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Sample records for absorbed laser energy

  1. Apollo couch energy absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, C. J.; Drexel, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Load attenuators for the Apollo spacecraft crew couch and its potential applications are described. Energy absorption is achieved through friction and cyclic deformation of material. In one concept, energy absorption is accomplished by rolling a compressed ring of metal between two surfaces. In another concept, energy is absorbed by forcing a plastically deformed washer along a rod. Among the design problems that had to be solved were material selection, fatigue life, ring slippage, lubrication, and friction loading.

  2. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  3. Energy absorber for the CETA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, Clarence J.

    1994-01-01

    The energy absorber that was developed for the CETA (Crew Equipment and Translation Aid) on Space Station Freedom is a metal on metal frictional type and has a load regulating feature that prevents excessive stroking loads from occurring while in operation. This paper highlights some of the design and operating aspects and the testing of this energy absorber.

  4. Laser diode structures with a saturable absorber for high-energy picosecond optical pulse generation by combined gain-and Q-switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryvkin, B. S.; Avrutin, E. A.; Kostamovaara, J. E. K.; Kostamovaara, J. T.

    2017-02-01

    The performance of gain-switched Fabry-Perot asymmetric-waveguide semiconductor lasers with a large equivalent spot size and an intracavity saturable absorber was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The laser with a short (˜20 μm) absorber emitted high-energy afterpulse-free optical pulses in a broad range of injection current pulse amplitudes; optical pulses with a peak power of about 35 W and a duration of about 80 ps at half maximum were achieved with a current pulse with an amplitude of just 8 A and a duration of 1.5 ns. Good quality pulsations were observed in a broad range of elevated temperatures. The introduction of a substantially longer absorber section leads to strong spectral broadening of the output without a significant improvement to pulse energy and peak power.

  5. Reconstructing the energy band electronic structure of pulsed laser deposited CZTS thin films intended for solar cell absorber applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandiyan, Rajesh; Oulad Elhmaidi, Zakaria; Sekkat, Zouheir; Abd-lefdil, Mohammed; El Khakani, My Ali

    2017-02-01

    We report here on the use of pulsed KrF-laser deposition (PLD) technique for the growth of high-quality Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films onto Si, and glass substrates without resorting to any post sulfurization process. The PLD-CZTS films were deposited at room temperature (RT) and then subjected to post annealing at different temperatures ranging from 200 to 500 °C in Argon atmosphere. The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the PLD films crystallize in the characteristic kesterite CZTS structure regardless of their annealing temperature (Ta), but their crystallinity is much improved for Ta ≥ 400 °C. The PLD-CZTS films were found to exhibit a relatively dense morphology with a surface roughness (RMS) that increases with Ta (from ∼14 nm at RT to 70 nm at Ta = 500 °C with a value around 40 nm for Ta = 300-400 °C). The optical bandgap of the PLD-CZTS films, was derived from UV-vis transmission spectra analysis, and found to decrease from 1.73 eV for non-annealed films to ∼1.58 eV for those annealed at Ta = 300 °C. These band gap values are very close to the optimum value needed for an ideal solar cell absorber. In order to achieve a complete reconstruction of the one-dimensional energy band structure of these PLD-CZTS absorbers, we have combined both XPS and UPS spectroscopies to determine their chemical bondings, the position of their valence band maximum (relative to Fermi level), and their work function values. This enabled us to sketch out, as accurately as possible, the band alignment of the heterojunction interface formed between CZTS and both CdS and ZnS buffer layer materials.

  6. Metal-shearing energy absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, R. J.; Wittrock, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Device, consisting of tongue of thin aluminum alloy strip, pull tab, slotted steel plate which serves as cutter, and steel buckle, absorbs mechanical energy when its ends are subjected to tensile loading. Device is applicable as auxiliary shock absorbing anchor for automobile and airplane safety belts.

  7. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Efficiency of ablative loading of material upon the fast-electron transfer of absorbed laser energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, Sergei Yu; Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Borodziuk, S.; Kalal, M.; Limpouch, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Krousky, E.; Masek, K.; Pfeifer, M.; Rohlena, K.; Skala, J.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2006-05-01

    We present the results of experiments on the short-term irradiation of a solid material by a laser beam. The data testify to a rise in efficiency of the energy transfer from the laser pulse to a shock wave due to the fast-electron energy transfer. The experiments were performed with massive aluminium targets on the PALS iodine laser, whose pulse duration (0.4 ns) was much shorter than the time of shock decay and crater formation in the target (50-200 ns). The irradiation experiments were carried out using the fundamental laser harmonic (1.315 μm) with an energy of 360 J. The greater part of the experiments were performed for the radiation intensity exceeding 1015 W cm-2, which corresponded to the efficient generation of fast electrons under the conditions where the relatively long-wavelength iodine-laser radiation was employed. The irradiation intensity was varied by varying the laser beam radius for a specified pulse energy.

  8. Energy Absorbing Protective Shroud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a dissipating protection energy system designed to receive and safely dissipate the kinetic energy from high energy fragments. The energy dissipation system dissipates energy transferred to it by the incremental and progressive rupturing at an approximately constant force of strategically placed sacrificial stitching applied to a number of high strength straps, such as an aromatic polyimide fiber of extremely high tensile strength. Thus, the energy dissipation system provides a lightweight device for controlling and dissipating the dangerous and destructive energy stored in high strength fragments released by catastrophic failures of machinery minimizing damage to other critical components.

  9. Energy-Absorbing, Lightweight Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waydo, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Improved energy-absorbing wheels are under development for use on special-purpose vehicles that must traverse rough terrain under conditions (e.g., extreme cold) in which rubber pneumatic tires would fail. The designs of these wheels differ from those of prior non-pneumatic energy-absorbing wheels in ways that result in lighter weights and more effective reduction of stresses generated by ground/wheel contact forces. These wheels could be made of metals and/or composite materials to withstand the expected extreme operating conditions. As shown in the figure, a wheel according to this concept would include an isogrid tire connected to a hub via spring rods. The isogrid tire would be a stiff, lightweight structure typically made of aluminum. The isogrid aspect of the structure would both impart stiffness and act as a traction surface. The hub would be a thin-walled body of revolution having a simple or compound conical or other shape chosen for structural efficiency. The spring rods would absorb energy and partially isolate the hub and the supported vehicle from impact loads. The general spring-rod configuration shown in the figure was chosen because it would distribute contact and impact loads nearly evenly around the periphery of the hub, thereby helping to protect the hub against damage that would otherwise be caused by large loads concentrated onto small portions of the hub.

  10. Large-energy, narrow-bandwidth laser pulse at 1645 nm in a diode-pumped Er:YAG solid-state laser passively Q-switched by a monolayer graphene saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rong; Tang, Pinghua; Chen, Yu; Chen, Shuqing; Zhao, Chujun; Zhang, Han; Wen, Shuangchun

    2014-01-10

    Nonlinear transmission parameters of monolayer graphene at 1645 nm were obtained. Based on the monolayer graphene saturable absorber, a 1532 nm LD pumped 1645 nm passively Q-switched Er:YAG laser was demonstrated. Under the pump power of 20.8 W, a 1645 nm Q-switched pulse with FWHM of 0.13 nm (without the use of etalon) and energy of 13.5 μJ per pulse can be obtained. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest pulse energy for graphene-based passively Q-switched Er:YAG laseroperating at 1645 nm, suggesting the potentials of graphene materials for high-energy solid-state laser applications.

  11. High-energy passively Q-switched operation of Yb:GdCa(4)O(BO(3))(3) laser with a GaAs semiconductor saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaowen; Wang, Lisha; Han, Wenjuan; Guo, Yunfeng; Xu, Honghao; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Liu, Junhai

    2015-11-16

    High-energy passively Q-switched operation of a Yb:GdCa(4)O(BO(3))(3) laser is demonstrated, with a GaAs crystal plate acting as saturable absorber. An average output power of 1.31 W at 1027 nm is produced at a pulse repetition rate of 1.92 kHz, the resulting pulse energy, duration, and peak power being respectively 0.68 mJ, 9.0 ns, and 75.6 kW. The shortest pulse duration obtained is 4.9 ns; whereas the maximum pulse energy achievable amounts to 0.83 mJ, which proves to be nearly one order of magnitude higher than ever generated from Yb or Nd lasers passively Q-switched by a GaAs saturable absorber.

  12. Energy absorber uses expanded coiled tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. F.

    1972-01-01

    Mechanical shock mitigating device, based on working material to its failure point, absorbs mechanical energy by bending or twisting tubing. It functions under axial or tangential loading, has no rebound, is area independent, and is easy and inexpensive to build.

  13. Analysis of Energy-Absorbing Foundations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-15

    1ENN51YVAN&A 5TATL UNIV UNIVERSITY PARK DEPT OF ENGI-CYTC F/S 13/h ANALYSIS OF ENERGY -ABSORBING POUNDATIONS.(U) ECC 78 V H NEUBERT, S Ji YIN DNA01-78...C-0036 UNCLASSIFIED DNA-48OFP NL "M~ENOMOEE MIflfl END ______ 1 32 112.2 MICROCOPY RILSOLUTION TEST CHIART LELL ,NA 480 MIL ANALYSIS OF ENERGY ...8217 REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Final Report for Period ANALYSIS OF ENERGY -ABSORBING FOUNDATIONS I Dee 77-1S Dee 78 6. PERFORMING ORG, REPORT NUMBER 7AUTHOR

  14. Parasitic oscillation suppression in solid state lasers using absorbing thin films

    DOEpatents

    Zapata, Luis E.

    1994-01-01

    A thin absorbing film is bonded onto at least certain surfaces of a solid state laser gain medium. An absorbing metal-dielectric multilayer film is optimized for a broad range of incidence angles, and is resistant to the corrosive/erosive effects of a coolant such as water, used in the forced convection cooling of the film. Parasitic oscillations hamper the operation of solid state lasers by causing the decay of stored energy to amplified rays trapped within the gain medium by total and partial internal reflections off the gain medium facets. Zigzag lasers intended for high average power operation require the ASE absorber.

  15. Parasitic oscillation suppression in solid state lasers using absorbing thin films

    DOEpatents

    Zapata, L.E.

    1994-08-02

    A thin absorbing film is bonded onto at least certain surfaces of a solid state laser gain medium. An absorbing metal-dielectric multilayer film is optimized for a broad range of incidence angles, and is resistant to the corrosive/erosive effects of a coolant such as water, used in the forced convection cooling of the film. Parasitic oscillations hamper the operation of solid state lasers by causing the decay of stored energy to amplified rays trapped within the gain medium by total and partial internal reflections off the gain medium facets. Zigzag lasers intended for high average power operation require the ASE absorber. 16 figs.

  16. Optical analysis of solar energy tubular absorbers.

    PubMed

    Saltiel, C; Sokolov, M

    1982-11-15

    The energy absorbed by a solar energy tubular receiver element for a single incident ray is derived. Two types of receiver elements were analyzed: (1) an inner tube with an absorbing coating surrounded by a semitransparent cover tube, and (2) a semitransparent inner tube filled with an absorbing fluid surrounded by a semitransparent cover tube. The formation of ray cascades in the semitransparent tubes is considered. A numerical simulation to investigate the influence of the angle of incidence, sizing, thickness, and coefficient of extinction of the tubes was performed. A comparison was made between receiver elements with and without cover tubes. Ray tracing analyses in which rays were followed within the tubular receiver element as well as throughout the rest of the collector were performed for parabolic and circular trough concentrating collectors.

  17. Tech Transfer Webinar: Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Duoss, Eric

    2016-07-12

    A new material has been designed and manufactured at LLNL that can absorb mechanical energy--a cushion--while also providing protection against sheering. This ordered cellular material is 3D printed using direct ink writing techniques under development at LLNL. It is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  18. Lightweight Energy Absorbers for Blast Containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balles, Donald L.; Ingram, Thomas M.; Novak, Howard L.; Schricker, Albert F.

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic-energy-absorbing liners made of aluminum foam have been developed to replace solid lead liners in blast containers on the aft skirt of the solid rocket booster of the space shuttle. The blast containers are used to safely trap the debris from small explosions that are initiated at liftoff to sever frangible nuts on hold-down studs that secure the spacecraft to a mobile launch platform until liftoff.

  19. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Duoss, Eric

    2016-07-12

    Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  20. Tech Transfer Webinar: Energy Absorbing Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-06-17

    A new material has been designed and manufactured at LLNL that can absorb mechanical energy--a cushion--while also providing protection against sheering. This ordered cellular material is 3D printed using direct ink writing techniques under development at LLNL. It is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  1. Design and Manufacture of Energy Absorbing Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-05-28

    Learn about an ordered cellular material that has been designed and manufactured using direct ink writing (DIW), a 3-D printing technology being developed at LLNL. The new material is a patterned cellular material that can absorb mechanical energy-a cushion-while also providing protection against sheering. This material is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  2. Load limiting energy absorbing lightweight debris catcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor); Schneider, William C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    In the representative embodiment of the invention disclosed, a load limiting, energy absorbing net is arranged to overlay a normally-covered vent opening in the rear bulkhead of the space orbiter vehicle. Spatially-disposed flexible retainer straps are extended from the net and respectively secured to bulkhead brackets spaced around the vent opening. The intermediate portions of the straps are doubled over and stitched together in a pattern enabling the doubled-over portions to progressively separate at a predicable load designed to be well below the tensile capability of the straps as the stitches are successively torn apart by the forces imposed on the retainer members whenever the cover plate is explosively separated from the bulkhead and propelled into the net. By arranging these stitches to be successively torn away at a load below the strap strength in response to forces acting on the retainers that are less than the combined strength of the retainers, this tearing action serves as a predictable compact energy absorber for safely halting the cover plate as the retainers are extended as the net is deployed. The invention further includes a block of an energy-absorbing material positioned in the net for receiving loose debris produced by the explosive release of the cover plate.

  3. Energy harvesting from an autoparametric vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhimiao; Hajj, Muhammad R.

    2015-11-01

    The combined control and energy harvesting characteristics of an autoparametric vibration absorber consisting of a base structure subjected to the external force and a cantilever beam with a tip mass are investigated. The piezoelectric sheets are attached to the cantilever beam to convert the vibrations of the base structure into electrical energy. The coupled nonlinear representative model is developed by using the extended Hamiton’s principle. The effects of the electrical load resistance on the frequency and damping ratio of the cantilever beam are analyzed. The impacts of the external force and load resistance on the structural displacements of the base structure and the beam and on the level of harvested energy are determined. The results show that the initial conditions have a significant impact on the system’s response. The relatively high level of energy harvesting is not necessarily accompanied with the minimum displacements of the base structure.

  4. Dual-wavelength passively Q-switched Nd:GYSGG laser by tungsten disulfide saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Gao, Y J; Zhang, B Y; Song, Q; Wang, G J; Wang, W J; Hong, M H; Dou, R Q; Sun, D L; Zhang, Q L

    2016-06-20

    A dual-wavelength passively Q-switched Nd:GYSGG laser using vacuum evaporating tungsten disulfide (WS2) as a saturable absorber was demonstrated for the first time to the best of our knowledge. The WS2 saturable absorber was prepared simply by evaporating nanometer WS2 powders onto a quartz substrate in a vacuum. By inserting the WS2 saturable absorber into the laser cavity, stable Q-switched laser operation was achieved with a maximum average output power of 367 mW, a pulse repetition rate of 70.7 kHz, the shortest pulse width of 591 ns, and pulse energy of about 1.05 μJ. By vacuum evaporation method, a high-quality WS2 saturable absorber can be produced, and it seems to be a suitable method for fabrication of 2D transition metal dichalcogenides.

  5. Intensity and absorbed-power distribution in a cylindrical solar-pumped dye laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    The internal intensity and absorbed-power distribution of a simplified hypothetical dye laser of cylindrical geometry is calculated. Total absorbed power is also calculated and compared with laboratory measurements of lasing-threshold energy deposition in a dye cell to determine the suitability of solar radiation as a pump source or, alternatively, what modifications, if any, are necessary to the hypothetical system for solar pumping.

  6. An Energy Absorber for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Bob; Laurence, Lora

    2000-01-01

    The energy absorber described herein is similar in size and shape to an automotive shock absorber, requiring a constant, high load to compress over the stroke, and self-resetting with a small load. The differences in these loads over the stroke represent the energy absorbed by the device, which is dissipated as friction. This paper describes the evolution of the energy absorber, presents the results of testing performed, and shows the sensitivity of this device to several key design variables.

  7. Conversion of laser energy to gas kinetic energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques for the gas-phase absorption of laser energy with ultimate conversion to heat or directed kinetic energy are reviewed. It is shown that the efficiency of resonance absorption by the vibration/rotation bands of the working gas can be enhanced by operating at sufficiently high pressures so that the linewidths of the absorbing transition exceed the line spacing. Within this limit, the gas can absorb continuously over the full spectral region of the band, and bleaching can be minimized since the manifold of molecular vibrational levels can simultaneously absorb the laser radiation.

  8. Wave energy extraction by coupled resonant absorbers.

    PubMed

    Evans, D V; Porter, R

    2012-01-28

    In this article, a range of problems and theories will be introduced that will build towards a new wave energy converter (WEC) concept, with the acronym 'ROTA' standing for resonant over-topping absorber. First, classical results for wave power absorption for WECs constrained to operate in a single degree of freedom will be reviewed and the role of resonance in their operation highlighted. Emphasis will then be placed on how the introduction of further resonances can improve power take-off characteristics by extending the range of frequencies over which the efficiency is close to a theoretical maximum. Methods for doing this in different types of WECs will be demonstrated. Coupled resonant absorbers achieve this by connecting a WEC device equipped with its own resonance (determined from a hydrodynamic analysis) to a new system having separate mass/spring/damper characteristics. It is shown that a coupled resonant effect can be realized by inserting a water tank into a WEC, and this idea forms the basis of the ROTA device. In essence, the idea is to exploit the coupling between the natural sloshing frequencies of the water in the internal tank and the natural resonance of a submerged buoyant circular cylinder device that is tethered to the sea floor, allowing a rotary motion about its axis of attachment.

  9. Graphene-clad microfibre saturable absorber for ultrafast fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. M.; Yang, H. R.; Cui, Y. D.; Chen, G. W.; Yang, Y.; Wu, X. Q.; Yao, X. K.; Han, D. D.; Han, X. X.; Zeng, C.; Guo, J.; Li, W. L.; Cheng, G.; Tong, L. M.

    2016-05-01

    Graphene, whose absorbance is approximately independent of wavelength, allows broadband light-matter interactions with ultrafast responses. The interband optical absorption of graphene can be saturated readily under strong excitation, thereby enabling scientists to exploit the photonic properties of graphene to realize ultrafast lasers. The evanescent field interaction scheme of the propagating light with graphene covered on a D-shaped fibre or microfibre has been employed extensively because of the nonblocking configuration. Obviously, most of the fibre surface is unused in these techniques. Here, we exploit a graphene-clad microfibre (GCM) saturable absorber in a mode-locked fibre laser for the generation of ultrafast pulses. The proposed all-surface technique can guarantee a higher efficiency of light-graphene interactions than the aforementioned techniques. Our GCM-based saturable absorber can generate ultrafast optical pulses within 1.5 μm. This saturable absorber is compatible with current fibre lasers and has many merits such as low saturation intensities, ultrafast recovery times, and wide wavelength ranges. The proposed saturable absorber will pave the way for graphene-based wideband photonics.

  10. Graphene-clad microfibre saturable absorber for ultrafast fibre lasers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X. M.; Yang, H. R.; Cui, Y. D.; Chen, G. W.; Yang, Y.; Wu, X. Q.; Yao, X. K.; Han, D. D.; Han, X. X.; Zeng, C.; Guo, J.; Li, W. L.; Cheng, G.; Tong, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene, whose absorbance is approximately independent of wavelength, allows broadband light–matter interactions with ultrafast responses. The interband optical absorption of graphene can be saturated readily under strong excitation, thereby enabling scientists to exploit the photonic properties of graphene to realize ultrafast lasers. The evanescent field interaction scheme of the propagating light with graphene covered on a D-shaped fibre or microfibre has been employed extensively because of the nonblocking configuration. Obviously, most of the fibre surface is unused in these techniques. Here, we exploit a graphene-clad microfibre (GCM) saturable absorber in a mode-locked fibre laser for the generation of ultrafast pulses. The proposed all-surface technique can guarantee a higher efficiency of light–graphene interactions than the aforementioned techniques. Our GCM-based saturable absorber can generate ultrafast optical pulses within 1.5 μm. This saturable absorber is compatible with current fibre lasers and has many merits such as low saturation intensities, ultrafast recovery times, and wide wavelength ranges. The proposed saturable absorber will pave the way for graphene-based wideband photonics. PMID:27181419

  11. Passively Q-switched Nd:GdTaO4 laser by graphene oxide saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bingyuan; Song, Qi; Wang, Guoju; Gao, Yajing; Zhang, Qingli; Wang, Minghong; Wang, Wenjun

    2016-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a laser diode-pumped Q-switched Nd:GdTaO4 crystal laser at 1066 nm using a multilayer graphene oxide as the saturable absorber (GOSA). The GOSA is fabricated by transferring the liquid-phase-exfoliated GO nanosheets onto a K9 glass substrate. When the GOSA was inserted into the plano-plano laser cavity, a stable Q-switched laser operation is achieved with a maximum average output power of 0.382 W and repetition rate of 362 kHz. The shortest pulse duration is 194 ns and the single pulse energy is about 1.05 μJ.

  12. Absorber for wakefield interference management at the entrance of the wiggler of a free electron laser

    DOEpatents

    Marchlik, Matthew; Biallas, George Herman

    2017-03-07

    A method for managing the broad band microwave and TeraHertz (THz) radiation in a free electron laser (FEL) having a wiggler producing power in the electromagnetic spectrum. The method includes placement of broadband microwave and TeraHertz (THz) radiation absorbers on the upstream end of the wiggler. The absorbers dampen the bounced back, broad band microwave and THz radiation returning from the surfaces outside the nose of the cookie-cutter and thus preventing broadening of the electron beam pulse's narrow longitudinal energy distribution. Broadening diminishes the ultimate laser power from the wiggler. The broadband microwave and THz radiation absorbers are placed on either side of the slot in the cookie-cutter that shapes the wake field wave of the electron pulse to the slot shape of the wiggler chamber aperture. The broad band microwave and THz radiation absorber is preferably a non-porous pyrolytic grade of graphite with small grain size.

  13. Black phosphorus based saturable absorber for Nd-ion doped pulsed solid state laser operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.; Zhang, F.; Wang, M.; Wang, L.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, Z.; Xu, X.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the use of black phosphorus (BP) as a saturable absorber in a Q-switched Nd-ion doped solid state laser is presented. Few layers of BP in isopropyl alcohol are obtained by liquid phase exfoliation. The BP nanosheets with thicknesses in the range of 15-20 nm are deposited onto a K9 glass substrate. By inserting the BP nanosheets into a diode pumped Nd-ion doped solid state laser, stable Q-switched lasing at 0.9, 1.06, 1.3 μm is obtained. Using this approach, we have achieved a short pulse duration down to 219 ns, a high pulse energy of up to 6.5 μJ, and the corresponding peak power of 30 W. Our results show that the BP saturable absorber functions well in a Nd-ion doped solid state laser for pulsed laser generation.

  14. Black phosphorus based saturable absorber for Nd-ion doped pulsed solid state laser operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.; Zhang, F.; Wang, M.; Wang, L.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, Z.; Xu, X.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the use of black phosphorus (BP) as a saturable absorber in a Q-switched Nd-ion doped solid state laser is presented. Few layers of BP in isopropyl alcohol are obtained by liquid phase exfoliation. The BP nanosheets with thicknesses in the range of 15-20 nm are deposited onto a K9 glass substrate. By inserting the BP nanosheets into a diode pumped Nd-ion doped solid state laser, stable Q-switched lasing at 0.9, 1.06, 1.3 μm is obtained. Using this approach, we have achieved a short pulse duration down to 219 ns, a high pulse energy of up to 6.5 μJ, and the corresponding peak power of 30 W. Our results show that the BP saturable absorber functions well in a Nd-ion doped solid state laser for pulsed laser generation.

  15. Study of laser energy standard and establishment of calibration device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ming; Gao, Jianqiang; Xia, Junwen; Yin, Dejin; Li, Tiecheng; Zhang, Dong

    2016-10-01

    This paper studied the standard laser energy meter. A self calibration of the thermoelectric type standard laser energy meter is developed, which is provided with a suitable electric heater. It can be used to simulate and replace the equivalent thermal effect, and to realize the absolute measurement of the laser energy. Because the standard laser energy meter can bulk absorb laser radiation, it can bear higher laser energy density. The material absorption spectrum of the standard laser energy meter is relatively flat from the ultraviolet to the infrared, so it can be used for the measurement of laser energy at any wavelength. In addition, an electric calibration instrument is developed. The electric calibration instrument can be directly displayed or synchronous display by the digital frequency meter. The laser energy calibration device is composed of standard laser energy meter, pulsed laser source, monitoring system, digital multi meter and complete set of electric calibration system. Laser energy calibration device uses split beam detection method. The laser is divided into two beams by means of a wedge shaped optical beam splitter. A laser energy meter is used to monitor the change of the reflected light to reduce the influence of the output laser energy stability of the pulsed laser source, thereby improving the uncertainty of the calibration result. The sensitivity, correction factor and indication error of the laser energy meter can be calibrated by using the standard laser energy meter and the under calibrated laser energy meter to measure the transmission laser beam.

  16. Transition metal dichalcogenides based saturable absorbers for pulsed laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanraj, J.; Velmurugan, V.; Sivabalan, S.

    2016-10-01

    Ultrashort pulsed laser is an indispensable tool for the evolution of photonic technology in the present and future. This laser has been progressing tremendously with new pulse regimes and incorporating novel devices inside its cavity. Recently, a nanomaterial based saturable absorber (SA) was used in ultrafast laser that has improved the lasing performance and caused a reduction in the physical dimension when compared to conventional SAs. To date, the nanomaterials that are exploited for the development of SA devices are carbon nanotubes, graphene, topological insulators, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) and black phosphorous. These materials have unique advantages such as high nonlinear optical response, fiber compatibility and ease of fabrication. In these, TMDs are prominent and an emerging two-dimensional nanomaterial for photonics and optoelectronics applications. Therefore, we review the reports of Q-switched and mode-locked pulsed lasers using TMDs (specifically MoS2, MoSe2, WS2 and WSe2) based SAs.

  17. High Power Q-Switched Thulium Doped Fibre Laser using Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite Saturable Absorber.

    PubMed

    Chernysheva, Maria; Mou, Chengbo; Arif, Raz; AlAraimi, Mohammed; Rümmeli, Mark; Turitsyn, Sergei; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2016-04-11

    We have proposed and demonstrated a Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser (TDFL) with a 'Yin-Yang' all-fibre cavity scheme based on a combination of nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) and nonlinear amplified loop mirror (NALM). Unidirectional lasing operation has been achieved without any intracavity isolator. By using a carbon nanotube polymer composite based saturable absorber (SA), we demonstrated the laser output power of ~197 mW and pulse energy of 1.7 μJ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output power from a nanotube polymer composite SA based Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser.

  18. Hybrid mode-locking in pulsed ytterbium fiber laser with carbon nanotube saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudyakov, Dmitry V.; Borodkin, Andrey A.; Lobach, Anatoly S.; Vartapetov, Sergey K.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrafast pulse generation in all-normal dispersion Yb-doped fiber laser on 1.04 μm have been reported. Stable self-starting pulse generation in output of the ring fiber laser have been investigated where nonlinear polarization rotation interacted with contribution from the single walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber. Laser pulses with 0.7 nJ pulse energy and 1.7 ps pulse width at 35.6 MHz repetition rate were achieved. The output pulse could be externally compressed to width of 180 fs by pair of gratings.

  19. High Power Q-Switched Thulium Doped Fibre Laser using Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite Saturable Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Chernysheva, Maria; Mou, Chengbo; Arif, Raz; AlAraimi, Mohammed; Rümmeli, Mark; Turitsyn, Sergei; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser (TDFL) with a ‘Yin-Yang’ all-fibre cavity scheme based on a combination of nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) and nonlinear amplified loop mirror (NALM). Unidirectional lasing operation has been achieved without any intracavity isolator. By using a carbon nanotube polymer composite based saturable absorber (SA), we demonstrated the laser output power of ~197 mW and pulse energy of 1.7 μJ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output power from a nanotube polymer composite SA based Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser. PMID:27063511

  20. High Power Q-Switched Thulium Doped Fibre Laser using Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite Saturable Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysheva, Maria; Mou, Chengbo; Arif, Raz; Alaraimi, Mohammed; Rümmeli, Mark; Turitsyn, Sergei; Rozhin, Aleksey

    2016-04-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser (TDFL) with a ‘Yin-Yang’ all-fibre cavity scheme based on a combination of nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) and nonlinear amplified loop mirror (NALM). Unidirectional lasing operation has been achieved without any intracavity isolator. By using a carbon nanotube polymer composite based saturable absorber (SA), we demonstrated the laser output power of ~197 mW and pulse energy of 1.7 μJ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output power from a nanotube polymer composite SA based Q-switched Thulium doped fibre laser.

  1. Energy conversion in laser propulsion: III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Carl W.; Mead, Franklin B., Jr.; Kalliomaa, Wayne M.

    2002-09-01

    Conversion of pulses of CO2 laser energy (18 microsecond pulses) to propellant kinetic energy was studied in a Myrabo Laser Lightcraft (MLL) operating with laser heated STP air and laser ablated delrin propellants. The MLL incorporates an inverted parabolic reflector that focuses laser energy into a toroidal volume where it is absorbed by a unit of propellant mass that subsequently expands in the geometry of the plug nozzle aerospike. With Delrin propellant, measurements of the coupling coefficients and the ablated mass as a function of laser pulse energy showed that the efficiency of conversion of laser energy to propellant kinetic energy was approximately 54%. With STP air, direct experimental measurement efficiency was not possible because the propellant mass associated with measured coupling coefficients was not known. Thermodynamics predicted that the upper limit of the efficiency of conversion of the internal energy of laser heated air to jet kinetic energy, (alpha) , is approximately 0.30 for EQUILIBRIUM expansion to 1 bar pressure. For FROZEN expansion (alpha) approximately 0.27. These upper limit efficiencies are nearly independent of the initial specific energy from 1 to 110 MJ/kg. With heating of air at its Mach 5 stagnation density (5.9 kg/m3 as compared to STP air density of 1.18 kg/m3) these efficiencies increase to about 0.55 (equilibrium) and 0.45 (frozen). Optimum blowdown from 1.18 kg/m3 to 1 bar occurs with expansion ratios approximately 1.5 to 4 as internal energy increases from 1 to 100 MJ/kg. Optimum expansion from the higher density state requires larger expansion ratios, 8 to 32. Expansion of laser ablated Delrin propellant appears to convert the absorbed laser energy more efficiently to jet kinetic energy because the effective density of the ablated gaseous Delrin is significantly greater than that of STP air.

  2. Energy conversion in laser propulsion III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, C. William; Mead, Franklin B.; Kalliomaa, Wayne M.

    2003-05-01

    Conversion of pulses of CO2 laser energy (18 microsecond pulses) to propellant kinetic energy was studied in a Myrabo Laser Lightcraft (MLL) operating with laser heated STP air and laser ablated delrin propellants. The MLL incorporates an inverted parabolic reflector that focuses laser energy into a toroidal volume where it is absorbed by a unit of propellant mass that subsequently expands in the geometry of the plug nozzle aerospike. With Delrin propellant, measurements of the coupling coefficients and the ablated mass as a function of laser pulse energy showed that the efficiency of conversion of laser energy to propellant kinetic energy was ~ 54%. With STP air, direct experimental measurement of efficiency was not possible because the propellant mass associated with measured coupling coefficients was not known. Thermodynamics predicted that the upper limit of the efficiency of conversion of the internal energy of laser heated air to jet kinetic energy, α, is ~ 0.30 for EQUILIBRIUM expansion to 1 bar pressure. For FROZEN expansion α ~ 0.27. These upper limit efficiencies are nearly independent of the initial specific energy from 1 to 110 MJ/kg. With heating of air at its Mach 5 stagnation density (5.9 kg/m3 as compared to STP air density of 1.18 kg/m3) these efficiencies increase to about 0.55 (equilibrium) and 0.45 (frozen). Optimum blowdown from 1.18 kg/m3 to 1 bar occurs with expansion ratios ~ 1.5 to 4 as internal energy increases from 1 to 100 MJ/kg. Optimum expansion from the higher density state requires larger expansion ratios, 8 to 32. Expansion of laser ablated Delrin propellant appears to convert the absorbed laser energy more efficiently to jet kinetic energy because the effective density of the ablated gaseous Delrin is significantly greater than that of STP air.

  3. Diode-pumped passively Q-switched Nd:GGG laser with a Bi-doped GaAs semiconductor saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Wen; Li, Dechun; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Li, Xiangyang; Qiao, Hui; Liu, Ji

    2014-12-01

    Passive Q-switching of a diode-pumped Nd:GGG laser is demonstrated using Bi-doped GaAs as saturable absorber. The Bi-doped GaAs wafer is fabricated by ion implantation and subsequent annealing. Compared with the Q-switched laser by undoped GaAs semiconductor saturable absorber, the laser with Bi-doped GaAs as saturable absorber can produce higher output power, shorter pulses, higher single pulse energies and higher peak powers. These results suggest that Bi-doped GaAs can be a promising new candidate of semiconductor saturable absorber in Q-switched laser.

  4. Laser energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W.

    1975-01-01

    Laser radiation could possibly provide a feasible approach for the transmission of energy between stations and vehicles in space and on earth. The transmitted energy could be used for the operational requirements of the receiving space station, lunar base, or spacecraft. In addition, laser energy could also be employed to provide power for the propulsion of vehicles in space. The present status of development regarding the various technological areas involved in an implementation of these objectives is examined, taking into account the possibility of further advances needed to satisfy the technical requirements. Attention is given to laser-induced chemistry for converting the radiation energy into chemical energy. Other subjects considered are related to photovoltaics, optical diodes, thermo-electronics, laser rockets, and photon engines.

  5. Triplet-triplet energy transfer from a UV-A absorber butylmethoxydibenzoylmethane to UV-B absorbers.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Azusa; Oguchi-Fujiyama, Nozomi; Miyazawa, Kazuyuki; Yagi, Mikio

    2014-01-01

    The phosphorescence decay of a UV-A absorber, 4-tert-butyl-4'-methoxydibenzolymethane (BMDBM) has been observed following a 355 nm laser excitation in the absence and presence of UV-B absorbers, 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate (octyl methoxycinnamate, OMC) and octocrylene (OCR) in ethanol at 77 K. The lifetime of the lowest excited triplet (T1) state of BMDBM is significantly reduced in the presence of OMC and OCR. The observed quenching of BMDBM triplet by OMC and OCR suggests that the intermolecular triplet-triplet energy transfer occurs from BMDBM to OMC and OCR. The T1 state of OCR is nonphosphorescent or very weakly phosphorescent. However, we have shown that the energy level of the T1 state of OCR is lower than that of the enol form of BMDBM. Our methodology of energy-donor phosphorescence decay measurements can be applied to the study of the triplet-triplet energy transfer between UV absorbers even if the energy acceptor is nonphosphorescent. In addition, the delayed fluorescence of BMDBM due to triplet-triplet annihilation was observed in the BMDBM-OMC and BMDBM-OCR mixtures in ethanol at 77 K. Delayed fluorescence is one of the deactivation processes of the excited states of BMDBM under our experimental conditions.

  6. Laser energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1989-01-01

    The conversion of laser energy to other, more useful, forms is an important element of any space power transmission system employing lasers. In general the user, at the receiving sight, will require the energy in a form other than laser radiation. In particular, conversion to rocket power and electricity are considered to be two major areas where one must consider various conversion techniques. Three systems (photovoltaic cells, MHD generators, and gas turbines) have been identified as the laser-to-electricity conversion systems that appear to meet most of the criteria for a space-based system. The laser thruster also shows considerable promise as a space propulsion system. At this time one cannot predict which of the three laser-to-electric converters will be best suited to particular mission needs. All three systems have some particular advantages, as well as disadvantages. It would be prudent to continue research on all three systems, as well as the laser rocket thruster. Research on novel energy conversion systems, such as the optical rectenna and the reverse free-electron laser, should continue due to their potential for high payoff.

  7. Numerical modeling of mode-locked fiber lasers with a fiber-based saturable-absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Long; Chong, Andy; Haus, Joseph W.

    2017-01-01

    We report fiber laser simulations with a fiber compatible, self-focusing, saturable absorber (SA) device. The SA device consists of two tapered fiber ends separated by a bulk, nonlinear medium. An optical beam transmitted from one tapered fiber end, propagate through the nonlinear medium (chalcogenide glass As40 S e60) and couples back into the other tapered fiber end. Pulse propagation in the fiber laser cavity is performed using the Split Step Method. Stable pulses are generated with energies around 0.3 nJ and a transform limited pulse width around 200 fs.

  8. Black phosphorus-based saturable absorber for Q-switched Tm:YAG ceramic laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yixuan; Kong, Lingchen; Qin, Zhipeng; Xie, Guoqiang; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated a passively Q-switched Tm-doped YAG ceramic laser with black phosphorus (BP) as saturable absorber (SA). According to the measurement, the BP saturable absorber mirror has a modulation depth of 5% and a saturation fluence of 20 μJ/cm2. The generated Q-switched pulse has a maximum average power of 38.5 mW and pulse energy of 3.32 μJ, with the corresponding repetition rate of 11.6 KHz and pulse width of 3.12 μs at 2 μm wavelength. The results show that BP is a promising SA for midinfrared-pulsed lasers.

  9. Delayed-feedback vibration absorbers to enhance energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammer, Ayhan S.; Olgac, Nejat

    2016-02-01

    Recovering energy from ambient vibrations has recently been a popular research topic. This article is conceived as a concept study that explores new directions to enhance the performance of such energy harvesting devices from base excitation. The main idea revolves around the introduction of delayed feedback sensitization (or tuning) of an active vibration absorber setup. To clarify the concept, the Delayed Resonator theory is reviewed and its suitability for energy harvesting purposes is studied. It is recognized that an actively tuned and purely resonant absorber is infeasible for such applications. The focus is then shifted to alternative tuning schemes that deviate from resonance conditions. Also called Delayed Feedback Vibration Absorbers, these devices may indeed provide significant enhancements in energy harvesting capacity. Analytical developments are presented to study energy generation and consumption characteristics. Effects of excitation frequency and absorber damping are investigated. The influences of time-delayed feedback on the stability and the transient performance of the system are also treated. The analysis starts from a stand-alone absorber, emulating seismic mass type harvesters. The work is then extended to vibration control applications, where an absorber/harvester is coupled with a primary structure. The results are demonstrated with numerical simulations on a case study.

  10. Modeling a semiconductor laser with an intracavity atomic absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Masoller, C.; Vilaseca, R.; Oria, M.

    2009-07-15

    The dynamics of a semiconductor laser with an intracavity atomic absorber is studied numerically. The study is motivated by the experiments of Barbosa et al. [Opt. Lett. 32, 1869 (2007)], using a semiconductor junction as an active medium, with its output face being antireflection coated, and a cell containing cesium vapor placed in a cavity that was closed by a diffraction grating (DG). The DG allowed scanning the lasing frequency across the D{sub 2} line in the Cs spectrum, and different regimes such as frequency bistability or dynamic instability were observed depending on the operating conditions. Here we propose a rate-equation model that takes into account the dispersive losses and the dispersive refractive index change in the laser cavity caused by the presence of the Cs vapor cell. These effects are described through a modification of the complex susceptibility. The numerical results are found to be in qualitative good agreement with some of the observations; however, some discrepancies are also noticed, which can be attributed to multi-longitudinal-mode emission in the experiments. The simulations clearly show the relevant role of the Lamb dips and crossover resonances, which arise on top of the Doppler-broadened D{sub 2} line in the Cs spectrum, and are due to the forward and backward intracavity fields interacting resonantly with the Cs atoms. When the laser frequency is locked in a dip, a reduction in the frequency noise and of the intensity noise is demonstrated.

  11. Thermal mechanisms of laser marking in transparent polymers with light-absorbing microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenska, K. S.; Zelensky, S. E.; Poperenko, L. V.; Kanev, K.; Mizeikis, V.; Gnatyuk, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    Interaction of highly viscous polystyrene suspensions of light-absorbing microparticles with pulsed radiation of a Q-switched YAG:Nd3+ laser is investigated. Absorption of laser radiation by the suspended microparticles causes thermal decomposition (pyrolysis) of the polymer in the vicinity of the overheated particles. Laser-induced incandescence (LII) of light-absorbing microparticles under irradiation by a sequence of laser pulses is observed. The mechanism of laser marking includes formation of light-absorbing and scattering centers by accumulation of carbonaceous and gaseous products of pyrolysis.

  12. Laser heating of an absorbing and conducting media applied to laser flash property measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gritzo, L.A.; Anderson, E.E.

    1993-12-31

    The laser flash technique is widely used for determining the thermal diffusivity of a sample. In this work, the temperature distribution throughout the sample is investigated, identifying localized, highly-heated regions near the front surface of the sample as a function of: (1) pulse duration, (2) incident beam uniformity, and (3) sample opacity. These high-temperature regions result in an increase in the uncertainty due to temperature-dependent properties, an increase in the heat loss from the sample, and an increased risk of sample damage. The temperature within a semi-transparent media is also investigated in order to establish a regime for which the media can reasonably be considered as opaque. This analysis illustrates that, for same total energy deposition, treatment of the incident energy as a continuous heat source, as opposed to an infinitesimal pulse of energy, results in a factor of 2 increase in the front surface temperature during heating. Also, for the same total energy deposition and approximate beam size, use of a Gaussian intensity distribution increases the front surface temperature during heating by more than a factor of 2 as compared to the use of a uniform temperature distribution. By analyzing the front surface temperature of an absorbing and conducting semi-transparent sample subjected to a Gaussian intensity distribution, it is concluded that the media can be treated as opaque, (i.e. the energy can be applied as a boundary condition) for {var_epsilon} = kd > 50, where k is the extinction coefficient and d is the beam diameter. For materials with a sufficiently small absorption coefficient and thermal diffusivity, a closed-form solution suitable for design use is presented for the front-surface temperature at a location coincident with the beam centerline.

  13. Study on metal microparticle content of the material transferred with Absorbing Film Assisted Laser Induced Forward Transfer when using silver absorbing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smausz, T.; Hopp, B.; Kecskeméti, G.; Bor, Z.

    2006-04-01

    Absorbing Film Assisted Laser Induced Forward Transfer (AFA-LIFT) is a modified LIFT method where a high absorption coefficient thin film coating of a transparent substrate is used to transform the laser energy into kinetic in order to transfer the "target" material spread on it. This method can be used for the transfer of biomaterials and living cells, which could be damaged by direct irradiation of the laser beam. In previous experiments, ˜50-100 nm thick metal films have been used as absorbing layer. The transferred material can also contain metal microparticles originating from the absorbing thin film and acting as non-desired impurities in some cases. The aim of our work was to study how the properties (number, size and covered area) of metal particles transferred during the AFA-LIFT process depend on film thickness and the applied fluence. Silver thin films with different thickness (50-400 nm) were used as absorbing layers and real experimental conditions were modeled by a 100 μm thick water layer. The particles transferred without the use of water layer were also studied. The threshold laser fluence for the complete removal of the absorber from the irradiated area was found to strongly increase with increasing film thickness. The deposited micrometer and submicrometer particles were observed with optical microscope and atomic force microscope. Their size ranged from 100 nm to 20 μm and depended on the laser fluence. The increase in fluence resulted in an increasing number of particles of smaller average size.

  14. Status of thermoelectronic laser energy conversion, TELEC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    A concept known as a thermo-electronic laser energy converter (TELEC), was studied as a method of converting a 10.6 micron CO2 laser beam into electric power. The calculated characteristics of a TELEC seem to be well matched to the requirements of a spacecraft laser energy conversion system. The TELEC is a high power density plasma device which absorbs an intense laser beam by inverse bremsstrahlung with the plasma electrons. In the TELEC process, electromagnetic radiation is absorbed directly in the plasma electrons producing a high electron temperature. The energetic electrons diffuse out of the plasma striking two electrodes which are in contact with the plasma at the boundaries. These two electrodes have different areas: the larger one is designated as the collector, the smaller one is designated as the emitter. The smaller electrode functions as an electron emitter provide continuity of the current. Waste heat is rejected from the collector electrode. An experiment was carried out with a high power laser using a cesium vapor TELEC cell with 30 cm active length. Laser supported plasma were produced in the TELEC device during a number of laser runs over a period of several days. Electric power from the TELEC was observed with currents in the range of several amperes and output potentials of less than 1 volt.

  15. Multiobjective Topology Optimization of Energy Absorbing Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    overlapping function. This data structure is tree-shaped and so genetic programming is used as the optimizer. The forward problem is solved with a...strain energy. Results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed algorithm. 15. SUBJECT TERMS topology optimization; Pareto optimization; genetic ...combined using an overlapping function. This data structure is tree-shaped and so genetic programming is used as the optimizer. The forward problem

  16. Energy deposition studies for the LBNE beam absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, Igor L.; Mokhov, Nikolai V.; Tropin, Igor S.

    2015-01-29

    Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition studies performed for the LBNE absorber core and the surrounding shielding with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility, that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system – all with corresponding radiation shielding – was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. This option provides substantial flexibility and automation when developing complex geometry models. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Various design options were considered, in particular the following: (i) filling the decay pipe with air or helium; (ii) the absorber mask material and shape; (iii) the beam spoiler material and size. Results of detailed thermal calculations with the ANSYS code helped to select the most viable absorber design options.

  17. Femtosecond laser printing of living cells using absorbing film-assisted laser-induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Béla; Smausz, Tomi; Szabó, Gábor; Kolozsvári, Lajos; Kafetzopoulos, Dimitris; Fotakis, Costas; Nógrádi, Antal

    2012-01-01

    The applicability of a femtosecond KrF laser in absorbing film-assisted, laser-induced forward transfer of living cells was studied. The absorbing materials were 50-nm-thick metal films and biomaterials (gelatine, Matrigel, each 50 μm thick, and polyhydroxybutyrate, 2 μm). The used cell types were human neuroblastoma, chronic myeloid leukemia, and osteogenic sarcoma cell lines, and primary astroglial rat cells. Pulses of a 500-fs KrF excimer laser focused onto the absorbing layer in a 250-μm diameter spot with 225 mJ/cm2 fluence were used to transfer the cells to the acceptor plate placed at 0.6 mm distance, which was a glass slide either pure or covered with biomaterials. While the low-absorptivity biomaterial absorbing layers proved to be ineffective in transfer of cells, when applied on the surface of acceptor plate, the wet gelatine and Matrigel layers successfully ameliorated the impact of the cells, which otherwise did not survive the arrival onto a hard surface. The best short- and long-term survival rate was between 65% and 70% for neuroblastoma and astroglial cells. The long-term survival of the transferred osteosarcoma cells was low, while the myeloid leukemia cells did not tolerate the procedure under the applied experimental conditions.

  18. fs Laser surface nano-structuring of high refractory ceramics to enhance solar radiation absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, E.; Orlando, S.; Sciti, D.; Bellucci, A.; Lettino, A.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2014-10-01

    High refractory pressure-less sintered ternary composite ceramics of AlN-SiC-MoSi2 (ASMY), polished by mechanical grinding to a surface roughness R a ~40 nm, have been treated in vacuum by fs Ti:sapphire laser, operating at 800 nm wavelength, 100 fs pulse duration, and increasing fluence, to generate a "black ceramic material", able to minimize solar radiation reflectance, in such a way that they could be used as the absorber material in an innovative conversion module of solar radiation into electrical energy. Disk specimens of approximately 3 cm in diameter and 3 mm thick have been treated by normal incident laser beam, generating a scanning pattern of parallel lines, at a lateral distance of about 80 μm, using a stage in motion, in the x, y, z directions, driven by a computer. The experimental conditions of laser treatment (energy fluence, speed of transition and lateral distance of steps) have been optimized to maximize the absorption properties of the patterned surface. In some samples this value was increased by about 15 %, compared to untreated surface, up to a value of final absorbance of about 95 %, all over the range of solar radiation spectrum (from UV to NIR). The morphological and chemical effects have been evaluated by SEM-EDS analysis. At higher fluence, we obtained the characteristic ablation craters and corresponding local material decomposition, while at lower fluence (over the ablation threshold) an ordered periodic nano-structure has been obtained, exploitable for its high capacity of entrapment of visible light. The laser treated ceramic specimen, characterized by very high absorption properties and reflectivity values lower than 4 %, has been used as active absorber material in a conversion module, installed in a solar test platform.

  19. Fiber-integrated tungsten disulfide saturable absorber (mirror) for pulsed fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Li, Irene Ling; Ruan, Shuangchen; Guo, Tuan; Yan, Peiguang

    2016-08-01

    We propose two schemes for achieving tungsten disulfide (WS2)-based saturable absorber (SA) and saturable absorber mirror (SAM). By utilizing the pulsed laser deposition method, we grow the WS2 film on microfiber to form an evanescent field interaction SA device. Incorporating this SA device into a common ring-cavity erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser, stably passive mode-locking can be achieved with pulse duration of 395 fs and signal-to-noise ratio of 64 dB. We also produce a fiber tip integrated WS2-SAM by utilizing the magnetron sputtering technique (MST). This new type of SAM combines the WS2 layer as SA and gold mirror as high reflective mirror. By employing the WS2-SAM, we construct the linear-cavity EDF lasers, and achieve passive mode-locking operation with pulse duration of ˜1 ns and SNR of ˜61 dB. We further achieve stably passive Q-switching operation with pulse duration of ˜160 ns and pulse energy of 54.4 nJ. These fiber-integrated SAs and SAMs have merits of compactness and reliability, paving the way for the development of new photonic devices such as SAs for pulsed laser technology.

  20. Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Munley, John T.; Nelson, Danny A.; Qiao, Hong; Phillips, Jon R.

    2012-07-17

    Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids, producing a small atomic uranium vapor plume. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. LAARS has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for U-235. The sample is scanned and assayed point-by-point at rates reaching 1 million measurements/hour, enabling LAARS to detect and analyze uranium in trace samples. The spectrometer is assembled using primarily commercially available components and features a compact design and automated analysis.Two specific gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) applications of the spectrometer are currently under development: 1) LAARS-Environmental Sampling (ES), which collects and analyzes aerosol particles for GCEP misuse detection and 2) LAARS-Destructive Assay (DA), which enables onsite enrichment DA sample collection and analysis for protracted diversion detection. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in GCEP safeguards verification.

  1. Energy absorber for sodium-heated heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Essebaggers, J.

    1975-12-01

    A heat exchanger is described in which water-carrying tubes are heated by liquid sodium and in which the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes is minimized. An energy absorbing chamber contains a compressible gas and is connected to the body of flowing sodium by a channel so that, in the event of a sodium-water reaction, products of the reaction will partially fill the energy absorbing chamber to attenuate the rise in pressure within the heat exchanger.

  2. Nanosecond laser-induced back side wet etching of fused silica with a copper-based absorber liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Pierre; Zehnder, Sarah; Ehrhardt, Martin; Frost, Frank; Zimmer, Klaus; Schwaller, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Cost-efficient machining of dielectric surfaces with high-precision and low-roughness for industrial applications is still challenging if using laser-patterning processes. Laser induced back side wet etching (LIBWE) using UV laser pulses with liquid heavy metals or aromatic hydrocarbons as absorber allows the fabrication of well-defined, nm precise, free-form surfaces with low surface roughness, e.g., needed for optical applications. The copper-sulphatebased absorber CuSO4/K-Na-Tartrate/NaOH/formaldehyde in water is used for laser-induced deposition of copper. If this absorber can also be used as precursor for laser-induced ablation, promising industrial applications combining surface structuring and deposition within the same setup could be possible. The etching results applying a KrF excimer (248 nm, 25 ns) and a Nd:YAG (1064 nm, 20 ns) laser are compared. The topography of the etched surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), white light interferometry (WLI) as well as laser scanning microscopy (LSM). The chemical composition of the irradiated surface was studied by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For the discussion of the etching mechanism the laser-induced heating was simulated with finite element method (FEM). The results indicate that the UV and IR radiation allows micro structuring of fused silica with the copper-based absorber where the etching process can be explained by the laser-induced formation of a copper-based absorber layer.

  3. Energy-harvesting shock absorber with a mechanical motion rectifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongjie; Zuo, Lei; Kuang, Jian; Luhrs, George

    2013-02-01

    Energy-harvesting shock absorbers are able to recover the energy otherwise dissipated in the suspension vibration while simultaneously suppressing the vibration induced by road roughness. They can work as a controllable damper as well as an energy generator. An innovative design of regenerative shock absorbers is proposed in this paper, with the advantage of significantly improving the energy harvesting efficiency and reducing the impact forces caused by oscillation. The key component is a unique motion mechanism, which we called ‘mechanical motion rectifier (MMR)’, to convert the oscillatory vibration into unidirectional rotation of the generator. An implementation of a MMR-based harvester with high compactness is introduced and prototyped. A dynamic model is created to analyze the general properties of the motion rectifier by making an analogy between mechanical systems and electrical circuits. The model is capable of analyzing electrical and mechanical components at the same time. Both simulation and experiments are carried out to verify the modeling and the advantages. The prototype achieved over 60% efficiency at high frequency, much better than conventional regenerative shock absorbers in oscillatory motion. Furthermore, road tests are done to demonstrate the feasibility of the MMR shock absorber, in which more than 15 Watts of electricity is harvested while driving at 15 mph on a smooth paved road. The MMR-based design can also be used for other applications of vibration energy harvesting, such as from tall buildings or long bridges.

  4. Energy Deposition and Radiological Studies for the LBNF Hadron Absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I. L.; Mokhov, N. V.; Tropin, I. S.; Eidelman, Y. I.

    2015-06-25

    Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition and radiological studies performed for the LBNF hadron absorber with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility, that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system – all with corresponding radiation shielding – was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Results of detailed thermal calculations with the ANSYS code helped to select the most viable design options.

  5. Phosphorene quantum dot saturable absorbers for ultrafast fiber lasers

    PubMed Central

    Du, J.; Zhang, M.; Guo, Z.; Chen, J.; Zhu, X.; Hu, G.; Peng, P.; Zheng, Z.; Zhang, H.

    2017-01-01

    We fabricate ultrasmall phosphorene quantum dots (PQDs) with an average size of 2.6 ± 0.9 nm using a liquid exfoliation method involving ultrasound probe sonication followed by bath sonication. By coupling the as-prepared PQDs with microfiber evanescent light field, the PQD-based saturable absorber (SA) device exhibits ultrafast nonlinear saturable absorption property, with an optical modulation depth of 8.1% at the telecommunication band. With the integration of the all-fiber PQD-based SA, a continuous-wave passively mode-locked erbium-doped (Er-doped) laser cavity delivers stable, self-starting pulses with a pulse duration of 0.88 ps and at the cavity repetition rate of 5.47 MHz. Our results contribute to the growing body of work studying the nonlinear optical properties of ultrasmall PQDs that present new opportunities of this two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial for future ultrafast photonic technologies. PMID:28211471

  6. Phosphorene quantum dot saturable absorbers for ultrafast fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Zhang, M.; Guo, Z.; Chen, J.; Zhu, X.; Hu, G.; Peng, P.; Zheng, Z.; Zhang, H.

    2017-02-01

    We fabricate ultrasmall phosphorene quantum dots (PQDs) with an average size of 2.6 ± 0.9 nm using a liquid exfoliation method involving ultrasound probe sonication followed by bath sonication. By coupling the as-prepared PQDs with microfiber evanescent light field, the PQD-based saturable absorber (SA) device exhibits ultrafast nonlinear saturable absorption property, with an optical modulation depth of 8.1% at the telecommunication band. With the integration of the all-fiber PQD-based SA, a continuous-wave passively mode-locked erbium-doped (Er-doped) laser cavity delivers stable, self-starting pulses with a pulse duration of 0.88 ps and at the cavity repetition rate of 5.47 MHz. Our results contribute to the growing body of work studying the nonlinear optical properties of ultrasmall PQDs that present new opportunities of this two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial for future ultrafast photonic technologies.

  7. Phosphorene quantum dot saturable absorbers for ultrafast fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Du, J; Zhang, M; Guo, Z; Chen, J; Zhu, X; Hu, G; Peng, P; Zheng, Z; Zhang, H

    2017-02-17

    We fabricate ultrasmall phosphorene quantum dots (PQDs) with an average size of 2.6 ± 0.9 nm using a liquid exfoliation method involving ultrasound probe sonication followed by bath sonication. By coupling the as-prepared PQDs with microfiber evanescent light field, the PQD-based saturable absorber (SA) device exhibits ultrafast nonlinear saturable absorption property, with an optical modulation depth of 8.1% at the telecommunication band. With the integration of the all-fiber PQD-based SA, a continuous-wave passively mode-locked erbium-doped (Er-doped) laser cavity delivers stable, self-starting pulses with a pulse duration of 0.88 ps and at the cavity repetition rate of 5.47 MHz. Our results contribute to the growing body of work studying the nonlinear optical properties of ultrasmall PQDs that present new opportunities of this two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterial for future ultrafast photonic technologies.

  8. Dental Enamel Irradiated with Infrared Diode Laser and Photo-Absorbing Cream: Part 2—EDX Study

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Edson Aparecido Pereira; Soares, Luís Eduardo Silva; do Espírito Santo, Ana Maria; Martin, Airton Abrahão; Duarte, Danilo Antônio; Pacheco-Soares, Cristina; Brugnera, Aldo

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The effects of laser-induced compositional changes on the enamel were investigated by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDX). After cariogenic challenge, we administered treatment of low-level infrared diode laser and a photo-absorbing cream (used to intensify the superficial light absorption). Background Data: Dental caries is considered the most prevalent oral disease. A simple and noninvasive caries preventive regimen is treating tooth enamel with a laser, either alone or in combination with fluoride, which reduces enamel solubility and dissolution rates. High power lasers are still not widely used in private practice. Low-power near-infrared lasers may be an alternative approach. Energy-dispersive μ-EDX is a versatile and nondestructive spectroscopic technique that allows for a qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis of inorganic enamel components, such as calcium and phosphorus. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four extracted or exfoliated caries-free deciduous molars were divided into six groups: 1) control group (CTR-no treatment); 2) infrared laser treatment (L) (λ = 810 nm, 100 mW/cm2, 90 sec, 4.47 J/cm2, 9 J); 3) infrared laser irradiation and photo-absorbing agent (CL); 4) photo-absorbing agent alone (C); 5) infrared laser irradiation and fluoridated photo-absorbing agent (FCL); and 6) fluoridated photo-absorbing agent alone (FC). Samples were analyzed using μ-EDX after two sets of treatments and pH cycling cariogenic challenges. Results: The CL group showed statistically significant increases in calcium and phosphorus (wt%) compared with the CTR group. The Ca/P ratio was similar in the FCL and CTR groups. There was a significant laser-induced reduction compared with the CTR group, and there was a possible modification of the organic balance content in enamel treated with laser and cream. Conclusion: μ-EDX may be able to detect compositional changes in mineral phases of lased enamel under

  9. A novel self-locked energy absorbing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuli; Qiao, Chuan; Qiu, Xinming; Zhao, Shougen; Zhen, Cairu; Liu, Bin

    2016-02-01

    Metallic thin-walled round tubes are widely used as energy absorption elements. However, lateral splash of the round tubes under impact loadings reduces the energy absorption efficiency and may cause secondary damage. Therefore, it is necessary to assemble and fasten round tubes together by boundary constraints and/or fasteners between tubes, which increases the time and labor cost and affects the mechanical performance of round tubes. In an effort to break through this limitation, a novel self-locked energy-absorbing system has been proposed in this paper. The proposed system is made up of thin-walled tubes with dumbbell-shaped cross section, which are specially designed to interlock with each other and thus provide lateral constraint under impact loadings. Both finite element simulations and impact experiment demonstrated that without boundary constraints or fasteners between tubes, the proposed self-locked energy-absorbing system can still effectively attenuate impact loads while the round tube systems fail to carry load due to the lateral splashing of tubes. Furthermore, the geometric design for a single dumbbell-shaped tube and the stacking arrangement for the system are discussed, and a general guideline on the structural design of the proposed self-locked energy absorbing system is provided.

  10. Mode-locked thulium-bismuth codoped fiber laser using graphene saturable absorber in ring cavity.

    PubMed

    Zen, D I M; Saidin, N; Damanhuri, S S A; Harun, S W; Ahmad, H; Ismail, M A; Dimyati, K; Halder, A; Paul, M C; Das, S; Pal, M; Bhadra, S K

    2013-02-20

    We demonstrate mode locking of a thulium-bismuth codoped fiber laser (TBFL) operating at 1901.6 nm, using a graphene-based saturable absorber (SA). In this work, a single layer graphene is mechanically exfoliated using the scotch tape method and directly transferred onto the surface of a fiber pigtail to fabricate the SA. The obtained Raman spectrum characteristic indicates that the graphene on the core surface has a single layer. At 1552 nm pump power of 869 mW, the mode-locked TBFL self starts to generate an optical pulse train with a repetition rate of 16.7 MHz and pulse width of 0.37 ps. This is a simple, low-cost, stable, and convenient laser oscillator for applications where eye-safe and low-photon-energy light sources are required, such as sensing and biomedical diagnostics.

  11. Energy Absorbing Seat System for an Agricultural Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Jones, Lisa E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A task was initiated to improve the energy absorption capability of an existing aircraft seat through cost-effective retrofitting, while keeping seat-weight increase to a minimum. This task was undertaken as an extension of NASA ongoing safety research and commitment to general aviation customer needs. Only vertical crash scenarios have been considered in this task which required the energy absorbing system to protect the seat occupant in a range of crash speeds up to 31 ft/sec. It was anticipated that, the forward and/or side crash accelerations could be attenuated with the aid of airbags, the technology of which is currently available in automobiles and military helicopters. Steps which were followed include, preliminary crush load determination, conceptual design of cost effective energy absorbers, fabrication and testing (static and dynamic) of energy absorbers, system analysis, design and fabrication of dummy seat/rail assembly, dynamic testing of dummy seat/rail assembly, and finally, testing of actual modified seat system with a dummy occupant. A total of ten full scale tests have been performed including three of the actual aircraft seat. Results from full-scale tests indicated that occupant loads were attenuated successfully to survivable levels.

  12. Evaluation of a commercially available passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with LiF: F2- saturable absorber for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Cantwell G.; Goueguel, Christian L.; Sanghapi, Hervé; Jain, Jinesh; McIntyre, Dustin

    2016-05-01

    Interest in passively Q-switched microchip lasers as a means for miniaturization of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) apparatus has rapidly grown in the last years. To explore the possibility of using a comparatively UV-vis transparent absorber, we herein present the first report on the evaluation of a commercially available flash lamp-pumped passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with LiF: F2- saturable absorber as an excitation source in LIBS. Quantitative measurements of barium, strontium, rubidium and lithium in granite, rhyolite, basalt and syenite whole-rock glass samples were performed. Using a gated intensified benchtop spectrometer, limits of detection of 0.97, 23, 37, and 144 ppm were obtained for Li, Sr, Rb, and Ba, respectively. Finally, we discuss the advantages of using such a laser unit for LIBS applications in terms of ablation efficiency, analytical performances, output energy, and standoff capabilities.

  13. Passive Q-switching of Pr:LiYF4 orange laser at 604 nm using topological insulators Bi2Se3 as saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yongjie; Peng, Jian; Bin, Xu; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Weng, Jian

    2017-02-01

    Q-switched laser operation of a laser diode pumped Pr:LiYF4 laser is reported at 604 nm using a topological insulator (TI) Bi2Se3 nanosheet material as saturable absorbers (SAs), for the first time to our knowledge. Stable Q-switched laser operation is obtained with shortest pulse width of about 802 ns, a maximum pulse repetition rate of 130 kHz, pulse energy of about 0.2 μJ and a maximum average output power of 26 mW. This work further extends the working wavelength of Bi2Se3 as saturable absorbers to visible domain.

  14. Research of the temperature measurement of high-energy laser energy meter and energy loss compensation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xun; Wang, Hui; Wu, Ji'an; Wang, Fang; Li, Qian

    2009-11-01

    The energy measurement of high energy laser is converts incident laser energy into heat energy, calculates energy utilizing absorber temperature rise, thus the energy value can be gained. Temperature measurement of high-energy laser energy meter and energy loss compensation during the course of the measurement were studied here. Firstly, temperature-resistance characteristics of resistance wire was analyzed, which was winded on exterior surface of the absorbing cavity of high-energy laser energy meter and used in temperature measurement. Least square method was used to process experiment data and a compensation model was established to calibrate the relationship of temperature vs. resistance. Experiment proved that, error between resistance wire and Pt100 is less than 0.01Ω and temperature error is less than 0.02°C. This greatly improves accuracy of the high energy meter measurement result. Secondly, aimed to the compensation of laser energy loss caused by absorbing cavity's heat exchange, the heat energy loss of absorbing cavity, resulted from thermal radiation, heat convection and heat conduction was analyzed based on heat transfer theory. Its mathematics model was established. Least square method was used to fit a curve of experiment data in order to compensate energy loss. Repetitiveness of measurement is 0.7%, which is highly improved.

  15. Passively Q-switched flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG laser using liquid graphene oxide as saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnan, N. N.; Bidin, N.; Taib, N. A. M.; Haris, H.; Fakaruddin, M.; Hashim, A. M.; Krishnan, G.; Harun, S. W.

    2016-06-01

    The performance of passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1060 nm is demonstrated using liquid graphene oxide (GO) composite solution as saturable absorber for the first time. The Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is pumped by a xenon flashlamp. The GO was prepared using the simplified Hummer's method and then mixed with polyethylene oxide to form a composite solution. The Q-switched pulsed laser operates at wavelength of 1064.5 nm with a threshold pump energy of 33.64 J. The maximum output Q-switched laser energy of 41.6 mJ achieved at the maximum pump energy of 81 J. The corresponding pulse width is 98.67 ns.

  16. Energy scavenging strain absorber: application to kinetic dielectric elastomer generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Mistral, C.; Beaune, M.; Vu-Cong, T.; Sylvestre, A.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric elastomer generators (DEGs) are light, compliant, silent energy scavengers. They can easily be incorporated into clothing where they could scavenge energy from the human kinetic movements for biomedical applications. Nevertheless, scavengers based on dielectric elastomers are soft electrostatic generators requiring a high voltage source to polarize them and high external strain, which constitutes the two major disadvantages of these transducers. We propose here a complete structure made up of a strain absorber, a DEG and a simple electronic power circuit. This new structure looks like a patch, can be attached on human's wear and located on the chest, knee, elbow… Our original strain absorber, inspired from a sailing boat winch, is able to heighten the external available strain with a minimal factor of 2. The DEG is made of silicone Danfoss Polypower and it has a total area of 6cm per 2.5cm sustaining a maximal strain of 50% at 1Hz. A complete electromechanical analytical model was developed for the DEG associated to this strain absorber. With a poling voltage of 800V, a scavenged energy of 0.57mJ per cycle is achieved with our complete structure. The performance of the DEG can further be improved by enhancing the imposed strain, by designing a stack structure, by using a dielectric elastomer with high dielectric permittivity.

  17. Oscillatory phenomena and Q switching in a model for laser with a saturable absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Antoranz, J.C.; Gea, J.; Velarde, M.G.

    1981-12-28

    Sufficiently long population decay times and sufficiently short dipole decay times in a single-mode laser with saturable absorber permit passive Q switching in the form of a hard-mode sustained relaxation oscillation.

  18. Bistable limit cycles in a model for a laser with a saturable absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Antoranz, J.C.; Bonilla, L.L.; Gea, J.; Velarde, M.G.

    1982-07-05

    Sufficiently long population decay times and sufficiently short dipole decay times in a single-mode model for a laser with saturable absorber permit coexistence of soft-excited oscillations and Q switching (hard-mode sustained relaxation oscillations).

  19. V:YAG saturable absorber for flash-lamp and diode-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulc, Jan; Jelinkova, Helena; Nemec, Michal; Nejezchleb, Karel; Skoda, Vaclav

    2004-09-01

    V:YAG saturable absorber was used for efficient Q-switching and mode-locking of Nd:YAG and Nd:YAP flash-lamp or diode pumped lasers operating in 1.3 mm region. Crystals of Yttrium-Aluminum Garnet (YAG) doped with three-valence vanadium V3+ in tetrahedral position (V:YAG) were grown using of Czochralski method in reducing protective atmosphere. High purity oxides were used for crystal growth (Y2O3 (5N), Al2O3 (5N), V2O5 (4N)). Concentration of V2O5 in the melt reached up to 1 wt. %. Discs of the diameter 5 or 10 mm and of various thickness were machined from grown V:YAG crystals. The discs were both sides polished and AR coated so that minimum reflectivity at 1.08 and 1.34 microns was reached. The initial transmission of the saturable absorber was dependent on the sample's thickness and its annealing process. We report stability improvement of passively mode-locked (by these V:YAG crystals) Nd:YAP flash-lamp pumped lasers. The maximum output energy 53 mJ at wavelength 1340 nm was obtained for Nd:YAP flash-lamp pumped laser operating at repetition rate 5 Hz. Mode-locked train envelope width was measured to be 22 ns (FWHM). Individual pulses inside the train were shorter than 1 ns. Also results with composite Nd:YAG rod Q-switched by V:YAG crystal and with Nd:YAG/V:YAG monolith rod under CW longitudinal diode pumping was obtained and compared. These laser systems represent new powerfull sources in the near infrared region.

  20. Crash-Energy Absorbing Composite Structure and Method of Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris (Inventor); Carden, Huey D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A stand-alone, crash-energy absorbing structure and fabrication method are provided. A plurality of adjoining rigid cells are each constructed of resin-cured fiber reinforcement and are arranged in a geometric configuration. The geometric configuration of cells is integrated by means of continuous fibers wrapped thereabout in order to maintain the cells in the geometric configuration. The cured part results in a net shape, stable structure that can function on its own with no additional reinforcement and can withstand combined loading while crushing in a desired direction.

  1. Tunable multiwavelength L-band Brillouin-Erbium fiber laser utilizing passive EDF absorber section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mashhadani, T. F.; Al-Mansoori, M. H.; Jamaludin, M. Z.; Abdullah, F.; Abass, A. K.; Rawi, N. I. M.

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate a simple tunable L-band multiwavelength Brillouin-Erbium fiber laser that utilizes a short passive erbium doped fiber (PEDF) as an absorber section. The impact of including the PEDF absorber section on the laser tunability is investigated. The proposed laser structure exhibits a wide tuning range of 24.4 nm (from 1583.5 nm to 1607.9 nm) at 1480 nm pump and Brillouin pump powers of 100 and 4 mW, respectively. This tuning range represents a 31% increase compared with a laser without a PEDF absorber section. The average number of stable output channels produced within this wavelength range is 16 channels with a spacing of 0.089 nm.

  2. Passively Q-switched nd:YAG laser via a WS2 saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Wang, Yonggang; Duan, Lina; Li, Lu; Sun, Hang

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report a passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm by using WS2 solution as the saturable absorber (SA). The WS2 solution with different concentrations (0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/ml) were fabricated by the liquid-phase-exfoliated method and injected into quartz cells. Such liquid absorbers have the virtues of adjustable optical absorption, high heat dissipation and non-contact damage. By inserting those WS2 solutions in the laser cavity, stable Q-switched laser operations were obtained. The corresponding pulse duration as short as 922 ns was obtained. The result shows that the WS2 material can be act as absorber for solid-state lasers.

  3. An Yb3+-doped Lu2SiO5 mode-locked laser using a reflective graphene oxide absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chao; Liu, Jie; Wang, Yonggang; Zheng, Lihe; Su, Liangbi; Xu, Jun

    2013-06-01

    Reflective graphene oxide played the part of the saturable absorber to achieve a continuous wave mode-locking (CWML) laser based on Yb3+:Lu2SiO5 (Yb:LSO) crystal for the first time. The laser operated at a repetition frequency of 87 MHz at a maximum average output power of 0.95 W with a single pulse energy of 10.9 nJ. A 9.8 ps ultra-short pulse was yielded at 1058 nm with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 2.09 nm, corresponding to a peak power of 1.11 kW.

  4. Sub-90 fs a stretched-pulse mode-locked fiber laser based on a graphene saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Sotor, Jaroslaw; Pasternak, Iwona; Krajewska, Aleksandra; Strupinski, Wlodek; Sobon, Grzegorz

    2015-10-19

    In this paper a stretched-pulse, mode-locked Er-doped fiber laser based on graphene saturable absorber (SA) is presented. A 60 layer graphene/polymer composite was used as a SA. The all-fiber dispersion managed laser resonator with the repetition frequency of 21.15 MHz allows for Gaussian pulses generation with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 48 nm. The generated chirped pulses were compressed outside the cavity to the 88 fs using a piece of standard single mode fiber. The average output power and pulse energy were of 1.5 mW and 71 pJ, respectively.

  5. Ultrafast erbium-doped fiber laser mode-locked with a black phosphorus saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. H. M.; Latiff, A. A.; Arof, H.; Harun, S. W.

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a passive mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) using a multi-layer black phosphorus saturable absorber (BPSA). The BPSA is fabricated by mechanically exfoliating a BP crystal and sticking the acquired BP flakes onto scotch tape. A small piece of the tape is then placed between two ferrules and integrated into an EDFL cavity to achieve a self-started soliton mode-locked pulse operation at 1560.7 nm wavelength. The 3 dB bandwidth, pulse width, and repetition rate of the laser are 6.4 nm, 570 fs, and 6.88 MHz, respectively. The average output power is 5.1 mW at pump power of 140 mW and thus, the pulse energy and peak power are estimated at 0.74 nJ and 1.22 kW, respectively. The BPSA was constructed in a simple fabrication process and has a modulation depth of 7% to successfully produce the stable mode-locked fiber laser.

  6. 10 GHz fundamental mode fiber laser using a graphene saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Amos; Yamashita, Shinji

    2012-07-01

    All-fiber mode-locked lasers with fundamental repetition rates of several gigahertz are sought after for applications in optical communications and metrology. In this paper, we propose a fiber Fabry-Pérot laser mode-locked by a graphene-based saturable absorber that operates at a fundamental repetition rate of 9.67 GHz. We use this laser as the seed for the generation of supercontinuum with 0.08 nm mode spacing.

  7. 320 fs pulse generation from an ultrafast laser inscribed waveguide laser mode-locked by a nanotube saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beecher, S. J.; Thomson, R. R.; Psaila, N. D.; Sun, Z.; Hasan, T.; Rozhin, A. G.; Ferrari, A. C.; Kar, A. K.

    2010-09-01

    Ultrafast laser inscription is used to fabricate the gain element for a mode-locked Er-doped bismuthate glass waveguide laser. Mode-locking is initiated and stabilized by the use of a single wall carbon nanotube saturable absorber. The waveguide laser produces 320 fs pulses at 1.56 μm with a pulse repetition rate of 40 MHz and average output power of 1.25 mW.

  8. Energy-absorbing-beam design for composite aircraft subfloors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, Huey D.; Kellas, Sotiris

    1993-01-01

    Data have been presented from the design support testing of composite energy absorbing (EA) aircraft subfloor structures. The focus of the current study is the design and testing of subfloor structural concepts that would limit the loads transmitted to occupants to less than 20 g at crush speeds of approximately 30 fps. The EA composite subfloor is being designed to replace an existing noncrashworthy metallic subfloor in a composite aircraft prior to a full-scale crash test. A sandwich spar construction of a sine wave beam was chosen for evaluation and was found to have excellent energy absorbing characteristics. The design objective of obtaining sustained crushing loads of the spar between 200-300 lbf/inch were achieved for potentially limiting occupants loads to around 20 g's. Stroke efficiency of up to 79 percent of the initial spar height under desired sustained crushing loads was obtained which is far greater than the level provided by metal structure. Additionally, a substantial residual spar stiffness was retained after impact, and the flange integrity, which is critical for seat retention, was maintained after crushing of the spars.

  9. Material Model Evaluation of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Annett, Martin S.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate four different material models in predicting the dynamic crushing response of solid-element-based models of a composite honeycomb energy absorber, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA). Dynamic crush tests of three DEA components were simulated using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic code, LS-DYNA . In addition, a full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter, retrofitted with DEA blocks, was simulated. The four material models used to represent the DEA included: *MAT_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 63), *MAT_HONEYCOMB (Mat 26), *MAT_SIMPLIFIED_RUBBER/FOAM (Mat 181), and *MAT_TRANSVERSELY_ANISOTROPIC_CRUSHABLE_FOAM (Mat 142). Test-analysis calibration metrics included simple percentage error comparisons of initial peak acceleration, sustained crush stress, and peak compaction acceleration of the DEA components. In addition, the Roadside Safety Verification and Validation Program (RSVVP) was used to assess similarities and differences between the experimental and analytical curves for the full-scale crash test.

  10. Energy absorption of refractory absorber with periodic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yuchen; Yang, Shuhan; Wang, Yanhong; Wu, Jingzhi

    2016-10-01

    Refractory material with surface plasmonic structures have the function of spectrum selective absorption and radiation spectrum regulation. In this paper, we design an absorber with periodic cylindrical nanostructures and a dielectric layer of Al2O3 based on the substrate of metal Tantalum (Ta). The energy absorption characteristics of the absorber have been simulated and analyzed by changing various constructional parameters. The simulation results indicate that structural parameters have great influence on the spectrum absorption in the range of wavelength 400-4000nm. The period and radius of nanostructure have a important effect on the absorption peaks in the infrared region. Infrared absorption peak can reach more than 99% and produce a red shift due to parameters changing. At the whole visible field, the absorption enhancement effect is significant. The refractive index and thickness of dielectric layer also have an obviously effect on the absorption spectrum. Furthermore, it is also obviously that thickness of dielectric layer has enhancement effect on absorption of infrared spectrum. The research found that the absorption and radiation spectrum of surface plasmonic materials can be effectively controlled by combining the high temperature radiation characteristics of high temperature metal. Thermophotovoltaic system can provide a kind of new methods and ideas for improving conversion efficiency, energy saving and consumption reducing.

  11. Dual-wavelength synchronously Q-switched solid-state laser with multi-layered graphene as saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongguang; Li, Xianlei; Xu, Miaomiao; Yu, Haohai; Wu, Yongzhong; Wang, Zhengping; Hao, Xiaopeng; Xu, Xinguang

    2013-02-11

    Using multilayered graphene as the saturable absorber (SA), Nd:LYSO crystal as the laser material, we demonstrated a laser-diode (LD) pumped, dual-wavelength passively Q-switched solid-state laser. The maximum average output power is 1.8 W, the largest pulse energy and highest peak power is 11.3 μJ, 118 W, respectively. As we have known, they are the best results for passively Q-switched operation of graphene. The pulse laser is strong enough to realize extra-cavity frequency conversions. With a KTP crystal as the sum-frequency generator, the dual wavelengths are proved to be well time overlapped, which manifests the synchronous modulation to the dual-wavelength with multi-layered graphene.

  12. Nanosecond passively Q-switched Nd:YVO4 laser based on WS2 saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Li, Lu; Wang, Yonggang; Zhang, Ling; Wen, Qiao; Yang, Guowen

    2017-04-01

    We report on a nanosecond pulse generation in a diode end-pumped passively Q-switched Nd:YVO4 laser using a tungsten disulfide (WS2) solution saturable absorber (SA). The WS2 suspension is fabricated by the liquid-phase-exfoliated method and injected into a quartz cell for the use of SA. Compared with solid absorber, such solution absorber has the virtues of good optical transparency, high heat dissipation and long term stability. By inserting the WS2 solution SA in the laser cavity, a stable Q-switched laser operation centered at 1064.45 nm wavelength is obtained with the shortest pulse duration of 788 ns and corresponding repetition rate of 333.5 kHz. The maximum average output power is registered to be 720 mW with the slope efficiency of 7.8%. To the best of our knowledge, it is the highest output power so far among pulsed lasers based on transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) SAs. The results demonstrate that WS2 solution absorber is a promising saturable absorber for the generation of high output power pulsed lasers.

  13. High-damage-resistant tungsten disulfide saturable absorber mirror for passively Q-switched fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Chen, YuShan; Yin, Jinde; Zhang, Xuejun; Guo, Tuan; Yan, Peiguang

    2016-07-25

    In this paper, we demonstrate a high-damage-resistant tungsten disulfide saturable absorber mirror (WS2-SAM) fabricated by magnetron sputtering technique. The WS2-SAM has an all-fiber-integrated configuration and high-damage-resistant merit because the WS2 layer is protected by gold film so as to avoid being oxidized and destroyed at high pump power. Employing the WS2-SAM in an Erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) with linear cavity, the stable Q-switching operation is achieved at central wavelength of 1560 nm, with the repetition rates ranging from 29.5 kHz to 367.8 kHz and the pulse duration ranging from 1.269 μs to 154.9 ns. For the condition of the maximum pump power of 600 mW, the WS2-SAM still works stably with an output power of 25.2 mW, pulse energy of 68.5 nJ, and signal-noise-ratio of 42 dB. The proposed WS2-SAM configuration provides a promising solution for advanced pulsed fiber lasers with the characteristics of high damage resistance, high output energy, and wide tunable frequency.

  14. Compact, high energy gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.; Stapleton, Robert E.; Stratton, Thomas F.

    1976-08-03

    An electrically pumped gas laser amplifier unit having a disc-like configuration in which light propagation is radially outward from the axis rather than along the axis. The input optical energy is distributed over a much smaller area than the output optical energy, i.e., the amplified beam, while still preserving the simplicity of parallel electrodes for pumping the laser medium. The system may thus be driven by a comparatively low optical energy input, while at the same time, owing to the large output area, large energies may be extracted while maintaining the energy per unit area below the threshold of gas breakdown.

  15. Laser-induced synergistic effects around absorbing nanoclusters in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, Vladimir P.; Letfullin, Renat R.; Galitovskay, Elena

    2005-04-01

    Background and Objective: The application of nanotechnology for laser thermal-based killing of abnormal cells (e.g. cancer cells) targeted with absorbing nanoparticles (e.g. gold solid nanospheres, nanoshells, or rod) is becoming an extensive area of research. We develop an approach to enhance the efficiency of selective nanophotothermolysis of cancer cells through laser-induced synergistic effects around gold nanoparticles aggregated in nanoclusters on cell membrane. Study Design/Materials and Methods: A concept of selective target damages by laser-induced synergistic interaction of optical, thermal, and acoustic fields around clustered nanoparticles is presented with focus on overlapping bubbles from nanoparticles aggregated on cell's membrane. The experimental verification of this concept in vitro was performed by the use a tunable laser pulses (420-570 nm, 8-12 ns, 0.1-300 μJ, laser flux of 0.1-10 J/cm2) for irradiation of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells targeted with primary antibodies to which selecttively 40-nm gold nanoparticles were attached by the means of secondary antibodies. The photothermal, electron and atomic force microscopes in combination with viability test (annexin -V-Propidium iodide) were employed to study the nanoparticle's spatial organization, the dynamics of microbubble formations around the particle's clusters, and cells damage. Results: An aggregation of nanoparticles on cell membrane was observed with simultaneous increase bubble formation phenomena, and red-shifted absorption due to plasmon-plasmon resonances into nanoclusters. It led to a significant enhancement, at least two orders of magnitude, of the efficiency of selectively killing cancer cells with nanosecond laser pulses. Conclusion: Described approach allows using relatively small nanoparticles which would be easier delivery to target site with further creation of nanoclusters with larger sizes which provide more profound thermal and related phenomena leading to more

  16. Intracavity absorption with a continuous wave dye laser - Quantification for a narrowband absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brobst, William D.; Allen, John E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the dependence of intracavity absorption on factors including transition strength, concentration, absorber path length, and pump power is presented for a CW dye laser with a narrow-band absorber (NO2). A Beer-Lambert type relationship is found over a small but useful range of these parameters. Quantitative measurement of intracavity absorption from the dye laser spectral profiles showed enhancements up to 12,000 (for pump powers near lasing threshold) when compared to extracavity measurements. The definition of an intracavity absorption coefficient allowed the determination of accurate transition strength ratios, demonstrating the reliability of the method.

  17. Enhanced optical absorbance and fabrication of periodic arrays on nickel surface using nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jinxiang; Liang, Hao; Zhang, Jingyuan; Wang, Yibo; Liu, Yannan; Zhang, Zhiyan; Lin, Xuechun

    2017-04-01

    A hundred-nanosecond pulsed laser was employed to structure the nickel surface. The effects of laser spatial filling interval and laser scanning speed on the optical absorbance capacity and morphologies on the nickel surface were experimentally investigated. The black nickel surface covered with dense micro/nanostructured broccoli-like clusters with strong light trapping capacity ranging from the UV to the near IR was produced at a high laser scanning speed up to v=100 mm/s. The absorbance of the black nickel is as high as 98% in the UV range of 200-400 nm, more than 97% in the visible spectrum, ranging from 400 to 800 nm, and over 90% in the IR between 800 and 2000 nm. In addition, when the nickel surface was irradiated in two-dimensional crossing scans by laser with different processing parameters, self-organized and shape-controllable structures of three-dimensional (3D) periodic arrays can be fabricated. Compared with ultrafast laser systems previously used for such processing, the nanosecond fiber laser used in this work is more cost-effective, compact and allows higher processing rates. This nickel surface structured technique may be applicable in optoelectronics, batteries industry, solar/wave absorbers, and wettability materials.

  18. Improving dye laser efficiency with uv absorbers and wavelength shifters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Matheson, K L; Thorne, J M

    1981-01-01

    The nonuniform heating in flashlamp pumped dye lasers forms refractive index gradients in the dye solution. These gradients distort the wavefront of the laser beam resulting in limited output power, limited pulse repetition rate, and limited attainable linewidth. The theorectical bases for using uv absorbers and wavelength shifters to eliminate light of detrimental wavelengths and thereby improve dye laser efficiency are described, and the results of experiments for evaluating 12 uv absorbers and 12 wavelength filters for use as possible pump light filters are presented. These experiments showed that the appropriate uv absorber or wavelength shifter to be used with a given laser dye is based on the absorption spectrum of the dye. If a uv absorber is needed, then the compound should be chosen so that its long wavelength absorption peak is just to the short wavelength side of the absorption peaks of the laser dye. If a wavelength shifter is needed, then the compound should be chosen so that there is maximum overlap between the fluorescence spectrum of the shifter and the absorption spectrum of the dye. Tabulated data are presented which can be used to selected protectors and shifters for specific dyes. (LCL)

  19. Prompt-gamma detection towards absorbed energy monitoring during hadrontherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Krimmer, J.; Balleyguier, L.; Dauvergne, D.; Mathez, H.; Pinto, M.; Testa, E.; Zoccarato, Y.; Herault, J.; Amblard, R.; Angellier, G.

    2015-07-01

    Hadrontherapy is an emerging technique which exploits the fact that a large quantity of the energy of the incident particles is deposited at the end of their flight path. This allows a conformation of the applied dose to the tumor volume and a simultaneous sparing of surrounding healthy tissue. A real-time control of the ion range during the treatment is possible via the detection of prompt secondary radiation (gamma rays or charged particles). Besides a monitoring of the ion range, the knowledge of the total energy absorbed inside the patient is also of importance for an improvement of the treatment quality. It has been shown that the ambient dose in a treatment room is correlated to the monitoring units, i.e. the number of protons of the beam delivery system. The present study consists in applying time-of-flight (TOF) information to identify prompt gamma-rays generated by interactions inside the patient which provides a direct information on the energy imparted. Results from test measurements will be given, which show that events generated in the nozzle and the target phantom can be discriminated. Furthermore, a standalone detection system is being developed which will be read out by a standard PC. The status of the developments for the corresponding electronics will be presented. (authors)

  20. A study on single-crystal alloy surface's structure and performance of laser shock peening without absorbent coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Wang; Zhihui, Tang; Chenguang, Liu; ChunZhi, Li; Zhenye, Zhao

    2016-11-01

    in order to determine how the laser shock peening without absorbent coating (LSPwC) affects Ni-base single-crystal superalloy, DD11, the surface structure and hardness gradient of single-crystal alloy after LSPwC of two pulse energies. The result shows that the width of linear structure is in direct proportion to the laser impact energy by observing the "linear" deformed structure through the scanning electron microscope, and the linear structure's length increases when the pulse energy increases from 3J to 5J; the observation by the transmission electron microscope at ×10 000 show s that the linear structure is actually the "line cluster" formed by more than one parallel "fine lines", and the fine lines are along the the [111] direction; the observation under a high resolution shows that fine lines are the single-crystal structure, the twinning plane is (1-11), and the twinning direction is [1-1-2].

  1. Saturable absorber based on silver nanoparticles for passively mode-locked lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Glubokov, D A; Sychev, V V; Korolkov, A E; Chubich, D A; Vitukhnovskii, A G; Mikhailov, A S; Shapiro, B I

    2014-04-28

    A saturable absorber based on plane (tabular) stabilised silver nanocrystals, which is promising for picoseconds laser systems operating in the range 650–900 nm, is studied. This material has a plasmon decay time of about 2 ps, while its absorption at a pump intensity of 10 MW cm{sup -2} decreases by 1.6%, which is sufficient for using this crystal for passive mode locking. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  2. Watt-level passively Q-switched heavily Er3+-doped ZBLAN fiber laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yanlong; Wang, Yishan; Luan, Kunpeng; Huang, Ke; Tao, Mengmeng; Chen, Hongwei; Yi, Aiping; Feng, Guobin; Si, Jinhai

    2016-01-01

    A diode-cladding pumped mid-infrared passively Q-switched Er3+-doped ZBLAN fiber laser with an average output power of watt-level based on a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) is demonstrated. Stable pulse train was produced at a slope efficiency of 17.8% with respect to launched pump power. The maximum average power of 1.01 W at a repetition rate of 146.3 kHz was achieved with a corresponding pulse energy of 6.9 μJ, from which the maximum peak power was calculated to be 21.9 W. To the best of our knowledge, the average power and the peak power are the highest in 3 μm region passively Q-switched fiber lasers. The influence of gain fiber length on the operation regime of the fiber laser has been investigated in detail. PMID:27225029

  3. Passive Q-switching of Yb bulk lasers by a graphene saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiko, P. A.; Serres, J. M.; Mateos, X.; Liu, J.; Zhang, H.; Yasukevich, A. S.; Yumashev, K. V.; Petrov, V.; Griebner, U.; Aguiló, M.; Díaz, F.

    2016-04-01

    Compact Yb:KLu(WO4)2 and Yb:LuVO4 lasers diode-pumped at 978 nm are passively Q-switched by a single-layer graphene saturable absorber. The Yb:KLu(WO4)2 laser generated 165 ns/0.49 μJ pulses at 1030 nm with 170 mW average output power and 12 % slope efficiency. With the Yb:LuVO4 laser, 152 ns/0.83 μJ pulses were achieved. The output power reached 300 mW at 1024 nm, and the slope efficiency was 10 %. Laser operation in a plano-plano cavity is achieved with both crystals with thermal lensing playing a key role in their performance. A model describing graphene Q-switched Yb lasers is developed. Our results indicate the potential of graphene for passive Q-switching of ~1 μm bulk lasers.

  4. Multi-gigahertz repetition rate ultrafast waveguide lasers mode-locked with graphene saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obraztsov, P. A.; Okhrimchuk, A. G.; Rybin, M. G.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Garnov, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    We report the development of an approach to build compact waveguide lasers that operate in the stable fundamental mode-locking regime with multigigahertz repetition rates. The approach is based on the use of depressed cladding multi- or single-mode waveguides fabricated directly in the active laser crystal using the femtosecond laser inscription method and a graphene saturable absorber. Using this approach we achieve the stable self-starting mode-locking operation of a diode-pumped waveguide Nd:YAG laser that delivers picosecond pulses at a repetition rate of up to 11.5 GHz with an average power of 12 mW at a central wavelength of 1064 nm. The saturable absorbers are formed through the chemical vapor deposition of single-layer graphene on the output coupler mirror or directly on the end facet of the laser crystal. The stable self-starting mode-locking operation is achieved by controlling the group delay dispersion in the laser cavity with an intracavity interferometer. The method developed for the creation of compact ultrashort pulse laser generators with gigahertz repetition rates can be extended further and applied for the development of compact high-repetition rate lasers that operate at a wide range of IR wavelengths.

  5. 763 fs Passively mode-locked Yb:Y2SiO5 laser with a graphene oxide absorber mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongtong; Cai, Wei; Wei, Jiafeng; Liu, Jie; Zheng, Lihe; Su, Liangbi; Xu, Jun; Wang, Yonggang

    2015-05-01

    Based on a graphene oxide absorber mirror, the laser-diode pumped mode-locked Yb:Y2SiO5 (Yb:YSO) laser was demonstrated for the first time. The laser generated pulses with pulse duration as short as ~763 fs and average output power of 700 mW at the central wavelength of 1059 nm. The corresponding peak power and energy of a single pulse were ~8.6 kW and ~7.4 nJ, respectively. To our best knowledge, this is the shortest bulk mode-locked laser based on graphene oxide.

  6. Homoclinic orbits and cycles in the instabilities of a laser with a saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennequin, Daniel; de Tomasi, Ferdinando; Zambon, Bruno; Arimondo, Ennio

    1988-03-01

    The phase-space evolution for the instabilities in a CO2 laser with an intracavity saturable absorber is investigated experimentally. The different scenarios corresponding to limit cycles, homoclinic orbits and cycles involving two unstable points, and chaotic behavior are investigated. A theoretical analysis of the experimental results is sketched out.

  7. Passive mode locking in a Ti:sapphire laser using a single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber at a wavelength of 810 nm.

    PubMed

    Khudyakov, Dmitry V; Lobach, Anatoly S; Nadtochenko, Viktor A

    2010-08-15

    We report mode locking in a Ti:sapphire (Ti:Sa) laser at the wavelength of 810 nm using a polymer film with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) applied as a saturable absorber. Pulses with 600 fs duration and 0.4 nJ energy were generated from the Ti:Sa laser with polymer-SWNT composite film for cw passive mode locking.

  8. Passively Q-switched Er,Yb:GdAl3(BO3)4 laser with single-walled carbon nanotube based saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachenya, K. N.; Kisel, V. E.; Yasukevich, A. S.; Prudnikova, M. B.; Maltsev, V. V.; Leonyuk, N. I.; Choi, S. Y.; Rotermund, F.; Kuleshov, N. V.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a passively Q-switched Er,Yb:GdAl3(BO3)4 diode-pumped laser emitting near 1.5 µm. By using a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as a saturable absorber, Q-switched laser pulses with energy of 0.8 µJ and duration of 130 ns at a maximum repetition rate of 500 kHz were obtained at 1550 nm.

  9. Quantum-dot saturable absorber and Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb:KGW laser with >450  kW of peak power.

    PubMed

    Akbari, R; Zhao, H; Fedorova, K A; Rafailov, E U; Major, A

    2016-08-15

    The hybrid action of quantum-dot saturable absorber and Kerr-lens mode locking in a diode-pumped Yb:KGW laser was demonstrated. Using a quantum-dot saturable absorber with a 0.7% (0.5%) modulation depth, the mode-locked laser delivered 90 fs (93 fs) pulses with 3.2 W (2.9 W) of average power at the repetition rate of 77 MHz, corresponding to 462 kW (406 kW) of peak power and 41 nJ (38 nJ) of pulse energy. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the highest average and peak powers generated to date from quantum-dot saturable absorber-based mode-locked lasers.

  10. Two-mode diode-pumped colour-centre laser with an intracavity absorbing methane cell

    SciTech Connect

    Gubin, M A; Kireev, A N; Koval'chuk, E V; Tyurikov, D A

    1999-12-31

    A two-mode laser based on the colour centres in an Li:RbCl crystal and pumped by several laser diodes was constructed. The tuning range was 2.7 - 3.28 {mu}m. The use of a laser with an intracavity absorbing methane cell made it possible to observe saturated-dispersion resonances at the R-branch lines of the {nu}{sub 3} band of the methane molecule with a spectral resolution of 300 kHz. (letters to the editor)

  11. Flat solar energy collector with low heat contact between absorber and edge of collector

    SciTech Connect

    Hussmann, E.

    1981-10-27

    The present invention relates to a flat, gas-tight solar energy collector having a novel absorber means consisting of an absorber plate and an edge connecting means attached thereto for connecting the absorber to the edge structure of the collector. No direct thermal contact exists between the edge of the absorber plate and the edge structure means. Thus, heat losses on the sides of the collector are kept to a minimum.

  12. Infrared pulsed fiber lasers employing 2D nanomaterials as saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Li, Heping; Li, Jianfeng

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate that two kinds of 2D nanomaterials are employed as saturable absorbers to realize infrared pulsed fiber lasers at 1.5 μm and 3 μm, respectively. Mode-locked optical pulses are achieved at 1.5 μm erbium-doped fiber lasers by using multilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2). In addition, Q-switched fiber lasers are realized at 3 μm region by using topological insulator: Bi2Te3. Experimental proofs are provided. Our work reveals that 2D nanomaterials like MoS2 and TI: Bi2Te3 are absolutely a class of promising and reliable saturable absorbers for optical pulse generation at infrared waveband.

  13. Rugged TDLAS system for High Energy Laser atmospheric propagation characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perram, Glen; Rice, Christopher

    2008-10-01

    An active remote sensing instrument for the characterization of atmospheric absorption, scattering, and scintillation at several key high energy laser wavelengths is in development. The instrument is based on narrow band tunable diode lasers fiber coupled to a 12'' Ritchey-Chretien transmit telescope and a second receive telescope with visible or near infrared imager. For example, tunable diode lasers have been used to obtain absorption spectra in the laboratory for the Cs D2 lines near 852 nm and the oxygen X-b lines near 760 nm, key to the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) concept. Absorbencies of less than 0.5% are observable. Applications will be assessed including effects to HEL atmospheric propagation from molecular and aerosol absorption and scattering, Cn2 estimation from atmospheric turbulence, hazardous chemical emission detection, and laser communication interception from side scattering. The system will soon be deployed to a military laser test range to characterize path lengths of greater than 1 km.

  14. Anti-terrorist vehicle crash impact energy absorbing barrier

    DOEpatents

    Swahlan, David J.

    1989-01-01

    An anti-terrorist vehicle crash barrier includes side support structures, crushable energy absorbing aluminum honeycomb modules, and an elongated impact-resistant beam extending between, and at its opposite ends through vertical guideways defined by, the side support structures. An actuating mechanism supports the beam at its opposite ends for movement between a lowered barrier-withdrawn position in which a traffic-supporting side of the beam is aligned with a traffic-bearing surface permitting vehicular traffic between the side support structures and over the beam, and a raised barrier-imposed position in which the beam is aligned with horizontal guideways defined in the side support structures above the traffic-bearing surface, providing an obstruction to vehicular traffic between the side support structures. The beam is movable rearwardly in the horizontal guideways with its opposite ends disposed transversely therethrough upon being impacted at its forward side by an incoming vehicle. The crushable modules are replaceably disposed in the horizontal guideways between aft ends thereof and the beam. The beam, replaceable modules, side support structures and actuating mechanism are separate and detached from one another such that the beam and replaceable modules are capable of coacting to disable and stop an incoming vehicle without causing structural damage to the side support structures and actuating mechanism.

  15. Anti-terrorist vehicle crash impact energy absorbing barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Swahlan, D.J.

    1989-04-18

    An anti-terrorist vehicle crash barrier includes side support structures, crushable energy absorbing aluminum honeycomb modules, and an elongated impact-resistant beam extending between, and at its opposite ends through vertical guideways defined by, the side support structures. An actuating mechanism supports the beam at its opposite ends for movement between a lowered barrier-withdrawn position in which a traffic-supporting side of the beam is aligned with a traffic-bearing surface permitting vehicular traffic between the side support structures and over the beam, and a raised barrier-imposed position in which the beam is aligned with horizontal guideways defined in the side support structures above the traffic-bearing surface, providing an obstruction to vehicular traffic between the side support structures. The beam is movable rearwardly in the horizontal guideways with its opposite ends disposed transversely therethrough upon being impacted at its forward side by an incoming vehicle. The crushable modules are replaceably disposed in the horizontal guideways between aft ends thereof and the beam. The beam, replaceable modules, side support structures and actuating mechanism are separate and detached from one another such that the beam and replaceable modules are capable of coacting to disable and stop an incoming vehicle without causing structural damage to the side support structures and actuating mechanism. 6 figs.

  16. Nonlinear modeling of magnetorheological energy absorbers under impact conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Min; Hu, Wei; Choi, Young-Tai; Wereley, Norman M.; Browne, Alan L.; Ulicny, John; Johnson, Nancy

    2013-11-01

    Magnetorheological energy absorbers (MREAs) provide adaptive vibration and shock mitigation capabilities to accommodate varying payloads, vibration spectra, and shock pulses, as well as other environmental factors. A key performance metric is the dynamic range, which is defined as the ratio of the force at maximum field to the force in the absence of field. The off-state force is typically assumed to increase linearly with speed, but at the higher shaft speeds occurring in impact events, the off-state damping exhibits nonlinear velocity squared damping effects. To improve understanding of MREA behavior under high-speed impact conditions, this study focuses on nonlinear MREA models that can more accurately predict MREA dynamic behavior for nominal impact speeds of up to 6 m s-1. Three models were examined in this study. First, a nonlinear Bingham-plastic (BP) model incorporating Darcy friction and fluid inertia (Unsteady-BP) was formulated where the force is proportional to the velocity. Second, a Bingham-plastic model incorporating minor loss factors and fluid inertia (Unsteady-BPM) to better account for high-speed behavior was formulated. Third, a hydromechanical (HM) analysis was developed to account for fluid compressibility and inertia as well as minor loss factors. These models were validated using drop test data obtained using the drop tower facility at GM R&D Center for nominal drop speeds of up to 6 m s-1.

  17. Passively Q-Switched Yb:YAG Laser with Cr(4+):YAG as the Saturable Absorber.

    PubMed

    Dong, J; Deng, P; Liu, Y; Zhang, Y; Xu, J; Chen, W; Xie, X

    2001-08-20

    By using a continuous-wave Ti:sapphire laser as a pumping source, we demonstrated a passively Q-switched Yb:YAG laser at room temperature with Cr(4+):YAG as the saturable absorber. We achieved an average output power of as much as 55 mW at 1.03 mum with a pulse width (FWHM) as short as 350 ns. The initial transmission of the Cr(4+):YAG has an effect on the pulse duration (FWHM) and the repetition rate of the Yb:YAG passively Q-switched laser. The Yb:YAG crystal can be a most promising passively Q-switched laser crystal for compact, efficient, solid-state lasers.

  18. Unique aspects of laser energy deposition in the fs pulse regime

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Shore, B.W.

    1996-02-02

    Ultrashort laser pulse tissue ablation has demonstrated advantages of greatly reduced required energy and collateral damage. These advantages stem directly from the fact that laser energy is absorbed nonlinearly in a time too hsort for significant thermal dn hydrodynamic response. The high peak power and short pulse duration both have implications for practical fiber delivery systems.

  19. Second NASA Conference on Laser Energy Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W. (Editor)

    1976-01-01

    The possible transmission of high power laser beams over long distances and their conversion to thrust, electricity, or other useful forms of energy is considered. Specific topics discussed include: laser induced chemistry; developments in photovoltaics, including modification of the Schottky barrier devices and generation of high voltage emf'sby laser radiation of piezoelectric ceramics; the thermo electronic laser energy converter and the laser plasmadynamics converters; harmonic conversion of infrared laser radiation in molecular gases; and photon engines.

  20. Watt-level passively Q-switched double-cladding fiber laser based on graphene oxide saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenhua; Song, Yanrong; Dong, Xinzheng; Li, Yanlin; Tian, Jinrong; Wang, Yonggang

    2013-10-10

    A watt-level passively Q-switched ytterbium-doped double-cladding fiber laser with a graphene oxide (GO) absorber was demonstrated. The structure of the GO saturable absorber mirror (GO-SAM) was of the sandwich type. A maximum output power of 1.8 W was obtained around a wavelength of 1044 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output power in Q-switched fiber lasers based on a GO saturable absorber. The pure GO was protected from the oxygen in the air so that the damage threshold of the GO-SAM was effectively raised. The gain fiber was a D-shaped ytterbium-doped double-cladding fiber. The pulse repetition rates were tuned from 120 to 215 kHz with pump powers from 3.89 to 7.8 W. The maximum pulse energy was 8.37 μJ at a pulse width of 1.7 μs.

  1. Passively Q-switched ytterbium-doped ScBO3 laser with black phosphorus saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dazhi; Pan, Zhongben; Zhang, Rui; Xu, Tianxiang; Yang, Ruilong; Yang, Bingchao; Liu, Zhongyuan; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a passively Q-switched Yb3+-doped ScBO3 bulk laser using a black phosphorous (BP) saturable absorber, a two-dimensional semiconductor. The response spectra of BP show that it is suitable as a universal switcher in the spectral range from the visible to midinfrared band. Considering the saturable absorption properties of BP and emission properties of Yb3+-doped crystals, the passively Q-switched bulk laser pulses were realized with the Yb3+:ScBO3 crystal as a gain material and a fabricated BP sample as a Q-switcher. Because of the large energy storage capacity of Yb3+:ScBO3, the maximum output energy is obtained to be 1.4 μJ, which is comparable with the previous reported maximum energy of graphene Q-switched lasers. The obtained results identify the potential capability of BP as a pulse modulator in bulk lasers, and BP plays an increasingly important role in a wide range of its applications, including photonics and optoelectronics.

  2. High-power passively mode-locked Nd:YVO(4) laser using SWCNT saturable absorber fabricated by dip coating method.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chun Yin; Chai, Yang; Long, Hui; Tao, Lili; Zeng, Long Hui; Tsang, Yuen Hong; Zhang, Ling; Lin, Xuechun

    2015-02-23

    Passive mode locked laser is typically achieved by the Semiconductor Saturable absorber Mirror, SESAM, saturable absorber, which is produced by expensive and complicated metal organic chemical vapor deposition method. Carbon based single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT), saturable absorber, is a promising material which is capable to produce stable passive mode-locking in the high power laser cavity over a wide operational wavelength range. This study has successfully demonstrated the high power mode locking laser system operating at 1 micron by using SWCNT based absorbers fabricated by dip coating method. The proposed fabrication method is practical, simple and cost effective for fabricating SWCNT saturable absorber. The demonstrated high power Nd:YVO(4) mode-locked laser operating at 1064nm have maximum output power up to 2.7W,with the 167MHz repetition rate and 3.1 ps pulse duration, respectively. The calculated output pulse energy and peak power are 16.1nJ and 5.2kW, respectively.

  3. Reprint of : Thermoelectricity without absorbing energy from the heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Robert S.; Sánchez, Rafael; Haupt, Federica; Splettstoesser, Janine

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the power output of a quantum dot machine coupled to two electronic reservoirs via thermoelectric contacts, and to two thermal reservoirs - one hot and one cold. This machine is a nanoscale analogue of a conventional thermocouple heat-engine, in which the active region being heated is unavoidably also exchanging heat with its cold environment. Heat exchange between the dot and the thermal reservoirs is treated as a capacitive coupling to electronic fluctuations in localized levels, modeled as two additional quantum dots. The resulting multiple-dot setup is described using a master equation approach. We observe an "exotic" power generation, which remains finite even when the heat absorbed from the thermal reservoirs is zero (in other words the heat coming from the hot reservoir all escapes into the cold environment). This effect can be understood in terms of a non-local effect in which the heat flow from heat source to the cold environment generates power via a mechanism which we refer to as Coulomb heat drag. It relies on the fact that there is no relaxation in the quantum dot system, so electrons within it have a non-thermal energy distribution. More poetically, one can say that we find a spatial separation of the first-law of thermodynamics (heat to work conversion) from the second-law of thermodynamics (generation of entropy). We present circumstances in which this non-thermal system can generate more power than any conventional macroscopic thermocouple (with local thermalization), even when the latter works with Carnot efficiency.

  4. Optimization of doubly Q-switched lasers with both an acousto-optic modulator and a GaAs saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Li, Dechun; Zhao, Shengzhi; Li, Guiqiu; Yang, Kejian

    2007-08-20

    A doubly Q-switched laser with both an acousto-optic (AO) modulator and a GaAs saturable absorber can obtain a more symmetric and shorter pulse with high pulse peak power, which has been experimentally proved. The key parameters of an optimally coupled doubly Q-switched laser with both an AO modulator and a GaAs saturable absorber are determined, and a group of general curves are generated for what we believe is the first time, when the single-photon absorption (SPA) and two-photon absorption (TPA) processes of GaAs are combined, and the Gaussian spatial distributions of the intracavity photon density and the initial population-inversion density as well as the influence of the AO Q-switch are considered. These key parameters include the optimal normalized coupling parameter, the optimal normalized GaAs saturable absorber parameters, and the normalized parameters of the AO Q-switch, which can maximize the output energy. Meanwhile, the corresponding normalized energy, the normalized peak power, and the normalized pulse width are given. The curves clearly show the dependence of the optimal key parameters on the parameters of the gain medium, the GaAs saturable absorber, the AO Q-switch, and the resonator. Sample calculations for a diode-pumped Nd3+:YVO4 laser with both an AO modulator and a GaAs saturable absorber are presented to demonstrate the use of the curves and the relevant formulas.

  5. Moving body velocity arresting line. [stainless steel cables with energy absorbing sleeves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, R. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    The arresting of a moving body is improved through the use of steel cables that elongate to absorb the kinetic energy of the body. A sleeve surrounds the cables, protecting them from chafing and providing a failsafe energy absorbing system should the cables fail.

  6. Nano-Textured Fiber Coatings for Energy Absorbing Polymer Matrix Composite Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    NANO-TEXTURED FIBER COATINGS FOR ENERGY ABSORBING POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE MATERIALS R. E. Jensen and S. H. McKnight Army Research Laboratory...Textured Fiber Coatings For Energy Absorbing Polymer Matrix Composite Materials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  7. Low-loss flake-graphene saturable absorber mirror for laser mode-locking at sub-200-fs pulse duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunning, B. V.; Brown, C. L.; Kielpinski, D.

    2011-12-01

    Saturable absorbers are a key component for mode-locking femtosecond lasers. Polymer films containing graphene flakes have recently been used in transmission as laser mode-lockers but suffer from high nonsaturable loss, limiting their application in low-gain lasers. Here, we present a saturable absorber mirror based on a film of pure graphene flakes. The device is used to mode lock an erbium-doped fiber laser, generating pulses with state-of-the-art, sub-200-fs duration. The laser characteristic indicates that the film exhibits low nonsaturable loss (13% per pass) and large absorption modulation depth (45% of low-power absorption).

  8. Experimental and theoretical study of passively Q-switched Yb:YAG laser with GaAs saturable absorber near 1050 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hongwei; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Li, Yuefei; Li, Dechun; Li, Guiqiu; Zhao, Jia; Qiao, Wenchao; Xu, Xiaodong; Di, Juqing; Zheng, Lihe; Xu, Jun

    2014-03-01

    A diode-end-pumped passively Q-switched ytterbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Yb:YAG) laser with gallium arsenide (GaAs) wafer as saturable absorber has been realized. In the experiment, two pieces of GaAs wafers with respective thicknesses of 400 and 700 μm were used respectively. The output laser characteristics such as the pulse duration, single pulse energy and peak power, have been measured. By using thicker GaAs wafer as saturable absorber, a minimum pulse duration of 3.5 ns was obtained with an average output power of 361 mW and a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of 25 kHz, corresponding to a single pulse energy of 19.6 μJ and a peak power of 5.7 kW. With a 400 μm-thick GaAs wafer as saturable absorber, a maximum output power of 469 mW was achieved. The central wavelength of the laser was measured to be 1050.4 nm at pump power of 7.8 W and dual wavelength operation peaked at 1049.3 nm and 1051.6 nm was observed at a high pump power of 10 W. By considering Gaussian spatial distribution and the thermal effects in the gain medium, the coupled rate equations for passively Q-switched Yb:YAG laser with GaAs saturable absorber were given.

  9. Laser measurement of extinction coefficients of highly absorbing liquids. [airborne oil spill monitoring application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Kincaid, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    A coaxial dual-channel laser system has been developed for the measurement of extinction coefficients of highly absorbing liquids. An empty wedge-shaped sample cell is first translated laterally through a He-Ne laser beam to measure the differential thickness using interference fringes in reflection. The wedge cell is carefully filled with the oil sample and translated through the coaxially positioned dye laser beam for the differential attenuation or extinction measurement. Optional use of the instrumentation as a single-channel extinction measurement system and also as a refractometer is detailed. The system and calibration techniques were applied to the measurement of two crude oils whose extinction values were required to complete the analysis of airborne laser data gathered over four controlled spills.

  10. High power L-band mode-locked fiber laser based on topological insulator saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yichang; Semaan, Georges; Salhi, Mohamed; Niang, Alioune; Guesmi, Khmaies; Luo, Zhi-Chao; Sanchez, Francois

    2015-09-07

    We demonstrate a passive mode-locked Er:Yb doped double-clad fiber laser using a microfiber-based topological insulator (Bi(2)Se(3)) saturable absorber (TISA). By optimizing the cavity loss and output coupling ratio, the mode-locked fiber laser can operate in L-band with high average output power. With the highest pump power of 5 W, 91st harmonic mode locking of soliton bunches with average output power of 308 mW was obtained. This is the first report that the TISA based erbium-doped fiber laser operating above 1.6 μm and is also the highest output power yet reported in TISA based passive mode-locked fiber laser.

  11. Lidar remote sensing of laser-induced incandescence on light absorbing particles in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Miffre, Alain; Anselmo, Christophe; Geffroy, Sylvain; Fréjafon, Emeric; Rairoux, Patrick

    2015-02-09

    Carbon aerosol is now recognized as a major uncertainty on climate change and public health, and specific instruments are required to address the time and space evolution of this aerosol, which efficiently absorbs light. In this paper, we report an experiment, based on coupling lidar remote sensing with Laser-Induced-Incandescence (LII), which allows, in agreement with Planck's law, to retrieve the vertical profile of very low thermal radiation emitted by light-absorbing particles in an urban atmosphere over several hundred meters altitude. Accordingly, we set the LII-lidar formalism and equation and addressed the main features of LII-lidar in the atmosphere by numerically simulating the LII-lidar signal. We believe atmospheric LII-lidar to be a promising tool for radiative transfer, especially when combined with elastic backscattering lidar, as it may then allow a remote partitioning between strong/less light absorbing carbon aerosols.

  12. Passively Q-switched erbium doped fiber laser based on double walled carbon nanotubes-polyvinyl alcohol saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, D. Z.; Al-Janabi, A. H.

    2016-11-01

    A passively Q-switched Er-doped fiber laser with a ring cavity operating at 1568.6 nm is demonstrated using a saturable absorber based on a double walled carbon nanotubes film, which is prepared using polyvinyl alcohol as a host polymer. The Q-switching operation is achieved at a low pump threshold of 40 mW. The proposed fiber laser produces stable pulses train of repetition rate ranging from 14.7 KHz to 47 KHz as the pump power increases from threshold to 203 mW. The minimum recorded pulse width was 4.6 µs at 203 mW, while the highest energy obtained was 102.1 nJ.

  13. Passively Q-switched erbium all-fiber lasers by use of thulium-doped saturable-absorber fibers.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tzong-Yow; Fang, Yen-Cheng; Hung, Shih-Hao

    2010-05-10

    We demonstrate all-fiber passively Q-switched erbium lasers at 1570 nm using Tm(3+)-doped saturable-absorber fibers. The absorption cross section of a Tm(3+)-doped fiber at 1570 nm was measured in a bleaching experiment to be about 1.44 x 10(-20) cm(2). With a thulium-doped fiber, sequential pulses with a pulse energy of 9 microJ and a pulse duration of about 420 ns were stably produced at repetition rates in the range 0.1 to 2 kHz. The maximum pulse repetition rate was 6 kHz, limited by the maximum pump power of a 980-nm laser diode, about 230 mW.

  14. Laser energy converted into electric power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimada, K.

    1973-01-01

    Apparatus verifies concepts of converting laser energy directly into electric energy. Mirror, placed in beam and inclined at angle to it, directs small amount of incident radiation to monitor which establishes precise power levels and other beam characteristics. Second mirror and condensing lens direct bulk of laser energy into laser plasmadynamic converter.

  15. Hybrid mode-locked fiber ring laser using graphene and charcoal nanoparticles as saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hongyu; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Wenbo; Dutta, Niloy K.

    2016-05-01

    A fiber ring laser which implements hybrid mode locking technique has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated to generate pulse train at 20 GHz repetition rate with ultrashort pulse width. Graphene and charcoal nano-particles acting as passive mode lockers are inserted into a rational harmonic mode-locked fiber laser to improve the performance. With graphene saturable absorbers, the pulse duration is shortened from 5.3 ps to 2.8 ps, and with charcoal nano-particles, it is shortened to 3.2 ps. The RF spectra show that supermode noise can be removed in the presence of the saturable absorbers. Numerical simulation of the pulse transmission has also been carried out, which shows good agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Sound-absorbing slabs and structures based on granular materials (bound and unbound). [energy absorbing efficiency of porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre-Lazar, S.; Popeea, G.

    1974-01-01

    Sound absorbing slabs and structures made up of bound or unbound granular materials are considered and how to manufacture these elements at the building site. The raw material is a single grain powder (sand, expanded blast furnace slag, etc.) that imparts to the end products an apparent porosity of 25-45% and an energy dissipation within the structure leading to absorption coefficients that can be compared with those of mineral wool and urethane.

  17. Monolayer graphene saturable absorber with sandwich structure for ultrafast solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongtong; Zhao, Lina; Liu, Jie; Xu, Shicai; Cai, Wei; Jiang, Shouzhen; Zheng, Lihe; Su, Liangbi; Xu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The uniform-quality, large-area, monolayer graphene saturable absorber (SA) with sandwich structure was fabricated, tested, and successfully applied for the generation of diode-pumped Yb:Y2SiO5 mode-locked laser. Without extra negative dispersion elements, the shortest pulse with duration of ˜883 fs was obtained at 1042.6 nm with an output power of ˜1 W. These promising experimental results suggested that the low-cost, high-quality graphene SA could potentially be employed in practical, high-power, ultrafast mode-locking laser systems.

  18. Sound absorption of metallic sound absorbers fabricated via the selective laser melting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Li-Wei; Cheng, Chung-Wei; Chung, Kuo-Chun; Kam, Tai-Yan

    2017-01-01

    The sound absorption capability of metallic sound absorbers fabricated using the additive manufacturing (selective laser melting) method is investigated via both the experimental and theoretical approaches. The metallic sound absorption structures composed of periodic cubic cells were made of laser-melted Ti6Al4 V powder. The acoustic impedance equations with different frequency-independent and frequency-dependent end corrections factors are employed to calculate the theoretical sound absorption coefficients of the metallic sound absorption structures. The calculated sound absorption coefficients are in close agreement with the experimental results for the frequencies ranging from 2 to 13 kHz.

  19. Dual-comb modelocked lasers: semiconductor saturable absorber mirror decouples noise stabilization.

    PubMed

    Link, Sandro M; Klenner, Alexander; Keller, Ursula

    2016-02-08

    In this paper we present the stabilization of the pulse repetition rate of dual-comb lasers using an intracavity semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) for passive modelocking and an intracavity birefringent crystal for polarization-duplexing to obtain simultaneous emission of two modelocked beams from the same linear cavity sharing all components. Initially surprising was the observation that the cavity length adjustments to stabilize one polarization did not significantly affect the pulse repetition rate of the other. We gained insight in the underlying physics using both a semiconductor and Nd:YAG laser gain material with the conclusion that the pulse arrival timing jitter of the two beams is decoupled by the uncorrelated time delay from the saturated SESAM and becomes locked with sufficient but not too much pulse overlap. Noise stabilization is in all cases still possible for both combs. The dual-comb modelocked laser is particularly interesting for the semiconductor laser enabling the integration of gain and absorber layers within one wafer (referred to as the modelocked integrated external-cavity surface emitting laser--MIXSEL).

  20. All-GaInNAs ultrafast lasers: Material development for emitters and absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutz, A.; Liverini, V.; Müller, E.; Schön, S.; Keller, U.

    2007-04-01

    Defect engineering is a key feature in material development for active and passive laser devices. Active devices such as surface emitting lasers require excellent material quality with low defect concentration and good strain management. In contrast, passive devices such as saturable absorbers benefit from nonradiative recombination via defect states. Different molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth conditions and annealing parameters were developed to optimize GaInNAs for both active and passive devices. We have demonstrated for the first time an all-GaInNAs modelocked vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser (VECSEL) at 1.3 μm. We combined a GaInNAs VECSEL with a GaInNAs semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) in a laser cavity. The VECSEL was optically pumped by an 808 nm semiconductor diode laser. The intracavity GaInNAs SESAM self-starts stable modelocking and generates a pulse duration of 18.7 ps with a pulse repetition rate of 6.1 GHz at 57 mW of average output power at a center wavelength of 1308 nm. In this paper, we briefly review the modelocking result and then focus on the MBE growth and fabrication of both active and passive GaInNAs devices.

  1. Passive Q switching of Er-Yb fiber laser with semiconductor saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Huang, J Y; Huang, S C; Chang, H L; Su, K W; Chen, Y F; Huang, K F

    2008-03-03

    A high-performance AlGaInAs quantum-well saturable absorber is developed for passively Q-switched Er-Yb double-clad fiber lasers at 1560 nm. With an incident pump power of 13.5 W, an average output power of 1.26 W with a pulse repetition rate of 12 kHz is obtained. The maximum peak power is greater than 500 W.

  2. Sub-100-fs Cr:YAG laser mode-locked by monolayer graphene saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Davide Di Dio Cafiso, Samuele; Ugolotti, Elena; Schmidt, Andreas; Petrov, Valentin; Griebner, Uwe; Agnesi, Antonio; Cho, Won Bae; Jung, Bo Hee; Rotermund, Fabian; Bae, Sukang; Hong, Byung Hee; Reali, Giancarlo; Pirzio, Federico

    2013-05-15

    We report on mode-locking of a Cr:YAG laser at 1516 nm using a monolayer graphene-based saturable absorber of transmission type generating 91 fs pulses with a Fourier product of 0.38 at an average output power exceeding 100 mW. Stable single-pulse mode-locked operation without any sign of Q-switching instabilities or multiple pulses is achieved.

  3. Energy balance in laser ablation of metal targets

    SciTech Connect

    Sobral, H.; Villagran-Muniz, M.; Bredice, F.

    2005-10-15

    Laser-generated plasma was induced on metallic targets glued to a piezoelectric microphone and placed between the plates of a planar charged capacitor. The plasma generates a temporal redistribution of electric charge on the plates that can easily be measured by a resistor connected to the ground plate; this signal is proportional to the total number of ions removed by breakdown. Both the absorbed and scattered energies were simultaneously monitored by the photoacoustic signal and an energy meter. From these signals it was possible to determine the energy involved in each of the processes. Just above the ablation threshold most of the delivered energy is absorbed and the acoustic signal prevails compared to other contributions. Above this region, the electric signal, which is proportional to the energy involved in the ablation process, becomes dominant.

  4. Reducing heat loss from the energy absorber of a solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Chao, Bei Tse; Rabl, Ari

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for reducing convective heat loss in a cylindrical radiant energy collector. It includes a curved reflective wall in the shape of the arc of a circle positioned on the opposite side of the exit aperture from the reflective side walls of the collector. Radiant energy exiting the exit aperture is directed by the curved wall onto an energy absorber such that the portion of the absorber upon which the energy is directed faces downward to reduce convective heat loss from the absorber.

  5. Impact resistance of fiber composites - Energy-absorbing mechanisms and environmental effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Energy absorbing mechanisms were identified by several approaches. The energy absorbing mechanisms considered are those in unidirectional composite beams subjected to impact. The approaches used include: mechanic models, statistical models, transient finite element analysis, and simple beam theory. Predicted results are correlated with experimental data from Charpy impact tests. The environmental effects on impact resistance are evaluated. Working definitions for energy absorbing and energy releasing mechanisms are proposed and a dynamic fracture progression is outlined. Possible generalizations to angle-plied laminates are described.

  6. Impact resistance of fiber composites: Energy absorbing mechanisms and environmental effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    Energy absorbing mechanisms were identified by several approaches. The energy absorbing mechanisms considered are those in unidirectional composite beams subjected to impact. The approaches used include: mechanic models, statistical models, transient finite element analysis, and simple beam theory. Predicted results are correlated with experimental data from Charpy impact tests. The environmental effects on impact resistance are evaluated. Working definitions for energy absorbing and energy releasing mechanisms are proposed and a dynamic fracture progression is outlined. Possible generalizations to angle-plied laminates are described.

  7. Graphene in NLO Devices for High Energy Laser Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-17

    including eye) protection can be achieved by blocking, scattering, diffracting, or absorbing incoming laser light. Current solutions include shutter...noticeable color distortion (filters), narrow band protection (filters), low saturation thresholds (Reverse-Saturable Absorbing (RSA) NLO dyes), and...protecting. Sensor (including eye) protection can be achieved by blocking, scattering, diffracting, or absorbing incoming laser light. Current solutions

  8. High Energy 2-Micron Laser Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    A master oscillator power amplifier, high energy Q-switched 2-micron laser system has been recently demonstrated. The laser and amplifiers are all designed in side-pumped rod configuration, pumped by back-cooled conductive packaged GaAlAs diode laser arrays. This 2-micron laser system provides nearly transform limited beam quality.

  9. Radiant energy absorption studies for laser propulsion. [gas dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, G. E.; Wu, P. K. S.; Pirri, A. N.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the energy absorption mechanisms and fluid dynamic considerations for efficient conversion of high power laser radiation into a high velocity flow is presented. The objectives of the study are: (1) to determine the most effective absorption mechanisms for converting laser radiation into translational energy, and (2) to examine the requirements for transfer of the absorbed energy into a steady flow which is stable to disturbances in the absorption zone. A review of inverse Bremsstrahlung, molecular and particulate absorption mechanisms is considered and the steady flow and stability considerations for conversion of the laser power to a high velocity flow in a nozzle configuration is calculated. A quasi-one-dimensional flow through a nozzle was formulated under the assumptions of perfect gas.

  10. Few-layer black phosphorus based saturable absorber mirror for pulsed solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Lu, Shunbin; Guo, Zhinan; Xu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Han; Tang, Dingyuan; Fan, Dianyuan

    2015-08-24

    We experimentally demonstrated that few-layer black phosphorus (BP) could be used as an optical modulator for solid-state lasers to generate short laser pulses. The BP flakes were fabricated by the liquid phase exfoliation method and drop-casted on a high-reflection mirror to form a BP-based saturable absorber mirror (BP-SAM). Stable Q-switched pulses with a pulse width of 620 ns at the wavelength of 1046 nm were obtained in a Yb:CaYAlO(4) (Yb:CYA) laser with the BP-SAM. The generated pulse train has a repetition rate of 113.6 kHz and an average output power of 37 mW. Our results show that the BP-SAMs could have excellent prospective for ultrafast photonics applications.

  11. Laser measurement of the spectral extinction coefficients of fluorescent, highly absorbing liquids. [crude petroleum oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.

    1982-01-01

    A conceptual method is developed to deduce rapidly the spectral extinction coefficient of fluorescent, highly absorbing liquids, such as crude or refined petroleum oils. The technique offers the advantage of only requiring one laser wavelength and a single experimental assembly and execution for any specific fluorescent liquid. The liquid is inserted into an extremely thin wedge-shaped cavity for stimulation by a laser from one side and flurescence measurement on the other side by a monochromator system. For each arbitrarily selected extinction wavelength, the wedge is driven slowly to increasing thicknesses until the fluorescence extinguishes. The fluorescence as a function of wedge thickness permits a determination of the extinction coefficient using an included theoretical model. When the monochromator is set to the laser emission wavelength, the extinction coefficient is determined using the usual on-wavelength signal extinction procedure.

  12. Passive Q-switching with GaAs or Bi-doped GaAs saturable absorber in Tm:LuAG laser operating at 2μm wavelength.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lin; Li, Dechun; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Li, Xiangyang; Wang, Reng; Liu, Ji

    2015-06-15

    We report the first demonstration of a diode pumped passively Q-switched Tm:LuAG laser near 2μm wavelength with Bi-doped or undoped GaAs wafer as saturable absorber. For Bi-doped GaAs saturable absorber, stable Q-switched pulses with duration of 63.3ns under a repetition rate of 132.7 kHz and pulse energy of 5.51μJ are generated. In comparison to the passively Q-switched laser with undoped GaAs saturable absorber, the laser with Bi-doped GaAs can produce shorter pulses and higher peak power at almost the same incident pump power. The results suggest that Bi-doped GaAs can be an attractive candidate of saturable absorber for Q-switched laser near 2μm wavelength.

  13. Gold nanorods saturable absorber for Q-switched Nd:GAGG lasers at 1 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chao; Liu, Mingyi; Li, Yanbin; Gao, Xuejian; Kang, Zhe; Qin, Guanshi; Jia, Zhitai; Tao, Xutang; Song, Teng; Dun, Yangyang; Bai, Fen; Li, Ping; Wang, Qingpu; Fang, Jiaxiong

    2017-03-01

    A gold nanorod saturable absorber has been synthesized by the seed-mediated growth method characterized in detail. The absorption peak wavelength was 1080 nm, and the modulation depth was measured to be 9%. The performance of its Q-switched Nd:GAGG lasers at 1061 and 1106 nm has been systematically investigated, respectively. The corresponding shortest pulsewidths were 250 and 480 ns. Our experiment results proved that the GNR-SA is a promising saturable absorber for nanosecond bulk lasers.

  14. High Energy Laser Diagnostic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, James R.; Goddard, Douglas N.; Lewis, Jay; Thomas, David

    2010-10-01

    Recent advancements in high energy laser (HEL) sources have outpaced diagnostic tools capable of accurately quantifying system performance. Diagnostic tools are needed that allow system developers to measure the parameters that define HEL effectiveness. The two critical parameters for quantifying HEL effectiveness are the irradiance on target and resultant rise in target temperature. Off-board sensing has its limitations, including unpredictable changes in the reflectivity of the target, smoke and outgassing, and atmospheric distortion. On-board sensors overcome the limitations of off-board techniques but must survive high irradiance levels and extreme temperatures. We have developed sensors for on-target diagnostics of high energy laser beams and for the measurement of the thermal response of the target. The conformal sensors consist of an array of quantum dot photodetectors and resistive temperature detectors. The sensor arrays are lithographically fabricated on flexible substrates and can be attached to a variety of laser targets. We have developed a nanoparticle adhesive process that provides good thermal contact with the target and that ensures the sensor remains attached to the target for as long as the target survives. We have calibrated the temperature and irradiance sensors and demonstrated them in a HEL environment.

  15. Continuous-Integration Laser Energy Lidar Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karsh, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    This circuit design implements an integrator intended to allow digitization of the energy output of a pulsed laser, or the energy of a received pulse of laser light. It integrates the output of a detector upon which the laser light is incident. The integration is performed constantly, either by means of an active integrator, or by passive components.

  16. Photonic crystal fiber based dual-wavelength Q-switched fiber laser using graphene oxide as a saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, H; Soltanian, M R K; Pua, C H; Alimadad, M; Harun, S W

    2014-06-01

    A Q-switched dual-wavelength fiber laser with narrow channel spacing is proposed and demonstrated. The fiber laser is built around a 3 m long erbium doped fiber as the gain medium and a 10 cm long photonic crystal fiber (PCF) as the element used to generate the dual-wavelength output. The PCF has a solid core approximately 4.37 μm in diameter and is surrounded by microscopic air-holes with a diameter of about 5.06 μm each as well as a zero-dispersion wavelength of about 980 nm. A graphene oxide based saturable absorber is used to generate the desired pulsed output. At the maximum pump power of 72 mW the laser is capable of generating pulses with a repetition rate and pulse-width of 31.0 kHz and 7.0 μs, respectively, as well as an average output power and pulse energy of 0.086 mW and 2.8 nJ, respectively. The proposed fiber laser has substantial potential for use in applications that require longer duration pulsed outputs such as in range finding and terahertz radiation generation.

  17. Absorbing film assisted laser induced forward transfer of fungi (Trichoderma conidia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, B.; Smausz, T.; Antal, Zs.; Kresz, N.; Bor, Zs.; Chrisey, D.

    2004-09-01

    We present an investigation on absorbing film assisted laser induced forward transfer (AFA-LIFT) of fungus (Trichoderma) conidia. A KrF excimer laser beam [λ =248nm,FWHM=30ns (FWHM, full width at half maximum)] was directed through a quartz plate and focused onto its silver coated surface where conidia of the Trichoderma strain were uniformly spread. The laser fluence was varied in the range of 0-2600mJ/cm2 and each laser pulse transferred a pixel of target material. The average irradiated area was 8×10-2mm2. After the transfer procedure, the yeast extract medium covered glass slide and the transferred conidia patterns were incubated for 20 h and then observed using an optical microscope. The transferred conidia pixels were germinated and the areas of the culture medium surfaces covered by the pixels were evaluated as a function of laser fluence. As the laser fluence was increased from 0 to 355mJ/cm2 the transferred and germinated pixel area increased from 0 to 0.25mm2. Further increase in fluence resulted in a drastic decrease down to an approximately constant value of 0.06mm2. The yield of successful transfer by AFA-LIFT and germination was as much as 75% at 355mJ/cm2. The results prove that AFA-LIFT can successfully be applied for the controlled transfer of biological objects.

  18. Passively Q-switched dual-wavelength Yb:LSO laser based on tungsten disulphide saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing-Hui, Liu; Jin-Rong, Tian; He-Yang, Guoyu; Run-Qin, Xu; Ke-Xuan, Li; Yan-Rong, Song; Xin-Ping, Zhang; Liang-Bi, Su; Jun, Xu

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a passively Q-switched Yb:LSO laser based on tungsten disulphide (WS2) saturable absorber operating at 1034 nm and 1056 nm simultaneously. The saturable absorbers were fabricated by spin coating method. With low speed, the WS2 nanoplatelets embedded in polyvinyl alcohol could be coated on a BK7 glass substrate coated with high-refractive-index thin polymer. The shortest pulse width of 1.6 μs with a repetition rate of 76.9 kHz is obtained. As the pump power increases to 9 W, the maximum output power is measured to be 250 mW, corresponding to a single pulse energy of 3.25 μJ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to obtain dual-wavelength Q-switched solid-state laser using few-layer WS2 nanoplatelets. Project supported by the National Scientific Research Project of China (Grant No. 61177047), Beijing Municipal Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 1102005), and the Basic Research Foundation of Beijing University of Technology, China (Grant No. X3006111201501).

  19. Fiber Laser Front Ends for High Energy, Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J; Messerly, M; Phan, H; Siders, C; Beach, R; Barty, C

    2007-06-21

    We are developing a fiber laser system for short pulse (1-10ps), high energy ({approx}1kJ) glass laser systems. Fiber lasers are ideal for these systems as they are highly reliable and enable long term stable operation.

  20. Bistabilité optique dans un laser à absorbant saturable trimode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djabi, S.; Djabi, M.; Benkherourou, O.

    2005-10-01

    Cettte étude est consacrée à l'élaboration d'un modéele mathématique simple pour décrire l'action des lasers à absorbants saturables, l'approche envisage ici tient compte d'une manière phénoménologique des processus physiques essentiels qui permet de dégager les principaux paramètres physiques dans les LSA et leurs influences sur la bistabilité optique. Nous allons étudier théoriquement la bistabilité optique dans les lasers à absorbants saturables trimodes dans le cas où les deux milieux actif et absorbant subissent un élargissement homogène. Nous avons établi un programme permettant de déterminer l'effet de la bistabilité optique, de tracer les courbes qui représentent les densités de photons en fonction du pompage du milieu actif et d'analyser la stabilité linéaire des solutions obtenues.

  1. InGaAs/GaAs saturable absorber for diode-pumped passively Q-switched dual-wavelength Tm:YAP lasers.

    PubMed

    Yao, Baoquan; Tian, Yi; Li, Gang; Wang, Yuezhu

    2010-06-21

    We demonstrate the first use of InGaAs/GaAs as a saturable absorber in the Q-switching of a diode pumped Tm(3+) doped laser operating at the wavelengths of 1940 nm and 1986 nm. The influence of the semiconductor saturable absorber's (SESA) position and thermal lens effect on the Q-switch characteristics was investigated. With a pump power of 35 W, the maximum pulse energy of 28.1 microJ with a pulse width of 447 ns at the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 43.7 kHz was obtained by selecting the appropriate position of the SESA.

  2. Optimisation of dynamic vibration absorbers to minimise kinetic energy and maximise internal power dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilletti, Michele; Elliott, Stephen J.; Rustighi, Emiliano

    2012-08-01

    The tuning of a dynamic vibration absorber is considered such that either the kinetic energy of the host structure is minimised or the power dissipation within the absorber is maximised. If the host structure is approximated as a damped single degree of freedom, the optimal values for the ratio of the absorber's natural frequency to the host structure and the optimal damping ratio of the absorber are shown to be the same whether the kinetic energy of the host structure is minimised or the power dissipation of the absorber is maximised. It is also demonstrated that the total power input into the system does not depend on the two parameters but only on the host structure's mass.

  3. Ytterbium-doped Q-switched fiber laser based upon manganese dioxide (MnO2) saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Haroldo T; Khaleque, Abdul; Liu, Liming; Greck, Michael R

    2016-11-10

    Manganese dioxide (MnO2) is an abundant material that is widely used in many devices, such as alkaline batteries. At infrared frequencies, MnO2 is lossy and strongly absorbs light. These characteristics make MnO2 a potential candidate as a low-cost saturable absorber in Q-switched lasers. In this paper, we examine the performance of MnO2 as a saturable absorber in an ytterbium-doped Q-switched fiber laser: we show that it can produce pulses with durations ranging from 300 to 1800 ns.

  4. Absorbing TiOx thin film enabling laser welding of polyurethane membranes and polyamide fibers

    PubMed Central

    Amberg, Martin; Haag, Alexander; Storchenegger, Raphael; Rupper, Patrick; Lehmeier, Frederike; Rossi, René M; Hegemann, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    We report on the optical properties of thin titanium suboxide (TiOx) films for applications in laser transmission welding of polymers. Non-absorbing fibers were coated with TiOx coatings by reactive magnetron sputtering. Plasma process parameters influencing the chemical composition and morphology of the deposited thin films were investigated in order to optimize their absorption properties. Optical absorption spectroscopy showed that the oxygen content of the TiOx coatings is the main parameter influencing the optical absorbance. Overtreatment (high power plasma input) of the fiber surface leads to high surface roughness and loss of mechanical stability of the fiber. The study shows that thin substoichiometric TiOx films enable the welding of very thin polyurethane membranes and polyamide fibers with improved adhesion properties. PMID:27877837

  5. Development of 2 underseat energy absorbers for application to crashworthy passenger seats for general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warrick, J. C.; Desjardins, S. P.

    1979-01-01

    This report presents the methodology and results of a program conducted to develop two underseat energy absorber (E/A) concepts for application to nonadjustable crashworthy passenger seats for general aviation aircraft. One concept utilizes an inflated air bag, and the other, a convoluted sheet metal bellows. Prototypes of both were designed, built, and tested. Both concepts demonstrated the necessary features of an energy absorber (load-limiter); however, the air bag concept is particularly encouraging because of its light weight. Several seat frame concepts also were investigated as a means of resisting longitudinal and lateral loads and of guiding the primary vertical stroke of the underseat energy absorber. Further development of a seat system design using the underseat energy absorbers is recommended because they provide greatly enhanced crash survivability as compared with existing general aviation aircraft seats.

  6. Energy deposition through radiative processes in absorbers irradiated by electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsuo, Tabata; Pedro, Andreo; Kunihiko, Shinoda; Rinsuke, Ito

    1994-09-01

    The component of energy deposition due to radiative processes (bremsstrahlung component) in absorbers irradiated by electron beams has been computed together with the total energy deposition by using the ITS Monte Carlo system version 3.0. Plane-parallel electron beams with energies from 0.1 to 100 MeV have been assumed to be incident normally on the slab absorber, whose thickness is 2.5 times the continuous slowing-down approximation (csda) range of the incident electrons. Absorber materials considered are elemental solids with atomic numbers between 4 and 92 (Be, C, Al, Cu, Ag, Au and U). An analytic formula is given to express the depth profile of the bremsstrahlung component as a function of scaled depth (depth in units of the csda range), incident-electron energy and absorber atomic number. It is also applicable to compounds.

  7. High-Energy Passive Mode-Locking of Fiber Lasers

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Edwin; Renninger, William H.; Wise, Frank W.; Grelu, Philippe; Shlizerman, Eli; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Mode-locking refers to the generation of ultrashort optical pulses in laser systems. A comprehensive study of achieving high-energy pulses in a ring cavity fiber laser that is passively mode-locked by a series of waveplates and a polarizer is presented in this paper. Specifically, it is shown that the multipulsing instability can be circumvented in favor of bifurcating to higher-energy single pulses by appropriately adjusting the group velocity dispersion in the fiber and the waveplate/polarizer settings in the saturable absorber. The findings may be used as practical guidelines for designing high-power lasers since the theoretical model relates directly to the experimental settings. PMID:22866059

  8. Vaporization front in the interaction of a high-energy laser with aerosols - A solitary wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. T.; Miller, T. G.

    1982-06-01

    If a high-energy laser beam were to propagate through highly absorbent aerosols, the aerosols might be subject to extinction by evaporation. This could occur, for instance, if a high-energy CO2 laser beam were to propagate through a medium containing a mist of water droplets. The incident energy would evaporate the droplets, thus increasing the transmission with time. In this paper, solitary waves are obtained as the asymptotic solution to the coupled nonlinear equations describing such an interaction.

  9. Control of laser absorbing efficiency and proton quality by a specific double target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Q.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, X. F.; Qu, J. F.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.

    2016-08-01

    The micro-structured double-layer target is an efficient method to improve proton quality. However, the laser absorption efficiency is low due to strong reflection at the front surface of such targets. Moreover, the proton charge is limited by the driving laser radius. To overcome these shortcomings, a specific double-layer (SDL) target with a vacuum gap in the center of the heavy ion layer is proposed in this paper. In this specified target, the laser reflection effect is significantly weakened and the absorption and penetration efficiencies are greatly enhanced. The high-energy electrons from Breakout afterburner regime efficiently transfer their energy to the protons. Both the energy of the spectral peaks and maximum proton energy are greatly increased. The periodic structure of the longitudinal electric field makes the force applied on the protons becomes homogeneous in time average and therefore reduce the energy spread. In these SDL targets, the proton layer radius and the accelerated proton charge are not limited by the laser radius. With a larger-radius proton layer, the protons can be accelerated to high energy with small energy spread. When the proton layer radius is reduced to the laser radius, the SDL target is still an effective structure to improve the proton quality. The mechanism is proved by a series of particle-in-cell simulations.

  10. Space inhomogeneity and detuning effects in a laser with a saturable absorber: a first-order approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Fernandez, P.; Velarde, M.G.

    1988-05-01

    To a first approximation the effects of detuning and/or space inhomogeneity on the stability domain of a model for a laser with a saturable absorber are presented. It appears that the space dependence increases the domain of the emissionless state, thus delaying the laser action.

  11. Periodic orbits and synchronous chaos in lasers unidirectionally coupled via saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doedel, Eusebius J.; Pando, L. Carlos L.

    2017-02-01

    We study a model for two unidirectionally coupled molecular lasers with a saturable absorber. Our numerical bifurcation study shows the existence of isolas of in-phase periodic solutions as physical parameters change. There are also other non-isola in-phase and intermediate-phase families of periodic oscillations. The coupling parameter strongly affects the stability of these periodic solutions. In this model the unstable periodic orbits belonging to the in-phase isolas constitute a skeleton of the attractor, when chaotic synchronization sets in for a set of physically relevant control parameters.

  12. Semiconductor laser having a non-absorbing passive region with beam guiding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botez, Dan (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A laser comprises a semiconductor body having a pair of end faces and including an active region comprising adjacent active and guide layers which is spaced a distance from the end face and a passive region comprising adjacent non-absorbing guide and mode control layers which extends between the active region and the end face. The combination of the guide and mode control layers provides a weak positive index waveguide in the lateral direction thereby providing lateral mode control in the passive region between the active region and the end face.

  13. Low Energy Laser Biostimulation: New Prospects For Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castel, John C.; Abergel, R. Patrick; Willner, Robert E.; Baumann, James G.

    1987-03-01

    The therapeutic benefits of light-energy is not a new concept to the modern world. Documented applications from ancient times tell of the therapeutic effects of ordinary sun-light to treat such common ailments as painful body joints, wounds, compound fractures and tetanus. The discovery of laser light in the 1960's, opened up new prospects for the medical use of light. Laser light differs from other forms of electromagnetic spectrum in that a single wavelength rather than a spectrum of wavelengths is emitted. Since the early 1970's, low-energy laser radiation has been reported to enhance wound healing rates, reduce edema, and relieve musculoskeletal pain. There is no detectable thermal effect of this laser on the tissue being treated. The effects are considered to occur as a result of photochemical, non thermal effects of the laser beam. Photons are absorbed by the tissue being treated and, in turn, produce positive therapeutic effects such as reduction of pain and edema. Pre-clinical and clinical evaluations are, presently, underway to document the safety and efficacy of low energy laser therapy, which represents a significant advance in the non-invasive treatment of pain.

  14. Study of a high output coupling ratio Q-switched erbium-doped fibre laser using MoS2 saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, W. Y.; Yap, Y. K.; Behameen, S.; Ahmad, H.

    2017-02-01

    In the work here, the performance of a Q-switched erbium-doped fibre laser using a MoS2 saturable absorber and operating with a high output coupling ratio has been studied. It is found that the pump conversion efficiency for the higher output coupling ratio is higher in the current setup. Q-switched laser oscillation is observed over the set wavelength range from 1525-1565 nm with a maximum pulse energy of ~0.50 µJ achieved at a pump power of ~83 mW, corresponding to a maximum peak power of ~186 mW. With lower intra-cavity laser intensity achieved using the higher output coupling ratio, the second order absorption of the MoS2 is mitigated. However, scaling of the peak power and pulse energy seems to be limited by the interplay between the pulse duration, pulse energy and repetition rate.

  15. Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles as saturable absorber in passively Q-switched fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, H.; Lee, C. S. J.; Ismail, M. A.; Ali, Z. A.; Reduan, S. A.; Ruslan, N. E.; Ismail, M. F.; Harun, S. W.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate a passively Q-switched erbium-doped fiber laser using zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles thin film as saturable absorber (SA). ZnO exhibits high nonlinear optical response and fast recovery time, fulfilling the requirements of an ideal SA. The nonlinear optical absorption is characterised by modulation depth of 3.5% with saturation intensity of 0.016 MW cm-2. We insert the SA into the laser cavity and obtain stable Q-switched pulse whereby the repetition rate increases from 41.7 kHz to 77.2 kHz while the pulse width decreases from 9.6 μs to 3.0 μs as the pump power is increased from 60 mW to 360 mW. This result suggests that ZnO could be a promising SA for photonic applications.

  16. Mode-Locked Thulium Ytterbium Co-Doped Fiber Laser with Graphene Oxide Paper Saturable Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. Azooz, S.; W. Harun, S.; H., Ahmad; Halder, A.; C. Paul, M.; Pal, M.; K. Bhadra, S.

    2015-01-01

    A mode-locked thulium ytterbium co-doped fiber laser (TYDFL) is proposed and demonstrated by using a commercial graphene oxide (GO) paper as saturable absorber (SA). The GO paper is sandwiched between two fiber ferrules and incorporates a ring laser cavity to generate soliton pulse train operating at 1942.0nm at a threshold multimode pump power as low as 1.8 W. The mode-locked TYDFL has a repetition rate of 22.32 MHz and the calculated pulse width of 1.1 ns. Even though the SA has a low damage threshold, the easy fabrication of GO paper should promote its potential application in ultrafast photonics.

  17. Exfoliated layers of black phosphorus as saturable absorber for ultrafast solid-state laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baitao; Lou, Fei; Zhao, Ruwei; He, Jingliang; Li, Jing; Su, Xiancui; Ning, Jian; Yang, Kejian

    2015-08-15

    High-quality black phosphorus (BP) saturable absorber mirror (SAM) was successfully fabricated with few-layered BP (phosphorene). By employing the prepared phosphorene SAM, we have demonstrated ultrafast pulse generation from a BP mode-locked bulk laser for the first time to our best knowledge. Pulses as short as 6.1 ps with an average power of 460 mW were obtained at the central wavelength of 1064.1 nm. Considering the direct and flexible band gap for different layers of phosphorene, this work may provide a possible method for fabricating BP SAM to achieve ultrafast solid-state lasers in IR and mid-IR wavelength region.

  18. Gold nanoparticle transfer through photothermal effects in a metamaterial absorber by nanosecond laser

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Hanmo; Yang, Yuanqing; Chen, Xingxing; Zhao, Ding; Chen, Xi; Chen, Yiting; Yan, Min; Li, Qiang; Qiu, Min

    2014-01-01

    A non-complicated, controllable method of metallic nanoparticle fabrication at low operating light power is proposed. The method is based on laser-induced forward transfer, using a metamaterial absorber as the donor to significantly enhance the photothermal effect and reduce the operating light fluence to 35 mJ/cm2, which is much lower than that in previous works. A large number of metallic nanoparticles can be transferred by one shot of focused nanosecond laser pulses. Transferred nanoparticles exhibit good size uniformity and the sizes are controllable. The optical properties of transferred particles are characterized by dark-field spectroscopy and the experimental results agree with the simulation results. PMID:25156404

  19. Microfiber-based gold nanorods as saturable absorber for femtosecond pulse generation in a fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xu-De; Luo, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Hao; Liu, Meng; Luo, Ai-Ping Xu, Wen-Cheng

    2014-10-20

    We reported on the femtosecond pulse generation from an erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser by using microfiber-based gold nanorods (GNRs) as saturable absorber (SA). By virtue of the geometric characteristic of microfiber-based GNRs, the optical damage threshold of GNRs-SA could be greatly enhanced. The microfiber-based GNRs-SA shows a modulation depth of 4.9% and a nonsaturable loss of 21.1%. With the proposed GNRs-SA, the fiber laser emitted a mode-locked pulse train with duration of ∼887 fs. The obtained results demonstrated that the GNRs deposited microfiber could indeed serve as a high-performance SA towards the practical applications in the field of ultrafast photonics.

  20. Harnessing snap-through instability for shape-recoverable energy-absorbing structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sung; Shan, Sicong; Raney, Jordan; Wang, Pai; Candido, Francisco; Lewis, Jennifer; Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-03-01

    Energy absorbing materials and structures are used in numerous areas for maintaining structural integrity, protection and comfort. To absorb/dissipate energy from shock/vibration, one generally relies on processes such as plastic deformation and damping as the case of metal foams and suspensions. Because plastic deformation and damping induce irreversible change in the energy-absorbing systems such as shape changes and degradation of damping elements by heat dissipation, it would be desirable to develop a new energy-absorption mechanism with reversibility. Furthermore, it would be desirable to implement energy-absorption mechanisms whose behavior is not affected by the rate of loading. Here, we report a shape-recoverable system that absorbs energy without degradation by harnessing multistability in elastic structures. Using numerical simulations, we investigate geometrical parameters that determine the onset of the snap-through and multi-stability. We subsequently manufacture structures with different geometrical parameters and sizes using a scalable direct-write 3D printing approach. We experimentally demonstrate reversible energy-absorption in these structures at strain rates over three orders of magnitudes, with reduced peak acceleration under impact by up to one order of magnitude compared with control samples. Our findings can open new opportunities for scalable design and manufacturing of energy-absorbing materials and structures.

  1. Diode-pumped Nd:YAG ceramic laser at 946 nm passively Q-switched with a Cr 4+:YAG saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Zhang, Huanian; Chen, Xiaohan; Wang, Qingpu

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate a diode-pumped Nd:YAG ceramic laser with emission at 946 nm that is passively Q-switched by single-crystal Cr 4+:YAG saturable absorber. An average output power of 1.7 W is measured under 18.4 W of incident power using an output mirror with transmission T=4%. The corresponding optical-to-optical efficiency is 9.2%. The laser runs at a pulse repetition rate of 120 kHz and delivers pulses with energy of 14 μJ and duration of 80 ns, which corresponds to a peak power of 175 W.

  2. Numerical simulation of dual-loss-modulated Q-switched and mode-locked laser with an acousto-optic and Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shengzhi; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Yang, Kejian; Li, Yufei; Li, Ming; Li, Tao; Zhang, Gang; Cheng, Kang

    2010-04-01

    By considering the influence of the turn-off time and the modulation frequency of the acousto-optic (AO) modulator as well as the Gaussian spatial distribution of the photon density, we give a developed rate equation model for a diode-pumped dual-loss-modulated Q-switched and mode-locked (QML) Nd:GdVO(4) laser with AO modulator and Cr(4+):YAG saturable absorber. With this developed model, the dual-loss-modulated QML laser characteristics, such as pulse width and pulse energy, can be numerically simulated, and the theoretical evaluations are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  3. WS₂ as a saturable absorber for ultrafast photonic applications of mode-locked and Q-switched lasers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jun; Li, Xing; Chen, Jianping

    2015-05-04

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, especially the transition metal sulfide semiconductors, have drawn great interests due to their potential applications in viable photonic and optoelectronic devices. In this work, 2D tungsten disulfide (WS2) based saturable absorber (SA) for ultrafast photonic applications was demonstrated. WS2 nanosheets were prepared using liquid-phase exfoliation method and embedded in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) thin film for the practical usage. Saturable absorption was discovered in the WS2-PVA SA at the telecommunication wavelength near 1550 nm. By incorporating WS2-PVA SA into a fiber laser cavity, both stable mode locking operation and Q-switching operation were achieved. In the mode locking operation, the laser obtained femtosecond output pulse width and high spectral purity in the radio frequency spectrum. In the Q-switching operation, the laser had tunable repetition rate and output pulse energy of a few tens of nano joule. Our findings suggest that few-layer WS2 nanosheets embedded in PVA thin film are promising nonlinear optical materials for ultrafast photonic applications as a mode locker or Q-switcher.

  4. Characterization of cobalt doped ZnSe and ZnS crystals as saturable absorbers for alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Robert A.; Kernal, John; Fedorov, Vladimir V.; Mirov, Sergey B.

    2006-02-01

    Cobalt doped ZnSe and ZnS crystals have been studied to determine their effectiveness for passive Q-switching for 700-800nm spectral range (Alexandrite laser). Samples were prepared using Bridgeman technique for single-step growth of Co doped crystals as well as after growth thermal diffusion of Co in undoped crystals. ZnS:Co:Cr crystals, which have been produced using the Bridgeman technique, show maximum initial absorption coefficients of 17 cm -1 at 725nm. Experimental results are reported on effective thermal diffusion of Co 2+ in ZnSe and ZnS polycrystals and thermal diffusion constants of cobalt ions in ZnSe and ZnS are estimated. The nonlinear saturation properties of cobalt doped ZnSe and ZnS crystals have been investigated experimentally. The induced transparency measurements were performed using electro-optically Q-switched, alexandrite laser radiation at 731, 741, and 778 nm with a pulse duration of about 70 ns. The induced transmission measurements were analyzed using a four-level absorber model and the absorption cross sections have been estimated at both 731nm and 741nm to be 9.5 × 10 -18 cm2 and 8.2 × 10 -18 cm2, respectively. Absorption cross sections calculated from saturation measurements at 4A II--> 4T I(4P) transition are in agreement with results earlier reported for mid-infrared spectral region 4A II--> 4T II of Co 2+ ions. The described Co-doped crystals are very promising as passive Q-switches for alexandrite laser resonators. Co 2+ centers feature high cross section of saturation and their absorption bands are nicely matched to the spectral emission of the tunable alexandrite laser. An efficient ZnS:Co:Cr passive Q-switching of the alexandrite laser cavity was realized with output energy of 15 mJ and 50 ns pulse duration.

  5. High slope efficiency and low threshold in a laser-diode-pumped passively Q-switched ion-implanted Nd:YVO4 planar waveguide laser with GaAs saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, G. L.; Li, G. Q.; Zhao, S. Z.; Li, T.; Yang, K. J.; Li, X.

    2011-11-01

    A passively Q-switched waveguide laser, to our knowledge, has been firstly demonstrated in Nd: YVO4 crystal formed by 3 MeV Si+ ion implantation at a dose of 1 × 1015 ions/cm2 at room temperature, in which GaAs was used as saturable absorber. The dependences of the average output power, pulse width, pulse repetition rate on absorbed pump power have been measured at different output plane mirror transmissions. At an absorbed pump power of 78.8 mW and output transmission of 20%, the shortest pulse width of 3.88 ns was obtained, corresponding to the peak power and single pulse energy of 212 W and 0.82 μJ, respectively. The threshold pump power was as low as 40 mW, and the slope efficiency was about 64.5% when the absorbed pump power was lower than 70 mW.

  6. Stowable Energy-Absorbing Rocker-Bogie Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Brian; Voorhees, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    A report discusses the design of the rocker-bogie suspensions of the Mars Exploration Rover vehicles, which were landed on Mars in January 2004. Going beyond the basic requirements regarding mobility on uneven terrain, the design had to satisfy requirements (1) to enable each suspension to contort so that the rover could be stowed within limited space in a tetrahedral lander prior to deployment and (2) that the suspension be able to absorb appreciable impact loads, with limited deflection, during egress from the lander and traversal of terrain. For stowability, six joints (three on the right, three on the left) were added to the basic rocker-bogie mechanism. One of the joints on each side was a yoke-and-clevis joint at the suspension/differential interface, one was a motorized twist joint in the forward portion of the rocker, and one was a linear joint created by modifying a fixed-length bogie member into a telescoping member. For absorption of impact, the structural members were in the form of box beams made by electron-beam welding of machined, thin-walled, C-channel, titanium components. The box beams were very lightweight and could withstand high bending and torsional loads.

  7. Excimer laser forward transfer of mammalian cells using a novel triazene absorbing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doraiswamy, A.; Narayan, R. J.; Lippert, T.; Urech, L.; Wokaun, A.; Nagel, M.; Hopp, B.; Dinescu, M.; Modi, R.; Auyeung, R. C. Y.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2006-04-01

    We present a novel laser-based approach for developing tissue engineered constructs and other cell-based assembly's. We have deposited mesoscopic patterns of viable B35 neuroblasts using a soft direct approach of the matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation direct write (MAPLE DW) process. As a development of the conventional direct write process, an intermediate layer of absorbing triazene polymer is used to provide gentler and efficient transfers. Transferred cells were examined for viability and proliferation and compared with that of as-seeded cells to determine the efficacy of the process. Results suggest that successful transfers can be achieved at lower fluences than usual by the incorporation of the intermediate absorbing layer thus avoiding any damage to cells and other delicate materials. MAPLE DW offers rapid computer-controlled deposition of mesoscopic voxels at high spatial resolutions, with extreme versatility in depositing combinations of natural/synthetic, living/non-living, organic/inorganic and hard/soft materials. Our approach offers a gentle and efficient transfer of viable cells which when combined with a variety of matrix materials allows development of constructs and bioactive systems in bioengineering.

  8. Black phosphorus as saturable absorber for the Q-switched Er:ZBLAN fiber laser at 2.8 μm.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhipeng; Xie, Guoqiang; Zhang, Han; Zhao, Chujun; Yuan, Peng; Wen, Shuangchun; Qian, Liejia

    2015-09-21

    Black phosphorus, a newly emerged two-dimensional material, has attracted wide attention as novel photonic material. Here, multilayer black phosphorus is successfully fabricated by liquid phase exfoliation method. By employing black phosphorus as saturable absorber, we demonstrate a passively Q-switched Er-doped ZBLAN fiber laser at the wavelength of 2.8 μm. The modulation depth and saturation fluence of the black phosphorus saturable absorber are measured to be 15% and 9 μJ/cm(2), respectively. The Q-switched fiber laser delivers a maximum average power of 485 mW with corresponding pulse energy of 7.7 μJ and pulse width of 1.18 μs at repetition rate of 63 kHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to demonstrate that black phosphorus can realize Q-switching of 2.8-μm fiber laser. Our research results show that black phosphorus is a promising saturable absorber for mid-infrared pulsed lasers.

  9. Laser-induced back-side etching with liquid and the solid hydrocarbon absorber films of different thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, M.; Lorenz, P.; Yunxiang, P.; Bayer, L.; Han, B.; Zimmer, K.

    2017-04-01

    Laser-induced backside wet and dry etching (LIBWE and LIBDE) are methods for high-quality surface patterning of transparent dielectrics that making use of an additional absorber material attached to the rear side that is ablated in a confined configuration. Due to the manifold of the involved processes, the mechanism of the etching process and the parameter influence on the material removal process are multifaceted and not fully understood yet. In the present paper, we investigate the influence of the confinement to the backside etching process by studying the impact of the thickness of the attached liquid or solid absorber within a range of 12-125 and 0.2-11.7 μm, respectively. It was found that for the liquid and solid absorbers, the etching rate increases with the thickness of the absorber layer and saturates exceeding a certain value, which depends on the used laser fluence. Moreover, the incubation of etching depends on the absorber thickness. The comparison of the etching results of a similar thickness of the liquid and the solid absorber layers shows that the phase of the absorber (liquid or solid) does not influence the back-side etching process. Time-resolved shadowgraph images of the process indicate that with higher absorber layer thickness, the interaction time and strength of the laser-induced processes at the sample surface increase. The results suggest that confinement of the rear side attached absorber ablation influences the impact of the laser-induced secondary processes to the strength of the material modifications and, therefore, the etching rate.

  10. Energy loss by resonance line photons in an absorbing medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummer, D. G.; Kunasz, P. B.

    1980-01-01

    The mean path length of photons undergoing repeated scatterings in media of large optical thickness is calculated from accurate numerical solutions of the transfer equation including the effect of frequency redistribution characteristic of combined Doppler and natural broadening. Energy loss by continuous absorption processes, such as ionization or dust absorption, is discussed, and asymptotic scaling laws for the energy loss, the mean path length, and the mean number of scatterings are inferred from the numerical data.

  11. Energy Absorption Structure of Laser Supported Detonation Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Hatai, Keigo; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2010-05-01

    In Repetitive Pulsed (RP) laser propulsion, when the high energy laser beam is focused in the thruster, Laser Supported Detonation (LSD) wave is generated. This LSD wave converts the laser energy to the enthalpy of the blast wave, which will then apply impulse to the wall of the thruster. Therefore, the energy absorption structure and sustaining condition of LSD wave are important to be understood, which was still not clear though some visualized experiments have been conducted by Ushio et al. before. In this paper, 2-wavelength Mach-Zehnder interferometry is brought to investigate the electron density distribution of LSD area. At the same time, the temperature of the laser induced plasma is measured by an emission spectroscopy experiment, and calculated based on the assumption of local thermal equilibrium. The results show that in LSD, the electron density has a peak (as high as 2×1024[m-3]) behind the shock wave. The irradiated laser can be entirely absorbed before reaching the position of this peak. As a result, a new peak is always generating in front of the old one and this propagating has the same velocity as that of the blast wave. In this way, high heating ratio is sustained right after the shock front. However, as the laser pulse energy becomes lower, the propagating peak cannot catch up with the blast wave anymore, which leads to a termination of the LSD wave. From this study, it is found that for sustaining the LSD wave, a sufficiently thin laser absorption layer is necessary.

  12. Mode-locked ytterbium fiber lasers using a large modulation depth carbon nanotube saturable absorber without an additional spectral filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y. Z.; Miao, J. G.; Liu, W. J.; Huang, X. J.; Wang, Y. B.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate an all-normal-dispersion ytterbium (Yb)-doped fiber laser mode-locked by a higher modulation depth carbon nanotube saturable absorber (CNT-SA) based on an evanescent field interaction scheme. The laser cavity consists of pure normal dispersion fibers without dispersion compensation and an additional spectral filter. It is exhibited that the higher modulation depth CNT-SA could contribute to stabilize the mode-locking operation within a limited range of pump power and generate the highly chirped pulses with a high-energy level in the cavity with large normal dispersion and strong nonlinearity. Stable mode-locked pulses with a maximal energy of 29 nJ with a 5.59 MHz repetition rate at the operating wavelength around 1085 nm have been obtained. The maximal time-bandwidth product is 262.4. The temporal and spectral characteristics of pulses versus pump power are demonstrated. The experimental results suggest that the CNT-SA provides a sufficient nonlinear loss to compensate high nonlinearity and catch up the gain at a different pump power and thus leads to the stable mode locking.

  13. Can silicon carbide serve as a saturable absorber for passive mode-locked fiber lasers?

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Chen, Ting-Hui; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Leeb, Chao-Kuei; Wua, Chih-I; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2015-01-01

    The study presents a novel demonstration of a passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) that is based on a silicon carbide (SixC1−x) saturable absorber. When the C/Si composition ratio is increased to 1.83, the SixC1−x film transforms from two-photon absorption to nonlinear saturable absorption, and the corresponding value reaches −3.9 × 10−6 cm/W. The Si-rich SixC1−x film cannot mode lock the EDFL because it induced high intracavity loss through two-photon absorption. Even when a stoichiometric SiC is used, the EDFL is mode locked, similar to an EDFL operating under weak nonlinear-polarization-rotation condition. A C-rich SixC1−x film containing sp2-orbital C–C bonds with a linear absorbance of 0.172 and nonlinear absorbance of 0.04 at a 181 MW/cm2 saturation intensity demonstrates nonlinear transmittance. The C-rich SixC1−x saturable absorber successfully generates a short mode-locked EDFL pulse of 470 fs. The fluctuation of the pulse-train envelope dropps considerably from 11.6% to 0.8% when a strong saturable-absorption-induced self-amplitude modulation process occurs in the C-rich SixC1−x film. PMID:26558531

  14. Multi-layered black phosphorus as saturable absorber for pulsed Cr:ZnSe laser at 2.4 μm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaowei; Zhao, Ruwei; He, Jingliang; Zhang, Baitao; Ning, Jian; Wang, Yiran; Su, Xiancui; Hou, Jia; Lou, Fei; Yang, Kejian; Fan, Yisong; Bian, Jintian; Nie, Jinsong

    2016-01-25

    A high-quality black phosphorus (BP) saturable-absorber mirror (SAM) was successfully fabricated with the multi-layered BP, prepared by liquid-phase exfoliation (LPE) method. The modulation depth and saturation power intensity of BP absorber were measured to be 10.7% and 0.96 MW/cm(2), respectively. Using the BP-SAM, we experimentally demonstrated the mid-infrared (mid-IR) pulse generation from a BP Q-switched Cr:ZnSe laser for the first time to our best knowledge. Stable Q-switched pulse as short as 189 ns with an average output power of 36 mW was realized at 2.4 μm, corresponding to a repetition rate of 176 kHz and a single pulse energy of 205 nJ. Our work sufficiently validated that multi-layer BP could be used as an optical modulator for mid-IR pulse laser sources.

  15. Single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber for a diode-pumped passively mode-locked Nd,Y:SrF2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun; Cai, Wei; Liu, Jie; Su, Liangbi; Jiang, Dapeng; Ma, Fengkai; Zhang, Qian; Xu, Jun; Wang, Yonggang

    2016-08-01

    A reflective single-walled carbon nanotube as saturable absorber has been firstly adopted to a passively mode-locked Nd,Y:SrF2 crystal. Without any dispersion compensation, the stably mode-locked laser delivers pulses with pulse width as short as 1.7 ps, repetition rate of 107.8 MHz and center wavelength of 1056 nm. The oscillator produces maximum average output power of 319 mW corresponding with a high slope efficiency of 20.2%. The single pulse energy and the peak power are 2.96 nJ and 1.74 kW, respectively. The experimental results show that single-walled carbon nanotube is an excellent saturable absorber for mode-locked lasers.

  16. Influence of the electron energy and number of beams on the absorbed dose distributions in radiotherapy of deep seated targets.

    PubMed

    Garnica-Garza, H M

    2014-12-01

    With the advent of compact laser-based electron accelerators, there has been some renewed interest on the use of such charged particles for radiotherapy purposes. Traditionally, electrons have been used for the treatment of fairly superficial lesions located at depths of no more than 4cm inside the patient, but lately it has been proposed that by using very high energy electrons, i.e. those with an energy in the order of 200-250MeV it should be possible to safely reach deeper targets. In this paper, we used a realistic patient model coupled with detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the electron transport in such a patient model to examine the characteristics of the resultant absorbed dose distributions as a function of both the electron beam energy as well as the number of beams for a particular type of treatment, namely, a prostate radiotherapy treatment. Each treatment is modeled as consisting of nine, five or three beam ports isocentrically distributed around the patient. An optimization algorithm is then applied to obtain the beam weights in each treatment plan. It is shown that for this particularly challenging case, both excellent target coverage and critical structure sparing can be obtained for energies in the order of 150MeV and for as few as three treatment ports, while significantly reducing the total energy absorbed by the patient with respect to a conventional megavoltage x-ray treatment.

  17. Synthesis of Numerical Methods for Modeling Wave Energy Converter-Point Absorbers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Yu, Y. H.

    2012-05-01

    During the past few decades, wave energy has received significant attention among all ocean energy formats. Industry has proposed hundreds of prototypes such as an oscillating water column, a point absorber, an overtopping system, and a bottom-hinged system. In particular, many researchers have focused on modeling the floating-point absorber as the technology to extract wave energy. Several modeling methods have been used such as the analytical method, the boundary-integral equation method, the Navier-Stokes equations method, and the empirical method. However, no standardized method has been decided. To assist the development of wave energy conversion technologies, this report reviews the methods for modeling the floating-point absorber.

  18. MCNP simulation of absorbed energy and dose by iodinated contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wenjun; Mah, Eugene; Huda, Walter; Yao, Hai

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the absorbed dose and energy by iodinated contrast medium in diagnostic radiology. A simulation geometry in which an inner sphere (d = 0.2cm, 1cm, 5cm) filled with iodinated contrast medium (or water) is located at the center of a 20cm diameter water sphere was used in simulations performed with MCNP5 codes. Monoenergetic x-rays with energies ranging from 40 to 80keV from a cone beam source were utilized and contrast medium concentration ranged from 100 to 1mg/ml. Absorbed dose ratio (RD) to inner sphere and total absorbed energies ratio (RE) to the whole phantom with and without iodinated contrast medium were investigated. The maximum RD was ~13 for the 0.2cm diameter sphere with 100mg/ml contrast medium. The maximum RE was ~1.05 for the 5cm diameter contrast sphere at 80keV with 100mg/ml contrast medium. Under the same incident photon energy, increasing the inner sphere size from 0.2cm to 5cm caused a ~63% increase in the RD on average. Decreasing the contrast medium concentration from 100 to 10 mg/ml caused a decrease of RD of ~ 76%. A conclusion was reached that although local absorbed dose increase caused by iodinated contrast agent could be high; the increase in total absorbed energy is negligible.

  19. Investigation of the laser pumping power impact on the operating regimes of a laser passively Q-switched by a saturated absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benarab, Mustapha; Mokdad, Rabah; Djellout, Hocine; Benfdila, Arezki; Lamrous, Omar; Meyrueis, Patrick

    2011-09-01

    We have adapted the point model for the study of an all-fiber laser doped with Nd3+ and Q-switched by a saturable fiber absorber doped with Cr4+. Calculations of the output power of the 1084 nm laser are considered as a function of the pump power supplied by a 790 nm laser diode. The analysis of the simulation results reveals the existence of pulsed, sinusoidal, and dc operating regimes.

  20. S-band Q-switched fiber laser using MoSe2 saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, H.; Ismail, M. A.; Sathiyan, S.; Reduan, S. A.; Ruslan, N. E.; Lee, C. S. J.; Zulkifli, M. Z.; Thambiratnam, K.; Ismail, M. F.; Harun, S. W.

    2017-01-01

    A passively Q-switched S-band fiber laser using Molybdenum Diselenide (MoSe2) saturable absorber (SA) is proposed and demonstrated. The SA is fabricated by depositing MoSe2 onto two fiber ferrules using the drop-cast method before heating and connecting the two fiber ferrules to form the SA. The passively Q-switched fiber laser designed using the MoSe2 SA has an operational range of 1491.0-1502.0 nm. The output pulse train has a pulse-width ranging from 2.0 μs to 1.0 μs and corresponding repetition rate of between 34.5 kHz and 90 kHz with increasing pump powers, as well as a signal-to-noise of about 35.97 dB. The peak performance of the proposed laser is between 1480.0 and 1490.0 nm, corresponding to the first peak gain region with the S-band.

  1. CsPbBr3 nanocrystal saturable absorber for mode-locking ytterbium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Hu, Zhiping; Li, Yue; Xu, Jianqiu; Tang, Xiaosheng; Tang, Yulong

    2016-06-01

    Cesium lead halide perovskite nanocrystals (CsPbX3, X = Cl, Br, I) have been reported as efficient light-harvesting and light-emitting semiconductor materials, but their nonlinear optical properties have been seldom touched upon. In this paper, we prepare layered CsPbBr3 nanocrystal films and characterize their physical properties. Broadband linear absorption from ˜0.8 to over 2.2 μm and nonlinear optical absorption at the 1-μm wavelength region are measured. The CsPbBr3 saturable absorber (SA), manufactured by drop-casting of colloidal CsPbBr3 liquid solution on a gold mirror, shows modulation depth and saturation intensity of 13.1% and 10.7 MW/cm2, respectively. With this SA, mode-locking operation of a polarization-maintained ytterbium fiber laser produces single pulses with duration of ˜216 ps, maximum average output power of 10.5 mW, and the laser spectrum is centered at ˜1076 nm. This work shows that CsPbBr3 films can be efficient SA candidates for fiber lasers and also have great potential to become broadband linear and nonlinear optical materials for photonics and optoelectronics.

  2. Development of a carbonaceous selective absorber for solar thermal energy collection and process for its formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, John D.

    1989-02-01

    The main goal of the US Department of Energy supported part of this project is to develop information about controlling the complicated chemical processes involved in the formation of a carbonaceous selective absorber and learn what equipment will allow production of this absorber commercially. The work necessary to accomplish this goal is not yet complete. Formation of the carbonaceous selective absorber in the conveyor oven tried so far has been unsatisfactory, because the proper conditions for applying the carbonaceous coating in each conveyor oven fabricated, either have been difficult to obtain, or have been difficult to maintain over an extended period of time. A new conveyor oven is nearing completion which is expected to allow formation of the carbonaceous selective absorber on absorber tubes in a continuous operation over many days without the necessity of cleaning the conveyor oven or changing the thickness of the electroplated nickel catalyst to compensate for changes in the coating environment in the oven. Work under this project concerned with forming and sealing glass panels to test ideas on evacuated glass solar collector designs and production have been generally quite satisfactory. Delays in completion of the selective absorber work, has caused postponement of the fabrication of a small prototype evacuated glass solar collector panel. Preliminary cost estimates of the selective absorber and solar collector panel indicate that this collector system should be lower in cost than evacuated solar collectors now on the market.

  3. Vector soliton fiber laser passively mode locked by few layer black phosphorus-based optical saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Song, Yufeng; Chen, Si; Zhang, Qian; Li, Lei; Zhao, Luming; Zhang, Han; Tang, Dingyuan

    2016-11-14

    We report on the optical saturable absorption of few-layer black phosphorus nanoflakes and demonstrate its application for the generation of vector solitons in an erbium-doped fiber laser. By incorporating the black phosphorus nanoflakes-based saturable absorber (SA) into an all-fiber erbium-doped fiber laser cavity, we are able to obtain passive mode-locking operation with soliton pulses down to ~670 fs. The properties and dynamics of the as-generated vector solitons are experimentally investigated. Our results show that BP nanoflakes could be developed as an effective SA for ultrashort pulse fiber lasers, particularly for the generation of vector soliton pulses in fiber lasers.

  4. Graphene in NLO Devices for High Laser Energy Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    absorbing incoming laser light. Current solutions include shutter systems, fixed-line filters, dyes, and/or reflective technologies. Limitations of these...thresholds (Reverse-Saturable Absorbing (RSA) NLO dyes), and insufficient magnitude of the non-linear effect (metal nano-particles, carbon nanotubes and...scattering, diffracting, or absorbing incoming laser light. Current solutions include shutter systems, fixed-line filters, dyes, and/or reflective

  5. Effects of weld damage on the dynamics of energy absorbing lanyards.

    PubMed

    Katona, David N; Bennett, Charlie R; McKoryk, Michael; Brisson, Andre L; Sparrey, Carolyn J

    2017-01-26

    Manufacturers recommend removing fall protection system components from service for any indication of weld spatter or tool damage; however, little is known about the specific effects of lanyard damage on fall arrest dynamics. Thirty-two energy absorbing lanyards were drop tested after being damaged with weld spatter, plasma torches and cutting tools and compared with new, undamaged lanyards. Two lanyards damaged with a plasma torch failed completely without deploying the energy absorber while weld spatter damage and tool cuts, up to 2/3 through the width of the webbing, had no effect on fall arrest dynamics. The results highlight the catastrophic implications of high temperature damage to lanyard webbing resulting from plasma torches - which require immediate removal from service. In addition, the integrated energy absorber design in bungee style lanyards makes them more susceptible to damage anywhere along its length. We therefore recommended against bungee lanyards for ironworkers and welders.

  6. Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Aceves, S; Anklam, T; Badders, D; Cook, A W; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Farmer, J C; Flowers, D; Fratoni, M; ONeil, R G; Heltemes, T; Kane, J; Kramer, K J; Kramer, R; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G A; Morris, K R; Moses, G A; Olson, B; Pantano, C; Reyes, S; Rhodes, M; Roe, K; Sawicki, R; Scott, H; Spaeth, M; Tabak, M; Wilks, S

    2010-11-30

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. The present work focuses on the pure fusion option. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. It must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  7. 90-fs diode-pumped Yb:CLNGG laser mode-locked using single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuangeng; Petrov, Valentin; Griebner, Uwe; Zhang, Xingyu; Choi, Sun Young; Gwak, Ji Yoon; Rotermund, Fabian; Mateos, Xavier; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Liu, Junhai

    2014-03-10

    A diode-pumped Yb:CLNGG laser is mode-locked with a single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber (SWCNT-SA) for the first time. Pulse durations as short as 90 fs are obtained at ~1049 nm with 0.4% output coupler, the shortest pulses to our knowledge for a diode-pumped 1-µm laser applying SWCNTs as saturable absorber. Using 3% output coupler, the maximum average output power reached 90 mW at a repetition frequency of 83 MHz.

  8. Enhancement of the stability of a synchronously excited cw dye laser by insertion of a nonlinear absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Gafurov, K.G.; Krindach, D.P.; Nekhaenko, V.A.; Yakovlev, A.G.

    1985-06-01

    An experimental investigation was made of combined mode locking of a cw laser utilizing a mixture of rhodamine 6G (amplifier) and malachite green (absorber). The action of a saturable absorber shortened the output pulses to 700 fsec, widened the range of existence of the short pulses, and appreciably increased the lasing stability compared with synchronous excitation of pure rhodamine 6G. These characteristics of the radiation of a laser with combined mode locking were associated with the saturation dynamics of the gain and the absorption.

  9. 400 µJ 79 ns amplified pulses from a Q-switched fiber laser using an Yb(3+)-doped fiber saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sean W; Soh, Daniel B S; Bisson, Scott E; Patterson, Brian D; Hsu, Wen L

    2012-10-08

    We report a passively Q-switched all-fiber laser using a large mode area (LMA) Yb(3+)-doped fiber cladding-pumped at 915 nm and an unpumped single-mode Yb(3+)-doped fiber as the saturable absorber (SA). The saturable absorber fiber and gain fiber were coupled with a free-space telescope to optimize the coupling efficiency between the disparate fibers, preferentially bleaching the SA fiber before gain depletion in the pumped fiber. Using this scheme we first demonstrate a Q-switched oscillator with 40 μJ 79 ns pulses at 1026 nm, and show that pulses can be generated from 1020 nm to 1040 nm. The associated peak power of the oscillator alone is more than two orders of magnitude larger than that reported in previous experimental studies using an Yb(3+)-doped fiber as a saturable absorber. We further demonstrate an amplified pulse energy of 0.4 mJ using an Yb(3+)-doped cladding pumped fiber amplifier. Experimental studies in which the saturable absorber length, pump times, and wavelengths are independently varied reveal the impact of these parameters on laser performance.

  10. Thermal smoothing and hydrodynamical compensation of the nonuniformities of laser energy deposition in a direct-driven target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S.; Rozanov, V.; Lebo, I.; Vergunova, G.; Tishkin, V.; Zmitrenko, N.; Kozubskaya, T.; Popov, I.; Nikishin, V.

    1996-05-01

    Design of the LIGHT target based on an electron heat conductivity smoothing and hydrodynamical compensation of the nonuniformities of energy deposition of a small quantity laser beams is discussed. 2D distribution of absorbed laser energy deposition in an undercritical low-Z absorber of LIGHT target under propagation of a super sonic electron heat conductivity waves and 2D implosion of target with ablator having special initially given distributions of mass are presented. Numerical simulations show the flexibility of LIGHT target ignition at the laser energy of (200-300) kJ and quantity of beams 6.

  11. Multi-Level Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of Two Composite Energy Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Annett, Martin S.; Seal, Michael D., II

    2015-01-01

    Two composite energy absorbers were developed and evaluated at NASA Langley Research Center through multi-level testing and simulation performed under the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) research program. A conical-shaped energy absorber, designated the conusoid, was evaluated that consisted of four layers of hybrid carbon-Kevlar plain weave fabric oriented at [+45 deg/-45 deg/-45 deg/+45 deg] with respect to the vertical, or crush, direction. A sinusoidal-shaped energy absorber, designated the sinusoid, was developed that consisted of hybrid carbon-Kevlar plain weave fabric face sheets, two layers for each face sheet oriented at +/-45deg with respect to the vertical direction and a closed-cell ELFOAM P200 polyisocyanurate (2.0-lb/cu ft) foam core. The design goal for the energy absorbers was to achieve average floor-level accelerations of between 25- and 40-g during the full-scale crash test of a retrofitted CH-46E helicopter airframe, designated TRACT 2. Variations in both designs were assessed through dynamic crush testing of component specimens. Once the designs were finalized, subfloor beams of each configuration were fabricated and retrofitted into a barrel section of a CH-46E helicopter. A vertical drop test of the barrel section was conducted onto concrete to evaluate the performance of the energy absorbers prior to retrofit into TRACT 2. The retrofitted airframe was crash tested under combined forward and vertical velocity conditions onto soil, which is characterized as a sand/clay mixture. Finite element models were developed of all test articles and simulations were performed using LS-DYNA, a commercial nonlinear explicit transient dynamic finite element code. Test-analysis results are presented for each energy absorber as comparisons of time-history responses, as well as predicted and experimental structural deformations and progressive damage under impact loading for each evaluation level.

  12. Apparatus for advancing a wellbore using high power laser energy

    DOEpatents

    Zediker, Mark S.; Land, Mark S.; Rinzler, Charles C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F.

    2014-09-02

    Delivering high power laser energy to form a borehole deep into the earth using laser energy. Down hole laser tools, laser systems and laser delivery techniques for advancement, workover and completion activities. A laser bottom hole assembly (LBHA) for the delivery of high power laser energy to the surfaces of a borehole, which assembly may have laser optics, a fluid path for debris removal and a mechanical means to remove earth.

  13. Using a black phosphorus saturable absorber to generate dual wavelengths in a Q-switched ytterbium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, F. A. A.; Azzuhri, Saaidal R.; Salim, M. A. M.; Shaharuddin, R. A.; Ismail, M. A.; Ismail, M. F.; Razak, M. Z. A.; Ahmad, H.

    2016-08-01

    Using a few-layer black phosphorus (BP) thin film that acts as a saturable absorber (SA) in an ytterbium-doped fiber laser setup, we experimentally demonstrated a passively dual-wavelength Q-switching laser operation. The setup also incorporated a D-shaped polished fiber as a wavelength selective filter. As the SA was used in the ring cavity, a dual-wavelength Q-switch produced consistent outputs at 1038.68 and 1042.05 nm. A maximum pulse energy of 2.09 nJ with a shortest pulse width of 1.16 µs was measured for the achieved pulses. In addition, the repetition rate increased from 52.52 to 58.73 kHz with the increment of the pump level. Throughout the measurement process, the results were obtained consistently and this demonstrates that the BP film is a very good candidate to produce Q-switching pulses for the 1 micron region.

  14. High-power Q-switched erbium-ytterbium codoped fiber laser using multiwalled carbon nanotubes saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ab Razak, Mohd Zulhakimi; Saleh, Zatul Saliza; Ahmad, Fauzan; Anyi, Carol Livan; Harun, Sulaiman W.; Arof, Hamzah

    2016-10-01

    Due to an enormous potential of pulsed lasers in applications such as manufacturing, metrology, environmental sensing, and biomedical diagnostics, a high-power and stable Q-switched erbium-ytterbium codoped double-clad fiber laser (EYDFL) incorporating of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) saturable absorber (SA) made based on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) with a 3∶2 ratio is demonstrated. The SA was fabricated by mixing a dilute PVA solution with an MWCNTs homogeneous solution. Subsequently, the mixture was sonicated and centrifuged to produce a homogeneous suspension that was left to dry at room temperature to form the MWCNTs-PVA film. The SA was formed by inserting the film between a pair of FC/PC fiber connectors. Then, it was integrated into the EYDFL's ring cavity, which uses a 5-m-long erbium-ytterbium codoped fiber (EYDF). The lasing threshold for the Q-switched EYDFL was at 330 mW. At the maximum available pump power of 900 mW, the proposed EYDFL produced Q-switched pulses with a repetition rate of 74.85 kHz, pulsewidth of ˜3.6 μs, and an average output power of about 5 mW. The maximum energy per pulse of ˜85 nJ was obtained at pump power of ˜700 mW with peak power of 21 mW.

  15. Passively Q-switched Ytterbium doped fiber laser with mechanically exfoliated MoS2 saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Masoodi, A. H. H.; Ahmed, M. H. M.; Latiff, A. A.; Arof, H.; Harun, S. W.

    2017-01-01

    A passively Q-switched Ytterbium-doped fiber laser (YDFL) based on MoS2 saturable absorber (SA) is demonstrated. A few layers of MoS2 are mechanically exfoliated from a natural MoS2 crystal using a scotch tape and the resulting SA is sandwiched between two fiber ferrules to form a fiber compatible Q-switcher. The saturation intensity, non-saturable intensity, and modulation depth of the MoS2 SA are 23.5 MW/cm2, 23.0, and 11.3%, respectively. By introducing the MoS2 SA into the YDFL cavity, a stable pulse laser is generated at 1070.2 nm wavelength with a threshold pump power of 49.57 mW. The repetition rate of the Q-switched pulses ranges from 3.817 to 25.25 kHz, as the 980 nm pump power increases from 49.57 to 87.2 mW. The highest pulse energy is 295.45 nJ at a pump power of 87.2 mW.

  16. Black phosphorus as a saturable absorber for generating mode-locked fiber laser in normal dispersion regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latiff, A. A.; Rusdi, M. F. M.; Hisyam, M. B.; Ahmad, H.; Harun, S. W.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports a few-layer black phosphorus (BP) as a saturable absorber (SA) or phase-locker in generating modelocked pulses from a double-clad ytterbium-doped fiber laser (YDFL). We mechanically exfoliated the BP flakes from BP crystal through a scotch tape, and repeatedly press until the flakes thin and spread homogenously. Then, a piece of BP tape was inserted in the cavity between two fiber connectors end facet. Under 810 mW to 1320 mW pump power, stable mode-locked operation at 1085 nm with a repetition rate of 13.4 MHz is successfully achieved in normal dispersion regime. Before mode-locked operation disappears above maximum pump, the output power and pulse energy is about 80 mW and 6 nJ, respectively. This mode-locked laser produces peak power of 0.74 kW. Our work may validates BP SA as a phase-locker related to two-dimensional nanomaterials and pulsed generation in normal dispersion regime.

  17. Safeguards Verification Measurements using Laser Ablation, Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong; Phillips, Jon R.

    2012-07-01

    Laser Ablation Absorbance Ratio Spectrometry (LAARS) is a new verification measurement technology under development at the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). LAARS uses three lasers to ablate and then measure the relative isotopic abundance of uranium compounds. An ablation laser is tightly focused on uranium-bearing solids producing a small plume containing uranium atoms. Two collinear wavelength-tuned spectrometry lasers transit through the plume and the absorbance of U-235 and U-238 isotopes are measured to determine U-235 enrichment. The measurement has high relative precision and detection limits approaching the femtogram range for uranium. It is independent of chemical form and degree of dilution with nuisance dust and other materials. High speed sample scanning and pinpoint characterization allow measurements on millions of particles/hour to detect and analyze the enrichment of trace uranium in samples. The spectrometer is assembled using commercially available components at comparatively low cost, and features a compact and low power design. Future designs can be engineered for reliable, autonomous deployment within an industrial plant environment. Two specific applications of the spectrometer are under development: 1) automated unattended aerosol sampling and analysis and 2) on-site small sample destructive assay measurement. The two applications propose game-changing technological advances in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plant (GCEP) safeguards verification. The aerosol measurement instrument, LAARS-environmental sampling (ES), collects aerosol particles from the plant environment in a purpose-built rotating drum impactor and then uses LAARS-ES to quickly scan the surface of the impactor to measure the enrichments of the captured particles. The current approach to plant misuse detection involves swipe sampling and offsite analysis. Though this approach is very robust it generally requires several months to

  18. Thermoelectronic laser energy conversion for power transmission in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.; Yuen, C.

    1977-01-01

    Long distance transmission of power in space by means of laser beams is an attractive concept because of the very narrow beam divergence. Such a system requires efficient means to both generate the laser beam and to convert the light energy in the beam into useful electric output at the receiver. A plasma-type device known as a Thermo-Electronic Laser Energy Converter (TELEC) has been studied as a method of converting a 10.6 micron CO2 laser beam into electric power. In the TELEC process, electromagnetic radiation is absorbed directly in the plasma electrons producing a high electron temperature. The energetic electrons diffuse out of the plasma striking two electrodes with different areas. Since more electrons are collected by the larger electrode there is a net transport of current, and an EMF is generated in the external circuit. The smaller electrode functions as an electron emitter to provide continuity of the current. Waste heat is rejected from the large electrode. A design for a TELEC system with an input 1 MW laser beam was developed as part of the study. The calculated performance of the system showed an overall efficiency of about 42%.

  19. Concentration measurements of complex mixtures of broadband absorbers by widely tunable optical parametric oscillator laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruxton, K.; Macleod, N. A.; Weidmann, D.; Malcolm, G. P. A.; Maker, G. T.

    2012-11-01

    The ability to obtain accurate vapour parameter information from a compound's absorption spectrum is an essential data processing application in order to quantify the presence of an absorber. Concentration measurements can be required for a variety of applications including environmental monitoring, pipeline leak detection, surface contamination and breath analysis. This work demonstrates sensitive concentration measurements of complex mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using broadly tunable mid wave infrared (MWIR) laser spectroscopy. Due to the high absorption cross-sections, the MWIR spectral region is ideal to carry out sensitive concentration measurements of VOCs by tunable laser absorption spectroscopy (TLAS) methods. Absorption spectra of mixtures of VOCs were recorded using a MWIR optical parametric oscillator (OPO), with a tuning range covering 2.5 μm to 3.7 μm. The output of the MWIR OPO was coupled to a multi-pass astigmatic Herriott gas cell, maintained at atmospheric pressure that can provide up to 210 m of absorption path length, with the transmission output from the cell being monitored by a detector. The resulting spectra were processed by a concentration retrieval algorithm derived from the optimum estimation method, taking into account both multiple broadband absorbers and interfering molecules that exhibit narrow multi-line absorption features. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the concentration measurements and assess the capability of the spectral processor, experiments were conducted on calibrated VOCs vapour mixtures flowing through the spectroscopic cell with concentrations ranging from parts per billion (ppb) to parts per million (ppm). This work represents as a first step in an effort to develop and apply a similar concentration fitting algorithm to hyperspectral images in order to provide concentration maps of the spatial distribution of multi-species vapours. The reported functionality of the novel fitting algorithm

  20. High energy chemical laser system

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, D.W.; Pearson, R.K.

    1975-12-23

    A high energy chemical laser system is described wherein explosive gaseous mixtures of a reducing agent providing hydrogen isotopes and interhalogen compounds are uniformly ignited by means of an electrical discharge, flash- photolysis or an electron beam. The resulting chemical explosion pumps a lasing chemical species, hydrogen fluoride or deuterium fluoride which is formed in the chemical reaction. The generated lasing pulse has light frequencies in the 3- micron range. Suitable interhalogen compounds include bromine trifluoride (BrF$sub 3$), bromine pentafluoride (BrF$sub 5$), chlorine monofluoride (ClF), chlorine trifluoride (ClF$sub 3$), chlorine pentafluoride (ClF$sub 5$), iodine pentafluoride (IF$sub 5$), and iodine heptafluoride (IF$sub 7$); and suitable reducing agents include hydrogen (H$sub 2$), hydrocarbons such as methane (CH$sub 4$), deuterium (D$sub 2$), and diborane (B$sub 2$H$sub 6$), as well as combinations of the gaseous compound and/or molecular mixtures of the reducing agent.

  1. Stimulated Raman scattering of light absorbing media excited by ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchevskiy, F. N.; Strizhevskiy, V. L.; Feshchenko, V. P.

    1985-01-01

    The fluctuation-dissipation theory of spontaneous and stimulated vibration Raman scattering is worked out taking into account the dissipation losses at frequencies of laser pump and scattering radiation. General expressions are found, which describe the absolute intensities and shape, energy and duration of scattered pulses in terms of the parameters of the medium and the the input laser pulses. The general regularities are analyzed in detail. Conditions are found for the realization of spontaneous or stimulated Raman scattering and its dependence on absorption, pulse duration and other parameters of the problem.

  2. Scientific applications for high-energy lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.W.

    1994-03-01

    The convergence of numerous factors makes the time ripe for the development of a community of researchers to use the high-energy laser for scientific investigations. This document attempts to outline the steps necessary to access high-energy laser systems and create a realistic plan to implement usage. Since an academic/scientific user community does not exist in the USA to any viable extent, we include information on present capabilities at the Nova laser. This will briefly cover laser performance and diagnostics and a sampling of some current experimental projects. Further, to make the future possibilities clearer, we will describe the proposed next- generation high-energy laser, named for its inertial fusion confinement (ICF) goal, the multi-megaJoule, 500-teraWatt National Facility, or NIF.

  3. Passively Q-switched, intracavity frequency-doubled YVO{sub 4}/Nd : YVO{sub 4}/KTP green laser with a GaAs saturable absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Shang Gao

    2015-11-30

    A diode-pumped, passively Q-switched, intracavity frequency-doubled YVO{sub 4}/Nd : YVO{sub 4}/KTP green laser is realised using a GaAs saturable absorber. Two pieces of GaAs wafers are employed in the experiment. In using a 400-μm-thick GaAs wafer and an incident pump power of 10.5 W, the maximum output power of the passively Q-switched green laser is 362 mW at a pulse repetition rate of 84 kHz and a pulse duration of 2.5 ns. When use is made of a 700-mm-thick GaAs wafer, the minimum pulse duration is 1.5 ns at a repetition rate of 67 kHz, pulse energy of 4.18 μJ and peak power of 2.8 kW. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  4. Tri-wavelength passively Q-switched Yb3+:GdAl3(BO3)4 solid-state laser based on WS2 saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xihu; Xu, Jinlong; You, Zhenyu; Sun, Yijian; Zhu, Zhaojie; Tu, Chaoyang

    2016-12-01

    Using the WS2 nanosheets prepared by a facile hydrothermal reaction as saturable absorber (SA), we demonstrate a tri-wavelength passively Q-switching operation of a diode-pumped Yb:GdAl3(BO3)4 (Yb:GAB) crystal laser for the first time. The single pulse energy up to 1.30 μJ with the output power of 140 mW is obtained. The corresponding pulse width and repetition frequency rate are 440 ns and 107.8 kHz, respectively. The stable pulsed laser operates at 1044.9, 1045.6 and 1048.5 nm, simultaneously. This work suggests that solvothermal synthesized WS2 could be a promising SA to realize a simultaneously multi-wavelength laser operation.

  5. Conversion of laser energy to gas kinetic energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Techniques for the gas phase absorption of laser radiation for ultimate conversion to gas kinetic energy are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on absorption by the vibration rotation bands of diatomic molecules at high pressures. This high pressure absorption appears to offer efficient conversion of laser energy to gas translational energy. Bleaching and chemical effects are minimized and the variation of the total absorption coefficient with temperature is minimal.

  6. All-fiber thulium/holmium-doped mode-locked laser by tungsten disulfide saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hao; Zheng, Xin; Yin, Ke; Cheng, Xiang'ai; Jiang, Tian

    2017-01-01

    A passively mode-locked thulium/holmium-doped fiber laser (THDFL) based on tungsten disulfide (WS2) saturable absorber (SA) was demonstrated. The WS2 nanosheets were prepared by liquid phase exfoliation method and the SA was fabricated by depositing the few-layer WS2 nanosheets on the surface of a fiber taper. The modulation depth, saturable intensity, and non-saturable loss of this SA were measured to be 8.2%, 0.82 GW cm-2, and 29.4%, respectively. Based on this SA, a stable mode-locked laser operated at 1.91 µm was achieved with pulse duration of 825 fs and repetition rate of 15.49 MHz, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 67 dB. Meanwhile, by increasing the pump power and adjusting the position of polarization controller, harmonic mode-locking operations were obtained. These results showed that the WS2 nanosheet-based SA could be served as a desirable candidate for a short-pulse mode locker at 2 µm wavelength.

  7. Effects of Consecutive Wideband Tympanometry Trials on Energy Absorbance Measures of the Middle Ear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdiek, Laina M.; Sun, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Wideband acoustic immittance (WAI) is a new technique for assessing middle ear transfer function. It includes energy absorbance (EA) measures and can be acquired with the ear canal pressure varied, known as "wideband tympanometry" (WBTymp). The authors of this study aimed to investigate effects of consecutive WBTymp testing on…

  8. Passive Q-switching of a Tm:YLF laser with a Co2+ doped silver halide saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Harel; Burshtein, Zeev; Katzir, Abraham; Noach, Salman; Sokol, Maxim; Frumker, Eugene; Galun, Ehud; Ishaaya, Amiel A.

    2017-02-01

    We report a successful passive Q-switching of a Tm:YLF laser operating at λ = 1.9 μm, using a Co2+:AgCl0.5Br0.5 saturable absorber. Approximately 200-ns long, 150 μJ pulses were obtained. Increase in pump energy resulted in repetitive pulsing, with a repetition rate approximately proportional to the pump pulse energy. Room-temperature optical transmission saturation curves measured in ∼1-mm thick Co2+:AgCl0.5Br0.5 plates yielded a ground state absorption cross section σgs =(7.8 ± 0.5) ×10-18 cm2 , and an excited state absorption cross section σes =(3.3 ± 0.3) ×10-18 cm2 , at λ = 1.9 μm. The lifetime of the A2(4F) second excited-state of the octahedral O symmetry was τ∗ =(0.6 ± 0.06) ns .

  9. Impact Testing and Simulation of a Sinusoid Foam Sandwich Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L; Littell, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    A sinusoidal-shaped foam sandwich energy absorber was developed and evaluated at NASA Langley Research Center through multi-level testing and simulation performed under the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) research project. The energy absorber, designated the "sinusoid," consisted of hybrid carbon- Kevlar® plain weave fabric face sheets, two layers for each face sheet oriented at +/-45deg with respect to the vertical or crush direction, and a closed-cell ELFOAM(TradeMark) P200 polyisocyanurate (2.0-lb/ft3) foam core. The design goal for the energy absorber was to achieve an average floor-level acceleration of between 25- and 40-g during the full-scale crash test of a retrofitted CH-46E helicopter airframe, designated TRACT 2. Variations in the design were assessed through quasi-static and dynamic crush testing of component specimens. Once the design was finalized, a 5-ft-long subfloor beam was fabricated and retrofitted into a barrel section of a CH-46E helicopter. A vertical drop test of the barrel section was conducted onto concrete to evaluate the performance of the energy absorber prior to retrofit into TRACT 2. Finite element models were developed of all test articles and simulations were performed using LSDYNA ®, a commercial nonlinear explicit transient dynamic finite element code. Test analysis results are presented for the sinusoid foam sandwich energy absorber as comparisons of load-displacement and acceleration-time-history responses, as well as predicted and experimental structural deformations and progressive damage for each evaluation level (component testing through barrel section drop testing).

  10. Cyanine dyes with high-absorbance cross section as donor chromophores in energy transfer labels

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, A.N.; Mathies, R.A.; Hung, S.C.; Ju, J.

    1998-12-29

    Cyanine dyes are used as the donor fluorophore in energy transfer labels in which light energy is absorbed by a donor fluorophore and transferred to an acceptor fluorophore which responds to the transfer by emitting fluorescent light for detection. The cyanine dyes impart an unusually high sensitivity to the labels thereby improving their usefulness in a wide variety of biochemical procedures, particularly nucleic acid sequencing, nucleic acid fragment sizing, and related procedures. 22 figs.

  11. Cyanine dyes with high-absorbance cross section as donor chromophores in energy transfer labels

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Mathies, Richard A.; Hung, Su-Chun; Ju, Jingyue

    1998-01-01

    Cyanine dyes are used as the donor fluorophore in energy transfer labels in which light energy is absorbed by a donor fluorophore and transferred to an acceptor fluorophore which responds to the transfer by emitting fluorescent light for detection. The cyanine dyes impart an unusually high sensitivity to the labels thereby improving their usefulness in a wide variety of biochemical procedures, particularly nucleic acid sequencing, nucleic acid fragment sizing, and related procedures.

  12. Q-switching of a Tm,Ho:KLu(WO4)2 microchip laser by a graphene-based saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serres, J. M.; Loiko, P.; Mateos, X.; Jambunathan, V.; Yumashev, K.; Griebner, U.; Petrov, V.; Aguiló, M.; Díaz, F.

    2016-02-01

    The first Ho microchip laser passively Q-switched using a graphene-based saturable absorber is demonstrated based on a Tm,Ho:KLu(WO4)2 crystal cut along the N g-axis. A maximum average output power of 74 mW is extracted from the diode-pumped laser at 2061 nm with a slope efficiency of 4%. Pulses as short as 200 ns with an energy of ~0.2 μJ are obtained at a repetition rate of 340 kHz. The energy transfer (ET), 3F4 (Tm3+) ↔ 5I7 (Ho3+) is studied, yielding ET parameters of P 28  =  1.69 and P 71  =  0.15  ×  10-22 cm3 μs-1, revealing the strong prevalence of direct ET.

  13. Thermal damage suppression of a black phosphorus saturable absorber for high-power operation of pulsed fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghyun; Park, Kichul; Debnath, Pulak C.; Kim, Inho; Song, Yong-Won

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies of black phosphorus (BP) have shown its future potential in the field of photonics. We determined the optical damage threshold of BP at 21.8 dBm in a fiber ring laser cavity, and demonstrated the high-power operation capacity of an evanescent field interaction-based BP saturable absorber. The long-term stability of a passively mode-locked fiber laser with a saturable absorber operating at the optical power of 23.3 dBm was verified for 168 h without any significant performance degradation. The center wavelength, spectral width, and pulse width of the laser output are 1558.8 nm, 14.2 nm, and 805 fs, respectively.

  14. Thermal damage suppression of a black phosphorus saturable absorber for high-power operation of pulsed fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Donghyun; Park, Kichul; Debnath, Pulak C; Kim, Inho; Song, Yong-Won

    2016-09-09

    Recent studies of black phosphorus (BP) have shown its future potential in the field of photonics. We determined the optical damage threshold of BP at 21.8 dBm in a fiber ring laser cavity, and demonstrated the high-power operation capacity of an evanescent field interaction-based BP saturable absorber. The long-term stability of a passively mode-locked fiber laser with a saturable absorber operating at the optical power of 23.3 dBm was verified for 168 h without any significant performance degradation. The center wavelength, spectral width, and pulse width of the laser output are 1558.8 nm, 14.2 nm, and 805 fs, respectively.

  15. Performance evaluation and parameter sensitivity of energy-harvesting shock absorbers on different vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Sijing; Liu, Yilun; Xu, Lin; Guo, Xuexun; Zuo, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Traditional shock absorbers provide favourable ride comfort and road handling by dissipating the suspension vibration energy into heat waste. In order to harvest this dissipated energy and improve the vehicle fuel efficiency, many energy-harvesting shock absorbers (EHSAs) have been proposed in recent years. Among them, two types of EHSAs have attracted much attention. One is a traditional EHSA which converts the oscillatory vibration into bidirectional rotation using rack-pinion, ball-screw or other mechanisms. The other EHSA is equipped with a mechanical motion rectifier (MMR) that transforms the bidirectional vibration into unidirectional rotation. Hereinafter, they are referred to as NonMMR-EHSA and MMR-EHSA, respectively. This paper compares their performances with the corresponding traditional shock absorber by using closed-form analysis and numerical simulations on various types of vehicles, including passenger cars, buses and trucks. Results suggest that MMR-EHSA provides better ride performances than NonMMR-EHSA, and that MMR-EHSA is able to improve both the ride comfort and road handling simultaneously over the traditional shock absorber when installed on light-damped, heavy-duty vehicles. Additionally, the optimal parameters of MMR-EHSA are obtained for ride comfort. The optimal solutions ('Pareto-optimal solutions') are also obtained by considering the trade-off between ride comfort and road handling.

  16. IR laser ablation of dental enamel: mechanistic dependence on the primary absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel; Zuerlein, Michael; Featherstone, John D. B.; Seka, Wolf; Duhn, Clifford; McCormack, Sandra M.

    1998-05-01

    The mechanism of ablation of dental enamel was investigated at IR laser wavelengths from 9.3-10.6 μm and 2.7-3.0 μm. The mechanism of ablation varies markedly depending on whether the laser energy is coupled to the water (Er:YAG - λ=3.0 μm) or coupled to the mineral (CO 2 - λ=9.6 μm). The ablation threshold occurs well below the melting point of dental enamel (1280°C) as indicated by SEM and time resolved surface temperature measurements during Er:YAG laser ablation. Conversely, ablation is initiated at temperatures above the melting point of hydroxyapatite during irradiation with 9.6 μm CO 2 laser radiation. The ablation mechanism is apparently photomechanical in nature and water mediated at 2.94 μm, while near 9.6 μm, the mechanism is more indicative of thermal vaporization of the mineral matrix. Absorption spectra and SEM are used to support the hypothesis that the spatial distribution of water and mineral in the enamel microstructure is responsible for the mechanistic differences in ablation observed between the two IR wavelength regions.

  17. A universal electromagnetic energy conversion adapter based on a metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yunsong; Fan, Xin; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chen, Yunpeng; Xiao, John Q.

    2014-09-01

    On the heels of metamaterial absorbers (MAs) which produce near perfect electromagnetic (EM) absorption and emission, we propose a universal electromagnetic energy conversion adapter (UEECA) based on MA. By choosing the appropriate energy converting sensors, the UEECA is able to achieve near 100% signal transfer ratio between EM energy and various forms of energy such as thermal, DC electric, or higher harmonic EM energy. The inherited subwavelength dimension and the EM field intensity enhancement can further empower UEECA in many critical applications such as energy harvesting, photoconductive antennas, and nonlinear optics. The principle of UEECA is understood with a transmission line model, which further provides a design strategy that can incorporate a variety of energy conversion devices. The concept is experimentally validated at a microwave frequency with a signal transfer ratio of 96% by choosing an RF diode as the energy converting sensor.

  18. A universal electromagnetic energy conversion adapter based on a metamaterial absorber

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yunsong; Fan, Xin; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chen, Yunpeng; Xiao, John Q.

    2014-01-01

    On the heels of metamaterial absorbers (MAs) which produce near perfect electromagnetic (EM) absorption and emission, we propose a universal electromagnetic energy conversion adapter (UEECA) based on MA. By choosing the appropriate energy converting sensors, the UEECA is able to achieve near 100% signal transfer ratio between EM energy and various forms of energy such as thermal, DC electric, or higher harmonic EM energy. The inherited subwavelength dimension and the EM field intensity enhancement can further empower UEECA in many critical applications such as energy harvesting, photoconductive antennas, and nonlinear optics. The principle of UEECA is understood with a transmission line model, which further provides a design strategy that can incorporate a variety of energy conversion devices. The concept is experimentally validated at a microwave frequency with a signal transfer ratio of 96% by choosing an RF diode as the energy converting sensor. PMID:25200005

  19. A universal electromagnetic energy conversion adapter based on a metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yunsong; Fan, Xin; Wilson, Jeffrey D; Simons, Rainee N; Chen, Yunpeng; Xiao, John Q

    2014-09-09

    On the heels of metamaterial absorbers (MAs) which produce near perfect electromagnetic (EM) absorption and emission, we propose a universal electromagnetic energy conversion adapter (UEECA) based on MA. By choosing the appropriate energy converting sensors, the UEECA is able to achieve near 100% signal transfer ratio between EM energy and various forms of energy such as thermal, DC electric, or higher harmonic EM energy. The inherited subwavelength dimension and the EM field intensity enhancement can further empower UEECA in many critical applications such as energy harvesting, photoconductive antennas, and nonlinear optics. The principle of UEECA is understood with a transmission line model, which further provides a design strategy that can incorporate a variety of energy conversion devices. The concept is experimentally validated at a microwave frequency with a signal transfer ratio of 96% by choosing an RF diode as the energy converting sensor.

  20. Design, Fabrication and Testing of a Crushable Energy Absorber for a Passive Earth Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Corliss, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A conceptual study was performed to investigate the impact response of a crushable energy absorber for a passive Earth entry vehicle. The spherical energy-absorbing concept consisted of a foam-filled composite cellular structure capable of omni-directional impact-load attenuation as well as penetration resistance. Five composite cellular samples of hemispherical geometry were fabricated and tested dynamically with impact speeds varying from 30 to 42 meters per second. Theoretical crush load predictions were obtained with the aid of a generalized theory which accounts for the energy dissipated during the folding deformation of the cell-walls. Excellent correlation was obtained between theoretical predictions and experimental tests on characteristic cell-web intersections. Good correlation of theory with experiment was also found to exist for the more complex spherical cellular structures. All preliminary design requirements were met by the cellular structure concept, which exhibited a near-ideal sustained crush-load and approximately 90% crush stroke.

  1. Comparative studies for Cr4+:YAG crystal and AlGaInAs semiconductor used as a saturable absorber in Q-switched Yb-doped fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Huang, J Y; Zhuang, W Z; Huang, W C; Su, K W; Hu, C; Huang, K F; Chen, Y F

    2009-11-09

    We demonstrate comparative studies for Cr(4+):YAG crystal and AlGaInAs quantum-well (QW) used as a saturable absorbers in passively Q-switched Yb-doped fiber lasers. Both saturable absorbers were designed to be possessed of nearly the same initial transmission. Under a pump power of 24 W, the average output powers were up to 14.4 W and 13.8 W obtained with the AlGaInAs QWs and with the Cr(4+):YAG crystal, respectively. The maximum pulse energies obtained with the Cr(4+):YAG crystal and with the AlGaInAs QWs were found to be 0.35 mJ and 0.45 mJ, respectively.

  2. Incorporating piezoelectric energy harvester in tunable vibration absorber for application in multi-modal vibration reduction of a platform structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chun-Ying; Lin, Jia-Hong

    2017-02-01

    Tunable vibration absorber is an effective device to reduce the vibration of structure subjected to harmonic excitation. The vibration energy is transferred mostly to the absorber when the natural frequency of the absorber is tuned to the excitation frequency. In this study, a piezoelectric (PZT) transducer was incorporated into the absorber in order to harvest the vibration energy and still alleviate the vibration of a platform structure. The tuning in dynamic characteristics of the absorber was facilitated by controlling its tip mass. The design formulation of the absorber was presented with a single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) model having the equivalent parameters. In the meantime, an optimal electric load resistor was determined to maximize the power output from the PZT transducer. The experimental measurement validated the SDOF model with good accuracy both in the vibration response and the output electric voltage. Finally, the absorber was installed on a platform structure to investigate its vibration reduction and energy harvesting capability for the external disturbance frequency covering certain frequency span. With three resonance modes of the platform studied, the absorber was able to reduce more than 80% of its original vibration and harvest several folds of electric power comparing with the untuned absorber. Although the performance in vibration reduction was slightly influenced (<6%), the great increase in the electric energy harvested revealed the absorber design a good potential toward self-powered sensor or actuator applications.

  3. Study on energy loss compensation of back scattering conical cavity high-energy laser energy meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xun; Wang, Hui; Shang, Xiao-yan; Nie, Liang; Liu, Bao-yuan

    2009-05-01

    Because absolute quantity thermal laser energy meter based on conical cavity has some features, for example, wide wavelength adaptation range, high laser damage threshold value, extensive measuring energy range and so on, it is often used as the standard of high-energy laser energy meter, and is used extensively in the domain of high energy laser measurement. But, laser energy will lose because of back scattering of conical absorption cavity. So, only after the loss is compensated and amended, exact measurement of laser energy can be achieved. Aiming at energy loss compensation problem of conical cavity high-energy laser energy meter, we firstly, according to speckle statistics optical theory, analyze the back scattering of the conical absorption cavity in condition of uniform distribution laser incident on diffuse reflection surface, and secondly, we aim at high power laser's output facula shape: round, based on optical principles of interaction of the conical cavity inner face and the incident laser and utilize complexfication Simpson numerical method, the mathematical models of optical power density distribution at open-end of conical cavity and back scattering gross power are established. On this basis, the measured result is compensated and amended. The back scattering energy loss is about 0.5% to 2.5%.High-energy laser energy measuring accuracy is improved effectively.

  4. Wavelength-Versatile Graphene-Gold Film Saturable Absorber Mirror for Ultra-Broadband Mode-Locking of Bulk Lasers

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Xie, Guoqiang; Lv, Peng; Gao, Wenlan; Yuan, Peng; Qian, Liejia; Griebner, Uwe; Petrov, Valentin; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Jiyang

    2014-01-01

    An ultra-broadband graphene-gold film saturable absorber mirror (GG-SAM) with a spectral coverage exceeding 1300 nm is experimentally demonstrated for mode-locking of bulk solid-state lasers. Owing to the p-type doping effect caused by graphene-gold film interaction, the graphene on gold-film substrate shows a remarkably lower light absorption relative to pristine graphene, which is very helpful to achieve continuous-wave mode-locking in low-gain bulk lasers. Using the GG-SAM sample, stable mode-locking is realized in a Yb:YCOB bulk laser near 1 μm, a Tm:CLNGG bulk laser near 2 μm and a Cr:ZnSe bulk laser near 2.4 μm. The saturable absorption is characterised at an intermediate wavelength of 1.56 μm by pump-probe measurements. The as-fabricated GG-SAM with ultra-broad bandwidth, ultrafast recovery time, low absorption, and low cost has great potential as a universal saturable absorber mirror for mode-locking of various bulk lasers with unprecedented spectral coverage. PMID:24853072

  5. Laser ablation of absorbing liquids under transparent cover: acoustical and optical monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samokhin, A. A.; Il'ichev, N. N.; Pivovarov, P. A.; Sidorin, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Phase transition induced with infrared (λ = 2920 nm and λ = 2940 nm) nanosecond laser pulses in strongly absorbing liquids (water, ethanol) under transparent solid cover is investigated with the help of acoustical and optical monitoring. LiNbO3 transducer is used for registration of pressure pulses generated in irradiated liquids. Optical signals due to scattering and specular reflection of probing optical beams are explored with the schemes involving total internal reflection and interference effects. Combination of these two optical diagnostic methods permits for the first time to show that irradiation of covered liquids leads to vapor cavity formation which is divided from the cover with thin (submicron) liquid film despite the fact that radiation intensity maximum is located just at the liquid-plate boundary. The cavity formation is due to explosive boiling which occurs when the superheated liquid reaches its superheating limit in near critical region. After the first acoustical signal, the second signal is observed with several hundreds microseconds time delay which is caused by the vapor cavity collapse. Some results of optical and acoustical diagnostics in the case of free liquid surface are also presented.

  6. Effects of laser energy and wavelength on the analysis of LiFePO₄ using laser assisted atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Santhanagopalan, Dhamodaran; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Perea, Daniel E.; ...

    2014-09-21

    The effects of laser wavelength (355 nm and 532 nm) and laser pulse energy on the quantitative analysis of LiFePO₄ by atom probe tomography are considered. A systematic investigation of ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) and green (532 nm) laser assisted field evaporation has revealed distinctly different behaviors. With the use of a UV laser, the major issue was identified as the preferential loss of oxygen (up to 10 at%) while other elements (Li, Fe and P) were observed to be close to nominal ratios. Lowering the laser energy per pulse to 1 pJ/pulse from 50 pJ/pulse increased the observed oxygenmore » concentration to nearer its correct stoichiometry, which was also well correlated with systematically higher concentrations of ¹⁶O₂⁺ ions. Green laser assisted field evaporation led to the selective loss of Li (33% deficiency) and a relatively minor O deficiency. The loss of Li is likely a result of selective dc evaporation of Li between or after laser pulses. Comparison of the UV and green laser data suggests that the green wavelength energy was absorbed less efficiently than the UV wavelength because of differences in absorption at 355 and 532 nm for LiFePO₄. Plotting of multihit events on Saxey plots also revealed a strong neutral O₂ loss from molecular dissociation, but quantification of this loss was insufficient to account for the observed oxygen deficiency.« less

  7. Conversion of blackbody radiation into laser energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInville, R. M.; Hassan, H. A.

    1982-06-01

    By employing detailed kinetic models, three concepts which utilize a blackbody cavity for the conversion of solar energy into laser energy using a CO2 lasant are analyzed and compared. In the first, the blackbody radiation is used to excite flowing CO2 directly. The second and third employ a mixing laser concept with CO and N2 being the donor gases. The CO is optically pumped while thermal heating excites the N2. Blackbody temperatures ranging from 1500 deg K - 2500 deg K are considered. Based on calculated laser power output per unit flow rate of CO2, it appears that the N2-CO2 mixing laser is the most attractive system.

  8. Estimation of RF energy absorbed in the brain from mobile phones in the Interphone Study

    PubMed Central

    Varsier, N; Bowman, J D; Deltour, I; Figuerola, J; Mann, S; Moissonnier, M; Taki, M; Vecchia, P; Villegas, R; Vrijheid, M; Wake, K; Wiart, J

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to develop an estimate of a radio frequency (RF) dose as the amount of mobile phone RF energy absorbed at the location of a brain tumour, for use in the Interphone Epidemiological Study. Methods We systematically evaluated and quantified all the main parameters thought to influence the amount of specific RF energy absorbed in the brain from mobile telephone use. For this, we identified the likely important determinants of RF specific energy absorption rate during protocol and questionnaire design, we collected information from study subjects, network operators and laboratories involved in specific energy absorption rate measurements and we studied potential modifiers of phone output through the use of software-modified phones. Data collected were analysed to assess the relative importance of the different factors, leading to the development of an algorithm to evaluate the total cumulative specific RF energy (in joules per kilogram), or dose, absorbed at a particular location in the brain. This algorithm was applied to Interphone Study subjects in five countries. Results The main determinants of total cumulative specific RF energy from mobile phones were communication system and frequency band, location in the brain and amount and duration of mobile phone use. Though there was substantial agreement between categorisation of subjects by cumulative specific RF energy and cumulative call time, misclassification was non-negligible, particularly at higher frequency bands. Factors such as adaptive power control (except in Code Division Multiple Access networks), discontinuous transmission and conditions of phone use were found to have a relatively minor influence on total cumulative specific RF energy. Conclusions While amount and duration of use are important determinants of RF dose in the brain, their impact can be substantially modified by communication system, frequency band and location in the brain. It is important to take

  9. High energy laser demonstrators for defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, M.; Riesbeck, Th.; Schmitz, J.; Baumgärtel, Th.; Ludewigt, K.; Graf, A.

    2017-01-01

    Rheinmetall Waffe Munition has worked since 30 years in the area of High Energy Laser (HEL) for defence applications, starting from pulsed CO2 to pulsed glass rods lasers. In the last decade Rheinmetall Waffe Munition changed to diode pumped solid state laser (DPSSL) technology and has successfully developed, realised and tested a variety of versatile HEL weapon demonstrators for air- and ground defence scenarios like countering rocket, artillery, mortar, missile (RAMM), unmanned aerial systems (UAS) and unexploded ordnances clearing. By employing beam superimposing technology and a modular laser weapon concept, the total optical power has been successively increased. Stationary weapon platforms, military vehicles and naval platforms have been equipped with high energy laser effectors. The contribution gives a summary of the most recent development stages of Rheinmetalls HEL weapon program. In addition to the stationary 30 kW laser weapon demonstrator, we present vehicle based HEL demonstrators: the 5 kW class Mobile HEL Effector Track V, the 20 kW class Mobile HEL Effector Wheel XX and the 50 kW class Mobile HEL Effector Container L and the latest 10 kW HEL effector integrated in the naval weapon platform MLG 27. We describe the capabilities of these demonstrators against different potential targets. Furthermore, we will show the capability of the 30 kW stationary Laser Weapon Demonstrator integrated into an existing ground based air defence system to defeat saturated attacks of RAMM and UAS targets.

  10. Diode-pumped passively Q-switched and mode-locked Nd:GdVO4 laser at 1.34 microm with V:YAG saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kejian; Zhao, Shengzhi; He, Jingliang; Zhang, Baitao; Zuo, Chunhua; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Li, Ming

    2008-12-08

    Using V:YAG as the saturable absorber, a diode-pumped passively Q-switched and mode-locked Nd:GdVO(4) laser at 1.34 microm is realized. Nearly 100% modulation depth of mode-locking has been achieved. The width of the mode-locked pulse is estimated to be less than 460 ps with 125 MHz repetition rate within an about 1 micros-long Q-switched pulse envelope. A maximum output power of 220 mW and Q-switched pulse energy of 10.5 microJ is obtained. Using the hyperbolic secant function methods, a fluctuation rate equation model considering the Gaussian distribution of the intracavity photon density and the population inversion in the gain medium as well as the ground-state population intensity of the saturable absorber has been proposed to describe the mode-locking process of diode-pumped Nd:GdVO(4)/V(3+):YAG laser. With the space-dependent rate equations solved numerically, the theoretical calculations reproduce the laser characteristics well.

  11. Finite Element Analysis of an Energy Absorbing Sub-floor Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Scott C.

    1995-01-01

    As part of the Advanced General Aviation Transportation Experiments program, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center is conducting tests to design energy absorbing structures to improve occupant survivability in aircraft crashes. An effort is currently underway to design an Energy Absorbing (EA) sub-floor structure which will reduce occupant loads in an aircraft crash. However, a recent drop test of a fuselage specimen with a proposed EA sub-floor structure demonstrated that the effects of sectioning the fuselage on both the fuselage section's stiffness and the performance of the EA structure were not fully understood. Therefore, attempts are underway to model the proposed sub-floor structure on computers using the DYCAST finite element code to provide a better understanding of the structure's behavior in testing, and in an actual crash.

  12. Development of an energy-absorbing passenger seat for a transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichelberger, C. P.; Alfaro-Bou, E.; Fasanella, E. L.

    1985-01-01

    Commercial air transport passenger safety and survivability, in the event of an impact-survivable crash, are subjects receiving increased technical focus/study by the aviation community. A B-720 aircraft, highly instrumented, and remotely controlled from the ground by a pilot in a simulated cockpit, was crashed on a specially prepared gravel covered impact site. The aircraft was impacted under controlled conditions in an air-to-ground gear-up mode, at a nominal speed of 150 knots and 4-1/2 deg glide slope. Data from a number of on board, crash worthiness experiments provided valuable information related to structural loads/failure modes, antimisting kerosene fuel, passenger and attendant restraint systems and energy absorbing seats. The development of an energy absorbing (EA) seat accomplished through innovative modification of a typical modern standard commercial aviation transport, three passenger seat is described.

  13. Calculation of fluence and absorbed dose in head tissues due to different photon energies.

    PubMed

    Azorín, C; Vega-Carrillo, H R; Rivera, T; Azorín, J

    2014-01-01

    Calculations of fluence and absorbed dose in head tissues due to different photon energies were carried out using the MCNPX code, to simulate two models of a patient's head: one spherical and another more realistic ellipsoidal. Both head models had concentric shells to describe the scalp skin, the cranium and the brain. The tumor was located at the center of the head and it was a 1 cm-radius sphere. The MCNPX code was run for different energies. Results showed that the fluence decreases as the photons pass through the different head tissues. It can be observed that, although the fluence into the tumor is different for both head models, absorbed dose is the same.

  14. Numerical simulation of energy-absorbing capacity of metal sheet under penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminishi, K.

    1997-07-01

    A finite element program employing a new explicit and consistent scheme for dynamic plasticity problems has been developed and deformation analysis of metal sheet under penetration has been carried out by this program. On the basis of this simulation, formulae for estimating the energy-absorbing capacity of thin metal sheet are proposed and the validity of this formulae has been shown numerically and experimentally.

  15. Improving impact resistance of ceramic materials by energy absorbing surface layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirchner, H. P.; Seretsky, J.

    1974-01-01

    Energy absorbing surface layers were used to improve the impact resistance of silicon nitride and silicon carbide ceramics. Low elastic modulus materials were used. In some cases, the low elastic modulus was achieved using materials that form localized microcracks as a result of thermal expansion anisotropy, thermal expansion differences between phases, or phase transformations. In other cases, semi-vitreous or vitreous materials were used. Substantial improvements in impact resistance were observed at room and elevated temperatures.

  16. Methacrylic resin having a high solar radiant energy absorbing property and process for producing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Kamada, K.; Nakai, Y.

    1981-10-20

    A methacrylic resin having a high solar radiant energy absorbing property wherein an organic compound (A) containing cupric ion and a compound (B) having at least one p-o-h bond in a molecule are contained into the methacrylic resin selected from poly(Methyl methacrylate) or methacrylic polymers containing at least 50% by weight of a methyl methacrylate unit. A process for producing said methacrylic resin is also disclosed.

  17. Low threshold diode-pumped picosecond mode-locked Nd:YAG laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshghi, M. J.; Majdabadi, A.; Koohian, A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a low threshold diode pumped passively mode-locked Nd:YAG laser has been demonstrated by using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror. The threshold power for continuous-wave mode-locking is relatively low, about 3.2 W. The resonator stability across the pump power has been analytically examined. Moreover, the mode overlap between the pump beam and the laser fundamental mode has been simulated by MATLAB software. Adopting Z-shaped resonator configuration and suitable design of the resonator’s arm lengths, has enabled the author to prepare mode-locking conditions, and obtain 40 ps pulses with 112 MHz pulse repetition rate. The laser output was stable without any Q switched instability. To the best of our knowledge, this is the lowest threshold for CW mode-locking operation of a Nd:YAG laser.

  18. Laser-induced processes on the back side of dielectric surfaces using a CuSO4-based absorber liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehnder, Sarah; Lorenz, Pierre; Ehrhardt, Martin; Zimmer, Klaus; Schwaller, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Micro-structured dielectric surfaces in combination with electrode structures are promising in the field of rapid prototyping of micro-sensors. In this work laser-induced back side etching and back side deposition using aqueous copper sulfate in form of a tartrate complex with formaldehyde as absorber liquid has been investigated regarding this aim. Results obtained with different laser systems ranging from UV to Near-IR and with pulse lengths from femtoseconds to nanoseconds will be presented, in order to give a wide-spread overview of the different observable effects. Depending on the specific setup and laser parameters, either well-defined compact Cu deposits, micro- or nanoscaled Cu droplets or ablation of the dielectric substrate was observed. Best quality crystalline and conducting Cu structures were achieved using ns pulses at 532 nm wavelength. Droplet formation with UV excimer laser was observed. Parameters influencing each configuration will be discussed.

  19. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of Composite Energy-Absorbing Keel Beams for General Aviation Type Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A lightweight energy-absorbing keel-beam concept was developed and retrofitted in a general aviation type aircraft to improve crashworthiness performance. The energy-absorbing beam consisted of a foam-filled cellular structure with glass fiber and hybrid glass/kevlar cell walls. Design, analysis, fabrication and testing of the keel beams prior to installation and subsequent full-scale crash testing of the aircraft are described. Factors such as material and fabrication constraints, damage tolerance, crush stress/strain response, seat-rail loading, and post crush integrity, which influenced the course of the design process are also presented. A theory similar to the one often used for ductile metal box structures was employed with appropriate modifications to estimate the sustained crush loads for the beams. This, analytical tool, coupled with dynamic finite element simulation using MSC.Dytran were the prime design and analysis tools. The validity of the theory as a reliable design tool was examined against test data from static crush tests of beam sections while the overall performance of the energy-absorbing subfloor was assessed through dynamic testing of 24 in long subfloor assemblies.

  20. Influence of absorbed pump profile on the temperature distribution within a diode side-pumped laser rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghtader Dindarlu, M. H.; Tehrani, M. Kavosh; Saghafifar, H.; Maleki, A.; Solookinejad, Gh; Jabbari, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, an analytical model for temperature distribution of the side-pumped laser rod is extracted. This model can be used for side-pumped laser rods whose absorbed pump profile is a Gaussian profile. Then, it is validated by numerical results which exhibit a good agreement with the analytical results. Afterwards, by considering a general expression for super-Gaussian and top-hat profiles, and solving the heat equation, the influence of profile width and super-Gaussian exponent of the profile on temperature distribution are investigated. Consequently, the profile width turns out to have a greater influence on the temperature compared to the type of the profile.

  1. Theory of passive mode locking of solid-state lasers using metal nanocomposites as slow saturable absorbers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang-Hyon; Griebner, Uwe; Herrmann, Joachim

    2012-05-01

    Mode locking of solid-state lasers using metal nanocomposites as slow saturable absorbers (SAs) is studied theoretically. The derived equation for the transient nonlinear response of metal nanocomposites is based on the semiclassical two-temperature model. The model is confirmed experimentally by pump-probe measurements on Au nanoparticles (NPs). The theory was applied to study passive mode locking of a solid-state laser containing Au NPs as SA in the green spectral range. Pulse durations as short as 100 fs are predicted, and design criteria of metal NP SAs are derived.

  2. Passive synchronization of erbium and thulium doped fiber mode-locked lasers enhanced by common graphene saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Sotor, Jaroslaw; Sobon, Grzegorz; Tarka, Jan; Pasternak, Iwona; Krajewska, Aleksandra; Strupinski, Wlodek; Abramski, Krzysztof M

    2014-03-10

    In this work we present for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, a passively synchronized thulium (Tm) and erbium (Er) doped fiber laser mode-locked by a common graphene saturable absorber (GSA). The laser consists of two ring resonators combined with a 90 cm long common fiber branch incorporating the saturable absorber (SA). Such laser generates optical solitons centered at 1558.5 nm and 1938 nm with pulse durations of 915 fs and 1.57 ps, respectively. Both laser loops were passively synchronized at repetition frequency of 20.5025 MHz by nonlinear interaction (cross phase modulation, XPM) in common fiber branch between generated pulses. The maximum cavity mismatch of the Er-laser in synchronization regime was 0.78 mm. The synchronization mechanism was also investigated. We demonstrate that the third order nonlinearities of graphene enhance the synchronization range. In our case the range was increased about 85%. The integrated RMS timing jitter between the synchronized pulses was 67 fs.

  3. High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

    2009-10-30

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has substantial relevant experience in the construction of high energy lasers, and more recently in the development of advanced high average power solid state lasers. We are currently developing new concepts for advanced solid state laser drivers for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) application, and other high average power laser applications that could become central technologies for use in space debris removal. The debris population most readily addressed by our laser technology is that of 0.1-10 cm sized debris in low earth orbit (LEO). In this application, a ground based laser system would engage an orbiting target and slow it down by ablating material from its surface which leads to reentry into the atmosphere, as proposed by NASA's ORION Project. The ORION concept of operations (CONOPS) is also described in general terms by Phipps. Key aspects of this approach include the need for high irradiance on target, 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, which favors short (i.e., picoseconds to nanoseconds) laser pulse durations and high energy per pulse ({approx} > 10 kJ). Due to the target's orbital velocity, the potential duration of engagement is only of order 100 seconds, so a high pulse repetition rate is also essential. The laser technology needed for this application did not exist when ORION was first proposed, but today, a unique combination of emerging technologies could create a path to enable deployment in the near future. Our concepts for the laser system architecture are an extension of what was developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), combined with high repetition rate laser technology developed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and heat capacity laser technology developed for military applications. The 'front-end' seed pulse generator would be fiber-optics based, and would generate a temporally, and spectrally tailored

  4. High-energy laser plasma diagnostic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingjun M.; Aye, Tin M.; Fruehauf, Norbert; Savant, Gajendra D.; Erwin, Daniel A.; Smoot, Brayton E.; Loose, Richard W.

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a non-contact diagnosis system for analyzing the plasma density profile, temperature profile, and ionic species of a high energy laser-generated plasma. The system was developed by Physical Optics Corporation in cooperation with the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command, High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. The non- contact diagnostic system consists of three subsystems: an optical fiber-based interferometer, a plasma spectrometer, and a genetic algorithm-based fringe-image processor. In the interferometer subsystem, the transmitter and the receiver are each packaged as a compact module. A narrow notch filter rejects strong plasma light, passing only the laser probing beam, which carries the plasma density information. The plasma spectrum signal is collected by an optical fiber head, which is connected to a compact spectrometer. Real- time genetic algorithm-based data processing/display permits instantaneous analysis of the plasma characteristics. The research effort included design and fabrication of a vacuum chamber, and high-energy laser plasma generation. Compactness, real-time operation, and ease of use make the laser plasma diagnosis system well suited for dual use applications such as diagnosis of electric arc and other industrial plasmas.

  5. New Insight into the Angle Insensitivity of Ultrathin Planar Optical Absorbers for Broadband Solar Energy Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Yu, Haitong; Duan, Yuanyuan; Li, Qiang; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-09-01

    Two challenging problems still remain for optical absorbers consisting of an ultrathin planar semiconductor film on top of an opaque metallic substrate. One is the angle-insensitive mechanism and the other is the system design needed for broadband solar energy harvesting. Here, first we theoretically demonstrates that the high refractive index, instead of the ultrathin feature as reported in previous studies, is the physical origin of the angle insensitivity for ultrathin planar optical absorbers. They exhibit omnidirectional resonance for TE polarization due to the high complex refractive index difference between the semiconductor and the air, while for TM polarization the angle insensitivity persists up to an incident angle related to the semiconductor refractive index. These findings were validated by fabricating and characterizing an 18 nm Ge/Ag absorber sample (representative of small band gap semiconductors for photovoltaic applications) and a 22 nm hematite/Ag sample (representative of large band gap semiconductors for photoelectrochemical applications). Then, we took advantage of angle insensitivity and designed a spectrum splitting configuration for broadband solar energy harvesting. The cascaded solar cell and unassisted solar water splitting systems have photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells that are also spectrum splitters, so an external spectrum splitting element is not needed.

  6. New Insight into the Angle Insensitivity of Ultrathin Planar Optical Absorbers for Broadband Solar Energy Harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Yu, Haitong; Duan, Yuanyuan; Li, Qiang; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    Two challenging problems still remain for optical absorbers consisting of an ultrathin planar semiconductor film on top of an opaque metallic substrate. One is the angle-insensitive mechanism and the other is the system design needed for broadband solar energy harvesting. Here, first we theoretically demonstrates that the high refractive index, instead of the ultrathin feature as reported in previous studies, is the physical origin of the angle insensitivity for ultrathin planar optical absorbers. They exhibit omnidirectional resonance for TE polarization due to the high complex refractive index difference between the semiconductor and the air, while for TM polarization the angle insensitivity persists up to an incident angle related to the semiconductor refractive index. These findings were validated by fabricating and characterizing an 18 nm Ge/Ag absorber sample (representative of small band gap semiconductors for photovoltaic applications) and a 22 nm hematite/Ag sample (representative of large band gap semiconductors for photoelectrochemical applications). Then, we took advantage of angle insensitivity and designed a spectrum splitting configuration for broadband solar energy harvesting. The cascaded solar cell and unassisted solar water splitting systems have photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells that are also spectrum splitters, so an external spectrum splitting element is not needed. PMID:27582317

  7. Point-by-point near-field optical energy deposition around plasmonic nanospheres in absorbing media.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R K; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2015-08-01

    Here we investigate the effects of absorbing media on plasmon-enhanced near-field optical energy deposition. We find that increasing absorption by the medium results in increased particle scattering at the expense of particle absorption, and that much of this increased particle scattering is absorbed by the medium close to the particle surface. We present an analytical method for evaluating the spatial distribution of near-field enhanced absorption surrounding plasmonic metal nanospheres in absorbing media using a new point-by-point method. We propose criteria to define relevant near-field boundaries and calculate the properties of the local absorption enhancement, which redistributes absorption to the near-field and decays asymptotically as a function of the distance from the particle to background levels. Using this method, we performed a large-scale parametric study to understand the effect of particle size and wavelength on the near-field absorption for gold nanoparticles in aqueous media and silicon, and identified conditions that are relevant to enhanced local infrared absorption in silicon. The presented approach provides insight into the local energy transfer around plasmonic nanoparticles for predicting near-field effects for advanced concepts in optical sensing, thin-film solar cells, nonlinear imaging, and photochemical applications.

  8. New Insight into the Angle Insensitivity of Ultrathin Planar Optical Absorbers for Broadband Solar Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Yu, Haitong; Duan, Yuanyuan; Li, Qiang; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-09-01

    Two challenging problems still remain for optical absorbers consisting of an ultrathin planar semiconductor film on top of an opaque metallic substrate. One is the angle-insensitive mechanism and the other is the system design needed for broadband solar energy harvesting. Here, first we theoretically demonstrates that the high refractive index, instead of the ultrathin feature as reported in previous studies, is the physical origin of the angle insensitivity for ultrathin planar optical absorbers. They exhibit omnidirectional resonance for TE polarization due to the high complex refractive index difference between the semiconductor and the air, while for TM polarization the angle insensitivity persists up to an incident angle related to the semiconductor refractive index. These findings were validated by fabricating and characterizing an 18 nm Ge/Ag absorber sample (representative of small band gap semiconductors for photovoltaic applications) and a 22 nm hematite/Ag sample (representative of large band gap semiconductors for photoelectrochemical applications). Then, we took advantage of angle insensitivity and designed a spectrum splitting configuration for broadband solar energy harvesting. The cascaded solar cell and unassisted solar water splitting systems have photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells that are also spectrum splitters, so an external spectrum splitting element is not needed.

  9. The series elastic shock absorber: tendon elasticity modulates energy dissipation by muscle during burst deceleration.

    PubMed

    Konow, Nicolai; Roberts, Thomas J

    2015-04-07

    During downhill running, manoeuvring, negotiation of obstacles and landings from a jump, mechanical energy is dissipated via active lengthening of limb muscles. Tendon compliance provides a 'shock-absorber' mechanism that rapidly absorbs mechanical energy and releases it more slowly as the recoil of the tendon does work to stretch muscle fascicles. By lowering the rate of muscular energy dissipation, tendon compliance likely reduces the risk of muscle injury that can result from rapid and forceful muscle lengthening. Here, we examine how muscle-tendon mechanics are modulated in response to changes in demand for energy dissipation. We measured lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle activity, force and fascicle length, as well as leg joint kinematics and ground-reaction force, as turkeys performed drop-landings from three heights (0.5-1.5 m centre-of-mass elevation). Negative work by the LG muscle-tendon unit during landing increased with drop height, mainly owing to greater muscle recruitment and force as drop height increased. Although muscle strain did not increase with landing height, ankle flexion increased owing to increased tendon strain at higher muscle forces. Measurements of the length-tension relationship of the muscle indicated that the muscle reached peak force at shorter and likely safer operating lengths as drop height increased. Our results indicate that tendon compliance is important to the modulation of energy dissipation by active muscle with changes in demand and may provide a mechanism for rapid adjustment of function during deceleration tasks of unpredictable intensity.

  10. Modelling a point absorbing wave energy converter by the equivalent electric circuit theory: A feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Ling; Svensson, Olle; Isberg, Jan; Leijon, Mats

    2015-04-01

    There is a need to have a reliable tool to quickly assess wave energy converters (WECs). This paper explores whether it is possible to apply the equivalent electric circuit theory as an evaluation tool for point absorbing WEC system modelling. The circuits were developed starting from the force analysis, in which the hydrodynamic, mechanical, and electrical parameters were expressed by electrical components. A methodology on how to determine the parameters for electrical components has been explained. It is found that by using a multimeter, forces in the connection line and the absorbed electric power can be simulated and read directly from the electric circuit model. Finally, the circuit model has been validated against the full scale offshore experiment. The results indicated that the captured power could be predicted rather accurately and the line force could be estimated accurately near the designed working condition of the WEC.

  11. Atmospheric applications of high-energy lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Joung R.

    2005-03-01

    It has been over forty years since the invention of the laser, which has inspired the imagination of scientists and science fiction writers alike. Many ideas have been realized, many still remain as dreams, and new ones are still being conceived. The High Energy Laser (HEL) has been associated with weapon applications during the past three decades. Much of the same technology can be directly applied to power beaming, laser propulsion, and other potential remote energy and power transfer applications. Economically, these application areas are becoming increasingly more viable. This paper reviews the evolutionarey history of the HEL device technologies. It points out the basic system components and layouts with associated key technologies that drive the effectiveness and efficiency of the system level performance. It describes the fundamental properties and wavelength dependencies of atmospheric propagation that in turn have become the prescription for wavelength properties that are desired from the device.

  12. Applications for Energy Recovering Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2007-08-01

    The availability of high-power, high-brilliance sources of tunable photons from energy-recovered Free Electron Lasers is opening up whole new fields of application of accelerators in industry. This talk will review some of the ideas that are already being put into production, and some of the newer ideas that are still under development.

  13. An APL program for the distribution of energy deposition by charged particles passing through thin absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    An APL program which numerically evaluates the probability density function (PDF) for the energy deposited in a thin absorber by a charged particle is proposed, with application to the construction, pointing, and control of spacecraft. With this program, the PDF of the restricted energy loss distribution of Watts (1973) is derived, and Vavilov's (1957) distribution is obtained by proper parameter selection. The method is demonstrated with the example of the effect of charged particle induced radiation on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) pointing accuracy. A Monte Carlo study simulates the photon noise caused by charged particles passing through the photomultiplier tube window, and the stochastic variation of energy loss is introduced into the simulation by generating random energy losses from a power law distribution. The program eliminates annoying loop procedures, and model parameter sensitivity can be studied using the graphical output.

  14. Experimental comparison of laser energy losses in high-quality laser-oxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using radiation from fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Golyshev, A A; Malikov, A G; Orishich, A M; Shulyat'ev, V B

    2015-09-30

    We report a comparative experimental study of laseroxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using a fibre laser with a wavelength of 1.07 μm and a CO{sub 2} laser with a wavelength of 10.6 μm at the sheet thickness of 3 – 16 mm. For the two lasers we have measured the dependence of the cutting speed on the radiation power and determined the cutting speed at which the surface roughness is minimal. The coefficient of laser radiation absorption in the laser cutting process is measured for these lasers at different values of the cutting speed and radiation power. It is found that the minimal roughness of the cut surface is reached at the absorbed laser energy per unit volume of the removed material, equal to 11 – 13 J mm{sup -3}; this value is the same for the two lasers and does not depend on the sheet thickness. (laser technologies)

  15. High-Energy Petawatt Capability for the Omega Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Waxer, L.J.; Maywar, D.N.; Kelly, J.H.; Kessler, T.J.; Kruschwitz, B.E.; Loucks, S.J.; McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Morse, S.F.B.; Stoeckl, C.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2005-07-25

    The 60-beam Omega laser system at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) has been a workhorse on the frontier of laser fusion and high-energy-density physics for more than a decade. LLE scientists are currently extending the performance of this unique, direct-drive laser system by adding high-energy petawatt capabilities.

  16. Energy, Electron Transfer and Photocatalytic Reactions of Visible Light Absorbing Transition Metal Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Schmehl, Russell H.

    2016-03-02

    This is the final technical report for a project carried out at Tulane University of New Orleans that describes the development of light induced (solar) reactions geared toward decomposing water into its component elements : hydrogen and oxygen. Much of the work involved optimizing systems for absorbing visible light and undergoing light promoted reactions to generate very strong reducing agents that are capable of reacting with water to produce hydrogen. Additional portions of the research were collaborative efforts to put the strong reducing agents to work in reaction with hydrogen generation catalysts prepared elsewhere. Time resolved laser spectroscopic methods were used to evaluate the light induced reactions and characterize very reactive intermediate substances formed during the reactions.

  17. Passively Q-switched and mode-locked Nd:GGG laser with a Bi-doped GaAs saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Cong, Wen; Li, Dechun; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Li, Xiangyang; Qiao, Hui; Liu, Ji

    2014-06-16

    A simultaneously passively Q-switched and mode-locked (QML) Nd:GGG laser using a Bi-doped GaAs wafer as saturable absorber is accomplished for the first time. The Bi-doped GaAs wafer is fabricated by ion implantation and subsequent annealing. In comparison to the passively QML laser with GaAs, the QML laser with Bi-doped GaAs can generate more stable pulses with 99% modulation depth. The experiment results indicate that the Bi-doped GaAs could be an excellent saturable absorber for diode-pumped QML lasers.

  18. Cr:YSO Saturable Absorber for the Three-Level Cr:BeAl2O4 Laser at 680.4 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yen-Kuang; Chen, Horng-Min

    2000-12-01

    In addition to being an efficient saturable absorber Q switch for the tunable Cr:BeAl2O4 laser for its entire tuning range from 700 to 818 nm, the Cr:YSO is shown to be an effective saturable absorber Q switch for the 3-level Cr:BeAl2O4 laser at 680.4 nm. The passive Q-switching performance of this 3-level laser is similar to that of the passively Q-switched ruby laser.

  19. 131 fs, 33 MHz all-fiber soliton laser at 1.07 microm with a film-type SWNT saturable absorber coated on polyimide.

    PubMed

    Shohda, Fumio; Hori, Yuichiro; Nakazawa, Masataka; Mata, Junji; Tsukamoto, Jun

    2010-05-24

    We present a 1.07 microm all-fiber femtosecond soliton laser employing a film-type saturable absorber with a P3HT (poly-3-hexylthiophene) incorporated SWNT coated on polyimide film. We optimized the laser cavity as a dispersion-managed soliton laser with photonic crystal fiber (PCF) as an anomalous dispersion fiber at 1.07 microm. As a result, a 131 fs, 33 MHz pulse was successfully generated with a simple laser configuration.

  20. 147 fs, 51 MHz soliton fiber laser at 1.56 microm with a fiber-connector-type SWNT/P3HT saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Shohda, Fumio; Shirato, Takafumi; Nakazawa, Masataka; Mata, Junji; Tsukamoto, Jun

    2008-12-08

    We fabricated a fiber-connector-type saturable absorber in which SWNTs and P3HT (poly-3-hexylthiophene) were coated on the fiber connector end. This saturable absorber allowed us to realize a short laser cavity length. We used a soliton cavity configuration to generate the shortest pulse (147 fs) at the highest repetition rate (51 MHz) yet obtained with carbon nanotubes (CNT) related saturable absorbers.

  1. LASERS: Ultrashort-pulse erbium-doped fibre laser using a saturable absorber based on single-wall carbon nanotubes synthesised by the arc-discharge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tausenev, A. V.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Lobach, A. S.; Konov, V. I.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Kryukov, P. G.; Dianov, E. M.

    2007-09-01

    An erbium-doped fibre laser operating in self-mode-locked regime achieved with the help of a saturable absorber based on single-wall carbon nanotubes synthesised by the arc-discharge method is fabricated and studied. Due to the development of an original method for preparing samples, films of the optical quality containing individual single-wall carbon nanotubes were synthesised. The study of the dependence of resonance absorption at a wavelength of 1.5 μm on the laser radiation intensity transmitted through a film showed that these films have nonlinear transmission and can be used in fibre lasers as saturable absorbers to provide self-mode locking. Stable transform-limited pulses having the shape of optical solitons were generated at a wavelength of 1557.5 nm in the laser with a ring resonator. The pulse duration was 1.13 ps at a pulse repetition rate of 20.5 MHz. The continuous output power achieved 1.1 mW upon pumping by a 25-mW laser diode at 980 nm.

  2. 2 GHz passively harmonic mode-locked fiber laser by a microfiber-based topological insulator saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Meng; Liu, Hao; Zheng, Xu-Wu; Luo, Ai-Ping; Zhao, Chu-Jun; Zhang, Han; Wen, Shuang-Chun; Xu, Wen-Cheng

    2013-12-15

    We report on the generation of passive harmonic mode locking of a fiber laser using a microfiber-based topological insulator (TI) Bi(2)Te(3) saturable absorber (SA). The optical deposition method was employed to fabricate the microfiber-based TISA. By virtue of the excellent nonlinear optical property of the proposed TISA, the fiber laser could operate at the pulse repetition rate of 2.04 GHz under a pump power of 126 mW, corresponding to the 418th harmonic of fundamental repetition frequency. The results demonstrate that the microfiber-based TI photonic device can operate as both the high nonlinear optical component and the SA in fiber lasers, and could also find other applications in the related fields of photonics.

  3. High speed fabrication of absorbance-enhanced micro-nanostructures on nickel surface using hundred-nanosecond pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jinxiang; Zhang, Jingyuan; Liang, Hao; Wang, Yibo; Zhang, Zhiyan; Liu, Yannan; Lin, Xuechun

    2017-01-01

    We report the generation of micro-nanostructures on nickel surface using a pulsed laser with pulse duration of 100/200 ns. The blacken nickel, which is covered with dense broccoli-like clusters having strong light trapping capacity covering broad spectrum (200-2000 nm), can be produced at a high laser scanning speed up to 100 mm/s. The absorbance of the blacken nickel can be over 98% in the UV, more than 97% in the visible, and over 90% in the near IR. In addition, by treating the nickel surface with two crossing scans of the laser, highly organized and shape-controllable periodic arrays of hump-craters can be fabricated.

  4. Semiconductor Laser Diode Pumps for Inertial Fusion Energy Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, R J

    2011-01-03

    Solid-state lasers have been demonstrated as attractive drivers for inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and at the Omega Facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) in Rochester, NY. For power plant applications, these lasers must be pumped by semiconductor diode lasers to achieve the required laser system efficiency, repetition rate, and lifetime. Inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants will require approximately 40-to-80 GW of peak pump power, and must operate efficiently and with high system availability for decades. These considerations lead to requirements on the efficiency, price, and production capacity of the semiconductor pump sources. This document provides a brief summary of these requirements, and how they can be met by a natural evolution of the current semiconductor laser industry. The detailed technical requirements described in this document flow down from a laser ampl9ifier design described elsewhere. In brief, laser amplifiers comprising multiple Nd:glass gain slabs are face-pumped by two planar diode arrays, each delivering 30 to 40 MW of peak power at 872 nm during a {approx} 200 {micro}s quasi-CW (QCW) pulse with a repetition rate in the range of 10 to 20 Hz. The baseline design of the diode array employs a 2D mosaic of submodules to facilitate manufacturing. As a baseline, they envision that each submodule is an array of vertically stacked, 1 cm wide, edge-emitting diode bars, an industry standard form factor. These stacks are mounted on a common backplane providing cooling and current drive. Stacks are conductively cooled to the backplane, to minimize both diode package cost and the number of fluid interconnects for improved reliability. While the baseline assessment in this document is based on edge-emitting devices, the amplifier design does not preclude future use of surface emitting diodes, which may offer appreciable future cost reductions and

  5. All-fiber multi-wavelength passive Q-switched Er/Yb fiber laser based on a Tm-doped fiber saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada-Ramírez, B.; Durán-Sánchez, M.; Álvarez-Tamayo, R. I.; Alaniz-Baylón, J.; Ibarra-Escamilla, B.; López-Estopier, R.; Kuzin, E. A.

    2017-03-01

    We report on a ring cavity, multi-wavelength, passive Q-switched erbium–ytterbium double cladding fiber laser based on the use of an unpumped segment of Tm-doped fiber acting as a saturable absorber for passive Q-switched pulse generation and a wavelength filter for multi-wavelength laser generation. By performing pump power variations from 1.6 to 9.8 W, stable Q-switched laser pulses are observed in a repetition rate from 135.8 to 27.5 kHz at room temperature. With a maximal repetition rate of 135.8 kHz, the minimum pulse duration of 430 ns is obtained. The maximal average output power of 2.2 W is reached with a pump power of 9.8 W. The maximum pulse energy was 16.4 µJ and the average output power slope efficiency is ~24.8%. The obtained results demonstrate a laser performance with extended range of high repetition rate and improved stability.

  6. Passively Q-switched thulium-doped fiber laser with silver-nanoparticle film as the saturable absorber for operation at 2.0 µm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, H.; Samion, M. Z.; Muhamad, A.; Sharbirin, A. S.; Ismail, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, a compact thulium-doped fiber laser with a Q-switched output is proposed and demonstrated. A thulium-doped fiber is used for the laser, with a peak absorption of 200 dB m-1 at 790 nm and a cutoff wavelength of 1350 nm as the primary gain medium, and a silver-based saturable absorber as the pulse generation mechanism. The pulses obtained from the proposed laser have repetition rates from 38.3 kHz up to 56.2 kHz, with a pulse width as low as 4.2 µs and pulse energy as high as 67.3 nJ at a maximum pump power of 228.8 mW. The generated pulses are highly stable, showing no changes or fluctuations over operation for a period of 60 min, and further validated with signal-to-noise ratios of 57.0 dB and 59.5 dB in the optical and frequency domains respectively. The proposed laser has high potential for eye-safe applications in manufacturing and medicine.

  7. Mechanical Design of a High Energy Beam Absorber for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Baffes, C.; Church, M.; Leibfritz, J.; Oplt, S.; Rakhno, I.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-10

    A high energy beam absorber has been built for the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab. In the facility's initial configuration, an electron beam will be accelerated through 3 TTF-type or ILC-type SRF cryomodules to an energy of 750MeV. The electron beam will be directed to one of multiple downstream experimental and diagnostic beam lines and then deposited in one of two beam absorbers. The facility is designed to accommodate up to 6 cryomodules, which would produce a 75kW beam at 1.5GeV; this is the driving design condition for the beam absorbers. The beam absorbers consist of water-cooled graphite, aluminum and copper layers contained in a helium-filled enclosure. This paper describes the mechanical implementation of the beam absorbers, with a focus on thermal design and analysis. The potential for radiation-induced degradation of the graphite is discussed.

  8. Passive Q-switching of a Tm,Ho:KLu(WO4)2 microchip laser by a Cr:ZnS saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Serres, J M; Loiko, P; Mateos, X; Jambunathan, V; Yasukevich, A S; Yumashev, K V; Petrov, V; Griebner, U; Aguiló, M; Díaz, F

    2016-05-10

    A diode-pumped Tm,Ho:KLu(WO4)2 microchip laser passively Q-switched with a Cr:ZnS saturable absorber generated an average output power of 131 mW at 2063.6 nm with a slope efficiency of 11% and a Q-switching conversion efficiency of 58%. The pulse characteristics were 14  ns/9  μJ at a pulse repetition frequency of 14.5 kHz. With higher modulation depth of the saturable absorber, 9  ns/10.4  μJ/8.2  kHz pulses were generated at 2061.1 nm, corresponding to a record peak power extracted from a passively Q-switched Tm,Ho laser of 1.15 kW. A theoretical model is presented, predicting the pulse energy and duration. The simulations are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Differential absorbed dose distributions in lineal energy for neutrons and gamma rays at the mono-energetic neutron calibration facility.

    PubMed

    Takada, M; Baba, M; Yamaguchi, H; Fujitaka, K

    2005-01-01

    Absorbed dose distributions in lineal energy for neutrons and gamma rays of mono-energetic neutron sources from 140 keV to 15 MeV were measured in the Fast Neutron Laboratory at Tohoku University. By using both a tissue-equivalent plastic walled counter and a graphite-walled low-pressure proportional counter, absorbed dose distributions in lineal energy for neutrons were obtained separately from those for gamma rays. This method needs no knowledge of energy spectra and dose distributions for gamma rays. The gamma-ray contribution in this neutron calibration field >1 MeV neutron was <3%, while for <550 keV it was >40%. The measured neutron absolute absorbed doses per unit neutron fluence agreed with the LA150 evaluated kerma factors. By using this method, absorbed dose distributions in lineal energy for neutrons and gamma rays in an unknown neutron field can be obtained separately.

  10. Design and testing of an energy-absorbing crewseat for the F/FB-111 aircraft, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shane, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    A program to determine if the injury potential could be reduced by replacing the existing crewseats with energy absorbing crewseats is explored. An energy-absorbing test seat was designed using much of the existing seat hardware. An extensive dynamic seat test series, designed to duplicate various crew module ground impact conditions, was conducted at a sled test facility. Comparative tests with operational F-111 crewseats were also conducted. After successful dynamic testing of the seat, more testing was conducted with the seats mounted in an F-111 crew module. Both swing tests and vertical drop tests were conducted. The vertical drop tests were used to obtain comparative data between the energy-absorbing and operational seats. Volume 1 describes the energy absorbing test seat and testing conducted, and evaluates the data from both test series.

  11. Diamond detector in absorbed dose measurements in high-energy linear accelerator photon and electron beams.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Binukumar, John Pichy; Al Amri, Iqbal; Davis, Cheriyathmanjiyil Antony

    2016-03-08

    Diamond detectors (DD) are preferred in small field dosimetry of radiation beams because of small dose profile penumbras, better spatial resolution, and tissue-equivalent properties. We investigated a commercially available 'microdiamond' detector in realizing absorbed dose from first principles. A microdiamond detector, type TM 60019 with tandem electrometer is used to measure absorbed doses in water, nylon, and PMMA phantoms. With sensitive volume 0.004 mm3, radius 1.1mm, thickness 1 x10(-3) mm, the nominal response is 1 nC/Gy. It is assumed that the diamond detector could collect total electric charge (nC) developed during irradiation at 0 V bias. We found that dose rate effect is less than 0.7% for changing dose rate by 500 MU/min. The reproducibility in obtaining readings with diamond detector is found to be ± 0.17% (1 SD) (n = 11). The measured absorbed doses for 6 MV and 15 MV photons arrived at using mass energy absorption coefficients and stop-ping power ratios compared well with Nd, water calibrated ion chamber measured absorbed doses within 3% in water, PMMA, and nylon media. The calibration factor obtained for diamond detector confirmed response variation is due to sensitivity due to difference in manufacturing process. For electron beams, we had to apply ratio of electron densities of water to carbon. Our results qualify diamond dosimeter as a transfer standard, based on long-term stability and reproducibility. Based on micro-dimensions, we recommend these detectors for pretreatment dose verifications in small field irradiations like stereotactic treatments with image guidance.

  12. Three electron beams from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and the energy apportioning question.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Brunetti, E; Gil, D Reboredo; Welsh, G H; Li, F Y; Cipiccia, S; Ersfeld, B; Grant, D W; Grant, P A; Islam, M R; Tooley, M P; Vieux, G; Wiggins, S M; Sheng, Z M; Jaroszynski, D A

    2017-03-10

    Laser-wakefield accelerators are compact devices capable of delivering ultra-short electron bunches with pC-level charge and MeV-GeV energy by exploiting the ultra-high electric fields arising from the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma. We show experimentally and through numerical simulations that a high-energy electron beam is produced simultaneously with two stable lower-energy beams that are ejected in oblique and counter-propagating directions, typically carrying off 5-10% of the initial laser energy. A MeV, 10s nC oblique beam is ejected in a 30°-60° hollow cone, which is filled with more energetic electrons determined by the injection dynamics. A nC-level, 100s keV backward-directed beam is mainly produced at the leading edge of the plasma column. We discuss the apportioning of absorbed laser energy amongst the three beams. Knowledge of the distribution of laser energy and electron beam charge, which determine the overall efficiency, is important for various applications of laser-wakefield accelerators, including the development of staged high-energy accelerators.

  13. Three electron beams from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and the energy apportioning question

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X.; Brunetti, E.; Gil, D. Reboredo; Welsh, G. H.; Li, F. Y.; Cipiccia, S.; Ersfeld, B.; Grant, D. W.; Grant, P. A.; Islam, M. R.; Tooley, M. P.; Vieux, G.; Wiggins, S. M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators are compact devices capable of delivering ultra-short electron bunches with pC-level charge and MeV-GeV energy by exploiting the ultra-high electric fields arising from the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma. We show experimentally and through numerical simulations that a high-energy electron beam is produced simultaneously with two stable lower-energy beams that are ejected in oblique and counter-propagating directions, typically carrying off 5–10% of the initial laser energy. A MeV, 10s nC oblique beam is ejected in a 30°–60° hollow cone, which is filled with more energetic electrons determined by the injection dynamics. A nC-level, 100s keV backward-directed beam is mainly produced at the leading edge of the plasma column. We discuss the apportioning of absorbed laser energy amongst the three beams. Knowledge of the distribution of laser energy and electron beam charge, which determine the overall efficiency, is important for various applications of laser-wakefield accelerators, including the development of staged high-energy accelerators. PMID:28281679

  14. Phase conjugation of high energy lasers.

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, David E; Valley, Michael T.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Bigman, Verle Howard; Boye, Lydia Ann; Broyles, Robin Scott; Kimmel, Mark W.; Law, Ryan J.; Yoder, James R.

    2013-01-01

    In this report we explore claims that phase conjugation of high energy lasers by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) can compensate optical aberrations associated with severely distorted laser amplifier media and aberrations induced by the atmosphere. The SBS media tested was a gas cell pressurized up to 300 psi with SF6 or Xe or both. The laser was a 10 Hz, 3J, Q-switched Nd:YAG with 25 ns wide pulses. Atmospheric aberrations were created with space heaters, helium jets and phase plates designed with a Kolmogorov turbulence spectrum characterized by a Fried parameter, ro , ranging from 0.6 6.0 mm. Phase conjugate tests in the laboratory were conducted without amplification. For the strongest aberrations, D/ro ~ 20, created by combining the space heaters with the phase plate, the Strehl ratio was degraded by a factor of ~50. Phase conjugation in SF6 restored the peak focusable intensity to about 30% of the original laser. Phase conjugate tests at the outdoor laser range were conducted with laser amplifiers providing gain in combination with the SBS cell. A large 600,000 BTU kerosene space heater was used to create turbulence along the beam path. An atmospheric structure factor of Cn2 = 5x10-13 m2/3 caused the illumination beam to expand to a diameter 250mm and overfill the receiver. The phase conjugate amplified return could successfully be targeted back onto glints 5mm in diameter. Use of a lenslet arrays to lower the peak focusable intensity in the SBS cell failed to produce a useful phase conjugate beam; The Strehl ratio was degraded with multiple random lobes instead of a single focus. I will review literature results which show how multiple beams can be coherently combined by SBS when a confocal reflecting geometry is used to focus the laser in the SBS cell.

  15. Diode-pumped passively mode-locked Nd:YAG laser at 1338 nm with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Xu, Jin-Long; He, Jing-Liang; Yang, Xiu-Qin; Zhang, Bing-Yuan; Yang, He; Liu, Shan-De; Zhang, Bai-Tao

    2011-12-20

    We demonstrate a diode-end-pumped passively mode-locked 1338 nm Nd:YAG laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror. At the absorbed pump power of 8.89 W, an average output power of 1.12 W was obtained with a slope efficiency of 14%. The pulse width was 22.4 ps with a repetition rate of 63.9 MHz, corresponding to a peak power of 782 W. In addition, the bandwidth of the mode-locking spectrum is as narrow as 20.44 GHz, which shows the potential application in long-distance ranging and fiber information transmission because of the low dispersion of these ultrashort pulses.

  16. Specific absorbed fractions of energy from internal photon sources in brain tumor and cerebrospinal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.F. )); Stubbs, J.B. )

    1995-03-01

    Transferrin, radiolabeled with In-111, can be coinjected into glioblastoma multiforme lesions, and subsequent scintigraphic imaging can demonstrate the biokinetics of the cytotoxic transferrin. The administration of [sup 111]In transferrin into a brain tumor results in distribution of radioactivity in the brain, brain tumor, and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Information about absorbed radiation doses to these regions, as well as other nearby tissues and organs, is important for evaluating radiation-related risks from this procedure. The radiation dose is usually estimated for a mathematical representation of the human body. We have included source/target regions for the eye, lens of the eye, spinal column, spinal CSF, cranial CSF, and a 100-g tumor within the brain of an adult male phantom developed by Cristy and Eckerman. The spinal column, spinal CSF, and the eyes have not been routinely included in photon transport simulations. Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) as a function of photon energy were calculated using the ALGAMP computer code, which utilizes Monte Carlo techniques for simulating photon transport. The ALGAMP code was run three times, with the source activity distributed uniformly within the tumor, cranial CSF, and the spinal CSF volumes. These SAFs, which were generated for 12 discrete photon energies ranging from 0.01 to 4.0 MeV, were used with decay scheme data to calculate [ital S]-values needed for estimating absorbed doses. [ital S]-values for [sup 111]In are given for three source regions (brain tumor, cranial CSF, and spinal CSF) and all standard target regions/organs, the eye and lens, as well as to tissues within these source regions. [ital S]-values for the skeletal regions containing active marrow are estimated. These results are useful in evaluating the radiation doses from intracranial administration of [sup 111]In transferrin.

  17. Laser energy deposition in crossing shock interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, H.; Knight, D.; Elliott, G.

    A combined computational and experimental study was performed to investigate the effect of a single laser energy pulse on the transition from a Mach Reflection (MR) to a Regular Reflection (RR) in the Dual Solution Domain (DSD). The freestream Mach number is 3.45 and two oblique shock waves are formed by two symmetric 22° wedges. These conditions correspond to a point midway within the DSD wherein either an MR or an RR is possible. A steady MR was first obtained experimentally and numerically, then a single laser pulse was deposited above the horizontal center plane. The experiment showed that the Mach stem height decreased to 30% of its original height due to the interaction with the thermal spot generated by the laser pulse and then returned to its original height by 300μs. That the Mach stem returned to its original height was most likely due to freestream turbulence in the wind tunnel. The numerical simulation successfully predicted the reverse transition from a stable MR to a stable RR and the stable RR persisted across the span. This study showed the capability of a laser energy pulse to control the reverse transition of MR → RR within the Dual Solution Domain.

  18. Analytical Simulations of Energy-Absorbing Impact Spheres for a Mars Sample Return Earth Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Marcus Dwight; Fasanella, Edwin L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamic finite element simulations were performed to aid in the design of an energy-absorbing impact sphere for a passive Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) that is a possible architecture for the Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission. The MSR EEV concept uses an entry capsule and energy-absorbing impact sphere designed to contain and limit the acceleration of collected samples during Earth impact without a parachute. The spherical shaped impact sphere is composed of solid hexagonal and pentagonal foam-filled cells with hybrid composite, graphite-epoxy/Kevlar cell walls. Collected Martian samples will fit inside a smaller spherical sample container at the center of the EEV's cellular structure. Comparisons were made of analytical results obtained using MSC.Dytran with test results obtained from impact tests performed at NASA Langley Research Center for impact velocities from 30 to 40 m/s. Acceleration, velocity, and deformation results compared well with the test results. The correlated finite element model was then used for simulations of various off-nominal impact scenarios. Off-nominal simulations at an impact velocity of 40 m/s included a rotated cellular structure impact onto a flat surface, a cellular structure impact onto an angled surface, and a cellular structure impact onto the corner of a step.

  19. Full-Scale Crash Test of a MD-500 Helicopter with Deployable Energy Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    A new externally deployable energy absorbing system was demonstrated during a full-scale crash test of an MD-500 helicopter. The deployable system is a honeycomb structure and utilizes composite materials in its construction. A set of two Deployable Energy Absorbers (DEAs) were fitted on the MD-500 helicopter for the full-scale crash demonstration. Four anthropomorphic dummy occupants were also used to assess human survivability. A demonstration test was performed at NASA Langley's Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR). The test involved impacting the helicopter on a concrete surface with combined forward and vertical velocity components of 40-ft/s and 26-ft/s, respectively. The objectives of the test were to evaluate the performance of the DEA concept under realistic crash conditions and to generate test data for validation of dynamic finite element simulations. Descriptions of this test as well as other component and full-scale tests leading to the helicopter test are discussed. Acceleration data from the anthropomorphic dummies showed that dynamic loads were successfully attenuated to within non-injurious levels. Moreover, the airframe itself survived the relatively severe impact and was retested to provide baseline data for comparison for cases with and without DEAs.

  20. Impact Test and Simulation of Energy Absorbing Concepts for Earth Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, Marcus D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2001-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamic finite element simulations have been performed to aid in the design of an energy absorbing concept for a highly reliable passive Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) that will directly impact the Earth without a parachute. EEV's are designed to return materials from asteroids, comets, or planets for laboratory analysis on Earth. The EEV concept uses an energy absorbing cellular structure designed to contain and limit the acceleration of space exploration samples during Earth impact. The spherical shaped cellular structure is composed of solid hexagonal and pentagonal foam-filled cells with hybrid graphite- epoxy/Kevlar cell walls. Space samples fit inside a smaller sphere at the center of the EEV's cellular structure. Comparisons of analytical predictions using MSC,Dytran with test results obtained from impact tests performed at NASA Langley Research Center were made for three impact velocities ranging from 32 to 40 m/s. Acceleration and deformation results compared well with the test results. These finite element models will be useful for parametric studies of off-nominal impact conditions.

  1. Absorbable energy monitoring scheme: new design protocol to test vehicle structural crashworthiness.

    PubMed

    Ofochebe, Sunday M; Enibe, Samuel O; Ozoegwu, Chigbogu G

    2016-05-01

    In vehicle crashworthiness design optimization detailed system evaluation capable of producing reliable results are basically achieved through high-order numerical computational (HNC) models such as the dynamic finite element model, mesh-free model etc. However the application of these models especially during optimization studies is basically challenged by their inherent high demand on computational resources, conditional stability of the solution process, and lack of knowledge of viable parameter range for detailed optimization studies. The absorbable energy monitoring scheme (AEMS) presented in this paper suggests a new design protocol that attempts to overcome such problems in evaluation of vehicle structure for crashworthiness. The implementation of the AEMS involves studying crash performance of vehicle components at various absorbable energy ratios based on a 2DOF lumped-mass-spring (LMS) vehicle impact model. This allows for prompt prediction of useful parameter values in a given design problem. The application of the classical one-dimensional LMS model in vehicle crash analysis is further improved in the present work by developing a critical load matching criterion which allows for quantitative interpretation of the results of the abstract model in a typical vehicle crash design. The adequacy of the proposed AEMS for preliminary vehicle crashworthiness design is demonstrated in this paper, however its extension to full-scale design-optimization problem involving full vehicle model that shows greater structural detail requires more theoretical development.

  2. High energy photocathodes for laser fusion diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Halvorson, C; Houck, T; Macphee, A; Opachich, Y P; Lahowe, D; Copsey, B

    2010-10-01

    Laser fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility require time-resolved x-ray images of the ignition target self-emission. The photon energies are expected to be greater than 10 keV. Photoemission quantum yield measurement data and photoelectron energy spectrum data are presently unavailable in this photon energy range, but are essential in the design of x-ray imaging diagnostics. We developed an apparatus to measure the quantum efficiency of primary and secondary photoelectron emission and to estimate the energy spectrum of the secondary photoelectrons. The apparatus has been tested using photon energies less than 10 keV to allow comparisons with prior work. A method for preparing photocathodes with geometrically enhanced photoefficiency has been developed.

  3. Pulse switching for high energy lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, J. B.; Pacala, T. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A saturable inductor switch for compressing the width and sharpening the rise time of high voltage pulses from a relatively slow rise time, high voltage generator to an electric discharge gas laser (EDGL) also provides a capability for efficient energy transfer from a high impedance primary source to an intermediate low impedance laser discharge network. The switch is positioned with respect to a capacitive storage device, such as a coaxial cable, so that when a charge build-up in the storage device reaches a predetermined level, saturation of the switch inductor releases or switches energy stored in the capactive storage device to the EDGL. Cascaded saturable inductor switches for providing output pulses having rise times of less than ten nanoseconds and a technique for magnetically biasing the saturable inductor switch are disclosed.

  4. An energy absorbing far-field boundary condition for the elastic wave equation

    SciTech Connect

    Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B

    2008-07-15

    The authors present an energy absorbing non-reflecting boundary condition of Clayton-Engquist type for the elastic wave equation together with a discretization which is stable for any ratio of compressional to shear wave speed. They prove stability for a second order accurate finite-difference discretization of the elastic wave equation in three space dimensions together with a discretization of the proposed non-reflecting boundary condition. The stability proof is based on a discrete energy estimate and is valid for heterogeneous materials. The proof includes all six boundaries of the computational domain where special discretizations are needed at the edges and corners. The stability proof holds also when a free surface boundary condition is imposed on some sides of the computational domain.

  5. Experimental Investigation of the Power Generation Performance of Floating-Point Absorber Wave Energy Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Yu, Y.; Epler, J.; Previsic, M.

    2012-04-01

    The extraction of energy from ocean waves has gained interest in recent years. The floating-point absorber (FPA) is one of the most promising devices among a wide variety of wave energy conversion technologies. Early theoretical studies mainly focused on understanding the hydrodynamics of the system and on predicting the maximum power that could be extracted by a heaving body. These studies evolve from the investigation of floating-body interactions in offshore engineering and naval architecture disciplines. To our best knowledge, no systematic study has been reported about the investigation of the power generation performance of an FPA with a close-to-commercial design. A series of experimental tests was conducted to investigate the power extraction performance of an FPA system.

  6. Path toward a high-energy solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Gary L.; Merkle, Larry D.; Dubinskii, Mark; Zandi, Bahram

    2004-04-01

    Lasers have come a long way since the first demonstration by Maiman of a ruby crystal laser in 1960. Lasers are used as scientific tools as well as for a wide variety of applications for both commercial industry and the military. Today lasers come in all types, shapes and sizes depending on their application. The solid-state laser has some distinct advantages in that it can be rugged, compact, and self contained, making it reliable over long periods of time. With the advent of diode laser pumping a ten times increase in overall laser efficiency has been realized. This significant event, and others, is changing the way solid-state lasers are applied and allows new possibilities. One of those new areas of exploration is the high energy laser. Solid-state lasers for welding are already developed and yield energies in the 0.5 to 6 kilojoule range. These lasers are at the forefront of what is possible in terms of high energy solid-state lasers. It is possible to achieve energies of greater than 100 kJ. These sorts of energies would allow applications, in addition to welding, such as directed energy weapons, extremely remote sensing, power transfer, propulsion, biological and chemical agent neutralization and unexploded and mine neutralization. This article will review these new advances in solid-state lasers and the different paths toward achieving a high energy laser. The advantages and challenges of each approach will be highlighted.

  7. Multilayered graphene efficiently formed by mechanical exfoliation for nonlinear saturable absorbers in fiber mode-locked lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, You Min; Kim, Hyungseok; Lee, Ju Han; Song, Yong-Won

    2010-11-01

    An efficiently prepared graphene from a bulk graphite using mechanical exfoliation is experimentally investigated for the first practical application to ultrafast photonics. Overcoming the limitations of the method in its size and atomic layer control, the multilayered graphene guarantees a nonlinear intensity modulation. After confirming its excellent crystal quality and few-layered nanostructure employing Raman analysis and atomic force microscopy the graphene layer is introduced into a fiber laser as an intracavity saturable absorber to realize the passive mode-locking that produces picosecond pulses at the repetition rate of 10.9 MHz. Extinction ratio of the resultant pulsed output is higher than 40 dB.

  8. Research of the conical cavity high-energy laser energy meter energy loss compensation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xun; Li, Qian; Nie, Liang; Shang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Baoyuan

    2008-09-01

    Because absolute quantity thermal laser energy meter based on conical cavity has some features, for example, wavelength adaptation range is wide and laser damage threshold value is high. It is used for the standard of the high-energy laser energy meter and extensively in the domain of the high energy laser measurement. However, laser energy will lose because of the heat exchange and the back scattering of the conical absorption cavity. Therefore, only after compensating and amending the loss, the exact measurement of the laser energy can be achieved. Aimed to the energy loss compensation problem of the conical cavity high-energy laser energy meter, firstly, according to the heat transfer theory, this paper analyzes the heat energy loss of the conical cavity due to the heat emission, the heat convection and the heat exchange, and construct the mathematical model of the heat energy loss, based on which measuring result is curved fit using the least squares technique, and is compensated and amended utilizing the fitting curve, whose measurement repetitiveness is 0.7%, from which we can know that measuring repetitiveness is increased consumedly. Secondly, according to the optics principles of reciprocity of the conical cavity inner face and the incident laser and utilizing complexification Simpson numerical method, the mathematical model of conical cavity jaw opening optical power density distribution and back scattering gross power is established, based on which measuring result is compensated and amended, the back scattering energy loss is about 0.5% to 2.5%, high-energy laser energy measuring accuracy is improved availably.

  9. Lumbar load attenuation for rotorcraft occupants using a design methodology for the seat impact energy-absorbing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Rasoul; Beheshti, Hamid; Lankarani, Hamid

    2012-12-01

    Aircraft occupant crash-safety considerations require a minimum cushion thickness to limit the relative vertical motion of the seat-pelvis during high vertical impact loadings in crash landings or accidents. In military aircraft and helicopter seat design, due to the potential for high vertical accelerations in crash scenarios, the seat system must be provided with an energy absorber to attenuate the acceleration level sustained by the occupants. Because of the limited stroke available for the seat structure, the design of the energy absorber becomes a trade-off problem between minimizing the stroke and maximizing the energy absorption. The available stroke must be used to prevent bottoming out of the seat as well as to absorb maximum impact energy to protect the occupant. In this study, the energy-absorbing system in a rotorcraft seat design is investigated using a mathematical model of the occupant/seat system. Impact theories between interconnected bodies in multibody mechanical systems are utilized to study the impact between the seat pan and the occupant. Experimental responses of the seat system and the occupant are utilized to validate the results from this study for civil and military helicopters according to FAR 23 and 25 and MIL-S-58095 requirements. A model for the load limiter is proposed to minimize the lumbar load for the occupant by minimizing the relative velocity between the seat pan and the occupant's pelvis. The modified energy absorber/load limiter is then implemented for the seat structure so that it absorbs the energy of impact in an effective manner and below the tolerable limit for the occupant in a minimum stroke. Results show that for a designed stroke, the level of occupant lumbar spine injury would be significantly attenuated using this modified energy-absorber system.

  10. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, Y.T.; Payne, S.A.; Hayden, J.S.; Campbell, J.H.; Aston, M.K.; Elder, M.L.

    1996-06-11

    In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.

  11. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, Yuiko T.; Payne, Stephen A.; Hayden, Joseph S.; Campbell, John H.; Aston, Mary Kay; Elder, Melanie L.

    1996-01-01

    In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.

  12. High-power 880-nm diode-directly-pumped passively mode-locked Nd:YVO₄ laser at 1342 nm with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang-Qin; Liu, Ke; Han, Lin; Zong, Nan; Bo, Yong; Zhang, Jing-Yuan; Peng, Qin-Jun; Cui, Da-Fu; Xu, Zu-Yan

    2011-04-15

    A high-power 880-nm diode-directly-pumped passively mode-locked 1342 nm Nd:YVO₄ laser was demonstrated with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM). The laser mode radii in the laser crystal and on the SESAM were optimized carefully using the ABCD matrix formalism. An average output power of 2.3 W was obtained with a repetition rate of 76 MHz and a pulse width of 29.2 ps under an absorbed pump power of 12.1 W, corresponding to an optical-optical efficiency of 19.0% and a slope efficiency of 23.9%, respectively.

  13. Yb- and Er-doped fiber laser Q-switched with an optically uniform, broadband WS2 saturable absorber

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, M.; Hu, Guohua; Hu, Guoqing; Howe, R. C. T.; Chen, L.; Zheng, Z.; Hasan, T.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a ytterbium (Yb) and an erbium (Er)-doped fiber laser Q-switched by a solution processed, optically uniform, few-layer tungsten disulfide saturable absorber (WS2-SA). Nonlinear optical absorption of the WS2-SA in the sub-bandgap region, attributed to the edge-induced states, is characterized by 3.1% and 4.9% modulation depths with 1.38 and 3.83 MW/cm2 saturation intensities at 1030 and 1558 nm, respectively. By integrating the optically uniform WS2-SA in the Yb- and Er-doped laser cavities, we obtain self-starting Q-switched pulses with microsecond duration and kilohertz repetition rates at 1030 and 1558 nm. Our work demonstrates broadband sub-bandgap saturable absorption of a single, solution processed WS2-SA, providing new potential efficacy for WS2 in ultrafast photonic applications. PMID:26657601

  14. Yb- and Er-doped fiber laser Q-switched with an optically uniform, broadband WS2 saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Hu, Guohua; Hu, Guoqing; Howe, R. C. T.; Chen, L.; Zheng, Z.; Hasan, T.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate a ytterbium (Yb) and an erbium (Er)-doped fiber laser Q-switched by a solution processed, optically uniform, few-layer tungsten disulfide saturable absorber (WS2-SA). Nonlinear optical absorption of the WS2-SA in the sub-bandgap region, attributed to the edge-induced states, is characterized by 3.1% and 4.9% modulation depths with 1.38 and 3.83 MW/cm2 saturation intensities at 1030 and 1558 nm, respectively. By integrating the optically uniform WS2-SA in the Yb- and Er-doped laser cavities, we obtain self-starting Q-switched pulses with microsecond duration and kilohertz repetition rates at 1030 and 1558 nm. Our work demonstrates broadband sub-bandgap saturable absorption of a single, solution processed WS2-SA, providing new potential efficacy for WS2 in ultrafast photonic applications.

  15. Switchable narrow linewidth single-longitudinal mode erbium fiber laser by using saturable-absorber filter and cavity loss control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junfa; Zhang, Cheng; Miao, Changyun; Gu, Hong

    2014-11-01

    A simple single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber ring laser is proposed and demonstrated at first by using an arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) as wavelength filter. Owing to the two sub-ring cavities with different cavity losses, equalized dual-wavelength output can be achieved easily utilizing cavity loss control. The SLM operation is guaranteed by self-injection feedback mechanism under low pump power. In order to improve the dual-wavelength output power, a saturable-absorber (SA) based on a 4 m unpumped EDF is inserted into the main cavity to guarantee the SLM operation under high pump power. The performance of the laser outputs has been experimental studied and all the output wavelengths have a narrow linewidth output.

  16. Generation of bound states of pulses in a soliton laser with complex relaxation of a saturable absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotovskii, I O; Korobko, D A; Okhotnikov, O G; Gumenyuk, R V

    2015-01-31

    A numerical model of a soliton fibre laser with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), characterised by the complex dynamics of absorption relaxation, is considered. It is shown that stationary bound states of pulses can be formed in this laser as a result of their interaction via the dispersion-wave field. The stability of stationary bound states of several pulses is analysed. It is shown that an increase in the number of pulses in a stationary bound state leads eventually to its decay and formation of a random bunch. It is found that the bunch stability is caused by the manifestation of nonlinear self-phase modulation, which attracts pulses to the bunch centre. The simulation results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  17. Thulium/holmium-doped fiber laser passively mode locked by black phosphorus nanoplatelets-based saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao; Zheng, Xin; Yin, Ke; Cheng, Xiang'ai; Jiang, Tian

    2015-12-01

    By coupling black phosphorus (BP) nanoplatelets (NPs) with a fiber-taper evanescent light field, a saturable absorber (SA) based on the BP NPs has been successfully fabricated and used in a thulium/holmium-doped fiber laser as the mode locker. The SA had a modulation depth of ∼9.8% measured at 1.93 μm. A stable mode-locking operation at 1898 nm was achieved with a pulse width of 1.58 ps and a fundamental mode-lock repetition rate of 19.2 MHz. By increasing the pump intensity, phenomena of multi-pulsing operations, including harmonic mode-locked states and soliton bunches, were obtained in the experiment, showing that the BP NPs possess an ultrafast optical response time. This work suggests that the BP NPs-based SA is potentially useful for ultrashort, pulsed laser operations in the eye-safe region of 2 μm.

  18. Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of a Composite Honeycomb Deployable Energy Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Kellas, Sotiris; Horta, Lucas G.; Annett, Martin S.; Polanco, Michael A.; Littell, Justin D.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2011-01-01

    In 2006, the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Aeronautics Program sponsored the experimental and analytical evaluation of an externally deployable composite honeycomb structure that is designed to attenuate impact energy during helicopter crashes. The concept, which is designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA), utilizes an expandable Kevlar honeycomb structure to dissipate kinetic energy through crushing. The DEA incorporates a unique flexible hinge design that allows the honeycomb to be packaged and stowed flat until needed for deployment. A variety of deployment options such as linear, radial, and/or hybrid methods can be used. Experimental evaluation of the DEA utilized a building block approach that included material characterization testing of its constituent, Kevlar -129 fabric/epoxy, and flexural testing of single hexagonal cells. In addition, the energy attenuation capabilities of the DEA were demonstrated through multi-cell component dynamic crush tests, and vertical drop tests of a composite fuselage section, retrofitted with DEA blocks, onto concrete, water, and soft soil. During each stage of the DEA evaluation process, finite element models of the test articles were developed and simulations were performed using the explicit, nonlinear transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA. This report documents the results of the experimental evaluation that was conducted to assess the energy absorption capabilities of the DEA.

  19. High-energy femtosecond Yb-doped dispersion compensation free fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Ortaç, B; Schmidt, O; Schreiber, T; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A; Hideur, A

    2007-08-20

    We report on a mode-locked high energy fiber laser operating in the dispersion compensation free regime. The sigma cavity is constructed with a saturable absorber mirror and short-length large-mode-area photonic crystal fiber. The laser generates positively-chirped pulses with an energy of 265 nJ at a repetition rate of 10.18 MHz in a stable and self-starting operation. The pulses are compressible down to 400 fs leading to a peak power of 500 kW. Numerical simulations accurately reflect the experimental results and reveal the mechanisms for self consistent intracavity pulse evolution. With this performance mode-locked fiber lasers can compete with state-of-the-art bulk femtosecond oscillators for the first time and pulse energy scaling beyond the muJ-level appears to be feasible.

  20. High-quality and Large-size Topological Insulator Bi2Te3-Gold Saturable Absorber Mirror for Mode-Locking Fiber Laser

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hou-Ren; Tsai, Chih-Ya; Cheng, Hsin-Ming; Lin, Kuei-Huei; Yen, Po-Hsiu; Chen, Chyong-Hua; Hsieh, Wen-Feng

    2016-01-01

    A novel high-quality, large-size, reflection-type topological insulator Bi2Te3-Gold (BG) film-based nonlinear optical modulator has been successfully fabricated as a two-dimensional saturable absorber mirror (SAM) by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). This BG-SAM possesses saturation fluence of 108.3 μJ/cm2, modulation depth (ΔR) of 6.5%, non-saturable loss of 38.4%, high damage threshold above 1.354 mJ/cm2 and excellent uniformity providing for the generation of passive mode-locked (ML) pulses for erbium-doped fiber lasers (EDFLs) on a large sample area. Under 124 mW 976 nm pumping, We obtained 452-fs continuous-wave ML pulses with pulse energy of 91 pJ and full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 6.72-nm from this EDFL. The results clearly evidence that the PLD is an efficient method for fabricating BG-SAM that is suitable for a compact ultrafast ML fiber laser system. PMID:27917938

  1. Dependence of the absorption of pulsed CO2-laser radiation by silane on wavenumber, fluence, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of absorbing and nonabsorbing gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bl/aŻejowski, Jerzy; Gruzdiewa, Ludwika; Rulewski, Jacek; Lampe, Frederick W.

    1995-05-01

    The absorption of three lines [P(20), 944.2 cm-1; P(14), 949.2 cm-1; and R(24), 978.5 cm-1] of the pulsed CO2 laser (0001-1000 transition) by SiH4 was measured at various pulse energy, pulse duration, temperature, optical path length, and pressure of the compound and nonabsorbing foreign gases. In addition, low intensity infrared absorption spectrum of silane was compared with high intensity absorption characteristics for all lines of the pulsed CO2 laser. The experimental dependencies show deviations from the phenomenological Beer-Lambert law which can be considered as arising from the high intensity of an incident radiation and collisions of absorbing molecules with surroundings. These effects were included into the expression, being an extended form of the Beer-Lambert law, which reasonably approximates all experimental data. The results, except for extending knowledge on the interaction of a high power laser radiation with matter, can help understanding and planning processes leading to preparation of silicon-containing technologically important materials.

  2. Widely-tunable, passively Q-switched erbium-doped fiber laser with few-layer MoS2 saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yizhong; Luo, Zhengqian; Li, Yingyue; Zhong, Min; Xu, Bin; Che, Kaijun; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Peng, Jian; Weng, Jian

    2014-10-20

    We propose and demonstrate a MoS2-based passively Q-switched Er-doped fiber laser with a wide tuning range of 1519.6-1567.7 nm. The few-layer MoS2 nano-platelets are prepared by the liquid-phase exfoliation method, and are then made into polymer-composite film to construct the fiber-compatible MoS2 saturable absorber (SA). It is measured at 1560 nm wavelength, that such MoS2 SA has the modulation depth of ∼ 2% and the saturable optical intensity of ∼ 10 MW/cm(2). By further inserting the filmy MoS2-SA into an Er-doped fiber laser, stable Q-switching operation with a 48.1 nm continuous tuning from S- to C-waveband is successfully achieved. The shortest pulse duration and the maximum pulse energy are 3.3 μs and 160 nJ, respectively. The repetition rate and the pulse duration under different operation conditions have been also characterized. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first demonstration of MoS2 Q-switched, widely-tunable fiber laser.

  3. Study on preparation of the core-nanoshell composite absorbers by high-energy ball milling at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Che, Ruxin; Gao, Hong; Yu, Bing; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Chunxia

    2012-02-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) wave pollution has become the chief physical pollution for environment. In recent years, some researches have been focused on the preparation of nano-composite absorbers at low temperatures or even at room temperature. In this letter, preparation of nanocomposite by using high-energy ball milling at room temperature is reported. The core-nanoshell composite absorbers with magnetic fly-ash hollow cenosphere (MFHC) as nuclear and nanocrystalline magnetic material as shell were prepared by high-energy ball milling and vacuum-sintering in this paper. The pre-treatment of MFHC, the sintering process and the mol ratio of starting chemicals had a significant impact for property of composite absorbers. The results of X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and vector network analyzer (VNA) analysis indicated that perfect-crystalline nanomagnetic material coating was gotten with a particle size of 12 nm after ball milling. The results show the MFHC is dielectric loss and magnetic loss too; the exchange-coupling interaction happened between ferrite of the MFHC and nanocrystalline magnetic material coating. The exchange-coupling interaction enhances magnetic loss of composite absorbers. They have a perfect EM parameters at low microwave frequency. The core-nanoshell composite absorbers have a higher magnetic loss at low frequencies, and it is consistent with requirements of the microwave absorbing material at the low-frequency absorption. The microwave absorptivity of the core-nanoshell composite absorbers is better than single material.

  4. Laser Energy Monitor for Double-Pulsed 2-Micrometer IPDA Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.

    2014-01-01

    Integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is a remote sensing technique for monitoring different atmospheric species. The technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features normalized to the transmitted energy. 2-micron double-pulsed IPDA lidar is best suited for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements. In such case, the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by short interval (200 microseconds), with low repetition rate (10Hz). Conventional laser energy monitors, based on thermal detectors, are suitable for low repetition rate single pulse lasers. Due to the short pulse interval in double-pulsed lasers, thermal energy monitors underestimate the total transmitted energy. This leads to measurement biases and errors in double-pulsed IPDA technique. The design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on a high-speed, extended range InGaAs pin quantum detectors suitable for separating the two pulse events. Pulse integration is applied for converting the detected pulse power into energy. Results are compared to a photo-electro-magnetic (PEM) detector for impulse response verification. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in single-pulsed mode, then comparing the pin and PEM detectors in double-pulsed mode. Energy monitor linearity will be addressed.

  5. Laser energy monitor for double-pulsed 2-μm IPDA lidar application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.

    2014-10-01

    Integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is a remote sensing technique for monitoring different atmospheric species. The technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features normalized to the transmitted energy. 2-μm double-pulsed IPDA lidar is best suited for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurements. In such case, the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by short interval (200 μs), with low repetition rate (10Hz). Conventional laser energy monitors, based on thermal detectors, are suitable for low repetition rate single pulse lasers. Due to the short pulse interval in double-pulsed lasers, thermal energy monitors underestimate the total transmitted energy. This leads to measurement biases and errors in double-pulsed IPDA technique. The design and calibration of a 2-μm double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on a highspeed, extended range InGaAs pin quantum detectors suitable for separating the two pulse events. Pulse integration is applied for converting the detected pulse power into energy. Results are compared to a photo-electro-magnetic (PEM) detector for impulse response verification. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in singlepulsed mode, then comparing the pin and PEM detectors in double-pulsed mode. Energy monitor linearity will be addressed.

  6. Q-switched dual-wavelength fiber laser using a graphene oxide saturable absorber and singlemode-multimode-singlemode fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, H.; Zulkifli, A. Z.; Yasin, M.; Thambiratnam, K.

    2016-10-01

    A Q-switched dual-wavelength fiber laser using a graphene oxide-based saturable absorber to generate the desired output pulses is proposed and demonstrated. The system utilizes a singlemode-multimode-singlemode fiber structure to control the net losses in the cavity so that only two dominant wavelengths are allowed to oscillate. The proposed system is capable of generating an output with a high repetition rate of 27.1 kHz and a narrow pulse width of 4.03 µs. The output pulses also have average output power and pulse energy of up to 0.5 mW and 18.5 nJ, respectively. The 1st harmonic obtained has a high signal-to-noise ratio of 33.2 dB, indicating a highly stable pulse output with minimum mode hopping.

  7. High-power passively Q-switched Yb:YCa4O(BO3)3 laser with a GaAs crystal plate as saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaowen; Han, Wenjuan; Xu, Honghao; Jia, Minghui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Liu, Junhai

    2015-04-10

    We report on efficient high-power passively Q-switched operation of a Yb:YCa4O(BO3)3 laser with a GaAs crystal plate acting as the saturable absorber. An average output power of 5.7 W at 1032 nm is generated at a pulse repetition rate of 166.7 kHz when the incident pump power is 26.8 W, with a slope efficiency determined to be 24.5%. The averaged pulse energy achieved is roughly 30 μJ and is increased to about 40 μJ when the output coupling used changes from 30% to 50%, while the shortest pulse width is measured to be 153 ns.

  8. Conversion of laser energy to gas kinetic energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for the gas phase absorption of laser radiation for conversion to gas kinetic energy are discussed. Absorption by inverse Bremsstrahlung, in which laser energy is converted at a gas kinetic rate in a spectrally continuous process, is briefly described, and absorption by molecular vibrational rotation bands is discussed at length. High pressure absorption is proposed as a means of minimizing gas bleaching and dissociation, the major disadvantages of the molecular absorption process. A band model is presented for predicting the molecular absorption spectra in the high pressure absorption region and is applied to the CO molecule. Use of a rare gas seeded with Fe(CO)5 for converting vibrational modes to translation modes is described.

  9. Approximate theory of highly absorbing polymer ablation by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furzikov, N. P.

    1990-04-01

    Surface interference, nonlinearly saturated instability of laser-induced thermodestruction, and subsequent oscillation of absorption mode permit the description of analytical ablation thresholds and depths per pulse of polymers having high absorption at laser wavelengths, e.g., polyimide and poly(ethylene terephtalate). Inverse problem solution for polycarbonate and ablation invariant designing are also realized.

  10. Energy enhancement of mixed Nd:LuYSGG crystal in passively Q-switched lasers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baolin; Tian, Li; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Jiyang

    2015-07-01

    The continuous-wave (cw) and passively Q-switched laser performances of mixed Nd:Lu(2)YSc(1.5)Ga(3.5)O(12) (Nd:LuYSGG) crystal at 1.06 μm were reported for the first time. The cw output power reached 4.39 W at the absorbed pump power of 10.34 W with slope efficiency of 48.0%. With a Cr(4+):YAG crystal as both the saturable absorber and output coupler, a passively Q-switched laser was realized with the maximum average output power of 1.43 W and slope efficiency of 21.0%. The shortest pulse width, largest pulse energy, and highest peak power were 4.1 ns, 157.1 μJ, and 38.3 kW, respectively. Compared with Nd:Lu(3)Sc(1.5)Ga(3.5)O(12) (Nd:LuSGG) crystal, the pulse energy and peak power are enhanced over more than two times for Nd:LuYSGG. The results show that Nd:LuYSGG crystal is a promising laser material with large energy storage capacities and suitable for the application of pulsed lasers with shorter pulses and larger energies.

  11. Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) metric to characterize solar absorber coatings for the CSP industry

    DOE PAGES

    Boubault, Antoine; Ho, Clifford K.; Hall, Aaron; ...

    2015-07-08

    The contribution of each component of a power generation plant to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) can be estimated and used to increase the power output while reducing system operation and maintenance costs. The LCOE is used in order to quantify solar receiver coating influence on the LCOE of solar power towers. Two new parameters are introduced: the absolute levelized cost of coating (LCOC) and the LCOC efficiency. Depending on the material properties, aging, costs, and temperature, the absolute LCOC enables quantifying the cost-effectiveness of absorber coatings, as well as finding optimal operating conditions. The absolute LCOC is investigatedmore » for different hypothetic coatings and is demonstrated on Pyromark 2500 paint. Results show that absorber coatings yield lower LCOE values in most cases, even at significant costs. Optimal reapplication intervals range from one to five years. At receiver temperatures greater than 700 °C, non-selective coatings are not always worthwhile while durable selective coatings consistently reduce the LCOE—up to 12% of the value obtained for an uncoated receiver. Moreover the absolute LCOC is a powerful tool to characterize and compare different coatings, not only considering their initial efficiencies but also including their durability.« less

  12. Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) metric to characterize solar absorber coatings for the CSP industry

    SciTech Connect

    Boubault, Antoine; Ho, Clifford K.; Hall, Aaron; Lambert, Timothy N.; Ambrosini, Andrea

    2015-07-08

    The contribution of each component of a power generation plant to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) can be estimated and used to increase the power output while reducing system operation and maintenance costs. The LCOE is used in order to quantify solar receiver coating influence on the LCOE of solar power towers. Two new parameters are introduced: the absolute levelized cost of coating (LCOC) and the LCOC efficiency. Depending on the material properties, aging, costs, and temperature, the absolute LCOC enables quantifying the cost-effectiveness of absorber coatings, as well as finding optimal operating conditions. The absolute LCOC is investigated for different hypothetic coatings and is demonstrated on Pyromark 2500 paint. Results show that absorber coatings yield lower LCOE values in most cases, even at significant costs. Optimal reapplication intervals range from one to five years. At receiver temperatures greater than 700 °C, non-selective coatings are not always worthwhile while durable selective coatings consistently reduce the LCOE—up to 12% of the value obtained for an uncoated receiver. Moreover the absolute LCOC is a powerful tool to characterize and compare different coatings, not only considering their initial efficiencies but also including their durability.

  13. High shear rate flow in a linear stroke magnetorheological energy absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W.; Wereley, N. M.; Hiemenz, G. J.; Ngatu, G. T.

    2014-05-01

    To provide adaptive stroking load in the crew seats of ground vehicles to protect crew from blast or impact loads, a magnetorheological energy absorber (MREA) or shock absorber was developed. The MREA provides appropriate levels of controllable stroking load for different occupant weights and peak acceleration because the viscous stroking load generated by the MREA force increases with velocity squared, thereby reducing its controllable range at high piston velocity. Therefore, MREA behavior at high piston velocity is analyzed and validated experimentally in order to investigate the effects of velocity and magnetic field on MREA performance. The analysis used to predict the MREA force as a function of piston velocity squared and applied field is presented. A conical fairing is mounted to the piston head of the MREA in order reduce predicted inlet flow loss by 9% at nominal velocity of 8 m/s, which resulted in a viscous force reduction of nominally 4%. The MREA behavior is experimentally measured using a high speed servo-hydraulic testing system for speeds up to 8 m/s. The measured MREA force is used to validate the analysis, which captures the transient force quite accurately, although the peak force is under-predicted at the peak speed of 8 m/s.

  14. Q-switching of a thulium-doped fibre laser using a holmium-doped fibre saturable absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Sadovnikova, Ya E; Kamynin, V A; Kurkov, A S; Medvedkov, O I; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2014-01-31

    We have proposed and demonstrated a new passively Q-switched thulium-doped fibre laser configuration. A distinctive feature of this configuration is the use of a heavily holmium-doped fibre for Q-switching. Lasing was obtained at 1.96 μm, with a pulse energy of 3 μJ and pulse duration of 600 ns. The highest pulse repetition rate was 80 kHz. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  15. Study the penetration of IR laser radiation in human teeth: determination of the absorbed and scattered parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunova, Pepa; Rabadgiiska, Stanislava; Uzunov, Tzonko; Kisov, Hristo; Kaimakanova, Nadejda; Deneva, Margarita; Dinkov, Emil; Nenchev, Marin

    2013-03-01

    By using the developed by us approaches and instrumentation, we have obtained and presented series of systematized data, which are important for the use of the laser light in infrared (IR) spectral region. The obtained data include: 1) reflectivity of the human tooth dentin; 2) the spatial intensity distribution in the cross-section of the light beam penetrating the tooth's dentin; 3) the absorbed and the diffused parts of the laser light that have been determined separately through combination of optical and calorimetric techniques. The last result is the most important because it permits to calculate the dentin absorption and scattering coefficients. The study is performed for the laser light at two easily generated wavelengths - 1.06 μm and 1.36 μm, emitted by the Nd:YAG laser that is well known, commercially available, economical and widely used in many laboratories and medical institutions. The study is made on the basis of fresh in-vitro teeth samples from the persons of Bulgaria, Sofia region.

  16. Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, D.; Shu, A. J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Matlis, N. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Plateau, G.; Lin, C.; Toth, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10 m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  17. Stabilizing laser energy density on a target during pulsed laser deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Dowden, Paul C.; Jia, Quanxi

    2016-05-31

    A process for stabilizing laser energy density on a target surface during pulsed laser deposition of thin films controls the focused laser spot on the target. The process involves imaging an image-aperture positioned in the beamline. This eliminates changes in the beam dimensions of the laser. A continuously variable attenuator located in between the output of the laser and the imaged image-aperture adjusts the energy to a desired level by running the laser in a "constant voltage" mode. The process provides reproducibility and controllability for deposition of electronic thin films by pulsed laser deposition.

  18. Multi-Terrain Impact Testing and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Sparks, Chad E.; Sareen, Ashish K.

    2004-01-01

    Comparisons of the impact performance of a 5-ft diameter crashworthy composite fuselage section were investigated for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts. The fuselage concept, which was originally designed for impacts onto a hard surface only, consisted of a stiff upper cabin, load bearing floor, and an energy absorbing subfloor. Vertical drop tests were performed at 25-ft/s onto concrete, soft-soil, and water at NASA Langley Research Center. Comparisons of the peak acceleration values, pulse durations, and onset rates were evaluated for each test at specific locations on the fuselage. In addition to comparisons of the experimental results, dynamic finite element models were developed to simulate each impact condition. Once validated, these models can be used to evaluate the dynamic behavior of subfloor components for improved crash protection for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts.

  19. Multi-Terrain Impact Testing and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Lyle, Karen H.; Sparks, Chad E.; Sareen, Ashish K.

    2007-01-01

    Comparisons of the impact performance of a 5-ft diameter crashworthy composite fuselage section were investigated for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts. The fuselage concept, which was originally designed for impacts onto a hard surface only, consisted of a stiff upper cabin, load bearing floor, and an energy absorbing subfloor. Vertical drop tests were performed at 25-ft/s onto concrete, soft-soil, and water at NASA Langley Research Center. Comparisons of the peak acceleration values, pulse durations, and onset rates were evaluated for each test at specific locations on the fuselage. In addition to comparisons of the experimental results, dynamic finite element models were developed to simulate each impact condition. Once validated, these models can be used to evaluate the dynamic behavior of subfloor components for improved crash protection for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts.

  20. A fail-safe magnetorheological energy absorber for shock and vibration isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Wereley, Norman M.

    2014-05-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) energy absorbers (EAs) are an effective adaptive EA technology with which to maximize shock and vibration isolation. However, to realize maximum performance of the semi-active control system, the off-state (i.e., field off) stroking load of the MREA must be minimized at all speeds, and the dynamic range of the MREA must be maximized at high speed. This study presents a fail-safe MREA (MREA-FS) concept that, can produce a greater dynamic range at all piston speeds. A bias damping force is generated in the MREA-FS using permanent magnetic fields, which enables fail-safe behavior in the case of power failure. To investigate the feasibility and capability of the MREA-FS in the context of the semi-active control systems, a single-degree-of-freedom base excited rigid payload is mathematically constructed and simulated with skyhook control.

  1. A fail-safe magnetorheological energy absorber for shock and vibration isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Xian-Xu; Wereley, Norman M.

    2014-05-07

    Magnetorheological (MR) energy absorbers (EAs) are an effective adaptive EA technology with which to maximize shock and vibration isolation. However, to realize maximum performance of the semi-active control system, the off-state (i.e., field off) stroking load of the MREA must be minimized at all speeds, and the dynamic range of the MREA must be maximized at high speed. This study presents a fail-safe MREA (MREA-FS) concept that, can produce a greater dynamic range at all piston speeds. A bias damping force is generated in the MREA-FS using permanent magnetic fields, which enables fail-safe behavior in the case of power failure. To investigate the feasibility and capability of the MREA-FS in the context of the semi-active control systems, a single-degree-of-freedom base excited rigid payload is mathematically constructed and simulated with skyhook control.

  2. Bistable optical devices with laser diodes coupled to absorbers of narrow spectral bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Y

    1994-06-20

    An optical signal inverter was demonstrated with a combination of the following two effects: One is the decrease of the transmission of an Er-doped YAG crystal with increasing red shift of a laser diode resulting from an increase in the injection current, and the other is a negative nonlinear absorption in which the transmission decreases inversely with increasing laser intensity. Because a hysteresis characteristic exists in the relationship between the wavelength and the injection current of the laser diode, an optical bistability was observed in this system.

  3. Development of Lead Free Energy Absorber for Space Shuttle Blast Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balles, Donald; Ingram, Thomas; Novak, Howard; Schricker, Albert

    1999-01-01

    The Space Shuttle is connected to the mobile launch platform (MLP) by four aft skirt hold down studs on each solid rocket booster (SRB). Prior to lift-off, the frangible nuts inside the aft skirt blast containers are severed into two nut halves by two pyrotechnic booster cartridges. This action releases the Space Shuttle and allows the hold down studs to eject through the aft skirt bore and then down into the MLP. USBI has been tasked to upgrade the blast container for two specific reasons: (1) To eliminate lead for environmental concerns, and (2) To reduce the chance of nut recontact with the holddown stud. Nut recontact with the stud has been identified as a likely contributor to stud hang-ups. This upgrade will replace the lead liner with a unique open cell aluminum foam material, that has commercial and military uses. The aluminum foam used as an energy absorber is a proven design in many other aerospace/defense applications. Additional benefits of using the open cell, energy absorbent aluminum foam in place of the solid lead liner are: (1) Lead handling / exposure and possible contamination, along with hazardous waste disposal, will be eliminated; (2) Approximately 200 lbs. weight savings will be contributed to each Space Shuttle flight by using aluminum foam instead of lead; (3) The new aluminum liner is designed to catch all shrapnel from frangible nuts, thus virtually eliminating chance of debris exiting the HDP and causing potential damage to the vehicle; (4) Using the lighter aluminum liner instead of lead, allows for easier assembly and disassembly of blast container elements, which also improves safety, operator handling, and the efficiency of operations.

  4. Crash Test of an MD-500 Helicopter with a Deployable Energy Absorber Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.; Jackson, Karen E.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2010-01-01

    On December 2, 2009, a full scale crash test was successfully conducted of a MD-500 helicopter at the NASA Langley Research Center Landing and Impact Research Facility . The purpose of this test was to evaluate a novel composite honeycomb deployable energy absorbing (DEA) concept for attenuation of structural and crew loads during helicopter crashes under realistic crash conditions. The DEA concept is an alternative to external airbags, and absorbs impact energy through crushing. In the test, the helicopter impacted the concrete surface with 11.83 m/s (38.8 ft/s) horizontal, 7.80 m/s (25.6 ft/s) vertical and 0.15 m/s (0.5 ft/s) lateral velocities; corresponding to a resultant velocity of 14.2 m/s (46.5 ft/s). The airframe and skid gear were instrumented with accelerometers and strain gages to determine structural integrity and load attenuation, while the skin of the airframe was covered with targets for use by photogrammetry to record gross vehicle motion before, during, and after the impact. Along with the collection of airframe data, one Hybrid III 50th percentile anthropomorphic test device (ATD), two Hybrid II 50th percentile ATDs and a specialized human surrogate torso model (HSTM) occupant were seated in the airframe and instrumented for the collection of occupant loads. Resultant occupant data showed that by using the DEA, the loads on the Hybrid II and Hybrid III ATDs were in the Low Risk regime for the injury criteria, while structural data showed the airframe retained its structural integrity post crash. Preliminary results show that the DEA is a viable concept for the attenuation of impact loads.

  5. Development of Lead Free Energy Absorber for Space Shuttle Blast Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balles, Donald; Ingram, Thomas; Novak, Howard; Schricker, Albert

    1998-01-01

    The Space Shuttle is connected to the mobile launch platform (MLP) by four aft skirt hold down studs on each solid rocket booster (SRB). Prior to lift-off, the frangible nuts inside the aft skirt blast containers are severed into two nut halves by two pyrotechnic booster cartridges. This action releases the Space Shuttle and allows the hold down studs to eject through the aft skirt bore and then down into the MLP. USBI has been tasked to upgrade the blast container for two specific reasons: (1) To eliminate lead for environmental concerns, and (2) To reduce the chance of nut recontact with the holddown stud. Nut recontact with the stud has been identified as a likely contributor to stud hang-ups. This upgrade will replace the lead liner with a unique open cell aluminum foam material, that has commercial and military uses. The aluminum foam used as an energy absorber is a proven design in many other aerospace/defense applications. Additional benefits of using the open cell, energy absorbent aluminum foam in place of the solid lead liner are: (A) Lead handling/exposure and possible contamination, along with hazardous waste disposal, will be eliminated; (B) Approximately 200 lbs. weight savings will be contributed to each Space Shuttle flight by using aluminum foam instead of lead; (C) The new aluminum liner is designed to catch all shrapnel from frangible nuts, thus virtually eliminating chance of debris exiting the HDP and causing potential damage to the vehicle; and (D) Using the lighter aluminum liner instead of lead, allows for easier assembly and disassembly of blast container elements, which also improves safety, operator handling, and the efficiency of operations.

  6. Tactical laser weapons and other directed-energy weapons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rongrui

    1993-07-01

    This paper briefly introduces the current development status of three directed-energy weapons: laser weapons, radio frequency/microwave weapons, and charged-particle-beam weapons. Among them, the tactical laser weapon may be the first to find application.

  7. Control, Filtering and System Identification for High Energy Lasers and Laser Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-16

    LASERS AND LASER COMMUNICATIONS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER I H ENERGY LASER AND LASER COMMUNICATIO S 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-09-1-0542...wavefront prediction are being employed in an Air Force-sponsored SBIR to MZA Associates Corporation , Dayton, OH, for spatial-temporal control in adaptive optics. Point of contact: Dr. Matthew Whiteley, 937-684-4100 x101.

  8. Microbubbles-overlapping mode for laser killing of cancer cells with absorbing nanoparticle clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, V. P.; Letfullin, R. R.; Galitovskaya, E. N.

    2005-08-01

    Laser-induced bubble formation around nanoparticles may play a crucial role in selective laser nanophotothermolysis of cancer cells targeted with nanoparticles. In this paper, we propose theoretically, and confirm experimentally, a new dynamic mode for selective cancer treatment that involves the overlapping of bubbles inside the cell volume. This bubbles-overlapping mode (BOM) can dramatically increase the efficiency of cancer treatment by laser-heated nanoparticles as a result of the large damage range. On the basis of nanoparticle optics below the diffraction limit and the kinetic model of bubble dynamics, we found the criteria and conditions (interparticle distance and particle size and concentration) for BOM initiation in cancer cells by laser radiation. Using MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, we showed that the optimal size range of the gold nanoparticles for effective laser initiation of BOM is 30-40 nm and the lower concentration limit is n ap 2.44 × 1011 cm-3 (i.e. the absolute number of particles homogeneously distributed inside a tumour cell is n ap 430). It was demonstrated that the formation of nanoclusters on the cell surface with sizes larger than the sizes of individual nanoparticles, may further increase the efficiency of the laser treatment of cancer.

  9. Advanced solar energy conversion. [solar pumped gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    An atomic iodine laser, a candidate for the direct solar pumped lasers, was successfully excited with a 4 kW beam from a xenon arc solar simulator, thus proving the feasibility of the concept. The experimental set up and the laser output as functions of operating conditions are presented. The preliminary results of the iodine laser amplifier pumped with the HCP array to which a Q switch for giant pulse production was coupled are included. Two invention disclosures - a laser driven magnetohydrodynamic generator for conversion of laser energy to electricity and solar pumped gas lasers - are also included.

  10. Buck-boost converter for simultaneous semi-active vibration control and energy harvesting for electromagnetic regenerative shock absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Chongxiao; Kim, Junyoung; Yu, Liangyao; Zuo, Lei

    2014-04-01

    Regenerative semi-active suspensions can capture the previously dissipated vibration energy and convert it to usable electrical energy for powering on-board electronic devices, while achieve both the better ride comfort and improved road handling performance at the same time when certain control is applied. To achieve this objective, the power electronics interface circuit connecting the energy harvester and the electrical loads, which can perform simultaneous vibration control and energy harvesting function is in need. This paper utilized a buck-boost converter for simultaneous semi-active vibration control and energy harvesting with electromagnetic regenerative shock absorber, which utilizes a rotational generator to converter the vibration energy to electricity. It has been found that when the circuit works in discontinuous current mode (DCM), the ratio between the input voltage and current is only related to the duty cycle of the switch pulse width modulation signal. Using this property, the buck-boost converter can be used to perform semi-active vibration control by controlling the load connected between the terminals of the generator in the electromagnetic shock absorber. While performing the vibration control, the circuit always draw current from the shock absorber and the suspension remain dissipative, and the shock absorber takes no additional energy to perform the vibration control. The working principle and dynamics of the circuit has been analyzed and simulations were performed to validate the concept.

  11. Space electric power design study. [laser energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martini, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    The conversion of laser energy to electrical energy is discussed. Heat engines in which the laser heats the gas inside the engine through a window as well as heat engines in which the gas is heated by a thermal energy storage reservoir which has been heated by laser radiation are both evaluated, as well as the necessary energy storage, transmission and conversion components needed for a full system. Preliminary system concepts are presented and a recommended development program is outlined. It appears possible that a free displacer Stirling engine operating directly a linear electric generator can convert 65% of the incident laser energy into electricity.

  12. A novel strain energy density algorithm for laser-induced micro-hollows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelen, Serap

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical adaptation and stability of implants are dependent on strain energy density algorithms of their surfaces. These applications are in their early stage, but theoretical predictions show us that we can manufacture very strong, flexible biomaterial surface which has a shock absorbing ability. Laser micro-machining is a clean tool for biomedical industry. The purpose of this manuscript is to consolidate a laser micro-machining method for imitating lotus effect on commercially pure titanium specimen surfaces and to develop a novel strain energy density algorithm. Novel 3D nelumbo leafs were prepared using a fiber laser (λ=1060 nm) with 200-250 ns pulse durations and optimum operation parameters were suggested.

  13. An investigation into the simultaneous use of a resonator as an energy harvester and a vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, M. J.; Tang, B.; Melo, G. Pechoto; Lopes, V.

    2014-02-01

    A mass-spring-damper system is at the core of both a vibration absorber and a harvester of energy from ambient vibrations. If such a device is attached to a structure that has a high impedance, then it will have very little effect on the vibrations of the structure, but it can be used to convert mechanical vibrations into electrical energy (act as an energy harvester). However, if the same device is attached to a structure that has a relatively low impedance, then the device may attenuate the vibrations as it may act as both a vibration absorber and an energy harvester simultaneously. In this paper such a device is discussed. Two situations are considered; the first is when the structure is excited with broadband random excitation and the second is when the structure is excited by a single frequency. The optimum parameters of the device for both energy harvesting and vibration attenuation are discussed for these two cases. For random excitation it is found that if the device is optimized for vibration suppression, then this is also adequate for maximizing the energy absorbed (harvested), and thus a single device can effectively suppress vibration and harvest energy at the same time. For single frequency excitation this is found not to be the case. To maximize the energy harvested, the natural frequency of the system (host structure and absorber) has to coincide with the forcing frequency, but to minimize vibration of the host structure, the natural frequency of the absorber has to coincide with the forcing frequency. In this case, therefore, a single resonator cannot effectively suppress vibration and harvest energy at the same time.

  14. High Energy 2-micron Laser Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation shows the development of 2-micron solid state lasers. The topics covered include: 1) Overview 2-micron solid state lasers; 2) Modeling and population inversion measurement; 3) Side pump oscillator; and 4) One Joule 2-m Laser.

  15. High strength semi-active energy absorbers using shear- and mixedmode operation at high shear rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becnel, Andrew C.

    This body of research expands the design space of semi-active energy absorbers for shock isolation and crash safety by investigating and characterizing magnetorheological fluids (MRFs) at high shear rates ( > 25,000 1/s) under shear and mixed-mode operation. Magnetorheological energy absorbers (MREAs) work well as adaptive isolators due to their ability to quickly and controllably adjust to changes in system mass or impact speed while providing fail-safe operation. However, typical linear stroking MREAs using pressure-driven flows have been shown to exhibit reduced controllability as impact speed (shear rate) increases. The objective of this work is to develop MREAs that improve controllability at high shear rates by using pure shear and mixed shear-squeeze modes of operation, and to present the fundamental theory and models of MR fluids under these conditions. A proof of concept instrument verified that the MR effect persists in shear mode devices at shear rates corresponding to low speed impacts. This instrument, a concentric cylinder Searle cell magnetorheometer, was then used to characterize three commercially available MRFs across a wide range of shear rates, applied magnetic fields, and temperatures. Characterization results are presented both as flow curves according to established practice, and as an alternate nondimensionalized analysis based on Mason number. The Mason number plots show that, with appropriate correction coefficients for operating temperature, the varied flow curve data can be collapsed to a single master curve. This work represents the first shear mode characterization of MRFs at shear rates over 10 times greater than available with commercial rheometers, as well as the first validation of Mason number analysis to high shear rate flows in MRFs. Using the results from the magnetorheometer, a full scale rotary vane MREA was developed as part of the Lightweight Magnetorheological Energy Absorber System (LMEAS) for an SH-60 Seahawk helicopter

  16. Development of Lead Free Energy Absorber for Space Shuttle Blast Container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, T.; Balles, D.; Schricker, A.; Novak, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Space Shuttle vehicle (SSV) is connected to the mobile launch platform (MLP) by four aft skirt hold down studs on each solid rocket booster (SRB). Prior to lift-off, the frangible nuts inside the aft skirt blast containers (BC) are severed into two nut halves by two pyrotechnic booster cartridges. This action releases the SSV and allows the hold down studs to eject through the aft skirt bore and then down into the MLP. USBI has been tasked to upgrade the BC for two specific reasons; 1. to eliminate lead for environmental concerns, and 2. to reduce the chance of nut recontact with the holddown stud. Nut recontact with the stud has been identified as a likely contributor to stud hangups. This upgrade will replace the lead liner with an aluminum foam material. The aluminum foam used as a energy absorber is a proven design in many other aerospace/defense applications. Additional benefits of using the open cell, energy absorbent aluminum foam in place of the solid lead liner are: A. Lead handling/ exposure, and possible contamination, along with hazardous waste disposal will be eliminated; B. Approximately 200 lbs. weight savings will be contributed to each Space Shuttle flight by using aluminum foam over lead; C. The new aluminum liner is designed to catch all shrapnel from frangible nuts thus virtually eliminating chance of foreign object debris (FOD) exiting the HDP, and causing potential damage to the vehicle; D. Potential of using the lighter aluminum liner over lead, allows for easier assembly and disassembly of blast container elements, also allowing for improvements in safety, operator handling, and efficiency of operations. Six BC firing tests will be required to determine if the new liner material will perform in a way to decrease the chance of stud hangups and enhance the ability of the BC to retain blast debris. Testing will be performed at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) facility known as the Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF), and will simulate the

  17. LD-pumped erbium and neodymium lasers with high energy and output beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabanov, Vladimir V.; Bezyazychnaya, Tatiana V.; Bogdanovich, Maxim V.; Grigor'ev, Alexandr V.; Lebiadok, Yahor V.; Lepchenkov, Kirill V.; Ryabtsev, Andrew G.; Ryabtsev, Gennadii I.; Shchemelev, Maxim A.

    2013-05-01

    Physical and fabrication peculiarities which provide the high output energy and beam quality for the diode pumped erbium glass and Nd:YAG lasers are considered. Developed design approach allow to make passively Q-switched erbium glass eye-safe portable laser sources with output energy 8 - 12 mJ (output pulse duration is less than 25 ns, pulse repetition rate up to 5 Hz) and beam quality M2 less than 1.3. To reach these values the erbium laser pump unit parameters were optimized also. Namely, for the powerful laser diode arrays the optimal near-field fill-factor, output mirror reflectivity and heterostructure properties were determined. Construction of advanced diode and solid-state lasers as well as the optical properties of the active element and the pump unit make possible the lasing within a rather wide temperature interval (e.g. from minus forty till plus sixty Celsius degree) without application of water-based chillers. The transversally pumped Nd:YAG laser output beam uniformity was investigated depending on the active element (AE) pump conditions. In particular, to enhance the pump uniformity within AE volume, a special layer which practically doesn't absorb the pump radiation but effectively scatters the pump and lasing beams, was used. Application of such layer results in amplified spontaneous emission suppression and improvement of the laser output beam uniformity. The carried out investigations allow us to fabricate the solid-state Nd:YAG lasers (1064 nm) with the output energy up to 420 mJ at the pulse repetition rate up to 30 Hz and the output energy up to 100 mJ at the pulse repetition rate of of 100 Hz. Also the laser sources with following characteristics: 35 mJ, 30 Hz (266 nm); 60 mJ, 30 Hz (355 nm); 100 mJ, 30 Hz (532 nm) were manufactured on the base of the developed Nd:YAG quantrons.

  18. Vapor shielding models and the energy absorbed by divertor targets during transient events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skovorodin, D. I.; Pshenov, A. A.; Arakcheev, A. S.; Eksaeva, E. A.; Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2016-02-01

    The erosion of divertor targets caused by high heat fluxes during transients is a serious threat to ITER operation, as it is going to be the main factor determining the divertor lifetime. Under the influence of extreme heat fluxes, the surface temperature of plasma facing components can reach some certain threshold, leading to an onset of intense material evaporation. The latter results in formation of cold dense vapor and secondary plasma cloud. This layer effectively absorbs the energy of the incident plasma flow, turning it into its own kinetic and internal energy and radiating it. This so called vapor shielding is a phenomenon that may help mitigating the erosion during transient events. In particular, the vapor shielding results in saturation of energy (per unit surface area) accumulated by the target during single pulse of heat load at some level Emax. Matching this value is one of the possible tests to verify complicated numerical codes, developed to calculate the erosion rate during abnormal events in tokamaks. The paper presents three very different models of vapor shielding, demonstrating that Emax depends strongly on the heat pulse duration, thermodynamic properties, and evaporation energy of the irradiated target material. While its dependence on the other shielding details such as radiation capabilities of material and dynamics of the vapor cloud is logarithmically weak. The reason for this is a strong (exponential) dependence of the target material evaporation rate, and therefore the "strength" of vapor shield on the target surface temperature. As a result, the influence of the vapor shielding phenomena details, such as radiation transport in the vapor cloud and evaporated material dynamics, on the Emax is virtually completely masked by the strong dependence of the evaporation rate on the target surface temperature. However, the very same details define the amount of evaporated particles, needed to provide an effective shielding to the target, and

  19. Experimental evaluation of a stationary spherical reflector tracking absorber solar energy collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steward, W. G.; Kreider, J. F.; Caruso, P. S., Jr.; Kreith, F.

    1976-01-01

    This article presents experimental data for the thermal performance of a stationary, spherical-reflector, tracking-absorber solar energy collector (SRTA). The principle of operation and details of thermal performance of such an SRTA have previously been described. These experimental results were compared with the predictions of a thermal analysis previously published. Experimental results were compared with the prediction of Kreider's computer model. Within the range of the temperature of the experiments, the predicted performance of the unit agreed well with experimental data collected under clear sky conditions. In addition, the extrapolation of the efficiency to higher temperature is shown so that the potential of an SRTA solar collector as a means of providing high temperature steam to operate an electric power facility or for process heat can be evaluated. As a result of the tests conducted by NASA, and an economic analysis not yet publicly available, it appears that the SRTA solar collector concept will be economically viable in competition with any other existing solar system in providing electrical energy.

  20. High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility (HELSTF) Enhanced Laser and Range Operations. Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-16

    energy technologies for the DoD, other government agencies, industry, and academia. HELSTF represents a national investment of approximately $800 million...in high energy laser technology . As a result of the existing laser technologies and supporting infrastructure, which have an established record of...successful and innovative laser testing, research, and development, HELSTF is an important national asset to support continued laser technologies . It is

  1. Future scientific applications for high-energy lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.W.

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses future applications for high-energy lasers in the areas of astrophysics and space physics; hydrodynamics; material properties; plasma physics; radiation sources; and radiative properties.

  2. Q-switched thulium-doped fiber laser operating at 1940 nm region using a pencil-core as saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latiff, A. A.; Shamsudin, H.; Ahmad, H.; Harun, S. W.

    2016-04-01

    Q-switched thulium-doped fiber laser (TDFL) is demonstrated using pencil-core flakes as a saturable absorber (SA) for the first time. The SA was fabricated by exfoliating pencil-core flakes on adhesive tape surface, then repeatedly folded over the tape until the flakes homogenously deposited on the tape. A small piece of the tape is sandwiched between two ferrules and incorporated in TDFL cavity to realize a stable Q-switching pulse train. By increasing the 1552-nm pump power from 389 to 431 mW, the repetition rate of the TDFL increases from 14.95 to 34.60 kHz while the pulse width decreases from 6.70 to 4.69 μs. The maximum pulse energy of 46.05 nJ is generated with repetition rate and pulse width of 21.25 kHz and 6.27 μs, respectively. To the best our knowledge, this is a first demonstration SA from mundane object as alternative to commercial bulk graphite for Q-switched fiber laser.

  3. CO2 LASERS IN HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS.

    SciTech Connect

    POGORELSKY,I.V.

    2001-12-03

    Several proof-of-principle laser accelerator experiments turned a long-wavelength of a CO{sub 2} laser to advantage. Ongoing advancement to multi-terawatt femtosecond CO{sub 2} lasers opens new venues for next-generation laser acceleration research.

  4. Capturing the Energy Absorbing Mechanisms of Composite Structures under Crash Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Bonnie

    As fiber reinforced composite material systems become increasingly utilized in primary aircraft and automotive structures, the need to understand their contribution to the crashworthiness of the structure is of great interest to meet safety certification requirements. The energy absorbing behavior of a composite structure, however, is not easily predicted due to the great complexity of the failure mechanisms that occur within the material. Challenges arise both in the experimental characterization and in the numerical modeling of the material/structure combination. At present, there is no standardized test method to characterize the energy absorbing capability of composite materials to aide crashworthy structural design. In addition, although many commercial finite element analysis codes exist and offer a means to simulate composite failure initiation and propagation, these models are still under development and refinement. As more metallic structures are replaced by composite structures, the need for both experimental guidelines to characterize the energy absorbing capability of a composite structure, as well as guidelines for using numerical tools to simulate composite materials in crash conditions has become a critical matter. This body of research addresses both the experimental characterization of the energy absorption mechanisms occurring in composite materials during crushing, as well as the numerical simulation of composite materials undergoing crushing. In the experimental investigation, the specific energy absorption (SEA) of a composite material system is measured using a variety of test element geometries, such as corrugated plates and tubes. Results from several crush experiments reveal that SEA is not a constant material property for laminated composites, and varies significantly with the geometry of the test specimen used. The variation of SEA measured for a single material system requires that crush test data must be generated for a range of

  5. Tm:KLu(WO(4))(2) microchip laser Q-switched by a graphene-based saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Serres, Josep Maria; Loiko, Pavel; Mateos, Xavier; Yumashev, Konstantin; Griebner, Uwe; Petrov, Valentin; Aguiló, Magdalena; Díaz, Francesc

    2015-06-01

    We report on the first Tm-doped double tungstate microchip laser Q-switched with graphene using a Tm:KLu(WO4)2 crystal cut along the Ng dielectric axis. This laser generates a maximum average output power of 310 mW with a slope efficiency of 13%. At a repetition rate of 190 kHz the shortest pulses with 285 ns duration and 1.6 µJ energy are achieved.

  6. Chromatism compensation of the PETAL multipetawatt high-energy laser.

    PubMed

    Néauport, J; Blanchot, N; Rouyer, C; Sauteret, C

    2007-03-20

    High-energy petawatt lasers use series of spatial filters in their amplification section. The refractive lenses employed introduce longitudinal chromatism that can spatially and temporally distort the ultrafast laser beam after focusing. To ensure optimum performances of petawatt laser facilities, these distortions need to be corrected. Several solutions using reflective, refractive, or diffractive optical components can be addressed. We give herein a review of these various possibilities with their application to the PETAL (Petawatt Aquitaine Laser at the Laser Integration Line facility) laser beamline and show that diffractive-based corrections appear to be the most promising.

  7. Mathematical modeling of a photovoltaic-laser energy converter for iodine laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Gilbert H.; Heinbockel, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Space-based laser power systems will require converters to change laser radiation into electricity. Vertical junction photovoltaic converters are promising devices for this use. A promising laser for the laser power station is the t-C4F9I laser which emits radiation at a wavelength of 1.315 microns. This paper describes the results of mathematical modeling of a photovoltaic-laser energy converter for use with this laser. The material for this photovoltaic converter is Ga(53)In(47)As which has a bandgap energy of 0.94 eV, slightly below the energy of the laser photons (0.943 eV). Results of a study optimizing the converter parameters are presented. Calculated efficiency for a 1000 vertical junction converter is 42.5 percent at a power density of 1 x 10 to the 3d power w/sq cm.

  8. 1.61 μm high-order passive harmonic mode locking in a fiber laser based on graphene saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yichang; Niang, Alioune; Guesmi, Khmaies; Salhi, Mohamed; Sanchez, Francois

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate a passive mode-locked Er:Yb doped double-clad ring fiber laser based on graphene saturable absorber. By adjusting the polarization controller and minimizing the cavity loss, the laser can operate at hundreds of harmonics of the fundamental repetition frequency of the resonator with the central wavelength of 1.61 μm. Up to 683rd harmonic (which corresponds to 5.882 GHz) of the fundamental repetition frequency was achieved.

  9. Laser-Plasma Interactions in High-Energy Density Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, C G; Baldis, H A; Schneider, M B; Hinkel, D E; Langdon, A B; Seka, W; Bahr, R; Depierreaux, S

    2005-08-24

    Laser-plasma interactions (LPI) have been studied experimentally in high-temperature, high-energy density plasmas. The studies have been performed using the Omega laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), Rochester, NY. Up to 10 TW of power was incident upon reduced-scale hohlraums, distributed in three laser beam cones. The hot hohlraums fill quickly with plasma. Late in the laser pulse, most of the laser energy is deposited at the laser entrance hole, where most of the LPI takes place. Due to the high electron temperature, the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectrum extends well beyond {omega}{sub 0}/2, due to the Bohm-Gross shift. This high-temperature, high-energy density regime provides a unique opportunity to study LPI beyond inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions.

  10. Parametric study of laser photovoltaic energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, G. H.; Heinbockel, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    Photovoltaic converters are of interest for converting laser power to electrical power in a space-based laser power system. This paper describes a model for photovoltaic laser converters and the application of this model to a neodymium laser silicon photovoltaic converter system. A parametric study which defines the sensitivity of the photovoltaic parameters is described. An optimized silicon photovoltaic converter has an efficiency greater than 50 percent for 1000 W/sq cm of neodymium laser radiation.

  11. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, Yuiko T.; Guesto-Barnak, Donna

    1992-01-01

    A low-or no-silica, low- or no-alkali phosphate glass useful as a laser amplifier in a multiple pass, high energy laser system having a high thermal conductivity, K.sub.90.degree. C. >0.85 W/mK, a low coefficient of thermal expansion, .alpha..sub.20.degree.-300.degree. C. <80.times.10.sup.-7 /.degree.C., low emission cross section, .sigma.<2.5.times.10.sup.-20 cm.sup.2, and a high fluorescence lifetime, .tau.>325 .mu.secs at 3 wt. % Nd doping, consisting essentially of (on an oxide composition basis): wherein Ln.sub.2 O.sub.3 is the sum of lanthanide oxides; .SIGMA.R.sub.2 O is <5, R being Li, Na, K, Cs, and Rb; the sum of Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and MgO is <24 unless .SIGMA.R.sub.2 O is 0, then the sum of Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and MgO is <42; and the ratio of MgO to B.sub.2 O.sub.3 is 0.48-4.20.

  12. Soft Landing of Spacecraft on Energy-Absorbing Self-Deployable Cushions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Witold

    2003-01-01

    A report proposes the use of cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) foam structures to cushion impacts of small (1 to 50 kg) exploratory spacecraft on remote planets. Airbags, which are used on larger (800 to 1,000 kg) spacecraft have been found to (1) be too complex for smaller spacecraft; (2) provide insufficient thermal insulation between spacecraft and ground; (3) bounce on impact, thereby making it difficult to land spacecraft in precisely designated positions; and (4) be too unstable to serve as platforms for scientific observations. A CHEM foam pad according to the proposal would have a glass-transition temperature (Tg) well above ambient temperature. It would be compacted, at a temperature above Tg, to about a tenth or less of its original volume, then cooled below Tg, then installed on a spacecraft without compacting restraints. Upon entry of the spacecraft into a planetary atmosphere, the temperature would rise above Tg, causing the pad to expand to its original volume and shape. As the spacecraft decelerated and cooled, the temperature would fall below Tg, rigidifying the foam structure. The structure would absorb kinetic energy during ground impact by inelastic crushing, thus protecting the payload from damaging shocks. Thereafter, this pad would serve as a mechanically stable, thermally insulating platform for the landed spacecraft.

  13. A Computational Approach for Model Update of an LS-DYNA Energy Absorbing Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Jackson, Karen E.; Kellas, Sotiris

    2008-01-01

    NASA and its contractors are working on structural concepts for absorbing impact energy of aerospace vehicles. Recently, concepts in the form of multi-cell honeycomb-like structures designed to crush under load have been investigated for both space and aeronautics applications. Efforts to understand these concepts are progressing from tests of individual cells to tests of systems with hundreds of cells. Because of fabrication irregularities, geometry irregularities, and material properties uncertainties, the problem of reconciling analytical models, in particular LS-DYNA models, with experimental data is a challenge. A first look at the correlation results between single cell load/deflection data with LS-DYNA predictions showed problems which prompted additional work in this area. This paper describes a computational approach that uses analysis of variance, deterministic sampling techniques, response surface modeling, and genetic optimization to reconcile test with analysis results. Analysis of variance provides a screening technique for selection of critical parameters used when reconciling test with analysis. In this study, complete ignorance of the parameter distribution is assumed and, therefore, the value of any parameter within the range that is computed using the optimization procedure is considered to be equally likely. Mean values from tests are matched against LS-DYNA solutions by minimizing the square error using a genetic optimization. The paper presents the computational methodology along with results obtained using this approach.

  14. Experimental validation of a magnetorheological energy absorber design optimized for shock and impact loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harinder J.; Hu, Wei; Wereley, Norman M.; Glass, William

    2014-12-01

    A linear stroke adaptive magnetorheological energy absorber (MREA) was designed, fabricated and tested for intense impact conditions with piston velocities up to 8 m s-1. The performance of the MREA was characterized using dynamic range, which is defined as the ratio of maximum on-state MREA force to the off-state MREA force. Design optimization techniques were employed in order to maximize the dynamic range at high impact velocities such that MREA maintained good control authority. Geometrical parameters of the MREA were optimized by evaluating MREA performance on the basis of a Bingham-plastic analysis incorporating minor losses (BPM analysis). Computational fluid dynamics and magnetic FE analysis were conducted to verify the performance of passive and controllable MREA force, respectively. Subsequently, high-speed drop testing (0-4.5 m s-1 at 0 A) was conducted for quantitative comparison with the numerical simulations. Refinements to the nonlinear BPM analysis were carried out to improve prediction of MREA performance.

  15. Simulating the Response of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber. Part 2; Full-Scale Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Annett, Martin S.; Jackson, Karen E.; Polanco, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has sponsored research to evaluate an externally deployable composite honeycomb designed to attenuate loads in the event of a helicopter crash. The concept, designated the Deployable Energy Absorber (DEA), is an expandable Kevlar(Registered TradeMark) honeycomb. The DEA has a flexible hinge that allows the honeycomb to be stowed collapsed until needed during an emergency. Evaluation of the DEA began with material characterization of the Kevlar(Registered TradeMark)-129 fabric/epoxy, and ended with a full-scale crash test of a retrofitted MD-500 helicopter. During each evaluation phase, finite element models of the test articles were developed and simulations were performed using the dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA(Registered TradeMark). The paper will focus on simulations of two full-scale impact tests involving the DEA, a mass-simulator and a full-scale crash of an instrumented MD-500 helicopter. Isotropic (MAT24) and composite (MAT58) material models, which were assigned to DEA shell elements, were compared. Based on simulations results, the MAT58 model showed better agreement with test.

  16. Relative Efficiency of TLD-100 to High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation: Correction to Astronaut Absorbed Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Cash, B. L.; Semones, E. J.; Yasuda, H.; Fujitaka, K.

    1999-01-01

    Response of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD-100) to high linear energy transfer (LET) particles has been studied using helium, carbon, silicon, and iron ions from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator at Chiba (Japan), iron ions from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (NY) Alternate Gradient Synchrotron, and 53, 134, 185, and 232 MeV protons from the Loma Linda accelerator. Using the measured relative (to 137Cs) dose efficiency, and measured LET spectra from a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) on 20 Space Shuttle flights, and 7 Mir flights, the underestimation of absorbed dose by these detectors has been evaluated. The dose underestimation is between 15-20% depending upon the flight inclination and shielding location. This has been confirmed by direct correlation of measured dose by TEPC and TLD-100 at a low shielded location in the Shuttle mid-deck. A comparison of efficiency- LET data with a compilation of similar data from TLD-700, shows that shapes of the two curves are nearly identical, but that the TLD-100 curve is systematically lower by about 13%, and is the major cause of dose underestimation. These results strongly suggest that TLDs used for crew dose estimation be regularly calibrated using heavy ions.

  17. Relative Efficiency of TLD-100 to Linear Energy Transfer Radiation: Correction to Astronaut Absorbed Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.; Cash, B. L.; Semones, E. J.; Yasuda, H.; Fujitaka, K.

    1999-01-01

    Response of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD-100) to high linear energy transfer (LET) particles has been studied using helium, carbon, silicon, and iron ions from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator at Chiba (Japan), iron ions from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (NY) Alternate Gradient Synchrotron, and 53, 134, 185, and 232 MeV protons from the Loma Linda accelerator. Using the measured relative (to (137)Cs dose efficiency, and measured LET spectra from a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) on 20 Space Shuttle flights, and 7 Mir flights, the underestimation of absorbed dose by these detectors has been evaluated. The dose underestimation is between 15-20% depending upon the flight inclination and shielding location. This has been confirmed by direct correlation of measured dose by TEPC and TLD-100 at a low shielded location in the Shuttle mid-deck. A comparison of efficiency- LET data with a compilation of similar data from TLD-700, shows that shapes of the two curves are nearly identical, but that the TLD-100 curve is systematically lower by about 13%, and is the major cause of dose underestimation. These results strongly suggest that TLDs used for crew dose estimation be regularly calibrated using heavy ions.

  18. Specific absorbed fractions of energy at various ages from internal photon sources: 6, Newborn

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, M.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1987-04-01

    Specific absorbed fraction (PHI's) in various organs of the body (target organs) from sources of monoenergetic photons in various other organs (source organs) are tabulated. In this volume PHI-values are tabulated for a newborn or 3.4-kg person. These PHI-values can be used in calculating the photon component of the dose-equivalent rate in a given target from a given radionuclide that is present in a given source organ. The International Commission on Radiological Protection recognizes that the endosteal, or bone surface, cells are the tissue at risk for bone cancer. We have applied the dosimetry methods that Spiers and co-workers developed for beta-emitting radionuclides deposited in bone to follow the transport of secondary electrons that were freed by photon interactions through the microscopic structure of the skeleton. With these methods we can estimate PHI in the endosteal cells and can better estimate PHI in the active marrow; the latter is overestimated with other methods at photon energies below 200 keV. 12 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  20. Preliminary results on the conversion of laser energy into electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. W.; Manista, E. J.; Alger, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary experiment was performed to investigate conversion of 10.6 micron laser energy to electrical energy via a laser-sustained argon plasma. Short-circuit currents of 0.7 A were measured between a thoriated-tungsten emitter and collector electrodes immersed in the laser-sustained argon plasma. Open-circuit voltages of about 1.5 V were inferred from the current-voltage load characteristics. The dominant mechanism of laser energy conversion is uncertain at this time. Much higher output powers appear possible.

  1. Degradation of optical properties of a film-type single-wall carbon nanotubes saturable absorber (SWNT-SA) with an Er-doped all-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Sung Yoon; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Jungwon; Kim, Soohyun

    2012-06-04

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are promising materials for saturable absorbers (SAs) in mode-locked lasers. However it has been widely recognized that the degradation of optical properties of film-type SWNTs used in femtosecond mode-locked lasers limits the achievable long-term stability of such lasers. In this paper, we study the degradation of optical properties of SWNT-SA fabricated as sandwich type using HiPCO SWNTs with an Er-doped all-fiber laser. The thresholds of laser pump power are examined to avoid the damage of the SWNT-SA. Based on the proposed analysis, it is shown that all-fiber laser pulses of 300 fs pulse width, 3.85 mW average output power, 211.7 MW/cm² peak intensity and 69.9 MHz repetition rate can be reliably generated without any significant damage to the SWNT-SA film.

  2. Repetition frequency scaling of an all-polarization maintaining erbium-doped mode-locked fiber laser based on carbon nanotubes saturable absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Sotor, J. Sobon, G.; Abramski, K. M.; Jagiello, J.; Lipinska, L.

    2015-04-07

    We demonstrate an all-polarization maintaining (PM), mode-locked erbium (Er)-doped fiber laser based on a carbon nanotubes (CNT) saturable absorber (SA). The laser resonator was maximally simplified by using only one passive hybrid component and a pair of fiber connectors with deposited CNTs. The repetition frequency (F{sub rep}) of such a cost-effective and self-starting mode-locked laser was scaled from 54.3 MHz to 358.6 MHz. The highest F{sub rep} was obtained when the total cavity length was shortened to 57 cm. The laser allows ultrashort pulse generation with the duration ranging from 240 fs to 550 fs. Because the laser components were based on PM fibers the laser was immune to the external perturbations and generated laniary polarized light with the degree of polarization (DOP) of 98.7%.

  3. Problems of cosmic laser energy supply to users on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyakov, Boris A.; Batenin, Vyatcheslav M.; Klimovskii, Ivan I.; Konev, Yuri B.

    1999-01-01

    The global cosmic systems may be used for solution of problems of the Earth supply with energy in the nearest future. Such system can involve several cosmic platforms on the polar or heliostationary orbits. The present paper deals with prospects for using 3 types of the high power IR lasers for the cosmic power systems. The first laser type is a laser optically pumped by thermal radiation; it uses an intermediate 'black body' radiator heated by solar radiation and offers substantial and important advantages. The second laser type is a CO2 laser with radio frequency pumping. We can use several 33 X 30000 W lasers in one module for approximately 1 MW cosmic laser system. The module of 320 X 320 m2 solar cells is needed for such laser system energy supply. The third laser type is a CO2 gas-dynamic laser. The numerical studies of carbon dioxide laser that is pumped by solar-thermal heating were made, and the output laser power approximately 1 MW was calculated. The parameters studies were conducted for this laser conception.

  4. 463-MHz fundamental mode-locked fiber laser based on few-layer MoS(2) saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jun; Chen, Jianping

    2015-04-01

    We report on the passive-mode-locking operation of a fiber laser with a fundamental repetition rate of 463 MHz based on molybdenum disulfide (MoS(2)) saturable absorber (SA). By embedding MoS(2) into polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) thin film, MoS(2)-PVA SA was prepared with a modulation depth of 2.7% and a saturation intensity of 137  MW/cm(2). The mode-locked fiber laser-employed MoS(2)-PVA SA was achieved with center wavelength of 1556.3 nm, 3-dB bandwidth of 6.1 nm, output power of 5.9 mW, and an extinction ratio of up to 97 dB in the RF spectrum. The demonstration of mode-locking operation with high fundamental repetition rate and high spectral purity indicates that MoS(2)-PVA SA can be a good candidate for high-precision ultrafast applications.

  5. Q-switched erbium doped fiber laser based on single and multiple walled carbon nanotubes embedded in polyethylene oxide film as saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. H. M.; Ali, N. M.; Salleh, Z. S.; Rahman, A. A.; Harun, S. W.; Manaf, M.; Arof, H.

    2015-01-01

    A passive, stable and low cost Q-switched Erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) is demonstrated using both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), which are embedded in polyethylene oxide (PEO) film as a saturable absorber (SA). The film is sandwiched between two FC/PC fiber connectors and integrated into the laser cavity for Q-switching pulse generation operating at wavelength of 1533.6 nm. With SWCNTs, the laser produces a stable pulse train with repetition rate and pulse width ranging from 9.52 to 33.33 kHz and 16.8 to 8.0 μs while varying the 980 nm pump power from 48.5 mW to 100.4 mW. On the other hand, with MWCNTs, the repetition rate and pulse width can be tuned in a wider range of 6.12-33.62 kHz and 9.5- 4.2 μs, respectively as the pump power increases from 37.9 to 120.6 mW. The MWCNTs produce the pulse train at a lower threshold and attain a higher repetition rate compared to the SWCNTs. This is due to thicker carbon nanotubes layer of the MWCNTs which provides more absorption and consequently higher damage threshold. The Q-switched EDFL produces the highest pulse energy of 531 nJ at pump power of 37.9 mW with the use of MWCNTs-PEO SA.

  6. A New HOM Water Cooled Absorber for the PEP-II B-factory Low Energy Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, Stephen; Kosovsky, Michael; Kurita, Nadine; Novokhatski, Alexander; Seeman, John; /SLAC

    2006-09-05

    At high currents and small bunch lengths beam line components in the PEP-II B-factory experience RF induced heating from higher order RF modes (HOMs) produced by scattered intense beam fields. A design for a passive HOM water cooled absorber for the PEP-II low energy ring is presented. This device is situated near HOM producing beamline components such as collimators and provide HOM damping for dipole and quadrupole modes without impacting beam impedance. We optimized the impedance characteristics of the device through the evaluation of absorber effectiveness for specific modes using scattering parameter and wakefield analysis. Operational results are presented and agree very well with the predicted effectiveness.

  7. Integrated Modeling of Polymer Composites Under High Energy Laser Irradiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-30

    included as an appendix. 15. SUBJECT TERMS organic matrix composites, polymer matrix composites, lasers, thermal transport, ICMSE, molecular dynamics...AFRL-RX-WP-TR-2016-0071 INTEGRATED MODELING OF POLYMER COMPOSITES UNDER HIGH ENERGY LASER IRRADIATION Brent Volk, Gregory Ehlert...22 July 2013 – 30 September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INTEGRATED MODELING OF POLYMER COMPOSITES UNDER HIGH ENERGY LASER IRRADIATION 5a. CONTRACT

  8. Vapor shielding models and the energy absorbed by divertor targets during transient events

    SciTech Connect

    Skovorodin, D. I. Arakcheev, A. S.; Pshenov, A. A.; Eksaeva, E. A.; Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2016-02-15

    The erosion of divertor targets caused by high heat fluxes during transients is a serious threat to ITER operation, as it is going to be the main factor determining the divertor lifetime. Under the influence of extreme heat fluxes, the surface temperature of plasma facing components can reach some certain threshold, leading to an onset of intense material evaporation. The latter results in formation of cold dense vapor and secondary plasma cloud. This layer effectively absorbs the energy of the incident plasma flow, turning it into its own kinetic and internal energy and radiating it. This so called vapor shielding is a phenomenon that may help mitigating the erosion during transient events. In particular, the vapor shielding results in saturation of energy (per unit surface area) accumulated by the target during single pulse of heat load at some level E{sub max}. Matching this value is one of the possible tests to verify complicated numerical codes, developed to calculate the erosion rate during abnormal events in tokamaks. The paper presents three very different models of vapor shielding, demonstrating that E{sub max} depends strongly on the heat pulse duration, thermodynamic properties, and evaporation energy of the irradiated target material. While its dependence on the other shielding details such as radiation capabilities of material and dynamics of the vapor cloud is logarithmically weak. The reason for this is a strong (exponential) dependence of the target material evaporation rate, and therefore the “strength” of vapor shield on the target surface temperature. As a result, the influence of the vapor shielding phenomena details, such as radiation transport in the vapor cloud and evaporated material dynamics, on the E{sub max} is virtually completely masked by the strong dependence of the evaporation rate on the target surface temperature. However, the very same details define the amount of evaporated particles, needed to provide an effective shielding

  9. Semiconductor saturable absorber mirror passively Q-switched 2.97 μm fluoride fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianfeng; Luo, Hongyu; He, Yulian; Liu, Yong; Luo, Binbin; Sun, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Lin; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2014-05-01

    A diode-cladding-pumped mid-infrared passively Q-switched Ho3+-doped fluoride fiber laser using a reverse designed broad band semiconductor saturable mirror (SESAM) was demonstrated. Nonlinear reflectivity of the SESAM was measured using an in-house Yb3+-doped mode-locked fiber laser at 1062 nm. Stable pulse train was produced at a slope efficient of 12.1% with respect to the launched pump power. Maximum pulse energy of 6.65 μJ with a pulse width of 1.68 μs and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of ~50 dB was achieved at a repetition rate of 47.6 kHz and center wavelength of 2.971 μm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first 3 μm region SESAM based Q-switched fiber laser with the highest average power and pulse energy, as well as the longest wavelength from mid-infrared passively Q-switched fluoride fiber lasers.

  10. Semiconductor saturable absorber mirror passively Q-switched 2.97 μm fluoride fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. F.; Luo, H. Y.; He, Y. L.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, L.; Zhou, K. M.; Rozhin, A. G.; Turistyn, S. K.

    2014-06-01

    A diode-cladding-pumped mid-infrared passively Q-switched Ho3+-doped fluoride fiber laser using a reverse designed broad band semiconductor saturable mirror (SESAM) was demonstrated. Nonlinear reflectivity of the SESAM was measured using an in-house Yb3+-doped mode-locked fiber laser at 1062 nm. Stable pulse train was produced at a slope efficient of 12.1% with respect to the launched pump power. Maximum pulse energy of 6.65 µJ with a pulse width of 1.68 µs and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of ~50 dB was achieved at a repetition rate of 47.6 kHz and center wavelength of 2.971 µm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first 3 µm region SESAM-based Q-switched fiber laser with the highest average power and pulse energy, as well as the longest wavelength from mid-infrared passively Q-switched fluoride fiber lasers.

  11. Phase Conjugation Scaling for High Energy Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-30

    ultimate output power (-105W) of the laser system. Our object is to demonstrate phase-conjugation of an available pulsed or cw CO2 10.6 micron lasers ...with or without guiding, has never been reported. Pilot SBB experiments with higher powers from an available pulsed CO2 laser without guiding were...L required to obtain stimulated Brillouin backscattering (-1 to 10 m for our 50 W, CO2 laser ). The dielectric wall or "cladding" which surrounds the

  12. High energy efficient solid state laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations continue of diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser oscillators and nonlinear processes using them as sources. Diode laser array pumped Nd:YAG and Nd:glass lasers have been demonstrated. Theoretical studies of non-planar oscillators have been advanced, producing new designs which should be more resistant to feedback and offer better frequency stability. A monolithic, singly resonant Optical Parametric Oscillator in MgO:LiNbO3 has been operated.

  13. Passively mode-locked pulse generation in a c-cut Nd:LuVO4 laser at 1086 nm with a semiconductor saturable-absorber mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ja-Hon; Yang, Pao-Keng; Lin, Wei-Cheng

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate a diode-pumped passively mode-locked (ML) c-cut Nd:LuVO4 laser with central wavelength at 1086 nm by shifting the reflectance band of the SESAM into a longer wavelength to result in larger loss around 1068 nm. At 15 W absorbed pump power, the highest output power of the ML pulse was about 2.6 W that corresponded to the 17.3% optical-to-optical conversion efficiency and the slope efficiency of laser was about 22.9%. Using our ML laser as the light source, we have also successfully measured the saturation fluence of the SESAM at 1086 nm.

  14. High Average Power, High Energy Short Pulse Fiber Laser System

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, M J

    2007-11-13

    Recently continuous wave fiber laser systems with output powers in excess of 500W with good beam quality have been demonstrated [1]. High energy, ultrafast, chirped pulsed fiber laser systems have achieved record output energies of 1mJ [2]. However, these high-energy systems have not been scaled beyond a few watts of average output power. Fiber laser systems are attractive for many applications because they offer the promise of high efficiency, compact, robust systems that are turn key. Applications such as cutting, drilling and materials processing, front end systems for high energy pulsed lasers (such as petawatts) and laser based sources of high spatial coherence, high flux x-rays all require high energy short pulses and two of the three of these applications also require high average power. The challenge in creating a high energy chirped pulse fiber laser system is to find a way to scale the output energy while avoiding nonlinear effects and maintaining good beam quality in the amplifier fiber. To this end, our 3-year LDRD program sought to demonstrate a high energy, high average power fiber laser system. This work included exploring designs of large mode area optical fiber amplifiers for high energy systems as well as understanding the issues associated chirped pulse amplification in optical fiber amplifier systems.

  15. Dual-wavelength Q-switched Er:SrF2 laser with a black phosphorus absorber in the mid-infrared region.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Liu, Jie; Guo, Zhinan; Zhang, Han; Ma, Weiwei; Wang, Jingya; Su, Liangbi

    2016-12-26

    An efficient Er:SrF2 crystal, lightly Er-doped to a concentration of 4at.%, was successfully grown by the traditional Bridgman method and displayed excellent spectral properties. A diode-end-pumped passively Q-switched dual-wavelength laser, operating at 2.79 μm wavelength, was demonstrated with this crystal by using black phosphorus as the saturable absorber (BP-SA). In the compact passively Q-switched Er:SrF2 laser, the maximum average output power of 180 mW was achieved at an absorbed pump power of 2.47 W, with a pulse duration of 702 ns and a repetition rate of 77.03 kHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported application of BP-SA to dual-wavelength pulse laser operation in the mid-infrared region.

  16. Broadband wavelength tunable mode-locked thulium-doped fiber laser operating in the 2 μm region by using a graphene saturable absorber on microfiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Liu, Yan-ge; Wang, Zhi; Lou, Jiachang; Wang, Zhenhong; Liu, Zhibo

    2016-06-01

    A broadband wavelength tunable mode-locked Tm3+-doped fiber laser operating in the 2 μm region based on a graphene saturable absorber is experimentally investigated. A section of graphene film is transferred on a microfiber, which allows light-graphene interaction via evanescent field. The microfiber based graphene not only acts as an excellent saturable absorber for mode-locking, but also induces a polarizing effect to form an artificial birefringent filter for wavelength selection. By tuning the polarization states in the laser cavity, the laser exhibits tunable wavelength mode-locked pulses over a wide range from 1880 to 1940 nm. Such a system provides a compact, user friendly and low cost wavelength tunable ultrashort pulse source in the 2 μm region.

  17. Rapid laser induced energy transfer in atomic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies of the rapid transfer of stored populations from metastable states to selected target states of a different species are reported. Both laser-induced or laser-switched collision and laser-induced two-photon spontaneous emission are described. It is shown that the laser-induced collision method is particularly useful in the visible and UV spectral regions. It has applications in photochemistry, gas-phase kinetics, and in high-power, high-energy gas-phase lasers. The anti-Stokes source is useful in the VUV and soft X-ray spectral regions.

  18. Absorber and gain chip optimization to improve performance from a passively modelocked electrically pumped vertical external cavity surface emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaugg, C. A.; Gronenborn, S.; Moench, H.; Mangold, M.; Miller, M.; Weichmann, U.; Pallmann, W. P.; Golling, M.; Tilma, B. W.; Keller, U.

    2014-03-01

    We present an electrically pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (EP-VECSEL) modelocked with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) with significantly improved performance. In different cavity configurations, we present the shortest pulses (2.5 ps), highest average output power (53.2 mW), highest repetition rate (18.2 GHz), and highest peak power (4.7 W) to date. The simple and low-cost concept of EP-VECSELs is very attractive for mass-market applications such as optical communication and clocking. The improvements result from an optimized gain chip from Philips Technologie GmbH and a SESAM, specifically designed for EP-VECSELs. For the gain chip, we found a better trade-off between electrical and optical losses with an optimized doping scheme in the substrate to increase the average output power. Furthermore, the device's bottom contact diameter (60 μm) is smaller than the oxide aperture diameter (100 μm), which favors electro-optical conversion into a TEM00 mode. Compared to optically pumped VECSELs we have to increase the field enhancement in the active region of an EP-VECSEL which requires a SESAM with lower saturation fluence and higher modulation depth for modelocking. We therefore used a resonant quantum well SESAM with a 3.5-pair dielectric top-coating (SiNx and SiO2) to enhance the field in the absorber at the lasing wavelength of 980 nm. The absorption bandedge at room temperature is detuned (965 nm) compared to the resonance (980 nm), which enables temperature-tuning of the modulation depth and saturation fluence from approximately 2.5% up to 15% and from 20 μJ/cm2 to 1.1 μJ/cm2, respectively.

  19. Investigation of the crater-like microdefects induced by laser shock processing with aluminum foil as absorbent layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Y. X.; Xuan, T.; Lian, Z. C.; Feng, Y. Y.; Hua, X. J.

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports that 3D crater-like microdefects form on the metal surface when laser shock processing (LSP) is applied. LSP was conducted on pure copper block using the aluminum foil as the absorbent material and water as the confining layer. There existed the bonding material to attach the aluminum foil on the metal target closely. The surface morphologies and metallographs of copper surfaces were characterized with 3D profiler, the optical microscopy (OM) or the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Temperature increases of metal surface due to LSP were evaluated theoretically. It was found that, when aluminum foil was used as the absorbent material, and if there existed air bubbles in the bonding material, the air temperatures within the bubbles rose rapidly because of the adiabatic compression. So at the locations of the air bubbles, the metal materials melted and micromelting pool formed. Then under the subsequent expanding of the air bubbles, a secondary shock wave was launched against the micromelting pool and produced the crater-like microdefects on the metal surface. The temperature increases due to shock heat and high-speed deformation were not enough to melt the metal target. The temperature increase induced by the adiabatic compression of the air bubbles may also cause the gasification of the metal target. This will also help form the crater-like microdefects. The results of this paper can help to improve the surface quality of a metal target during the application of LSP. In addition, the results provide another method to fabricate 3D crater-like dents on metal surface. This has a potential application in mechanical engineering.

  20. Short-pulsed laser transport in absorbing and scattering media: time-based versus frequency-based approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francoeur, Mathieu; Rousse, Daniel R.

    2007-09-01

    Optical tomography (OT) is a promising non-intrusive characterization technique of absorbing and scattering media that uses transmitted and/or reflected signals of samples irradiated with visible or near-infrared light. The quality of OT techniques is directly related to the accuracy of their forward models due to the use of inversion algorithms. In this paper, forward models for transient OT approaches are investigated. The system under study involves a one-dimensional absorbing and scattering medium illuminated by a short laser pulse; this problem is solved using a discrete ordinates-finite volume (DO-FV) method in both time and frequency domain. Previous works have shown that time-domain approaches coupled with first order spatial interpolation schemes cannot represent the physics of the problem adequately as transmitted fluxes emerge before the minimal physical time required to leave the medium. In this work, the Van Leer and Superbee flux limiters, combined with the second order Lax-Wendroff scheme, are used in an attempt to prevent this. Results show that despite significant improvement, flux limiters fail to completely eliminate the physically unrealistic behaviour. On the other hand, results for transmittance obtained from the frequency-based method are accurate, without physically unrealistic behaviours at early time periods. The frequency-dependent approach is however computationally expensive, since it requires approximately five times more computational time than its temporal counterpart when used as a forward model for transient OT. On the other hand, the great advantages of the frequency-based approach is that limited windows of temporal signals can be calculated efficiently (in transient OT), and it can also be used as a forward model for steady-state, frequency-based and transient OT techniques.

  1. Absorber and gain chip optimization to improve performance from a passively modelocked electrically pumped vertical external cavity surface emitting laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zaugg, C. A. Mangold, M.; Pallmann, W. P.; Golling, M.; Tilma, B. W.; Keller, U.; Gronenborn, S.; Moench, H.; Weichmann, U.; Miller, M.

    2014-03-24

    We present an electrically pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (EP-VECSEL) modelocked with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) with significantly improved performance. In different cavity configurations, we present the shortest pulses (2.5 ps), highest average output power (53.2 mW), highest repetition rate (18.2 GHz), and highest peak power (4.7 W) to date. The simple and low-cost concept of EP-VECSELs is very attractive for mass-market applications such as optical communication and clocking. The improvements result from an optimized gain chip from Philips Technologie GmbH and a SESAM, specifically designed for EP-VECSELs. For the gain chip, we found a better trade-off between electrical and optical losses with an optimized doping scheme in the substrate to increase the average output power. Furthermore, the device's bottom contact diameter (60 μm) is smaller than the oxide aperture diameter (100 μm), which favors electro-optical conversion into a TEM{sub 00} mode. Compared to optically pumped VECSELs we have to increase the field enhancement in the active region of an EP-VECSEL which requires a SESAM with lower saturation fluence and higher modulation depth for modelocking. We therefore used a resonant quantum well SESAM with a 3.5-pair dielectric top-coating (SiN{sub x} and SiO{sub 2}) to enhance the field in the absorber at the lasing wavelength of 980 nm. The absorption bandedge at room temperature is detuned (965 nm) compared to the resonance (980 nm), which enables temperature-tuning of the modulation depth and saturation fluence from approximately 2.5% up to 15% and from 20 μJ/cm{sup 2} to 1.1 μJ/cm{sup 2}, respectively.

  2. Integrated Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Kramer, K J; Abbott, R P; Morris, K R; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G; Reyes, S; Moses, G A; Fratoni, M; Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Rhodes, M; Kane, J; Scott, H; Kramer, R; Pantano, C; Scullard, C; Sawicki, R; Wilks, S; Mehl, M

    2010-12-07

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. The present work details the chamber design for the pure fusion option. The fusion chamber consists of the first wall and blanket. This integrated system must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated LIFE design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  3. A robust method for determining the absorbed dose to water in a phantom for low-energy photon radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, T.

    2011-06-01

    The application of more and more low-energy photon radiation in brachytherapy—either in the form of low-dose-rate radioactive seeds such as Pd-103 or I-125 or in the form of miniature x-ray tubes—has induced greater interest in determining the absorbed dose to water in water in this energy range. As it seems to be hardly feasible to measure the absorbed dose with calorimetric methods in this low energy range, ionometric methods are the preferred choice. However, the determination of the absorbed dose to water in water by ionometric methods is difficult in this energy range. With decreasing energy, the relative uncertainty of the photon cross sections increases and as the mass energy transfer coefficients show a steep gradient, the spectra of the radiation field must be known precisely. In this work two ionometric methods to determine the absorbed dose to water are evaluated with respect to their sensitivity to the uncertainties of the spectra and of the atomic database. The first is the measurement of the air kerma free in air and the application of an MC-based conversion factor to the absorbed dose to water. The second is the determination of the absorbed dose to water by means of an extrapolation chamber as an integral part of a phantom. In the complementing MC-calculations, two assortments of spectra each of which is based on a separate unfolding procedure were used as well as two kinds of databases: the standard PEGS and the recently implemented NIST database of EGSnrc. Experimental results were obtained by using a parallel-plate graphite extrapolation chamber and a free-air chamber. In the case when the water kerma in a phantom is determined from the measurements of air kerma free in air, differences in the order of 10% were found, according to which the database or the kind of spectrum is used. In contrast to this, for the second method, the differences found were about 0.5%.

  4. The TELEC - A plasma type of direct energy converter. [Thermo-Electronic Laser Energy Converter for electric power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Thermo-Electronic Laser Energy Converter (TELEC) is a high-power density plasma device designed to convert a 10.6-micron CO2 laser beam into electric power. Electromagnetic radiation is absorbed in plasma electrons, creating a high-electron temperature. Energetic electrons diffuse from the plasma and strike two electrodes having different areas. The larger electrode collects more electrons and there is a net transport of current. An electromagnetic field is generated in the external circuit. A computer program has been designed to analyze TELEC performance allowing parametric variation for optimization. Values are presented for TELEC performance as a function of cesium pressure and for current density and efficiency as a function of output voltage. Efficiency is shown to increase with pressure, reaching a maximum over 45%.

  5. High-power lasers for directed-energy applications.

    PubMed

    Sprangle, Phillip; Hafizi, Bahman; Ting, Antonio; Fischer, Richard

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we review and discuss the research programs at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) on high-power lasers for directed-energy (DE) applications in the atmosphere. Physical processes affecting propagation include absorption/scattering, turbulence, and thermal blooming. The power levels needed for DE applications require combining a number of lasers. In atmospheric turbulence, there is a maximum intensity that can be placed on a target that is independent of the initial beam spot size and laser beam quality. By combining a number of kW-class fiber lasers, scientists at the NRL have successfully demonstrated high-power laser propagation in a turbulent atmosphere and wireless recharging. In the NRL experiments, four incoherently combined fiber lasers having a total power of 5 kW were propagated to a target 3.2 km away. These successful high-power experiments in a realistic atmosphere formed the basis of the Navy's Laser Weapon System. We compare the propagation characteristics of coherently and incoherently combined beams without adaptive optics. There is little difference in the energy on target between coherently and incoherently combined laser beams for multi-km propagation ranges and moderate to high levels of turbulence. Unlike incoherent combining, coherent combining places severe constraints on the individual lasers. These include the requirement of narrow power spectral linewidths in order to have long coherence times as well as polarization alignment of all the lasers. These requirements are extremely difficult for high-power lasers.

  6. Development and testing of a dynamic absorber with corrugated piezoelectric spring for vibration control and energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harne, R. L.

    2013-04-01

    Vibrational energy harvesting devices are often designed in a manner analogous to classical dynamic vibration absorbers (DVAs). An electromechanical mass-spring system is devised so as to resonate at the frequency most dominant in the environmental vibration spectrum; the consequent device oscillation is converted to a electrical signal which is harnessed for immediate usage or as a charging mechanism for a battery. The DVA is likewise designed but with the intention of inducing substantial inertial influence upon a host structure for vibration control purposes, either to globally dampen the vibration of the main body or, in an undamped configuration to "absorb" the primary system vibration at a single frequency. This paper describes the development of an electromechanical mass-spring-damper which seeks to serve both goals of passive vibration control and energy harvesting. The device utilizes a piezoelectric film spring and a distributed mass layer so as to be suitable for the attenuation of surface vibrations and to convert a portion of the absorbed energy into electric power. The development and design of the device are presented and the results of realistic tests are provided to show both the potentials and the challenges encountered when attempting to superpose the goals of vibration control and energy harvesting.

  7. Scaling of energy characteristics of polycrystalline Fe{sup 2+}:ZnSe laser at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrishchuk, E M; Ikonnikov, V B; Rodin, S A; Savin, D V; Timofeeva, N A; Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, I G; Firsov, K N

    2015-09-30

    The lasing characteristics of lasers based on diffusiondoped Fe{sup 2+}:ZnSe polycrystalline samples excited at room temperature by an electric-discharge HF laser are studied. A sample doped from two sides (working surfaces) emitted laser radiation with the energy E='253' mJ with the slope efficiency η{sub d} = 33% and the efficiency with respect to the absorbed energy η{sub abs} ≈ 28% in the case of an elliptical pump spot of size a × b = 6.8 × 7.5 mm. It is found that the possibility of increasing the lasing energy of the samples of these types by increasing the pump spot area (at a constant pump energy density) is limited by the appearance of parasitic generation typical for disk lasers. The first results are reported on the laser based on a polycrystalline sample made by a technology that allows one to form a zero dopant concentration on the surface and a maximum concentration inside the sample (i.e., to create a sample with internal doping). The possibilities of increasing the Fe{sup 2+}:ZnSe laser energy at room temperature by using multilayer samples fabricated by this doping method are discussed. (lasers)

  8. Fabrication of photovoltaic laser energy converterby MBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Hamilton; Wang, Scott; Chan, W. S.

    1993-01-01

    A laser-energy converter, fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), was developed. This converter is a stack of vertical p-n junctions connected in series by low-resistivity, lattice matched CoSi2 layers to achieve a high conversion efficiency. Special high-temperature electron-beam (e-beam) sources were developed especially for the MBE growth of the junctions and CoSi2 layers. Making use of the small (greater than 1.2 percent) lattice mismatch between CoSi2 and Si layers, high-quality and pinhole-free epilayers were achieved, providing a capability of fabricating all the junctions and connecting layers as a single growth process with one pumpdown. Well-defined multiple p-n junctions connected by CoSi2 layers were accomplished by employing a low growth temperature (greater than 700 C) and a low growth rate (less than 0.5 microns/hour). Producing negligible interdiffusion, the low growth temperature and rate also produced negligible pinholes in the CoSi2 layers. For the first time, a stack of three p-n junctions connected by two 10(exp -5) Ohm-cm CoSi2 layers was achieved, meeting the high conversion efficiency requirement. This process can now be optimized for high growth rate to form a practical converter with 10 p-n junctions in the stack.

  9. Aspects of High-Energy Laser Theory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-31

    addition, some work in the foundations of radiative transport theory and spectroscopy was also performed. The use of a metastable state as the uppvr laser...statistic3. In addition, some work in the foundations of radiative transport theory and spectroscopy *vas also performed. A brief summary of this work... absorbtion process to an arbitrary number of modes. Two-photon lasers were also studied. The photon statistics of such a laser with a loss mechanism

  10. High energy efficient solid state laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser oscillators and nonlinear processes were investigated. A new generation on nonplanar oscillator was fabricated, and it is anticipated that passive linewidths will be pushed to the kilohertz regime. A number of diode-pumped laser transitions were demonstrated in the rod configuration. Second-harmonic conversion efficiencies as high as 15% are routinely obtained in a servo-locked external resonant doubling crystal at 15 mW cw input power levels at 1064 nm.

  11. Impact Testing and Simulation of a Crashworthy Composite Fuselage Section with Energy-Absorbing Seats and Dummies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.

    2002-01-01

    A 25-ft/s vertical drop test of a composite fuselage section was conducted with two energy-absorbing seats occupied by anthropomorphic dummies to evaluate the crashworthy features of the fuselage section and to determine its interaction with the seats and dummies. The 5-ft diameter fuselage section consists of a stiff structural floor and an energy-absorbing subfloor constructed of Rohacel foam blocks. The experimental data from this test were analyzed and correlated with predictions from a crash simulation developed using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic computer code, MSC.Dytran. The anthropomorphic dummies were simulated using the Articulated Total Body (ATB) code, which is integrated into MSC.Dytran.

  12. Impact Testing and Simulation of a Crashworthy Composite Fuselage Section with Energy-Absorbing Seats and Dummies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.

    2002-01-01

    A 25-ft/s vertical drop test of a composite fuselage section was conducted with two energy-absorbing seats occupied by anthropomorphic dummies to evaluate the crashworthy features of the fuselage section and to determine its interaction with the seats and dummies. The 5-ft. diameter fuselage section consists of a stiff structural floor and an energy-absorbing subfloor constructed of Rohacel foam blocks. The experimental data from this test were analyzed and correlated with predictions from a crash simulation developed using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic computer code, MSC.Dytran. The anthropomorphic dummies were simulated using the Articulated Total Body (ATB) code, which is integrated into MSC.Dytran.

  13. Applications analysis of high energy lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arno, R. D.; Mackay, J. S.; Nishioka, K.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis and comparison of laser technology with competing technologies were made to determine possible laser applications. The analysis was undertaken as follows: (1) possible applications were listed and categorized; (2) required components were enumerated and the characteristics of these components were extrapolated; (3) complete system characteristics were calculated parametrically for selected applications using the postulated component characteristics; and (4) where possible and appropriate, comparisons were made with competing systems. It was found that any large scale replacement of existing systems and methods by lasers requires many technological advances in laser and associated systems. However, several applications appear feasible, such as low orbit drag make-up, orbit changing, communications, and illumination applications.

  14. Diode-pumped passively dual-wavelength Q-switched Nd:GYSGG laser using graphene oxide as the saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Song, Qi; Wang, Guoju; Zhang, Bingyuan; Wang, Wenjun; Wang, Minghong; Zhang, Qingli; Sun, Guihua; Bo, Yong; Peng, Qinjun

    2015-04-01

    The performance of a diode end-pumped passively Q-switched dual-wavelength Nd:GYSGG laser operating at 1057.28 and 1060.65 nm with graphene oxide as the saturable absorber was demonstrated. The maximum dual-wavelength average output power of 521 mW was achieved under the absorbed pump power of 5.4 W, corresponding to the optical-to-optical conversion and slope efficiency of 9.8% and 21%, respectively. The minimum pulse width was 115 ns with a pulse repetition rate of 338 kHz.

  15. High-energy transversely pumped alkali vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.

    2011-03-01

    We report on the results from our transversely pumped alkali laser. This system uses an Alexandrite laser to pump a stainless steel laser head. The system uses methane and helium as buffer gasses. Using rubidium, the system produced up to 40 mJ of output energy when pumped with 63 mJ. Slope efficiency was 75%. Using potassium as the lasing species the system produced 32 mJ and a 53% slope efficiency.

  16. High energy XeBr electric discharge laser

    DOEpatents

    Sze, R.C.; Scott, P.B.

    A high energy XeBr laser for producing coherent radiation at 282 nm is disclosed. The XeBr laser utilizes an electric discharge as the excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HBr, is used as the halogen donor which undergoes harpooning reactions with Xe/sub M/ to form XeBr.

  17. High energy XeBr electric discharge laser

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Scott, Peter B.

    1981-01-01

    A high energy XeBr laser for producing coherent radiation at 282 nm. The XeBr laser utilizes an electric discharge as the excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HBr is used as the halogen donor which undergoes harpooning reactions with Xe.sub.M * to form XeBr*.

  18. CNT-based saturable absorbers with scalable modulation depth for Thulium-doped fiber lasers operating at 1.9 μm

    PubMed Central

    Sobon, Grzegorz; Duzynska, Anna; Świniarski, Michał; Judek, Jarosław; Sotor, Jarosław; Zdrojek, Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a comprehensive study on the nonlinear parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT) saturable absorbers (SA) as a function of the nanotube film thickness. We have fabricated a set of four saturable absorbers with different CNT thickness, ranging from 50 to 200 nm. The CNTs were fabricated via a vacuum filtration technique and deposited on fiber connector end facets. Each SA was characterized in terms of nonlinear transmittance (i.e. optical modulation depth) and tested in a Thulium-doped fiber laser. We show, that increasing the thickness of the CNT layer significantly increases the modulation depth (up to 17.3% with 200 nm thick layer), which strongly influences the central wavelength of the laser, but moderately affects the pulse duration. It means, that choosing the SA with defined CNT thickness might be an efficient method for wavelength-tuning of the laser, without degrading the pulse duration. In our setup, the best performance in terms of bandwidth and pulse duration (8.5 nm and 501 fs, respectively) were obtained with 100 nm thick CNT layer. This is also, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of a fully polarization-maintaining mode-locked Tm-doped laser based on CNT saturable absorber. PMID:28368014

  19. Effect of laser shock peening without absorbent coating on the mechanical properties of Zr-based bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunhu; Fu, Jie; Zheng, Chao; Ji, Zhong

    2015-12-01

    In this work, laser shock peening without absorbent coating (LSPwC) was employed to Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 (vit1) bulk metallic glass in order to improve its mechanical properties. The phase structure and thermal properties of the as-cast and LSPwC treated samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope and differential scanning calorimeter. Three-point bending fracture tests of vit1 were performed on universal testing machine at room temperature with loading rate of 0.1 mm/min. The results showed that LSPwC enhanced the plasticity of vit1, and the plastic deflection increased by 23%. This enhancement could be attributed to the generation of crystalline phase and more free volume as well as the complex residual stresses induced by LSPwC. The optical profiling test showed that the LSPwC increased the surface roughness of vit1. Scanning electron microscope measurements on the fracture surface of vit1 revealed that high dense vein patterns were formed on cross section of the LSPwC treated sample.

  20. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, Y.T.; Guesto-Barnak, D.

    1992-12-22

    Disclosed is a low-or no-silica, low- or no-alkali phosphate glass useful as a laser amplifier in a multiple pass, high energy laser system having a high thermal conductivity, K[sub 90 C] >0.85 W/mK, a low coefficient of thermal expansion, [alpha][sub 20-300 C] <80[times]10[sup [minus]7]/C, low emission cross section, [sigma]<2.5[times]10[sup [minus]20] cm[sup 2], and a high fluorescence lifetime, [tau]>325 [mu]secs at 3 wt. % Nd doping, consisting essentially of (on an oxide composition basis): (Mole %) P[sub 2]O[sub 5], (52-72); Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], (0-<20); B[sub 2]O[sub 3], (>0-25); ZnO, (0-31); Li[sub 2]O, (0-5); K[sub 2]O, (0-5); Na[sub 2]O, (0-5); Cs[sub 2]O, (0-5); Rb[sub 2]O, (0-5); MgO, (>0-<30); CaO, (0-20); BaO, (0-20); SrO, (0-<20); Sb[sub 2]O[sub 3], (0-<1); As[sub 2]O[sub 3], (0-<1); Nb[sub 2]O[sub 5], (0-<1); Ln[sub 2]O[sub 3], (up to 6.5); PbO, (0-<5); and SiO[sub 2], (0-3); wherein Ln[sub 2]O[sub 3] is the sum of lanthanide oxides; [Sigma]R[sub 2]O is <5, R being Li, Na, K, Cs, and Rb; the sum of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and MgO is <24 unless [Sigma]R[sub 2]O is 0, then the sum of Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and MgO is <42; and the ratio of MgO to B[sub 2]O[sub 3] is 0.48-4.20. 7 figs.

  1. High-energy krypton fluoride lasers for inertial fusion.

    PubMed

    Obenschain, Stephen; Lehmberg, Robert; Kehne, David; Hegeler, Frank; Wolford, Matthew; Sethian, John; Weaver, James; Karasik, Max

    2015-11-01

    Laser fusion researchers have realized since the 1970s that the deep UV light from excimer lasers would be an advantage as a driver for robust high-performance capsule implosions for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Most of this research has centered on the krypton-fluoride (KrF) laser. In this article we review the advantages of the KrF laser for direct-drive ICF, the history of high-energy KrF laser development, and the present state of the art and describe a development path to the performance needed for laser fusion and its energy application. We include descriptions of the architecture and performance of the multi-kilojoule Nike KrF laser-target facility and the 700 J Electra high-repetition-rate KrF laser that were developed at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory. Nike and Electra are the most advanced KrF lasers for inertial fusion research and energy applications.

  2. Synthesis of oxocarbon-encapsulated gold nanoparticles with blue-shifted localized surface plasmon resonance by pulsed laser ablation in water with CO2 absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Rosso, T.; Rey, N. A.; Rosado, T.; Landi, S.; Larrude, D. G.; Romani, E. C.; Freire Junior, F. L.; Quinteiro, S. M.; Cremona, M.; Aucelio, R. Q.; Margheri, G.; Pandoli, O.

    2016-06-01

    Colloidal suspensions of oxocarbon-encapsulated gold nanoparticles have been synthesized in a one-step procedure by pulsed-laser ablation (PLA) at 532 nm of a solid gold target placed in aqueous solution containing CO2 absorbers, but without any stabilizing agent. Multi-wavelength surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy allows the identification of adsorbed amorphous carbon and graphite, Au-carbonyl, Au coordinated CO2-derived bicarbonates/carbonates and hydroxyl groups around the AuNPs core. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis and high resolution transmission electron microscopy highlight the organic shell structure around the crystalline metal core. The stability of the colloidal solution of nanocomposites (NCs) seems to be driven by solvation forces and is achieved only in neutral or basic pH using monovalent hydroxide counter-ions (NaOH, KOH). The NCs are characterized by a blue shift of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) band typical of metal-ligand stabilization by terminal π-back bonding, attributed to a core charging effect caused by Au-carbonyls. Total organic carbon measurements detect the final content of organic carbon in the colloidal solution of NCs that is about six times higher than the value of the water solution used to perform PLA. The colloidal dispersions of NCs are stable for months and are applied as analytical probes in amino glycoside antibiotic LSPR based sensing.

  3. Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) film as a new saturable absorber for generating mode-locked Thulium-Holmium doped all-fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Rusdi, Muhammad Farid; Latiff, Anas Abdul; Paul, Mukul Chandra; Das, Shyamal; Dhar, Anirban; Ahmad, Harith; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi

    2017-03-01

    We report the generation of mode-locked thulium-holmium doped fiber laser (THDFL) at 1979 nm. This is a first demonstration of mode-locked by using Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) film as a saturable absorber (SA). A piece of 1 mm×1 mm TiO2 film was sandwiched in between two fiber ferrule in the cavity. Fabrication process of TiO2 film incorporated a TiO2 and a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The stable 9 MHz repetition rate of mode-locked mode operation with 58 dB SNR was generated under pump power of 902-1062 mW. At maximum pump power, the mode-locked THDFL has output power and pulse energy of 15 mW and 1.66 nJ, respectively. Our results demonstrate the TiO2 can be used promisingly in ultrafast photonics applications.

  4. Synthesis of oxocarbon-encapsulated gold nanoparticles with blue-shifted localized surface plasmon resonance by pulsed laser ablation in water with CO2 absorbers.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, T; Rey, N A; Rosado, T; Landi, S; Larrude, D G; Romani, E C; Junior, F L Freire; Quinteiro, S M; Cremona, M; Aucelio, R Q; Margheri, G; Pandoli, O

    2016-06-24

    Colloidal suspensions of oxocarbon-encapsulated gold nanoparticles have been synthesized in a one-step procedure by pulsed-laser ablation (PLA) at 532 nm of a solid gold target placed in aqueous solution containing CO2 absorbers, but without any stabilizing agent. Multi-wavelength surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy allows the identification of adsorbed amorphous carbon and graphite, Au-carbonyl, Au coordinated CO2-derived bicarbonates/carbonates and hydroxyl groups around the AuNPs core. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis and high resolution transmission electron microscopy highlight the organic shell structure around the crystalline metal core. The stability of the colloidal solution of nanocomposites (NCs) seems to be driven by solvation forces and is achieved only in neutral or basic pH using monovalent hydroxide counter-ions (NaOH, KOH). The NCs are characterized by a blue shift of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) band typical of metal-ligand stabilization by terminal π-back bonding, attributed to a core charging effect caused by Au-carbonyls. Total organic carbon measurements detect the final content of organic carbon in the colloidal solution of NCs that is about six times higher than the value of the water solution used to perform PLA. The colloidal dispersions of NCs are stable for months and are applied as analytical probes in amino glycoside antibiotic LSPR based sensing.

  5. Effect of nonablative laser energy on joint capsular properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kei; Markel, Mark D.; Thabit, George, III; Bogdanske, John J.; Thielke, Robert J.

    1995-05-01

    Recent scientific studies evaluating laser energy for tissue welding and thermokeratoplasty have demonstrated that the application of laser energy at non-ablative levels can alter collagen's structural and biochemical properties. The application of non-ablative laser to the human shoulder joint capsule in patients with glenohumeral instability has been found to enhance stability of the joint. Based on the collective findings of these studies, we hypothesized that thermal modification of dense collagenous tissues such as joint capsule, ligament, and tendon can be achieved by applying non-ablative laser energy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of laser energy at non-ablative levels on joint capsular mechanical properties in an in vitro rabbit model. Twelve mature New Zealand white rabbits, ranging from 3.73 to 5.33 kg (4.49 +/- 0.44; mean +/- SD), were used for this experiment. Animals were euthanized and two 5 mm X 20 mm specimens were collected from the medial and lateral portion of the femoropatellar joint of each rabbit under a dissecting microscope; therefore four specimens were collected from each rabbit (right medial, right lateral, left medial, left lateral). Specimens were divided into four groups using a randomized block design; a control group and 3 laser power settings (5 watts (5 W), 10 watts (10 W), 15 watts (15 W)). Laser energy was applied using the Ho:YAG laser in four transverse passes across the tissue at a velocity of 2 mm/sec and distance from the tip of the handpiece to the synovial surface of the specimen set at 1.5 mm in a 37 degree(s)C tissue bath of lactated Ringer's solution. Forty-eight specimens (n equals 12) were mechanically tested to determine single cycle structural properties (stiffness) and viscoelastic properties (% relaxation) before and after laser treatment. Shrinkage of the tissue and the loads required to return specimens to their original length were recorded after laser treatment. The application of laser

  6. ND:GLASS LASER DESIGN FOR LASER ICF FISSION ENERGY (LIFE)

    SciTech Connect

    Caird, J A; Agrawal, V; Bayramian, A; Beach, R; Britten, J; Chen, D; Cross, R; Ebbers, C; Erlandson, A; Feit, M; Freitas, B; Ghosh, C; Haefner, C; Homoelle, D; Ladran, T; Latkowski, J; Molander, W; Murray, J; Rubenchik, S; Schaffers, K; Siders, C W; Stappaerts, E; Sutton, S; Telford, S; Trenholme, J; Barty, C J

    2008-10-28

    We have developed preliminary conceptual laser system designs for the Laser ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) Fission Energy (LIFE) application. Our approach leverages experience in high-energy Nd:glass laser technology developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), along with high-energy-class diode-pumped solid-state laser (HEC-DPSSL) technology developed for the DOE's High Average Power Laser (HAPL) Program and embodied in LLNL's Mercury laser system. We present laser system designs suitable for both indirect-drive, hot spot ignition and indirect-drive, fast ignition targets. Main amplifiers for both systems use laser-diode-pumped Nd:glass slabs oriented at Brewster's angle, as in NIF, but the slabs are much thinner to allow for cooling by high-velocity helium gas as in the Mercury laser system. We also describe a plan to mass-produce pump-diode lasers to bring diode costs down to the order of $0.01 per Watt of peak output power, as needed to make the LIFE application economically attractive.

  7. Magnetic Field Generation and Electron Acceleration in Relativistic Laser Channel

    SciTech Connect

    I.Yu. Kostyukov; G. Shvets; N.J. Fisch; J.M. Rax

    2001-12-12

    The interaction between energetic electrons and a circularly polarized laser pulse inside an ion channel is studied. Laser radiation can be resonantly absorbed by electrons executing betatron oscillations in the ion channel and absorbing angular momentum from the laser. The absorbed angular momentum manifests itself as a strong axial magnetic field (inverse Faraday effect). The magnitude of this magnetic field is calculated and related to the amount of the absorbed energy. Absorbed energy and generated magnetic field are estimated for the small and large energy gain regimes. Qualitative comparisons with recent experiments are also made.

  8. A High Energy 2-microns Laser for Multiple Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Singh, Upendra N.; Barnes, James C.; Barnes, Norman P.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2000-01-01

    Solid-state 2-microns laser has been receiving considerable interest because of its eye-safe property and efficient diode pump operation, It has potential for multiple lidar applications to detect water vapor. carbon dioxide and winds. In this paper, we describe a 2-microns double pulsed Ho:Tm:YLF laser and end-pumped amplifier system. A comprehensive theoretical model has been developed to aid the design and optimization of the laser performance. In a single Q-switched pulse operation the residual energy stored in the Tm atoms will be wasted. However, in a double pulses operation mode, the residual energy stored in the Tm atoms will repopulate the Ho atoms that were depleted by the extraction of the first Q-switched pulse. Thus. the Tin sensitized Ho:YLF laser provides a unique advantage in applications that require double pulse operation, such as Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL). A total output energy of 146 mJ per pulse pair under Q-switch operation is achieved with as high as 4.8% optical to optical efficiency. Compared to a single pulse laser, 70% higher laser efficiency is realized. To obtain high energy while maintaining the high beam quality, a master-oscillator-power-amplifier 2-microns system is designed. We developed an end-pumped Ho:Tm:YLF disk amplifier. This amplifier uses two diode arrays as pump source. A non-imaging lens duct is used to couple the radiation from the laser diode arrays to the laser disk. Preliminary result shows that the efficiency of this laser can be as high as 3%, a factor of three increases over side-pump configuration. This high energy, highly efficient and high beam quality laser is a promising candidate for use in an efficient, multiple lidar applications.

  9. Switchable single-longitudinal-mode dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser based on one polarization-maintaining fiber Bragg grating incorporating saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Suchun; Xu, Ou; Lu, Shaohua; Chen, Ming; Jian, Shuisheng

    2009-08-01

    Switchable single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber laser at room temperature is demonstrated. One fiber Bragg grating (FBG) directly written in a polarization-maintaining and photosensitive erbiumdoped fiber (PMPEDF) as the wavelength-selective component is used in a linear laser cavity. Due to the polarization hole burning (PHB) enhanced by the polarization-maintaining fiber Bragg grating (PMFBG), the laser can be designed to operate in stable dual-wavelength or wavelength-switching modes with a wavelength spacing of 0.202 nm by adjusting a polarization controller (PC). The stable SLM operation is guaranteed by a saturable absorber (SA). The optical signal-tonoise ratio (OSNR) of the laser is over 40 dB. The amplitude variation in nearly one and half an hour is less than 0.5 dB for both wavelengths.

  10. Passively Q-switched Er3+-doped fiber lasers using colloidal PbS quantum dot saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yin-Wen; Chen, Chien-Ming; Huang, Chia-Wei; Chen, Shih-Ken; Jiang, Jhang-Rong

    2016-05-16

    We report on the demonstration of a passively Q-switched 1.55 µm fiber laser utilizing a colloidal PbS quantum dot (QD) thin film as a saturable absorber. Colloidal PbS QD films have several features that are advantageous in passively Q-switched fiber laser operation, including a large operation wavelength range, cost-effectiveness, and a low saturable absorption intensity. We conducted thorough material and optical studies to verify the advantages of PbS QDs in Q-switched laser operation and successfully generated 801 nJ pulses with a 24.2 kHz repetition rate. To the best of our knowledge, the developed Q-switched fiber laser is the first based on colloidal PbS QDs.

  11. Laser safety research and modeling for high-energy laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Peter A.; Montes de Oca, Cecilia I.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Keppler, Kenneth S.

    2002-06-01

    The Department of Defense has an increasing number of high-energy laser weapons programs with the potential to mature in the not too distant future. However, as laser systems with increasingly higher energies are developed, the difficulty of the laser safety problem increases proportionally, and presents unique safety challenges. The hazard distance for the direct beam can be in the order of thousands of miles, and radiation reflected from the target may also be hazardous over long distances. This paper details the Air Force Research Laboratory/Optical Radiation Branch (AFRL/HEDO) High-Energy Laser (HEL) safety program, which has been developed to support DOD HEL programs by providing critical capability and knowledge with respect to laser safety. The overall aim of the program is to develop and demonstrate technologies that permit safe testing, deployment and use of high-energy laser weapons. The program spans the range of applicable technologies, including evaluation of the biological effects of high-energy laser systems, development and validation of laser hazard assessment tools, and development of appropriate eye protection for those at risk.

  12. Resonance Absorption of Laser Light by Warm and Cold Plasmas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    34 Ponderomotive Force................38 Hot Electron Energy ................40 Validity bf Assumptions..............41 V. Conclusions...Indicated by Arrows) for the Warm and Cold Plasma Models ..... ................ 31 7 Cold Plasma: Fraction of Laser Energy Resonantly Absorbed as a...Function of Incident Angle .. ............ 35 8 Warm Plasma: Fraction of Laser Energy Resonantly Absorbed as a Function of Incident Angle (T = 637 ev and

  13. High energy KrCl electric discharge laser

    DOEpatents

    Sze, R.C.; Scott, P.B.

    A high energy KrCl laser is presented for producing coherent radiation at 222 nm. Output energies on the order of 100 mJ per pulse are produced utilizing a discharge excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions, thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HCl is used as a halogen donor which undergoes a harpooning reaction with metastable Kr/sub M/ to form KrCl.

  14. High energy KrCl electric discharge laser

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Scott, Peter B.

    1981-01-01

    A high energy KrCl laser for producing coherent radiation at 222 nm. Output energies on the order of 100 mJ per pulse are produced utilizing a discharge excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions, thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HCl is used as a halogen donor which undergoes a harpooning reaction with metastable Kr.sub.M * to form KrCl.

  15. The formation of various multi-soliton patterns and noise-like pulse in a fiber laser passively mode-locked by a topological insulator based saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Wu, Man; Tang, Pinghua; Chen, Shuqing; Du, Juan; Jiang, Guobao; Li, Ying; Zhao, Chujun; Zhang, Han; Wen, Shuangchun

    2014-05-01

    We experimentally investigated the formation of various multi-soliton patterns and noise-like (NL) pulses in an erbium-doped fiber laser passively mode-locked by a new type of saturable absorber: topological insulator. With the increase of pump power, various multi-soliton operation states—ordered, chaotic and bunched multiple-soliton—were subsequently obtained. Once the pump power exceeds 401 mW, an NL pulse state emerged, with a maximum 3 dB bandwidth of about 9.3 nm. This systematic study clearly demonstrated that a topological insulator could be an effective saturable absorber for the formation of various soliton operation states in a fiber laser cavity.

  16. As-grown uniform MoS2/mica saturable absorber for passively Q-switched mode-locked Nd:GdVO4 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Cheng; Ge, Pengguang; Liu, Jie; Jiang, Shouzhen; Li, Chun; Man, Baoyuan

    2016-08-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has recently attracted growing attention due to its distinctive properties and potential applications in optoelectronics and electronics. Here, large-area and high-quality MoS2 film with uniform thickness was obtained by thermally decomposing ammonium thiomolybdate. Besides, it is firstly demonstrated that the as-grown MoS2/mica can be directly inserted into Nd:GdVO4 laser cavity as saturable absorber for the output of diode-pumped passively Q-switched mode-locked pulse trains. Using the MoS2 saturable absorbers, the stable Q-switched mode-locked pulse trains with high modulation depth were realized, suggesting that the broadband MoS2 SA could potentially be employed in mode-locking laser system

  17. Picosecond blue light pulse generation by frequency doubling of a gain-switched GaAlAs laser diode with saturable absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ohya, J.; Tohmon, G.; Yamamoto, K.; Taniuchi, T. ); Kume, M. )

    1990-06-04

    Picosecond blue light pulse generation by frequency doubling of a gain-switched GaAlAs laser diode in a proton-exchanged MgO:LiNbO{sub 3} waveguide is reported. High-peak fundamental pulse power of 1.23 W is obtained by employing a laser diode with saturable absorbers. Blue light pulse of 7.88 mW maximum peak power and 28.7 ps pulse width is generated in the form of Cherenkov radiation.

  18. Characteristics of a diode-pumped Yb:CaF2-SrF2 mode-locked laser using a carbon nanotube absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Feng, C.; Su, L. B.; Jiang, D. P.; Zheng, L. H.; Qian, X. B.; Wang, J. Y.; Xu, J.; Wang, Y. G.

    2013-10-01

    Yb:CaF2-SrF2 disordered crystals are successfully grown by the TGT method. By using a double-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber (DWCNT-SA), the continuous-wave mode-locked (CWML) laser properties of Yb:CaF2-SrF2 crystals are demonstrated under diode pumping for the first time. The mode-locked laser delivers pulses as short as 5 ps at a center wavelength of 1045.5 nm without any dispersion compensation. The oscillator operating at a repetition rate of ˜87 MHz delivers 292 mW average output power.

  19. Traveling-wave laser-produced-plasma energy source for photoionization laser pumping and lasers incorporating said

    DOEpatents

    Sher, Mark H.; Macklin, John J.; Harris, Stephen E.

    1989-09-26

    A traveling-wave, laser-produced-plasma, energy source used to obtain single-pass gain saturation of a photoionization pumped laser. A cylindrical lens is used to focus a pump laser beam to a long line on a target. Grooves are cut in the target to present a surface near normal to the incident beam and to reduce the area, and hence increase the intensity and efficiency, of plasma formation.

  20. Optical theory of partially coherent thin-film energy-absorbing structures for power detectors and imaging arrays.

    PubMed

    Withington, Stafford; Thomas, Christopher N

    2009-06-01

    Free-space power detectors often have energy absorbing structures comprising multilayer systems of patterned thin films. We show that for any system of interacting resistive films, the expectation value of the absorbed power is given by the contraction of two tensor fields: one describes the spatial state of coherence of the incoming radiation, the other the state of coherence to which the detector is sensitive. Equivalently, the natural modes of the optical field scatter power into the natural modes of the detector. We describe a procedure for determining the amplitude, phase, and polarization patterns of a detector's optical modes and their relative responsivities. The procedure gives the state of coherence of the currents flowing in the system and leads to important conceptual insights into the way the pixels of an imaging array interact and extract information from an optical field.

  1. Investigation of variation of energy of laser beam on structural, electrical and optical properties of pulsed laser deposited CuO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dahiya, V. Kumar, A.; Kaur, G.; Mitra, A.

    2014-04-24

    In this paper, copper oxide (CuO) thin films have been deposited successfully by pulsed laser deposition technique using copper metal as target material. Thin films have been prepared under different energy of laser pulses ranging from 100mJ/pulse to 250 mJ/pulse. These films have been characterized for their structural, electrical and optical properties by using X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD), Four probe method and UV spectroscopy. Morphological and structural studies show that there is increase in crystallite size with the increase in energy of laser beam. Thus resulting in improved crystallinity and degree of orientation of the CuO thin films. Optoelectrical properties show direct relation between conductivity and energy of laser beam. Optical analysis of CuO thin films prepared under different energy of laser beam shows good agreement with structural analysis. The prepared CuO thin films show high absorbance in the UV and visible range and thus are suitable candidate for thin films solar cell application.

  2. Efficiency enhancement using electron energy detuning in a laser seeded free electron laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X. J.; Watanabe, T.; Shen, Y.; Li, R. K.; Murphy, J. B.; Tsang, T.; Freund, H. P.

    2007-10-29

    We report the experimental characterization of efficiency enhancement in a single-pass seeded free-electron laser (FEL) where the electron energy is detuned from resonance. Experiments show a doubling of the efficiency for beam energies above the resonant energy. Measurements of the FEL spectra versus energy detuning shows that the wavelength is governed by the seed laser. The variation in the gain length with beam energy was also observed. Good agreement is found between the experiment and numerical simulations using the MEDUSA simulation code.

  3. The effect of the elliptical ratio on the tubular energy absorber subjected to lateral loading under quasistatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroutaji, A.; Olabi, A. G.

    2010-06-01

    Tubular systems are proposed to be used as energy absorber because they are cheap and easy to manufacture; recently some researchers use the elliptical tube as energy absorber. In this work, the influence of elliptical ratio (r =D1/D2) on energy absorption capability and load carrying capacity and stress of mild steel elliptical tubes has been investigated both experimentally and numerically, the experimental analyses conducted by using Zwick Type BT1-FB050TN testing instrument. This machine is universal instrument for performing tensile test and compression test, Fig (1) and bending test and it is consider as an important machine for measuring the mechanical properties of materials and structures. The loading frame consist of two vertical lead screws, a moving crosshead and an upper and lower bearing plate which bears the load of the lead screws. The maximum capacity of the loading frame attached to the table mounted unit is 50KN In this study a velocity between 310mm/min was applied to the moving component to ensure the quasistatic conditions whereas velocities between 0.5mm/min and 15 mm/min have been used by many researchers to simulate the quasi-static lateral compression of tubes between various indenters [1-2]. In addition to the experimental work, computational method using ANSYS is used to predict the loading and response of such tubes where series of models was performed with elliptical ratios ranging from 0.5 to 1.5. Comparison of numerical and experimental forcedeflection response is presented. It has been found that with changing the elliptical ratio of the tube the loaddeflection curve change and this leads to change the energy absorbed by tube, the changing of the geometrical shape of the tube leads to change the volume of this tube and hence the mass. By reducing the elliptical ratio to 0.5 the tube will absorb 43.3% more energy and the system will gain 102% more in terms of specific energy, fig (2).

  4. Seasonal Evolution and Interannual Variability of the Local Solar Energy Absorbed by the Arctic Sea Ice-Ocean System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perovich, Donald K.; Nghiem, Son V.; Markus, Thorsten; Schwieger, Axel

    2007-01-01

    The melt season of the Arctic sea ice cover is greatly affected by the partitioning of the incident solar radiation between reflection to the atmosphere and absorption in the ice and ocean. This partitioning exhibits a strong seasonal cycle and significant interannual variability. Data in the period 1998, 2000-2004 were analyzed in this study. Observations made during the 1997-1998 SHEBA (Surface HEat Budget of the Arctic Ocean) field experiment showed a strong seasonal dependence of the partitioning, dominated by a five-phase albedo evolution. QuikSCAT scatterometer data from the SHEBA region in 1999-2004 were used to further investigate solar partitioning in summer. The time series of scatterometer data were used to determine the onset of melt and the beginning of freezeup. This information was combined with SSM/I-derived ice concentration, TOVS-based estimates of incident solar irradiance, and SHEBA results to estimate the amount of solar energy absorbed in the ice-ocean system for these years. The average total solar energy absorbed in the ice-ocean system from April through September was 900 MJ m(sup -2). There was considerable interannual variability, with a range of 826 to 1044 MJ m(sup -2). The total amount of solar energy absorbed by the ice and ocean was strongly related to the date of melt onset, but only weakly related to the total duration of the melt season or the onset of freezeup. The timing of melt onset is significant because the incident solar energy is large and a change at this time propagates through the entire melt season, affecting the albedo every day throughout melt and freezeup.

  5. Laser interaction based on resonance saturation (LIBORS): an alternative to inverse bremsstrahlung for coupling laser energy into a plasma.

    PubMed

    Measures, R M; Drewell, N; Cardinal, P

    1979-06-01

    Resonance saturation represents an efficient and rapid method of coupling laser energy into a gaseous medium. In the case of a plasma superelastic collision quenching of the laser maintained resonance state population effectively converts the laser beam energy into translational energy of the free electrons. Subsequently, ionization of the laser pumped species rapidly ensues as a result of both the elevated electron temperature and the effective reduction of the ionization energy for those atoms maintained in the resonance state by the laser radiation. This method of coupling laser energy into a plasma has several advantages over inverse bremsstrahlung and could therefore be applicable to several areas of current interest including plasma channel formation for transportation of electron and ion beams, x-ray laser development, laser fusion, negative ion beam production, and the conversion of laser energy to electricity.

  6. Measuring Energy Scaling of Laser Driven Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jackson; Goyon, Clement; Mariscal, Derek; Pollock, Brad; Patankar, Siddharth; Moody, John

    2016-10-01

    Laser-driven magnetic fields are of interest in particle confinement, fast ignition, and ICF platforms as an alternative to pulsed power systems to achieve many times higher fields. A comprehensive model describing the mechanism responsible for creating and maintaining magnetic fields from laser-driven coils has not yet been established. Understanding the scaling of key experimental parameters such as spatial and temporal uniformity and duration are necessary to implement coil targets in practical applications yet these measurements prove difficult due to the highly transient nature of the fields. We report on direct voltage measurements of laser-driven coil targets in which the laser energy spans more than four orders of magnitude. Results suggest that at low energies, laser-driven coils can be modeled as an electric circuit; however, at higher energies plasma effects dominate and a simple circuit treatment is insufficient to describe all observed phenomenon. The favorable scaling with laser power and pulse duration, observed in the present study and others at kilojoule energies, has positive implications for sustained, large magnetic fields for applications on the NIF. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Hybrid Q-switched laser with MoS2 saturable absorber and AOM driven sub-nanosecond KTP-OPO.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Junpeng; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Zhao, Jia; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Li, Tao; Qiao, Wenchao

    2017-02-20

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials, especially transition-metal dichalcogenides, such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and tungsten disulfide (WS2), have attracted great interests due to their exceptional optical properties as saturable absorbers in laser systems. In this work, at first, we presented a diode-pumped passively Q-switched laser with MoS2 saturable absorber (MoS2-SA). At an incident pump power of 6.54 W, a maximum output power of 1.15 W with a minimum pulse duration of 70.6 ns was obtained, which is the shortest pulse duration of diode pumped passively Q-switched laser with MoS2-SA to the best of our knowledge. Then, by using a hybrid Q-switched laser with a MoS2-SA and an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) as pumping fundamental laser, a sub-nanosecond KTiOPO4 (KTP) based intracavity optical parametric oscillation (IOPO) was realized. With an incident pump power of 10.2 W and AOM repetition rate of 10 kHz, the maximum output power of 183 mW with minimum pulse duration of 850 ps was obtained. The experimental results indicate that the IOPO pumped by the hybrid Q-switched laser with AOM and MoS2-SA can generate signal wave with shorter pulse duration than those IOPOs pumped by hybrid Q-switched laser with AOM and Cr4+:YAG or single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absober (SWCNT-SA) or monolayer graphene SA.

  8. Doubly Q-switched Ho:LuAG laser with acoustic-optic modulator and Cr²⁺:ZnS saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Cui, Z; Duan, X M; Yao, B Q; Yang, H Y; Li, J; Yuan, J H; Dai, T Y; Li, C Y; Pan, Y B

    2015-12-01

    A doubly Q-switched (DQS) Ho:LuAG laser resonantly pumped by a 1.91-μm laser was first presented with an acoustic-optic modulator (AOM) and a Cr2+:ZnS saturable absorber. A comparison among the active Q-switched (AQS), passively Q-switched (PQS), and DQS laser performances was carried out. The maximum continuous wave (CW) output power of 6 W with the central wavelength of 2100.65 nm was obtained at an incident pump power of 35.2 W. Compared with CW laser, the AQS, PQS, and DQS lasers shared the same central wavelength of 2098.34 nm under the same incident pump power. The central wavelength of the AQS and DQS lasers remained constant with the change of AOM repetition frequency (RF). When the incident pump power was 35.2 W and the AOM RF was 15 kHz, the DQS Ho:LuAG laser at a maximum RF of 2.13 kHz achieved the maximum average output power of 4.95 W. At the AOM RF of 10 kHz, the DQS Ho:LuAG laser achieved the shortest pulse width of 40.4 ns with the highest peak power of 61.5 kW. At an incident pump power of 35.2 W, the PQS Ho:LuAG laser obtained the shortest pulse width of 46.1 ns, corresponding to the RF of 2.25 kHz. Experiment results showed that the pulse width could be compressed effectively with a significant increase of peak power for a 2-μm DQS laser.

  9. Absorbed doses and energy imparted from radiographic examination of velopharyngeal function during speech

    SciTech Connect

    Isberg, A.; Julin, P.; Kraepelien, T.; Henrikson, C.O. )

    1989-04-01

    Absorbed doses of radiation were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) using a skull phantom during simulated cinefluorographic and videofluorographic examination of velopharyngeal function in frontal and lateral projections. Dosages to the thyroid gland, the parotid gland, the pituitary gland, and ocular lens were measured. Radiation dosage was found to be approximately 10 times less for videofluoroscopy when compared with that of cinefluoroscopy. In addition, precautionary measures were found to reduce further the exposure of radiation-sensitive tissues. Head fixation and shielding resulted in dose reduction for both video- and cinefluoroscopy. Pulsing exposure for cinefluoroscopy also reduced the dosage.

  10. Radiation energy receiver for laser and solar propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rault, D. F. G.; Hertzberg, A.

    1983-01-01

    The concept of remotely heating a rocket propellant with a high intensity radiant energy flux is especially attractive due to its high specific impulse and large payload mass capabilities. In this paper, a radiation receiver-thruster which is especially suited to the particular thermodynamic and spectral characteristics of highly concentrated solar energy is proposed. In this receiver, radiant energy is volumetrically absorbed within a hydrogen gas seeded with alkali metal vapors. The alkali atoms and molecules absorb the radiant flux and, subsequently, transfer their internal excitation to hydrogen molecules through collisional quenching. It is shown that such a radiation receiver would outperform a blackbody cavity type receiver in both efficiency and maximum operating temperatures. A solar rocket equipped with such a receiver-thruster would deliver thrusts of several hundred newtons at a specific impulse of 1000 seconds.

  11. Field experiment of laser energy transmission and laser to electric conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Yugami, H.; Kanamori, Y.; Arashi, H.; Niino, M.; Moro, A.; Eguchi, K.; Okada, Y.; Endo, A.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, the authors report the result of the field experiment of laser power transmission over 500m using different laser systems, i.e., CO{sub 2}, YAG, etc. The efficiency of energy transmission for long time period under various meteorological conditions was measured. They have observed large and long time scale fluctuation of beam pointing. It is found that the position of laser beam at the receiving site is correlated with the temperature difference between laser path height and ground. The laser to electricity conversion experiment has been performed using GaAs, c-Si, tandem-type a-Si, and CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) solar cells. Finally, they briefly introduce the proposal on the space experiment of laser power transmission at Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the international space station.

  12. A Q-switched Ho:YAG laser assisted nanosecond time-resolved T-jump transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Deyong; Li, Yunliang; Li, Hao; Weng, Yuxiang; Wu, Xianyou; Yu, Qingxu

    2015-05-15

    Knowledge of dynamical structure of protein is an important clue to understand its biological function in vivo. Temperature-jump (T-jump) time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy is a powerful tool in elucidating the protein dynamical structures and the folding/unfolding kinetics of proteins in solution. A home-built setup of T-jump time-resolved transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity is developed, which is composed of a Q-switched Cr, Tm, Ho:YAG laser with an output wavelength at 2.09 μm as the T-jump heating source, and a continuous working CO laser tunable from 1580 to 1980 cm{sup −1} as the IR probe. The results demonstrate that this system has a sensitivity of 1 × 10{sup −4} ΔOD for a single wavelength detection, and 2 × 10{sup −4} ΔOD for spectral detection in amide I′ region, as well as a temporal resolution of 20 ns. Moreover, the data quality coming from the CO laser is comparable to the one using the commercial quantum cascade laser.

  13. The performance of a novel Ho:LuAG ceramic laser Q-switched by a polycrystalline Cr2+:ZnS saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Yao, B. Q.; Cui, Z.; Li, J.; Li, H.; Xie, T. F.; Li, C. Y.; Kou, H. M.; Pan, Y. B.

    2017-01-01

    A novel Ho:LuAG ceramic laser Q-switched by a polycrystalline Cr2+:ZnS saturable absorber was reported for the first time in this paper. We took a diode-pumped Tm:YLF laser emitting at 1.9075 μm as the pump source. The laser operated in both continuous wave mode and passively Q-switching (PQS) mode. The maximum PQS output power of 2.67 W was obtained with a slope efficiency of 26.4%. When the absorbed pump power increased from 4.78 to 10.8 W, with three output couplers of T = 2%, T = 10% and T = 25%, the pulse widths decreased as the pump power increased, from 102.9 to 89.2 ns, from 147.1 to 127.6 ns, and from 173 to 150 ns, respectively, and the repetition frequency varied from 10.2 to 20.1 kHz, from 9.3 to 18.3 kHz, and from 8.45 to 16.66 kHz as well. The central wavelength remained constant 2100.64 nm with the change of output couplers and operation modes. Furthermore, the output laser had a beam quality factor M 2 of 1.1.

  14. Femtosecond mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser based on MoS2-PVA saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. H. M.; Latiff, A. A.; Arof, H.; Ahmad, H.; Harun, S. W.

    2016-08-01

    We fabricate a free-standing few-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2)-polymer composite by liquid phase exfoliation of chemically pristine MoS2 crystals and use this to demonstrate a soliton mode-locked Erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL). A stable self-started mode-locked soliton pulse is generated by fine-tuning the rotation of the polarization controller at a low threshold pump power of 25 mW. Its solitonic behavior is verified by the presence of Kelly sidebands in the output spectrum. The central wavelength, pulse width, and repetition rate of the laser are 1573.7 nm, 630 fs, and 27.1 MHz, respectively. The maximum pulse energy is 0.141 nJ with peak power of 210 W at pump power of 170 mW. This result contributes to the growing body of work studying the nonlinear optical properties of transition metal dichalcogenides that present new opportunities for ultrafast photonic applications.

  15. Spectroscopic properties, energy transfer dynamics, and laser performance of thulium-holmium doped laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisky, Yehoshua Y.; Rotman, Stanley R.; Boulon, Georges; Pedrini, Christian; Brenier, Alain

    1994-07-01

    Spectroscopic studies using laser induced fluorescence and numerical modelling of energy transfer and back transfer mechanism are reported in Er:Tm:Ho:YLF, Cr:Tm:Ho:YAG and Cr:Tm:YAG laser crystals at various temperatures (10 K - 300 K). Direct energy transfer from Tm3+ excited states to Ho3+ 5I7 emitting level was observed and analyzed both in YAG and YLF. Further analysis of Cr3+ and Tm3+ time-dependent emission curves indicate a strong correlation of chromium- thulium pairs. Pulsed operation of holmium laser at high temperature will be presented.

  16. Laser energy density, structure and properties of pulsed-laser deposited zinc oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoutsouva, M. G.; Panagopoulos, C. N.; Kompitsas, M.

    2011-05-01

    Zinc oxide thin films were deposited on soda lime glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition in an oxygen-reactive atmosphere at 20 Pa and a constant substrate temperature at 300 °C. A pulsed KrF excimer laser, operated at 248 nm with pulse duration 10 ns, was used to ablate the ceramic zinc oxide target. The structure, the optical and electrical properties of the as-deposited films were studied in dependence of the laser energy density in the 1.2-2.8 J/cm 2 range, with the aid of X-ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscope, Transmission Spectroscopy techniques, and the Van der Pauw method, respectively. The results indicated that the structural and optical properties of the zinc oxide films were improved by increasing the laser energy density of the ablating laser. The surface roughness of the zinc oxide film increased with the decrease of laser energy density and both the optical bang gap and the electrical resistivity of the film were significantly affected by the laser energy density.

  17. Impact behavior of a high viscosity magnetorheological fluid-based energy absorber with a radial flow mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Benyuan; Liao, Changrong; Li, Zhuqiang; Xie, Lei; Zhang, Peng; Jian, Xiaochun

    2017-02-01

    High viscosity linear polysiloxane magnetorheological fluid (HVLP MRF) was demonstrated with excellent suspension stability. Such material is suitable for application in the magnetorheological energy absorbers (MREAs) under axial impact loading conditions. On this basis, a new energy absorber incorporating a radial valve with high magnetic field utilization and a corrugated tube is proposed. In energy absorption applications where the MREA is rarely if ever used, our MREA takes the ultra-stable HVLP MRF as controlled medium in order for a long-term stability. For MREA performing at very high shear rates where the minor losses are important contributing factors to damping, a nonlinear analytical model, based on the Herschel-Bulkley flow model (HB model), is developed taking into account the effects of minor losses (called HBM model). The HB model parameters are determined by rheological experiments with a commercial shear rheometer. Then, continuity equation and governing differential equation of the HVLP MRF in radial flow are established. Based on the HB model, the expressions of radial velocity distribution are deduced. The influences of minor losses on pressure drop are analyzed with mean fluid velocities. Further, mechanical behavior of the corrugated tube is investigated via drop test. In order to verify the theoretical methodology, a MREA is fabricated and tested using a high-speed drop tower facility with a 600 kg mass at different drop heights and in various magnetic fields. The experiment results show that the HBM model is capable of well predicting the impact behavior of the proposed MREA.

  18. High energy efficient solid state laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of highly efficient coherent optical sources was reviewed. This work has focused on nonlinear frequency conversion of the highly coherent output of the non-planar ring laser oscillators developed earlier in the program, and includes high efficiency second harmonic generation and the operation of optical parametric oscillators for wavelength diversity and tunability.

  19. High energy efficient solid state laser sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of highly efficient coherent optical sources is reviewed. This work focusses on nonlinear frequency conversion of the highly coherent output of the Non-Planar Ring Laser Oscillators developed earlier in the program, and includes high efficiency second harmonic generation and the operation of optical parametric oscillators for wavelength diversity and tunability.

  20. The Development of a Conical Composite Energy Absorber for Use in the Attenuation of Crash/Impact Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2014-01-01

    A design for a novel light-weight conical shaped energy absorbing (EA) composite subfloor structure is proposed. This composite EA is fabricated using repeated alternating patterns of a conical geometry to form long beam structures which can be implemented as aircraft subfloor keel beams or frame sections. The geometrical features of this conical design, along with the hybrid composite materials used in the manufacturing process give a strength tailored to achieve a constant 25-40 g sustained crush load, small peak crush loads and long stroke limits. This report will discuss the geometrical design and fabrication methods, along with results from static and dynamic crush testing of 12-in. long subcomponents.

  1. Energy transfer between laser filaments in liquid methanol.

    PubMed

    Strycker, B D; Springer, M; Trendafilova, C; Hua, X; Zhi, M; Kolomenskii, A A; Schroeder, H; Strohaber, J; Schuessler, H A; Kattawar, G W; Sokolov, A V

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate energy exchange between two filament-forming femtosecond laser beams in liquid methanol. Our results are consistent with those of previous works documenting coupling between filaments in air; in addition, we identify an unreported phenomenon in which the direction of energy exchange oscillates at increments in the relative pulse delay equal to an optical period (2.6 fs). Energy transfer from one filament to another may be used in remote sensing and spectroscopic applications utilizing femtosecond laser filaments in water and air.

  2. High-energy lasers by using distributed reflection: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffren, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    Lasers may be made with higher energy photons than heretofore possible. It has been proposed that vacuum ultraviolet lasing can be obtained by bombarding superfluid helium with electron beam, while coupling acoustic energy into helium to set up standing waves in fluid.

  3. High energy intracavity pumped eye-safe BaWO4 Raman laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitzler, Ondrej; Jelínková, Helena; Å ulc, Jan; Koubíková, Lucia; Němec, Michal; Nejezchleb, Karel; Å koda, Václav

    2013-03-01

    The goal of our research is a compact Raman laser emitting short pulses with high energy and peak power in "eye-safe" region around wavelength 1.5 μm. We utilize intracavity conversion of giant pulses at wavelength 1.34 μm in a BaWO4 Raman crystal (18 mm long, AR coated). Required high energy and peak power was reached using a flash-lamp pumped Nd:YAG laser (rod 100 mm long, diameter 4 mm), Q-switched by V:YAG solid-state saturable absorber (initial transmission 37% @ 1.34 μm). The L-shaped oscillator for 1.34 μm radiation consisted of a concave mirror (r = 0.5 m, HR @ 1.3 μm, HT @ 1.06 μm), flat polarizing intracavity mirror, and output coupler (r = 1 m, HR @ 1.3 μm, R = 39 % @ 1.5 μm). The polarizing mirror ensured stable linearly polarized laser emission and prevented parasitic oscillations at 1.06 μm. The Raman laser oscillator was formed by the output coupler and another intracavity mirror (r = 0.5 m, HR @ 1.5 μm, HT @ 1.3 μm), inserted between BaWO4 and the polarizing mirror. For pumping energy of 28.2 J stable vertically polarized generation of the 1st Stokes radiation at 1528 nm was reached. In multimode operation the output energy was 20 mJ in 2.25 ns pulses. Single mode operation was possible by inserting a 1.5 mm aperture between Nd:YAG and V:YAG crystal. The output energy dropped to 9.7 mJ (even for higher pump power of 30.7 W) and output pulses were shortened to 1.87 ns.

  4. A 31 mW, 280 fs passively mode-locked fiber soliton laser using a high heat-resistant SWNT/P3HT saturable absorber coated with siloxane.

    PubMed

    Ono, Takato; Hori, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Masato; Hirooka, Toshihiko; Nakazawa, Masataka; Mata, Junji; Tsukamoto, Jun

    2012-10-08

    We report a substantial increase in the heat resistance in a connector-type single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) saturable absorber by sealing SWNT/P3HT composite with siloxane. By applying the saturable absorber to a passively mode-locked Er fiber laser, we successfully demonstrated 280 fs, 31 mW pulse generation with a fivefold improvement in heat resistance.

  5. Technical challenges for the future of high energy lasers

    SciTech Connect

    LaFortune, K N; Hurd, R L; Fochs, S N; Rotter, M D; Pax, P H; Combs, R L; Olivier, S S; Brase, J M; Yamamoto, R M

    2007-01-10

    The Solid-State, Heat-Capacity Laser (SSHCL) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a multi-generation laser development effort scalable to the megawatt power levels with current performance approaching 100 kilowatts. This program is one of many designed to harness the power of lasers for use as directed energy weapons. There are many hurdles common to all of these programs that must be overcome to make the technology viable. There will be a in-depth discussion of the general issues facing state-of-the-art high energy lasers and paths to their resolution. Despite the relative simplicity of the SSHCL design, many challenges have been uncovered in the implementation of this particular system. An overview of these and their resolution are discussed. The overall system design of the SSHCL, technological strengths and weaknesses, and most recent experimental results will be presented.

  6. Technical challenges for the future of high energy lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFortune, K. N.; Hurd, R. L.; Fochs, S. N.; Rotter, M. D.; Pax, P. H.; Combs, R. L.; Olivier, S. S.; Brase, J. M.; Yamamoto, R. M.

    2007-02-01

    The Solid-State, Heat-Capacity Laser (SSHCL) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a multi-generation laser development effort scalable to the megawatt power levels with current performance approaching 100 kilowatts. This program is one of many designed to harness the power of lasers for use as directed energy weapons. There are many hurdles common to all of these programs that must be overcome to make the technology viable. There will be a in-depth discussion of the general issues facing state-of-the-art high energy lasers and paths to their resolution. Despite the relative simplicity of the SSHCL design, many challenges have been uncovered in the implementation of this particular system. An overview of these and their resolution are discussed. The overall system design of the SSHCL, technological strengths and weaknesses, and most recent experimental results will be presented.

  7. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Mechanism of high-energy electron production in a laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, V. S.

    2004-01-01

    A mechanism of high-energy electron production in the interaction of high-intensity short laser pulses with a solid target is proposed and analysed. The theoretical dependences of fast-electron kinetic energy on the parameters of laser radiation and target material are given. The effect of ionisation of the target material is considered. The generation of ultrastrong magnetic fields in the laser plasma is shown to play the key part in the formation, transfer, and acceleration of electron beams. This results in the production of vortex electric fields accelerating electrons. The theoretical dependences yield well-proved limits for the electron energy and are in good agreement with the results of experiments performed on high-intensity laser setups, including the results obtained with participation of the author.

  8. Influence of laser energy on the electron temperature of a laser-induced Mg plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asamoah, Emmanuel; Hongbing, Yao

    2017-01-01

    The magnesium plasma induced by a 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in atmospheric air was investigated. The evolution of the plasma was studied by acquiring spectral images at different laser energies and delay times. We observed that the intensities of the spectral lines decrease with larger delay times. The electron temperature was determined using the Boltzmann plot method. At a delay time of 100 ns and laser energy of 350 mJ, the electron temperature attained their highest value at 10164 K and then decreases slowly up to 8833.6 K at 500 ns. We found that the electron temperature of the magnesium plasma increases rapidly with increasing laser energy.

  9. Effects of CO2 laser energy on dentin permeability.

    PubMed

    Pashley, E L; Horner, J A; Liu, M; Kim, S; Pashley, D H

    1992-06-01

    The effect of a CO2 laser on the structure and permeability of smear layer-covered human dentin was evaluated in vitro. Three different energy levels were used (11, 113, and 566 J/cm2). The lowest exposure to the laser energy increased dentin permeability, measured as a hydraulic conductance, due to partial measured as a hydraulic conductance, due to partial loss of the superficial smear layer and smear plugs. The intermediate energy level also increased dentin permeability by crater formation, making the dentin thinner. The lack of uniform glazing of the surface of the crater, leaving its surface porous and in communication with the underlying dentinal tubules also contributed to the increase in dentin permeability seen with the intermediate laser energy. The highest laser energy produced complete glazing of the crater surfaces and sealed the dentinal tubules beneath the crater. However, it also completely removed the smear layer in a halo zone about 100-microns wide around each crater which increased the permeability of the pericrater dentin at the same time it decreased the permeability of the dentin within the crater. The combined use of scanning electron microscopy and permeability measurements provides important complementary information that is essential in evaluating the effects of lasers on dentin.

  10. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  11. Impact of Fast Ignition on Laser Fusion Energy Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirna, Kunioki

    2016-10-01

    Reviewed are the early history of Japanese laser fusion research and the recent achievement of fast ignition research at Institute of Laser Engineering (ILE), Osaka University. After the achievement of high density compression at Osaka University, LLE of University Rochester, and LLNL, the critical issue of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) research became the formation of hot spark in a compressed plasma. In this lecture, the history of the fast ignition research will be reviewed and future prospects are presented.

  12. RECENT LASER ACCIDENTS AT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LABORATORIES

    SciTech Connect

    ODOM, CONNON R.

    2007-02-02

    Recent laser accidents and incidents at research laboratories across the Department of Energy complex are reviewed in this paper. Factors that contributed to the accidents are examined. Conclusions drawn from the accident reports are summarized and compared. Control measures that could have been implemented to prevent the accidents will be summarized and compared. Recommendations for improving laser safety programs are outlined and progress toward achieving them are summarized.

  13. High-energy Nd:glass laser for oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutchenkov, Vyatcheslav A.; Utenkov, Boris I.; Zaitsev, V. K.; Bayanov, Valentin I.; Serebryakov, Victor A.

    1991-07-01

    The use of high energy solid state lasers for the treatment of human skin neoplasia was based on the experiments and clinic studies by Helsper and Goldman (1964), McGuff (1966). The heat of precise local volume is emitted due to the pulse laser radiation. The thermal effect results in the superficial necrosis of tissues with their integrity destruction, vascular repture accompanied by bloodstoke in some cases and by capillary embolism in others. Obvious tumour destruction is note only in case of high density irradiation. General tumour destruction depends on biological neoplasia features as well as the laser type.

  14. Diode-pumped solid state laser for inertial fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.; Orth, C.D.

    1994-11-01

    The authors evaluate the prospect for development of a diode-pumped solid-state-laser driver in an inertial fusion energy power plant. Using a computer code, they predict that their 1 GWe design will offer electricity at 8.6 cents/kW {center_dot} hr with the laser operating at 8.6% efficiency and the recycled power level at 31%. The results of their initial subscale experimental testbed of a diode-pumped solid state laser are encouraging, demonstrating good efficiencies and robustness.

  15. Interaction of repetitively pulsed high energy laser radiation with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, M.

    1986-05-01

    Laser target interaction processes and methods of improving the overall energy balance are discussed. This can be achieved with high repetition rate pulsed lasers even for initially highly reflecting materials, such as metals. Experiments were performed using a pulsed CO2 laser at mean powers up to 2 KW and repetition rates up to 100 Hz. The rates of temperature rise of aluminum for example are increased by more than a factor of 3 as compared to cw-radiation of comparable power density. Similar improvements are found for the overall absorptivities, that are increased by more than an order of magnitude.

  16. Study of the energy characteristics of a plasma generated in air near a target by CO2-laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgov-Savelev, G. G.; Zhuk, V. A.; Orishich, A. M.; Ponomarenko, A. G.; Posukh, V. G.; Snytnikov, V. N.

    1983-10-01

    A method for determining the radiation energy absorbed in a plasma initiated by a high-power pulsed CO2 laser near a plane target is investigated. The present method, based on the measurement of parameters of a shock wave originating in a cold gas surrounding the target, determines the plasma energy characteristics near the plasma formation threshold which are dependent on the target material and on the radiation intensity. Simple relations between shock wave energy (determined experimentally) and the energy absorbed in the plasma layer near the target are obtained for values of the power density of the radiation incident on the target from 3 x 10 to the 6th to 1.5 x 10 to the 7th W/sq cm. The shock wave motion is experimentally shown to be described by the point explosion theory. This permits the determination of the total energy of the gas in the shock wave by the measurement of one shock wave parameter. The efficiency of the conversion of laser energy to plasma energy varies as the value of the radiation power density.

  17. Femtosecond pulse generation from a Ti3+:sapphire laser near 800  nm with voltage reconfigurable graphene saturable absorbers.

    PubMed

    Baylam, Isınsu; Ozharar, Sarper; Kakenov, Nurbek; Kocabas, Coskun; Sennaroglu, Alphan

    2017-04-01

    We experimentally show that a voltage-controlled graphene-gold supercapacitor saturable absorber (VCG-gold-SA) can be operated as a fast saturable absorber with adjustable linear absorption at wavelengths as low as 795 nm. This was made possible by the use of a novel supercapacitor architecture, consisting of a high-dielectric electrolyte sandwiched between a graphene and a gold electrode. The high-dielectric electrolyte allowed continuous, reversible adjustment of the Fermi level and, hence, the optical loss of the VCG-gold-SA up to the visible wavelengths at low bias voltages of the order of a few volts (0-2 V). The fast saturable absorber action of the VCG-gold-SA and the bias-dependent reduction of its loss were successfully demonstrated inside a femtosecond Ti3+:sapphire laser operating near 800 nm. Dispersion compensation was employed by using dispersion control mirrors and a prism pair. At a bias voltage of 1.2 V, the laser operated with improved power performance in comparison with that at zero bias, and the VCG-gold-SA initiated the generation of nearly transform-limited pulses as short as 48 fs at a pulse repetition rate of 131.7 MHz near 830 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the shortest wavelength where a VCG-gold-SA has been employed as a mode locker with adjustable loss.

  18. Energy absorption behavior of polyurea coatings under laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajam, Kailash; Lee, Jaejun; Sottos, Nancy

    2015-06-01

    Energy absorbing, lightweight, thin transparent layers/coatings are desirable in many civilian and military applications such as hurricane resistant windows, personnel face-shields, helmet liners, aircraft canopies, laser shields, blast-tolerant sandwich structures, sound and vibration damping materials to name a few. Polyurea, a class of segmented block copolymer, has attracted recent attention for its energy absorbing properties. However, most of the dynamic property characterization of polyurea is limited to tensile and split-Hopkinson-pressure-bar compression loading experiments with strain rates on the order of 102 and 104 s-1, respectively. In the present work, we report the energy absorption behavior of polyurea thin films (1 to 2 μm) subjected to laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading. The laser-generated high amplitude stress wave propagates through the film in short time frames (15 to 20 ns) leading to very high strain rates (107 to 108 s-1) . The substrate stress, surface velocity and fluence histories are inferred from the displacement fringe data. On comparing input and output fluences, test results indicate significant energy absorption by the polyurea films under both tensile and mixed-mode loading conditions. Microscopic examination reveals distinct changes in failure mechanisms under mixed-mode loading from that observed under pure tensile loading. Office of Naval Research MURI.

  19. High-energy femtosecond Yb-doped fiber laser operating in the anomalous dispersion regime.

    PubMed

    Ortaç, Bülend; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2007-08-01

    We report on high-energy ultrashort pulse generation from a passively mode-locked ytterbium-doped large-mode-area photonic crystal fiber oscillator operating in the anomalous dispersion regime. In the single-pulse regime, the laser directly generates 880 mW of average power of sub-500 fs pulses at a repetition rate of 53.33 MHz, corresponding to a pulse energy of 16.5 nJ. Stable and self-starting operation is obtained by adapting the spot size at the saturable absorber mirror to the pulse evolution in the low-nonlinearity fiber. The approach presented demonstrates the scaling potential of fiber based short pulse oscillators towards the microJ-level.

  20. Predicting the biological effects of mobile phone radiation absorbed energy linked to the MRI-obtained structure.

    PubMed

    Krstić, Dejan; Zigar, Darko; Petković, Dejan; Sokolović, Dušan; Dinđić, Boris; Cvetković, Nenad; Jovanović, Jovica; Dinđić, Nataša

    2013-01-01

    The nature of an electromagnetic field is not the same outside and inside a biological subject. Numerical bioelectromagnetic simulation methods for penetrating electromagnetic fields facilitate the calculation of field components in biological entities. Calculating energy absorbed from known sources, such as mobile phones when placed near the head, is a prerequisite for studying the biological influence of an electromagnetic field. Such research requires approximate anatomical models which are used to calculate the field components and absorbed energy. In order to explore the biological effects in organs and tissues, it is necessary to establish a relationship between an analogous anatomical model and the real structure. We propose a new approach in exploring biological effects through combining two different techniques: 1) numerical electromagnetic simulation, which is used to calculate the field components in a similar anatomical model and 2) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), which is used to accurately locate sites with increased absorption. By overlapping images obtained by both methods, we can precisely locate the spots with maximum absorption effects. This way, we can detect the site where the most pronounced biological effects are to be expected. This novel approach successfully overcomes the standard limitations of working with analogous anatomical models.

  1. Photoluminescence-based quality control for thin film absorber layers of photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Repins, Ingrid L.; Kuciauskas, Darius

    2015-07-07

    A time-resolved photoluminescence-based system providing quality control during manufacture of thin film absorber layers for photovoltaic devices. The system includes a laser generating excitation beams and an optical fiber with an end used both for directing each excitation beam onto a thin film absorber layer and for collecting photoluminescence from the absorber layer. The system includes a processor determining a quality control parameter such as minority carrier lifetime of the thin film absorber layer based on the collected photoluminescence. In some implementations, the laser is a low power, pulsed diode laser having photon energy at least great enough to excite electron hole pairs in the thin film absorber layer. The scattered light may be filterable from the collected photoluminescence, and the system may include a dichroic beam splitter and a filter that transmit the photoluminescence and remove scattered laser light prior to delivery to a photodetector and a digital oscilloscope.

  2. High energy mode locked fiber oscillators for high contrast, high energy petawatt laser seed sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; An, J; Kim, D; Barty, C J

    2006-06-15

    In a high-energy petawatt laser beam line the ASE pulse contrast is directly related to the total laser gain. Thus a more energetic input pulse will result in increased pulse contrast at the target. We have developed a mode-locked fiber laser with high quality pulses and energies exceeding 25nJ. We believe this 25nJ result is scalable to higher energies. This oscillator has no intra-cavity dispersion compensation, which yields an extremely simple, and elegant laser configuration. We will discuss the design of this laser, our most recent results and characterization of all the key parameters relevant to it use as a seed laser. Our oscillator is a ring cavity mode-locked fiber laser [1]. These lasers operate in a self-similar pulse propagation regime characterized by a spectrum that is almost square. This mode was found theoretically [2] to occur only in the positive dispersion regime. Further increasing positive dispersion should lead to increasing pulse energy [2]. We established that the positive dispersion required for high-energy operation was approximately that of 2m of fiber. To this end, we constructed a laser cavity similar to [1], but with no gratings and only 2m of fiber, which we cladding pumped in order to ensure sufficient pump power was available to achieve mode-locked operation. A schematic of the laser is shown in figure 1 below. This laser produced low noise 25nJ pulses with a broad self similar spectrum (figure 2) and pulses that could be de-chirped to <100fs (figure 3). Pulse contrast is important in peta-watt laser systems. A major contributor to pulse contrast is amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), which is proportional to the gain in the laser chain. As the oscillator strength is increased, the required gain to reach 1PW pulses is decreased, reducing ASE and improving pulse contrast. We believe these lasers can be scaled in a stable fashion to pulse energies as high as 100nJ and have in fact seen 60nJ briefly in our lab, which is work still

  3. Degradation and decoloration of textiles wastewater by electron beam irradiation: Effect of energy, current and absorbed dose

    SciTech Connect

    Bakar, Khomsaton Abu; Zulkafli,; Hashim, Siti A'aisah; Ahmad, Pauzi

    2014-09-03

    In this study, electron beam accelerator (EB) was used to treat textiles wastewater from Rawang Industrial Park, Selangor. The objectives were to determine effective energy, beam current and absorbed dose required for decoloration and degradation of the textiles effluent. The textiles effluent was irradiated in a batch with various energy of 1MeV to 3MeV at constant beam current of 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with higher beam energy. The EB energy of 1MeV effectively to removed 58% color and 19% COD. For textile effluent sample irradiated at fix energy of 1MeV and 3Mev but at different beam current 10mA, 20mA and 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with the increased of beam current at each energy. However removal of color was significantly better at 1Mev as compared to 3Mev. In the case of textiles effluent, irradiated at doses of 17, 20,25,30, 35, 100 and 200kGy using 30 kW power of EB (1Mev, 30mA), results shows removal of BOD{sub 5}, COD and color were in the range 9%-33%, 14%-38% and 43%-78% respectively.

  4. Degradation and decoloration of textiles wastewater by electron beam irradiation: Effect of energy, current and absorbed dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakar, Khomsaton Abu; Ahmad, Pauzi; Zulkafli, Hashim, Siti A'aisah

    2014-09-01

    In this study, electron beam accelerator (EB) was used to treat textiles wastewater from Rawang Industrial Park, Selangor. The objectives were to determine effective energy, beam current and absorbed dose required for decoloration and degradation of the textiles effluent. The textiles effluent was irradiated in a batch with various energy of 1MeV to 3MeV at constant beam current of 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with higher beam energy. The EB energy of 1MeV effectively to removed 58% color and 19% COD. For textile effluent sample irradiated at fix energy of 1MeV and 3Mev but at different beam current 10mA, 20mA and 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with the increased of beam current at each energy. However removal of color was significantly better at 1Mev as compared to 3Mev. In the case of textiles effluent, irradiated at doses of 17, 20,25,30, 35, 100 and 200kGy using 30 kW power of EB (1Mev, 30mA), results shows removal of BOD5, COD and color were in the range 9%-33%, 14%-38% and 43%-78% respectively.

  5. Diurnal and developmental changes in energy allocation of absorbed light at PSII in field-grown rice.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Satoshi; Uebayashi, Nozomu; Tazoe, Youshi; Ikeuchi, Masahiro; Homma, Koki; Sato, Fumihiko; Endo, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The allocation of absorbed light energy in PSII to electron transport and heat dissipation processes in rice grown under waterlogged conditions was estimated with the lake model of energy transfer. With regard to diurnal changes in energy allocation, the peak of the energy flux to electron transport, J(PSII), occurred in the morning and the peak of the energy flux to heat dissipation associated with non-photochemical quenching of Chl fluorescence, J(NPQ), occurred in the afternoon. With regard to seasonal changes in energy allocation, J(PSII) in the rapidly growing phase was greater than that in the ripening phase, even though the leaves of rice receive less light in the growing phase than in the ripening period in Japan. This seasonal decrease in J(PSII) was accompanied by an increase in J(NPQ). One of the reasons for the lower J(PSII) in the ripening phase might be a more sever afternoon suppression of J(PSII). To estimate energy dissipation due to photoinhibition of PSII, J(NPQ) was divided into J(fast), which is associated with fast-recovering NPQ mainly due to qE, and J(slow), which is mainly due to photoinhibition. The integrated daily energy loss by photoinhibiton was calculated to be about 3-8% of light energy absorption in PSII. Strategies for the utilization of light energy adopted by rice are discussed. For example, very efficient photosynthesis under non-saturating light in the rapidly growing phase is proposed.

  6. Interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules

    DOEpatents

    English, Jr., Ronald E.; Johnson, Steve A.

    1994-01-01

    An interface module (10) for transverse energy input to dye laser modules is provided particularly for the purpose of delivering enhancing transverse energy beams (36) in the form of illumination bar (54) to the lasing zone (18) of a dye laser device, in particular to a dye laser amplifier (12). The preferred interface module (10) includes an optical fiber array (30) having a plurality of optical fibers (38) arrayed in a co-planar fashion with their distal ends (44) receiving coherent laser energy from an enhancing laser source (46), and their proximal ends (4) delivered into a relay structure (3). The proximal ends (42) of the optical fibers (38) are arrayed so as to be coplanar and to be aimed generally at a common point. The transverse energy beam array (36) delivered from the optical fiber array (30) is acted upon by an optical element array (34) to produce an illumination bar (54) which has a cross section in the form of a elongated rectangle at the position of the lasing window (18). The illumination bar (54) is selected to have substantially uniform intensity throughout.

  7. Interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules

    DOEpatents

    English, R.E. Jr.; Johnson, S.A.

    1994-10-11

    An interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules is provided particularly for the purpose of delivering enhancing transverse energy beams in the form of illumination bar to the lasing zone of a dye laser device, in particular to a dye laser amplifier. The preferred interface module includes an optical fiber array having a plurality of optical fibers arrayed in a co-planar fashion with their distal ends receiving coherent laser energy from an enhancing laser source, and their proximal ends delivered into a relay structure. The proximal ends of the optical fibers are arrayed so as to be coplanar and to be aimed generally at a common point. The transverse energy beam array delivered from the optical fiber array is acted upon by an optical element array to produce an illumination bar which has a cross section in the form of a elongated rectangle at the position of the lasing window. The illumination bar is selected to have substantially uniform intensity throughout. 5 figs.

  8. Laser-based profile and energy monitor for H beams

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly,R.; Alessi, J.; Bellavia, S.; Dawson, C.; Degen, C.; Meng, W.; Raparia, D.; Russo, T.; Tsoupas, N.

    2008-09-29

    A beam profile and energy monitor for H{sup -} beams based on laser photoneutralization was built at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)* for use on the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HMS) at Fermilab. An H{sup -} ion has a first ionization potential of 0.75eV and can be neutralized by light from a Nd:YAG laser ({lambda}=1064nm). To measure beam profiles, a narrow laser beam is stepped across the ion beam, removing electrons from the portion of the H{sup -} beam intercepted by the laser. These electrons are channeled into a Faraday cup by a curved axial magnetic field. To measure the energy distribution of the electrons, the laser position is fixed and the voltage on a screen in front of the Faraday cup is raised in small steps. We present a model which reproduces the measured energy spectrum from calculated beam energy and space-charge fields. Measurements are reported from experiments in the BNL linac MEBT at 750keV.

  9. Passively Q-switched single-frequency 2μm laser used graphene as saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    A graphene passively Q-switched single frequency Ho:YAG laser was demonstrated. Ho:YAG crystal was resonantly pumped by a 1908 nm diode laser. Twisted-mode single frequency technique was applied to realize single frequency oscillation. The maximum single frequency laser output was 358 mW. Single frequency pulse laser output was achieved by inserting a graphene into the single frequency Ho:YAG laser. The maximum average power of 149 mW was obtained with the pulse repetition rate of 40.45 kHz under 8.32 W of incident pump power.

  10. PHITS simulations of absorbed dose out-of-field and neutron energy spectra for ELEKTA SL25 medical linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) based calculation methods for modeling photon and particle transport, have several potential applications in radiotherapy. An essential requirement for successful radiation therapy is that the discrepancies between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient are minimized. It is also essential to minimize the dose to radiosensitive and critical organs. With MC technique, the dose distributions from both the primary and scattered photons can be calculated. The out-of-field radiation doses are of particular concern when high energy photons are used, since then neutrons are produced both in the accelerator head and inside the patients. Using MC technique, the created photons and particles can be followed and the transport and energy deposition in all the tissues of the patient can be estimated. This is of great importance during pediatric treatments when minimizing the risk for normal healthy tissue, e.g. secondary cancer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate 3D general purpose PHITS MC code efficiency as an alternative approach for photon beam specification. In this study, we developed a model of an ELEKTA SL25 accelerator and used the transport code PHITS for calculating the total absorbed dose and the neutron energy spectra infield and outside the treatment field. This model was validated against measurements performed with bubble detector spectrometers and Boner sphere for 18 MV linacs, including both photons and neutrons. The average absolute difference between the calculated and measured absorbed dose for the out-of-field region was around 11%. Taking into account a simplification for simulated geometry, which does not include any potential scattering materials around, the obtained result is very satisfactorily. A good agreement between the simulated and measured neutron energy spectra was observed while comparing to data found in the literature.

  11. PHITS simulations of absorbed dose out-of-field and neutron energy spectra for ELEKTA SL25 medical linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Puchalska, Monika; Sihver, Lembit

    2015-06-21

    Monte Carlo (MC) based calculation methods for modeling photon and particle transport, have several potential applications in radiotherapy. An essential requirement for successful radiation therapy is that the discrepancies between dose distributions calculated at the treatment planning stage and those delivered to the patient are minimized. It is also essential to minimize the dose to radiosensitive and critical organs. With MC technique, the dose distributions from both the primary and scattered photons can be calculated. The out-of-field radiation doses are of particular concern when high energy photons are used, since then neutrons are produced both in the accelerator head and inside the patients. Using MC technique, the created photons and particles can be followed and the transport and energy deposition in all the tissues of the patient can be estimated. This is of great importance during pediatric treatments when minimizing the risk for normal healthy tissue, e.g. secondary cancer. The purpose of this work was to evaluate 3D general purpose PHITS MC code efficiency as an alternative approach for photon beam specification. In this study, we developed a model of an ELEKTA SL25 accelerator and used the transport code PHITS for calculating the total absorbed dose and the neutron energy spectra infield and outside the treatment field. This model was validated against measurements performed with bubble detector spectrometers and Boner sphere for 18 MV linacs, including both photons and neutrons. The average absolute difference between the calculated and measured absorbed dose for the out-of-field region was around 11%. Taking into account a simplification for simulated geometry, which does not include any potential scattering materials around, the obtained result is very satisfactorily. A good agreement between the simulated and measured neutron energy spectra was observed while comparing to data found in the literature.

  12. Short Pulse Laser Absorption and Energy Partition at Relativistic Laser Intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R; Chen, H; Ping, Y; Dyer, G; Wilks, S; Chung, H; Kemp, A; Hanson, S; Widmann, K; Fournier, K; Faenov, A; Pikuz, T; Niles, A; Beiersdorfer, P

    2007-02-27

    We have performed experiments at the COMET and Calisto short pulse laser facilities to make the first comprehensive measurements of the laser absorption and energy partition in solid targets heated with an ultrashort laser pulse focused to relativistic laser intensities (>10 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}). The measurements show an exceedingly high absorption for P polarized laser-target interactions above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Additionally, the hot electron population is observed to markedly increase at the same intensity range. An investigation of the relaxation process was initiated u using time sing time-resolved K{sub {alpha}} spectroscopy. Measurements of the time time-resolved K{sub {alpha}} radiation suggest a 10-20 ps relativistic electron relaxation time. However modeling difficulties of these data are apparent and a more detailed investigation on this subject matter is warranted.

  13. Passively Q-switched Erbium-doped and Ytterbium-doped fibre lasers with topological insulator bismuth selenide (Bi2Se3) as saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, H.; Harun, S. W.; Muhammad, A. R.; Anyi, C. L.; Tan, S. J.; Ahmad, F.; Nor, R. M.; Zulkepely, N. R.; Arof, H.

    2017-02-01

    This paper portrays a simple Q-switched Erbium-doped fibre (EDF) and Ytterbium doped fibre (YDF) lasers by using topological insulator (TI) Bismuth Selenide (Bi2Se3) as saturable absorber. The modulation depth of the fabricated Bi2Se3 is about 39.8% while its saturating intensity is about 90.2 MW/cm2. By depositing the TI Bi2Se3 SA onto fibre ferrules and incorporate it inside the proposed cavity, a stable Q-switching operation was achieved at 1 μm and 1.5 μm. The fabricated Bismuth Selenide (Bi2Se3) as saturable absorber (SA) is a broadband SA where it offers a compact and low cost fabrication which is beneficial in various photonic applications.

  14. High-Energy Laser-Target Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-06

    Second Workshop held at RPI, Hartford Graduate Center, t ,edited by H.J. Schwarz and H Hora , Plenum Press. 23. Keldysh, L. V. (1965) Soviet Physics JETP...insofar as the ac magnetic field contributes to the nonlinear force discussed by Hora 1 7 (22) The wave period T = 2r/u of the laser radiation is much...the laws of classical physics can be used to describe the plasma. (25) The nonlinear force term fNL " 1 [-1eIoEy12 + 1 aIHzI2] (6) discussed by Hora 1

  15. Dichroic beamsplitter for high energy laser diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    LaFortune, Kai N; Hurd, Randall; Fochs, Scott N; Rotter, Mark D; Hackel, Lloyd

    2011-08-30

    Wavefront control techniques are provided for the alignment and performance optimization of optical devices. A Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor can be used to measure the wavefront distortion and a control system generates feedback error signal to optics inside the device to correct the wavefront. The system can be calibrated with a low-average-power probe laser. An optical element is provided to couple the optical device to a diagnostic/control package in a way that optimizes both the output power of the optical device and the coupling of the probe light into the diagnostics.

  16. United States army tactical high-energy laser program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachs, John J.; Wilson, Gerald T.

    2013-02-01

    The tactical high energy laser (THEL) program, conducted from 1996 to 2005, successfully demonstrated the capability of a high-energy laser to counter rockets, artillery, and mortars. The program was a US/Israeli cooperative research and development effort that was designated by the Secretary of Defense as an advanced concept technology demonstration with Presidential interest. The THEL system was designed and built under an SMDC/ARSTART prime contract awarded to TRW (now, Northrop Grumman Corporation), jointly managed by the Israel Ministry of Defence Directorate of Defence Research & Development. We summarize the effort and highlight some of the "firsts" of the THEL program.

  17. TEA HF laser with a high specific radiation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchikin, A. V.; Andreev, M. V.; Losev, V. F.; Panchenko, Yu. N.

    2017-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of the chemical HF laser with a non-chain reaction are presented. The possibility of the total laser efficiency of 5 % is shown when a traditional C-to-C pumping circuit with the charging voltage of 20-24 kV is used. It is experimentally shown that the specific radiation output energy of 21 J/l is reached at the specific pump energy of 350 J/l in SF6/H2 = 14/1 mixture at the total pressure of 0.27 bar.

  18. Laser-material interactions: A study of laser energy coupling with solids

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, Mark Alan

    1993-11-01

    This study of laser-light interactions with solid materials ranges from low-temperature heating to explosive, plasma-forming reactions. Contained are four works concerning laser-energy coupling: laser (i) heating and (ii) melting monitored using a mirage effect technique, (iii) the mechanical stress-power generated during high-powered laser ablation, and (iv) plasma-shielding. First, a photothermal deflection (PTD) technique is presented for monitoring heat transfer during modulated laser heating of opaque solids that have not undergone phase-change. Of main interest is the physical significance of the shape, magnitude, and phase for the temporal profile of the deflection signal. Considered are the effects that thermophysical properties, boundary conditions, and geometry of the target and optical probe-beam have on the deflection response. PTD is shown to monitor spatial and temporal changes in heat flux leaving the surface due to changes in laser energy coupling. The PTD technique is then extended to detect phase-change at the surface of a solid target. Experimental data shows the onset of melt for indium and tin targets. The conditions for which melt can be detected by PTD is analyzed in terms of geometry, incident power and pulse length, and thermophysical properties of the target and surroundings. Next, monitoring high-powered laser ablation of materials with stress-power is introduced. The motivation for considering stress-power is given, followed by a theoretical discussion of stress-power and how it is determined experimentally. Experiments are presented for the ablation of aluminum targets as a function of energy and intensity. The stress-power response is analyzed for its physical significance. Lastly, the influence of plasma-shielding during high-powered pulsed laser-material interactions is considered. Crater size, emission, and stress-power are measured to determine the role that the gas medium and laser pulse length have on plasma shielding.

  19. Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating-Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter Project

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y. H.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Previsic, M.; Epler, J.; Lou, J.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy established a reference model project to benchmark a set of marine and hydrokinetic technologies including current (tidal, open-ocean, and river) turbines and wave energy converters. The objectives of the project were to first evaluate the status of these technologies and their readiness for commercial applications. Second, to evaluate the potential cost of energy and identify cost-reduction pathways and areas where additional research could be best applied to accelerate technology development to market readiness.

  20. Single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide-based saturable absorbers for low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohui; Wu, Kan; Sun, Zhipei; Meng, Bo; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Yishan; Yu, Xuechao; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Shum, Perry Ping; Wang, Qi Jie

    2016-04-01

    Low phase noise mode-locked fiber laser finds important applications in telecommunication, ultrafast sciences, material science, and biology, etc. In this paper, two types of carbon nano-materials, i.e. single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) and graphene oxide (GO), are investigated as efficient saturable absorbers (SAs) to achieve low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers. Various properties of these wall-paper SAs, such as saturable intensity, optical absorption and degree of purity, are found to be key factors determining the performance of the ultrafast pulses. Reduced-noise femtosecond fiber lasers based on such carbon-based SAs are experimentally demonstrated, for which the phase noise has been reduced by more than 10 dB for SWNT SAs and 8 dB for GO SAs at 10 kHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the relationship between different carbon material based SAs and the phase noise of mode-locked lasers. This work paves the way to generate high-quality low phase noise ultrashort pulses in passively mode-locked fiber lasers.