. Once the geometry and holder were optimized, the dose obtained with the Fricke system was compared to the standard method used in North America, based on air-kerma strength.Initial investigations focused on reproducible positioning of the ring-shaped holder for the Fricke solution with respect to the Ir-192 source and obtaining an acceptable type A uncertainty in the optical density measurements required to yield the absorbed dose. Source positioning was found to be reproducible to better than 0.3 mm, and a careful cleaning and control procedure reduced the variation in optical density reading due to contamination of the Fricke solution by the PMMA holder. It was found that fewer than 10 irradiations were required to yield a type A standard uncertainty of less than 0.5%.Correction factors to take account of the non-water components of the geometry and the volume averaging effect of the Fricke solution volume were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. A sensitivity analysis showed that the dependence on the input data used (e.g. interaction cross-sections) was small with a type B uncertainty for these corrections estimated to be 0.2%.The combined standard uncertainty in the determination of absorbed dose to water at

  9. Deterministic absorbed dose estimation in computed tomography using a discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Edward T.; Liu, Xin; Hsieh, Jiang

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Organ dose estimation for a patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scanning is very important. Although Monte Carlo methods are considered gold-standard in patient dose estimation, the computation time required is formidable for routine clinical calculations. Here, the authors instigate a deterministic method for estimating an absorbed dose more efficiently. Methods: Compared with current Monte Carlo methods, a more efficient approach to estimating the absorbed dose is to solve the linear Boltzmann equation numerically. In this study, an axial CT scan was modeled with a software package, Denovo, which solved the linear Boltzmann equation using the discrete ordinates method. The CT scanning configuration included 16 x-ray source positions, beam collimators, flat filters, and bowtie filters. The phantom was the standard 32 cm CT dose index (CTDI) phantom. Four different Denovo simulations were performed with different simulation parameters, including the number of quadrature sets and the order of Legendre polynomial expansions. A Monte Carlo simulation was also performed for benchmarking the Denovo simulations. A quantitative comparison was made of the simulation results obtained by the Denovo and the Monte Carlo methods. Results: The difference in the simulation results of the discrete ordinates method and those of the Monte Carlo methods was found to be small, with a root-mean-square difference of around 2.4%. It was found that the discrete ordinates method, with a higher order of Legendre polynomial expansions, underestimated the absorbed dose near the center of the phantom (i.e., low dose region). Simulations of the quadrature set 8 and the first order of the Legendre polynomial expansions proved to be the most efficient computation method in the authors’ study. The single-thread computation time of the deterministic simulation of the quadrature set 8 and the first order of the Legendre polynomial expansions was 21 min on a personal computer

  10. Absorbed doses and energy imparted from radiographic examination of velopharyngeal function during speech

    SciTech Connect

    Isberg, A.; Julin, P.; Kraepelien, T.; Henrikson, C.O. )

    1989-04-01

    Absorbed doses of radiation were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) using a skull phantom during simulated cinefluorographic and videofluorographic examination of velopharyngeal function in frontal and lateral projections. Dosages to the thyroid gland, the parotid gland, the pituitary gland, and ocular lens were measured. Radiation dosage was found to be approximately 10 times less for videofluoroscopy when compared with that of cinefluoroscopy. In addition, precautionary measures were found to reduce further the exposure of radiation-sensitive tissues. Head fixation and shielding resulted in dose reduction for both video- and cinefluoroscopy. Pulsing exposure for cinefluoroscopy also reduced the dosage.

  11. Equilibration of a Graphite Absorbed-Dose Calorimeter and the Quasi-Isothermal Mode of Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssens, A.; Cottens, E.; Paulsen, A.; Poffijn, A.

    1986-01-01

    From a mathematical model of a three-body absorbed-dose calorimeter a procedure for achieving thermal equilibrium is developed which uses calculational methods to determine the exact amount and timing of electrical energy to be dissipated in the calorimetric bodies. This procedure is applied to the quasi-isothermal mode of operation in which a radiation beam and equivalent electrical heating are alternately used to keep the calorimetric bodies at temperatures as constant as possible. Measurements of the dose rate of a 60Co beam in graphite using this technique are reported.

  12. Mycosis Fungoides electron beam absorbed dose distribution using Fricke xylenol gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silveira, Michely C.; Sampaio, Francisco G. A.; Petchevist, Paulo C. D.; de Oliveira, André L.; Almeida, Adelaide de

    2011-12-01

    Radiotherapy uses ionizing radiation to destroy tumor cells. The absorbed dose control in the target volume is realized through radiation sensors, such as Fricke dosimeters and radiochromic film, which permit to realize bi-dimensional evaluations at once and because of that, they will be used in this study as well. Among the several types of cancer suitable for ionizing radiation treatment, the Mycosis Fungoides, a lymphoma that spreads on the skin surface and depth, requires for its treatment total body irradiation by high-energy electrons. In this work the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) was used in order to obtain information about the absorbed dose distribution induced by the electron interactions with the irradiated tissues and to control this type of treatment. FXG can be considered as an alternative dosimeter, since up to now only films have been used. FXG sample cuvettes, simulating two selected tomos (cranium and abdomen) of the Rando anthropomorphic phantom, were positioned along with radiochromic films for comparison. The phantom was subjected to Stanford total body irradiation using 6 MeV electrons. Tomographic images were acquired for both dosimeters and evaluated through horizontal and vertical profiles along the tomographic centers. These profiles were obtained through a Matlab routine developed for this purpose. From the obtained results, one could infer that, for a superficial and internal patient irradiation, the FXG dosimeter showed an absorbed dose distribution similar to the one of the film. These results can validate the FXG dosimeter as an alternative dosimeter for the Mycosis Fungoides treatment planning.

  13. Verification of absorbed dose using diodes in cobalt-60 radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Gadhi, Muhammad Asghar; Fatmi, Shahab; Chughtai, Gul M; Arshad, Muhammad; Shakil, Muhammad; Rahmani, Uzma Mahmood; Imran, Malik Younas; Buzdar, Saeed Ahmad

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this work was to enhance the quality and safety of dose delivery in the practice of radiation oncology. To achieve this goal, the absorbed dose verification program was initiated by using the diode in vivo dosimetry (IVD) system (for entrance and exit). This practice was implemented at BINO, Bahawalpur, Pakistan. Diodes were calibrated for making absorbed dose measurements. Various correction factors (SSD, dose non-linearity, field size, angle of incidence, and wedge) were determined for diode IVD system. The measurements were performed in phantom in order to validate the IVD procedure. One hundred and nineteen patients were monitored and 995 measurements were performed. For phantom, the percentage difference between measured and calculated dose for entrance setting remained within ±2% and for exit setting ±3%. For patient measurements, the percentage difference between measured and calculated dose remained within ±5% for entrance/open fields and ±7% for exit/wedge/oblique fields. One hundred and nineteen patients and 995 fields have been monitored during the period of 6 months. The analysis of all available measurements gave a mean percent deviation of ±1.19% and standard deviation of ±2.87%. Larger variations have been noticed in oblique, wedge and exit measurements. This investigation revealed that clinical dosimetry using diodes is simple, provides immediate results and is a useful quality assurance tool for dose delivery. It has enhanced the quality of radiation dose delivery and increased/improved the reliability of the radiation therapy practice in BINO. PMID:26753835

  14. SU-E-I-85: Absorbed Dose Estimation for a Commercially Available MicroCT Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, A; Ahmad, S; Chen, Y; Ren, L; Liu, H; Yang, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the simulated absorbed dose delivered for a typical scan from a commercially available microCT scanner in order to aid in the dose estimation. Methods: The simulations were conducted using the Geant4 Monte Carlo Toolkit (version 10) with the standard electromagnetic classes. The Quantum FX microCT scanner (PerkinElmer, Waltham, MA) was modeled incorporating the energy fluence and angular distributions of generated photons, spatial dimensions of nominal source-to-object and source-to-detector distances. The energy distribution was measured using a spectrometer (X-123CdTe, Amptek Inc., Bedford, USA) with a 300 angular spread from the source for the 90 kVp X-ray beams with no additional filtration. The nominal distances from the source to object consisted of three setups: 154.0 mm, 104.0 mm, and 51.96 mm. Our simulations recorded the dose absorbed in a cylindrical phantom of PMMA with a fixed length of 2 cm and varying radii (10, 20, 30 and 40 mm) using 100 million incident photons. The averaged absorbed dose in the object was then quantified for all setups. An exposure measurement of 417 mR was taken using a Radcal 9095 system utilizing 10×9–180 ion chamber with the given technique of 90 kVp, 63 μA, and 12 s. The exposure rate was also simulated with same setup to calculate the conversion factor of the beam current and the number of incident photons. Results: For a typical cone-beam scan with non-filtered 90kVp, the dose coefficients (the absorbed dose per mAs) were 2.614, 2.549 and 2.467 μGy/mAs under source to object distance of 104 mm for the object diameters of 10 mm, 20 mm and 30 mm, respectively. Conclusion: A look-up table was developed where an investigator can estimate the delivered dose using this particular microCT given the scanning protocol (kVp and mAs) as well as the size of the scanned object.

  15. Fine-Resolution Voxel S Values for Constructing Absorbed Dose Distributions at Variable Voxel Size

    PubMed Central

    Dieudonné, Arnaud; Hobbs, Robert F.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Sgouros, George; Gardin, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a revised voxel S values (VSVs) approach for dosimetry in targeted radiotherapy, allowing dose calculation for any voxel size and shape of a given SPECT or PET dataset. This approach represents an update to the methodology presented in MIRD pamphlet no. 17. Methods VSVs were generated in soft tissue with a fine spatial sampling using the Monte Carlo (MC) code MCNPX for particle emissions of 9 radionuclides: 18F, 90Y, 99mTc, 111In, 123I, 131I, 177Lu, 186Re, and 201Tl. A specific resampling algorithm was developed to compute VSVs for desired voxel dimensions. The dose calculation was performed by convolution via a fast Hartley transform. The fine VSVs were calculated for cubic voxels of 0.5 mm for electrons and 1.0 mm for photons. Validation studies were done for 90Y and 131I VSV sets by comparing the revised VSV approach to direct MC simulations. The first comparison included 20 spheres with different voxel sizes (3.8–7.7 mm) and radii (4–64 voxels) and the second comparison a hepatic tumor with cubic voxels of 3.8 mm. MC simulations were done with MCNPX for both. The third comparison was performed on 2 clinical patients with the 3D-RD (3-Dimensional Radiobiologic Dosimetry) software using the EGSnrc (Electron Gamma Shower National Research Council Canada)-based MC implementation, assuming a homogeneous tissue-density distribution. Results For the sphere model study, the mean relative difference in the average absorbed dose was 0.20% ± 0.41% for 90Y and −0.36% ± 0.51% for 131I (n = 20). For the hepatic tumor, the difference in the average absorbed dose to tumor was 0.33% for 90Y and −0.61% for 131I and the difference in average absorbed dose to the liver was 0.25% for 90Y and −1.35% for 131I. The comparison with the 3D-RD software showed an average voxel-to-voxel dose ratio between 0.991 and 0.996. The calculation time was below 10 s with the VSV approach and 50 and 15 h with 3D-RD for the 2 clinical patients. Conclusion This new

  16. In vivo absorbed dose measurements in mammography using a new real-time luminescence technique.

    PubMed

    Aznar, M C; Hemdal, B; Medin, J; Marckmann, C J; Andersen, C E; Bøtter-Jensen, L; Andersson, I; Mattsson, S

    2005-04-01

    A dosimetry system based on radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from carbon doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C) crystals was developed for in vivo absorbed dose measurements in mammography. A small cylindrical crystal of Al2O3:C (diameter 0.48 mm and length 2 mm) was coupled to the end of a 1 mm diameter optical fibre cable. Owing to their small size and characteristic shape, these probes can be placed on the body surface in the field of view during the examination, without compromising the reading of the mammogram. Our new technique was tested with a mammography unit (Siemens Mammomat 3000) and screen-film technique over a range of clinically relevant X-ray energies. The results were compared with those obtained from an ionization chamber usually used for the determination of absorbed dose in mammography. The reproducibility of measurements was around 3% (1 standard deviation) at 4.5 mGy for both RL and OSL data. The dose response was found to be linear between 4.5 mGy and 30 mGy. The energy dependence of the system is around 18% between 23 kV and 35 kV. In vivo measurements were performed during three patient examinations. It was shown that entrance and exit doses could be measured. The presence of the small probes did not significantly interfere with the diagnostic quality of the images. Entrance doses estimated by RL/OSL results agreed within 3% with entrance surface dose values calculated from the ionization chamber measurements. These results indicate a considerable potential for use in routine control and in vivo dose measurements in mammography.

  17. The estimation of absorbed dose rates for non-human biota : an extended inter-comparison.

    SciTech Connect

    Batlle, J. V. I.; Beaugelin-Seiller, K.; Beresford, N. A.; Copplestone, D.; Horyna, J.; Hosseini, A.; Johansen, M.; Kamboj, S.; Keum, D.-K.; Kurosawa, N.; Newsome, L.; Olyslaegers, G.; Vandenhove, H.; Ryufuku, S.; Lynch, S. V.; Wood, M. D.; Yu, C.

    2011-05-01

    An exercise to compare 10 approaches for the calculation of unweighted whole-body absorbed dose rates was conducted for 74 radionuclides and five of the ICRP's Reference Animals and Plants, or RAPs (duck, frog, flatfish egg, rat and elongated earthworm), selected for this exercise to cover a range of body sizes, dimensions and exposure scenarios. Results were analysed using a non-parametric method requiring no specific hypotheses about the statistical distribution of data. The obtained unweighted absorbed dose rates for internal exposure compare well between the different approaches, with 70% of the results falling within a range of variation of {+-}20%. The variation is greater for external exposure, although 90% of the estimates are within an order of magnitude of one another. There are some discernible patterns where specific models over- or under-predicted. These are explained based on the methodological differences including number of daughter products included in the calculation of dose rate for a parent nuclide; source-target geometry; databases for discrete energy and yield of radionuclides; rounding errors in integration algorithms; and intrinsic differences in calculation methods. For certain radionuclides, these factors combine to generate systematic variations between approaches. Overall, the technique chosen to interpret the data enabled methodological differences in dosimetry calculations to be quantified and compared, allowing the identification of common issues between different approaches and providing greater assurance on the fundamental dose conversion coefficient approaches used in available models for assessing radiological effects to biota.

  18. The estimation of absorbed dose rates for non-human biota: an extended intercomparison.

    PubMed

    Vives i Batlle, J; Beaugelin-Seiller, K; Beresford, N A; Copplestone, D; Horyna, J; Hosseini, A; Johansen, M; Kamboj, S; Keum, D-K; Kurosawa, N; Newsome, L; Olyslaegers, G; Vandenhove, H; Ryufuku, S; Vives Lynch, S; Wood, M D; Yu, C

    2011-05-01

    An exercise to compare 10 approaches for the calculation of unweighted whole-body absorbed dose rates was conducted for 74 radionuclides and five of the ICRP's Reference Animals and Plants, or RAPs (duck, frog, flatfish egg, rat and elongated earthworm), selected for this exercise to cover a range of body sizes, dimensions and exposure scenarios. Results were analysed using a non-parametric method requiring no specific hypotheses about the statistical distribution of data. The obtained unweighted absorbed dose rates for internal exposure compare well between the different approaches, with 70% of the results falling within a range of variation of ±20%. The variation is greater for external exposure, although 90% of the estimates are within an order of magnitude of one another. There are some discernible patterns where specific models over- or under-predicted. These are explained based on the methodological differences including number of daughter products included in the calculation of dose rate for a parent nuclide; source-target geometry; databases for discrete energy and yield of radionuclides; rounding errors in integration algorithms; and intrinsic differences in calculation methods. For certain radionuclides, these factors combine to generate systematic variations between approaches. Overall, the technique chosen to interpret the data enabled methodological differences in dosimetry calculations to be quantified and compared, allowing the identification of common issues between different approaches and providing greater assurance on the fundamental dose conversion coefficient approaches used in available models for assessing radiological effects to biota. PMID:21113609

  19. A geochemical assessment of terrestrial gamma-ray absorbed dose rates.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg, H A; Smith, A R

    1990-02-01

    A survey of the geochemical literature and unpublished data has resulted in the classification of the concentrations of the naturally occurring radioelements U, Th, and K by their associated rock types. A data base of over 2500 entries has been compiled, permitting calculation of terrestrial gamma-ray absorbed dose rates. The general lithology of terrains may be distinguished by their radioelement ratios, relative abundances, and total gamma radioactivities. The gamma-ray absorbed dose rates in air above igneous rocks generally vary with their silica contents, and with the exception of shale, sedimentary rocks have lower K:U and K:Th ratios than most igneous rocks. The appreciable difference between the overall mean terrestrial gamma-ray dose rate for rock of the continental surface (approximately 7 X 10(-8) Gy h-1) and the mean dose rate from field measurements over soil (approximately 5 X 10(-8) Gy h-1) is explained by the substantial differences between radioelement concentrations of soil and rock, differences that may vary markedly with rock type.

  20. Estimation of radiation absorbed doses to the red marrow in radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Macey, D.J.; DeNardo, S.J.; DeNardo, G.L.; DeNardo, D.A.; Sui Shen

    1995-02-01

    Myelotoxicity is the dose-limiting factor in radioimmunotherapy. Traditional methods most commonly used to estimate the radiation adsorbed dose to the bone marrow of patients consider contribution from radionuclide in the blood and/or total body. Targeted therapies, such as radioimmunotherapy, add a third potential source for radiation to the bone marrow because the radiolabeled targeting molecules can accumulate specifically on malignant target cells infiltrating the bone marrow. A non-invasive method for estimating the radiation absorbed dose to the red marrow of patients who have received radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) has been developed and explored. The method depends on determining the cumulated activity in three contributing sources: (1) marrow; (2) blood; and (3) total body. The novel aspect of this method for estimating marrow radiation dose is derivation of the radiation dose for the entire red marrow from radiation dose estimates obtained by detection of cumulated activity in three lumbar vertebrae using a gamma camera. Contributions to the marrow radiation dose form marrow, blood, and total body cumulated activity were determined for patients who received an I-131 labeled MoAb, Lym-1, that reacts with malignant B-lymphocytes of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and nonHodgkin`s lymphoma. Six patients were selected for illustrative purposes because their vertebrae were readily visualized on lumbar images. 32 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Calculation of absorbed doses to water pools in severe accident sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.F.

    1991-12-01

    A methodology is presented for calculating the radiation dose to a water pool from the decay of uniformly distributed nuclides in that pool. Motivated by the need to accurately model radiolysis reactions of iodine, direct application is made to fission product sources dissolved or suspended in containment sumps or pools during a severe nuclear reactor accident. Two methods of calculating gamma absorption are discussed - one based on point-kernal integration and the other based on Monte Carlo techniques. Using least-squares minimization, the computed results are used to obtain a correlation that relates absorbed dose to source energy and surface-to-volume ratio of the pool. This correlation is applied to most relevant fission product nuclides and used to actually calculate transient sump dose rate in a pressurized-water reactor (PWR) severe accident sequence.

  2. Effect of gamma ray absorbed dose on the FET transistor parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Baharak; Ashrafi, Saleh

    This article tries to explain a modified method on dosimetry, based on electronic solid state including MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect) transistors. For this purpose, behavior of two models of MOSFETs has been studied as a function of the absorbed dose. The MOSFETs were irradiated at room temperature by 137Cs gamma ray source in the dose range of 1-5 Gy. Threshold voltage variation of investigated samples has been studied based on their transfer characteristic curves (TF) and also using the readout circuit (RC). For evaluation of laboratory samples sensitivity at different operating conditions, different biases were applied on the gate. In practical applications of radiation dosimetry, a significant change occurs in the threshold voltage of irradiated MOSFETs. And sensitivity of these MOSFETs is increased with increasing the bias values. Therefore, these transistors can be excellent candidates as low-cost sensors for systems that are capable of measuring gamma radiation dose.

  3. Absorbed dose determination using experimental and analytical predictions of x-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, David Lee

    1999-10-01

    Electron beam welding in a vacuum is a technology that NASA is investigating as a joining technique for manufacture of space structures. The interaction of energetic electrons with metal produces x-rays. This investigation characterizes the x-ray environment due to operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool and provides recommendations for adequate radiation shielding for astronauts performing the in-vacuum electron beam welding. NASA, in a joint venture with the Russian Space Agency, was scheduled to perform a series of welding in space experiments on board the United States Space Shuttle. This series of experiments was named the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE). The hardware associated with the ISWE was leased to NASA, by the Paton Welding Institute (PWI) in Ukraine, for ground based welding experiments in preparation for flight. Two ground tests were scheduled, using the ISWE electron beam welding tool, to characterize the radiation exposure to an astronaut during the operation of the ISWE. These radiation exposure tests used Thermoluminescence Dosimeters (TLD's) shielded with material currently used by astronauts during Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA) to measure the radiation dose. The TLD's were exposed to x- ray radiation generated by operation of the ISWE in- vacuum electron beam welding tool. This investigation was the first known application of TLD's to measure absorbed dose from x-rays of energy less than 10 keV. The ISWE hardware was returned to Ukraine before the issue of adequate shielding for the astronauts was completely verified. Therefore alternate experimental and analytical methods were developed to measure and predict the x-ray spectral and intensity distribution generated by ISWE electron beam impact with metal. These x-ray spectra were normalized to an equivalent ISWE exposure then used to calculate the absorbed radiation dose to astronauts. These absorbed dose values were compared to TLD measurements obtained during

  4. Relative Efficiency of TLD-100 to Linear Energy Transfer Radiation: Correction to Astronaut Absorbed Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.; Cash, B. L.; Semones, E. J.; Yasuda, H.; Fujitaka, K.

    1999-01-01

    Response of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD-100) to high linear energy transfer (LET) particles has been studied using helium, carbon, silicon, and iron ions from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator at Chiba (Japan), iron ions from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (NY) Alternate Gradient Synchrotron, and 53, 134, 185, and 232 MeV protons from the Loma Linda accelerator. Using the measured relative (to (137)Cs dose efficiency, and measured LET spectra from a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) on 20 Space Shuttle flights, and 7 Mir flights, the underestimation of absorbed dose by these detectors has been evaluated. The dose underestimation is between 15-20% depending upon the flight inclination and shielding location. This has been confirmed by direct correlation of measured dose by TEPC and TLD-100 at a low shielded location in the Shuttle mid-deck. A comparison of efficiency- LET data with a compilation of similar data from TLD-700, shows that shapes of the two curves are nearly identical, but that the TLD-100 curve is systematically lower by about 13%, and is the major cause of dose underestimation. These results strongly suggest that TLDs used for crew dose estimation be regularly calibrated using heavy ions.

  5. Relative Efficiency of TLD-100 to High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation: Correction to Astronaut Absorbed Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cash, B. L.; Semones, E. J.; Yasuda, H.; Fujitaka, K.

    1999-01-01

    Response of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD-100) to high linear energy transfer (LET) particles has been studied using helium, carbon, silicon, and iron ions from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator at Chiba (Japan), iron ions from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (NY) Alternate Gradient Synchrotron, and 53, 134, 185, and 232 MeV protons from the Loma Linda accelerator. Using the measured relative (to 137Cs) dose efficiency, and measured LET spectra from a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) on 20 Space Shuttle flights, and 7 Mir flights, the underestimation of absorbed dose by these detectors has been evaluated. The dose underestimation is between 15-20% depending upon the flight inclination and shielding location. This has been confirmed by direct correlation of measured dose by TEPC and TLD-100 at a low shielded location in the Shuttle mid-deck. A comparison of efficiency- LET data with a compilation of similar data from TLD-700, shows that shapes of the two curves are nearly identical, but that the TLD-100 curve is systematically lower by about 13%, and is the major cause of dose underestimation. These results strongly suggest that TLDs used for crew dose estimation be regularly calibrated using heavy ions.

  6. Response functions for computing absorbed dose to skeletal tissues from photon irradiation—an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry B.; Bahadori, Amir A.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-04-01

    A comprehensive set of photon fluence-to-dose response functions (DRFs) is presented for two radiosensitive skeletal tissues—active and total shallow marrow—within 15 and 32 bone sites, respectively, of the ICRP reference adult male. The functions were developed using fractional skeletal masses and associated electron-absorbed fractions as reported for the UF hybrid adult male phantom, which in turn is based upon micro-CT images of trabecular spongiosa taken from a 40 year male cadaver. The new DRFs expand upon both the original set of seven functions produced in 1985, and a 2007 update calculated under the assumption of secondary electron escape from spongiosa. In this study, it is assumed that photon irradiation of the skeleton will yield charged particle equilibrium across all spongiosa regions at energies exceeding 200 keV. Kerma coefficients for active marrow, inactive marrow, trabecular bone and spongiosa at higher energies are calculated using the DRF algorithm setting the electron-absorbed fraction for self-irradiation to unity. By comparing kerma coefficients and DRF functions, dose enhancement factors and mass energy-absorption coefficient (MEAC) ratios for active marrow to spongiosa were derived. These MEAC ratios compared well with those provided by the NIST Physical Reference Data Library (mean difference of 0.8%), and the dose enhancement factors for active marrow compared favorably with values calculated in the well-known study published by King and Spiers (1985 Br. J. Radiol. 58 345-56) (mean absolute difference of 1.9 percentage points). Additionally, dose enhancement factors for active marrow were shown to correlate well with the shallow marrow volume fraction (R2 = 0.91). Dose enhancement factors for the total shallow marrow were also calculated for 32 bone sites representing the first such derivation for this target tissue.

  7. SU-FF-T-390: In-Vivo Prostate Brachytherapy Absorbed Dose Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gueye, Paul; Velasco, Carlos; Keppel, Cynthia; Murphy, B; Sinesi, C

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: In-vivo prostate brachytherapy absorbed dosimetrydetector using scintillating fibers. Method and Materials: Five pairs of 85.5 {+-} 0.05 cm long blue shifted scintillating fibers (model BCF-10) with 1 mm{sup 2} cross sectional area were placed in a mixture of gelatin (368.6 {+-} 0.5 grams) and water (3.78 {+-} 0.025 liters) to measured the absorbed dose delivered by a 12 Ci {sup 192}Ir HDR source. The fibers were held by a 7 x 7 cm{sup 2} template grid and optically connected to a 16-channel multianode photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu, model H6568). Each pair consisted of one fiber 4 mm shorter than the other one to extract the dose by the subtraction method. A dose atlas was used for radiation delivered to the phantom. The plans followed delivered 5 and 7 Gy to a point located 2.0 centimeters away from the central dwelling positions. A total of 32 data points were acquired in a plan to assess the linearity and reproducibility of the measurements.Results: Reproducibility of the data was found to be within 5% and the overall accuracy of the system estimated to be {+-}5.5%. The linearity of the data for all 7 measureddose values (ranging from 0.6 to 7 Gy), gives a slope of 312 counts/Gy with a 1.4% relative deviation. Conclusion: This work indicates the possibility of measuring in real-time the dose effectively delivered to a biological system during prostate brachytherapy treatments. The availability of commercially thin (150 {micro}m) scintillating fibers opens the capability of using such system during clinical treatments (by embedding the fibers within the catheters) with the advantage of performing real-time adjustment of the dose delivery.

  8. Mercury exposure from dental amalgam fillings: absorbed dose and the potential for adverse health effects.

    PubMed

    Mackert, J R; Berglund, A

    1997-01-01

    This review examines the question of whether adverse health effects are attributable to amalgam-derived mercury. The issue of absorbed dose of mercury from amalgam is addressed first. The use of intra-oral Hg vapor measurements to estimate daily uptake must take into account the differences between the collection volume and flow rate of the measuring instrument and the inspiratory volume and flow rate of air through the mouth during inhalation of a single breath. Failure to account for these differences will result in substantial overestimation of the absorbed dose. Other factors that must be considered when making estimates of Hg uptake from amalgam include the accurate measurement of baseline (unstimulated) mercury release rates and the greater stimulation of Hg release afforded by chewing gum relative to ordinary food. The measured levels of amalgam-derived mercury in brain, blood, and urine are shown to be consistent with low absorbed doses (1-3 micrograms/day). Published relationships between the number of amalgam surfaces and urine levels are used to estimate the number of amalgam surfaces that would be required to produce the 30 micrograms/g creatinine urine mercury level stated by WHO to be associated with the most subtle, pre-clinical effects in the most sensitive individuals. From 450 to 530 amalgam surfaces would be required to produce the 30 micrograms/g creatinine urine mercury level for people without any excessive gum-chewing habits. The potential for adverse health effects and for improvement in health following amalgam removal is also addressed. Finally, the issue of whether any material can ever be completely exonerated of claims of producing adverse health effects is considered.

  9. Uncertainties in electron-absorbed fractions and lung doses from inhaled beta-emitters.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Eduardo B; Bolch, Wesley E; Huston, Thomas E; Rajon, Didier A; Huh, Chulhaeng; Bolch, W Emmett

    2005-01-01

    The computer code LUDUC (Lung Dose Uncertainty Code), developed at the University of Florida, was originally used to investigate the range of potential doses from the inhalation of either plutonium or uranium oxides. The code employs the ICRP Publication 66 Human Respiratory Tract model; however, rather than using simple point estimates for each of the model parameters associated with particle deposition, clearance, and lung-tissue dosimetry, probability density functions are ascribed to these parameters based upon detailed literature review. These distributions are subsequently sampled within LUDUC using Latin hypercube sampling techniques to generate multiple (e.g., approximately 1,000) sets of input vectors (i.e., trials), each yielding a unique estimate of lung dose. In the present study, the dosimetry component of the ICRP-66 model within LUDUC has been extended to explicitly consider variations in the beta particle absorbed fraction due to corresponding uncertainties and biological variabilities in both source and target tissue depths and thicknesses within the bronchi and bronchioles of the thoracic airways. Example dose distributions are given for the inhalation of absorption Type S compounds of 90Sr (Tmax = 546 keV) and 90Y (Tmax = 2,284 keV) as a function of particle size. Over the particle size range of 0.001 to 1 microm, estimates of total lung dose vary by a factor of 10 for 90Sr particles and by a factor of 4 to 10 for 90Y particles. As the particle size increases to 10 microm, dose uncertainties reach a factor of 100 for both radionuclides. In comparisons to identical exposures scenarios run by the LUDEP 2.0 code, Reference Man doses for inhaled beta-emitters were shown to provide slightly conservative estimates of lung dose compared to those in this study where uncertainties in lung airway histology are considered.

  10. Uncertainties in electron-absorbed fractions and lung doses from inhaled beta-emitters.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Eduardo B; Bolch, Wesley E; Huston, Thomas E; Rajon, Didier A; Huh, Chulhaeng; Bolch, W Emmett

    2005-01-01

    The computer code LUDUC (Lung Dose Uncertainty Code), developed at the University of Florida, was originally used to investigate the range of potential doses from the inhalation of either plutonium or uranium oxides. The code employs the ICRP Publication 66 Human Respiratory Tract model; however, rather than using simple point estimates for each of the model parameters associated with particle deposition, clearance, and lung-tissue dosimetry, probability density functions are ascribed to these parameters based upon detailed literature review. These distributions are subsequently sampled within LUDUC using Latin hypercube sampling techniques to generate multiple (e.g., approximately 1,000) sets of input vectors (i.e., trials), each yielding a unique estimate of lung dose. In the present study, the dosimetry component of the ICRP-66 model within LUDUC has been extended to explicitly consider variations in the beta particle absorbed fraction due to corresponding uncertainties and biological variabilities in both source and target tissue depths and thicknesses within the bronchi and bronchioles of the thoracic airways. Example dose distributions are given for the inhalation of absorption Type S compounds of 90Sr (Tmax = 546 keV) and 90Y (Tmax = 2,284 keV) as a function of particle size. Over the particle size range of 0.001 to 1 microm, estimates of total lung dose vary by a factor of 10 for 90Sr particles and by a factor of 4 to 10 for 90Y particles. As the particle size increases to 10 microm, dose uncertainties reach a factor of 100 for both radionuclides. In comparisons to identical exposures scenarios run by the LUDEP 2.0 code, Reference Man doses for inhaled beta-emitters were shown to provide slightly conservative estimates of lung dose compared to those in this study where uncertainties in lung airway histology are considered. PMID:15596988

  11. Theory, performance, and measured results with an improved absorbed dose water calorimeter. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Domen, S.T.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of this calorimeter is mainly the result of the low thermal diffusivity of water that retards a temperature change at a point along a temperature profile. The temperature change is sensed by two calibrated thermistors sandwiched between two polyethylene films that electrically insulate the thermistors from water. The product of the temperature rise and the specific heat of water gives the combined effect of the absorbed dose and any heat defect. Temperature drifts are quickly controlled by making slight changes in electrical power dissipated in the water. Compared to solid-bodied calorimeters requiring vacuum systems, it was easy to construct, to get into operation, and to operate.

  12. Estimation of the absorbed dose in radiation-processed food. 4. EPR measurements on eggshell

    SciTech Connect

    Desrosiers, M.F.; Le, F.G. ); Harewood, P.M.; Josephson, E.S. ); Montesalvo, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Fresh whole eggs treated with ionizing radiation for Salmonellae control testing. The eggshell was then removed and examined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine if EPR could be used to (1) distinguish irradiated from unirradiated eggs and (2) assess the absorbed dose. No EPR signals were detected in unirradiated eggs, while strong signals were measurable for more than 200 days after irradiation. Although a number of EPR signals were measured, the most intense resonance (g = 2.0019) was used for dosimetry throughout the study. This signal was observed to increase linearly with dose (up to [approximately]6 kGy), which decayed [approximately]20% within the first 5 days after irradiation and remained relatively constant thereafter. The standard added-dose method was used to assess, retrospectively, the dose to eggs processed at 0.2, 0.7, and 1.4 kGy. Relatively good results were obtained when measurement was made on the day the shell was reirradiated; with this procedure estimates were better for shell processed at the lower doses.

  13. Radiobiologic risk estimation from dental radiology. Part I. Absorbed doses to critical organs

    SciTech Connect

    Underhill, T.E.; Chilvarquer, I.; Kimura, K.; Langlais, R.P.; McDavid, W.D.; Preece, J.W.; Barnwell, G.

    1988-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to generate one consistent set of data for evaluating and comparing radiobiologic risks from different dental radiographic techniques. To accomplish this goal, absorbed doses were measured in fourteen anatomic sites from (1) five different panoramic machines with the use of rare-earth screens, (2) a twenty-film complete-mouth survey with E-speed film, long round cone, (3) a twenty-film complete-mouth survey with E-speed film, long rectangular cone, (4) a four-film interproximal survey with E-speed film, long round cone, and (5) a four-film interproximal survey with E-speed film, long rectangular cone. The dose to the thyroid gland, the active bone marrow, the brain, and the salivary glands was evaluated by means of exposure of a tissue-equivalent phantom, fitted with lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) at the relevant locations.

  14. Radiation-induced biomarkers for the detection and assessment of absorbed radiation doses

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sudha; Kumar, Raj; Sultana, Sarwat; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Radiation incident involving living organisms is an uncommon but a very serious situation. The first step in medical management including triage is high-throughput assessment of the radiation dose received. Radiation exposure levels can be assessed from viability of cells, cellular organelles such as chromosome and different intermediate metabolites. Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation result in carcinogenesis, lowering of the immune response and, ultimately, damage to the hematopoietic system, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. Biodosimetry is based on the measurement of the radiation-induced changes, which can correlate them with the absorbed dose. Radiation biomarkers such as chromosome aberration are most widely used. Serum enzymes such as serum amylase and diamine oxidase are the most promising biodosimeters. The level of gene expression and protein are also good biomarkers of radiation. PMID:21829314

  15. Radiobiologic risk estimation from dental radiology. Part I. Absorbed doses to critical organs.

    PubMed

    Underhill, T E; Chilvarquer, I; Kimura, K; Langlais, R P; McDavid, W D; Preece, J W; Barnwell, G

    1988-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to generate one consistent set of data for evaluating and comparing radiobiologic risks from different dental radiographic techniques. To accomplish this goal, absorbed doses were measured in fourteen anatomic sites from (1) five different panoramic machines with the use of rare-earth screens, (2) a twenty-film complete-mouth survey with E-speed film, long round cone, (3) a twenty-film complete-mouth survey with E-speed film, long rectangular cone, (4) a four-film interproximal survey with E-speed film, long round cone, and (5) a four-film interproximal survey with E-speed film, long rectangular cone. The dose to the thyroid gland, the active bone marrow, the brain, and the salivary glands was evaluated by means of exposure of a tissue-equivalent phantom, fitted with lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) at the relevant locations.

  16. Absorbed dose distribution visualization for superficial treatments through the Fricke Xylenol Gel dosimeter (FXG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva, M.; Sampaio, F. G. A.; Moreira, M. V.; Petchevist, P. C. D.; de Almeida, A.

    2010-11-01

    Electrons, orthovoltage X-rays and betas are used for superficial treatments. It has been shown that it is practical to measure these three types of radiation using gel dosimetry, which is an accurate dosimetric tool, from which one can infer the absorbed dose. The Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXG) dosimeter has presented adequate results due to its spatial resolution, effective atomic number and density that are near to those of soft tissue. The aim of this work is to compare three types of radiation for skin treatments like orthovoltage (X-rays), brachytherapy (beta rays) and megavoltage (electrons) using the FXG-CCD dosimetric system to determine the calibration curves (CC), beam profiles (BP) and percentage depth dose curves (PDD), evidencing why for clinical applications a specific type of radiation is selected for superficial treatment. From the results obtained we can infer that the FXG-CCD system is adequate for linear, area and volume measurements.

  17. A Comparison of Model Calculation and Measurement of Absorbed Dose for Proton Irradiation. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapp, N.; Semones, E.; Saganti, P.; Cucinotta, F.

    2003-01-01

    With the increase in the amount of time spent EVA that is necessary to complete the construction and subsequent maintenance of ISS, it will become increasingly important for ground support personnel to accurately characterize the radiation exposures incurred by EVA crewmembers. Since exposure measurements cannot be taken within the organs of interest, it is necessary to estimate these exposures by calculation. To validate the methods and tools used to develop these estimates, it is necessary to model experiments performed in a controlled environment. This work is such an effort. A human phantom was outfitted with detector equipment and then placed in American EMU and Orlan-M EVA space suits. The suited phantom was irradiated at the LLUPTF with proton beams of known energies. Absorbed dose measurements were made by the spaceflight operational dosimetrist from JSC at multiple sites in the skin, eye, brain, stomach, and small intestine locations in the phantom. These exposures are then modeled using the BRYNTRN radiation transport code developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, and the CAM (computerized anatomical male) human geometry model of Billings and Yucker. Comparisons of absorbed dose calculations with measurements show excellent agreement. This suggests that there is reason to be confident in the ability of both the transport code and the human body model to estimate proton exposure in ground-based laboratory experiments.

  18. Thyroid absorbed dose for people at Rongelap, Utirik, and Sifo on March 1, 1954

    SciTech Connect

    Lessard, E.T.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Conrad, R.A.; Musoline, S.V.; Naidu, J.R.; Moorthy, A.; Schopfer, C.J.

    1985-03-01

    A study was undertaken to reexamine thyroid absorbed dose estimates for people accidentally exposed to fallout at Rongelap, Sifo, and Utirik Islands from the Pacific weapon test known as Operation Castle BRAVO. The study included: (1) reevaluation of radiochemical analysis, to relate results from pooled urine to intake, retention, and excretion functions; (2) analysis of neutron-irradiation studies of archival soil samples, to estimate areal activities of the iodine isotopes; (3) analysis of source term, weather data, and meteorological functions used in predicting atmospheric diffusion and fallout deposition, to estimate airborne concentrations of the iodine isotopes; and (4) reevaluation of radioactive fallout, which contaminated a Japanese fishing vessel in the vicinity of Rongelap Island on March 1, 1954, to determine fallout components. The conclusions of the acute exposure study were that the population mean thyroid absorbed doses were 21 gray (2100 rad) at Rongelap, 6.7 gray (670 rad) at Sifo, and 2.8 gray (280 rad) at Utirik. The overall thyroid cancer risk we estimated was in agreement with results published on the Japanese exposed at Nagasaki and Hiroshima. We now postulate that the major route for intake of fallout was by direct ingestion of food prepared and consumed outdoors. 66 refs., 13 figs., 25 tabs.

  19. ESR spectroscopy for detecting gamma-irradiated dried vegetables and estimating absorbed doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Joong-Ho; Chung, Hyung-Wook; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2000-03-01

    In view of an increasing demand for food irradiation technology, the development of a reliable means of detection for the control of irradiated foods has become necessary. Various vegetable food materials (dried cabbage, carrot, chunggyungchae, garlic, onion, and green onion), which can be legally irradiated in Korea, were subjected to a detection study using ESR spectroscopy. Correlation coefficients ( R2) between absorbed doses (2.5-15 kGy) and their corresponding ESR signals were identified from ESR signals. Pre-established threshold values were successfully applied to the detection of 54 coded unknown samples of dried clean vegetables ( chunggyungchae, Brassica camestris var. chinensis), both non-irradiated and irradiated. The ESR signals of irradiated chunggyungchae decreased over a longer storage time, however, even after 6 months of ambient storage, these signals were still distinguishable from those of non-irradiated samples. The most successful estimates of absorbed dose (5 and 8 kGy) were obtained immediately after irradiation using a quadratic fit with average values of 4.85 and 8.65 kGy being calculated.

  20. Fraction of a dose absorbed estimation for structurally diverse low solubility compounds.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Kiyohiko

    2011-02-28

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the prediction accuracy of the fully mechanistic gastrointestinal unified theoretical (GUT) framework for in vivo oral absorption of low solubility drugs. Solubility in biorelevant media, molecular weight, logP(oct), pK(a), Caco-2 permeability, dose and particle size were used as the input parameters. To neglect the effect of the low stomach pH on dissolution of a drug, the fraction of a dose absorbed (Fa%) of undissociable and free acids were used. In addition, Fa% of free base drugs with the high pH stomach was also included to increase the number of model drugs. In total twenty nine structurally diverse compounds were used as the model drugs. Fa% data at several doses and particle sizes in humans and dogs were collated from the literature (total 110 Fa% data). In approximately 80% cases, the prediction error was within 2 fold, suggesting that the GUT framework has practical predictability for drug discovery, but not for drug development. The GUT framework appropriately captured the dose and particle size dependency of Fa% as the particle drifting effect was taken into account. It should be noted that the present validation results cannot be applied for salt form cases and other special formulations such as solid dispersions and emulsion formulations.

  1. Absorbed dose-to-water protocol applied to synchrotron-generated x-rays at very high dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, P.; Crosbie, J. C.; Cornelius, I.; Berkvens, P.; Donzelli, M.; Clavel, A. H.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.

    2016-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a new radiation treatment modality in the pre-clinical stage of development at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. MRT exploits the dose volume effect that is made possible through the spatial fractionation of the high dose rate synchrotron-generated x-ray beam into an array of microbeams. As an important step towards the development of a dosimetry protocol for MRT, we have applied the International Atomic Energy Agency’s TRS 398 absorbed dose-to-water protocol to the synchrotron x-ray beam in the case of the broad beam irradiation geometry (i.e. prior to spatial fractionation into microbeams). The very high dose rates observed here mean the ion recombination correction factor, k s , is the most challenging to quantify of all the necessary corrections to apply for ionization chamber based absolute dosimetry. In the course of this study, we have developed a new method, the so called ‘current ramping’ method, to determine k s for the specific irradiation and filtering conditions typically utilized throughout the development of MRT. Using the new approach we deduced an ion recombination correction factor of 1.047 for the maximum ESRF storage ring current (200 mA) under typical beam spectral filtering conditions in MRT. MRT trials are currently underway with veterinary patients at the ESRF that require additional filtering, and we have estimated a correction factor of 1.025 for these filtration conditions for the same ESRF storage ring current. The protocol described herein provides reference dosimetry data for the associated Treatment Planning System utilized in the current veterinary trials and anticipated future human clinical trials.

  2. Absorbed dose-to-water protocol applied to synchrotron-generated x-rays at very high dose rates.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P; Crosbie, J C; Cornelius, I; Berkvens, P; Donzelli, M; Clavel, A H; Rosenfeld, A B; Petasecca, M; Lerch, M L F; Bräuer-Krisch, E

    2016-07-21

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a new radiation treatment modality in the pre-clinical stage of development at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. MRT exploits the dose volume effect that is made possible through the spatial fractionation of the high dose rate synchrotron-generated x-ray beam into an array of microbeams. As an important step towards the development of a dosimetry protocol for MRT, we have applied the International Atomic Energy Agency's TRS 398 absorbed dose-to-water protocol to the synchrotron x-ray beam in the case of the broad beam irradiation geometry (i.e. prior to spatial fractionation into microbeams). The very high dose rates observed here mean the ion recombination correction factor, k s , is the most challenging to quantify of all the necessary corrections to apply for ionization chamber based absolute dosimetry. In the course of this study, we have developed a new method, the so called 'current ramping' method, to determine k s for the specific irradiation and filtering conditions typically utilized throughout the development of MRT. Using the new approach we deduced an ion recombination correction factor of 1.047 for the maximum ESRF storage ring current (200 mA) under typical beam spectral filtering conditions in MRT. MRT trials are currently underway with veterinary patients at the ESRF that require additional filtering, and we have estimated a correction factor of 1.025 for these filtration conditions for the same ESRF storage ring current. The protocol described herein provides reference dosimetry data for the associated Treatment Planning System utilized in the current veterinary trials and anticipated future human clinical trials. PMID:27366861

  3. An Absorbed-Dose/Dose-Rate Dependence for the Alanine-EPR Dosimetry System and Its Implications in High-Dose Ionizing Radiation Metrology

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, M. F.; Puhl, J. M.; Cooper, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    NIST developed the alanine dosimetry system in the early 1990s to replace radiochromic dye film dosimeters. Later in the decade the alanine system was firmly established as a transfer service for high-dose radiation dosimetry and an integral part of the internal calibration scheme supporting these services. Over the course of the last decade, routine monitoring of the system revealed a small but significant observation that, after examination, led to the characterization of a previously unknown absorbed-dose-dependent, dose-rate effect for the alanine system. Though the potential impact of this effect is anticipated to be extremely limited for NIST’s customer-based transfer dosimetry service, much greater implications may be realized for international measurement comparisons between National Measurement Institutes. PMID:27096113

  4. Uncertainties in Monte Carlo-based absorbed dose calculations for an experimental benchmark.

    PubMed

    Renner, F; Wulff, J; Kapsch, R-P; Zink, K

    2015-10-01

    There is a need to verify the accuracy of general purpose Monte Carlo codes like EGSnrc, which are commonly employed for investigations of dosimetric problems in radiation therapy. A number of experimental benchmarks have been published to compare calculated values of absorbed dose to experimentally determined values. However, there is a lack of absolute benchmarks, i.e. benchmarks without involved normalization which may cause some quantities to be cancelled. Therefore, at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt a benchmark experiment was performed, which aimed at the absolute verification of radiation transport calculations for dosimetry in radiation therapy. A thimble-type ionization chamber in a solid phantom was irradiated by high-energy bremsstrahlung and the mean absorbed dose in the sensitive volume was measured per incident electron of the target. The characteristics of the accelerator and experimental setup were precisely determined and the results of a corresponding Monte Carlo simulation with EGSnrc are presented within this study. For a meaningful comparison, an analysis of the uncertainty of the Monte Carlo simulation is necessary. In this study uncertainties with regard to the simulation geometry, the radiation source, transport options of the Monte Carlo code and specific interaction cross sections are investigated, applying the general methodology of the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement. Besides studying the general influence of changes in transport options of the EGSnrc code, uncertainties are analyzed by estimating the sensitivity coefficients of various input quantities in a first step. Secondly, standard uncertainties are assigned to each quantity which are known from the experiment, e.g. uncertainties for geometric dimensions. Data for more fundamental quantities such as photon cross sections and the I-value of electron stopping powers are taken from literature. The significant uncertainty contributions are identified as

  5. Uncertainties in Monte Carlo-based absorbed dose calculations for an experimental benchmark.

    PubMed

    Renner, F; Wulff, J; Kapsch, R-P; Zink, K

    2015-10-01

    There is a need to verify the accuracy of general purpose Monte Carlo codes like EGSnrc, which are commonly employed for investigations of dosimetric problems in radiation therapy. A number of experimental benchmarks have been published to compare calculated values of absorbed dose to experimentally determined values. However, there is a lack of absolute benchmarks, i.e. benchmarks without involved normalization which may cause some quantities to be cancelled. Therefore, at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt a benchmark experiment was performed, which aimed at the absolute verification of radiation transport calculations for dosimetry in radiation therapy. A thimble-type ionization chamber in a solid phantom was irradiated by high-energy bremsstrahlung and the mean absorbed dose in the sensitive volume was measured per incident electron of the target. The characteristics of the accelerator and experimental setup were precisely determined and the results of a corresponding Monte Carlo simulation with EGSnrc are presented within this study. For a meaningful comparison, an analysis of the uncertainty of the Monte Carlo simulation is necessary. In this study uncertainties with regard to the simulation geometry, the radiation source, transport options of the Monte Carlo code and specific interaction cross sections are investigated, applying the general methodology of the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement. Besides studying the general influence of changes in transport options of the EGSnrc code, uncertainties are analyzed by estimating the sensitivity coefficients of various input quantities in a first step. Secondly, standard uncertainties are assigned to each quantity which are known from the experiment, e.g. uncertainties for geometric dimensions. Data for more fundamental quantities such as photon cross sections and the I-value of electron stopping powers are taken from literature. The significant uncertainty contributions are identified as

  6. A Feasibility Study of Fricke Dosimetry as an Absorbed Dose to Water Standard for 192Ir HDR Sources

    PubMed Central

    deAlmeida, Carlos Eduardo; Ochoa, Ricardo; de Lima, Marilene Coelho; David, Mariano Gazineu; Pires, Evandro Jesus; Peixoto, José Guilherme; Salata, Camila; Bernal, Mario Antônio

    2014-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) using 192Ir sources is well accepted as an important treatment option and thus requires an accurate dosimetry standard. However, a dosimetry standard for the direct measurement of the absolute dose to water for this particular source type is currently not available. An improved standard for the absorbed dose to water based on Fricke dosimetry of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources is presented in this study. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate the potential usefulness of the Fricke dosimetry technique for the standardization of the quantity absorbed dose to water for 192Ir sources. A molded, double-walled, spherical vessel for water containing the Fricke solution was constructed based on the Fricke system. The authors measured the absorbed dose to water and compared it with the doses calculated using the AAPM TG-43 report. The overall combined uncertainty associated with the measurements using Fricke dosimetry was 1.4% for k = 1, which is better than the uncertainties reported in previous studies. These results are promising; hence, the use of Fricke dosimetry to measure the absorbed dose to water as a standard for HDR 192Ir may be possible in the future. PMID:25521914

  7. A feasibility study of Fricke dosimetry as an absorbed dose to water standard for 192Ir HDR sources.

    PubMed

    deAlmeida, Carlos Eduardo; Ochoa, Ricardo; Lima, Marilene Coelho de; David, Mariano Gazineu; Pires, Evandro Jesus; Peixoto, José Guilherme; Salata, Camila; Bernal, Mario Antônio

    2014-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) using 192Ir sources is well accepted as an important treatment option and thus requires an accurate dosimetry standard. However, a dosimetry standard for the direct measurement of the absolute dose to water for this particular source type is currently not available. An improved standard for the absorbed dose to water based on Fricke dosimetry of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources is presented in this study. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate the potential usefulness of the Fricke dosimetry technique for the standardization of the quantity absorbed dose to water for 192Ir sources. A molded, double-walled, spherical vessel for water containing the Fricke solution was constructed based on the Fricke system. The authors measured the absorbed dose to water and compared it with the doses calculated using the AAPM TG-43 report. The overall combined uncertainty associated with the measurements using Fricke dosimetry was 1.4% for k = 1, which is better than the uncertainties reported in previous studies. These results are promising; hence, the use of Fricke dosimetry to measure the absorbed dose to water as a standard for HDR 192Ir may be possible in the future. PMID:25521914

  8. Assessment of personnel absorbed dose at production of medical radioisotopes by a cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Sadat-Eshkevar, S M; Karimian, A; Mirzaee, M

    2011-09-01

    The medical radioisotope (201)Tl is produced by a cyclotron through the (203)Tl(p, 3n)(201)Pb reaction in the nuclear medicine research group of Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research Schools in Iran. The produced (201)Pb decays to (201)Tl by electron capture. One of the most important problems that may occur is malfunction of a part of target or beam line, so that it needs the bombardment to be stopped and the problem fixed. In this work, induced radioactivity of the target, aluminium case of target, beam line and concrete walls of the thallium target room were calculated by Monte Carlo method. Then by using the results of the Monte Carlo simulation, the whole body absorbed dose to cyclotron personnel during repair and after stopping the bombardment, were assessed at different places of target room.

  9. Estimation of Organ Absorbed Doses in Patients from 99mTc-diphosphonate Using the Data of MIRDose Software

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Cheki, Mohsen; Moslehi, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare estimation of radiation absorbed doses to patients following bone scans with technetium-99m-labeled methylene diphosphonate (MDP) with the estimates given in MIRDose software. In this study, each patient was injected 25 mCi of 99mTc-MDP. Whole-body images from thirty patients were acquired by gamma camera at 10, 60, 90, 180 minutes after 99mTc-MDP injection. To determine the amount of activity in each organ, conjugate view method was applied on images. MIRD equation was then used to estimate absorbed doses in different organs of patients. At the end, absorbed dose values obtained in this study were compared with the data of MIRDose software. The absorbed doses per unit of injected activity (mGy/MBq × 10–4) for liver, kidneys, bladder wall and spleen were 3.86 ± 1.1, 38.73 ± 4.7, 4.16 ± 1.8 and 3.91 ± 1.3, respectively. The results of this study may be useful to estimate the amount of activity that can be administered to the patient and also showed that methods used in the study for absorbed dose calculation is in good agreement with the data of MIRDose software and it is possible to use by a clinician. PMID:23724374

  10. Response functions for computing absorbed dose to skeletal tissues from neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Amir A.; Johnson, Perry; Jokisch, Derek W.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-11-01

    Spongiosa in the adult human skeleton consists of three tissues—active marrow (AM), inactive marrow (IM) and trabecularized mineral bone (TB). AM is considered to be the target tissue for assessment of both long-term leukemia risk and acute marrow toxicity following radiation exposure. The total shallow marrow (TM50), defined as all tissues lying within the first 50 µm of the bone surfaces, is considered to be the radiation target tissue of relevance for radiogenic bone cancer induction. For irradiation by sources external to the body, kerma to homogeneous spongiosa has been used as a surrogate for absorbed dose to both of these tissues, as direct dose calculations are not possible using computational phantoms with homogenized spongiosa. Recent micro-CT imaging of a 40 year old male cadaver has allowed for the accurate modeling of the fine microscopic structure of spongiosa in many regions of the adult skeleton (Hough et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 2309-46). This microstructure, along with associated masses and tissue compositions, was used to compute specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values for protons originating in axial and appendicular bone sites (Jokisch et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 6857-72). These proton SAFs, bone masses, tissue compositions and proton production cross sections, were subsequently used to construct neutron dose-response functions (DRFs) for both AM and TM50 targets in each bone of the reference adult male. Kerma conditions were assumed for other resultant charged particles. For comparison, AM, TM50 and spongiosa kerma coefficients were also calculated. At low incident neutron energies, AM kerma coefficients for neutrons correlate well with values of the AM DRF, while total marrow (TM) kerma coefficients correlate well with values of the TM50 DRF. At high incident neutron energies, all kerma coefficients and DRFs tend to converge as charged-particle equilibrium is established across the bone site. In the range of 10 eV to 100 Me

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Radiation-Absorbed Dose Estimation of {sup 166}Ho Microspheres in Liver Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Seevinck, Peter R.; Maat, Gerrit H. van de; Wit, Tim C. de; Vente, Maarten A.D.; Nijsen, Johannes F.W.; Bakker, Chris J.G.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for accurate assessment of the three-dimensional {sup 166}Ho activity distribution to estimate radiation-absorbed dose distributions in {sup 166}Ho-loaded poly (L-lactic acid) microsphere ({sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS) liver radioembolization. Methods and Materials: MRI, computed tomography (CT), and single photon emission CT (SPECT) experiments were conducted on an anthropomorphic gel phantom with tumor-simulating gel samples and on an excised human tumor-bearing liver, both containing known amounts of {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS. Three-dimensional radiation-absorbed dose distributions were estimated at the voxel level by convolving the {sup 166}Ho activity distribution, derived from quantitative MRI data, with a {sup 166}Ho dose point-kernel generated by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code) and from Medical Internal Radiation Dose Pamphlet 17. MRI-based radiation-absorbed dose distributions were qualitatively compared with CT and autoradiography images and quantitatively compared with SPECT-based dose distributions. Both MRI- and SPECT-based activity estimations were validated against dose calibrator measurements. Results: Evaluation on an anthropomorphic phantom showed that MRI enables accurate assessment of local {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS mass and activity distributions, as supported by a regression coefficient of 1.05 and a correlation coefficient of 0.99, relating local MRI-based mass and activity calculations to reference values obtained with a dose calibrator. Estimated MRI-based radiation-absorbed dose distributions of {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS in an ex vivo human liver visually showed high correspondence to SPECT-based radiation-absorbed dose distributions. Quantitative analysis revealed that the differences in local and total amounts of {sup 166}Ho-PLLA-MS estimated by MRI, SPECT, and the dose calibrator were within 10%. Excellent agreement was observed between MRI- and SPECT-based dose

  12. Monte Carlo Analysis of Pion Contribution to Absorbed Dose from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aghara, S.K.; Battnig, S.R.; Norbury, J.W.; Singleterry, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the physics of interaction, particle production and transport is necessary to estimate the radiation damage to equipment used on spacecraft and the biological effects of space radiation. For long duration astronaut missions, both on the International Space Station and the planned manned missions to Moon and Mars, the shielding strategy must include a comprehensive knowledge of the secondary radiation environment. The distribution of absorbed dose and dose equivalent is a function of the type, energy and population of these secondary products. Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) comprised of protons and heavier nuclei have energies from a few MeV per nucleon to the ZeV region, with the spectra reaching flux maxima in the hundreds of MeV range. Therefore, the MeV - GeV region is most important for space radiation. Coincidentally, the pion production energy threshold is about 280 MeV. The question naturally arises as to how important these particles are with respect to space radiation problems. The space radiation transport code, HZETRN (High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport), currently used by NASA, performs neutron, proton and heavy ion transport explicitly, but it does not take into account the production and transport of mesons, photons and leptons. In this paper, we present results from the Monte Carlo code MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended), showing the effect of leptons and mesons when they are produced and transported in a GCR environment.

  13. Monte Carlo analysis of pion contribution to absorbed dose from Galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghara, S. K.; Blattnig, S. R.; Norbury, J. W.; Singleterry, R. C.

    2009-04-01

    Accurate knowledge of the physics of interaction, particle production and transport is necessary to estimate the radiation damage to equipment used on spacecraft and the biological effects of space radiation. For long duration astronaut missions, both on the International Space Station and the planned manned missions to Moon and Mars, the shielding strategy must include a comprehensive knowledge of the secondary radiation environment. The distribution of absorbed dose and dose equivalent is a function of the type, energy and population of these secondary products. Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) comprised of protons and heavier nuclei have energies from a few MeV per nucleon to the ZeV region, with the spectra reaching flux maxima in the hundreds of MeV range. Therefore, the MeV-GeV region is most important for space radiation. Coincidentally, the pion production energy threshold is about 280 MeV. The question naturally arises as to how important these particles are with respect to space radiation problems. The space radiation transport code, HZETRN (High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport), currently used by NASA, performs neutron, proton and heavy ion transport explicitly, but it does not take into account the production and transport of mesons, photons and leptons. In this paper, we present results from the Monte Carlo code MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended), showing the effect of leptons and mesons when they are produced and transported in a GCR environment.

  14. Study of natural radionuclide and absorbed gamma dose in Ukhimath area of Garhwal Himalaya, India.

    PubMed

    Rautela, B S; Yadav, M; Bourai, A A; Joshi, V; Gusain, G S; Ramola, R C

    2012-11-01

    Natural radiation is the largest contributor to the collective radiation dose of the world population. It is widely distributed in different geological formations such as soil, rocks, air and groundwater. In the present investigation, (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were measured in soil samples of the Ukhimath region of Garhwal Himalaya, India using NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectrometry. The activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K were found to vary from 38.4 ± 6.1 to 141.7 ± 11.9 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 80.5 Bq kg(-1), 57.0 ± 7.5 to 155.9 ± 12.4 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 118.9 Bq kg(-1) and 9.0 ± 3.0 to 672.8 ± 25.9 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 341 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The total absorbed gamma dose rate varies from 70.4 to 169.1 nGy h(-1) with an average of 123.4 nGy h(-1). This study is important to generate a baseline data of radiation exposure in the area. Health hazard effects due to natural radiation exposure are discussed in details.

  15. Dependence of TLD thermoluminescence yield on absorbed dose in a thermal neutron field.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, G; Roy, M S

    1997-01-01

    The emission from 6LiF and 7LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) exposed to the mixed field of thermal neutrons and gamma-rays of the thermal facility of a TRIGA MARK II nuclear reactor has been investigated for various thermal neutron fluences of the order of magnitude of those utilised in radiotherapy, with the purpose of investigating the reliability of TLD readouts in such radiation fields and of giving some information for better obtainment of the absorbed dose values. The emission after exposure in this mixed field is compared with the emission after gamma-rays only. The glow curves have been deconvoluted into gaussian peaks, and the differences in the characteristics of the peaks observed for the two radiation fields, having different linear energy transfers, and for different doses are shown. Irreversible radiation damage in dosimeters having high sensitivity to thermal neutrons is also reported, showing a memory effect of the previous thermal neutron irradiation history which is not restored by anneal treatment. PMID:9463872

  16. Analysis of the Body Distribution of Absorbed Dose in the Organs of Three Species of Fish from Sepetiba Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Wagner de S; Kelecom, Alphonse; Santos Gouvea, Rita de Cassia dos; Azevedo Py Junior, Delcy de

    2008-08-07

    The body distribution of Polonium-210 in three fishes from the Sepetiba Bay (Macrodon ancylodon, Micropogonias furnieri and Mugil curema) has been studied under the approach of the Department of Energy of the United States of America (DOE) that set the limit of absorbed dose rate in biota equal to 3.5x10{sup 3} {mu}Gy/y, and that also established the relation between dose rate (D) and radionuclide concentration (c) on a fish muscle fresh weight basis, as follows: D = 5.05 ExNxC, assuming that the radionuclide distribution is homogenous among organs. Two hypotheses were tested here, using statistical tools: 1) is the body distribution of absorbed dose homogenous among organs? and 2) is the body distribution of absorbed dose identical among studied fishes? It was concluded, as expected, that the distribution among organs is heterogeneous; but, unexpectedly, that the three fishes display identical body distribution pattern, although they belong to different trophic levels. Hence, concerning absorbed dose calculation, the statement that data distribution is homogenous must be understood merely as an approximation, at least in the case of Polonium-210.

  17. Computational Modeling of Cellular Effects Post-Irradiation with Low- and High-Let Particles and Different Absorbed Doses

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Adriana Alexandre S.; Tavares, João Manuel R. S.

    2013-01-01

    The use of computational methods to improve the understanding of biological responses to various types of radiation is an approach where multiple parameters can be modelled and a variety of data is generated. This study compares cellular effects modelled for low absorbed doses against high absorbed doses. The authors hypothesized that low and high absorbed doses would contribute to cell killing via different mechanisms, potentially impacting on targeted tumour radiotherapy outcomes. Cellular kinetics following irradiation with selective low- and high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles were investigated using the Virtual Cell (VC) radiobiology algorithm. Two different cell types were assessed using the VC radiobiology algorithm: human fibroblasts and human crypt cells. The results showed that at lower doses (0.01 to 0.2 Gy), all radiation sources used were equally able to induce cell death (p>0.05, ANOVA). On the other hand, at higher doses (1.0 to 8.0 Gy), the radiation response was LET and dose dependent (p<0.05, ANOVA). The data obtained suggests that the computational methods used might provide some insight into the cellular effects following irradiation. The results also suggest that it may be necessary to re-evaluate cellular radiation-induced effects, particularly at low doses that could affect therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:23930101

  18. Transcriptional Response in Mouse Thyroid Tissue after 211At Administration: Effects of Absorbed Dose, Initial Dose-Rate and Time after Administration

    PubMed Central

    Rudqvist, Nils; Spetz, Johan; Schüler, Emil; Parris, Toshima Z.; Langen, Britta; Helou, Khalil; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Background 211At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals are potentially useful for tumor therapy. However, a limitation has been the preferential accumulation of released 211At in the thyroid gland, which is a critical organ for such therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of absorbed dose, dose-rate, and time after 211At exposure on genome-wide transcriptional expression in mouse thyroid gland. Methods BALB/c mice were i.v. injected with 1.7, 7.5 or 100 kBq 211At. Animals injected with 1.7 kBq were killed after 1, 6, or 168 h with mean thyroid absorbed doses of 0.023, 0.32, and 1.8 Gy, respectively. Animals injected with 7.5 and 100 kBq were killed after 6 and 1 h, respectively; mean thyroid absorbed dose was 1.4 Gy. Total RNA was extracted from pooled thyroids and the Illumina RNA microarray platform was used to determine mRNA levels. Differentially expressed transcripts and enriched GO terms were determined with adjusted p-value <0.01 and fold change >1.5, and p-value <0.05, respectively. Results In total, 1232 differentially expressed transcripts were detected after 211At administration, demonstrating a profound effect on gene regulation. The number of regulated transcripts increased with higher initial dose-rate/absorbed dose at 1 or 6 h. However, the number of regulated transcripts decreased with mean absorbed dose/time after 1.7 kBq 211At administration. Furthermore, similar regulation profiles were seen for groups administered 1.7 kBq. Interestingly, few previously proposed radiation responsive genes were detected in the present study. Regulation of immunological processes were prevalent at 1, 6, and 168 h after 1.7 kBq administration (0.023, 0.32, 1.8 Gy). PMID:26177204

  19. Proton and photon absorbed-dose conversion coefficients for embryo and foetus from top-down irradiation geometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing

    2007-01-01

    Absorbed-dose conversion coefficients are calculated for the embryo of 8 weeks and the foetus of 3, 6 or 9 months when the mother's body is exposed to protons and photons from top-down (TOP) direction. It provides data sets in addition to other standard irradiation geometries published previously. The TOP-irradiation geometry is considered here, because high-energy particles are often peaked from the TOP direction onboard aircrafts. The results show that absorbed-doses from high-energy particles could be underestimated significantly if isotropic (ISO) irradiation geometry is assumed. For protons of 100 GeV, absorbed-doses from TOP irradiation are approximately 2.3-2.9 times higher than the doses from ISO irradiation for different foetal ages. For 10 GeV photons, foetal doses from TOP irradiation are approximately 6.8-12 times higher than the doses from ISO irradiation. The coefficients from TOP-irradiation geometry are given in wide energy ranges, from 100 MeV to 100 GeV for protons and from 50 keV to 10 GeV for photons. They can, therefore, be used in various applications whenever exposure from the TOP-irradiation direction is concerned.

  20. Visible photoluminescence of color centers in LiF crystals for absorbed dose evaluation in clinical dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal-Barajas, J. E.; Piccinini, M.; Vincenti, M. A.; Bonfigli, F.; Khan, R. F.; Montereali, R. M.

    2015-04-01

    Among insulating materials, lithium fluoride (LiF) has been successfully used as ionizing radiation dosemeter for more than 60 years. Thermoluminescence (TL) has been the most commonly used reading technique to evaluate the absorbed dose. Lately, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) of visible emitting color centers (CCs) has also been explored in pure and doped LiF. This work focuses on the experimental behaviour of nominally pure LiF crystals dosemeters for 6 MV x rays at low doses based on photoluminescence (PL) of radiation induced CCs. Polished LiF crystals were irradiated using 6 MV x rays produced by a clinical linear accelerator. The doses (absorbed dose to water) covered the 1-100 Gy range. Optical absorption spectra show stable formation of primary F defects up to a maximum concentration of 2×1016 cm-3, while no significant M absorption band at around 450 nm was detected. On the other hand, under Argon laser excitation at 458 nm, PL spectra of the irradiated LiF crystals clearly exhibited the characteristic F2 and F+3 visible broad emission bands. Their sum intensity is linearly proportional to the absorbed dose in the investigated range. PL integrated intensity was also measured using a conventional fluorescence optical microscope under blue lamp illumination. The relationship between the absorbed dose and the integrated F2 and F+3 PL intensities, represented by the net average pixel number in the optical fluorescence images, is also fairly linear. Even at the low point defect densities obtained at the investigated doses, these preliminary experimental results are encouraging for further investigation of CCs PL in LiF crystals for clinical dosimetry.

  1. An estimate by two methods of thyroid absorbed doses due to BRAVO fallout in several northern Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Musolino, S.V.; Hull, A.P.; Greenhouse, N.A.

    1997-10-01

    Estimates of the thyroid absorbed doses due to fallout originating from the 1 March 1954 BRAVO thermonuclear test on Bikini Atoll have been made for several inhabited locations in the Northern Marshall Islands. Rongelap, Utirik, Rongerik and Ailinginae Atolls were also inhabited on 1 March 1954, where retrospective thyroid absorbed doses have previously been reconstructed. Current estimates are based primarily on external exposure data, which were recorded shortly after each nuclear test in the Castle Series, and secondarily on soil concentrations of {sup 137}Cs in samples collected in 1978 and 1988, along with aerial monitoring done in 1978. External exposures and {sup 137}Cs Soil concentrations were representative of the atmospheric transport and deposition patterns of the entire Castle Series tests and show that the BRAVO test was the major contributor to fallout exposure during the Castle series and other test series which were carried out in the Marshall Islands. These data have been used as surrogates for fission product radioiodines and telluriums in order to estimate the range of thyroid absorbed doses that may have occurred throughout the Marshall Islands. Dosimetry based on these two sets of estimates agreed within a factor of 4 at the locations where BRAVO was the dominant contributor to the total exposure and deposition. Both methods indicate that thyroid absorbed doses in the range of 1 Gy (100 rad) may have been incurred in some of the northern locations, whereas the doses at southern locations did not significantly exceed levels comparable to those from worldwide fallout. The results of these estimates indicate that a systematic medical survey for thyroid disease should be conducted, and that a more definitive dose reconstruction should be made for all the populated atolls and islands in the Northern Marshall Islands beyond Rongelap, Utirik, Rongerik and Ailinginae, which were significantly contaminated by BRAVO fallout. 30 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. Secondary neutron dose measurement for proton eye treatment using an eye snout with a borated neutron absorber

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We measured and assessed ways to reduce the secondary neutron dose from a system for proton eye treatment. Methods Proton beams of 60.30 MeV were delivered through an eye-treatment snout in passive scattering mode. Allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39) etch detectors were used to measure the neutron dose in the external field at 0.00, 1.64, and 6.00 cm depths in a water phantom. Secondary neutron doses were measured and compared between those with and without a high-hydrogen–boron-containing block. In addition, the neutron energy and vertices distribution were obtained by using a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation. Results The ratio of the maximum neutron dose equivalent to the proton absorbed dose (H(10)/D) at 2.00 cm from the beam field edge was 8.79 ± 1.28 mSv/Gy. The ratio of the neutron dose equivalent to the proton absorbed dose with and without a high hydrogen-boron containing block was 0.63 ± 0.06 to 1.15 ± 0.13 mSv/Gy at 2.00 cm from the edge of the field at depths of 0.00, 1.64, and 6.00 cm. Conclusions We found that the out-of-field secondary neutron dose in proton eye treatment with an eye snout is relatively small, and it can be further reduced by installing a borated neutron absorbing material. PMID:23866307

  3. Determination of the Absorbed Dose Rate to Water for the 18-mm Helmet of a Gamma Knife

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hyun-Tai; Park, Youngho; Hyun, Sangil; Choi, Yongsoo; Kim, Gi Hong; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chun, Kook Jin

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To measure the absorbed dose rate to water of {sup 60}Co gamma rays of a Gamma Knife Model C using water-filled phantoms (WFP). Methods and Materials: Spherical WFP with an equivalent water depth of 5, 7, 8, and 9 cm were constructed. The dose rates at the center of an 18-mm helmet were measured in an 8-cm WFP (WFP-3) and two plastic phantoms. Two independent measurement systems were used: one was calibrated to an air kerma (Set I) and the other was calibrated to the absorbed dose to water (Set II). The dose rates of WFP-3 and the plastic phantoms were converted to dose rates for an 8-cm water depth using the attenuation coefficient and the equivalent water depths. Results: The dose rate measured at the center of WFP-3 using Set II was 2.2% and 1.0% higher than dose rates measured at the center of the two plastic phantoms. The measured effective attenuation coefficient of Gamma Knife photon beam in WFPs was 0.0621 cm{sup -1}. After attenuation correction, the difference between the dose rate at an 8-cm water depth measured in WFP-3 and dose rates in the plastic phantoms was smaller than the uncertainty of the measurements. Conclusions: Systematic errors related to the characteristics of the phantom materials in the dose rate measurement of a Gamma Knife need to be corrected for. Correction of the dose rate using an equivalent water depth and attenuation provided results that were more consistent.

  4. Calculation of Absorbed Dose in Target Tissue and Equivalent Dose in Sensitive Tissues of Patients Treated by BNCT Using MCNP4C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamani, M.; Kasesaz, Y.; Khalafi, H.; Pooya, S. M. Hosseini

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is used for treatment of many diseases, including brain tumors, in many medical centers. In this method, a target area (e.g., head of patient) is irradiated by some optimized and suitable neutron fields such as research nuclear reactors. Aiming at protection of healthy tissues which are located in the vicinity of irradiated tissue, and based on the ALARA principle, it is required to prevent unnecessary exposure of these vital organs. In this study, by using numerical simulation method (MCNP4C Code), the absorbed dose in target tissue and the equiavalent dose in different sensitive tissues of a patiant treated by BNCT, are calculated. For this purpose, we have used the parameters of MIRD Standard Phantom. Equiavelent dose in 11 sensitive organs, located in the vicinity of target, and total equivalent dose in whole body, have been calculated. The results show that the absorbed dose in tumor and normal tissue of brain equal to 30.35 Gy and 0.19 Gy, respectively. Also, total equivalent dose in 11 sensitive organs, other than tumor and normal tissue of brain, is equal to 14 mGy. The maximum equivalent doses in organs, other than brain and tumor, appear to the tissues of lungs and thyroid and are equal to 7.35 mSv and 3.00 mSv, respectively.

  5. Absorbed dose measurements for kV-cone beam computed tomography in image-guided radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hioki, Kazunari; Araki, Fujio; Ohno, Takeshi; Nakaguchi, Yuji; Tomiyama, Yuuki

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we develope a novel method to directly evaluate an absorbed dose-to-water for kilovoltage-cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Absorbed doses for the kV-CBCT systems of the Varian On-Board Imager (OBI) and the Elekta X-ray Volumetric Imager (XVI) were measured by a Farmer ionization chamber with a 60Co calibration factor. The chamber measurements were performed at the center and four peripheral points in body-type (30 cm diameter and 51 cm length) and head-type (16 cm diameter and 33 cm length) cylindrical water phantoms. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water by using a 60Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo (MC)-calculated beam quality conversion factor, kQ, for 60Co to kV-CBCT. The irradiation for OBI and XVI was performed with pelvis and head modes for the body- and the head-type phantoms, respectively. In addition, the dose distributions in the phantom for both kV-CBCT systems were calculated with MC method and were compared with measured values. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated at the center in the water phantom and compared with measured doses at four peripheral points. The measured absorbed doses at the center in the body-type phantom were 1.96 cGy for OBI and 0.83 cGy for XVI. The peripheral doses were 2.36-2.90 cGy for OBI and 0.83-1.06 cGy for XVI. The doses for XVI were lower up to approximately one-third of those for OBI. Similarly, the measured doses at the center in the head-type phantom were 0.48 cGy for OBI and 0.21 cGy for XVI. The peripheral doses were 0.26-0.66 cGy for OBI and 0.16-0.30 cGy for XVI. The calculated peripheral doses agreed within 3% in the pelvis mode and within 4% in the head mode with measured doses for both kV-CBCT systems. In addition, the absorbed dose determined in this study was approximately 4% lower than that in TG-61 but the absorbed dose by both methods was in agreement within their combined

  6. Influence of lead apron shielding on absorbed doses from panoramic radiography

    PubMed Central

    Rottke, D; Grossekettler, L; Sawada, K; Poxleitner, P; Schulze, D

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the absorbed doses in a full anthropomorphic body phantom from two different panoramic radiography devices, performing protocols with and without applying a lead apron. Methods: A RANDO® full body phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories Inc., Stamford, CT) was equipped with 110 thermoluminescent dosemeters at 55 different sites and set up in two different panoramic radiography devices [SCANORA® three-dimensional (3D) (SOREDEX, Tuusula, Finland) and ProMax® 3D (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland)] and exposed. Two different protocols were performed in the two devices. The first protocol was performed without any lead shielding, whereas the phantom was equipped with a standard adult lead apron for the second protocol. Results: A two-tailed paired samples t-test for the SCANORA 3D revealed that there is no difference between the protocol using lead apron shielding (m = 87.99, s = 102.98) and the protocol without shielding (m = 87.34, s = 107.49), t(54) = −0.313, p > 0.05. The same test for the ProMax 3D showed that there is also no difference between the protocol using shielding (m = 106.48, s = 117.38) and the protocol without shielding (m = 107.75, s = 114,36), t(54) = 0.938, p > 0.05. Conclusions: In conclusion, the results of this study showed no statistically significant differences between a panoramic radiography with or without the use of lead apron shielding. PMID:24174012

  7. Radiation absorbed dose estimates for oxygen-15 radiopharmaceuticals (H2( V)O, C VO, O VO) in newborn infants

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, W.J.; Stabin, M.; Howse, D.; Eichling, J.O.; Herscovitch, P.

    1988-12-01

    In preparation for measurement of regional cerebral oxygen metabolism by positron emission tomography, radiation absorbed dose estimates for 19 internal organs, blood, and total body were calculated for newborn infants following bolus intravenous administration of H2( V)O and brief inhalation of C VO and O VO. Cumulated activity for each radiopharmaceutical was calculated from a compartmental model based on the known biologic behavior of the compound. Values for mean absorbed dose/unit cumulated activity (S) for internal organs and total body were based on a newborn phantom. S was separately calculated for blood. Total radiopharmaceutical absorbed dose estimates necessary to measure cerebral oxygen metabolism in a 3.51-kg infant based on 0.7 mCi/kg H2( V)O and 1 mCi/kg C VO and O VO were determined to be 1.6 rad to the lung (maximum organ dose), 0.28 rad to the marrow, 0.46 rad to the gonads, and 0.22 rad to total body. These values are similar to those for current clinical nuclear medicine procedures employing /sup 99m/Tc in newborn infants.

  8. The PTB primary standard for the absorbed-dose to water for I-125 interstitial brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, T.

    2012-10-01

    The German national metrology institute (PTB) developed a primary standard in terms of absorbed-dose to water Dw for low-energy interstitial brachytherapy sources, which is based on an extrapolation chamber in a phantom of water-equivalent material. The method to determine Dw from extrapolation chamber measurements has been newly developed and is already described in the literature. With the chamber the absorbed-dose at 30 cm distance from the source is measured and the quantity is converted into the desired quantity, the absorbed-dose to water measured at 1 cm distance perpendicular to the source axis. In this paper, a synthesis of the work done within the EMRP Project: ‘TP2.JRP6: Increasing Cancer Treatment Efficacy Using 3D Brachytherapy’ is given and the final results and the final uncertainty budget are presented. Furthermore, an experimentally determined dose-rate constant for this seed type (BEBIG Symmetra I25.S16) is given based on the measurement of four different instances.

  9. Development of a water calorimetry-based standard for absorbed dose to water in HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfehnia, Arman; Seuntjens, Jan

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this article is to develop and evaluate a primary standard for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy based on 4 deg. C stagnant water calorimetry. Methods: The absolute absorbed dose to water was directly measured for several different Nucletron microSelectron {sup 192}Ir sources of air kerma strength ranging between 21 000 and 38 000 U and for source-to-detector separations ranging between 25 and 70 mm. The COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS software was used to accurately calculate the heat transport in a detailed model geometry. Through a coupling of the ''conduction and convection'' module with the ''Navier-Stokes incompressible fluid'' module in the software, both the conductive and convective effects were modeled. Results: A detailed uncertainty analysis resulted in an overall uncertainty in the absorbed dose of 1.90%(1{sigma}). However, this includes a 1.5% uncertainty associated with a nonlinear predrift correction which can be substantially reduced if sufficient time is provided for the system to come to a new equilibrium in between successive calorimetric runs, an opportunity not available to the authors in their clinical setting due to time constraints on the machine. An average normalized dose rate of 361{+-}7 {mu}Gy/(h U) at a source-to-detector separation of 55 mm was measured for the microSelectron {sup 192}Ir source based on water calorimetry. The measured absorbed dose per air kerma strength agreed to better than 0.8%(1{sigma}) with independent ionization chamber and EBT-1 Gafchromic film reference dosimetry as well as with the currently accepted AAPM TG-43 protocol measurements. Conclusions: This work paves the way toward a primary absorbed dose to water standard in {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy.

  10. Direct determination of the absorbed dose to water from 125I low dose-rate brachytherapy seeds using the new absorbed dose primary standard developed at ENEA-INMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toni, M. P.; Pimpinella, M.; Pinto, M.; Quini, M.; Cappadozzi, G.; Silvestri, C.; Bottauscio, O.

    2012-10-01

    Low-intensity radioactive sources emitting low-energy photons are used in the clinic for low dose-rate brachytherapy treatments of tumours. The dosimetry of these sources is based on reference air kerma rate measurements. The absorbed dose rate to water at the reference depth d0 = 1 cm, \\dot {D}_{w,1\\,cm} , is then obtained by a conversion procedure with a large relative standard uncertainty of about 5%. This paper describes a primary standard developed at ENEA-INMRI to directly measure \\dot {D}_{w,1\\,cm} due to LDR sources. The standard is based on a large-angle and variable-volume ionization chamber, embedded in a graphite phantom and operating under ‘wall-less air chamber’ conditions. A set of correction and conversion factors, based on experiments and Monte Carlo simulations, are determined to obtain the value of Dw,1 cm from measurements of increment of ionization current with increasing chamber volume. The relative standard uncertainty on \\dot {D}_{w,1\\,cm} is 2.6%, which is appreciably lower than the current uncertainty. Characteristics of the standard, its associated uncertainty budget, and some experimental results are given for 125I BEBIG I25.S16.C brachytherapy seeds. Finally, results of the experimental determination of the dose-rate constant Λ1 cm, traceable to the Dw,1 cm and the low-energy air kerma ENEA-INMRI standards, are given. The relative standard uncertainty on Λ1 cm is 2.9%, appreciably lower than the typical uncertainty (4.8%) of the values available in the literature.

  11. A dosimetric phantom study of dose accuracy and build-up effects using IMRT and RapidArc in stereotactic irradiation of lung tumours

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Stereotactic lung radiotherapy (SLRT) has emerged as a curative treatment for medically inoperable patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc treatments (VMAT) have been proposed as the best practical approaches for the delivery of SLRT. However, a large number of narrow field shapes are needed in the dose delivery of intensity-modulated techniques and the probability of underdosing the tumour periphery increases as the effective field size is decreased. The purpose of this study was to evaluate small lung tumour doses irradiated by intensity-modulated techniques to understand the risk for dose calculation errors in precision radiotherapy such as SLRT. Materials and methods The study was executed with two heterogeneous phantoms with targets of Ø1.5 and Ø4.0 cm. Dose distributions in the simulated tumours delivered by small sliding window apertures (SWAs), IMRT and RapidArc treatment plans were measured with radiochromic film. Calculation algorithms of pencil beam convolution (PBC) and anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) were used to calculate the corresponding dose distributions. Results Peripheral doses of the tumours were decreased as SWA decreased, which was not modelled by the calculation algorithms. The smallest SWA studied was 2 mm, which reduced the 90% isodose line width by 4.2 mm with the Ø4.0 cm tumour as compared to open field irradiation. PBC was not able to predict the dose accurately as the gamma evaluation failed to meet the criteria of ±3%/±1 mm on average in 61% of the defined volume with the smaller tumour. With AAA the corresponding value was 16%. The dosimetric inaccuracy of AAA was within ±3% with the optimized treatment plans of IMRT and RapidArc. The exception was the clinical RapidArc plan with dose overestimation of 4%. Conclusions Overall, the peripheral doses of the simulated lung tumours were

  12. Linear energy transfer dependence of a normoxic polymer gel dosimeter investigated using proton beam absorbed dose measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, Helen; Bäck, Sven Å. J.; Medin, Joakim; Grusell, Erik; Olsson, Lars E.

    2004-09-01

    Three-dimensional dosimetry with good spatial resolution can be performed using polymer gel dosimetry, which has been investigated for dosimetry of different types of particles. However, there are only sparse data concerning the influence of the linear energy transfer (LET) properties of the radiation on the gel absorbed dose response. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible LET dependence for a polymer gel dosimeter using proton beam absorbed dose measurements. Polymer gel containing the antioxidant tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium (THP) was irradiated with 133 MeV monoenergetic protons, and the gel absorbed dose response was evaluated using MRI. The LET distribution for a monoenergetic proton beam was calculated as a function of depth using the Monte Carlo code PETRA. There was a steep increase in the Monte Carlo calculated LET starting at the depth corresponding to the front edge of the Bragg peak. This increase was closely followed by a decrease in the relative detector sensitivity (Srel = Dgel/Ddiode), indicating that the response of the polymer gel detector was dependent on LET. The relative sensitivity was 0.8 at the Bragg peak, and reached its minimum value at the end of the proton range. No significant effects in the detector response were observed for LET < 4.9 keV µm-1, thus indicating that the behaviour of the polymer gel dosimeter would not be altered for the range of LET values expected in the case of photons or electrons in a clinical range of energies.

  13. Mean Absorbed Dose to the Anal-Sphincter Region and Fecal Leakage among Irradiated Prostate Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Alsadius, David; Hedelin, Maria; Lundstedt, Dan; Pettersson, Niclas; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Steineck, Gunnar

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To supplement previous findings that the absorbed dose of ionizing radiation to the anal sphincter or lower rectum affects the occurrence of fecal leakage among irradiated prostate-cancer survivors. We also wanted to determine whether anatomically defining the anal-sphincter region as the organ at risk could increase the degree of evidence underlying clinical guidelines for restriction doses to eliminate this excess risk. Methods and Materials: We identified 985 men irradiated for prostate cancer between 1993 and 2006. In 2008, we assessed long-term gastrointestinal symptoms among these men using a study-specific questionnaire. We restrict the analysis to the 414 men who had been treated with external beam radiation therapy only (no brachytherapy) to a total dose of 70 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions to the prostate or postoperative prostatic region. On reconstructed original radiation therapy dose plans, we delineated the anal-sphincter region as an organ at risk. Results: We found that the prevalence of long-term fecal leakage at least once per month was strongly correlated with the mean dose to the anal-sphincter region. Examining different dose intervals, we found a large increase at 40 Gy; {>=}40 Gy compared with <40 Gy gave a prevalence ratio of 3.8 (95% confidence interval 1.6-8.6). Conclusions: This long-term study shows that mean absorbed dose to the anal-sphincter region is associated with the occurrence of long-term fecal leakage among irradiated prostate-cancer survivors; delineating the anal-sphincter region separately from the rectum and applying a restriction of a mean dose <40 Gy will, according to our data, reduce the risk considerably.

  14. Simulation studies on the effect of absorbers on dose distribution in rotational radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, T; Bliznakova, K; Malatara, G; Kardamakis, D; Kolitsi, Z; Pallikarakis, N

    2009-12-01

    The effect of cylindrical protector dimensions, material and distance from the source on the dose distribution in rotational radiotherapy was studied to assess the potential protection possibilities of small-sized radiosensitive structures, such as spinal cord. The dose distributions were evaluated in terms of dose at the protected region and surface dose, ratio of the dose at the protected region to the maximum dose, and dose gradient. High-density materials, such as lead, tungsten, gold and cerrobend, along with new polymer-metal composite ones were used in simulation studies, performed by an in-house developed Monte Carlo Radiotherapy Simulator. To ensure correct modeling of the composite materials, simulated attenuation data were verified against experimentally measured data. The dependence of the dose at the protected region from the protector diameter and the field size was established. Protectors of higher density and larger diameter provide not only lower dose at the protected region, but also steeper dose gradient and lower ratio of the dose at the protected region to the treatment dose. For the protection of small structures, high-density protectors placed further from the source allow thicker protectors to be used. The surface dose increases insignificantly for the studied protector-surface distances. The results have shown that shielding properties of composite materials are close to those of lead. PMID:19186088

  15. Reconstruction of Absorbed Doses to Fibroglandular Tissue of the Breast of Women undergoing Mammography (1960 to the Present)

    PubMed Central

    Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Simon, Steven L.; Weinstock, Robert M.; Kwon, Deukwoo; Linet, Martha S.

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of potential benefits versus harms from mammographic examinations as described in the controversial breast cancer screening recommendations of the U.S. Preventive Task Force included limited consideration of absorbed dose to the fibroglandular tissue of the breast (glandular tissue dose), the tissue at risk for breast cancer. Epidemiological studies on cancer risks associated with diagnostic radiological examinations often lack accurate information on glandular tissue dose, and there is a clear need for better estimates of these doses. Our objective was to develop a quantitative summary of glandular tissue doses from mammography by considering sources of variation over time in key parameters including imaging protocols, x-ray target materials, voltage, filtration, incident air kerma, compressed breast thickness, and breast composition. We estimated the minimum, maximum, and mean values for glandular tissue dose for populations of exposed women within 5-year periods from 1960 to the present, with the minimum to maximum range likely including 90% to 95% of the entirety of the dose range from mammography in North America and Europe. Glandular tissue dose from a single view in mammography is presently about 2 mGy, about one-sixth the dose in the 1960s. The ratio of our estimates of maximum to minimum glandular tissue doses for average-size breasts was about 100 in the 1960s compared to a ratio of about 5 in recent years. Findings from our analysis provide quantitative information on glandular tissue doses from mammographic examinations which can be used in epidemiologic studies of breast cancer. PMID:21988547

  16. Mars base buildup scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Blacic, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Two surface base build-up scenarios are presented in order to help visualize the mission and to serve as a basis for trade studies. In the first scenario, direct manned landings on the Martian surface occur early in the missions and scientific investigation is the main driver and rationale. In the second scenario, early development of an infrastructure to exploite the volatile resources of the Martian moons for economic purposes is emphasized. Scientific exploration of the surface is delayed at first, but once begun develops rapidly aided by the presence of a permanently manned orbital station.

  17. Mars base buildup scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacic, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    Two Mars surface based build-up scenarios are presented in order to help visualize the mission and to serve as a basis for trade studies. In the first scenario, direct manned landings on the Martian surface occur early in the missions and scientific investigation is the main driver and rationale. In the second senario, Earth development of an infrastructure to exploit the volatile resources of the Martian moons for economic purposes is emphasized. Scientific exploration of the surface is delayed at first in this scenario relative to the first, but once begun develops rapidly, aided by the presence of a permanently manned orbital station.

  18. Depth dependence of absorbed dose, dose equivalent and linear energy transfer spectra of galactic and trapped particles in polyethylene and comparison with calculations of models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    A matched set of five tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs), embedded at the centers of 0 (bare), 3, 5, 8 and 12-inch-diameter polyethylene spheres, were flown on the Shuttle flight STS-81 (inclination 51.65 degrees, altitude approximately 400 km). The data obtained were separated into contributions from trapped protons and galactic cosmic radiation (GCR). From the measured linear energy transfer (LET) spectra, the absorbed dose and dose-equivalent rates were calculated. The results were compared to calculations made with the radiation transport model HZETRN/NUCFRG2, using the GCR free-space spectra, orbit-averaged geomagnetic transmission function and Shuttle shielding distributions. The comparison shows that the model fits the dose rates to a root mean square (rms) error of 5%, and dose-equivalent rates to an rms error of 10%. Fairly good agreement between the LET spectra was found; however, differences are seen at both low and high LET. These differences can be understood as due to the combined effects of chord-length variation and detector response function. These results rule out a number of radiation transport/nuclear fragmentation models. Similar comparisons of trapped-proton dose rates were made between calculations made with the proton transport model BRYNTRN using the AP-8 MIN trapped-proton model and Shuttle shielding distributions. The predictions of absorbed dose and dose-equivalent rates are fairly good. However, the prediction of the LET spectra below approximately 30 keV/microm shows the need to improve the AP-8 model. These results have strong implications for shielding requirements for an interplanetary manned mission.

  19. Absorbed dose to man from the Se-75 labeled conjugated bile salt SeHCAT: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Soundy, R.G.; Simpson, J.D.; Ross, H.M.; Merrick, M.V.

    1982-02-01

    The absorbed radiation dose that would result from the oral or intravenous administration of SeHCAT (23-(75Se)selena-25-homotaurocholate) has been calculated using the MIRD tables and formulas and data from measurements of whole-body distribution and from long-term whole-body counting in rats, mice, and man. When SeHCAT is administered to normal subjects, the gallbladder is the critical organ, receiving 12 mrad (oral dose) or 22 mrad (i.v.) per microcurie. The whole-body dose is 1 mrad/microCi, whatever the route of administration. In severe hepatic failure the liver might receive 200 mrad/microCi. The activity likely to be used in routine clinical practice is 10 microCi. Where a whole-body counter is used, an activity of 1 microCi has proved adequate. Even at an administered activity of 25 microCi, the absorbed dose is small compared with established techniques of investigating the gastrointestinal tract.

  20. Absorbed dose to man from the Se-75 labeled conjugated bile salt SeHCAT: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Soundy, R.G.; Simpson, J.D.; Ross, H.M.; Merrick, M.V.

    1982-02-01

    The absorbed radiation dose that would result from the oral or intravenous administration of SeHCAT (23-(/sup 75/Se)selena-25-homotaurocholate) has been calculated using the MIRD tables and formulas and data from measurements of whole-body distribution and from long-term whole-body counting in rats, mice, and man. When SeHCAT is administered to normal subjects, the gallbladder is the critical organ, receiving 12 mrad (oral dose) or 22 mrad (i.v.) per microcurie. The whole-body dose is 1 mrad/..mu..Ci, whatever the route of administration. In severe hepatic failure the liver might receive 200 mrad/..mu..Ci. The activity likely to be used in routine clinical practice is 10 ..mu..Ci. Where a whole-body counter is used, an activity of 1 ..mu..Ci has proved adequate. Even at an administered activity of 25 ..mu..Ci, the absorbed dose is small compared with established techniques of investigating the gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Comparison of mathematical models for red marrow and blood absorbed dose estimation in the radioiodine treatment of advanced differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranti, A.; Giostra, A.; Richetta, E.; Gino, E.; Pellerito, R. E.; Stasi, M.

    2015-02-01

    Metastatic and recurrent differentiated thyroid carcinoma is preferably treated with 131I, whose administered activity is limited by red marrow (RM) toxicity, originally correlated by Benua to a blood absorbed dose higher than 2 Gy. Afterward a variety of dosimetric approaches has been proposed. The aim of this work is to compare the results of the Benua formula with the ones of other three blood and RM absorbed dose formulae. Materials and methods have been borrowed by the dosimetric protocol of the Italian Internal Dosimetry group and adapted to the routine of our centre. Wilcoxon t-tests and percentage differences have been applied for comparison purposes. Results are significantly different (p < 0.05) from each other, with an average percentage difference between Benua versus other results of -22%. The dosimetric formula applied to determine blood or RM absorbed dose may contribute significantly to increase heterogeneity in absorbed dose and dose-response results. Standardization should be a major objective.

  2. On the suitability of ultrathin detectors for absorbed dose assessment in the presence of high-density heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Bueno, M. Duch, M. A.; Carrasco, P.; Jornet, N.; Muñoz-Montplet, C.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of several detectors for the determination of absorbed dose in bone. Methods: Three types of ultrathin LiF-based thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs)—two LiF:Mg,Cu,P-based (MCP-Ns and TLD-2000F) and a{sup 7}Li-enriched LiF:Mg,Ti-based (MTS-7s)—as well as EBT2 Gafchromic films were used to measure percentage depth-dose distributions (PDDs) in a water-equivalent phantom with a bone-equivalent heterogeneity for 6 and 18 MV and a set of field sizes ranging from 5×5 cm{sup 2} to 20×20 cm{sup 2}. MCP-Ns, TLD-2000F, MTS-7s, and EBT2 have active layers of 50, 20, 50, and 30 μm, respectively. Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations (PENELOPE code) were used as the reference and helped to understand the experimental results and to evaluate the potential perturbation of the fluence in bone caused by the presence of the detectors. The energy dependence and linearity of the TLDs’ response was evaluated. Results: TLDs exhibited flat energy responses (within 2.5%) and linearity with dose (within 1.1%) within the range of interest for the selected beams. The results revealed that all considered detectors perturb the electron fluence with respect to the energy inside the bone-equivalent material. MCP-Ns and MTS-7s underestimated the absorbed dose in bone by 4%–5%. EBT2 exhibited comparable accuracy to MTS-7s and MCP-Ns. TLD-2000F was able to determine the dose within 2% accuracy. No dependence on the beam energy or field size was observed. The MC calculations showed that a50 μm thick detector can provide reliable dose estimations in bone regardless of whether it is made of LiF, water or EBT’s active layer material. Conclusions: TLD-2000F was found to be suitable for providing reliable absorbed dose measurements in the presence of bone for high-energy x-ray beams.

  3. Monte Carlo calculations and measurements of absorbed dose per monitor unit for the treatment of uveal melanoma with proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Nicholas; Newhauser, Wayne D; Titt, Uwe; Gombos, Dan; Coombes, Kevin; Starkschall, George

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of uveal melanoma with proton radiotherapy has provided excellent clinical outcomes. However, contemporary treatment planning systems use simplistic dose algorithms that limit the accuracy of relative dose distributions. Further, absolute predictions of absorbed dose per monitor unit are not yet available in these systems. The purpose of this study was to determine if Monte Carlo methods could predict dose per monitor unit (D/MU) value at the center of a proton spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) to within 1% on measured values for a variety of treatment fields relevant to ocular proton therapy. The MCNPX Monte Carlo transport code, in combination with realistic models for the ocular beam delivery apparatus and a water phantom, was used to calculate dose distributions and D/MU values, which were verified by the measurements. Measured proton beam data included central-axis depth dose profiles, relative cross-field profiles and absolute D/MU measurements under several combinations of beam penetration ranges and range-modulation widths. The Monte Carlo method predicted D/MU values that agreed with measurement to within 1% and dose profiles that agreed with measurement to within 3% of peak dose or within 0.5 mm distance-to-agreement. Lastly, a demonstration of the clinical utility of this technique included calculations of dose distributions and D/MU values in a realistic model of the human eye. It is possible to predict D/MU values accurately for clinical relevant range-modulated proton beams for ocular therapy using the Monte Carlo method. It is thus feasible to use the Monte Carlo method as a routine absolute dose algorithm for ocular proton therapy. PMID:18367789

  4. Spatial variations in natural background radiation: absorbed dose rates in air in Colorado.

    PubMed

    Stone, J M; Whicker, R D; Ibrahim, S A; Whicker, F W

    1999-05-01

    Large and small-scale spatial variations in natural ambient background radiation dose rates in Colorado were investigated at 1,150 specific locations with particular attention to 40 of the more populated areas along the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. Total dose rates (including cosmic and terrestrial components) in Front Range communities below 2,000 m elevation averaged 135 nGy h(-1). Terrestrial dose rates had a coefficient of variation of 17%. Communities above 2,000 m had a mean total dose rate of 196 nGy h(-1), and a terrestrial dose rate coefficient of variation of 17%. Across all Front Range communities, the coefficient of variation for terrestrial dose rates was 22%. Within individual communities, coefficient of variation values for terrestrial dose rates ranged from 3 to 21%. Smaller-scale spatial variability (to within a few meters) was relatively small (coefficient of variation values generally ranged from 3 to 7%). A significant linear relationship (r2 = 0.83) between the size of area surveyed (km2) and coefficient of variation value for terrestrial dose rates was found. West of the Continental Divide, the terrestrial component accounted for roughly 60% of total measured dose rates, while east of the Continental Divide, where enriched granitic source rocks and associated soils are prevalent, the terrestrial component generally accounted for two-thirds or more of total dose rates. PMID:10201565

  5. Multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-76: relationship to radiation dose absorbed by marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimaru, M.; Ishimaru, T.; Mikami, M.; Matsunaga, M.

    1982-08-01

    The relationship between atomic bomb exposure and the incidence of multiple myeloma has been examined in a fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors and controls in the life-span study sample for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. From October 1950 to December 1976, 29 cases of multiple myeloma were confirmed in this sample. Our analysis shows that the standardized relative risk (RR) adjusted for city, sex, and age at the time of bombings (ATB) increased with marrow-absorbed radiation dose. The increased RR does not appear to differ between cities or sexes and is demonstrable only for those survivors whose age ATB was between 20 and 59 years. The estimated risk in these individuals is approximately 0.48 cases/million person-years/rad for bone marrow total dose. This excess risk did not become apparent in individuals receiving 50 rad or more in marrow total dose until 20 years or more after exposure.

  6. Multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-76: relationship to radiation dose absorbed by marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Ichimaru, M.; Ishimaru, T.; Mikami, M.; Matsunaga, M.

    1982-08-01

    The relationship between atomic bomb exposure and the incidence of multiple myeloma has been examined in a fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors and controls in the life-span study sample for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. From October 1950 to December 1976, 29 cases of multiple myeloma were confirmed in this sample. Our analysis shows that the standardized relative risk (RR) adjusted for city, sex, and age at the time of bombings (ATB) increased with marrow-absorbed radiation dose. The increased RR does not appear to differ between cities or sexes and is demonstrable only for those survivors whose age ATB was between 20 and 59 years. The estimaged risk in these individuals is approximately 0.48 cases/million person-years/rad for bone marrow total dose. This excess risk did not become apparent in individuals receiving 50 rad or more in marrow total dose until 20 years or more after exposure.

  7. Calculation of. beta. -ray absorbed dose rate for /sup 131/I applied to the inflorescence of Tradescantia

    SciTech Connect

    Bingo, K.; Tano, S.; Numakunai, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.

    1981-03-01

    Effects of /sup 131/I applied to the inflorescence on the induction of somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs were previously investigated, and the doubling dose (activity) was estimated to be 4 nCi. In the present paper, the absorbed dose rate in stamen hairs of Tradescantia for ..beta.. rays from the applied /sup 131/I was calculated. The doubling dose for the /sup 131/I (4 nCi) applied to the inflorescence was estimated to be higher than 0.3 rad (assuming uniform distribution of /sup 131/I on the surface of the buds and assuming that the shape of the buds was a sphere) and lower than 1.0 rad.

  8. Human absorbed dose estimation for a new (175)Yb-phosphonate based on rats data: Comparison with similar bone pain palliation agents.

    PubMed

    Vaez-Tehrani, Mahdokht; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Yousefnia, Hassan; Afarideh, Hossein

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the absorbed dose to human organs for (175)Yb-BPAMD was evaluated based on the biodistribution studies in rats. The results showed that the bone surface would receive the highest absorbed dose after injection of (175)Yb-BPAMD with 13.32mGy/MBq, while the other organs receive insignificant absorbed dose. Also, the comparison of (175)Yb-BPAMD with other therapeutic phosphonate complexes demonstrated noticeable characteristics for this new agent. Generally, based on the obtained results, (175)Yb-BPAMD can be considered as a promising agent for bone pain palliative therapy in near future. PMID:27337650

  9. PHITS simulations of absorbed dose out-of-field and neutron energy spectra for ELEKTA SL25 medical linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) based calculation methods for modeling photon and particle transport, have several potential applications in radiotherapy. An essential requirement for successful radiation therapy is that the discrepancies between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient are minimized. It is also essential to minimize the dose to radiosensitive and critical organs. With MC technique, the dose distributions from both the primary and scattered photons can be calculated. The out-of-field radiation doses are of particular concern when high energy photons are used, since then neutrons are produced both in the accelerator head and inside the patients. Using MC technique, the created photons and particles can be followed and the transport and energy deposition in all the tissues of the patient can be estimated. This is of great importance during pediatric treatments when minimizing the risk for normal healthy tissue, e.g. secondary cancer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate 3D general purpose PHITS MC code efficiency as an alternative approach for photon beam specification. In this study, we developed a model of an ELEKTA SL25 accelerator and used the transport code PHITS for calculating the total absorbed dose and the neutron energy spectra infield and outside the treatment field. This model was validated against measurements performed with bubble detector spectrometers and Boner sphere for 18 MV linacs, including both photons and neutrons. The average absolute difference between the calculated and measured absorbed dose for the out-of-field region was around 11%. Taking into account a simplification for simulated geometry, which does not include any potential scattering materials around, the obtained result is very satisfactorily. A good agreement between the simulated and measured neutron energy spectra was observed while comparing to data found in the literature.

  10. PHITS simulations of absorbed dose out-of-field and neutron energy spectra for ELEKTA SL25 medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    2015-06-21

    Monte Carlo (MC) based calculation methods for modeling photon and particle transport, have several potential applications in radiotherapy. An essential requirement for successful radiation therapy is that the discrepancies between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient are minimized. It is also essential to minimize the dose to radiosensitive and critical organs. With MC technique, the dose distributions from both the primary and scattered photons can be calculated. The out-of-field radiation doses are of particular concern when high energy photons are used, since then neutrons are produced both in the accelerator head and inside the patients. Using MC technique, the created photons and particles can be followed and the transport and energy deposition in all the tissues of the patient can be estimated. This is of great importance during pediatric treatments when minimizing the risk for normal healthy tissue, e.g. secondary cancer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate 3D general purpose PHITS MC code efficiency as an alternative approach for photon beam specification. In this study, we developed a model of an ELEKTA SL25 accelerator and used the transport code PHITS for calculating the total absorbed dose and the neutron energy spectra infield and outside the treatment field. This model was validated against measurements performed with bubble detector spectrometers and Boner sphere for 18 MV linacs, including both photons and neutrons. The average absolute difference between the calculated and measured absorbed dose for the out-of-field region was around 11%. Taking into account a simplification for simulated geometry, which does not include any potential scattering materials around, the obtained result is very satisfactorily. A good agreement between the simulated and measured neutron energy spectra was observed while comparing to data found in the literature.

  11. Accidental embryo irradiation during barium enema examinations: An estimation of absorbed dose

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, J.; Perisinakis, K.; Grammatikakis, J.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to investigate the possibility of an embryo to receive a dose of more than 10 cGy, the threshold of malformation induction in embryos reported by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, during barium enema examinations. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were place in a phantom to calculate the depth-to-skin conversion coefficient needed for dose estimation at the average embryo depth in patients. Barium enema examinations were performed in 20 women of childbearing age with diagnostic problems demanding longer fluoroscopy times. Doses at 6 cm, the average embryo depth, were determined by measurements at the patients` skin followed by dose calculation at the site of interest. The range of doses estimated at embryo depth for patients was 1.9 to 8.2 cGy. The dose always exceeded 5 cGy when fluoroscopy time was longer than 7 minutes. The dose at the embryo depth never exceeded 10 cGy. This study indicates that fluoroscopy time should not exceed 7 minutes in childbearing-age female patients undergoing barium enema examinations. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. Absorbed Gamma-Ray Doses due to Natural Radionuclides in Building Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, Vitor A. P.; Medina, Nilberto H.; Moreira, Ramon H.; Silveira, Marcilei A. G.

    2010-05-21

    This work is devoted to the application of high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in the study of the effective dose coming from naturally occurring radionuclides, namely {sup 40}K, {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U, present in building materials such as sand, cement, and granitic gravel. Four models were applied to estimate the effective dose and the hazard indices. The maximum estimated effective dose coming from the three reference rooms considered is 0.90(45) mSv/yr, and maximum internal hazard index is 0.77(24), both for the compact clay brick reference room. The principal gamma radiation sources are cement, sand and bricks.

  13. Absorbed Gamma-Ray Doses due to Natural Radionuclides in Building Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Vitor A. P.; Medina, Nilberto H.; Moreira, Ramon H.; Silveira, Marcilei A. G.

    2010-05-01

    This work is devoted to the application of high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in the study of the effective dose coming from naturally occurring radionuclides, namely 40K, 232Th and 238U, present in building materials such as sand, cement, and granitic gravel. Four models were applied to estimate the effective dose and the hazard indices. The maximum estimated effective dose coming from the three reference rooms considered is 0.90(45) mSv/yr, and maximum internal hazard index is 0.77(24), both for the compact clay brick reference room. The principal gamma radiation sources are cement, sand and bricks.

  14. Evaluation of a deterministic grid-based Boltzmann solver (GBBS) for voxel-level absorbed dose calculations in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikell, Justin; Cheenu Kappadath, S.; Wareing, Todd; Erwin, William D.; Titt, Uwe; Mourtada, Firas

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the 3D Grid-based Boltzmann Solver (GBBS) code ATTILA ® for coupled electron and photon transport in the nuclear medicine energy regime for electron (beta, Auger and internal conversion electrons) and photon (gamma, x-ray) sources. Codes rewritten based on ATTILA are used clinically for both high-energy photon teletherapy and 192Ir sealed source brachytherapy; little information exists for using the GBBS to calculate voxel-level absorbed doses in nuclear medicine. We compared DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo (MC) with published voxel-S-values to establish MC as truth. GBBS was investigated for mono-energetic 1.0, 0.1, and 0.01 MeV electron and photon sources as well as 131I and 90Y radionuclides. We investigated convergence of GBBS by analyzing different meshes ({{M}0},{{M}1},{{M}2} ), energy group structures ({{E}0},{{E}1},{{E}2} ) for each radionuclide component, angular quadrature orders (≤ft. {{S}4},{{S}8},{{S}16}\\right) , and scattering order expansions ({{P}0} –{{P}6} ); higher indices imply finer discretization. We compared GBBS to MC in (1) voxel-S-value geometry for soft tissue, lung, and bone, and (2) a source at the interface between combinations of lung, soft tissue, and bone. Excluding Auger and conversion electrons, MC agreed within  ≈5% of published source voxel absorbed doses. For the finest discretization, most GBBS absorbed doses in the source voxel changed by less than 1% compared to the next finest discretization along each phase space variable indicating sufficient convergence. For the finest discretization, agreement with MC in the source voxel ranged from  ‑3% to  ‑20% with larger differences at lower energies (‑3% for 1 MeV electron in lung to  ‑20% for 0.01 MeV photon in bone); similar agreement was found for the interface geometries. Differences between GBBS and MC in the source voxel for 90Y and 131I were  ‑6%. The GBBS ATTILA was benchmarked against MC in the nuclear medicine regime. GBBS can be a

  15. Evaluation of a deterministic grid-based Boltzmann solver (GBBS) for voxel-level absorbed dose calculations in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikell, Justin; Cheenu Kappadath, S.; Wareing, Todd; Erwin, William D.; Titt, Uwe; Mourtada, Firas

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the 3D Grid-based Boltzmann Solver (GBBS) code ATTILA ® for coupled electron and photon transport in the nuclear medicine energy regime for electron (beta, Auger and internal conversion electrons) and photon (gamma, x-ray) sources. Codes rewritten based on ATTILA are used clinically for both high-energy photon teletherapy and 192Ir sealed source brachytherapy; little information exists for using the GBBS to calculate voxel-level absorbed doses in nuclear medicine. We compared DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo (MC) with published voxel-S-values to establish MC as truth. GBBS was investigated for mono-energetic 1.0, 0.1, and 0.01 MeV electron and photon sources as well as 131I and 90Y radionuclides. We investigated convergence of GBBS by analyzing different meshes ({{M}0},{{M}1},{{M}2} ), energy group structures ({{E}0},{{E}1},{{E}2} ) for each radionuclide component, angular quadrature orders (≤ft. {{S}4},{{S}8},{{S}16}\\right) , and scattering order expansions ({{P}0} -{{P}6} ); higher indices imply finer discretization. We compared GBBS to MC in (1) voxel-S-value geometry for soft tissue, lung, and bone, and (2) a source at the interface between combinations of lung, soft tissue, and bone. Excluding Auger and conversion electrons, MC agreed within  ≈5% of published source voxel absorbed doses. For the finest discretization, most GBBS absorbed doses in the source voxel changed by less than 1% compared to the next finest discretization along each phase space variable indicating sufficient convergence. For the finest discretization, agreement with MC in the source voxel ranged from  -3% to  -20% with larger differences at lower energies (-3% for 1 MeV electron in lung to  -20% for 0.01 MeV photon in bone); similar agreement was found for the interface geometries. Differences between GBBS and MC in the source voxel for 90Y and 131I were  -6%. The GBBS ATTILA was benchmarked against MC in the nuclear medicine regime. GBBS can be a viable

  16. Evaluation of a deterministic grid-based Boltzmann solver (GBBS) for voxel-level absorbed dose calculations in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Mikell, Justin; Cheenu Kappadath, S; Wareing, Todd; Erwin, William D; Titt, Uwe; Mourtada, Firas

    2016-06-21

    To evaluate the 3D Grid-based Boltzmann Solver (GBBS) code ATTILA (®) for coupled electron and photon transport in the nuclear medicine energy regime for electron (beta, Auger and internal conversion electrons) and photon (gamma, x-ray) sources. Codes rewritten based on ATTILA are used clinically for both high-energy photon teletherapy and (192)Ir sealed source brachytherapy; little information exists for using the GBBS to calculate voxel-level absorbed doses in nuclear medicine. We compared DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo (MC) with published voxel-S-values to establish MC as truth. GBBS was investigated for mono-energetic 1.0, 0.1, and 0.01 MeV electron and photon sources as well as (131)I and (90)Y radionuclides. We investigated convergence of GBBS by analyzing different meshes ([Formula: see text]), energy group structures ([Formula: see text]) for each radionuclide component, angular quadrature orders ([Formula: see text], and scattering order expansions ([Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text]); higher indices imply finer discretization. We compared GBBS to MC in (1) voxel-S-value geometry for soft tissue, lung, and bone, and (2) a source at the interface between combinations of lung, soft tissue, and bone. Excluding Auger and conversion electrons, MC agreed within  ≈5% of published source voxel absorbed doses. For the finest discretization, most GBBS absorbed doses in the source voxel changed by less than 1% compared to the next finest discretization along each phase space variable indicating sufficient convergence. For the finest discretization, agreement with MC in the source voxel ranged from  -3% to  -20% with larger differences at lower energies (-3% for 1 MeV electron in lung to  -20% for 0.01 MeV photon in bone); similar agreement was found for the interface geometries. Differences between GBBS and MC in the source voxel for (90)Y and (131)I were  -6%. The GBBS ATTILA was benchmarked against MC in the nuclear medicine regime. GBBS can be a

  17. Evaluation of a deterministic grid-based Boltzmann solver (GBBS) for voxel-level absorbed dose calculations in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Mikell, Justin; Cheenu Kappadath, S; Wareing, Todd; Erwin, William D; Titt, Uwe; Mourtada, Firas

    2016-06-21

    To evaluate the 3D Grid-based Boltzmann Solver (GBBS) code ATTILA (®) for coupled electron and photon transport in the nuclear medicine energy regime for electron (beta, Auger and internal conversion electrons) and photon (gamma, x-ray) sources. Codes rewritten based on ATTILA are used clinically for both high-energy photon teletherapy and (192)Ir sealed source brachytherapy; little information exists for using the GBBS to calculate voxel-level absorbed doses in nuclear medicine. We compared DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo (MC) with published voxel-S-values to establish MC as truth. GBBS was investigated for mono-energetic 1.0, 0.1, and 0.01 MeV electron and photon sources as well as (131)I and (90)Y radionuclides. We investigated convergence of GBBS by analyzing different meshes ([Formula: see text]), energy group structures ([Formula: see text]) for each radionuclide component, angular quadrature orders ([Formula: see text], and scattering order expansions ([Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text]); higher indices imply finer discretization. We compared GBBS to MC in (1) voxel-S-value geometry for soft tissue, lung, and bone, and (2) a source at the interface between combinations of lung, soft tissue, and bone. Excluding Auger and conversion electrons, MC agreed within  ≈5% of published source voxel absorbed doses. For the finest discretization, most GBBS absorbed doses in the source voxel changed by less than 1% compared to the next finest discretization along each phase space variable indicating sufficient convergence. For the finest discretization, agreement with MC in the source voxel ranged from  -3% to  -20% with larger differences at lower energies (-3% for 1 MeV electron in lung to  -20% for 0.01 MeV photon in bone); similar agreement was found for the interface geometries. Differences between GBBS and MC in the source voxel for (90)Y and (131)I were  -6%. The GBBS ATTILA was benchmarked against MC in the nuclear medicine regime. GBBS can be a

  18. Experimental determination of the absorbed dose to water in a scanned proton beam using a water calorimeter and an ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnebin, Solange; Twerenbold, Damian; Pedroni, Eros; Meer, David; Zenklusen, Silvan; Bula, Christian

    2010-03-01

    The absorbed dose to water is the reference physical quantity for the energy absorbed in tissue when exposed to beams of ionizing radiation in radiotherapy. The SI unit of absorbed dose to water is the gray (Gy = 1 J/kg). Ionization chambers are used as the dosimeters of choice in the clinical environment because they show a high reproducibility and are easy to use. However, ionization chambers have to be calibrated in order to convert the measured electrical charge into absorbed dose to water. In addition, protocols require these conversion factors to be SI traceable to a primary standard of absorbed dose to water. We present experimental results where the ionization chamber used for the dosimetry for the scanned proton beam facility at PSI is compared with the direct determination of absorbed dose to water from the METAS primary standard water calorimeter. The agreement of 3.2% of the dose values measured by the two techniques are within their respective statistical uncertainties.

  19. High-Dose 131I-Tositumomab (Anti-CD20) Radioimmunotherapy for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Adjusting Radiation Absorbed Dose to Actual Organ Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Gopal, A K.; Durack, L. D.; Press, O. W.; Eary, Janet F.

    2004-06-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using 131I-tositumomab has been used successfully to treat relapsed or refractory B-cell non-Hodgin's lymphoma (NHL). Our approach to treatment planning has been to determine limits on radiation absorbed close to critical nonhematopoietic organs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using CT to adjust for actual organ volumes in calculating organ-specific absorbed dose estimates. Methods: Records of 84 patients who underwent biodistribution studies after a trace-labeled infusion of 131I-tositumomab for RIT (January 1990 and April 2003) were reviewed. Serial planar -camera images and whole-body Nal probe counts were obtained to estimate 131I-antibody source-organ residence times as recommended by the MIRD Committee. The source-organ residence times for standard man or woman were adjusted by the ratio of the MIRD phantom organ mass to the CT-derived organ mass. Results: The mean radiation absorbed doses (in mGy/MBq) for our data using the MIRD model were lungs= 1.67; liver= 1.03; kidneys= 1.08; spleen= 2.67; and whole body= 0.3; and for CT volume-adjusted organ volumes (in mGy/MBq) were lungs= 1.30; liver= 0.92; kidneys= 0.76; spleen= 1.40; and whole body= 0.22. We determined the following correlation coefficients between the 2 methods for the various organs; lungs, 0.49; (P= 0.0001); liver, 0.64 (P= 0.004); kidneys, 0.45 (P= 0.0001), for the residence times. For therapy, patients received mean 131I administered activities of 19.2 GBq (520 mCi) after adjustment for CT-derived organ mass compared with 16.0 GBq (433 mCi) that would otherwise have been given had therapy been based only using standard MIRD organ volumes--a statistically significant difference (P= 0.0001). Conclusion: We observed large variations in organ masses among our patients. Our treatments were planned to deliver the maximally tolerated radiation dose to the dose-limiting normal organ. This work provides a simplified method for calculating patient-specific radiation

  20. Contrast-enhanced radiotherapy: feasibility and characteristics of the physical absorbed dose distribution for deep-seated tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnica-Garza, H. M.

    2009-09-01

    Radiotherapy using kilovoltage x-rays in conjunction with contrast agents incorporated into the tumor, gold nanoparticles in particular, could represent a potential alternative to current techniques based on high-energy linear accelerators. In this paper, using the voxelized Zubal phantom in conjunction with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE to model a prostate cancer treatment, it is shown that in combination with a 360° arc delivery technique, tumoricidal doses of radiation can be delivered to deep-seated tumors while still providing acceptable doses to the skin and other organs at risk for gold concentrations in the tumor within the range of 7-10 mg-Au per gram of tissue. Under these conditions and using a x-ray beam with 90% of the fluence within the range of 80-200 keV, a 72 Gy physical absorbed dose to the prostate can be delivered, while keeping the rectal wall, bladder, skin and femoral heads below 65 Gy, 55 Gy, 40 Gy and 30 Gy, respectively. However, it is also shown that non-uniformities in the contrast agent concentration lead to a severe degradation of the dose distribution and that, therefore, techniques to locally quantify the presence of the contrast agent would be necessary in order to determine the incident x-ray fluence that best reproduces the dosimetry obtained under conditions of uniform contrast agent distribution.

  1. Contrast-enhanced radiotherapy: feasibility and characteristics of the physical absorbed dose distribution for deep-seated tumors.

    PubMed

    Garnica-Garza, H M

    2009-09-21

    Radiotherapy using kilovoltage x-rays in conjunction with contrast agents incorporated into the tumor, gold nanoparticles in particular, could represent a potential alternative to current techniques based on high-energy linear accelerators. In this paper, using the voxelized Zubal phantom in conjunction with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE to model a prostate cancer treatment, it is shown that in combination with a 360 degrees arc delivery technique, tumoricidal doses of radiation can be delivered to deep-seated tumors while still providing acceptable doses to the skin and other organs at risk for gold concentrations in the tumor within the range of 7-10 mg-Au per gram of tissue. Under these conditions and using a x-ray beam with 90% of the fluence within the range of 80-200 keV, a 72 Gy physical absorbed dose to the prostate can be delivered, while keeping the rectal wall, bladder, skin and femoral heads below 65 Gy, 55 Gy, 40 Gy and 30 Gy, respectively. However, it is also shown that non-uniformities in the contrast agent concentration lead to a severe degradation of the dose distribution and that, therefore, techniques to locally quantify the presence of the contrast agent would be necessary in order to determine the incident x-ray fluence that best reproduces the dosimetry obtained under conditions of uniform contrast agent distribution.

  2. [Spatial distribution of local absorbed doses inside the Russian segment of the International Space Station].

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, V A; Mitrikas, V G; Tsetlin, V V

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses the procedure of operational radiation safety monitoring with the use of portable Pille-MKS dosimeters, presents the results of ISS dose measurements from September 22, 2003 (after Pille deployment on board the ISS) to March 16, 2011 (completion of the ISS-25 mission). The necessity of continuous dynamic tracking of the radiation environment in ISS compartments arises from the character and uniqueness of space ionizing radiation effects on crew. Radiation loading in the ISS compartments was analyzed and results of using different dosimeters were compared. Experimental radiation studies of the ISS piloted compartments are needed for reliable prediction of doses for the crew that still defy precise estimation. PMID:21970039

  3. Detector photon response and absorbed dose and their applications to rapid triage techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Shannon Prentice

    As radiation specialists, one of our primary objectives in the Navy is protecting people and the environment from the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. Focusing on radiological dispersal devices (RDD) will provide increased personnel protection as well as optimize emergency response assets for the general public. An attack involving an RDD has been of particular concern because it is intended to spread contamination over a wide area and cause massive panic within the general population. A rapid method of triage will be necessary to segregate the unexposed and slightly exposed from those needing immediate medical treatment. Because of the aerosol dispersal of the radioactive material, inhalation of the radioactive material may be the primary exposure route. The primary radionuclides likely to be used in a RDD attack are Co-60, Cs-137, Ir-192, Sr-90 and Am-241. Through the use of a MAX phantom along with a few Simulink MATLAB programs, a good anthropomorphic phantom was created for use in MCNPX simulations that would provide organ doses from internally deposited radionuclides. Ludlum model 44-9 and 44-2 detectors were used to verify the simulated dose from the MCNPX code. Based on the results, acute dose rate limits were developed for emergency response personnel that would assist in patient triage.

  4. Tumoral fibrosis effect on the radiation absorbed dose of (177)Lu-Tyr(3)-octreotate and (177)Lu-Tyr(3)-octreotate conjugated to gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Azorín-Vega, E P; Zambrano-Ramírez, O D; Rojas-Calderón, E L; Ocampo-García, B E; Ferro-Flores, G

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the tumoral fibrosis effect on the radiation absorbed dose of the radiopharmaceuticals (177)Lu-Tyr(3)-octreotate (monomeric) and (177)Lu-Tyr(3)-octreotate-gold nanoparticles (multimeric) using an experimental HeLa cells tumoral model and the Monte Carlo PENELOPE code. Experimental and computer micro-environment models with or without fibrosis were constructed. Results showed that fibrosis increases up to 33% the tumor radiation absorbed dose, although the major effect on the dose was produced by the type of radiopharmaceutical (112Gy-multimeric vs. 43Gy-monomeric).

  5. Tumoral fibrosis effect on the radiation absorbed dose of (177)Lu-Tyr(3)-octreotate and (177)Lu-Tyr(3)-octreotate conjugated to gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Azorín-Vega, E P; Zambrano-Ramírez, O D; Rojas-Calderón, E L; Ocampo-García, B E; Ferro-Flores, G

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the tumoral fibrosis effect on the radiation absorbed dose of the radiopharmaceuticals (177)Lu-Tyr(3)-octreotate (monomeric) and (177)Lu-Tyr(3)-octreotate-gold nanoparticles (multimeric) using an experimental HeLa cells tumoral model and the Monte Carlo PENELOPE code. Experimental and computer micro-environment models with or without fibrosis were constructed. Results showed that fibrosis increases up to 33% the tumor radiation absorbed dose, although the major effect on the dose was produced by the type of radiopharmaceutical (112Gy-multimeric vs. 43Gy-monomeric). PMID:25305748

  6. Absorbed Radiation Dose in Radiosensitive Organs Using 64- and 320-Row Multidetector Computed Tomography: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Atif N.; Nikolic, Boris; Khan, Mohammad K.; Kang, Jian; Khosa, Faisal

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To determine absorbed radiation dose (ARD) in radiosensitive organs during prospective and full phase dose modulation using ECG-gated MDCTA scanner under 64- and 320-row detector modes. Methods. Female phantom was used to measure organ radiation dose. Five DP-3 radiation detectors were used to measure ARD to lungs, breast, and thyroid using the Aquilion ONE scanner in 64- and 320-row modes using both prospective and dose modulation in full phase acquisition. Five measurements were made using three tube voltages: 100, 120, and 135 kVp at 400 mA at heart rate (HR) of 60 and 75 bpm for each protocol. Mean acquisition was recorded in milligrays (mGy). Results. Mean ARD was less for 320-row versus 64-row mode for each imaging protocol. Prospective EKG-gated imaging protocol resulted in a statistically lower ARD using 320-row versus 64-row modes for midbreast (6.728 versus 19.687 mGy, P < 0.001), lung (6.102 versus 21.841 mGy, P < 0.001), and thyroid gland (0.208 versus 0.913 mGy; P < 0.001). Retrospective imaging using 320- versus 64-row modes showed lower ARD for midbreast (10.839 versus 43.169 mGy, P < 0.001), lung (8.848 versus 47.877 mGy, P < 0.001), and thyroid gland (0.057 versus 2.091 mGy; P < 0.001). ARD reduction was observed at lower kVp and heart rate. Conclusions. Dose reduction to radiosensitive organs is achieved using 320-row compared to 64-row modes for both prospective and retrospective gating, whereas 64-row mode is equivalent to the same model 64-row MDCT scanner. PMID:25170427

  7. A radiochromic folm dosimeter for gamma radiation in the absorbed-dose range 0.1-10 kGy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Hasan M.; Farahani, Mahnaz; William L., McLaughlin

    A commercially available leuco-dye film (FWT-63-02), having a thickness of 0.55 mm, has been investigated spectrophotometrically for its characteristics as a radiochromic dosimeter and for its potential use in food-irradiation applications. The γ-ray irradiation of the nearly colorless, transparent film induces blue color with an absorption maximum at 600 nm. The increase in absorbance at 600 nm per unit thickness of film (Δ A mm -1) is linear with dose in the dose range up to 8 kGy, with a slope of 0.91 mm -1·kGy -1. After a modest additional increase during the first day following irradiation, the radiation-induced color is stable when stored at room temperature at least for 5 weeks. The response slope is 16% higher when stored at 60°C, however, after the initial 1-day increase it is stable for several weeks when stored at that temperature. The response of the dosimeter is independent of dose rate in the range 0.5-170 Gy min -1.

  8. The development of early pediatric models and their application to radiation absorbed dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, J.W.

    1989-12-31

    This presentation will review and describe the development of pediatric phantoms for use in radiation dose calculations . The development of pediatric models for dose calculations essentially paralleled that of the adult. In fact, Snyder and Fisher at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory reported on a series of phantoms for such calculations in 1966 about two years before the first MIRD publication on the adult human phantom. These phantoms, for a newborn, one-, five-, ten-, and fifteen-year old, were derived from the adult phantom. The ``pediatric`` models were obtained through a series of transformations applied to the major dimensions of the adult, which were specified in a Cartesian coordinate system. These phantoms suffered from the fact that no real consideration was given to the influence of these mathematical transformations on the actual organ sizes in the other models nor to the relation of the resulting organ masses to those in humans of the particular age. Later, an extensive effort was invested in designing ``individual`` pediatric phantoms for each age based upon a careful review of the literature. Unfortunately, the phantoms had limited use and only a small number of calculations were made available to the user community. Examples of the phantoms, their typical dimensions, common weaknesses, etc. will be discussed.

  9. The development of early pediatric models and their application to radiation absorbed dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    This presentation will review and describe the development of pediatric phantoms for use in radiation dose calculations . The development of pediatric models for dose calculations essentially paralleled that of the adult. In fact, Snyder and Fisher at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory reported on a series of phantoms for such calculations in 1966 about two years before the first MIRD publication on the adult human phantom. These phantoms, for a newborn, one-, five-, ten-, and fifteen-year old, were derived from the adult phantom. The pediatric'' models were obtained through a series of transformations applied to the major dimensions of the adult, which were specified in a Cartesian coordinate system. These phantoms suffered from the fact that no real consideration was given to the influence of these mathematical transformations on the actual organ sizes in the other models nor to the relation of the resulting organ masses to those in humans of the particular age. Later, an extensive effort was invested in designing individual'' pediatric phantoms for each age based upon a careful review of the literature. Unfortunately, the phantoms had limited use and only a small number of calculations were made available to the user community. Examples of the phantoms, their typical dimensions, common weaknesses, etc. will be discussed.

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: Advances in the determination of absorbed dose to water in clinical high-energy photon and electron beams using ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiful Huq, M.; Andreo, Pedro

    2004-02-01

    During the last two decades, absorbed dose to water in clinical photon and electron beams was determined using dosimetry protocols and codes of practice based on radiation metrology standards of air kerma. It is now recommended that clinical reference dosimetry be based on standards of absorbed dose to water. Newer protocols for the dosimetry of radiotherapy beams, based on the use of an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water, ND,w, in a standards laboratory's reference quality beam, have been published by several national or regional scientific societies and international organizations. Since the publication of these protocols multiple theoretical and experimental dosimetry comparisons between the various ND,w based recommendations, and between the ND,w and the former air kerma (NK) based protocols, have been published. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the dosimetry protocols based on these standards and of the intercomparisons of the different protocols published in the literature, discussing the reasons for the observed discrepancies between them. A summary of the various types of standards of absorbed dose to water, together with an analysis of the uncertainties along the various steps of the dosimetry chain for the two types of formalism, is also included. It is emphasized that the NK-ND,air and ND,w formalisms have very similar uncertainty when the same criteria are used for both procedures. Arguments are provided in support of the recommendation for a change in reference dosimetry based on standards of absorbed dose to water.

  11. Influence of the characteristic curve on the clinical image quality and patient absorbed dose in lumbar spine radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingberg, Anders; Herrmann, Clemens; Lanhede, Birgitta; Almen, Anja; Mattsson, Saron; Panzer, Werner; Besjakov, Jack; Mansson, Lars G.; Kheddache, Susanne; Zankl, Maria

    2001-06-01

    The 'European Guidelines on Quality Criteria for Diagnostic Radiographic Images' do not address the choice of film characteristic (H/D) curve, which is an important parameter for the description of a radiographic screen-film system. Since it is not possible to investigate this influence by taking repeated exposures of the same patients on films with systematically varied H/D curves, patient images of lumbar spine were digitised in the current study. The image contrast was altered by digital image processing techniques, simulating images with H/D curves varying from flat over standard latitude to a film type steeper than a mammography film. The manipulated images were printed on film for evaluation. Seven European radiologists evaluated the clinical image quality of in total 224 images by analysing the fulfilment of the European Image Criteria and by visual grading analysis of the images. The results show that the local quality can be significantly improved by the application of films with a steeper film H/D curve compared to the standard latitude film. For images with an average optical density of about 1.25, the application of the steeper film results in a reduction of patient absorbed dose by about 10-15% without a loss of diagnostically relevant image information. The results also show that the patient absorbed dose reduction obtained by altering the tube voltage from 70 kV to 90 kV coincides with a loss of image information that cannot be compensated for by simply changing the shape of the H/D curve.

  12. A graphite calorimeter for absolute measurements of absorbed dose to water: application in medium-energy x-ray filtered beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, M.; Pimpinella, M.; Quini, M.; D'Arienzo, M.; Astefanoaei, I.; Loreti, S.; Guerra, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    The Italian National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology (ENEA-INMRI) has designed and built a graphite calorimeter that, in a water phantom, has allowed the determination of the absorbed dose to water in medium-energy x-rays with generating voltages from 180 to 250 kV. The new standard is a miniaturized three-bodies calorimeter, with a disc-shaped core of 21 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness weighing 1.134 g, sealed in a PMMA waterproof envelope with air-evacuated gaps. The measured absorbed dose to graphite is converted into absorbed dose to water by means of an energy-dependent conversion factor obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. Heat-transfer correction factors were determined by FEM calculations. At a source-to-detector distance of 100 cm, a depth in water of 2 g cm-2, and at a dose rate of about 0.15 Gy min-1, results of calorimetric measurements of absorbed dose to water, D w, were compared to experimental determinations, D wK, obtained via an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of air kerma, according to established dosimetry protocols. The combined standard uncertainty of D w and D wK were estimated as 1.9% and 1.7%, respectively. The two absorbed dose to water determinations were in agreement within 1%, well below the stated measurement uncertainties. Advancements are in progress to extend the measurement capability of the new in-water-phantom graphite calorimeter to other filtered medium-energy x-ray qualities and to reduce the D w uncertainty to around 1%. The new calorimeter represents the first implementation of in-water-phantom graphite calorimetry in the kilovoltage range and, allowing independent determinations of D w, it will contribute to establish a robust system of absorbed dose to water primary standards for medium-energy x-ray beams.

  13. Assessment of absorbed dose to thyroid, parotid and ovaries in patients undergoing Gamma Knife radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanzadeh, H.; Sharafi, A.; Allah Verdi, M.; Nikoofar, A.

    2006-09-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery was originally introduced by Lars Leksell in 1951. This treatment refers to the noninvasive destruction of an intracranial target localized stereotactically. The purpose of this study was to identify the dose delivered to the parotid, ovaries, testis and thyroid glands during the Gamma Knife radiosurgery procedure. A three-dimensional, anthropomorphic phantom was developed using natural human bone, paraffin and sodium chloride as the equivalent tissue. The phantom consisted of a thorax, head and neck and hip. In the natural places of the thyroid, parotid (bilateral sides) and ovaries (midline), some cavities were made to place TLDs. Three TLDs were inserted in a batch with 1 cm space between the TLDs and each batch was inserted into a single cavity. The final depth of TLDs was 3 cm from the surface for parotid and thyroid and was 15 cm for the ovaries. Similar batches were placed superficially on the phantom. The phantom was gamma irradiated using a Leksell model C Gamma Knife unit. Subsequently, the same batches were placed superficially over the thyroid, parotid, testis and ovaries in 30 patients (15 men and 15 women) who were undergoing radiosurgery treatment for brain tumours. The mean dosage for treating these patients was 14.48 ± 3.06 Gy (10.5-24 Gy) to a mean tumour volume of 12.30 ± 9.66 cc (0.27-42.4 cc) in the 50% isodose curve. There was no significant difference between the superficial and deep batches in the phantom studies (P-value < 0.05). The mean delivered doses to the parotid, thyroid, ovaries and testis in human subjects were 21.6 ± 15.1 cGy, 9.15 ± 3.89 cGy, 0.47 ± 0.3 cGy and 0.53 ± 0.31 cGy, respectively. The data can be used in making decisions for special clinical situations such as treating pregnant patients or young patients with benign lesions who need radiosurgery for eradication of brain tumours.

  14. Degradation and decoloration of textiles wastewater by electron beam irradiation: Effect of energy, current and absorbed dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakar, Khomsaton Abu; Ahmad, Pauzi; Zulkafli, Hashim, Siti A'aisah

    2014-09-01

    In this study, electron beam accelerator (EB) was used to treat textiles wastewater from Rawang Industrial Park, Selangor. The objectives were to determine effective energy, beam current and absorbed dose required for decoloration and degradation of the textiles effluent. The textiles effluent was irradiated in a batch with various energy of 1MeV to 3MeV at constant beam current of 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with higher beam energy. The EB energy of 1MeV effectively to removed 58% color and 19% COD. For textile effluent sample irradiated at fix energy of 1MeV and 3Mev but at different beam current 10mA, 20mA and 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with the increased of beam current at each energy. However removal of color was significantly better at 1Mev as compared to 3Mev. In the case of textiles effluent, irradiated at doses of 17, 20,25,30, 35, 100 and 200kGy using 30 kW power of EB (1Mev, 30mA), results shows removal of BOD5, COD and color were in the range 9%-33%, 14%-38% and 43%-78% respectively.

  15. Degradation and decoloration of textiles wastewater by electron beam irradiation: Effect of energy, current and absorbed dose

    SciTech Connect

    Bakar, Khomsaton Abu; Zulkafli,; Hashim, Siti A'aisah; Ahmad, Pauzi

    2014-09-03

    In this study, electron beam accelerator (EB) was used to treat textiles wastewater from Rawang Industrial Park, Selangor. The objectives were to determine effective energy, beam current and absorbed dose required for decoloration and degradation of the textiles effluent. The textiles effluent was irradiated in a batch with various energy of 1MeV to 3MeV at constant beam current of 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with higher beam energy. The EB energy of 1MeV effectively to removed 58% color and 19% COD. For textile effluent sample irradiated at fix energy of 1MeV and 3Mev but at different beam current 10mA, 20mA and 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with the increased of beam current at each energy. However removal of color was significantly better at 1Mev as compared to 3Mev. In the case of textiles effluent, irradiated at doses of 17, 20,25,30, 35, 100 and 200kGy using 30 kW power of EB (1Mev, 30mA), results shows removal of BOD{sub 5}, COD and color were in the range 9%-33%, 14%-38% and 43%-78% respectively.

  16. Toward the development of transcriptional biodosimetry for the identification of irradiated individuals and assessment of absorbed radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Brzóska, Kamil; Kruszewski, Marcin

    2015-08-01

    The most frequently used and the best established method of biological dosimetry at present is the dicentric chromosome assay, which is poorly suitable for a mass casualties scenario. This gives rise to the need for the development of new, high-throughput assays for rapid identification of the subjects exposed to ionizing radiation. In the present study, we tested the usefulness of gene expression analysis in blood cells for biological dosimetry. Human peripheral blood from three healthy donors was X-irradiated with doses of 0 (control), 0.6, and 2 Gy. The mRNA level of 16 genes (ATF3, BAX, BBC3, BCL2, CDKN1A, DDB2, FDXR, GADD45A, GDF15, MDM2, PLK3, SERPINE1, SESN2, TNFRSF10B, TNFSF4, and VWCE) was assessed by reverse transcription quantitative PCR 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after exposure with ITFG1 and DPM1 used as a reference genes. The panel of radiation-responsive genes was selected comprising GADD45A, CDKN1A, BAX, BBC3, DDB2, TNFSF4, GDF15, and FDXR. Cluster analysis showed that ΔC t values of the selected genes contained sufficient information to allow discrimination between irradiated and non-irradiated blood samples. The samples were clearly grouped according to the absorbed doses of radiation and not to the time interval after irradiation or to the blood donor. PMID:25972268

  17. Estimated human absorbed dose of ¹⁷⁷Lu-BPAMD based on mice data: Comparison with ¹⁷⁷Lu-EDTMP.

    PubMed

    Yousefnia, Hassan; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the absorbed dose of human organs for (177)Lu-BPAMD was evaluated based on biodistribution studies into the Syrian mice by RADAR method and was compared with (177)Lu-EDTMP as the only clinically used Lu-177 bone-seeking agent. The highest absorbed dose for both (177)Lu-BPAMD and (177)Lu-EDTMP is observed on the bone surface with 8.007 and 4.802 mSv/MBq. Generally, (177)Lu-BPAMD has considerable characteristics compared with (177)Lu-EDTMP and can be considered as a promising agent for the bone pain palliation therapy. PMID:26163291

  18. Accuracy and optimal timing of activity measurements in estimating the absorbed dose of radioiodine in the treatment of Graves' disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, S.; Horowitz, J.; Traino, A. C.; Chipkin, S. R.; Hollot, C. V.; Chait, Y.

    2011-02-01

    Calculation of the therapeutic activity of radioiodine 131I for individualized dosimetry in the treatment of Graves' disease requires an accurate estimate of the thyroid absorbed radiation dose based on a tracer activity administration of 131I. Common approaches (Marinelli-Quimby formula, MIRD algorithm) use, respectively, the effective half-life of radioiodine in the thyroid and the time-integrated activity. Many physicians perform one, two, or at most three tracer dose activity measurements at various times and calculate the required therapeutic activity by ad hoc methods. In this paper, we study the accuracy of estimates of four 'target variables': time-integrated activity coefficient, time of maximum activity, maximum activity, and effective half-life in the gland. Clinical data from 41 patients who underwent 131I therapy for Graves' disease at the University Hospital in Pisa, Italy, are used for analysis. The radioiodine kinetics are described using a nonlinear mixed-effects model. The distributions of the target variables in the patient population are characterized. Using minimum root mean squared error as the criterion, optimal 1-, 2-, and 3-point sampling schedules are determined for estimation of the target variables, and probabilistic bounds are given for the errors under the optimal times. An algorithm is developed for computing the optimal 1-, 2-, and 3-point sampling schedules for the target variables. This algorithm is implemented in a freely available software tool. Taking into consideration 131I effective half-life in the thyroid and measurement noise, the optimal 1-point time for time-integrated activity coefficient is a measurement 1 week following the tracer dose. Additional measurements give only a slight improvement in accuracy.

  19. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-06: Y90 PET/CT for the Instantaneous Determination of Both Target and Non-Target Absorbed Doses Following Hepatic Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Pasciak, A; Kao, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose The process of converting Yttrium-90 (Y90) PET/CT images into 3D absorbed dose maps will be explained. The simple methods presented will allow the medical physicst to analyze Y90 PET images following radioembolization and determine the absorbed dose to tumor, normal liver parenchyma and other areas of interest, without application of Monte-Carlo radiation transport or dose-point-kernel (DPK) convolution. Methods Absorbed dose can be computed from Y90 PET/CT images based on the premise that radioembolization is a permanent implant with a constant relative activity distribution after infusion. Many Y90 PET/CT publications have used DPK convolution to obtain 3D absorbed dose maps. However, this method requires specialized software limiting clinical utility. The Local Deposition method, an alternative to DPK convolution, can be used to obtain absorbed dose and requires no additional computer processing. Pixel values from regions of interest drawn on Y90 PET/CT images can be converted to absorbed dose (Gy) by multiplication with a scalar constant. Results There is evidence that suggests the Local Deposition method may actually be more accurate than DPK convolution and it has been successfully used in a recent Y90 PET/CT publication. We have analytically compared dose-volume-histograms (DVH) for phantom hot-spheres to determine the difference between the DPK and Local Deposition methods, as a function of PET scanner point-spread-function for Y90. We have found that for PET/CT systems with a FWHM greater than 3.0 mm when imaging Y90, the Local Deposition Method provides a more accurate representation of DVH, regardless of target size than DPK convolution. Conclusion Using the Local Deposition Method, post-radioembolization Y90 PET/CT images can be transformed into 3D absorbed dose maps of the liver. An interventional radiologist or a Medical Physicist can perform this transformation in a clinical setting, allowing for rapid prediction of treatment efficacy by

  20. First international comparison of primary absorbed dose to water standards in the medium-energy X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büermann, Ludwig; Guerra, Antonio Stefano; Pimpinella, Maria; Pinto, Massimo; de Pooter, Jacco; de Prez, Leon; Jansen, Bartel; Denoziere, Marc; Rapp, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the results of the first international comparison of primary measurement standards of absorbed dose to water for the medium-energy X-ray range. Three of the participants (VSL, PTB, LNE-LNHB) used their existing water calorimeter based standards and one participant (ENEA) recently developed a new standard based on a water-graphite calorimeter. The participants calibrated three transfer chambers of the same type in terms of absorbed dose to water (NDw) and in addition in terms of air kerma (NK) using the CCRI radiation qualities in the range 100 kV to 250 kV. The additional NK values were intended to be used for a physical analysis of the ratios NDw/NK. All participants had previously participated in the BIPM.RI(I)-K3 key comparison of air kerma standards. Ratios of pairs of NMI's NK results of the current comparison were found to be consistent with the corresponding key comparison results within the expanded uncertainties of 0.6 % - 1 %. The NDw results were analysed in terms of the degrees of equivalence with the comparison reference values which were calculated for each beam quality as the weighted means of all results. The participant's results were consistent with the reference value within the expanded uncertainties. However, these expanded uncertainties varied significantly and ranged between about 1-1.8 % for the water calorimeter based standards and were estimated at 3.7 % for the water-graphite calorimeter. It was shown previously that the ratios NDw/NK for the type of ionization chamber used as transfer chamber in this comparison were very close (within less than 1 %) to the calculated values of (bar muen/ρ)w,ad, the mean values of the water-to-air ratio of the mass-energy-absorption coefficients at the depth d in water. Some of the participant's results deviated significantly from the expected behavior. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of

  1. SU-E-T-516: Measurement of the Absorbed Dose Rate in Water Under Reference Conditions in a CyberKnife Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon-Martinez, N; Hernandez-Guzman, A; Gomez-Munoz, A; Massillon-JL, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to measure the absorbed-dose-rate in a CyberKnife unit reference-field (6cm diameter) using three ionization chambers (IC) following the new IAEA/AAPM formalism and Gafchromic film (MD-V3-55 and EBT3) protocol according to our work reported previously. Methods: The absorbed-dose-rates were measured at 90cm and 70cm SSD in a 10cmx10cm field and at 70cm SSD in a 5.4cmx5.4cm equivalent to 6cm diameter field using a linac Varian iX. All measurements were performed at 10cm depth in water. The correction factors that account for the difference between the IC response on the reference field and the CyberKnife reference field, k-(Q-msr,Q)^(f-msr,f-ref), were evaluated and Gafchromic film were calibrated using the results obtained above. Under the CyberKnife reference conditions, the factors were used to measure the absorbed-dose-rate with IC according to the new formalism and the calibrated film was irradiated in water. The film calibration curve was used to evaluate the absorbed-dose-rate in the CyberKnife unit. Results: Difference up to 2.56% is observed between dose-rate measured with IC in the reference 10cmx10cm field, depending where the chamber was calibrated, which was not reflected in the correction factor k-(Q-msr,Q)^(f-msr,f-ref ) where variations of ~0.15%-0.5% were obtained. Within measurements uncertainties, maximum difference of 1.8% on the absorbed-dose-rate in the CyberKnife reference field is observed between all IC and the films Conclusion: Absorbed-dose-rate to water was measured in a CyberKnife reference field with acceptable accuracy (combined uncertainties ~1.32%-1.73%, k=1) using three IC and films. The MD-V3-55 film as well as the new IAEA/AAPM formalism can be considered as a suitable dosimetric method to measure absorbed-dose-rate to water in small and non-standard CyberKnife fields used in clinical treatments However, the EBT3 film is not appropriated due to the high uncertainty provided (combined uncertainty ~9%, k=1

  2. Relative Importance of Hip and Sacral Pain Among Long-Term Gynecological Cancer Survivors Treated With Pelvic Radiotherapy and Their Relationships to Mean Absorbed Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Waldenstroem, Ann-Charlotte; Olsson, Caroline; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Dunberger, Gail; Lind, Helena; Alevronta, Eleftheria; Al-Abany, Massoud; Tucker, Susan; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Steineck, Gunnar

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relative importance of patient-reported hip and sacral pain after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) for gynecological cancer and its relationship to the absorbed doses in these organs. Methods and Materials: We used data from a population-based study that included 650 long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated with pelvic RT in the Gothenburg and Stockholm areas in Sweden with a median follow-up of 6 years (range, 2-15) and 344 population controls. Symptoms were assessed through a study-specific postal questionnaire. We also analyzed the hip and sacral dose-volume histogram data for 358 of the survivors. Results: Of the survivors, one in three reported having or having had hip pain after completing RT. Daily pain when walking was four times as common among the survivors compared to controls. Symptoms increased in frequency with a mean absorbed dose >37.5 Gy. Also, two in five survivors reported pain in the sacrum. Sacral pain also affected their walking ability and tended to increase with a mean absorbed dose >42.5 Gy. Conclusions: Long-term survivors of gynecological cancer treated with pelvic RT experience hip and sacral pain when walking. The mean absorbed dose was significantly related to hip pain and was borderline significantly related to sacral pain. Keeping the total mean absorbed hip dose below 37.5 Gy during treatment might lower the occurrence of long-lasting pain. In relation to the controls, the survivors had a lower occurrence of pain and pain-related symptoms from the hips and sacrum compared with what has previously been reported for the pubic bone.

  3. The effect of systematic set-up deviations on the absorbed dose distribution for left-sided breast cancer treated with respiratory gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edvardsson, A.; Ceberg, S.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was 1) to investigate interfraction set-up uncertainties for patients treated with respiratory gating for left-sided breast cancer, 2) to investigate the effect of the inter-fraction set-up on the absorbed dose-distribution for the target and organs at risk (OARs) and 3) optimize the set-up correction strategy. By acquiring multiple set-up images the systematic set-up deviation was evaluated. The effect of the systematic set-up deviation on the absorbed dose distribution was evaluated by 1) simulation in the treatment planning system and 2) measurements with a biplanar diode array. The set-up deviations could be decreased using a no action level correction strategy. Not using the clinically implemented adaptive maximum likelihood factor for the gating patients resulted in better set-up. When the uncorrected set-up deviations were simulated the average mean absorbed dose was increased from 1.38 to 2.21 Gy for the heart, 4.17 to 8.86 Gy to the left anterior descending coronary artery and 5.80 to 7.64 Gy to the left lung. Respiratory gating can induce systematic set-up deviations which would result in increased mean absorbed dose to the OARs if not corrected for and should therefore be corrected for by an appropriate correction strategy.

  4. A 3-Dimensional Absorbed Dose Calculation Method Based on Quantitative SPECT for Radionuclide Therapy: Evaluation for 131I Using Monte Carlo Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Ljungberg, Michael; Sjögreen, Katarina; Liu, Xiaowei; Frey, Eric; Dewaraja, Yuni; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2009-01-01

    A general method is presented for patient-specific 3-dimensional absorbed dose calculations based on quantitative SPECT activity measurements. Methods The computational scheme includes a method for registration of the CT image to the SPECT image and position-dependent compensation for attenuation, scatter, and collimator detector response performed as part of an iterative reconstruction method. A method for conversion of the measured activity distribution to a 3-dimensional absorbed dose distribution, based on the EGS4 (electron-gamma shower, version 4) Monte Carlo code, is also included. The accuracy of the activity quantification and the absorbed dose calculation is evaluated on the basis of realistic Monte Carlo–simulated SPECT data, using the SIMIND (simulation of imaging nuclear detectors) program and a voxel-based computer phantom. CT images are obtained from the computer phantom, and realistic patient movements are added relative to the SPECT image. The SPECT-based activity concentration and absorbed dose distributions are compared with the true ones. Results Correction could be made for object scatter, photon attenuation, and scatter penetration in the collimator. However, inaccuracies were imposed by the limited spatial resolution of the SPECT system, for which the collimator response correction did not fully compensate. Conclusion The presented method includes compensation for most parameters degrading the quantitative image information. The compensation methods are based on physical models and therefore are generally applicable to other radionuclides. The proposed evaluation methodology may be used as a basis for future intercomparison of different methods. PMID:12163637

  5. Comparison of Accuracy in Calculation of Absorbed Dose to Patients Following Bone Scan with 99mTc-Marked Diphosphonates by Two Different Background Correction Methods

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Damoori, Mehri; Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher; Moslehi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    To improve the accuracy of the activity quantification and the image quality in scintigraphy, scatter correction is a vital procedure. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy in calculation of absorbed dose to patients following bone scan with 99mTc-marked diphosphonates (99mTc-MDP) by two different methods of background correction in conjugate view method. This study involved 22 patients referring to the Nuclear Medicine Center of Shahid Chamran Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. After the injection of 99mTc-MDP, whole-body images from patients were acquired at 10, 60, 90, and 180 min. Organ activities were calculated using the conjugate view method by Buijs and conventional background correction. Finally, the absorbed dose was calculated using the Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) technique. The results of this study showed that the absorbed dose per unit of injected activity (rad/mCi) ± standard deviation for pelvis bone, bladder, and kidneys by Buijs method was 0.19 ± 0.05, 0.08 ± 0.01, and 0.03 ± 0.01 and by conventional method was 0.13 ± 0.04, 0.08 ± 0.01, and 0.024 ± 0.01, respectively. This showed that Buijs background correction method had a high accuracy compared to conventional method for the estimated absorbed dose of bone and kidneys whereas, for the bladder, its accuracy was low. PMID:27014610

  6. Absorbed dose estimates for positron emission tomography (PET): C/sup 15/O, /sup 11/CO, and CO/sup 15/O

    SciTech Connect

    Kearfott, K.J.

    1982-11-01

    Regional cerebral blood volume and blood flow may be determined using PET and C/sup 15/O, /sup 11/CO, and CO/sup 15/O. Detailed estimates of radiation absorbed dose for 22 organs and the whole body are reported and compared for these gases administered by continuous or bolus inhalation and by infusion techniques.

  7. Evaluation of absorbed dose in irradiated sugar-containing plant material (peony roots) by an ESR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoki, Rumi; Kimura, Shojiro; Ohta, Masatoshi

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between electron spin resonance (ESR) signal intensity of irradiated plant materials and sugar content was investigated by spectral analysis using peony roots. A weak background signal near g=2.005 was observed in the roots. After a 10 kGy irradiation, the ESR line broadened and the intensity increased, and the spectral characteristics were similar to a typical spectrum of irradiated food containing crystalline sugars. The free radical concentration was nearly stable 30 days after irradiation. The spectrum of peony root 30 days after irradiation was simulated using the summation of the intensities of six assumed components: radical signals derived from (a) sucrose, (b) glucose, (c) fructose, (d) cellulose, (e) the background signal near g=2.005 and (f) unidentified component. The simulated spectra using the six components were in agreement with the observed sample spectra. The intensity of sucrose radical signal in irradiated samples increased proportionally up to 20 kGy. In addition, the intensity of sucrose radical signals was strongly correlated with the sucrose contents of the samples. The results showed that the radiation sensitivity of sucrose in peony roots was influenced little by other plant constituents. There was also a good correlation between the total area of the spectra and the sucrose content, because the sucrose content was higher than that of other sugars in the samples. In peony roots, estimation of the absorbed dose from the ESR signal intensity may be possible by a calibration method based on the sucrose content.

  8. Determination of absorbed dose of ozone (O3) in animals and humans using stable-isotope (oxygen-18) tracing

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, G.E.; Aissa, M.

    1987-05-01

    A method for the determination of absorbed dose of ozone (O3) in animals and humans using oxygen-18 YO as a physiological tracer is presented. The experimental aspects of the method are based on the instantaneous pyrolysis of tissue samples and subsequent conversion of the sample oxygen to carbon monoxide then to carbon dioxide whose isotopic composition is determined by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. A mathematical procedure is then used to correct the isotopic data for interferences from the blank and memory effects and from the iodine pentoxide oxidation of CO to CO2. Laboratory animals were exposed to YO3 (1 ppm, 1 hr) then tissues were dried and processed for YO measurement. Enrichments in YO over natural abundance YO was observed in lung homogenates, nasal cavities, trachea, and pulmonary lavage fluids but not in blood of mice, rats, and rabbits. Thus, the YO tracing method appears to be sensitive enough to detect the reaction products of YO in animals exposed to near environmental concentrations of this gas.

  9. Comparison of the NMIJ and the ARPANSA standards for absorbed dose to water in high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, M; Morishita, Y; Kato, M; Tanaka, T; Kurosawa, T; Takata, N; Saito, N; Ramanathan, G; Harty, P D; Oliver, C; Wright, T; Butler, D J

    2015-04-01

    The authors report the results of an indirect comparison of the standards of absorbed dose to water in high-energy photon beams from a clinical linac and (60)Co radiation beam performed between the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) and the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). Three ionisation chambers were calibrated by the NMIJ in April and June 2013 and by the ARPANSA in May 2013. The average ratios of the calibration coefficients for the three ionisation chambers obtained by the NMIJ to those obtained by the ARPANSA were 0.9994, 1.0040 and 1.0045 for 6-, 10- and 15-MV (18 MV at the ARPANSA) high-energy photon beams, respectively. The relative standard uncertainty of the value was 7.2 × 10(-3). The ratio for (60)Co radiation was 0.9986(66), which is consistent with the results published in the key comparison of BIPM.RI(I)-K4.

  10. Determination of absorbed dose in high-energy electron and photon radiation by means of an uncalibrated ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Klevenhagen, S C

    1991-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a dosimetric method based on an ionization chamber which has an uncalibrated sensitive volume but which behaves as a Bragg-Gray cavity in high-energy radiation. The new type of chamber developed in the course of this study has a variable volume and is constructed from water-similar materials. It can be used in a water phantom directly in a beam of a therapy megavoltage machine under clinical conditions. The chamber allows absorbed dose to be determined from first principles, overcoming many of the problems encountered with conventional dosimetry based on calibrated chambers. The study involved an intercomparison of the performance of the new chamber in high-energy electron and photon radiation with the conventional calibrated chambers employed according to the established dosimetry protocols. Good agreement was found between these dosimetric methods and it may therefore be concluded that the method developed in this work can be successfully employed for absolute dosimetry. The new chamber is a promising device for research in various aspects of dosimetry.

  11. Case control study to assess the possibility of decrease the risk of osteoradionecrosis in relation to the dose of radiation absorbed by the jaw

    PubMed Central

    Carini, Fabrizio; Bucalo, Concetta; Saggese, Vito; Monai, Dario; Porcaro, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    Summary Aims the assessment of the limit dose for the organs at risk in external radiotherapy is a fundamental step to guarantee an optimal risk-benefit ratio. The aim of this study was to assess, through contouring the single dental cavities, the absorbed radiation dose on irradiated alveolar bones during the treatment of cervico-facial tumours, so as to test the correlation between the absorbed dose of radiation at alveolar level and the level of individual surgical risk for osteonecrosis. Materials and methods we selected 45 out of 89 patients on the basis of different exclusion criteria. Nine of these patients showed evidence of osteoradionecrosis. The patients were treated either with 3D conformational radiation therapy (3D-CRT) or with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), there after alveolar bones were contoured using computed axial tomography (CAT scans) carried out following oncological and dental treatment. The dose-volume histograms (DVH) were obtained on the basis of such data, which included those relating to the dental cavities in addition to those inherent to the tumours and the organs at risk. Results all patients, irrespective of type of treatment, received an average of 60 to 70 grays in 30/35 sittings. The patients treated with IMRT showed higher variation in absorbed radiation dose than those treated with 3D-CRT. The alveolar encirclement allowed the assessment of the absorbed radiation dose, and consequently it also allowed to assess the individual surgical risk for osteonecrosis in patients with head and neck tumours who underwent radiography treatment. Conclusions the study of DVH allows the assessment of limit dose and the detection of the areas at greater risk for osteoradionecrosis before dental surgery. PMID:23285316

  12. Reduction of the Buildup Contribution in Gamma Ray Attenuation Measurements and a New Way to Study This Experiment in a Student Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamides, E.; Kavadjiklis, A.; Koutroubas, S.K.; Moshonas, N.; Tzedakis, A.; Yiasemides, K.

    2014-01-01

    In continuation of our investigation into the buildup phenomenon appearing in gamma ray attenuation measurements in laboratory experiments we study the dependence of the buildup factor on the area of the absorber in an effort to reduce the buildup of photons. Detailed measurements are performed for up to two mean free paths of [superscript 60]Co…

  13. Measurement of absorbed dose-to-water for an HDR {sup 192}Ir source with ionization chambers in a sandwich setup

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, Fujio; Kouno, Tomohiro; Ohno, Takeshi; Kakei, Kiyotaka; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki; Kawamura, Shinji

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: In this study, a dedicated device for ion chamber measurements of absorbed dose-to-water for a Nucletron microSelectron-v2 HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source is presented. The device uses two ionization chambers in a so-called sandwich assembly. Using this setup and by taking the average reading of the two chambers, any dose error due to difficulties in absolute positioning (centering) of the source in between the chambers is cancelled to first order. The method's accuracy was examined by comparing measurements with absorbed dose-to-water determination based on the AAPM TG-43 protocol.Methods: The optimal source-to-chamber distance (SCD) for {sup 192}Ir dosimetry was determined from ion chamber measurements in a water phantom. The {sup 192}Ir source was sandwiched between two Exradin A1SL chambers (0.057 cm{sup 3}) at the optimal SCD separation. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water using a {sup 60}Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo-calculated beam quality conversion factor, k{sub Q}, for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir. An uncertainty estimate of the proposed method was determined based on reproducibility of measurements at different institutions for the same type of source.Results: The optimal distance for the A1SL chamber measurements was determined to be 5 cm from the {sup 192}Ir source center, considering the depth dependency of k{sub Q} for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir and the chamber positioning. The absorbed dose to water measured at (5 cm, 90°) on the transverse axis was 1.3% lower than TG-43 values and its reproducibility and overall uncertainty were 0.8% and 1.7%, respectively. The measurement doses at anisotropic points agreed within 1.5% with TG-43 values.Conclusions: The ion chamber measurement of absorbed dose-to-water with a sandwich method for the {sup 192}Ir source provides a more accurate, direct, and reference dose compared to the dose-to-water determination based on air-kerma strength in the TG-43 protocol

  14. A graphite calorimeter for absolute measurements of absorbed dose to water: application in medium-energy x-ray filtered beams.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M; Pimpinella, M; Quini, M; D'Arienzo, M; Astefanoaei, I; Loreti, S; Guerra, A S

    2016-02-21

    The Italian National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology (ENEA-INMRI) has designed and built a graphite calorimeter that, in a water phantom, has allowed the determination of the absorbed dose to water in medium-energy x-rays with generating voltages from 180 to 250 kV. The new standard is a miniaturized three-bodies calorimeter, with a disc-shaped core of 21 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness weighing 1.134 g, sealed in a PMMA waterproof envelope with air-evacuated gaps. The measured absorbed dose to graphite is converted into absorbed dose to water by means of an energy-dependent conversion factor obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. Heat-transfer correction factors were determined by FEM calculations. At a source-to-detector distance of 100 cm, a depth in water of 2 g cm(-2), and at a dose rate of about 0.15 Gy min(-1), results of calorimetric measurements of absorbed dose to water, D(w), were compared to experimental determinations, D wK, obtained via an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of air kerma, according to established dosimetry protocols. The combined standard uncertainty of D(w) and D(wK) were estimated as 1.9% and 1.7%, respectively. The two absorbed dose to water determinations were in agreement within 1%, well below the stated measurement uncertainties. Advancements are in progress to extend the measurement capability of the new in-water-phantom graphite calorimeter to other filtered medium-energy x-ray qualities and to reduce the D(w) uncertainty to around 1%. The new calorimeter represents the first implementation of in-water-phantom graphite calorimetry in the kilovoltage range and, allowing independent determinations of D(w), it will contribute to establish a robust system of absorbed dose to water primary standards for medium-energy x-ray beams. PMID:26841127

  15. Direct measurement of absorbed dose to water in HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy: Water calorimetry, ionization chamber, Gafchromic film, and TG-43

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfehnia, Arman; Kawrakow, Iwan; Seuntjens, Jan

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Gafchromic film and ionometric calibration procedures for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources in terms of dose rate to water are presented and the experimental results are compared to the TG-43 protocol as well as with the absolute dose measurement results from a water calorimetry-based primary standard. Methods: EBT-1 Gafchromic films, an A1SL Exradin miniature Shonka thimble type chamber, and an SI HDR 1000 Plus well-type chamber (Standard Imaging, Inc., Middleton, WI) with an ADCL traceable S{sub k} calibration coefficient (following the AAPM TG-43 protocol) were used. The Farmer chamber and Gafchromic film measurements were performed directly in water. All results were compared to direct and absolute absorbed dose to water measurements from a 4 deg. C stagnant water calorimeter. Results: Based on water calorimetry, the authors measured the dose rate to water to be 361{+-}7 {mu}Gy/(h U) at a 55 mm source-to-detector separation. The dose rate normalized to air-kerma strength for all the techniques agree with the water calorimetry results to within 0.83%. The overall 1-sigma uncertainty on water calorimetry, ionization chamber, Gafchromic film, and TG-43 dose rate measurement amounts to 1.90%, 1.44%, 1.78%, and 2.50%, respectively. Conclusions: This work allows us to build a more realistic uncertainty estimate for absorbed dose to water determination using the TG-43 protocol. Furthermore, it provides the framework necessary for a shift from indirect HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy dosimetry to a more accurate, direct, and absolute measurement of absorbed dose to water.

  16. Improvement of Photon Buildup Factors for Radiological Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Schirmers, Fritz Gordon

    2006-07-01

    Slant-path buildup factors for photons between 1 keV and 10 MeV for nine radiation shielding materials (air, aluminum, concrete, iron, lead, leaded glass, polyethylene, stainless steel, and water) are calculated with the most recent cross-section data available using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates methods. Discrete ordinates calculations use a 244-group energy structure that is based on previous research at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), but extended with the results of this thesis, and its focused studies on low-energy photon transport and the effects of group widths in multigroup calculations. Buildup factor calculations in discrete ordinates benefit from coupled photon/electron cross sections to account for secondary photon effects. Also, ambient dose equivalent (herein referred to as dose) buildup factors were analyzed at lower energies where corresponding response functions do not exist in literature. The results of these studies are directly applicable to radiation safety at LANL, where the dose modeling tool Pandemonium is used to estimate worker dose in plutonium handling facilities. Buildup factors determined in this thesis will be used to enhance the code's modeling capabilities, but should be of interest to the radiation shielding community.

  17. Determination of absorbed dose to water around a clinical HDR {sup 192}Ir source using LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs demonstrates an LET dependence of detector response

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa; Elia, Rouba; Hedtjaern, Haakan; Olsson, Sara; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Experimental radiation dosimetry with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), calibrated in a {sup 60}Co or megavoltage (MV) photon beam, is recommended by AAPM TG-43U1for verification of Monte Carlo calculated absorbed doses around brachytherapy sources. However, it has been shown by Carlsson Tedgren et al.[Med. Phys. 38, 5539-5550 (2011)] that for TLDs of LiF:Mg,Ti, detector response was 4% higher in a {sup 137}Cs beam than in a {sup 60}Co one. The aim of this work was to investigate if similar over-response exists when measuring absorbed dose to water around {sup 192}Ir sources, using LiF:Mg,Ti dosimeters calibrated in a 6 MV photon beam. Methods: LiF dosimeters were calibrated to measure absorbed dose to water in a 6 MV photon beam and used to measure absorbed dose to water at distances of 3, 5, and 7 cm from a clinical high dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir source in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom. Measured values were compared to values of absorbed dose to water calculated using a treatment planning system (TPS) including corrections for the difference in energy absorption properties between calibration quality and the quality in the users'{sup 192}Ir beam and for the use of a PMMA phantom instead of the water phantom underlying dose calculations in the TPS. Results: Measured absorbed doses to water around the {sup 192}Ir source were overestimated by 5% compared to those calculated by the TPS. Corresponding absorbed doses to water measured in a previous work with lithium formate electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimeters by Antonovic et al. [Med. Phys. 36, 2236-2247 (2009)], using the same irradiation setup and calibration procedure as in this work, were 2% lower than those calculated by the TPS. The results obtained in the measurements in this work and those obtained using the EPR lithium formate dosimeters were, within the expanded (k = 2) uncertainty, in agreement with the values derived by the TPS. The discrepancy between the results using

  18. Absorbed Dose Rate Due to Intake of Natural Radionuclides by Tilapia Fish (Tilapia nilotica,Linnaeus, 1758) Estimated Near Uranium Mining at Caetité, Bahia, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Kelecom, Alphonse; Py Júnior, Delcy de Azevedo

    2008-08-01

    The uranium mining at Caetité (Uranium Concentrate Unit—URA) is in its operational phase. Aiming to estimate the radiological environmental impact of the URA, a monitoring program is underway. In order to preserve the biota of the deleterious effects from radiation and to act in a pro-active way as expected from a licensing body, the present work aims to use an environmental protection methodology based on the calculation of absorbed dose rate in biota. Thus, selected target organism was the Tilapia fish (Tilapia nilotica, Linnaeus, 1758) and the radionuclides were: uranium (U-238), thorium (Th-232), radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) and lead (Pb-210). As, in Brazil there are no radiation exposure limits adopted for biota the value proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States of 3.5×103 μGy y-1 has been used. The derived absorbed dose rate calculated for Tilapia was 2.51×100 μGy y-1, that is less than 0.1% of the dose limit established by DOE. The critical radionuclide was Ra-226, with 56% of the absorbed dose rate, followed by U-238 with 34% and Th-232 with 9%. This value of 0.1% of the limit allows to state that, in the operational conditions analyzed, natural radionuclides do not represent a radiological problem to biota.

  19. Absorbed Dose Rate Due to Intake of Natural Radionuclides by Tilapia Fish (Tilapia nilotica,Linnaeus, 1758) Estimated Near Uranium Mining at Caetite, Bahia, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Wagner de S; Kelecom, Alphonse

    2008-08-07

    The uranium mining at Caetite (Uranium Concentrate Unit--URA) is in its operational phase. Aiming to estimate the radiological environmental impact of the URA, a monitoring program is underway. In order to preserve the biota of the deleterious effects from radiation and to act in a pro-active way as expected from a licensing body, the present work aims to use an environmental protection methodology based on the calculation of absorbed dose rate in biota. Thus, selected target organism was the Tilapia fish (Tilapia nilotica, Linnaeus, 1758) and the radionuclides were: uranium (U-238), thorium (Th-232), radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) and lead (Pb-210). As, in Brazil there are no radiation exposure limits adopted for biota the value proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States of 3.5x10{sup 3} {mu}Gy y{sup -1} has been used. The derived absorbed dose rate calculated for Tilapia was 2.51x10{sup 0} {mu}Gy y{sup -1}, that is less than 0.1% of the dose limit established by DOE. The critical radionuclide was Ra-226, with 56% of the absorbed dose rate, followed by U-238 with 34% and Th-232 with 9%. This value of 0.1% of the limit allows to state that, in the operational conditions analyzed, natural radionuclides do not represent a radiological problem to biota.

  20. A 3D Monte Carlo Method for Estimation of Patient-specific Internal Organs Absorbed Dose for (99m)Tc-hynic-Tyr(3)-octreotide Imaging.

    PubMed

    Momennezhad, Mehdi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Parach, Ali Asghar; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Asl, Ruhollah Ghahraman

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based tracers are easily available and more widely used than positron emission tomography (PET)-based tracers, and SPECT imaging still remains the most prevalent nuclear medicine imaging modality worldwide. The aim of this study is to implement an image-based Monte Carlo method for patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) absorbed dose calculation in patients after injection of (99m)Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide (hynic)-Tyr(3)-octreotide as a SPECT radiotracer. (99m)Tc patient-specific S values and the absorbed doses were calculated with GATE code for each source-target organ pair in four patients who were imaged for suspected neuroendocrine tumors. Each patient underwent multiple whole-body planar scans as well as SPECT imaging over a period of 1-24 h after intravenous injection of (99m)hynic-Tyr(3)-octreotide. The patient-specific S values calculated by GATE Monte Carlo code and the corresponding S values obtained by MIRDOSE program differed within 4.3% on an average for self-irradiation, and differed within 69.6% on an average for cross-irradiation. However, the agreement between total organ doses calculated by GATE code and MIRDOSE program for all patients was reasonably well (percentage difference was about 4.6% on an average). Normal and tumor absorbed doses calculated with GATE were slightly higher than those calculated with MIRDOSE program. The average ratio of GATE absorbed doses to MIRDOSE was 1.07 ± 0.11 (ranging from 0.94 to 1.36). According to the results, it is proposed that when cross-organ irradiation is dominant, a comprehensive approach such as GATE Monte Carlo dosimetry be used since it provides more reliable dosimetric results.

  1. Measurement of absorbed dose to water around an electronic brachytherapy source. Comparison of two dosimetry systems: lithium formate EPR dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolfsson, Emelie; White, Shane; Landry, Guillaume; Lund, Eva; Gustafsson, Håkan; Verhaegen, Frank; Reniers, Brigitte; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun

    2015-05-01

    Interest in high dose rate (HDR) electronic brachytherapy operating at 50 kV is increasing. For quality assurance it is important to identify dosimetry systems that can measure the absorbed doses in absolute terms which is difficult in this energy region. In this work a comparison is made between two dosimetry systems, EPR lithium formate dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film. Both types of dosimeters were irradiated simultaneously in a PMMA phantom using the Axxent EBS. Absorbed dose to water was determined at distances of 10 mm, 30 mm and 50 mm from the EBS. Results were traceable to different primary standards as regards to absorbed dose to water (EPR) and air kerma (EBT2). Monte Carlo simulations were used in absolute terms as a third estimate of absorbed dose to water. Agreement within the estimated expanded (k = 2) uncertainties (5% (EPR), 7% (EBT2)) was found between the results at 30 mm and 50 mm from the x-ray source. The same result was obtained in 4 repetitions of irradiation, indicating high precision in the measurements with both systems. At all distances, agreement between EPR and Monte Carlo simulations was shown as was also the case for the film measurements at 30mm and 50mm. At 10mm the geometry for the film measurements caused too large uncertainty in measured values depending on the exact position (within sub-mm distances) of the EBS and the 10 mm film results were exculded from comparison. This work has demonstrated good performance of the lithium formate EPR dosimetry system in accordance with earlier experiments at higher photon energies (192Ir HDR brachytherapy). It was also highlighted that there might be issues regarding the energy dependence and intrinsic efficiency of the EBT2 film that need to be considered for measurements using low energy sources.

  2. A 3D Monte Carlo Method for Estimation of Patient-specific Internal Organs Absorbed Dose for (99m)Tc-hynic-Tyr(3)-octreotide Imaging.

    PubMed

    Momennezhad, Mehdi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Parach, Ali Asghar; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Asl, Ruhollah Ghahraman

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based tracers are easily available and more widely used than positron emission tomography (PET)-based tracers, and SPECT imaging still remains the most prevalent nuclear medicine imaging modality worldwide. The aim of this study is to implement an image-based Monte Carlo method for patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) absorbed dose calculation in patients after injection of (99m)Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide (hynic)-Tyr(3)-octreotide as a SPECT radiotracer. (99m)Tc patient-specific S values and the absorbed doses were calculated with GATE code for each source-target organ pair in four patients who were imaged for suspected neuroendocrine tumors. Each patient underwent multiple whole-body planar scans as well as SPECT imaging over a period of 1-24 h after intravenous injection of (99m)hynic-Tyr(3)-octreotide. The patient-specific S values calculated by GATE Monte Carlo code and the corresponding S values obtained by MIRDOSE program differed within 4.3% on an average for self-irradiation, and differed within 69.6% on an average for cross-irradiation. However, the agreement between total organ doses calculated by GATE code and MIRDOSE program for all patients was reasonably well (percentage difference was about 4.6% on an average). Normal and tumor absorbed doses calculated with GATE were slightly higher than those calculated with MIRDOSE program. The average ratio of GATE absorbed doses to MIRDOSE was 1.07 ± 0.11 (ranging from 0.94 to 1.36). According to the results, it is proposed that when cross-organ irradiation is dominant, a comprehensive approach such as GATE Monte Carlo dosimetry be used since it provides more reliable dosimetric results. PMID:27134562

  3. A 3D Monte Carlo Method for Estimation of Patient-specific Internal Organs Absorbed Dose for 99mTc-hynic-Tyr3-octreotide Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Momennezhad, Mehdi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Zakavi, Seyed Rasoul; Parach, Ali Asghar; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Asl, Ruhollah Ghahraman

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based tracers are easily available and more widely used than positron emission tomography (PET)-based tracers, and SPECT imaging still remains the most prevalent nuclear medicine imaging modality worldwide. The aim of this study is to implement an image-based Monte Carlo method for patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) absorbed dose calculation in patients after injection of 99mTc-hydrazinonicotinamide (hynic)-Tyr3-octreotide as a SPECT radiotracer. 99mTc patient-specific S values and the absorbed doses were calculated with GATE code for each source-target organ pair in four patients who were imaged for suspected neuroendocrine tumors. Each patient underwent multiple whole-body planar scans as well as SPECT imaging over a period of 1-24 h after intravenous injection of 99mhynic-Tyr3-octreotide. The patient-specific S values calculated by GATE Monte Carlo code and the corresponding S values obtained by MIRDOSE program differed within 4.3% on an average for self-irradiation, and differed within 69.6% on an average for cross-irradiation. However, the agreement between total organ doses calculated by GATE code and MIRDOSE program for all patients was reasonably well (percentage difference was about 4.6% on an average). Normal and tumor absorbed doses calculated with GATE were slightly higher than those calculated with MIRDOSE program. The average ratio of GATE absorbed doses to MIRDOSE was 1.07 ± 0.11 (ranging from 0.94 to 1.36). According to the results, it is proposed that when cross-organ irradiation is dominant, a comprehensive approach such as GATE Monte Carlo dosimetry be used since it provides more reliable dosimetric results. PMID:27134562

  4. Role of shielding in modulating the effects of solar particle events: Monte Carlo calculation of absorbed dose and DNA complex lesions in different organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, F.; Biaggi, M.; De Biaggi, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ottolenghi, A.; Panzarasa, A.; Paretzke, H. G.; Pelliccioni, M.; Sala, P.; Scannicchio, D.; Zankl, M.

    2004-01-01

    Distributions of absorbed dose and DNA clustered damage yields in various organs and tissues following the October 1989 solar particle event (SPE) were calculated by coupling the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code with two anthropomorphic phantoms (a mathematical model and a voxel model), with the main aim of quantifying the role of the shielding features in modulating organ doses. The phantoms, which were assumed to be in deep space, were inserted into a shielding box of variable thickness and material and were irradiated with the proton spectra of the October 1989 event. Average numbers of DNA lesions per cell in different organs were calculated by adopting a technique already tested in previous works, consisting of integrating into "condensed-history" Monte Carlo transport codes - such as FLUKA - yields of radiobiological damage, either calculated with "event-by-event" track structure simulations, or taken from experimental works available in the literature. More specifically, the yields of "Complex Lesions" (or "CL", defined and calculated as a clustered DNA damage in a previous work) per unit dose and DNA mass (CL Gy -1 Da -1) due to the various beam components, including those derived from nuclear interactions with the shielding and the human body, were integrated in FLUKA. This provided spatial distributions of CL/cell yields in different organs, as well as distributions of absorbed doses. The contributions of primary protons and secondary hadrons were calculated separately, and the simulations were repeated for values of Al shielding thickness ranging between 1 and 20 g/cm 2. Slight differences were found between the two phantom types. Skin and eye lenses were found to receive larger doses with respect to internal organs; however, shielding was more effective for skin and lenses. Secondary particles arising from nuclear interactions were found to have a minor role, although their relative contribution was found to be larger for the Complex Lesions than for

  5. Comparison of the action spectra and relative DNA absorbance spectra of microorganisms: information important for the determination of germicidal fluence (UV dose) in an ultraviolet disinfection of water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ren Zhuo; Craik, Stephen A; Bolton, James R

    2009-12-01

    The action spectra of Bacillus subtilis spores (ATCC6633) and Salmonella typhimurium LT2 were characterized using physical radiometry for irradiance measurements and a multiple target model to interpret the inactivation kinetics. The observed action spectrum of B. subtilis spores deviated significantly from the relative absorbance spectrum of the DNA purified from the spores, but matched quite well with the relative absorbance spectrum of decoated spores. The action spectrum of B. subtilis spores determined in this study was statistically different from those reported in previous studies. On the other hand, the action spectrum of S. typhimurium bacteria matched quite well with the relative absorbance spectrum of DNA extracted from vegetative cells, except in the region below 240nm. It is concluded that the common use of the relative DNA absorbance spectrum as a surrogate for the germicidal action spectrum can result in systematic errors when evaluating the performance of a polychromatic UV light reactors using bioassays. For example, if the weighted germicidal fluence (UV dose) calculated using the relative DNA absorbance spectrum as the germicidal weighting factor is found to be 40mJcm(-2) for a medium pressure lamp UV reactor, that calculated using the relative action spectrum of B. subtilis spores, as determined in this study, would be 66mJcm(-2). PMID:19762061

  6. Comparison of the action spectra and relative DNA absorbance spectra of microorganisms: information important for the determination of germicidal fluence (UV dose) in an ultraviolet disinfection of water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ren Zhuo; Craik, Stephen A; Bolton, James R

    2009-12-01

    The action spectra of Bacillus subtilis spores (ATCC6633) and Salmonella typhimurium LT2 were characterized using physical radiometry for irradiance measurements and a multiple target model to interpret the inactivation kinetics. The observed action spectrum of B. subtilis spores deviated significantly from the relative absorbance spectrum of the DNA purified from the spores, but matched quite well with the relative absorbance spectrum of decoated spores. The action spectrum of B. subtilis spores determined in this study was statistically different from those reported in previous studies. On the other hand, the action spectrum of S. typhimurium bacteria matched quite well with the relative absorbance spectrum of DNA extracted from vegetative cells, except in the region below 240nm. It is concluded that the common use of the relative DNA absorbance spectrum as a surrogate for the germicidal action spectrum can result in systematic errors when evaluating the performance of a polychromatic UV light reactors using bioassays. For example, if the weighted germicidal fluence (UV dose) calculated using the relative DNA absorbance spectrum as the germicidal weighting factor is found to be 40mJcm(-2) for a medium pressure lamp UV reactor, that calculated using the relative action spectrum of B. subtilis spores, as determined in this study, would be 66mJcm(-2).

  7. Ion chamber absorbed dose calibration coefficients, N{sub D,w}, measured at ADCLs: Distribution analysis and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B. R.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To analyze absorbed dose calibration coefficients, N{sub D,w}, measured at accredited dosimetry calibration laboratories (ADCLs) for client ionization chambers to study (i) variability among N{sub D,w} coefficients for chambers of the same type calibrated at each ADCL to investigate ion chamber volume fluctuations and chamber manufacturing tolerances; (ii) equivalency of ion chamber calibration coefficients measured at different ADCLs by intercomparing N{sub D,w} coefficients for chambers of the same type; and (iii) the long-term stability of N{sub D,w} coefficients for different chamber types by investigating repeated chamber calibrations. Methods: Large samples of N{sub D,w} coefficients for several chamber types measured over the time period between 1998 and 2014 were obtained from the three ADCLs operating in the United States. These are analyzed using various graphical and numerical statistical tests for the four chamber types with the largest samples of calibration coefficients to investigate (i) and (ii) above. Ratios of calibration coefficients for the same chamber, typically obtained two years apart, are calculated to investigate (iii) above and chambers with standard deviations of old/new ratios less than 0.3% meet stability requirements for accurate reference dosimetry recommended in dosimetry protocols. Results: It is found that N{sub D,w} coefficients for a given chamber type compared among different ADCLs may arise from differing probability distributions potentially due to slight differences in calibration procedures and/or the transfer of the primary standard. However, average N{sub D,w} coefficients from different ADCLs for given chamber types are very close with percent differences generally less than 0.2% for Farmer-type chambers and are well within reported uncertainties. Conclusions: The close agreement among calibrations performed at different ADCLs reaffirms the Calibration Laboratory Accreditation Subcommittee process of ensuring

  8. Estimation of absorbed radiation dose rates in wild rodents inhabiting a site severely contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yoshihisa; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yoshito; Fuma, Shoichi; Kawaguchi, Isao; Aoki, Masanari; Kubota, Masahide; Furuhata, Yoshiaki; Shigemura, Yusaku; Yamada, Fumio; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Obara, Satoshi; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    The dose rates of radiation absorbed by wild rodents inhabiting a site severely contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident were estimated. The large Japanese field mouse (Apodemus speciosus), also called the wood mouse, was the major rodent species captured in the sampling area, although other species of rodents, such as small field mice (Apodemus argenteus) and Japanese grass voles (Microtus montebelli), were also collected. The external exposure of rodents calculated from the activity concentrations of radiocesium ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) in litter and soil samples using the ERICA (Environmental Risk from Ionizing Contaminants: Assessment and Management) tool under the assumption that radionuclides existed as the infinite plane isotropic source was almost the same as those measured directly with glass dosimeters embedded in rodent abdomens. Our findings suggest that the ERICA tool is useful for estimating external dose rates to small animals inhabiting forest floors; however, the estimated dose rates showed large standard deviations. This could be an indication of the inhomogeneous distribution of radionuclides in the sampled litter and soil. There was a 50-fold difference between minimum and maximum whole-body activity concentrations measured in rodents at the time of capture. The radionuclides retained in rodents after capture decreased exponentially over time. Regression equations indicated that the biological half-life of radiocesium after capture was 3.31 d. At the time of capture, the lowest activity concentration was measured in the lung and was approximately half of the highest concentration measured in the mixture of muscle and bone. The average internal absorbed dose rate was markedly smaller than the average external dose rate (<10% of the total absorbed dose rate). The average total absorbed dose rate to wild rodents inhabiting the sampling area was estimated to be approximately 52 μGy h(-1) (1.2 mGy d(-1)), even 3 years after

  9. Comparison of MCNPX and GEANT4 to Predict the Contribution of Non-elastic Nuclear Interactions to Absorbed Dose in Water, PMMA and A150

    SciTech Connect

    Shtejer, K.; Arruda-Neto, J. D. T.; Rodrigues, T. E.; Schulte, R.; Wroe, A.; Menezes, M. O. de; Moralles, M.

    2008-08-11

    Proton induced non-elastic nuclear reactions play an important role in the dose distribution of clinically used proton beams as they deposit dose of high biological effectiveness both within the primary beam path as well as outside the beam to untargeted tissues. Non-elastic nuclear reactions can be evaluated using transport codes based on the Monte Carlo method. In this work, we have utilized the Los Alamos code MCNPX and the CERN GEANT4 toolkit, which are currently the most widely used Monte Carlo programs for proton radiation transport simulations in medical physics, to study the contribution of non-elastic nuclear interactions to the absorbed dose of proton beams in the therapeutic energy range. The impact of different available theoretical models to address the nuclear reaction process was investigated. The contribution of secondary particles from non-elastic nuclear reactions was calculated in three materials relevant in radiotherapy applications: water, PMMA and A150. The results evidence that there are differences in the calculated contribution of the secondary particles heavier than protons to the absorbed dose, with different approaches to model the nuclear reactions. The MCNPX calculation give rise to a larger contribution of d, t, {alpha}{sup 3}He to the total dose compared to the GEANT4 physical models chosen in this work.

  10. KEY COMPARISON: Comparison of the standards for absorbed dose to water of the ENEA-INMRI (Italy) and the BIPM for 60Co γ rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Allisy-Roberts, P. J.; Burns, D. T.; Guerra, A. S.; Laitano, R. F.; Pimpinella, M.

    2010-01-01

    A comparison of the standards for absorbed dose to water of the Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti of the Ente per le Nuove Tecnologie, l'Energia e l'Ambiente, Italy (ENEA-INMRI), and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) has been made in 60Co gamma radiation under the auspices of the key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K4. The comparison result, based on the calibration coefficients for three transfer standards and expressed as a ratio of the ENEA and the BIPM standards for absorbed dose to water, is 0.9999 (0.0044). The present 2007 result replaces the earlier ENEA value in this key comparison. The degrees of equivalence between the ENEA and the other participants in this comparison have been calculated and the results are given in the form of a matrix for the ten national metrology institutes (NMIs) that have published results in this ongoing comparison for absorbed dose to water. A graphical presentation is also given. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI Section I, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  11. Efficacy of a Radiation Absorbing Shield in Reducing Dose to the Interventionalist During Peripheral Endovascular Procedures: A Single Centre Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Power, S.; Mirza, M.; Thakorlal, A.; Ganai, B.; Gavagan, L. D.; Given, M. F.; Lee, M. J.

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThis prospective pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of using a radiation absorbing shield to reduce operator dose from scatter during lower limb endovascular procedures.Materials and MethodsA commercially available bismuth shield system (RADPAD) was used. Sixty consecutive patients undergoing lower limb angioplasty were included. Thirty procedures were performed without the RADPAD (control group) and thirty with the RADPAD (study group). Two separate methods were used to measure dose to a single operator. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) badges were used to measure hand, eye, and unshielded body dose. A direct dosimeter with digital readout was also used to measure eye and unshielded body dose. To allow for variation between control and study groups, dose per unit time was calculated.ResultsTLD results demonstrated a significant reduction in median body dose per unit time for the study group compared with controls (p = 0.001), corresponding to a mean dose reduction rate of 65 %. Median eye and hand dose per unit time were also reduced in the study group compared with control group, however, this was not statistically significant (p = 0.081 for eye, p = 0.628 for hand). Direct dosimeter readings also showed statistically significant reduction in median unshielded body dose rate for the study group compared with controls (p = 0.037). Eye dose rate was reduced for the study group but this was not statistically significant (p = 0.142).ConclusionInitial results are encouraging. Use of the shield resulted in a statistically significant reduction in unshielded dose to the operator’s body. Measured dose to the eye and hand of operator were also reduced but did not reach statistical significance in this pilot study.

  12. Calculated and TLD-based absorbed dose estimates for I-131-labeled 3F8 monoclonal antibody in a human neuroblastoma xenograft nude mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ugur, O; Scott, A M; Kostakoglu, L; Hui, T E; Masterson, M E; Febo, R; Sgouros, G; Rosa, E; Mehta, B M; Fisher, D R

    1995-01-01

    Preclinical evaluation of the therapeutic potential of radiolabeled antibodies is commonly performed in a xenografted nude mouse model. To assess therapeutic efficacy it is important to estimate the absorbed dose to the tumor and normal tissues of the nude mouse. The current study was designed to accurately measure radiation does to human neuroblastoma xenografts and normal organs in nude mice treated with I-131-labeled 3F8 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) against disialoganglioside GD2 antigen. Absorbed dose estimates were obtained using two different approaches: (1) measurement with teflon-imbedded CaSO4:Dy mini-thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and (2) calculations using mouse S-factors. The calculated total dose to tumor one week after i.v. injection of the 50 microCi I-131-3F8 MoAb was 604 cGy. The corresponding decay corrected and not corrected TLD measurements were 109 +/- 9 and 48.7 +/- 3.4 cGy respectively. The calculated to TLD-derived dose ratios for tumor ranged from 6.1 at 24 h to 5.5 at 1 week. The light output fading rate was found to depend upon the tissue type within which the TLDs were implanted. The decay rate in tumor, muscle, subcutaneous tissue and in vitro, were 9.5, 5.0, 3.7 and 0.67% per day, respectively. We have demonstrated that the type of tissue in which the TLD was implanted strongly influenced the in vivo decay of light output. Even with decay correction, a significant discrepancy was observed between MIRD-based calculated and CaSO4:Dy mini-TLD measured absorbed doses. Batch dependence, pH of the tumor or other variables associated with TLDs which are not as yet well known may account for this discrepancy.

  13. Estimation of absorbed dose to the kidneys in patients after treatment with 177Lu-octreotate: comparison between methods based on planar scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lu-[DOTA0, Tyr3]-octreotate (177Lu-octreotate) is used to treat neuroendocrine tumors with high somatostatin-receptor expression. 177Lu-octreotate is mainly excreted via the kidneys, but to some extent, accumulates in the kidney cortex due to, e.g., tubular reabsorption. Renal toxicity is one of the main limiting factors in 177Lu-octreotate treatment. Further knowledge of the biodistribution and dosimetry of 177Lu-octreotate in individual patients is needed. The aim of this study was to estimate the absorbed dose to the kidneys and compare the results obtained with planar imaging and different dosimetric methods: (1) conjugate-view (CV) method using patient-specific kidney sizes, (2) PA method, based on posterior images only, (3) CV method with reduced number of time points (CVreduced data), and (4) CV method using standard kidney sizes (CVstandard size). Methods Totally, 33 patients each received 3.4 to 8.2 GBq of 177Lu-octreotate up to five times, with infusion of lysine and arginine to block the renal uptake. Whole-body planar gamma camera images were acquired on days 0, 1, 2, and 7. The 177Lu concentration in the kidneys was determined by the CV method, and the absorbed dose was estimated with patient-specific organ sizes. Comparison to the CV method was made using posterior images only, together with the influence of the number of time points and with standard organ sizes. Results Large interindividual variations were found in the time-activity curve pattern and in the absorbed dose to the kidneys using the CV method: 0.33 to 2.4 Gy/GBq (mean =  0.80 Gy/GBq, SD = 0.30). In the individual patient, the mean deviation of all subsequent kidney doses compared to that of the first administration was 1% (SD = 19%) and 5% (SD = 23%) for the right and left kidneys, respectively. Excluding data for day 7 resulted in large variations in the absorbed dose. Conclusion Large interindividual variations in kidney dose were found, demonstrating the

  14. Stratigraphic framework of productive carbonate buildups

    SciTech Connect

    Greenlee, S.M.; Lehmann, P.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Hydrocarbon-productive carbonate buildups are found within a relatively narrow window of geologic time and stratigraphic settings. Because buildups are common exploration objectives in frontier and mature basins, an understanding of their stratigraphic occurrence permits them to be more accurately explored. Based on a worldwide survey, most production occurs in isolated periods of geologic time: Middle Silurian-Late Silurian, late Middle and Late Devonian, Late Pennsylvanian and Early Permian, Late Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Miocene. The authors results suggest that many factors of successful buildup plays are predictable on the basis of geohistory analysis and of basin-filling stratal patterns. Deposition of extensive source beds and thick buildups coincide with second-order eustatic rises. Other primary controls on the temporal distribution of buildups include reef-building organism type, mineralogy, and paleolatitude. Geohistory analysis indicates that periods immediately prior to or during the earliest portion of rapid increases of accommodation correspond to times of productive buildup growth. During this time, shelf margins step landward and buildups become progressively more areally restricted. Buildups eventually are unable to keep pace with high rates of accommodation increase and often are overlain by distal toes of clinoforms within regressive wedges deposited during subsequent periods with lower rates of accommodation increase. The result is a stratigraphic juxtaposition of mounded reservoir carbonate and deep-marine sealing shale. This basin-fill position accounts for over 70% of known buildup-reservoired hydrocarbons. Buildups deposited in overlying regressive wedges are often lower relief and prone to seal problems.

  15. Using LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs to estimate the absorbed dose to water in liquid water around an {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, P. Avilés Aubineau-Lanièce, I.; Lourenço, V.; Vermesse, D.; Cutarella, D.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The absorbed dose to water is the fundamental reference quantity for brachytherapy treatment planning systems and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) have been recognized as the most validated detectors for measurement of such a dosimetric descriptor. The detector response in a wide energy spectrum as that of an{sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source as well as the specific measurement medium which surrounds the TLD need to be accounted for when estimating the absorbed dose. This paper develops a methodology based on highly sensitive LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs to directly estimate the absorbed dose to water in liquid water around a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source. Methods: Different experimental designs in liquid water and air were constructed to study the response of LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs when irradiated in several standard photon beams of the LNE-LNHB (French national metrology laboratory for ionizing radiation). Measurement strategies and Monte Carlo techniques were developed to calibrate the LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors in the energy interval characteristic of that found when TLDs are immersed in water around an{sup 192}Ir source. Finally, an experimental system was designed to irradiate TLDs at different angles between 1 and 11 cm away from an {sup 192}Ir source in liquid water. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to correct measured results to provide estimates of the absorbed dose to water in water around the {sup 192}Ir source. Results: The dose response dependence of LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs with the linear energy transfer of secondary electrons followed the same variations as those of published results. The calibration strategy which used TLDs in air exposed to a standard N-250 ISO x-ray beam and TLDs in water irradiated with a standard{sup 137}Cs beam provided an estimated mean uncertainty of 2.8% (k = 1) in the TLD calibration coefficient for irradiations by the {sup 192}Ir source in water. The 3D TLD measurements performed in liquid water were obtained with a

  16. Neutron relative biological effectiveness for solid cancer incidence in the Japanese A-bomb survivors: an analysis considering the degree of independent effects from γ-ray and neutron absorbed doses with hierarchical partitioning.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Linda

    2013-03-01

    It has generally been assumed that the neutron and γ-ray absorbed doses in the data from the life span study (LSS) of the Japanese A-bomb survivors are too highly correlated for an independent separation of the all solid cancer risks due to neutrons and due to γ-rays. However, with the release of the most recent data for all solid cancer incidence and the increased statistical power over previous datasets, it is instructive to consider alternatives to the usual approaches. Simple excess relative risk (ERR) models for radiation-induced solid cancer incidence fitted to the LSS epidemiological data have been applied with neutron and γ-ray absorbed doses as separate explanatory covariables. A simple evaluation of the degree of independent effects from γ-ray and neutron absorbed doses on the all solid cancer risk with the hierarchical partitioning (HP) technique is presented here. The degree of multi-collinearity between the γ-ray and neutron absorbed doses has also been considered. The results show that, whereas the partial correlation between the neutron and γ-ray colon absorbed doses may be considered to be high at 0.74, this value is just below the level beyond which remedial action, such as adding the doses together, is usually recommended. The resulting variance inflation factor is 2.2. Applying HP indicates that just under half of the drop in deviance resulting from adding the γ-ray and neutron absorbed doses to the baseline risk model comes from the joint effects of the neutrons and γ-rays-leaving a substantial proportion of this deviance drop accounted for by individual effects of the neutrons and γ-rays. The average ERR/Gy γ-ray absorbed dose and the ERR/Gy neutron absorbed dose that have been obtained here directly for the first time, agree well with previous indirect estimates. The average relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons relative to γ-rays, calculated directly from fit parameters to the all solid cancer ERR model with both

  17. SU-F-18C-08: A Validation Study of a Commercially Available Software Package's Absorbed Dose Estimates in a Physical Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Supanich, M; Siegelman, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This study assesses the accuracy of the absorbed dose estimates from CT scans generated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation using a commercially available radiation dose monitoring software program. Methods: Axial CT studies of an anthropomorphic abdomen phantom with dose bores at a central location and 4 peripheral locations were conducted using a fixed tube current at 120 kV. A 100 mm ion chamber and a 0.6 cc ion chamber calibrated at diagnostic energy levels were used to measure dose in the phantom at each of the 5 dose bore locations. Simulations using the software program's Monte Carlo engine were run using a mathematical model of the anthropomorphic phantom to determine conversion coefficients between the CTDIvol used for the study and the dose at the location of the dose bores. Simulations were conducted using both the software's generic CT beam model and a refined model generated using HVL and bow tie filter profile measurements made on the scanner used for the study. Results: Monte Carlo simulations completed using the generalized beam model differed from the measured conversion factors by an absolute value average of 13.0% and 13.8% for the 100 mm and 0.6 cc ion chamber studies, respectively. The MC simulations using the scanner specific beam model generated conversion coefficients that differed from the CTDIvol to measured dose conversion coefficients by an absolute value average of 7.3% and 7.8% for the 100 mm and 0.6 cc ion chamber cases, respectively. Conclusion: A scanner specific beam model used in MC simulations generates more accurate dose conversion coefficients in an anthropomorphic phantom than those generated with a generalized beam model. Agreement between measured conversion coefficients and simulated values were less than 20% for all positions using the universal beam model.

  18. Dynamic evaluation of absorbed dose to the bladder wall with a balloon-bladder phantom during a study using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, T H; Liu, R S; Dong, S L; Chung, Y W; Chou, K L; Lee, J S

    2002-08-01

    An accurate evaluation of the absorbed dose to the bladder wall from 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) is clinically important because the bladder is considered as a critical organ in most positron emission tomography (PET) studies that cumulate about 20% of the total activity injection during image procedures. In the MIRD calculation, no allowance is made for the inclusion of all the dynamic parameters that affect the actual dose to the bladder wall to be taken in the dose assessment. The goal of the study is to propose a dose evaluation model by using a dynamic bladder phantom and time-activity curves from the bladder PET imaging. The proposed model takes all dynamic parameters into account and provides a much more accurate dose estimation to the bladder. In this study, the lowest dose to the bladder wall was obtained at the conditions of having a larger initial volume for the bladder contents and a higher production rate for urine. It is then advised patients to drink a bulk amount of water before the FDG injection or after urine voiding to facilitate urine production and to enlarge the bladder surface area, which are the most crucial steps in reducing the dose to the bladder wall. In our study, the voiding schedule in dose calculation plays certain roles although it is much more critical in the conventional MIRD calculation. The model estimated that the lowest dose to the bladder would occur at an initial void about 40 min after the FDG injection and the urine voiding was as complete as possible. PMID:12124480

  19. Treatment of small-cell lung cancer xenografts with iodine-313-anti-neural cell adhesion molecule monoclonal antibody and evaluation of absorbed dose in tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Hosono, Makoto; Endo, Keigo; Hosono, Masako N.

    1994-02-01

    Human small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is considered a feasible target for immunotherapy using a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (Mab). A murine Mab, NE150 (IgG1), reacts with the neural cell adhesion molecule, which is identical to cluster 1 antigen of SCLC. To estimate their therapeutic effects, NE150 and an isotype-matched control Mab were labeled with {sup 131}I and administered intravenously as a single dose into athymic mice inoculated with a NCI-H69 SCLC xenograft. The absorbed dose in organs was also examined based upon a long-term biodistribution study of {sup 131}I-NE150. Tumors initial volume 563.4 {plus_minus} 223.5 mm{sup 3} treated with 11.1 MBq (300 {mu}Ci) of {sup 131}I-NE150 diminished and became invisible at days 30-33, demonstrating a 60-day mean growth delay to reach a tripled initial volume compared with sham-treated tumors. Cumulative absorbed doses were estimated to be 2310, 410, 500, 330, and 790 cGy for the tumor, liver, kidney, spleen and lung, respectively. Iodine-131-NE150 had potent therapeutic effects against SCLC transplants in athymic mice, however, careful assessment of the side effects, improvement of radioiodination and chimerization of the Mab might be necessary to achieve efficient targeting in clinical therapeutic applications. 25 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Role of shielding in modulating the effects of solar particle events: Monte Carlo calculation of absorbed dose and DNA complex lesions in different organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, F.; Biaggi, M.; De Biaggi, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ottolenghi, A.; Panzarasa, A.; Paretzke, H. G.; Pelliccioni, M.; Sala, P.; Scannicchio, D.; Zankl, M.; Townsend, L. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2004-01-01

    Distributions of absorbed dose and DNA clustered damage yields in various organs and tissues following the October 1989 solar particle event (SPE) were calculated by coupling the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code with two anthropomorphic phantoms (a mathematical model and a voxel model), with the main aim of quantifying the role of the shielding features in modulating organ doses. The phantoms, which were assumed to be in deep space, were inserted into a shielding box of variable thickness and material and were irradiated with the proton spectra of the October 1989 event. Average numbers of DNA lesions per cell in different organs were calculated by adopting a technique already tested in previous works, consisting of integrating into "condensed-history" Monte Carlo transport codes--such as FLUKA--yields of radiobiological damage, either calculated with "event-by-event" track structure simulations, or taken from experimental works available in the literature. More specifically, the yields of "Complex Lesions" (or "CL", defined and calculated as a clustered DNA damage in a previous work) per unit dose and DNA mass (CL Gy-1 Da-1) due to the various beam components, including those derived from nuclear interactions with the shielding and the human body, were integrated in FLUKA. This provided spatial distributions of CL/cell yields in different organs, as well as distributions of absorbed doses. The contributions of primary protons and secondary hadrons were calculated separately, and the simulations were repeated for values of Al shielding thickness ranging between 1 and 20 g/cm2. Slight differences were found between the two phantom types. Skin and eye lenses were found to receive larger doses with respect to internal organs; however, shielding was more effective for skin and lenses. Secondary particles arising from nuclear interactions were found to have a minor role, although their relative contribution was found to be larger for the Complex Lesions than for the

  1. Production and in vivo imaging of (203)Pb as a surrogate isotope for in vivo (212)Pb internal absorbed dose studies.

    PubMed

    Máthé, Domokos; Szigeti, Krisztián; Hegedűs, Nikolett; Horváth, Ildikó; Veres, Dániel S; Kovács, Béla; Szűcs, Zoltán

    2016-08-01

    (212)Pb is a clinically relevant therapeutic alpha emitter isotope. A surrogate, (203)Pb, if prepared with sufficiently high specific activity could be used to estimate (212)Pb in vivo absorbed doses. An improved production procedure of (203)Pb with a simple, new separation method and high specific radioactivity for imaging is reported. We determined the in-vivo biodistribution of (203)Pb in mice by SPECT/CT. This highlights application possibilities of (203)Pb for further in vivo and clinical uses (radiolabeled (212)Pb-peptide co-injection, dosimetry calculation).

  2. SU-F-19A-02: Comparison of Absorbed Dose to Water Standards for HDR Ir-192 Brachytherapy Between the LCR, Brazil and NRC, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Salata, C; David, M; Almeida, C de; El Gamal, I; Cojocaru, C; Mainegra-Hing, E; McEwen, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare absorbed dose to water standards for HDR brachytherapy dosimetry developed by the Radiological Science Laboratory of Rio de Janeiro State University (LCR) and the National Research Council, Canada (NRC). Methods: The two institutions have separately developed absorbed dose standards based on the Fricke dosimetry system. There are important differences between the two standards, including: preparation and read-out of the Fricke solution, irradiation geometry of the Fricke holder in relation to the Ir-192 source, and determination of the G-value to be used at Ir-192 energies. All measurements for both standards were made directly at the NRC laboratory (i.e., no transfer instrument was used) using a single Ir-192 source (microSelectron v2). In addition, the NRC group has established a self-consistent method to determine the G-value for Ir-192, based on an interpolation between G-values obtained at Co-60 and 250kVp X-rays, and this measurement was repeated using the LCR Fricke solution to investigate possible systematic uncertainties. Results: G-values for Co-60 and 250 kVp x-rays, obtained using the LCR Fricke system, agreed with the NRC values within 0.5 % and 1 % respectively, indicating that the general assumption of universal G-values is appropriate in this case. The standard uncertainty in the determination of G for Ir-192 is estimated to be 0.6 %. For the comparison of absorbed dose measurements at the reference point for Ir-192 (1 cm depth in water, perpendicular to the seed long-axis), the ratio Dw(NRC)/Dw(LCR) was found to be 1.011 with a combined standard uncertainty of 1.7 %, k=1. Conclusion: The agreement in the absorbed dose to water values for the LCR and NRC systems is very encouraging. Combined with the lower uncertainty in this approach compared to the present air-kerma approach, these results reaffirm the use of Fricke solution as a potential primary standard for HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy.

  3. Role of cardiac ultrafast cameras with CZT solid-state detectors and software developments on radiation absorbed dose reduction to the patients.

    PubMed

    Gunalp, Bengul

    2015-07-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is one the most contributing nuclear medicine technique to the annual population dose. The purpose of this study is to compare radiation-absorbed doses to the patients examined by conventional cardiac SPECT (CSPECT) camera and ultrafast cardiac (UFC) camera with cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) solid-state detectors. Total injected activity was reduced by 50 % when both stress and rest images were acquired and by 75 % when only stress images were taken with UFC camera. As a result of this, the mean total effective dose was found significantly lower with UFC camera (2.2 ± 1.2 mSv) than CSPECT (7.7 ± 3.8 mSv) (p < 0.001). Further dose reduction was obtained by reducing equivocal test results and unnecessary additional examinations with UFC camera. Using UFC camera, MPI can be conveniently used for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) much less increasing annual population radiation dose as it had been before. PMID:25848109

  4. Efficacy and Immunogenicity of Single-Dose AdVAV Intranasal Anthrax Vaccine Compared to Anthrax Vaccine Absorbed in an Aerosolized Spore Rabbit Challenge Model

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Vyjayanthi; Andersen, Bo H.; Shoemaker, Christine; Sivko, Gloria S.; Tordoff, Kevin P.; Stark, Gregory V.; Zhang, Jianfeng; Feng, Tsungwei; Duchars, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    AdVAV is a replication-deficient adenovirus type 5-vectored vaccine expressing the 83-kDa protective antigen (PA83) from Bacillus anthracis that is being developed for the prevention of disease caused by inhalation of aerosolized B. anthracis spores. A noninferiority study comparing the efficacy of AdVAV to the currently licensed Anthrax Vaccine Absorbed (AVA; BioThrax) was performed in New Zealand White rabbits using postchallenge survival as the study endpoint (20% noninferiority margin for survival). Three groups of 32 rabbits were vaccinated with a single intranasal dose of AdVAV (7.5 × 107, 1.5 × 109, or 3.5 × 1010 viral particles). Three additional groups of 32 animals received two doses of either intranasal AdVAV (3.5 × 1010 viral particles) or intramuscular AVA (diluted 1:16 or 1:64) 28 days apart. The placebo group of 16 rabbits received a single intranasal dose of AdVAV formulation buffer. All animals were challenged via the inhalation route with a targeted dose of 200 times the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of aerosolized B. anthracis Ames spores 70 days after the initial vaccination and were followed for 3 weeks. PA83 immunogenicity was evaluated by validated toxin neutralizing antibody and serum anti-PA83 IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). All animals in the placebo cohort died from the challenge. Three of the four AdVAV dose cohorts tested, including two single-dose cohorts, achieved statistical noninferiority relative to the AVA comparator group, with survival rates between 97% and 100%. Vaccination with AdVAV also produced antibody titers with earlier onset and greater persistence than vaccination with AVA. PMID:25673303

  5. Efficacy and immunogenicity of single-dose AdVAV intranasal anthrax vaccine compared to anthrax vaccine absorbed in an aerosolized spore rabbit challenge model.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vyjayanthi; Andersen, Bo H; Shoemaker, Christine; Sivko, Gloria S; Tordoff, Kevin P; Stark, Gregory V; Zhang, Jianfeng; Feng, Tsungwei; Duchars, Matthew; Roberts, M Scot

    2015-04-01

    AdVAV is a replication-deficient adenovirus type 5-vectored vaccine expressing the 83-kDa protective antigen (PA83) from Bacillus anthracis that is being developed for the prevention of disease caused by inhalation of aerosolized B. anthracis spores. A noninferiority study comparing the efficacy of AdVAV to the currently licensed Anthrax Vaccine Absorbed (AVA; BioThrax) was performed in New Zealand White rabbits using postchallenge survival as the study endpoint (20% noninferiority margin for survival). Three groups of 32 rabbits were vaccinated with a single intranasal dose of AdVAV (7.5 × 10(7), 1.5 × 10(9), or 3.5 × 10(10) viral particles). Three additional groups of 32 animals received two doses of either intranasal AdVAV (3.5 × 10(10) viral particles) or intramuscular AVA (diluted 1:16 or 1:64) 28 days apart. The placebo group of 16 rabbits received a single intranasal dose of AdVAV formulation buffer. All animals were challenged via the inhalation route with a targeted dose of 200 times the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of aerosolized B. anthracis Ames spores 70 days after the initial vaccination and were followed for 3 weeks. PA83 immunogenicity was evaluated by validated toxin neutralizing antibody and serum anti-PA83 IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). All animals in the placebo cohort died from the challenge. Three of the four AdVAV dose cohorts tested, including two single-dose cohorts, achieved statistical noninferiority relative to the AVA comparator group, with survival rates between 97% and 100%. Vaccination with AdVAV also produced antibody titers with earlier onset and greater persistence than vaccination with AVA.

  6. Development and verification of an analytical algorithm to predict absorbed dose distributions in ocular proton therapy using Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Koch, Nicholas C; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2010-02-01

    Proton beam radiotherapy is an effective and non-invasive treatment for uveal melanoma. Recent research efforts have focused on improving the dosimetric accuracy of treatment planning and overcoming the present limitation of relative analytical dose calculations. Monte Carlo algorithms have been shown to accurately predict dose per monitor unit (D/MU) values, but this has yet to be shown for analytical algorithms dedicated to ocular proton therapy, which are typically less computationally expensive than Monte Carlo algorithms. The objective of this study was to determine if an analytical method could predict absolute dose distributions and D/MU values for a variety of treatment fields like those used in ocular proton therapy. To accomplish this objective, we used a previously validated Monte Carlo model of an ocular nozzle to develop an analytical algorithm to predict three-dimensional distributions of D/MU values from pristine Bragg peaks and therapeutically useful spread-out Bragg peaks (SOBPs). Results demonstrated generally good agreement between the analytical and Monte Carlo absolute dose calculations. While agreement in the proximal region decreased for beams with less penetrating Bragg peaks compared with the open-beam condition, the difference was shown to be largely attributable to edge-scattered protons. A method for including this effect in any future analytical algorithm was proposed. Comparisons of D/MU values showed typical agreement to within 0.5%. We conclude that analytical algorithms can be employed to accurately predict absolute proton dose distributions delivered by an ocular nozzle.

  7. Calculation of the absorbed dose for the overexposed patients at the JCO criticality accident in Tokai-mura.

    PubMed

    Ishigure, N; Endo, A; Yamaguchi, Y; Kawachi, K

    2001-09-01

    The doses for the overexposed patients were estimated by the measurement result of specific activity of 24Na in blood. The present method is almost based on documents of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The neutron energy spectrum obtained using the ANISN code (Multigroup One-Dimensional Discrete Ordinates Transport Code System with Anisotropic Scattering) was assumed. The values in ICRP Publication 74 were applied for the doses in each organ per unit neutron fluence. Gamma-ray dose was indirectly estimated based on (a) the result of environmental monitoring around the accident site and (b) a graph in IAEA manual, which gives the kerma ratio of neutrons and gamma-rays as a function of the critical volume or the atomic ratio of hydrogen to 235U. The estimated neutron doses were 5.4 Gy for patient A. 2.9 Gy for patient B and 0.81 Gy for patient C. The estimated gamma-ray doses were 8.5 or 13 Gy for patient A, 4.5 or 6.9 Gy for patient B, and 1.3 or 2.0 Gy for patient C. PMID:11791747

  8. Structural changes caused by radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis: the effect of X-ray absorbed dose in a fungal multicopper oxidase

    PubMed Central

    De la Mora, Eugenio; Lovett, Janet E.; Blanford, Christopher F.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Valderrama, Brenda; Rudino-Pinera, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    X-ray radiation induces two main effects at metal centres contained in protein crystals: radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis and a resulting decrease in metal occupancy. In blue multicopper oxidases (BMCOs), the geometry of the active centres and the metal-to-ligand distances change depending on the oxidation states of the Cu atoms, suggesting that these alterations are catalytically relevant to the binding, activation and reduction of O2. In this work, the X-ray-determined three-dimensional structure of laccase from the basidiomycete Coriolopsis gallica (Cg L), a high catalytic potential BMCO, is described. By combining spectroscopic techniques (UV–Vis, EPR and XAS) and X-ray crystallography, structural changes at and around the active copper centres were related to pH and absorbed X-­ray dose (energy deposited per unit mass). Depletion of two of the four active Cu atoms as well as low occupancies of the remaining Cu atoms, together with different conformations of the metal centres, were observed at both acidic pH and high absorbed dose, correlating with more reduced states of the active coppers. These observations provide additional evidence to support the role of flexibility of copper sites during O2 reduction. This study supports previous observations indicating that interpretations regarding redox state and metal coordination need to take radiation effects explicitly into account. PMID:22525754

  9. Comparison of the calculated absorbed dose using the Cadplan™ treatment planning software and Tld-100 measurements in an Alderson-Rando phantom for a bronchogenic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gutiérrez Castillo, J. G.; Álvarez Romero, J. T. E-mail: fisarmandotorres@gmail.com Calderón, A. Torres E-mail: fisarmandotorres@gmail.com M, V. Tovar E-mail: fisarmandotorres@gmail.com

    2014-11-07

    To verify the accuracy of the absorbed doses D calculated by a TPS Cadplan for a bronchogenic treatment (in an Alderson-Rando phantom) are chosen ten points with the following D's and localizations. Point 1, posterior position on the left edge with 136.4 Gy. Points: 2, 3 and 4 in the left lung with 104.9, 104.3 and 105.8 Gy, respectively; points 5 and 6 at the mediastinum with 192.4 and 173.5 Gy; points 7, 8 and 9 in the right lung with 105.8, 104.2 and 104.7 Gy, and 10 at posterior position on right edge with 143.7 Gy. IAEA type capsules with TLD 100 powder are placed, planned and irradiated. The evaluation of the absorbed dose is carried out a curve of calibration for the LiF response (nC) {sup vs} {sup DW}, to several cavity theories. The traceability for the DW is obtained with a secondary standard calibrated at the NRC (Canada). The dosimetric properties for the materials considered are determined from the Hounsfield numbers reported by the TPS. The stopping power ratios are calculated for nominal spectrum to 6 MV photons. The percent variations among the planned and determined D in all the cases they are < ± 3%.

  10. The effect of differences in data base on the determination of absorbed dose in high-energy photon beams using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine protocol.

    PubMed

    Mijnheer, B J; Chin, L M

    1989-01-01

    Exposure rates were adjusted at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) on January 1, 1986 to take into account more recent values for some physical parameters, mainly in electron stopping power ratios. Exposure calibration factors for 60Co gamma rays Nx will therefore be lowered by 1.1%. Consequently, absorbed dose determinations in high-energy photon beams will be reduced by the same amount if the values for these physical parameters remain unchanged in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) protocol. If the same data base as used at NIST is applied in the AAPM protocol, then Ngas/Nx values, water-air stopping power ratios, and Pwall values will be different. The overall change in absorbed dose determinations using a consistent set of data will be a reduction of 0.8% for 60Co gamma rays and 1.5% for a 20-MV x-ray beam compared to the values before January 1, 1986. Since the net effect is small when different sets of data are applied, the new NIST exposure calibration factors may be used in combination with the AAPM protocol without significant error.

  11. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K4 of the absorbed dose to water standards of the PTB, Germany and the BIPM in 60Co gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, C.; Burns, D. T.; Kapsch, R.-P.; Krauss, A.

    2016-01-01

    An indirect comparison has been made of the standards for absorbed dose to water in 60Co radiation of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, (PTB), Germany and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). The measurements at the BIPM were carried out in October 2015. The comparison result, based on the calibration coefficients for two transfer standards and evaluated as a ratio of the PTB and the BIPM standards for absorbed dose to water, is 0.9977 with a combined standard uncertainty of 3.8 × 10-3. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  12. Comparison of the calculated absorbed dose using the Cadplan™ treatment planning software and Tld-100 measurements in an Alderson-Rando phantom for a bronchogenic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez Castillo, J. G.; Álvarez Romero, J. T.; Torres Calderón, A.; Tovar, M. V.

    2014-11-01

    To verify the accuracy of the absorbed doses D calculated by a TPS Cadplan for a bronchogenic treatment (in an Alderson-Rando phantom) are chosen ten points with the following D's and localizations. Point 1, posterior position on the left edge with 136.4 Gy. Points: 2, 3 and 4 in the left lung with 104.9, 104.3 and 105.8 Gy, respectively; points 5 and 6 at the mediastinum with 192.4 and 173.5 Gy; points 7, 8 and 9 in the right lung with 105.8, 104.2 and 104.7 Gy, and 10 at posterior position on right edge with 143.7 Gy. IAEA type capsules with TLD 100 powder are placed, planned and irradiated. The evaluation of the absorbed dose is carried out a curve of calibration for the LiF response (nC) vs DW, to several cavity theories. The traceability for the DW is obtained with a secondary standard calibrated at the NRC (Canada). The dosimetric properties for the materials considered are determined from the Hounsfield numbers reported by the TPS. The stopping power ratios are calculated for nominal spectrum to 6 MV photons. The percent variations among the planned and determined D in all the cases they are < ± 3%.

  13. An ICRP-based Chinese adult male voxel model and its absorbed dose for idealized photon exposures--the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liye; Zeng, Zhi; Li, Junli; Zhang, Binquan; Qiu, Rui; Ma, Jizeng

    2009-11-01

    A site-specific skeleton voxel model for a Chinese adult male was constructed in this paper upon a previous Chinese individual voxel model. The whole skeleton was divided into 19 site-specific bones and bone groups; the mass of various skeleton tissues at each bone site, e.g. red bone marrow, was specified according to Asian reference data and the distribution data from ICRP Publication 70. The resultant voxel model (called CAM) has a resolution of 1.741 mm x 1.741 mm in plane, and the total bone mass is 8397.8 g which is almost equal to the Asian reference value. Dose coefficients for the red bone marrow and bone surface in CAM were calculated, and then compared with those from Rex, CMP and ICRP 74. It shows that the dose to RBM in Rex is generally 12% lower than that to CAM in low-energy range (30-150 keV) for AP, LAT, ROT and ISO geometries. It is also found that the RBM dose from mathematical models, i.e. CMP and ICRP 74, is underestimated by -30% in AP geometry and overestimated by 30% in PA geometry for low-energy photons. Meanwhile, the bone surface dose in the low-energy range is overestimated by 150% and 75% in CMP and ICRP 74, respectively, if compared with that from CAM. PMID:19841519

  14. An ICRP-based Chinese adult male voxel model and its absorbed dose for idealized photon exposures—the skeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liye; Zeng, Zhi; Li, Junli; Zhang, Binquan; Qiu, Rui; Ma, Jizeng

    2009-11-01

    A site-specific skeleton voxel model for a Chinese adult male was constructed in this paper upon a previous Chinese individual voxel model. The whole skeleton was divided into 19 site-specific bones and bone groups; the mass of various skeleton tissues at each bone site, e.g. red bone marrow, was specified according to Asian reference data and the distribution data from ICRP Publication 70. The resultant voxel model (called CAM) has a resolution of 1.741 mm × 1.741 mm in plane, and the total bone mass is 8397.8 g which is almost equal to the Asian reference value. Dose coefficients for the red bone marrow and bone surface in CAM were calculated, and then compared with those from Rex, CMP and ICRP 74. It shows that the dose to RBM in Rex is generally 12% lower than that to CAM in low-energy range (30-150 keV) for AP, LAT, ROT and ISO geometries. It is also found that the RBM dose from mathematical models, i.e. CMP and ICRP 74, is underestimated by -30% in AP geometry and overestimated by 30% in PA geometry for low-energy photons. Meanwhile, the bone surface dose in the low-energy range is overestimated by 150% and 75% in CMP and ICRP 74, respectively, if compared with that from CAM.

  15. Experimental assessment of absorbed dose to mineralized bone tissue from internal emitters: An electron paramagnetic resonance study

    SciTech Connect

    Desrosiers, M.F.

    1994-12-31

    EPR resonances attributable to radiation-induced centers in hydroxyapatite were not detectable in bone samples supplied by the USTUR. These centers are the basis for imaging and dose assessment. Presumable, the short range of the alpha particles emitted precluded the formation of appreciable amounts of hydroxyapatite centers. However, one bone sample did offer a suggestion of hydroxyapatite centers and newly-developed methods to extract this information will be pursued.

  16. PHITS simulations of the Protective curtain experiment onboard the Service module of ISS: Comparison with absorbed doses measured with TLDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploc, Ondřej; Sihver, Lembit; Kartashov, Dmitry; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Tolochek, Raisa

    2013-12-01

    "Protective curtain" was the physical experiment onboard the International Space Station (ISS) aimed on radiation measurement of the dose - reducing effect of the additional shielding made of hygienic water-soaked wipes and towels placed on the wall in the crew cabin of the Service module Zvezda. The measurements were performed with 12 detector packages composed of thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) and plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) placed at the Protective curtain, so that they created pairs of shielded and unshielded detectors.

  17. Extrapolation algorithm to Forecast the Dynamics of Accumulation of the Absorbed Dose at the International Space Station, according to the Radiation Monitoring System Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lishnevskii, Andrey

    The ISS service module is equipped with the radiation monitoring system (RMS) which provides data for the daily estimation of the radiation environment on board the station. The sensitive elements of the RMS are silicon semiconductor detectors and ionization chambers. The data obtained in quiet radiation environment allowed to determine the contribution to the absorbed radiation dose due to galactic cosmic rays and the Earth’s inner radiation belt. The corresponding analysis was conducted for the 2005-2011 period. As a result empirical relations were obtained allowing to calculate the dose for one crossing of the area of the South Atlantic Anomaly. The initial parameters for the calculation are longitude and altitude on which the ISS trajectory crosses this area. The obtained empirical relations allowed to develop a simple calculation algorithm for the short-term forecasting of the dynamics of accumulation of the radiation dose at the ISS which is based on the assumption that the current level of contribution to the daily dose of galactic cosmic rays and the structure of the Earth’s inner radiation belt at the station flight altitude remains unchanged within a few days. The results of the analysis of the ISS RMS data which was conducted using the developed calculation algorithm for the period from 2005 to 2011 (the period in which solar cycle 23 ended and solar cycle 24 began) showed the possibility to implement a short-term (1-2 days) forecast of the dynamics of accumulation of the dose on board the station with an acceptable error (of no more than 30 percent). Besides, the developed forecast algorithm for the growth phase of the 24th solar cycle (2011-2014) was verified. The algorithm developed for forecasting the radiation environment may be used to process and analyse the current RMS information when providing effective radiation safety for the ISS crew.

  18. Monte Carlo evaluation of the relationship between absorbed dose and contrast-to-noise ratio in coherent scatter breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghammraoui, B.; Popescu, L. M.; Badal, A.

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the advantages and shortcomings associated with Coherent Scatter Computed Tomography (CSCT) systems for breast imaging and study possible alternative configurations. The relationship between dose in a breast phantom and a simple surrogate of image quality in pencil-beam and fan-beam CSCT geometries was evaluated via Monte Carlo simulation, and an improved pencil-beam setup was proposed for faster CSCT data acquisition. CSCT projection datasets of a simple breast phantom have been simulated using a new version of the MC-GPU code that includes an improved model of x-ray coherent scattering using experimentally measured molecular interference functions. The breast phantom was composed of an 8 cm diameter cylinder of 50/50 glandular/adipose material and nine rods with different diameters of cancerous, adipose and glandular tissues. The system performance has been assessed in terms of the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in multiple regions of interest within the reconstructed images, for a range of exposure levels. The enhanced pencil-beam setup consisted of multiplexed pencil beams and specific post-processing of the projection data to calculate the scatter intensity coming from each beam separately. At reconstruction spatial resolution of 1×1×1 mm3 and from 1 to 10 mGy of received breast dose, fan-beam geometry showed higher statistical noise and lower CNR than pencil-beam geometry. Conventional CT acquisition had the highest CNR per dose. However, the CNR figure of merit did not combine yet all the information available at different scattering angles in the CSCT, which has potential for increased discrimination of materials with similar attenuation properties. Preliminary evaluation of the multiplexed pencil-beam geometry showed that the scattering profiles simulated with the new approach are similar to those of the single pencil-beam geometry. Conclusion: It has been shown that the GPU-accelerated MC-GPU code is a practical

  19. Monte Carlo estimation of radiation dose in organs of female and male adult phantoms due to FDG-F18 absorbed in the lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinato, Walmir; Santos, William S.; Silva, Rogério M. V.; Souza, Divanizia N.

    2014-03-01

    The determination of dose conversion factors (S values) for the radionuclide fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) absorbed in the lungs during a positron emission tomography (PET) procedure was calculated using the Monte Carlo method (MCNPX version 2.7.0). For the obtained dose conversion factors of interest, it was considered a uniform absorption of radiopharmaceutical by the lung of a healthy adult human. The spectrum of fluorine was introduced in the input data file for the simulation. The simulation took place in two adult phantoms of both sexes, based on polygon mesh surfaces called FASH and MASH with anatomy and posture according to ICRP 89. The S values for the 22 internal organs/tissues, chosen from ICRP No. 110, for the FASH and MASH phantoms were compared with the results obtained from a MIRD V phantoms called ADAM and EVA used by the Committee on Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD). We observed variation of more than 100% in S values due to structural anatomical differences in the internal organs of the MASH and FASH phantoms compared to the mathematical phantom.

  20. The expression revealing variation trend about radiation resistance of aromatic polymers serving in nuclear environment over absorbed dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shuangying; Hu, Huasi; Hu, Guang; Liu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    For polymeric materials applied in nuclear environment, the macroscopic properties usually remain unchanged after irradiation for several years or decades up to a threshold dose at which the deterioration of materials begins to take place. In this paper, the general radiation response of aromatic polymers is firstly reviewed and discussed. Then percolation theory is employed innovatively to elucidate the critical phenomenon over the service life for polymeric materials with high radiation resistance. For a better quantitative evaluation, a novel two-parameter radiation resistance model is proposed by the method of analogy between two nuclear-related phenomena. Six epoxy systems are employed from the published literatures to verify the novel model and the result shows that it is reliable and helpful in not only estimating the radiation damage over the service period but also multi-objective optimum design of polymeric materials.

  1. Structural changes caused by radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis: the effect of X-ray absorbed dose in a fungal multicopper oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    De la Mora, Eugenio; Lovett, Janet E.; Blanford, Christopher F.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Valderrama, Brenda; Rudino-Pinera, Enrique

    2012-05-01

    Radiation-induced reduction, radiolysis of copper sites and the effect of pH value together with the concomitant geometrical distortions of the active centres were analysed in several fungal (C. gallica) laccase structures collected at cryotemperature. This study emphasizes the importance of careful interpretation when the crystallographic structure of a metalloprotein is described. X-ray radiation induces two main effects at metal centres contained in protein crystals: radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis and a resulting decrease in metal occupancy. In blue multicopper oxidases (BMCOs), the geometry of the active centres and the metal-to-ligand distances change depending on the oxidation states of the Cu atoms, suggesting that these alterations are catalytically relevant to the binding, activation and reduction of O{sub 2}. In this work, the X-ray-determined three-dimensional structure of laccase from the basidiomycete Coriolopsis gallica (Cg L), a high catalytic potential BMCO, is described. By combining spectroscopic techniques (UV–Vis, EPR and XAS) and X-ray crystallography, structural changes at and around the active copper centres were related to pH and absorbed X-ray dose (energy deposited per unit mass). Depletion of two of the four active Cu atoms as well as low occupancies of the remaining Cu atoms, together with different conformations of the metal centres, were observed at both acidic pH and high absorbed dose, correlating with more reduced states of the active coppers. These observations provide additional evidence to support the role of flexibility of copper sites during O{sub 2} reduction. This study supports previous observations indicating that interpretations regarding redox state and metal coordination need to take radiation effects explicitly into account.

  2. The biodistribution and dosimetry of {sup 117m}Sn DTPA with special emphasis on active marrow absorbed doses

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, J.; Atkins, H.

    1999-01-01

    {sup 117m}Sn(4+) DTPA is a new radiopharmaceutical for the palliation of pain associated with metastatic bone cancer. Recently, the Phase 2 clinical trials involving 47 patients were completed. These patients received administered activities in the range 6.7--10.6 MBq/kg of body mass. Frequent collections of urine were acquired over the first several hours postadministration and daily cumulative collections were obtained for the next 4--10 days. Anterior/posterior gamma camera images were obtained frequently over the initial 10 days. Radiation dose estimates were calculated for 8 of these patients. Each patient`s biodistribution data were mathematically simulated using a multicompartmental model. The model consisted of the following compartments: central, bone, kidney, other tissues, and cumulative urine. The measured cumulative urine data were used as references for the cumulative urine excretion compartment. The total-body compartment (sum of the bone surfaces, central, kidney, and other tissues compartments) was reference to all activity not excreted in the urine.

  3. EURAMET.RI(I)-S7 comparison of alanine dosimetry systems for absorbed dose to water measurements in gamma- and x-radiation at radiotherapy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Tristan; Anton, Mathias; Sharpe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The National Physical Laboratory (NPL), the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB) are involved in the European project 'External Beam Cancer Therapy', a project of the European Metrology Research Programme. Within this project, the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)/alanine dosimetric method has been chosen for performing measurements in small fields such as those used in IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy). In this context, these three National Metrology Institutes (NMI) wished to compare the result of their alanine dosimetric systems (detector, modus operandi etc) at radiotherapy dose levels to check their consistency. This EURAMET.RI(I)-S7 comparison has been performed with the support of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) which collected and distributed the results as a neutral organization, to ensure the comparison was 'blind'. Irradiations have been made under reference conditions by each laboratory in a 60Co beam and in an accelerator beam (10 MV or 12 MV) in a water phantom of 30 cm × 30 cm × 30 cm in a square field of 10 cm × 10 cm at the reference depth. Irradiations have been performed at known values of absorbed dose to water (Dw) within 10% of nominal doses of 5 Gy and 10 Gy, i.e. between 4.5 Gy and 5.5 Gy and between 9 Gy and 11 Gy, respectively. Each participant read out their dosimeters and assessed the doses using their own protocol (calibration curve, positioning device etc) as this comparison aims at comparing the complete dosimetric process. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the EPR/alanine dosimetry systems operated by National Metrology Institutes as a method of assuring therapy level doses with the accuracy required. The maximum deviation in the ratio of measured to applied dose is less than 1%. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key

  4. Fluence-to-Absorbed Dose Conversion Coefficients for Use in Radiological Protection of Embryo and Foetus Against External Exposure to Muons from 20MeV to 50GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Jing

    2008-08-07

    This study used the Monte-Carlo code MCNPX to determine mean absorbed doses to the embryo and foetus when the mother is exposed to external muon fields. Monoenergetic muons ranging from 20 MeV to 50 GeV were considered. The irradiation geometries include anteroposterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), lateral (LAT), rotational (ROT), isotropic (ISO), and top-down (TOP). At each of these irradiation geometries, absorbed doses to the foetal body were calculated for the embryo of 8 weeks and the foetus of 3, 6 or 9 months, respectively. Muon fluence-to-absorbed-dose conversion coefficients were derived for the four prenatal ages. Since such conversion coefficients are yet unknown, the results presented here fill a data gap.

  5. [Comparison of the absorbed dose at calibration depth of photon beams using the Japan Society of Medical Physics 12 beam quality conversion factor in the presence or absence of a waterproofing sleeve].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Naoki; Takemura, Akihiro; Kita, Akinobu; Murai, Emi; Nishimoto, Yasuhiro; Toi, Akiko; Shimada, Masato; Sasamoto, Kouhei; Adachi, Toshiki

    2013-10-01

    In standard external beam radiotherapy dosimetry, which is based on absorbed dose by water, the absorbed dose at any calibration depth is calculated using the same beam quality conversion factor, regardless of the presence or absence of a waterproofing sleeve. In this study, we evaluated whether there were differences between absorbed doses at calibration depths calculated using a beam quality conversion factor including a wall correction factor that corresponds to a waterproofing sleeve thickness of 0.3 mm, and without a waterproofing sleeve. The Japan Society of Medical Physics (JSMP) has reported that the uncertainty of the results using a beam quality conversion factor that included a wall correction factor corresponding to a waterproofing sleeve thickness of 0.3 mm, regardless of the presence or absence of the sleeve, was 0.2%. This uncertainty proved to be in agreement with the reported range.

  6. PLATIN (plant-atmosphere interaction) I: A model of plant-atmosphere interaction for estimating absorbed doses of gaseous air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Grünhage, L; Haenel, H D

    1997-01-01

    A PLant-ATmosphere INteraction model (PLATIN) was developed for estimating air pollutant absorbed doses under ambient conditions. PLATIN is based on the canopy energy balance combined with a gas transport submodel. The model has three major resistance components: (1) a turbulent atmospheric resistance Rah(zm) that describes the atmospheric transport properties between a measurement height above the canopy and the conceptual height z=d+z0m which represents the sink for momentum according to the big-leaf concept; (2) a quasilaminar layer resistance R(b,A) that quantifies the way in which the transfer of sensible heat and matter (e.g. latent heat, ozone) differs from momentum transfer; (3) a canopy or surface resistance R(c,A) that describes the influences of the plant/soil system on the exchange processes. Soil water content is simulated by a Force-Restore model. By a simple interception submodel precipitation and dew are partitioned into intercepted water and water reaching the soil surface. PLATIN can be run in a prognostic or a diagnostic mode. It is also intended for on-line use in air quality monitoring networks.

  7. A water calorimeter for on-site absorbed dose to water calibrations in (60)Co and MV-photon beams including MRI incorporated treatment equipment.

    PubMed

    de Prez, Leon; de Pooter, Jacco; Jansen, Bartel; Aalbers, Tony

    2016-07-01

    In reference dosimetry the aim is to establish the absorbed dose to water, D w, under reference conditions. However, existing dosimetry protocols are not always applicable for rapidly emerging new treatment modalities. For primary standard dosimetry laboratories it is generally not feasible to acquire such modalities. Therefore it is strongly desired that D w measurements with primary standards can be performed on-site in clinical beams for the new treatment modalities in order to characterize and calibrate detectors. To serve this need, VSL has developed a new transportable water calorimeter serving as a primary D w standard for (60)Co and MV-photons including MRI incorporated treatment equipment. Special attention was paid to its operation in different beam geometries and beam modalities including the application in magnetic fields. The new calorimeter was validated in the VSL (60)Co beam and on-site in clinical MV-photon beams. Excellent agreement of 0.1% was achieved with previous (60)Co field calibrations, i.e. well within the uncertainty of the previous calorimeter, and with measurements performed in horizontal and vertical MV-photon beams. k Q factors, determined for two PTW 30013 ionization chambers, agreed very well with available literature data. The relative combined standard uncertainty (k  =  1) for D w measurements in (60)Co and MV-photons is 0.37%. Calibrations are carried out with a standard uncertainty of 0.42% and k Q -factors are determined with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.40%. PMID:27300589

  8. A water calorimeter for on-site absorbed dose to water calibrations in 60Co and MV-photon beams including MRI incorporated treatment equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Prez, Leon; de Pooter, Jacco; Jansen, Bartel; Aalbers, Tony

    2016-07-01

    In reference dosimetry the aim is to establish the absorbed dose to water, D w, under reference conditions. However, existing dosimetry protocols are not always applicable for rapidly emerging new treatment modalities. For primary standard dosimetry laboratories it is generally not feasible to acquire such modalities. Therefore it is strongly desired that D w measurements with primary standards can be performed on-site in clinical beams for the new treatment modalities in order to characterize and calibrate detectors. To serve this need, VSL has developed a new transportable water calorimeter serving as a primary D w standard for 60Co and MV-photons including MRI incorporated treatment equipment. Special attention was paid to its operation in different beam geometries and beam modalities including the application in magnetic fields. The new calorimeter was validated in the VSL 60Co beam and on-site in clinical MV-photon beams. Excellent agreement of 0.1% was achieved with previous 60Co field calibrations, i.e. well within the uncertainty of the previous calorimeter, and with measurements performed in horizontal and vertical MV-photon beams. k Q factors, determined for two PTW 30013 ionization chambers, agreed very well with available literature data. The relative combined standard uncertainty (k  =  1) for D w measurements in 60Co and MV-photons is 0.37%. Calibrations are carried out with a standard uncertainty of 0.42% and k Q -factors are determined with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.40%.

  9. Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    2007-06-18

    I present a summary of topics relevant to the electron-cloud build-up and dissipation that were presented at the International Workshop on Electron-Cloud Effects 'ECLOUD 07' (Daegu, S. Korea, April 9-12, 2007). This summary is not meant to be a comprehensive review of the talks. Rather, I focus on those developments that I found, in my personal opinion, especially interesting. The contributions, all excellent, are posted in http://chep.knu.ac.kr/ecloud07/.

  10. Effect of the calibration in water and the build-up cap on the Mg(Ar) ionization chamber measurements.

    PubMed

    Koivunoro, H; Hyvönen, H; Uusi-Simola, J; Jokelainen, I; Kosunen, A; Kortesniemi, M; Seppälä, T; Auterinen, I; Savolainen, S

    2011-12-01

    Magnesium-walled argon gas flow ionization chamber (Mg(Ar)) is used for photon dose measurements in the epithermal neutron beam of FiR 1 reactor in Finland. In this study, the photon dose measurements were re-evaluated against calculations applying a new chamber calibration factor defined in water instead of in air. Also, effect of the build-up cap on the measurements was investigated. The new calibration factor provides improved agreement between measured and calculated photon dose. Use of the build-up cap does not affect the measured signal in water in neutron beam.

  11. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  12. Hypergol Systems: Design, Buildup, and Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, David; Rathgeber, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    This course was developed by personnel at the NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility in conjunction with the NASA Safety Training Center (NSTC). The NSTC was established in May 1991 by the NASA Headquarters Safety Directorate to provide up-to-date, high-quality, NASA specific safety training on location at NASA centers, or simultaneously to multiple centers over the Video Teleconferencing System (ViTS). Our desire is to establish and maintain a strong, long-lasting relationship with all NASA centers in order to fulfill your safety training needs on a cost-effective basis. Our ultimate goal is to provide a positive contribution to safe operations at NASA. NSTC Course 055 is a 2-day course discussing the safe usage of hypergols (hydrazine fuels and nitrogen tetroxide). During the course we will identify the hazards associated with hypergols including toxicity, reactivity, fire, and explosion. Management of risk is discussed in terms of the primary engineering controls design, buildup, and operation; and secondary controls personal protective equipment and detectors/monitors. The emphasis is on the design and buildup of compatible systems and the safe operation of these systems by technicians and engineers.

  13. Data on biodistribution and radiation absorbed dose profile of a novel (64)Cu-labeled high affinity cell-specific peptide for positron emission tomography imaging of tumor vasculature.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Joseph R; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Yuan, Hong; Frank, Jonathan E; Lalush, David S; Patterson, Cam; Veleva, Anka N

    2016-06-01

    New peptide-based diagnostic and therapeutic approaches hold promise for highly selective targeting of cancer leading to more precise and effective diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. An important feature of these approaches is to reach the tumor tissue while limiting or minimizing the dose to normal organs. In this context, efforts to design and engineer materials with optimal in vivo targeting and clearance properties are important. This Data In Brief article reports on biodistribution and radiation absorbed dose profile of a novel high affinity radiopeptide specific for bone marrow-derived tumor vasculature. Background information on the design, preparation, and in vivo characterization of this peptide-based targeted radiodiagnostic is described in the article "Synthesis and comparative evaluation of novel 64Cu-labeled high affinity cell-specific peptides for positron emission tomography of tumor vasculature" (Merrill et al., 2016) [1]. Here we report biodistribution measurements in mice and calculate the radiation absorbed doses to normal organs using a modified Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) methodology that accounts for physical and geometric factors and cross-organ beta doses. PMID:27014735

  14. Fluence-to-absorbed-dose conversion coefficients for neutron beams from 0.001 eV to 100 GeV calculated for a set of pregnant female and fetus models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranenko, Valery; Xu, X. George

    2008-03-01

    Protection of fetuses against external neutron exposure is an important task. This paper reports a set of absorbed dose conversion coefficients for fetal and maternal organs for external neutron beams using the RPI-P pregnant female models and the MCNPX code. The newly developed pregnant female models represent an adult female with a fetus including its brain and skeleton at the end of each trimester. The organ masses were adjusted to match the reference values within 1%. For the 3 mm cubic voxel size, the models consist of 10-15 million voxels for 35 organs. External monoenergetic neutron beams of six standard configurations (AP, PA, LLAT, RLAT, ROT and ISO) and source energies 0.001 eV-100 GeV were considered. The results are compared with previous data that are based on simplified anatomical models. The differences in dose depend on source geometry, energy and gestation periods: from 20% up to 140% for the whole fetus, and up to 100% for the fetal brain. Anatomical differences are primarily responsible for the discrepancies in the organ doses. For the first time, the dependence of mother organ doses upon anatomical changes during pregnancy was studied. A maximum of 220% increase in dose was observed for the placenta in the nine months model compared to three months, whereas dose to the pancreas, small and large intestines decreases by 60% for the AP source for the same models. Tabulated dose conversion coefficients for the fetus and 27 maternal organs are provided.

  15. Comparison of internal doses calculated using the specific absorbed fractions of the average adult Japanese male phantom with those of the reference computational phantom-adult male of ICRP publication 110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, Kentaro; Sato, Kaoru; Endo, Akira

    2014-03-01

    In order to study the effects of body sizes and masses of organs and tissues on internal dose assessment, the values corresponding to effective dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides were calculated using the specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) of two phantoms: the average adult Japanese male phantom (JM-103) and the reference computational phantom-adult male (RCP-AM) of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. SAFs were evaluated using the phantoms and Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX or were taken from published data. As a result of a comparison for 2894 cases of 923 radionuclides, the maximum discrepancy in the effective dose coefficients between the JM-103 and RCP-AM was about 40%. However, the discrepancies were smaller than 10% in 97% of all cases.

  16. Attenuation of external Bremsstrahlung in metallic absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Dhaliwal, A.S.; Powar, M.S.; Singh, M. )

    1990-12-01

    In this paper attenuation of bremsstrahlung from {sup 147}Pm and {sup 170}Tm beta emitters has been studied in aluminum, copper, tin, and lead metallic absorbers. Bremsstrahlung spectra and mass attenuation coefficients for monoenergetic gamma rays are used to calculate theoretical attenuation curves. Magnetic deflection and beta stopping techniques are used to measure the integral bremsstrahlung intensities above 30 keV in different target thicknesses. Comparison of measured and calculated attenuation curves shows a good agreement for various absorbers, thus providing a test of this technique, which may be useful in understanding bremsstrahlung intensity buildup and in the design of optimum shielding for bremsstrahlung sources. It is found that the absorption of bremsstrahlung in metallic absorbers does not obey an exponential law and that absorbers act as energy filters.

  17. Build-up material requirements in clinical dosimetry during total body irradiation treatments.

    PubMed

    Butson, Martin; Pope, Dane; Haque, Mamoon; Chen, Tom; Song, Guangli; Whitaker, May

    2016-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) treatments are mainly used in a preparative regimen for hematopoietic stem cell (or bone marrow) transplantation. Our standard clinical regimen is a 12 Gy/6 fraction bi-daily technique using 6MV X-rays at a large extended source to surface distance (SSD). This work investigates and quantifies the dose build-up characteristics and thus the requirements for bolus used for in vivo dosimetry for TBI applications. Percentage dose build-up characteristics of photon beams have been investigated at large extended SSDs using ionization chambers and Gafchromic film. Open field measurements at different field sizes and with differing scatter conditions such as the introduction of standard Perspex scattering plates at different distances to the measurement point were made in an effort to determine the required bolus/build-up material required for accurate determination of applied dose. Percentage surface dose values measured for open fields at 300 cm SSD were found to range from 20% up to 65.5% for fields 5 cm × 5 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm, respectively. With the introduction of 1 cm Perspex scattering plates used in TBI treatments, the surface dose values increased up to 83-90% (93-97% at 1 mm depth), depending on the position of the Perspex scattering plate compared to the measurement point. Our work showed that at least 5 mm water equivalent bolus/scatter material should be placed over the EBT3 film for accurate dose assessment for TBI treatments. Results also show that a small but measurable decrease in measured dose occurred with 5 mm water equivalent thick bolus material of areas '3 cm(2). As such, we recommend that 3 cm × 3 cm × 5 mm bolus build-up is the smallest size that should be placed over EBT3 Gafchromic film when used for accurate in vivo dosimetry for TBI applications.

  18. Build-up material requirements in clinical dosimetry during total body irradiation treatments.

    PubMed

    Butson, Martin; Pope, Dane; Haque, Mamoon; Chen, Tom; Song, Guangli; Whitaker, May

    2016-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) treatments are mainly used in a preparative regimen for hematopoietic stem cell (or bone marrow) transplantation. Our standard clinical regimen is a 12 Gy/6 fraction bi-daily technique using 6MV X-rays at a large extended source to surface distance (SSD). This work investigates and quantifies the dose build-up characteristics and thus the requirements for bolus used for in vivo dosimetry for TBI applications. Percentage dose build-up characteristics of photon beams have been investigated at large extended SSDs using ionization chambers and Gafchromic film. Open field measurements at different field sizes and with differing scatter conditions such as the introduction of standard Perspex scattering plates at different distances to the measurement point were made in an effort to determine the required bolus/build-up material required for accurate determination of applied dose. Percentage surface dose values measured for open fields at 300 cm SSD were found to range from 20% up to 65.5% for fields 5 cm × 5 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm, respectively. With the introduction of 1 cm Perspex scattering plates used in TBI treatments, the surface dose values increased up to 83-90% (93-97% at 1 mm depth), depending on the position of the Perspex scattering plate compared to the measurement point. Our work showed that at least 5 mm water equivalent bolus/scatter material should be placed over the EBT3 film for accurate dose assessment for TBI treatments. Results also show that a small but measurable decrease in measured dose occurred with 5 mm water equivalent thick bolus material of areas '3 cm(2). As such, we recommend that 3 cm × 3 cm × 5 mm bolus build-up is the smallest size that should be placed over EBT3 Gafchromic film when used for accurate in vivo dosimetry for TBI applications. PMID:27217628

  19. Build-up material requirements in clinical dosimetry during total body irradiation treatments

    PubMed Central

    Butson, Martin; Pope, Dane; Haque, Mamoon; Chen, Tom; Song, Guangli; Whitaker, May

    2016-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) treatments are mainly used in a preparative regimen for hematopoietic stem cell (or bone marrow) transplantation. Our standard clinical regimen is a 12 Gy/6 fraction bi-daily technique using 6MV X-rays at a large extended source to surface distance (SSD). This work investigates and quantifies the dose build-up characteristics and thus the requirements for bolus used for in vivo dosimetry for TBI applications. Percentage dose build-up characteristics of photon beams have been investigated at large extended SSDs using ionization chambers and Gafchromic film. Open field measurements at different field sizes and with differing scatter conditions such as the introduction of standard Perspex scattering plates at different distances to the measurement point were made in an effort to determine the required bolus/build-up material required for accurate determination of applied dose. Percentage surface dose values measured for open fields at 300 cm SSD were found to range from 20% up to 65.5% for fields 5 cm × 5 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm, respectively. With the introduction of 1 cm Perspex scattering plates used in TBI treatments, the surface dose values increased up to 83–90% (93–97% at 1 mm depth), depending on the position of the Perspex scattering plate compared to the measurement point. Our work showed that at least 5 mm water equivalent bolus/scatter material should be placed over the EBT3 film for accurate dose assessment for TBI treatments. Results also show that a small but measurable decrease in measured dose occurred with 5 mm water equivalent thick bolus material of areas '3 cm2. As such, we recommend that 3 cm × 3 cm × 5 mm bolus build-up is the smallest size that should be placed over EBT3 Gafchromic film when used for accurate in vivo dosimetry for TBI applications. PMID:27217628

  20. USE OF PBPK MODELS FOR ASSESSING ABSORBED DOSE AND CHE INHIBITION FROM AGGREGATE EXPOSURE OF INFANTS AND CHILDREN TO ORGANOPHOSPHORUS INSECTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiological pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling framework has been established to assess cumulative risk of dose and injury of infants and children to organophosphorus (OP) insecticides from aggregate sources and routes. Exposure inputs were drawn from all reasonable sources, pr...

  1. Estimation of absorbed dose in irradiated dates ( Phoenix dactylifera L.). Test of ESR response function by a weighted linear least-squares regression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghelawi, M. A.; Moore, J. S.; Bisby, R. H.; Dodd, N. J. F.

    2001-01-01

    Food spoilage is caused by infestation by insects, contamination by bacteria and fungi and by deterioration by enzymes. In the third world, it has been estimated that 25% of agricultural products are lost before they reach the market. One way to decrease such losses is by treatment with ionising radiation and maximum permitted doses have been established for treatment of a wide variety of foods. For dates this dose is 2.0 kGy. Detection of irradiated foods is now essential and here we have used ESR to detect and estimate the dose received by a single date. The ESR spectrum of unirradiated date stone contains a single line g=2.0045 (signal A). Irradiation up to 2.0 kGy induces radical formation with g=1.9895, g=2.0159 (signal C) and g=1.9984 (signal B) high field. The lines with g=1.9895 and 2.0159 are readily detected and stable at room temperature for at least 27 months for samples irradiated up to this dose. The yield of the radicals resulting in these lines increase linearly up to a dose of 5.0 kGy as is evidenced by the linear increase in their intensity. In blind trials of 21 unirradiated and irradiated dates we are able to identify with 100% accuracy an irradiated sample and to estimate the dose to which the sample was irradiated to within ˜0.5 kGy.

  2. Understanding nutrient build-up on urban road surfaces.

    PubMed

    Miguntanna, Nandika Prasadani; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Egodowatta, Prasanna; Kokot, Serge

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the outcomes of a research project on nutrients build-up on urban road surfaces. Nutrient build-up was investigated on road sites belonging to residential, industrial and commercial land use. Collected build-up samples were separated into five particle size ranges and were tested for total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP) and sub species of nutrients, namely, NO2-, NO3-, TKN and PO4(3-). Multivariate analytical techniques were used to analyse the data and to develop detailed understanding on buildup. Data analysis revealed that the solids loads on urban road surfaces are highly influenced by factors such as land use, antecedent dry period and traffic volume. However, the nutrient build-up process was found to be independent of the type of land use. It was solely dependent on the particle size of solids build-up. Most of the nutrients were associated with the particle size range < 150 microm. Therefore, the removal of particles below 150 microm from road surfaces is of importance for the removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from road surface solids build-up. It is also important to consider the difference in the composition of nitrogen and phosphorus build-up in the context of designing effective stormwater quality mitigation strategies.

  3. In vivo dosimetry with optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters, OSLDs, compared to diodes; the effects of buildup cap thickness and fabrication material

    SciTech Connect

    Jursinic, Paul A.; Yahnke, Clifford J.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: For external beam in vivo measurements, the dosimeter is normally placed on the patient's skin, and the dose to a point of interest inside the patient is derived from surface measurements. In order to obtain accurate and reliable measurements, which correlate with the dose values predicted by a treatment planning system, a dosimeter needs to be at a point of electronic equilibrium. This equilibrium is accomplished by adding material (buildup) above the detector. This paper examines the use of buildup caps in a clinical setting for two common detector types: OSLDs and diodes. Clinically built buildup-caps and commercially available hemispherical caps are investigated. The effects of buildup cap thickness and fabrication material on field-size correction factors, C{sub FS}, are reported, and differences between the effects of thickness and fabrication material are explained based on physical parameters. Methods: Measurements are made on solid water phantoms for 6 and 15 MV x-ray beams. Two types of dosimeters are used: OSLDs, InLight/OSL Nanodot dosimeters (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL) and a P-type surface diode (Standard Imaging, Madison, WI). Buildup caps for these detectors were fabricated out of M3, a water-equivalent material, and sheet-metal stock of Al, Cu, and Pb. Also, commercially available hemispherical buildup caps made of plastic water and brass (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL) were used with Nanodots. OSLDs were read with an InLight microStar reader (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL). Dose calculations were carried out with the XiO treatment planning system (CMS/Elekta, Stockholm) with tissue heterogeneity corrections. Results: For OSLDs and diodes, when measurements are made with no buildup cap a change in C{sub FS} of 200% occurs for a field-size change from 3 cm x 3 cm to 30 cm x 30 cm. The change in C{sub FS} is reduced to about 4% when a buildup cap with wall thickness equal to the depth of maximum dose is used. Buildup caps with larger wall

  4. CURRENT BUILDUP IN EMERGING SERPENTINE FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Pariat, E.; Masson, S.; Aulanier, G.

    2009-08-20

    The increase of magnetic flux in the solar atmosphere during active-region formation involves the transport of the magnetic field from the solar convection zone through the lowest layers of the solar atmosphere, through which the plasma {beta} changes from >1 to <1 with altitude. The crossing of this magnetic transition zone requires the magnetic field to adopt a serpentine shape also known as the sea-serpent topology. In the frame of the resistive flux-emergence model, the rising of the magnetic flux is believed to be dynamically driven by a succession of magnetic reconnections which are commonly observed in emerging flux regions as Ellerman bombs. Using a data-driven, three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulation of flux emergence occurring in active region 10191 on 2002 November 16-17, we study the development of 3D electric current sheets. We show that these currents buildup along the 3D serpentine magnetic-field structure as a result of photospheric diverging horizontal line-tied motions that emulate the observed photospheric evolution. We observe that reconnection can not only develop following a pinching evolution of the serpentine field line, as usually assumed in two-dimensional geometry, but can also result from 3D shearing deformation of the magnetic structure. In addition, we report for the first time on the observation in the UV domain with the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) of extremely transient loop-like features, appearing within the emerging flux domain, which link several Ellermam bombs with one another. We argue that these loop transients can be explained as a consequence of the currents that build up along the serpentine magnetic field.

  5. Assessment of the accuracy of an MCNPX-based Monte Carlo simulation model for predicting three-dimensional absorbed dose distributions

    PubMed Central

    Titt, U; Sahoo, N; Ding, X; Zheng, Y; Newhauser, W D; Zhu, X R; Polf, J C; Gillin, M T; Mohan, R

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the Monte Carlo method has been used in a large number of research studies in radiation therapy. For applications such as treatment planning, it is essential to validate the dosimetric accuracy of the Monte Carlo simulations in heterogeneous media. The AAPM Report no 105 addresses issues concerning clinical implementation of Monte Carlo based treatment planning for photon and electron beams, however for proton-therapy planning, such guidance is not yet available. Here we present the results of our validation of the Monte Carlo model of the double scattering system used at our Proton Therapy Center in Houston. In this study, we compared Monte Carlo simulated depth doses and lateral profiles to measured data for a magnitude of beam parameters. We varied simulated proton energies and widths of the spread-out Bragg peaks, and compared them to measurements obtained during the commissioning phase of the Proton Therapy Center in Houston. Of 191 simulated data sets, 189 agreed with measured data sets to within 3% of the maximum dose difference and within 3 mm of the maximum range or penumbra size difference. The two simulated data sets that did not agree with the measured data sets were in the distal falloff of the measured dose distribution, where large dose gradients potentially produce large differences on the basis of minute changes in the beam steering. Hence, the Monte Carlo models of medium- and large-size double scattering proton-therapy nozzles were valid for proton beams in the 100 MeV–250 MeV interval. PMID:18670050

  6. WE-A-17A-01: Absorbed Dose Rate-To-Water at the Surface of a Beta-Emitting Planar Ophthalmic Applicator with a Planar, Windowless Extrapolation Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, A; Soares, C; Micka, J; Culberson, W; DeWerd, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Currently there is no primary calibration standard for determining the absorbed dose rate-to-water at the surface of β-emitting concave ophthalmic applicators and plaques. Machining tolerances involved in the design of concave window extrapolation chambers are a limiting factor for development of such a standard. Use of a windowless extrapolation chamber avoids these window-machining tolerance issues. As a windowless extrapolation chamber has never been attempted, this work focuses on proof of principle measurements with a planar, windowless extrapolation chamber to verify the accuracy in comparison to initial calibration, which could be extended to the design of a hemispherical, windowless extrapolation chamber. Methods: The window of an extrapolation chamber defines the electrical field, aids in aligning the source parallel to the collector-guard assembly, and decreases the backscatter due to attenuation of lower electron energy. To create a uniform and parallel electric field in this research, the source was made common to the collector-guard assembly. A precise positioning protocol was designed to enhance the parallelism of the source and collector-guard assembly. Additionally, MCNP5 was used to determine a backscatter correction factor to apply to the calibration. With these issues addressed, the absorbed dose rate-to-water of a Tracerlab 90Sr planar ophthalmic applicator was determined using National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) calibration formalism, and the results of five trials with this source were compared to measurements at NIST with a traditional extrapolation chamber. Results: The absorbed dose rate-to-water of the planar applicator was determined to be 0.473 Gy/s ±0.6%. Comparing these results to NIST's determination of 0.474 Gy/s yields a −0.6% difference. Conclusion: The feasibility of a planar, windowless extrapolation chamber has been demonstrated. A similar principle will be applied to developing a primary

  7. Note: Utilization of polymer gel as a bolus compensator and a dosimeter in the near-surface buildup region for breast-conserving therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuse, Hiraku; Shinoda, Kazuya; Inohira, Masaya; Kawamura, Hiraku; Miyamoto, Katsumi; Sakae, Takeji; Fujisaki, Tatsuya

    2015-09-01

    Tangential beam radiotherapy is routinely used for radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery. A tissue-equivalent bolus placed on the irradiated area shifts the depth of the dose distribution; this bolus provides uniform dose distribution to the breast. The gel bolus made by the BANG-Pro® polymer gel and in an oxygen non-transmission pack was applicable as a dosimeter to measure dose distribution in near-surface buildup region. We validated the use of the gel bolus to improve in the whole-breast/chest wall, including the near-surface buildup region.

  8. Note: Utilization of polymer gel as a bolus compensator and a dosimeter in the near-surface buildup region for breast-conserving therapy.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Hiraku; Shinoda, Kazuya; Inohira, Masaya; Kawamura, Hiraku; Miyamoto, Katsumi; Sakae, Takeji; Fujisaki, Tatsuya

    2015-09-01

    Tangential beam radiotherapy is routinely used for radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery. A tissue-equivalent bolus placed on the irradiated area shifts the depth of the dose distribution; this bolus provides uniform dose distribution to the breast. The gel bolus made by the BANG-Pro(®) polymer gel and in an oxygen non-transmission pack was applicable as a dosimeter to measure dose distribution in near-surface buildup region. We validated the use of the gel bolus to improve in the whole-breast/chest wall, including the near-surface buildup region.

  9. Note: Utilization of polymer gel as a bolus compensator and a dosimeter in the near-surface buildup region for breast-conserving therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuse, Hiraku Inohira, Masaya; Kawamura, Hiraku; Fujisaki, Tatsuya; Shinoda, Kazuya; Miyamoto, Katsumi; Sakae, Takeji

    2015-09-15

    Tangential beam radiotherapy is routinely used for radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery. A tissue-equivalent bolus placed on the irradiated area shifts the depth of the dose distribution; this bolus provides uniform dose distribution to the breast. The gel bolus made by the BANG-Pro{sup ®} polymer gel and in an oxygen non-transmission pack was applicable as a dosimeter to measure dose distribution in near-surface buildup region. We validated the use of the gel bolus to improve in the whole-breast/chest wall, including the near-surface buildup region.

  10. E-Cloud Build-up in Grooved Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, Marco

    2007-05-01

    We simulate electron cloud build-up in a grooved vacuumchamber including the effect of space charge from the electrons. Weidentify conditions for e-cloud suppression and make contact withprevious estimates of an effective secondary electron yield for groovedsurfaces.

  11. Paleozoic carbonate buildup (reef) inventory, central and southeastern Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacson, P.E.

    1987-08-01

    Knowledge of central and southeastern Idaho's Paleozoic rocks to date suggest that three styles of buildup (reef) complexes occur in Late Devonian, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian-Permian time. The Late Devonian Jefferson Formation has stromatoporoid and coral (both rugosan and tabulate) organisms effecting a buildup in the Grandview Canyon vicinity; Early Mississippian Waulsortian-type mud mounds occur in the Lodgepole formation of southeastern Idaho; there are Late Mississippian Waulsortian-type mounds in the Surrett Canyon Formation of the Lost River Range; and cyclic Pennsylvanian-Permian algal and hydrozoan buildups occur in the Juniper gulch Member of the Snaky Canyon Formation in the Arco Hills and Lemhi Range. Late Devonian (Frasnian) carbonates of the Jefferson formation show buildup development on deep ramp sediments.

  12. Use of Monte Carlo simulations with a realistic rat phantom for examining the correlation between hematopoietic system response and red marrow absorbed dose in Brown Norway rats undergoing radionuclide therapy with {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 90}Y-BR96 mAbs

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, Erik; Ljungberg, Michael; Martensson, Linda; Nilsson, Rune; Tennvall, Jan; Strand, Sven-Erik; Joensson, Bo-Anders

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Biokinetic and dosimetry studies in laboratory animals often precede clinical radionuclide therapies in humans. A reliable evaluation of therapeutic efficacy is essential and should be based on accurate dosimetry data from a realistic dosimetry model. The aim of this study was to develop an anatomically realistic dosimetry model for Brown Norway rats to calculate S factors for use in evaluating correlations between absorbed dose and biological effects in a preclinical therapy study. Methods: A realistic rat phantom (Roby) was used, which has some flexibility that allows for a redefinition of organ sizes. The phantom was modified to represent the anatomic geometry of a Brown Norway rat, which was used for Monte Carlo calculations of S factors. Kinetic data for radiolabeled BR96 monoclonal antibodies were used to calculate the absorbed dose. Biological data were gathered from an activity escalation study with {sup 90}Y- and {sup 177}Lu-labeled BR96 monoclonal antibodies, in which blood cell counts and bodyweight were examined up to 2 months follow-up after injection. Reductions in white blood cell and platelet counts and declines in bodyweight were quantified by four methods and compared to the calculated absorbed dose to the bone marrow or the total body. Results: A red marrow absorbed dose-dependent effect on hematological parameters was observed, which could be evaluated by a decrease in blood cell counts. The absorbed dose to the bone marrow, corresponding to the maximal tolerable activity that could safely be administered, was determined to 8.3 Gy for {sup 177}Lu and 12.5 Gy for {sup 90}Y. Conclusions: There was a clear correlation between the hematological effects, quantified with some of the studied parameters, and the calculated red marrow absorbed doses. The decline in body weight was stronger correlated to the total body absorbed dose, rather than the red marrow absorbed dose. Finally, when considering a constant activity concentration, the phantom

  13. An alternating renewal process describes the buildup of perceptual segregation

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Sara A.; Tranchina, Daniel; Rinzel, John

    2015-01-01

    For some ambiguous scenes perceptual conflict arises between integration and segregation. Initially, all stimulus features seem integrated. Then abruptly, perhaps after a few seconds, a segregated percept emerges. For example, segregation of acoustic features into streams may require several seconds. In behavioral experiments, when a subject's reports of stream segregation are averaged over repeated trials, one obtains a buildup function, a smooth time course for segregation probability. The buildup function has been said to reflect an underlying mechanism of evidence accumulation or adaptation. During long duration stimuli perception may alternate between integration and segregation. We present a statistical model based on an alternating renewal process (ARP) that generates buildup functions without an accumulative process. In our model, perception alternates during a trial between different groupings, as in perceptual bistability, with random and independent dominance durations sampled from different percept-specific probability distributions. Using this theory, we describe the short-term dynamics of buildup observed on short trials in terms of the long-term statistics of percept durations for the two alternating perceptual organizations. Our statistical-dynamics model describes well the buildup functions and alternations in simulations of pseudo-mechanistic neuronal network models with percept-selective populations competing through mutual inhibition. Even though the competition model can show history dependence through slow adaptation, our statistical switching model, that neglects history, predicts well the buildup function. We propose that accumulation is not a necessary feature to produce buildup. Generally, if alternations between two states exhibit independent durations with stationary statistics then the associated buildup function can be described by the statistical dynamics of an ARP. PMID:25620927

  14. Monte Carlo Simulations on Neutron Transport and Absorbed Dose in Tissue-Equivalent Phantoms Exposed to High-Flux Epithermal Neutron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartesaghi, G.; Gambarini, G.; Negri, A.; Carrara, M.; Burian, J.; Viererbl, L.

    2010-04-01

    Presently there are no standard protocols for dosimetry in neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) treatments. Because of the high radiation intensity and of the presence at the same time of radiation components having different linear energy transfer and therefore different biological weighting factors, treatment planning in epithermal neutron fields for BNCT is usually performed by means of Monte Carlo calculations; experimental measurements are required in order to characterize the neutron source and to validate the treatment planning. In this work Monte Carlo simulations in two kinds of tissue-equivalent phantoms are described. The neutron transport has been studied, together with the distribution of the boron dose; simulation results are compared with data taken with Fricke gel dosimeters in form of layers, showing a good agreement.

  15. [Evaluation of the dose equivalent absorbed by the population of Como and surrounding area following the nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl].

    PubMed

    Cirla, A; Ostinelli, A; Zingales, A

    1987-12-01

    The effects produced as a consequence of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the population of Como are assessed on the basis of the measurements taken in the environment and on the food. Exposure measurements produced by external radiation and the activities of the different radionuclides introduced into the body, by ingestion and inhalation, made it possible to obtain an estimate of the dose equivalent and its somatic and genetic effects on the population. The results show that such effects may produce 0.5-2 cases of malignant tumour in the next 25 years and 0.2-1 case of genetic damage in the next 60 years and are therefore statistically insignificant.

  16. SU-E-T-59: Calculations of Collimator Scatter Factors (Sc) with and Without Custom-Made Build-Up Caps for CyberKnife

    SciTech Connect

    Wokoma, S; Yoon, J; Jung, J; Lee, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of custom-made build-up caps for a diode detector in robotic radiosurgery radiation fields with variable collimator (IRIS) for collimator scatter factor (Sc) calculation. Methods: An acrylic cap was custom-made to fit our SFD (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) diode detector. The cap has thickness of 5 cm, corresponding to a depth beyond electron contamination. IAEA phase space data was used for beam modeling and DOSRZnrc code was used to model the detector. The detector was positioned at 80 cm source-to-detector distance. Calculations were performed with the SFD, with and without the build-up cap, for clinical IRIS settings ranging from 7.5 to 60 mm. Results: The collimator scatter factors were calculated with and without 5 cm build-up cap. They were agreed within 3% difference except 15 mm cone. The Sc factor for 15 mm cone without buildup was 13.2% lower than that with buildup. Conclusion: Sc data is a critical component in advanced algorithms for treatment planning in order to calculate the dose accurately. After incorporating build-up cap, we discovered differences of up to 13.2 % in Sc factors in the SFD detector, when compared against in-air measurements without build-up caps.

  17. A method for a short-term forecast of the absorbed dose accumulation dynamics on the international space station based on radiation monitoring system data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lishnevskii, A. E.; Benghin, V. V.

    2014-12-01

    Many papers are devoted to the prediction of radiation conditions on board of a spacecraft (Pichkhadze et al., 2004; Khamidullina et al., 2008; 2012), and a number of software systems for corresponding calculations have been developed: the US information system CREME96 (https://creme.isde.vander-bilt.edu/); European SPENVIS (http://www.spenvis.oma.be/intro.php); Russian SEREIS (Kuznetsov et al., 2001; Model' kosmosa, 2007) and COSRAD (http://cosrad.sinp.msu.ru/manual.html; Kuznetsov et al., 2011) based on the models of the radiation environment in near-Earth space (Bashkirov et al., 1998; Nymmik, 2004; Model' kosmosa, 2007; Kuznetsov et al., 2011). In this paper we propose a simple calculation algorithm of short-term (for a few days) forecasting of dynamics of the radiation dose on the International Space Station (ISS) in radiation environment undisturbed by solar proton events. This algorithm does not use radiation environment models and detailed ballistic calculations, while it uses data of the onboard radiation monitoring system (RMS) and empirical relations, obtained for ISS orbital motion.

  18. Effect of pore pressure buildup on slowness of rupture propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ougier-Simonin, A.; Zhu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Pore fluid pressure is known to play an important role in brittle fracture initiation and propagation, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We conducted triaxial experiments on saturated porous sandstones to investigate effects of pore pressure buildup on the slowness of shear rupture propagation at different confining pressures. At low to intermediate confinements, rocks fail by brittle faulting, and pore pressure buildup causes a reduction in rock's shear strength but does not induce measurable differences in slip behavior. When the confinement is high enough to prohibit dynamic faulting, rocks fail in the brittle-ductile transitional regime. In the transitional regime, pore pressure buildup promotes slip instability on an otherwise stably sliding fracture. Compared to those observed in the brittle regime, the slip rate, stress drop, and energy dissipated during rupture propagation with concurrent pore pressure buildup in the transitional regime are distinctively different. When decreasing confining pressure instead, the slip behavior resembles the ones of the brittle regime, emphasizing how the observed slowness is related to excess pore pressure beyond the effective pressure phenomenon. Analysis of the mechanical data using existing theoretical models confirms these observations. Quantitative microstructural analyses reveal that increasing pore pressure lessens the dilatancy hardening during failure, thus enhances slip along the localized zone in the transitional regime. Our experimental results suggest that pore pressure buildup induces slow slip in the transitional regime, and slip rates along a shear fracture may vary considerably depending on effective stress states.

  19. Experimental method of in-vivo dosimetry without build-up device on the skin for external beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Hosang; Nam, Jiho; Lee, Jayoung; Park, Dahl; Baek, Cheol-Ha; Kim, Wontaek; Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Dongwon

    2015-06-01

    Accurate dose delivery is crucial to the success of modern radiotherapy. To evaluate the dose actually delivered to patients, in-vivo dosimetry (IVD) is generally performed during radiotherapy to measure the entrance doses. In IVD, a build-up device should be placed on top of an in-vivo dosimeter to satisfy the electron equilibrium condition. However, a build-up device made of tissue-equivalent material or metal may perturb dose delivery to a patient, and requires an additional laborious and time-consuming process. We developed a novel IVD method using a look-up table of conversion ratios instead of a build-up device. We validated this method through a monte-carlo simulation and 31 clinical trials. The mean error of clinical IVD is 3.17% (standard deviation: 2.58%), which is comparable to that of conventional IVD methods. Moreover, the required time was greatly reduced so that the efficiency of IVD could be improved for both patients and therapists.

  20. Characterising metal build-up on urban road surfaces.

    PubMed

    Egodawatta, Prasanna; Ziyath, Abdul M; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2013-05-01

    Reliable approaches for predicting pollutant build-up are essential for accurate urban stormwater quality modelling. Based on the in-depth investigation of metal build-up on residential road surfaces, this paper presents empirical models for predicting metal loads on these surfaces. The study investigated metals commonly present in the urban environment. Analysis undertaken found that the build-up process for metals primarily originating from anthropogenic (copper and zinc) and geogenic (aluminium, calcium, iron and manganese) sources were different. Chromium and nickel were below detection limits. Lead was primarily associated with geogenic sources, but also exhibited a significant relationship with anthropogenic sources. The empirical prediction models developed were validated using an independent data set and found to have relative prediction errors of 12-50%, which is generally acceptable for complex systems such as urban road surfaces. Also, the predicted values were very close to the observed values and well within 95% prediction interval. PMID:23416742

  1. Energy absorption buildup factors of human organs and tissues at energies and penetration depths relevant for radiotherapy and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Manohara, S R; Hanagodimath, S M; Gerward, L

    2011-11-15

    Energy absorption geometric progression (GP) fitting parameters and the corresponding buildup factors have been computed for human organs and tissues, such as adipose tissue, blood (whole), cortical bone, brain (grey/white matter), breast tissue, eye lens, lung tissue, skeletal muscle, ovary, testis, soft tissue, and soft tissue (4-component), for the photon energy range 0.015-15 MeV and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp (mean free path). The chemical composition of human organs and tissues is seen to influence the energy absorption buildup factors. It is also found that the buildup factor of human organs and tissues changes significantly with the change of incident photon energy and effective atomic number, Z(eff). These changes are due to the dominance of different photon interaction processes in different energy regions and different chemical compositions of human organs and tissues. With the proper knowledge of buildup factors of human organs and tissues, energy absorption in the human body can be carefully controlled. The present results will help in estimating safe dose levels for radiotherapy patients and also useful in diagnostics and dosimetry. The tissue-equivalent materials for skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, cortical bone, and lung tissue are also discussed. It is observed that water and MS20 are good tissue equivalent materials for skeletal muscle in the extended energy range.

  2. Key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K6 of the standards for absorbed dose to water at 10 g cm-2 of the NMIJ, Japan and the BIPM in accelerator photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, S.; Burns, D. T.; Roger, P.; Shimizu, M.; Morishita, Y.; Kato, M.; Tanaka, T.; Kurosawa, T.; Saito, N.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of the dosimetry for accelerator photon beams was carried out between the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) from 9 to 23 April 2015. The comparison was based on the determination of absorbed dose to water at 10 g cm-2 for three radiation qualities at the NMIJ. The results, reported as ratios of the NMIJ and the BIPM evaluations (and with the combined standard uncertainties given in parentheses), are 0.9966 (47) at 6 MV, 0.9965 (60) at 10 MV and 0.9953 (50) at 15 MV. This result is the eighth in the on-going BIPM.RI(I)-K6 series of comparisons. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCRI, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  3. Understanding the build-up of SMBH and Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Francisco; Georgakakis, Antonis; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Akylas, Thanassis; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Castello, N.

    2015-09-01

    . The excellent survey capabilities of Athena/WFI (effective area, angular resolution, field of view) will allow to measure the incidence of feedback in the shape of warm absorbers and Ultra Fast Outflows among the general population of AGN, as well as to complete the census of black hole growth by detecting and characterising significant samples of the most heavily obscured (including Compton thick) AGN, to redshifts z~3-4. The outstanding spectral throughput and resolution of Athena/X-IFU will permit measuring the energetics of those outflows to assess their influence on their host galaxies. The demographics of the heavily obscured and outflowing populations relative to their hosts are fundamental for understanding how major black hole growth events relate to the build-up of galaxies.

  4. Surface Buildup Scenarios and Outpost Architectures for Lunar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Troutman, Patrick A.; Culbert, Christopher J.; Leonard, Matthew J.; Spexarth, Gary R.

    2009-01-01

    The Constellation Program Architecture Team and the Lunar Surface Systems Project Office have developed an initial set of lunar surface buildup scenarios and associated polar outpost architectures, along with preliminary supporting element and system designs in support of NASA's Exploration Strategy. The surface scenarios are structured in such a way that outpost assembly can be suspended at any time to accommodate delivery contingencies or changes in mission emphasis. The modular nature of the architectures mitigates the impact of the loss of any one element and enhances the ability of international and commercial partners to contribute elements and systems. Additionally, the core lunar surface system technologies and outpost operations concepts are applicable to future Mars exploration. These buildup scenarios provide a point of departure for future trades and assessments of alternative architectures and surface elements.

  5. Spontaneous Polarization Buildup in a Room-Temperature Polariton Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Baumberg, J. J.; Christopoulos, S.; Kavokin, A. V.; Grundy, A. J. D.; Baldassarri Hoeger von Hoegersthal, G.; Butte, R.; Christmann, G.; Feltin, E.; Carlin, J.-F.; Grandjean, N.; Solnyshkov, D. D.; Malpuech, G.

    2008-09-26

    We observe the buildup of strong ({approx}50%) spontaneous vector polarization in emission from a GaN-based polariton laser excited by short optical pulses at room temperature. The Stokes vector of emitted light changes its orientation randomly from one excitation pulse to another, so that the time-integrated polarization remains zero. This behavior is completely different from any previous laser. We interpret this observation in terms of the spontaneous symmetry breaking in a Bose-Einstein condensate of exciton polaritons.

  6. Flux buildup in FRCs using rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Alan L.

    1999-11-01

    FRCs have a purely diamagnetic current with a line density magnitude I' = Δ B/μo just sufficient to reverse the external confinement field. This results in an average electron rotational velocity ωr ≈ j_e/ner. A rotating magnetic field (RMF) causes the electrons to oscillate along the axial field lines and creates an azimuthal EMF equal to . This EMF will act to overcome the η_⊥j_θ resistive loss and result in flux buildup if the RMF frequency ω exceeds ω_r. The RMF penetration is approximately δ = (2η_allel/μ_o\\varpi)^1/2 where \\varpi = ω-ωr is the effective frequency seen in the electron frame of reference, and the resultant total electron drive is strongly peaked at small \\varpi where δ^* = r_s, the FRC separatrix radius. As the FRC expands due to flux buildup ωr will change and strongly affect the RMF drive. This interplay between RMF drive and FRC equilibrium has been studied using the type of analytic solutions first derived by Hugrass^1 for rigid rotor rotations. Results are compared with flux buildup and sustainment measurements in the STX device, and the implications for larger devices are discussed. Support by USDOE. ^1W.N. Hugrass, Aust. J. Phys. 39, 513 (1986).

  7. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Enz, Glenn L.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  8. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  9. Modelling Absorbent Phenomena of Absorbent Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayeb, S.; Ladhari, N.; Ben Hassen, M.; Sakli, F.

    Absorption, retention and strike through time, as evaluating criteria of absorbent structures quality were studied. Determination of influent parameters on these criteria were realized by using the design method of experimental sets. In this study, the studied parameters are: Super absorbent polymer (SAP)/fluff ratio, compression and the porosity of the non woven used as a cover stock. Absorption capacity and retention are mostly influenced by SAP/fluff ratio. However, strike through time is affected by compression. Thus, a modelling of these characteristics in function of the important parameter was established.

  10. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Guillen, Donna P.; Longhurst, Glen R.; Porter, Douglas L.; Parry, James R.

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  11. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Ronald J.

    1987-09-22

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  12. An alternative buildup material: combine dressing and liquid paraffin.

    PubMed

    Rykers, K; Trenkner, S

    1998-01-01

    A tissue substitute of combine dressing (gauze and cottonwool) soaked with liquid paraffin was found to be a practical, easily manufactured and inexpensive buildup material for use in treating radiation therapy patients with electron and photon beams. Tissue equivalence was measured for electron energies of 6, 9, 12, and 16 MeV and photon energies of 6 MV and 10 MV delivered by a Varian 2100C linear accelerator. The solid water equivalence of the combine dressing/liquid paraffin material was approximately 1.2 times the geometric thickness of tissue substitute material across all energies.

  13. Progressive Fracture of Fiber Composite Build-Up Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    1997-01-01

    Damage progression and fracture of built-up composite structures is evaluated by using computational simulation. The objective is to examine the behavior and response of a stiffened composite (0/ +/- 45/90)(sub s6) laminate panel by simulating the damage initiation, growth, accumulation, progression and propagation to structural collapse. An integrated computer code, CODSTRAN, was augmented for the simulation of the progressive damage and fracture of built-up composite structures under mechanical loading. Results show that damage initiation and progression have significant effect on the structural response. Influence of the type of loading is investigated on the damage initiation, propagation and final fracture of the build-up composite panel.

  14. Electron Cloud Build-up Study for DAFNE

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccarezza, C.; Cimino, R.; Drago, A.; Zobov, M.; Bellodi, G.; Schulte, D.; Zimmermann, F.; Rumolo, G.; Ohmi, K.; Pivi, M.; /SLAC

    2005-05-27

    After the first experimental observations compatible with the presence of the e-cloud effect in the DAFNE positron ring, a more systematic study has been performed regarding the e-cloud build-up. The measured field map of the magnetic field has been taken into account in the simulation for elements present in the four 10 m long bending sections, representing 40% of the whole positron ring. The obtained simulation results are presented together with the recent experimental observations performed on the vacuum behavior of the positron ring.

  15. Characterization of differences in calculated and actual measured skin doses to canine limbs during stereotactic radiosurgery using Gafchromic film

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Jerri; Ryan, Stewart; Harmon, Joseph F.

    2012-07-01

    Accurate calculation of absorbed dose to the skin, especially the superficial and radiosensitive basal cell layer, is difficult for many reasons including, but not limited to, the build-up effect of megavoltage photons, tangential beam effects, mixed energy scatter from support devices, and dose interpolation caused by a finite resolution calculation matrix. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been developed as an alternative limb salvage treatment option at Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for dogs with extremity bone tumors. Optimal dose delivery to the tumor during SBRT treatment can be limited by uncertainty in skin dose calculation. The aim of this study was to characterize the difference between measured and calculated radiation dose by the Varian Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) AAA treatment planning algorithm (for 1-mm, 2-mm, and 5-mm calculation voxel dimensions) as a function of distance from the skin surface. The study used Gafchromic EBT film (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ), FilmQA analysis software, a limb phantom constructed from plastic water Trade-Mark-Sign (fluke Biomedical, Everett, WA) and a canine cadaver forelimb. The limb phantom was exposed to 6-MV treatments consisting of a single-beam, a pair of parallel opposed beams, and a 7-beam coplanar treatment plan. The canine forelimb was exposed to the 7-beam coplanar plan. Radiation dose to the forelimb skin at the surface and at depths of 1.65 mm and 1.35 mm below the skin surface were also measured with the Gafchromic film. The calculation algorithm estimated the dose well at depths beyond buildup for all calculation voxel sizes. The calculation algorithm underestimated the dose in portions of the buildup region of tissue for all comparisons, with the most significant differences observed in the 5-mm calculation voxel and the least difference in the 1-mm voxel. Results indicate a significant difference between measured and calculated data

  16. Belize model, a carbonate-clastic shelf buildup

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, W.

    1987-05-01

    Belize, a small Central American country located on the Caribbean Sea south of the Yucatan Peninsula, offers an excellent modern analog of a mixed carbonate/clastic shelf buildup. Its 175-mi long reef tract, second longest in the world, restricts a shallow shelf depobasin into which terrigenous clastics source from the Maya Mountains to the west and carbonates dominate from the east. Mixed lithologies occur along strandlines, in submarine channels, and in lagoons and river-delta fronts, which are scattered throughout the depobasin. Energy sources from both land and sea influence sedimentation. Heavy summer rains flood the basin with arkosic and quartzose clastics, and periodic sea storms and hurricanes drive carbonate particles from the reef tract landward into the basin. Modern environments include the reef tract, carbonate tidal flats, shallow shelf patch reefs, lagoons, cayes, mainland coast deltas, estuaries, lagoons, and beach/bar barriers. Modern sediments include reef metazoans, algae, coralline algae, lime mud, quartz, and feldspathic sand and clay. The setting for the model has been influenced by Tertiary tectonics and Pleistocene sea level changes. Karstification occurred during the past 10,000 years, partly controlling topography and resulting Holocene sediment patterns. Facies patterns of the Belize Holocene are compared to the Jurassic of Montana. The Middle Jurassic Piper Formation exhibits a nearly 100-mi long carbonate barrier/buildup restricting a clastic-dominated shelf. Other ancient mixed carbonate/clastic terranes may fit this model as well.

  17. Energy buildup in sheared force-free magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, Richard; Low, Boon C.

    1992-01-01

    Photospheric displacement of the footpoints of solar magnetic field lines results in shearing and twisting of the field, and consequently in the buildup of electric currents and magnetic free energy in the corona. The sudden release of this free energy may be the origin of eruptive events like coronal mass ejections, prominence eruptions, and flares. An important question is whether such an energy release may be accompanied by the opening of magnetic field lines that were previously closed, for such open field lines can provide a route for matter frozen into the field to escape the sun altogether. This paper presents the results of numerical calculations showing that opening of the magnetic field is permitted energetically, in that it is possible to build up more free energy in a sheared, closed, force-free magnetic field than is in a related magnetic configuration having both closed and open field lines. Whether or not the closed force-free field attains enough energy to become partially open depends on the form of the shear profile; the results presented compare the energy buildup for different shear profiles. Implications for solar activity are discussed briefly.

  18. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  19. Absorbing Outflows in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, Smita

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this program was a comprehensive multiwavelength study of absorption phenomena in active galactic nuclei (AGN). These include a variety of associated absorption systems: X-ray warm absorbers, X-ray cold absorbers. UV absorbers with high ionization lines, MgII absorbers, red quasars and BALQSOs. The aim is to determine the physical conditions in the absorbing outflows, study their inter-relations and their role in AGN. We designed several observing programs to achieve this goal: X-ray spectroscopy, UV spectroscopy, FLAY spectroscopy and X-ray imaging. We were very successful towards achieving the goal over the five year period as shown through following observing programs and papers. Copies of a few papers are attached with this report.

  20. Internal absorber solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Sletten, Carlyle J.; Herskovitz, Sheldon B.; Holt, F. S.; Sletten, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Thin solar collecting panels are described made from arrays of small rod collectors consisting of a refracting dielectric rod lens with an absorber imbedded within it and a reflecting mirror coated on the back side of the dielectric rod. Non-tracking collector panels on vertical walls or roof tops receive approximately 90% of solar radiation within an acceptance zone 60.degree. in elevation angle by 120.degree. or more in the azimuth sectors with a collector concentration ratio of approximately 3.0. Miniaturized construction of the circular dielectric rods with internal absorbers reduces the weight per area of glass, plastic and metal used in the collector panels. No external parts or insulation are needed as heat losses are low due to partial vacuum or low conductivity gas surrounding heated portions of the collector. The miniature internal absorbers are generally made of solid copper with black selective surface and the collected solar heat is extracted at the collector ends by thermal conductivity along the absorber rods. Heat is removed from end fittings by use of liquid circulants. Several alternate constructions are provided for simplifying collector panel fabrication and for preventing the thermal expansion and contraction of the heated absorber or circulant tubes from damaging vacuum seals. In a modified version of the internal absorber collector, oil with temperature dependent viscosity is pumped through a segmented absorber which is now composed of closely spaced insulated metal tubes. In this way the circulant is automatically diverted through heated portions of the absorber giving higher collector concentration ratios than theoretically possible for an unsegmented absorber.

  1. Lipid-absorbing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Wallace, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The removal of bile acids and cholesterol by polymeric absorption is discussed in terms of micelle-polymer interaction. The results obtained with a polymer composed of 75 parts PEO and 25 parts PB plus curing ingredients show an absorption of 305 to 309%, based on original polymer weight. Particle size effects on absorption rate are analyzed. It is concluded that crosslinked polyethylene oxide polymers will absorb water, crosslinked polybutadiene polymers will absorb lipids; neither polymer will absorb appreciable amounts of lipids from micellar solutions of lipids in water.

  2. Chaetetid buildups in a Westphalian (Desmoinesian) Cyclothem in Southeastern Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suchy, D.R.; West, R.R.

    2001-01-01

    Small buildups of chaetetids and associated biota in the Higginsville Limestone Member of the Fort Scott Formation (Desmoinesian, Middle Pennsylvanian) are well exposed in three dimensions in an abandoned quarry in Crawford County, Kansas, Regional studies indicate that the buildups were deposited during a relative sea-level highstand, but within normal wave-base, on the southern flank of the Bourbon Arch. The chaetetid facies consists of a fusulinid wackestone to packstone that encloses the chaetetids. In the lower part of the chaetetid interval, chaetetids are small and tabular, but gradually upsection they grade into larger domical forms that sometimes form tall, ragged columns. These, in turn, coalesce upward to form large masses (boundstone) up to 6 m across. At the top of the bed, the chaetetid masses and surrounding matrix are covered by intertidal to supratidal, coastal, and /or terrigenous facies, indicating a shallowing of sea level to the point that chaetetid growth was terminated. Attachment surfaces for individual chaetetids initially involved partially lithified sediment or shell fragments, whereas within the columns they attached to underlying chaetetids, Multithecopora or algal overgrowths on underlying chaetetids, or thin sediment layers that define growth interruptions within the columns. Apparent maximum relief of chaetetids relative to the seafloor during growth was from 30 to 45 cm. Cross laminations in the matrix and some toppling of chaetetids indicate a moderately high-energy paleoenvironment. Ragged margins of the chaetetids accompanied by overlying thin sediment layers, and periodic overgrowths by the tabulate coral Multithecopora and encrusting algae, indicate growth interruptions instigated by periodic influxes of sediment or other environmental factors. Abundant fossils are present on and among the chaetetids, including brachiopods, bryozoans, rugose corals, crinoids, echinoids, gastropods, encrusting algae, ostracodes, and

  3. Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Theory and Data

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M. A.

    2010-10-08

    We present a broad-brush survey of the phenomenology, history and importance of the electron-cloud effect (ECE). We briefly discuss the simulation techniques used to quantify the electron-cloud (EC) dynamics. Finally, we present in more detail an effective theory to describe the EC density build-up in terms of a few effective parameters. For further details, the reader is encouraged to refer to the proceedings of many prior workshops, either dedicated to EC or with significant EC contents, including the entire 'ECLOUD' series. In addition, the proceedings of the various flavors of Particle Accelerator Conferences contain a large number of EC-related publications. The ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter series contains one dedicated issue, and several occasional articles, on EC. An extensive reference database is the LHC website on EC.

  4. Preflare energy build-up in a filament circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, P. C. H.

    1987-01-01

    The May 16, 1981 flare observed at Debrecen is studied by extending to a fully three-dimensional model the two-dimensional Van Tend and Kuperus (1978) scenario for preflare energy build-up. It is shown that there are 10 to the 33rd ergs of free energy available to explain the subsequent large two-ribbon flare. As a result of the three-dimensional character of the present model, this estimate is an order of magnitude larger than that made by Van Tend. It is confirmed that the global form of the preflare circuit is highly important in determining the amount of energy stored in the preflare configuration. The present model gives correct predictions for the independently observed photospheric flow velocity and current strength in filaments.

  5. Progressive Fracture of Fiber Composite Build-Up Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Gotsis, Pascal K.; Chamis, C. C.

    1997-01-01

    Damage progression and fracture of built-up composite structures is evaluated by using computational simulation. The objective is to examine the behavior and response of a stiffened composite (0 +/-45/90)(sub s6) laminate panel by simulating the damage initiation, growth, accumulation, progression and propagation to structural collapse. An integrated computer code CODSTRAN was augmented for the simulation of the progressive damage and fracture of built-up composite structures under mechanical loading. Results show that damage initiation and progression to have significant effect on the structural response. Influence of the type of loading is investigated on the damage initiation, propagation and final fracture of the build-up composite panel.

  6. Orbit averaged radial buildup code for tandem mirror geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.; Futch, A.H.

    1981-01-22

    The radial Fokker-Planck (RFP) model of A. Futch was modified to treat plasma buildup in the tandem mirror plug and center cell with a self-consistent model (TOARBUC). Two major changes have been made to the original version of this code. First, the center cell is treated as having separate electron and ion confining potentials with the ion potential having the opposite sign of that in a conventional mirror. Second, a two-electron-temperature treatment derived by R. Cohen was included in the present model to allow the plug and center cell to have different T/sub e/'s as observed in the experiment. The following sections explain these changes in greater detail.

  7. Mid-Dinantian Waulsortian buildups in the Dublin Basin, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, Ian D.; Strogen, Peter; Jones, Gareth Ll.

    1992-08-01

    The sedimentary history and biostratigraphic setting of Waulsortian carbonate buildups of the Feltrim Limestone Formation (late Courceyan to early Chadian) within the Dublin Basin are described. There is no unique precursor or successor facies to this formation, and the massive Waulsortian banks are composed predominantly of peloidal, skeletal wackestones and lime mudstones with packstones near the tops of banks. These banks form tabular bodies of moderate relief and are interbedded with thin shales and argillaceous crinoidal limestones of inter-bank facies. In the southwest of the basin inter-bank facies are rare and the bank facies have abundant stromatactis cavities, and uniquely at Roselawn a fauna of rugose corals. All buildups in the Dublin Basin have Phase C and/or D component assemblages of Lees and Miller (1985) and are interpreted as accumulating in moderately shallow-water depths, near or within the photic zone. Isopachs for the Feltrim Limestone Formation show a NE-SW-trending axial depocentre where the Waulsortian facies is in excess of 400 m thickness. Deposition appears to have taken place on this "double-sided" ramp, in a manner similar to the model of Lees (1982) for Belgium and southern Britain. Soft-sediment deformation such as large-scale slumping, shale-injections and water-escape structures, not previously recorded from these rocks is widespread. The upper surface of the Feltrim Limestone Formation is fissured and displays a prominent erosion surface. Termination of Waulsortian facies deposition and influx of terrigenous sediment was caused by rapid uplift, attributed to Chadian tectonism. However, eustatic sea-level fall cannot be ruled out as a partial cause of the demise of the Waulsortian.

  8. Wear and hardness of different core build-up materials.

    PubMed

    Schmage, Petra; Nergiz, Ibrahim; Sito, Fekry; Platzer, Ursula; Rosentritt, Martin

    2009-10-01

    Before crown preparation, teeth with extensive coronal destructions are built up with core materials. Sometimes, these build ups are exposed to the oral environment without the protection of crowns. Therefore, this in vitro investigation was aimed at evaluating the wear, surface roughness, Vickers hardness, and surface structure of 10 core composites, two glass ionomer cements (GICs), and four posterior restoration composites. The three-body wear was tested after water storage and 2,00,000 cycles. We measured both surface roughness and Vickers hardness (DIN 50133) and evaluated the surface structures by scanning electron microscopy. Results were statistically analyzed by use of the Mann-Whitney U test (alpha = 0.05). Lowest wear was found for the restorative composites (20 microm Grandio; others about 40 microm). A comparison of the composites Build-It, Chroma Core, Rebilda LC, and Rebilda DC to Quixfil showed similar wear values for each material (43-50 microm). Wear values of GICs and all others core composites ranged between 58 and 75 microm. Only Ti-Core showed significantly higher wear than all other materials (p < 0.05). All core materials except Ti-Core (35 HV) showed Vickers hardness values between 42 and 61 HV. Most core composites, particularly Build-It, Multicore Flow, Rebilda LC, Ecusit, and Tetric Evo Ceram, showed more homogenous surface structures compared to GICs and restorative composites. Therefore, wear values of core build-up materials not only differed widely but were higher than those of conventional restorative materials; yet, core build-up materials showed advantageous surface structures.

  9. Diagnostic beam absorber in Mu2e beam line

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, Igor; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Star density, hadron flux, and residual dose distributions are calculated around the {mu}2e diagnostic beam absorber. Corresponding surface and ground water activation, and air activation are presented as well.

  10. Taxonomy of factors which influence heavy metal build-up on urban road surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, An; Gunawardana, Chandima; Gunawardena, Janaka; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Ayoko, Godwin A; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2016-06-01

    Heavy metals build-up on urban road surfaces is a complex process and influenced by a diverse range of factors. Although numerous research studies have been conducted in the area of heavy metals build-up, limited research has been undertaken to rank these factors in terms of their influence on the build-up process. This results in limitations in the identification of the most critical factor/s for accurately estimating heavy metal loads and for designing effective stormwater treatment measures. The research study undertook an in-depth analysis of the factors which influence heavy metals build-up based on data generated from a number of different geographical locations around the world. Traffic volume was found to be the highest ranked factor in terms of influencing heavy metals build-up while land use was ranked the second. Proximity to arterial roads, antecedent dry days and road surface roughness has a relatively lower ranking. Furthermore, the study outcomes advances the conceptual understanding of heavy metals build-up based on the finding that with increasing traffic volume, total heavy metal build-up load increases while the variability decreases. The outcomes from this research study are expected to contribute to more accurate estimation of heavy metals build-up loads leading to more effective stormwater treatment design.

  11. Eustatic and tectonic controls on development and demise of Waulsortian carbonate buildups, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Precht, W.F.; Shepard, W.

    1989-03-01

    Deeper water Waulsortian carbonate buildups of Kinderhookian age are known from four localities in Montana. These buildups are situated within rhythmically bedded carbonate mudstones in the Paine Member of the Lodgepole formation. These buildups are mud-rich, byrozoan-crinoid mounds which contain abundant stromatactoid-like spar-filled cavities. The buildups are located along downdropped blocks on bounding faults of the Central Montana trough related to reactivation of a middle Proterozoic intracratonic rift margin (aulacogen). Sequence stratigraphic analyses of the Lodgepole throughout central Montana forms the basis for interpretation of buildup development and demise. Opening of the trough coupled with sea level rise formed three distinct members of the Lodgepole, including (1) a transgressive surface marked by shallow-water deposits of the Cottonwood Canyon Member, (2) a transgressive systems tract of the Paine Member which can be separated into two distinct facies - a condensed section of deeper water carbonate mudstones to wackestones and the Waulsortian buildup facies which are encased within these rhythmically bedded deposits, and (3) a high-stand systems tract characterized by high-energy, cyclic, shoaling-upward crinoidal grainstones and oolites of the Woodhurst Member. Rapid eustatic rise and syntectonic subsidence during the transgressive systems tract outpassed buildup development and led to subsequent drowning. The lack of rapid reef building metazoans during the Mississippian is also suspect in explaining Waulsortian buildup demise.

  12. Photon buildup factors to account for angular incidence on shield walls.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHIRMERS, FRITZ G.

    2009-12-15

    Version 00 The buildup factors utilized the following LANL codes: CEPXS, NJOY, and PARTISN. MCNPX was also used to provide a comparison to a few representative PARTISN buildup factor values. These codes are not included in this distribution but can be obtained from RSICC or the NEADB. Sample input files for these codes can be found in the appendix of the thesis.

  13. Effect of avalanche build-up time on avalanche photodiode sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, H.; Kanbe, H.

    1985-03-01

    A calculation method for the receiver sensitivity of an avalanche photodiode is considered, taking into account avalanche build-up time and carrier transit time, in addition to the CR time constant. Actual receiver performance is estimated in a high data rate region of up to 10 Gbits/s for germanium avalanche photodiodes, applying the measured avalanche build-up time.

  14. Unidirectional perfect absorber

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Wang, P.; Song, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices. PMID:27615125

  15. Unidirectional perfect absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Wang, P.; Song, Z.

    2016-09-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices.

  16. Unidirectional perfect absorber.

    PubMed

    Jin, L; Wang, P; Song, Z

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices. PMID:27615125

  17. Mechanical energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An energy absorbing system for controlling the force where a moving object engages a stationary stop and where the system utilized telescopic tubular members, energy absorbing diaphragm elements, force regulating disc springs, and a return spring to return the telescoping member to its start position after stroking is presented. The energy absorbing system has frusto-conical diaphragm elements frictionally engaging the shaft and are opposed by a force regulating set of disc springs. In principle, this force feedback mechanism serves to keep the stroking load at a reasonable level even if the friction coefficient increases greatly. This force feedback device also serves to desensitize the singular and combined effects of manufacturing tolerances, sliding surface wear, temperature changes, dynamic effects, and lubricity.

  18. Unidirectional perfect absorber.

    PubMed

    Jin, L; Wang, P; Song, Z

    2016-09-12

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices.

  19. Characterization of 2 MeV, 4 MeV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV buildup caps for use with a 0.6 cubic centimeter thimble ionization chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Salyer, R.L.; VanDenburg, J.W.; Prinja, A.K.; Kirby, T.; Busch, R.; Hong-Nian Jow

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to characterize existing 2 MeV, 4 MeV and 6 MeV buildup caps, and to determine if a buildup cap can be made for the 0.6 cm{sup 3} thimble ionization chamber that will accurately measure exposures in a high-energy photon radiation field. Two different radiation transport codes were used to computationally characterize existing 2 MeV, 4 MeV, and 6 MeV buildup caps for a 0.6 cm{sup 3} active volume thimble ionization chamber: ITS, The Integrated TIGER Series of Coupled Electron-Photon Monte Carlo Transport Codes; and CEPXS/ONEDANT, A One-Dimensional Coupled Electron-Photon Discrete Ordinates Code Package. These codes were also used to determine the design characteristics of a buildup cap for use in the 18 MeV photon beam produced by the 14 TW pulsed power HERMES-III electron accelerator. The maximum range of the secondary electron, the depth at which maximum dose occurs, and the point where dose and collision kerma are equal have been determined to establish the validity of electronic equilibrium. The ionization chamber with the appropriate buildup cap was then subjected to a 4 MeV and a 6 MeV bremmstrahlung radiation spectrum to determine the detector response.

  20. Space Station redesign option A: Modular buildup concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In early 1993, President Clinton mandated that NASA look at lower cost alternatives to Space Station Freedom. He also established an independent advisory committee - the Blue Ribbon Panel - to review the redesign work and evaluate alternatives. Daniel Goldin, NASA Administrator, established a Station Redesign Team that began operating in late March from Crystal City, Virginia. NASA intercenter teams - one each at Marshall Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, and Langley Research Center provided engineering and other support. The results of the Option A study done at Marshall Space Flight Center are summarized. Two configurations (A-1 and A-2) are covered. Additional data is provided in the briefing package MSFC SRT-001, Final System Review to SRT-002, Space Station Option A Modular Buildup Concept, Volumes 1-5, Revision B, June 10, 1993. In June 1993, President Clinton decided to proceed with a modular concept consistent with Option A, and asked NASA to provide an Implementation Plan by September. All data from the Option A redesign activity was provided to NASA's Transition Team for use in developing the Implementation Plan.

  1. Compressive shear bond strength of core buildup materials.

    PubMed

    Görücü, Jale; Saygili, Gülbin; Ozgünaltay, Gül

    2006-04-01

    New tooth-colored restorative materials have been developed with the goal of replacing amalgam. These restoratives are marketed as packable composite and ormocer. The purpose of the present study was to compare the compressive shear bond strengths of these new materials with that of hybrid composite and amalgam as core materials. Standardized core buildups were made on four groups of extracted molars, with 10 teeth per group. Three tooth-colored restorative materials (Filtek Z 250, Filtek P 60, and Definite) and an amalgam (SDI Permite) were used. Specimens were placed in a special jig at a 45-degree angle. The compressive shear bond strength was obtained using a universal testing machine. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the groups, and pairwise comparisons were made by Mann-Whitney U test (P < .05). Filtek P 60, a packable composite resin, had the greatest compressive shear bond strength values in all instances, and the ormocer (Definite) had the lowest. The strengths of packable composite, hybrid composite, and amalgam as core materials were not significantly different (P > .05).

  2. Mechanism of cake buildup in crossflow filtration of colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, D.; Sharma, M.M. )

    1994-02-01

    Experimental results are presented for the crossflow filtration of concentrated bentonite suspensions. It is proposed that the hydrodynamic forces acting on the suspended colloids determine the rate of cake buildup and, therefore, the fluid loss rate. A simple model is proposed that predicts a power law relationship between the filtration rate and the shear stress at the cake surface. This is found to be consistent with experimental data at different filtration times at various suspension flow rates using three different suspensions. The mode shows that the cake formed will be inhomogeneous with smaller and smaller particles being deposited as filtration proceeds. An equilibrium cake thickness is achieved when no particles small enough to be deposited are available in the suspension. The cake thickness as a function of time can be computed form the model. It is also shown that for a given suspension rheology and flow rate there exists a critical permeability of the filter below which no cake will be formed. This critical permeability has been computed for these experiments. The model suggests that the equilibrium cake thickness can be precisely controlled by an appropriate choice of suspension flow rate and filter permeability. These observations have important implications in cross-flow filtration and in slip-casting of inorganic membranes.

  3. Beam Pipe HOM Absorber for 750 MHz RF Cavity Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Neubauer, Michael

    2014-10-29

    This joint project of Muons, Inc., Cornell University and SLAC was supported by a Phase I and Phase II grant monitored by the SBIR Office of Science of the DOE. Beam line HOM absorbers are a critical part of future linear colliders. The use of lossy materials at cryogenic temperatures has been incorporated in several systems. The design in beam pipes requires cylinders of lossy material mechanically confined in such a way as to absorb the microwave energy from the higher-order modes and remove the heat generated in the lossy material. Furthermore, the potential for charge build-up on the surface of the lossy material requires the conductivity of the material to remain consistent from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. In this program a mechanical design was developed that solved several design constraints: a) fitting into the existing Cornell load vacuum component, b) allowing the use of different material compositions, c) a thermal design that relied upon the compression of the lossy ceramic material without adding stress. Coating experiments were performed that indicated the design constraints needed to fully implement this approach for solving the charge build-up problem inherent in using lossy ceramics. In addition, the ACE3P program, used to calculate the performance of lossy cylinders in beam pipes in general, was supported by this project. Code development and documentation to allow for the more wide spread use of the program was a direct result of this project was well.

  4. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  5. Solar concentrator/absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Tiesenhausen, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Collector/energy converter, consisting of dual-slope optical concentrator and counterflow thermal energy absorber, is attached to multiaxis support structure. Efficient over wide range of illumination levels, device may be used to generate high temperature steam, serve as solar powered dryer, or power absorption cycle cooler.

  6. Does contamination buildup limit throughput for automated cryoEM?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Anchi; Fellmann, Denis; Pulokas, James; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget

    2006-06-01

    The development of automated systems for data acquisition in cryo electron microscopy has enabled the possibility of acquiring very large number of images from a single specimen grid. We have demonstrated that over images of 250,000 single particles can be acquired in a 24 h period. This has raised questions as to whether contamination buildup on the specimen limits the quality of the data that can be acquired during these long duration experiments and also whether the data acquisition session could be extended to allow acquisition of more than 1,000,000 particles. We report here a systematic characterization of contamination of specimens maintained for long periods of time at liquid nitrogen temperatures using standard side entry cryo stages. As part of this characterization we developed a more reliable method for accurately estimating specimen ice thickness. Using the method, we were able to calibrate image contrast against ice thickness under a variety of magnifications, objective aperture positions, and defoci, and demonstrated the strong dependence of the calibration curve on these parameters. The results show the anti-contamination aperture is, as expected, critical to the prevention of contamination and that loading film into the microscope dramatically increases the contamination rate, particularly in the first 3 h after the insertion of the film box. In the absence of film, we were able to reproducibly demonstrate that the contamination rate can be limited to a rate of approximately 1 angstrom/h providing reassurance that contamination will not be a major limiting factor for long term cryoEM experiments if a CCD camera is used for the imaging.

  7. MAGNETIC ENERGY BUILDUP FOR RELATIVISTIC MAGNETAR GIANT FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Cong

    2011-09-01

    Motivated by coronal mass ejection studies, we construct general relativistic models of a magnetar magnetosphere endowed with strong magnetic fields. The equilibrium states of the stationary, axisymmetric magnetic fields in the magnetar magnetosphere are obtained as solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation in a Schwarzschild spacetime. To understand the magnetic energy buildup in the magnetar magnetosphere, a generalized magnetic virial theorem in the Schwarzschild metric is newly derived. We carefully address the question whether the magnetar magnetospheric magnetic field can build up sufficient magnetic energy to account for the work required to open up the magnetic field during magnetar giant flares. We point out the importance of the Aly-Sturrock constraint, which has been widely studied in solar corona mass ejections, as a reference state in understanding magnetar energy storage processes. We examine how the magnetic field can possess enough energy to overcome the Aly-Sturrock energy constraint and open up. In particular, general relativistic (GR) effects on the Aly-Sturrock energy constraint in the Schwarzschild spacetime are carefully investigated. It is found that, for magnetar outbursts, the Aly-Sturrock constraint is more stringent, i.e., the Aly-Sturrock energy threshold is enhanced due to the GR effects. In addition, neutron stars with greater mass have a higher Aly-Sturrock energy threshold and are more difficult to erupt. This indicates that magnetars are probably not neutron stars with extreme mass. For a typical neutron star with mass of 1-2 M{sub sun}, we further explore the cross-field current effects, caused by the mass loading, on the possibility of stored magnetic field energy exceeding the Aly-Sturrock threshold.

  8. Characterizing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon build-up processes on urban road surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang; Liu, An; Li, Dunzhu; Zhang, Lixun; Guan, Yuntao

    2016-07-01

    Reliable prediction models are essential for modeling pollutant build-up processes on urban road surfaces. Based on successive samplings of road deposited sediments (RDS), this study presents empirical models for mathematical replication of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) build-up processes on urban road surfaces. The contaminant build-up behavior was modeled using saturation functions, which are commonly applied in US EPA's Stormwater Management Model (SWMM). Accurate fitting results were achieved in three typical urban land use types, and the applicability of the models was confirmed based on their acceptable relative prediction errors. The fitting results showed high variability in PAH saturation value and build-up rate among different land use types. Results of multivariate data and temporal-based analyses suggested that the quantity and property of RDS significantly influenced PAH build-up. Furthermore, pollution sources, traffic parameters, road surface conditions, and sweeping frequency could synthetically impact the RDS build-up and RDS property change processes. Thus, changes in these parameters could be the main reason for variations in PAH build-up in different urban land use types. PMID:27086074

  9. Characterizing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon build-up processes on urban road surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang; Liu, An; Li, Dunzhu; Zhang, Lixun; Guan, Yuntao

    2016-07-01

    Reliable prediction models are essential for modeling pollutant build-up processes on urban road surfaces. Based on successive samplings of road deposited sediments (RDS), this study presents empirical models for mathematical replication of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) build-up processes on urban road surfaces. The contaminant build-up behavior was modeled using saturation functions, which are commonly applied in US EPA's Stormwater Management Model (SWMM). Accurate fitting results were achieved in three typical urban land use types, and the applicability of the models was confirmed based on their acceptable relative prediction errors. The fitting results showed high variability in PAH saturation value and build-up rate among different land use types. Results of multivariate data and temporal-based analyses suggested that the quantity and property of RDS significantly influenced PAH build-up. Furthermore, pollution sources, traffic parameters, road surface conditions, and sweeping frequency could synthetically impact the RDS build-up and RDS property change processes. Thus, changes in these parameters could be the main reason for variations in PAH build-up in different urban land use types.

  10. Lower Cambrian archaeocyathan buildups, Todd River Dolomite, northeast Amadeus Basin, central Australia: Sedimentology and diagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennard, J. M.

    Two distinct types of archaeocyathan buildups occur within the Lower Cambrian Todd River Dolomite: a high energy, intermittently emergent, bioherm and grainstone reef-shoal, and low energy open-shelf bioherms and patch reefs. The primary fabric of these buildups was largely destroyed by dolomitisation. Facies relationship indicate that high and low energy buildups are temporal equivalents, and that the high energy reef-shoal now present in the N'Dhala Thrust Sheet was flanked to the east and south by a low energy shelf studded with bioherms and patch reefs. The reef-shoal was capped locally by microbial mudflats.

  11. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure. PMID:26828999

  12. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul K; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J M; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R; Luk, Ting S; Taylor, Antoinette J; Dalvit, Diego A R; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.

  13. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    DOE PAGES

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Moreover, our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributionsmore » to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.« less

  14. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul K; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J M; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R; Luk, Ting S; Taylor, Antoinette J; Dalvit, Diego A R; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure. PMID:26828999

  15. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-01-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  16. Estimate Radiological Dose for Animals

    1997-12-18

    Estimate Radiological dose for animals in ecological environment using open literature values for parameters such as body weight, plant and soil ingestion rate, rad. halflife, absorbed energy, biological halflife, gamma energy per decay, soil-to-plant transfer factor, ...etc

  17. Know your dose: RADDOSE

    PubMed Central

    Paithankar, Karthik S.; Garman, Elspeth F.

    2010-01-01

    The program RADDOSE is widely used to compute the dose absorbed by a macromolecular crystal during an X-ray diffraction experiment. A number of factors affect the absorbed dose, including the incident X-ray flux density, the photon energy and the composition of the macromolecule and of the buffer in the crystal. An experimental dose limit for macromolecular crystallography (MX) of 30 MGy at 100 K has been reported, beyond which the biological information obtained may be compromised. Thus, for the planning of an optimized diffraction experiment the estimation of dose has become an additional tool. A number of approximations were made in the original version of RADDOSE. Recently, the code has been modified in order to take into account fluorescent X-­ray escape from the crystal (version 2) and the inclusion of incoherent (Compton) scattering into the dose calculation is now reported (version 3). The Compton cross-section, although negligible at the energies currently commonly used in MX, should be considered in dose calculations for incident energies above 20 keV. Calculations using version 3 of RADDOSE reinforce previous studies that predict a reduction in the absorbed dose when data are collected at higher energies compared with data collected at 12.4 keV. Hence, a longer irradiation lifetime for the sample can be achieved at these higher energies but this is at the cost of lower diffraction intensities. The parameter ‘diffraction-dose efficiency’, which is the diffracted intensity per absorbed dose, is revisited in an attempt to investigate the benefits and pitfalls of data collection using higher and lower energy radiation, particularly for thin crystals. PMID:20382991

  18. Tubiphytes-archaeolithoporella-girvanella reefal facies in Permian buildup, Mino terrane, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Hiroyoshi; Horibo, Kenji; Kumamoto, Yasuko

    1990-10-01

    The Lower to Middle Permian Okumino buildup of the Mino terrane, central Japan, formed a carbonate cap on a seamount which was sitting in an open-ocean realm. Microscopic examination reveals considerable amounts of Tubiphytes, Archaeolithoporella, and Girvanella in these rocks. These low laminar encrusting organisms together with cystopore bryozoa and syndepositional radial-fibrous cements formed bindstones. The bindstones are interpreted as having formed wave-resistant algal reefal mounds on the marginal terrace of the Okumino buildup which also has the lagoonal flat, sand bar or shoal, and foreslope facies. The Okumino buildup is closer in its biotic association of major encrusting organisms to the Trogkofel buildup in southern Alps than to the Capitan Reef Complex in New Mexico and Texas. The similarity implies that Tubiphytes and Archaeolithoporella were the most predominant and significant rock-forming encrusting organisms in Early to early Middle Permian times.

  19. PREDICTING THE BUILDUP OF POLLUTANT CONCENTRATIONS USING EPA'S VISUAL PLUMES MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic sources contribute pollutants to estuaries that are significantly influenced by tides, frequently exhibiting velocity reversals. Flow reversals, even in the absence of diffusion, can cause a buildup of pollution from a particular discharge in the receiving water. ...

  20. Absorber for terahertz radiation management

    DOEpatents

    Biallas, George Herman; Apeldoorn, Cornelis; Williams, Gwyn P.; Benson, Stephen V.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Heckman, John D.

    2015-12-08

    A method and apparatus for minimizing the degradation of power in a free electron laser (FEL) generating terahertz (THz) radiation. The method includes inserting an absorber ring in the FEL beam path for absorbing any irregular THz radiation and thus minimizes the degradation of downstream optics and the resulting degradation of the FEL output power. The absorber ring includes an upstream side, a downstream side, and a plurality of wedges spaced radially around the absorber ring. The wedges form a scallop-like feature on the innermost edges of the absorber ring that acts as an apodizer, stopping diffractive focusing of the THz radiation that is not intercepted by the absorber. Spacing between the scallop-like features and the shape of the features approximates the Bartlett apodization function. The absorber ring provides a smooth intensity distribution, rather than one that is peaked on-center, thereby eliminating minor distortion downstream of the absorber.

  1. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C; Lee, Chuck K; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2013-11-12

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  2. Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph C.; Lee, Chuck K.; Walker, Jeffrey; Russell, Paige; Kirkwood, Jon; Yang, Nancy; Champagne, Victor

    2012-05-29

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

  3. Feasibility of lateral dose profile measurements in a small field using TLDs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bailin; Zhu, Jinhan; Li, Yinghui; Chen, Shaowen; Chen, Lixin; Liu, Xiaowei

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the feasibility of lateral dose profile measurements in a small field using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and to evaluate the impact of the field size on the absorbed dose ratio factor fmd of LiF and Al2O3 TLDs. The Monte Carlo package BEAM/EGSNRC was used to simulate the lateral dose profile in solid water phantoms (RW3 slab phantom) with various field sizes beyond the build-up region for 6 MV x-rays, and a LiF : Mg, Cu, P (GR-200) dosimeter with dimensions of 0.1  ×  0.1  ×  0.1 cm(3) was used to measure the lateral dose profile under the same conditions as the Monte Carlo simulations. To enable comparisons between dosimeters, Gafchromic EBT3 films were used. The results indicate that (1) the measured results are in agreement with the simulated results within the uncertainty of the simulation; (2) the values of fmd for Al2O3 and LiF in a 1  ×  1 cm(2) field are 2.8% and 1.6% less, respectively, than those in a 10  ×  10 cm(2) field; and (3) within the 80% profile region, the dose differences between TLDs and solid water are less than 1%. In the 80-10% profile region, the TLD results are in agreement with the absorbed doses in the solid water within 1 mm. It is generally acceptable to ignore the impact of field size on the absorbed dose ratio factor fmd when the field sizes are larger than 1  ×  1 cm(2) for LiF and 2  ×  2 cm(2) for Al2O3. For 6 MV x-rays, the small GR-200 chip can be used to measure the relative lateral dose profiles of small fields.

  4. Analysis of the build-up of semi and non volatile organic compounds on urban roads.

    PubMed

    Mahbub, Parvez; Ayoko, Godwin A; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Egodawatta, Prasanna

    2011-04-01

    Vehicular traffic in urban areas may adversely affect urban water quality through the build-up of traffic generated semi and non volatile organic compounds (SVOCs and NVOCs) on road surfaces. The characterisation of the build-up processes is the key to developing mitigation measures for the removal of such pollutants from urban stormwater. An in-depth analysis of the build-up of SVOCs and NVOCs was undertaken in the Gold Coast region in Australia. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Multicriteria Decision tools such as PROMETHEE and GAIA were employed to understand the SVOC and NVOC build-up under combined traffic scenarios of low, moderate, and high traffic in different land uses. It was found that congestion in the commercial areas and use of lubricants and motor oils in the industrial areas were the main sources of SVOCs and NVOCs on urban roads, respectively. The contribution from residential areas to the build-up of such pollutants was hardly noticeable. It was also revealed through this investigation that the target SVOCs and NVOCs were mainly attached to particulate fractions of 75-300 μm whilst the redistribution of coarse fractions due to vehicle activity mainly occurred in the >300 μm size range. Lastly, under combined traffic scenario, moderate traffic with average daily traffic ranging from 2300 to 5900 and average congestion of 0.47 were found to dominate SVOC and NVOC build-up on roads.

  5. Ordovician carbonate buildups: Potential gas reservoirs in the Ordos basin, central China

    SciTech Connect

    Huaida Hsu )

    1991-03-01

    The Ordos basin of central China covers an area of about 25,000 km{sup 2}. A series of eastward moving overthrusts developed along its western flank, but most of the basin consists of a stable slope that dips westward less than one degree. The basin contains sediments from Sinian to Middle Ordovician and from the Middle Carboniferous to Cretaceous. Its evolutionary history is similar to that of the Alberta basin. Recently drilled wildcat wells have produced commercial gas flows that are closely associated with Ordovician carbonate buildups and a weathered surface between the Ordovician and Carboniferous. Most of the buildups consist of agal mounds; however, some Middle Ordovician reefs developed in the western portion and along the southern margin of the Ordos basin. More than 200 buildups were delineated using seismic stratigraphic techniques. They can be divided into four distinct types. The growth and distribution of buildups were controlled by sea-level fluctuations. The interpretations made in this study were based on the integration of results from a variety of analyses including vertical profiling, differential interformational velocity analysis, amplitude versus offset comparisons, G-log analysis, seismic modeling techniques, and high-precision gravity surveys. The best gas prospects are the Ordovician carbonate buildups distributed around the basin's central uplift. The delineation of carbonate buildups and the demonstration that they are associated with commercial gas flows open the gate for future gas exploration in this area.

  6. Statistical Correlation of Gain and Buildup Time in APDs and Its Effects on Receiver Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peng; Hayat, Majeed M.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.; Teich, Malvin Carl

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports a novel recurrence theory that enables us to calculate the exact joint probability density function (pdf) of the random gain and the random avalanche buildup time in avalanche photodiodes (APDs) including the effect of dead space. Such calculations reveal a strong statistical correlation between the gain and the buildup time for all widths of the multiplication region. To facilitate the calculation of the photocurrent statistics in the presence of this correlation, the impulse-response function of the APD is approximately modeled by a function of time whose prespecified shape is appropriately parameterized by two random variables: the gain and the buildup time. The evaluation of the variance of the photocurrent under this model leads to the definition of the shot-noise-equivalent bandwidth of the APD, which captures the statistical correlation between the gain and the buildup time. It is shown that the shot-noise-equivalent bandwidth in GaAs APDs is greater, by approximately 30%, than the traditional buildup-time-limited 3-dB bandwidth, which is calculated from the mean of the impulse-response function. A thorough analysis of the performance of APD-based integrate-and-dump digital receivers reveals that the strong correlation between the gain and the buildup time accentuates intersymbol interference (ISI) noise, and thus, adversely affects receiver sensitivity at high transmission rates beyond previously known limits.

  7. Underwater acoustic omnidirectional absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naify, Christina J.; Martin, Theodore P.; Layman, Christopher N.; Nicholas, Michael; Thangawng, Abel L.; Calvo, David C.; Orris, Gregory J.

    2014-02-01

    Gradient index media, which are designed by varying local element properties in given geometry, have been utilized to manipulate acoustic waves for a variety of devices. This study presents a cylindrical, two-dimensional acoustic "black hole" design that functions as an omnidirectional absorber for underwater applications. The design features a metamaterial shell that focuses acoustic energy into the shell's core. Multiple scattering theory was used to design layers of rubber cylinders with varying filling fractions to produce a linearly graded sound speed profile through the structure. Measured pressure intensity agreed with predicted results over a range of frequencies within the homogenization limit.

  8. Solar radiation absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M.; Schmitt, Charles R.; Schreyer, James M.; Whitehead, Harlan D.

    1977-01-01

    Solar energy absorbing means in solar collectors are provided by a solar selective carbon surface. A solar selective carbon surface is a microporous carbon surface having pores within the range of 0.2 to 2 micrometers. Such a surface is provided in a microporous carbon article by controlling the pore size. A thermally conductive substrate is provided with a solar selective surface by adhering an array of carbon particles in a suitable binder to the substrate, a majority of said particles having diameters within the range of about 0.2-10 microns.

  9. Liquid Cryogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Baynham, D.E.; Bish, P.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Cummings, M.A.; Green,M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivaniouchenkov, I.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.Q.; Zisman, M.S.

    2005-08-20

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will test ionization cooling of muons. In order to have effective ionization cooling, one must use an absorber that is made from a low-z material. The most effective low z materials for ionization cooling are hydrogen, helium, lithium hydride, lithium and beryllium, in that order. In order to measure the effect of material on cooling, several absorber materials must be used. This report describes a liquid-hydrogen absorber that is within a pair of superconducting focusing solenoids. The absorber must also be suitable for use with liquid helium. The following absorber components are discussed in this report; the absorber body, its heat exchanger, the hydrogen system, and the hydrogen safety. Absorber cooling and the thin windows are not discussed here.

  10. Dual broadband metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ju; Yoo, Young Joon; Kim, Ki Won; Rhee, Joo Yull; Kim, Yong Hwan; Lee, YoungPak

    2015-02-23

    We propose polarization-independent and dual-broadband metamaterial absorbers at microwave frequencies. This is a periodic meta-atom array consisting of metal-dielectric-multilayer truncated cones. We demonstrate not only one broadband absorption from the fundamental magnetic resonances but additional broadband absorption in high-frequency range using the third-harmonic resonance, by both simulation and experiment. In simulation, the absorption was over 90% in 3.93-6.05 GHz, and 11.64-14.55 GHz. The corresponding experimental absorption bands over 90% were 3.88-6.08 GHz, 9.95-10.46 GHz and 11.86-13.84 GHz, respectively. The origin of absorption bands was elucidated. Furthermore, it is independent of polarization angle owing to the multilayered circular structures. The design is scalable to smaller size for the infrared and the visible ranges.

  11. Absorber coatings' degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    This report is intended to document some of the Los Alamos efforts that have been carried out under the Department of Energy (DOE) Active Heating and Cooling Materials Reliability, Maintainability, and Exposure Testing program. Funding for these activities is obtained directly from DOE although they represent a variety of projects and coordination with other agencies. Major limitations to the use of solar energy are the uncertain reliability and lifetimes of solar systems. This program is aimed at determining material operating limitations, durabilities, and failure modes such that materials improvements can be made and lifetimes can be extended. Although many active and passive materials and systems are being studied at Los Alamos, this paper will concentrate on absorber coatings and degradation of these coatings.

  12. On the Use of Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeter for Surface Dose Measurement during Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yusof, Fasihah Hanum; Ung, Ngie Min; Wong, Jeannie Hsiu Ding; Jong, Wei Loong; Ath, Vannyat; Phua, Vincent Chee Ee; Heng, Siew Ping; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the suitability of using the optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD) in measuring surface dose during radiotherapy. The water equivalent depth (WED) of the OSLD was first determined by comparing the surface dose measured using the OSLD with the percentage depth dose at the buildup region measured using a Markus ionization chamber. Surface doses were measured on a solid water phantom using the OSLD and compared against the Markus ionization chamber and Gafchromic EBT3 film measurements. The effect of incident beam angles on surface dose was also studied. The OSLD was subsequently used to measure surface dose during tangential breast radiotherapy treatments in a phantom study and in the clinical measurement of 10 patients. Surface dose to the treated breast or chest wall, and on the contralateral breast were measured. The WED of the OSLD was found to be at 0.4 mm. For surface dose measurement on a solid water phantom, the Markus ionization chamber measured 15.95% for 6 MV photon beam and 12.64% for 10 MV photon beam followed by EBT3 film (23.79% and 17.14%) and OSLD (37.77% and 25.38%). Surface dose increased with the increase of the incident beam angle. For phantom and patient breast surface dose measurement, the response of the OSLD was higher than EBT3 film. The in-vivo measurements were also compared with the treatment planning system predicted dose. The OSLD measured higher dose values compared to dose at the surface (Hp(0.0)) by a factor of 2.37 for 6 MV and 2.01 for 10 MV photon beams, respectively. The measurement of absorbed dose at the skin depth of 0.4 mm by the OSLD can still be a useful tool to assess radiation effects on the skin dermis layer. This knowledge can be used to prevent and manage potential acute skin reaction and late skin toxicity from radiotherapy treatments. PMID:26052690

  13. Analysis of build-up of heavy metals and volatile organics on urban roads in gold coast, Australia.

    PubMed

    Mahbub, Parvez; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Ayoko, Godwin A; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Yigitcanlar, Tan

    2011-01-01

    Urban water quality can be significantly impaired by the build-up of pollutants such as heavy metals and volatile organics on urban road surfaces due to vehicular traffic. Any control strategy for the mitigation of traffic related build-up of heavy metals and volatile organic pollutants should be based on the knowledge of their build-up processes. In the study discussed in this paper, the outcomes of a detailed experimental investigation into build-up processes of heavy metals and volatile organics are presented. It was found that traffic parameters such as average daily traffic, volume over capacity ratio and surface texture depth had similar strong correlations with the build-up of heavy metals and volatile organics. Multicriteria decision analyses revealed that that the 1-74 microm particulate fraction of total suspended solids (TSS) could be regarded as a surrogate indicator for particulate heavy metals in build-up and this same fraction of total organic carbon could be regarded as a surrogate indicator for particulate volatile organics build-up. In terms of pollutants affinity, TSS was found to be the predominant parameter for particulate heavy metals build-up and total dissolved solids was found to be the predominant parameter for the potential dissolved particulate fraction in heavy metals buildup. It was also found that land use did not play a significant role in the build-up of traffic generated heavy metals and volatile organics.

  14. Use of effective dose.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J D; Balonov, M; Martin, C J; Ortiz Lopez, P; Menzel, H-G; Simmonds, J R; Smith-Bindman, R; Wakeford, R

    2016-06-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 provided a detailed explanation of the purpose and use of effective dose and equivalent dose to individual organs and tissues. Effective dose has proven to be a valuable and robust quantity for use in the implementation of protection principles. However, questions have arisen regarding practical applications, and a Task Group has been set up to consider issues of concern. This paper focusses on two key proposals developed by the Task Group that are under consideration by ICRP: (1) confusion will be avoided if equivalent dose is no longer used as a protection quantity, but regarded as an intermediate step in the calculation of effective dose. It would be more appropriate for limits for the avoidance of deterministic effects to the hands and feet, lens of the eye, and skin, to be set in terms of the quantity, absorbed dose (Gy) rather than equivalent dose (Sv). (2) Effective dose is in widespread use in medical practice as a measure of risk, thereby going beyond its intended purpose. While doses incurred at low levels of exposure may be measured or assessed with reasonable reliability, health effects have not been demonstrated reliably at such levels but are inferred. However, bearing in mind the uncertainties associated with risk projection to low doses or low dose rates, it may be considered reasonable to use effective dose as a rough indicator of possible risk, with the additional consideration of variation in risk with age, sex and population group. PMID:26980800

  15. Use of effective dose.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J D; Balonov, M; Martin, C J; Ortiz Lopez, P; Menzel, H-G; Simmonds, J R; Smith-Bindman, R; Wakeford, R

    2016-06-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 provided a detailed explanation of the purpose and use of effective dose and equivalent dose to individual organs and tissues. Effective dose has proven to be a valuable and robust quantity for use in the implementation of protection principles. However, questions have arisen regarding practical applications, and a Task Group has been set up to consider issues of concern. This paper focusses on two key proposals developed by the Task Group that are under consideration by ICRP: (1) confusion will be avoided if equivalent dose is no longer used as a protection quantity, but regarded as an intermediate step in the calculation of effective dose. It would be more appropriate for limits for the avoidance of deterministic effects to the hands and feet, lens of the eye, and skin, to be set in terms of the quantity, absorbed dose (Gy) rather than equivalent dose (Sv). (2) Effective dose is in widespread use in medical practice as a measure of risk, thereby going beyond its intended purpose. While doses incurred at low levels of exposure may be measured or assessed with reasonable reliability, health effects have not been demonstrated reliably at such levels but are inferred. However, bearing in mind the uncertainties associated with risk projection to low doses or low dose rates, it may be considered reasonable to use effective dose as a rough indicator of possible risk, with the additional consideration of variation in risk with age, sex and population group.

  16. Gamma-ray energy buildup factor calculations and shielding effects of some Jordanian building structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharaf, J. M.; Saleh, H.

    2015-05-01

    The shielding properties of three different construction styles, and building materials, commonly used in Jordan, were evaluated using parameters such as attenuation coefficients, equivalent atomic number, penetration depth and energy buildup factor. Geometric progression (GP) method was used to calculate gamma-ray energy buildup factors of limestone, concrete, bricks, cement plaster and air for the energy range 0.05-3 MeV, and penetration depths up to 40 mfp. It has been observed that among the examined building materials, limestone offers highest value for equivalent atomic number and linear attenuation coefficient and the lowest values for penetration depth and energy buildup factor. The obtained buildup factors were used as basic data to establish the total equivalent energy buildup factors for three different multilayer construction styles using an iterative method. The three styles were then compared in terms of fractional transmission of photons at different incident photon energies. It is concluded that, in case of any nuclear accident, large multistory buildings with five layers exterior walls, style A, could effectively attenuate radiation more than small dwellings of any construction style.

  17. Absorbed fractions for electrons in ellipsoidal volumes.

    PubMed

    Amato, E; Lizio, D; Baldari, S

    2011-01-21

    We applied a Monte Carlo simulation in Geant4 in order to calculate the absorbed fractions for monoenergetic electrons in the energy interval between 10 keV and 2 MeV, uniformly distributed in ellipsoids made from soft tissue. For each volume, we simulated a spherical shape, four oblate and four prolate ellipsoids, and one scalene shape. For each energy and for every geometrical configuration, an analytical relationship between the absorbed fraction and a 'generalized radius' was found, and the dependence of the fit parameters from electron energy is discussed and fitted by proper parametric functions. With the proposed formulation, the absorbed fraction for electrons in the 10-2000 keV energy range can be calculated for all volumes and for every ellipsoidal shape of practical interest. This method can be directly applied to evaluation of the absorbed fraction from the radionuclide emission of monoenergetic electrons, such as Auger or conversion electrons. The average deposited energy per disintegration in the case of extended beta spectra can be evaluated through integration. Two examples of application to a pure beta emitter such as (90)Y and to (131)I, whose emission include monoenergetic and beta electrons plus gamma photons, are presented. This approach represent a generalization of our previous studies, allowing a comprehensive treatment of absorbed fractions from electron and photon sources uniformly distributed in ellipsoidal volumes of any ellipticity and volume, in the whole range of practical interest for internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine applications, as well as in radiological protection estimations of doses from an internal contamination.

  18. Absorbed fractions for electrons in ellipsoidal volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, E.; Lizio, D.; Baldari, S.

    2011-01-01

    We applied a Monte Carlo simulation in Geant4 in order to calculate the absorbed fractions for monoenergetic electrons in the energy interval between 10 keV and 2 MeV, uniformly distributed in ellipsoids made from soft tissue. For each volume, we simulated a spherical shape, four oblate and four prolate ellipsoids, and one scalene shape. For each energy and for every geometrical configuration, an analytical relationship between the absorbed fraction and a 'generalized radius' was found, and the dependence of the fit parameters from electron energy is discussed and fitted by proper parametric functions. With the proposed formulation, the absorbed fraction for electrons in the 10-2000 keV energy range can be calculated for all volumes and for every ellipsoidal shape of practical interest. This method can be directly applied to evaluation of the absorbed fraction from the radionuclide emission of monoenergetic electrons, such as Auger or conversion electrons. The average deposited energy per disintegration in the case of extended beta spectra can be evaluated through integration. Two examples of application to a pure beta emitter such as 90Y and to 131I, whose emission include monoenergetic and beta electrons plus gamma photons, are presented. This approach represent a generalization of our previous studies, allowing a comprehensive treatment of absorbed fractions from electron and photon sources uniformly distributed in ellipsoidal volumes of any ellipticity and volume, in the whole range of practical interest for internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine applications, as well as in radiological protection estimations of doses from an internal contamination.

  19. Broadband patterned magnetic microwave absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Wu, Tianlong; Wang, Wei; Guan, Jianguo; Zhai, Pengcheng

    2014-07-28

    It is a tough task to greatly improve the working bandwidth for the traditional flat microwave absorbers because of the restriction of available material parameters. In this work, a simple patterning method is proposed to drastically broaden the absorption bandwidth of a conventional magnetic absorber. As a demonstration, an ultra-broadband microwave absorber with more than 90% absorption in the frequency range of 4–40 GHz is designed and experimentally realized, which has a thin thickness of 3.7 mm and a light weight equivalent to a 2-mm-thick flat absorber. In such a patterned absorber, the broadband strong absorption is mainly originated from the simultaneous incorporation of multiple λ/4 resonances and edge diffraction effects. This work provides a facile route to greatly extend the microwave absorption bandwidth for the currently available absorbing materials.

  20. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimoto, S.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshida, M.; Green, Michael A.; Kuno, Y.; Lau, Wing

    2010-05-30

    Liquid hydrogen absorbers for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) have been developed, and the first absorber has been tested at KEK. In the preliminary test at KEK we have successfully filled the absorber with {approx}2 liters of liquid hydrogen. The measured hydrogen condensation speed was 2.5 liters/day at 1.0 bar. No hydrogen leakage to vacuum was found between 300 K and 20 K. The MICE experiment includes three AFC (absorber focusing coil) modules, each containing a 21 liter liquid hydrogen absorber made of aluminum. The AFC module has safety windows to separate its vacuum from that of neighboring modules. Liquid hydrogen is supplied from a cryocooler with cooling power 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The first absorber will be assembled in the AFC module and installed in MICE at RAL.

  1. Electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, R. R.; Marshall, R. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Heppner, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary designs were generated for two electrochemically regenerable carbon dioxide absorber concepts. Initially, an electrochemically regenerable absorption bed concept was designed. This concept incorporated the required electrochemical regeneration components in the absorber design, permitting the absorbent to be regenerated within the absorption bed. This hardware was identified as the electrochemical absorber hardware. The second hardware concept separated the functional components of the regeneration and absorption process. This design approach minimized the extravehicular activity component volume by eliminating regeneration hardware components within the absorber. The electrochemical absorber hardware was extensively characterized for major operating parameters such as inlet carbon dioxide partial pressure, process air flow rate, operational pressure, inlet relative humidity, regeneration current density and absorption/regeneration cycle endurance testing.

  2. Plants absorb heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, J.

    1995-02-01

    Decontamination of heavy metals-polluted soils remains one of the most intractable problems of cleanup technology. Currently available techniques include extraction of the metals by physical and chemical means, such as acid leaching and electroosmosis, or immobilization by vitrification. There are presently no techniques for cleanup which are low cost and retain soil fertility after metals removal. But a solution to the problem could be on the horizon. A small but growing number of plants native to metalliferous soils are known to be capable of accumulating extremely high concentrations of metals in their aboveground portions. These hyperaccumulators, as they are called, contain up to 1,000 times larger metal concentrations in their aboveground parts than normal species. Their distribution is global, including many different families of flowering plants of varying growth forms, from herbaceous plants to trees. Hyperaccumulators absorb metals they do not need for their own nutrition. The metals are accumulated in the leaf and stem vacuoles, and to a lesser extent in the roots.

  3. Apparatus having inductively coupled coaxial coils for measuring buildup of slay or ash in a furnace

    DOEpatents

    Mathur, Mahendra P.; Ekmann, James M.

    1989-01-01

    The buildup of slag or ash on the interior surface of a furnace wall is monitored by disposing two coils to form a transformer which is secured adjacent to the inside surface of the furnace wall. The inductive coupling between the two coils of the transformer is affected by the presence of oxides of iron in the slag or ash which is adjacent to the transformer, and the application of a voltage to one winding produces a voltage at the other winding that is related to the thickness of the slag or ash buildup on the inside surface of the furnace wall. The output of the other winding is an electrical signal which can be used to control an alarm or the like or provide an indication of the thickness of the slag or ash buildup at a remote location.

  4. Contour Crafting Simulation Plan for Lunar Settlement Infrastructure Build-Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khoshnevis, B.; Carlson, A.; Leach N.; Thangavelu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Economically viable and reliable building systems and tool sets are being sought, examined and tested for extraterrestrial infrastructure buildup. This project focused on a unique architecture weaving the robotic building construction technology with designs for assisting rapid buildup of initial operational capability Lunar and Martian bases. The project aimed to study new methodologies to construct certain crucial infrastructure elements in order to evaluate the merits, limitations and feasibility of adapting and using such technologies for extraterrestrial application. Current extraterrestrial settlement buildup philosophy holds that in order to minimize the materials needed to be flown in, at great transportation costs, strategies that maximize the use of locally available resources must be adopted. Tools and equipment flown as cargo from Earth are proposed to build required infrastructure to support future missions and settlements on the Moon and Mars.

  5. A comparison of the effects of different methods of impression build-up on earmoulds.

    PubMed

    Macrae, J H

    1991-06-01

    An investigation was carried out into effects of three types of impression build-up (patting down of impressions, special earmould-maker build-up and the multistage impression technique) on the dimensions, static pressure seal, degree of acoustic seal and the subjective tightness and comfort of earmoulds. Patting down the impression significantly improved the degree of acoustic seal provided by earmoulds without making them feel tighter or less comfortable. However, special build-up was much more effective than patting down and the multistage impression technique was slightly more effective than special build-up in improving the degree of acoustic seal. The improvement in acoustic seal provided by both multistage and specially built-up earmoulds can usually be obtained without an unacceptable level of discomfort. Patting down the impression did not improve the chance of obtaining a static pressure seal. Special build-up of the impression by the earmould-maker significantly increased the proportion of earmoulds which provided a static pressure seal but an even higher proportion of earmoulds made from multistage impressions provided a seal. Dimension results indicated that an increase in earmould-maker build-up of the minor axis at the beginning of the canal segment of the impression would improve the acoustic seal provided by specially built-up earmoulds and that earmoulds with rounder tips are more likely to provide a static pressure seal than earmoulds with more elliptical tips. The better the impression material fills the ear canal, the rounder the tip of the impression, and the rounder the tip of the earmould made from the impression.

  6. Pennsylvanian carbonate buildups, Paradox basin: Increasing reserves in heterogeneous, shallow-shelf reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, S.L.; Chidsey, T.C.; Eby, D.E.; Lorenz, D.M.; Culham, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    Productive carbonate buildups of Pennsylvanian age in the southern Paradox basin, Utah, contain up to 200 million bbl remaining oil potentially recoverable by enhanced recovery methods. These buildups comprise over 100 satellite fields to the giant Greater Aneth field, where secondary recovery operations thus far have been concentrated. Several types of satellite buildups exist and produce oil from the Desert Creek zone of the Paradox Formation. Many of the relevant fields have undergone early abandonment; wells in Desert Creek carbonate mounds commonly produce at very high initial rates (>1000 bbl/day) and then suffer precipitous declines. An important new study focused on the detailed characterization of five separate reservoirs has resulted in significant information relevant to their future redevelopment. Completed assessment of Anasazi field suggests that phylloid algal mounds, the major productive buildup type in this area, consist of ten separate lithotypes and can be described in terms of a two-level reservoir system with an underlying high-permeability mound-core interval overlain by a lower permeability but volumetrically larger supramound (mound capping) interval. Reservoir simulations and related performance predictions indicate that CO2 flooding of these reservoirs should have considerable success in recovering remaining oil reserves.Productive carbonate buildups of Pennsylvanian age in the southern Paradox basin, Utah, contain up to 200 million bbl remaining oil potentially recoverable by enhanced recovery methods. These buildups comprise over 100 satellite fields to the giant Greater Aneth field, where secondary recovery operations thus far have been concentrated. Several types of satellite buildups exist and produce oil from the Desert Creek zone of the Paradox Formation. Many of the relevant fields have undergone early abandonment; wells in Desert Creek carbonate mounds commonly produce at very high initial rates (>1000 bbl/day) and then suffer

  7. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  8. Hydraulic shock absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.

    1987-03-03

    This patent describes a hydraulic shock absorber including a piston reciprocating in a cylinder, a piston upper chamber and a piston lower chamber which are oil-tightly separated by the piston, piston ports formed through the piston in a circle for communicating the piston upper chamber with the piston lower chamber, and return ports formed outside of the piston ports in a circle for communicating the piston upper chamber with the piston lower chamber. It also includes a sheet ring-like non-return valve provided above the piston and fitted to a piston rod, valve holes formed through the non-return valve in opposed relation with the piston ports. A ring-like non-return valve stopper fixed to the piston rod on an upper side of the non-return valve with a small spaced defined between the non-return valve and the non-return valve stopper, and a spring is interposed between the non-return valve and the non-return valve stopper for normally urging the non-return valve to an upper surface of the piston. Movement of the piston to the piston upper chamber allows oil to flow from the piston upper chamber through the piston ports to the piston lower chamber, while the return ports are closed by the non-return valve to generate a vibration damping force by resistance upon pass of the oil through the piston parts. The improvement described here comprises a groove formed in an upper surface of the piston facing the non-return valve and aligned with the valve holes, the groove being in the circle where the piston ports lie and being in communication with the piston ports.

  9. Metal-shearing energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, R. J.; Wittrock, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Device, consisting of tongue of thin aluminum alloy strip, pull tab, slotted steel plate which serves as cutter, and steel buckle, absorbs mechanical energy when its ends are subjected to tensile loading. Device is applicable as auxiliary shock absorbing anchor for automobile and airplane safety belts.

  10. The broadband dynamic vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. B.; Nissen, J.-C.

    1982-08-01

    The limited effectiveness of the linear passive dynamic vibration absorber is described. This is followed by an analysis producing the response of a primary system when a non-linear softening Belleville spring is used in the absorber. It is shown that the suppression bandwidth can be doubled by this means.

  11. Absorbed radiation by various tissues during simulated endodontic radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Torabinejad, M.; Danforth, R.; Andrews, K.; Chan, C.

    1989-06-01

    The amount of absorbed radiation by various organs was determined by placing lithium fluoride thermoluminescent chip dosimeters at selected anatomical sites in and on a human-like X-ray phantom and exposing them to radiation at 70- and 90-kV X-ray peaks during simulated endodontic radiography. The mean exposure dose was determined for each anatomical site. The results show that endodontic X-ray doses received by patients are low when compared with other radiographic procedures.

  12. Finite and infinite system gamma ray buildup factor calculations with detailed physics.

    PubMed

    Atak, Haluk; Çelikten, Osman Şahin; Tombakoğlu, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Examination of physical interactions of photons in materials is a significant subject for buildup factor studies. In most of the buildup calculations, by default, coherent (Rayleigh) scattering is ignored and the Compton scattering is modeled by free-electron Klein-Nishina formula with "simple physics" treatment. In this work, photon buildup factors are calculated for many different cases including "detailed physics" by taking into account coherent and bound-electron Compton scatterings with the Monte Carlo code, MCNP5, and the results are compared with the literature values. They are computed for point isotropic photon sources up to depths of 20 mean free paths and at the three photon energies most widely used (0.06, 0.6 and 6MeV). Calculations are made for both finite and infinite homogeneous ordinary water media. It is concluded that Coherent scattering is very dominant at low energies and for deep penetrations and assumed physical approximation (simple/detailed, finite/infinite) is the critical point for determining shielding material dimensions. After all, it can be stated that all parametric assumptions should be clearly given and indicated in the tabulation of photon buildup factors.

  13. Finite and infinite system gamma ray buildup factor calculations with detailed physics.

    PubMed

    Atak, Haluk; Çelikten, Osman Şahin; Tombakoğlu, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Examination of physical interactions of photons in materials is a significant subject for buildup factor studies. In most of the buildup calculations, by default, coherent (Rayleigh) scattering is ignored and the Compton scattering is modeled by free-electron Klein-Nishina formula with "simple physics" treatment. In this work, photon buildup factors are calculated for many different cases including "detailed physics" by taking into account coherent and bound-electron Compton scatterings with the Monte Carlo code, MCNP5, and the results are compared with the literature values. They are computed for point isotropic photon sources up to depths of 20 mean free paths and at the three photon energies most widely used (0.06, 0.6 and 6MeV). Calculations are made for both finite and infinite homogeneous ordinary water media. It is concluded that Coherent scattering is very dominant at low energies and for deep penetrations and assumed physical approximation (simple/detailed, finite/infinite) is the critical point for determining shielding material dimensions. After all, it can be stated that all parametric assumptions should be clearly given and indicated in the tabulation of photon buildup factors. PMID:26218451

  14. Significance of cyclic Pennsylvanian-Permian coral/algal buildups Snaky Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Canter, K.L. ); Isaacson, P.E. )

    1991-02-01

    Five cyclic algal, hydrozoan, and coral buildups occur within a thick sequence of Pennsylvanian-Permian (Virgilian through Wolfcampain) carbonates in south-central Idaho. The Juniper Gulch Member of the Snaky Canyon Formation, as described by Skipp and coworkers, is approximately 600 m thick and contains four depositional facies, including: (1) open circulation outer( ) platform, (2) hydrozoan and phylloid algal mound-dominated carbonate buildup, (3) backmound, restricted platform/lagoon, and (4) restricted inner platform facies. Several microlithofacies, including lime mud-rich bafflestone, diversely fossiliferous packstone and grainstone, bryozoan lime floatstone, and phylloid algal and hydrozoan (Palaeoaplysina) lime bindstone are described within the phylloid algal mounds. Successional faunal assemblage stages are recognized within the buildups. Colonial rugose corals comprise a stabilization stage. When the algal communities of the diversification stage reached wave base, because of their rapid upward growth, cross-bedded oolitic grainstone and occasional cross-bedded dolomite shoals developed. Supratidal to high intertidal platform sedimentation is represented by dolomitic Palaeoaplysina bindstone, algal mat bindstone, and vuggy dolomite. Five vertical sequences of buildup development, each terminate by intertidal, supratidal, or erosional events, are seen in the Juniper Gulch Member in the North Howe stratigraphic section of the southern Lost River Range. The carbonate platform was constructed within a depositional basin that includes an eroded highland to the west, and a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate inner platform with craton uplifts to the east.

  15. Electron cloud buildup and instability: Numerical simulations for the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannozzi, M.; Métral, E.; Métral, G.; Rumolo, G.; Zimmermann, F.

    2003-01-01

    Experimental observations on the electron cloud have been collected at the CERN Proton Synchrotron machine throughout the last two years. At the same time, an intense campaign of simulations has been carried out to understand the observed electron cloud buildup and the related instability. In this paper, the results of the numerical simulations are presented and discussed.

  16. Influence of pollutant build-up on variability in wash-off from urban road surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wijesiri, Buddhi; Egodawatta, Prasanna; McGree, James; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2015-09-15

    Variability in the pollutant wash-off process is a concept which needs to be understood in-depth in order to better assess the outcomes of stormwater quality models, and thereby strengthen stormwater pollution mitigation strategies. Current knowledge about the wash-off process does not extend to a clear understanding of the influence of the initially available pollutant build-up on the variability of the pollutant wash-off load and composition. Consequently, pollutant wash-off process variability is poorly characterised in stormwater quality models, which can result in inaccurate stormwater quality predictions. Mathematical simulation of particulate wash-off from three urban road surfaces confirmed that the wash-off load of particle size fractions < 150 μm and > 150 μm after a storm event vary with the build-up of the respective particle size fractions available at the beginning of the storm event. Furthermore, pollutant load and composition associated with the initially available build-up of < 150 μm particles predominantly influence the variability in washed-off pollutant load and composition. The influence of the build-up of pollutants associated with > 150 μm particles on wash-off process variability is significant only for relatively shorter duration storm events.

  17. "Testing during Study Insulates against the Buildup of Proactive Interference": Correction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szpunar, Karl K.; McDermott, Kathleen B.; Roedigger, Henry L., III

    2009-01-01

    Reports an error in "Testing during study insulates against the buildup of proactive interference" by Karl K. Szpunar, Kathleen B. McDermott and Henry L. Roediger III ("Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition," 2008[Nov], Vol 34[6], 1392-1399). Incorrect figures were printed due to an error in the production process. A…

  18. Absorbent product to absorb fluids. [for collection of human wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Correale, J. V. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A multi-layer absorbent product for use in contact with the skin to absorb fluids is discussed. The product utilizes a water pervious facing layer for contacting the skin, overlayed by a first fibrous wicking layer, the wicking layer preferably being of the one-way variety in which fluid or liquid is moved away from the facing layer. The product further includes a first container section defined by inner and outer layer of a water pervious wicking material between which is disposed a first absorbent mass. A second container section defined by inner and outer layers between which is disposed a second absorbent mass and a liquid impermeable/gas permeable layer. Spacesuit applications are discussed.

  19. Self-Regulating Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J.

    1995-01-01

    Mechanical shock absorber keeps frictional damping force within tolerable limit. Its damping force does not increase with coefficient of friction between energy-absorbing components; rather, frictional damping force varies only slightly. Relatively insensitive to manufacturing variations and environmental conditions altering friction. Does not exhibit high breakaway friction and consequent sharp increase followed by sharp decrease in damping force at beginning of stroking. Damping force in absorber does not vary appreciably with speed of stroking. In addition, not vulnerable to leakage of hydraulic fluid.

  20. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials.

    PubMed

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Ghalab, Radwa M; Elsayed Akah, Mai M; Mobarak, Enas H

    2016-03-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers' instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm(2)) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64-86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage. PMID:26966567

  1. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials.

    PubMed

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Ghalab, Radwa M; Elsayed Akah, Mai M; Mobarak, Enas H

    2016-03-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers' instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm(2)) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64-86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage.

  2. Understanding the build-up of supermassive black holes and galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Francisco; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Georgakakis, Antonis

    2016-07-01

    . The excellent survey capabilities of Athena/WFI (effective area, angular resolution, field of view) will allow to measure the incidence of feedback in the shape of warm absorbers and Ultra Fast Outflows among the general population of AGN, as well as to complete the census of black hole growth by detecting and characterising significant samples of the most heavily obscured (including Compton thick) AGN, to redshifts z~3-4. The outstanding spectral throughput and resolution of Athena/X-IFU will permit measuring the energetics of those outflows to assess their influence on their host galaxies. The demographics of the heavily obscured and outflowing populations relative to their hosts are fundamental for understanding how major black hole growth events relate to the build-up of galaxies.

  3. Validation of Monte Carlo calculated surface doses for megavoltage photon beams.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Wamied; Seuntjens, Jan P; Verhaegen, Frank; Deblois, François; Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2005-01-01

    Recent work has shown that there is significant uncertainty in measuring build-up doses in mega-voltage photon beams especially at high energies. In this present investigation we used a phantom-embedded extrapolation chamber (PEEC) made of Solid Water to validate Monte Carlo (MC)-calculated doses in the dose build-up region for 6 and 18 MV x-ray beams. The study showed that the percentage depth ionizations (PDIs) obtained from measurements are higher than the percentage depth doses (PDDs) obtained with Monte Carlo techniques. To validate the MC-calculated PDDs, the design of the PEEC was incorporated into the simulations. While the MC-calculated and measured PDIs in the dose build-up region agree with one another for the 6 MV beam, a non-negligible difference is observed for the 18 MV x-ray beam. A number of experiments and theoretical studies of various possible effects that could be the source of this discrepancy were performed. The contribution of contaminating neutrons and protons to the build-up dose region in the 18 MV x-ray beam is negligible. Moreover, the MC calculations using the XCOM photon cross-section database and the NIST bremsstrahlung differential cross section do not explain the discrepancy between the MC calculations and measurement in the dose build-up region for the 18 MV. A simple incorporation of triplet production events into the MC dose calculation increases the calculated doses in the build-up region but does not fully account for the discrepancy between measurement and calculations for the 18 MV x-ray beam. PMID:15719980

  4. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, William H.

    1984-01-01

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system.

  5. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, W.H.

    1984-10-16

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system. 9 figs.

  6. Enhanced damage buildup in C{sup +}-implanted GaN film studied by a monoenergetic positron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. F.; Chen, Z. Q. Liu, C.; Zhang, H. J.; Kawasuso, A.

    2015-02-28

    Wurtzite GaN films grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy were implanted with 280 keV C{sup +} ions to a dose of 6 × 10{sup 16 }cm{sup −2}. Vacancy-type defects in C{sup +}-implanted GaN were probed using a slow positron beam. The increase of Doppler broadening S parameter to a high value of 1.08–1.09 after implantation indicates introduction of very large vacancy clusters. Post-implantation annealing at temperatures up to 800 °C makes these vacancy clusters to agglomerate into microvoids. The vacancy clusters or microvoids show high thermal stability, and they are only partially removed after annealing up to 1000 °C. The other measurements such as X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering and Photoluminescence all indicate severe damage and even disordered structure induced by C{sup +}-implantation. The disordered lattice shows a partial recovery after annealing above 800 °C. Amorphous regions are observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy measurement, which directly confirms that amorphization is induced by C{sup +}-implantation. The disordered GaN lattice is possibly due to special feature of carbon impurities, which enhance the damage buildup during implantation.

  7. Communication Buildup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criswell, Chad

    2012-01-01

    There was a time, not so long ago, when having a website for a teacher's music program was considered cutting-edge. But today, over 40 years after the birth of the Internet, everyone lives in an age of instant information. New online services and Internet technologies have changed more than just the interaction between teacher, student, and…

  8. Simulations of the electron cloud buildups and suppressions in Tevatron and main injector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Ostiguy, Jean-Francois; Chou, Weiren; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    To assess the effects of the electron cloud on Main Injector intensity upgrades, simulations of the cloud buildup were carried out using POSINST and compared with ECLOUD. Results indicate that even assuming an optimistic 1.3 maximum secondary electron yield, the electron cloud remains a serious concern for the planned future operational mode with 500 bunches, 3e11 proton per bunch. Electron cloud buildup can be mitigated in various ways. We consider a plausible scenario involving solenoids in straight section and a single clearing strip electrode (like SNEG in Tevatron) held at a potential of 500V. Simulations with parameters corresponding to Tevatron and Main Injector operating conditions at locations where special electron cloud detectors have been installed have been carried out and are in satisfactory agreement with preliminary measurements.

  9. On the dynamical mechanisms explaining the western Pacific subsurface temperature buildup leading to ENSO events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester, Joan; Bordoni, Simona; Petrova, Desislava; Rodó, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Despite steady progress in the understanding of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the past decades, questions remain on the exact mechanisms explaining the heat buildup leading to the onset of El Niño (EN) events. Here we use an ensemble of ocean and atmosphere assimilation products to identify mechanisms that are consistently identified by all the data sets and that contribute to the heat buildup in the western Pacific 18 to 24 months before the onset of EN events. Meridional and eastward heat advection due to equatorward subsurface mass convergence and transport along the equatorial undercurrent are found to contribute to the subsurface warming at 170°E-150°W. In the warm pool, instead, surface horizontal convergence and downwelling motion have a leading role in subsurface warming. The picture emerging from our results highlights a sharp dynamical transition at 170°E near the level of the thermocline.

  10. Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment (CARE)

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric

    2015-12-23

    During Project DE-FE0007528, CARE (Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment), Neumann Systems Group (NSG) designed, installed and tested a 0.5MW NeuStream® carbon dioxide (CO2) capture system using the patented NeuStream® absorber equipment and concentrated (6 molal) piperazine (PZ) as the solvent at Colorado Springs Utilities’ (CSU’s) Martin Drake pulverized coal (PC) power plant. The 36 month project included design, build and test phases. The 0.5MW NeuStream® CO2 capture system was successfully tested on flue gas from both coal and natural gas combustion sources and was shown to meet project objectives. Ninety percent CO2 removal was achieved with greater than 95% CO2product purity. The absorbers tested support a 90% reduction in absorber volume compared to packed towers and with an absorber parasitic power of less than 1% when configured for operation with a 550MW coal plant. The preliminary techno-economic analysis (TEA) performed by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) predicted an over-the-fence cost of $25.73/tonne of CO2 captured from a sub-critical PC plant.

  11. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF2 etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  12. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  13. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shinpei Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-26

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF{sub 2} etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  14. Nonventing, Regenerable, Lightweight Heat Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Chen, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    A lightweight, regenerable heat absorber (RHA), developed for rejecting metabolic heat from a space suit, may also be useful on Earth for short-term cooling of heavy protective garments. Unlike prior space-suit-cooling systems, a system that includes this RHA does not vent water. The closed system contains water reservoirs, tubes through which water is circulated to absorb heat, an evaporator, and an absorber/radiator. The radiator includes a solution of LiCl contained in a porous material in titanium tubes. The evaporator cools water that circulates through a liquid-cooled garment. Water vapor produced in the evaporator enters the radiator tubes where it is absorbed into the LiCl solution, releasing heat. Much of the heat of absorption is rejected to the environment via the radiator. After use, the RHA is regenerated by heating it to a temperature of 100 C for about 2 hours to drive the absorbed water back to the evaporator. A system including a prototype of the RHA was found to be capable of maintaining a temperature of 20 C while removing heat at a rate of 200 W for 6 hours.

  15. Optimal Thermo-Structural Analysis for High Density Package Mounting on Build-up Board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Tohru; Hase, Tomohiro

    The importance of the high density packaging technology and mounting technology on the printed wiring build-up board has been increased for the consumer electric products. On the other hand, the chance to use the build-up boards for mounting the high density packages has been increased. However, the understanding that the reliability of the solder connection depends on the structure of the package, the motherboard, and the material properties, is not very high. In this paper, the reliability for high density packaging, mounted on the build-up board, is assessed. The compact numerical analysis model for the reliability assessment is suggested and the most reliable packaging design with optimizing each of the parameters is reported. For introduction to the reliability assessment of the FCA attachment, ceramic and silicon are compared as the inter-poser with the parameter of the solder height. The verification of the numerical analysis results using tests on the actual hardware is also shown. And the established numerical analysis model is applied to the study of influence of the copper balance between the front side and the back side copper layers.

  16. Processing ultrasonic inspection data from multiple scan patterns for turbine rotor weld build-up evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xuefei; Zhou, S. Kevin; Rasselkorde, El Mahjoub; Abbasi, Waheed

    2015-03-31

    The study presents a data processing methodology for weld build-up using multiple scan patterns. To achieve an overall high probability of detection for flaws with different orientations, an inspection procedure with three different scan patterns is proposed. The three scan patterns are radial-tangential longitude wave pattern, axial-radial longitude wave pattern, and tangential shear wave pattern. Scientific fusion of the inspection data is implemented using volume reconstruction techniques. The idea is to perform spatial domain forward data mapping for all sampling points. A conservative scheme is employed to handle the case that multiple sampling points are mapped to one grid location. The scheme assigns the maximum value for the grid location to retain the largest equivalent reflector size for the location. The methodology is demonstrated and validated using a realistic ring of weld build-up. Tungsten balls and bars are embedded to the weld build-up during manufacturing process to represent natural flaws. Flat bottomed holes and side drilled holes are installed as artificial flaws. Automatic flaw identification and extraction are demonstrated. Results indicate the inspection procedure with multiple scan patterns can identify all the artificial and natural flaws.

  17. Characterizing heavy metal build-up on urban road surfaces: implication for stormwater reuse.

    PubMed

    Liu, An; Liu, Liang; Li, Dunzhu; Guan, Yuntao

    2015-05-15

    Stormwater reuse is increasingly popular in the worldwide. In terms of urban road stormwater, it commonly contains toxic pollutants such as heavy metals, which could undermine the reuse safety. The research study investigated heavy metal build-up characteristics on urban roads in a typical megacity of South China. The research outcomes show the high variability in heavy metal build-up loads among different urban road sites. The degree of traffic congestion and road surface roughness was found to exert a more significant influence on heavy metal build-up rather than traffic volume. Due to relatively higher heavy metal loads, stormwater from roads with more congested traffic conditions or rougher surfaces might be suitable for low-water-quality required activities while the stormwater from by-pass road sections could be appropriate for relatively high-water-quality required purposes since the stormwater could be relatively less polluted. Based on the research outcomes, a decision-making process for heavy metals based urban road stormwater reuse was proposed. The new finding highlights the importance to undertaking a "fit-for-purpose" road stormwater reuse strategy. Additionally, the research results can also contribute to enhancing stormwater reuse safety. PMID:25687783

  18. On spatial stabilization of dielectric barrier discharge microfilaments by residual heat build-up in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ráhel, Jozef; Szalay, Zsolt; Čech, Jan; Morávek, Tomás

    2016-04-01

    Microfilaments of dielectric barrier discharge are known for their multiple re-appearance at the same spot on dielectrics. This effect of localized re-appearance is driven by residual excited species and ions, surface charge deposited on the dielectric and the local temperature build-up resulting in the local increase of reduced electric field E/ΔN. To assess the magnitude of the latter, the breakdown voltage vs. temperature up to 180 °C was carefully measured at coplanar DBD and used as an input into the numerical simulation of heat build-up by the train of discharge pulses. An average reduction of breakdown voltage was found to be 20 V/K. The model predicted a quasi-stable microfilament temperature into which the thermal build-up rapidly converges. Its magnitude agreed well with the reported rotational temperature of similar electrode configuration. The impact of quasi-stable temperature on microfilament formation dynamics is further discussed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Recent Breakthroughs in Microplasma Science and Technology", edited by Kurt Becker, Jose Lopez, David Staack, Klaus-Dieter Weltmann and Wei Dong Zhu.

  19. Pressure Buildup Analysis for Two-Phase Geothermal Wells: Application to the Baca Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riney, T. D.; Garg, S. K.

    1985-03-01

    The recently published pressure transient analysis methods for two-phase geothermal wells are employed to analyze the pressure buildup data for several wells located in the Redondo Creek area of the Baca geothermal field in New Mexico. The downhole drilling information and pressure/temperature surveys are first interpreted to locate zones at which fluid enters the well bore from the formation and to estimate the initial reservoir temperature and pressure in these zones. All of the Baca wells considered here induced flashing in the formation upon production. Interpretation of the buildup data for each well considers well bore effects (e.g., phase change in the well bore fluid and location of the pressure sensor with respect to the permeable horizon) and the carbon dioxide content of the fluid and its effects on the phase behavior of the reservoir fluids and differentiates between the single- and two-phase portions of the pressure buildup data. Different straight-line approximations to the two portions (i.e., single- and two-phase) of the data on the Homer plot are used to obtain corresponding estimates for the single- and two-phase mobilities. Estimates for the formation permeability-thickness (kH) product are also given.

  20. Characterizing heavy metal build-up on urban road surfaces: implication for stormwater reuse.

    PubMed

    Liu, An; Liu, Liang; Li, Dunzhu; Guan, Yuntao

    2015-05-15

    Stormwater reuse is increasingly popular in the worldwide. In terms of urban road stormwater, it commonly contains toxic pollutants such as heavy metals, which could undermine the reuse safety. The research study investigated heavy metal build-up characteristics on urban roads in a typical megacity of South China. The research outcomes show the high variability in heavy metal build-up loads among different urban road sites. The degree of traffic congestion and road surface roughness was found to exert a more significant influence on heavy metal build-up rather than traffic volume. Due to relatively higher heavy metal loads, stormwater from roads with more congested traffic conditions or rougher surfaces might be suitable for low-water-quality required activities while the stormwater from by-pass road sections could be appropriate for relatively high-water-quality required purposes since the stormwater could be relatively less polluted. Based on the research outcomes, a decision-making process for heavy metals based urban road stormwater reuse was proposed. The new finding highlights the importance to undertaking a "fit-for-purpose" road stormwater reuse strategy. Additionally, the research results can also contribute to enhancing stormwater reuse safety.

  1. Tumour dose estimation using automated TLD techniques.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, H M; Lambert, G D; Gustard, D; Harrison, R M

    1998-01-01

    Lithium fluoride (TLD-700) dosimeters were used to measure exit surface absorbed doses in external beam radiotherapy using an automated TLD reader. Delivered tumour absorbed doses were derived from these measurements for head and neck, pelvis and breast treatments. For the head and neck treatments (first fraction only), the mean percentage difference between prescribed and delivered tumour absorbed doses was -0.15 +/- 3.0% (+/- 1 SD), for the pelvic treatments -0.83 +/- 2.8% and for the breast treatments +0.26 +/- 2.9%. The spread of results is approximately +/- 3% (+/- 1 SD). This is comparable with the estimated uncertainty in a single TLD absorbed dose measurement in phantom (+/- 2%; +/- 1 SD). Thus, ICRU recommended tolerances for absorbed dose delivery of +/- 5% may not be unequivocally detectable using this method. An action level of +/- 10% is suggested, allowing investigation of possible gross errors in treatment delivery at an early stage, before the course of treatment has progressed to a point at which absorbed dose compensation is impossible.

  2. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Hamby, Jr., Clyde; Akerman, M. Alfred; Seals, Roland D.

    1993-01-01

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000.degree. C. to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm.sup.3.

  3. Damage tolerant light absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Hamby, C. Jr.; Akerman, M.A.; Seals, R.D.

    1993-09-07

    A light absorbing article comprised of a composite of carbon-bonded carbon fibers, is prepared by: blending carbon fibers with a carbonizable organic powder to form a mixture; dispersing the mixture into an aqueous slurry; vacuum molding the aqueous slurry to form a green article; drying and curing the green article to form a cured article; and, carbonizing the cured article at a temperature of at least about 1000 C to form a carbon-bonded carbon fiber light absorbing composite article having a bulk density less than 1 g/cm[sup 3]. 9 figures.

  4. Waveform-Dependent Absorbing Metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakatsuchi, Hiroki; Kim, Sanghoon; Rushton, Jeremiah J.; Sievenpiper, Daniel F.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first use of a waveform-dependent absorbing metasurface for high-power pulsed surface currents. The new type of nonlinear metasurface, composed of circuit elements including diodes, is capable of storing high-power pulse energy to dissipate it between pulses, while allowing propagation of small signals. Interestingly, the absorbing performance varies for high-power pulses but not for high-power continuous waves (CW’s), since the capacitors used are fully charged up. Thus, the waveform dependence enables us to distinguish various signal types (i.e., CW or pulse) even at the same frequency, which potentially creates new kinds of microwave technologies and applications.

  5. [Study on radiation dose estimation and monitor in TBI using an anthropomorphic phantom].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y B; Yang, Y

    2001-11-01

    Absorbed doses and the dose distributions at important tissues and organs in an anthropomorphic phantom are measured using TLD under the TBI conditions. The dose for each tissue or organ is also estimated and monitored for TBI treatment. PMID:12583267

  6. Oil and fat absorbing polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for forming a solid network polymer having a minimal amount of crosslinking for use in absorbing fats and oils. The polymer remains solid at a swelling ratio in oil or fat of at least ten and provides an oil absorption greater than 900 weight percent.

  7. Counterflow absorber for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    An air-cooled, vertical tube absorber for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. Strong absorbent solution is supplied to the top of the absorber and refrigerant vapor is supplied to the bottom of the absorber to create a direct counterflow of refrigerant vapor and absorbent solution in the absorber. The refrigeration system is designed so that the volume flow rate of refrigerant vapor in the tubes of the absorber is sufficient to create a substantially direct counterflow along the entire length of each tube in the absorber. This provides several advantages for the absorber such as higher efficiency and improved heat transfer characteristics, and allows improved purging of non-condensibles from the absorber.

  8. Calculation of dose conversion factors for doses in the fingernails to organ doses at external gamma irradiation in air

    PubMed Central

    Khailov, A.M.; Ivannikov, A. I.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Stepanenko, V.F.; Orlenko, S.P.; Flood, A.B.; Williams, B.B.; Swartz, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Absorbed doses to fingernails and organs were calculated for a set of homogenous external gamma-ray irradiation geometries in air. The doses were obtained by stochastic modeling of the ionizing particle transport (Monte Carlo method) for a mathematical human phantom with arms and hands placed loosely along the sides of the body. The resulting dose conversion factors for absorbed doses in fingernails can be used to assess the dose distribution and magnitude in practical dose reconstruction problems. For purposes of estimating dose in a large population exposed to radiation in order to triage people for treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the calculated data for a range of energies having a width of from 0.05 to 3.5 MeV were used to convert absorbed doses in fingernails to corresponding doses in organs and the whole body as well as the effective dose. Doses were assessed based on assumed rates of radioactive fallout at different time periods following a nuclear explosion. PMID:26347593

  9. Endogenous Delta/Theta Sound-Brain Phase Entrainment Accelerates the Buildup of Auditory Streaming.

    PubMed

    Riecke, Lars; Sack, Alexander T; Schroeder, Charles E

    2015-12-21

    In many natural listening situations, meaningful sounds (e.g., speech) fluctuate in slow rhythms among other sounds. When a slow rhythmic auditory stream is selectively attended, endogenous delta (1‒4 Hz) oscillations in auditory cortex may shift their timing so that higher-excitability neuronal phases become aligned with salient events in that stream [1, 2]. As a consequence of this stream-brain phase entrainment [3], these events are processed and perceived more readily than temporally non-overlapping events [4-11], essentially enhancing the neural segregation between the attended stream and temporally noncoherent streams [12]. Stream-brain phase entrainment is robust to acoustic interference [13-20] provided that target stream-evoked rhythmic activity can be segregated from noncoherent activity evoked by other sounds [21], a process that usually builds up over time [22-27]. However, it has remained unclear whether stream-brain phase entrainment functionally contributes to this buildup of rhythmic streams or whether it is merely an epiphenomenon of it. Here, we addressed this issue directly by experimentally manipulating endogenous stream-brain phase entrainment in human auditory cortex with non-invasive transcranial alternating current stimulation (TACS) [28-30]. We assessed the consequences of these manipulations on the perceptual buildup of the target stream (the time required to recognize its presence in a noisy background), using behavioral measures in 20 healthy listeners performing a naturalistic listening task. Experimentally induced cyclic 4-Hz variations in stream-brain phase entrainment reliably caused a cyclic 4-Hz pattern in perceptual buildup time. Our findings demonstrate that strong endogenous delta/theta stream-brain phase entrainment accelerates the perceptual emergence of task-relevant rhythmic streams in noisy environments. PMID:26628008

  10. Endogenous Delta/Theta Sound-Brain Phase Entrainment Accelerates the Buildup of Auditory Streaming.

    PubMed

    Riecke, Lars; Sack, Alexander T; Schroeder, Charles E

    2015-12-21

    In many natural listening situations, meaningful sounds (e.g., speech) fluctuate in slow rhythms among other sounds. When a slow rhythmic auditory stream is selectively attended, endogenous delta (1‒4 Hz) oscillations in auditory cortex may shift their timing so that higher-excitability neuronal phases become aligned with salient events in that stream [1, 2]. As a consequence of this stream-brain phase entrainment [3], these events are processed and perceived more readily than temporally non-overlapping events [4-11], essentially enhancing the neural segregation between the attended stream and temporally noncoherent streams [12]. Stream-brain phase entrainment is robust to acoustic interference [13-20] provided that target stream-evoked rhythmic activity can be segregated from noncoherent activity evoked by other sounds [21], a process that usually builds up over time [22-27]. However, it has remained unclear whether stream-brain phase entrainment functionally contributes to this buildup of rhythmic streams or whether it is merely an epiphenomenon of it. Here, we addressed this issue directly by experimentally manipulating endogenous stream-brain phase entrainment in human auditory cortex with non-invasive transcranial alternating current stimulation (TACS) [28-30]. We assessed the consequences of these manipulations on the perceptual buildup of the target stream (the time required to recognize its presence in a noisy background), using behavioral measures in 20 healthy listeners performing a naturalistic listening task. Experimentally induced cyclic 4-Hz variations in stream-brain phase entrainment reliably caused a cyclic 4-Hz pattern in perceptual buildup time. Our findings demonstrate that strong endogenous delta/theta stream-brain phase entrainment accelerates the perceptual emergence of task-relevant rhythmic streams in noisy environments.

  11. The safety of self-administered allergen immunotherapy during the buildup and maintenance phases

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Frederick M.; Naples, Andrew R.; Ebeling, Myla; Hulsey, Thomas C.; Garner, Larry M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Self-administered allergen immunotherapy is considered controversial. We believe the implementation of a self-administration protocol characterized by patient preselection and a slow buildup phase is safe. Methods We analyzed 23,614 patient records and associated immunotherapy injections for systemic reactions (SR) during a 1-year period (2011 to 2012). SRs were graded in accordance with the World Allergy Organization (WAO) criteria. Results Thirty-seven SRs were reported for 23,614 patients who self-administered 2,021,600 injections yielding an annual SR rate of 0.16% (per patient) or 0.002% (per injection). Only 9 of 4643 pediatric (0.19%) and 28 of 18,971 adult patients (0.15%) experienced 1 or more SRs. No deaths (grade V SR) occurred. From 2009 through early 2014, over 90,000 patients received more than 10 million injections in accordance with the United Allergy Services (UAS) protocol without fatalities. Conclusion We believe this safety profile is due to a preselection of patients to exclude those with a high risk for adverse reactions and a slow immunotherapy buildup phase. In contrast, previous studies documented office-based SRs ranging from approximately 3% to greater than 14%. Thus, the UAS home-immunotherapy SR rate is significantly lower than office-based immunotherapy SR rates (p < 0.0001). The enhanced safety of this protocol results in a decreased frequency and severity of SRs. This safety report, derived from analyses of one of the largest patient cohorts studied, corroborates and expands the observations of previous studies of self-administered subcutaneous immunotherapy in a low-risk patient population by assessing self-administered allergen immunotherapy during the buildup and maintenance phases. PMID:25476041

  12. Digital Alloy Absorber for Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Cory J. (Inventor); Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    In order to increase the spectral response range and improve the mobility of the photo-generated carriers (e.g. in an nBn photodetector), a digital alloy absorber may be employed by embedding one (or fraction thereof) to several monolayers of a semiconductor material (insert layers) periodically into a different host semiconductor material of the absorber layer. The semiconductor material of the insert layer and the host semiconductor materials may have lattice constants that are substantially mismatched. For example, this may performed by periodically embedding monolayers of InSb into an InAsSb host as the absorption region to extend the cutoff wavelength of InAsSb photodetectors, such as InAsSb based nBn devices. The described technique allows for simultaneous control of alloy composition and net strain, which are both key parameters for the photodetector operation.

  13. 18F-Labelled Intermediates for Radiosynthesis by Modular Build-Up Reactions: Newer Developments

    PubMed Central

    Ermert, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    This brief review gives an overview of newer developments in 18F-chemistry with the focus on small 18F-labelled molecules as intermediates for modular build-up syntheses. The short half-life (<2 h) of the radionuclide requires efficient syntheses of these intermediates considering that multistep syntheses are often time consuming and characterized by a loss of yield in each reaction step. Recent examples of improved synthesis of 18F-labelled intermediates show new possibilities for no-carrier-added ring-fluorinated arenes, novel intermediates for tri[18F]fluoromethylation reactions, and 18F-fluorovinylation methods. PMID:25343144

  14. Correlation buildup during recrystallization in three-dimensional dusty plasma clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Schella, André; Mulsow, Matthias; Melzer, André

    2014-05-15

    The recrystallization process of finite three-dimensional dust clouds after laser heating is studied experimentally. The time-dependent Coulomb coupling parameter is presented, showing that the recrystallization starts with an exponential cooling phase where cooling is slower than damping by the neutral gas friction. At later times, the coupling parameter oscillates into equilibrium. It is found that a large fraction of cluster states after recrystallization experiments is in metastable states. The temporal evolution of the correlation buildup shows that correlation occurs on even slower time scale than cooling.

  15. Rime Mushrooms - Extreme Rime Ice Buildup on Mountain Summits of Southern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteman, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern Patagonian Andes are known among mountain climbers for a meteorological phenomenon that occurs there but is unknown in many other mountain areas. The phenomenon is the buildup of rime ice in large bulbous or mushroom-shaped accretions on the windward side of projecting mountain summits, ridges and exposed near-vertical rock faces. These "ice mushrooms" have never been investigated scientifically. This talk will introduce the audience to ice mushrooms, describe where they are found, consider the meteorological factors leading to their formation, and illustrate how they are negotiated by mountain climbers using photographs and descriptions from Southern Patagonia.

  16. Formation damage and filter cake buildup in laboratory core tests: Modeling and model-assisted analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Civan, F.

    1996-03-01

    A mathematical model for the analysis of formation damage in laboratory core tests is presented. The model considers filter cake buildup on sand face, invasion of external particles, release of formation fines, migration and retention of external particles and formation fines, interphase transfer of particles, and alteration of porosity and permeability. The effects of wettabilities of fine particles and pore surfaces, relative permeabilities and capillary pressure on formation damage in two-phase flow conditions are also included. Simulation results from the model are in good agreement with experimental results from core tests. This model can be used for the analysis of formation damage due to particulate processes in laboratory core tests.

  17. Charge partitioning at gas-solid interfaces: humidity causes electricity buildup on metals.

    PubMed

    Ducati, Telma R D; Simões, Luís H; Galembeck, Fernando

    2010-09-01

    Isolated metals within Faraday cages spontaneously acquire charge at relative humidity above 50%: aluminum and chrome-plated brass become negative, stainless steel is rendered positive, and copper remains almost neutral. Isolated metal charging within shielded and grounded containers confirms that the atmosphere is an electric charge reservoir where OH(-) and H(+) ions transfer to gas-solid interfaces, producing net current. The electricity buildup dependence on humidity, or hygroelectricity, acts simultaneously but in opposition to the well-known charge dissipation due to the increase in surface conductance of solids under high humidity. Acknowledging this dual role of humidity improves the reproducibility of electrostatic experiments.

  18. Simulations of electron cloud build-up and saturation in the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Harkay, K.C.; Rosenberg, R.A.; Furman, M.A.; Pivi, M.

    2002-06-19

    In studies with positron beams in the Advanced Photon Source, a dramatic amplification was observed in the electron cloud for certain bunch current and bunch spacings. In modeling presented previously, we found qualitative agreement with the observed beam-induced multipacting condition, provided reasonable values were chosen for the secondary electron yield parameters, including the energy distribution. In this paper, we model and discuss the build-up and saturation process observed over long bunch trains at the resonance condition. Understanding this saturation mechanism in more detail may have implications for predicting electron cloud amplification, multipacting, and instabilities in future rings.

  19. Energy-Absorbing, Lightweight Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waydo, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Improved energy-absorbing wheels are under development for use on special-purpose vehicles that must traverse rough terrain under conditions (e.g., extreme cold) in which rubber pneumatic tires would fail. The designs of these wheels differ from those of prior non-pneumatic energy-absorbing wheels in ways that result in lighter weights and more effective reduction of stresses generated by ground/wheel contact forces. These wheels could be made of metals and/or composite materials to withstand the expected extreme operating conditions. As shown in the figure, a wheel according to this concept would include an isogrid tire connected to a hub via spring rods. The isogrid tire would be a stiff, lightweight structure typically made of aluminum. The isogrid aspect of the structure would both impart stiffness and act as a traction surface. The hub would be a thin-walled body of revolution having a simple or compound conical or other shape chosen for structural efficiency. The spring rods would absorb energy and partially isolate the hub and the supported vehicle from impact loads. The general spring-rod configuration shown in the figure was chosen because it would distribute contact and impact loads nearly evenly around the periphery of the hub, thereby helping to protect the hub against damage that would otherwise be caused by large loads concentrated onto small portions of the hub.

  20. Principles determining the length of time materials can be dated by TL (thermoluminescence), ESR (electron spin resonance) and other trapped charge buildup methods

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, P.W.

    1989-01-01

    The dating of nonmetallic objects by thermoluminescence (TL), electron spin resonance (ESR), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), and similar methods is possible only when these objects possess certain properties that determine the length of time that the dating method will be valid. These, and other properties also determine the useful temperature range, the precision, accuracy and other effects that influence the dating procedure. The most important factors that contribute to the dating of rocks and minerals will described. Detailed descriptions will not be attempted. The length of time materials can be dated by TL, ESR and other methods based on tapped charge buildup during irradiation depends on the trap concentration vs. dose curve. If the trap concentration is constant, i.e., independent of dose, the datable period is less than the time required to ''fill up'' the traps, usually 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 5/ Gy. If the trap concentration increases with dose the datable period can be 10/sup 3/, or more, times longer. 2 refs.

  1. Coupled diffusion in aqueous weak acid + alkanolamine absorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Leaist, D.G.; Li, Y.; Poissant, R.

    1998-11-01

    Taylor dispersion and differential refractometry are used to measure ternary interdiffusion coefficients (D{sub ik}) for aqueous solutions of acetic acid + triethanolamine (TEA) and aqueous solutions of oxalic acid + TEA at 25 C. The D{sub ik} coefficients give the coupled fluxes of acid and TEA driven by the gradient in the concentration of each solute. Ternary Fick equations with variable D{sub ik} coefficients are integrated numerically to calculate accurate concentration profiles and the moving reaction front produced by the interdiffusion of TEA and acetic or oxalic acid. Ternary diffusion coefficients are also used to predict the rate of dissolution of oxalic acid in 1.00 mol/dm{sup 3} aqueous TEA, a process analogous to the absorption of a diprotic acid gas by an alkanolamine absorbent. The diffusion of oxalic acid drives a significant counterflow of TEA. The resulting buildup of TEA at the surface of the dissolving acid increases the interfacial concentration of TEA from 1.00 to 1.20 mol/dm{sup 3}, which in turn increases the solubility of the acid by 0.20 mol/dm{sup 3}. Nernst-Planck equations are used to predict D{sub ik} coefficients for aqueous weak acid + alkanolamine solutions. The fluxes of these solutes are shown to be strongly coupled by the electric field that is generated by the diffusing ions.

  2. Clearance of absorbed selenium by the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Tatsuko; Read, R.; Rozga, J.; Burk, R.F. )

    1991-03-11

    The liver plays a central role in the metabolism of selenium. It secretes plasma selenoproteins, contains a major fraction of the glutathione peroxidase in the body, and synthesizes excretory metabolites. The role of the liver in processing newly absorbed selenium was studied. Male chow-fed rats were fasted overnight and given 24 ng of selenium as {sup 75}SeO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} by stomach tube. Animals were exsanguinated at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, and 180 min after dosing. Comparison of {sup 75}Se uptake by liver, kidney, heart, muscle, testis, brain, and spleen indicated an earlier uptake by liver than by any other tissue. At 15 min, {sup 75}Se in the portal vein blood was 2.6 times that in the hepatic vein blood. Gel filtration analysis suggested a loose association of {sup 75}Se with protein in plasma at 15 min, but immunoprecipitation indicated it was largely in the form of selenoprotein P after 30 min. End-to-side portacaval shunts (PCS) were constructed in rats and sham-operated animals were used as controls. When {sup 75}SeO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} was given to animals with PCS, uptake of {sup 75}Se by liver did not precede uptake by other tissues. Also no gradient was detected across the lungs or kidney. {sup 75}Se content of the kidney was higher in PCS rats than in sham-operated rats. This is consistent with removal of the first-pass effect of the liver facilitating uptake of {sup 75}Se by systemic tissues. These results suggest that the preferential uptake of absorbed selenium by the liver is due both to its position in the portal circulation and to an intrinsic high uptake capacity.

  3. Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms.

  4. Energy-dependent finite-orbit treatment for plasma buildup in mirror fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer simulation of hot plasma buildup in mirror fusion devices and results from this model are presented. In a small, hot magnetically confined plasma, the ion orbit radius (rho/sub i/) can be comparable to the plasma radius (R/sub p/). It a mirror-confined plasma were rho/sub i//R/sub p/ > 1/25 (such as 2XII-B), a point kinetic treatment of ion interactions becomes inaccurate and a finite gyro-radius (FGR) treatment must be used to adequately describe plasma buildup processes. This is particularly true for describing losses due to cold-gas charge exchange (c-x) near the plasma surface, since a particle lost near the vacuum interface may have contributed to the density as far as 2 rho/sub i/ radially inward from the c-x point. A similar FGR effect applies to beam-deposited ions whose large orbits influence the density up to 2 rho/sub i/ from the trapping point.

  5. Multiple dolomitization events in Triassic Latemar buildup, the Dolomites, northern Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, E.N.

    1988-01-01

    Partially dolomitized grainstones of the Middle Triassic Latemar buildup (Dolomites, northern Italy) exhibit a range of texturally distinct dolomite types. Petrographic and field observations of spatial associations and cross-cutting relationships among dolomites allow unravelling of the paragenesis of dolomitization events. Three generations of dolomite are preserved in the Latemar. Microdolomite, the earliest generation, occurs as replacement of allochems and as cement in thin (5-15 cm) exposure caps of meter-scale subtidal cycles. These dolomite crusts are texturally and chemically analogous to the Holocene supratidal crusts of Florida and the Bahamas. Saddle dolomite cements, the second generation, fill or line pores and fractures through the platform. The final generation is massive replacement of limestone by coarse, crystalline dolomite, which occupies a 2-3 km/sup 3/ mushroom-shaped zone in the center of the buildup and includes a wide array of fabrics. Here, subtidal limestones are altered to porous sucrosic dolomite, while microdolomite caps are altered to dense dolomite mosaics. Saddle dolomite cements remain as relics surrounded by replacement rhombs. Two important conclusions are (1) early dolomite is preserved as poorly ordered microdolomite (unless overprinted by a later dolomitization event) and accounts for an insignificant volume of the Latemar dolomite, and (2) saddle dolomite cements, often regarded as late-stage burial, occur before massive replacement.

  6. Build-up of toxic metals on the impervious surfaces of a commercial seaport.

    PubMed

    Ziyath, Abdul M; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2016-05-01

    In the context of increasing threats to the sensitive marine ecosystem by toxic metals, this study investigated the metal build-up on impervious surfaces specific to commercial seaports. The knowledge generated from this study will contribute to managing toxic metal pollution of the marine ecosystem. The study found that inter-modal operations and main access roadway had the highest loads followed by container storage and vehicle marshalling sites, while the quay line and short term storage areas had the lowest. Additionally, it was found that Cr, Al, Pb, Cu and Zn were predominantly attached to solids, while significant amount of Cu, Pb and Zn were found as nutrient complexes. As such, treatment options based on solids retention can be effective for some metal species, while ineffective for other species. Furthermore, Cu and Zn are more likely to become bioavailable in seawater due to their strong association with nutrients. Mathematical models to replicate the metal build-up process were also developed using experimental design approach and partial least squares regression. The models for Cr and Pb were found to be reliable, while those for Al, Zn and Cu were relatively less reliable, but could be employed for preliminary investigations.

  7. Prediction model of the buildup of volatile organic compounds on urban roads.

    PubMed

    Mahbub, Parvez; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Ayoko, Godwin A

    2011-05-15

    A model to predict the buildup of mainly traffic-generated volatile organic compounds or VOCs (toluene, ethylbenzene, ortho-xylene, meta-xylene, and para-xylene) on urban road surfaces is presented. The model required three traffic parameters, namely average daily traffic (ADT), volume to capacity ratio (V/C), and surface texture depth (STD), and two chemical parameters, namely total suspended solid (TSS) and total organic carbon (TOC), as predictor variables. Principal component analysis and two phase factor analysis were performed to characterize the model calibration parameters. Traffic congestion was found to be the underlying cause of traffic-related VOC buildup on urban roads. The model calibration was optimized using orthogonal experimental design. Partial least squares regression was used for model prediction. It was found that a better optimized orthogonal design could be achieved by including the latent factors of the data matrix into the design. The model performed fairly accurately for three different land uses as well as five different particle size fractions. The relative prediction errors were 10-40% for the different size fractions and 28-40% for the different land uses while the coefficients of variation of the predicted intersite VOC concentrations were in the range of 25-45% for the different size fractions. Considering the sizes of the data matrices, these coefficients of variation were within the acceptable interlaboratory range for analytes at ppb concentration levels.

  8. Investigation of Pectin/Chitosan Multilayers Build-up on Corona Charged Polylactide Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yovcheva, T. A.; Marudova, M. G.; Viraneva, A. P.; Gencheva, E. A.; Mekishev, G. A.; Sainov, S. H.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to investigate the formation and stability of pectin/chitosan multilayer films on preliminary corona charged polylactide substrate with different polarity. For this purpose two different multilayer structures with alternative ordering of polycation and polyanion layers were prepared. Layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition technique was used for multilayer build-up. The FT-IR transmittance spectra of the substrates with multilayers indicated of the presence of pectin and chitosan. The intensity of the typical bands was found to increase with increasing of the number of the deposited layers. The stability and physico-chemical properties of the multilayer structures were investigated by determination of surface refractive index and swelling behaviour. Multilayers are stable enough in distilled water and their equilibrium degree of swelling increases with the increase of build-up layers. This relation is correlated with the increased amount of hydrophilic biopolymers. It was found out that chitosan/pectin multilayers buil-up on negatively charged substrate consist of higher amount of polyelectrolytes and are more stable in distilled water.

  9. Understanding the physical processes of pollutant build-up and wash-off on roof surfaces.

    PubMed

    Egodawatta, Prasanna; Thomas, Evan; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2009-03-01

    Pollutants originating with roof runoff can have a significant impact on urban stormwater quality. This signifies the importance of understanding pollutant processes on roof surfaces. Additionally, knowledge of pollutant processes on roof surfaces is important as roofs are used as the primary catchment surface for domestic rainwater harvesting. In recent years, rainwater harvesting has become one of the primary sustainable water management techniques to counteract the growing demand for potable water. This paper presents the outcomes of an in-depth research study into particulate matter build-up and wash-off for roof surfaces. In this research, particulate matter was considered as the indicator pollutant where the processes related to other pollutants can be predicted based on the understanding generated for particulate matter. The study outcomes confirm that the build-up process on roof surfaces is comparatively similar to road surfaces. However, particle loads collected from roofs were significantly less compared to road surfaces and much finer in texture. Wash-off from roofs also showed significant similarities to wash-off from roads. A relatively high concentration of particulate matter was noted during the initial part of storm events. Furthermore, the amount of particulate matter remaining on the roof surfaces was significantly high for less intense rain events. PMID:19157516

  10. Modeling cake buildup under TMP-step filtration in a membrane bioreactor: cake compressibility is significant.

    PubMed

    Bugge, Thomas V; Jørgensen, Mads K; Christensen, Morten L; Keiding, Kristian

    2012-09-15

    Fouling is inevitable in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) due to the complex nature of activated sludge, which contains a broad variety of potential foulants. Filter cakes that build up from sludge particles are traditionally highly compressible due to both the deformation of the individual sludge particles and the rearrangement of these particles in the cake. However, this phenomenon has been little examined in studies of fouling mechanisms in MBR systems. This study examines the properties of the cake layer, modeling the cake buildup and specific cake resistance (α), including compressibility, in terms of pressure-dependent α. The changes in fouling resistance during transmembrane pressure (TMP)-step filtration in an MBR setup were simulated using an empirical pressure dependence of the specific cake resistance and a simple mass balance model. The total change in fouling resistance in each TMP step could be divided into an initial rapid change in specific cake resistance due to filter cake compression followed by simple cake buildup. By including cake compression in this simple model, the model fitted the data with high precision. We demonstrated that compressibility should be considered when describing cake fouling in MBRs.

  11. Optical fiber sensors and their application in monitoring stress build-up in dental resin cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottevaere, H.; Tabak, M.; Fernandez Fernandez, A.; Berghmans, F.; Thienpont, H.

    2005-09-01

    The field of optical fiber sensing is highly diverse and this diversity is perceived as a great advantage over more conventional sensors in that an optical sensor can be tailored to measure any of a myriad of physical parameters. In this paper we present a niche application for optical fiber sensors in the domain of biophotonics, namely the monitoring of stress build-up during the curing process of dental resin cements. We discuss the origin of this stress build-up and the problems it can cause when treating patients. Optical fiber sensors aim at excelling in two kind of applications: firstly to perform quality control on batch produced dental cements and measure their total material shrinkage, secondly to monitor the hardening of the cement during in-vivo measurements resulting in the dynamic measurement of the shrinkage and to control the stress in a facing based restoration. We therefore investigated two types of optical fiber sensors as alternatives to conventional measurement techniques; namely polarimetric optical fiber sensors and fiber Bragg gratings written in polarization maintaining fibers. After discussing the results obtained with both optical fiber sensors, we will conclude with a critical assessment of the suitability of the two proposed sensing configurations for multi-parameter stress monitoring.

  12. Simulation on buildup of electron cloud in a proton circular accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kai-Wei; Liu, Yu-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Electron cloud interaction with high energy positive beams are believed responsible for various undesirable effects such as vacuum degradation, collective beam instability and even beam loss in high power proton circular accelerators. An important uncertainty in predicting electron cloud instability lies in the detailed processes of the generation and accumulation of the electron cloud. The simulation on the build-up of electron cloud is necessary to further studies on beam instability caused by electron clouds. The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is an intense proton accelerator facility now being built, whose accelerator complex includes two main parts: an H-linac and a rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS). The RCS accumulates the 80 MeV proton beam and accelerates it to 1.6 GeV with a repetition rate of 25 Hz. During beam injection with lower energy, the emerging electron cloud may cause serious instability and beam loss on the vacuum pipe. A simulation code has been developed to simulate the build-up, distribution and density of electron cloud in CSNS/RCS. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275221, 11175193)

  13. Impact of eccentricity build-up and graveyard disposal Strategies on MEO navigation constellations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, Jonas; Domínguez-González, Raúl; Flegel, Sven K.; Sánchez-Ortiz, Noelia; Merz, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    With currently two constellations being in or close to the build-up phase, in a few years the Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) region will be populated with four complete navigation systems in relatively close orbital altitudes: The American GPS, Russian GLONASS, European Galileo, and Chinese BeiDou. To guarantee an appropriate visibility of constellation satellites from Earth, these constellations rely on certain defined orbits. For this, both the repeat pattern, which is basically defined by the semimajor axis and inclination, as well as the orbital planes, which are defined by the right ascension of ascending node, are determining values. To avoid an overcrowding of the region of interest, the disposal of satellites after their end-of-life is recommended. However, for the MEO region, no internationally agreed mitigation guidelines exist. Because of their distances to Earth, ordinary disposal manoeuvres leading to a direct or delayed re-entry due to atmospheric drag are not feasible: The needed fuel masses for such manoeuvres are by far above the reasonable limits and available fuel budgets. Thus, additional approaches have to be applied. For this, in general two options exist: disposal to graveyard orbits or the disposal to eccentricity build-up orbits. In the study performed, the key criterion for the graveyard strategy is that the disposed spacecraft must keep a safe minimum distance to the altitude of the active constellation on a long-term time scale of up to 200 years. This constraint imposes stringent requirements on the stability of the graveyard orbit. Similar disposals are also performed for high LEO satellites and disposed GEO payloads. The eccentricity build-up strategy on the other hand uses resonant effects between the Earth's geopotential, the Sun and the Moon. Depending on the initial conditions, these can cause a large eccentricity build-up, which finally can lead to a re-entry of the satellite. In this paper, the effects of applying either the first or

  14. Measured and Calculated Neutron Spectra and Dose Equivalent Rates at High Altitudes; Relevance to SST Operations and Space Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foelsche, T.; Mendell, R. B.; Wilson, J. W.; Adams, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    Results of the NASA Langley-New York University high-altitude radiation study are presented. Measurements of the absorbed dose rate and of secondary fast neutrons (1 to 10 MeV energy) during the years 1965 to 1971 are used to determine the maximum radiation exposure from galactic and solar cosmic rays of supersonic transport (SST) and subsonic jet occupants. The maximum dose equivalent rates that the SST crews might receive turn out to be 13 to 20 percent of the maximum permissible dose rate (MPD) for radiation workers (5 rem/yr). The exposure of passengers encountering an intense giant-energy solar particle event could exceed the MPD for the general population (0.5 rem/yr), but would be within these permissible limits if in such rare cases the transport descends to subsonic altitude; it is in general less than 12 percent of the MPD. By Monte Carlo calculations of the transport and buildup of nucleons in air for incident proton energies E of 0.02 to 10 GeV, the measured neutron spectra were extrapolated to lower and higher energies and for galactic cosmic rays were found to continue with a relatively high intensity to energies greater than 400 MeV, in a wide altitude range. This condition, together with the measured intensity profiles of fast neutrons, revealed that the biologically important fast and energetic neutrons penetrate deep into the atmosphere and contribute approximately 50 percent of the dose equivalant rates at SST and present subsonic jet altitudes.

  15. Improving the laboratory monitoring of absorbent oil

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Shved; S.S. Sychev; I.V. Safina; S.A. Klykov

    2009-05-15

    The performance of absorbent coal tar oil is analyzed as a function of the constituent and group composition. The qualitative and quantitative composition of the oil that ensures the required absorbent properties is determined. Operative monitoring may be based on absorbent characteristics that permit regulation of the beginning and end of regeneration.

  16. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-01-01

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  17. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-02-06

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  18. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOEpatents

    Iverson, D.C.

    1987-11-20

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compound of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved. 2 figs.

  19. The Double Absorbing Boundary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstrom, Thomas; Givoli, Dan; Rabinovich, Daniel; Bielak, Jacobo

    2014-02-01

    A new approach is devised for solving wave problems in unbounded domains. It has common features to each of two types of existing techniques: local high-order Absorbing Boundary Conditions (ABC) and Perfectly Matched Layers (PML). However, it is different from both and enjoys relative advantages with respect to both. The new method, called the Double Absorbing Boundary (DAB) method, is based on truncating the unbounded domain to produce a finite computational domain Ω, and on applying a local high-order ABC on two parallel artificial boundaries, which are a small distance apart, and thus form a thin non-reflecting layer. Auxiliary variables are defined on the two boundaries and inside the layer bounded by them, and participate in the numerical scheme. The DAB method is first introduced in general terms, using the 2D scalar time-dependent wave equation as a model. Then it is applied to the 1D Klein-Gordon equation, using finite difference discretization in space and time, and to the 2D wave equation in a wave guide, using finite element discretization in space and dissipative time stepping. The computational aspects of the method are discussed, and numerical experiments demonstrate its performance.

  20. Analytical expressions for the gate utilization factors of passive multiplicity counters including signal build-up

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, Stephen; Evans, Louise G; Schear, Melissa A

    2010-01-01

    In the realm of nuclear safeguards, passive neutron multiplicity counting using shift register pulse train analysis to nondestructively quantify Pu in product materials is a familiar and widely applied technique. The approach most commonly taken is to construct a neutron detector consisting of {sup 3}He filled cylindrical proportional counters embedded in a high density polyethylene moderator. Fast neutrons from the item enter the moderator and are quickly slowed down, on timescales of the order of 1-2 {micro}s, creating a thermal population which then persists typically for several 10's {micro}s and is sampled by the {sup 3}He detectors. Because the initial transient is of comparatively short duration it has been traditional to treat it as instantaneous and furthermore to approximate the subsequent capture time distribution as exponential in shape. With these approximations simple expressions for the various Gate Utilization Factors (GUFs) can be obtained. These factors represent the proportion of time correlated events i.e. Doubles and Triples signal present in the pulse train that is detected by the coincidence gate structure chosen (predelay and gate width settings of the multiplicity shift register). More complicated expressions can be derived by generalizing the capture time distribution to multiple time components or harmonics typically present in real systems. When it comes to applying passive neutron multiplicity methods to extremely intense (i.e. high emission rate and highly multiplying) neutron sources there is a drive to use detector types with very fast response characteristics in order to cope with the high rates. In addition to short pulse width, detectors with a short capture time profile are also desirable so that a short coincidence gate width can be set in order to reduce the chance or Accidental coincidence signal. In extreme cases, such as might be realized using boron loaded scintillators, the dieaway time may be so short that the build-up

  1. Verification of Internal Dose Calculations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aissi, Abdelmadjid

    The MIRD internal dose calculations have been in use for more than 15 years, but their accuracy has always been questionable. There have been attempts to verify these calculations; however, these attempts had various shortcomings which kept the question of verification of the MIRD data still unanswered. The purpose of this research was to develop techniques and methods to verify the MIRD calculations in a more systematic and scientific manner. The research consisted of improving a volumetric dosimeter, developing molding techniques, and adapting the Monte Carlo computer code ALGAM to the experimental conditions and vice versa. The organic dosimetric system contained TLD-100 powder and could be shaped to represent human organs. The dosimeter possessed excellent characteristics for the measurement of internal absorbed doses, even in the case of the lungs. The molding techniques are inexpensive and were used in the fabrication of dosimetric and radioactive source organs. The adaptation of the computer program provided useful theoretical data with which the experimental measurements were compared. The experimental data and the theoretical calculations were compared for 6 source organ-7 target organ configurations. The results of the comparison indicated the existence of an agreement between measured and calculated absorbed doses, when taking into consideration the average uncertainty (16%) of the measurements, and the average coefficient of variation (10%) of the Monte Carlo calculations. However, analysis of the data gave also an indication that the Monte Carlo method might overestimate the internal absorbed doses. Even if the overestimate exists, at least it could be said that the use of the MIRD method in internal dosimetry was shown to lead to no unnecessary exposure to radiation that could be caused by underestimating the absorbed dose. The experimental and the theoretical data were also used to test the validity of the Reciprocity Theorem for heterogeneous

  2. A polarization-independent broadband terahertz absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Cheng; Zang, XiaoFei E-mail: ymzhu@usst.edu.cn; Wang, YiQiao; Chen, Lin; Cai, Bin; Zhu, YiMing E-mail: ymzhu@usst.edu.cn

    2014-07-21

    A highly efficient broadband terahertz absorber is designed, fabricated, and experimentally as well as theoretically evaluated. The absorber comprises a heavily doped silicon substrate and a well-designed two-dimensional grating. Due to the destructive interference of waves and diffraction, the absorber can achieve over 95% absorption in a broad frequency range from 1 to 2 THz and for angles of incidence from 0° to 60°. Such a terahertz absorber is also polarization-independent due to its symmetrical structure. This omnidirectional and broadband absorber have potential applications in anti-reflection coatings, imaging systems, and so on.

  3. Radiation Dose Optimization For Critical Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodadadegan, Yasaman

    Ionizing radiation used in the patient diagnosis or therapy has negative effects on the patient body in short term and long term depending on the amount of exposure. More than 700,000 examinations are everyday performed on Interventional Radiology modalities, however; there is no patient-centric information available to the patient or the Quality Assurance for the amount of organ dose received. In this study, we are exploring the methodologies to systematically reduce the absorbed radiation dose in the Fluoroscopically Guided Interventional Radiology procedures. In the first part of this study, we developed a mathematical model which determines a set of geometry settings for the equipment and a level for the energy during a patient exam. The goal is to minimize the amount of absorbed dose in the critical organs while maintaining image quality required for the diagnosis. The model is a large-scale mixed integer program. We performed polyhedral analysis and derived several sets of strong inequalities to improve the computational speed and quality of the solution. Results present the amount of absorbed dose in the critical organ can be reduced up to 99% for a specific set of angles. In the second part, we apply an approximate gradient method to simultaneously optimize angle and table location while minimizing dose in the critical organs with respect to the image quality. In each iteration, we solve a sub-problem as a MIP to determine the radiation field size and corresponding X-ray tube energy. In the computational experiments, results show further reduction (up to 80%) of the absorbed dose in compare with previous method. Last, there are uncertainties in the medical procedures resulting imprecision of the absorbed dose. We propose a robust formulation to hedge from the worst case absorbed dose while ensuring feasibility. In this part, we investigate a robust approach for the organ motions within a radiology procedure. We minimize the absorbed dose for the critical

  4. Effect of Mn on the Formation of Oxide Buildups Upon HVOF-Sprayed MCrAlY-Ceramic-Type Cermet Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tsai-Shang

    2011-03-01

    Thermal spray coatings have been widely used on hearth rolls in a continuous annealing line to improve steel sheet quality and to prolong the roll service life. One of the common defects formed on a working hearth roll is the oxide buildup. HVOF-sprayed CoCrAlY-CrB2-Y2O3 coating was used in this study to duplicate buildups by reacting with Fe and Mn oxides. The reaction was performed in a furnace at 900 °C with inert gases flowing through. After reacting for 8 days, large Mn-rich buildups were formed on the coating while the buildups without Mn were very small. Mn was shown to enhance the formation of buildups. Buildups from a hearth roll were also examined and compared with the laboratory ones.

  5. Urban nonpoint source pollution buildup and washoff models for simulating storm runoff quality in the Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Wang, Long; Wei, Jiahua; Huang, Yuefei; Wang, Guangqian; Maqsood, Imran

    2011-07-01

    Many urban nonpoint source pollution models utilize pollutant buildup and washoff functions to simulate storm runoff quality of urban catchments. In this paper, two urban pollutant washoff load models are derived using pollutant buildup and washoff functions. The first model assumes that there is no residual pollutant after a storm event while the second one assumes that there is always residual pollutant after each storm event. The developed models are calibrated and verified with observed data from an urban catchment in the Los Angeles County. The application results show that the developed model with consideration of residual pollutant is more capable of simulating nonpoint source pollution from urban storm runoff than that without consideration of residual pollutant. For the study area, residual pollutant should be considered in pollutant buildup and washoff functions for simulating urban nonpoint source pollution when the total runoff volume is less than 30 mm.

  6. Surface dose measurements and comparison of unflattened and flattened photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Sigamani, Ashokkumar; Nambiraj, Arunai; Yadav, Girigesh; Giribabu, Ananda; Srinivasan, Karthikeyan; Gurusamy, Venkadamanickam; Raman, Kothanda; Karunakaran, Kaviarasu; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the central axis dose in the build-up region and the surface dose of a 6 MV and 10 MV flattened photon beam (FB) and flattening filter free (FFF) therapeutic photon beam for different square field sizes (FSs) for a Varian Truebeam linear accelerator using parallel-plate ionization chamber and Gafchromic film. Knowledge of dosimetric characteristics in the build-up region and surface dose of the FFF is essential for clinical care. The dose measurements were also obtained empirically using two different commonly used dosimeters: a p-type photon semiconductor dosimeter and a cylindrical ionization chamber. Surface dose increased linearly with FS for both FB and FFF photon beams. The surface dose values of FFF were higher than the FB FSs. The measured surface dose clearly increases with increasing FS. The FFF beams have a modestly higher surface dose in the build-up region than the FB. The dependence of source to skin distance (SSD) is less significant in FFF beams when compared to the flattened beams at extended SSDs. PMID:27217619

  7. Surface dose measurements and comparison of unflattened and flattened photon beams.

    PubMed

    Sigamani, Ashokkumar; Nambiraj, Arunai; Yadav, Girigesh; Giribabu, Ananda; Srinivasan, Karthikeyan; Gurusamy, Venkadamanickam; Raman, Kothanda; Karunakaran, Kaviarasu; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the central axis dose in the build-up region and the surface dose of a 6 MV and 10 MV flattened photon beam (FB) and flattening filter free (FFF) therapeutic photon beam for different square field sizes (FSs) for a Varian Truebeam linear accelerator using parallel-plate ionization chamber and Gafchromic film. Knowledge of dosimetric characteristics in the build-up region and surface dose of the FFF is essential for clinical care. The dose measurements were also obtained empirically using two different commonly used dosimeters: a p-type photon semiconductor dosimeter and a cylindrical ionization chamber. Surface dose increased linearly with FS for both FB and FFF photon beams. The surface dose values of FFF were higher than the FB FSs. The measured surface dose clearly increases with increasing FS. The FFF beams have a modestly higher surface dose in the build-up region than the FB. The dependence of source to skin distance (SSD) is less significant in FFF beams when compared to the flattened beams at extended SSDs. PMID:27217619

  8. Influence of uncertainty inherent to heavy metal build-up and wash-off on stormwater quality.

    PubMed

    Wijesiri, Buddhi; Egodawatta, Prasanna; McGree, James; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2016-03-15

    Uncertainty inherent to heavy metal build-up and wash-off stems from process variability. This results in inaccurate interpretation of stormwater quality model predictions. The research study has characterised the variability in heavy metal build-up and wash-off processes based on the temporal variations in particle-bound heavy metals commonly found on urban roads. The study outcomes found that the distribution of Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb were consistent over particle size fractions <150 μm and >150 μm, with most metals concentrated in the particle size fraction <150 μm. When build-up and wash-off are considered as independent processes, the temporal variations in these processes in relation to the heavy metals load are consistent with variations in the particulate load. However, the temporal variations in the load in build-up and wash-off of heavy metals and particulates are not consistent for consecutive build-up and wash-off events that occur on a continuous timeline. These inconsistencies are attributed to interactions between heavy metals and particulates <150 μm and >150 μm, which are influenced by particle characteristics such as organic matter content. The behavioural variability of particles determines the variations in the heavy metals load entrained in stormwater runoff. Accordingly, the variability in build-up and wash-off of particle-bound pollutants needs to be characterised in the description of pollutant attachment to particulates in stormwater quality modelling. This will ensure the accounting of process uncertainty, and thereby enhancing the interpretation of the outcomes derived from modelling studies.

  9. Simulation of soluble waste transport and buildup in surface waters using tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilpatrick, F.A.

    1993-01-01

    Soluble tracers can be used to simulate the transport and dispersion of soluble wastes that might have been introduced or are planned for introduction into surface waters. Measured tracer-response curves produced from the injection of a known quantity of soluble tracer can be used in conjunction with the superposition principle to simulate potential waste buildup in streams, lakes, and estuaries. Such information is particularly valuable to environmental and water-resource planners in determining the effects of proposed waste discharges. The theory, techniques, analysis, and presentation of results of tracer-waste simulation tests in rivers, lakes, and estuaries are described. This manual builds on other manuals dealing with dye tracing by emphasizing the expanded use of data from time-of-travel studies.

  10. Comparison between the radial density buildup in the TARA plugs using hydrogen versus deuterium neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Blackfield, D.T.

    1983-11-01

    The WOLF code is used to compare the beam divergences from a TARA source using hydrogen and deuterium. Factors which influence the divergence which are investigated are the electron temperature, initial ion energy, electrode positions and ion beam current density. The beam divergence for 20 keV hydrogen is found to be only 20% smaller than for 25 keV deuterium for the same electrode positions. Since the optimal positioning of the electrodes is found to be independent of mesh spacing, a large parameter study is undertaken using little computer time. A time-dependent radial Fokker-Planck code is next used to examine the radial density buildup in a plug of the TARA tandem mirror. For both hydrogen and deuterium neutral beams, the influences of beam positioning, current and energy, edge neutral pressure and assumed electron temperature are studied.

  11. Influence of fast alpha diffusion and thermal alpha buildup on tokamak reactor performance

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.; Tolliver, J.S.; Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1987-11-01

    The effect of fast alpha diffusion and thermal alpha accumulation on the confinement capability of a candidate Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) plasma (Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor (TIBER-II)) in achieving ignition and steady-state driven operation has been assessed using both global and 1-1/2-D transport models. Estimates are made of the threshold for radial diffusion of fast alphas and thermal alpha buildup. It is shown that a relatively low level of radial transport, when combined with large gradients in the fast alpha density, leads to a significant radial flow with a deleterious effect on plasma performance. Similarly, modest levels of thermal alpha concentration significantly influence the ignition and steady-state burn capability. 23 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Simulation of sulfide buildup in wastewater and atmosphere of sewer networks.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, A H; Yongsiri, C; Hvitved-Jacobsen, T; Vollertsen, J

    2005-01-01

    A model concept for prediction of sulfide buildup in sewer networks is presented. The model concept is an extension to--and a further development of--the WATS model (Wastewater Aerobic-anaerobic Transformations in Sewers), which has been developed by Hvitved-Jacobsen and co-workers at Aalborg University. In addition to the sulfur cycle, the WATS model simulates changes in dissolved oxygen and carbon fractions of different biodegradability. The sulfur cycle was introduced via six processes: 1. sulfide production taking place in the biofilm covering the permanently wetted sewer walls; 2. biological sulfide oxidation in the permanently wetted biofilm; 3. chemical and biological sulfide oxidation in the water phase; 4. sulfide precipitation with metals present in the wastewater; 5. emission of hydrogen sulfide to the sewer atmosphere and 6. adsorption and oxidation of hydrogen sulfide on the moist sewer walls where concrete corrosion may take place. PMID:16206860

  13. Aircraft wing weight build-up methodology with modification for materials and construction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, P.; Labell, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    An aircraft wing weight estimating method based on a component buildup technique is described. A simplified analytically derived beam model, modified by a regression analysis, is used to estimate the wing box weight, utilizing a data base of 50 actual airplane wing weights. Factors representing materials and methods of construction were derived and incorporated into the basic wing box equations. Weight penalties to the wing box for fuel, engines, landing gear, stores and fold or pivot are also included. Methods for estimating the weight of additional items (secondary structure, control surfaces) have the option of using details available at the design stage (i.e., wing box area, flap area) or default values based on actual aircraft from the data base.

  14. Simulation of sulfide buildup in wastewater and atmosphere of sewer networks.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, A H; Yongsiri, C; Hvitved-Jacobsen, T; Vollertsen, J

    2005-01-01

    A model concept for prediction of sulfide buildup in sewer networks is presented. The model concept is an extension to--and a further development of--the WATS model (Wastewater Aerobic-anaerobic Transformations in Sewers), which has been developed by Hvitved-Jacobsen and co-workers at Aalborg University. In addition to the sulfur cycle, the WATS model simulates changes in dissolved oxygen and carbon fractions of different biodegradability. The sulfur cycle was introduced via six processes: 1. sulfide production taking place in the biofilm covering the permanently wetted sewer walls; 2. biological sulfide oxidation in the permanently wetted biofilm; 3. chemical and biological sulfide oxidation in the water phase; 4. sulfide precipitation with metals present in the wastewater; 5. emission of hydrogen sulfide to the sewer atmosphere and 6. adsorption and oxidation of hydrogen sulfide on the moist sewer walls where concrete corrosion may take place.

  15. Electron-Cloud Build-up in the FNAL Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    2007-06-04

    We present a summary on ongoing simulation results for the electron-cloud buildup in the context of the proposed FNAL Main Injector (MI) intensity upgrade [1] in a fieldfree region at the location of the RFA electron detector [2]. By combining our simulated results for the electron flux at the vacuum chamber wall with the corresponding measurements obtained with the RFA we infer that the peak secondary electron yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max} is {approx}> 1.4, and the average electron density is n{sub e} {approx}> 10{sup 10} m{sup -3} at transition energy for the specific fill pattern and beam intensities defined below. The sensitivity of our results to several variables remains to be explored in order to reach more definitive results. Effects from the electron cloud on the beam are being investigated separately [3].

  16. Use of Nuclear Spin Noise Spectroscopy to Monitor Slow Magnetization Buildup at Millikelvin Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Pöschko, Maria Theresia; Peat, David; Owers‐Bradley, John

    2016-01-01

    Abstract At ultralow temperatures, longitudinal nuclear magnetic relaxation times become exceedingly long and spectral lines are very broad. These facts pose particular challenges for the measurement of NMR spectra and spin relaxation phenomena. Nuclear spin noise spectroscopy is used to monitor proton spin polarization buildup to thermal equilibrium of a mixture of glycerol, water, and copper oxide nanoparticles at 17.5 mK in a static magnetic field of 2.5 T. Relaxation times determined in such a way are essentially free from perturbations caused by excitation radiofrequency pulses, radiation damping, and insufficient excitation bandwidth. The experimental spin‐lattice relaxation times determined on resonance by saturation recovery with spin noise detection are consistently longer than those determined by using pulse excitation. These longer values are in better accordance with the expected field dependence trend than those obtained by on‐resonance experiments with pulsed excitation. PMID:27305629

  17. Reevaluation of the newborn thyroid dose from radioiodines

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, W.R.; Milavickas, L.R.

    1987-07-01

    The basis for the current thyroid absorbed dose estimates for radioiodines has been examined. The values for the newborn thyroid dose were found to underestimate the dose by a factor of 3. This underestimation of the dose was caused by the assumption that the biokinetic distribution of iodine is the same for the newborn and the adult. Increased thyroid uptake by the newborn requires that higher cumulated activities be incorporated into the dose determinations for the newborn.

  18. Multiple dolomitization events in Triassic latemar buildup, the dolomites, northern Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, E.N.

    1988-02-01

    Partially dolomitized grainstones of the Middle Triassic Latemar buildup (Dolomites, northern Italy) exhibit a range of texturally distinct dolomite types. Petrographic and field observations of spatial associations and cross-cutting relationships among dolomites allow unravelling of the paragenesis of dolomitization events. Three generations of dolomite are preserved in the Latemar. Microdolomite, the earliest generation, occurs as replacement of allochems and as cement in thin (5-15 cm) exposure caps of meter-scale subtidal cycles. These dolomite crusts are texturally and chemically analogous to the Holocene supratidal crusts of Florida and the Bahamas. Saddle dolomite cements, the second generation, fill or line pores and fractures through the platform. The final generation is massive replacement of limestone by coarse, crystalline dolomite, which occupies a 2-3 km/sup 3/ mushroom-shaped zone in the center of the buildup and includes a wide array of fabrics. Here, subtidal limestones are altered to porous sucrosic dolomite, while microdolomite caps are altered to dense dolomite mosaics. Saddle dolomite cements remain as relics surrounded by replacement rhombs. Two important conclusions are (1) early dolomite is preserved as poorly ordered microdolomite (unless overprinted by a later dolomitization event) and accounts for an insignificant volume of the Latemar dolomite, and (2) saddle dolomite cements, often regarded as late-stage burial, occur before massive replacement. Standard textural classification of Latemar dolomites hindered the resolution of the timing of dolomitization events. Instead, paragenetic relationships provided a powerful tool for grouping dolomites into generations representing specific diagenetic events in specific dolomitizing environments.

  19. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Luting Cements to Different Core Buildup Materials in Lactic Acid Buffer Solution

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Siddharam M.; Desai, Raviraj G.; Arabbi, Kashinath C.; Prakash, Ved

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Objectives The core buildup material is used to restore badly broken down tooth to provide better retention for fixed restorations. The shear bond strength of a luting agent to core buildup is one of the crucial factors in the success of the cast restoration. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of luting cements with different core buildup materials in lactic acid buffer solution. Materials and Methods Two luting cements {Traditional Glass Ionomer luting cement (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer luting cement (RMGIC)} and five core buildup materials {Silver Amalgam, Glass ionomer (GI), Glass Ionomer Silver Reinforced (GI Silver reinforced), Composite Resin and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer(RMGIC)} were selected for this study. Total 100 specimens were prepared with 20 specimens for each core buildup material using a stainless steel split metal die. Out of these 20 specimens, 10 specimens were bonded with each luting cement. All the bonded specimens were stored at 370c in a 0.01M lactic acid buffer solution at a pH of 4 for 7days. Shear bond strength was determined using a Universal Testing Machine at a cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. The peak load at fracture was recorded and shear bond strength was calculated. The data was statistically analysed using Two-way ANOVA followed by HOLM-SIDAK method for pair wise comparison at significance level of p<0.05. Results Two-Way ANOVA showed significant differences in bond strength of the luting cements (p<0.05) and core materials (p<0.05) and the interactions (p<0.05). Pairwise comparison of luting cements by HOLM-SIDAK test, showed that the RMGIC luting cement had higher shear bond strength values than Traditional GIC luting cement for all the core buildup materials. RMGIC core material showed higher bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI silver reinforced, GI and silver amalgam core materials for both the luting agents. Conclusion Shear bond strength of

  20. High-Dose-Rate 192Ir Brachytherapy Dose Verification: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Nikoofar, Alireza; Hoseinpour, Zohreh; Rabi Mahdavi, Seied; Hasanzadeh, Hadi; Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: The high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy might be an effective tool for palliation of dysphagia. Because of some concerns about adverse effects due to absorbed radiation dose, it is important to estimate absorbed dose in risky organs during this treatment. Objectives: This study aimed to measure the absorbed dose in the parotid, thyroid, and submandibular gland, eye, trachea, spinal cord, and manubrium of sternum in brachytherapy in an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods: To measure radiation dose, eye, parotid, thyroid, and submandibular gland, spine, and sternum, an anthropomorphic phantom was considered with applicators to set thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). A specific target volume of about 23 cm3 in the upper thoracic esophagus was considered as target, and phantom planned computed tomography (CT) for HDR brachytherapy, then with a micro-Selectron HDR (192Ir) remote after-loading unit. Results: Absorbed doses were measured with calibrated TLDs and were expressed in centi-Gray (cGy). In regions far from target (≥ 16 cm) such as submandibular, parotid and thyroid glands, mean measured dose ranged from 1.65 to 5.5 cGy. In closer regions (≤ 16 cm), the absorbed dose might be as high as 113 cGy. Conclusions: Our study showed similar depth and surface doses; in closer regions, the surface and depth doses differed significantly due to the role of primary radiation that had imposed a high-dose gradient and difference between the plan and measurement, which was more severe because of simplifications in tissue inhomogeneity, considered in TPS relative to phantom. PMID:26413250

  1. In vivo verification of superficial dose for head and neck treatments using intensity-modulated techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Zhenyu; Deng Xiaowu; Huang Shaomin; Zhang Li; He Zhichun; Allen Li, X.; Kwan, Ian; Lerch, Michael; Cutajar, Dean; Metcalfe, Peter; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2009-01-15

    Skin dose is one of the key issues for clinical dosimetry in radiation therapy. Currently planning computer systems are unable to accurately predict dose in the buildup region, leaving ambiguity as to the dose levels actually received by the patient's skin during radiotherapy. This is one of the prime reasons why in vivo measurements are necessary to estimate the dose in the buildup region. A newly developed metal-oxide-semiconductor-field-effect-transistor (MOSFET) detector designed specifically for dose measurements in rapidly changing dose gradients was introduced for accurate in vivo skin dosimetry. The feasibility of this detector for skin dose measurements was verified in comparison with plane parallel ionization chamber and radiochromic films. The accuracy of a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) in skin dose calculations for intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma was evaluated using MOSFET detectors in an anthropomorphic phantom as well as on the patients. Results show that this newly developed MOSFET detector can provide a minimal but highly reproducible intrinsic buildup of 7 mg cm{sup -2} corresponding to the requirements of personal surface dose equivalent Hp (0.07). The reproducibility of the MOSFET response, in high sensitivity mode, is found to be better than 2% at the phantom surface for the doses normally delivered to the patients. The MOSFET detector agrees well with the Attix chamber and the EBT Gafchromic registered film in terms of surface and buildup region dose measurements, even for oblique incident beams. While the dose difference between MOSFET measurements and TPS calculations is within measurement uncertainty for the depths equal to or greater than 0.5 cm, an overestimation of up to 8.5% was found for the surface dose calculations in the anthropomorphic phantom study. In vivo skin dose measurements reveal that the dose difference between the MOSFET results and the TPS calculations was on

  2. Time-dependent neutron and photon dose-field analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Hasani Omar

    2005-11-01

    A unique tool is developed that allows the user to model physical representations of complicated glovebox facilities in two dimensions and determine neutral-particle flux and ambient dose-equivalent fields throughout that geometry. The code Pandemonium, originally designed to determine flux and dose rates only, has been improved to include realistic glovebox geometries, time-dependent source and detector positions, time-dependent shielding thickness calculations, time-integrated doses, a representative criticality accident scenario based on time-dependent reactor kinetics, and more rigorous photon treatment. The photon model has been significantly enhanced by expanding the energy range to 10 MeV to include fission photons, and by including a set of new buildup factors, the result of an extensive study into the previously unknown "purely-angular effect" on photon buildup. Purely-angular photon buildup factors are determined using discrete ordinates and coupled electron-photon cross sections to account for coherent and incoherent scattering and secondary photon effects of bremsstrahlung and florescence. Improvements to Pandemonium result in significant modeling capabilities for processing facilities using intense neutron and photon sources, and the code obtains comparable results to Monte Carlo calculations but within a fraction of the time required to run such codes as MCNPX.

  3. Dose to lung from inhaled tritiated particles.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R B; Hong, A

    2001-09-01

    Tritiated particulate materials are of potential hazard in fission, fusion, and other tritium handling facilities. The absorbed fractions (fraction of energy emitted that is absorbed by the target region) are calculated for tritiated particles deposited in the alveolar-interstitial (AI) region of the respiratory tract. The energy absorbed by radiologically sensitive tissue irradiated by tritiated particles, in regions of the lung other than in the AI region, is negligible. The ICRP Publication 71 assumes the absorbed fraction is unity for tritium deposited in the AI region. We employed Monte Carlo methods in a model to evaluate the energy deposition in the wall of the alveolar sac from particles of tritiated beryllium, tritiated graphite, titanium tritide, tritiated iron hydroxide and zirconium tritide. For the five materials examined, the absorbed fraction in alveolar tissue ranged from 0.31 to 0.61 for particles of 1 microm physical diameter and 0.07 to 0.21 for 5 microm diameter particles. The dose to alveolar tissue, for an acute inhalation of tritiated particles by an adult male worker, was calculated based on the ICRP 66 lung model and the particle dissolution model of Mercer (1967). For particles of 5 microm activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD), the committed equivalent dose to alveolar tissue, calculated for the five materials, ranged from 32-42%, respectively, of the committed equivalent dose derived assuming the absorbed fractions were unity. PMID:11513464

  4. Patient radiation doses for electron beam CT.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Isabel A; Dance, David R; Skinner, Claire L; Evans, Phil M

    2005-08-01

    A Monte Carlo based computer model has been developed for electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) to calculate organ and effective doses in a humanoid hermaphrodite phantom. The program has been validated by comparison with experimental measurements of the CT dose index in standard head and body CT dose phantoms; agreement to better than 8% has been found. The robustness of the model has been established by varying the input parameters. The amount of energy deposited at the 12:00 position of the standard body CT dose phantom is most susceptible to rotation angle, whereas that in the central region is strongly influenced by the beam quality. The program has been used to investigate the changes in organ absorbed doses arising from partial and full rotation about supine and prone subjects. Superficial organs experience the largest changes in absorbed dose with a change in subject orientation and for partial rotation. Effective doses for typical clinical scan protocols have been calculated and compared with values obtained using existing dosimetry techniques based on full rotation. Calculations which make use of Monte Carlo conversion factors for the scanner that best matches the EBCT dosimetric characteristics consistently overestimate the effective dose in supine subjects by typically 20%, and underestimate the effective dose in prone subjects by typically 13%. These factors can therefore be used to correct values obtained in this way. Empirical dosimetric techniques based on the dose-length product yield errors as great as 77%. This is due to the sensitivity of the dose length product to individual scan lengths. The magnitude of these errors is reduced if empirical dosimetric techniques based on the average absorbed dose in the irradiated volume (CTDIvol) are used. Therefore conversion factors specific to EBCT have been calculated to convert the CTDIvol to an effective dose. PMID:16193782

  5. Patient radiation doses for electron beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, Isabel A.; Dance, David R.; Skinner, Claire L.; Evans, Phil M.

    2005-08-15

    A Monte Carlo based computer model has been developed for electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) to calculate organ and effective doses in a humanoid hermaphrodite phantom. The program has been validated by comparison with experimental measurements of the CT dose index in standard head and body CT dose phantoms; agreement to better than 8% has been found. The robustness of the model has been established by varying the input parameters. The amount of energy deposited at the 12:00 position of the standard body CT dose phantom is most susceptible to rotation angle, whereas that in the central region is strongly influenced by the beam quality. The program has been used to investigate the changes in organ absorbed doses arising from partial and full rotation about supine and prone subjects. Superficial organs experience the largest changes in absorbed dose with a change in subject orientation and for partial rotation. Effective doses for typical clinical scan protocols have been calculated and compared with values obtained using existing dosimetry techniques based on full rotation. Calculations which make use of Monte Carlo conversion factors for the scanner that best matches the EBCT dosimetric characteristics consistently overestimate the effective dose in supine subjects by typically 20%, and underestimate the effective dose in prone subjects by typically 13%. These factors can therefore be used to correct values obtained in this way. Empirical dosimetric techniques based on the dose-length product yield errors as great as 77%. This is due to the sensitivity of the dose length product to individual scan lengths. The magnitude of these errors is reduced if empirical dosimetric techniques based on the average absorbed dose in the irradiated volume (CTDI{sub vol}) are used. Therefore conversion factors specific to EBCT have been calculated to convert the CTDI{sub vol} to an effective dose.

  6. Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

  7. [The shape of the absorbed dosage in neutron irradiation of a water phantom].

    PubMed

    Kapchigashev, S P; Chernichenko, I M; Kuznetsov, M V; Obaturov, G M; Baranov, O V; Korobeĭnikov, V V

    1990-02-01

    The paper is concerned with the results of experimental and estimated investigations into the spatial distribution of an absorbed dose and the spectrum of neutrons during irradiation of a water phantom by a P-3 beam of a BP-10 reactor. The ratio of densely ionizing and rarely ionizing components of an absorbed dose as well as the ratios between neutrons of different energetic groups were shown to undergo considerable changes with the penetration of reactor neutrons into the depth of a tissue-equivalent medium. The obtained results serve as basic data in various biomedical investigations using reactor neutron beams, including the planning of their use in cancer therapy.

  8. Assessment of individual organ doses in a realistic human phantom from neutron and gamma stimulated spectroscopy of the breast and liver

    PubMed Central

    Belley, Matthew D.; Segars, William Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the radiation dose to a patient is essential when considering the use of an ionizing diagnostic imaging test for clinical diagnosis and screening. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors estimated the three-dimensional organ-dose distribution from neutron and gamma irradiation of the male liver, female liver, and female breasts for neutron- and gamma-stimulated spectroscopic imaging. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were developed using the Geant4 GATE application and a voxelized XCAT human phantom. A male and a female whole body XCAT phantom was voxelized into 256 × 256 × 600 voxels (3.125 × 3.125 × 3.125 mm3). A monoenergetic rectangular beam of 5.0 MeV neutrons or 7.0 MeV photons was made incident on a 2 cm thick slice of the phantom. The beam was rotated at eight different angles around the phantom ranging from 0° to 180°. Absorbed dose was calculated for each individual organ in the body and dose volume histograms were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each organ. Results: The neutron irradiations of the liver showed the highest organ dose absorption in the liver, with appreciably lower doses in other proximal organs. The dose distribution within the irradiated slice exhibited substantial attenuation with increasing depth along the beam path, attenuating to ∼15% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. The gamma irradiation of the liver imparted the highest organ dose to the stomach wall. The dose distribution from the gammas showed a region of dose buildup at the beam entrance, followed by a relatively uniform dose distribution to all of the deep tissue structures, attenuating to ∼75% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. For the breast scans, both the neutron and gamma irradiation registered maximum organ doses in the breasts, with all other organs receiving less than 1% of the breast dose. Effective doses ranged from 0.22 to 0.37 mSv for the neutron scans and 41 to 66 mSv for the gamma scans

  9. Assessment of individual organ doses in a realistic human phantom from neutron and gamma stimulated spectroscopy of the breast and liver

    SciTech Connect

    Belley, Matthew D.; Segars, William Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Understanding the radiation dose to a patient is essential when considering the use of an ionizing diagnostic imaging test for clinical diagnosis and screening. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors estimated the three-dimensional organ-dose distribution from neutron and gamma irradiation of the male liver, female liver, and female breasts for neutron- and gamma-stimulated spectroscopic imaging. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were developed using the Geant4 GATE application and a voxelized XCAT human phantom. A male and a female whole body XCAT phantom was voxelized into 256 × 256 × 600 voxels (3.125 × 3.125 × 3.125 mm{sup 3}). A monoenergetic rectangular beam of 5.0 MeV neutrons or 7.0 MeV photons was made incident on a 2 cm thick slice of the phantom. The beam was rotated at eight different angles around the phantom ranging from 0° to 180°. Absorbed dose was calculated for each individual organ in the body and dose volume histograms were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each organ. Results: The neutron irradiations of the liver showed the highest organ dose absorption in the liver, with appreciably lower doses in other proximal organs. The dose distribution within the irradiated slice exhibited substantial attenuation with increasing depth along the beam path, attenuating to ∼15% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. The gamma irradiation of the liver imparted the highest organ dose to the stomach wall. The dose distribution from the gammas showed a region of dose buildup at the beam entrance, followed by a relatively uniform dose distribution to all of the deep tissue structures, attenuating to ∼75% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. For the breast scans, both the neutron and gamma irradiation registered maximum organ doses in the breasts, with all other organs receiving less than 1% of the breast dose. Effective doses ranged from 0.22 to 0.37 mSv for the neutron scans and 41 to 66 mSv for the gamma

  10. The solar physics shuttle/Spacelab program and its relationship to studies of the flare build-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neupert, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    The definition of the NASA program to support astronomical observations from shuttle/Spacelab is discussed. Steps are described which were taken to insure that instruments to be used in specific scientific efforts such as a flare build-up study have flight opportunities.

  11. TPX/TFTR Neutral Beam energy absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlgren, F.; Wright, K.; Kamperschroer, J.; Grisham, L.; Lontai, L.; Peters, C.; VonHalle, A.

    1993-11-01

    The present beam energy absorbing surfaces on the TFTR Neutral Beams such as Ion Dumps, Calorimeters, beam defining apertures, and scrapers, are simple water cooled copper plates which wee designed to absorb (via their thermal inertia) the incident beam power for two seconds with a five minute coal down interval between pulses. These components are not capable of absorbing the anticipated beam power loading for 1000 second TPX pulses and will have to be replaced with an actively cooled design. While several actively cooled energy absorbing designs were considered,, the hypervapotron elements currently being used on the JET beamlines were chosen due to their lower cooling water demands and reliable performance on JET.

  12. Absorbent product and articles made therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawn, F. S.; Correale, J. V. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A multilayer absorbent product for use in contact with the skin to absorb fluids is described. The product has a water pervious facing layer for contacting the skin, and a first fibrous wicking layer overlaying the water pervious layer. A first container section is defined by inner and outer layers of a water pervious wicking material in between a first absorbent mass and a second container section defined by inner and outer layers of a water pervious wicking material between what is disposed a second absorbent mass, and a liquid impermeable/gas permeable layer overlaying the second fibrous wicking layer.

  13. Advanced Reflector and Absorber Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of advanced reflector and absorber materials: evaluating performance, determining degradation rates and lifetime, and developing new coatings.

  14. LINKING DERMAL MODELING AND LOADING DATA TO PREDICT LONG-TERM DOSES FROM INTERMITTENT DERMAL CONTACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we assess dermal exposure and dose resulting from intermittent contact with residue-contaminated surfaces. These estimates require an understanding of (1) the quantitative relationship between exposure and absorbed dose; (2) the impact of intermittent exposure on ...

  15. Bayesian estimation of dose thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groer, P. G.; Carnes, B. A.

    2003-01-01

    An example is described of Bayesian estimation of radiation absorbed dose thresholds (subsequently simply referred to as dose thresholds) using a specific parametric model applied to a data set on mice exposed to 60Co gamma rays and fission neutrons. A Weibull based relative risk model with a dose threshold parameter was used to analyse, as an example, lung cancer mortality and determine the posterior density for the threshold dose after single exposures to 60Co gamma rays or fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory. The data consisted of survival, censoring times and cause of death information for male B6CF1 unexposed and exposed mice. The 60Co gamma whole-body doses for the two exposed groups were 0.86 and 1.37 Gy. The neutron whole-body doses were 0.19 and 0.38 Gy. Marginal posterior densities for the dose thresholds for neutron and gamma radiation were calculated with numerical integration and found to have quite different shapes. The density of the threshold for 60Co is unimodal with a mode at about 0.50 Gy. The threshold density for fission neutrons declines monotonically from a maximum value at zero with increasing doses. The posterior densities for all other parameters were similar for the two radiation types.

  16. Cenozoic topographic build-up of the Iranien plateau: first constraints from low-temperature thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Thomas; Agard, Philippe; Meyer, Bertrand; Zarrinkoub, Mohammad; Chung, Sun-Lin; Bernet, Matthias; Burov, Evgueni

    2013-04-01

    The Iranian plateau is a smooth topographic high at the rear of the Zagros mountains, with average elevation of c. 1.5 km. Its formation is thought to result from the collision between the Arabian and Eurasian plates since ~35 Myrs, following a long-standing subduction, and represents an interesting analogue to the so far better documented Tibetan plateau. Yet, while the Zagros orogeny was reappraised by numerous authors over the past few years, the topographic build-up of both the Zagros and the Iranian plateau remains ill-constrained. We herein present (U-Th)/He and fission track (FT) thermochronology results to reconstruct the Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Iranien plateau and quantify the age and amount of vertical movements. Apatite and zircon single grain cooling age data were collected on plutonic rocks (for which crystallization ages were already available: Chiu et al., 2010) from the internal domains of Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ), Urumieh-Doktar magmatic arc (UDMA), Central Iran and, for comparison, Kopet Dagh. We stress that an important milestone for topographic build-up is the presence of the marine Qom formation (coeval with the external Asmari formation) in the UDMA and part of the SSZ, indicating that the plateau was at or near sea level at 20 Ma. Temperature time paths inferred from low temperature thermochronology suggest a spatial and temporal separation of exhumation processes. The results show that the SSZ was exhumed very early in the collision process (essentially before 20 Ma), with a likely acceleration around the Oligocene (i.e., at the onset of continental collision) from 0.05 to 0.3 mm/yr. Post-collision cooling along the UDMA is marked by an average, constant exhumation rate of 0.3-0.4 mm/yr, which suggests that no significant increase or decrease of erosion occurred since continental collision. In Central Iran, the overlap (within error) of ZrFT, AFT and AHe ages from gneissic samples points to their rapid cooling during the upper

  17. Device for absorbing mechanical shock

    DOEpatents

    Newlon, Charles E.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

  18. Device for absorbing mechanical shock

    DOEpatents

    Newlon, C.E.

    1979-08-29

    This invention is a comparatively inexpensive but efficient shock-absorbing device having special application to the protection of shipping and storage cylinders. In a typical application, two of the devices are strapped to a cylinder to serve as saddle-type supports for the cylinder during storage and to protect the cylinder in the event it is dropped during lifting or lowering operations. In its preferred form, the invention includes a hardwood plank whose grain runs in the longitudinal direction. The basal portion of the plank is of solid cross-section, whereas the upper face of the plank is cut away to form a concave surface fittable against the sidewall of a storage cylinder. The concave surface is divided into a series of segments by transversely extending, throughgoing relief slots. A layer of elastomeric material is positioned on the concave face, the elastomer being extrudable into slots when pressed against the segments by a preselected pressure characteristic of a high-energy impact. The compressive, tensile, and shear properties of the hardwood and the elastomer are utilized in combination to provide a surprisingly high energy-absorption capability.

  19. Radon Exposure and the Definition of Low Doses-The Problem of Spatial Dose Distribution.

    PubMed

    Madas, Balázs G

    2016-07-01

    Investigating the health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation is considered to be one of the most important fields in radiological protection research. Although the definition of low dose given by a dose range seems to be clear, it leaves some open questions. For example, the time frame and the target volume in which absorbed dose is measured have to be defined. While dose rate is considered in the current system of radiological protection, the same cancer risk is associated with all exposures, resulting in a given amount of energy absorbed by a single target cell or distributed among all the target cells of a given organ. However, the biological effects and so the health consequences of these extreme exposure scenarios are unlikely to be the same. Due to the heterogeneous deposition of radon progeny within the lungs, heterogeneous radiation exposure becomes a practical issue in radiological protection. While the macroscopic dose is still within the low dose range, local tissue doses on the order of Grays can be reached in the most exposed parts of the bronchial airways. It can be concluded that progress in low dose research needs not only low dose but also high dose experiments where small parts of a biological sample receive doses on the order of Grays, while the average dose over the whole sample remains low. A narrow interpretation of low dose research might exclude investigations with high relevance to radiological protection. Therefore, studies important to radiological protection should be performed in the frame of low dose research even if the applied doses do not fit in the dose range used for the definition of low doses. PMID:27218294

  20. Radon Exposure and the Definition of Low Doses-The Problem of Spatial Dose Distribution.

    PubMed

    Madas, Balázs G

    2016-07-01

    Investigating the health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation is considered to be one of the most important fields in radiological protection research. Although the definition of low dose given by a dose range seems to be clear, it leaves some open questions. For example, the time frame and the target volume in which absorbed dose is measured have to be defined. While dose rate is considered in the current system of radiological protection, the same cancer risk is associated with all exposures, resulting in a given amount of energy absorbed by a single target cell or distributed among all the target cells of a given organ. However, the biological effects and so the health consequences of these extreme exposure scenarios are unlikely to be the same. Due to the heterogeneous deposition of radon progeny within the lungs, heterogeneous radiation exposure becomes a practical issue in radiological protection. While the macroscopic dose is still within the low dose range, local tissue doses on the order of Grays can be reached in the most exposed parts of the bronchial airways. It can be concluded that progress in low dose research needs not only low dose but also high dose experiments where small parts of a biological sample receive doses on the order of Grays, while the average dose over the whole sample remains low. A narrow interpretation of low dose research might exclude investigations with high relevance to radiological protection. Therefore, studies important to radiological protection should be performed in the frame of low dose research even if the applied doses do not fit in the dose range used for the definition of low doses.