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Sample records for absorbed x-ray dose

  1. Absorbed dose assessment in newborns during x-ray examinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taipe, Patricia K.; Berrocal, Mariella J.; Carita, Raúl F.

    2012-02-01

    Often a newborn presents breathing problems during the early days of life, i.e. bronchopneumonia, wich are caused in most of cases, by aspirating a mixture of meconium and amniotic fluid. In these cases, it is necessary to make use of a radiograph, requested by the physician to reach a diagnosis. This paper seeks to evaluate the absorbed doses in neonates undergoing a radiograph. For this reason we try to simulate the real conditions in a X-ray room from Lima hospitals. With this finality we perform a simulation made according a questionnaire related to technical data of X-ray equipment, distance between the source and the neonate, and its position to be irradiated. The information obtained has been used to determine the absorbed dose by infants, using the MCNP code. Finally, the results are compared with reference values of international health agencies.

  2. Absorbed Dose Determination Using Experimental and Analytical Predictions of X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Carruth, Ralph (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Electron beam welding in a vacuum is a technology that NASA is investigating as a joining technique for manufacture of space structures. This investigation characterizes the x-ray environment due to operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool and provides recommendations for adequate shielding for astronauts performing the in-vacuum electron beam welding. NASA, in a joint venture with the Russian Space Agency, was scheduled to perform a series of welding in space experiments on board the U.S. Space Shuttle. This series of experiments was named the international space welding experiment (ISWE). The hardware associated with the ISWE was leased to NASA by the Paton Welding Institute (PWI) in Ukraine for ground-based welding experiments in preparation for flight. Two ground tests were scheduled, using the ISWE electron beam welding tool, to characterize the radiation exposure to an astronaut during the operation of the ISWE. These radiation exposure tests used thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's) shielded with material currently used by astronauts during extravehicular activities to measure the radiation dose. The TLD's were exposed to x-ray radiation generated by operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. This investigation was the first known application of TLD's to measure absorbed dose from x rays of energy less than 10 keV. The ISWE hardware was returned to Ukraine before the issue of adequate shielding for the astronauts was completely verified. Therefore, alternate experimental and analytical methods were developed to measure and predict the x-ray spectral and intensity distribution generated by ISWE electron beam impact with metal. These x-ray spectra were normalized to an equivalent ISWE exposure, then used to calculate the absorbed radiation dose to astronauts. These absorbed dose values were compared to TLD measurements obtained during actual operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. The calculated absorbed dose

  3. Estimating the Absorbed Dose to Critical Organs During Dual X-ray Absorptiometry

    PubMed Central

    Sharafi, A A; Larijani, B; Mokhlesian, N; Hasanzadeh, H

    2008-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to estimate a patient's organ dose (effective dose) during performance of dual X-ray absorptiometry by using the correlations derived from the surface dose and the depth doses in an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods An anthropomorphic phantom was designed and TLDs (Thermoluminescent Dosimeters) were placed at the surface and these were also inserted at different depths of the thyroid and uterus of the anthropomorphic phantom. The absorbed doses were measured on the phantom for the spine and femur scan modes. The correlation coefficients and regression functions between the absorbed surface dose and the depth dose were determined. The derived correlation was then applied for 40 women patients to estimate the depth doses to the thyroid and uterus. Results There was a correlation between the surface dose and depth dose of the thyroid and uterus in both scan modes. For the women's dosimetry, the average surface doses of the thyroid and uterus were 1.88 µGy and 1.81 µGy, respectively. Also, the scan center dose in the women was 5.70 µGy. There was correlation between the thyroid and uterus surface doses, and the scan center dose. Conclusion We concluded that the effective dose to the patient's critical organs during dual X-ray absorptiometry can be estimated by the correlation derived from phantom dosimetry. PMID:18385556

  4. The distribution of absorbed dose from x-rays as a function of depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Frederick

    2000-08-01

    Organizations responsible for monitoring the occupational exposure to radiation workers in the U.S. are directed to measure the dose to specific depths in tissue. The knowledge of the depth distribution of energy deposited by radiation in materials is essential to the interpretation of devices used to measure occupational exposure In this work, the quantities used to convert the reference transfer quantity for x-ray fields, air kerma, to the regulatory quantity, dose equivalent, for mono- energetic x-ray fields and poly-energetic x-ray fields specified by the National Institute of Standards and Technology are cogenerated for European x-ray fields are indicated and consistent conversion factors for use in the U.S. are recommended. For the mono-energetic x-ray beams conversion factors ranged from 0.9 to 1.7 at the 7 mg/cm2 depth and from 0.03 to 1.9 at the 1000 mg/cm2 depth in tissue specified by the International Commission of Radiation Units and Measurements. The conversion factors for the NIST x-ray fields were reasonably consistent with values in an unpublished draft standard by the American National Standards Institute, but exhibited sufficient disagreement to warrant a re-evaluation of the factors in that document prior to publication.

  5. Absorbed dose-to-water protocol applied to synchrotron-generated x-rays at very high dose rates.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P; Crosbie, J C; Cornelius, I; Berkvens, P; Donzelli, M; Clavel, A H; Rosenfeld, A B; Petasecca, M; Lerch, M L F; Bräuer-Krisch, E

    2016-07-21

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a new radiation treatment modality in the pre-clinical stage of development at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. MRT exploits the dose volume effect that is made possible through the spatial fractionation of the high dose rate synchrotron-generated x-ray beam into an array of microbeams. As an important step towards the development of a dosimetry protocol for MRT, we have applied the International Atomic Energy Agency's TRS 398 absorbed dose-to-water protocol to the synchrotron x-ray beam in the case of the broad beam irradiation geometry (i.e. prior to spatial fractionation into microbeams). The very high dose rates observed here mean the ion recombination correction factor, k s , is the most challenging to quantify of all the necessary corrections to apply for ionization chamber based absolute dosimetry. In the course of this study, we have developed a new method, the so called 'current ramping' method, to determine k s for the specific irradiation and filtering conditions typically utilized throughout the development of MRT. Using the new approach we deduced an ion recombination correction factor of 1.047 for the maximum ESRF storage ring current (200 mA) under typical beam spectral filtering conditions in MRT. MRT trials are currently underway with veterinary patients at the ESRF that require additional filtering, and we have estimated a correction factor of 1.025 for these filtration conditions for the same ESRF storage ring current. The protocol described herein provides reference dosimetry data for the associated Treatment Planning System utilized in the current veterinary trials and anticipated future human clinical trials. PMID:27366861

  6. Absorbed dose-to-water protocol applied to synchrotron-generated x-rays at very high dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, P.; Crosbie, J. C.; Cornelius, I.; Berkvens, P.; Donzelli, M.; Clavel, A. H.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.

    2016-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a new radiation treatment modality in the pre-clinical stage of development at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. MRT exploits the dose volume effect that is made possible through the spatial fractionation of the high dose rate synchrotron-generated x-ray beam into an array of microbeams. As an important step towards the development of a dosimetry protocol for MRT, we have applied the International Atomic Energy Agency’s TRS 398 absorbed dose-to-water protocol to the synchrotron x-ray beam in the case of the broad beam irradiation geometry (i.e. prior to spatial fractionation into microbeams). The very high dose rates observed here mean the ion recombination correction factor, k s , is the most challenging to quantify of all the necessary corrections to apply for ionization chamber based absolute dosimetry. In the course of this study, we have developed a new method, the so called ‘current ramping’ method, to determine k s for the specific irradiation and filtering conditions typically utilized throughout the development of MRT. Using the new approach we deduced an ion recombination correction factor of 1.047 for the maximum ESRF storage ring current (200 mA) under typical beam spectral filtering conditions in MRT. MRT trials are currently underway with veterinary patients at the ESRF that require additional filtering, and we have estimated a correction factor of 1.025 for these filtration conditions for the same ESRF storage ring current. The protocol described herein provides reference dosimetry data for the associated Treatment Planning System utilized in the current veterinary trials and anticipated future human clinical trials.

  7. Measurement of absorbed doses from X-ray baggage examinations to tooth enamel by means of ESR and glass dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Zhumadilov, Kassym; Stepanenko, Valeriy; Ivannikov, Alexander; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Zharlyganova, Dinara; Toyoda, Shin; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2008-11-01

    The contribution of radiation from X-ray baggage scans at airports on dose formation in tooth samples was investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry and by glass dosimetry. This was considered important, because tooth samples from population around the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS), Kazakhstan, had been transported in the past to Hiroshima University for retrospective dose assessment of these residents. Enamel samples and glass dosimeters were therefore examined at check-in time at Kansai airport (Osaka, Japan), Dubai airport (Dubai, United Arab Emirates) and Domodedovo airport (Moscow, Russia). These airports are on the route from Kazakhstan to Japan. Three different potential locations of the samples were investigated: in pocket (without X-ray scans), in a small bag (with four X-ray scans) and in large luggage (with two X-ray scans). The doses obtained by glass and ESR dosimetry methods were cross-compared. As expected, doses from X-ray examinations measured by glass dosimetry were in the microGy range, well below the ESR detection limit and also below the doses measured in enamel samples from residents of the SNTS. PMID:18648837

  8. First international comparison of primary absorbed dose to water standards in the medium-energy X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büermann, Ludwig; Guerra, Antonio Stefano; Pimpinella, Maria; Pinto, Massimo; de Pooter, Jacco; de Prez, Leon; Jansen, Bartel; Denoziere, Marc; Rapp, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the results of the first international comparison of primary measurement standards of absorbed dose to water for the medium-energy X-ray range. Three of the participants (VSL, PTB, LNE-LNHB) used their existing water calorimeter based standards and one participant (ENEA) recently developed a new standard based on a water-graphite calorimeter. The participants calibrated three transfer chambers of the same type in terms of absorbed dose to water (NDw) and in addition in terms of air kerma (NK) using the CCRI radiation qualities in the range 100 kV to 250 kV. The additional NK values were intended to be used for a physical analysis of the ratios NDw/NK. All participants had previously participated in the BIPM.RI(I)-K3 key comparison of air kerma standards. Ratios of pairs of NMI's NK results of the current comparison were found to be consistent with the corresponding key comparison results within the expanded uncertainties of 0.6 % - 1 %. The NDw results were analysed in terms of the degrees of equivalence with the comparison reference values which were calculated for each beam quality as the weighted means of all results. The participant's results were consistent with the reference value within the expanded uncertainties. However, these expanded uncertainties varied significantly and ranged between about 1-1.8 % for the water calorimeter based standards and were estimated at 3.7 % for the water-graphite calorimeter. It was shown previously that the ratios NDw/NK for the type of ionization chamber used as transfer chamber in this comparison were very close (within less than 1 %) to the calculated values of (bar muen/ρ)w,ad, the mean values of the water-to-air ratio of the mass-energy-absorption coefficients at the depth d in water. Some of the participant's results deviated significantly from the expected behavior. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of

  9. A graphite calorimeter for absolute measurements of absorbed dose to water: application in medium-energy x-ray filtered beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, M.; Pimpinella, M.; Quini, M.; D'Arienzo, M.; Astefanoaei, I.; Loreti, S.; Guerra, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    The Italian National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology (ENEA-INMRI) has designed and built a graphite calorimeter that, in a water phantom, has allowed the determination of the absorbed dose to water in medium-energy x-rays with generating voltages from 180 to 250 kV. The new standard is a miniaturized three-bodies calorimeter, with a disc-shaped core of 21 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness weighing 1.134 g, sealed in a PMMA waterproof envelope with air-evacuated gaps. The measured absorbed dose to graphite is converted into absorbed dose to water by means of an energy-dependent conversion factor obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. Heat-transfer correction factors were determined by FEM calculations. At a source-to-detector distance of 100 cm, a depth in water of 2 g cm-2, and at a dose rate of about 0.15 Gy min-1, results of calorimetric measurements of absorbed dose to water, D w, were compared to experimental determinations, D wK, obtained via an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of air kerma, according to established dosimetry protocols. The combined standard uncertainty of D w and D wK were estimated as 1.9% and 1.7%, respectively. The two absorbed dose to water determinations were in agreement within 1%, well below the stated measurement uncertainties. Advancements are in progress to extend the measurement capability of the new in-water-phantom graphite calorimeter to other filtered medium-energy x-ray qualities and to reduce the D w uncertainty to around 1%. The new calorimeter represents the first implementation of in-water-phantom graphite calorimetry in the kilovoltage range and, allowing independent determinations of D w, it will contribute to establish a robust system of absorbed dose to water primary standards for medium-energy x-ray beams.

  10. Structural changes caused by radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis: the effect of X-ray absorbed dose in a fungal multicopper oxidase

    PubMed Central

    De la Mora, Eugenio; Lovett, Janet E.; Blanford, Christopher F.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Valderrama, Brenda; Rudino-Pinera, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    X-ray radiation induces two main effects at metal centres contained in protein crystals: radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis and a resulting decrease in metal occupancy. In blue multicopper oxidases (BMCOs), the geometry of the active centres and the metal-to-ligand distances change depending on the oxidation states of the Cu atoms, suggesting that these alterations are catalytically relevant to the binding, activation and reduction of O2. In this work, the X-ray-determined three-dimensional structure of laccase from the basidiomycete Coriolopsis gallica (Cg L), a high catalytic potential BMCO, is described. By combining spectroscopic techniques (UV–Vis, EPR and XAS) and X-ray crystallography, structural changes at and around the active copper centres were related to pH and absorbed X-­ray dose (energy deposited per unit mass). Depletion of two of the four active Cu atoms as well as low occupancies of the remaining Cu atoms, together with different conformations of the metal centres, were observed at both acidic pH and high absorbed dose, correlating with more reduced states of the active coppers. These observations provide additional evidence to support the role of flexibility of copper sites during O2 reduction. This study supports previous observations indicating that interpretations regarding redox state and metal coordination need to take radiation effects explicitly into account. PMID:22525754

  11. A graphite calorimeter for absolute measurements of absorbed dose to water: application in medium-energy x-ray filtered beams.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M; Pimpinella, M; Quini, M; D'Arienzo, M; Astefanoaei, I; Loreti, S; Guerra, A S

    2016-02-21

    The Italian National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology (ENEA-INMRI) has designed and built a graphite calorimeter that, in a water phantom, has allowed the determination of the absorbed dose to water in medium-energy x-rays with generating voltages from 180 to 250 kV. The new standard is a miniaturized three-bodies calorimeter, with a disc-shaped core of 21 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness weighing 1.134 g, sealed in a PMMA waterproof envelope with air-evacuated gaps. The measured absorbed dose to graphite is converted into absorbed dose to water by means of an energy-dependent conversion factor obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. Heat-transfer correction factors were determined by FEM calculations. At a source-to-detector distance of 100 cm, a depth in water of 2 g cm(-2), and at a dose rate of about 0.15 Gy min(-1), results of calorimetric measurements of absorbed dose to water, D(w), were compared to experimental determinations, D wK, obtained via an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of air kerma, according to established dosimetry protocols. The combined standard uncertainty of D(w) and D(wK) were estimated as 1.9% and 1.7%, respectively. The two absorbed dose to water determinations were in agreement within 1%, well below the stated measurement uncertainties. Advancements are in progress to extend the measurement capability of the new in-water-phantom graphite calorimeter to other filtered medium-energy x-ray qualities and to reduce the D(w) uncertainty to around 1%. The new calorimeter represents the first implementation of in-water-phantom graphite calorimetry in the kilovoltage range and, allowing independent determinations of D(w), it will contribute to establish a robust system of absorbed dose to water primary standards for medium-energy x-ray beams. PMID:26841127

  12. Structural changes caused by radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis: the effect of X-ray absorbed dose in a fungal multicopper oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    De la Mora, Eugenio; Lovett, Janet E.; Blanford, Christopher F.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Valderrama, Brenda; Rudino-Pinera, Enrique

    2012-05-01

    Radiation-induced reduction, radiolysis of copper sites and the effect of pH value together with the concomitant geometrical distortions of the active centres were analysed in several fungal (C. gallica) laccase structures collected at cryotemperature. This study emphasizes the importance of careful interpretation when the crystallographic structure of a metalloprotein is described. X-ray radiation induces two main effects at metal centres contained in protein crystals: radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis and a resulting decrease in metal occupancy. In blue multicopper oxidases (BMCOs), the geometry of the active centres and the metal-to-ligand distances change depending on the oxidation states of the Cu atoms, suggesting that these alterations are catalytically relevant to the binding, activation and reduction of O{sub 2}. In this work, the X-ray-determined three-dimensional structure of laccase from the basidiomycete Coriolopsis gallica (Cg L), a high catalytic potential BMCO, is described. By combining spectroscopic techniques (UV–Vis, EPR and XAS) and X-ray crystallography, structural changes at and around the active copper centres were related to pH and absorbed X-ray dose (energy deposited per unit mass). Depletion of two of the four active Cu atoms as well as low occupancies of the remaining Cu atoms, together with different conformations of the metal centres, were observed at both acidic pH and high absorbed dose, correlating with more reduced states of the active coppers. These observations provide additional evidence to support the role of flexibility of copper sites during O{sub 2} reduction. This study supports previous observations indicating that interpretations regarding redox state and metal coordination need to take radiation effects explicitly into account.

  13. [X-ray exposure dose control for x-ray CT system].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    Shortening scan time of CT scanner system has been evolved and increase in number of CT examinations has also been remarkable. This has been resulted from global recognition of usefulness of the CT examination, contrary to this merit, however, it is important to recognize the risk of x-ray exposure dose. Japan Industry Association of Radiological Systems (JIRA) in which CT manufacturers join has issued the concrete countermeasure and guidance for reduction in x-ray exposure dose in response to the ICRP90 Recommendation. Current CT scanner systems provide the data related to x-ray exposure dose such as CTDI(w) for setting CT scan parameters. To reduce x-ray exposure dose against infant patient, the scan parameters specified to infant patient (CT infant protocol) can be provided. Exposure dose by x-ray CT can be measured by the measurement method corresponding to IEC-60601-2-44 and by using phantom. CTDI measurement is made by CTDI(100) that measures in a range of 100mm for all slice thicknesses, and absorbed radiation dose is converted to that of air. Dose profile is measured by using multiple thermoluminescence dosimeter (TDL) chips. CT exposure dose data including CTDI(100) and Dose profile are well-defined, and Dose Information Guide conforming to IEC-60601-2-44 is provided to user for the purpose of reducing x-ray exposure dose. Studies by low dose (2.5 approximately 3mA) simulation for the purpose of reducing x-ray exposure dose in screening CT examination of lung cancer and development of ROI scan to reduce x-ray exposure dose in puncture under CT fluoroscopy have also been conducted. PMID:12766284

  14. Evaluation of the absorbed dose to the breast using radiochromic film in a dedicated CT mammotomography system employing a quasi-monochromatic x-ray beam

    PubMed Central

    Crotty, Dominic J.; Brady, Samuel L.; Jackson, D’Vone C.; Toncheva, Greta I.; Anderson, Colin E.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Tornai, Martin P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A dual modality SPECT-CT prototype system dedicated to uncompressed breast imaging (mammotomography) has been developed. The computed tomography subsystem incorporates an ultrathick K-edge filtration technique producing a quasi-monochromatic x-ray cone beam that optimizes the dose efficiency of the system for lesion imaging in an uncompressed breast. Here, the absorbed dose in various geometric phantoms and in an uncompressed and pendant cadaveric breast using a normal tomographic cone beam imaging protocol is characterized using both thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements and ionization chamber-calibrated radiochromic film. Methods: Initially, two geometric phantoms and an anthropomorphic breast phantom are filled in turn with oil and water to simulate the dose to objects that mimic various breast shapes having effective density bounds of 100% fatty and glandular breast compositions, respectively. Ultimately, an excised human cadaver breast is tomographically scanned using the normal tomographic imaging protocol, and the dose to the breast tissue is evaluated and compared to the earlier phantom-based measurements. Results: Measured trends in dose distribution across all breast geometric and anthropomorphic phantom volumes indicate lower doses in the medial breast and more proximal to the chest wall, with consequently higher doses near the lateral peripheries and nipple regions. Measured doses to the oil-filled phantoms are consistently lower across all volume shapes due to the reduced mass energy-absorption coefficient of oil relative to water. The mean measured dose to the breast cadaver, composed of adipose and glandular tissues, was measured to be 4.2 mGy compared to a mean whole-breast dose of 3.8 and 4.5 mGy for the oil- and water-filled anthropomorphic breast phantoms, respectively. Conclusions: Assuming rotational symmetry due to the tomographic acquisition exposures, these results characterize the 3D dose distributions in an uncompressed

  15. Constraining MHD Disk-Winds with X-ray Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Tombesi, F.; Shrader, C. R.; Kazanas, D.; Contopoulos, J.; Behar, E.

    2014-01-01

    From the state-of-the-art spectroscopic observations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) the robust features of absorption lines (e.g. most notably by H/He-like ions), called warm absorbers (WAs), have been often detected in soft X-rays (< 2 keV). While the identified WAs are often mildly blueshifted to yield line-of-sight velocities up to ~100-3,000 km/sec in typical X-ray-bright Seyfert 1 AGNs, a fraction of Seyfert galaxies such as PG 1211+143 exhibits even faster absorbers (v/ 0.1-0.2) called ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) whose physical condition is much more extreme compared with the WAs. Motivated by these recent X-ray data we show that the magnetically- driven accretion-disk wind model is a plausible scenario to explain the characteristic property of these X-ray absorbers. As a preliminary case study we demonstrate that the wind model parameters (e.g. viewing angle and wind density) can be constrained by data from PG 1211+143 at a statistically significant level with chi-squared spectral analysis. Our wind models can thus be implemented into the standard analysis package, XSPEC, as a table spectrum model for general analysis of X-ray absorbers.

  16. Fast Ionized X-ray Absorbers in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, K.; Tombesi, F.; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C.; Behar, E.; Contopoulos, I.

    2015-07-01

    We present a study of X-ray ionization of MHD accretion-disk wind models in an effort to explain the highly-ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) identified as X-ray absorbers recently detected in various sub-classes of Seyfert AGNs. Our primary focus is to show that magnetically-driven outflows are physically plausible candidates to account for the AGN X-ray spectroscopic observations. We calculate its X-ray ionization and the ensuing X-ray absorption line spectra in comparison with an XXM-Newton/EPIC spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert AGN, PG 1211+143. We find, through identifying the detected features with Fe Kα transitions, that the absorber has a characteristic ionization parameter of log(xi[erg cm/s]) = 5-6 and a hydrogen-equivalent column density on the order of 1e23 cm-2, outflowing at a sub-relativistic velocity of v/c = 0.1-0.2. The best-fit model favors its radial location at R = 200 Rs (Rs is the Schwarzschild radius), with a disk inner truncation radius at Rt = 30Rs. The overall K-shell feature in data is suggested to be dominated by Fe XXV with very little contribution from Fe XXVI and weakly-ionized iron, which is in a good agreement with a series of earlier analysis of the UFOs in various AGNs including PG 1211+143.

  17. X-Ray Absorbed, Broad-Lined, Red AGN and the Cosmic X-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Wilkes, Belinda

    2005-01-01

    We have obtained XMM spectra for five red, 2MASS AGN, selected from a sample observed by Chandra to be X-ray bright and to cover a range of hardness ratios. Our results confirm the presence of substantial absorbing material in three sources which have optical classifications ranging from Type 1 to Type 2, with an intrinsically flat (hard) power law continuum indicated in the other two. The presence of both X-ray absorption and broad optical emission lines with the usual strength suggests either a small (nuclear) absorber or a favored viewing angle so as to cover the X-ray source but not the broad emission line region (BELR). A soft excess is detected in all three Type 1 sources. We speculate that this soft X-ray emission may arise in an extended region of ionized gas, perhaps linked with the polarized (scattered) light which is a feature of these sources. The spectral complexity revealed by XMM emphasizes the limitations of the low S/N Chandra data. Overall, the new XMM results strengthen our conclusions (Wilkes et al. 2002) that the observed X-ray continua of red AGN are unusually hard at energies greater than 2 keV. Whether due to substantial line-of-sight absorption or to an intrinsically hard or reflection-dominated spectrum, these 'red' AGN have an observed spectral form consistent with contributing significantly to the missing had absorbed population of the Cosmic X-ray Background (CXRB). When absorption and or reflection is taken into account, all these AGN have power law slopes typical of broad-line (Type 1) AGN (Gamma approximately 1.9). This appears to resolve the spectral paradox which for so long has existed between the CXRB and the AGN thought to be the dominant contributors. It also suggests two scenarios whereby Type 1 AGN/QSOs may be responsible for a significant fraction of the CXRB at energies above 2 keV: 1) X-ray absorbed AGN/QSOs with visible broad emission lines; 2) AGN/QSOs with complex spectra whose hardness greater than 2 keV is not

  18. Comparison between absorbed dose to water standards established by water calorimetry at the LNE-LNHB and by application of international air-kerma based protocols for kilovoltage medium energy x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perichon, N.; Rapp, B.; Denoziere, M.; Daures, J.; Ostrowsky, A.; Bordy, J.-M.

    2013-05-01

    Nowadays, the absorbed dose to water for kilovoltage x-ray beams is determined from standards in terms of air-kerma by application of international dosimetry protocols. New standards in terms of absorbed dose to water has just been established for these beams at the LNE-LNHB, using water calorimetry, at a depth of 2 cm in water in accordance with protocols. The aim of this study is to compare these new standards in terms of absorbed dose to water, to the dose values calculated from the application of four international protocols based on air-kerma standards (IAEA TRS-277, AAPM TG-61, IPEMB and NCS-10). The acceleration potentials of the six beams studied are between 80 and 300 kV with half-value layers between 3.01 mm of aluminum and 3.40 mm of copper. A difference between the two methods smaller than 2.1% was reported. The standard uncertainty of water calorimetry being below 0.8%, and the one associated with the values from protocols being around 2.5%, the results are in good agreement. The calibration coefficients of some ionization chambers in terms of absorbed dose to water, established by application of calorimetry and air-kerma based dosimetry protocols, were also compared. The best agreement with the calibration coefficients established by water calorimetry was found for those established with the AAPM TG-61 protocol.

  19. Dose in x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalender, Willi A.

    2014-02-01

    Radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) has become a topic of high interest due to the increasing numbers of CT examinations performed worldwide. This review aims to present an overview of current concepts for both scanner output metrics and for patient dosimetry and will comment on their strengths and weaknesses. Controversial issues such as the appropriateness of the CT dose index (CTDI) are discussed in detail. A review of approaches to patient dose assessment presently in practice, of the dose levels encountered and options for further dose optimization are also given and discussed. Patient dose assessment remains a topic for further improvement and for international consensus. All approaches presently in use are based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Estimates for effective dose are established, but they are crude and not patient-specific; organ dose estimates are rarely available. Patient- and organ-specific dose estimates can be provided with adequate accuracy and independent of CTDI phantom measurements by fast MC simulations. Such information, in particular on 3D dose distributions, is important and helpful in optimization efforts. Dose optimization has been performed very successfully in recent years and even resulted in applications with effective dose values of below 1 mSv. In general, a trend towards lower dose values based on technical innovations has to be acknowledged. Effective dose values are down to clearly below 10 mSv on average, and there are a number of applications such as cardiac and pediatric CT which are performed routinely below 1 mSv on modern equipment.

  20. Dose in x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kalender, Willi A

    2014-02-01

    Radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) has become a topic of high interest due to the increasing numbers of CT examinations performed worldwide. This review aims to present an overview of current concepts for both scanner output metrics and for patient dosimetry and will comment on their strengths and weaknesses. Controversial issues such as the appropriateness of the CT dose index (CTDI) are discussed in detail. A review of approaches to patient dose assessment presently in practice, of the dose levels encountered and options for further dose optimization are also given and discussed. Patient dose assessment remains a topic for further improvement and for international consensus. All approaches presently in use are based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Estimates for effective dose are established, but they are crude and not patient-specific; organ dose estimates are rarely available. Patient- and organ-specific dose estimates can be provided with adequate accuracy and independent of CTDI phantom measurements by fast MC simulations. Such information, in particular on 3D dose distributions, is important and helpful in optimization efforts. Dose optimization has been performed very successfully in recent years and even resulted in applications with effective dose values of below 1 mSv. In general, a trend towards lower dose values based on technical innovations has to be acknowledged. Effective dose values are down to clearly below 10 mSv on average, and there are a number of applications such as cardiac and pediatric CT which are performed routinely below 1 mSv on modern equipment. PMID:24434792

  1. Optimization of X-ray Absorbers for TES Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyomoto, Naoko; Sadleir, John E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Saab, Tarek; Bandler, Simon; Kilbourne, Caroline; Chervenak, James; Talley, Dorothy; Finkbeiner, Fred; Brekosky, Regis

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the thermal, electrical, and structural properties of Bi and BiCu films that are being developed as X-ray absorbers for transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter arrays for imaging X-ray spectroscopy. Bi could be an ideal material for an X-ray absorber due to its high X-ray stopping power and low heat capacity, but it has a low thermal conductivity, which can result in position dependence of the pulses in the absorber. In order to improve the thermal conductivity, we added Cu layers in between the Bi layers. We measured electrical and thermal conductivities of the films around 0.1 K(sub 1) the operating temperature of the TES calorimeter, to examine the films and to determine the optimal thickness of the Cu layer. From the electrical conductivity measurements, we found that the Cu is more resistive on the Bi than on a Si substrate. Together with an SEM picture of the Bi surface, we concluded that the rough surface of the Bi film makes the Cu layer resistive when the Cu layer is not thick enough t o fill in the roughness. From the thermal conductivity measurements, we determined the thermal diffusion constant to be 2 x l0(exp 3) micrometers squared per microsecond in a film that consists of 2.25 micrometers of Bi and 0.1 micrometers of Cu. We measured the position dependence in the film and found that its thermal diffusion constant is too low to get good energy resolution, because of the resistive Cu layer and/or possibly a very high heat capacity of our Bi films. We show plans to improve the thermal diffusion constant in our BiCu absorbers.

  2. X-ray and radioiodine dose to thyroid follicular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Faw, R.E. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Eckerman, K.F.; Ryman, J.C. )

    1991-01-01

    Radiation doses to the epithelial cells of thyroid follicles have been calculated for internal exposure by radionuclides of iodine and by secondary radiations created as a result of interactions of externally administered x rays with iodine naturally occurring in the thyroid. Calculations were performed for the thyroids of subjects ranging from the newborn to the adult male. Results for internal radionuclides are reported as the dose rate to follicular-cell nuclei per unit specific activity of the radionuclide in the thyroid as a whole, i.e., as the specific S value'' as used in the MIRD method for internal dosimetry. Results for x rays are reported as the response function, i.e., the absorbed dose per unit fluence of primary x rays. Dose rates are subdivided into internal and external components, the former from radiations emitted within the colloid volume of any one follicle, and the latter from radiations emitted throughout the thyroid in follicles surrounding that one follicle. 37 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Effects of X-Ray Dose On Rhizosphere Studies Using X-Ray Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zappala, Susan; Helliwell, Jonathan R.; Tracy, Saoirse R.; Mairhofer, Stefan; Sturrock, Craig J.; Pridmore, Tony; Bennett, Malcolm; Mooney, Sacha J.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a non-destructive imaging technique originally designed for diagnostic medicine, which was adopted for rhizosphere and soil science applications in the early 1980s. X-ray CT enables researchers to simultaneously visualise and quantify the heterogeneous soil matrix of mineral grains, organic matter, air-filled pores and water-filled pores. Additionally, X-ray CT allows visualisation of plant roots in situ without the need for traditional invasive methods such as root washing. However, one routinely unreported aspect of X-ray CT is the potential effect of X-ray dose on the soil-borne microorganisms and plants in rhizosphere investigations. Here we aimed to i) highlight the need for more consistent reporting of X-ray CT parameters for dose to sample, ii) to provide an overview of previously reported impacts of X-rays on soil microorganisms and plant roots and iii) present new data investigating the response of plant roots and microbial communities to X-ray exposure. Fewer than 5% of the 126 publications included in the literature review contained sufficient information to calculate dose and only 2.4% of the publications explicitly state an estimate of dose received by each sample. We conducted a study involving rice roots growing in soil, observing no significant difference between the numbers of root tips, root volume and total root length in scanned versus unscanned samples. In parallel, a soil microbe experiment scanning samples over a total of 24 weeks observed no significant difference between the scanned and unscanned microbial biomass values. We conclude from the literature review and our own experiments that X-ray CT does not impact plant growth or soil microbial populations when employing a low level of dose (<30 Gy). However, the call for higher throughput X-ray CT means that doses that biological samples receive are likely to increase and thus should be closely monitored. PMID:23840640

  4. Fast ionized X-ray absorbers in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, K.; Tombesi, F.; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C.; Behar, E.; Contopoulos, I.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the physics of the X-ray ionized absorbers often identified as warm absorbers (WAs) and ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) in Seyfert AGNs from spectroscopic studies in the context of magnetically-driven accretion-disk wind scenario. Launched and accelerated by the action of a global magnetic field anchored to an underlying accretion disk around a black hole, outflowing plasma is irradiated and ionized by an AGN radiation field characterized by its spectral energy density (SED). By numerically solving the Grad-Shafranov equation in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) framework, the physical property of the magnetized disk-wind is determined by a wind parameter set, which is then incorporated into radiative transfer calculations with xstar photoionization code under heating-cooling equilibrium state to compute the absorber's properties such as column density N_H, line-of-sight (LoS) velocity v, ionization parameter ξ, among others. Assuming that the wind density scales as n ∝ r-1, we calculate theoretical absorption measure distribution (AMD) for various ions seen in AGNs as well as line spectra especially for the Fe Kα absorption feature by focusing on a bright quasar PG 1211+143 as a case study and show the model's plausibility. In this note we demonstrate that the proposed MHD-driven disk-wind scenario is not only consistent with the observed X-ray data, but also help better constrain the underlying nature of the AGN environment in a close proximity to a central engine.

  5. Determination of absorbed dose to water in reference conditions for radiotherapy kilovoltage x-rays between 10 and 300 kV: a comparison of the data in the IAEA, IPEMB, DIN and NCS dosimetry protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peixoto, J. G. P.; Andreo, P.

    2000-03-01

    A comparison of four of the most commonly used dosimetry protocols for the determination of absorbed dose to water in therapeutic kilovoltage x-rays using an ionization chamber (IAEA TRS-277, IPEMB, DIN and NCS) has been carried out. Owing to the different energy ranges and HVLs recommended by each protocol, backscatter factors, water-to-air mass energy absorption coefficient ratios and perturbation correction factors have been recast to a common quality range that all protocols satisfy individually to make a comparison possible. The results of the comparison show that in the sometimes reduced quality range originally included by the different protocols, determinations of absorbed dose to water at all beam qualities agree to within ±1.0% with that obtained using the second edition of the IAEA TRS-277 code of practice (1997). The extrapolation of data to a common beam quality range practically preserves the agreement for all the protocols except for that issued by the NCS at the extremes of the range, where differences of up to 1.8% and 1.4% have been found for low and medium energies respectively. In all cases the DIN protocol yields very good agreement with TRS-277.

  6. Dose optimization in cardiac x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gislason-Lee, Amber J.; McMillan, Catherine; Cowen, Arnold R.; Davies, Andrew G.

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The aim of this research was to optimize x-ray image quality to dose ratios in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. This study examined independently the effects of peak x-ray tube voltage (kVp), copper (Cu), and gadolinium (Gd) x-ray beam filtration on the image quality to radiation dose balance for adult patient sizes.Methods: Image sequences of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms representing two adult patient sizes were captured using a modern flat panel detector based x-ray imaging system. Tin and copper test details were used to simulate iodine-based contrast medium and stents/guide wires respectively, which are used in clinical procedures. Noise measurement for a flat field image and test detail contrast were used to calculate the contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Entrance surface dose (ESD) and effective dose measurements were obtained to calculate the figure of merit (FOM), CNR{sup 2}/dose. This FOM determined the dose efficiency of x-ray spectra investigated. Images were captured with 0.0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.4, and 0.9 mm Cu filtration and with a range of gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S) filtration.Results: Optimum x-ray spectra were the same for the tin and copper test details. Lower peak tube voltages were generally favored. For the 20 cm phantom, using 2 Lanex Fast Back Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S screens as x-ray filtration at 65 kVp provided the highest FOM considering ESD and effective dose. Considering ESD, this FOM was only marginally larger than that from using 0.4 mm Cu at 65 kVp. For the 30 cm phantom, using 0.25 mm copper filtration at 80 kVp was most optimal; considering effective dose the FOM was highest with no filtration at 65 kVp.Conclusions: These settings, adjusted for x-ray tube loading limits and clinically acceptable image quality, should provide a useful option for optimizing patient dose to image quality in cardiac x-ray imaging. The same optimal x-ray beam spectra were found for both the tin and copper details, suggesting

  7. On the origin of highly ionized X-ray absorbers detected in the galactic X-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yang; Fang, Taotao

    2014-01-10

    X-ray observations of the Galactic X-ray binaries (XRBs) revealed numerous highly ionized metal absorption lines. However, it is unclear whether such lines are produced by the hot interstellar medium (ISM) or the circumstellar medium intrinsic to the binaries. Here we present a Chandra X-ray absorption line study of 28 observations of 12 XRBs, with a focus on the Ne IX and Fe XVII lines. We report the first detections of these lines in a significant amount of observations. We do not find a significant dependence of the line equivalent width on the distance of the XRBs, but we do see a weak dependence on the source X-ray luminosity. We also find 2 out of 12 selected targets show strong temporal variation of the Ne IX absorbers. While the line ratio between the two ion species suggests a temperature consistent with the previous predictions of the ISM, comparing with two theoretical models of the ISM shows the observed column densities are significantly higher than predictions. On the other hand, photoionization by the XRBs provides a reasonably good fit to the data. Our findings suggest that a significant fraction of these X-ray absorbers may originate in the hot gas intrinsic to the XRBs, and that the ISM makes small, if not negligible, contribution. We briefly discuss the implications to the study of the Milky Way hot gas content.

  8. Determination of half-dose depth in skin for soft x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.; Kolber, A.B.; Altman, S.M.; Gladstein, A.H.; Buchanan, S.; Marx, J.; Grisewood, E.; Kopf, A.

    1982-09-01

    Unlike superficial x-rays, the soft x-rays normally used in dermatologic practice spare unaffected underlying organs during treatment of cutaneous malignancies. However, since the dose with depth from soft x-rays varies markedly, it is important to know this relationship for optimal therapeutic results. The peak kilovoltage, and thus the energy of the beam, is generally selected so that the dose to the base of the lesion is one-half the surface dose. An absorbed dose of 3,400 rads to the surface and a dose of about one-half this amount to the base of most malignant lesions is one standard protocol for optimal therapeutic results. An accurate value of half-depth dose in skin is therefore necessary and is readily obtained from ordinary half-value layer measurements using the technic described.

  9. Ultra low dose X-ray spinal examinations.

    PubMed

    Fessler, Pierre; Prevot, Guy; Hilt, B

    2002-01-01

    The study and treatment of spinal deformities may lead to excessive doses of radiation for patients (especially children) examined by conventional X-ray radiology apparatus. In order to avoid this very crucial problem, a new X-ray radiology system has been devised. The new apparatus uses a high efficiency linear solid-state detector and highly sensitive electronics, operating in single X-ray counting mode (quantum mode). The scan parameters and image filtering are computer controlled. Data is acquired in real time by a high speed VME system. In this paper, the first images recorded using this new apparatus are shown. The main conclusion of the preliminary comparative dosimetric analysis is that it is possible to divide the patient's dose by a factor of at least ten to one hundred with the quantum X-ray radiology apparatus. PMID:15456030

  10. Evaluation of the medical exposure doses regarding dental examinations with different X-ray instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Chi; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Yu, Cheng-Ching; Chao, Jiunn-Hsing; Hsu, Fang-Yuh

    2015-11-01

    Modern dental X-ray examination that consists of traditional form, panorama, and cone-beamed 3D technologies is one of the most frequent diagnostic applications nowadays. This study used the Rando Phantom and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) to measure the absorbed doses of radiosensitive organs recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and whole body effective doses which were delivered due to dental X-ray examination performed with different types of X-ray instrument. Besides, enamel samples which performed reading with Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) procedure were also used to estimate the tooth doses. EPR is a dose reconstruction method of measuring free radicals induced by radiation exposure to the calcified tissue (mainly in the tooth enamel or bone) to evaluate the accepted high dose. The tooth doses estimated by TLD and EPR methods were compared. Relationships between the tooth doses and effective doses by dental X-ray examinations with different types of X-ray equipment were investigated in this work.

  11. Absorbed Dose to Water Determination Using IAEA, HPA, NACP, AAPM, NCRP and ICRU Protocols for 1.25 MeV Gamma Ray 6 MV and 10 MV X-Rays: An Intercomparison of Results when IAEA was taken as a Standard Protocol.

    PubMed

    Dolah, M T; Samat, S B; Kadni, T

    2000-01-01

    Absorbed dose to water was measured with ionisation chambers NE 2561 (#267), NE 2581 (#334), NE 2571 (#1028), using the IAEA standard water phantom. The ionisation chamber was inserted in the water phantom at a reference depth dependent on the type of the radiation quality used. Three radiation qualities were used namely 1.25 MeV gamma ray, 6 MV x-rays and 10 MV x-rays. The values of the absorbed dose to water were determined by the N(K)- and N(X)- based methods, i.e with the use of IAEA, HPA, NACP, AAPM, NCRP and ICRU protocols. The aim of this study was to make an intercomparison of the results, by taking the IAEA protocol as a standard. The largest deviation contributed by any of these protocols was recorded for each quality. It was found that AAPM, NCRP and ICRU protocols contributed 0.94% for 1.25 MeV gamma ray, NACP contributed 2.12% for the 6 MV x-rays, and NACP contributed 2.35% for 10 MV x-rays. Since the acceptable limit of deviation set by the IAEA for this absorbed dose work is ± 3%, it is clear that the overall deviations obtained were all satisfactory. PMID:22844215

  12. Thermoluminescent dosimeters for low dose X-ray measurements.

    PubMed

    Fernández, S Del Sol; García-Salcedo, R; Sánchez-Guzmán, D; Ramírez-Rodríguez, G; Gaona, E; de León-Alfaro, M A; Rivera-Montalvo, T

    2016-01-01

    The response of TLD-100, CaSO4:Dy and LiF:Mg,Cu,P for a range of X-ray low dose was measured. For calibration, the TLDs were arranged at the center of the X-ray field. The dose output of the X-ray machine was determined using an ACCU-Gold. All dosimeters were exposed at the available air kerma values of 14.69 mGy within a field 10×10 cm(2) at 80 cm of SSD. Results of LiF:Mg,Cu,P X-ray irradiated showed 4.8 times higher sensitivity than TLD-100. Meanwhile, TL response of CaSO4:Dy exposed at the same dose was 5.6 time higher than TLD-100. Experimental results show for low dose X-ray measurements a better linearity for LiF:Mg,Cu,P compared with that of TLD-100. CaSO4:Dy showed a linearity from 0.1 to 60 mGy. PMID:26609683

  13. The influence of feature sidewall tolerance on minimum absorber thickness for LIGA x-ray masks

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Griffiths; J. M. Hruby; A. Ting

    1999-02-01

    Minimizing mask absorber thickness is an important practical concern in producing very small features by the LIGA process. To assist in this minimization, the authors have developed coupled numerical models describing both the exposure and development of a thick PMMA resist. The exposure model addresses multi-wavelength, one-dimensional x-ray transmission through multiple beam filters, through the mask substrate and absorber, and the subsequent attenuation and photon absorption in the PMMA resist. The development model describes one-dimensional dissolution of a feature and its sidewalls, taking into account the variation in absorbed dose through the PMMA thickness. These exposure and development models are coupled in a single interactive code, permitting the automated adjustment of mask absorber thickness to yield a prescribed sidewall taper or dissolution distance. They have used this tool to compute the minimum required absorber thickness yielding a prescribed sidewall tolerance for exposures performed at the ALS, SSRL and NSLS synchrotron sources. Results are presented as a function of the absorbed dose for a range of the prescribed sidewall tolerance, feature size, PMMA thickness, mask substrate thickness and the development temperature.

  14. Dose optimization in pediatric cardiac x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gislason, Amber J.; Davies, Andrew G.; Cowen, Arnold R.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The aim of this research was to explore x-ray beam parameters with intent to optimize pediatric x-ray settings in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. This study examined the effects of peak x-ray tube voltage (kVp) and of copper (Cu) x-ray beam filtration independently on the image quality to dose balance for pediatric patient sizes. The impact of antiscatter grid removal on the image quality to dose balance was also investigated. Methods: Image sequences of polymethyl methacrylate phantoms approximating chest sizes typical of pediatric patients were captured using a modern flat-panel receptor based x-ray imaging system. Tin was used to simulate iodine-based contrast medium used in clinical procedures. Measurements of tin detail contrast and flat field image noise provided the contrast to noise ratio. Entrance surface dose (ESD) and effective dose (E) measurements were obtained to calculate the figure of merit (FOM), CNR{sup 2}/dose, which evaluated the dose efficiency of the x-ray parameters investigated. The kVp, tube current (mA), and pulse duration were set manually by overriding the system's automatic dose control mechanisms. Images were captured with 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.4, and 0.9 mm added Cu filtration, for 50, 55, 60, 65, and 70 kVp with the antiscatter grid in place, and then with it removed. Results: For a given phantom thickness, as the Cu filter thickness was increased, lower kVp was favored. Examining kVp alone, lower values were generally favored, more so for thinner phantoms. Considering ESD, the 8.5 cm phantom had the highest FOM at 50 kVp using 0.4 mm of Cu filtration. The 12 cm phantom had the highest FOM at 55 kVp using 0.9 mm Cu, and the 16 cm phantom had highest FOM at 55 kVp using 0.4 mm Cu. With regard to E, the 8.5 and 12 cm phantoms had the highest FOM at 50 kVp using 0.4 mm of Cu filtration, and the 16 cm phantom had the highest FOM at 50 kVp using 0.25 mm Cu. Antiscatter grid removal improved the FOM for a given set of x-ray

  15. Enhancement of X-ray dose absorption for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sara; Montenegro, Maximiliano; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil; Barth, Rolf; Nakkula, Robin; Bell, Erica; Yu, Yan

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of high-Z (HZ) elements with X-rays occurs efficiently at specific resonant energies. Cross sections for photoionization rapidly decrease after the K-edge; higher energy X-rays are mostly Compton-scattered. These features restrict the energy range for the use of HZ moities for radiosensitization in cancer therapy. Conventional X-ray sources such as linear accelerators (LINAC) used in radiotherapy emit a broad spectrum up to MeV energies. We explore the dichotomy between X-ray radiotherapy in two ranges: (i) E < 100 keV including HZ sensitization, and (ii) E > 100 keV where sensitization is inefficient. We perform Monte Carlo numerical simulations of tumor tissue embedded with platinum compounds and gold nanoparticles and compute radiation dose enhancement factors (DEF) upon irradiation with 100 kV, 170 kV and 6 MV sources. Our results demonstrate that the DEF peak below 100 keV and fall sharply above 200 keV to very small values. Therefore most of the X-ray output from LINACs up to the MeV range is utilized very inefficiently. We also describe experimental studies for implementation of option (i) using Pt and Au reagents and selected cancer cell lines. Resultant radiation exposure to patients could be greatly reduced, yet still result in increased tumoricidal ability.

  16. Order of magnitude reduction of fluoroscopic x-ray dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Abhinav; Robert, Normand; Machan, Lindsay; Deutsch, Meir; Kisselgoff, David; Babyn, Paul; Rowlands, John A.

    2012-03-01

    The role of fluoroscopic imaging is critical for diagnostic and image guided therapy. However, fluoroscopic imaging can require significant radiation leading to increased cancer risk and non-stochastic effects such as radiation burns. Our purpose is to reduce the exposure and dose to the patient by an order of magnitude in these procedures by use of the region of interest method. Method and Materials: Region of interest fluoroscopy (ROIF) uses a partial attenuator. The central region of the image has full exposure while the image periphery, there to provide context only, has a reduced exposure rate. ROIF using a static partial attenuator has been shown in our previous studies to reduce the dose area product (DAP) to the patient by at least 2.5 times. Significantly greater reductions in DAP would require improvements in flat panel detectors performance at low x-ray exposures or a different x-ray attenuation strategy. Thus we have investigated a second, dynamic, approach. We have constructed an x-ray shutter system allowing a normal x-ray exposure in the region of interest while reducing the number of x-ray exposures in the periphery through the rapid introduction, positioning and removal of an x-ray attenuating shutter to block radiation only for selected frames. This dynamic approach eliminates the DQE(0) loss associated with the use of static partial attenuator applied to every frame thus permitting a greater reduction in DAP. Results: We have compared the two methods by modeling and determined their fundamental limits.

  17. High-dose-rate pulse x-ray detection using a multipixel photon counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Hitomi, Keitaro; Nomiya, Seiichiro; Onabe, Hideaki; Shoji, Tadayoshi; Tanaka, Etsuro; Kawai, Toshiaki; Inoue, Takashi; Ogawa, Akira; Sato, Shigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2007-09-01

    Detection of high-dose-rate pulse x-rays from a samarium plasma flash x-ray generator utilizing a multipixel photon counter is described. Monochromatic K-series characteristic x-rays are detected by a plastic scintillator, and fluorescent lights are lead to the photon counter through a 10-m-length plastic fiber. The reverse bias was 70.0 V, and x-ray outputs were recorded by a digital storage scope. The samarium plasma flash x-ray generator is useful for performing high-speed enhanced K-edge angiography using cone beams because K-series characteristic x-rays from the samarium target are absorbed effectively by iodine-based contrast media. In the flash x-ray generator, a 150 nF condenser is charged up to 80 kV by a power supply, and flash x-rays are produced by the discharging. Since the electric circuit of the high-voltage pulse generator employs a cable transmission line, the high-voltage pulse generator produces twice the potential of the condenser charging voltage. At a charging voltage of 80 kV, the estimated maximum tube voltage and current are approximately 160 kV and 40 kA, respectively. When the charging voltage was increased, the K-series characteristic x-ray intensities of samarium increased. Bremsstrahlung x-ray intensity rate decreased with increasing the charging voltage, and K lines were produced with a charging voltage of 80 kV. The x-ray pulse widths were approximately 100 ns, and the time-integrated x-ray intensity had a value of approximately 500 μGy at 1.0 m from the x-ray source with a charging voltage of 80 kV. Angiography was performed using a filmless computed radiography (CR) system and iodine-based contrast media. In the angiography of nonliving animals, we observed fine blood vessels of approximately 100 μm with high contrasts.

  18. Ionized absorbers, ionized emitters, and the X-ray spectrum of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Netzer, Hagai

    1993-01-01

    Broad absorption features are common in the X-ray spectrum of low-luminosity AGNs. The features have been modeled by leaky neutral absorbers or by highly ionized gas that completely occult the continuum source. Such models are incomplete since they do not take into account all the physical processes in the gas. In particular, no previous model included the X-ray emission by the ionized absorbing gas and the reflection of the continuum source radiation. The present work discusses the emission, absorption, and reflection properties of photoionized gases with emphasis on conditions thought to prevail in AGNs. It shows that such gas is likely to produce intense X-ray line and continuum radiation and to reflect a sizable fraction of the nonstellar continuum at all energies. If such gas is indeed responsible for the observed X-ray absorption, then absorption edges are much weaker than commonly assumed, and some residual X-ray continuum is likely to be observed even if the line of sight is completely blocked. Moreover, X-ray emission features may show up in sources not showing X-ray absorption. This has immense consequences for medium-resolution X-ray missions, such as BBXRT and Astro-D, and for the planned high-resolution experiments on board XMM and AXAF.

  19. The Nature of the UV/X-ray Absorber In PG 2302+029

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabra, Bassem M.; Hamann, Fred; Jannuzi, Buell T.; George, Ian M.; Shields, Joseph C.

    2003-01-01

    We present Chandra X-ray observations of the radio-quiet QSO PG 2302+029. This quasar has a rare system of ultra-high velocity (-56,000 km s(exp -1) UV absorption lines that form in an outflow from the active nucleus. The Chandra data indicate that soft X-ray absorption is also present. We perform a joint UV and X-ray analysis, using photoionization calculations, to determine the nature of the absorbing gas. The UV and X-ray datasets were not obtained simultaneously. Nonetheless, our analysis suggests that the X-ray absorption occurs at high velocities in the same general region as the UV absorber. There are not enough constraints to rule out multi-zone models. In fact, the distinct broad and narrow UV line profiles clearly indicate that multiple zones are present. Our preferred estimates of the ionization and total column density in the X-ray absorber (logU = 1.6, N(sub eta) = 10(exp 22.4) cm (exp -2) over predict the O VI lambda lambda1032,1038 absorption unless the X-ray absorber is also outflowing at approximately 56,000 km s(exp-l), but they over predict the Ne VIII lambda lambda 770,780 absorption at all velocities. If we assume that the X-ray absorbing gas is outflowing at the same velocity of the UV-absorbing wind and that the wind is radiatively accelerated, then the outflow must be launched at a radius of less than or equal to 10(exp 15) cm from the central continuum source. The smallness of this radius casts doubts on the assumption of radiative acceleration.

  20. OT1_mpage_1: Star Formation in X-ray Absorbed QSOs through cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M.

    2010-07-01

    The nature of the connection between the growth of a black hole via accretion and that of its host galaxy bulge via star formation remains a fundamental question in galaxy evolution. SCUBA/850micron observations of matched samples of high redshift X-ray absorbed and unabsorbed QSOs demonstrated that the X-ray absorbed QSO were far more likely to be detected suggesting that their host galaxies had very high star formation rates. This result implies that the z~2 X-ray absorbed QSO population are undergoing the transition from the main star forming phase and the QSO phase of a massive galaxy. Follow-up X-ray observations of the absorbed X-ray QSOs found that the X-ray absorption is due to an outflowing, ionized wind which is potentially the feedback invoked by theorists to terminate star formation in the host galaxy. However, no QSOs from the samples, X-ray absorbed or unabsorbed, were detected with SCUBA below z=1.5. We propose SPIRE and PACS observations of a sample of 10 X-ray absorbed QSOs in the 1

  1. A tunable wedge-shaped absorber for hard X-ray synchrotron applications.

    PubMed

    Krywka, C; Brix, M; Müller, M

    2014-07-01

    The concept of a concave aluminium wedge-shaped absorber for hard X-ray synchrotron beamlines is presented. Unlike the commonly used absorber types (fixed-thickness absorber sheets or binary exchangers of individual fixed absorbers), this concept allows a compact system, controlled with a single linear positioner, and provides a wide attenuation range as well as a precise tunability over a large energy range. Data were recorded at the Nanofocus Endstation of the MINAXS beamline, PETRA III, Hamburg, Germany. PMID:24971979

  2. Automated Absorber Attachment for X-ray Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S.; Allen, Christine; Kilbourne, Caroline; Miller, Timothy M.; Costen, Nick; Schulte, Eric; Moseley, Samuel J.

    2007-01-01

    Our goal is to develop a method for the automated attachment of large numbers of absorber tiles to large format detector arrays. This development includes the fabrication of high quality, closely spaced HgTe absorber tiles that are properly positioned for pick-and-place by our FC150 flip chip bonder. The FC150 also transfers the appropriate minute amount of epoxy to the detectors for permanent attachment of the absorbers. The success of this development will replace an arduous, risky and highly manual task with a reliable, high-precision automated process.

  3. Dose responses of diamond detectors to monoenergetic X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Z.; Hugtenburg, R. P.; Green, S.; Beddoe, A. H.

    2004-01-01

    The characterisation of a detectors response in the kilovoltage range is necessary to understand its response to scattered radiation in the megavoltage range. Scattered radiation is absorbed in the detector by the highly Z-dependent photoelectric process. Measurements of diamond detector response to highly filtered quasi-monoenergetic X-rays and synchrotron-generated monoenergetic photons have been performed revealing effects that relate to the presence of copper and silver used to form electrical contact with the crystal. A three-component model of energy absorption, utilizing tabulated cross-sections for C, Cu and Ag, is proposed and a calculation of phantom scatter factors for diamond detector is given.

  4. Effective dose and risks from medical X-ray procedures.

    PubMed

    Balonov, M I; Shrimpton, P C

    2012-01-01

    The radiation risks from a range of medical x-ray examinations (radiography, fluoroscopy, and computed tomography) were assessed as a function of the age and sex of the patient using risk models described in Publication 103 (ICRP, 2007) and UNSCEAR (2006, Annex A). Such estimates of risk based on typical organ doses were compared with those derived from effective doses using the International Commission on Radiological Protection's nominal risk coefficients. Methodologically similar but not identical dose and risk calculations were performed independently at the Institute of Radiation Hygiene (Russia) and the Health Protection Agency (UK), and led to similar conclusions. The radiogenic risk of stochastic health effects following various x-ray procedures varied significantly with the patient's age and sex, but to differing degrees depending on which body organs were irradiated. In general, the risks of radiation-induced stochastic health effects in children are estimated to be higher (by a factor of ≤ 4) than in adults, and risks in senior patients are lower by a factor of ≥ 10 relative to younger people. If risks are assessed on the basis of effective dose, they are underestimated for children of both sexes by a factor of ≤ 4. This approach overestimates risks by a factor of ≤ 3 for adults and about an order of magnitude for senior patients. The significant sex and age dependence of radiogenic risk for different cancer types is an important consideration for radiologists when planning x-ray examinations. Whereas effective dose was not intended to provide a measure of risk associated with such examinations, it may be sufficient to make simple adjustments to the nominal risk per unit effective dose to account for age and sex differences. PMID:23089012

  5. Automated Hybridization of X-ray Absorber Elements-A Path to Large Format Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S.; Kelley, R.; Allen, C.; Kilbourne, C.; Costen, N.; Miller, T.

    2007-01-01

    In the design of microcalorimeters, it is often desirable to produce the X-ray absorber separately from the detector element. In this case, the attachment of the absorber to the detector element with the required thermal and mechanical characteristics is a major challenge. In such arrays, the attachment has been done by hand. This process is not easily extended to the large format arrays required for future X- ray astronomy missions such as the New x-ray Telescope or NeXT. In this paper we present an automated process for attaching absorber tiles to the surface of a large-scale X-ray detector array. The absorbers are attached with stycast epoxy to a thermally isolating polymer structure made of SU-8. SU-8 is a negative epoxy based photo resist produced by Microchem. We describe the fabrication of the X-ray absorbers and their suspension on a handle die in an adhesive matrix. We describe the production process for the polymer isolators on the detector elements. We have developed a new process for the alignment, and simultaneous bonding of the absorber tiles to an entire detector array. This process uses equipment and techniques used in the flip-chip bonding industry and approaches developed in the fabrication of the XRS-2 instrument. XRS-2 was an X-ray spectrometer that was launched on the Suzaku telescope in July 10, 2005. We describe the process and show examples of sample arrays produced by this process. Arrays with up to 300 elements have been bonded. The present tests have used dummy absorbers made of Si. In future work, we will demonstrate bonding of HgTe absorbers.

  6. An adaptive gating approach for x-ray dose reduction during cardiac interventional procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Malek, A.; Yassa, F.; Bloomer, J. )

    1994-03-01

    The increasing number of cardiac interventional procedures has resulted in a tremendous increase in the absorbed x-ray dose by radiologists as well as patients. A new method is presented for x-ray dose reduction which utilizes adaptive tube pulse-rate scheduling in pulsed fluoroscopic systems. In the proposed system, pulse-rate scheduling depends on the heart muscle activity phase determined through continuous guided segmentation of the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG). Displaying images generated at the proposed adaptive nonuniform rate is visually unacceptable; therefore, a frame-filling approach is devised to ensure a 30 frame/sec display rate. The authors adopted two approaches for the frame-filling portion of the system depending on the imaging mode used in the procedure. During cine-mode imaging (high x-ray dose), collected image frame-to-frame pixel motion is estimated using a pel-recursive algorithm followed by motion-based pixel interpolation to estimate the frames necessary to increase the rate to 30 frames/sec. The other frame-filling approach is adopted during fluoro-mode imaging (low x-ray dose), characterized by low signal-to-noise ratio images. This approach consists of simply holding the last collected frame for as many frames as necessary to maintain the real-time display rate.

  7. Grazing exit micro X-ray fluorescence analysis of a hazardous metal attached to a plant leaf surface using an X-ray absorber method.

    PubMed

    Awane, Tohru; Fukuoka, Shintaro; Nakamachi, Kazuo; Tsuji, Kouichi

    2009-05-01

    If human beings or animals repeatedly ingest plant leaves contaminated with minute quantities of hazardous metals (Pb, As, Hg, Cd, etc.), the metals will gradually accumulate in their bodies. When the quantities of the metals in the bodies reach toxic levels, they may cause serious symptoms of poisoning. Therefore, it is significant to detect and analyze the minute quantities of hazardous metals that attach to plant leaves in terms of epidemiology and disease prevention. We developed grazing exit micro X-ray fluorescence analysis (GE-micro-XRF), which was expected to analyze the localized surface of an aqueous plant leaf with a much faster and simpler sample treatment than with conventional analytical methods, to detect Pb attached to a surface of a leaf of Camellia hiemalis. A micro X-ray beam was produced by using a polycapillary X-ray lens. GE-v-XRF is a grazing exit X-ray analysis (GE-XA) method in which X-rays emitted from only the near-surface region of a specimen are selectively detected under a grazing exit angle condition (extremely low exit angle near 0 degrees). In any GE-XA method, X-rays emitted from inside the specimen must be absorbed inside the specimen and attenuated when X-rays pass through the specimen. However, we deduced that X-rays emitted from inside aqueous organic material such as a plant leaf are scarcely absorbed because X-ray absorption in any aqueous organic material is much smaller than that in most metallic and semiconductor materials, which was analyzed with GE-XA methods. Therefore, we have developed a novel GE-micro-XRF method in which a chip of a silicon wafer is placed between the analyzed leaf and an X-ray detector as an absorber of the X-rays emitted from inside the leaf. As a result of GE-XRF analysis of a leaf dipped in Pb standard solution using the X-ray absorber, we have for the first time selectively detected X-rays emitted from the near-surface region of an aqueous plant leaf. Therefore, we have detected X-rays emitted

  8. Exposure Dose Reconstruction from EPR Spectra of Tooth Enamel Exposed to the Combined Effect of X-rays and Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Kuchuro, J. I.

    2014-09-01

    We have used EPR dosimetry on tooth enamel to show that the combined effect of x-rays with effective energy 34 keV and gamma radiation with average energy 1250 keV leads to a significant increase in the reconstructed absorbed dose compared with the applied dose from a gamma source or from an x-ray source or from both sources of electromagnetic radiation. In simulation experiments, we develop an approach to estimating the contribution of diagnostic x-rays to the exposure dose formed in the tooth enamel by the combined effect of x-rays and gamma radiation.

  9. Impact of x-ray dose on track formation and data analysis for CR-39-based proton diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rojas-Herrera, J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Filkins, T.; Steidle, Jeffrey A.; Steidle, Jessica A.; Traynor, N.; Freeman, C.

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear track detector CR-39 is used extensively for charged particle diagnosis, in particular proton spectroscopy, at inertial confinement fusion facilities. These detectors can absorb x-ray doses from the experiments in the order of 1-100 Gy, the effects of which are not accounted for in the previous detector calibrations. X-ray dose absorbed in the CR-39 has previously been shown to affect the track size of alpha particles in the detector, primarily due to a measured reduction in the material bulk etch rate [Rojas-Herrera et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 033501 (2015)]. Similar to the previous findings for alpha particles, protons with energies in the range 0.5-9.1 MeV are shown to produce tracks that are systematically smaller as a function of the absorbed x-ray dose in the CR-39. The reduction of track size due to x-ray dose is found to diminish with time between exposure and etching if the CR-39 is stored at ambient temperature, and complete recovery is observed after two weeks. The impact of this effect on the analysis of data from existing CR-39-based proton diagnostics on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility is evaluated and best practices are proposed for cases in which the effect of x rays is significant.

  10. Impact of x-ray dose on track formation and data analysis for CR-39-based proton diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rinderknecht, H G; Rojas-Herrera, J; Zylstra, A B; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Sio, H; Sinenian, N; Rosenberg, M J; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D; Filkins, T; Steidle, Jeffrey A; Steidle, Jessica A; Traynor, N; Freeman, C

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear track detector CR-39 is used extensively for charged particle diagnosis, in particular proton spectroscopy, at inertial confinement fusion facilities. These detectors can absorb x-ray doses from the experiments in the order of 1-100 Gy, the effects of which are not accounted for in the previous detector calibrations. X-ray dose absorbed in the CR-39 has previously been shown to affect the track size of alpha particles in the detector, primarily due to a measured reduction in the material bulk etch rate [Rojas-Herrera et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 033501 (2015)]. Similar to the previous findings for alpha particles, protons with energies in the range 0.5-9.1 MeV are shown to produce tracks that are systematically smaller as a function of the absorbed x-ray dose in the CR-39. The reduction of track size due to x-ray dose is found to diminish with time between exposure and etching if the CR-39 is stored at ambient temperature, and complete recovery is observed after two weeks. The impact of this effect on the analysis of data from existing CR-39-based proton diagnostics on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility is evaluated and best practices are proposed for cases in which the effect of x rays is significant. PMID:26724031

  11. Impact of x-ray dose on track formation and data analysis for CR-39-based proton diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, H. G. Rojas-Herrera, J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Filkins, T.; Steidle, Jessica A.; Traynor, N.; Freeman, C.; Steidle, Jeffrey A.

    2015-12-15

    The nuclear track detector CR-39 is used extensively for charged particle diagnosis, in particular proton spectroscopy, at inertial confinement fusion facilities. These detectors can absorb x-ray doses from the experiments in the order of 1–100 Gy, the effects of which are not accounted for in the previous detector calibrations. X-ray dose absorbed in the CR-39 has previously been shown to affect the track size of alpha particles in the detector, primarily due to a measured reduction in the material bulk etch rate [Rojas-Herrera et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 033501 (2015)]. Similar to the previous findings for alpha particles, protons with energies in the range 0.5–9.1 MeV are shown to produce tracks that are systematically smaller as a function of the absorbed x-ray dose in the CR-39. The reduction of track size due to x-ray dose is found to diminish with time between exposure and etching if the CR-39 is stored at ambient temperature, and complete recovery is observed after two weeks. The impact of this effect on the analysis of data from existing CR-39-based proton diagnostics on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility is evaluated and best practices are proposed for cases in which the effect of x rays is significant.

  12. Impact of x-ray dose on track formation and data analysis for CR-39-based proton diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rojas-Herrera, J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Filkins, T.; Steidle, Jeffrey A.; Steidle, Jessica A.; Traynor, N.; Freeman, C.

    2015-12-23

    The nuclear track detector CR-39 is used extensively for charged particle diagnosis, in particular proton spectroscopy, at inertial confinement fusion facilities. These detectors can absorb x-ray doses from the experiments in the order of 1–100 Gy, the effects of which are not accounted for in the previous detector calibrations. X-ray dose absorbed in the CR-39 has previously been shown to affect the track size of alpha particles in the detector, primarily due to a measured reduction in the material bulk etch rate [Rojas-Herrera et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 033501 (2015)]. Similar to the previous findings for alpha particles, protons with energies in the range 0.5–9.1 MeV are shown to produce tracks that are systematically smaller as a function of the absorbed x-ray dose in the CR-39. The reduction of track size due to x-ray dose is found to diminish with time between exposure and etching if the CR-39 is stored at ambient temperature, and complete recovery is observed after two weeks. Lastly, the impact of this effect on the analysis of data from existing CR-39-based proton diagnostics on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility is evaluated and best practices are proposed for cases in which the effect of x rays is significant.

  13. Impact of x-ray dose on track formation and data analysis for CR-39-based proton diagnostics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rojas-Herrera, J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; et al

    2015-12-23

    The nuclear track detector CR-39 is used extensively for charged particle diagnosis, in particular proton spectroscopy, at inertial confinement fusion facilities. These detectors can absorb x-ray doses from the experiments in the order of 1–100 Gy, the effects of which are not accounted for in the previous detector calibrations. X-ray dose absorbed in the CR-39 has previously been shown to affect the track size of alpha particles in the detector, primarily due to a measured reduction in the material bulk etch rate [Rojas-Herrera et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 033501 (2015)]. Similar to the previous findings for alpha particles, protonsmore » with energies in the range 0.5–9.1 MeV are shown to produce tracks that are systematically smaller as a function of the absorbed x-ray dose in the CR-39. The reduction of track size due to x-ray dose is found to diminish with time between exposure and etching if the CR-39 is stored at ambient temperature, and complete recovery is observed after two weeks. Lastly, the impact of this effect on the analysis of data from existing CR-39-based proton diagnostics on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility is evaluated and best practices are proposed for cases in which the effect of x rays is significant.« less

  14. Medical x-ray exposure doses as contaminants of atomic bomb doses.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, O; Antoku, S; Russell, W J; Fujita, S; Sawada, S

    1988-03-01

    Since 1967 at the times of their biennial ABCC/RERF radiological examinations, all Adult Health Study (AHS) subjects have been interviewed to determine the exposures to medical x-rays they experienced in institutions other than RERF in order to estimate the numbers of examinations and corresponding doses which they received. These data have been stored on computer tapes together with the doses these subjects received during their radiological examinations in the ABCC/RERF Department of Radiology. Thus, their medical x-ray doses are available along with their atomic bomb doses (tentative 1965 doses revised, T65DR) for assessment of the role of ionizing radiation in the development of diseases. The medical x-ray doses incurred at RERF were assessed by means of phantom dosimetry. Those at other institutions were determined using phantom dosimetry data and results of surveys for trends in radiological examinations in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. By the end of 1982, the average medical x-ray doses to the active bone marrow were 12.04 mGy for A-bomb exposed groups and 8.92 mGy for control groups (not-in-cities); to the male gonads, 2.26 mGy and 1.89 mGy, respectively; and to the female gonads, 17.45 mGy and 12.58 mGy, respectively. Results for Hiroshima and Nagasaki were similar. The main impact of medical x-ray doses was in the lowest T65DR group. Medical x-ray active bone marrow doses ranged from 0.05-500% (mean, 35%) of A-bomb doses in the 10-99 mGy T65DR group. In the 100-999 mGy T65DR group, medical x-ray active bone marrow doses ranged from 0.005-50% (mean, 5%) of their T65DR. In the greater than 1,000-mGy T65DR group, medical x-ray exposures were proportionally less. Female active bone marrow and gonad doses were similar in magnitude to the male active bone marrow doses. Medical x-ray exposures produced smaller doses to the gonads of males than to those of the females. The use of medical x-rays is steadily increasing. Careful consideration of doses from medical sources

  15. Absorber Materials for Transition-Edge Sensor X-ray Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari-David; Bandler, Simon; Brekosky, Regis; Chervenak, James; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Finkbeiner, Fred; Sadleir, Jack; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kelley, Richard; Kilbourne, Caroline; Porter, F. Scott; Smith, Stephen; Saab, Tarek; Sadleir, Jac,

    2007-01-01

    Arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TES) can provide high spatial and energy resolution necessary for x-ray astronomy. High quantum efficiency and uniformity of response can be achieved with a suitable absorber material, in which absorber x-ray stopping power, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity are relevant parameters. Here we compare these parameters for bismuth and gold. We have fabricated electroplated gold, electroplated gold/electroplated bismuth, and evaporated gold/evaporated bismuth 8x8 absorber arrays and find that a correlation exists between the residual resistance ratio (RRR) and thin film microstructure. This finding indicates that we can tailor absorber material conductivity via microstructure alteration, so as to permit absorber thermalization on timescales suitable for high energy resolution x-ray microcalorimetry. We show that by incorporating absorbers possessing large grain size, including electroplated gold and electroplated gold/electroplated bismuth, into our current Mo/Au TES, devices with tunable heat capacity and energy resolution of 2.3 eV (gold) and 2.1 eV (gold/bismuth) FWHM at 6 keV have been fabricated.

  16. Low dose, limited energy spectroscopic x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson Weker, Johanna; Li, Yiyang; Chueh, William C.

    2015-09-01

    In order to achieve high quality in situ spectroscopic X-ray microscopy of complex systems far from equilibrium, such as lithium ion batteries under standard electrochemical cycling, careful consideration of the total number of energy points is required. Enough energy points are need to accurately determine the per pixel chemical information; however, total radiation dose needs to be limited to avoid damaging the system which would produce misleading results. Here we consider the number of energy points need to accurately reproduce the state of charge maps of a LiFePO2 electrode recorded during electrochemical cycling. We observe very good per pixel agreement using only 13 energy points. Additionally, we find the quality of the agreement is heavily dependent on the number of energy points used in the post edge fit during normalization of the spectra rather than the total number of energies used. Finally, we suggest a straightforward protocol for determining the minimum number of energy points needed prior to initiating any in situ spectroscopic X-ray microscopy experiment.

  17. Multi-Absorber Transition-Edge Sensors for X-Ray Astronomy Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Busch, S. E.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. J.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kelly, D. P.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porst, J. P.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J. E.; Wassell, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing multi-absorber Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs) for applications in x-ray astronomy. These position-sensitive devices consist of multiple x-ray absorbers each with a different thermal coupling to a single readout TES. Heat diffusion between the absorbers and the TES gives rise to a characteristic pulse shape corresponding to each absorber element and enables position discrimination. The development of these detectors is motivated by a desire to maximize focal plane arrays with the fewest number of readout channels. In this contribution we report on the first results from devices consisting of nine) 65 X 65 sq. microns Au x-ray absorbers) 5 microns thick. These are coupled to a single 35 X 35 sq. microns Mo/Au bilayer TES. These devices have demonstrated full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) energy resolution of 2.1 eV at 1.5 keV) 2.5 eV at 5.9 keV and 3.3 eV at 8 keV. This is coupled with position discrimination from pulse shape over the same energy range. We use a finite-element model to reproduce the measured pulse shapes and investigate the detector non-linearity with energy) which impacts on the devices position sensitivity and energy resolution.

  18. Development of Large Bismuth Absorbers for Magnetic Calorimeters Applied to Hard X-ray Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M.; Loidl, M.; Pies, C.; Fleischmann, A.; Enss, C.

    2014-08-01

    Bismuth is an interesting material for magnetic calorimeter absorbers applied to high energy resolution X-ray spectrometry; it has a low specific heat and high atomic number. However, past detector developments with Bi absorbers were confronted with the low thermal conductivity of bismuth that degraded the energy resolution and deformed the detector response function (non-Gaussian energy peak). In the present study, we have investigated the performances of large bulk bismuth absorbers ( mm) thermally coupled to metallic magnetic sensors. Despite a very good baseline energy resolution, detectors with monolithic bismuth absorbers have degraded FWHM energy resolutions with any type of thermal coupling between the absorber and the sensor tested. In comparison tests with BiCu and BiAg bilayer absorbers demonstrated much better performances.

  19. Note: Gratings on low absorbing substrates for x-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, F. J.; Schröter, T. J.; Kunka, D.; Meyer, P.; Meiser, J.; Faisal, A.; Khalil, M. I.; Birnbacher, L.; Viermetz, M.; Walter, M.; Schulz, J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Mohr, J.

    2015-12-01

    Grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging is on the verge of being applied in clinical settings. To achieve this goal, compact setups with high sensitivity and dose efficiency are necessary. Both can be increased by eliminating unwanted absorption in the beam path, which is mainly due to the grating substrates. Fabrication of gratings via deep X-ray lithography can address this issue by replacing the commonly used silicon substrate with materials with lower X-ray absorption that fulfill certain boundary conditions. Gratings were produced on both graphite and polymer substrates without compromising on structure quality. These gratings were tested in a three-grating setup with a source operated at 40 kVp and lead to an increase in the detector photon count rate of almost a factor of 4 compared to a set of gratings on silicon substrates. As the visibility was hardly affected, this corresponds to a significant increase in sensitivity and therefore dose efficiency.

  20. Note: Gratings on low absorbing substrates for x-ray phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, F. J. Schröter, T. J.; Kunka, D.; Meyer, P.; Meiser, J.; Faisal, A.; Khalil, M. I.; Mohr, J.; Birnbacher, L.; Viermetz, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Walter, M.; Schulz, J.

    2015-12-15

    Grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging is on the verge of being applied in clinical settings. To achieve this goal, compact setups with high sensitivity and dose efficiency are necessary. Both can be increased by eliminating unwanted absorption in the beam path, which is mainly due to the grating substrates. Fabrication of gratings via deep X-ray lithography can address this issue by replacing the commonly used silicon substrate with materials with lower X-ray absorption that fulfill certain boundary conditions. Gratings were produced on both graphite and polymer substrates without compromising on structure quality. These gratings were tested in a three-grating setup with a source operated at 40 kVp and lead to an increase in the detector photon count rate of almost a factor of 4 compared to a set of gratings on silicon substrates. As the visibility was hardly affected, this corresponds to a significant increase in sensitivity and therefore dose efficiency.

  1. Modeling X-ray Absorbers in AGNs with MHD-Driven Accretion-Disk Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C. R.; Tombesi, F.; Contopoulos, J.; Behar, E.

    2013-04-01

    We have proposed a systematic view of the observed X-ray absorbers, namely warm absorbers (WAs) in soft X-ray and highly-ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs), in the context of magnetically-driven accretion-disk wind models. While potentially complicated by variability and thermal instability in these energetic outflows, in this simplistic model we have calculated 2D kinematic field as well as density and ionization structure of the wind with density profile of 1/r corresponding to a constant column distribution per decade of ionization parameter. In particular we show semi-analytically that the inner layer of the disk-wind manifests itself as the strongly-ionized fast outflows while the outer layer is identified as the moderately-ionized absorbers. The computed characteristics of these two apparently distinct absorbers are consistent with X-ray data (i.e. a factor of ~100 difference in column and ionization parameters as well as low wind velocity vs. near-relativistic flow). With the predicted contour curves for these wind parameters one can constrain allowed regions for the presence of WAs and UFOs.The model further implies that the UFO's gas pressure is comparable to that of the observed radio jet in 3C111 suggesting that the magnetized disk-wind with density profile of 1/r is a viable agent to help sustain such a self-collimated jet at small radii.

  2. Effective absorbing column density in the gamma-ray burst afterglow X-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, S.; Bernardini, M. G.; Braito, V.; Cusumano, G.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Melandri, A.; Salvaterra, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S. D.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the scaling relation between the observed amount of absorption in the X-ray spectra of gamma-ray burst afterglows and the absorber redshift. Through dedicated numerical simulations of an ideal instrument, we establish that this dependence has a power-law shape with index 2.4. However, for real instruments, this value depends on their low-energy cut-off, spectral resolution and on the detector spectral response in general. We thus provide appropriate scaling laws for specific instruments. Finally, we discuss the possibility to measure the absorber redshift from X-ray data alone. We find that 105-106 counts in the 0.3-10 keV band are needed to constrain the redshift with 10 per cent accuracy. As a test case, we discuss the XMM-Newton observation of GRB 090618 at z = 0.54. We are able to recover the correct redshift of this burst with the expected accuracy.

  3. Dose distributions using kilovoltage x-rays and dose enhancement from iodine contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa, A. V.; Norman, A.; Solberg, T. D.; Demarco, J. J.; Smathers, J. B.

    1999-08-01

    In x-ray phototherapy of brain tumours, the tumour is loaded with iodine and exposed to kilovoltage x-rays. Due to the high photoelectric cross sections of iodine, substantial photoelectric interactions occur. The flux of photoelectrons, characteristic x-rays and Auger electrons produce a localized dose enhancement. A modified computed tomography scanner, CTRx, can be used both for tumour localization and delivery of the dose enhancement therapy. Monte Carlo methods were employed to simulate the treatment of iodinated brain tumours with a CTRx. The calculated results reveal the effect of tumour iodine concentration on dose distribution, the degree of skull bone sparing with the application of multiple arcs, and the homogeneity of tumour dose distribution versus iodine concentration. A comparison with 10 MV stereotactic radiosurgery treatment shows the potential of CTRx treatment relative to conventional treatment modalities.

  4. Atomic Calculations and Laboratory Measurements Relevant to X-ray Warm Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, Tim; Bautista, M.; Palmeri, P.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the atomic calculations and the measurements from the laboratory that are relevant to our understanding of X-Ray Warm Absorbers. Included is a brief discussion of the theoretical and the experimental tools. Also included is a discussion of the challenges, and calculations relevant to dielectronic recombination, photoionization cross sections, and collisional ionization. A review of the models is included, and the sequence that the models were applied.

  5. The XMM-Newton Bright Survey sample of absorbed quasars: X-ray and accretion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballo, L.; Severgnini, P.; Della Ceca, R.; Caccianiga, A.; Vignali, C.; Carrera, F. J.; Corral, A.; Mateos, S.

    2014-11-01

    Although absorbed quasars are extremely important for our understanding of the energetics of the Universe, the main physical parameters of their central engines are still poorly known. In this work, we present and study a complete sample of 14 quasars (QSOs) that are absorbed in the X-rays (column density NH > 4 × 1021 cm-2 and X-ray luminosity L 2-10 keV > 1044 ergs-1; XQSO2) belonging to the XMM-Newton Bright Serendipitous Survey (XBS). From the analysis of their ultraviolet-to-mid-infrared spectral energy distribution, we can separate the nuclear emission from the host galaxy contribution, obtaining a measurement of the fundamental nuclear parameters, like the mass of the central supermassive black hole and the value of Eddington ratio, λ Edd. Comparing the properties of XQSO2s with those previously obtained for the X-ray unabsorbed QSOs in the XBS, we do not find any evidence that the two samples are drawn from different populations. In particular, the two samples span the same range in Eddington ratios, up to λ Edd ˜ 0.5; this implies that our XQSO2s populate the `forbidden region' in the so-called `effective Eddington limit paradigm'. A combination of low grain abundance, presence of stars inwards of the absorber, and/or anisotropy of the disc emission can explain this result.

  6. X-ray wind tomography of the highly absorbed HMXB IGR J17252-3616

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manousakis, A.; Walter, R.

    2011-02-01

    Context. About ten persistently highly absorbed super-giant high-mass X-ray binaries (sgHMXB) have been discovered by INTEGRAL as bright hard X-ray sources lacking bright X-ray counterparts. Besides IGR J16318-4848, which has peculiar characteristics, the other members of this family share many properties with the classical wind-fed sgHMXB systems. Aims: Our goal is to understand the characteristics of highly absorbed sgHMXB and in particular the companion stellar wind, which is thought to be responsible for the strong absorption. Methods: We monitored IGR J17252-3616, a highly absorbed system featuring eclipses, with XMM-Newton to study the variability of the column density and the Fe Kα emission line along the orbit and during the eclipses. We also compiled a 3D model of the stellar wind to reproduce the observed variability. Results: We first derive a refined orbital solution based on INTEGRAL, RXTE, and XMM-Newton data. We find that the XMM-Newton monitoring campaign reveals significant variations in the intrinsic absorbing column density along the orbit and the Fe Kα line equivalent width around the eclipse. The origin of the soft X-ray absorption is associated with a dense and extended hydrodynamical tail, trailing the neutron star. This structure extends along most of the orbit, indicating that the stellar wind has been strongly disrupted. The variability of the absorbing column density suggests that the wind velocity is smaller (\\upsilon∞ ≈ 400 km s-1) than observed in classical systems. This may also explain the much stronger density perturbation inferred from the observations. Most of the Fe Kα emission is generated in the innermost region of the hydrodynamical tail. This region, which extends over a few accretion radii, is ionized and does not contribute to the soft X-ray absorption. Conclusions: We present a qualitative model of the stellar wind of IGR J17252-3616 that can represent the observations, and we suggest that highly absorbed systems

  7. Construction of an ionization chamber for the measurement of dose of low energy x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Y. B. Alcantara; Jimenez, F. J. Ramirez

    2008-08-11

    We designed and constructed the prototype of an ionization chamber to measure the dose of an X-ray tube with Molybdenum anode. This X-ray tube is located in the Physics department at CINVESTAV and is used for medical physics purposes in the imaging area. The ionization chamber is designed to measure doses on biological samples exposed to X-rays and will be applied in radiation protection studies.

  8. Enhancement of X-ray dose absorption for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sara; Nahar, S.; Pradhan, A.; Barth, R.

    2013-05-01

    A promising technique for cancer treatment is radiation therapy with high-Z (HZ) nanomoities acting as radio-sensitizers attached to tumor cells and irradiated with X-rays. But the efficacy of radiosenstization is highly energy dependent. We study the physical effects in using platinum (Pt) as the radio-sensitizing agent, coupled with commonly employed broadband x-ray sources with mean energies around 100 keV, as opposed to MeV energies produced by clinical linear accelerators (LINAC) used in radiation therapy. Numerical calculations, in vitro, and in vivo studies of F98 rat glioma (brain cancer) demonstrate that irradiation from a medium energy X-ray (MEX) 160 kV source is far more effective than from a high energy x-ray (HEX) 6 MV LINAC. We define a parameter to quantify photoionization by an x-ray source, which thereby provides a measure of subsequent Auger decays. The platinum (Z = 78) results are also relevant to ongoing studies on x-ray interaction with gold (Z = 79) nanoparticles, widely studied as an HZ contrast agent. The present study should be of additional interest for a combined radiation plus chemotherapy treatment since Pt compounds such cis-Pt and carbo-Pt are commonly used in chemotherapy.

  9. Low dose hard x-ray contact microscopy assisted by a photoelectric conversion layer

    SciTech Connect

    Gomella, Andrew; Martin, Eric W.; Lynch, Susanna K.; Wen, Han; Morgan, Nicole Y.

    2013-04-15

    Hard x-ray contact microscopy provides images of dense samples at resolutions of tens of nanometers. However, the required beam intensity can only be delivered by synchrotron sources. We report on the use of a gold photoelectric conversion layer to lower the exposure dose by a factor of 40 to 50, allowing hard x-ray contact microscopy to be performed with a compact x-ray tube. We demonstrate the method in imaging the transmission pattern of a type of hard x-ray grating that cannot be fitted into conventional x-ray microscopes due to its size and shape. Generally the method is easy to implement and can record images of samples in the hard x-ray region over a large area in a single exposure, without some of the geometric constraints associated with x-ray microscopes based on zone-plate or other magnifying optics.

  10. Hot absorbers and the x-ray spectra of BL Lac objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urry, C. Megan

    1994-01-01

    This is the final report to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) concerning NASA grant NAG5-1671. This grant was awarded to Dr. C. Megan Urry of the Space Telescope Science Institute in response to a proposal, entitled 'Hot Absorbers and the X-Ray Spectra of BL Lac Objects.' The grant was originally awarded in October 1991 and expired in February 1994. The purpose of this project was to detect spectral features in high signal-to-noise Rosat PSPC spectra of X-ray-bright BL Lac objects. We were granted observations of three targets: PKS2155-304, Mrk421, and Mrk501. All three were bright and yielded 5,000-30,000 photons in the good PSPC data.

  11. Experimental validation of a kilovoltage x-ray source model for computing imaging dose

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, Yannick; Kouznetsov, Alexei; Koger, Brandon; Tambasco, Mauro

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To introduce and validate a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source model and characterization method to compute absorbed dose accrued from kV x-rays. Methods: The authors propose a simplified virtual point source model and characterization method for a kV x-ray source. The source is modeled by: (1) characterizing the spatial spectral and fluence distributions of the photons at a plane at the isocenter, and (2) creating a virtual point source from which photons are generated to yield the derived spatial spectral and fluence distribution at isocenter of an imaging system. The spatial photon distribution is determined by in-air relative dose measurements along the transverse (x) and radial (y) directions. The spectrum is characterized using transverse axis half-value layer measurements and the nominal peak potential (kVp). This source modeling approach is used to characterize a Varian{sup ®} on-board-imager (OBI{sup ®}) for four default cone-beam CT beam qualities: beams using a half bowtie filter (HBT) with 110 and 125 kVp, and a full bowtie filter (FBT) with 100 and 125 kVp. The source model and characterization method was validated by comparing dose computed by the authors’ inhouse software (kVDoseCalc) to relative dose measurements in a homogeneous and a heterogeneous block phantom comprised of tissue, bone, and lung-equivalent materials. Results: The characterized beam qualities and spatial photon distributions are comparable to reported values in the literature. Agreement between computed and measured percent depth-dose curves is ⩽2% in the homogeneous block phantom and ⩽2.5% in the heterogeneous block phantom. Transverse axis profiles taken at depths of 2 and 6 cm in the homogeneous block phantom show an agreement within 4%. All transverse axis dose profiles in water, in bone, and lung-equivalent materials for beams using a HBT, have an agreement within 5%. Measured profiles of FBT beams in bone and lung-equivalent materials were higher than their

  12. The Radiation Dose Determination of the Pulsed X-ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloichikova, I.; Stuchebrov, S.; Zhaksybayeva, G.; Wagner, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the radiation dose measurement technique of the pulsed X-ray source RAP-160-5 is described. The dose rate measurement results from the pulsed X-ray beams at the different distance between the pulsed X-ray source focus and the detector obtained with the help of the thermoluminescent detectors DTL-02, the universal dosimeter UNIDOS E equipped with the plane-parallel ionization chamber type 23342, the dosimeter-radiometer DKS-96 and the radiation dosimeter AT 1123 are demonstrated. The recommendations for the dosimetry measurements of the pulsed X-ray generator RAP-160-5 under different radiation conditions are proposed.

  13. Equally sloped X-ray microtomography of living insects with low radiation dose and improved resolution capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shengkun; Fan, Jiadong; Zong, Yunbing; He, You; Zhou, Guangzhao; Sun, Zhibin; Zhang, Jianhua; Huang, Qingjie; Xiao, Tiqiao; Jiang, Huaidong

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional X-ray imaging of living specimens is challenging due to the limited resolution of conventional absorption contrast X-ray imaging and potential irradiation damage of biological specimens. In this letter, we present microtomography of a living specimen combining phase-contrast imaging and a Fourier-based iterative algorithm termed equally sloped tomography. Non-destructive 3D imaging of an anesthetized living yellow mealworm Tenebrio molitor was demonstrated with a relatively low dose using synchrotron generated X-rays. Based on the high-quality 3D images, branching tracheoles and different tissues of the insect in a natural state were identified and analyzed, demonstrating a significant advantage of the technique over conventional X-ray radiography or histotomy. Additionally, the insect survived without problem after a 1.92-s X-ray exposure and subsequent absorbed radiation dose of ˜1.2 Gy. No notable physiological effects were observed after reviving the insect from anesthesia. The improved static tomographic method demonstrated in this letter shows advantage in the non-destructive structural investigation of living insects in three dimensions due to the low radiation dose and high resolution capability, and offers many potential applications in biological science.

  14. THERMAL FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS X9 AND X29 X-RAY RING CROTCH RADIATION ABSORBERS.

    SciTech Connect

    MERCADO-CORUJO,H.

    1999-08-11

    This report details the efforts by engineers at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to evaluate the reliability of water-cooled radiation absorbers used in the NSLS X-ray ring. The absorbers on this report are part of the X-9 and X-29 dipole vacuum chambers. The absorbers are located at the intersection (crotch) of the beamline exit ports with the electron beam chamber, and are generally referred to as ''crotches''. The purpose of this analysis was to demonstrate the thermal reliability of the crotches under operating conditions that will be present over the expected life of the ring. The efforts described include general engineering layouts, engineering calculations, finite element analysis (FEA), results and conclusions of the analysis, and future design recommendations.

  15. Modelling of TES X-ray Microcalorimeters with a Novel Absorber Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyomoto, Naoko; Bandler, Simon; Brefosky, Regis; Brown, Ari; Chervenak, James; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Finkbeiner, Frederick; Kelley, Richard; Kilbourne, Caroline; Lindeman, Mark; Porter, Frederick; Saab, Tarek; Sadleir, Jack; Smith, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Our development of a novel x-ray absorber design that has enabled the incorporation of high-conductivity electroplated gold into our absorbers has yielded devices that not only have achieved breakthrough performance at 6 keV, but also are extraordinarily well modelled. We have determined device parameters that reproduce complex impedance curves and noise spectra throughout transition. Observed pulse heights, decay time and baseline energy resolution were in good agreement with simulated results using the same parameters. In the presentation, we will show these results in detail and we will also show highlights of the characterization of our gold/bismuth-absorber devices. We will discuss possible improvement of our current devices and expected performance of future devices using the modelling results.

  16. Calculating patient-specific doses in X-ray diagnostics and from radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampinen, Juha Sakari

    2000-06-01

    The risk associated with exposure to ionising radiation is dependent on the characteristics of the exposed individual. The size and structure of the individual influences the absorbed dose distribution in the organs. Traditional methods used to calculate the patient organ doses are based on standardised calculation phantoms, which neglect the variance of the patient size or even sex. Methods for patient specific dosimetry in the fields of X-ray diagnostics and diagnostic and therapeutic use of radiopharmaceuticals were proposed in this thesis. A computer program, ODS-60, for calculating organ doses from diagnostic X-ray exposures was presented. The calculation is done in a patient specific phantom with depth dose and profile algorithms fitted to Monte Carlo simulation data from a previous study. Improvements to the version reported earlier were introduced, e.g. bone attenuation was implemented. The applicability of the program to determine patient doses from complex X-ray examinations (barium enema examination) was studied. The conversion equations derived for female and male patients as a function of patient weight gave the smallest deviation from the actual patient doses when compared to previous studies. Another computer program, Intdose, was presented for calculation of the dose distribution from radiopharmaceuticals. The calculation is based on convolution of an isotope specific point dose kernel with activity distribution, obtained from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Anatomical information is taken from magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT) images. According to a phantom study, Intdose agreed within 3% with measurements. For volunteers administered diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals, the results given by Intdose were found to agree with traditional methods in cases of medium sized patients. For patients undergoing systemic radiation therapy, the results by Intdose differed from measurements due to dynamic biodistribution

  17. A partial eclipse of the heart: the absorbed X-ray low state in Mrk 1048

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, M. L.; Schartel, N.; Komossa, S.; Grupe, D.; Santos-Lleó, M.; Fabian, A. C.; Mathur, S.

    2014-11-01

    We present two new XMM-Newton observations of an unprecedented low-flux state in the Seyfert 1 Mrk 1048 (NGC 985), taken in 2013. The X-ray flux below 1 keV drops by a factor of 4-5, whereas the spectrum above 5 keV is essentially unchanged. This points towards an absorption origin for the low state, and we confirm this with spectral fitting, finding that the spectral differences can be well modelled by the addition of a partial covering neutral absorber, with a column density of ˜3 × 1022 cm-2 and a covering fraction of ˜0.6. The optical and UV fluxes are not affected, and indeed are marginally brighter in the more recent observations, suggesting that only the inner regions of the disc are affected by the absorption event. This indicates either that the absorption is due to a cloud passing over the inner disc, obscuring the X-ray source but leaving the outer disc untouched, or that the absorber is dust-free so the UV continuum is unaffected. We use arguments based on the duration of the event and the physical properties of the absorber to constrain its size and location, and conclude that it is most likely a small cloud at ˜1018 cm from the source.

  18. BeppoSAX Observation of NGC 7582: Constraints on the X-Ray Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Fiore, F.; Perola, G. C.; Matt, G.; George, I. M.; Piro, L.; Bassani, L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a BeppoSAX observation of NGC 7582 made during 1998 November and an optical spectrum taken in 1998 October. The new X-ray data reveal a previously unknown hard X-ray component in NGC 7582, peaking close to 20 keV. Rapid variability is observed with correlated changes in the 5-10 and 13-60 keV bands indicating that a single continuum component, produced by the active nucleus, provides the, dominant flux across both bands. Comparison between RXTE and BeppoSAX data reveals changes in the 2 - 10 keV flux on timescales of months. Changes in the nuclear X-ray flux appear unrelated to the gradual decline in optical flux noted since the high-state in 1998 July. The 0.5 - 2 keV flux of NGC 7582 is not significantly variable within the BeppoSAX observation, but has brightened by a factor of approximately 2 since the ASCA observation of 1994. While there is some concern about contamination from spatially-unresolved sources, the long-term variability in soft X-ray flux seems most likely associated with the nucleus or an event within the host galaxy of NGC 7582. The 2 - 100 keV spectrum is well fit by a powerlaw of photon index Gamma = 1.95(sup +0.09, sub -0.18) steeper by Delta.Gamma approximately equal 0.40 than the index during the 1994 ASCA observation. The X-ray continuum is attenuated by a thick absorber of N(H) approximately 1.6 x10(exp 24)/sq cm covering approximately 60(sup +10%, sub -14%) of the nucleus plus a screen with N(sub H) approximately 1.4 x 10(exp 23)/ sq cm covering the entire nucleus. Comparison of the BeppoSAX and ASCA spectra shows an increase in the full screen by Delta.N(sub H) approximately equal 7 x 10(exp 22)/sq cm since 1994, confirming the absorption variability found by Xue et al. The increase in soft X-ray flux between 1994 and 1998 is consistent with the appearance of holes in the full screen allowing approximately < 1% of the nuclear flux to escape, and producing some clear lines-of-sight to the broad-line-region. The data

  19. Application of an x-ray TV system to examining crystals that absorb x-rays strongly

    SciTech Connect

    Ingal, V.N.; Belyaeushaya, E.A.; Tronova, A.B.

    1985-08-01

    Single crystals with low dislocation densities made of lithium neobate, lithium tantalate, garnets, gallium arsendide, and indium phosphide are examined in order to enable the authors to reduce exposure times. The calculations for the mass attenuation coeffecient for characteristic radiation are calculated in those crystals for wide wavelength ranges, which has enabled a reduction in exposure times to result. An x-ray TV topographic system is described that employs an x-ray vidicon with controllee memory which enables the reduction of recording times for specimens of Si, SiC, and SiO/sub 2/ of diameter 30 mm to 10-20 min. The TV pictures show that the dislocation density in the crystal was at the limit of the method.

  20. A Unified View of X-ray Absorbers in AGNs and XRBs with MHD Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Shrader, Chris R.; Tombesi, Francesco; Behar, Ehud; Contopoulos, John

    2016-01-01

    The presence of UV and X-ray absorbers (aka. warm absorbers or WAs) has been long known for decades from extensive spectroscopic studies across diverse AGN populations such as nearby Seyfert galaxies and distant quasars. Furthermore, another class of seemingly distinct type of absorbers, ultra-fast outflows or UFOs, is becoming increasingly known today. Nonetheless, a physical identification of such absorbers, such as geometrical property and physical conditions, is very elusive to date despite the recent state-of-the-art observations. We develop a coherent scenario in which the detected absorbers are driven primarily (if not exclusively) by the action of global magnetic fields originating from a black hole accretion disk. In the context of MHD disk-wind of density profile of n~1/r, it is found that the properties of the observed WAs/UFOs are successfully described assuming a characteristic SED. As a case study, we analyze PG1211+143 and GRO J1655-40 to demonstrate that our wind model can systematically unify apparently diverse absorbers in both AGNs and XRBs in terms of explaining their global behavior as well as individual spectral lines.

  1. Reliability test: X-ray ring exit chambers crotch radiation absorbers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, D.R.; Morgan, J.

    1999-04-09

    This report details the efforts by engineers at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to evaluate the reliability of water-cooled radiation absorbers used in the NSLS X-ray ring. These absorbers are part of the 16 dipole vacuum chambers which comprise the arc sections of the ring. They are located at the intersections (crotch) of the beamline exit ports with the electron beam chamber, and are commonly referred to as crotches. The purpose of these efforts was to demonstrate the reliability of the crotches under operating conditions that the crotches will be subjected to over the entire expected life of the ring. The efforts described include engineering calculations, finite element analysis, conceptual design for a reliability test, test implementation and descriptions, results and conclusions related to these analyses and tests.

  2. Stress Stability of W Ti X-Ray Absorber in Patterning Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Kaeko; Yabe, Hideki; Ami, Shigeto; Kise, Koji; Aya, Sunao; Marumoto, Kenji; Satoh, Shin-ichi

    1999-12-01

    We investigated the stress stability of the W Ti absorber during the patterning process. The three kinds of mask stacks used were stable during the mask fabrication steps and after being kept in air for six months. We also investigated the IP shift due to etching of the quartermicron-rule device patterns. The line pattern mask indicated larger displacement than the hole mask, however, no remarkable anisotropic distortion was observed because the sidewall area of those masks was not as much as in the case of 100 nm device masks. Anisotropic distortion along the line was clearly observed in the case of absorber etching in the 100 nm region. The maximum displacement observed in the mask geometry was 21 nm, however, it is expected to decrease in the case of a narrow perimeter for a low contrast X-ray mask.

  3. Measurement of X-ray for the dose area product and spectrum by the added filtration in Rando phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Woong; Kim, Eun-Soo; Choi, Jiwon; Kweon, Dae Cheol

    2014-02-01

    The most important point in the medical use of radiation is to minimize the patient entrance dose while maintaining the diagnostic information. Low-energy photons (long-wave X-ray) are unnecessary among diagnostic X-ray because they are mostly absorbed and increase the patient's entrance dose. The most effective method to eliminate the low-energy photon is use of a filtering plate. Using a filter appropriate for the image will maintain diagnostic value. Obtaining an effective image allows comparison of the resulting images in a logical objective way. This experiment was performed to determine the quality of image dosimeter when there is no filter, and when 2 mm Al, 0.1 mm Cu + 1 mm Al, 0.2 mm Cu + 1 mm Al filters are used. Using TORECK PD-8100 dose area products meter placed on top of an abdominal phantom, we measured the dose when the filter changes in this condition 85 kVp, 40 mAs, anode angle 13, source image distance 100 cm, 20 cm × 20 cm. We used the SRS-78 program for accurate comparison because we could not evaluate the difference in the image optically. The spectrum changed due to the emission of X-rays as the filter changed. We observed that the use of a filter eliminated the low-energy photons and revealed continuous X-ray and special X-ray. Therefore, the experiment highlighted the advantages of filters and confirmed that there are no changes in the quality of image through signal to noise ratio, peak signal to noise ratio, root mean square error comparison. We found that the use of filter did not lead to distortions in the image or drop in diagnostic value while minimizing the radiation dose. This means that it can help manage long-term patient dose. We conclude that we need to recommend the use of the filter as it reduces the area of dose.

  4. Absorbed doses from temporomandibular joint radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, S.L.; Lanzetta, M.L.

    1985-06-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used in a tissue-equivalent phantom to measure doses of radiation absorbed by various structures in the head when the temporomandibular joint was examined by four different radiographic techniques--the transcranial, transorbital, and sigmoid notch (Parma) projections and the lateral tomograph. The highest doses of radiation occurred at the point of entry for the x-ray beam, ranging from 112 mrad for the transorbital view to 990 mrad for the sigmoid notch view. Only the transorbital projection a radiation dose to the lens of the eye. Of the four techniques evaluated, the lateral tomograph produced the highest doses to the pituitary gland and the bone marrow, while the sigmoid notch radiograph produced the highest doses to the parotid gland.

  5. Extracting material parameters from x-ray attenuation: a CT feasibility study using kilovoltage synchrotron x-rays incident upon low atomic number absorbers.

    PubMed

    Kirby, B J; Davis, J R; Grant, J A; Morgan, M J

    2003-10-21

    The work reported here is a feasibility study of the extraction of material parameters from measurements of the linear x-ray attenuation coefficient of low atomic number absorbers. Computed tomography (CT) scans of small samples containing several liquids and solids were carried out with synchrotron radiation at the Australian National Beamline Facility (BL 20B) in Japan. Average values of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient were extracted for each material for x-ray energies ranging from 11 keV to 20.5 keV. The electron density was estimated by applying results derived from a parametrization of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient first developed by Jackson and Hawkes and extended for this work. Average estimates for the electron density of triethanolamine and acetic acid were made to within +5.3% of the actual value. Other materials examined included furfuraldehyde, perspex and teflon, for which average estimates of the electron density were less than 10% in excess of the calculated value. PMID:14620065

  6. Extracting material parameters from x-ray attenuation: a CT feasibility study using kilovoltage synchrotron x-rays incident upon low atomic number absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, B. J.; Davis, J. R.; Grant, J. A.; Morgan, M. J.

    2003-10-01

    The work reported here is a feasibility study of the extraction of material parameters from measurements of the linear x-ray attenuation coefficient of low atomic number absorbers. Computed tomography (CT) scans of small samples containing several liquids and solids were carried out with synchrotron radiation at the Australian National Beamline Facility (BL 20B) in Japan. Average values of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient were extracted for each material for x-ray energies ranging from 11 keV to 20.5 keV. The electron density was estimated by applying results derived from a parametrization of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient first developed by Jackson and Hawkes and extended for this work. Average estimates for the electron density of triethanolamine and acetic acid were made to within +5.3% of the actual value. Other materials examined included furfuraldehyde, perspex and teflon, for which average estimates of the electron density were less than 10% in excess of the calculated value.

  7. The structure of the X-ray absorber in Mrk 915 revealed by Swift.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severgnini, P.; Ballo, L.; Braito, V.; Caccianiga, A.; Campana, S.; Della Ceca, R.; Moretti, A.; Vignali, C.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present the results obtained with a monitoring programme (23 days long) performed with Swift-XRT on the local Seyfert galaxy Mrk 915. The light-curve analysis shows a significant count rate variation (about a factor of 2-3) on a time-scale of a few days, while the X-ray colours show a change in the spectral curvature below 2 keV and the presence of two main spectral states. From the spectral analysis we find that the observed variations can be explained by the change of the intrinsic nuclear power (about a factor of 1.5) coupled with a change of the properties of an ionized absorber. The quality of the data prevents us from firmly establishing if the spectral variation is due to a change in the ionization state and/or in the covering factor of the absorbing medium. The latter scenario would imply a clumpy structure of the ionized medium. By combining the information provided by the light curve and the spectral analyses, we can derive some constraints on the location of the absorber under the hypotheses of either homogeneous or clumpy medium. In both cases, we find that the absorber should be located inside the outer edge of an extended torus and, in particular, under the clumpy hypothesis, it should be located near, or just outside, to the broad emission line region.

  8. 20 percent lower lung cancer mortality with low-dose CT vs chest X-ray

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have found a 20 percent reduction in deaths from lung cancer among current or former heavy smokers who were screened with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) versus those screened by chest X-ray.

  9. The ROSAT spectrum of 3C 351 - A warm absorber in an X-ray-'quiet' quasar?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiore, Fabrizio; Elvis, Martin; Mathur, Smita; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Mcdowell, Jonathan C.

    1993-01-01

    3C 351 is one of the most X-ray-quiet radio quasars (alpha(ox) about 1.6). We have observed 3C 351 with the ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) and find a complex X-ray spectrum which is not well reproduced by a power law plus low-energy cut-off model. Soft excess, partial covering, and 'warm absorber' models can all produce acceptable fits, although only the warm absorber model gives typical values for the high-energy continuum slope. The alpha(ox) measured by using quasi-simultaneous ROSAT, MMT, and HST observations is in the range 1.5-1.6, significantly above the average of 1.37 for a complete sample of 33 3CR quasars. If the soft excess or partial covering models are correct, 3C 351 appears X-ray-quiet in the PSPC band because it has an extremely steep or flat intrinsic high-energy spectral slope. However, if the warm absorber model is correct, the quasar is intrinsically X-ray-quiet; the normalization of the intrinsic (unabsorbed) X-ray emission is unusually low relative to the optical luminosity. We investigate the properties of our warm absorber model in some detail. The apparently complicated behavior of the fit parameters may be understood by considering the effects of changing absorbing column and ionization parameter on intrinsic power-law-spectra of different slopes.

  10. Study of Multilayer X-ray Absorbers to Improve Detection Efficiency of TES X-ray Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, T.; Nagayoshi, K.; Muramatsu, H.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Saito, M.; Homma, T.; Hara, T.; Noda, H.

    2016-07-01

    We report the fabrication and evaluation of the Cu/Bi bilayer absorber with electrodeposition. We designed the Cu/Bi absorber to satisfy the requirements for scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The residual resistivity ratios of films of Cu and Bi with electrodeposition was {5.91± 0.49} and {2.06± 0.33}, respectively; these values are sufficient for the requirements of STEM. We found that the Cu/Bi bilayer absorber TES microcalorimeter experienced a pulse-shape variation and we considered that these variations were caused by the quality of the contact surface between the absorber and TES. In addition, we examined the structure of the absorber using focus ion beam analysis and STEM. The results suggest that an oxidation between the Cu and seed layer, in which the layer is an electrode for electrodeposition, yielded variations. Moreover, thermal simulation suggests that the thermal conduction between the absorber and TES caused variations. The results of this study will improve the process of Bi electrodeposition.

  11. Study of Multilayer X-ray Absorbers to Improve Detection Efficiency of TES X-ray Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, T.; Nagayoshi, K.; Muramatsu, H.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Saito, M.; Homma, T.; Hara, T.; Noda, H.

    2016-03-01

    We report the fabrication and evaluation of the Cu/Bi bilayer absorber with electrodeposition. We designed the Cu/Bi absorber to satisfy the requirements for scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The residual resistivity ratios of films of Cu and Bi with electrodeposition was {5.91± 0.49} and {2.06± 0.33} , respectively; these values are sufficient for the requirements of STEM. We found that the Cu/Bi bilayer absorber TES microcalorimeter experienced a pulse-shape variation and we considered that these variations were caused by the quality of the contact surface between the absorber and TES. In addition, we examined the structure of the absorber using focus ion beam analysis and STEM. The results suggest that an oxidation between the Cu and seed layer, in which the layer is an electrode for electrodeposition, yielded variations. Moreover, thermal simulation suggests that the thermal conduction between the absorber and TES caused variations. The results of this study will improve the process of Bi electrodeposition.

  12. Connecting the X-ray and UV ionized absorbers in Mrk 279

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arav, N.

    Our proposed FUSE observations are the last component of a deep X-ray/UV spectroscopy campaign on the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 279. In the current Chandra cycle, 360 ksec Chandra LETGS and 16 HST/STIS orbits have been approved for this project. Our main scientific goal is to study the AGN outflow seen as an ionized absorber in this galaxy, focusing on the crucial connection between the X-ray and UV manifestations of the outflows. We will map the ionization and velocity structure, measure the elemental abundances and then determine the mass and kinetic luminosity flux of the outflow, all stepping stones for studying the importance of the outflows in the evolution of AGN and their host galaxies. The combination of unblended outflow troughs, very low Galactic column (avoiding the plague of H_2 contamination) and very high UV flux, makes Mrk 279 the most promising of all AGN outflow targets in the FUSE band. In addition, the proposed FUSE observa tions will allow for a unique high-quality variability study of an AGN outflow, since we will have three epochs of excellent FUSE AGN outflow data (35-100 ks each) with simultaneous HST echelle data for two of these epochs.

  13. Dosimetry of Microdistributed Dose-Enhancing Agents in X-ray Synchrotron Binary Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugtenburg, Richard P.

    2010-07-01

    Monte Carlo based modelling of the dose distribution in the vicinity of concentrates of iodine (I) and gold (Au) binary radiotherapy agents has been performed for monochromatised synchrotron X-rays. While the KERMA approximation, which ignores electron transport, is often acceptable for kilovoltage X-ray dosimetry in X-ray binary therapy, the range of photoelectrons and Auger electrons may be significant when compared to the microdostributed structure of the binary compound in which case corrections to the approximation may be necessary. Dose is calculated using EGSnrc for microdistributions associated with X-ray radiation synovecotomy, where iodine is taken up in the synovial lining. Dose as a function of the volume of aggregation for an Au-based contrast agent such as Au nanoparticles, ranging in diameter from 5 micron to 100 micron, were calculated using EGSnrc and Penelope, showing that the dose varies slowly for 90 keV X-rays, where much of the dose delivered by short range photoelectrons while 80 keV X-rays, just below the K-edge of Au (80.729 keV) increases linearly with diameter. In general the dose varies slowly as a function of volume suggesting that only small corrections will be needed to account for effects due to the failure of electronic equilibrium.

  14. Dosimetry of Microdistributed Dose-Enhancing Agents in X-ray Synchrotron Binary Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hugtenburg, Richard P.

    2010-07-23

    Monte Carlo based modelling of the dose distribution in the vicinity of concentrates of iodine (I) and gold (Au) binary radiotherapy agents has been performed for monochromatised synchrotron X-rays. While the KERMA approximation, which ignores electron transport, is often acceptable for kilovoltage X-ray dosimetry in X-ray binary therapy, the range of photoelectrons and Auger electrons may be significant when compared to the microdostributed structure of the binary compound in which case corrections to the approximation may be necessary. Dose is calculated using EGSnrc for microdistributions associated with X-ray radiation synovecotomy, where iodine is taken up in the synovial lining. Dose as a function of the volume of aggregation for an Au-based contrast agent such as Au nanoparticles, ranging in diameter from 5 micron to 100 micron, were calculated using EGSnrc and Penelope, showing that the dose varies slowly for 90 keV X-rays, where much of the dose delivered by short range photoelectrons while 80 keV X-rays, just below the K-edge of Au (80.729 keV) increases linearly with diameter. In general the dose varies slowly as a function of volume suggesting that only small corrections will be needed to account for effects due to the failure of electronic equilibrium.

  15. Context sensitive cardiac x-ray imaging: a machine vision approach to x-ray dose control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kengyelics, Stephen M.; Gislason-Lee, Amber J.; Keeble, Claire; Magee, Derek R.; Davies, Andrew G.

    2015-09-01

    Modern cardiac x-ray imaging systems regulate their radiation output based on the thickness of the patient to maintain an acceptable signal at the input of the x-ray detector. This approach does not account for the context of the examination or the content of the image displayed. We have developed a machine vision algorithm that detects iodine-filled blood vessels and fits an idealized vessel model with the key parameters of contrast, diameter, and linear attenuation coefficient. The spatio-temporal distribution of the linear attenuation coefficient samples, when appropriately arranged, can be described by a simple linear relationship, despite the complexity of scene information. The algorithm was tested on static anthropomorphic chest phantom images under different radiographic factors and 60 dynamic clinical image sequences. It was found to be robust and sensitive to changes in vessel contrast resulting from variations in system parameters. The machine vision algorithm has the potential of extracting real-time context sensitive information that may be used for augmenting existing dose control strategies.

  16. An investigation of dose changes for therapeutic kilovoltage x-ray beams with underlying lead shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Robin; Healy, Brendan; Holloway, Lois; Baldock, Clive

    2007-07-15

    Kilovoltage x-ray beams are used to treat cancer on or close to the skin surface. Many clinical cases use high atomic number materials as shielding to reduce dose to underlying healthy tissues. In this work, we have investigated the effect on both the surface dose and depth doses in a water phantom with lead shielding at depth in the phantom. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the water phantom and to calculate the surface doses and depth doses using primary x-ray beam spectra derived from an analytical model. The x-ray beams were in the energy range of 75-135 kVp with field sizes of 2, 5 and 8 cm diameter. The lead sheet was located beneath the water surface at depths ranging from 0.5-7.5 cm. The surface dose decreased as the lead was positioned closer to the water surface and as the field size was increased. The variation in surface dose as a function of x-ray beam energy was only small but the maximum reduction occurred for the 100 kVp x-ray beam. For the 8 cm diameter field with the lead at 1 cm depth and using the 100 kVp x-ray beam, the surface dose was reduced to 0.898 of the surface dose in the water phantom only. Measured surface dose changes, using a Farmer-type ionization chamber, agreed with the Monte Carlo calculated doses. Calculated depth doses in water with a lead sheet positioned below the surface showed that the dose fall-off increased as the lead was positioned closer to the water surface as compared to the depth dose in the water phantom only. Monte Carlo calculations of the total x-ray beam spectrum at the water surface showed that the total fluence decreased due to a reduction in backscatter from within the water and very little backscatter from the lead. The mean energy of the x-ray spectrum varied less than 1 keV, with the lead at 1 cm beneath the water phantom surface. As the Monte Carlo calculations showed good agreement with the measured results, this method can be used to verify surface dose changes in clinical situations

  17. X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat ...

  18. Image quality based x-ray dose control in cardiac imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Andrew G.; Kengyelics, Stephen M.; Gislason-Lee, Amber J.

    2015-03-01

    An automated closed-loop dose control system balances the radiation dose delivered to patients and the quality of images produced in cardiac x-ray imaging systems. Using computer simulations, this study compared two designs of automatic x-ray dose control in terms of the radiation dose and quality of images produced. The first design, commonly in x-ray systems today, maintained a constant dose rate at the image receptor. The second design maintained a constant image quality in the output images. A computer model represented patients as a polymethylmetacrylate phantom (which has similar x-ray attenuation to soft tissue), containing a detail representative of an artery filled with contrast medium. The model predicted the entrance surface dose to the phantom and contrast to noise ratio of the detail as an index of image quality. Results showed that for the constant dose control system, phantom dose increased substantially with phantom size (x5 increase between 20 cm and 30 cm thick phantom), yet the image quality decreased by 43% for the same thicknesses. For the constant quality control, phantom dose increased at a greater rate with phantom thickness (>x10 increase between 20 cm and 30 cm phantom). Image quality based dose control could tailor the x-ray output to just achieve the quality required, which would reduce dose to patients where the current dose control produces images of too high quality. However, maintaining higher levels of image quality for large patients would result in a significant dose increase over current practice.

  19. Dental staff doses with handheld dental intraoral x-ray units.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joel E; Bailey, Edgar D; Ludlow, John B

    2012-02-01

    A handheld portable dental intraoral x-ray system is available in the United States and elsewhere. The system is designed to minimize the user's radiation dose. It includes specially designed shielding of the x-ray tube housing and an integral radiation shield to minimize backscatter. Personnel radiation dose records were obtained from 18 dental facilities using both the handheld system and a wall mounted dental x-ray system, providing 661 individual dose measurements. Dental staff doses were also compared for the handheld and conventional systems using both film and digital imaging for the same facilities and staff members. The results indicate that the doses for the handheld systems are significantly less than for wall-mounted systems. The average monthly dose for the handheld systems was 0.28 μSv vs. 7.86 μSv (deep dose equivalent) for the wall-mounted systems, a difference that is statistically significant at the p = 0.01 level. Consequently, there should be no concern about the use of this handheld dental intraoral x-ray system. Additional shielding efforts, (e.g., wearing a lead apron) will not provide significant benefit nor reduce staff radiation dose. PMID:22217586

  20. Generation and dose distribution measurement of flash x-ray in KALI-5000 system

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Rakhee; Roy, Amitava; Mitra, S.; Sharma, A.; Mondal, J.; Mittal, K. C.; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2008-10-15

    Flash x-ray generation studies have been carried out in KALI-5000 Pulse power system. The intense relativistic electron beam has been bombarded on a tantalum target at anode to produce flash x-ray via bremsstrahlung conversion. The typical electron beam parameter was 360 kV, 18 kA, and 100 ns, with a few hundreds of A/cm{sup 2} current density. The x-ray dose has been measured with calcium sulfate:dysposium (CaSO{sub 4}:Dy) thermoluminescent dosimeter and the axial dose distribution has been characterized. It has been observed that the on axis dose falls of with distance {approx}1/x{sup n}, where n varies from 1.8 to 1.85. A maximum on axis dose of 46 mrad has been measured at 1 m distance from the source. A plastic scintillator with optical fiber coupled to a photomultiplier tube has been developed to measure the x-ray pulse width. The typical x-ray pulse width varied from 50 to 80 ns.

  1. Generation and dose distribution measurement of flash x-ray in KALI-5000 system.

    PubMed

    Menon, Rakhee; Roy, Amitava; Mitra, S; Sharma, A; Mondal, J; Mittal, K C; Nagesh, K V; Chakravarthy, D P

    2008-10-01

    Flash x-ray generation studies have been carried out in KALI-5000 Pulse power system. The intense relativistic electron beam has been bombarded on a tantalum target at anode to produce flash x-ray via bremsstrahlung conversion. The typical electron beam parameter was 360 kV, 18 kA, and 100 ns, with a few hundreds of A/cm(2) current density. The x-ray dose has been measured with calcium sulfate:dysposium (CaSO(4):Dy) thermoluminescent dosimeter and the axial dose distribution has been characterized. It has been observed that the on axis dose falls of with distance approximately 1/x(n), where n varies from 1.8 to 1.85. A maximum on axis dose of 46 mrad has been measured at 1 m distance from the source. A plastic scintillator with optical fiber coupled to a photomultiplier tube has been developed to measure the x-ray pulse width. The typical x-ray pulse width varied from 50 to 80 ns. PMID:19044706

  2. Modification of X-Ray Tissue Doses with Strong Magnetic Fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borke, Michael Faison

    1990-01-01

    The modification of dose distributions from secondary electrons produced by accelerator-generated photon or electron beams in the presence of strong magnetic fields was studied. A need exists to predict the action of magnetic fields on X-ray tissue doses and to identify those combinations of X-ray energies, magnetic field strengths, and tissue factors where the dose might be changed significantly from an exposure without the presence of a magnetic field. Modification of X-ray produced tissue dose arises from the ability of a strong magnetic field to induce deflections on the path of secondary electrons. In order to demonstrate the existence of this deflection, measurements were made of the relative dose distributions present within a tissue -equivalent phantom produced by exposures to X-rays and in the presence of strong magnetic fields. The dose measurements were made using radiographic film detectors, sandwiched within a polystyrene target phantom irradiated in the presence of different magnetic field intensities. The fields were oriented transversely to the direction of the incident X-ray beam. Optical densities of the film exposures were converted to equivalent tissue doses for comparison to the predictions of a semi-analytical relative dose model for the process. This model was a combination of the electron Continuous Slowing Down Approximation, modified to account for multiple scattering, and a exponential photon dose model. As a result of this work, it was found that: (1) strong magnetic fields in the range of 1.2 to 5 T can induce changes in the tissue distribution of X-ray produced dose to small volumes in excess of 10%, (2) the region of maximum dose may be displaced significantly from the undeflected target volume, and (3) a reasonable estimate of the magnitude of these changes can be predicted, if the X-ray energy distribution and magnetic flux density are known. Such changes in deposited doses may be clinically significant and should be taken into

  3. 3D, high-resolution deep x-ray absorber mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbravescu, Niculae; Grigore, Luminita

    2000-08-01

    Although, by using gray-tone lithography and common technologies in standard IC fabrication it's easy to obtain an arbitrarily 3-D shaping of positive thick resists, there are some limitations too. E-beam writing implies a maximum of only 200 gray-levels on the project retilce, and the limited focus depth of the projection objective gives a poor lateral resolution. That's why we applied a new approach to enhance the 3-D resolution of gray-tone lithography. By combining gray-tone lithography with binary masking technique, it was possible to obtain a high resolution (vertical and horizontal directions) into thick resist. Considering it as a primary mold, a metallic variable absorber mask for deep X-ray lithography may be processed. Previously, it's necessary to transform the resist surface into a conductive layer as follows: conditioning, nucleation and electroless plating, respectively. After that, a metallic deposit is obtained by electroplating at a desired thickness, resulting in a complementary shape of the mold resist. The original design and fabrication method for the gray-tone test reticle were supported by preliminary experiments showing the main advantage of this new technology: the 3-D structuring of thick resists in a single exposure step and also a very promising aspect ratio obtained of over 9:1.

  4. Repetitive flash x-ray generator operated at low-dose rates for a medical x-ray television system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Isobe, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kei; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1991-04-01

    The fundamental studies for the repetitive flash x-ray generator operated at lowdose rates for a medical x-ray television system are described. This x-ray generator consisted of the following components: a high-voltage power supply, an energy storage condenser of lOOnF, a coaxial cable condenser with a capacity of l000pF, a repetitive impulse switching system, a turbo molecular pump, and an x-ray tube having a cold cathode. The condenser was charged from 40 to 70kV by a power supply, and the electric charges stored in the condenser were discharged repetitively by using a trigger electrode operated by an impulse switching system. The x-ray tube was of the triode-type which was connected to the turbo molecular pump and had a large discharge impedance in order to prevent the damped oscillations of the tube current and voltage. The maximum tube voltage was equivalent to the initial charged voltage, and the peak current was less than 70A. The durations were about 2ps, and the x-ray intensities were less than 1. OpC/kg at 0. 5m per pulse. The repetition frequency was less than 50Hz, and the effective focal spot size was equivalent to the anode diameter of 3. 0mm. For the x-ray television system used in conjunction with this repetitive pulsed x-ray generator, since the electromagnetic noise primarily caused by the high tube current was decreased, noise-free stroboscopic radiography performed by the television system could be realized.

  5. Mutations induced in Tradescantia by small doses of X-rays and neutrons - Analysis of dose-response curves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, A. H.; Underbrink, A. G.; Rossi, H. H.

    1972-01-01

    Dose-response curves for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs were analyzed after neutron and X-ray irradiation with doses ranging from a fraction of a rad to the region of saturation. The dose-effect relation for neutrons indicates a linear dependence from 0.01 to 8 rads; between 0.25 and 5 rads, a linear dependence is indicated for X-rays also. As a consequence the relative biological effectiveness reaches a constant value (about 50) at low doses. The observations are in good agreement with the predictions of the theory of dual radiation action and support its interpretation of the effects of radiation on higher organisms. The doubling dose of X-rays was found to be nearly 1 rad.

  6. Low-dose performance of wafer-scale CMOS-based X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Willem H.; Peters, Inge M.; Smit, Chiel; Kessener, Yves; Bosiers, Jan

    2015-03-01

    Compared to published amorphous-silicon (TFT) based X-ray detectors, crystalline silicon CMOS-based active-pixel detectors exploit the benefits of low noise, high speed, on-chip integration and featuring offered by CMOS technology. This presentation focuses on the specific advantage of high image quality at very low dose levels. The measurement of very low dose performance parameters like Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) and Noise Equivalent Dose (NED) is a challenge by itself. Second-order effects like defect pixel behavior, temporal and quantization noise effects, dose measurement accuracy and limitation of the x-ray source settings will influence the measurements at very low dose conditions. Using an analytical model to predict the low dose behavior of a detector from parameters extracted from shot-noise limited dose levels is presented. These models can also provide input for a simulation environment for optimizing the performance of future detectors. In this paper, models for predicting NED and the DQE at very low dose are compared to measurements on different CMOS detectors. Their validity for different sensor and optical stack combinations as well as for different x-ray beam conditions was validated.

  7. Multichord time-resolved electron temperature measurements by the x-ray absorber-foil method on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Kiraly, J.; Bitter, M.; Efthimion, P.; von Goeler, S.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Johnson, D.; McGuire, K.; Sauthoff, N.; Sesnic, S.

    1985-09-01

    Absorber foils have been installed in the TFTR X-Ray Imaging System to permit measurement of the electron temperature along 10 to 30 chords spaced at 5-12.5 cm with a time resolution of less than 100 ..mu..s. The technique uses the ratio of x-ray fluxes transmitted through two different foils. The ratio depends mainly on electron temperature. Simulations show that strong impurity line radiation can distort this ratio. To correct for these effects, special beryllium-scandium filters are employed to select the line-free region between 2 and 4.5 keV. Other filter pairs allow corrections for Fe L and Ni L line radiation as well as Ti K and Ni K emission. Good accuracy is also obtained with simple beryllium filters, provided that impurity corrections are incorporated in the analysis, taking line intensities from the x-ray pulse-height analysis diagnostic. A description of modeling calculations and a comparison of temperature values from this diagnostic with data from the x-ray pulse height analysis, the electron cyclotron emission, and the Thomson scattering diagnostics are presented. Several applications of the absorber foil electron temperature diagnostic on TFTR are discussed.

  8. Dose distribution around a needle-like anode X-ray tube: dye-film vs. planar thermoluminescent detectors.

    PubMed

    Budzanowski, M; Olko, P; Marczewska, B; Czopyk, L; Slapa, M; Stras, W; Traczyk, M; Talejko, M

    2006-01-01

    The dosimetry around the X-ray tube with a needle-like anode (NAXT), developed at the Institute of Nuclear Studies, for interstitial brachytherapy has been performed using (1) dye films (Gafchromic XR-T), (2) large-area thermoluminescent (TL) detectors--prepared either by gluing TL powder onto thin Al foil (so-called planar detectors with spatial resolution of 0.1 mm) and (3) miniature (2 mm diameter and 0.5 mm thick) TL detectors. The measurements were performed in following geometries. (1) Needle inside a PMMA cylinder--the planar TL detector mounted on the surface of the cylinder. (2) Needle inside a thick block of PMMA and TL detector mounted vertically 7 mm from needle axis. TL detectors were read with the planar (2D) thermoluminescence reader, developed at IFJ, with a sensitive CCD (charge couple device) camera. Gafchromic films were evaluated with a system based on Agfa Arcus 1200 scanner and calibrated with X rays (35 kV) filtered with 0.03 mm Mo and with Co-60 photons. The intensity distribution of TL light on the planar detector was calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water, using (137)Cs gamma-rays. TL planar detectors seem to be a promising tool for 2D dosimetry of miniature X-ray sources. Obtained results for TLDs and Gafchromic films seem to be comparable but differences have been found. Both methods are useful for measurements of dose distribution around the NAXT X-rays source. PMID:16614087

  9. Soft x-ray-controlled dose deposition in yeast cells: techniques, model, and biological assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Marziale; Batani, Dimitri; Conti, Aldo; Masini, Alessandra; Costato, Michele; Pozzi, Achille; Turcu, I. C. Edmond

    1996-12-01

    A procedure is presented to release soft x-rays onto yeast cell membrane allegedly damaging the resident enzymatic processes connected with fermentation. The damage is expected to be restricted to regulating fermentation processes without interference with respiration. By this technique fermentation is followed leading to CO2 production, and respiration resulting in global pressure measurements. A solid state pressure sensor system has been developed linked to a data acquisition system. Yeast cells cultures have been investigated at different concentrations and with different nutrients. A non-monotone response in CO2 production as a function of the delivered x-ray dose is observed.

  10. MANAGEMENT OF PATIENT DOSES FROM DIGITAL X-RAY CHEST SCREENING EXAMINATIONS.

    PubMed

    Vodovatov, A V; Drozdov, A A; Telnova, A U; Bernhardsson, C

    2016-06-01

    An anthropomorphic phantom study was carried out in 2013-14 in two hospitals, one located in Russia (Mariinsky Hospital, Saint Petersburg) and the other in Sweden (Skåne University Hospital, Malmö). The aim of the study was to investigate the possibilities to reduce the patient dose from digital X-ray chest screening examinations. The existing chest imaging protocols were adjusted by changing the tube voltage, total filtration and grid in order to determine the most dose-effective combination of the examination parameters. It was possible to achieve up to 50 % dose-area product (DAP) and 30 % effective dose reduction by raising the tube voltage from 100 to 125 or 150 kV, and simultaneously decrease the total filtration to the minimum allowed by the X-ray unit (3 mm Al). The absence of a grid allowed to further reduce the DAP and effective dose by up to 80 %. Comparison between Russian and Swedish X-ray units showed the same trend in DAP and effective dose reduction, but the absolute dose values were lower by almost a factor of 10 for the Swedish units due to different image receptors and automatic exposure control settings. PMID:26769906

  11. Dictionary learning based low-dose x-ray CT reconstruction using a balancing principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Xuanqin; Wu, Junfeng; Bai, Ti; Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Wang, Ge

    2014-09-01

    The high utility and wide applicability of x-ray imaging has led to a rapidly increased number of CT scans over the past years, and at the same time an elevated public concern on the potential risk of x-ray radiation to patients. Hence, a hot topic is how to minimize x-ray dose while maintaining the image quality. The low-dose CT strategies include modulation of x-ray flux and minimization of dataset size. However, these methods will produce noisy and insufficient projection data, which represents a great challenge to image reconstruction. Our team has been working to combine statistical iterative methods and advanced image processing techniques, especially dictionary learning, and have produced excellent preliminary results. In this paper, we report recent progress in dictionary learning based low-dose CT reconstruction, and discuss the selection of regularization parameters that are crucial for the algorithmic optimization. The key idea is to use a "balancing principle" based on a model function to choose the regularization parameters during the iterative process, and to determine a weight factor empirically for address the noise level in the projection domain. Numerical and experimental results demonstrate the merits of our proposed reconstruction approach.

  12. The integral dose in panoramic intraoral x-ray tube radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Hayami, A.; Fujishita, M.; Sumida, A.; Kanke, M.; Fujiki, T.; Uemura, S.; Fuchihata, H.

    1983-07-01

    A Monte Carlo computer program was developed to estimate the integral dose to the head and thyroid for panoramic intraoral x-ray tube radiography. The advantage of this computer simulation is that it is able to avoid many of the difficulties associated with low-energy and low-dose x-ray dosimetry. The calculations were made for maxillary and mandibular projections separately, using 10 kv. increments between 40 and 60 kv. The results obtained were presented in terms of the integral dose per milliampere second. Typical integral doses for a routine examination of the head are 2.1 mJ. and 8.5 microJ for the thyroid during mandibular radiography and 1.7 microJ for the thyroid during radiography of the maxilla using 55 kv. and 0.5 mAs.

  13. Dose properties of x-ray beams produced by laser-wakefield-accelerated electrons.

    PubMed

    Kainz, K K; Hogstrom, K R; Antolak, J A; Almond, P R; Bloch, C D

    2005-01-01

    Given that laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been demonstrated experimentally to accelerate electron beams to energies beyond 25 MeV, it is reasonable to assess the ability of existing LWFA technology to compete with conventional radiofrequency linear accelerators in producing electron and x-ray beams for external-beam radiotherapy. We present calculations of the dose distributions (off-axis dose profiles and central-axis depth dose) and dose rates of x-ray beams that can be produced from electron beams that are generated using state-of-the-art LWFA. Subsets of an LWFA electron energy distribution were propagated through the treatment head elements (presuming an existing design for an x-ray production target and flattening filter) implemented within the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. Three x-ray energy configurations (6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV) were studied, and the energy width deltaE of the electron-beam subsets varied from 0.5 MeV to 12.5 MeV. As deltaE increased from 0.5 MeV to 4.5 MeV, we found that the off-axis and central-axis dose profiles for x-rays were minimally affected (to within about 3%), a result slightly different from prior calculations of electron beams broadened by scattering foils. For deltaE of the order of 12 MeV, the effect on the off-axis profile was of the order of 10%, but the central-axis depth dose was affected by less than 2% for depths in excess of about 5 cm beyond d(max). Although increasing deltaE beyond 6.5 MeV increased the dose rate at d(max) by more than 10 times, the absolute dose rates were about 3 orders of magnitude below those observed for LWFA-based electron beams at comparable energies. For a practical LWFA-based x-ray device, the beam current must be increased by about 4-5 orders of magnitude. PMID:15715431

  14. Modeling a superficial radiotherapy X-ray source for relative dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Christopher D; LaFontaine, Richard; Poirier, Yannick; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically characterize and validate a kilovoltage (kV) X-ray beam source model of a superficial X-ray unit for relative dose calculations in water and assess the accuracy of the British Journal of Radiology Supplement 25 (BJR 25) percentage depth dose (PDD) data. We measured central axis PDDs and dose profiles using an Xstrahl 150 X-ray system. We also compared the measured and calculated PDDs to those in the BJR 25. The Xstrahl source was modeled as an effective point source with varying spatial fluence and spectra. In-air ionization chamber measurements were made along the x- and y-axes of the X-ray beam to derive the spatial fluence and half-value layer (HVL) measurements were made to derive the spatially varying spectra. This beam characterization and resulting source model was used as input for our in-house dose calculation software (kVDoseCalc) to compute radiation dose at points of interest (POIs). The PDDs and dose profiles were measured using 2, 5, and 15 cm cone sizes at 80, 120, 140, and 150 kVp energies in a scanning water phantom using IBA Farmer-type ionization chambers of volumes 0.65 and 0.13 cc, respectively. The percent difference in the computed PDDs compared with our measurements range from -4.8% to 4.8%, with an overall mean percent difference and standard deviation of 1.5% and 0.7%, respectively. The percent difference between our PDD measurements and those from BJR 25 range from -14.0% to 15.7%, with an overall mean percent difference and standard deviation of 4.9% and 2.1%, respectively - showing that the measurements are in much better agreement with kVDoseCalc than BJR 25. The range in percent difference between kVDoseCalc and measurement for profiles was -5.9% to 5.9%, with an overall mean percent difference and standard deviation of 1.4% and 1.4%, respectively. The results demonstrate that our empirically based X-ray source modeling approach for superficial X-ray therapy can be used to accurately

  15. A detailed analysis of the high-resolution X-ray spectra of NGC 3516: variability of the ionized absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Huerta, E. M.; Krongold, Y.; Jimenez-Bailon, E.; Nicastro, F.; Mathur, S.; Longinotti, A. L.

    2014-09-20

    The 1.5 Seyfert galaxy NGC 3516 presents a strong time variability in X-rays. We re-analyzed the nine observations performed in 2006 October by XMM-Newton and Chandra in the 0.3 to 10 keV energy band. An acceptable model was found for the XMM-Newton data fitting the EPIC-PN and RGS spectra simultaneously; later, this model was successfully applied to the contemporary Chandra high-resolution data. The model consists of a continuum emission component (power law + blackbody) absorbed by four ionized components (warm absorbers), and 10 narrow emission lines. Three absorbing components are warm, producing features only in the soft X-ray band. The fourth ionization component produces Fe XXV and Fe XXVI in the hard-energy band. We study the time response of the absorbing components to the well-detected changes in the X-ray luminosity of this source and find that the two components with the lower ionization state show clear opacity changes consistent with gas close to photoionization equilibrium. These changes are supported by the models and by differences in the spectral features among the nine observations. On the other hand, the two components with higher ionization state do not seem to respond to continuum variations. The response time of the ionized absorbers allows us to constrain their electron density and location. We find that one component (with intermediate ionization) must be located within the obscuring torus at a distance 2.7 × 10{sup 17} cm from the central engine. This outflowing component likely originated in the accretion disk. The three remaining components are at distances larger than 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} cm. Two of the absorbing components in the soft X-rays have similar outflow velocities and locations. These components may be in pressure equilibrium, forming a multi-phase medium, if the gas has metallicity larger than the solar one (≳ 5 Z {sub ☉}). We also search for variations in the covering factor of the ionized absorbers (although partial

  16. National reference doses for common radiographic, fluoroscopic and dental X-ray examinations in the UK.

    PubMed

    Hart, D; Hillier, M C; Wall, B F

    2009-01-01

    The National Patient Dose Database (NPDD) is maintained by the Radiation Protection Division of the Health Protection Agency. The latest review of the database analysed the data collected from 316 hospitals over a 5-year period to the end of 2005. The information supplied amounted to a total of 23 000 entrance surface dose measurements and 57 000 dose-area product measurements for single radiographs, and 208 000 dose-area product measurements along with 187 000 fluoroscopy times for diagnostic examinations or interventional procedures. In addition, patient dose data for dental X-ray examinations were included for the first time in the series of 5-yearly reviews. This article presents a summary of a key output from the NPDD - national reference doses. These are based on the third quartile values of the dose distributions for 30 types of diagnostic X-ray examination and 8 types of interventional procedure on adults, and for 4 types of X-ray examination on children. The reference doses are approximately 16% lower than the corresponding values in the previous (2000) review, and are typically less than half the values of the original UK national reference doses that were derived from a survey in the mid-1980s. This commentary suggests that two of the national reference doses from the 2000 review be retained as diagnostic reference levels because the older sample size was larger than for the 2005 review. No clear evidence could be found for the use of digital imaging equipment having a significant effect on dose. PMID:18852213

  17. Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure of low-Z absorbates using fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Stoehr, J.; Kollin, E.B.; Fischer, D.A.; Hastings, J.B.; Zaera, F.; Sette, F.

    1985-05-01

    Comparison of x-ray fluorescence yield (FY) and electron yield surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra above the S K-edge for c(2 x 2) S on Ni(100) reveals an order of magnitude higher sensitivity of the FY technique. Using FY detection, thiophene (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/S) chemisorption on Ni(100) is studied with S coverages down to 0.08 monolayer. The molecule dissociates at temperatures as low as 100K by interaction with fourfold hollow Ni sites. Blocking of these sites by oxygen leaves the molecule intact.

  18. Dose distribution from x-ray microbeam arrays applied to radiation therapy: an EGS4 Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    De Felici, M; Felici, R; Sanchez del Rio, M; Ferrero, C; Bacarian, T; Dilmanian, F A

    2005-08-01

    We present EGS4 Monte Carlo calculations of the spatial distribution of the dose deposited by a single x-ray pencil beam, a planar microbeam, and an array of parallel planar microbeams as used in radiation therapy research. The profiles of the absorbed dose distribution in a phantom, including the peak-to-valley ratio of the dose distribution from microbeam arrays, were calculated at micrometer resolution. We determined the dependence of the findings on the main parameters of photon and electron transport. The results illustrate the dependence of the electron range and the deposited in-beam dose on the cut-off energy, of the electron transport, as well as the effects on the dose profiles of the beam energy, the array size, and the beam spacing. The effect of beam polarization also was studied for a single pencil beam and for an array of parallel planar microbeams. The results show that although the polarization effect on the dose distribution from a 3 cm x 3 cm microbeam array inside a water phantom is large enough to be measured at the outer side of the array (16% difference of the deposited dose for x-ray beams of 200 keV), it is not detectable at the array's center, thus being irrelevant for the radiation therapy purposes. Finally we show that to properly compare the dose profiles determined with a metal oxide semiconductor field emission transistor detector with the computational method predictions, it is important to simulate adequately the size and the material of the device's Si active element. PMID:16193774

  19. Dose and energy dependence of response of Gafchromic® XR-QA film for kilovoltage x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampado, O.; Garelli, E.; Deagostini, S.; Ropolo, R.

    2006-06-01

    There is a growing interest in Gafchromic® films for patient dosimetry in radiotherapy and in radiology. A new model (XR-QA) with high sensitivity to low dose was tested in this study. The response of the film to different x-ray beam energies (range 28-145 kVp with various filtrations, dose range 0-100 mGy) and to visible light was investigated, together with the after exposure darkening properties. Exposed films were digitized with a commercially available, optical flatbed scanner. A single functional form for dose versus net pixel value variation has been determined for all the obtained calibration curves, with a unique fit parameter different for each of the used x-ray beams. The film response was dependent on beam energy, with higher colour variations for the beams in the range 80-140 kVp. Different sources of uncertainties in dose measurements, governed by the digitalization process, the film response uniformity and the calibration curve fit procedure, have been considered. The overall one-sigma dose measurement uncertainty depended on the beam energy and decreased with increasing absorbed dose. For doses above 10 mGy and beam energies in the range 80-140 kVp the total uncertainty was less than 5%, whereas for the 28 kVp beam the total uncertainty at 10 mGy was about 10%. The post-exposure colour variation was not negligible in the first 24 h after the exposure, with a consequent increase in the calculated dose of about 10%. Results of the analysis of the sensitivity to visible light indicated that a short exposure of this film to ambient and scanner light during the measurements will not have a significant impact on the radiation dosimetry.

  20. Dose and energy dependence of response of Gafchromic XR-QA film for kilovoltage x-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Rampado, O; Garelli, E; Deagostini, S; Ropolo, R

    2006-06-01

    There is a growing interest in Gafchromic films for patient dosimetry in radiotherapy and in radiology. A new model (XR-QA) with high sensitivity to low dose was tested in this study. The response of the film to different x-ray beam energies (range 28-145 kVp with various filtrations, dose range 0-100 mGy) and to visible light was investigated, together with the after exposure darkening properties. Exposed films were digitized with a commercially available, optical flatbed scanner. A single functional form for dose versus net pixel value variation has been determined for all the obtained calibration curves, with a unique fit parameter different for each of the used x-ray beams. The film response was dependent on beam energy, with higher colour variations for the beams in the range 80-140 kVp. Different sources of uncertainties in dose measurements, governed by the digitalization process, the film response uniformity and the calibration curve fit procedure, have been considered. The overall one-sigma dose measurement uncertainty depended on the beam energy and decreased with increasing absorbed dose. For doses above 10 mGy and beam energies in the range 80-140 kVp the total uncertainty was less than 5%, whereas for the 28 kVp beam the total uncertainty at 10 mGy was about 10%. The post-exposure colour variation was not negligible in the first 24 h after the exposure, with a consequent increase in the calculated dose of about 10%. Results of the analysis of the sensitivity to visible light indicated that a short exposure of this film to ambient and scanner light during the measurements will not have a significant impact on the radiation dosimetry. PMID:16723772

  1. Low-dose phase contrast tomography with conventional x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, C. K. Endrizzi, M.; Diemoz, P. C.; Olivo, A.; Munro, P. R. T.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) method has been recently further developed to perform tomographic and, thus, volumetric imaging. In this paper, the first tomographic EI XPCi images acquired with a conventional x-ray source at dose levels below that used for preclinical small animal imaging are presented. Methods: Two test objects, a biological sample and a custom-built phantom, were imaged with a laboratory-based EI XPCi setup in tomography mode. Tomographic maps that show the phase shift and attenuating properties of the object were reconstructed, and analyzed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and quantitative accuracy. Dose measurements using thermoluminescence devices were performed. Results: The obtained images demonstrate that phase based imaging methods can provide superior results compared to attenuation based modalities for weakly attenuating samples also in 3D. Moreover, and, most importantly, they demonstrate the feasibility of low-dose imaging. In addition, the experimental results can be considered quantitative within the constraints imposed by polychromaticity. Conclusions: The results, together with the method's dose efficiency and compatibility with conventional x-ray sources, indicate that tomographic EI XPCi can become an important tool for the routine imaging of biomedical samples.

  2. Collective effective dose in Europe from X-ray and nuclear medicine procedures.

    PubMed

    Bly, R; Jahnen, A; Järvinen, H; Olerud, H; Vassileva, J; Vogiatzi, S

    2015-07-01

    Population doses from radiodiagnostic (X-ray and nuclear medicine) procedures in Europe were estimated based on data collected from 36 European countries. For X-ray procedures in EU and EFTA countries (except Liechtenstein) the collective effective dose is 547,500 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 1.06 mSv per caput. For all European countries included in the survey the collective effective dose is 605,000 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 1.05 mSv per caput. For nuclear medicine procedures in EU countries and EFTA (except Liechtenstein) countries the collective effective dose is 30,700 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 0.06 mSv per caput. For all European countries included in the survey the collective effective dose is 31,100 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 0.05 mSv per caput. PMID:25848115

  3. A correction-based dose calculation algorithm for kilovoltage x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, George X.; Pawlowski, Jason M.; Coffey, Charles W.

    2008-12-15

    Frequent and repeated imaging procedures such as those performed in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) programs may add significant dose to radiosensitive organs of radiotherapy patients. It has been shown that kV-CBCT results in doses to bone that are up to a factor of 3-4 higher than those in surrounding soft tissue. Imaging guidance procedures are necessary due to their potential benefits, but the additional incremental dose per treatment fraction may exceed an individual organ tolerance. Hence it is important to manage and account for this additional dose from imaging for radiotherapy patients. Currently available model-based dose calculation methods in radiation treatment planning (RTP) systems are not suitable for low-energy x rays, and new and fast calculation algorithms are needed for a RTP system for kilovoltage dose computations. This study presents a new dose calculation algorithm, referred to as the medium-dependent-correction (MDC) algorithm, for accurate patient dose calculation resulting from kilovoltage x rays. The accuracy of the new algorithm is validated against Monte Carlo calculations. The new algorithm overcomes the deficiency of existing density correction based algorithms in dose calculations for inhomogeneous media, especially for CT-based human volumetric images used in radiotherapy treatment planning.

  4. Patient and staff doses for some complex x-ray examinations.

    PubMed

    Olgar, T; Bor, D; Berkmen, G; Yazar, T

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to measure patient and staff doses simultaneously for some complex x-ray examinations. Measurements of dose-area product (DAP) and entrance skin dose (ESD) were carried out in a sample of 107 adult patients who underwent different x-ray examinations such as double contrast barium enema (DCBE), single contrast barium enema (SCBE), barium swallow, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC), and various orthopaedic surgical procedures. Dose measurements were made separately for each projection, and DAP, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD), film dosimetry and tube output measurement techniques were used. Staff doses were measured simultaneously with patient doses for these examinations, with the exception of barium procedures. The measured mean DAP values were found to be 8.33, 90.24, 79.96 Gy cm(2) for barium swallow, SCBE and DCBE procedures with the fluoroscopy times of 3.1, 4.43 and 5.86 min, respectively. The calculated mean DAP was 26.33 Gy cm(2) for diagnostic and 89.76 Gy cm(2) therapeutic ERCP examinations with the average fluoroscopy times of 1.9 and 5.06 min respectively. Similarly, the calculated mean DAP was 97.53 Gy cm(2) with a corresponding fluoroscopy time of 6.1 min for PTC studies. The calculated mean entrance skin dose (ESD) was 172 mGy for the orthopaedic surgical studies. Maximum skin doses were measured as 324, 891, 1218, 750, 819 and 1397 mGy for barium swallow, SCBE, DCBE, ERCP, PTC and orthopaedic surgical procedures, respectively. The high number of radiographs taken during barium enema examinations, and the high x-ray outputs of the fluoroscopic units used in ERCP, were the main reasons for high doses, and some corrective actions were immediately taken. PMID:19690354

  5. Low dose digital X-ray imaging with avalanche amorphous selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Goldan, Amir H.; Tousignant, Olivier; Léveillé, Sébastien; Zhao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Active Matrix Flat Panel Imagers (AMFPI) based on an array of thin film transistors (TFT) have become the dominant technology for digital x-ray imaging. In low dose applications, the performance of both direct and indirect conversion detectors are limited by the electronic noise associated with the TFT array. New concepts of direct and indirect detectors have been proposed using avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se), referred to as high gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP). The indirect detector utilizes a planar layer of HARP to detect light from an x-ray scintillator and amplify the photogenerated charge. The direct detector utilizes separate interaction (non-avalanche) and amplification (avalanche) regions within the a-Se to achieve depth-independent signal gain. Both detectors require the development of large area, solid state HARP. We have previously reported the first avalanche gain in a-Se with deposition techniques scalable to large area detectors. The goal of the present work is to demonstrate the feasibility of large area HARP fabrication in an a-Se deposition facility established for commercial large area AMFPI. We also examine the effect of alternative pixel electrode materials on avalanche gain. The results show that avalanche gain > 50 is achievable in the HARP layers developed in large area coaters, which is sufficient to achieve x-ray quantum noise limited performance down to a single x-ray photon per pixel. Both chromium (Cr) and indium tin oxide (ITO) have been successfully tested as pixel electrodes.

  6. Ionized Absorbers in Active Galactic Nuclei and Very Steap Soft X-Ray Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiore, Fabrizio; White, Nicholas (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Steep soft X-ray (0.1-2 keV) quasars share several unusual properties: narrow Balmer lines, strong Fe II emission, large and fast X-ray variability, and a rather steep 2-10 keV spectrum. These intriguing objects have been suggested to be the analogues of Galactic black hole candidates in the high, soft state. We present here results from ASCA observations for two of these quasars: NAB 0205 + 024 and PG 1244 + 026. Both objects show similar variations (factor of approximately 2 in 10 ks), despite a factor of approximately 10 difference in the 0.5-10 keV luminosity (7.3 x 10(exp 43) erg/s for PG 1244 + 026 and 6.4 x 10(exp 44) erg/s for NAB 0205 + 024, assuming isotropic emission, H(sub 0) = 50.0 and q(sub 0) = 0.0). The X-ray continuum of the two quasars flattens by 0.5-1 going from the 0.1-2 keV band towards higher energies, strengthening recent results on another half-dozen steep soft X-ray active galactic nuclei. PG 1244 + 026 shows a significant feature in the '1-keV' region, which can be described either as a broad emission line centered at 0.95 keV (quasar frame) or as edge or line absorption at 1.17 (1.22) keV. The line emission could be a result of reflection from a highly ionized accretion disc, in line with the view that steep soft X-ray quasars are emitting close to the Eddington luminosity. Photoelectric edge absorption or resonant line absorption could be produced by gas outflowing at a large velocity (0.3-0.6 c).

  7. X-ray depth-dose characteristics of the Toshiba LMR-16.

    PubMed

    Mantel, J; Perry, H; Weinkam, J J

    1979-01-01

    The depth-dose characteristics of the Toshiba LMR-16 linear accelerator for 14-MeV x rays have been measured at an SSD of 100 cm using diodes and ion chambers. The surface dose and build-up depth both exhibit a considerable variation with field size. A new central axis model has been developed which takes account of these variations, and the agreement between the measured and computed data using this model is found to be excellent. Formulas are also presented to estimate the surface dose, buildup depth, and output factor as a function of field size. PMID:460069

  8. Unification of X-ray Winds in Seyfert Galaxies: From Ultra-fast Outflows to Warm Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, Francesco; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J.; Nemmen, R.; Braito, V.; Gaspari, M.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2013-04-01

    The existence of ionized X-ray absorbing layers of gas along the line of sight to the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies is a well established observational fact. This material is systematically outflowing and shows a large range in parameters. However, its actual nature and dynamics are still not clear. In order to gain insights into these important issues we performed a literature search for papers reporting the parameters of the soft X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) in 35 type 1 Seyferts and compared their properties to those of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) detected in the same sample. The fraction of sources with WAs is >60%, consistent with previous studies. The fraction of sources with UFOs is >34%, >67% of which also show WAs. The large dynamic range obtained when considering all the absorbers together allows us, for the first time, to investigate general relations among them. In particular, we find significant correlations indicating that the closer the absorber is to the central black hole, the higher the ionization, column, outflow velocity and consequently the mechanical power. The absorbers continuously populate the whole parameter space, with the WAs and the UFOs lying always at the two ends of the distribution. This strongly suggest that these absorbers, often considered of different types, could actually represent parts of a single large-scale stratified outflow observed at different locations from the black hole. The observed parameters and correlations are consistent with both radiation pressure through Compton scattering and MHD processes contributing to the outflow acceleration, the latter playing a major role. Most of the absorbers, especially the UFOs, have a sufficiently high mechanical power to significantly contribute to the AGN feedback.

  9. Radiation dose to patients from X-ray radiographic examinations using computed radiography imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reena; Sharma, Sunil Dutt; Pawar, Shramika; Chaubey, Ajay; Kantharia, S; Babu, D A R

    2015-01-01

    The screen-film system is replaced by computed radiography system for recording the images of the patients during X-ray radiography examinations. The change in imaging system requires the re-establishment of the institutional diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for different types of X-ray examinations conducted at the hospital. For this purpose, patient specific parameters [age, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), object to image distance (OID)] and machine specific parameters (kVp, mAs, distance and field sizes) of 1875 patients during 21 different types of X-ray examinations were recorded for estimating the entrance skin dose (ESD). The ESD for each of these patients were estimated using measured X-ray beam output and the standard value of the back scatter factor. Five number summary was calculated for all the data for their presentation in the Box-Whisker plot, which provides the statistical distribution of the data. The data collected indicates that majorly performed examinations are cervical spine AP, Chest PA and Knee Lat with percentage contributions of 16.05, 16 and 8.27% respectively. The lowest contribution comes from Hip Lat which is about 1.01%. The ratio of measured ESD (maximum to minimum) for these examinations is found to be highest for the cervical spine AP with a value of 50 followed by Thoracic spine AP of 32.36. The ESD ratio for Chest PA, Knee Lat and Lumbar Spine AP are 30.75, 30.4 and 30.2 respectively. The lowest ESD ratio is for Hip Lat which is 2.68. The third quartile values of ESDs are established as the institutional DRLs. The ESD values obtained for 21 different X-ray projections are either comparable or lesser than the reported national/international values. PMID:26150685

  10. A new approach to account for the medium-dependent effect in model-based dose calculations for kilovoltage x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlowski, Jason M.; Ding, George X.

    2011-07-01

    This study presents a new approach to accurately account for the medium-dependent effect in model-based dose calculations for kilovoltage (kV) x-rays. This approach is based on the hypothesis that the correction factors needed to convert dose from model-based dose calculations to absorbed dose-to-medium depend on both the attenuation characteristics of the absorbing media and the changes to the energy spectrum of the incident x-rays as they traverse media with an effective atomic number different than that of water. Using Monte Carlo simulation techniques, we obtained empirical medium-dependent correction factors that take both effects into account. We found that the correction factors can be expressed as a function of a single quantity, called the effective bone depth, which is a measure of the amount of bone that an x-ray beam must penetrate to reach a voxel. Since the effective bone depth can be calculated from volumetric patient CT images, the medium-dependent correction factors can be obtained for model-based dose calculations based on patient CT images. We tested the accuracy of this new approach on 14 patients for the case of calculating imaging dose from kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography used for patient setup in radiotherapy, and compared it with the Monte Carlo method, which is regarded as the 'gold standard'. For all patients studied, the new approach resulted in mean dose errors of less than 3%. This is in contrast to current available inhomogeneity corrected methods, which have been shown to result in mean errors of up to -103% for bone and 8% for soft tissue. Since there is a huge gain in the calculation speed relative to the Monte Carlo method (~two orders of magnitude) with an acceptable loss of accuracy, this approach provides an alternative accurate dose calculation method for kV x-rays.

  11. Dose estimation and shielding calculation for X-ray hazard at high intensity laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Rui; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Bo; James, C. Liu; Sayed, H. Rokni; Michael, B. Woods; Li, Jun-Li

    2014-12-01

    An ionizing radiation hazard produced from the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets has been observed. Laser-plasma interactions create “hot” electrons, which generate bremsstrahlung X-rays when they interact with ions in the target. However, up to now only limited studies have been conducted on this laser-induced radiological protection issue. In this paper, the physical process and characteristics of the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets are analyzed. The parameters of the radiation sources are discussed, including the energy conversion efficiency from laser to hot electrons, hot electron energy spectrum and electron temperature, and the bremsstrahlung X-ray energy spectrum produced by hot electrons. Based on this information, the X-ray dose generated with high-Z targets for laser intensities between 1014 and 1020 W/cm2 is estimated. The shielding effects of common shielding items such as the glass view port, aluminum chamber wall and concrete wall are also studied using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. This study provides a reference for the dose estimation and the shielding design of high intensity laser facilities.

  12. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC ACCRETION DISK WINDS AS X-RAY ABSORBERS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Behar, Ehud

    2010-05-20

    We present the two-dimensional ionization structure of self-similar magnetohydrodynamic winds off accretion disks around and irradiated by a central X-ray point source. On the basis of earlier observational clues and theoretical arguments, we focus our attention on a subset of these winds, namely those with radial density dependence n(r) {proportional_to} 1/r (r is the spherical radial coordinate). We employ the photoionization code XSTAR to compute the ionic abundances of a large number of ions of different elements and then compile their line-of-sight (LOS) absorption columns. We focus our attention on the distribution of the column density of the various ions as a function of the ionization parameter {xi} (or equivalently r) and the angle {theta}. Particular attention is paid to the absorption measure distribution (AMD), namely their hydrogen-equivalent column per logarithmic {xi} interval, dN{sub H}/dlog {xi}, which provides a measure of the winds' radial density profiles. For the chosen density profile n(r) {proportional_to} 1/r, the AMD is found to be independent of {xi}, in good agreement with its behavior inferred from the X-ray spectra of several active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For the specific wind structure and X-ray spectrum, we also compute detailed absorption line profiles for a number of ions to obtain their LOS velocities, v {approx} 100-300 km s{sup -1} (at log {xi} {approx} 2-3) for Fe XVII and v {approx} 1000-4000 km s{sup -1} (at log {xi} {approx} 4-5) for Fe XXV, in good agreement with the observation. Our models describe the X-ray absorption properties of these winds with only two parameters, namely the mass-accretion rate m-dot and the LOS angle {theta}. The probability of obscuration of the X-ray ionizing source in these winds decreases with increasing m-dot and increases steeply with the LOS inclination angle {theta}. As such, we concur with previous authors that these wind configurations, viewed globally, incorporate all the requisite

  13. Increasing the field of view of x-ray phase contrast imaging using stitched gratings on low absorbent carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiser, J.; Amberger, M.; Willner, M.; Kunka, D.; Meyer, P.; Koch, F.; Hipp, A.; Walter, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Mohr, J.

    2014-03-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging has become a promising biomedical imaging technique for enhancing soft-tissue contrast. In addition to an absorption contrast image it provides two more types of image, a phase contrast and a small-angle scattering contrast image recorded at the same time. In biomedical imaging their combination allows for the conventional investigation of e.g. bone fractures on the one hand and for soft-tissue investigation like cancer detection on the other hand. Among the different methods of X-ray phase contrast imaging the grating based approach, the Talbot-Lau interferometry, has the highest potential for commercial use in biomedical imaging at the moment, because commercially available X-ray sources can be used in a compact setup. In Talbot-Lau interferometers, core elements are phase and absorption gratings with challenging specifications because of their high aspect ratios (structure height over width). For the long grating lamellas structural heights of more than 100 μm together with structural width in the micron range are requested. We are developing a fabrication process based on deep x-ray lithography and electroforming (LIGA) to fabricate these challenging structures. In case of LIGA gratings the structural area is currently limited to several centimeters by several centimeters which limit the field of view in grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging. In order to increase the grating area significantly we are developing a stitching method for gratings using a 625 μm thick silicon wafer as a carrier substrate. In this work we compare the silicon carrier with an alternative one, polyimide, for patient dose reduction and for the use at lower energies in terms of transmission and image reconstruction problems.

  14. Warm Absorbers in X-rays (WAX), a comprehensive high resolution grating spectral study of a sample of Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, S.; Guainazzi, M.; Dewangan, G.; Chakravorty, S.; Kembhavi, A.

    2014-07-01

    We present results from a homogeneous analysis of the broadband 0.3-10 keV CCD resolution as well as of soft X-ray high-resolution grating spectra of a hard X-ray flux-limited sample of 26 Seyfert galaxies observed with XMM-Newton. We could put a strict lower limit on the detection fraction of 50%. We find a gap in the distribution of the ionisation parameter in the range 0.5absorber flow is probably constituted by a clumpy distribution of discrete clouds. The distribution of the WA column densities for the sources with broad Fe K-alpha lines are similar to those sources which do not have broadened emission lines. Therefore the detected broad Fe K lines are bonafide and not artefacts of ionised absorption in the soft X-rays. The WA parameters show no correlation among themselves, except for one case. The shallow slope of the logξ versus logv_{out} linear regression (0.12± 0.03) is inconsistent with the scaling laws predicted by radiation or magneto-hydrodynamic-driven winds. Our results suggest also that WA and Ultra Fast Outflows (UFOs) do not represent extreme manifestation of the same astrophysical system.

  15. Development of Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detector with High Absorption Yields Utilizing Silicon Pixel Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiki, Shigetomo; Fujii, Go; Ukibe, Masahiro; Kitajima, Yoshinori; Ohkubo, Masataka

    2016-02-01

    A superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) array detector along with silicon pixel absorbers (STJ-SPA) is fabricated to achieve high detection efficiency at X-ray energies below 10 keV. The STJ pixels have dimensions of 100 \\upmu m × 100 \\upmu m and are composed of Nb-Al/AlOX /Al-Nb thin layers. The SPAs are also 100 \\upmu m × 100 \\upmu m and have a depth of 400 \\upmu m, and are isolated from each other by a deep trench with a depth of 350 \\upmu m. The detection efficiency of the STJ-SPA exceeds 95 % at X-ray energies below 10 keV, and its energy resolution is 82 eV FWHM, as measured at the Si K\\upalpha line at 1740 eV. By means of the STJ-SPA detector, the X-ray absorption spectrum of the light element sulfur with a concentration of less than 0.1 wt% in a soda-lime glass sample was successfully acquired.

  16. Development of Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detector with High Absorption Yields Utilizing Silicon Pixel Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiki, Shigetomo; Fujii, Go; Ukibe, Masahiro; Kitajima, Yoshinori; Ohkubo, Masataka

    2016-07-01

    A superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) array detector along with silicon pixel absorbers (STJ-SPA) is fabricated to achieve high detection efficiency at X-ray energies below 10 keV. The STJ pixels have dimensions of 100 \\upmu m × 100 \\upmu m and are composed of Nb-Al/AlOX/Al-Nb thin layers. The SPAs are also 100 \\upmu m × 100 \\upmu m and have a depth of 400 \\upmu m, and are isolated from each other by a deep trench with a depth of 350 \\upmu m. The detection efficiency of the STJ-SPA exceeds 95 % at X-ray energies below 10 keV, and its energy resolution is 82 eV FWHM, as measured at the Si K\\upalpha line at 1740 eV. By means of the STJ-SPA detector, the X-ray absorption spectrum of the light element sulfur with a concentration of less than 0.1 wt% in a soda-lime glass sample was successfully acquired.

  17. Measurement of patient entrance surface dose rates for fluoroscopic x-ray units.

    PubMed

    Martin, C J

    1995-05-01

    Measurements of patient entrance surface dose rate provide valuable data for interpreting results from dose-area product studies on fluoroscopic x-ray equipment. Methods for measurement of entrance surface dose rate with backscatter and incident dose rate without backscatter have been investigated. Entrance surface dose rate is measured with an ionization chamber in contact with a tissue-equivalent phantom. Backscattered radiation contributes 27-45% to the measurement and is affected by field size and chamber position. Incident dose rate measured using a copper phantom provides an alternative approach. Consistent relationships between thicknesses of Perspex and copper giving similar incident dose rates under automatic gain control have been established for different tube potentials with and without a grid. This allows measurements of incident dose rate made using copper to be linked to corresponding thicknesses of tissue-equivalent material. Since only a few millimetres of copper are required, contributions from backscatter can be minimized and transport of phantoms is simplified. Incident dose can be related to dose-area product and entrance surface dose derived using backscatter factors. Such measurements play a valuable role in interpreting patient dose data and recommending options to reduce patient dose. PMID:7652010

  18. Determination of Lateral Diffusivity in Single Pixel X-ray Absorbers with Implications for Position Dependent Excess Broadening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saab, T.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Iyomoto, N.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J.; Finkbeiner, F.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J.

    2005-01-01

    An ideal microcalorimeter is characterized by a constant energy resolution across the sensor's dynamic range. Any dependence of pulse shape on the position within the absorber where an event occurs leads to a degradation in resolution that is linear with event s energy (excess broadening). In this paper we present a numerical simulation that was developed to model the variation in pulse shape with position based on the thermal conductivity within the absorber and between the absorber, sensor, and heat bath, for arbitrarily shaped absorbers and sensors. All the parameters required for the simulation can be measured from actual devices. We describe how the thermal conductivity of the absorber material is determined by comparing the results of this model with data taken from a position sensitive detector in which any position dependent effect is purposely emphasized by making a long, narrow absorber that is read out by sensors on both end. Finally, we present the implications for excess broadening given the measured parameters of our X-ray microcalorimeters.

  19. A framework for organ dose estimation in x-ray angiography and interventional radiology based on dose-related data in DICOM structured reports.

    PubMed

    Omar, Artur; Bujila, Robert; Fransson, Annette; Andreo, Pedro; Poludniowski, Gavin

    2016-04-21

    Although interventional x-ray angiography (XA) procedures involve relatively high radiation doses that can lead to deterministic tissue reactions in addition to stochastic effects, convenient and accurate estimation of absorbed organ doses has traditionally been out of reach. This has mainly been due to the absence of practical means to access dose-related data that describe the physical context of the numerous exposures during an XA procedure. The present work provides a comprehensive and general framework for the determination of absorbed organ dose, based on non-proprietary access to dose-related data by utilizing widely available DICOM radiation dose structured reports. The framework comprises a straightforward calculation workflow to determine the incident kerma and reconstruction of the geometrical relation between the projected x-ray beam and the patient's anatomy. The latter is difficult in practice, as the position of the patient on the table top is unknown. A novel patient-specific approach for reconstruction of the patient position on the table is presented. The proposed approach was evaluated for 150 patients by comparing the estimated position of the primary irradiated organs (the target organs) with their position in clinical DICOM images. The approach is shown to locate the target organ position with a mean (max) deviation of 1.3 (4.3), 1.8 (3.6) and 1.4 (2.9) cm for neurovascular, adult and paediatric cardiovascular procedures, respectively. To illustrate the utility of the framework for systematic and automated organ dose estimation in routine clinical practice, a prototype implementation of the framework with Monte Carlo simulations is included. PMID:27008040

  20. A framework for organ dose estimation in x-ray angiography and interventional radiology based on dose-related data in DICOM structured reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Artur; Bujila, Robert; Fransson, Annette; Andreo, Pedro; Poludniowski, Gavin

    2016-04-01

    Although interventional x-ray angiography (XA) procedures involve relatively high radiation doses that can lead to deterministic tissue reactions in addition to stochastic effects, convenient and accurate estimation of absorbed organ doses has traditionally been out of reach. This has mainly been due to the absence of practical means to access dose-related data that describe the physical context of the numerous exposures during an XA procedure. The present work provides a comprehensive and general framework for the determination of absorbed organ dose, based on non-proprietary access to dose-related data by utilizing widely available DICOM radiation dose structured reports. The framework comprises a straightforward calculation workflow to determine the incident kerma and reconstruction of the geometrical relation between the projected x-ray beam and the patient’s anatomy. The latter is difficult in practice, as the position of the patient on the table top is unknown. A novel patient-specific approach for reconstruction of the patient position on the table is presented. The proposed approach was evaluated for 150 patients by comparing the estimated position of the primary irradiated organs (the target organs) with their position in clinical DICOM images. The approach is shown to locate the target organ position with a mean (max) deviation of 1.3 (4.3), 1.8 (3.6) and 1.4 (2.9) cm for neurovascular, adult and paediatric cardiovascular procedures, respectively. To illustrate the utility of the framework for systematic and automated organ dose estimation in routine clinical practice, a prototype implementation of the framework with Monte Carlo simulations is included.

  1. ESR investigation of sucrose radicals produced by 0.25−4.5 Gy doses of X-ray irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Kobukai, Ken; Sato, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    We investigated stable radicals produced by 0.25−4.5 Gy doses of X-ray irradiation of sucrose. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is able to observe the signal from sucrose irradiated at 0.25 Gy. The ESR signal intensity of the radicals is related to the accumulated dose, and it increases linearly with increasing absorbed dose. In addition, we examined the effect of dose rate (0.50−1.5 Gy/min) on the signal intensity of the irradiated sucrose. The stable radical production did not exhibit dose rate dependence. In addition, the peak corresponding to the irradiated glucose was observed to increase more with increasing absorbed dose than the peak corresponding to irradiated fructose. Therefore, the present ESR results regarding the 0.25−4.5 Gy irradiation of sucrose provide new insights into a possible sucrose ESR dosimeter. PMID:24672022

  2. Cosolvent-free polymer gel dosimeters with improved dose sensitivity and resolution for x-ray CT dose response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chain, J. N. M.; Jirasek, A.; Schreiner, L. J.; McAuley, K. B.

    2011-04-01

    This study reports new N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel recipes with increased dose sensitivity and improved dose resolution for x-ray CT readout. NIPAM can be used to increase the solubility of N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide (Bis) in aqueous solutions from approximately 3% to 5.5% by weight, enabling the manufacture of dosimeters containing up to 19.5%T, which is the total concentration of NIPAM and Bis by weight. Gelatin is shown to have a mild influence on dose sensitivity when gels are imaged using x-ray CT, and a stronger influence when gels are imaged optically. Phantoms that contain only 3% gelatin and 5 mM tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride are sufficiently stiff for dosimetry applications. The best cosolvent-free gel formulation has a dose sensitivity in the linear range (~0.88 H Gy-1) that is a small improvement compared to the best NIPAM-based gels that incorporate isopropanol as a cosolvent (~0.80 H Gy-1). This new gel formulation results in enhanced dose resolution (~0.052 Gy) for x-ray CT readout, making clinical applications of this imaging modality more feasible.

  3. Relationship between radiation dose and reduced X-ray sensitivity surrounding breast region using CR stimulable phosphor plate for mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishide, Hiroko; Kodera, Yoshie

    2015-03-01

    Computed radiography (CR) systems use a photostimulable phosphor plate (imaging plate ; IP) as a sensor for digital mammography. In clinical mammography, breast is almost exposed same region of IP, and therefor, direct x-ray regions surrounding suffer from reduced x-ray sensitivity. Consequently, the difference in x-ray sensitivity between the breast regions and the unattenuated x-ray region was obtained. However, radiation dose quantity that reduces x-ray sensitivity is not known. In this study, we imaged a breast phantom under fixed conditions, and subsequently, we investigated the pixel value differences between the breast region and the unattenuated x-ray regions. We measured the entrance air-kerma using 550 sensing elements of glass dosimeter, 22x25 lines, that were placed at the surface of the cassette including the IP. In order to measure the x-ray sensitivity, pre- and post-exposure breast phantom images were acquired after 500, 1,000, 1,350, and 1,500 trials. The pixel values were measured at four points; in the breast region and in the unattenuated x-ray region. The ratio of these pixel values was compared with the cumulative exposure dose. The ratio was nearly constant until 1,000 trials, but a significant reduction was observed after 1,350 trials. Further, in the image obtained after 1,500th trials, the shape of breast phantom could be observed. This image supports the fact that the x-ray sensitivity was lowered in the unattenuated x-ray region. The difference in the pixel value between the breast region and the unattenuated x-ray region was obtained over 1,000 exposures at 100,000 mAs.

  4. Characterization of amorphous thermoluminescence dosimeters for patient dose measurement in X-ray diagnostic procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, N. N. H.; Salleh, H.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Zulkifli, M. I.; Hashim, S.; Bradley, D. A.; M. Noor, N.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the use of novel Ge-doped amorphous silica flat fibers as thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in verifying patient entrance surface-dose (ESD) in diagnostic examinations. Selected fibers with established dosimetric characteristics (including energy dependence, linearity, reproducibility, and fading) were loaded into plastic capsules in groups of six. The fibers have been calibrated against a parallel plate ionization chamber, use being made of x-rays generated at 70 kVp, accessing a Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL) facility. The fiber characterization measurements were made using a Toshiba X-ray machine operating within the nominal energies range 40 kVp to 150 kVp, for doses in the range 0.02 mGy up to 3 mGy. For doses from 2 mGy up to 150 mGy, the flat fibers exhibit linearity between TL yield and dose, reproducible to better than 3% standard deviation following repeat measurements (n=3). A marked energy-dependent response is observed for photons generated at potentials from 40 kVp to 150 kVp. From present results, it is concluded that Ge-doped fibers represent a viable system for use in diagnostic dosimetry, corrections being made for the various factors influencing TL yield.

  5. Fetal radiation doses and subsequent risks from X-ray examinations: Should we be concerned?

    PubMed Central

    Chaparian, Ali; Aghabagheri, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pregnant women are sometimes exposed to ionizing radiation in radiology examinations for various reasons. In such cases, the radiation dose to the conceptus and subsequent risks should be estimated. Objective: The purpose of this study was the calculation and presentation of fetal dose and subsequent risks resulted from different X-ray examinations. Materials and Methods: An analytical simulation study was conducted and six common radiographies in different views and three types of special examinations were evaluated. The entrance skin exposure (ESE) was measured using a solid-state dosimeter. A Monte Carlo program was used in order to simulate different views of X-ray examinations and calculate the radiation doses received by the conceptus for every view of each examination. Then the risk of childhood cancer and small head size were calculated for different radiographies. Results: The fetal doses and consequence risks of the small head size and childhood cancer for the radiographs of chest, skull, and sinuses were negligible but the risks of childhood cancer and small head size due to radiographies of abdomen, lumbar spine, and pelvis areas were ponderable. Conclusion: Results of this study can be used for the pregnant women radiographies management. PMID:24639714

  6. X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat and ...

  7. Toward an organ based dose prescription method for the improved accuracy of murine dose in orthovoltage x-ray irradiators

    PubMed Central

    Belley, Matthew D.; Wang, Chu; Nguyen, Giao; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetry is essential when irradiating mice to ensure that functional and molecular endpoints are well understood for the radiation dose delivered. Conventional methods of prescribing dose in mice involve the use of a single dose rate measurement and assume a uniform average dose throughout all organs of the entire mouse. Here, the authors report the individual average organ dose values for the irradiation of a 12, 23, and 33 g mouse on a 320 kVp x-ray irradiator and calculate the resulting error from using conventional dose prescription methods. Methods: Organ doses were simulated in the Geant4 application for tomographic emission toolkit using the MOBY mouse whole-body phantom. Dosimetry was performed for three beams utilizing filters A (1.65 mm Al), B (2.0 mm Al), and C (0.1 mm Cu + 2.5 mm Al), respectively. In addition, simulated x-ray spectra were validated with physical half-value layer measurements. Results: Average doses in soft-tissue organs were found to vary by as much as 23%–32% depending on the filter. Compared to filters A and B, filter C provided the hardest beam and had the lowest variation in soft-tissue average organ doses across all mouse sizes, with a difference of 23% for the median mouse size of 23 g. Conclusions: This work suggests a new dose prescription method in small animal dosimetry: it presents a departure from the conventional approach of assigning a single dose value for irradiation of mice to a more comprehensive approach of characterizing individual organ doses to minimize the error and uncertainty. In human radiation therapy, clinical treatment planning establishes the target dose as well as the dose distribution, however, this has generally not been done in small animal research. These results suggest that organ dose errors will be minimized by calibrating the dose rates for all filters, and using different dose rates for different organs. PMID:24593746

  8. Toward an organ based dose prescription method for the improved accuracy of murine dose in orthovoltage x-ray irradiators

    SciTech Connect

    Belley, Matthew D.; Wang, Chu; Nguyen, Giao; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetry is essential when irradiating mice to ensure that functional and molecular endpoints are well understood for the radiation dose delivered. Conventional methods of prescribing dose in mice involve the use of a single dose rate measurement and assume a uniform average dose throughout all organs of the entire mouse. Here, the authors report the individual average organ dose values for the irradiation of a 12, 23, and 33 g mouse on a 320 kVp x-ray irradiator and calculate the resulting error from using conventional dose prescription methods. Methods: Organ doses were simulated in the Geant4 application for tomographic emission toolkit using the MOBY mouse whole-body phantom. Dosimetry was performed for three beams utilizing filters A (1.65 mm Al), B (2.0 mm Al), and C (0.1 mm Cu + 2.5 mm Al), respectively. In addition, simulated x-ray spectra were validated with physical half-value layer measurements. Results: Average doses in soft-tissue organs were found to vary by as much as 23%–32% depending on the filter. Compared to filters A and B, filter C provided the hardest beam and had the lowest variation in soft-tissue average organ doses across all mouse sizes, with a difference of 23% for the median mouse size of 23 g. Conclusions: This work suggests a new dose prescription method in small animal dosimetry: it presents a departure from the conventional approach of assigninga single dose value for irradiation of mice to a more comprehensive approach of characterizing individual organ doses to minimize the error and uncertainty. In human radiation therapy, clinical treatment planning establishes the target dose as well as the dose distribution, however, this has generally not been done in small animal research. These results suggest that organ dose errors will be minimized by calibrating the dose rates for all filters, and using different dose rates for different organs.

  9. Unification of X-ray Winds in Seyfert Galaxies: From Ultra-fast Outflows to Warm Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Nemmen, R. S.; Braito, V.; Gaspari, M.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    The existence of ionized X-ray absorbing layers of gas along the line of sight to the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies is a well established observational fact. This material is systematically outflowing and shows a large range in parameters. However, its actual nature and dynamics are still not clear. In order to gain insights into these important issues we performed a literature search for papers reporting the parameters of the soft X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) in 35 type 1 Seyferts and compared their properties to those of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) detected in the same sample. The fraction of sources with WAs is >60 per cent, consistent with previous studies. The fraction of sources with UFOs is >34 per cent, >67 per cent of which also show WAs. The large dynamic range obtained when considering all the absorbers together, spanning several orders of magnitude in ionization, column, velocity and distance allows us, for the first time, to investigate general relations among them. In particular, we find significant correlations indicating that the closer the absorber is to the central black hole, the higher the ionization, column, outflow velocity and consequently the mechanical power. In all the cases, the absorbers continuously populate the whole parameter space, with the WAs and the UFOs lying always at the two ends of the distribution. These evidence strongly suggest that these absorbers, often considered of different types, could actually represent parts of a single large-scale stratified outflow observed at different locations from the black hole. The UFOs are likely launched from the inner accretion disc and the WAs at larger distances, such as the outer disc and/or torus. We argue that the observed parameters and correlations are, to date, consistent with both radiation pressure through Compton scattering and magnetohydrodynamic processes contributing to the outflow acceleration, the latter playing a major role. Most of the absorbers, especially the UFOs, show

  10. Unification of X-ray winds in Seyfert galaxies: from ultra-fast outflows to warm absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Nemmen, R. S.; Braito, V.; Gaspari, M.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2013-04-01

    The existence of ionized X-ray absorbing layers of gas along the line of sight to the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies is a well established observational fact. This material is systematically outflowing and shows a large range in parameters. However, its actual nature and dynamics are still not clear. In order to gain insights into these important issues we performed a literature search for papers reporting the parameters of the soft X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) in 35 type 1 Seyferts and compared their properties to those of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) detected in the same sample. The fraction of sources with WAs is >60 per cent, consistent with previous studies. The fraction of sources with UFOs is >34 per cent, >67 per cent of which also show WAs. The large dynamic range obtained when considering all the absorbers together, spanning several orders of magnitude in ionization, column, velocity and distance allows us, for the first time, to investigate general relations among them. In particular, we find significant correlations indicating that the closer the absorber is to the central black hole, the higher the ionization, column, outflow velocity and consequently the mechanical power. In all the cases, the absorbers continuously populate the whole parameter space, with the WAs and the UFOs lying always at the two ends of the distribution. These evidence strongly suggest that these absorbers, often considered of different types, could actually represent parts of a single large-scale stratified outflow observed at different locations from the black hole. The UFOs are likely launched from the inner accretion disc and the WAs at larger distances, such as the outer disc and/or torus. We argue that the observed parameters and correlations are, to date, consistent with both radiation pressure through Compton scattering and magnetohydrodynamic processes contributing to the outflow acceleration, the latter playing a major role. Most of the absorbers, especially the UFOs, show

  11. Empirical electro-optical and x-ray performance evaluation of CMOS active pixels sensor for low dose, high resolution x-ray medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, C D; Bohndiek, S E; Royle, G; Blue, A; Liang, H X; Clark, A; Prydderch, M; Turchetta, R; Speller, R

    2007-12-01

    Monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors with high performance have gained attention in the last few years in many scientific and space applications. In order to evaluate the increasing capabilities of this technology, in particular where low dose high resolution x-ray medical imaging is required, critical electro-optical and physical x-ray performance evaluation was determined. The electro-optical performance includes read noise, full well capacity, interacting quantum efficiency, and pixels cross talk. The x-ray performance, including x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detection quantum efficiency, has been evaluated in the mammographic energy range. The sensor is a 525 x 525 standard three transistor CMOS active pixel sensor array with more than 75% fill factor and 25 x 25 microm pixel pitch. Reading at 10 f/s, it is found that the sensor has 114 electrons total additive noise, 10(5) electrons full well capacity with shot noise limited operation, and 34% interacting quantum efficiency at 530 nm. Two different structured CsI:Tl phosphors with thickness 95 and 115 microm, respectively, have been optically coupled via a fiber optic plate to the array resulting in two different system configurations. The sensitivity of the two different system configurations was 43 and 47 electrons per x-ray incident on the sensor. The MTF at 10% of the two different system configurations was 9.5 and 9 cycles/mm with detective quantum efficiency of 0.45 and 0.48, respectively, close to zero frequency at approximately 0.44 microC/kg (1.72 mR) detector entrance exposure. The detector was quantum limited at low spatial frequencies and its performance was comparable with high resolution a: Si and charge coupled device based x-ray imagers. The detector also demonstrates almost an order of magnitude lower noise than active matrix flat panel imagers. The results suggest that CMOS active pixel sensors when coupled

  12. Empirical electro-optical and x-ray performance evaluation of CMOS active pixels sensor for low dose, high resolution x-ray medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Arvanitis, C. D.; Bohndiek, S. E.; Royle, G.; Blue, A.; Liang, H. X.; Clark, A.; Prydderch, M.; Turchetta, R.; Speller, R.

    2007-12-15

    Monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors with high performance have gained attention in the last few years in many scientific and space applications. In order to evaluate the increasing capabilities of this technology, in particular where low dose high resolution x-ray medical imaging is required, critical electro-optical and physical x-ray performance evaluation was determined. The electro-optical performance includes read noise, full well capacity, interacting quantum efficiency, and pixels cross talk. The x-ray performance, including x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detection quantum efficiency, has been evaluated in the mammographic energy range. The sensor is a 525x525 standard three transistor CMOS active pixel sensor array with more than 75% fill factor and 25x25 {mu}m pixel pitch. Reading at 10 f/s, it is found that the sensor has 114 electrons total additive noise, 10{sup 5} electrons full well capacity with shot noise limited operation, and 34% interacting quantum efficiency at 530 nm. Two different structured CsI:Tl phosphors with thickness 95 and 115 {mu}m, respectively, have been optically coupled via a fiber optic plate to the array resulting in two different system configurations. The sensitivity of the two different system configurations was 43 and 47 electrons per x-ray incident on the sensor. The MTF at 10% of the two different system configurations was 9.5 and 9 cycles/mm with detective quantum efficiency of 0.45 and 0.48, respectively, close to zero frequency at {approx}0.44 {mu}C/kg (1.72 mR) detector entrance exposure. The detector was quantum limited at low spatial frequencies and its performance was comparable with high resolution a:Si and charge coupled device based x-ray imagers. The detector also demonstrates almost an order of magnitude lower noise than active matrix flat panel imagers. The results suggest that CMOS active pixel sensors when coupled to

  13. Measurement of radiotherapy superficial X-ray dose under eye shields with radiochromic film.

    PubMed

    Butson, Martin J; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K N; Price, Sian; Bailey, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Accurate measurement and knowledge of dose delivered under eye shield during superficial X-ray radiotherapy is required for patient peripheral dose assessment. Critical structures can include the cornea, lens and retina. Measurement of dose under eye shields has been historically performed with Thermoluminescent Dosimeters (TLD's) due to their small size and design. Restrictions include the energy dependence and the fact that they only provide a point dose assessment. This note investigates the use of a low energy dependence radiochromic thin film for measurement of dose under eye shields in a phantom and compares results to theoretical calculation of dose. Results have shown a good match between predicted and experimentally measured results at the centre of an eye shield irradiated with 50kVp and 150kVp beams. The added advantage of radiochromic film compared to TLD measurements is the two dimensional dose map which is recorded for the assessment of dose providing not only an assessment at the site of the cornea, lens and retina in a phantom but in other areas as well. Radiochromic film has been found to accurately measure dose under eye shield in phantom treatments. PMID:18162428

  14. Radiation dose levels for conventional chest and abdominal X-ray procedures in elected hospitals in Sudan.

    PubMed

    Babikir, E; Hasan, Hussein A; Abdelrazig, A; Alkhorayef, M A; Manssor, E; Sulieman, A

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to assess patient entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) during chest and abdominal X-ray procedures in screen film radiography (SFR) and computed radiography (CR) to establish dose reference levels. Patients' doses were measured in five hospitals for a total of 196 patients. ESAK was calculated from exposure parameters using DosCal software. The X-ray tube output (mGy mAs(-1)), accuracy of exposure factors, linearity and reproducibility were measured using an Unfors Xi dosimeter. The overall mean and range of ESAK during chest X-ray were 0.6 ± 0.3 (0.1-1.3) mGy, while for abdominal X-rays they were 4.0 ± 3.2 (1.3-9.2) mGy. Hospital with a CR system was found to use relatively higher doses. Dose values for abdominal X-ray procedures were comparable with previous studies. The dose for chest X-ray procedure was higher by a factor of 2-3 compared with the current international reference levels. PMID:25852182

  15. [Absorbed doses in dental radiology].

    PubMed

    Bianchi, S D; Roccuzzo, M; Albrito, F; Ragona, R; Anglesio, S

    1996-01-01

    The growing use of dento-maxillo-facial radiographic examinations has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies on dosimetry. A thorough review of the literature is presented in this article. Most studies were carried out on tissue equivalent skull phantoms, while only a few were in vivo. The aim of the present study was to evaluate in vivo absorbed doses during Orthopantomography (OPT). Full Mouth Periapical Examination (FMPE) and Intraoral Tube Panoramic Radiography (ITPR). Measurements were made on 30 patients, reproducing clinical conditions, in 46 anatomical sites, with 24 intra- and 22 extra-oral thermoluminiscent dosimeters (TLDS). The highest doses were measured, in orthopantomography, at the right mandibular angle (1899 mu Gy) in FMPE on the right naso-labial fold (5640 mu Gy and in ITPR on the palatal surface of the left second upper molar (1936 mu Gy). Intraoral doses ranged from 21 mu Gy, in orthopantomography, to 4494 mu Gy in FMPE. Standard errors ranged from 142% in ITPR to 5% in orthopantomography. The highest rate of standard errors was found in FMPE and ITPR. The data collected in this trial are in agreement with others in major literature reports. Disagreements are probably due to different exam acquisition and data collections. Such differences, presented comparison in several sites, justify lower doses in FMPE and ITPR. Advantages and disadvantages of in vivo dosimetry of the maxillary region are discussed, the former being a close resemblance to clinical conditions of examination and the latter the impossibility of collecting values in depth of tissues. Finally, both ITPR and FMPE required lower doses than expected, and can be therefore reconsidered relative to their radiation risk. PMID:8966249

  16. Filtration to reduce paediatric dose for a linear slot-scanning digital X-ray machine.

    PubMed

    Perks, T D; Dendere, R; Irving, B; Hartley, T; Scholtz, P; Lawson, A; Trauernicht, C; Steiner, S; Douglas, T S

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes modelling, application and validation of a filtration technique for a linear slot-scanning digital X-ray system to reduce radiation dose to paediatric patients while preserving diagnostic image quality. A dose prediction model was implemented, which calculates patient entrance doses using variable input parameters. Effective dose is calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation. An added filter of 1.8-mm aluminium was predicted to lower the radiation dose significantly. An objective image quality study was conducted using detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The PTW Normi 4FLU test phantom was used for quantitative assessment, showing that image contrast and spatial resolution were maintained with the proposed filter. A paediatric cadaver full-body imaging trial assessed the diagnostic quality of the images and measured the dose reduction using a 1.8-mm aluminium filter. Assessment by radiologists indicated that diagnostic quality was maintained with the added filtration, despite a reduction in DQE. A new filtration technique for full-body paediatric scanning on the Lodox Statscan has been validated, reducing entrance dose for paediatric patients by 36 % on average and effective dose by 27 % on average, while maintaining image quality. PMID:25433049

  17. Patient dose measurement in common medical X-ray examinations in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rasuli, Behrouz; Mahmoud-Pashazadeh, Ali; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Tabari Juybari, Raheleh; Naserpour, Mozafar

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate patient dose in the chest (PA/AP/LAT) and skull (PA/AP/LAT) X-ray examinations, as frequent procedures. The study was performed in eight public hospitals of Khuzestan province, Iran. Patient dosimetry was conducted on 567 standard patient X-ray examinations (males: 61.2%, female: 38.2%). Dosimetry protocol in this study was indirect method, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Reports series No.457. Patients weighing 70 ± 10 kg were considered as standard. In the indirect dosimetry approach, exposure parameters such as kVp, mAs, focal film distance (FFD), and tube outputs recorded during data acquisition were used for calculating incident air kerma on the patient's skin, entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) that is recommended by the IAEA as the most appropriate patient dosimetry quantity in simple radiographic examinations. This survey reveals significant variations in the radiological practice. Results showed that the parameters set by radiologic technologists change in a wide range: mAs varied from 2 to 80 for skull PA, 2 to 202 for chest LAT, and FFD varied from 50 to 180 for skull LAT projection. The study showed that patient doses in three chest projections exceed the IAEA and European Commission dose reference levels (EC DRLs) - 1.0, 1.12, and 2.20 mGy for chest PA, chest AP, and chest LAT, respectively. Results also showed that mean ESAKs of patients in skull projections were generally lower than the IAEA and EC DRLs, 1.5, 1.72, and 2.25 for skull LAT, skull AP, and skull PA, respectively. This study provides evidence that dose reduction in the simple X-ray examinations is feasible by updating clinical audits and implementation of systematic quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) programs. The authors recommend that DRLs obtained in this study can be used as local DRLs in Khuzestan area and dose surveys must be performed in all provinces to establish national dose

  18. Low-dose X-ray CT reconstruction via dictionary learning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Mou, Xuanqin; Zhang, Lei; Hsieh, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2012-09-01

    Although diagnostic medical imaging provides enormous benefits in the early detection and accuracy diagnosis of various diseases, there are growing concerns on the potential side effect of radiation induced genetic, cancerous and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic performance is a major challenge in the computed tomography (CT) field. Inspired by the compressive sensing theory, the sparse constraint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT reconstruction. Compared to the discrete gradient transform used in the TV method, dictionary learning is proven to be an effective way for sparse representation. On the other hand, it is important to consider the statistical property of projection data in the low-dose CT case. Recently, we have developed a dictionary learning based approach for low-dose X-ray CT. In this paper, we present this method in detail and evaluate it in experiments. In our method, the sparse constraint in terms of a redundant dictionary is incorporated into an objective function in a statistical iterative reconstruction framework. The dictionary can be either predetermined before an image reconstruction task or adaptively defined during the reconstruction process. An alternating minimization scheme is developed to minimize the objective function. Our approach is evaluated with low-dose X-ray projections collected in animal and human CT studies, and the improvement associated with dictionary learning is quantified relative to filtered backprojection and TV-based reconstructions. The results show that the proposed approach might produce better images with lower noise and more detailed structural features in our selected cases. However, there is no proof that this is true for all kinds of structures. PMID:22542666

  19. Low-Dose X-ray CT Reconstruction via Dictionary Learning

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiong; Zhang, Lei; Hsieh, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Although diagnostic medical imaging provides enormous benefits in the early detection and accuracy diagnosis of various diseases, there are growing concerns on the potential side effect of radiation induced genetic, cancerous and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic performance is a major challenge in the computed tomography (CT) field. Inspired by the compressive sensing theory, the sparse constraint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT reconstruction. Compared to the discrete gradient transform used in the TV method, dictionary learning is proven to be an effective way for sparse representation. On the other hand, it is important to consider the statistical property of projection data in the low-dose CT case. Recently, we have developed a dictionary learning based approach for low-dose X-ray CT. In this paper, we present this method in detail and evaluate it in experiments. In our method, the sparse constraint in terms of a redundant dictionary is incorporated into an objective function in a statistical iterative reconstruction framework. The dictionary can be either predetermined before an image reconstruction task or adaptively defined during the reconstruction process. An alternating minimization scheme is developed to minimize the objective function. Our approach is evaluated with low-dose X-ray projections collected in animal and human CT studies, and the improvement associated with dictionary learning is quantified relative to filtered backprojection and TV-based reconstructions. The results show that the proposed approach might produce better images with lower noise and more detailed structural features in our selected cases. However, there is no proof that this is true for all kinds of structures. PMID:22542666

  20. Repair in mouse lung between multiple small doses of X rays

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, E.L.; Parkins, C.S.; Down, J.D.; Fowler, J.F.; Thames, H.D.

    1983-05-01

    Multiple fraction experiments have been carried out to determine the response of mouse lung to repeated small doses of 240 kV X rays down to 150 rad/fraction using breathing rate and lethality to assess damage. Two experimental approaches were used to measure the effect of small doses in vivo: (1) multiple equal doses and (2) multiple priming doses followed by a large test dose. Analysis was performed using the multitarget two-component model and the linear test dose. The amount of repair was calculated as a function of either dose per fraction (F/sub R/) or total dose (F/sub rec/). Both F/sub R/ and F/sub rec/ increased with decreasing dose per fraction but the change in F/sub R/ was small. The advantage of F/sub rec/ was that it varied more rapidly with dose per fraction than F/sub R/, so that possible differences between tissue repair capabilities are more visible on plots of repair as a function of dose per fraction. F/sub R/ and F/sub rec/ both decreased with the level of single-dose isoeffect injury; thus neither parameter is acceptable for comparing repair capability of different normal tissues with widely differing single-dose end point levels. Beta/alpha values were calculated and found to be a more acceptable index of repair capability than either F/sub R/ or F/sub rec/ because unlike those two parameters, ..beta../..cap alpha.. varied little with level of damage. Beta/alpha values of 1.7 to 4.2 krad/sup -1/ were obtained for both lung death and increased breathing rate and are clearly intermediate between the lower ..beta../..cap alpha.. ratios for acute reactions, i.e., skin and intestine, and the higher values for late reactions in kidney and spinal cord.

  1. Evidence for a Circum-Nuclear and Ionised Absorber in the X-ray Obscured Broad Line Radio Galaxy 3C 445

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braito, V.; Reeves, J. N.; Sambruna, R. M.; Gofford, J.

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the results of a Suzaku observation of the Broad Line Radio Galaxy 3C 445. We confirm the results obtained with the previous X-ray observations which unveiled the presence of several soft X-ray emission lines and an overall X-ray emission which strongly resembles a typical Seyfert 2 despite of the optical classification as an unobscured AGN. The broad band spectrum allowed us to measure for the first time the amount of reflection (R approximately 0.9) which together with the relatively strong neutral Fe Ka emission line (EW approximately 100 eV) strongly supports a scenario where a Compton-thick mirror is present. The primary X ray continuum is strongly obscured by an absorber with a column density of NH = 2 - 3 x 10(exp 23) per square centimeter. Two possible scenarios are proposed for the absorber: a neutral partial covering or a mildly ionised absorber with an ionisation parameter log xi approximately 1.0 erg centimeter per second. A comparison with the past and more recent X-ray observations of 3C 445 performed with XMM-Newton and Chandra is presented, which provided tentative evidence that the ionised and outflowing absorber varied. We argue that the absorber is probably associated with an equatorial diskwind located within the parsec scale molecular torus.

  2. Determination of the implantation dose in silicon wafers by X-ray fluorescence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Klockenkaemper, R.; Becker, M.; Bubert, H.; Burba, P. ); Palmetshofer, L. )

    1990-08-01

    The ion dose implanted in silicon wafers was determined by X-ray fluorescence analysis after the implantation process. As only near-surface layers below 1-{mu}m thickness were considered, the calibration could be carried out with external standards consisting of thin films of doped gelatine spread on pure wafers. Dose values for Cr and Co were determined between 4 {times} 10{sup 15} and 2 {times} 10{sup 17} atoms/cm{sup 2}, the detection limits being about 3 {times} 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2}. The results are precise and accurate apart from a residual scatter of less than 7%. This was confirmed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after volatilization of the silicon matrix as SiF{sub 4}. It was found that ion-current measurements carried out during the implantation process can have considerable systematic errors.

  3. X-Ray Mask Fabrication Process Using Cr Mask and ITO Stopper in the Dry Etching of W Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Takeshi; Sasaki, Kei; Marumoto, Kenji; Yabe, Hideki; Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Watakabe, Yaichiro

    1992-12-01

    An X-ray mask fabrication technology using a tungsten (W) absorber with a chromium (Cr) mask and indium titanium oxide (ITO) stopper was developed. When SF6 was used as the dry etching gas, substantial side etching occurred because the F radical reacts with W on the sidewall. In order to prevent side etching, a SF6 and CHF3 gas mixture was applied; however, the ratio of dry etching rate of W to that of resist is low. Furthermore, the underlying layer such as that of silicon dioxide (SiO2), which was used as the etching stopper, was easily damaged. Instead of a resist mask and SiO2 stopper, a Cr layer as the etching mask and ITO layer as the stopper layer were applied. By the use of these structures and etching procedures, high aspect ratio W patterns with vertical sidewalls have been successfully fabricated.

  4. Performance Evaluation of a Multichannel All-In-One Phantom Dosimeter for Dose Measurement of Diagnostic X-ray Beam

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyesu; Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Kwon, Guwon; Kim, Mingeon; Kim, Hye Jin; Song, Young Beom; Jang, Kyoung Won; Youn, Won Sik; Lee, Bongsoo

    2015-01-01

    We developed a multichannel all-in-one phantom dosimeter system composed of nine sensing probes, a chest phantom, an image intensifier, and a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor to measure the dose distribution of an X-ray beam used in radiation diagnosis. Nine sensing probes of the phantom dosimeter were fabricated identically by connecting a plastic scintillating fiber (PSF) to a plastic optical fiber (POF). To measure the planar dose distribution on a chest phantom according to exposure parameters used in clinical practice, we divided the top of the chest phantom into nine equal parts virtually and then installed the nine sensing probes at each center of the nine equal parts on the top of the chest phantom as measuring points. Each scintillation signal generated in the nine sensing probes was transmitted through the POFs and then intensified by the image intensifier because the scintillation signal normally has a very low light intensity. Real-time scintillation images (RSIs) containing the intensified scintillation signals were taken by the CMOS image sensor with a single lens optical system and displayed through a software program. Under variation of the exposure parameters, we measured RSIs containing dose information using the multichannel all-in-one phantom dosimeter and compared the results with the absorbed doses obtained by using a semiconductor dosimeter (SCD). From the experimental results of this study, the light intensities of nine regions of interest (ROI) in the RSI measured by the phantom dosimeter were similar to the dose distribution obtained using the SCD. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the planar dose distribution including the entrance surface dose (ESD) can be easily measured by using the proposed phantom dosimeter system. PMID:26569252

  5. Measurement of effects of nasal and facial shields on delivered radiation dose for superficial x-ray treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Peter K. N.; Butson, Martin J.

    2013-03-01

    Kilovoltage x-ray beams are used for the treatment of facial cancers when located on the patient's skin or subcutaneous tissue. This is of course due to the sharp depth dose characteristics of these beams delivering much lower doses at depth, than high energy x-ray beams. When treatment is performed, lead shields are often used within the nasal passage, or behind the lips and ears. These shields affect the backscattering patterns of the x-ray beams producing perturbations to upstream dose thus reducing delivered dose to the tumour. Experimental results using radiochromic films have shown that up to 10.5% ± 1.9% reduction in tumour dose can occur for field sizes less than 5 cm circle diameter for x-ray beams of 50 to 150 kVp. These results were confirmed using EGSnrc Monte Carlo techniques. Clinically more than 70% of treatments used fields of diameters less than 3 cm where the reductions were up to 6% ± 1.3%. Using a 1 cm diameter field, which can be used for skin cancer treatment on the nose, reductions up to 2.5% ± 1.3% were seen. Thus corrections need to be applied for dose calculations when underlying lead shields are used clinically in kilovoltage x-rays. The size of the reduction was also found to be dependent on the depth of the shield which will normally clinically vary from approximately 0.5 cm for nasal shields or behind eye lobes and up to approximately 1 cm for lips or cheek areas. We recommend that clinics utilize data for corrections to delivered dose in kilovoltage x-ray beams when lead shields are used in nasal passages, behind lips or behind ears for dose reduction. This can be easily and accurately measured with EBT2 Gafchromic film.

  6. Measurement of effects of nasal and facial shields on delivered radiation dose for superficial x-ray treatments.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peter K N; Butson, Martin J

    2013-03-01

    Kilovoltage x-ray beams are used for the treatment of facial cancers when located on the patient's skin or subcutaneous tissue. This is of course due to the sharp depth dose characteristics of these beams delivering much lower doses at depth, than high energy x-ray beams. When treatment is performed, lead shields are often used within the nasal passage, or behind the lips and ears. These shields affect the backscattering patterns of the x-ray beams producing perturbations to upstream dose thus reducing delivered dose to the tumour. Experimental results using radiochromic films have shown that up to 10.5% ± 1.9% reduction in tumour dose can occur for field sizes less than 5 cm circle diameter for x-ray beams of 50 to 150 kVp. These results were confirmed using EGSnrc Monte Carlo techniques. Clinically more than 70% of treatments used fields of diameters less than 3 cm where the reductions were up to 6% ± 1.3%. Using a 1 cm diameter field, which can be used for skin cancer treatment on the nose, reductions up to 2.5% ± 1.3% were seen. Thus corrections need to be applied for dose calculations when underlying lead shields are used clinically in kilovoltage x-rays. The size of the reduction was also found to be dependent on the depth of the shield which will normally clinically vary from approximately 0.5 cm for nasal shields or behind eye lobes and up to approximately 1 cm for lips or cheek areas. We recommend that clinics utilize data for corrections to delivered dose in kilovoltage x-ray beams when lead shields are used in nasal passages, behind lips or behind ears for dose reduction. This can be easily and accurately measured with EBT2 Gafchromic film. PMID:23422253

  7. Suitability of laser stimulated TLD arrays as patient dose monitors in high dose x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Geise, R A; Schueler, B A; Lien, W; Jones, S C

    1997-10-01

    Skin entrance doses of patients undergoing interventional x-ray procedures are capable of causing skin damage and should be monitored routinely. Single TLD chips are not suitable because the location of maximum skin exposure cannot be predicted. Most photographic films are too sensitive at diagnostic x-ray energies for dosimetry, exhibit temporal changes in response, and require special packaging by the user. We have investigated the suitability of laser heated MgB4O7 TLDs in a polyimide binder in the range of 0.2-20 Gy. These are available in radioluscent arrays up to 30 x 30 cm for direct measurement of patient skin dose. Dose response was compared with a calibrated ion chamber dosimeter. Exposures were made at 60, 90, and 120 kVp, at low (fluoroscopy) and high (DSA) dose rates, and at different beam incidence angles. Longitudinal reproducibility and response to temperature changes during exposure were also checked. The dose response is linear below approximately 6 Gy where the slope starts to increase 2% per Gy. Errors were less than +/- 2% over a 0-80 degrees range of beam incidence angles; less than +/- 3% for both dose rate variations and kVp differences between 70 and 120 kVp. The response was unaffected by temperature changes between 20 and 37 degrees C. Reproducibility is current +/- 7%. MgB4O7 TLD arrays are suitable for patient dosimetry in high dose fluoroscopy procedures if appropriate calibrations are used. Uncertainty in skin dose measurement is less than 10%, which is substantially better than film dosimetry. PMID:9350720

  8. Monte Carlo simulation estimates of neutron doses to critical organs of a patient undergoing 18 MV x-ray LINAC-based radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Barquero, R.; Edwards, T.M.; Iniguez, M. P.; Vega-Carrillo, H.R.

    2005-12-15

    Absorbed photoneutron dose to patients undergoing 18 MV x-ray therapy was studied using Monte Carlo simulations based on the MCNPX code. Two separate transport simulations were conducted, one for the photoneutron contribution and another for neutron capture gamma rays. The phantom model used was of a female patient receiving a four-field pelvic box treatment. Photoneutron doses were determinate to be higher for organs and tissues located inside the treatment field, especially those closest to the patient's skin. The maximum organ equivalent dose per x-ray treatment dose achieved within each treatment port was 719 {mu}Sv/Gy to the rectum (180 deg. field), 190 {mu}Sv/Gy to the intestine wall (0 deg. field), 51 {mu}Sv/Gy to the colon wall (90 deg. field), and 45 {mu}Sv/Gy to the skin (270 deg. field). The maximum neutron equivalent dose per x-ray treatment dose received by organs outside the treatment field was 65 {mu}Sv/Gy to the skin in the antero-posterior field. A mean value of 5{+-}2 {mu}Sv/Gy was obtained for organs distant from the treatment field. Distant organ neutron equivalent doses are all of the same order of magnitude and constitute a good estimate of deep organ neutron equivalent doses. Using the risk assessment method of the ICRP-60 report, the greatest likelihood of fatal secondary cancer for a 70 Gy dose is estimated to be 0.02% for the pelvic postero-anterior field, the rectum being the organ representing the maximum contribution of 0.011%.

  9. Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenberger, J.; Hell, E.; Knüpfer, W.

    2001-06-01

    While X-ray image intensifiers (XII), storage phosphor screens and film-screen systems are still the work horses of medical imaging, large flat panel solid state detectors using either scintillators and amorphous silicon photo diode arrays (FD-Si), or direct X-ray conversion in amorphous selenium are reaching maturity. The main advantage with respect to image quality and low patient dose of the XII and FD-Si systems is caused by the rise of the Detector Quantum Efficiency originating from the application of thick needle-structured phosphor X-ray absorbers. With the detectors getting closer to an optimal state, further progress in medical X-ray imaging requires an improvement of the usable source characteristics. The development of clinical monochromatic X-ray sources of high power would not only allow an improved contrast-to-dose ratio by allowing smaller average photon energies in applications but would also lead to new imaging techniques.

  10. Biphasic and triphasic dose responses in zebrafish embryos to low-dose 150 kV X-rays with different levels of hardness

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Eva Yi; Cheng, Shuk Han; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo low-dose responses of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to 150 kV X-rays with different levels of hardness were examined through the number of apoptotic events revealed at 24 h post fertilization by vital dye acridine orange staining. Our results suggested that a triphasic dose response was likely a common phenomenon in living organisms irradiated by X-rays, which comprised an ultra-low-dose inhibition, low-dose stimulation and high-dose inhibition. Our results also suggested that the hormetic zone (or the stimulation zone) was shifted towards lower doses with application of filters. The non-detection of a triphasic dose response in previous experiments could likely be attributed to the use of hard X-rays, which shifted the hormetic zone into an unmonitored ultra-low-dose region. In such cases where the subhormetic zone was missed, a biphasic dose response would be reported instead. PMID:26951078

  11. Small-dose-sensitive X-ray image pixel with HgI2 photoconductor and amorphous oxide thin-film transistor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Chul; Jeon, Pyo Jin; Kim, Jin Sung; Im, Seongil

    2015-01-01

    A new X-ray image sensor is demonstrated with an oxide thin-film transistor backplane and HgI2 sensing material. It displays outstanding image quality under a low X-ray exposure and a low electric field. It is promising as a state-of-the-art device to realize highly resolved images at a low X-ray dose for a variety of medical X-ray imaging applications. PMID:24753443

  12. Absorbed dose to water: Standards and traceability for radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    Although the need for appropriate quantities and units for ionizing radiation has existed since shortly after discovery of X-rays, the quantities and units in general use today were not completely formalized until about 15 years ago. The development of appropriate national and international standards have also been ongoing. For many years the quantity, exposure, measured in units of roentgen was the national standard and they were also the quantity and units in which radiotherapy was described. With the introduction of megavoltage X-ray and electron-beam equipment and the adoption of the quantity {open_quotes}absorbed-dose{close_quotes} measured in units of rad (or gray) different approaches to calibrating these beams were needed. This was especially the case since the national standard in terms of exposure at a maximum photon energy for {sup 60}Co gamma rays was only available. Since the late 1960s various machine calibration protocols have been published. These protocols have to accommodate changes in modality, energy, quantities and units between the national standard and the user. Because of this, a new definition of traceability is proposed to accommodate the present system. By recording all intercomparisons and parameters used, an auditable calibration chain can be maintained. Even with the introduction of calibration protocols based upon national absorbed dose standards, the proposed traceability definition will still be needed.

  13. Image quality and dose efficiency of high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging: Phantom studies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this preliminary study was to perform an image quality comparison of high energy phase sensitive imaging with low energy conventional imaging at similar radiation doses. The comparison was performed with the following phantoms: American College of Radiology (ACR), contrast-detail (CD), acrylic edge and tissue-equivalent. Visual comparison of the phantom images indicated comparable or improved image quality for all phantoms. Quantitative comparisons were performed through ACR and CD observer studies, both of which indicated higher image quality in the high energy phase sensitive images. The results of this study demonstrate the ability of high energy phase sensitive imaging to overcome existing challenges with the clinical implementation of phase contrast imaging and improve the image quality for a similar radiation dose as compared to conventional imaging near typical mammography energies. In addition, the results illustrate the capability of phase sensitive imaging to sustain the image quality improvement at high x-ray energies and for – breast – simulating phantoms, both of which indicate the potential to benefit fields such as mammography. Future studies will continue to investigate the potential for dose reduction and image quality improvement provided by high energy phase sensitive contrast imaging. PMID:24865208

  14. Megavoltage X-ray Dose Enhancement with Gold Nanoparticles in Tumor Bearing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mousavie Anijdan, Sayyed Hossein; Mahdavi, Seyyed Rabi; Shirazi, Alireza; Zarrinfard, Mohammad Ali; Hajati, Jamshid

    2013-01-01

    One of the applications of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in medicine is radiation dose-enhancing effect. Although there are many simulations, in vitro and in vivo evidence that GNPs can enhance significantly the radiation dose effect of orthovoltage beams. These beams compared with megavoltage (MV) beams, have limited applications in radiotherapy. In order to evaluate GNPs radiosensitization performance with MV beams in-vivo, we used two most clinically used X-ray beams (6 and 18 MV) with the dose of 20 Gy for each mouse. Intratumoral injection of 50 nm GNPs with the concentration of 5 mg ml-1 was applied to melanoma tumor growing in the left leg of 7 to 8 mice in 4 control and treatment groups of C57BL/6 mice. Albeit, using 10 cm plexiglass jig phantom in the beam path improved the radiation - treatments, the statistical differences between groups were not significant. According to the results, it is concluded that mice can be treated with smaller tumors and higher concentrations of GNPs in MV radiation beams. PMID:24551801

  15. Absorbed Dose and Dose Equivalent Calculations for Modeling Effective Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Andrew; Lee, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    While in orbit, Astronauts are exposed to a much higher dose of ionizing radiation than when on the ground. It is important to model how shielding designs on spacecraft reduce radiation effective dose pre-flight, and determine whether or not a danger to humans is presented. However, in order to calculate effective dose, dose equivalent calculations are needed. Dose equivalent takes into account an absorbed dose of radiation and the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation. This is important in preventing long-term, stochastic radiation effects in humans spending time in space. Monte carlo simulations run with the particle transport code FLUKA, give absorbed and equivalent dose data for relevant shielding. The shielding geometry used in the dose calculations is a layered slab design, consisting of aluminum, polyethylene, and water. Water is used to simulate the soft tissues that compose the human body. The results obtained will provide information on how the shielding performs with many thicknesses of each material in the slab. This allows them to be directly applicable to modern spacecraft shielding geometries.

  16. Discovery of Associated Absorption Lines in an X-Ray Warm Absorber: Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph Observations of MR 2251-178

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monier, Eric M.; Mathur, Smita; Wilkes, Belinda; Elvis, Martin

    2001-01-01

    The presence of a 'warm absorber' was first suggested to explain spectral variability in an X-ray spectrum of the radio-quiet quasi-stellar object (QSO) MR 2251-178. A unified picture, in which X-ray warm absorbers and 'intrinsic' UV absorbers are the same, offers the opportunity to probe the nuclear environment of active galactic nuclei. To test this scenario and understand the physical properties of the absorber, we obtained a UV spectrum of MR 2251-178 with the Faint Object Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HST spectrum clearly shows absorption due to Lyalpha, N v, and C IV, blueshifted by 300 km s(exp -1) from the emission redshift of the QSO. The rarity of both X-ray and UV absorbers in radio-quiet QSOs suggests these absorbers are physically related, if not identical. Assuming the unified scenario, we place constraints on the physical parameters of the absorber and conclude the mass outflow rate is essentially the same as the accretion rate in MR 2251-178.

  17. Radiation dose reduction in medical x-ray CT via Fourier-based iterative reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Zhao Yunzhe; Huang Zhifeng; Fung, Russell; Zhu Chun; Miao Jianwei; Mao Yu; Khatonabadi, Maryam; DeMarco, John J.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Osher, Stanley J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: A Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique, termed Equally Sloped Tomography (EST), is developed in conjunction with advanced mathematical regularization to investigate radiation dose reduction in x-ray CT. The method is experimentally implemented on fan-beam CT and evaluated as a function of imaging dose on a series of image quality phantoms and anonymous pediatric patient data sets. Numerical simulation experiments are also performed to explore the extension of EST to helical cone-beam geometry. Methods: EST is a Fourier based iterative algorithm, which iterates back and forth between real and Fourier space utilizing the algebraically exact pseudopolar fast Fourier transform (PPFFT). In each iteration, physical constraints and mathematical regularization are applied in real space, while the measured data are enforced in Fourier space. The algorithm is automatically terminated when a proposed termination criterion is met. Experimentally, fan-beam projections were acquired by the Siemens z-flying focal spot technology, and subsequently interleaved and rebinned to a pseudopolar grid. Image quality phantoms were scanned at systematically varied mAs settings, reconstructed by EST and conventional reconstruction methods such as filtered back projection (FBP), and quantified using metrics including resolution, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Pediatric data sets were reconstructed at their original acquisition settings and additionally simulated to lower dose settings for comparison and evaluation of the potential for radiation dose reduction. Numerical experiments were conducted to quantify EST and other iterative methods in terms of image quality and computation time. The extension of EST to helical cone-beam CT was implemented by using the advanced single-slice rebinning (ASSR) method. Results: Based on the phantom and pediatric patient fan-beam CT data, it is demonstrated that EST reconstructions with the lowest

  18. Dosimetric study of the effective doses resulting during dental X-ray and panoramic radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shousha, Hany A.; Abd-El Hafez, A. I.; Ahmad, Fawzia

    2011-01-01

    The panoramic image is one of the most commonly used radiographic examinations in dentistry, owing to its low dose and large area for evaluation, including bone and teeth in the same image. Although digital images are usually reported to deliver a lower radiation dose to the patient, conventional images are still available, especially in countries where digital systems are not widely economically available. Dentists should weigh the benefits of dental radiographs against the consequences of increasing a patient's exposure to radiation, the effects of which accumulate from multiple sources over time. The "as low as reasonably achievable" principle should be followed to minimize the exposure to radiation. The purpose of this investigation is to measure the absorbed radiation doses at 12 anatomical sites of a Rando-phantom and calculate the effective doses result from a full-mouth survey and panoramic radiography. Organ-absorbed doses are measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD 100) and effective organ doses (μ Sv) are estimated according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection in 2007. The total effective dose results from the panoramic imaging system have so far been below those obtained using the full-mouth survey technique used in intra-oral radiographic examination.

  19. Experimental evidence of an incomplete thermalization of the energy in an x-ray microcalorimeter with a TaAu absorber.

    PubMed

    Perinati, E; Barbera, M; Varisco, S; Silver, E; Beeman, J; Pigot, C

    2008-05-01

    We have conducted an experimental test at our XACT facility using an x-ray microcalorimeter with TaAu absorber and neutron transmutation doped germanium thermal sensor. The test was aimed at measuring the percentage of energy effectively thermalized after absorption of x-ray photons in superconducting tantalum. Moreover, in general, possible formation of long living quasiparticles implies that by using a superconducting absorber, a fraction of the deposited energy could not be thermalized on the useful time scale of the thermal sensor. To investigate this scenario, we exploited an absorber made of gold, where no energy trapping is expected, with a small piece of superconducting tantalum attached on top. We obtained evidence that the thermalization of photons absorbed in tantalum is delayed by energy trapping from quasiparticles. We compare the experimental results with numerical simulations and derive a value for the intrinsic lifetime of quasiparticles. PMID:18513077

  20. Imaging doses from the Elekta Synergy X-ray cone beam CT system.

    PubMed

    Amer, A; Marchant, T; Sykes, J; Czajka, J; Moore, C

    2007-06-01

    The Elekta Synergy is a radiotherapy treatment machine with integrated kilovoltage (kV) X-ray imaging system capable of producing cone beam CT (CBCT) images of the patient in the treatment position. The aim of this study is to assess the additional imaging dose. Cone beam CT dose index (CBDI) is introduced and measured inside standard CTDI phantoms for several sites (head: 100 kV, 38 mAs, lung: 120 kV, 152 mAs and pelvis: 130 kV, 456 mAs). The measured weighted doses were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements at various locations in a Rando phantom and at patients' surfaces. The measured CBDIs in-air at the isocentre were 9.2 mGy 100 mAs(-1), 7.3 mGy 100 mAs(-1) and 5.3 mGy 100 mAs(-1) for 130 kV, 120 kV and 100 kV, respectively. The body phantom weighted CBDI were 5.5 mGy 100 mAs(-1) and 3.8 mGy 100 mAs(-1 )for 130 kV and 120 kV. The head phantom weighted CBDI was 4.3 mGy 100 mAs(-1) for 100 kV. The weighted doses for the Christie Hospital CBCT imaging techniques were 1.6 mGy, 6 mGy and 22 mGy for the head, lung and pelvis. The measured CBDIs were used to estimate the total effective dose for the Synergy system using the ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator. Measured CBCT doses using the Christie Hospital protocols are low for head and lung scans whether compared with electronic portal imaging (EPI), commonly used for treatment verification, or single and multiple slice CT. For the pelvis, doses are similar to EPI but higher than CT. Repeated use of CBCT for treatment verification is likely and hence the total patient dose needs to be carefully considered. It is important to consider further development of low dose CBCT techniques to keep additional doses as low as reasonably practicable. PMID:17684077

  1. Changes in the electrical properties of pure and doped polymers under the influence of small doses of X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, S. A.; Madi, N. K.; Kassem, M. E.; El-Khatib, A.

    A study has been made of the temperature dependence of the d.c. conductivity of pure and borated low density polyethylene LDPE (4% and 8% borax). The above calculations were carried out before and after X-ray irradiation. The irradiation dose was varied from 0 to 1000 rad. The d.c. electrical conductivity of Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and perspex was measured as a function of temperature ranging from 20°C to 100°C. These samples were irradiated with X-rays of dose 200 rad. The variation of the d.c. conductivity of the treated samples versus temperature was investigated. The results reveal that the d.c. conductivity of LDPE is highly affected by radiation and/or dopant. In addition, the sensitivity of the explored polymers to X-ray irradiation is strongly dependent on its chemical nature.

  2. The MIRD method of estimating absorbed dose

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    The estimate of absorbed radiation dose from internal emitters provides the information required to assess the radiation risk associated with the administration of radiopharmaceuticals for medical applications. The MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) system of dose calculation provides a systematic approach to combining the biologic distribution data and clearance data of radiopharmaceuticals and the physical properties of radionuclides to obtain dose estimates. This tutorial presents a review of the MIRD schema, the derivation of the equations used to calculate absorbed dose, and shows how the MIRD schema can be applied to estimate dose from radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine.

  3. Optimized Fluoroscopy Setting and Appropriate Project Position Can Reduce X-ray Radiation Doses Rates during Electrophysiology Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Bing-Bo; Yao, Yan; Wu, Ling-Min; Qiao, Yu; Zheng, Li-Hui; Ding, Li-Gang; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nonfluoroscopic three-dimensional electroanatomical system is widely used nowadays, but X-ray remains indispensable for complex electrophysiology procedures. This study aimed to evaluate the value of optimized parameter setting and different projection position to reduce X-ray radiation dose rates. Methods: From June 2013 to October 2013, 105 consecutive patients who underwent complex ablation were enrolled in the study. After the ablation, the radiation dose rates were measured by two different settings (default setting and optimized setting) with three projection positions (posteroanterior [PA] projection; left anterior oblique [LAO] 30° projection; and LAO 45° projection). The parameter of preset voltage, pulse width, critical voltage, peak voltage, noise reduction, edge enhancement, pulse rate, and dose per frame was modified in the optimized setting. Results: The optimized setting reduced radiation dose rates by 87.5% (1.7 Gy/min vs. 13.6 Gy/min, P < 0.001) in PA, 87.3% (2.5 Gy/min vs. 19.7 Gy/min, P < 0.001) in LAO 30°, 85.9% (3.1 Gy/min vs. 22.1 Gy/min, P < 0.001) in LAO 45°. Increase the angle of projection position will increase the radiation dose rate. Conclusions: We can reduce X-ray radiation dose rates by adjusting the parameter setting of X-ray system. Avoiding oblique projection of large angle is another way to reduce X-ray radiation dose rates. PMID:25947395

  4. X-ray beam filtration, dosimetry phantom size and CT patient dose conversion factors.

    PubMed

    Huda, Walter; Sterzik, Alexander; Tipnis, Sameer

    2010-01-21

    We examine how the choice of CT x-ray beam filtration and phantom size influences patient dose (D) to computed tomography dose index (CTDI) conversion factors (i.e. D/CTDI). The ratio of head to body phantom CTDI(w) for a defined scan technique is alpha, and the ratio of organ dose when the body filter is changed to the head filter is beta. CTDI and organ doses were obtained using the ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator, and values of alpha and beta were determined for 39 CT scanners. The average value of alpha for the 39 CT scanners covering a 20 year period was 1.99 +/- 0.23, but 30% of scanners had alpha values that differed by more than 10% from the average. For GE, the value of alpha has been approximately constant at approximately 2.0. Both Philips and Siemens show a definite upward trend from values well below 2.0 in the early 1990s to well over 2.0 for their latest models. The data for Toshiba show no overall trend with time with half the data points below 2.0 and the remainder above this value. The average value of beta was 1.09 +/- 0.25. All vendors showed a downward trend in the beta parameter, and where the most recent scanners from each vendor had a beta value close to unity. Our results show that average D/CTDI conversion factors for a body phantom/filter combination are typically double those appropriate for a head phantom/filter combination. PMID:20023330

  5. Measurement of radiotherapy x-ray skin dose on a chest wall phantom.

    PubMed

    Quach, K Y; Morales, J; Butson, M J; Rosenfeld, A B; Metcalfe, P E

    2000-07-01

    Sufficient skin dose needs to be delivered by a radiotherapy chest wall treatment regimen to ensure the probability of a near surface tumor recurrence is minimized. To simulate a chest wall treatment a hemicylindrical solid water phantom of 7.5 cm radius was irradiated with 6 MV x-rays using 20x20 cm2 and 10x20 cm2 fields at 100 cm source surface distance (SSD) to the base of the phantom. A surface dose profile was obtained from 0 to 180 degrees, in 10 degrees increments around the circumference of the phantom. Dosimetry results obtained from radiochromic film (effective depth of 0.17 mm) were used in the investigation, the superficial doses were found to be 28% (of Dmax) at the 0 degrees beam entry position and 58% at the 90 degrees oblique beam position. Superficial dose results were also obtained using extra thin thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) (effective depth 0.14 mm) of 30% at 0 degrees, 57% at 90 degrees, and a metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detector (effective depth 0.5 mm) of 43% at 0 degrees, 62% at 90 degrees. Because the differences in measured superficial doses were significant and beyond those related to experimental error, these differences are assumed to be mostly attributable to the effective depth of measurement of each detector. We numerically simulated a bolus on/bolus off technique and found we could increase the coverage to the skin. Using an alternate "bolus on," "bolus off" regimen, the skin would receive 36.8 Gy at 0 degrees incidence and 46.4 Gy at 90 degrees incidence for a prescribed midpoint dose of 50 Gy. From this work it is evident that, as the circumference of the phantom is traversed the SSD increases and hence there is an inverse square fluence fall-off, this is more than offset by the increase in skin dose due to surface curvature to a plateau at about 90 degrees. Beyond this angle it is assumed that beam attenuation through the phantom and inverse square fall-off is causing the surface dose to

  6. Converging Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Kilovoltage X-Rays: Experimental Irradiation of Normal Rabbit Lung and Dose-Volume Analysis With Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo Deloar, Hossain M.; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N.; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. Methods and Materials: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. Results: A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. Conclusions: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  7. Evaluation of an X-Ray Dose Profile Derived from an Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeter during Computed Tomographic Fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Sato, Masanori; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate scatter radiation dose to the subject surface during X-ray computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy using the integrated dose ratio (IDR) of an X-ray dose profile derived from an optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeter. We aimed to obtain quantitative evidence supporting the radiation protection methods used during previous CT fluoroscopy. A multislice CT scanner was used to perform this study. OSL dosimeters were placed on the top and the lateral side of the chest phantom so that the longitudinal direction of dosimeters was parallel to the orthogonal axis-to-slice plane for measurement of dose profiles in CT fluoroscopy. Measurement of fluoroscopic conditions was performed at 120 kVp and 80 kVp. Scatter radiation dose was evaluated by calculating the integrated dose determined by OSL dosimetry. The overall percent difference of the integrated doses between OSL dosimeters and ionization chamber was 5.92%. The ratio of the integrated dose of a 100-mm length area to its tails (-50 to -6 mm, 50 to 6 mm) was the lowest on the lateral side at 80 kVp and the highest on the top at 120 kVp. The IDRs for different measurement positions were larger at 120 kVp than at 80 kVp. Similarly, the IDRs for the tube voltage between the primary X-ray beam and scatter radiation was larger on the lateral side than on the top of the phantom. IDR evaluation suggested that the scatter radiation dose has a high dependence on the position and a low dependence on tube voltage relative to the primary X-ray beam for constant dose rate fluoroscopic conditions. These results provided quantitative evidence supporting the radiation protection methods used during CT fluoroscopy in previous studies. PMID:26151914

  8. Evaluation of an X-Ray Dose Profile Derived from an Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeter during Computed Tomographic Fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Sato, Masanori; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate scatter radiation dose to the subject surface during X-ray computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy using the integrated dose ratio (IDR) of an X-ray dose profile derived from an optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeter. We aimed to obtain quantitative evidence supporting the radiation protection methods used during previous CT fluoroscopy. A multislice CT scanner was used to perform this study. OSL dosimeters were placed on the top and the lateral side of the chest phantom so that the longitudinal direction of dosimeters was parallel to the orthogonal axis-to-slice plane for measurement of dose profiles in CT fluoroscopy. Measurement of fluoroscopic conditions was performed at 120 kVp and 80 kVp. Scatter radiation dose was evaluated by calculating the integrated dose determined by OSL dosimetry. The overall percent difference of the integrated doses between OSL dosimeters and ionization chamber was 5.92%. The ratio of the integrated dose of a 100-mm length area to its tails (−50 to −6 mm, 50 to 6 mm) was the lowest on the lateral side at 80 kVp and the highest on the top at 120 kVp. The IDRs for different measurement positions were larger at 120 kVp than at 80 kVp. Similarly, the IDRs for the tube voltage between the primary X-ray beam and scatter radiation was larger on the lateral side than on the top of the phantom. IDR evaluation suggested that the scatter radiation dose has a high dependence on the position and a low dependence on tube voltage relative to the primary X-ray beam for constant dose rate fluoroscopic conditions. These results provided quantitative evidence supporting the radiation protection methods used during CT fluoroscopy in previous studies. PMID:26151914

  9. Development of a Radiation Dose Reporting Software for X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Aiping

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has experienced tremendous technological advances in recent years and has established itself as one of the most popular diagnostic imaging tools. While CT imaging clearly plays an invaluable role in modern medicine, its rapid adoption has resulted in a dramatic increase in the average medical radiation exposure to the worldwide and United States populations. Existing software tools for CT dose estimation and reporting are mostly based on patient phantoms that contain overly simplified anatomies insufficient in meeting the current and future needs. This dissertation describes the development of an easy-to-use software platform, “VirtualDose”, as a service to estimate and report the organ dose and effective dose values for patients undergoing the CT examinations. “VirtualDose” incorporates advanced models for the adult male and female, pregnant women, and children. To cover a large portion of the ignored obese patients that frequents the radiology clinics, a new set of obese male and female phantoms are also developed and applied to study the effects of the fat tissues on the CT radiation dose. Multi-detector CT scanners (MDCT) and clinical protocols, as well as the most recent effective dose algorithms from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 are adopted in “VirtualDose” to keep pace with the MDCT development and regulatory requirements. A new MDCT scanner model with both body and head bowtie filter is developed to cover both the head and body scanning modes. This model was validated through the clinical measurements. A comprehensive slice-by-slice database is established by deriving the data from a larger number of single axial scans simulated on the patient phantoms using different CT bowtie filters, beam thicknesses, and different tube voltages in the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) code. When compared to the existing CT dose software packages, organ dose data in this

  10. X-Ray Dose and Spot Size Calculations for the DARHT-II Distributed Target

    SciTech Connect

    McCarrick, J

    2001-04-05

    The baseline DARHT-II converter target consists of foamed tantalum within a solid-density cylindrical tamper. The baseline design has been modified by D. Ho to further optimize the integrated line density of material in the course of multiple beam pulses. LASNEX simulations of the hydrodynamic expansion of the target have been performed by D. Ho (documented elsewhere). The resulting density profiles have been used as inputs in the MCNP radiation transport code to calculate the X-ray dose and spot size assuming a incoming Gaussian electron beam with {sigma} = 0.65mm, and a PIC-generated beam taking into account the ''swept'' spot emerging from the DARHT-II kicker system. A prerequisite to these calculations is the absorption spectrum of air. In order to obtain this, a separate series of MCNP runs was performed for a set of monoenergetic photon sources, tallying the energy deposited in a volume of air. The forced collision feature was used to improve the statistics since the photon mean free path in air is extremely long at the energies of interest. A sample input file is given below. The resulting data for the MCNP DE and DF cards is shown in the beam-pulse input files, one of which is listed below. Note that the DE and DF cards are entered in column format for easy reading.

  11. Reducing radiation dose by application of optimized low-energy x-ray filters to K-edge imaging with a photon counting detector.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yu-Na; Lee, Seungwan; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-01-21

    K-edge imaging with photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) can improve image quality compared with conventional energy integrating detectors. However, low-energy x-ray photons below the K-edge absorption energy of a target material do not contribute to image formation in the K-edge imaging and are likely to be completely absorbed by an object. In this study, we applied x-ray filters to the K-edge imaging with a PCXD based on cadmium zinc telluride for reducing radiation dose induced by low-energy x-ray photons. We used aluminum (Al) filters with different thicknesses as the low-energy x-ray filters and implemented the iodine K-edge imaging with an energy bin of 34-48 keV at the tube voltages of 50, 70 and 90 kVp. The effects of the low-energy x-ray filters on the K-edge imaging were investigated with respect to signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and figure of merit (FOM). The highest value of SDNR was observed in the K-edge imaging with a 2 mm Al filter, and the SDNR decreased as a function of the filter thicknesses. Compared to the K-edge imaging with a 2 mm Al filter, the ESAK was reduced by 66%, 48% and 39% in the K-edge imaging with a 12 mm Al filter for 50 kVp, 70 kVp and 90 kVp, respectively. The FOM values, which took into account the ESAK and SDNR, were maximized for 8, 6 to 8 and 4 mm Al filters at 50 kVp, 70 kVp and 90 kVp, respectively. We concluded that the use of an optimal low-energy filter thickness, which was determined by maximizing the FOM, could significantly reduce radiation dose while maintaining image quality in the K-edge imaging with the PCXD. PMID:26733235

  12. Reducing radiation dose by application of optimized low-energy x-ray filters to K-edge imaging with a photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yu-Na; Lee, Seungwan; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-01-01

    K-edge imaging with photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) can improve image quality compared with conventional energy integrating detectors. However, low-energy x-ray photons below the K-edge absorption energy of a target material do not contribute to image formation in the K-edge imaging and are likely to be completely absorbed by an object. In this study, we applied x-ray filters to the K-edge imaging with a PCXD based on cadmium zinc telluride for reducing radiation dose induced by low-energy x-ray photons. We used aluminum (Al) filters with different thicknesses as the low-energy x-ray filters and implemented the iodine K-edge imaging with an energy bin of 34-48 keV at the tube voltages of 50, 70 and 90 kVp. The effects of the low-energy x-ray filters on the K-edge imaging were investigated with respect to signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and figure of merit (FOM). The highest value of SDNR was observed in the K-edge imaging with a 2 mm Al filter, and the SDNR decreased as a function of the filter thicknesses. Compared to the K-edge imaging with a 2 mm Al filter, the ESAK was reduced by 66%, 48% and 39% in the K-edge imaging with a 12 mm Al filter for 50 kVp, 70 kVp and 90 kVp, respectively. The FOM values, which took into account the ESAK and SDNR, were maximized for 8, 6 to 8 and 4 mm Al filters at 50 kVp, 70 kVp and 90 kVp, respectively. We concluded that the use of an optimal low-energy filter thickness, which was determined by maximizing the FOM, could significantly reduce radiation dose while maintaining image quality in the K-edge imaging with the PCXD.

  13. Low contrast detectability and dose savings with an amorphous silicon detector designed for x-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Ping; Schubert, Scott F.; Aufrichtig, Richard

    2000-04-01

    In an observer study we compare low contrast detectability and dose efficiency of an amorphous silicon x-ray detector versus a standard thoracic screen-film (Kodak InSight HC/InSight IT). Twelve images of a CDRAD contrast-detail phantom were acquired with the screen-film system using an entrance exposure corresponding to a conventional chest x-ray. Using the same x- ray system with an interchanged digital detector, we acquired four digital image sets (12 images each) at dose levels corresponding to 27%, 41%, 63% and 100% of the film dose. Prior to laser printing, the digital images were processed to match the film contrast and optical density level. A 4- alternative forced choice (4-AFC) paradigm with seven observers was used to measure the threshold contrasts of disk sizes from 0.5 to 4.0 mm. Further, we estimated the equivalent perceptual dose (EPD), which is the dose level of digital for which the same contrast detectability as film is obtained. Contrast detectability is significantly improved with the digital detector. On average, all disk shaped objects detected from the digital detector have lower threshold contrasts than those from film at the same dose level. The EPD value averaged over disk size is 44%, which corresponds to a 56% dose savings for the digital detector.

  14. Patient dose simulations for scanning-beam digital x-ray tomosynthesis of the lungs

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Geoff; Yoon, Sungwon; Krishna, Ganesh; Wilfley, Brian; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    location. When tumor SNR is held constant (i.e., x-ray fluence is scaled appropriately), SBDX gives 2–10 times less dose than fluoroscopy for the same conditions within the typical range of patient locations. The relative position of the patient (as a percent of SDD) has a much more significant impact on dose than either SDD or patient position. The patient position providing the minimum dose for a given tumor SNR and SDD is approximately the same as the position of maximum tomographic angle. Conclusions: SBDX offers a significant dose advantage over currently used C-arm fluoroscopy. The patient location with lowest dose coincides with the location of maximum tomographic angle. In order to provide adequate space for the patient and for the pulmonologists’ equipment, a SDD of 100 cm is recommended. PMID:24320450

  15. Patient dose simulations for scanning-beam digital x-ray tomosynthesis of the lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Geoff; Fahrig, Rebecca; Yoon, Sungwon; Krishna, Ganesh; Wilfley, Brian

    2013-11-15

    location. When tumor SNR is held constant (i.e., x-ray fluence is scaled appropriately), SBDX gives 2–10 times less dose than fluoroscopy for the same conditions within the typical range of patient locations. The relative position of the patient (as a percent of SDD) has a much more significant impact on dose than either SDD or patient position. The patient position providing the minimum dose for a given tumor SNR and SDD is approximately the same as the position of maximum tomographic angle.Conclusions: SBDX offers a significant dose advantage over currently used C-arm fluoroscopy. The patient location with lowest dose coincides with the location of maximum tomographic angle. In order to provide adequate space for the patient and for the pulmonologists’ equipment, a SDD of 100 cm is recommended.

  16. X-ray to NIR emission from AA Tauri during the dim state. Occultation of the inner disk and gas-to-dust ratio of the absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, P. C.; France, K.; Günther, H. M.; Herczeg, G.; Robrade, J.; Bouvier, J.; McJunkin, M.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2015-12-01

    AA Tau is a well-studied, nearby classical T Tauri star, which is viewed almost edge-on. A warp in its inner disk periodically eclipses the central star, causing a clear modulation of its optical light curve. The system underwent a major dimming event beginning in 2011 caused by an extra absorber, which is most likely associated with additional disk material in the line of sight toward the central source. We present new XMM-Newton X-ray, Hubble Space Telescope FUV, and ground-based optical and near-infrared data of the system obtained in 2013 during the long-lasting dim phase. The line width decrease of the fluorescent H2 disk emission shows that the extra absorber is located at r > 1 au. Comparison of X-ray absorption (NH) with dust extinction (AV), as derived from measurements obtained one inner disk orbit (eight days) after the X-ray measurement, indicates that the gas-to-dust ratio as probed by the NH to AV ratio of the extra absorber is compatible with the ISM ratio. Combining both results suggests that the extra absorber, i.e., material at r > 1 au, has no significant gas excess in contrast to the elevated gas-to-dust ratio previously derived for material in the inner region (≲0.1 au). Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Simple Method to Estimate Mean Heart Dose From Hodgkin Lymphoma Radiation Therapy According to Simulation X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Nimwegen, Frederika A. van; Cutter, David J.; Schaapveld, Michael; Rutten, Annemarieke; Kooijman, Karen; Krol, Augustinus D.G.; Janus, Cécile P.M.; Darby, Sarah C.; Leeuwen, Flora E. van; Aleman, Berthe M.P.

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: To describe a new method to estimate the mean heart dose for Hodgkin lymphoma patients treated several decades ago, using delineation of the heart on radiation therapy simulation X-rays. Mean heart dose is an important predictor for late cardiovascular complications after Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treatment. For patients treated before the era of computed tomography (CT)-based radiotherapy planning, retrospective estimation of radiation dose to the heart can be labor intensive. Methods and Materials: Patients for whom cardiac radiation doses had previously been estimated by reconstruction of individual treatments on representative CT data sets were selected at random from a case–control study of 5-year Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (n=289). For 42 patients, cardiac contours were outlined on each patient's simulation X-ray by 4 different raters, and the mean heart dose was estimated as the percentage of the cardiac contour within the radiation field multiplied by the prescribed mediastinal dose and divided by a correction factor obtained by comparison with individual CT-based dosimetry. Results: According to the simulation X-ray method, the medians of the mean heart doses obtained from the cardiac contours outlined by the 4 raters were 30 Gy, 30 Gy, 31 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively, following prescribed mediastinal doses of 25-42 Gy. The absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.85-0.97), indicating excellent agreement. Mean heart dose was 30.4 Gy with the simulation X-ray method, versus 30.2 Gy with the representative CT-based dosimetry, and the between-method absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.87 (95% confidence interval 0.80-0.95), indicating good agreement between the two methods. Conclusion: Estimating mean heart dose from radiation therapy simulation X-rays is reproducible and fast, takes individual anatomy into account, and yields results comparable to the labor

  18. Data of low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments.

    PubMed

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Honaramooz, Ali; Wiebe, Sheldon; Belev, George; Chen, Xiongbiao; Chapman, Dean

    2016-03-01

    This article presents the data of using three phase-based X-ray imaging techniques to characterize biomaterial scaffold and soft tissues in situ, as reported in our study "Low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging techniques for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments" [1]. The examined parameters include the radiation dose, scan time, and image quality, which are all critical to longitudinal in situ live animal assessments. The data presented were obtained from three dimensional imaging of scaffolds in situ cartilage by means of synchrotron-based computed tomography-diffraction enhanced imaging (CT-DEI), analyzer based imaging (CT-ABI), and in-line phase contrast imaging (CT-PCI) at standard and low dose imaging modalities. PMID:26909381

  19. Data of low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments

    PubMed Central

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Honaramooz, Ali; Wiebe, Sheldon; Belev, George; Chen, Xiongbiao; Chapman, Dean

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the data of using three phase-based X-ray imaging techniques to characterize biomaterial scaffold and soft tissues in situ, as reported in our study “Low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging techniques for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments” [1]. The examined parameters include the radiation dose, scan time, and image quality, which are all critical to longitudinal in situ live animal assessments. The data presented were obtained from three dimensional imaging of scaffolds in situ cartilage by means of synchrotron-based computed tomography-diffraction enhanced imaging (CT-DEI), analyzer based imaging (CT-ABI), and in-line phase contrast imaging (CT-PCI) at standard and low dose imaging modalities. PMID:26909381

  20. Dose calculations using convolution and superposition principles: the orientation of dose spread kernels in divergent x-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, M B; Battista, J J

    1993-01-01

    The convolution/superposition method of dose calculation has the potential to become the preferred technique for radiotherapy treatment planning. When this approach is used for therapeutic x-ray beams, the dose spread kernels are usually aligned parallel to the central axis of the incident beam. While this reduces the computational burden, it is more rigorous to tilt the kernel axis to align it with the diverging beam rays that define the incident direction of primary photons. We have assessed the validity of the parallel kernel approximation by computing dose distributions using parallel and tilted kernels for monoenergetic photons of 2, 6, and 10 MeV; source-to-surface distances (SSDs) of 50, 80, and 100 cm; and for field sizes of 5 x 5, 15 x 15, and 30 x 30 cm2. Over most of the irradiated volume, the parallel kernel approximation yields results that differ from tilted kernel calculations by 3% or less for SSDs greater than 80 cm. Under extreme conditions of a short SSD, a large field size and high incident photon energy, the parallel kernel approximation results in discrepancies that may be clinically unacceptable. For 10-MeV photons, we have observed that the parallel kernel approximation can overestimate the dose by up to 4.4% of the maximum on the central axis for a field size of 30 x 30 cm2 applied with a SSD of 50 cm. Very localized dose underestimations of up to 27% of the maximum dose occurred in the penumbral region of a 30 x 30-cm2 field of 10-MeV photons applied with a SSD of 50 cm. PMID:8309441

  1. Photon extremity absorbed dose and kerma conversion coefficients for calibration geometries.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G; Hertel, N E

    2007-02-01

    Absorbed dose and dose equivalent conversion coefficients are routinely used in personnel dosimetry programs. These conversion coefficients can be applied to particle fluences or to measured air kerma values to determine appropriate operational monitoring quantities such as the ambient dose equivalent or personal dose equivalent for a specific geometry. For personnel directly handling materials, the absorbed dose to the extremities is of concern. This work presents photon conversion coefficients for two extremity calibration geometries using finger and wrist/arm phantoms described in HPS N13.32. These conversion coefficients have been calculated as a function of photon energy in terms of the kerma and the absorbed dose using Monte Carlo techniques and the calibration geometries specified in HPS N13.32. Additionally, kerma and absorbed dose conversion coefficients for commonly used x-ray spectra and calibration source fields are presented. The kerma values calculated in this work for the x-ray spectra and calibration sources compare well to those listed in HPS N13.32. The absorbed dose values, however, differ significantly for higher energy photons because charged particle equilibrium conditions have not been satisfied for the shallow depth. Thus, the air-kerma-to-dose and exposure-to-dose conversion coefficients for Cs and Co listed in HPS N13.32 overestimate the absorbed dose to the extremities. Applying the conversion coefficients listed in HPS N13.32 for Cs, for example, would result in an overestimate of absorbed dose of 62% for the finger phantom and 55% for the wrist phantom. PMID:17220720

  2. On the definition of absorbed dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grusell, Erik

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: The quantity absorbed dose is used extensively in all areas concerning the interaction of ionizing radiation with biological organisms, as well as with matter in general. The most recent and authoritative definition of absorbed dose is given by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) in ICRU Report 85. However, that definition is incomplete. The purpose of the present work is to give a rigorous definition of absorbed dose. Methods: Absorbed dose is defined in terms of the random variable specific energy imparted. A random variable is a mathematical function, and it cannot be defined without specifying its domain of definition which is a probability space. This is not done in report 85 by the ICRU, mentioned above. Results: In the present work a definition of a suitable probability space is given, so that a rigorous definition of absorbed dose is possible. This necessarily includes the specification of the experiment which the probability space describes. In this case this is an irradiation, which is specified by the initial particles released and by the material objects which can interact with the radiation. Some consequences are discussed. Specific energy imparted is defined for a volume, and the definition of absorbed dose as a point function involves the specific energy imparted for a small mass contained in a volume surrounding the point. A possible more precise definition of this volume is suggested and discussed. Conclusions: The importance of absorbed dose motivates a proper definition, and one is given in the present work. No rigorous definition has been presented before.

  3. High-resolution, low-dose phase contrast X-ray tomography for 3D diagnosis of human breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunzhe; Brun, Emmanuel; Coan, Paola; Huang, Zhifeng; Sztrókay, Aniko; Diemoz, Paul Claude; Liebhardt, Susanne; Mittone, Alberto; Gasilov, Sergei; Miao, Jianwei; Bravin, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    Mammography is the primary imaging tool for screening and diagnosis of human breast cancers, but ~10-20% of palpable tumors are not detectable on mammograms and only about 40% of biopsied lesions are malignant. Here we report a high-resolution, low-dose phase contrast X-ray tomographic method for 3D diagnosis of human breast cancers. By combining phase contrast X-ray imaging with an image reconstruction method known as equally sloped tomography, we imaged a human breast in three dimensions and identified a malignant cancer with a pixel size of 92 μm and a radiation dose less than that of dual-view mammography. According to a blind evaluation by five independent radiologists, our method can reduce the radiation dose and acquisition time by ~74% relative to conventional phase contrast X-ray tomography, while maintaining high image resolution and image contrast. These results demonstrate that high-resolution 3D diagnostic imaging of human breast cancers can, in principle, be performed at clinical compatible doses. PMID:23091003

  4. Potential enhancement of warm x-ray dose from a reflexing bremsstrahlung diode

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Halbleib, J.A.; Cooperstein, G.; Weber, B.V.

    1995-07-01

    The potential for generating intense bursts of war x rays (20 to 60 keV) using electron reflexing diodes on pulsed-power accelerators is evaluated with the TIGER Monte Carlo code, showing that hundreds of kilojoules of warm x rays can be generated under idealized conditions. The calculation are compared with data from Gamble-II experiments and applied to two suggest Jupiter (60-MA, 5-MV, 100-ns) diode configurations. If the simultaneous irradiation from the high-energy tail of the bremsstrahlung which accompanies the warm x rays is a concern, then the reflexing technique is shown to be limited to the irradiation of targets thinner than {approximately} 400 {mu}m for low-Z targets like aluminum and thinner than {approximately} 5 {mu}m for high-Z targets like gold.

  5. Potential enhancement of warm X-ray dose from a reflexing bremsstrahlung diode

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Halbleib, J.A.; Cooperstein, G.

    1995-08-01

    The potential for generating intense bursts of warm x rays (20 to 60 keV) using electron reflexing diodes on pulsed-power accelerators is evaluated with the TIGER Monte Carlo code, showing that hundreds of kilojoules of warm x rays can be generated under idealized conditions, for a Jupiter (60-MA, 5-MV, 100-ns) class accelerator. The calculations are compared with data from Gamble-II experiments and applied to two suggested Jupiter diode configurations. If the simultaneous irradiation from the high-energy tail of the bremsstrahlung, which accompanies the warm x rays, is a concern then the reflexing technique is shown to be limited to the irradiation of targets thinner than {approximately}400 {mu}m for low-Z targets like aluminum and thinner than {approximately}5 {mu}m for high-Z targets like gold.

  6. Noise reduction by projection direction dependent diffusion for low dose fan-beam x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shaojie; Mou, Xuanqin; Zhang, Yanbo; Yu, Hengyong

    2011-03-01

    We propose a novel method to reduce the noise in fan-beam computed tomography (CT) imaging. First, the inverse Radon transform is induced for a family of differential expression of projection function. Second, the diffusion partial differential equation (PDE) is generalized from image space to projection space in parallel-beam geometry. Third, the diffusion PDE is further induced from parallel-beam geometry to fan-beam geometry. Finally, the projection direction dependent diffusion is developed to reduce CT noise, which arises from the quantum variation in the low dose exposure of a medical x-ray CT (XCT) system. The proposed noise reduction processes projections iteratively and dependently on x-ray path position, followed by a general CT reconstruction. Numerical simulation studies have demonstrated its feasibility in the noise reduction of low dose fan-beam XCT imaging.

  7. Dose and detectability improvements with high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging in comparison to low energy conventional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Yan, Aimin; Ghani, Muhammad; Li, Yuhua; Fajardo, Laurie; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the potential benefits of using high energy x-rays for phase sensitive breast imaging through a comparison with conventional mammography imaging. We compared images of a contrast-detail (CD) phantom acquired on a prototype phase sensitive x-ray imaging system with images acquired on a commercial flat panel digital mammography unit. The phase contrast images were acquired using a micro-focus x-ray source with a 50 μm focal spot at 120 kVp and 4.5 mAs, with a magnification factor of 2.46 and a 50 μm pixel pitch. A phase attenuation duality (PAD)-based phase retrieval algorithm that requires only a single phase contrast image was applied. Conventional digital mammography images were acquired at 27 kVp, 131 mAs and 28 kVp, 54 mAs. For the same radiation dose, both the observer study and SNR/FOM comparisons indicated a large improvement by the phase retrieved image as compared to the clinical system for the larger disk sizes, but the improvement was not enough to detect the smallest disks. Compared to the double dose image acquired with the clinical system, the observer study also indicated that the phase retrieved image provided improved detection capabilities for all disk sizes except the smallest disks. Thus the SNR improvement provided by phase contrast imaging is not yet enough to offset the noise reduction provided by the clinical system at the doubled dose level. However, the potential demonstrated by this study for high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging to improve lesion detection and reduce radiation dose in mammography warrants further investigation of this technique. PMID:24732108

  8. Dose and detectability improvements with high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging in comparison to low energy conventional imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan Wong, Molly; Yan, Aimin; Ghani, Muhammad; Li, Yuhua; Fajardo, Laurie; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the potential benefits of using high energy x-rays for phase sensitive breast imaging through a comparison with conventional mammography imaging. We compared images of a contrast-detail phantom acquired on a prototype phase sensitive x-ray imaging system with images acquired on a commercial flat panel digital mammography unit. The phase contrast images were acquired using a micro-focus x-ray source with a 50 µm focal spot at 120 kVp and 4.5 mAs, with a magnification factor of 2.46 and a 50 µm pixel pitch. A phase attenuation duality-based phase retrieval algorithm that requires only a single phase contrast image was applied. Conventional digital mammography images were acquired at 27 kVp, 131 mAs and 28 kVp, 54 mAs. For the same radiation dose, both the observer study and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)/figure of merit comparisons indicated a large improvement by the phase retrieved image as compared to the clinical system for the larger disc sizes, but the improvement was not enough to detect the smallest discs. Compared to the double dose image acquired with the clinical system, the observer study also indicated that the phase retrieved image provided improved detection capabilities for all disc sizes except the smallest discs. Thus the SNR improvement provided by phase contrast imaging is not yet enough to offset the noise reduction provided by the clinical system at the doubled dose level. However, the potential demonstrated by this study for high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging to improve lesion detection and reduce radiation dose in mammography warrants further investigation of this technique.

  9. Temporal, latitude and altitude absorbed dose dependences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stozhkov, Y.; Svirzhevsky, N.; Bazilevskaya, G.

    The regular balloon measurements in the Earth's atmosphere are carried on at the Lebedev Physical Institute since 1957. The regular balloon flights have been made at the high latitude stations (near Murmansk - northern hemisphere and Mi ny -r Antarctica) and at the middle latitude (Moscow). Based on these long-term measurements as well as on the latitude data obtained in the several Soviet Antarctic expeditions the calculations of absorbed doses were fulfilled for altitudes of 10, 15, 20 and 30 km. The absorbed dose dependences on the geomagnetic cutoff rigidities and the phase of the 11-year solar cycle were found. The evaluation of the solar proton events and energetic electron precipitation contributions to the absorbed dose enhancements was made.

  10. 3D global estimation and augmented reality visualization of intra-operative X-ray dose.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Nicolas Loy; Padoy, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The growing use of image-guided minimally-invasive surgical procedures is confronting clinicians and surgical staff with new radiation exposure risks from X-ray imaging devices. The accurate estimation of intra-operative radiation exposure can increase staff awareness of radiation exposure risks and enable the implementation of well-adapted safety measures. The current surgical practice of wearing a single dosimeter at chest level to measure radiation exposure does not provide a sufficiently accurate estimation of radiation absorption throughout the body. In this paper, we propose an approach that combines data from wireless dosimeters with the simulation of radiation propagation in order to provide a global radiation risk map in the area near the X-ray device. We use a multi-camera RGBD system to obtain a 3D point cloud reconstruction of the room. The positions of the table, C-arm and clinician are then used 1) to simulate the propagation of radiation in a real-world setup and 2) to overlay the resulting 3D risk-map onto the scene in an augmented reality manner. By using real-time wireless dosimeters in our system, we can both calibrate the simulation and validate its accuracy at specific locations in real-time. We demonstrate our system in an operating room equipped with a robotised X-ray imaging device and validate the radiation simulation on several X-ray acquisition setups. PMID:25333145

  11. Contact radiotherapy using a 50 kV X-ray system: Evaluation of relative dose distribution with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE and comparison with measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croce, Olivier; Hachem, Sabet; Franchisseur, Eric; Marcié, Serge; Gérard, Jean-Pierre; Bordy, Jean-Marc

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a dosimetric study concerning the system named "Papillon 50" used in the department of radiotherapy of the Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Nice, France. The machine provides a 50 kVp X-ray beam, currently used to treat rectal cancers. The system can be mounted with various applicators of different diameters or shapes. These applicators can be fixed over the main rod tube of the unit in order to deliver the prescribed absorbed dose into the tumor with an optimal distribution. We have analyzed depth dose curves and dose profiles for the naked tube and for a set of three applicators. Dose measurements were made with an ionization chamber (PTW type 23342) and Gafchromic films (EBT2). We have also compared the measurements with simulations performed using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE. Simulations were performed with a detailed geometrical description of the experimental setup and with enough statistics. Results of simulations are made in accordance with experimental measurements and provide an accurate evaluation of the dose delivered. The depths of the 50% isodose in water for the various applicators are 4.0, 6.0, 6.6 and 7.1 mm. The Monte Carlo PENELOPE simulations are in accordance with the measurements for a 50 kV X-ray system. Simulations are able to confirm the measurements provided by Gafchromic films or ionization chambers. Results also demonstrate that Monte Carlo simulations could be helpful to validate the future applicators designed for other localizations such as breast or skin cancers. Furthermore, Monte Carlo simulations could be a reliable alternative for a rapid evaluation of the dose delivered by such a system that uses multiple designs of applicators.

  12. Prunus armeniaca L (apricot) protects rat testes from detrimental effects of low-dose x-rays.

    PubMed

    Ugras, Murat Y; Kurus, Meltem; Ates, Burhan; Soylemez, Haluk; Otlu, Ali; Yilmaz, Ismet

    2010-03-01

    Exposure to low x-ray doses damages the spermatozoa, mainly by late-onset (ie, after 3 months) oxidative stress. Antioxidants ameliorate oxidation and prevent tissue damage. Prunus armeniaca L (apricot), rich in carotenoids and vitamins, is a potent natural antioxidant. We hypothesized that an apricot-rich diet might ameliorate the detrimental effects of low-dose x-rays on testis tissue. A 20% apricot diet was composed isoenergetically to the regular rodent diet. The total phenolic content, reducing power, and antioxidant capacity of both diets were determined. Sprague-Dawley rats received apricot-rich diets before and after x-ray exposure. Regular diets were given to controls. Rats were exposed to 0.2 Gy x-rays at the eighth week and were euthanized at the 20th postexposure week. Testicular oxidative status was determined by tissue thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities. For histologic evaluation, qualitative and quantitative microscopic determinations were performed, and Leydig and Sertoli cell counts and Johnsen scores were measured. The control diet group had significant testicular oxidative stress and mild tissue deterioration. Leydig and Sertoli cell counts, tubule diameters, and Johnsen scores were significantly decreased in the exposure groups. Apricot-rich diet significantly ameliorated the oxidative status and prevented the damage in tubular histology. The protective effects were prominent when the diet was maintained throughout the time course and were partially protected when the diet was initiated after exposure. The natural antioxidant activity of apricot ameliorates the delayed detrimental effects of low-dose irradiation on testis tissue. The high total antioxidant capacity of the apricot deserves further investigation. PMID:20417881

  13. Measurement of Entrance Skin Dose and Calculation of Effective Dose for Common Diagnostic X-Ray Examinations in Kashan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Aliasgharzadeh, Akbar; Mihandoost, Ehsan; Masoumbeigi, Mahboubeh; Salimian, Morteza; Mohseni, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of the radiation dose received by the patient during the radiological examination is essential to prevent risks of exposures. The aim of this work is to study patient doses for common diagnostic radiographic examinations in hospitals affiliated to Kashan University of Medical sciences, Iran. The results of this survey are compared with those published by some national and international values. Entrance surface dose (ESD) was measured based on the exposure parameters used for the actual examination and effective dose (ED) was calculated by use of conversion coefficients calculated by Monte Carlo methods. The mean entrance surface dose and effective dose for examinations of the chest (PA, Lat), abdomen (AP), pelvis (AP), lumbar spine (AP, Lat) and skull (AP, Lat) are 0.37, 0.99, 2.01, 1.76, 2.18, 5.36, 1.39 and 1.01 mGy, and 0.04, 0.1, 0.28, 0,28, 0.23, 0.13, 0.01 and 0.01 mSv, respectively. The ESDs and EDs reported in this study, except for examinations of the chest, are generally lower than comparable reference dose values published in the literature. On the basis of the results obtained in this study can conclude that use of newer equipment and use of the proper radiological parameter can significantly reduce the absorbed dose. It is recommended that radiological parameter in chest examinations be revised. PMID:26156930

  14. Measurement of Entrance Skin Dose and Calculation of Effective Dose for Common Diagnostic X-Ray Examinations in Kashan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Aliasgharzadeh, Akbar; Mihandoost, Ehsan; Masoumbeigi, Mahboubeh; Salimian, Morteza; Mohseni, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of the radiation dose received by the patient during the radiological examination is essential to prevent risks of exposures. The aim of this work is to study patient doses for common diagnostic radiographic examinations in hospitals affiliated to Kashan University of Medical sciences, Iran. The results of this survey are compared with those published by some national and international values. Entrance surface dose (ESD) was measured based on the exposure parameters used for the actual examination and effective dose (ED) was calculated by use of conversion coefficients calculated by Monte Carlo methods. The mean entrance surface dose and effective dose for examinations of the chest (PA, Lat), abdomen (AP), pelvis (AP), lumbar spine (AP, Lat) and skull (AP, Lat) are 0.37, 0.99, 2.01, 1.76, 2.18, 5.36, 1.39 and 1.01 mGy, and 0.04, 0.1, 0.28, 0,28, 0.23, 0.13, 0.01 and 0.01 mSv, respectively. The ESDs and EDs reported in this study, except for examinations of the chest, are generally lower than comparable reference dose values published in the literature. On the basis of the results obtained in this study can conclude that use of newer equipment and use of the proper radiological parameter can significantly reduce the absorbed dose. It is recommended that radiological parameter in chest examinations be revised. PMID:26156930

  15. Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) Juice Modulates Oxidative Damage Induced by Low Dose X-Ray in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Mohd Khairul Amran; Mohamed, Muhamad Idham; Abdul Razak, Hairil Rashmizal; Saad, Wan Mazlina Md.

    2014-01-01

    Watermelon is a natural product that contains high level of antioxidants and may prevent oxidative damage in tissues due to free radical generation following an exposure to ionizing radiation. The present study aimed to investigate the radioprotective effects of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice against oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray exposure in mice. Twelve adult male ICR mice were randomly divided into two groups consisting of radiation (Rx) and supplementation (Tx) groups. Rx received filtered tap water, while Tx was supplemented with 50% (v/v) watermelon juice for 28 days ad libitum prior to total body irradiation by 100 μGy X-ray on day 29. Brain, lung, and liver tissues were assessed for the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibition activities. Results showed significant reduction of MDA levels and AP sites formation of Tx compared to Rx (P < 0.05). Mice supplemented with 50% watermelon juice restore the intracellular antioxidant activities by significantly increased SOD inhibition activities and GSH levels compared to Rx. These findings may postulate that supplementation of 50% watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice could modulate oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray exposure. PMID:24877107

  16. Overall x-ray system simulation model developed for system design and image quality versus patient dose optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, Han

    2003-06-01

    We have developed a full-scale image quality (IQ) simulation model as a tool for X-ray system design, image quality optimization and patient dose reduction. The IQ model supports the (de-)composition of system level requirements and simulates several types of automatic X-ray control technique. The model is implemented in LabVIEW. The X-ray system is modeled in distinguishable components and processes, which allows isolation of sub-systems and exclusion of devices. All relevant patient dose and IQ items such as contrast, sharpness, lag and noise are calculated and additionally combined in IQ "figures of merit" (FOM). Some characteristic application examples will be presented: In a general image magnification study we compare magnification techniques, such as geometric enlargement, image intensifier zooming and digital processing. In an optimization study we apply a new IQ FOM that contains not only imaging properties of the system, but also detail information in terms of material, size and thickness. Combining the IQ simulation model with a Pareto trade-off algorithm appears to be a promising optimization approach. In addition to the mentioned employment, the IQ simulation model is also suitable for comparison studies on the performance of flat detectors versus image intensifier television detectors, application related studies and fine tuning of specific settings and adjustments, design of test objects and development of measuring methods.

  17. The impact of x-ray tube configuration on the eye lens and extremity doses received by cardiologists in electrophysiology room.

    PubMed

    Domienik, J; Bissinger, A; Zmyślony, M

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the influence of the x-ray tube configuration on the radiation doses to eye lens and extremities of cardiologists performing pacemaker implantation procedures in electrophysiology laboratory. The measurements were performed on one, widely used, portable C-arm system, first with x-ray tube mounted above the patient table and image intensifier below it and then on a reinstalled (but essentially the same) system with under-table x-ray tube configuration. Thermoluminescent dosimeters, placed in various positions near the eye lens, on the hands and ankle, were used during every procedure. The comparison of doses received by cardiologists after changing the x-ray tube configuration from over- to under-table shows statistically significant dose reduction (p < 0.009) for the eye lens closest to the x-ray tube, left finger, left wrist, while for the ankle a dose increase is observed. The corresponding over- to under-table x-ray tube median dose ratios are 4.1 for the right eye, 4.8 for the left finger, 3.0 for left wrist and, finally, 0.13 for the right ankle. Systems with under-table x-ray tube are preferable from a radiation protection point of view. The observed significant increase in doses to the legs should be partially compensated by the use of a protective lead curtain. PMID:25325561

  18. Monte Carlo derivation of filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra for dose computation in digital mammography*

    PubMed Central

    Paixão, Lucas; Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; Viloria, Carolina; de Oliveira, Marcio Alves; Teixeira, Maria Helena Araújo; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro

    2015-01-01

    Objective Derive filtered tungsten X-ray spectra used in digital mammography systems by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Materials and Methods Filtered spectra for rhodium filter were obtained for tube potentials between 26 and 32 kV. The half-value layer (HVL) of simulated filtered spectra were compared with those obtained experimentally with a solid state detector Unfors model 8202031-H Xi R/F & MAM Detector Platinum and 8201023-C Xi Base unit Platinum Plus w mAs in a Hologic Selenia Dimensions system using a direct radiography mode. Results Calculated HVL values showed good agreement as compared with those obtained experimentally. The greatest relative difference between the Monte Carlo calculated HVL values and experimental HVL values was 4%. Conclusion The results show that the filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra and the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code can be used for mean glandular dose determination in mammography. PMID:26811553

  19. SU-E-J-23: Characteristics of X-Rays From ExacTrac and Patient Dose From Imaging Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation is 1) provide the beam characteristics of x-rays produced by a Novalis TX ExacTrac system; 2) present a method to commission such beams, 3) present radiation dose to patients resulting from the imaging procedures. Methods: The Monte Carlo simulations were used to obtain the characteristics of kV beams and validated by measurements. The calculated beam HVLs, profiles and depth-dose curves were benchmarked against measurements. Twelve different image acquisition protocols were studied. The x-ray tube voltage ranges from 70 - 145 kV and milliampere-second (mAs) ranges from 8 - 80 mAs depending on the selection of Cranium, Head & Neck, Thorax or Abdomen imaging protocols. The beam output of each image acquisition protocol was determined by using an ionization chamber. The air kerma calibration factors of the ion chamber were obtained from an Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory for specified HVLs. Results: The agreements between measured and simulated results were within the uncertainties for HVLs, dose profiles and depth-dose curves. When %dd was normalized at 1 cm depth, its values at depth of 5 cm ranged from 45% to 66% of in water for kV beams range from 70 kVp to 145 kVp respectively. For head images, a typical dose to eye resulting from single projection ranged from 0.008 cGy to 0.025 cGy depending on the cranial image protocols selected. For a single pelvic image the skin dose could reach up to 0.1 cGy from an abdominal protocol. Conclusion: Although multiple pairs of x-ray images are commonly acquired during a daily patient treatment, the imaging doses to patients resulting from the sum of these projected x-rays are generally much less than 0.5 cGy. The knowledge obtained from this investigation can be used to estimate the image dose and optimize the used of the system.

  20. Dose-rate controlled energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic mapping of the metallic components in a biohybrid nanosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuanyuan; Munro, Catherine J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Edwards, Danny J.; Braunschweig, Adam B.; Knecht, Marc R.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we showcase that through precise control of the electron dose rate, state-of-the-art large solid angle energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy mapping in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope is capable of faithful and unambiguous chemical characterization of the Pt and Pd distribution in a peptide-mediated nanosystem. This low-dose-rate recording scheme adds another dimension of flexibility to the design of elemental mapping experiments, and holds significant potential for extending its application to a wide variety of beam sensitive hybrid nanostructures.

  1. A dual-energy medical instrument for measurement of x-ray source voltage and dose rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhikov, V. D.; Naydenov, S. V.; Volkov, V. G.; Opolonin, O. D.; Makhota, S.; Pochet, T.; Smith, C. F.

    2016-03-01

    An original dual-energy detector and medical instrument have been developed to measure the output voltages and dose rates of X-ray sources. Theoretical and experimental studies were carried out to characterize the parameters of a new scintillator-photodiode sandwich-detector based on specially-prepared zinc selenide crystals in which the low-energy detector (LED) works both as the detector of the low-energy radiation and as an absorption filter allowing the highenergy fraction of the radiation to pass through to the high-energy detector (HED). The use of the LED as a low-energy filter in combination with a separate HED opens broad possibilities for such sandwich structures. In particular, it becomes possible to analyze and process the sum, difference and ratio of signals coming from these detectors, ensuring a broad (up to 106) measurement range of X-ray intensity from the source and a leveling of the energy dependence. We have chosen an optimum design of the detector and the geometry of the component LED and HED parts that allow energy-dependence leveling to within specified limits. The deviation in energy dependence of the detector does not exceed about 5% in the energy range from 30 to 120 keV. The developed detector and instrument allow contactless measurement of the anode voltage of an X-ray emitter from 40 to 140 kV with an error no greater than 3%. The dose rate measurement range is from 1 to 200 R/min. An original medical instrument has passed clinical testing and was recommended for use in medical institutions for X-ray diagnostics.

  2. Algorithm for x-ray beam hardening and scatter correction in low-dose cone-beam CT: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenlei; Rong, Junyan; Gao, Peng; Liao, Qimei; Lu, HongBing

    2016-03-01

    X-ray scatter poses a significant limitation to image quality in cone-beam CT (CBCT), as well as beam hardening, resulting in image artifacts, contrast reduction, and lack of CT number accuracy. Meanwhile the x-ray radiation dose is also non-ignorable. Considerable scatter or beam hardening correction methods have been developed, independently, and rarely combined with low-dose CT reconstruction. In this paper, we combine scatter suppression with beam hardening correction for sparse-view CT reconstruction to improve CT image quality and reduce CT radiation. Firstly, scatter was measured, estimated, and removed using measurement-based methods, assuming that signal in the lead blocker shadow is only attributable to x-ray scatter. Secondly, beam hardening was modeled by estimating an equivalent attenuation coefficient at the effective energy, which was integrated into the forward projector of the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART). Finally, the compressed sensing (CS) iterative reconstruction is carried out for sparse-view CT reconstruction to reduce the CT radiation. Preliminary Monte Carlo simulated experiments indicate that with only about 25% of conventional dose, our method reduces the magnitude of cupping artifact by a factor of 6.1, increases the contrast by a factor of 1.4 and the CNR by a factor of 15. The proposed method could provide good reconstructed image from a few view projections, with effective suppression of artifacts caused by scatter and beam hardening, as well as reducing the radiation dose. With this proposed framework and modeling, it may provide a new way for low-dose CT imaging.

  3. Fluorescence imaging of reactive oxygen species by confocal laser scanning microscopy for track analysis of synchrotron X-ray photoelectric nanoradiator dose: X-ray pump-optical probe.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jae Kun; Han, Sung Mi; Kim, Jong Ki

    2016-09-01

    Bursts of emissions of low-energy electrons, including interatomic Coulomb decay electrons and Auger electrons (0-1000 eV), as well as X-ray fluorescence produced by irradiation of large-Z element nanoparticles by either X-ray photons or high-energy ion beams, is referred to as the nanoradiator effect. In therapeutic applications, this effect can damage pathological tissues that selectively take up the nanoparticles. Herein, a new nanoradiator dosimetry method is presented that uses probes for reactive oxygen species (ROS) incorporated into three-dimensional gels, on which macrophages containing iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) are attached. This method, together with site-specific irradiation of the intracellular nanoparticles from a microbeam of polychromatic synchrotron X-rays (5-14 keV), measures the range and distribution of OH radicals produced by X-ray emission or superoxide anions ({\\rm{O}}_2^-) produced by low-energy electrons. The measurements are based on confocal laser scanning of the fluorescence of the hydroxyl radical probe 2-[6-(4'-amino)phenoxy-3H-xanthen-3-on-9-yl] benzoic acid (APF) or the superoxide probe hydroethidine-dihydroethidium (DHE) that was oxidized by each ROS, enabling tracking of the radiation dose emitted by the nanoradiator. In the range 70 µm below the irradiated cell, ^\\bullet{\\rm{OH}} radicals derived mostly from either incident X-ray or X-ray fluorescence of ION nanoradiators are distributed along the line of depth direction in ROS gel. In contrast, {\\rm{O}}_2^- derived from secondary electron or low-energy electron emission by ION nanoradiators are scattered over the ROS gel. ROS fluorescence due to the ION nanoradiators was observed continuously to a depth of 1.5 mm for both oxidized APF and oxidized DHE with relatively large intensity compared with the fluorescence caused by the ROS produced solely by incident primary X-rays, which was limited to a depth of 600 µm, suggesting dose enhancement as well as more

  4. Locally optimized non-local means denoising for low-dose X-ray backscatter imagery.

    PubMed

    Tracey, Brian H; Miller, Eric L; Wu, Yue; Alvino, Christopher; Schiefele, Markus; Al-Kofahi, Omar

    2014-01-01

    While recent years have seen considerable progress in image denoising, the leading techniques have been developed for digital photographs or other images that can have very different characteristics than those encountered in X-ray applications. In particular here we examine X-ray backscatter (XBS) images collected by airport security systems, where images are piecewise smooth and edge information is typically more correlated with objects while texture is dominated by statistical noise in the detected signal. In this paper, we show how multiple estimates for a denoised XBS image can be combined using a variational approach, giving a solution that enhances edge contrast by trading off gradient penalties against data fidelity terms. We demonstrate the approach by combining several estimates made using the non-local means (NLM) algorithm, a widely used patch-based denoising method. The resulting improvements hold the potential for improving automated analysis of low-SNR X-ray imagery and can be applied in other applications where edge information is of interest. PMID:25265919

  5. A real-time regional adaptive exposure method for saving dose-area product in x-ray fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Burion, Steve; Speidel, Michael A.; Funk, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Reduction of radiation dose in x-ray imaging has been recognized as a high priority in the medical community. Here the authors show that a regional adaptive exposure method can reduce dose-area product (DAP) in x-ray fluoroscopy. The authors' method is particularly geared toward providing dose savings for the pediatric population. Methods: The scanning beam digital x-ray system uses a large-area x-ray source with 8000 focal spots in combination with a small photon-counting detector. An imaging frame is obtained by acquiring and reconstructing up to 8000 detector images, each viewing only a small portion of the patient. Regional adaptive exposure was implemented by varying the exposure of the detector images depending on the local opacity of the object. A family of phantoms ranging in size from infant to obese adult was imaged in anteroposterior view with and without adaptive exposure. The DAP delivered to each phantom was measured in each case, and noise performance was compared by generating noise arrays to represent regional noise in the images. These noise arrays were generated by dividing the image into regions of about 6 mm2, calculating the relative noise in each region, and placing the relative noise value of each region in a one-dimensional array (noise array) sorted from highest to lowest. Dose-area product savings were calculated as the difference between the ratio of DAP with adaptive exposure to DAP without adaptive exposure. The authors modified this value by a correction factor that matches the noise arrays where relative noise is the highest to report a final dose-area product savings. Results: The average dose-area product saving across the phantom family was (42 ± 8)% with the highest dose-area product saving in the child-sized phantom (50%) and the lowest in the phantom mimicking an obese adult (23%). Conclusions: Phantom measurements indicate that a regional adaptive exposure method can produce large DAP savings without compromising the

  6. A real-time regional adaptive exposure method for saving dose-area product in x-ray fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Burion, Steve; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Reduction of radiation dose in x-ray imaging has been recognized as a high priority in the medical community. Here the authors show that a regional adaptive exposure method can reduce dose-area product (DAP) in x-ray fluoroscopy. The authors' method is particularly geared toward providing dose savings for the pediatric population. Methods: The scanning beam digital x-ray system uses a large-area x-ray source with 8000 focal spots in combination with a small photon-counting detector. An imaging frame is obtained by acquiring and reconstructing up to 8000 detector images, each viewing only a small portion of the patient. Regional adaptive exposure was implemented by varying the exposure of the detector images depending on the local opacity of the object. A family of phantoms ranging in size from infant to obese adult was imaged in anteroposterior view with and without adaptive exposure. The DAP delivered to each phantom was measured in each case, and noise performance was compared by generating noise arrays to represent regional noise in the images. These noise arrays were generated by dividing the image into regions of about 6 mm{sup 2}, calculating the relative noise in each region, and placing the relative noise value of each region in a one-dimensional array (noise array) sorted from highest to lowest. Dose-area product savings were calculated as the difference between the ratio of DAP with adaptive exposure to DAP without adaptive exposure. The authors modified this value by a correction factor that matches the noise arrays where relative noise is the highest to report a final dose-area product savings. Results: The average dose-area product saving across the phantom family was (42 {+-} 8)% with the highest dose-area product saving in the child-sized phantom (50%) and the lowest in the phantom mimicking an obese adult (23%). Conclusions: Phantom measurements indicate that a regional adaptive exposure method can produce large DAP savings without

  7. Simultaneous UV and X-ray Spectroscopy of the Seyfert 1 Galaxy NGC 5548. I: Physical Conditions in the UV Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.; Gabel, J. R.; Kaastra, J. S.; Steenbrugge, K. C.; Brinkman, A. C.; Dunn, J. P.; George, I. M.; Liedahl, D. A.; Paerels, F. B. S.

    2003-01-01

    We present new UV spectra of the nucleus of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548, which we obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph at high spectral resolution, in conjunction with simultaneous Chandra X-ray Observatory spectra. Taking advantage of the low UV continuum and broad emission-line fluxes, we have determined that the deepest UV absorption component covers at least a portion of the inner, high-ionization narrow-line region (NLR). We find nonunity covering factors in the cores of several kinematic components, which increase the column density measurements of N V and C IV by factors of 1.2 to 1.9 over the full-covering case; however, the revised columns have only a minor effect on the parameters derived from our photoionization models. For the first time, we have simultaneous N V and C IV columns for component 1 (at -1040 km/s), and find that this component cannot be an X-ray warm absorber, contrary to our previous claim based on nonsimultaneous observations. We find that models of the absorbers based on solar abundances severely overpredict the O VI columns previously obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectrograph, and present arguments that this is not likely due to variability. However, models that include either enhanced nitrogen (twice solar) or dust, with strong depletion of carbon in either case, are successful in matching all of the observed ionic columns. These models result in substantially lower ionization parameters and total column densities compared to dust-free solar-abundance models, and produce little O VII or O VIII, indicating that none of the UV absorbers are X-ray warm absorbers.

  8. Comparison of effective radiation doses from X-ray, CT, and PET/CT in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma using a dose monitoring program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeun Yoon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the use of a dose monitoring program for calculating and comparing the diagnostic radiation doses in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed diagnostic and therapeutic imaging studies performed on pediatric patients with neuroblastoma from 2003 to 2014. We calculated the mean effective dose per exam for X-ray, conventional computed tomography (CT), and CT of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) from the data collected using a dose monitoring program (DoseTrack group) since October 2012. Using the data, we estimated the cumulative dose per person and the relative dose from each modality in all patients (Total group). The effective dose from PET was manually calculated for all patients. RESULTS We included 63 patients with a mean age of 3.2±3.5 years; 28 had a history of radiation therapy, with a mean irradiated dose of 31.9±23.2 Gy. The mean effective dose per exam was 0.04±0.19 mSv for X-ray, 1.09±1.11 mSv for CT, and 8.35±7.45 mSv for CT of PET/CT in 31 patients of the Dose-Track group. The mean estimated cumulative dose per patient in the Total group was 3.43±2.86 mSv from X-ray (8.5%), 7.66±6.09 mSv from CT (19.1%), 18.35±13.52 mSv from CT of PET/CT (45.7%), and 10.71±10.05 mSv from PET (26.7%). CONCLUSION CT of PET/CT contributed nearly half of the total cumulative dose in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. The radiation dose from X-ray was not negligible because of the large number of X-ray images. A dose monitoring program can be useful for calculating radiation doses in patients with cancer. PMID:27306659

  9. The ionized X-ray outflowing torus in ESO 323-G77: low-ionization clumps confined by homogeneous warm absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfrutos, M.; Miniutti, G.; Krongold, Y.; Agís-González, B.; Longinotti, A. L.

    2016-03-01

    We report on the long- and short-term X-ray spectral analysis of the polar-scattered Seyfert 1.2 galaxy ESO 323-G77, observed in three epochs between 2006 and 2013 with Chandra and XMM-Newton. Four high-resolution Chandra observations give us a unique opportunity to study the properties of the absorbers in detail, as well as their short time-scale (days) variability. From the rich set of absorption features seen in the Chandra data, we identify two warm absorbers with column densities and ionizations that are consistent with being constant on both short and long time-scales, suggesting that those are the signatures of a rather homogeneous and extended outflow. A third absorber, ionized to a lesser degree, is also present and it replaces the strictly neutral absorber that is ubiquitously inferred from the X-ray analysis of obscured Compton-thin sources. This colder absorber appears to vary in column density on long time-scales, suggesting a non-homogeneous absorber. Moreover, its ionization responds to the nuclear luminosity variations on time-scales as short as a few days, indicating that the absorber is in photoionization equilibrium with the nuclear source on these time-scales. All components are consistent with being co-spatial and located between the inner and outer edges of the so-called dusty, clumpy torus. Assuming co-spatiality, the three phases also share the same pressure, suggesting that the warm / hot phases confine the colder, most likely clumpy, medium. We discuss further the properties of the outflow in comparison with the lower resolution XMM-Newton data.

  10. Low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging techniques for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments.

    PubMed

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Honaramooz, Ali; Wiebe, Sheldon; Belev, George; Chen, Xiongbiao; Chapman, Dean

    2016-03-01

    In tissue engineering, non-invasive imaging of biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in living systems is essential to longitudinal animal studies for assessments without interrupting the repair process. Conventional X-ray imaging is inadequate for use in soft tissue engineering due to the limited absorption difference between the soft tissue and biomaterial scaffolds. X-ray phase-based imaging techniques that derive contrast from refraction or phase effects rather than absorption can provide the necessary contrast to see low-density biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in large living systems. This paper explores and compares three synchrotron phase-based X-ray imaging techniques-computed tomography (CT)-diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), -analyzer based imaging (ABI), and -phase contrast imaging (PCI)-for visualization and characterization of low-density biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in situ for non-invasive soft tissue engineering assessments. Intact pig joints implanted with polycaprolactone scaffolds were used as the model to assess and compare the imaging techniques in terms of different qualitative and quantitative criteria. For long-term in vivo live animal imaging, different strategies for reducing the imaging radiation dose and scan time-reduced number of CT projections, region of interest, and low resolution imaging-were examined with the presented phase-based imaging techniques. The results demonstrated promising capabilities of the phase-based techniques for visualization of biomaterial scaffolds and soft tissues in situ. The low-dose imaging strategies were illustrated effective for reducing the radiation dose to levels appropriate for live animal imaging. The comparison among the imaging techniques suggested that CT-DEI has the highest efficiency in retaining image contrast at considerably low radiation doses. PMID:26761779

  11. Monte Carlo simulations of dose enhancement around gold nanoparticles used as X-ray imaging contrast agents and radiosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. B.; Müllner, M.; Greiter, M. B.; Bissardon, C.; Xie, W. Z.; Schlatll, H.; Oeh, U.; Li, J. L.; Hoeschen, C.

    2014-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were demonstrated as X-ray imaging contrast agents and radiosensitizers in mice. However, the translational medical applications of GNPs in to the clinical practice need further detailed information on the biological effects related to the enhanced doses in malignant and healthy cells. The idea of improving radiotherapy with high atomic number materials, especially gold foils, was initiated in our research unit in the 1980s. Recently, experimental and theoretical efforts were made to investigate the potential improvement of imaging and radiotherapy with GNPs. Initially, the present work attempts to validate the dose enhancement effects of GNPs to cancer cells; secondly, it intends to examine the possible side effects on healthy cells when using GNPs as X-ray contrast agent. In this study, three Monte Carlo simulation programs, namely PENELOPE-2011, GEANT4 and EGSnrc were used to simulate the local energy deposition and the resulting dose enhancement of GNPs. Diameters of the GNPs were assumed to be 2 nm, 15 nm, 50 nm, 100 nm and 200 nm. The X-ray energy spectra for irradiation were 60 kVp, 80 kVp, 100 kVp, 150 kVp with a filtering of 2.7 mm Al for projectional radiography, and 8 mm Al for 100 kVp and 150 kVp for computed tomography. Additional peak energy of 200 kVp was simulated for radiotherapy purpose. The information of energy deposition and dose enhancement can help understanding the physical processes of medical imaging and the implication of nanoparticles in radiotherapy.

  12. The Swift Burst Alert Telescope Detected Seyfert 1 Galaxies: X-Ray Broadband Properties and Warm Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Lisa M.; Veilleux, Sylvain; McKernan, Barry; Kallman, T.

    2012-01-01

    We present results from an analysis of the broadband, 0.3-195 keV, X-ray spectra of 48 Seyfert 1-1.5 sources detected in the very hard X-rays with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). This sample is selected in an all-sky survey conducted in the 14-195 keV band. Therefore, our sources are largely unbiased toward both obscuration and host galaxy properties. Our detailed and uniform model fits to Suzaku/BAT and XMM-Newton/BAT spectra include the neutral absorption, direct power-law, reflected emission, soft excess, warm absorption, and narrow Fe I K[alpha] emission properties for the entire sample. We significantly detect O VII and O VIII edges in 52% of our sample. The strength of these detections is strongly correlated with the neutral column density measured in the spectrum. Among the strongest detections, X-ray grating and UV observations, where available, indicate outflowing material. The ionized column densities of sources with O VII and O VIII detections are clustered in a narrow range with Nwarm [approx] 1021 cm-2, while sources without strong detections have column densities of ionized gas an order of magnitude lower. Therefore, we note that sources without strong detections likely have warm ionized outflows present but at low column densities that are not easily probed with current X-ray observations. Sources with strong complex absorption have a strong soft excess, which may or may not be due to difficulties in modeling the complex spectra of these sources. Still, the detection of a flat [Gamma] [approx] 1 and a strong soft excess may allow us to infer the presence of strong absorption in low signal-to-noise active galactic nucleus spectra. Additionally, we include a useful correction from the Swift BAT luminosity to bolometric luminosity, based on a comparison of our spectral fitting results with published spectral energy distribution fits from 33 of our sources.

  13. Experimental evaluation of the image quality and dose in digital mammography: Influence of x-ray spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomal, A.; Perez, A. M. M. M.; Silva, M. C.; Poletti, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we studied experimentally the influence of x-ray spectrum on the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the average glandular dose (MDG) for two digital mammography systems: Senographe 2000D (GE Medical Systems) and Lorad Selenia (Hologic), with indirect and direct detector imaging technology, respectively. CNR and MGD were determined using PMMA phantoms simulating breasts with thicknesses of 4 cm and 6 cm. All available anode/filter combinations of the systems were evaluated for a wide range of tube voltages values. Results indicated that the Rh/Rh combination provides the highest image quality with the lower mean glandular dose for the Senographe 2000D system. For the Lorad Selenia system, the W/Ag combination at 30 kV showed the best performance, in terms of dose saving and image quality improvement in relation to all tube voltage range. The comparison between the optimal x-ray spectra and those selected by the AEC mode showed that this automatic selection mechanism could be readjusted to optimize the relationship between image quality and dose.

  14. Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1–5.5 MeV alphas

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas-Herrera, J. Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Orozco, D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-03-15

    The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics fielded at inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray fluences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-K{sub α} and K{sub β} x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1–5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed to x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0 ± 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 ± 2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 ± 1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 ± 5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual effect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.

  15. Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1-5.5 MeV alphas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Herrera, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Orozco, D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-03-01

    The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics fielded at inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray fluences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-Kα and Kβ x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1-5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed to x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0 ± 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 ± 2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 ± 1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 ± 5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual effect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.

  16. Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1–5.5 MeV alphas

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas-Herrera, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Orozco, D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-03-01

    The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics fielded at inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray uences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-Kα and Kβ x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1-5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed to x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0 ± 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 ± 2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 ± 1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 ± 5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual effect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.

  17. Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1-5.5 MeV alphas.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Herrera, J; Rinderknecht, H G; Zylstra, A B; Gatu Johnson, M; Orozco, D; Rosenberg, M J; Sio, H; Seguin, F H; Frenje, J A; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D

    2015-03-01

    The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics fielded at inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray fluences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-Kα and Kβ x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1-5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed to x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0 ± 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 ± 2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 ± 1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 ± 5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual effect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula. PMID:25832223

  18. Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1–5.5 MeV alphas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rojas-Herrera, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Orozco, D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; et al

    2015-03-01

    The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics fielded at inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray uences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-Kα and Kβ x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1-5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed tomore » x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0 ± 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 ± 2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 ± 1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 ± 5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual effect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.« less

  19. Early effects of low dose 12C6+ ion or X-ray irradiation on human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingtai; Li, Yumin; Zhang, Hong; Xie, Yi; Chen, Xuezhong; Ren, Jinyu; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Zijiang; Liu, Hongliang; Zhang, Yawei

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the acute effects of low dose 12C6+ ions or X-ray radiation on human immune function. The human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) of seven healthy donors were exposed to 0.05 Gy 12C6+ ions or X-ray radiation and cell responses were measured at 24 h after exposure. The cytotoxic activities of HPBL were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT); the percentages of T and NK cells subsets were detected by flow cytometry; mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ were examined by real time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR); and these cytokines protein levels in supernatant of cultured cells were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The results showed that the cytotoxic activity of HPBL, mRNA expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α in HPBL and their protein levels in supernatant were significantly increased at 24 h after exposure to 0.05 Gy 12C6+ ions radiation and the effects were stronger than observed for X-ray exposure. However, there was no significant change in the percentage of T and NK cells subsets of HPBL. These results suggested that 0.05 Gy high linear energy transfer (LET) 12C6+ radiation was a more effective approach to host immune enhancement than that of low LET X-ray. We conclude that cytokines production might be used as sensitive indicators of acute response to LDI.

  20. Quantitative comparison of dose distribution in radiotherapy plans using 2D gamma maps and X-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Balosso, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Background The advanced dose calculation algorithms implemented in treatment planning system (TPS) have remarkably improved the accuracy of dose calculation especially the modeling of electrons transport in the low density medium. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of 2D gamma (γ) index to quantify and evaluate the impact of the calculation of electrons transport on dose distribution for lung radiotherapy. Methods X-ray computed tomography images were used to calculate the dose for twelve radiotherapy treatment plans. The doses were originally calculated with Modified Batho (MB) 1D density correction method, and recalculated with anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), using the same prescribed dose. Dose parameters derived from dose volume histograms (DVH) and target coverage indices were compared. To compare dose distribution, 2D γ-index was applied, ranging from 1%/1 mm to 6%/6 mm. The results were displayed using γ-maps in 2D. Correlation between DVH metrics and γ passing rates was tested using Spearman’s rank test and Wilcoxon paired test to calculate P values. Results the plans generated with AAA predicted more heterogeneous dose distribution inside the target, with P<0.05. However, MB overestimated the dose predicting more coverage of the target by the prescribed dose. The γ analysis showed that the difference between MB and AAA could reach up to ±10%. The 2D γ-maps illustrated that AAA predicted more dose to organs at risks, as well as lower dose to the target compared to MB. Conclusions Taking into account of the electrons transport on radiotherapy plans showed a significant impact on delivered dose and dose distribution. When considering the AAA represent the true cumulative dose, a readjusting of the prescribed dose and an optimization to protect the organs at risks should be taken in consideration in order to obtain the better clinical outcome. PMID:27429908

  1. Luminescence properties after X-ray irradiation for dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Duk-Geun; Kim, Myung-Jin

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the luminescence characteristics after exposure to X-ray radiation, we developed an independent, small X-ray irradiation system comprising a Varian VF-50J mini X-ray generator, a Pb collimator, a delay shutter, and an Al absorber. With this system, the apparent dose rate increased linearly to 0.8 Gy/s against the emission current for a 50 kV anode potential when the shutter was delayed for an initial 4 s and the Al absorber was 300 µm thick. In addition, an approximately 20 mm diameter sample area was irradiated homogeneously with X rays. Based on three-dimensional (3D) thermoluminescence (TL) spectra, the small X-ray irradiator was considered comparable to the conventional 90Sr/90Y beta source even though the TL intensity from beta irradiation was higher than that from X-ray irradiation. The single aliquot regenerative (SAR) growth curve for the small X-ray irradiator was identical to that for the beta source. Therefore, we concluded that the characteristics of the small X-ray irradiator and the conventional 90Sr/90Y beta source were similar and that X ray irradiation had the potential for being suitable for use in luminescence dosimetry.

  2. MULTICENTRE COMPARISON OF PATIENT AND DETECTOR DOSE FOR X-RAY-GUIDED EMBOLISATIONS OF ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS IN THE BRAIN.

    PubMed

    Geleijns, J; Overvelde, M L; Zweers, D; Mourik, J E M

    2016-06-01

    Dosimetric benchmarking at four hospitals was performed to investigate incident entrance dose and dose rate on a phantom, and entrance detector dose and dose rate for protocols that are used in routine clinical practice for complex neuroradiological treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Measurements were performed with a head phantom that simulates the attenuation and scattering of the human head for the lateral and posteroanterior (PA) views. For fluoroscopy, the measured incident entrance dose rate and entrance detector dose rate were in the range of 44-172 and 0.3-1.3 μGy s(-1), respectively. The pulse rate in fluoroscopy varied between 6.3 and 15 frames per second (fps). For digital subtraction angiography (DSA), incident entrance dose per frame and entrance detector dose per frame were in the range of 744-2800 and 2.6-8.1 μGy/frame, respectively. Optimisation of acquisition parameters such as pulse rate in fluoroscopy, dose per frame in DSA, beam filtration and tube voltage may further improve imaging protocols and lower the patient dose in very complex X-ray-guided embolisations of AVMs in the brain. However, differences in these acquisition parameters observed in this study were relatively small, suggesting that a relatively high degree of optimisation has already been achieved. PMID:27154974

  3. Adaptive nonlocal means-based regularization for statistical image reconstruction of low-dose X-ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Ma, Jianhua; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yan; Han, Hao; Li, Lihong; Moore, William; Liang, Zhengrong

    2015-03-01

    To reduce radiation dose in X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging, one of the common strategies is to lower the milliampere-second (mAs) setting during projection data acquisition. However, this strategy would inevitably increase the projection data noise, and the resulting image by the filtered back-projection (FBP) method may suffer from excessive noise and streak artifacts. The edge-preserving nonlocal means (NLM) filtering can help to reduce the noise-induced artifacts in the FBP reconstructed image, but it sometimes cannot completely eliminate them, especially under very low-dose circumstance when the image is severely degraded. To deal with this situation, we proposed a statistical image reconstruction scheme using a NLM-based regularization, which can suppress the noise and streak artifacts more effectively. However, we noticed that using uniform filtering parameter in the NLM-based regularization was rarely optimal for the entire image. Therefore, in this study, we further developed a novel approach for designing adaptive filtering parameters by considering local characteristics of the image, and the resulting regularization is referred to as adaptive NLM-based regularization. Experimental results with physical phantom and clinical patient data validated the superiority of using the proposed adaptive NLM-regularized statistical image reconstruction method for low-dose X-ray CT, in terms of noise/streak artifacts suppression and edge/detail/contrast/texture preservation.

  4. Importance of Dose Settings in the X-Ray Systems Used for Interventional Radiology: A National Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Vano, E. Sanchez, R.; Fernandez, J. M.; Rosales, F.; Garcia, M. A.; Sotil, J.; Hernandez, J.; Carrera, F.; Ciudad, J.; Soler, M. M.; Ballester, T.

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the differences in dose settings among the X-ray units involved in a national survey of patient doses in interventional radiology (IR). The survey was promoted by the National Society of IR and involved 10 centers. As part of the agreed quality control for the survey, entrance doses were measured in a 20-cm-thick acrylic phantom simulating a medium-sized patient. A standard digital subtraction angiography (DSA) imaging protocol for the abdomen was used at the different centers. The center of the phantom was placed at the isocenter of the C-arm system during the measurements to simulate clinical conditions. Units with image intensifiers and flat detectors were involved in the survey. Entrance doses for low, medium, and high fluoroscopy modes and DSA acquisitions were measured for a field of view of 20 cm (or closest). A widespread range of entrance dose values was obtained: 4.5-18.6, 9.2-28.4, and 15.4-51.5 mGy/min in low, medium, and high fluoroscopy mode, respectively, and 0.7-5.0 mGy/DSA image. The ratios between the maximum and the minimum values measured (3-4 for fluoroscopy and 7 for DSA) suggest an important margin for optimization. The calibration factor for the dose-area product meter was also included in the survey and resulted in a mean value of 0.73, with a standard deviation of 0.07. It seems clear that the dose setting for the X-ray systems used in IR requires better criteria and approaches.

  5. Patient radiation dose reduction using an X-ray imaging noise reduction technology for cardiac angiography and intervention.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Funatsu, Atsushi; Okada, Tadahisa; Mauti, Maria; Waizumi, Yuki; Yamada, Shinichi

    2016-05-01

    Coronary angiography and intervention can expose patients to high radiation dose. This retrospective study quantifies the patient dose reduction due to the introduction of a novel X-ray imaging noise reduction technology using advanced real-time image noise reduction algorithms and optimized acquisition chain for fluoroscopy and exposure in interventional cardiology. Patient, procedure and radiation dose data were retrospectively collected in the period August 2012-August 2013 for 883 patients treated with the image noise reduction technology (referred as "new system"). The same data were collected for 1083 patients in the period April 2011-July 2012 with a system using state-of-the-art image processing and reference acquisition chain (referred as "reference system"). Procedures were divided into diagnostic (CAG) and intervention (PCI). Acquisition parameters such as fluoroscopy time, volume of contrast medium, number of exposure images and number of stored fluoroscopy images were collected to classify procedure complexity. The procedural dose reduction was investigated separately for three main cardiologists. The new system provides significant dose reduction compared to the reference system. Median DAP values decreased for all procedures (p < 0.0001) from 172.7 to 59.4 Gy cm(2), for CAG from 155.1 to 52.0 Gy cm(2) and for PCI from 229.0 to 85.8 Gy cm(2) with reduction quantified at 66, 66 and 63 %, respectively. Based on median values, the dose reduction for all procedures was 68, 60 and 67 % for cardiologists 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The X-ray imaging technology combining advanced real-time image noise reduction algorithms and anatomy-specific optimized fluoroscopy and cine acquisition chain provides 66 % patient dose reduction in interventional cardiology. PMID:25840815

  6. Low-Dose-Rate Computed Tomography System Utilizing 25 mm/s-Scan Silicon X-ray Diode and Its Application to Iodine K-Edge Imaging Using Filtered Bremsstrahlung Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Ryo; Sato, Eiichi; Yanbe, Yutaka; Chiba, Hiraku; Maeda, Tomoko; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2013-03-01

    A low-dose-rate X-ray computed tomography (CT) system is useful for reducing absorbed dose for patients. The CT system with a tube current of sub-mA was developed using a silicon X-ray diode (Si-XD). The Si-XD is a high-sensitivity Si photodiode (PD) selected for detecting X-ray photons, and the X-ray sensitivity of the Si-XD was twice as high as that of Si-PD cerium-doped yttrium aluminum perovskite [YAP(Ce)]. X-ray photons are directly detected using the Si-XD without a scintillator, and the photocurrent from the diode is amplified using current-voltage and voltage-voltage amplifiers. The output voltage is converted into logical pulses using a voltage-frequency converter with a maximum frequency of 500 kHz, and the frequency is proportional to the voltage. The pulses from the converter are sent to the differentiator with a time constant of 500 ns to generate short positive pulses for counting, and the pulses are counted using a counter card. Tomography is accomplished by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the linear scan. The exposure time for obtaining a tomogram was 5 min at a scan step of 0.5 mm and a rotation step of 3.0°. The tube current and voltage were 0.55 mA and 60 kV, respectively, and iodine K-edge CT was carried out using filtered bremsstrahlung X-ray spectra with a peak energy of 38 keV.

  7. An absorbed dose calorimeter for IMRT dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duane, S.; Aldehaybes, M.; Bailey, M.; Lee, N. D.; Thomas, C. G.; Palmans, H.

    2012-10-01

    A new calorimeter for dosimetry in small and complex fields has been built. The device is intended for the direct determination of absorbed dose to water in moderately small fields and in composite fields such as IMRT treatments, and as a transfer instrument calibrated against existing absorbed dose standards in conventional reference conditions. The geometry, materials and mode of operation have been chosen to minimize detector perturbations when used in a water phantom, to give a reasonably isotropic response and to minimize the effects of heat transfer when the calorimeter is used in non-reference conditions in a water phantom. The size of the core is meant to meet the needs of measurement in IMRT treatments and is comparable to the size of the air cavity in a type NE2611 ionization chamber. The calorimeter may also be used for small field dosimetry. Initial measurements in reference conditions and in an IMRT head and neck plan, collapsed to gantry angle zero, have been made to estimate the thermal characteristics of the device, and to assess its performance in use. The standard deviation (estimated repeatability) of the reference absorbed dose measurements was 0.02 Gy (0.6%).

  8. THE SWIFT BURST ALERT TELESCOPE DETECTED SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES: X-RAY BROADBAND PROPERTIES AND WARM ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Lisa M.; Veilleux, Sylvain; McKernan, Barry; Kallman, T. R.

    2012-02-01

    We present results from an analysis of the broadband, 0.3-195 keV, X-ray spectra of 48 Seyfert 1-1.5 sources detected in the very hard X-rays with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). This sample is selected in an all-sky survey conducted in the 14-195 keV band. Therefore, our sources are largely unbiased toward both obscuration and host galaxy properties. Our detailed and uniform model fits to Suzaku/BAT and XMM-Newton/BAT spectra include the neutral absorption, direct power-law, reflected emission, soft excess, warm absorption, and narrow Fe I K{alpha} emission properties for the entire sample. We significantly detect O VII and O VIII edges in 52% of our sample. The strength of these detections is strongly correlated with the neutral column density measured in the spectrum. Among the strongest detections, X-ray grating and UV observations, where available, indicate outflowing material. The ionized column densities of sources with O VII and O VIII detections are clustered in a narrow range with N{sub warm} {approx} 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, while sources without strong detections have column densities of ionized gas an order of magnitude lower. Therefore, we note that sources without strong detections likely have warm ionized outflows present but at low column densities that are not easily probed with current X-ray observations. Sources with strong complex absorption have a strong soft excess, which may or may not be due to difficulties in modeling the complex spectra of these sources. Still, the detection of a flat {Gamma} {approx} 1 and a strong soft excess may allow us to infer the presence of strong absorption in low signal-to-noise active galactic nucleus spectra. Additionally, we include a useful correction from the Swift BAT luminosity to bolometric luminosity, based on a comparison of our spectral fitting results with published spectral energy distribution fits from 33 of our sources.

  9. A track length estimator method for dose calculations in low-energy X-ray irradiations: implementation, properties and performance.

    PubMed

    Baldacci, F; Mittone, A; Bravin, A; Coan, P; Delaire, F; Ferrero, C; Gasilov, S; Létang, J M; Sarrut, D; Smekens, F; Freud, N

    2015-03-01

    The track length estimator (TLE) method, an "on-the-fly" fluence tally in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, recently implemented in GATE 6.2, is known as a powerful tool to accelerate dose calculations in the domain of low-energy X-ray irradiations using the kerma approximation. Overall efficiency gains of the TLE with respect to analogous MC were reported in the literature for regions of interest in various applications (photon beam radiation therapy, X-ray imaging). The behaviour of the TLE method in terms of statistical properties, dose deposition patterns, and computational efficiency compared to analogous MC simulations was investigated. The statistical properties of the dose deposition were first assessed. Derivations of the variance reduction factor of TLE versus analogous MC were carried out, starting from the expression of the dose estimate variance in the TLE and analogous MC schemes. Two test cases were chosen to benchmark the TLE performance in comparison with analogous MC: (i) a small animal irradiation under stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy conditions and (ii) the irradiation of a human pelvis during a cone beam computed tomography acquisition. Dose distribution patterns and efficiency gain maps were analysed. The efficiency gain exhibits strong variations within a given irradiation case, depending on the geometrical (voxel size, ballistics) and physical (material and beam properties) parameters on the voxel scale. Typical values lie between 10 and 10(3), with lower levels in dense regions (bone) outside the irradiated channels (scattered dose only), and higher levels in soft tissues directly exposed to the beams. PMID:24973309

  10. Bone marrow dose estimates from work-related medical x-ray examinations given between 1943 and 1966 for personnel from five U.S. nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeri L; Daniels, Robert D

    2006-06-01

    Inclusion of dose from work-related medical x-ray examinations with occupational external dose in an epidemiological study may reduce misclassification of exposures and provide more accurate assessment of leukemia risk from occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. In a multi-site leukemia case-control study, annual bone marrow doses due to work-related x-ray examinations given between 1943 and 1966 were estimated for cases and controls employed at five nuclear facilities. Only active bone marrow dose from photofluorographic chest and routine lumbar spine x rays were included. Bone marrow dose assigned for a single exposure ranged from 1.0 to 1.4 mGy. Mean and median cumulative bone marrow doses for each of the five sites from work-related x-ray examinations ranged from 2.0 to 14 mGy and 2.1 to 8.8 mGy, respectively. Results suggest that bone marrow dose from work-related photofluorographic and lumbar spine x-ray examinations given during the time period of this study may be significant compared to occupational bone marrow dose. PMID:16691102

  11. Development of Laser Plasma X-ray Microbeam Irradiation System and Radiation Biological Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Nishikino, Masaharu; Numasaki, Hodaka; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Teshima, Teruki; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    Laser plasma x-ray source has the features such as ultra short pulse, high brilliance, monochromaticity, and focusing ability. These features are excellent compared with conventional x-ray source. In order to apply the laser plasma x-ray source to the biomedical study and to more closely research the radiobilogical responce of the cancer cell such as radiation induced bystander effect, we have developed x-ray microbeam system using laser plasma x-ray source. The absorbed dose of laser plasma x-ray was estimated with Gafchromic EBT film and DNA double strand breaks on the cells were detected by immunofluorescence staining. When the cells were irradiated with laser plasma x-ray, the circular regions existing γ-H2AX positive cells were clearly identified. The usefulness of the laser plasma x-ray on the radiobiological study was proved in this research.

  12. EVALUATION OF DOSE REDUCTION POTENTIALS OF A NOVEL SCATTER CORRECTION SOFTWARE FOR BEDSIDE CHEST X-RAY IMAGING.

    PubMed

    Renger, Bernhard; Brieskorn, Carina; Toth, Vivien; Mentrup, Detlef; Jockel, Sascha; Lohöfer, Fabian; Schwarz, Martin; Rummeny, Ernst J; Noël, Peter B

    2016-06-01

    Bedside chest X-rays (CXR) for catheter position control may add up to a considerable radiation dose for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). In this study, image quality and dose reduction potentials of a novel X-ray scatter correction software (SkyFlow, Philips Healthcare, Hamburg, Germany) were evaluated. CXRs of a 'LUNGMAN' (Kyoto Kagaku Co., LTD, Kyoto, Japan) thoracic phantom with a portacath system, a central venous line and a dialysis catheter were performed in an experimental set-up with multiple tube voltage and tube current settings without and with an antiscatter grid. Images with diagnostic exposure index (EI) 250-500 were evaluated for the difference in applied mAs with and without antiscatter grid. Three radiologists subjectively assessed the diagnostic image quality of grid and non-grid images. Compared with a non-grid image, usage of an antiscatter grid implied twice as high mAs in order to reach diagnostic EI. SkyFlow significantly improved the image quality of images acquired without grid. CXR with grid provided better image contrast than grid-less imaging with scatter correction. PMID:26977074

  13. Effect of graded doses of fission neutrons or X rays on the stromal compartment of the thymus in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Huiskamp, R.; Davids, J.A.; van Ewijk, W.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on the supportive role of the thymic stroma in T cell differentiation was investigated in a transplantation model using athymic nude mice and transplanted irradiated thymuses. In this model, neonatal CBA/H mice were exposed to graded doses of whole-body irradiation with fast fission neutrons of 1 MeV mean energy or 300 kVp X rays. The doses used varied from 2.75 up to 6.88 Gy fission neutrons and from 6.00 up to 15.00 Gy X rays at center-line dose rates of 0.10 and 0.30 Gy/min, respectively. Subsequently, the thymus was excised and a thymus lobe was transplanted under the kidney capsule of H-2 compatible nude mice. One and two months after transplantation, the T cell composition of the thymic transplant was investigated using immunohistology with monoclonal antibodies directed to the cell surface differentiation antigens Thy-1, Lyt-1, Lyt-2, MT-4, and T-200. Furthermore, the stromal cell composition of the thymic transplant was investigated with monoclonal antibodies directed to MHC antigens and with monoclonal antibodies defining different subsets of thymic stromal cells. To investigate the reconstitution capacity of the thymic transplant, the peripheral T cell number was measured using flow cytofluorometric analysis of nude spleen cells with the monoclonal antibodies anti-Thy-1, anti-Lyt-2, and anti-MT-4. The results of this investigation show that a neonatal thymus grafted in a nude mouse has a similar stromal and T cell composition as that of a normal thymus in situ. In addition, grafting of such a thymus results in a significant increase of the peripheral T cell number. Irradiation of the graft prior to transplantation has no effects on the stromal and T cell composition but the graft size decreases. This reduction of size shows a linear dose-response curve after neutron irradiation. The X-ray curve is linear for doses in excess of 6.00 Gy.

  14. Intensity-modulated x-ray (IMXT) versus proton (IMPT) therapy for theragnostic hypoxia-based dose painting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Ryan T.; Bowen, Stephen R.; Bentzen, Søren M.; Rockwell Mackie, T.; Jeraj, Robert

    2008-08-01

    In this work the abilities of intensity-modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to deliver boosts based on theragnostic imaging were assessed. Theragnostic imaging is the use of functional or molecular imaging data for prescribing radiation dose distributions. Distal gradient tracking, an IMPT method designed for the delivery of non-uniform dose distributions, was assessed. Dose prescriptions for a hypoxic region in a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patient were designed to either uniformly boost the region or redistribute the dose based on positron emission tomography (PET) images of the 61Cu(II)-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (61Cu-ATSM) hypoxia surrogate. Treatment plans for the prescriptions were created for four different delivery methods: IMXT delivered with step-and-shoot and with helical tomotherapy, and IMPT delivered with spot scanning and distal gradient tracking. IMXT and IMPT delivered comparable dose distributions within the boost region for both uniform and redistributed theragnostic boosts. Normal tissue integral dose was lower by a factor of up to 3 for IMPT relative to the IMXT. For all delivery methods, the mean dose to the nearby organs at risk changed by less than 2 Gy for redistributed versus uniform boosts. The distal gradient tracking method resulted in comparable plans to the spot scanning method while reducing the number of proton beam spots by a factor of over 3.

  15. Assessment of effective radiation dose of an extremity CBCT, MSCT and conventional X ray for knee area using MOSFET dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, Juha; Kiljunen, Timo; Wolff, Jan; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess and compare the organ and effective doses in the knee area resulting from different commercially available multislice computed tomography devices (MSCT), one cone beam computed tomography device (CBCT) and one conventional X-ray radiography device using MOSFET dosemeters and an anthropomorphic RANDO knee phantom. Measurements of the MSCT devices resulted in effective doses ranging between 27 and 48 µSv. The CBCT measurements resulted in an effective dose of 12.6 µSv. The effective doses attained using the conventional radiography device were 1.8 µSv for lateral and 1.2 µSv for anterior-posterior projections. The effective dose resulting from conventional radiography was considerably lower than those recorded for the CBCT and MSCT devices. The MSCT effective dose results were two to four times higher than those measured on the CBCT device. This study demonstrates that CBCT can be regarded as a potential low-dose 3D imaging technique for knee examinations. PMID:23825221

  16. Radiation dose and cancer risk in patients undergoing multiple radiographs in intravenous urography X-ray examinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suliman, I. I.; Al-Jabri, Amna J.; Badawi, A. A.; Halato, M. A.; Alzimami, K.; Sulieman, A.

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of the this study was to measure the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and body organs, and the effective doses in intravenous urography (IVU) X-ray examinations in Sudanese hospitals. Seventy-two patients who underwent IVU multiple radiographs from five hospitals (six rooms) were examined. ESAK was calculated from incident air kerma (Ki) using patient exposure parameters and tube output Y(d). Dose calculations were performed using CALDOSE X 5.1 Monte Carlo-based software. Risk of cancer induction (4-8) and mortality per million (2-4) varied. The gallbladder, colon, stomach, gonads and uterus received organ doses of 5.3, 3.6, 3.2, 0.61, and 0.8 mGy, respectively. ESAK values ranged from 6.6 to 15.3 mGy (effective doses: 0.70-1.6 mSv). Mean ESAK fall slightly above the diagnostic reference level. Several optimization strategies to improve dose performance were discussed. Reducing the number of radiographs and the use of technique charts according to patient sizes and anatomic areas are among the most important dose optimization tools in IVU.

  17. Absorbed dose measurements and predictions on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. V.; Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1993-01-01

    The overall radiation environment of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was determined in part through the use of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD's) which were included in several experiments. The results given are from four experiments (A0015 Biostack, M0004 Fiber Optics Data Link, P0004 Seeds in Space, and P0006 Linear Energy Transfer Spectrum Measurement) and represent a large fraction of existing absorbed dose data. The TLD's were located on the leading and the trailing edges and the Earth end of the spacecraft under various shielding depths (0.48 to 15.4 g/sq cm). The measured absorbed doses were found to reflect both directional dependence of incident trapped protons and shielding. At the leading edge, doses ranged from 2.10 to 2.58 Gy under shielding of 2.90 to 1.37 g/sq cm Al equivalent (M0004). At the trailing edge, doses varied from 3.04 to 4.49 Gy under shielding of 11.7 to 3.85 g/sq cm (A0015), doses varied from 2.91 to 6.64 Gy under shielding of 11.1 to 0.48 g/sq cm (P0004), and a dose range of 2.66 to 6.48 Gy was measured under shielding of 15.4 to 0.48 g/sq cm (P0006). At the Earth end of the spacecraft, doses from 2.41 to 3.93 Gy were found under shielding of 10.0 to 1.66 g/sq cm (A0015). The effect of the trapped proton anisotropy was such that the western side of LDEF received more than 2 times the dose of the eastern side at shielding depths of approximately 1 g/sq cm. Calculations utilizing a directional model of trapped proton spectra predict smaller doses than those measured, being about 50 percent of measured values at the trailing edge and Earth end, and about 80 percent near the leading edge.

  18. Technical Note: Nanometric organic photovoltaic thin film detectors for dose monitoring in diagnostic x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Elshahat, Bassem; Gill, Hardeep Singh; Kumar, Jayant; Filipyev, Ilya; Zygmanski, Piotr; Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew; Hesser, Jürgen; Sajo, Erno

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To fabricate organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells with nanometric active layers sensitive to ionizing radiation and measure their dosimetric characteristics in clinical x-ray beams in the diagnostic tube potential range of 60–150 kVp. Methods: Experiments were designed to optimize the detector’s x-ray response and find the best parameter combination by changing the active layer thickness and the area of the electrode. The OPV cell consisted of poly (3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl): [6,6]-phenyl C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester photoactive donor and acceptor semiconducting organic materials sandwiched between an aluminum electrode as an anode and an indium tin oxide electrode as a cathode. The authors measured the radiation-induced electric current at zero bias voltage in all fabricated OPV cells. Results: The net OPV current as a function of beam potential (kVp) was proportional to kVp{sup −0.5} when normalized to x-ray tube output, which varies with kVp. Of the tested configurations, the best combination of parameters was 270 nm active layer thicknesses with 0.7 cm{sup 2} electrode area, which provided the highest signal per electrode area. For this cell, the measured current ranged from approximately 0.7 to 2.4 nA/cm{sup 2} for 60–150 kVp, corresponding to about 0.09 nA–0.06 nA/mGy air kerma, respectively. When compared to commercial amorphous silicon thin film photovoltaic cells irradiated under the same conditions, this represents 2.5 times greater sensitivity. An additional 40% signal enhancement was observed when a 1 mm layer of plastic scintillator was attached to the cells’ beam-facing side. Conclusions: Since both OPVs can be produced as flexible devices and they do not require external bias voltage, they open the possibility for use as thin film in vivo detectors for dose monitoring in diagnostic x-ray imaging.

  19. Alignment of low-dose X-ray fluorescence tomography images using differential phase contrast

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Young Pyo; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; O’Halloran, Thomas V.; Que, Emily L.; Bleher, Reiner; Vogt, Stefan; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2014-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence nanotomography provides unprecedented sensitivity for studies of trace metal distributions in whole biological cells. Dose fractionation, in which one acquires very low dose individual projections and then obtains high statistics reconstructions as signal from a voxel is brought together (Hegerl & Hoppe, 1976 ▶), requires accurate alignment of these individual projections so as to correct for rotation stage runout. It is shown here that differential phase contrast at 10.2 keV beam energy offers the potential for accurate cross-correlation alignment of successive projections, by demonstrating that successive low dose, 3 ms per pixel, images acquired at the same specimen position and rotation angle have a narrower and smoother cross-correlation function (1.5 pixels FWHM at 300 nm pixel size) than that obtained from zinc fluorescence images (25 pixels FWHM). The differential phase contrast alignment resolution is thus well below the 700 nm × 500 nm beam spot size used in this demonstration, so that dose fractionation should be possible for reduced-dose, more rapidly acquired, fluorescence nanotomography experiments. PMID:24365941

  20. Population doses, excess deaths and loss of life expectancy from mass chest x-ray examination in Japan-1980

    SciTech Connect

    Kumamoto, Y.

    1985-07-01

    The number of mass chest x-ray examinations in Japan in 1980 was 26.6 million and the average effective dose equivalent was 26 mrem per examination. The genetically significant dose was. 017 mrem per person per year, the per caput mean marrow dose was 5.9 mrem, the leukemia significant dose was 5.2 mrem and the malignancy significant dose was 2.8 mrem. The excess deaths were calculated to be 70-280 depending on the risk model used. Those would be in excess to the 3.7 million cancer deaths normally expected among the examined population. The loss of life expectancy calculated with a relative risk model was 38 yr for males and 43 yr for females due to leukemia with a latent period of 2 yr and an expression period of 25 yr, and 12 yr for males and 14 yr for females due to other cancers with a latent period of 10 yr and an expression period of lifetime in the 20-24 age group.

  1. Dose-response of x-ray-induced anaphase aberrations in the mitotic root tip chromosomes of allium

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T.H.; Lee, K.H.; Kong, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    A simplified Allium root mitotic chromosome aberration assay by using only the aberrant anaphases (fragments, laggards and bridges) as the end-points were developed by Rank and Nielsen (1993) for screening water soluble chemicals and complex mixtures. A dose-response curve was established by Meir et al., (1994) using a known clastogen, 4-nitroquinolene-N-oxide between the dose range of 0.1-0.5 ug/ml. In order to further validate this assay for clastogen detection, a series of X-ray dose response experiments was carried out. Allium roots were germinated in tapwater for 48 h and treated with a series of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 R (80 Kvp, 5 ma, dose rate 60 R/min) dosages. After an 18 hr recovery time, the root tips were hydrolyzed in 45% acetic and 1 N HC1 acid (9:1 ratio) solution under 50{degrees} C for 5 min and stained with aceto-carmine. Each of the data points were derived from scoring 7-10 slides (15-50 anaphases/slide). The corrrelation coefficient, slope and intercept values of the dose-response curve are: 0.954, 0.515 and 1.155 respectively.

  2. Alignment of low-dose X-ray fluorescence tomography images using differential phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Hong, Young Pyo; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Que, Emily L; Bleher, Reiner; Vogt, Stefan; Woodruff, Teresa K; Jacobsen, Chris

    2014-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence nanotomography provides unprecedented sensitivity for studies of trace metal distributions in whole biological cells. Dose fractionation, in which one acquires very low dose individual projections and then obtains high statistics reconstructions as signal from a voxel is brought together (Hegerl & Hoppe, 1976), requires accurate alignment of these individual projections so as to correct for rotation stage runout. It is shown here that differential phase contrast at 10.2 keV beam energy offers the potential for accurate cross-correlation alignment of successive projections, by demonstrating that successive low dose, 3 ms per pixel, images acquired at the same specimen position and rotation angle have a narrower and smoother cross-correlation function (1.5 pixels FWHM at 300 nm pixel size) than that obtained from zinc fluorescence images (25 pixels FWHM). The differential phase contrast alignment resolution is thus well below the 700 nm × 500 nm beam spot size used in this demonstration, so that dose fractionation should be possible for reduced-dose, more rapidly acquired, fluorescence nanotomography experiments. PMID:24365941

  3. Plug Would Collimate X Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Jeffrey E.; Adams, James F.

    1989-01-01

    Device creates narrow, well-defined beam for radiographic measurements of thickness. Cylindrical plug collimates and aligns X rays with respect to through holes in parts. Helps in determination of wall thickness by radiography. Lead absorbs X rays that do not pass axially through central hole. Lead/vinyl seals prevent off-axis rays from passing along periphery of plug.

  4. X-ray storage performance of KCl:Eu2+ with high cumulated dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, Rachael A.; Xiao, Zhiyan; Zhang, Lei; Li, H. Harold

    2014-05-01

    The effects of high cumulative radiation dose on the luminescence properties of KCl:Eu2+ are investigated. Pellet samples of KCl:Eu2+ were given doses of up to 200 kGy at the Louisiana State University Synchrotron facility. After synchrotron irradiation, samples were optically bleached and given a clinical dose of 2 Gy from a 6 MV medical linear accelerator. Optical properties were evaluated using photostimulated luminescence (PSL), photoluminescence (PL), and temperature-dependent PSL measurements. For a cumulated dose of up to 5-10 kGy, the PSL emission intensity increased by 15% compared to the PSL signal with no radiation history. For doses higher than 10 kGy, the PSL emission intensity retained at least 70% of the original intensity. Spatial correlation of the charge storage centers increased for doses up to 5 kGy and then decreased for higher cumulative doses. Emission band at 975 nm was attributed to transitions of Eu1+. PL spectra showed an intense peak centered at 420 nm for all cumulative doses. The results of this work show that KCl:Eu2+ storage phosphors are excellent reusable materials for radiation therapy dosimetry.

  5. Sinogram restoration for ultra-low-dose x-ray multi-slice helical CT by nonparametric regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lu; Siddiqui, Khan; Zhu, Bin; Tao, Yang; Siegel, Eliot

    2007-03-01

    During the last decade, x-ray computed tomography (CT) has been applied to screen large asymptomatic smoking and nonsmoking populations for early lung cancer detection. Because a larger population will be involved in such screening exams, more and more attention has been paid to studying low-dose, even ultra-low-dose x-ray CT. However, reducing CT radiation exposure will increase noise level in the sinogram, thereby degrading the quality of reconstructed CT images as well as causing more streak artifacts near the apices of the lung. Thus, how to reduce the noise levels and streak artifacts in the low-dose CT images is becoming a meaningful topic. Since multi-slice helical CT has replaced conventional stop-and-shoot CT in many clinical applications, this research mainly focused on the noise reduction issue in multi-slice helical CT. The experiment data were provided by Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16-Slice helical CT. It included both conventional CT data acquired under 120 kvp voltage and 119 mA current and ultra-low-dose CT data acquired under 120 kvp and 10 mA protocols. All other settings are the same as that of conventional CT. In this paper, a nonparametric smoothing method with thin plate smoothing splines and the roughness penalty was proposed to restore the ultra-low-dose CT raw data. Each projection frame was firstly divided into blocks, and then the 2D data in each block was fitted to a thin-plate smoothing splines' surface via minimizing a roughness-penalized least squares objective function. By doing so, the noise in each ultra-low-dose CT projection was reduced by leveraging the information contained not only within each individual projection profile, but also among nearby profiles. Finally the restored ultra-low-dose projection data were fed into standard filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm to reconstruct CT images. The rebuilt results as well as the comparison between proposed approach and traditional method were given in the results and

  6. Dual-gate photo thin-film transistor: a “smart” pixel for high- resolution and low-dose X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Ou, Hai; Chen, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Since its emergence a decade ago, amorphous silicon flat panel X-ray detector has established itself as a ubiquitous platform for an array of digital radiography modalities. The fundamental building block of a flat panel detector is called a pixel. In all current pixel architectures, sensing, storage, and readout are unanimously kept separate, inevitably compromising resolution by increasing pixel size. To address this issue, we hereby propose a “smart” pixel architecture where the aforementioned three components are combined in a single dual-gate photo thin-film transistor (TFT). In other words, the dual-gate photo TFT itself functions as a sensor, a storage capacitor, and a switch concurrently. Additionally, by harnessing the amplification effect of such a thin-film transistor, we for the first time created a single-transistor active pixel sensor. The proof-of-concept device had a W/L ratio of 250μm/20μm and was fabricated using a simple five-mask photolithography process, where a 130nm transparent ITO was used as the top photo gate, and a 200nm amorphous silicon as the absorbing channel layer. The preliminary results demonstrated that the photocurrent had been increased by four orders of magnitude due to light-induced threshold voltage shift in the sub-threshold region. The device sensitivity could be simply tuned by photo gate bias to specifically target low-level light detection. The dependence of threshold voltage on light illumination indicated that a dynamic range of at least 80dB could be achieved. The "smart" pixel technology holds tremendous promise for developing high-resolution and low-dose X-ray imaging and may potentially lower the cancer risk imposed by radiation, especially among paediatric patients.

  7. Traceable Quantitative Raman Microscopy and X-ray Fluorescence Analysis as Nondestructive Methods for the Characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Absorber Films.

    PubMed

    Zakel, Sabine; Pollakowski, Beatrix; Streeck, Cornelia; Wundrack, Stefan; Weber, Alfons; Brunken, Stefan; Mainz, Roland; Beckhoff, Burckhardt; Stosch, Rainer

    2016-02-01

    The traceability of measured quantities is an essential condition when linking process control parameters to guaranteed physical properties of a product. Using Raman spectroscopy as an analytical tool for monitoring the production of Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 thin-film solar cells, proper calibration with regard to chemical composition and lateral dimensions is a key prerequisite. This study shows how the multiple requirements of calibration in Raman microscopy might be addressed. The surface elemental composition as well as the integral elemental composition of the samples is traced back by reference-free X-ray fluorescence analysis. Reference Raman spectra are then generated for the relevant Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 related compounds. The lateral dimensions are calibrated with the help of a novel dimensional standard whose regular structures have been traced back to the International System of Units by metrological scanning force microscopy. On this basis, an approach for the quantitative determination of surface coverage values from lateral Raman mappings is developed together with a complete uncertainty budget. Raman and X-ray spectrometry have here been proven as complementary nondestructive methods combining surface sensitivity and in-depth information on elemental and species distribution for the reliable quality control of Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 absorbers and Cu(In1-xGax)3Se5 surface layer formation. PMID:26903563

  8. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Images Aortic rupture, chest x-ray Lung cancer, frontal chest x-ray Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray Coal ... cancer - chest x-ray Lung nodule, right middle lobe - chest x-ray Lung mass, right upper lung - ...

  9. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: Spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Zhao, Wei

    2008-01-01

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator∕HARP (SHARP) combination is read out by the electron beams emitted from the FEA. The proposed detector is called scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The programmable avalanche gain of HARP can improve the low dose performance of indirect FPI while the FEA can be made with pixel sizes down to 50 μm. Because of the avalanche gain, a high resolution type of CsI (Tl), which has not been widely used in indirect FPI due to its lower light output, can be used to improve the high spatial frequency performance. The purpose of the present article is to investigate the factors affecting the spatial resolution of SAPHIRE. Since the resolution performance of the SHARP combination has been well studied, the focus of the present work is on the inherent resolution of the FEA readout method. The lateral spread of the electron beam emitted from a 50 μm×50 μm pixel FEA was investigated with two different electron-optical designs: mesh-electrode-only and electrostatic focusing. Our results showed that electrostatic focusing can limit the lateral spread of electron beams to within the pixel size of down to 50 μm. Since electrostatic focusing is essentially independent of signal intensity, it will provide excellent spatial uniformity. PMID:18697540

  10. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: Spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Li Dan; Zhao Wei

    2008-07-15

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator/HARP (SHARP) combination is read out by the electron beams emitted from the FEA. The proposed detector is called scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The programmable avalanche gain of HARP can improve the low dose performance of indirect FPI while the FEA can be made with pixel sizes down to 50 {mu}m. Because of the avalanche gain, a high resolution type of CsI (Tl), which has not been widely used in indirect FPI due to its lower light output, can be used to improve the high spatial frequency performance. The purpose of the present article is to investigate the factors affecting the spatial resolution of SAPHIRE. Since the resolution performance of the SHARP combination has been well studied, the focus of the present work is on the inherent resolution of the FEA readout method. The lateral spread of the electron beam emitted from a 50 {mu}mx50 {mu}m pixel FEA was investigated with two different electron-optical designs: mesh-electrode-only and electrostatic focusing. Our results showed that electrostatic focusing can limit the lateral spread of electron beams to within the pixel size of down to 50 {mu}m. Since electrostatic focusing is essentially independent of signal intensity, it will provide excellent spatial uniformity.

  11. Scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout for low dose x-ray imaging: Lag

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Zhao, Wei; Nanba, Masakazu; Egami, Norifomi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: A new concept of indirect conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated. It is referred to as scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The present work investigates the temporal performance, i.e., lag, of SAPHIRE. Methods: Since the temporal performance of the x-ray detection materials, i.e., the structured scintillator and avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor, has been studied previously, the investigation is focused on lag due to the FEA readout method. The principle of FEA readout is similar to that of scanning electron beam readout used in camera tubes, where the dominant source of lag is the energy spread of electrons. Since the principles of emission and beam focusing methods for FEA are different from thermionic emission used in camera tubes, its electron beam energy spread and hence lag is expected to be different. In the present work, the energy spread of the electrons emitted from a FEA was investigated theoretically by analyzing different contributing factors due to the FEA design and operations: The inherent energy spread of field emission, the FEA driving pulse delay, and the angular distribution of emitted electrons. The electron energy spread determined the beam acceptance characteristic curve of the photoconductive target, i.e., the accepted beam current (Ia) as a function of target potential (Vt), from which lag could be calculated numerically. Lag calculation was performed using FEA parameters of two prototype HARP-FEA image sensors, and the results were compared with experimental measurements. Strategies for reducing lag in SAPHIRE were proposed and analyzed. Results: The theoretical analysis shows that the dominant factor for lag is the angular distribution of electrons emitted from the FEA. The first frame lags for two prototype sensors with 4 and 25 μm HARP layer thicknesses were 62.1% and 9.1%, respectively. A

  12. Study of X-ray field junction dose using an a-Si electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Madebo, Mebratu; Perkins, A; Fox, C; Johnston, P; Kron, T

    2010-03-01

    Field junctions between megavoltage photon beams are important in modern radiotherapy for treatments such as head and neck and breast cancer. An electronic portal imaging device (EPID) may be used to study junction dose between two megavoltage X-ray fields. In this study, the junction dose was used to determine machine characteristics such as jaw positions and their reproducibility, collimator rotation and the effect of gantry rotation. All measurements were done on Varian linear accelerators with EPID (Varian, Palo Alto, CA). The results show reproducibility in jaw positions of approximately 0.3 mm for repeated jaw placement while EPID readings were reproducible within a standard deviation of 0.4% for fixed jaw positions. Junction dose also allowed collimator rotation error of 0.1 degrees to be observed. Dependence of junction dose on gantry rotation due to gravity was observed; the gravity effect being maximum at 180 degrees gantry angle (beam pointing up). EPIDs were found to be reliable tools for checking field junctions, which in turn may be used to check jaw reproducibility and collimator rotation of linacs. PMID:20237889

  13. X-ray dose response of calcite-A comprehensive analysis for optimal application in TL dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, J. M.; Wary, G.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of various annealing treatments on dosimetric characteristics of orange calcite (CaCO3) mineral has been studied in detail. Quantitative analysis on the dose response shows that the 573 K annealed sample showed sublinear dose response from 10 mGy to 1 Gy. The fading and reproducibility of this sample are also good enough for dosimetric application. However, a specific annealing treatment after irradiation shows some significant improvements in the dosimetric characteristics of the sample. The 773 K pre-annealed sample, after X-ray irradiation post-annealing at 340 K for 6 min provides linear dose response from 10 mGy to 3.60 Gy, very less fading and good reproducibility. Moreover, this sample after post-annealing at 380 K for 6 min shows linear dose response from 10 mGy to 5.40 Gy when analyzed from the ∼408 K thermoluminescence (TL) glow peak. Analysis of TL glow curves confirmed that the 1.30 eV trap center in calcite crystal is the most effective trapping site for dosimetric application.

  14. Radiation dose to neonates undergoing X-ray imaging in special care baby units in Iran.

    PubMed

    Faghihi, Reza; Mehdizadeh, Simin; Sina, Sedigheh; Alizadeh, Fatemeh N; Zeinali, Banafsheh; Kamyab, Gholam Reza; Aghevlian, Sadaf; Khorramdel, Hossein; Namazi, Imen; Heirani, Mandana; Moshkriz, Meisam; Mahani, Hojjat; Sharifzadeh, Mohsen

    2012-06-01

    Radiographic imaging has a significant role in the timely diagnosis of the diseases of neonates in intensive care units. The estimation of the dose received by the infants undergoing radiographic examination is of great importance, due to greater more radiosensitivity and longer life expectancy of the neonates and premature babies. In this study, the values of entrance skin dose (ESD), dose area products (DAPs), energy imparted (EI), whole-body dose, effective dose and risk of childhood cancer were estimated using three methods including direct method [using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) chips], indirect method (using tube output) and Monte Carlo (MC) method (using MCNP4C code). In the first step, the ESD of the neonates was directly measured using TLD-100 chips. Fifty neonates, mostly premature, with different weights and gestational ages in five hospitals mostly suffering from respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia were involved in this study. In the second step, the values of ESD to neonates were indirectly obtained from the tube output in different imaging techniques. The imaging room, incubator, neonates and other components were then simulated in order to obtain the ESD values using the MCNP4C code. Finally, the values of ESD assessed by the three methods were used for calculation of DAP, EI, whole-body dose, effective dose and risk of childhood cancer. The results indicate that the mean ESD per radiograph estimated by the direct, indirect and MC methods are 56.6±4.1, 50.1±3.1 and 54.5±3.3 μGy, respectively. The mean risk of childhood cancer estimated in this study varied between 4.21×10(-7) and 2.72×10(-6). PMID:22128357

  15. X-ray dose estimation from cathode ray tube monitors by Monte Carlo calculation.

    PubMed

    Khaledi, Navid; Arbabi, Azim; Dabaghi, Moloud

    2015-04-01

    Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) monitors are associated with the possible emission of bremsstrahlung radiation produced by electrons striking the monitor screen. Because of the low dose rate, accurate dosimetry is difficult. In this study, the dose equivalent (DE) and effective dose (ED) to an operator working in front of the monitor have been calculated using the Monte Carlo (MC) method by employing the MCNP code. The mean energy of photons reaching the operator was above 17 keV. The phantom ED was 454 μSv y (348 nSv h), which was reduced to 16 μSv y (12 nSv h) after adding a conventional leaded glass sheet. The ambient dose equivalent (ADE) and personal dose equivalent (PDE) for the head, neck, and thorax of the phantom were also calculated. The uncertainty of calculated ED, ADE, and PDE ranged from 3.3% to 10.7% and 4.2% to 14.6% without and with the leaded glass, respectively. PMID:25706133

  16. Calculation of organ doses in x-ray examinations of premature babies

    SciTech Connect

    Smans, Kristien; Tapiovaara, Markku; Cannie, Mieke; Struelens, Lara; Vanhavere, Filip; Smet, Marleen; Bosmans, Hilde

    2008-02-15

    Lung disease represents one of the most life-threatening conditions in prematurely born children. In the evaluation of the neonatal chest, the primary and most important diagnostic study is the chest radiograph. Since prematurely born children are very sensitive to radiation, those radiographs may lead to a significant radiation detriment. Knowledge of the radiation dose is therefore necessary to justify the exposures. To calculate doses in the entire body and in specific organs, computational models of the human anatomy are needed. Using medical imaging techniques, voxel phantoms have been developed to achieve a representation as close as possible to the anatomical properties. In this study two voxel phantoms, representing prematurely born babies, were created from computed tomography- and magnetic resonance images: Phantom 1 (1910 g) and Phantom 2 (590 g). The two voxel phantoms were used in Monte Carlo calculations (MCNPX) to assess organ doses. The results were compared with the commercially available software package PCXMC in which the available mathematical phantoms can be downsized toward the prematurely born baby. The simple phantom-scaling method used in PCXMC seems to be sufficient to calculate doses for organs within the radiation field. However, one should be careful in specifying the irradiation geometry. Doses in organs that are wholly or partially outside the primary radiation field depend critically on the irradiation conditions and the phantom model.

  17. MiR-34a is up-regulated in response to low dose, low energy X-ray induced DNA damage in breast cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are non-coding RNAs involved in the regulation of gene expression including DNA damage responses. Low doses of low energy X-ray radiation, similar to those used in mammographic exams, has been described to be genotoxic. In the present work we investigated the expression of miR-34a; a well described p53-regulated miRNA implicated in cell responses to X-ray irradiation at low doses. Methods Non-cancerous breast cell line MCF-10A and cancerous T-47D and MCF-7 cell lines were submitted to a low-energy X-ray irradiation (ranging from 28–30 Kv) using a dose of 5 Gy. The expression level of miR-34a, let-7a and miR-21 was assessed by qRT-PCR at 4 and 24 hours post-irradiation. DNA damage was then measured by comet assay and micronuclei estimation in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines, where an increase of miR-34a levels could be observed after irradiation. The rate of apoptotic cells was estimated by nuclear staining and fluorescence microscopy. These experiments were also performed at low doses (3; 12 and 48 mGy) in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines. Results We have observed an increase in miR-34a expression 4 hours post-irradiation at 5 Gy in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines while its level did not change in T-47D, a breast cancer cell line bearing non-functional p53. At low doses, miR-34a was up-regulated in non-tumoral MCF-10A to a higher extent as compared to MCF-7. MiR-34a levels decreased 24 hours post-irradiation. We have also observed DNA damage and apoptosis at low-energy X-ray irradiation at low doses and the high dose in MCF-10A and MCF-7 4 and 24 hours post-irradiation relative to the mock control. Conclusion Low energy X-ray is able to promote DNA strand breaks and miR-34a might be involved in cell responses to low energy X-ray DNA damage. MiR-34a expression correlates with X-ray dose, time after irradiation and cell type. The present study reinforces the need of investigating consequences of low dose X-ray irradiation of breast cells. PMID

  18. CT-guided brachytherapy of prostate cancer: reduction of effective dose from X-ray examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanin, Dmitriy B.; Biryukov, Vitaliy A.; Rusetskiy, Sergey S.; Sviridov, Pavel V.; Volodina, Tatiana V.

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most effective and informative diagnostic method. Though the number of CT scans among all radiographic procedures in the USA and European countries is 11% and 4% respectively, CT makes the highest contribution to the collective effective dose from all radiographic procedures, it is 67% in the USA and 40% in European countries [1-5]. Therefore it is necessary to understand the significance of dose value from CT imaging to a patient . Though CT dose from multiple scans and potential risk is of great concern in pediatric patients, this applies to adults as well. In this connection it is very important to develop optimal approaches to dose reduction and optimization of CT examination. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its publications recommends radiologists to be aware that often CT image quality is higher than it is necessary for diagnostic confidence[6], and there is a potential to reduce the dose which patient gets from CT examination [7]. In recent years many procedures, such as minimally invasive surgery, biopsy, brachytherapy and different types of ablation are carried out under guidance of computed tomography [6;7], and during a procedures multiple CT scans focusing on a specific anatomic region are performed. At the Clinics of MRRC different types of treatment for patients with prostate cancer are used, incuding conformal CT-guided brachytherapy, implantation of microsources of I into the gland under guidance of spiral CT [8]. So, the purpose of the study is to choose optimal method to reduce radiation dose from CT during CT-guided prostate brachytherapy and to obtain the image of desired quality.

  19. Functional and morphological changes in pig skin after single or fractionated doses in x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.M.A.; Hopewell, J.W.

    1982-09-01

    The flank skin of pigs has been treated with either single or fractionated doses of x-irradiation. A single dose (2070 cGy) was compared with treatment given as 6 fractions in 18 days (6f/18 days; 3780 cGy) or 30 fractions in 39 days (30f/39 days; 8000 cGy). The doses were selected on the basis that similar levels of late tissue damage would result. Radiation induced changes in the skin were assessed by observing the skin reactions and by the measurement of isotope clearance (functional study), relative field contraction, dermal and epidermal thickness and dermal vascular density (morphological studies). In the three treatment groups the early radiation reaction varied considerably. In the first wave reaction (3 to 6 weeks after treatment) bright red erythema was recorded in many fields but moist desquamation developed only in the 30f/39 days treatment group. The second wave (10-16 weeks) was characterized by an ischemic mauve/dusky reaction. Dermal necrosis developed in 50% of the single dose fields. In the 30f/39 days regimen persistent moist desquamation progressed to dermal necrosis. Neither desquamation nor necrosis developed after 6f/18 days. Different levels of vascular damage in the dermis were assessed using an isotope clearance technique; for example in the early reaction significant changes were recorded in the papillary dermis (faster clearance) prior to the development of moist desquamation (30f/39 days) and in the reticular dermis (slower clearance) before necrosis (single dose). Changes in clearance rates have been correlated with changes in the vascular density and thickness of the dermis. Between 26 and 52 weeks (the late reaction) relative field contraction was slightly greater in the 30f/39 days group than in the other treatment groups.

  20. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC.

    PubMed

    Israngkul-Na-Ayuthaya, Isra; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Pengvanich, Phongpheath

    2015-11-01

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed (28)Al, (24)Na, (54)Mn and (60)Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is (28)Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several (28)Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received. PMID:26265661

  1. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC

    PubMed Central

    Israngkul-Na-Ayuthaya, Isra; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Pengvanich, Phongpheath

    2015-01-01

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed 28Al, 24Na, 54Mn and 60Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is 28Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several 28Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received. PMID:26265661

  2. Gauging low-dose X-ray phase-contrast imaging at a single and large propagation distance.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Ralf; Schober, Alexander; Hahn, Steffen; Moosmann, Julian; Kashef, Jubin; Hertel, Madeleine; Weinhardt, Venera; Hänschke, Daniel; Helfen, Lukas; Sánchez Salazar, Iván A; Guigay, Jean-Pierre; Xiao, Xianghui; Baumbach, Tilo

    2016-02-22

    The interactions of a beam of hard and spatio-temporally coherent X-rays with a soft-matter sample primarily induce a transverse distribution of exit phase variations δϕ (retardations or advancements in pieces of the wave front exiting the object compared to the incoming wave front) whose free-space propagation over a distance z gives rise to intensity contrast gz. For single-distance image detection and |δϕ| ≪ 1 all-order-in-z phase-intensity contrast transfer is linear in δϕ. Here we show that ideal coherence implies a decay of the (shot-)noise-to-signal ratio in gz and of the associated phase noise as z-1/2 and z-1, respectively. Limits on X-ray dose thus favor large values of z. We discuss how a phase-scaling symmetry, exact in the limit δϕ → 0 and dynamically unbroken up to |δϕ| ∼ 1, suggests a filtering of gz in Fourier space, preserving non-iterative quasi-linear phase retrieval for phase variations up to order unity if induced by multi-scale objects inducing phase variations δϕ of a broad spatial frequency spectrum. Such an approach continues to be applicable under an assumed phase-attenuation duality. Using synchrotron radiation, ex and in vivo microtomography on frog embryos exemplifies improved resolution compared to a conventional single-distance phase-retrieval algorithm. PMID:26907079

  3. WE-E-18A-01: Large Area Avalanche Amorphous Selenium Sensors for Low Dose X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Scheuermann, J; Goldan, A; Zhao, W; Tousignant, O; Leveille, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A large area indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with avalanche gain is being developed to achieve x-ray quantum noise limited low dose imaging. It uses a thin optical sensing layer of amorphous selenium (a-Se), known as High-Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP), to detect optical photons generated from a high resolution x-ray scintillator. We will report initial results in the fabrication of a solid-state HARP structure suitable for a large area FPI. Our objective is to establish the blocking layer structures and defect suppression mechanisms that provide stable and uniform avalanche gain. Methods: Samples were fabricated as follows: (1) ITO signal electrode. (2) Electron blocking layer. (3) A 15 micron layer of intrinsic a-Se. (4) Transparent hole blocking layer. (5) Multiple semitransparent bias electrodes to investigate avalanche gain uniformity over a large area. The sample was exposed to 50ps optical excitation pulses through the bias electrode. Transient time of flight (TOF) and integrated charge was measured. A charge transport simulation was developed to investigate the effects of varying blocking layer charge carrier mobility on defect suppression, avalanche gain and temporal performance. Results: Avalanche gain of ∼200 was achieved experimentally with our multi-layer HARP samples. Simulations using the experimental sensor structure produced the same magnitude of gain as a function of electric field. The simulation predicted that the high dark current at a point defect can be reduced by two orders of magnitude by blocking layer optimization which can prevent irreversible damage while normal operation remained unaffected. Conclusion: We presented the first solid state HARP structure directly scalable to a large area FPI. We have shown reproducible and uniform avalanche gain of 200. By reducing mobility of the blocking layers we can suppress defects and maintain stable avalanche. Future work will optimize the blocking layers to prevent lag

  4. X-Ray Dose Reduction in Abdominal Computed Tomography Using Advanced Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Peigang; Zhu, Shaocheng; Shi, Dapeng; Guo, Ying; Sun, Minghua

    2014-01-01

    Objective This work aims to explore the effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithms in reducing computed tomography (CT) radiation dosages in abdominal imaging. Methods CT scans on a standard male phantom were performed at different tube currents. Images at the different tube currents were reconstructed with the filtered back-projection (FBP), 50% ASiR and MBIR algorithms and compared. The CT value, image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of the reconstructed abdominal images were measured. Volumetric CT dose indexes (CTDIvol) were recorded. Results At different tube currents, 50% ASiR and MBIR significantly reduced image noise and increased the CNR when compared with FBP. The minimal tube current values required by FBP, 50% ASiR, and MBIR to achieve acceptable image quality using this phantom were 200, 140, and 80 mA, respectively. At the identical image quality, 50% ASiR and MBIR reduced the radiation dose by 35.9% and 59.9% respectively when compared with FBP. Conclusions Advanced iterative reconstruction techniques are able to reduce image noise and increase image CNRs. Compared with FBP, 50% ASiR and MBIR reduced radiation doses by 35.9% and 59.9%, respectively. PMID:24664174

  5. Visibility of microcalcification in cone beam breast CT: Effects of x-ray tube voltage and radiation dose

    SciTech Connect

    Lai Chaojen; Shaw, Chris C.; Chen, Lingyun; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Liu Xinming; Han Tao; Wang Tianpeng; Yang, Wei T.; Whitman, Gary J.; Tu Shuju

    2007-07-15

    Mammography is the only technique currently used for detecting microcalcification (MC) clusters, an early indicator of breast cancer. However, mammographic images superimpose a three-dimensional compressed breast image onto two-dimensional projection views, resulting in overlapped anatomical breast structures that may obscure the detection and visualization of MCs. One possible solution to this problem is the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with a flat-panel (FP) digital detector. Although feasibility studies of CBCT techniques for breast imaging have yielded promising results, they have not shown how radiation dose and x-ray tube voltage affect the accuracy with which MCs are detected by CBCT experimentally. We therefore conducted a phantom study using a FP-based CBCT system with various mean glandular doses and kVp values. An experimental CBCT scanner was constructed with a data acquisition rate of 7.5 frames/s. 10.5 and 14.5 cm diameter breast phantoms made of gelatin were used to simulate uncompressed breasts consisting of 100% glandular tissue. Eight different MC sizes of calcium carbonate grains, ranging from 180-200 {mu}m to 355-425 {mu}m, were used to simulate MCs. MCs of the same size were arranged to form a 5x5 MC cluster and embedded in the breast phantoms. These MC clusters were positioned at 2.8 cm away from the center of the breast phantoms. The phantoms were imaged at 60, 80, and 100 kVp. With a single scan (360 deg.), 300 projection images were acquired with 0.5x, 1x, and 2x mean glandular dose limit for 10.5 cm phantom and with 1x, 2x, and 4x for 14.5 cm phantom. A Feldkamp algorithm with a pure ramp filter was used for image reconstruction. The normalized noise level was calculated for each x-ray tube voltage and dose level. The image quality of the CBCT images was evaluated by counting the number of visible MCs for each MC cluster for various conditions. The average percentage of the visible MCs was computed and plotted as a function

  6. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a (60)Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the

  7. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a 60Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the

  8. Image quality evaluation and patient dose assessment of medical fluoroscopic X-ray systems: a national study.

    PubMed

    Economides, S; Hourdakis, C J; Kalivas, N; Kalathaki, M; Simantirakis, G; Tritakis, P; Manousaridis, G; Vogiatzi, S; Kipouros, P; Boziari, A; Kamenopoulou, V

    2008-01-01

    This study presents the results from a survey conducted by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), during the period 1998-2003, in 530 public and private owned fluoroscopic X-ray systems in Greece. Certain operational parameters for conventional and remote control systems were assessed, according to a quality control protocol developed by GAEC on the basis of the current literature. Public (91.5%) and private (81.5%) owned fluoroscopic units exhibit high-contrast resolution values over 1 lp mm(-1). Moreover, 88.5 and 87.1% of the fluoroscopic units installed in the public and private sector, respectively, present Maximum Patient Entrance Kerma Rate values lower than 100 mGy min(-1). Additionally, 68.3% of the units assessed were found to perform within the acceptance limits. Finally, the third quartile of the Entrance Surface Dose Rate distribution was estimated according to the Dose Reference Level definition and found equal to 35 mGy min(-1). PMID:17971345

  9. A Model of Regularization Parameter Determination in Low-Dose X-Ray CT Reconstruction Based on Dictionary Learning

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Tao; Zheng, Jian; Li, Ming; Lu, Yanfei; You, Jiali; Guan, Yihui

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, X-ray computed tomography (CT) is becoming widely used to reveal patient's anatomical information. However, the side effect of radiation, relating to genetic or cancerous diseases, has caused great public concern. The problem is how to minimize radiation dose significantly while maintaining image quality. As a practical application of compressed sensing theory, one category of methods takes total variation (TV) minimization as the sparse constraint, which makes it possible and effective to get a reconstruction image of high quality in the undersampling situation. On the other hand, a preliminary attempt of low-dose CT reconstruction based on dictionary learning seems to be another effective choice. But some critical parameters, such as the regularization parameter, cannot be determined by detecting datasets. In this paper, we propose a reweighted objective function that contributes to a numerical calculation model of the regularization parameter. A number of experiments demonstrate that this strategy performs well with better reconstruction images and saving of a large amount of time. PMID:26550024

  10. Computer program for absorbed dose to the breast in mammography. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, L.W.; Rosenstein, M.

    1985-07-01

    Two computer programs are used to generate absorbed dose to tissues in the breast from mammographic procedures. The first program calculates the absorbed dose to total breast tissue and glandular tissue for five reference breast sizes and several compositions, for a number of mammographic x-ray spectra. A data file is generated containing these data. The second program uses the data file generated by the first program, and produces for each reference breast and breast composition a mathematical curve fit as a function of beam quality (HVL, mm Al), using a polynomial expansion. Data tables are then produced by interpolation at discrete values of beam quality. The programs are in FORTRAN IV and run on an IBM 370/168 system using Multiple Virtual Storage. All input/output files are sequential.

  11. A laser-driven undulator x-ray source: simulation of image formation and dose deposition in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Schlattl, Helmut; Grüner, Florian; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    Since overcoming some of the inherent limitations of x-ray tubes becomes increasingly harder, it is important to consider new ways of x-ray generation and to study their applications in the field of medical imaging. In the present work we investigate a novel table-top-sized x-ray source, developed in a joint project within the Cluster of Excellence "Munich Center for Advanced Photonics". It uses laser-accelerated electrons emitting x-ray radiation in a short period undulator. This source has the potential to deliver tunable x-rays with a very narrow spectral bandwidth. The main purpose of this contribution is to investigate the performance of this source in the field of mammography and to compare it to that of conventional x-ray tubes. We simulated the whole imaging process from the electron beam dynamics through the generation of the synchrotron radiation in the undulator up to the x-ray-matter interaction and detection in the mammographic setting. A Monte Carlo simulation of the absorption and scattering processes based on the Geant4 software toolkit has been developed that uses a high-resolution voxel phantom of the female breast for the accurate simulation of mammography. We present simulated mammograms generated by using quasi-monochromatic undulator radiation and by using the polychromatic spectrum of a conventional x-ray tube.

  12. Breast Cancer Induced by X-Ray Mammography Screening? A Review Based on Recent Understanding of Low-Dose Radiobiology.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Ernest K J; Foray, Nicolas; Bourguignon, Michel H

    2016-01-01

    Screening mammography offers the possibility of discovering malignant diseases at an early stage, which is consequently treated early, thereby reducing the mortality rate. However, ionizing radiation as used in low-dose X-ray mammography may be associated with a risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. In the context of the harmful effects of ionizing radiation, this article reviewed novel radiobiological data and provided a simulation of the relative incidence of radiation-induced breast cancer due to screening against a background baseline incidence in a population of 100,000 individuals. The use of modern digital mammographic technology was assumed, giving rise to a glandular dose of 2.5 mGy from a 2-view per breast image. Assuming no latency time, this led to a ratio of induced incidence rate over baseline incidence rate of about 1.6‰ for biennial screening in women aged 50-74 years, although it cannot be excluded that the dose and dose rate effectiveness factor values relying on new radiobiological insights may lower this number to about 0.7‰. This carcinogenic risk is considered small in relation to the potential beneficial effects of screening, especially as latency time was not taken into consideration. However, individuals who are known to be carriers of risk-increasing genetic variations and/or have an inherited disposition of breast cancer should avoid ionizing radiation as much as possible and should be referred to ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, a significant, but difficult to quantify, risk of cancer is present for individuals who suffer from hypersusceptibility to ionizing radiation. PMID:26571215

  13. Assessing image quality and dose reduction of a new x-ray computed tomography iterative reconstruction algorithm using model observers

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu Kupinski, Matthew A.; Fan, Jiahua; Sainath, Paavana; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: A number of different techniques have been developed to reduce radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. In this paper, the authors will compare task-based measures of image quality of CT images reconstructed by two algorithms: conventional filtered back projection (FBP), and a new iterative reconstruction algorithm (IR). Methods: To assess image quality, the authors used the performance of a channelized Hotelling observer acting on reconstructed image slices. The selected channels are dense difference Gaussian channels (DDOG).A body phantom and a head phantom were imaged 50 times at different dose levels to obtain the data needed to assess image quality. The phantoms consisted of uniform backgrounds with low contrast signals embedded at various locations. The tasks the observer model performed included (1) detection of a signal of known location and shape, and (2) detection and localization of a signal of known shape. The employed DDOG channels are based on the response of the human visual system. Performance was assessed using the areas under ROC curves and areas under localization ROC curves. Results: For signal known exactly (SKE) and location unknown/signal shape known tasks with circular signals of different sizes and contrasts, the authors’ task-based measures showed that a FBP equivalent image quality can be achieved at lower dose levels using the IR algorithm. For the SKE case, the range of dose reduction is 50%–67% (head phantom) and 68%–82% (body phantom). For the study of location unknown/signal shape known, the dose reduction range can be reached at 67%–75% for head phantom and 67%–77% for body phantom case. These results suggest that the IR images at lower dose settings can reach the same image quality when compared to full dose conventional FBP images. Conclusions: The work presented provides an objective way to quantitatively assess the image quality of a newly introduced CT IR algorithm. The performance of the

  14. MCNP simulation of absorbed energy and dose by iodinated contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wenjun; Mah, Eugene; Huda, Walter; Yao, Hai

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the absorbed dose and energy by iodinated contrast medium in diagnostic radiology. A simulation geometry in which an inner sphere (d = 0.2cm, 1cm, 5cm) filled with iodinated contrast medium (or water) is located at the center of a 20cm diameter water sphere was used in simulations performed with MCNP5 codes. Monoenergetic x-rays with energies ranging from 40 to 80keV from a cone beam source were utilized and contrast medium concentration ranged from 100 to 1mg/ml. Absorbed dose ratio (RD) to inner sphere and total absorbed energies ratio (RE) to the whole phantom with and without iodinated contrast medium were investigated. The maximum RD was ~13 for the 0.2cm diameter sphere with 100mg/ml contrast medium. The maximum RE was ~1.05 for the 5cm diameter contrast sphere at 80keV with 100mg/ml contrast medium. Under the same incident photon energy, increasing the inner sphere size from 0.2cm to 5cm caused a ~63% increase in the RD on average. Decreasing the contrast medium concentration from 100 to 10 mg/ml caused a decrease of RD of ~ 76%. A conclusion was reached that although local absorbed dose increase caused by iodinated contrast agent could be high; the increase in total absorbed energy is negligible.

  15. Soft X-ray induced damage in PVA-based membranes in water environment monitored by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzvetkov, George; Späth, Andreas; Fink, Rainer H.

    2014-10-01

    The effect of synchrotron X-ray flux in a soft X-ray scanning-transmission microspectroscope (STXM) instrument on the chemical structure of air-filled poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) based microbubbles and their stabilizing shell has been examined. Prolonged soft X-ray illumination of the particles in aqueous suspension leads to the breaking of the microbubbles' protective polymer shell and substantial chemical changes. The latter were clarified via a micro-spot C K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy with further respect to the absorbed X-ray doses. Our results revealed a continuous degradation of the PVA network associated with formation of carbonyl- and carboxyl-containing species as well as an increased content of unsaturated bonds. The observed effects must be taken into account in studies of micro- and nanostructured polymer materials utilizing X-rays.

  16. Study of radiation effects on the cell structure and evaluation of the dose delivered by x-ray and {alpha}-particles microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kosior, Ewelina; Cloetens, Peter; Deves, Guillaume; Ortega, Richard; Bohic, Sylvain

    2012-12-24

    Hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy and magnified phase contrast imaging are combined to study radiation effects on cells. Experiments were performed on freeze-dried cells at the nano-imaging station ID22NI of the European synchrotron radiation facility. Quantitative phase contrast imaging provides maps of the projected mass and is used to evaluate the structural changes due to irradiation during X-ray fluorescence experiments. Complementary to phase contrast imaging, scanning transmission ion microscopy is performed and doses of all the experiments are compared. We demonstrate the sensitivity of the proposed approach to study radiation-induced damage at the sub-cellular level.

  17. Dose-response curve of EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films to synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas A. D.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews, Kenneth L. II; Ham, Kyungmin; Dugas, Joseph P.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: This work investigates the dose-response curves of GAFCHROMIC{sup Registered-Sign} EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films using synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams. EBT2 film is being utilized for dose verification in photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) synchrotron facility. Methods: Monochromatic beams of 25, 30, and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements were used to determine the dose delivered to films irradiated at depths from 0.7 to 8.5 cm in a 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 Multiplication-Sign 10-cm{sup 3} polymethylmethacrylate phantom. AAPM TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Films were digitized using an Epson 1680 Professional flatbed scanner and analyzed using the net optical density (NOD) derived from the red channel. A dose-response curve was obtained at 35 keV for EBT film, and at 25, 30, and 35 keV for EBT2 and EBT3 films. Calibrations of films for 4 MV x-rays were obtained for comparison using a radiotherapy accelerator at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center. Results: The sensitivity (NOD per unit dose) of EBT film at 35 keV relative to that for 4-MV x-rays was 0.73 and 0.76 for doses 50 and 100 cGy, respectively. The sensitivity of EBT2 film at 25, 30, and 35 keV relative to that for 4-MV x-rays varied from 1.09-1.07, 1.23-1.17, and 1.27-1.19 for doses 50-200 cGy, respectively. For EBT3 film the relative sensitivity was within 3% of unity for all three monochromatic x-ray beams. Conclusions: EBT and EBT2 film sensitivity showed strong energy dependence over an energy range of 25 keV-4 MV, although this dependence becomes weaker for larger doses. EBT3 film shows weak energy dependence, indicating that it would be a better dosimeter for kV x-ray beams where beam hardening effects can result in large changes in the effective energy.

  18. Estimates of Average Glandular Dose with Auto-modes of X-ray Exposures in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Izdihar; Chelliah, Kanaga K.; Mustafa, Nawal

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this research was to examine the average glandular dose (AGD) of radiation among different breast compositions of glandular and adipose tissue with auto-modes of exposure factor selection in digital breast tomosynthesis. Methods: This experimental study was carried out in the National Cancer Society, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between February 2012 and February 2013 using a tomosynthesis digital mammography X-ray machine. The entrance surface air kerma and the half-value layer were determined using a 100H thermoluminescent dosimeter on 50% glandular and 50% adipose tissue (50/50) and 20% glandular and 80% adipose tissue (20/80) commercially available breast phantoms (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems, Inc., Norfolk, Virginia, USA) with auto-time, auto-filter and auto-kilovolt modes. Results: The lowest AGD for the 20/80 phantom with auto-time was 2.28 milliGray (mGy) for two dimension (2D) and 2.48 mGy for three dimensional (3D) images. The lowest AGD for the 50/50 phantom with auto-time was 0.97 mGy for 2D and 1.0 mGy for 3D. Conclusion: The AGD values for both phantoms were lower against a high kilovolt peak and the use of auto-filter mode was more practical for quick acquisition while limiting the probability of operator error. PMID:26052465

  19. Photo neutron dose equivalent rate in 15 MV X-ray beam from a Siemens Primus Linac.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, A; Pourfallah, T Allahverdi; Akbari, M R; Babapour, H; Shahidi, M

    2015-01-01

    Fast and thermal neutron fluence rates from a 15 MV X-ray beams of a Siemens Primus Linac were measured using bare and moderated BF3 proportional counter inside the treatment room at different locations. Fluence rate values were converted to dose equivalent rate (DER) utilizing conversion factors of American Association of Physicist in Medicine's (AAPM) report number 19. For thermal neutrons, maximum and minimum DERs were 3.46 × 10(-6) (3 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size) and 8.36 × 10(-8) Sv/min (in maze, 40 × 40 field size), respectively. For fast neutrons, maximum DERs using 9" and 3" moderators were 1.6 × 10(-5) and 1.74 × 10(-5) Sv/min (2 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size), respectively. By changing the field size, the variation in thermal neutron DER was more than the fast neutron DER and the changes in fast neutron DER were not significant in the bunker except inside the radiation field. This study showed that at all points and distances, by decreasing field size of the beam, thermal and fast neutron DER increases and the number of thermal neutrons is more than fast neutrons. PMID:26170555

  20. Adaptive-weighted total variation minimization for sparse data toward low-dose x-ray computed tomography image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Ma, Jianhua; Fan, Yi; Liang, Zhengrong

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that by minimizing the total variation (TV) of the to-be-estimated image with some data and other constraints, piecewise-smooth x-ray computed tomography (CT) can be reconstructed from sparse-view projection data without introducing notable artifacts. However, due to the piecewise constant assumption for the image, a conventional TV minimization algorithm often suffers from over-smoothness on the edges of the resulting image. To mitigate this drawback, we present an adaptive-weighted TV (AwTV) minimization algorithm in this paper. The presented AwTV model is derived by considering the anisotropic edge property among neighboring image voxels, where the associated weights are expressed as an exponential function and can be adaptively adjusted by the local image-intensity gradient for the purpose of preserving the edge details. Inspired by the previously reported TV-POCS (projection onto convex sets) implementation, a similar AwTV-POCS implementation was developed to minimize the AwTV subject to data and other constraints for the purpose of sparse-view low-dose CT image reconstruction. To evaluate the presented AwTV-POCS algorithm, both qualitative and quantitative studies were performed by computer simulations and phantom experiments. The results show that the presented AwTV-POCS algorithm can yield images with several notable gains, in terms of noise-resolution tradeoff plots and full-width at half-maximum values, as compared to the corresponding conventional TV-POCS algorithm.

  1. Photo neutron dose equivalent rate in 15 MV X-ray beam from a Siemens Primus Linac

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, A.; Pourfallah, T. Allahverdi; Akbari, M. R.; Babapour, H.; Shahidi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Fast and thermal neutron fluence rates from a 15 MV X-ray beams of a Siemens Primus Linac were measured using bare and moderated BF3 proportional counter inside the treatment room at different locations. Fluence rate values were converted to dose equivalent rate (DER) utilizing conversion factors of American Association of Physicist in Medicine's (AAPM) report number 19. For thermal neutrons, maximum and minimum DERs were 3.46 × 10-6 (3 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size) and 8.36 × 10-8 Sv/min (in maze, 40 × 40 field size), respectively. For fast neutrons, maximum DERs using 9” and 3” moderators were 1.6 × 10-5 and 1.74 × 10-5 Sv/min (2 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size), respectively. By changing the field size, the variation in thermal neutron DER was more than the fast neutron DER and the changes in fast neutron DER were not significant in the bunker except inside the radiation field. This study showed that at all points and distances, by decreasing field size of the beam, thermal and fast neutron DER increases and the number of thermal neutrons is more than fast neutrons. PMID:26170555

  2. Monte Carlo simulation-based feasibility study of a dose-area product meter built into a collimator for diagnostic X-ray.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yongsu; Kim, Hyunji; Park, MinSeok; Kim, Jungsu; Seo, Deoknam; Choi, Inseok; Jeong, Hoiwoun; Kim, Jungmin

    2014-12-01

    According to the International Electro-technical Commission, manufacturers of X-ray equipment should indicate the number of radiation doses to which a patient can be exposed. Dose-area product (DAP) meters are readily available devices that provide dose indices. Collimators are the most commonly employed radiation beam restrictors in X-ray equipment. DAP meters are attached to the lower surface of a collimator. A DAP meter consists of a chamber and electronics. This separation makes it difficult for operators to maintain the accuracy of a DAP meter. Developing a comprehensive system that has a DAP meter in place of a mirror in the collimator would be effective for measuring, recording the dose and maintaining the quality of the DAP meter. This study was conducted through experimental measurements and a simulation. A DAP meter built into a collimator was found to be feasible when its reading was multiplied by a correction factor. PMID:24353031

  3. Preliminary investigation of the NMR, optical and x-ray CT dose-response of polymer gel dosimeters incorporating cosolvents to improve dose sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeva, V. I.; Olding, T.; Jirasek, A.; Schreiner, L. J.; McAuley, K. B.

    2009-05-01

    This study reports on efforts to increase the dose sensitivity of polymer gel dosimeters used in 3D radiation dosimetry. The potential of several different cosolvents is investigated, with the aim of increasing the solubility of N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide crosslinker in polymer gel dosimeters. Glycerol and isopropanol increase the limit for the crosslinker solubility from approximately 3% to 5% and 10% by weight, respectively. This enables the manufacture of polymer gel dosimeters with much higher levels of crosslinking than was previously possible. New dosimeter recipes containing up to 5 wt% N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide were subjected to spatially uniform radiation and were studied using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), as well as x-ray and optical CT techniques. The resulting dosimeters exhibit dose sensitivities that are up to 2.7 times higher than measured for a typical dosimeters with 3% N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide without the addition of cosolvent. Two additional cosolvents (n-propanol and sec-butanol) were deemed unsuitable for practical dosimeters due to incompatibility with gelatin, cloudiness prior to irradiation, and immiscibility with water when large quantities of cosolvent were used. The dosimeters with high N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide content that used isopropanol or glycerol as cosolvents had high optical clarity prior to irradiation, but did not produce suitable optical CT results for non-uniformly irradiated gels due to polymer development outside of the high dose regions of the pencil beams and significant light scatter. Further experiments are required to determine whether cosolvents can be used to manufacture gels with sufficiently high dose sensitivity for readout using x-ray computed tomography.

  4. Cellular analysis of residual hemopoietic deficiencies in mice after 4 repeated doses of 4. 5 Gray x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Hendry, J.H.; Xu, C.X.; Testa, N.G.

    1983-11-01

    A sub-optimal plateau in numbers of femoral stem-cells (CFU-S) in mice after 4 doses of 4.5 Gray x rays (each separated by 21 days), was shown to persist at 20 to 30% of control up to 1 year after the last dose, when about 50% of the mice had survived. The concentration of white cells in the blood was maintained persistently at about 70% of control, whereas the concentration of red cells was normal up to 4 months and then it declined to about 75% of control at 10 months after irradiation. Concentrations of some committed progenitor cells in the marrow (GM-CFC and ERC), which are capable of amplification cell divisions, were intermediate between the concentrations of marrow stem cells and mature blood cells in both the granuloid and the erythroid cell lineages, respectively. Hence increased amplification was a mechanism operating for a prolonged period in the production of numbers of mature cells. The numbers were subnormal, however, and this corresponded to only 1 extra amplification division on average. There was a slow decline after 6 months in the numbers of CFU-S, BFU-E and GM-CFC, and in the hematocrit, with reference to age-matched controls. The decline was due partly to a prevention of the natural increase in cell numbers in the marrow with the age of the mice, which was also seen with the femoral content of a stromal progenitor cell (CFU-F). A defect in the repeatedly-irradiated CFU-S population was detected as a persistent inability to produce colonies containing the same number of daughter CFU-S as contained in colonies derived from unirradiated marrow and assayed at the same time.

  5. Warm absorbers in X-rays (WAX), a comprehensive high-resolution grating spectral study of a sample of Seyfert galaxies - I. A global view and frequency of occurrence of warm absorbers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Sibasish; Guainazzi, Matteo; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Chakravorty, Susmita; Kembhavi, Ajit K.

    2014-07-01

    We present results from a homogeneous analysis of the broad-band 0.3-10 keV CCD resolution as well as of the soft X-ray high-resolution grating spectra of a hard X-ray flux-limited sample of 26 Seyfert galaxies observed with XMM-Newton. Our goal is to characterize warm absorbers (WAs) along the line of sight to the active nucleus. We significantly detect WAs in 65 per cent of the sample sources. Our results are consistent with WAs being present in at least half of the Seyfert galaxies in the nearby Universe, in agreement with previous estimates. We find a gap in the distribution of the ionization parameter in the range 0.5 < log ξ < 1.5 which we interpret as a thermally unstable region for WA clouds. This may indicate that the WA flow is probably constituted by a clumpy distribution of discrete clouds rather than a continuous medium. The distribution of the WA column densities for the sources with broad Fe Kα lines are similar to those sources which do not have broadened emission lines. Therefore, the detected broad Fe Kα emission lines are bona fide and not artefacts of ionized absorption in the soft X-rays. The WA parameters show no correlation among themselves, with the exception of the ionization parameter versus column density. The shallow slope of the log ξ versus log vout linear regression (0.12 ± 0.03) is inconsistent with the scaling laws predicted by radiation or magnetohydrodynamic-driven winds. Our results also suggest that WA and ultra fast outflows do not represent extreme manifestation of the same astrophysical system.

  6. Studies on best dose of X-ray for Hep-2 cells by using FTIR, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Renming; Tang, Weiyue; Kang, Yipu; Si, Minzhen

    2009-08-01

    We report here the use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy, and flow cytometry (FCM) to analysis the best dose of X-ray for human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (Hep-2). Our analysis indicates specific FTIR and UV-vis spectral differences between X-irradiated and normal Hep-2 cells. In addition, striking spectral differences are seen in FTIR spectra in the ratios at 2925/2958 and 1654/1542 cm -1. These two ratios of the X-irradiated cells for 8 Gy dose group with value of 1.07 ± 0.025 and 1.184 ± 0.013, respectively, were more notable (mean ± S.D., n = 5, P < 0.05) compared with that of the cells for the controls. UV-vis absorption spectra analysis shows X-ray irradiation disturbed the metabolism of phenylalanine and tyrosine intracellular, maybe, which was caused by cell cycle arrest. Spectroscopy analysis suggests 8 Gy is a better dose of X-ray for lowering the canceration degree of Hep-2 cells. Moreover, FCM analysis shows the apoptosis of X-irradiated cells depended on the radiation dose to some extent, but it was not linear. The total apoptosis ratio with value of (20.793 ± 1.133)% ( P < 0.01, n = 5) for the 12 Gy dose group was the maximum, however, the maximum apoptosis ratio per Gray (total apoptosis ratio/radiation dose) was the cells of the 2 Gy dose group with value of (4.887 ± 0.211)% ( P < 0.05, n = 5). Our data suggest that Hep-2 cells are given 2 Gy radiation of X-ray once a time, 8 Gy per week (accumulatively), the effect for lowering the canceration degree and restraining the proliferation of Hep-2 cells will be better.

  7. SU-D-207-07: Implementation of Full/half Bowtie Filter Model in a Commercial Treatment Planning System for Kilovoltage X-Ray Imaging Dose Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S; Alaei, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To implement full/half bowtie filter models in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) to calculate kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imaging dose of Varian On-Board Imager (OBI) cone beam CT (CBCT) system. Methods: Full/half bowtie filters of Varian OBI were created as compensator models in Pinnacle TPS (version 9.6) using Matlab software (version 2011a). The profiles of both bowtie filters were acquired from the manufacturer, imported into the Matlab system and hard coded in binary file format. A Pinnacle script was written to import each bowtie filter data into a Pinnacle treatment plan as a compensator. A kV x-ray beam model without including the compensator model was commissioned per each bowtie filter setting based on percent depth dose and lateral profile data acquired from Monte Carlo simulations. To validate the bowtie filter models, a rectangular water phantom was generated in the planning system and an anterior/posterior beam with each bowtie filter was created. Using the Pinnacle script, each bowtie filter compensator was added to the treatment plan. Lateral profile at the depth of 3cm and percent depth dose were measured using an ion chamber and compared with the data extracted from the treatment plans. Results: The kV x-ray beams for both full and half bowtie filter have been modeled in a commercial TPS. The difference of lateral and depth dose profiles between dose calculations and ion chamber measurements were within 6%. Conclusion: Both full/half bowtie filter models provide reasonable results in kV x-ray dose calculations in the water phantom. This study demonstrates the possibility of using a model-based treatment planning system to calculate the kV imaging dose for both full and half bowtie filter modes. Further study is to be performed to evaluate the models in clinical situations.

  8. True three-dimensional dose computations for megavoltage x-ray therapy: a role for the superposition principle.

    PubMed

    Battista, J J; Sharpe, M B

    1992-12-01

    The objective of radiation therapy is to concentrate a prescribed radiation dose accurately within a target volume in the patient. Major advances in imaging technology have greatly improved our ability to plan radiation treatments in three dimensions (3D) and to verify the treatment geometrically, but there is a concomitant need to improve dosimetric accuracy. It has been recommended that radiation doses should be computed with an accuracy of 3% within the target volume and in radiosensitive normal tissues. We review the rationale behind this recommendation, and describe a new generation of 3D dose algorithms which are capable of achieving this goal. A true 3D dose calculation tracks primary and scattered radiations in 3D space while accounting for tissue inhomogeneities. In the past, dose distributions have been computed in a 2D transverse slice with the assumption that the anatomy of the patient dose not change abruptly in nearby slices. We demonstrate the importance of computing 3D scatter contributions to dose from photons and electrons correctly, and show the magnitude of dose errors caused by using traditional 2D methods. The Monte Carlo technique is the most general and rigorous approach since individual primary and secondary particle tracks are simulated. However, this approach is too time-consuming for clinical treatment planning. We review an approach that is based on the superposition principle and achieves a reasonable compromise between the speed of computation and accuracy in dose. In this approach, dose deposition is separated into two steps. Firstly, the attenuation of incident photons interacting in the absorber is computed to determine the total energy released in the material (TERMA). This quantity is treated as an impulse at each irradiated point. Secondly, the transport of energy by scattered photons and electrons is described by a point dose spread kernel. The dose distribution is the superposition of the kernels, weighted by the magnitude of

  9. Independent absorbed-dose calculation using the Monte Carlo algorithm in volumetric modulated arc therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the result of independent absorbed-dose calculations based on a Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for various treatment sites. Methods and materials All treatment plans were created by the superposition/convolution (SC) algorithm of SmartArc (Pinnacle V9.2, Philips). The beam information was converted into the format of the Monaco V3.3 (Elekta), which uses the X-ray voxel-based MC (XVMC) algorithm. The dose distribution was independently recalculated in the Monaco. The dose for the planning target volume (PTV) and the organ at risk (OAR) were analyzed via comparisons with those of the treatment plan. Before performing an independent absorbed-dose calculation, the validation was conducted via irradiation from 3 different gantry angles with a 10- × 10-cm2 field. For the independent absorbed-dose calculation, 15 patients with cancer (prostate, 5; lung, 5; head and neck, 3; rectal, 1; and esophageal, 1) who were treated with single-arc VMAT were selected. To classify the cause of the dose difference between the Pinnacle and Monaco TPSs, their calculations were also compared with the measurement data. Result In validation, the dose in Pinnacle agreed with that in Monaco within 1.5%. The agreement in VMAT calculations between Pinnacle and Monaco using phantoms was exceptional; at the isocenter, the difference was less than 1.5% for all the patients. For independent absorbed-dose calculations, the agreement was also extremely good. For the mean dose for the PTV in particular, the agreement was within 2.0% in all the patients; specifically, no large difference was observed for high-dose regions. Conversely, a significant difference was observed in the mean dose for the OAR. For patients with prostate cancer, the mean rectal dose calculated in Monaco was significantly smaller than that calculated in Pinnacle. Conclusions There was no remarkable difference between the SC and XVMC calculations in the high-dose regions

  10. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top ...

  11. Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Lee

    2014-07-02

    This is the Final Progress Report for DOE-funded research project DE-PS02-08ER08-01 titled “Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens”. The project focuses on the effects of low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on the ocular lens. The lens is an exquisitely radiosensitive tissue with a highly-ordered molecular structure that is amenable to non-invasive optical study from the periphery. These merits point to the lens as an ideal target for laser-based molecular biodosimetry (MBD). Following exposure to different types of ionizing radiations, the lens demonstrates molecular changes (e.g., oxidation, racemization, crosslinkage, truncation, aggregation, etc.) that impact the structure and function of the long-lived proteins in the cytosol of lens fiber cells. The vast majority of proteins in the lens comprise the highly-ordered crystallins. These highly conserved lens proteins are amongst the most concentrated and stable in the body. Once synthesized, the crystallins are retained in the fiber cell cytoplasm for life. Taken together, these properties point to the lens as an ideal system for quantitative in vivo MBD assessment using quasi-elastic light scattering (QLS) analysis. In this project, we deploy a purpose-designed non-invasive infrared laser QLS instrument as a quantitative tool for longitudinal assessment of pre-cataractous molecular changes in the lenses of living mice exposed to low-dose low-LET radiation compared to non-irradiated sham controls. We hypothesize that radiation exposure will induce dose-dependent changes in the molecular structure of matrix proteins in the lens. Mechanistic assays to ascertain radiation-induced molecular changes in the lens focus on protein aggregation and gene/protein expression patterns. We anticipate that this study will contribute to our understanding of early molecular changes associated with radiation-induced tissue pathology. This study also affords potential for

  12. Silver fluorescent x-ray yield and its influence on the dose rate constant for nine low-energy brachytherapy source models

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, Ravinder; Chen, Zhe Jay

    2007-10-15

    The physical characteristics of the photons emitted by a low-energy brachytherapy source are strongly dependent on the source's construction. Aside from absorption and scattering caused by the internal structures and the source encapsulation, the photoelectric interactions occurred in certain type of source-construction materials can generate additional energetic characteristic x rays with energies different from those emitted by the bare radionuclide. As a result, the same radionuclide encapsulated in different source models can result in dose rate constants and other dosimetric parameters that are strikingly different from each other. The aim of this work was to perform a systematic study on the yield of silver fluorescent x rays produced in nine {sup 125}I sources that are known to contain silver and its impact on the dose-rate constant. Using a high-resolution germanium spectrometer, the relative {sup 125}I spectra emitted by the nine sources on its bisector were measured and found to be similar to each other (the maximum variation in the {sup 125}I-K{sub {beta}} relative intensity was less than 4%). On the other hand, the measured silver fluorescent x-ray spectra exhibited much greater variations from model to model; the maximum change in the measured Ag-K{sub {alpha}} relative intensity was over 95%. This larger variation in the measured silver fluorescent x-ray yield was caused by (1) the different amount of silver that was directly exposed to the {sup 125}I radionuclide in different source models and (2) the stronger influence of the source's internal geometry on the silver fluorescent x rays. Because the addition of silver fluorescent x rays can significantly alter the photon characteristics emitted by the radioactive sources, a precise knowledge on the silver fluorescent x-ray yield is needed in theoretical calculations of the sources' intrinsic dosimetric properties. This study concludes that the differences in silver fluorescent yield are the primary

  13. Adaptive-weighted total variation minimization for sparse data toward low-dose x-ray computed tomography image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Ma, Jianhua; Fan, Yi; Liang, Zhengrong

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that by minimizing the total variation (TV) of the to-be-estimated image with some data and other constraints, piecewise-smooth x-ray computed tomography (CT) can be reconstructed from sparse-view projection data without introducing notable artifacts. However, due to the piecewise constant assumption for the image, a conventional TV minimization algorithm often suffers from over-smoothness on the edges of the resulting image. To mitigate this drawback, we present an adaptive-weighted TV (AwTV) minimization algorithm in this paper. The presented AwTV model is derived by considering the anisotropic edge property among neighboring image voxels, where the associated weights are expressed as an exponential function and can be adaptively adjusted by the local image-intensity gradient for the purpose of preserving the edge details. Inspired by the previously reported TV-POCS (projection onto convex sets) implementation, a similar AwTV-POCS implementation was developed to minimize the AwTV subject to data and other constraints for the purpose of sparse-view low-dose CT image reconstruction. To evaluate the presented AwTV-POCS algorithm, both qualitative and quantitative studies were performed by computer simulations and phantom experiments. The results show that the presented AwTV-POCS algorithm can yield images with several notable gains, in terms of noise-resolution tradeoff plots and full-width at half-maximum values, as compared to the corresponding conventional TV-POCS algorithm. PMID:23154621

  14. Absorbed dose and dose rate using the Varian OBI 1.3 and 1.4 CBCT system.

    PubMed

    Palm, Asa; Nilsson, Elisabeth; Herrnsdorf, Lars

    2010-01-01

    According to published data, the absorbed dose used for a CBCT image acquisition with Varian OBI v1.3 can be as high as 100 mGy. In 2008 Varian released a new OBI version (v1.4), which promised to reduce the imaging dose. In this study, absorbed doses used for CBCT image acquisitions with the default irradiation techniques of Varian OBI v1.3 and v1.4 are measured. TLDs are used to derive dose distributions at three planes inside an anthropomorphic phantom. In addition, point doses and dose profiles inside a 'stack' of three CTDI body phantoms are measured using a new solid state detector, the CT Dose Profiler. With the CT Dose Profiler, the individual pulses from the X-ray tube are also studied. To verify the absorbed dose measured with the CT Dose Profiler, it is compared to TLD. The image quality is evaluated using a Catphan phantom. For OBI v1.3, doses measured in transverse planes of the Alderson phantom range between 64 mGy and 144 mGy. The average dose is around 100 mGy. For OBI v1.4, doses measured in transverse planes of the Alderson phantom range between 1 mGy and 51 mGy. Mean doses range between 3-35 mGy depending on CBCT mode. CT Dose Profiler data agree with TLD measurements in a CTDI phantom within the uncertainty of the TLD measurements (estimated SD +/- 10%). Instantaneous dose rate at the periphery of the phantom can be higher than 20 mGy/s, which is 10 times the dose rate at the center. The spatial resolution in v1.4 is not as high as in v1.3. In conclusion, measurements show that the imaging doses for default modes in Varian OBI v1.4 CBCT system are significantly lower than in v1.3. The CT Dose Profiler is proven fast and accurate for CBCT applications. PMID:20160695

  15. Mean glandular dose coefficients (D(g)N) for x-ray spectra used in contemporary breast imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Nosratieh, Anita; Hernandez, Andrew; Shen, Sam Z; Yaffe, Martin J; Seibert, J Anthony; Boone, John M

    2015-09-21

    To develop tables of normalized glandular dose coefficients D(g)N for a range of anode-filter combinations and tube voltages used in contemporary breast imaging systems. Previously published mono-energetic D(g)N values were used with various spectra to mathematically compute D(g)N coefficients. The tungsten anode spectra from TASMICS were used; molybdenum and rhodium anode-spectra were generated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The spectra were filtered with various thicknesses of Al, Rh, Mo or Cu. An initial half value layer (HVL) calculation was made using the anode and filter material. A range of the HVL values was produced with the addition of small thicknesses of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as a surrogate for the breast compression paddle, to produce a range of HVL values at each tube voltage. Using a spectral weighting method, D(g)N coefficients for the generated spectra were calculated for breast glandular densities of 0%, 12.5%, 25%, 37.5%, 50% and 100% for a range of compressed breast thicknesses from 3 to 8 cm. Eleven tables of normalized glandular dose (D(g)N) coefficients were produced for the following anode/filter combinations: W + 50 μm Ag, W + 500 μm Al, W + 700 μm Al, W + 200 μm Cu, W + 300 μm Cu, W + 50 μm Rh, Mo + 400 μm Cu, Mo + 30 μm Mo, Mo + 25 μm Rh, Rh + 400 μm Cu and Rh + 25 μm Rh. Where possible, these results were compared to previously published D(g)N values and were found to be on average less than 2% different than previously reported values.Over 200 pages of D(g)N coefficients were computed for modeled x-ray system spectra that are used in a number of new breast imaging applications. The reported values were found to be in excellent agreement when compared to published values. PMID:26348995

  16. Simulation of the upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopic examination for calculation of absorbed dose in tissue.

    PubMed

    Stern, S H; Dennis, M J; Williams, G; Rosenstein, M

    1995-09-01

    In order to simulate the upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopic examination, modifications were made to the Monte Carlo radiation-transport code that uses the anthropomorphic, mathematical reference phantoms ADAM and EVA. A set of discrete x-ray field projections of the principal anatomy of clinical interest has been previously defined. This note describes the new features incorporated in the simulations--divergent beams in oblique irradiation geometries, an esophagus and a duodenum, a double contrast medium consisting of a BaSO4-H2O mixture and air in the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum, and clinically representative beam qualities. The absorbed doses in tissues per unit entrance exposure (free-in-air) computed with the modified code appeared in Department of Health and Human Services Publication FDA 92-8282, Handbook of Selected Tissue Doses for the Upper Gastrointestinal Fluoroscopic Examination. A minor correction is described for the previously reported results for the esophagus. PMID:7635736

  17. Method for dose-reduced 3D catheter tracking on a scanning-beam digital x-ray system using dynamic electronic collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkerley, David A. P.; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system capable of tomosynthesis-based 3D catheter tracking. This work proposes a method of dose-reduced 3D tracking using dynamic electronic collimation (DEC) of the SBDX scanning x-ray tube. Positions in the 2D focal spot array are selectively activated to create a regionof- interest (ROI) x-ray field around the tracked catheter. The ROI position is updated for each frame based on a motion vector calculated from the two most recent 3D tracking results. The technique was evaluated with SBDX data acquired as a catheter tip inside a chest phantom was pulled along a 3D trajectory. DEC scans were retrospectively generated from the detector images stored for each focal spot position. DEC imaging of a catheter tip in a volume measuring 11.4 cm across at isocenter required 340 active focal spots per frame, versus 4473 spots in full-FOV mode. The dose-area-product (DAP) and peak skin dose (PSD) for DEC versus full field-of-view (FOV) scanning were calculated using an SBDX Monte Carlo simulation code. DAP was reduced to 7.4% to 8.4% of the full-FOV value, consistent with the relative number of active focal spots (7.6%). For image sequences with a moving catheter, PSD was 33.6% to 34.8% of the full-FOV value. The root-mean-squared-deviation between DEC-based 3D tracking coordinates and full-FOV 3D tracking coordinates was less than 0.1 mm. The 3D distance between the tracked tip and the sheath centerline averaged 0.75 mm. Dynamic electronic collimation can reduce dose with minimal change in tracking performance.

  18. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1996-01-01

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  19. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, R.B.

    1996-05-21

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  20. The absorbed dose in femur exposed to diagnostic radiography.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Z; Yusoff, A L

    2013-01-01

    A femur phantom made of wax and a real human bone was used to study the dose during radiographical procedures. The depth dose inside the phantom was determined using DOSXYZnrc, a Monte Carlo simulation software. The results were verified with measurements using TLD-100H. It was found that for 2.5 mm aluminium filtered 84-kVp X-rays, the radiation dose in the bone reached 57 % higher than the surface dose, i.e. 3.23 mGy as opposed to 2.06 mGy at the surface. The use of real bone introduces variations in the bone density in the DOSXYZnrc model, resulting in a lower attenuation effect than expected from solid bone tissues. PMID:23012482

  1. Localized Dose Enhancement to Tumor Blood Vessel Endothelial Cells via Megavoltage X-rays and Targeted Gold Nanoparticles: New Potential for External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Berbeco, Ross I.; Ngwa, Wilfred; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Tumor endothelial cell damage during radiation therapy may contribute significantly to tumor eradication and treatment efficacy. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) delivered preferentially to the walls of tumor blood vessels produce low-energy, short-range photoelectrons during external beam radiotherapy, boosting dose to the tumor microvasculature. In this study dosimetry at the single-cell level is used to estimate the anticipated AuNP-mediated dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cells during 6-MV X-ray irradiation. Methods and Materials: Endothelial cells are modeled as thin slabs with 100-nm-diameter AuNPs attached within the blood vessel. The number of photoelectrons emitted per AuNP per gray of X-rays is computed at multiple points along the external beam central axis by use of a Monte Carlo-generated energy fluence spectrum. The energy deposited from AuNP emissions to the endothelium is calculated based on an analytic method incorporating the energy-loss formula of Cole. The endothelial dose enhancement factor (EDEF) is the ratio of the overall (externally plus internally generated) dose to endothelial cells in the presence of AuNPs to the dose without AuNPs (from the external beam only). Results: At 20-cm depth, the EDEF is 1.7 (70% dose increase) for an intravascular AuNP concentration of 30 mg/g. Most of this dose enhancement arises from the low-energy (approximately 100 keV) portion of the linear accelerator X-ray spectrum. Furthermore, for AuNP concentrations ranging from 7 to 140 mg/g, EDEF values of 1.2 to 4.4 (20-340% dose increase) are calculated. Conclusions: In contrast to calculations assuming that AuNPs distributed homogeneously throughout the target volume (macrodosimetry), our cellular microdosimetry calculations predict a major dose enhancement to tumor microvasculature from conventional linear accelerator X-rays. This effect may enable the delivery of ablative therapeutic doses to these sensitive microstructures while maintaining

  2. Absorbed Dose Calculations Using Mesh-based Human Phantoms And Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Richard

    2011-08-01

    Health risks attributable to the exposure to ionizing radiation are considered to be a function of the absorbed or equivalent dose to radiosensitive organs and tissues. However, as human tissue cannot express itself in terms of equivalent dose, exposure models have to be used to determine the distribution of equivalent dose throughout the human body. An exposure model, be it physical or computational, consists of a representation of the human body, called phantom, plus a method for transporting ionizing radiation through the phantom and measuring or calculating the equivalent dose to organ and tissues of interest. The FASH2 (Female Adult meSH) and the MASH2 (Male Adult meSH) computational phantoms have been developed at the University of Pernambuco in Recife/Brazil based on polygon mesh surfaces using open source software tools and anatomical atlases. Representing standing adults, FASH2 and MASH2 have organ and tissue masses, body height and body mass adjusted to the anatomical data published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the reference male and female adult. For the purposes of absorbed dose calculations the phantoms have been coupled to the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code, which can transport photons, electrons and positrons through arbitrary media. This paper reviews the development of the FASH2 and the MASH2 phantoms and presents dosimetric applications for X-ray diagnosis and for prostate brachytherapy.

  3. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  4. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  5. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  6. A study on the dependence of exposure dose reduction and image evaluation on the distance from the dental periapical X-ray machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Kyu-Ji; Shin, Jae-Woo; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Lim, Chang-Seon; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Kim, Young-Jae

    2013-11-01

    Reducing the exposure dose from a periapical X-ray machine is an important aim in dental radiography. Although the radiation exposure dose is generally low, any radiation exposure is harmful to the human body. Therefore, this study developed a method that reduces the exposure dose significantly compared to that encountered in a normal procedure, but still produces an image with a similar resolution. The correlation between the image resolution and the exposure dose of the proposed method was examined with increasing distance between the dosimeter and the X-ray tube. The results were compared with those obtained from the existing radiography method. When periapical radiography was performed once according to the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the measured skin surface dose was low at 7 mGy or below. In contrast, the skin surface dose measured using the proposed method was only 1.57 mGy, showing a five-fold reduction. These results suggest that further decreases in dose might be achieved using the proposed method.

  7. Warm absorbers in X-rays (WAX), a comprehensive high-resolution grating spectral study of a sample of Seyfert Galaxies - II. Warm absorber dynamics and feedback to galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Sibasish; Guainazzi, Matteo; Chakravorty, Susmita; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Kembhavi, Ajit K.

    2016-04-01

    This paper is a sequel to the extensive study of warm absorber (WA) in X-rays carried out using high-resolution grating spectral data from XMM-Newton satellite (WAX-I). Here we discuss the global dynamical properties as well as the energetics of the WA components detected in the WAX sample. The slope of WA density profile (n ∝ r-α) estimated from the linear regression slope of ionization parameter ξ and column density NH in the WAX sample is α = 1.236 ± 0.034. We find that the WA clouds possibly originate as a result of photoionized evaporation from the inner edge of the torus (torus wind). They can also originate in the cooling front of the shock generated by faster accretion disc outflows, the ultrafast outflows, impinging on to the interstellar medium or the torus. The acceleration mechanism for the WA is complex and neither radiatively driven wind nor MHD-driven wind scenario alone can describe the outflow acceleration. However, we find that radiative forces play a significant role in accelerating the WA through the soft X-ray absorption lines, and also with dust opacity. Given the large uncertainties in the distance and volume filling factor estimates of the WA, we conclude that the kinetic luminosity ĖK of WA may sometimes be large enough to yield significant feedback to the host galaxy. We find that the lowest ionization states carry the maximum mass outflow, and the sources with higher Fe M UTA absorption (15-17 Å) have more mass outflow rates.

  8. Determination of neutron absorbed doses in lithium aluminates.

    PubMed

    Delfín Loya, A; Carrera, L M; Ureña-Núñez, F; Palacios, O; Bosch, P

    2003-04-01

    Lithium-based ceramics have been proposed as tritium breeders for fusion reactors. The lithium aluminate (gamma phase) seems to be thermally and structurally stable, the damages produced by neutron irradiation depend on the absorbed dose. A method based on the measurement of neutron activation of foils through neutron capture has been developed to obtain the neutron absorbed dose in lithium aluminates irradiated in the thermal column facility and in the fixed irradiation system of a Triga Mark III Nuclear Reactor. PMID:12672632

  9. Contrast-enhanced radiotherapy: feasibility and characteristics of the physical absorbed dose distribution for deep-seated tumors.

    PubMed

    Garnica-Garza, H M

    2009-09-21

    Radiotherapy using kilovoltage x-rays in conjunction with contrast agents incorporated into the tumor, gold nanoparticles in particular, could represent a potential alternative to current techniques based on high-energy linear accelerators. In this paper, using the voxelized Zubal phantom in conjunction with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE to model a prostate cancer treatment, it is shown that in combination with a 360 degrees arc delivery technique, tumoricidal doses of radiation can be delivered to deep-seated tumors while still providing acceptable doses to the skin and other organs at risk for gold concentrations in the tumor within the range of 7-10 mg-Au per gram of tissue. Under these conditions and using a x-ray beam with 90% of the fluence within the range of 80-200 keV, a 72 Gy physical absorbed dose to the prostate can be delivered, while keeping the rectal wall, bladder, skin and femoral heads below 65 Gy, 55 Gy, 40 Gy and 30 Gy, respectively. However, it is also shown that non-uniformities in the contrast agent concentration lead to a severe degradation of the dose distribution and that, therefore, techniques to locally quantify the presence of the contrast agent would be necessary in order to determine the incident x-ray fluence that best reproduces the dosimetry obtained under conditions of uniform contrast agent distribution. PMID:19700816

  10. Contrast-enhanced radiotherapy: feasibility and characteristics of the physical absorbed dose distribution for deep-seated tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnica-Garza, H. M.

    2009-09-01

    Radiotherapy using kilovoltage x-rays in conjunction with contrast agents incorporated into the tumor, gold nanoparticles in particular, could represent a potential alternative to current techniques based on high-energy linear accelerators. In this paper, using the voxelized Zubal phantom in conjunction with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE to model a prostate cancer treatment, it is shown that in combination with a 360° arc delivery technique, tumoricidal doses of radiation can be delivered to deep-seated tumors while still providing acceptable doses to the skin and other organs at risk for gold concentrations in the tumor within the range of 7-10 mg-Au per gram of tissue. Under these conditions and using a x-ray beam with 90% of the fluence within the range of 80-200 keV, a 72 Gy physical absorbed dose to the prostate can be delivered, while keeping the rectal wall, bladder, skin and femoral heads below 65 Gy, 55 Gy, 40 Gy and 30 Gy, respectively. However, it is also shown that non-uniformities in the contrast agent concentration lead to a severe degradation of the dose distribution and that, therefore, techniques to locally quantify the presence of the contrast agent would be necessary in order to determine the incident x-ray fluence that best reproduces the dosimetry obtained under conditions of uniform contrast agent distribution.

  11. Linear accelerator x-ray sources with high duty cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Condron, Cathie; Brown, Craig; Gozani, Tsahi; Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Hernandez, Michael

    2013-04-19

    X-ray cargo inspection systems typically use a several-MV pulsed linear accelerator (linac) to produce a bremsstrahlung spectrum of x rays by bombarding a target with electrons. The x rays traverse the cargo and are detected by a detector array. Spectroscopy of the detected x rays is very desirable: if one can determine the spectrum of the transmitted x rays, one can determine the Z of the material they traversed. Even in relatively low-dose modes of operation, thousands of x rays arrive at each detector element during each pulse, unless the x rays are heavily absorbed or scattered by the cargo. For portal or fixed-site systems, dose rates, and therefore x-ray count rates, are even higher. Because of the high x-ray count rate, spectroscopy is impractical in conventional cargo inspection systems, except in certain special cases. For a mobile system, typical pulse durations are a few microseconds, and the number of pulses is on the order of 100 per second, leading to a duty factor of about 0.04%. Clearly, a linear accelerator x-ray source with much higher duty factor would be useful, since then the same number of x rays could be spread out over time, reducing the x-ray count rate. In this paper, we explore the possibility of designing a linear accelerator system, using more or less Conventional Off the Shelf (COTS) components, capable of duty cycles of 1% or greater. A survey was conducted of available linac RF source options and, given the possibilities, calculations were performed for suitable beam centerline designs. Keeping in mind that the size and cost of the accelerator system should be practical for use in a mobile cargo inspection system, only a few options are shown to be reasonably feasible, both requiring the use of klystrons instead of the magnetrons used in conventional systems. An S-Band design appears clearly possible, and there is also a promising X-Band design.

  12. Compressed-sensing (CS)-based micro-DTS reconstruction for applications of fast, low-dose x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J. E.; Cho, H. S.; Hong, D. K.; Lee, M. S.; Park, Y. O.; Je, U. K.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, S. H.; Choi, S. I.; Koo, Y. S.; Cho, H. M.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce limited-angle tomography in which the object being imaged is rotated around the center of an inclined X-ray beam, the so-called micro-DTS (digital tomosynthesis), with a few-view image reconstruction based on the compressed-sensing (CS) theory for applications of fast, low-dose X-ray imaging. We implemented an effective CS-based reconstruction algorithm for micro-DTS and performed systematic simulation works. The assessment of the image characteristics was performed by using several figures of merit such as the root-mean-square error (RMSE), the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and the universal image-quality index (UQI) to compare the reconstructed images to the simulated phantoms. According to our results, compared to the FBP-based method, the CS-based reconstruction method substantially enhanced image accuracy against image artifacts from few-view and limited-angle projections. In the simulation, 41 projections were used for the half-tomographic angles of 30°, 45°, and 60°, giving UQI values of 0.92 ˜ 0.97, which seems promising for potential applications of fast, low-dose X-ray imaging.

  13. SU-F-18C-13: Low-Dose X-Ray CT Reconstruction Using a Hybrid First-Order Method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L; Lin, W; Jin, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel reconstruction method for X-ray CT that can lead to accurate reconstruction at significantly reduced dose levels combining low X-ray incident intensity and few views of projection data. Methods: The noise nature of the projection data at low X-ray incident intensity was modeled and accounted by the weighted least-squares (WLS) criterion. The total variation (TV) penalty was used to mitigate artifacts caused by few views of data. The first order primal-dual (FOPD) algorithm was used to minimize TV in image domain, which avoided the difficulty of the non-smooth objective function. The TV penalized WLS reconstruction was achieved by alternated FOPD TV minimization and projection onto convex sets (POCS) for data fidelity constraints. The proposed FOPD-POCS method was evaluated using the FORBILD jaw phantom and the real cadaver head CT data. Results: The quantitative measures, root mean square error (RMSE) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), demonstrate the superior denoising capability of WLS over LS-based TV iterative reconstruction. The improvement of RMSE (WLS vs. LS) is 15%∼21% and that of CNR is 17%∼72% when the incident counts per ray are ranged from 1×10{sup 5} to 1×10{sup 3}. In addition, the TV regularization can accurately reconstruct images from about 50 views of the jaw phantom. The FOPD-POCS reconstruction reveals more structural details and suffers fewer artifacts in both the phantom and real head images. The FOPD-POCS method also shows fast convergence at low X-ray incident intensity. Conclusion: The new hybrid FOPD-POCS method, based on TV penalized WLS, yields excellent image quality when the incident X-ray intensity is low and the projection views are limited. The reconstruction is computationally efficient since the FOPD minimization of TV is applied only in the image domain. The characteristics of FOPD-POCS can be exploited to significantly reduce radiation dose of X-ray CT without compromising accuracy for diagnosis

  14. Dose Measurement of Hard X-ray Produced by Damavand Tokamak by Means of LiF:Mg, Cu, P TLDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourshahab, B.; Rasouli, C.; Hosseini Pooya, S. M.; Rasouli, H.; Sadigzadeh, A.; Habibi, H.

    2013-08-01

    Damavand tokamak is the source of soft and hard X-ray by hydrogen working gas in plasma duration time. As such devices are widely used in fusion researches, it is required to comply with radiation protection standards and monitor radiation dose output. In this paper the dose measurement of hard X-rays produced by Damavand tokamak has been done in order to perform the necessary protection arrangement in torus area. All experiments were done by Thermoluminescence crystal dosimeter tools of the type LiF:Mg, Cu, P crystals. The results showed that radiation levels around the torus are very high (in the order of several mSv per shot) and various dose levels in different points (in terms of distance and height of device) imply the anisotropic spatial distribution of measured dose. According to the measurements during 100 shots of Damavand tokamak, the total dose in the shielding room which is 5 m away from torus, is above the permissible level. In order to control personnel safety, it was designed and constructed a lead shielding wall with 5 cm thick and 2 m × 7.5 m dimensions and the performed dosimetry operation after installation of wall shows a mean value of 96.33 % reduction in measured dose due to presence of lead shielding. Thus there will be possibility of doing 25,000 shots/year in safe condition.

  15. Dose dependence of x-ray luminescence from CaF{sub 2}:Eu{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+} phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wei; Westcott, Sarah L.; Zhang Jun

    2007-11-19

    In CaF{sub 2}:Mn{sup 2+}, Eu{sup 2+}, the emission from Eu{sup 2+} decreases while the emission from Mn{sup 2+} increases in intensity as the x-ray duration time increases. The decrease of Eu{sup 2+} emission is due to the oxidation of Eu{sup 2+} to Eu{sup 3+} upon x-ray irradiation, while the increase of Mn{sup 2+} emission in intensity is likely due to the breakdown of the forbidden transition by the defects. This phenomenon has potential for dose-dependent radiation detection because utilizing the ratio of the two emissions from Mn{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 2+} for radiation dosimetry is more sensitive and more reliable than using emission intensity change only.

  16. SU-D-BRF-02: In Situ Verification of Radiation Therapy Dose Distributions From High-Energy X-Rays Using PET Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q; Kai, L; Wang, X; Hua, B; Chui, L; Wang, Q; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the possibility of in situ verification of radiation therapy dose distributions using PET imaging based on the activity distribution of 11C and 15O produced via photonuclear reactions in patient irradiated by 45MV x-rays. Methods: The method is based on the photonuclear reactions in the most elemental composition {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O in body tissues irradiated by bremsstrahlung photons with energies up to 45 MeV, resulting primarily in {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O, which are positron-emitting nuclei. The induced positron activity distributions were obtained with a PET scanner in the same room of a LA45 accelerator (Top Grade Medical, Beijing, China). The experiments were performed with a brain phantom using realistic treatment plans. The phantom was scanned at 20min and 2-5min after irradiation for {sup 11}C and {sup 15}, respectively. The interval between the two scans was 20 minutes. The activity distributions of {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O within the irradiated volume can be separated from each other because the half-life is 20min and 2min for {sup 11}C and {sup 15}O, respectively. Three x-ray energies were used including 10MV, 25MV and 45MV. The radiation dose ranged from 1.0Gy to 10.0Gy per treatment. Results: It was confirmed that no activity was detected at 10 MV beam energy, which was far below the energy threshold for photonuclear reactions. At 25 MV x-ray activity distribution images were observed on PET, which needed much higher radiation dose in order to obtain good quality. For 45 MV photon beams, good quality activation images were obtained with 2-3Gy radiation dose, which is the typical daily dose for radiation therapy. Conclusion: The activity distribution of {sup 15}O and {sup 11}C could be used to derive the dose distribution of 45MV x-rays at the regular daily dose level. This method can potentially be used to verify in situ dose distributions of patients treated on the LA45 accelerator.

  17. Low Dose High Energy X-ray In-Line Phase Sensitive Imaging Prototype: Investigation of Optimal Geometric Conditions and Design Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Ghani, Muhammad. U.; Yan, Aimin; Wong, Molly. D.; Li, Yuhua; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the optimization of a high energy in-line phase sensitive x-ray imaging prototype under different geometric and operating conditions for mammography application. A phase retrieval algorithm based on phase attenuation duality (PAD) was applied to the phase contrast images acquired by the prototype. Imaging performance was investigated at four magnification values of 1.67, 2, 2.5 and 3 using an acrylic edge, an American College of Radiology (ACR) mammography phantom and contrast detail (CD) phantom with tube potentials of 100, 120 and 140 kVp. The ACR and CD images were acquired at the same mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.29 mGy with a computed radiography (CR) detector of 43.75 µm pixel pitch at a fixed source to image distance (SID) of 170 cm. The x-ray tube focal spot size was kept constant as 7 µm while a 2.5 mm thick aluminum (Al) filter was used for beam hardening. The performance of phase contrast and phase retrieved images were compared with computer simulations based on the relative phase contrast factor (RPF) at high x-ray energies. The imaging results showed that the x-ray tube operated at 100 kVp under the magnification of 2.5 exhibits superior imaging performance which is in accordance to the computer simulations. As compared to the phase contrast images, the phase retrieved images of the ACR and CD phantoms demonstrated improved imaging contrast and target discrimination. We compared the CD phantom images acquired in conventional contact mode with and without the anti-scatter grid using the same prototype at 1.295 mGy and 2.59 mGy using 40 kVp, a 25 µm rhodium (Rh) filter. At the same radiation dose, the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for both the large and small discs, while compared to the double dose image acquired in conventional mode, the observer study also indicated that the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for the large discs. This

  18. Low dose high energy x-ray in-line phase sensitive imaging prototype: Investigation of optimal geometric conditions and design parameters.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Muhammad U; Yan, Aimin; Wong, Molly D; Li, Yuhua; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the optimization of a high energy in-line phase sensitive x-ray imaging prototype under different geometric and operating conditions for mammography application. A phase retrieval algorithm based on phase attenuation duality (PAD) was applied to the phase contrast images acquired by the prototype. Imaging performance was investigated at four magnification values of 1.67, 2, 2.5 and 3 using an acrylic edge, an American College of Radiology (ACR) mammography phantom and contrast detail (CD) phantom with tube potentials of 100, 120 and 140 kVp. The ACR and CD images were acquired at the same mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.29 mGy with a computed radiography (CR) detector of 43.75 μm pixel pitch at a fixed source to image distance (SID) of 170 cm. The x-ray tube focal spot size was kept constant as 7 μm while a 2.5 mm thick aluminum (Al) filter was used for beam hardening. The performance of phase contrast and phase retrieved images were compared with computer simulations based on the relative phase contrast factor (RPF) at high x-ray energies. The imaging results showed that the x-ray tube operated at 100 kVp under the magnification of 2.5 exhibits superior imaging performance which is in accordance to the computer simulations. As compared to the phase contrast images, the phase retrieved images of the ACR and CD phantoms demonstrated improved imaging contrast and target discrimination. We compared the CD phantom images acquired in conventional contact mode with and without the anti-scatter grid using the same prototype at 1.295 mGy and 2.59 mGy using 40 kVp, a 25 μm rhodium (Rh) filter. At the same radiation dose, the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for both the large and small discs, while compared to the double dose image acquired in conventional mode, the observer study also indicated that the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for the large discs. This

  19. Variations in dose response with x-ray energy of LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescence dosimeters: implications for clinical dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan, Lisa; Hood, Claire; Warren-Forward, Helen; Haque, Mamoon; Kron, Tomas

    2004-09-01

    In many medical procedures where accurate radiation dose measurements are needed, the variation of detector response with x-ray energy is of concern. The response of LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs to a range of x-ray energies was analysed in monoenergetic (synchrotron), diagnostic and therapy radiation beams with the aim of implementing this dosimeter into clinical practice where existing dosimetry techniques are limited due to lack of sensitivity or tissue equivalence (e.g. neonatal radiography, mammography and brachytherapy). LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs in different forms from two manufacturers (MCP-N: TLD Poland, GR-200: SDDML China) were irradiated using x-ray beams covering 10 keV to 18 MVp. Dose readings were compared with an ionization chamber. The effect of different TLD types and annealing cycles on clinical utility was investigated. The measured energy response of LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs was fit to a simple model devised by Kron et al (1998 Phys. Med. Biol. 43 3235-59) to describe the variation of TLD response with x-ray energy. If TLDs are handled as recommended in the present paper, the energy response of LiF:Mg,Cu,P deviates by a maximum of 15% from unity and agrees with the model to within 5% or experimental uncertainty between 15 keV and 10 MeV. LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs of all forms have consistent and superior energy response compared to the standard material LiF:Mg,Ti and are therefore suitable for a wide range of applications in diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy.

  20. Direct MC conversion of absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water for 60Co radiation.

    PubMed

    Lye, J E; Butler, D J; Franich, R D; Harty, P D; Oliver, C P; Ramanathan, G; Webb, D V; Wright, T

    2013-06-01

    The ARPANSA calibration service for (60)Co gamma rays is based on a primary standard graphite calorimeter that measures absorbed dose to graphite. Measurements with the calorimeter are converted to the absorbed dose to water using the calculation of the ratio of the absorbed dose in the calorimeter to the absorbed dose in a water phantom. ARPANSA has recently changed the basis of this calculation from a photon fluence scaling method to a direct Monte Carlo (MC) calculation. The MC conversion uses an EGSnrc model of the cobalt source that has been validated against water tank and graphite phantom measurements, a step that is required to quantify uncertainties in the underlying interaction coefficients in the MC code. A comparison with the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) as part of the key comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K4 showed an agreement of 0.9973 (53). PMID:23152147

  1. A Comparative Study Using Numerical Methods for Surface X Ray Doses with Conventional and Digital Radiology Equipment in Pediatric Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Posa Ioan; Florin, Georgescu Remus; Virgil, Ciobanu; Antonescu, Elisabeta

    2011-09-01

    The place of the study is a pediatrics clinic which realizes a great variety of emergency, ambulatory ad hospital examinations. The radiology compartment respects work procedures and a system to ensure the quality of X ray examinations. The results show a constant for the programmator of the digital detector machine for the tension applied to the tube. For the screen-film detector machine the applied tension increases proportionally with the physical development of the child considering the trunk thickness.

  2. A Comparative Study Using Numerical Methods for Surface X Ray Doses with Conventional and Digital Radiology Equipment in Pediatric Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Dan, Posa Ioan; Florin, Georgescu Remus; Virgil, Ciobanu; Antonescu, Elisabeta

    2011-09-14

    The place of the study is a pediatrics clinic which realizes a great variety of emergency, ambulatory ad hospital examinations. The radiology compartment respects work procedures and a system to ensure the quality of X ray examinations. The results show a constant for the programmator of the digital detector machine for the tension applied to the tube. For the screen-film detector machine the applied tension increases proportionally with the physical development of the child considering the trunk thickness.

  3. Estimation of absorbed doses from paediatric cone-beam CT scans: MOSFET measurements and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangroh; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Toncheva, Greta; Frush, Donald P; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a dose estimation tool with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. A 5-y-old paediatric anthropomorphic phantom was computed tomography (CT) scanned to create a voxelised phantom and used as an input for the abdominal cone-beam CT in a BEAMnrc/EGSnrc MC system. An X-ray tube model of the Varian On-Board Imager((R)) was built in the MC system. To validate the model, the absorbed doses at each organ location for standard-dose and low-dose modes were measured in the physical phantom with MOSFET detectors; effective doses were also calculated. In the results, the MC simulations were comparable to the MOSFET measurements. This voxelised phantom approach could produce a more accurate dose estimation than the stylised phantom method. This model can be easily applied to multi-detector CT dosimetry. PMID:19889800

  4. Treatment of foods with high-energy X rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, M. R.; Meissner, J.; Herer, A. S.; Beers, E. W.

    2001-07-01

    The treatment of foods with ionizing energy in the form of gamma rays, accelerated electrons, and X rays can produce beneficial effects, such as inhibiting the sprouting in potatoes, onions, and garlic, controlling insects in fruits, vegetables, and grains, inhibiting the growth of fungi, pasteurizing fresh meat, poultry, and seafood, and sterilizing spices and food additives. After many years of research, these processes have been approved by regulatory authorities in many countries and commercial applications have been increasing. High-energy X rays are especially useful for treating large packages of food. The most attractive features are product penetration, absorbed dose uniformity, high utilization efficiency and short processing time. The ability to energize the X-ray source only when needed enhances the safety and convenience of this technique. The availability of high-energy, high-power electron accelerators, which can be used as X-ray generators, makes it feasible to process large quantities of food economically. Several industrial accelerator facilities already have X-ray conversion equipment and several more will soon be built with product conveying systems designed to take advantage of the unique characteristics of high-energy X rays. These concepts will be reviewed briefly in this paper.

  5. Radiation dose in breast CT imaging with monochromatic x-rays: simulation study of the influence of energy, composition and thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittone, A.; Bravin, A.; Coan, P.

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments have shown that high resolution phase contrast x-ray computed tomography (CT) of the breast can be performed at clinically compatible doses. Results have yet been obtained in vitro on full breasts, and the clinical translation of the technique seems more and more possible. This work presents a method to quickly estimate the average dose in the organ using the software GATE. The influence of different parameters on the dose distribution, like breast composition and thickness, and for preclinical test, the presence of a skin/PMMA external layer, has been investigated. Several correction factors, to be applied to the given dose database, are also introduced to allow the use of these results in geometries different from those studied here. An energy optimization study is presented that considers also the influence on the energy choice of x-ray detector. A simple analytical method to estimate the best energy that minimizes the dose-transmittance ratio in CT imaging is presented and compared with the results of simulations.

  6. Calibration of GafChromic XR-RV3 radiochromic film for skin dose measurement using standardized x-ray spectra and a commercial flatbed scanner

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Bradley P.; Speidel, Michael A.; Pike, Tina L.; Van Lysel, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, newly formulated XR-RV3 GafChromic® film was calibrated with National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceability for measurement of patient skin dose during fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures. Methods: The film was calibrated free-in-air to air kerma levels between 15 and 1100 cGy using four moderately filtered x-ray beam qualities (60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp). The calibration films were scanned with a commercial flatbed document scanner. Film reflective density-to-air kerma calibration curves were constructed for each beam quality, with both the orange and white sides facing the x-ray source. A method to correct for nonuniformity in scanner response (up to 25% depending on position) was developed to enable dose measurement with large films. The response of XR-RV3 film under patient backscattering conditions was examined using on-phantom film exposures and Monte Carlo simulations. Results: The response of XR-RV3 film to a given air kerma depended on kVp and film orientation. For a 200 cGy air kerma exposure with the orange side of the film facing the source, the film response increased by 20% from 60 to 120 kVp. At 500 cGy, the increase was 12%. When 500 cGy exposures were performed with the white side facing the x-ray source, the film response increased by 4.0% (60 kVp) to 9.9% (120 kVp) compared to the orange-facing orientation. On-phantom film measurements and Monte Carlo simulations show that using a NIST-traceable free-in-air calibration curve to determine air kerma in the presence of backscatter results in an error from 2% up to 8% depending on beam quality. The combined uncertainty in the air kerma measurement from the calibration curves and scanner nonuniformity correction was ±7.1% (95% C.I.). The film showed notable stability. Calibrations of film and scanner separated by 1 yr differed by 1.0%. Conclusions: XR-RV3 radiochromic film response to a given air kerma shows dependence on beam quality and film

  7. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  8. Technique-dependent decrease in thyroid absorbed dose for dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.E.; Bristow, R.G.; Clark, G.M.; Nussbaum, C.; Taylor, K.W.

    1989-06-01

    A LiF thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) system, calibrated in the tissue of interest with the beam used for experimentation, was employed to investigate dosages (muGy) to the thyroid region of an anthropomorphic phantom resultant from two dental complete-mouth radiographic procedures. Both techniques were compared in terms of dosages associated with combinations of lead apron and thyroid collar shielding while using a 70-kVp or 90-kVp x-ray beam for a 20-film complete-mouth series. Lead shielding significantly decreased the dose to the thyroid using both techniques (p less than 0.05). The use of the 90-kVp beam resulted in a significant reduction in the thyroid absorbed dose when using the bisecting angle technique (p less than 0.05) but caused a significant increase in the thyroid absorbed dose when the paralleling technique was used (p less than 0.05). The implementation of higher kilovoltage techniques in dental offices must therefore be dependent on the radiographic technique employed.

  9. Selective fallopian tube catheterisation in female infertility: clinical results and absorbed radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Ishiguchi, T; Maekoshi, H; Ando, Y; Tsuzaka, M; Tamiya, T; Suganuma, N; Ishigaki, T

    1996-01-01

    Clinical results of fluoroscopic fallopian tube catheterisation and absorbed radiation doses during the procedure were evaluated in 30 infertility patients with unilateral or bilateral tubal obstruction documented on hysterosalpingography. The staged technique consisted of contrast injection through an intrauterine catheter with a vacuum cup device, ostial salpingography with the wedged catheter, and selective salpingography with a coaxial microcatheter. Of 45 fallopian tubes examined, 35 (78%) were demonstrated by the procedure, and at least one tube was newly demonstrated in 26 patients (87%). Six of these patients conceived spontaneously in the follow-up period of 1-11 months. Four pregnancies were intrauterine and 2 were ectopic. This technique provided accurate and detailed information in the diagnosis and treatment of tubal obstruction in infertility patients. The absorbed radiation dose to the ovary in the average standardised procedure was estimated to be 0.9 cGy. Further improvement in the X-ray equipment and technique is required to reduce the radiation dose. PMID:8798025

  10. Dose evaluation for paediatric chest x-ray examinations in Brazil and Sudan: low doses and reliable examinations can be achieved in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamadain, K. E. M.; da Rosa, L. A. R.; Azevedo, A. C. P.; Guebel, M. R. N.; Boechat, M. C. B.; Habani, F.

    2004-03-01

    Radiation protection in paediatric radiology deserves special attention since it is assumed that children are more sensitive to radiation than adults. The aim of this work is to estimate the entrance skin dose (ESD), the body organ dose (BOD) and the effective dose (E) for chest x-ray exposure of paediatric patients in five large units, three in Sudan and two in Brazil, and to compare the results obtained in both countries with each other and with other values obtained by some European countries. Two examination projections have been investigated, namely, postero-anterior (PA) and antero-posterior (AP). The age intervals considered were: 0-1 year, 1-5 years, 5-10 years and 10-15 years. The results have been obtained with the use of a software called DoseCal. Results of mean ESD for the age interval 1-5 years and AP projection are: 66 µGy (Instituto de Pediatria e Puericultura Martagão Gesteira—IPPMG Hospital), 41, 86 and 68 µGy (Instituto Fernandes Figueira—IFF Hospital), 161 µGy (Omdurman Hospital), 395 µGy (Khartoum Hospital) and 23 µGy (Ahmed Gasim Hospital). In the case of the IFF Hospital, the results refer, respectively, to rooms 1, 2 and for the six mobile equipments. The reference dose values given by the European Guidelines were exceeded in the Khartoum Hospital whilst in all the other hospitals results obtained were below CEC reference values and comparable with the results found in Sweden, Germany, Spain and Italy. The mean E for the same age interval was 11 µSv in the IPPMG, 6, 15 and 11 µSv in the IFF, respectively for rooms 1, 2 and the 6 mobiles, 25 µSv in the Omdurman Hospital, 45 µSv in the Khartoum Hospital and 3 µSv in the Ahmed Gasim Hospital. These are some examples of the large discrepancies that have been detected in this survey.

  11. The X-ray optics for X-ray pulsar navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Dongdong; Li, Wenbin; Lian, Jian; Shi, Yufeng; Song, Juan; Wang, Wencong; Sun, Shukun

    2016-01-01

    The effective X-ray optics is a key premise for X-ray pulsar detection and navigation. However, it is very difficult to focus the X-ray photons through refraction for the reason that the X-ray photon is very easy to be absorbed by the materials. The most effective ways for the X-ray focusing is reflection. In this paper, we will give a brief introduction of the theory of the grazing incidence and the corresponding optical systems. By comparing the design parameters of main X-ray astronomical telescope in NASA and ESA, we will give the development trend of the X-ray optics for X-ray pulsar navigation and introduce several new technology for the manufacture of the micro-pore optics (MPO).

  12. Low doses of X-rays induce prolonged and ATM-independent persistence of γH2AX foci in human gingival mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Andreyan N; Pustovalova, Margarita; Grekhova, Anna; Eremin, Petr; Vorobyova, Natalia; Pulin, Andrey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Klokov, Dmitry Y; Eremin, Ilya

    2015-09-29

    Diagnostic imaging delivering low doses of radiation often accompany human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-based therapies. However, effects of low dose radiation on MSCs are poorly characterized. Here we examine patterns of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX) and phospho-S1981 ATM (pATM) foci formation in human gingiva-derived MSCs exposed to X-rays in time-course and dose-response experiments. Both γH2AX and pATM foci accumulated linearly with dose early after irradiation (5-60 min), with a maximum induction observed at 30-60 min (37 ± 3 and 32 ± 3 foci/cell/Gy for γH2AX and pATM, respectively). The number of γH2AX foci produced by intermediate doses (160 and 250 mGy) significantly decreased (40-60%) between 60 and 240 min post-irradiation, indicating rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks. In contrast, γH2AX foci produced by low doses (20-80 mGy) did not change after 60 min. The number of pATM foci between 60 and 240 min decreased down to control values in a dose-independent manner. Similar kinetics was observed for pATM foci co-localized with γH2AX foci. Collectively, our results suggest differential DNA double-strand break signaling and processing in response to low vs. intermediate doses of X-rays in human MSCs. Furthermore, mechanisms governing the prolonged persistence of γH2AX foci in these cells appear to be ATM-independent. PMID:26314960

  13. Characterization and dosimetry of a practical X-ray alternative to self-shielded gamma irradiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Kishor; Parker, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The Insect Pest Control Laboratory of the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture recently purchased an X-ray irradiator as part of their programme to develop the sterile insect technique (SIT). It is a self-contained type with a maximum X-ray beam energy of 150 keV using a newly developed 4 π X-ray tube to provide a very uniform dose to the product. This paper describes the results of our characterization study, which includes determination of dose rate in the centre of a canister as well as establishing absorbed dose distribution in the canister. The irradiation geometry consists of five canisters rotating around an X-ray tube—the volume of each canister being 3.5 l. The dose rate at the maximum allowed power of the tube (about 6.75 kW) in the centre of a canister filled with insects (or a simulated product) is about 14 Gy min -1. The dose uniformity ratio is about 1.3. The dose rate was measured using a Farmer type 0.18-cm 3 ionization chamber calibrated at the relevant low photon energies. Routine absorbed dose measurement and absorbed dose mapping can be performed using a Gafchromic® film dosimetry system. The radiation response of Gafchromic film is almost independent of X-ray energy in the range 100-150 keV, but is very sensitive to the surrounding material with which it is in immediate contact. It is important, therefore, to ensure that all absorbed dose measurements are performed under identical conditions to those used for the calibration of the dosimetry system. Our study indicates that this X-ray irradiator provides a practical alternative to self-shielded gamma irradiators for SIT programmes. Food and Agriculture Organization/International Atomic Energy Agency.

  14. X-ray Attenuation and Absorption Calculations.

    1988-02-25

    This point-source, polychromatic, discrete energy X-ray transport and energy deposition code system calculates first-order spectral estimates of X-ray energy transmission through slab materials and the associated spectrum of energy absorbed by the material.

  15. X-Ray Detection Visits the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta, Luis; Farinha, Ana; Pinto, Ana

    2008-01-01

    Film has been used to detect x-rays since the early days of their discovery by Rontgen. Although nowadays superseded by other techniques, film still provides a cheap means of x-ray detection, making it attractive in high-school or undergraduate university courses. If some sort of quantitative result is required, the film's optical absorbance or…

  16. Absorbed dose to water reference dosimetry using solid phantoms in the context of absorbed-dose protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Seuntjens, Jan; Olivares, Marina; Evans, Michael; Podgorsak, Ervin

    2005-09-15

    For reasons of phantom material reproducibility, the absorbed dose protocols of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) (TG-51) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (TRS-398) have made the use of liquid water as a phantom material for reference dosimetry mandatory. In this work we provide a formal framework for the measurement of absorbed dose to water using ionization chambers calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water but irradiated in solid phantoms. Such a framework is useful when there is a desire to put dose measurements using solid phantoms on an absolute basis. Putting solid phantom measurements on an absolute basis has distinct advantages in verification measurements and quality assurance. We introduce a phantom dose conversion factor that converts a measurement made in a solid phantom and analyzed using an absorbed dose calibration protocol into absorbed dose to water under reference conditions. We provide techniques to measure and calculate the dose transfer from solid phantom to water. For an Exradin A12 ionization chamber, we measured and calculated the phantom dose conversion factor for six Solid Water{sup TM} phantoms and for a single Lucite phantom for photon energies between {sup 60}Co and 18 MV photons. For Solid Water{sup TM} of certified grade, the difference between measured and calculated factors varied between 0.0% and 0.7% with the average dose conversion factor being low by 0.4% compared with the calculation whereas for Lucite, the agreement was within 0.2% for the one phantom examined. The composition of commercial plastic phantoms and their homogeneity may not always be reproducible and consistent with assumed composition. By comparing measured and calculated phantom conversion factors, our work provides methods to verify the consistency of a given plastic for the purpose of clinical reference dosimetry.

  17. The Fricke dosimeter as an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Gamal, Islam; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McEwen, Malcolm

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this project was to develop an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy based on the Fricke dosimeter. To achieve this within the framework of the existing TG-43 protocol, a determination of the absorbed dose to water at the reference position, D(r0,θ0), was undertaken. Prior to this investigation, the radiation chemical yield of the ferric ions (G-value) at the Ir-192 equivalent photon energy (0.380 MeV) was established by interpolating between G-values obtained for Co-60 and 250 kV x-rays. An irradiation geometry was developed with a cylindrical holder to contain the Fricke solution and allow irradiations in a water phantom to be conducted using a standard Nucletron microSelectron V2 HDR Ir-192 afterloader. Once the geometry and holder were optimized, the dose obtained with the Fricke system was compared to the standard method used in North America, based on air-kerma strength. Initial investigations focused on reproducible positioning of the ring-shaped holder for the Fricke solution with respect to the Ir-192 source and obtaining an acceptable type A uncertainty in the optical density measurements required to yield the absorbed dose. Source positioning was found to be reproducible to better than 0.3 mm, and a careful cleaning and control procedure reduced the variation in optical density reading due to contamination of the Fricke solution by the PMMA holder. It was found that fewer than 10 irradiations were required to yield a type A standard uncertainty of less than 0.5%. Correction factors to take account of the non-water components of the geometry and the volume averaging effect of the Fricke solution volume were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. A sensitivity analysis showed that the dependence on the input data used (e.g. interaction cross-sections) was small with a type B uncertainty for these corrections estimated to be 0.2%. The combined standard uncertainty in the determination of absorbed dose to water

  18. The Fricke dosimeter as an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    El Gamal, Islam; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McEwen, Malcolm

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this project was to develop an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy based on the Fricke dosimeter. To achieve this within the framework of the existing TG-43 protocol, a determination of the absorbed dose to water at the reference position, D(r0,θ0), was undertaken. Prior to this investigation, the radiation chemical yield of the ferric ions (G-value) at the Ir-192 equivalent photon energy (0.380 MeV) was established by interpolating between G-values obtained for Co-60 and 250 kV x-rays.An irradiation geometry was developed with a cylindrical holder to contain the Fricke solution and allow irradiations in a water phantom to be conducted using a standard Nucletron microSelectron V2 HDR Ir-192 afterloader. Once the geometry and holder were optimized, the dose obtained with the Fricke system was compared to the standard method used in North America, based on air-kerma strength.Initial investigations focused on reproducible positioning of the ring-shaped holder for the Fricke solution with respect to the Ir-192 source and obtaining an acceptable type A uncertainty in the optical density measurements required to yield the absorbed dose. Source positioning was found to be reproducible to better than 0.3 mm, and a careful cleaning and control procedure reduced the variation in optical density reading due to contamination of the Fricke solution by the PMMA holder. It was found that fewer than 10 irradiations were required to yield a type A standard uncertainty of less than 0.5%.Correction factors to take account of the non-water components of the geometry and the volume averaging effect of the Fricke solution volume were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. A sensitivity analysis showed that the dependence on the input data used (e.g. interaction cross-sections) was small with a type B uncertainty for these corrections estimated to be 0.2%.The combined standard uncertainty in the determination of absorbed dose to water at

  19. Evaluation of absorbed dose in Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaeva, Gayane; Djuraeva, Gulnara; Kim, Andrey; Koblik, Yuriy; Kulabdullaev, Gairatulla; Rakhmonov, Turdimukhammad; Saytjanov, Shavkat

    2015-02-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) is used for treatment of radioresistant malignant tumors. The absorbed dose in GdNCT can be divided into four primary dose components: thermal neutron, fast neutron, photon and natural gadolinium doses. The most significant is the dose created by natural gadolinium. The amount of gadolinium at the irradiated region is changeable and depends on the gadolinium delivery agent and on the structure of the location where the agent is injected. To de- fine the time dependence of the gadolinium concentration ρ(t) in the irradiated region the pharmacokinetics of gadolinium delivery agent (Magnevist) was studied at intratumoral injection in mice and intramuscular injection in rats. A polynomial approximation was applied to the experimental data and the influence of ρ(t) on the relative change of the absorbed dose of gadolinium was studied.

  20. Sparse-view image reconstruction in inverse-geometry CT (IGCT) for fast, low-dose, volumetric dental X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, D. K.; Cho, H. S.; Oh, J. E.; Je, U. K.; Lee, M. S.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, S. H.; Park, Y. O.; Choi, S. I.; Koo, Y. S.; Cho, H. M.

    2012-12-01

    As a new direction for computed tomography (CT) imaging, inverse-geometry CT (IGCT) has been recently introduced and is intended to overcome limitations in conventional cone-beam CT (CBCT) such as the cone-beam artifacts, imaging dose, temporal resolution, scatter, cost, and so on. While the CBCT geometry consists of X-rays emanating from a small focal spot and collimated toward a larger detector, the IGCT geometry employs a large-area scanned source array with the Xray beams collimated toward a smaller-area detector. In this research, we explored an effective IGCT reconstruction algorithm based on the total-variation (TV) minimization method and studied the feasibility of the IGCT geometry for potential applications to fast, low-dose volumetric dental X-ray imaging. We implemented the algorithm, performed systematic simulation works, and evaluated the imaging characteristics quantitatively. Although much engineering and validation works are required to achieve clinical implementation, our preliminary results have demonstrated a potential for improved volumetric imaging with reduced dose.

  1. Dose reduction technique using a combination of a region of interest (ROI) material x-ray attenuator and spatially different temporal filtering for fluoroscopic interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Panse, A.; Jain, A.; Sharma, P.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A. H.; Cartwright, A. N.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach for achieving patient dose savings during image-guided neurovascular interventions, involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and a spatially different ROI temporal filtering technique. The part of the image under the attenuator is reduced in dose but noisy and less bright due to fewer x-ray quanta reaching the detector, as compared to the non-attenuating (or less attenuating) region. First the brightness is equalized throughout the image by post processing and then a temporal filter with higher weights is applied to the high attenuating region to reduce the noise, at the cost of increased lag; however, in the regions where less attenuation is present, a lower temporal weight is needed and is applied to preserve temporal resolution. A simulation of the technique is first presented on an actual image sequence obtained from an endovascular image guided interventional (EIGI) procedure. Then the actual implementation of the technique with a physical ROI attenuator is presented. Quantitative analysis including noise analysis and integral dose calculations are presented to validate the proposed technique.

  2. Dose Reduction Technique Using a Combination of a Region of Interest (ROI) Material X-Ray Attenuator and Spatially Different Temporal Filtering for Fluoroscopic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Vasan, S.N Swetadri; Panse, A.; Jain, A.; Sharma, P.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A.H.; Cartwright, A.N.; Bednarek, D.R; Rudin, S.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel approach for achieving patient dose savings during image-guided neurovascular interventions, involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and a spatially different ROI temporal filtering technique. The part of the image under the attenuator is reduced in dose but noisy and less bright due to fewer x-ray quanta reaching the detector, as compared to the non-attenuating (or less attenuating) region. First the brightness is equalized throughout the image by post processing and then a temporal filter with higher weights is applied to the high attenuating region to reduce the noise, at the cost of increased lag; however, in the regions where less attenuation is present, a lower temporal weight is needed and is applied to preserve temporal resolution. A simulation of the technique is first presented on an actual image sequence obtained from an endovascular image guided interventional (EIGI) procedure. Then the actual implementation of the technique with a physical ROI attenuator is presented. Quantitative analysis including noise analysis and integral dose calculations are presented to validate the proposed technique. PMID:24027617

  3. Deterministic absorbed dose estimation in computed tomography using a discrete ordinates method

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Edward T.; Liu, Xin; Hsieh, Jiang

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Organ dose estimation for a patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scanning is very important. Although Monte Carlo methods are considered gold-standard in patient dose estimation, the computation time required is formidable for routine clinical calculations. Here, the authors instigate a deterministic method for estimating an absorbed dose more efficiently. Methods: Compared with current Monte Carlo methods, a more efficient approach to estimating the absorbed dose is to solve the linear Boltzmann equation numerically. In this study, an axial CT scan was modeled with a software package, Denovo, which solved the linear Boltzmann equation using the discrete ordinates method. The CT scanning configuration included 16 x-ray source positions, beam collimators, flat filters, and bowtie filters. The phantom was the standard 32 cm CT dose index (CTDI) phantom. Four different Denovo simulations were performed with different simulation parameters, including the number of quadrature sets and the order of Legendre polynomial expansions. A Monte Carlo simulation was also performed for benchmarking the Denovo simulations. A quantitative comparison was made of the simulation results obtained by the Denovo and the Monte Carlo methods. Results: The difference in the simulation results of the discrete ordinates method and those of the Monte Carlo methods was found to be small, with a root-mean-square difference of around 2.4%. It was found that the discrete ordinates method, with a higher order of Legendre polynomial expansions, underestimated the absorbed dose near the center of the phantom (i.e., low dose region). Simulations of the quadrature set 8 and the first order of the Legendre polynomial expansions proved to be the most efficient computation method in the authors’ study. The single-thread computation time of the deterministic simulation of the quadrature set 8 and the first order of the Legendre polynomial expansions was 21 min on a personal computer

  4. Monochromatic X-ray propagation in multi-Z media for imaging and diagnostics including Kα Resonance Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, Maximillian; Lim, Sara; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil

    2016-05-01

    Aimed at monochromatic X-ray imaging and therapy, broadband, monochromatic, and quasi-monochromatic X-ray sources and propagation through low and high-Z (HZ) media were studied with numerically and experimentally. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the software package Geant4, and a new code Photx, to simulate X-ray image contrast, depth of penetration, and total attenuation. The data show that monochromatic and quasi-monochromatic X-rays achieve improved contrast at lower absorbed radiation doses compared to conventional broadband 120 kV or CT scans. Experimental quasi-monochromatic high-intensity laser-produced plasma sources and monochromatic synchrotron beam data are compared. Physical processes responsible for X-ray photoexcitation and absorption are numerically modelled, including a novel mechanism for accelerating Kα resonance fluorescence via twin monochromatic X-ray beam. Potential applications are medical diagnostics and high-Z material detection. Acknowledgement: Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus, OH.

  5. Computational determination of absorbed dose distributions from gamma ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanyu; Inanc, Feyzi

    2001-04-01

    A biomedical procedure known as brachytherapy involves insertion of many radioactive seeds into a sick gland for eliminating sick tissue. For such implementations, the spatial distribution of absorbed dose is very important. A simulation tool has been developed to determine the spatial distribution of absorbed dose in heterogeneous environments where the gamma ray source consists of many small internal radiation emitters. The computation is base on integral transport method and the computations are done in a parallel fashion. Preliminary results involving 137Cs and 125I sources surrounded by water and comparison of the results to the experimental and computational data available in the literature are presented.

  6. Accelerating an Ordered-Subset Low-Dose X-Ray Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction with a Power Factor and Total Variation Minimization

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increased interest in low-dose X-ray cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in many fields, including dentistry, guided radiotherapy and small animal imaging. Despite reducing the radiation dose, low-dose CBCT has not gained widespread acceptance in routine clinical practice. In addition to performing more evaluation studies, developing a fast and high-quality reconstruction algorithm is required. In this work, we propose an iterative reconstruction method that accelerates ordered-subsets (OS) reconstruction using a power factor. Furthermore, we combine it with the total-variation (TV) minimization method. Both simulation and phantom studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Results show that the proposed method can accelerate conventional OS methods, greatly increase the convergence speed in early iterations. Moreover, applying the TV minimization to the power acceleration scheme can further improve the image quality while preserving the fast convergence rate. PMID:27073853

  7. SU-E-J-09: A Monte Carlo Analysis of the Relationship Between Cherenkov Light Emission and Dose for Electrons, Protons, and X-Ray Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, A; Zhang, R; Gladstone, D; Pogue, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A number of recent studies have proposed that light emitted by the Cherenkov effect may be used for a number of radiation therapy dosimetry applications. Here we investigate the fundamental nature and accuracy of the technique for the first time by using a theoretical and Monte Carlo based analysis. Methods: Using the GEANT4 architecture for medically-oriented simulations (GAMOS) and BEAMnrc for phase space file generation, the light yield, material variability, field size and energy dependence, and overall agreement between the Cherenkov light emission and dose deposition for electron, proton, and flattened, unflattened, and parallel opposed x-ray photon beams was explored. Results: Due to the exponential attenuation of x-ray photons, Cherenkov light emission and dose deposition were identical for monoenergetic pencil beams. However, polyenergetic beams exhibited errors with depth due to beam hardening, with the error being inversely related to beam energy. For finite field sizes, the error with depth was inversely proportional to field size, and lateral errors in the umbra were greater for larger field sizes. For opposed beams, the technique was most accurate due to an averaging out of beam hardening in a single beam. The technique was found to be not suitable for measuring electron beams, except for relative dosimetry of a plane at a single depth. Due to a lack of light emission, the technique was found to be unsuitable for proton beams. Conclusions: The results from this exploratory study suggest that optical dosimetry by the Cherenkov effect may be most applicable to near monoenergetic x-ray photon beams (e.g. Co-60), dynamic IMRT and VMAT plans, as well as narrow beams used for SRT and SRS. For electron beams, the technique would be best suited for superficial dosimetry, and for protons the technique is not applicable due to a lack of light emission. NIH R01CA109558 and R21EB017559.

  8. Is selective absorption of ultrasoft x-rays biologically important in mammalian cells?

    PubMed

    Goodhead, D T; Thacker, J; Cox, R

    1981-11-01

    This paper tests whether photon absorption processes in particular atomic element(s) may be responsible for the observed high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ultrasoft X-rays. The effectiveness of titanium K characteristic X-rays (4.55 keV) is compared with previous observations for aluminium (1.5 keV) and carbon (0.28 keV) K ultrasoft X-rays. For a given absorbed dose, five times more Ti K than Al K photons are absorbed in phosphorus; since Al K X-rays are observed to be more effective in killing human and hamster cells it is concluded that absorption in phosphorus does not play a dominant lethal role. This is supported by the observation that the absolute number of Al K photons absorbed in phosphorus of DNA of human fibroblasts is less than 1 per lethal event. For no element is the relative number of absorbed photons of the three X-ray energies even approximately proportional to their observed RBEs. The effectiveness of ultrasoft X-rays is apparently not due to selective absorption but rather to the secondary electrons; consequently the mechanism of action should be common to the large numbers of low energy secondary electrons produced by most other ionising radiations, including gamma-rays. PMID:7323149

  9. Extracellular Release of Annexin A2 is Enhanced upon Oxidative Stress Response via the p38 MAPK Pathway after Low-Dose X-Ray Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kita, Kazuko; Sugita, Katsuo; Sato, Chihomi; Sugaya, Shigeru; Sato, Tetsuo; Kaneda, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    The extracellular microenvironment affects cellular responses to various stressors including radiation. Annexin A2, which was initially identified as an intracellular molecule, is also released into the extracellular environment and is known to regulate diverse cell surface events, however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its release are not well known. In this study, we found that in cultured human cancer and non-cancerous cells an extracellular release of annexin A2 was greatly enhanced 1-4 h after a single 20 cGy X-ray dose, but not after exposure to ultraviolet C (UVC) radiation. Extracellular release of annexin A2 was also enhanced after H2O2 and nicotine treatments, which was suppressed by pretreatment with the antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine. Among the oxidative stress pathway molecules examined in HeLa cells, AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were mostly activated by low-dose X-ray radiation, and the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, but not compound C (an AMPKα inhibitor), suppressed the enhancement of the annexin A2 extracellular release after low-dose X irradiation. In addition, the enhancement was suppressed in the cells in which p38α MAPK was downregulated by siRNA. HeLa cells and human cultured cells preirradiated with 20 cGy or precultured in media from low-dose X-irradiated cells showed an increase in resistance to radiation-induced cell death, and the increase was suppressed by treatment of the irradiated cell-derived media with anti-annexin A2 antibodies. In addition, extracellularly added recombinant annexin A2 conferred cellular radiation resistance. These results indicate that an oxidative stress-activated pathway via p38 MAPK was involved in the extracellular release of annexin A2, and this pathway was stimulated by low-dose X-ray irradiation. Furthermore, released annexin A2 may function in low-dose ionizing radiation-induced responses, such as radioresistance. PMID:27356027

  10. Reduction of absorbed doses in radiography of the facial skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, P.; Kraepelien, T.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation absorbed doses from radiography of the paranasal sinuses and the facial skeleton were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) on a phantom head using high-sensitivity screens in an Orbix stand. The entrance doses to the skin of the head ranged from 0.31 to 2.9 mGy per exposure. The absorbed dose from a full series of sinus exposures averaged 0.33 mGy for the oral mucous membrane, 0.33 mGy for the maxillary sinus mucous membrane, 0.11 MgY for the parotid gland, 0.15 MgY for the submandibular gland, 0.61 mGy for the eye lens, and 0.75 mGy for the thyroid gland region. A leaded soft collar adapted to the thyroid region reduced the thyroid doses by more than one order of magnitude, but also reduced the image field.

  11. SU-E-J-06: Additional Imaging Guidance Dose to Patient Organs Resulting From X-Ray Tubes Used in CyberKnife Image Guidance System

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, A; Ding, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The use of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) has become increasingly common, but the additional radiation exposure resulting from repeated image guidance procedures raises concerns. Although there are many studies reporting imaging dose from different image guidance devices, imaging dose for the CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System is not available. This study provides estimated organ doses resulting from image guidance procedures on the CyberKnife system. Methods: Commercially available Monte Carlo software, PCXMC, was used to calculate average organ doses resulting from x-ray tubes used in the CyberKnife system. There are seven imaging protocols with kVp ranging from 60 – 120 kV and 15 mAs for treatment sites in the Cranium, Head and Neck, Thorax, and Abdomen. The output of each image protocol was measured at treatment isocenter. For each site and protocol, Adult body sizes ranging from anorexic to extremely obese were simulated since organ dose depends on patient size. Doses for all organs within the imaging field-of-view of each site were calculated for a single image acquisition from both of the orthogonal x-ray tubes. Results: Average organ doses were <1.0 mGy for every treatment site and imaging protocol. For a given organ, dose increases as kV increases or body size decreases. Higher doses are typically reported for skeletal components, such as the skull, ribs, or clavicles, than for softtissue organs. Typical organ doses due to a single exposure are estimated as 0.23 mGy to the brain, 0.29 mGy to the heart, 0.08 mGy to the kidneys, etc., depending on the imaging protocol and site. Conclusion: The organ doses vary with treatment site, imaging protocol and patient size. Although the organ dose from a single image acquisition resulting from two orthogonal beams is generally insignificant, the sum of repeated image acquisitions (>100) could reach 10–20 cGy for a typical treatment fraction.

  12. Feasibility study for application of the compressed-sensing framework to interior computed tomography (ICT) for low-dose, high-accurate dental x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Je, U. K.; Cho, H. M.; Cho, H. S.; Park, Y. O.; Park, C. K.; Lim, H. W.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, G. A.; Park, S. Y.; Woo, T. H.; Choi, S. I.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new/next-generation type of CT examinations, the so-called Interior Computed Tomography (ICT), which may presumably lead to dose reduction to the patient outside the target region-of-interest (ROI), in dental x-ray imaging. Here an x-ray beam from each projection position covers only a relatively small ROI containing a target of diagnosis from the examined structure, leading to imaging benefits such as decreasing scatters and system cost as well as reducing imaging dose. We considered the compressed-sensing (CS) framework, rather than common filtered-backprojection (FBP)-based algorithms, for more accurate ICT reconstruction. We implemented a CS-based ICT algorithm and performed a systematic simulation to investigate the imaging characteristics. Simulation conditions of two ROI ratios of 0.28 and 0.14 between the target and the whole phantom sizes and four projection numbers of 360, 180, 90, and 45 were tested. We successfully reconstructed ICT images of substantially high image quality by using the CS framework even with few-view projection data, still preserving sharp edges in the images.

  13. Mean glandular dose estimation using MCNPX for a digital breast tomosynthesis system with tungsten/aluminum and tungsten/aluminum+silver x-ray anode-filter combinations

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Andy K. W.; Darambara, Dimitra G.; Stewart, Alexander; Gunn, Spencer; Bullard, Edward

    2008-12-15

    Breast cancer screening with x-ray mammography, using one or two projection images of the breast, is an indispensible tool in the early detection of breast cancer in women. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a 3D imaging technique that promises higher sensitivity and specificity in breast cancer screening at a similar radiation dose to conventional two-view screening mammography. In DBT a 3D volume is reconstructed with anisotropic voxels from a limited number of x-ray projection images acquired over a limited angle. Although the benefit of early cancer detection through screening mammography outweighs the potential risks associated with radiation, the radiation dosage to women in terms of mean glandular dose (MGD) is carefully monitored. This work studies the MGD arising from a prototype DBT system under various parameters. Two anode/filter combinations (W/Al and W/Al+Ag) were investigated; the tube potential ranges from 20 to 50 kVp; and the breast size varied between 4 and 10 cm chest wall-to-nipple distance and between 3 and 7 cm compressed breast thickness. The dosimetric effect of breast positioning with respect to the imaging detector was also reviewed. It was found that the position of the breast can affect the MGD by as much as 5% to 13% depending on the breast size.

  14. Dose reduction in fluoroscopic interventions using a combination of a region of interest (ROI) x-ray attenuator and spatially different, temporally variable temporal filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swetadri Vasan, S. N.; Pope, Liza; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A. H.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2013-03-01

    A novel dose reduction technique for fluoroscopic interventions involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and spatially different, temporally variable ROI temporal recursive filter, was used to guide the catheter to the ROI in three live animal studies, two involving rabbits and one involving a sheep. In the two rabbit studies presented , a catheter was guided to the entrance of the carotid artery. With the added ROI attenuator the image under the high attenuation region is very noisy. By using temporal filtering with a filter weight of 0.6 on previous frames, the noise is reduced. In the sheep study the catheter was guided to the descending aorta of the animal. The sheep offered a relatively higher attenuation to the incident x-rays and thus a higher temporal filter weight of 0.8 on previous frames was used during the procedure to reduce the noise to levels acceptable by the interventionalist. The image sequences from both studies show that significant dose reduction of 5-6 times can be achieved with acceptable image quality outside the ROI by using the above mentioned technique. Even though the temporal filter weighting outside the ROI is higher, the consequent lag does not prevent perception of catheter movement.

  15. Dose Reduction in Fluoroscopic Interventions Using a Combination of a Region of Interest (ROI) X-Ray Attenuator and Spatially-Different, Temporally-Variable Temporal Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Vasan, S.N Swetadri; Pope, Liza; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Titus, A.H.; Bednarek, D.R; Rudin, S.

    2013-01-01

    A novel dose reduction technique for fluoroscopic interventions involving a combination of a material x-ray region of interest (ROI) attenuator and spatially different, temporally variable ROI temporal recursive filter, was used to guide the catheter to the ROI in three live animal studies, two involving rabbits and one involving a sheep. In the two rabbit studies presented, a catheter was guided to the entrance of the carotid artery. With the added ROI attenuator the image under the high attenuation region is very noisy. By using temporal filtering with a filter weight of 0.6 on previous frames, the noise is reduced. In the sheep study the catheter was guided to the descending aorta of the animal. The sheep offered a relatively higher attenuation to the incident x-rays and thus a higher temporal filter weight of 0.8 on previous frames was used during the procedure to reduce the noise to levels acceptable by the interventionalist. The image sequences from both studies show that significant dose reduction of 5–6 times can be achieved with acceptable image quality outside the ROI by using the above mentioned technique. Even though the temporal filter weighting outside the ROI is higher, the consequent lag does not prevent perception of catheter movement. PMID:24817800

  16. Absorbed dose behind eye shields during kilovoltage photon radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Baker, C R; Luhana, F; Thomas, S J

    2002-08-01

    The absorbed dose at the position of the lens of the eye under lead or tungsten eye shields during kilovoltage photon radiotherapy is critically dependent not so much on the thickness of the eye shield itself as on the size of the treatment field and the diameter of the shield used. Whilst dose from primary photons is easily attenuated to relatively insignificant levels by a few millimetres of lead or tungsten, scattered photons from outside the shielded area can provide over 25% of the prescribed dose. Since backscatter factors do not increase monotonically with photon energy, it is not safe to assume that the highest photon energy used will provide the highest dose. A simple method to estimate the dose under an eye shield based on tabulated backscatter factors is shown. Measurements under commercially available eye shields were made to verify the expression and to determine the attenuation of primary photons. Predicted and measured absorbed dose under the eye shields were found to agree to within 1% of the prescribed dose. The relative dose due to primary photons beneath the eye shields was found to be less than 0.1% and 0.5 (+/-0.1)% for the 150 kV and 260 kV beams, respectively. This is considerably less than the dose from backscattered radiation. PMID:12153943

  17. A real-time flat-panel X-ray pixel imaging system for low-dose medical diagnostics and craniofacial applications.

    PubMed

    Chapuy, S; Dimcovski, D; Dimcovski, Z; Grigoriev, E; Grob, E; Ligier, Y; Pachoud, M; Riondel, F; Rüfenacht, D; Sayegh, C; Terrier, F; Valley, J F; Verdun, F R

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate on-line performance of a real-time digital imaging system based on amorphous silicon technology and to compare it with conventional film-screen equipment. The digital detecting imager consists of (1) a converter, which transforms the energy of the incident X rays into light; (2) a real-time digital detecting system, capable of producing as many as 10 pictures per second using a large-area pixel matrix (20 x 20 cm2) based on solid-state amorphous silicon sensor technology with a pitch of 400 microns; and (3) appropriate computer tools for control, real-time image treatment, data representation, and off-line analysis. Different phantoms were used for qualitative comparison with the conventional film-screen technique, with images obtained with both systems at the normal dose (used as a reference), as well as with dose reduction by a factor of 10 to 100. Basic image quality parameters evaluated showed that the response of the detector is linear in a wide range of entrance air kerma; the dynamic range is higher compared with the conventional film-screen combination; the spatial resolution is 1.25 lp per millimeter, as expected from the pixel size; and good image quality is ensured at doses substantially lower than for the film-screen technique. The flat-panel X-ray imager based on amorphous silicon technology implemented in standard radiographic equipment permits acquisition of real-time images in radiology (as many as 10 images per second) of diagnostic quality with a marked reduction of dose (as much as 100 times) and better contrast compared with the standard film technique. Preliminary results obtained with a 100-micron pitch imager based on the same technology show better quality but a less substantial dose reduction. Applications in craniofacial surgery look promising. PMID:11314093

  18. An algorithm for kilovoltage x-ray dose calculations with applications in kV-CBCT scans and 2D planar projected radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlowski, Jason M.; Ding, George X.

    2014-04-01

    A new model-based dose calculation algorithm is presented for kilovoltage x-rays and is tested for the cases of calculating the radiation dose from kilovoltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT) and 2D planar projected radiographs. This algorithm calculates the radiation dose to water-like media as the sum of primary and scattered dose components. The scatter dose is calculated by convolution of a newly introduced, empirically parameterized scatter dose kernel with the primary photon fluence. Several approximations are introduced to increase the scatter dose calculation efficiency: (1) the photon energy spectrum is approximated as monoenergetic; (2) density inhomogeneities are accounted for by implementing a global distance scaling factor in the scatter kernel; (3) kernel tilting is ignored. These approximations allow for efficient calculation of the scatter dose convolution with the fast Fourier transform. Monte Carlo simulations were used to obtain the model parameters. The accuracy of using this model-based algorithm was validated by comparing with the Monte Carlo method for calculating dose distributions for real patients resulting from radiotherapy image guidance procedures including volumetric kV-CBCT scans and 2D planar projected radiographs. For all patients studied, mean dose-to-water errors for kV-CBCT are within 0.3% with a maximum standard deviation error of 4.1%. Using a medium-dependent correction method to account for the effects of photoabsorption in bone on the dose distribution, mean dose-to-medium errors for kV-CBCT are within 3.6% for bone and 2.4% for soft tissues. This algorithm offers acceptable accuracy and has the potential to extend the applicability of model-based dose calculation algorithms from megavoltage to kilovoltage photon beams.

  19. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some are: Bitewing Periapical Palatal (also called occlusal) ...

  20. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePlus

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  1. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  2. X Ray Topography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balchin, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some aspects in X-ray topography, including formation of dislocations, characteristics of stacking faults, x-ray contrast in defect inspection, Berg-Barrett technique, and Lang traversing crystal and Borrmann's methods. (CC)

  3. Extremity x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... degenerative) Bone tumor Broken bone (fracture) Dislocated bone Osteomyelitis (infection) Other conditions for which the test may ... Bone tumor Bone x-ray Broken bone Clubfoot Osteomyelitis X-ray Update Date 10/22/2014 Updated ...

  4. SU-E-I-85: Absorbed Dose Estimation for a Commercially Available MicroCT Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, A; Ahmad, S; Chen, Y; Ren, L; Liu, H; Yang, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the simulated absorbed dose delivered for a typical scan from a commercially available microCT scanner in order to aid in the dose estimation. Methods: The simulations were conducted using the Geant4 Monte Carlo Toolkit (version 10) with the standard electromagnetic classes. The Quantum FX microCT scanner (PerkinElmer, Waltham, MA) was modeled incorporating the energy fluence and angular distributions of generated photons, spatial dimensions of nominal source-to-object and source-to-detector distances. The energy distribution was measured using a spectrometer (X-123CdTe, Amptek Inc., Bedford, USA) with a 300 angular spread from the source for the 90 kVp X-ray beams with no additional filtration. The nominal distances from the source to object consisted of three setups: 154.0 mm, 104.0 mm, and 51.96 mm. Our simulations recorded the dose absorbed in a cylindrical phantom of PMMA with a fixed length of 2 cm and varying radii (10, 20, 30 and 40 mm) using 100 million incident photons. The averaged absorbed dose in the object was then quantified for all setups. An exposure measurement of 417 mR was taken using a Radcal 9095 system utilizing 10×9–180 ion chamber with the given technique of 90 kVp, 63 μA, and 12 s. The exposure rate was also simulated with same setup to calculate the conversion factor of the beam current and the number of incident photons. Results: For a typical cone-beam scan with non-filtered 90kVp, the dose coefficients (the absorbed dose per mAs) were 2.614, 2.549 and 2.467 μGy/mAs under source to object distance of 104 mm for the object diameters of 10 mm, 20 mm and 30 mm, respectively. Conclusion: A look-up table was developed where an investigator can estimate the delivered dose using this particular microCT given the scanning protocol (kVp and mAs) as well as the size of the scanned object.

  5. THE EFFECT OF UV/SOFT X-RAY EXCESS EMISSION ON THE WARM ABSORBER PROPERTIES OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI—A CASE STUDY OF IRAS 13349+2438

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, Sibasish; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Kembhavi, Ajit K.; Chakravorty, Susmita E-mail: gulabd@iucaa.ernet.in

    2013-11-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) to X-ray continuum of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is important for maintaining the ionization and thermal balance of the warm absorbers (WAs). However, the spectra in the sensitive energy range ∼13.6-300 eV are unobservable due to Galactic extinction. Moreover, many AGNs show soft X-ray excess emission of varying strength in the 0.1-2 keV band, whose origin is still highly debated. This soft excess connects to the UV bump in the unobserved region of 13.6-300 eV. Here, we investigate the effect of the assumed physical model for the soft excess on the flux of the unobserved part of the spectrum and its effect on the WA properties. We perform a case study using XMM-Newton observations of the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy IRAS 13349+2438 with WA features. Two different physical models for the soft excess (blurred Compton reflection from an ionized disk and optically thick thermal Comptonization of the disk photons) predict different fluxes in the unobserved energy range. However, the current X-ray data quality does not allow us to distinguish between them using derived WA parameters. This, in turn, implies that it is difficult to determine the origin of the soft excess emission using the WA features.

  6. A preliminary study of the measurement of slice-width dose profiles (SWDP) on diagnostic x-ray CT scanners using PAGAT polymer gel dosimeters with optical CT read-out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Bosi, Stephen; Hill, Brendan; Baldock, Clive

    2006-12-01

    The slice-width dose profile (SWDP) is a measurement undertaken during acceptance testing and subsequent quality assurance measurements of diagnostic x-ray CT scanners for the determination, of patient dose. In a previous study (Hill B, Venning A J and Baldock C 2005 Med. Phys. 32 1589-1597) normoxic polymer gel dosimeters were used to measure dose, the SWDP and subsequently calculate computer tomography dose index (CTDI) during acceptance testing of a CT scanner. In the current study, a preliminary investigation was undertaken to determine the SWDP of a diagnostic x-ray CT scanner using the PAGAT polymer gel dosimeters with optical CT read-out.

  7. X-Ray Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Surgery Imaging Clinical Trials Basics Patient Information X-Ray Imaging Print This Page X-ray imaging is perhaps the most familiar type of imaging. Images produced by X-rays are due to the different absorption rates of ...

  8. Hand x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  9. Sinus x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Paranasal sinus radiography; X-ray - sinuses ... sinus x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department. Or the x-ray may be taken ... Brown J, Rout J. ENT, neck, and dental radiology. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH Schaefer- ...

  10. Improving radiation dose efficiency of X-ray differential phase contrast imaging using an energy-resolving grating interferometer and a novel rank constraint.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ran; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-06-13

    In this paper, a novel method was developed to improve the radiation dose efficiency, viz., contrast to noise ratio normalized by dose (CNRD), of the grating-based X-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging system that is integrated with an energy-resolving photon counting detector. The method exploits the low-dimensionality of the spatial-spectral DPC image matrix acquired from different energy windows. A low rank approximation of the spatial-spectral image matrix was developed to reduce image noise while retaining the DPC signal accuracy for every energy window. Numerical simulations and experimental phantom studies have been performed to validate the proposed method by showing noise reduction and CNRD improvement for each energy window. PMID:27410315

  11. The feasibility of a sensitive low-dose method for the in vivo evaluation of Fe in skin using K-shell x-ray fluorescence (XRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Michael J.; Bradley, David A.

    1999-04-01

    An x-ray fluorescence (XRF) system designed for monitoring of skin Fe concentrations has been performance tested for use on patients treated for -thalassaemia. The essentials of the system are: a collimated x-ray tube operated at 20 kV and 20 mA; energy selection of the x-ray beam by means of a Cu K-edge filter; use of skin phantoms containing concentrations of Fe in the range 10 to 100 parts per million (ppm); and a high-purity germanium detector placed at to the incident beam. For a Cu K-edge filter of 0.15 mm thickness a quasi-monoenergetic beam of approximately 8.4 keV is obtained which is close to the absorption edge of Fe (7.11 keV). For a real-time counting period of 400 s the system is capable of detecting Fe concentrations of ppm at a skin dose of the order of 5 mSv. This level of Fe is at the higher end of the normal range found in the skin. In using the same system and operating parameters, measurements on a sample of ferritin obtained from a rat's liver yield an Fe concentration of ppm for a measurement time of 500 s; this can be compared with suppliers' data indicating an Fe level of 36 ppm.

  12. Verification of TG-61 dose for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams using fluence-normalized MCNP5 calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas A. D.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews, Kenneth L. II; Ham, Kyungmin

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Ion chamber dosimetry is being used to calibrate dose for cell irradiations designed to investigate photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) synchrotron facility. This study performed a dosimetry intercomparison for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams at 25 and 35 keV. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements in a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom were compared with the product of MCNP5 Monte Carlo calculations of dose per fluence and measured incident fluence. Methods: Monochromatic beams of 25 and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. A cylindrical, air-equivalent ion chamber was used to measure the ionization created in a 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 Multiplication-Sign 10-cm{sup 3} PMMA phantom for depths from 0.6 to 7.7 cm. The American Association of Physicists in Medicine TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Photon fluence was determined using a NaI detector to make scattering measurements of the beam from a thin polyethylene target at angles 30 Degree-Sign -60 Degree-Sign . Differential Compton and Rayleigh scattering cross sections obtained from xraylib, an ANSI C library for x-ray-matter interactions, were applied to derive the incident fluence. MCNP5 simulations of the irradiation geometry provided the dose deposition per photon fluence as a function of depth in the phantom. Results: At 25 keV the fluence-normalized MCNP5 dose overestimated the ion-chamber measured dose by an average of 7.2 {+-} 3.0%-2.1 {+-} 3.0% for PMMA depths from 0.6 to 7.7 cm, respectively. At 35 keV the fluence-normalized MCNP5 dose underestimated the ion-chamber measured dose by an average of 1.0 {+-} 3.4%-2.5 {+-} 3.4%, respectively. Conclusions: These results showed that TG-61 ion chamber dosimetry, used to calibrate dose output for cell irradiations, agreed with fluence-normalized MCNP5 calculations to within approximately 7

  13. Thermoluminescent response of CaSO4:Dy+PTFE induced by X-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Hernández, L; Rivera, T; Jimenez, Y; Alvarez, R; Zeferino, J; Vázquez, A; Azorín, J

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the feasibility of the utilization of CaSO4:Dy pellets for X-ray measurements in a general radiology department. Thermoluminescence (TL) response of CaSO4:Dy+PTFE was compared to the TL response of commercial LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) samples. TL pellets were exposed to X-ray beam from X-ray machine CMR for clinical diagnosis purpose. The calibration curve of CaSO4:Dy+PTFE was obtained and it showed a linear response as a function of absorbed dose in air at the studied dose interval. Despite this fact, this material can be used for X-ray beams measurements if appropriate calibration procedures are performed. PMID:22182627

  14. Low-dose 2D X-ray angiography enhancement using 2-axis PCA for the preservation of blood-vessel region and noise minimization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Geun; Lee, Jeongjin; Shin, Yeong-Gil; Kang, Ho Chul

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing 2D angiography while maintaining a low radiation dose has become an important research topic. However, it is difficult to enhance images while preserving vessel-structure details because X-ray noise and contrast blood vessels in 2D angiography have similar intensity distributions, which can lead to ambiguous images of vessel structures. In this paper, we propose a novel and fast vessel-enhancement method for 2D angiography. We apply filtering in the principal component analysis domain for vessel regions and background regions separately, using assumptions based on energy compaction. First, we identify an approximate vessel region using a Hessian-based method. Vessel and non-vessel regions are then represented sparsely by calculating their optimal bases separately. This is achieved by identifying periodic motion in the vessel region caused by the flow of the contrast medium through the blood vessels when viewed on the time axis. Finally, we obtain noise-free images by removing noise in the new coordinate domain for the optimal bases. Our method was validated for an X-ray system, using 10 low-dose sets for training and 20 low-dose sets for testing. The results were compared with those for a high-dose dataset with respect to noise-free images. The average enhancement rate was 93.11±0.71%. The average processing time for enhancing video comprising 50-70 frames was 0.80±0.35s, which is much faster than the previously proposed technique. Our method is applicable to 2D angiography procedures such as catheterization, which requires rapid and natural vessel enhancement. PMID:26483302

  15. LOW DOSE STUDIES WITH FOCUSED X-RAYS IN CELL AND TISSUE MODELS: MECHANISMS OF BYSTANDER AND GENOMIC INSTABILITY RESPONSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aims of this and other projects in the DOE's Low-Dose Program are to gain an understanding of the biological actions of low-dose radiation, ultimately to provide information that will lead to more accurate quantification of low-dose risk. Our project is based on the concept t...

  16. Combinatorial DNA Damage Pairing Model Based on X-Ray-Induced Foci Predicts the Dose and LET Dependence of Cell Death in Human Breast Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vadhavkar, Nikhil; Pham, Christopher; Georgescu, Walter; Deschamps, Thomas; Heuskin, Anne-Catherine; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2014-09-01

    In contrast to the classic view of static DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) being repaired at the site of damage, we hypothesize that DSBs move and merge with each other over large distances (m). As X-ray dose increases, the probability of having DSB clusters increases as does the probability of misrepair and cell death. Experimental work characterizing the X-ray dose dependence of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in nonmalignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) is used here to validate a DSB clustering model. We then use the principles of the local effect model (LEM) to predict the yield of DSBs at the submicron level. Two mechanisms for DSB clustering, namely random coalescence of DSBs versus active movement of DSBs into repair domains are compared and tested. Simulations that best predicted both RIF dose dependence and cell survival after X-ray irradiation favored the repair domain hypothesis, suggesting the nucleus is divided into an array of regularly spaced repair domains of ~;;1.55 m sides. Applying the same approach to high-linear energy transfer (LET) ion tracks, we are able to predict experimental RIF/m along tracks with an overall relative error of 12percent, for LET ranging between 30 350 keV/m and for three different ions. Finally, cell death was predicted by assuming an exponential dependence on the total number of DSBs and of all possible combinations of paired DSBs within each simulated RIF. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) predictions for cell survival of MCF10A exposed to high-LET showed an LET dependence that matches previous experimental results for similar cell types. Overall, this work suggests that microdosimetric properties of ion tracks at the submicron level are sufficient to explain both RIF data and survival curves for any LET, similarly to the LEM assumption. Conversely, high-LET death mechanism does not have to infer linear-quadratic dose formalism as done in the LEM. In addition, the size of repair domains derived in our model

  17. Space radiation absorbed dose distribution in a human phantom.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Atwell, W; Badavi, F F; Yang, T C; Cleghorn, T F

    2002-01-01

    The radiation risk to astronauts has always been based on measurements using passive thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The skin dose is converted to dose equivalent using an average radiation quality factor based on model calculations. The radiological risk estimates, however, are based on organ and tissue doses. This paper describes results from the first space flight (STS-91, 51.65 degrees inclination and approximately 380 km altitude) of a fully instrumented Alderson Rando phantom torso (with head) to relate the skin dose to organ doses. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose in 34 1-inch-thick sections measured using TLDs are described. There is about a 30% change in dose as one moves from the front to the back of the phantom body. Small active dosimeters were developed specifically to provide time-resolved measurements of absorbed dose rates and quality factors at five organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) inside the phantom. Using these dosimeters, it was possible to separate the trapped-proton and the galactic cosmic radiation components of the doses. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a charged-particle directional spectrometer (CPDS) were flown next to the phantom torso to provide data on the incident internal radiation environment. Accurate models of the shielding distributions at the site of the TEPC, the CPDS and a scalable Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model of the phantom torso were developed. These measurements provided a comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human phantom, and to assess the accuracy and validity of radiation transport models throughout the human body. The results show that for the conditions in the International Space Station (ISS) orbit during periods near the solar minimum, the ratio of the blood-forming organ dose rate to the skin absorbed dose rate is about 80%, and the ratio of the dose equivalents is almost one. The results show that the GCR model dose

  18. Space radiation absorbed dose distribution in a human phantom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Atwell, W.; Badavi, F. F.; Yang, T. C.; Cleghorn, T. F.

    2002-01-01

    The radiation risk to astronauts has always been based on measurements using passive thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The skin dose is converted to dose equivalent using an average radiation quality factor based on model calculations. The radiological risk estimates, however, are based on organ and tissue doses. This paper describes results from the first space flight (STS-91, 51.65 degrees inclination and approximately 380 km altitude) of a fully instrumented Alderson Rando phantom torso (with head) to relate the skin dose to organ doses. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose in 34 1-inch-thick sections measured using TLDs are described. There is about a 30% change in dose as one moves from the front to the back of the phantom body. Small active dosimeters were developed specifically to provide time-resolved measurements of absorbed dose rates and quality factors at five organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) inside the phantom. Using these dosimeters, it was possible to separate the trapped-proton and the galactic cosmic radiation components of the doses. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a charged-particle directional spectrometer (CPDS) were flown next to the phantom torso to provide data on the incident internal radiation environment. Accurate models of the shielding distributions at the site of the TEPC, the CPDS and a scalable Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model of the phantom torso were developed. These measurements provided a comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human phantom, and to assess the accuracy and validity of radiation transport models throughout the human body. The results show that for the conditions in the International Space Station (ISS) orbit during periods near the solar minimum, the ratio of the blood-forming organ dose rate to the skin absorbed dose rate is about 80%, and the ratio of the dose equivalents is almost one. The results show that the GCR model dose

  19. Estimation of patient doses for common diagnostic X-ray examinations in Latvian hospitals, analysis of radiographic techniques and comparison with European guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bogucarskis, K; Salmins, A; Gfirtner, H; Anatschkowa, E

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with the estimation of doses received by patients undergoing radiological examinations in order to establish dose reference levels (DRLs) in Latvia. Several large hospitals, small hospitals and private practices were selected for patient dose measurements. The measurements were carried out using calibrated thermoluminiscence dosemeters attached to the patient's skin. Exposure parameters and patient's data were recorded. The entrance surface doses (ESDs) to patients undergoing several common X-ray examinations (chest AP/PA, chest LAT, lumbar spine AP/PA, lumbar spine LAT and pelvis) were measured. Data concerning the kV(p) settings, used type of films, focus-film distance and the ESD values were analysed and compared with those recommended by the European Community (EC). Among the different hospitals and private practices, discrepancies in the patient doses and techniques used for the examination were found, where the doses exceeded the EC recommended values owing to a very low kV(p) and a very low sensitivity of the screen film combinations used. PMID:15933103

  20. Comparison between two FISH techniques in the in vitro study of cytogenetic markers for low-dose X-ray exposure in human primary fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Nieri, D.; Berardinelli, F.; Antoccia, A.; Tanzarella, C.; Sgura, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    This work is about the setup of an in vitro system to report low-dose of X-rays as measured as cytogenetic damage. Q- and multicolor FISH (m-FISH), for telomere length and chromosome instability analysis, respectively, were compared to evaluate their sensitivity in the low-dose range in human primary fibroblasts. No telomere length modulation was observed up to 1 Gy in cycling fibroblasts, though reported for high doses, by that frustrating the purpose of using it as a low-exposure marker. To date the m-FISH is the best setup for the assessment of the chromosome structural damage: it allows stable and instable aberrations to be detected all over the karyotype. Stable ones such as balanced translocations, are not eliminated due to cell-cycle as unstable ones, so they are considered transmissible markers for retrospective dosimetry. The induction of chromosome damage showed a clear dependence on dose delivered; unstable aberrations were demonstrated after doses of 0.1 Gy, and stable aberrations after doses higher than 0.5 Gy. Summarizing, q-FISH is unfit to report low exposures while m-FISH provides better results: unstable aberrations are sensible short-term reporters, while stable ones long report exposures but with a higher induction threshold. PMID:23908663

  1. Diagnostic x-ray dosimetry using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioppolo, J. L.; Price, R. I.; Tuchyna, T.; Buckley, C. E.

    2002-05-01

    An Electron Gamma Shower version 4 (EGS4) based user code was developed to simulate the absorbed dose in humans during routine diagnostic radiological procedures. Measurements of absorbed dose using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were compared directly with EGS4 simulations of absorbed dose in homogeneous, heterogeneous and anthropomorphic phantoms. Realistic voxel-based models characterizing the geometry of the phantoms were used as input to the EGS4 code. The voxel geometry of the anthropomorphic Rando phantom was derived from a CT scan of Rando. The 100 kVp diagnostic energy x-ray spectra of the apparatus used to irradiate the phantoms were measured, and provided as input to the EGS4 code. The TLDs were placed at evenly spaced points symmetrically about the central beam axis, which was perpendicular to the cathode-anode x-ray axis at a number of depths. The TLD measurements in the homogeneous and heterogenous phantoms were on average within 7% of the values calculated by EGS4. Estimates of effective dose with errors less than 10% required fewer numbers of photon histories (1 × 107) than required for the calculation of dose profiles (1 × 109). The EGS4 code was able to satisfactorily predict and thereby provide an instrument for reducing patient and staff effective dose imparted during radiological investigations.

  2. SU-E-T-322: The Evaluation of the Gafchromic EBT3 Film in Low Dose 6 MV X-Ray Beams with Different Scanning Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H; Sung, J; Yoon, M; Kim, D; Chung, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We have evaluated the response of the Gafchromic EBT3 film in low dose for 6 MV x-ray beams with two scanning modes, the reflection scanning mode and the transmission scanning mode. Methods: We irradiated the Gafcromic EBT3 film using a 60 degree enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) with 6 MV x-ray beams from Clinac iX Linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The irradiated Gafchromic EBT3 film was scanned with different scanning modes, the reflection scanning mode and the transmission scanning mode. The scanned Gafchromic EBT3 film was analyzed with MATLAB. Results: When 7.2 cGy was irradiated to the Gafchromic EBT3 film, the uncertainty was 0.54 cGy with reflection scanning mode and was 0.88 cGy with transmission scanning mode. When 24 cGy was irradiated to the Gafchromic EBT3 film, the uncertainty was similar to the case of 7.2 cGy irradiation showing 0.51 cGy of uncertainty with reflection scanning mode and 0.87 cGy of uncertainty with transmission scanning mode. The result suggests that the reflection mode should be used in Gafchromic EBT3 film for low irradiation. Conclusion: The result suggests that the reflection mode should be used in Gafchromic EBT3 film for low irradiation.

  3. SU-E-I-10: Automatic Monitoring of Accumulated Dose Indices From DICOM RDSR to Improve Radiation Safety in X-Ray Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, A; Bujila, R; Nowik, P; Karambatsakidou, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential benefits of automatic monitoring of accumulated patient and staff dose indicators, i.e., CAK and KAP, from DICOM Radiation Dose Structured Reports (RDSR) in x-ray angiography (XA). Methods: Recently RDSR has enabled the convenient aggregation of dose indices and technique parameters for XA procedures. The information contained in RDSR objects for three XA systems, dedicated to different types of clinical procedures, has been collected and aggregated in a database for over one year using a system developed with open-source software at the Karolinska University Hospital. Patient weight was complemented to the RDSR data via an interface with the Hospital Information System (HIS). Results: The linearly approximated trend in KAP over a time period of a year for cerebrovascular, pelvic/peripheral vascular, and cardiovascular procedures showed a decrease of 12%, 20%, and 14%, respectively. The decrease was mainly due to hardware/software upgrades and new low-dose imaging protocols, and partially due to ongoing systematic radiation safety education of the clinical staff. The CAK was in excess of 3 Gy for 15 procedures, and exceeded 5 Gy for 3 procedures. The dose indices have also shown a significant dependence on patient weight for cardiovascular and pelvic/peripheral vascular procedures; a 10 kg shift in mean patient weight can result in a dose index increase of 25%. Conclusion: Automatic monitoring of accumulated dose indices can be utilized to notify the clinical staff and medical physicists when the dose index has exceeded a predetermined action level. This allows for convenient and systematic follow-up of patients in risk of developing deterministic skin injuries. Furthermore, trend analyses of dose indices over time is a valuable resource for the identification of potential positive or negative effects (dose increase/decrease) from changes in hardware, software, and clinical work habits.

  4. Absorbed dose measurements for kV-cone beam computed tomography in image-guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Hioki, Kazunari; Araki, Fujio; Ohno, Takeshi; Nakaguchi, Yuji; Tomiyama, Yuuki

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we develope a novel method to directly evaluate an absorbed dose-to-water for kilovoltage-cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Absorbed doses for the kV-CBCT systems of the Varian On-Board Imager (OBI) and the Elekta X-ray Volumetric Imager (XVI) were measured by a Farmer ionization chamber with a (60)Co calibration factor. The chamber measurements were performed at the center and four peripheral points in body-type (30 cm diameter and 51 cm length) and head-type (16 cm diameter and 33 cm length) cylindrical water phantoms. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water by using a (60)Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo (MC)-calculated beam quality conversion factor, kQ, for (60)Co to kV-CBCT. The irradiation for OBI and XVI was performed with pelvis and head modes for the body- and the head-type phantoms, respectively. In addition, the dose distributions in the phantom for both kV-CBCT systems were calculated with MC method and were compared with measured values. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated at the center in the water phantom and compared with measured doses at four peripheral points. The measured absorbed doses at the center in the body-type phantom were 1.96 cGy for OBI and 0.83 cGy for XVI. The peripheral doses were 2.36-2.90 cGy for OBI and 0.83-1.06 cGy for XVI. The doses for XVI were lower up to approximately one-third of those for OBI. Similarly, the measured doses at the center in the head-type phantom were 0.48 cGy for OBI and 0.21 cGy for XVI. The peripheral doses were 0.26-0.66 cGy for OBI and 0.16-0.30 cGy for XVI. The calculated peripheral doses agreed within 3% in the pelvis mode and within 4% in the head mode with measured doses for both kV-CBCT systems. In addition, the absorbed dose determined in this study was approximately 4% lower than that in TG-61 but the absorbed dose by both methods was in agreement within their combined uncertainty. This method

  5. Measurement of patient imaging dose for real-time kilovoltage x-ray intrafraction tumour position monitoring in prostate patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, James K.; Aun Ng, Jin; Keall, Paul J.; Booth, Jeremy T.

    2012-05-01

    The dose for image-based motion monitoring of prostate tumours during radiotherapy delivery has not been established. This study aimed to provide quantitative analysis and optimization of the fluoroscopic patient imaging dose during radiotherapy for IMRT and VMAT treatments using standard and hypofractionated treatment schedules. Twenty-two patients with type T1c N0/M0 prostate cancer and three implanted fiducial markers were considered. Minimum field sizes encompassing all fiducial markers plus a 7.5 mm motion margin were determined for each treatment beam, each patient and the complete cohort. Imaging doses were measured for different field sizes and depths in a phantom at 75 and 120 kV. Based on these measurements, the patient imaging doses were then estimated according to beam-on time for clinical settings. The population minimum field size was 5.3 × 6.1 cm2, yielding doses of 406 and 185 mGy over the course of an IMRT treatment for 75 kV (10 mAs) and 120 kV (1.04 mAs) imaging respectively, at 1 Hz. The imaging dose was reduced by an average of 28% and 32% by adopting patient-specific and treatment-beam-specific field sizes respectively. Standard fractionation VMAT imaging doses were 37% lower than IMRT doses over a complete treatment. Hypofractionated IMRT stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and VMAT SBRT imaging doses were 58% and 76% lower than IMRT doses respectively. The patient dose for kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring of the prostate was quantified. Tailoring imaging field sizes to specific patients yielded a significant reduction in the imaging dose, as did adoption of faster treatment modalities such as VMAT.

  6. ITAR: A modified TAR method to determine depth dose distribution for an ophthalmic device that performs kilovoltage x-ray pencil-beam stereotaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, Justin Chell, Erik; Firpo, Michael; Koruga, Igor

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: New technology has been developed to treat age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using 100 kVp pencil-beams that enter the patient through the radio-resistant sclera with a depth of interest between 1.6 and 2.6 cm. Measurement of reference and relative dose in a kilovoltage x-ray beam with a 0.42 cm diameter field size and a 15 cm source to axis distance (SAD) is a challenge that is not fully addressed in current guidelines to medical physicists. AAPM's TG-61 gives dosimetry recommendations for low and medium energy x-rays, but not all of them are feasible to follow for this modality. Methods: An investigation was conducted to select appropriate equipment for the application. PTW's Type 34013 Soft X-Ray Chamber (Freiburg, Germany) and CIRS's Plastic Water LR (Norfolk, VA) were found to be the best available options. Attenuation curves were measured with minimal scatter contribution and thus called Low Scatter Tissue Air Ratio (LSTAR). A scatter conversion coefficient (C{sub scat}) was derived through Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation using MCNPX (LANL, Los Alamos, NM) to quantify the difference between a traditional TAR curve and the LSTAR curve. A material conversion coefficient (C{sub mat}) was determined through experimentation to evaluate the difference in attenuation properties between water and Plastic Water LR. Validity of performing direct dosimetry measurements with a source to detector distance other than the treatment distance, and therefore a different field size due to a fixed collimator, was explored. A method—Integrated Tissue Air Ratio (ITAR)—has been developed that isolates each of the three main radiological effects (distance from source, attenuation, and scatter) during measurement, and integrates them to determine the dose rate to the macula during treatment. Results: LSTAR curves were determined to be field size independent within the range explored, indicating that direct dosimetry measurements may be performed with a

  7. Evaluation of lens absorbed dose with Cone Beam IGRT procedures.

    PubMed

    Palomo, R; Pujades, M C; Gimeno-Olmos, J; Carmona, V; Lliso, F; Candela-Juan, C; Vijande, J; Ballester, F; Perez-Calatayud, J

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the absorbed dose to the eye lenses due to the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system used to accurately position the patient during head-and-neck image guided procedures. The on-board imaging (OBI) systems (v.1.5) of Clinac iX and TrueBeam (Varian) accelerators were used to evaluate the imparted dose to the eye lenses and some additional points of the head. All CBCT scans were acquired with the Standard-Dose Head protocol from Varian. Doses were measured using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) placed in an anthropomorphic phantom. TLDs were calibrated at the beam quality used to reduce their energy dependence. Average dose to the lens due to the OBI systems of the Clinac iX and the TrueBeam were 0.71  ±  0.07 mGy/CBCT and 0.70  ±  0.08 mGy/CBCT, respectively. The extra absorbed dose received by the eye lenses due to one CBCT acquisition with the studied protocol is far below the 500 mGy threshold established by ICRP for cataract formation (ICRP 2011 Statement on Tissue Reactions). However, the incremental effect of several CBCT acquisitions during the whole treatment should be taken into account. PMID:26457404

  8. High-Precision Radiosurgical Dose Delivery by Interlaced Microbeam Arrays of High-Flux Low-Energy Synchrotron X-Rays

    PubMed Central

    Serduc, Raphaël; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Siegbahn, Erik A.; Bouchet, Audrey; Pouyatos, Benoit; Carron, Romain; Pannetier, Nicolas; Renaud, Luc; Berruyer, Gilles; Nemoz, Christian; Brochard, Thierry; Rémy, Chantal; Barbier, Emmanuel L.; Bravin, Alberto; Le Duc, Géraldine; Depaulis, Antoine; Estève, François; Laissue, Jean A.

    2010-01-01

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is a preclinical form of radiosurgery dedicated to brain tumor treatment. It uses micrometer-wide synchrotron-generated X-ray beams on the basis of spatial beam fractionation. Due to the radioresistance of normal brain vasculature to MRT, a continuous blood supply can be maintained which would in part explain the surprising tolerance of normal tissues to very high radiation doses (hundreds of Gy). Based on this well described normal tissue sparing effect of microplanar beams, we developed a new irradiation geometry which allows the delivery of a high uniform dose deposition at a given brain target whereas surrounding normal tissues are irradiated by well tolerated parallel microbeams only. Normal rat brains were exposed to 4 focally interlaced arrays of 10 microplanar beams (52 µm wide, spaced 200 µm on-center, 50 to 350 keV in energy range), targeted from 4 different ports, with a peak entrance dose of 200Gy each, to deliver an homogenous dose to a target volume of 7 mm3 in the caudate nucleus. Magnetic resonance imaging follow-up of rats showed a highly localized increase in blood vessel permeability, starting 1 week after irradiation. Contrast agent diffusion was confined to the target volume and was still observed 1 month after irradiation, along with histopathological changes, including damaged blood vessels. No changes in vessel permeability were detected in the normal brain tissue surrounding the target. The interlacing radiation-induced reduction of spontaneous seizures of epileptic rats illustrated the potential pre-clinical applications of this new irradiation geometry. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations performed on a human-sized head phantom suggested that synchrotron photons can be used for human radiosurgical applications. Our data show that interlaced microbeam irradiation allows a high homogeneous dose deposition in a brain target and leads to a confined tissue necrosis while sparing surrounding tissues. The use of

  9. Computing patient doses of X-ray examinations using a patient size- and sex-adjustable phantom.

    PubMed

    Rannikko, S; Ermakov, I; Lampinen, J S; Toivonen, M; Karila, K T; Chervjakov, A

    1997-07-01

    Both the use of traditional fluoroscopy and the increasing use of modern digital techniques in radiology and interventional radiology demand the development of versatile computer programs for patient dose determinations. Long computing times restrict the use of Monte Carlo (MC) methods in dose monitoring applications where the radiological views change frequently. In the Organ Doses Calculation Software application (ODS-60), the phantom model is similar in principle to the Alderson-Rando (A-R) phantom, but its sex, size and shape is modified according to a particular patient. Organ and effective doses are computed online (in a few seconds) using a method similar to the traditional dose planning systems used in radiotherapy. In this paper, the new ODS-60 software is presented in detail and its capabilities are demonstrated. Software performance was determined by comparing the results with those from independent methods. In the case of a reference man-sized male, the effective dose was about 7% larger than the effective dose given in another publication. In the case of a reference woman-sized female, the disagreement with the other method was greater (33%). Anatomical differences between the phantom models (ODS-60 and MC) were found to be the main reasons for these findings. This paper shows the advantage of using a patient size- and sex-adaptable phantom for patient dose determinations; the conversion coefficient from entrance surface dose-to-effective dose ratio between male (170 cm, 85 kg) and a female (160 cm, 43 kg) varies in the range 1.5-2. PMID:9245883

  10. Characterization of hydrogenated amorphous germanium compounds obtained by x-ray chemical vapor deposition of germane: Effect of the irradiation dose on optical parameters and structural order

    SciTech Connect

    Arrais, Aldo; Benzi, Paola; Bottizzo, Elena; Demaria, Chiara

    2007-11-15

    Hydrogenated nonstoichiometric germanium materials have been produced by x-ray activated-chemical vapor deposition from germane. The reactions pattern leading to the solid products has been investigated. The dose effect on the composition, the local bonding configuration, and structural characteristics of the deposited solids has been studied using infrared absorption and Raman spectroscopy and has been discussed. Optical parameters have been also determined from ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry data. The results show that the solids are formed by a random bound network of germanium and hydrogen atoms with a-Ge zones dispersed in the matrix. The Raman results and optical parameters indicate that the structural order, both short-range and intermediate-range, decreases with increasing irradiation time. This behavior suggests that the solid is involved in the reactions leading to the final product and indicates that the formation of amorphous germanium zones is stimulated by postdeposition irradiation, which induces compositional and structural modifications.

  11. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-ray? What is Panoramic X-ray? Panoramic radiography , also called panoramic x-ray , is a two- ... Exams Dental Cone Beam CT X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety About this Site ...

  12. Low Dose Studies with Focused X-Rays in cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kathy Held; Kevin Prise; Barry Michael; Melvyn Folkard

    2002-12-14

    The management of the risks of exposure of people to ionizing radiation is important in relation to its uses in industry and medicine, also to natural and man-made radiation in the environment. The vase majority of exposures are at a very low level of radiation dose. The risks are of inducing cancer in the exposed individuals and a smaller risk of inducing genetic damage that can be indicate that they are low. As a result, the risks are impossible to detect in population studies with any accuracy above the normal levels of cancer and genetic defects unless the dose levels are high. In practice, this means that our knowledge depends very largely on the information gained from the follow-up of the survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Japanese cities. The risks calculated from these high-dose short-duration exposures then have to be projected down to the low-dose long-term exposures that apply generally. Recent research using cells in culture has revealed that the relationship between high- and low-dose biological damage may be much more complex than had previously been thought. The aims of this and other projects in the DOE's Low-Dose Program are to gain an understanding of the biological actions of low-dose radiation, ultimately to provide information that will lead to more accurate quantification of low-dose risk. Our project is based on the concept that the processes by which radiation induces cancer start where the individual tracks of radiation impact on cells and tissues. At the dose levels of most low-dose exposures, these events are rare and any individual cells only ''sees'' radiation tracks at intervals averaging from weeks to years apart. This contrasts with the atomic bomb exposures where, on average, each cell was hit by hundreds of tracks instantaneously. We have therefore developed microbeam techniques that enable us to target cells in culture with any numbers of tracks, from one upwards. This approach enables us to study the biological ha sis of

  13. Building X-ray tube based irradiators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The construction of economical x-ray tube based irradiators in a variety of configurations is described using 1000 Watt x-ray tubes. Single tube, double tube, and four tube designs are described, as well as various cabinet construction techniques. Relatively high dose rates were achieved for small s...

  14. Structural changes in mammalian cell DNA induced by low-dose x-ray damage and subsequent postirradiation incubation in the presence and absence of caffeine

    SciTech Connect

    Wun, K.L.W.; Shafer, R.H.

    1982-05-01

    DNA damage and postirradiation incubation effects from X-ray doses of 30-2000 rad delivered to rat 9L cells in vitro were detemined by viscoelastic analysis of neutral (pH 7) cell lysates. Damage studies showed first an increase in the principal viscoelastic retardation time, T, with increasing dose, followed by a decrease, with the maximum retardation time occurring at 1000 rad. Also, the variation of retardation time with increasing postirradiation incubation time at 37/sup 0/C was determined. At doses greater than 50 rad, this variation was quite complicated; e.g., following 100 rad, the retardation time showed a minimum followed by a maximum as a function of incubation time. All doses showed an initial return of T to close to control values at early times. Following 50 rad, control viscoelastic behavior was recovered in 1 hr. For doses of 100 rad and higher, 5 hr or more were required for complete return to control behavior has determined by both the value of T and the viscoelastic response to a probe dose of 200 rad immediately prior to lysis. These results are analyzed in terms of the dependence of the principal retardation time T on DNA molecular weight and conformation. Evidence is discussed indicating that the observed changes in T during postirradiation incubation reflect repair of DNA damage. Postirradiation incubation in the presence of 0.5 mM caffeine appeared to result in an inhibition of repair. In this case, both 30- and 50-rad doses required 5 hr for complete recovery of control behavior and showed the minimum and maximum in the T vs incubation time curve observed for incubation in the absence of caffeine following a dose of 100 rad.

  15. A portable absorbed dose measuring instrument with gamma discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quam, W. M.; Wilde, W. I.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of an electronic instrument for measuring the radiation dose absorbed by tissues are presented. The detector is a sphere of tissue-equivalent plastic with a single wire located on a diameter of the sphere. The electronic circuits and method of operation of the detector are described. Advantages are the small size and easy portability plus ability to selectively measure neutron and gamma plus neutron events.

  16. Low Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Barry D. Michael; Kathryn Held; Kevin Prise

    2002-12-19

    The management of the risks of exposure of people to ionizing radiation is important in relation to its uses in industry and medicine, also to natural and man-made radiation in the environment. The vase majority of exposures are at a very low level of radiation dose. The risks are of inducing cancer in the exposed individuals and a smaller risk of inducing genetic damage that can be transmitted to children conceived after exposure. Studies of these risks in exposed population studies with any accuracy above the normal levels of cancer and genetic defects unless the dose levels are high. In practice, this means that our knowledge depends very largely on the information gained from the follow-up of the survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Japanese cities. The risks calculated from these high-dose short-duration exposures then have to be projected down to the low-dose long-term exposures that apply generally. Recent research using cells in culture has revealed that the relations hi between high- and low-dose biological damage may be much more complex than had previously been thought. The aims of this and other projects in the DOE's Low-Dose Program are to gain an understanding of the biological actions of low-dose radiation, ultimately to provide information that will lead to more accurate quantification of low-dose risk. Our project is based on the concept that the processes by which radiation induces cancer start where the individual tracks of radiation impact on cells and tissues. At the dose levels of most low-dose exposures, these events are rare and any individual cells only ''sees'' radiation tracks at intervals averaging from weeks to years apart. This contracts with the atomic bomb exposures where, on average, each cell was hit by hundreds of tracks instantaneously. We have therefore developed microbeam techniques that enable us to target cells in culture with any number of tracks, from one upwards. This approach enables us to study the biological basis

  17. Dose profile measurement using an imaging plate: Evaluation of filters using Monte Carlo simulation of 4 MV x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Masatoshi; Tomita, Tetsuya; Sawada, Koichi; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Nishio, Teiji; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2009-04-15

    Computed radiography (CR) is gradually replacing film. The application of CR for two-dimensional profiles and off-axis ratio (OAR) measurement using an imaging plate (IP) in a CR system is currently under discussion. However, a well known problem for IPs in dosimetry is that they use high atomic number (Z) materials, such as Ba, which have an energy dependency in a photon interaction. Although there are some reports that it is possible to compensate for the energy dependency with metal filters, the appropriate thicknesses of these filters and where they should be located have not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to find the most suitable filter for use with an IP as a dosimetric tool. Monte Carlo simulation (Geant4 8.1) was used to determine the filter to minimize the measurement error in OAR measurements of 4 MV x-rays. In this simulation, the material and thickness of the filter and distance between the IP and the filter were varied to determine most suitable filter conditions that gave the best fit to the MC calculated OAR in water. With regard to changing the filter material, we found that using higher Z and higher density material increased the effectiveness of the filter. Also, increasing the distance between the filter and the IP reduced the effectiveness, whereas increasing the thickness of the filter increased the effectiveness. The result of this study showed that the most appropriate filter conditions consistent with the calculated OAR in water were the ones with the IP sandwiched between two 2 mm thick lead filters at a distance of 5 mm from the IP or the IP sandwiched directly between two 1 mm lead filters. Using these filters, we measured the OAR at 10 cm depth with 100 cm source-to-surface distance and surface 10x10 cm{sup 2} field size. The results of this measurement represented that it is possible to achieve measurements with less than within 2.0% and 2.0% in the field and with less than 1.1% and 0.6% out of the field by using 2 and

  18. Comparison of patient radiation dose from chest and lumbar spine X-ray examinations in 10 hospitals in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Ofori, E K; Antwi, W K; Arthur, L; Duah, H

    2012-05-01

    This study estimated the patient dose in chest and lumbar spine radiographic examinations in 10 hospitals in Ghana. Dose estimations were done on 1045 patients (aged, 39.6 ± 10.6 y; range 18-85 y) involving 501 (47.9%) males and 544 (52.1%) females for a total of 1495 individual projections. The entrance surface dose (ESD) for the patients was assessed by an indirect method, using the patient's anatomical data and exposure parameters utilised for the specific examination and a Quality Assurance Dose Database software developed by Integrated Radiological Services Ltd in Liverpool, UK. The study showed variations in the ESDs for chest examinations with five of the hospitals having values above the internationally recommended levels. ESDs for lumbar spine anterior-posterior and lateral projections were within acceptable limits. Diagnostic reference levels proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection based on patient dose data are imperative to the current Ghanaian situation and will lead to a reduction of the radiation dose. PMID:21775316

  19. Neutron and X-ray diffraction analysis of the effect of irradiation dose and temperature on microstructure of irradiated HT-9 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosbrucker, P. L.; Brown, D. W.; Anderoglu, O.; Balogh, L.; Maloy, S. A.; Sisneros, T. A.; Almer, J.; Tulk, E. F.; Morgenroth, W.; Dippel, A. C.

    2013-11-01

    Material harvested from several positions within a nuclear fuel duct (the ACO-3 duct) used in a 6-year irradiation of a fuel assembly in the Fast Flux Test Reactor Facility (FFTF) was examined using neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction. Samples with a wide range of irradiation dose and irradiation temperature history, reaching doses of up to 147 dpa and temperatures of up to 777 K, were examined. The response of various microstructural characteristics such as the weight fraction of M23C6 carbides, the dislocation density and character, and the crystallographic texture were determined using whole profile analysis of the diffraction data and related to the macroscopic mechanical behavior. For instance, the dislocation density was observed to be intimately linked with observed flow strength of the irradiated materials, following the Taylor law. In general, at the high doses studied in this work, the irradiation temperature is the predominant controlling factor of the dislocation density and, thus, the flow strength of the irradiated material. The results, representing some of the first diffraction work done on samples exposed to such a high received dose, demonstrate how non-destructive and stand-off diffraction techniques can be used to characterize irradiation induced microstructure and at least estimate mechanical properties in irradiated materials without exposing workers to radiation hazards.

  20. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  1. Insights into the mechanism of X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage in lysozyme crystals based on EPR, optical absorption and X-ray diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Kristin A.; Black, Paul J.; Mercer, Kermit R.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Owen, Robin L.; Snell, Edward H.; Bernhard, William A.

    2013-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage, to confirm a multi-track radiation-damage process and to develop a model of that process. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage. Online UV–visible spectroscopy showed that upon X-irradiation, disulfide radicalization appeared to saturate at an absorbed dose of approximately 0.5–0.8 MGy, in contrast to the saturating dose of ∼0.2 MGy observed using EPR at much lower dose rates. The observations suggest that a multi-track model involving product formation owing to the interaction of two separate tracks is a valid model for radiation damage in protein crystals. The saturation levels are remarkably consistent given the widely different experimental parameters and the range of total absorbed doses studied. The results indicate that even at the lowest doses used for structural investigations disulfide bonds are already radicalized. Multi-track considerations offer the first step in a comprehensive model of radiation damage that could potentially lead to a combined computational and experimental approach to identifying when damage is likely to be present, to quantitate it and to provide the ability to recover the native unperturbed structure.

  2. The effects of pre-emptive low-dose X-ray irradiation on MIA induced inflammatory pain in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, Suk-Chan; Lee, Go-Eun; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Junesun; Lee, Taewoong; Lee, Wonho

    2013-07-01

    This study was performed to determine the effect of pre-emptive low-dose irradiation on the development of inflammatory pain and to characterize the potential mechanisms underlying this effect in osteoarthritis (OA) animal model. Whole-body X-irradiations with 0.1, 0.5, 1 Gy or sham irradiations were performed for 3 days before the induction of ostearthritis with monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) (40 µl, in saline) into the right knee joint in male Sprague Dawley rats. Behavioral tests for arthritic pain including evoked and non-evoked pain were conducted before and after MIA injection and inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) expression level was measured by western blot. Low-dose radiation significantly prevented the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and reduction in weight bearing that is regarded as a behavioral signs of non-evoked pain following MIA injection. Low-dose radiation significantly inhibited the increase in iNOS expression after MIA injection in spinal L3-5 segments in rat. These data suggest that low-dose X-irradiation is able to prevent the development of arthritic pain through modulation of iNOS expression in the spinal cord dorsal horn. Thus, low-dose radiotherapy could be substituted in part for treatment with drugs for patients with chronic inflammatory disease in clinical setting.

  3. Total lymphoid irradiation in rat heart albgrafts: dose, fractionation, and combination with cyclosporin-A. [X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Rynasiewicz, J.J.; Sutherland, D.E.R.; Kawahara, K.; Kim, T.; Najarian, J.S.

    1981-03-01

    The survival or organ allografts is prolonged in mice and rats treated with fractionated, high-dose total lymphoid irradiation (TLI). We have studied the effect of TLI, alone or in combination with donor bone marrow or pharmacologic immunosuppression (cyclosporin-A: CY-A), on the survival of heterotopic rat heart allografts. Specifically, we evaluated the generalized immunosuppressive effect of TLI as a function of accumulated dose and fractionation schedule. In addition, TLI and CY-A were used individually in schedules that by themselves gave only moderate graft prolongation and then subsequently in sequential combination.

  4. Symbiotic stars in X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2013-11-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of nine white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that had previously been detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The nine new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. The Swift/XRT telescope detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component that we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component that probably originates in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e., a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the α/β/γ classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new δ classification

  5. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  6. Radiation Exposure in X-Ray and CT Examinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... procedures. See the X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety page for more information. top of page ... and Radiation Safety X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Videos related to Radiation Dose in X- ...

  7. Radiolytic yield of ozone in air for low dose neutron and x-ray/gamma-ray radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, J.; Su, S.; Blakeley, R. E.; Koonath, P.; Hecht, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation ionizes surrounding air and produces molecular species, and these localized effects may be used as a signature of, and for quantification of, radiation. Low-level ozone production measurements from radioactive sources have been performed in this work to understand radiation chemical yields at low doses. The University of New Mexico AGN-201 M reactor was used as a tunable radiation source. Ozone levels were compared between reactor-on and reactor-off conditions, and differences (0.61 to 0.73 ppb) well below background levels were measured. Simulations were performed to determine the dose rate distribution and average dose rate to the air sample within the reactor, giving 35 mGy of mixed photon and neutron dose. A radiation chemical yield for ozone of 6.5±0.8 molecules/100 eV was found by a variance weighted average of the data. The different contributions of photons and neutrons to radiolytic ozone production are discussed.

  8. Reduction of absorbed doses in radiography of the facial skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, P.; Kraepelien, T.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation absorbed doses from radiography of the paranasal sinuses and the facial skeleton were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) on a phantom head using high-sensitivity screens in an Orbix stand. The entrance doses to the skin of the head ranged from 0.31 to 2.9 mGy per exposure. The absorbed dose from a full series of sinus exposures averaged 0.33 mGy for the oral mucous membrane, 0.33 mGy for the maxillary sinus mucous membrane, 0.11 mGy for the parotid gland, 0.15 mGy for the submandibular gland, 0.61 mGy for the eye lens, and 0.75 mGy for the thyroid gland region. A leaded soft collar adapted to the thyroid region reduced the thyroid doses by more than one order of magnitude, but also reduced the image field. The mean energy imparted from a full series of paranasal sinus projections was 4.8 mJ and from a total series of the facial skeleton, 7.9 mJ.

  9. The absorbed dose to blood from blood-borne activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänscheid, H.; Fernández, M.; Lassmann, M.

    2015-01-01

    The radiation absorbed dose to blood and organs from activity in the blood is relevant for nuclear medicine dosimetry and for research in biodosimetry. The present study provides coefficients for the average absorbed dose rates to the blood from blood-borne activity for radionuclides frequently used in targeted radiotherapy and in PET diagnostics. The results were deduced from published data for vessel radius-dependent dose rate coefficients and reasonable assumptions on the blood-volume distribution as a function of the vessel radius. Different parts of the circulatory system were analyzed separately. Vessel size information for heart chambers, aorta, vena cava, pulmonary artery, and capillaries was taken from published results of morphometric measurements. The remaining blood not contained in the mentioned vessels was assumed to reside in fractal-like vascular trees, the smallest branches of which are the arterioles or venules. The applied vessel size distribution is consistent with recommendations of the ICRP on the blood-volume distribution in the human. The resulting average absorbed dose rates to the blood per nuclear disintegration per milliliter (ml) of blood are (in 10-11 Gy·s-1·Bq-1·ml) Y-90: 5.58, I-131: 2.49, Lu-177: 1.72, Sm-153: 2.97, Tc-99m: 0.366, C-11: 4.56, F-18: 3.61, Ga-68: 5.94, I-124: 2.55. Photon radiation contributes 1.1-1.2·10-11 Gy·s-1·Bq-1·ml to the total dose rate for positron emitters but significantly less for the other nuclides. Blood self-absorption of the energy emitted by ß-particles in the whole blood ranges from 37% for Y-90 to 80% for Tc-99m. The correspondent values in vascular trees, which are important for the absorbed dose to organs, range from 30% for Y-90 to 82% for Tc-99m.

  10. Calculation of size specific dose estimates (SSDE) value at cylindrical phantom from CBCT Varian OBI v1.4 X-ray tube EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation based

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, M.; Pratama, D.; Anam, C.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this research was to calculate Size Specific Dose Estimates (SSDE) generated by the varian OBI CBCT v1.4 X-ray tube working at 100 kV using EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code used in this simulation was divided into two parts. Phase space file data resulted by the first part simulation became an input to the second part. This research was performed with varying phantom diameters of 5 to 35 cm and varying phantom lengths of 10 to 25 cm. Dose distribution data were used to calculate SSDE values using trapezoidal rule (trapz) function in a Matlab program. SSDE obtained from this calculation was compared to that in AAPM report and experimental data. It was obtained that the normalization of SSDE value for each phantom diameter was between 1.00 and 3.19. The normalization of SSDE value for each phantom length was between 0.96 and 1.07. The statistical error in this simulation was 4.98% for varying phantom diameters and 5.20% for varying phantom lengths. This study demonstrated the accuracy of the Monte Carlo technique in simulating the dose calculation. In the future, the influence of cylindrical phantom material to SSDE would be studied.

  11. [Slow Formation and Degradation of γH2AX Foci in Human Skin Fibroblasts Exposed to Low-Dose X-Ray Radiation].

    PubMed

    Grekhova, A K; Eremin, P S; Osipov, A N; Eremin, I I; Pustovalova, M V; Ozerov, I V; Smetanina, N M; Lazareva, N L; Vorobyeva, N Yu; Pulin, A A; Maksimova, O A; Gordeev, A V; Bushmanov, A Yu; Kotenko, K V

    2015-01-01

    It was shown that the kinetics of changes of γH2AX foci number (marker of DNA double-strand breaks) in human skin fibroblasts after exposure to low doses of X-ray radiation (20, 40 and 80 mGy) differs from that observed after exposure to medium-low doses (160 and 240 mGy). After exposure to 160 and 240 mGy the highest number of γH2AX foci was detected at 30 min after exposure (first experimental point) and further their decrease was observed. At the same time we observed a fast phase of repair (upto 4 h), in which there was a decrease of the foci amount to ~50-60% and a slow phase of repair (from 4 h to 24 h). After 24 h only ~3-5% of the foci amount observed at 30 min after irradiation was left. After exposure to low doses, the foci number did not decrease during 2 h and even 24 h after exposure their amount was ~25% from that observed at maximum points (1 h after irradiation at 40 and 80 mGy and 2 h after irradiation at 20 mGy). PMID:26601539

  12. X-ray phase-contrast methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lider, V. V. Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2013-11-15

    This review is devoted to a comparative description of the methods for forming X-ray phase-contrast images of weakly absorbing (phase) objects. These include the crystal interferometer method, the Talbot interferometer method, diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging, and the in-line method. The potential of their practical application in various fields of science and technology is discussed. The publications on the development and optimization of X-ray phase-contrast methods and the experimental study of phase objects are analyzed.

  13. The symbiosis of variable absorption and blurred reflection in the X-ray-absorbed Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 4151

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuchert, T.; Markowitz, A.; Dauser, T.; García, J.; Keck, M.; Brenneman, L.; Zdziarski, A.; Wilms, J.; Kadler, M.

    2016-06-01

    We present results on time resolved spectroscopy of the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 4151. Suzaku, NuSTAR and XMM-Newton observations from mid 2011 until the end of 2012 reveal significant variability in absorption by intermediately ionized gas on various time-scales. The soft X-rays, on the other hand, stay rather constant, favoring emission from large-scale, diffuse gas. The soft emission lines are consistent with high resolution spectroscopic studies of the extended emission resolved with Chandra gratings. We extend on recent work by Keck et al., who modeled relativistically blurred, reflected disk emission in a 150 ks Suzaku/NuSTAR observation from 2012. They explored multiple emitting/reflecting components in the context of the "lamppost" geometry. We perform additional testing of blurred disk reflection in NGC 4151, using Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations. We use the latest version of RELXILL, which incorporates a fully angle-resolved treatment of ionized reflection in combination with a thermal Comptonization continuum.

  14. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Stearns, Daniel S.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  15. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  16. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    A skeletal x-ray is an imaging test used to look at the bones. It is used to detect fractures , tumors, or ... in the health care provider's office by an x-ray technologist. You will lie on a table or ...

  17. Extremity x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An extremity x-ray is an image of the hands, wrist, feet, ankle, leg, thigh, forearm humerus or upper arm, hip, shoulder ... term "extremity" often refers to a human limb. X-rays are a form of radiation that passes through ...

  18. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  19. Influence of eye size and beam entry angle on dose to non-targeted tissues of the eye during stereotactic x-ray radiosurgery of AMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantley, Justin L.; Hanlon, Justin; Chell, Erik; Lee, Choonsik; Smith, W. Clay; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2013-10-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a leading cause of vision loss for the elderly population of industrialized nations. The IRay® Radiotherapy System, developed by Oraya® Therapeutics, Inc., is a stereotactic low-voltage irradiation system designed to treat the wet form of the disease. The IRay System uses three robotically positioned 100 kVp collimated photon beams to deliver an absorbed dose of up to 24 Gy to the macula. The present study uses the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX to assess absorbed dose to six non-targeted tissues within the eye—total lens, radiosensitive tissues of the lens, optic nerve, distal tip of the central retinal artery, non-targeted portion of the retina, and the ciliary body--all as a function of eye size and beam entry angle. The ocular axial length was ranged from 20 to 28 mm in 2 mm increments, with the polar entry angle of the delivery system varied from 18° to 34° in 2° increments. The resulting data showed insignificant variations in dose for all eye sizes. Slight variations in the dose to the optic nerve and the distal tip of the central retinal artery were noted as the polar beam angle changed. An increase in non-targeted retinal dose was noted as the entry angle increased, while the dose to the lens, sensitive volume of the lens, and ciliary body decreased as the treatment polar angle increased. Polar angles of 26° or greater resulted in no portion of the sensitive volume of the lens receiving an absorbed dose of 0.5 Gy or greater. All doses to non-targeted structures reported in this study were less than accepted thresholds for post-procedure complications.

  20. A comparison of intensity modulated x-ray therapy to intensity modulated proton therapy for the delivery of non-uniform dose distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Ryan

    2007-12-01

    The distribution of biological characteristics such as clonogen density, proliferation, and hypoxia throughout tumors is generally non-uniform, therefore it follows that the optimal dose prescriptions should also be non-uniform and tumor-specific. Advances in intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) technology have made the delivery of custom-made non-uniform dose distributions possible in practice. Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) has the potential to deliver non-uniform dose distributions as well, while significantly reducing normal tissue and organ at risk dose relative to IMXT. In this work, a specialized treatment planning system was developed for the purpose of optimizing and comparing biologically based IMXT and IMPT plans. The IMXT systems of step-and-shoot (IMXT-SAS) and helical tomotherapy (IMXT-HT) and the IMPT systems of intensity modulated spot scanning (IMPT-SS) and distal gradient tracking (IMPT-DGT), were simulated. A thorough phantom study was conducted in which several subvolumes, which were contained within a base tumor region, were boosted or avoided with IMXT and IMPT. Different boosting situations were simulated by varying the size, proximity, and the doses prescribed to the subvolumes, and the size of the phantom. IMXT and IMPT were also compared for a whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) case, in which a brain metastasis was simultaneously boosted and the hippocampus was avoided. Finally, IMXT and IMPT dose distributions were compared for the case of non-uniform dose prescription in a head and neck cancer patient that was based on PET imaging with the Cu(II)-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone (Cu-ATSM) hypoxia marker. The non-uniform dose distributions within the tumor region were comparable for IMXT and IMPT. IMPT, however, was capable of delivering the same non-uniform dose distributions within a tumor using a 180° arc as for a full 360° rotation, which resulted in the reduction of normal tissue integral dose by a factor of

  1. X-ray monochromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An x-ray monochromator is described, wherin a housing supports a plurality of mirrors forming a plurality of opposed mirror faces in parallel with each other and having thereon multilayer coatings, with each of said pairs of mirror faces being provided with identical coatings which are different from the coatings on the other pairs of mirror faces such that each pair of mirror faces has a peak x-ray reflection at a different wavelength regime. The housing is moveable to bring into a polychromatic x-ray beam that pair of mirror faces having the best x-ray reflection for the desired wavelength, with the mirrors being pivotable to move the mirror faces to that angle of incidence at which the peak reflectivity of the desired wavelength x-rays occurs.

  2. Strontium-89 therapy: measurement of absorbed dose to skeletal metastases.

    PubMed

    Blake, G M; Zivanovic, M A; Blaquiere, R M; Fine, D R; McEwan, A J; Ackery, D M

    1988-04-01

    We report measurements of absorbed dose to vertebral metastases in ten patients referred for 89Sr therapy for disseminated prostatic carcinoma. Patients received a tracer dose of 85Sr at the time of 89Sr treatment and metastatic strontium retention was monitored scintigraphically for 6 mo. Metastatic 85Sr activity corrected for tissue attenuation was measured using the conjugate view principle, with special care taken to eliminate errors due to the selection of the metastatic region of interest. Metastatic volume was determined from high resolution CT images, and density inferred from Hounsfield number using the QCT bone mineral calibration of Genant and Cann. The mean absorbed dose was 850 rad/mCi (23 cGy/MBq) with a range from 220-2260 rad/mCi (6 to 61 cGy/MBq). The wide range found was consistent with the variation expected to arise due to differences in strontium renal plasma clearance (range 0.1-11.81/day) and extent of skeletal metastatic disease (varying from two small metastases to a superscan on [99mTc]MDP images) among the patients studied. PMID:3351609

  3. Radiation environments and absorbed dose estimations on manned space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, S. B.; Atwell, W.; Beever, R.; Hardy, A.

    In order to make an assessment of radiation risk during manned missions in space, it is necessary first to have as accurate an estimation as possible of the radiation environment within the spacecraft to which the astronauts will be exposed. Then, with this knowledge and the inclusion of body self-shielding, estimations can be made of absorbed doses for various body organs (skin, eye, blood-forming organs, etc.). A review is presented of our present knowledge of the radiation environments and absorbed doses expected for several space mission scenarios selected for our development of the new radiation protection guidelines. The scenarios selected are a 90-day mission at an altitude (450 km) and orbital inclinations (28.5°, 57° and 90°) appropriate for NASA's Space Station, a 15-day sortie to geosynchronous orbit and a 90-day lunar mission. All scenarios chosen yielded dose equivalents between five and ten rem to the blood forming organs if no large solar particle event were encountered. Such particle events could add considerable exposure particularly to the skin and eye for all scenarios except the one at 28.5° orbital inclination.

  4. Radiation dose optimized lateral expansion of the field of view in synchrotron radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Haberthür, David; Hintermüller, Christoph; Marone, Federica; Schittny, Johannes C.; Stampanoni, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Volumetric data at micrometer level resolution can be acquired within a few minutes using synchrotron-radiation-based tomographic microscopy. The field of view along the rotation axis of the sample can easily be increased by stacking several tomograms, allowing the investigation of long and thin objects at high resolution. On the contrary, an extension of the field of view in the perpendicular direction is non-trivial. This paper presents an acquisition protocol which increases the field of view of the tomographic dataset perpendicular to its rotation axis. The acquisition protocol can be tuned as a function of the reconstruction quality and scanning time. Since the scanning time is proportional to the radiation dose imparted to the sample, this method can be used to increase the field of view of tomographic microscopy instruments while optimizing the radiation dose for radiation-sensitive samples and keeping the quality of the tomographic dataset on the required level. This approach, dubbed wide-field synchrotron radiation tomographic microscopy, can increase the lateral field of view up to five times. The method has been successfully applied for the three-dimensional imaging of entire rat lung acini with a diameter of 4.1 mm at a voxel size of 1.48 µm. PMID:20724780

  5. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top ...

  6. X-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

  7. Red bone marrow doses, integral absorbed doses, and somatically effective dose equivalent from four maxillary occlusal projections

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, T.I.; Wohni, T.

    1984-02-01

    Phantom measurements of red bone marrow (RBM) doses, integral absorbed doses, and somatically effective dose equivalent (SEDE) from four different maxillary occlusal projections are presented. For each projection, different combinations of focus-skin distances and tube potentials were compared with regard to the patient's radiation load. The axial incisal view produced the highest patient exposures, with a maximum red bone marrow dose of 122.5 microGy/exposure, integral absorbed dose of 8.6 mJ/exposure, and SEDE values of 39.6 microSv/exposure. The corresponding values from the frontal, lateral occlusal, and tuber views ranged between 4% and 44% of the axial incisal view values for the integral absorbed dose and SEDE values, and between 0.3% and 3% for the red bone marrow doses. Increasing the focus-skin distance from 17.5 cm to 27 cm is accompanied by a 24% to 30% reduction in integral absorbed dose. Increasing the tube potential from 50 kV to 65 kV likewise results in a 23% reduction in absorbed energy.

  8. Analysis of the Central X-ray Source in DG Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, P. Christian; Schmitt, Jürgen H. M. M.

    As a stellar X-ray source DG Tau shows two rather unusual features: A resolved X-ray jet [2] and an X-ray spectrum best described by two thermal components with different absorbing column densities, a so called "two-absorber X-ray (TAX)" morphology [1, 2]. In an effort to understand the properties of the central X-ray source in DG Tau a detailed position analysis was carried out.

  9. Observation of femtosecond X-ray interactions with matter using an X-ray-X-ray pump-probe scheme.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ichiro; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Kameshima, Takashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Owada, Shigeki; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Takashi; Hara, Toru; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-02-01

    Resolution in the X-ray structure determination of noncrystalline samples has been limited to several tens of nanometers, because deep X-ray irradiation required for enhanced resolution causes radiation damage to samples. However, theoretical studies predict that the femtosecond (fs) durations of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses make it possible to record scattering signals before the initiation of X-ray damage processes; thus, an ultraintense X-ray beam can be used beyond the conventional limit of radiation dose. Here, we verify this scenario by directly observing femtosecond X-ray damage processes in diamond irradiated with extraordinarily intense (∼10(19) W/cm(2)) XFEL pulses. An X-ray pump-probe diffraction scheme was developed in this study; tightly focused double-5-fs XFEL pulses with time separations ranging from sub-fs to 80 fs were used to excite (i.e., pump) the diamond and characterize (i.e., probe) the temporal changes of the crystalline structures through Bragg reflection. It was found that the pump and probe diffraction intensities remain almost constant for shorter time separations of the double pulse, whereas the probe diffraction intensities decreased after 20 fs following pump pulse irradiation due to the X-ray-induced atomic displacement. This result indicates that sub-10-fs XFEL pulses enable conductions of damageless structural determinations and supports the validity of the theoretical predictions of ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions. The X-ray pump-probe scheme demonstrated here would be effective for understanding ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions, which will greatly stimulate advanced XFEL applications, such as atomic structure determination of a single molecule and generation of exotic matters with high energy densities. PMID:26811449

  10. Resonant X-ray emission with a standing wave excitation

    PubMed Central

    Ruotsalainen, Kari O.; Honkanen, Ari-Pekka; Collins, Stephen P.; Monaco, Giulio; Moretti Sala, Marco; Krisch, Michael; Hämäläinen, Keijo; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2016-01-01

    The Borrmann effect is the anomalous transmission of x-rays in perfect crystals under diffraction conditions. It arises from the interference of the incident and diffracted waves, which creates a standing wave with nodes at strongly absorbing atoms. Dipolar absorption of x-rays is thus diminished, which makes the crystal nearly transparent for certain x-ray wave vectors. Indeed, a relative enhancement of electric quadrupole absorption via the Borrmann effect has been demonstrated recently. Here we show that the Borrmann effect has a significantly larger impact on resonant x-ray emission than is observable in x-ray absorption. Emission from a dipole forbidden intermediate state may even dominate the corresponding x-ray spectra. Our work extends the domain of x-ray standing wave methods to resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy and provides means for novel spectroscopic experiments in d- and f-electron systems. PMID:26935531

  11. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  12. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  13. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... The test is done in a hospital radiology department or in the health care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  14. Bone cartilage imaging with x-ray interferometry using a practical x-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, Kazuhiro; Makifuchi, Chiho; Kiyohara, Junko; Itou, Tsukasa; Honda, Chika; Momose, Atsushi

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to design an X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometer for the imaging of bone cartilage using a practical X-ray tube and to develop that imaging system for clinical use. Wave-optics simulation was performed to design the interferometer with a practical X-ray tube, a source grating, two X-ray gratings, and an X-ray detector. An imaging system was created based on the results of the simulation. The specifications were as follows: the focal spot size was 0.3 mm of an X-ray tube with a tungsten anode (Toshiba, Tokyo, Japan). The tube voltage was set at 40 kVp with an additive aluminum filter, and the mean energy was 31 keV. The pixel size of the X-ray detector, a Condor 486 (Fairchild Imaging, California, USA), was 15 μm. The second grating was a Ronchi-type grating whose pitch was 5.3 μm. Imaging performance of the system was examined with X-ray doses of 0.5, 3 and 9 mGy so that the bone cartilage of a chicken wing was clearly depicted with X-ray doses of 3 and 9 mGy. This was consistent with the simulation's predictions. The results suggest that X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometry would be a promising tool in detecting soft tissues in the human body such as bone cartilage for the X-ray image diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Further optimization of the system will follow to reduce the X-ray dose for clinical use.

  15. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  16. Images of single X-ray photons from X-ray phosphor screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    Photographs show the efficiency and resolution characteristics of single X-ray photons converted to optical photons in a variety of commercial X-ray phosphor screens. The recording system uses a cooled, two-stage image intensifier system with fiber optics coupling to the phosphor screen. High efficiencies in the energy range 20-100 keV with position resolution of the order 200 microns are readily achievable, although the sensitive area is presently limited. Potential applications include X-ray astronomy, high-speed X-ray diffractometry, and extremely low dose radiography.

  17. Update of diagnostic medical and dental x-ray exposures in Romania.

    PubMed

    Sorop, Ioana; Mossang, Daniela; Iacob, Mihai Radu; Dadulescu, Elena; Iacob, Olga

    2008-12-01

    This national study, the third in the last 15 years, updates the magnitude of medical radiation exposure from conventional x-ray examinations, in order to optimise the radiological protection to the population in a cost-effective manner. Effective doses from diagnostic radiology were estimated for adult and paediatric patients undergoing the 20 most important types of x-ray examination. Data were collected from 179 x-ray departments, selected by their annual workload, throughout the country. Estimates were made using two dosimetric quantities: entrance surface dose, derived from the absorbed dose in air measured by simulation of radiographic examinations, and dose-area product, measured during fluoroscopic examinations performed on adult and paediatric patients. Conversion coefficients to effective dose of the UK National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) have been used in all calculations. The effective dose per patient from all medical x-ray examinations was 0.74 mSv and the resulting annual collective effective dose was 6930 man Sv, with annual effective dose per caput of 0.33 mSv. The current size of population exposure from diagnostic radiology is lower than the previous one by 40%, but could be about 30% higher by taking into account the estimated contribution from computed tomography (CT) procedures. PMID:19029586

  18. A simple and fast physics-based analytical method to calculate therapeutic and stray doses from external beam, megavoltage x-ray therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Lydia J; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2015-01-01

    State-of-the-art radiotherapy treatment planning systems provide reliable estimates of the therapeutic radiation but are known to underestimate or neglect the stray radiation exposures. Most commonly, stray radiation exposures are reconstructed using empirical formulas or lookup tables. The purpose of this study was to develop the basic physics of a model capable of calculating the total absorbed dose both inside and outside of the therapeutic radiation beam for external beam photon therapy. The model was developed using measurements of total absorbed dose in a water-box phantom from a 6 MV medical linear accelerator to calculate dose profiles in both the in-plane and cross-plane direction for a variety of square field sizes and depths in water. The water-box phantom facilitated development of the basic physical aspects of the model. RMS discrepancies between measured and calculated total absorbed dose values in water were less than 9.3% for all fields studied. Computation times for 10 million dose points within a homogeneous phantom were approximately 4 minutes. These results suggest that the basic physics of the model are sufficiently simple, fast, and accurate to serve as a foundation for a variety of clinical and research applications, some of which may require that the model be extended or simplified based on the needs of the user. A potentially important advantage of a physics-based approach is that the model is more readily adaptable to a wide variety of treatment units and treatment techniques than with empirical models. PMID:26040833

  19. A simple and fast physics-based analytical method to calculate therapeutic and stray doses from external beam, megavoltage x-ray therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagetic, Lydia J.; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2015-06-01

    State-of-the-art radiotherapy treatment planning systems provide reliable estimates of the therapeutic radiation but are known to underestimate or neglect the stray radiation exposures. Most commonly, stray radiation exposures are reconstructed using empirical formulas or lookup tables. The purpose of this study was to develop the basic physics of a model capable of calculating the total absorbed dose both inside and outside of the therapeutic radiation beam for external beam photon therapy. The model was developed using measurements of total absorbed dose in a water-box phantom from a 6 MV medical linear accelerator to calculate dose profiles in both the in-plane and cross-plane direction for a variety of square field sizes and depths in water. The water-box phantom facilitated development of the basic physical aspects of the model. RMS discrepancies between measured and calculated total absorbed dose values in water were less than 9.3% for all fields studied. Computation times for 10 million dose points within a homogeneous phantom were approximately 4 min. These results suggest that the basic physics of the model are sufficiently simple, fast, and accurate to serve as a foundation for a variety of clinical and research applications, some of which may require that the model be extended or simplified based on the needs of the user. A potentially important advantage of a physics-based approach is that the model is more readily adaptable to a wide variety of treatment units and treatment techniques than with empirical models.

  20. A simple and fast physics-based analytical method to calculate therapeutic and stray doses from external beam, megavoltage x-ray therapy.

    PubMed

    Jagetic, Lydia J; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2015-06-21

    State-of-the-art radiotherapy treatment planning systems provide reliable estimates of the therapeutic radiation but are known to underestimate or neglect the stray radiation exposures. Most commonly, stray radiation exposures are reconstructed using empirical formulas or lookup tables. The purpose of this study was to develop the basic physics of a model capable of calculating the total absorbed dose both inside and outside of the therapeutic radiation beam for external beam photon therapy. The model was developed using measurements of total absorbed dose in a water-box phantom from a 6 MV medical linear accelerator to calculate dose profiles in both the in-plane and cross-plane direction for a variety of square field sizes and depths in water. The water-box phantom facilitated development of the basic physical aspects of the model. RMS discrepancies between measured and calculated total absorbed dose values in water were less than 9.3% for all fields studied. Computation times for 10 million dose points within a homogeneous phantom were approximately 4 min. These results suggest that the basic physics of the model are sufficiently simple, fast, and accurate to serve as a foundation for a variety of clinical and research applications, some of which may require that the model be extended or simplified based on the needs of the user. A potentially important advantage of a physics-based approach is that the model is more readily adaptable to a wide variety of treatment units and treatment techniques than with empirical models. PMID:26040833

  1. Medical X-Rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnostic X-Ray Equipment Compliance Program Guidance Manual CP 7386.003 Field Compliance Testing of Diagnostic (Medical) ... and Exporting Electronic Products Compliance Program Guidance Manual CP 7386.003 Field Compliance Testing of Diagnostic (Medical) ...

  2. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... or impacted teeth The presence and extent of dental caries (cavities) Bone damage (such as from periodontitis ) Abscessed ... Dental x-rays can reveal dental cavities (tooth decay) before they ... take yearly bitewings for the early development of cavities.

  3. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to look for: Fractures or broken bone Cancer that has spread to other areas of the ... 2014:chap 8. Read More Bone tumor Broken bone Cancer Metastasis Osteomyelitis X-ray Update Date 5/9/ ...

  4. X-Ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  5. Abdominal x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    An abdominal x-ray is an imaging test to look at organs and structures in the abdomen. Organs include the spleen, stomach, and intestines. When the test is done to look at the bladder and kidney structures, ...

  6. X-Ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews instrumental developments and technique improvements in X-ray spectrometry, grouped into major topic areas of excitation, dispersion and detection, instrumentation and techniques, and quantitative analyses. Cites 162 references. (CS)

  7. Bone x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... or broken bone Bone tumors Degenerative bone conditions Osteomyelitis (inflammation of the bone caused by an infection) ... Multiple myeloma Osgood-Schlatter disease Osteogenesis imperfecta Osteomalacia Osteomyelitis Paget disease of the bone Rickets X-ray ...

  8. Compressed-sensing (CS)-based digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) reconstruction for low-dose, accurate 3D breast X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yeonok; Cho, Hyosung; Je, Uikyu; Hong, Daeki; Lee, Minsik; Park, Chulkyu; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo

    2014-08-01

    In practical applications of three-dimensional (3D) tomographic techniques, such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), computed tomography (CT), etc., there are often challenges for accurate image reconstruction from incomplete data. In DBT, in particular, the limited-angle and few-view projection data are theoretically insufficient for exact reconstruction; thus, the use of common filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithms leads to severe image artifacts, such as the loss of the average image value and edge sharpening. One possible approach to alleviate these artifacts may employ iterative statistical methods because they potentially yield reconstructed images that are in better accordance with the measured projection data. In this work, as another promising approach, we investigated potential applications to low-dose, accurate DBT imaging with a state-of-the-art reconstruction scheme based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory. We implemented an efficient CS-based DBT algorithm and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the imaging characteristics. We successfully obtained DBT images of substantially very high accuracy by using the algorithm and expect it to be applicable to developing the next-generation 3D breast X-ray imaging system.

  9. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    This final report covers the period 1 January 1985 - 31 March 1992. It is divided into the following sections: the soft x-ray background; proportional counter and filter calibrations; sounding rocket flight preparations; new sounding rocket payload: x-ray calorimeter; and theoretical studies. Staff, publications, conference proceedings, invited talks, contributed talks, colloquia and seminars, public service lectures, and Ph. D. theses are listed.

  10. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... Gillard JH, Schaefer-Prokop CM, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 6th ed. New ...

  11. 5.8 X-ray Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2008-01-01

    X-ray calorimeter instruments for astrophysics have seen rapid development since they were invented in 1984. The prime instrument on all currently planned X-ray spectroscopic observatories is based on calorimeter technology. This relatively simple detection concept that senses the energy of an incident photon by measuring the temperature rise of an absorber material at very low temperatures, can form the basis of a very high performance, non-dispersive spectrometer. State-of-the-art calorimeter instruments have resolving powers of over 3000, large simultaneous band-passes, and near unit efficiency. This coupled with the intrinsic imaging capability of a pixilated x-ray calorimeter array, allows true spectral-spatial instruments to be constructed. In this chapter I briefly review the detection scheme, the state-of-the-art in X-ray calorimeter instruments and the future outlook for this technology.

  12. Dual-energy bone densitometry using a single 100 ns x-ray pulse.

    PubMed

    Seely, J F; Boyer, C N; Holland, G E

    1998-10-01

    A pulsed, portable hard x-ray source has been developed for medical imaging and flash x-ray absorptiometry. The source is powered by a Marx generator that drives a field emission x-ray tube which produces a 30-300 keV x-ray pulse of 100 ns duration. The x-ray fluence has dual-energy properties. The x-ray energy is relatively high early in the pulse and lower later in the pulse. The feasibility of using a single x-ray pulse for precision bone densitometry was analyzed. A computer simulation model was developed for the x-ray source, the filtration that enhances the dual-energy distribution, the absorption of the energy distribution by bone mineral and soft tissue, and the dual-energy detection system. It is feasible to determine the bone mineral density (BMD) of axial sites such as the lumbar spine and proximal femur with 2% precision over an area that is 15-20 mm in size, depending on the bone mineral and soft tissue thicknesses. An algorithm for determining the absolute BMD, to an accuracy of 2%, using a Plexiglas/TiO2 calibration phantom is discussed. At a distance of 50 cm from the source, the patient exposure is 3.7 mR. The average absorbed bone and tissue doses are 0.6 and 4.3 mrem, respectively. Factors that facilitate diagnostic measurements in clinical settings are the short patient observation time and the portability of the x-ray source. PMID:9800712

  13. A new x-ray scatter reduction method based on frequency division multiplexing x-ray imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Chang, S.; Lu, J. P.; Zhou, O.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray scatter may significantly degrade imaging performance in x-ray radiography applications, including flatpanel detector-based x-ray imaging, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT (CBCT), primarily due to their large projection field sizes. It results in soft tissue contrast reduction, potentially severe image artifacts, and increased patient dose. Several different approaches have been developed to reject the scatter contributions, including analytical calculation, empirical algorithms, Monte-Carlo simulation, blocker based measurement, and slot scan technique. We recently developed a new x-ray scatter rejection method based on nanotechnology-enabled frequency division multiplexing x-ray (FDMX) imaging technique. The key enabling technology is the carbon nanotube (CNT)-based multi-beam field emission x-ray (MBFEX) source technology. The proposed FDMX imaging system has a MBFEX source with an array of x-ray tubes. The x-ray radiation from each individual x-ray tube is modulated at a certain given frequency. The collimated x-ray beams passed through the object and were captured by a high speed x-ray detector. A demultiplexing algorithm was applied to reject the scatter radiation from the primary radiation based on their different modulation frequencies. The x-ray images generated by the FDMX imaging technique clearly demonstrated improved imaging quality in terms of lower scatter-to-primary-ratio (SPR) and higher contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR). It shows great potential of improving x-ray imaging performance and reducing patient dose.

  14. X-ray source for mammography

    DOEpatents

    Logan, C.M.

    1994-12-20

    An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radi