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Sample records for absorbed x-ray dose

  1. Absorbed dose assessment in newborns during x-ray examinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taipe, Patricia K.; Berrocal, Mariella J.; Carita, Raúl F.

    2012-02-01

    Often a newborn presents breathing problems during the early days of life, i.e. bronchopneumonia, wich are caused in most of cases, by aspirating a mixture of meconium and amniotic fluid. In these cases, it is necessary to make use of a radiograph, requested by the physician to reach a diagnosis. This paper seeks to evaluate the absorbed doses in neonates undergoing a radiograph. For this reason we try to simulate the real conditions in a X-ray room from Lima hospitals. With this finality we perform a simulation made according a questionnaire related to technical data of X-ray equipment, distance between the source and the neonate, and its position to be irradiated. The information obtained has been used to determine the absorbed dose by infants, using the MCNP code. Finally, the results are compared with reference values of international health agencies.

  2. [Absorbed dose conversion factors obtained from X-ray spectra measured at water phantom surface].

    PubMed

    Aoki, Kiyoshi; Koyama, Masaki

    2005-03-20

    The absorbed dose conversion factor for X-rays at the water phantom surface has been obtained from the measured spectra. These measurements have been made at tube voltages of 60 kV to 120 kV and field sizes ranging from 5 x 5 cm(2) to 30 x 30 cm(2) with and without additional 2 mm aluminium filtration. A small silicon diode detector with little angular dependence was used for this measurement. The absorbed dose conversion factor obtained was 0.03-0.43% smaller than that obtained from the primary X-ray spectrum. The difference was large for high-voltage and heavily filtered X-rays. As field size increases, the conversion factor decreases, but the decrease is slight when field size exceeds 20 x 20 cm(2). The absorbed dose conversion factor obtained from the primary or surface X-ray spectrum is 0.4-1.8% larger than that obtained from the effective energy of primary X-rays. The difference is large in high-voltage X-rays and decreases slightly with increases in field size.

  3. Absorbed Dose Determination Using Experimental and Analytical Predictions of X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Carruth, Ralph (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Electron beam welding in a vacuum is a technology that NASA is investigating as a joining technique for manufacture of space structures. This investigation characterizes the x-ray environment due to operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool and provides recommendations for adequate shielding for astronauts performing the in-vacuum electron beam welding. NASA, in a joint venture with the Russian Space Agency, was scheduled to perform a series of welding in space experiments on board the U.S. Space Shuttle. This series of experiments was named the international space welding experiment (ISWE). The hardware associated with the ISWE was leased to NASA by the Paton Welding Institute (PWI) in Ukraine for ground-based welding experiments in preparation for flight. Two ground tests were scheduled, using the ISWE electron beam welding tool, to characterize the radiation exposure to an astronaut during the operation of the ISWE. These radiation exposure tests used thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's) shielded with material currently used by astronauts during extravehicular activities to measure the radiation dose. The TLD's were exposed to x-ray radiation generated by operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. This investigation was the first known application of TLD's to measure absorbed dose from x rays of energy less than 10 keV. The ISWE hardware was returned to Ukraine before the issue of adequate shielding for the astronauts was completely verified. Therefore, alternate experimental and analytical methods were developed to measure and predict the x-ray spectral and intensity distribution generated by ISWE electron beam impact with metal. These x-ray spectra were normalized to an equivalent ISWE exposure, then used to calculate the absorbed radiation dose to astronauts. These absorbed dose values were compared to TLD measurements obtained during actual operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. The calculated absorbed dose

  4. Absorbed XFEL Dose in the Components of the LCLS X-Ray Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Hau-Riege, Stefan

    2010-12-03

    There is great concern that the short, intense XFEL pulse of the LCLS will damage the optics that will be placed into the beam. We have analyzed the extent of the problem by considering the anticipated materials and position of the optical components in the beam path, calculated the absorbed dose as a function of photon energy, and compared these doses with the expected doses required (i) to observe rapid degradation due to thermal fatigue, (ii) to reach the melting temperature, or (iii) to actually melt the material. We list the materials that are anticipated to be placed into the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) beam line, their positions, and the absorbed dose, and compare this dose with anticipated damage thresholds.

  5. Absorbed dose distributions for X-ray beams and beams of electrons from the Therac 20 Saturne linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Tronc, D; Noël, A

    1978-11-01

    After a brief description of the Therac 20 Saturne linear accelerator a complete set of absorbed-dose distribution values is given. These values define the depths on the axis as a function of the depth dose and define the penumbra (as characterized by the positions of the intersections of the isodose curves with planes parallel to the phantom surface) for beams of X-rays and for beams of electrons. Tissue-maximum ratios are given for beams of X-rays. Analytical values for the electron depth dose curve are compared with the values obtained on the Sagittaire linear accelerator.

  6. Absorbed dose measurements of a handheld 50 kVP X-ray source in water with thermoluminescence dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Soares, Christopher; Drupieski, Chris; Wingert, Brian; Pritchett, Garey; Pagonis, Vasilis; O'Brien, Michelle; Sliski, Alan; Bilski, Pawel; Olko, Pawel

    2006-01-01

    Absorbed dose rate measurements of a 50 kV(p) handheld X-ray probe source in a water phantom are described. The X-ray generator is capable of currents of up to 40 microA, and is designed for cranial brachytherapy and intraoperative applications with applicators. The measurements were performed in a computer-controlled water phantom in which both the source and the detectors are mounted. Two different LiF thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) phosphors were employed for the measurements, MTS-N (LiF:Mg,Ti) and MCP-N (LiF:Mg,Cu,P). Two small ionisation chambers (0.02 and 0.0053 cm(3)) were also employed. The TLDs and chambers were positioned in watertight mounts made of water-equivalent plastic. The chambers were calibrated in terms of air-kerma rate, and conventional protocols were used to convert the measurements to absorbed dose rate. The TLDs were calibrated at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in terms of absorbed dose rate using a (60)Co teletherapy beam and narrow-spectrum X-ray beams. For the latter, absorbed dose was inferred from air-kerma rate using calculated air-kerma-to-dose conversion factors. The reference points of the various detectors were taken as the center of the TLD volumes and the entrance windows of the ionisation chambers. Measurements were made at distances of 3-45 mm from the detector reference point to the source center. In addition, energy dependence of response measurements of the TLDs used was made using NIST reference narrow spectrum X-ray beams. Measurement results showed reasonable agreement in absorbed dose rate determined from the energy dependence corrected TLD readings and from the ionisation chambers. Volume averaging effects of the TLDs at very close distances to the source were also evident.

  7. Study of the formalism used to determine the absorbed dose for low-energy x-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Chica, U; Anguiano, M; Lallena, A M

    2008-12-07

    We have studied the procedure commonly recommended by dosimetry protocols for the determination of the absorbed dose in water for low-energy x-rays beams, generated with potentials up to 150 kVp. X-ray beams with different spectra obtained with the XCOMP5R code were transported using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE in order to calculate backscatter factors and mass-energy absorption coefficients. We have analyzed the uncertainty in the absorbed doses, calculated using the half-value layer to characterize the x-ray beams, due to the uncertainties in both backscatter factors and mass-energy absorption coefficients. We have found that this uncertainty is larger than 5% and can reach values above 11% for some HVL(1) values. The characterization of these doses with the homogeneity coefficient or the generating potential, in addition to the half-value layer is also studied. Using HVL(1) and the kVp, the absorbed dose to water can be reproduced to within 3% for all spectra.

  8. Absorbed dose-to-water protocol applied to synchrotron-generated x-rays at very high dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, P.; Crosbie, J. C.; Cornelius, I.; Berkvens, P.; Donzelli, M.; Clavel, A. H.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.

    2016-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a new radiation treatment modality in the pre-clinical stage of development at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European synchrotron radiation facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. MRT exploits the dose volume effect that is made possible through the spatial fractionation of the high dose rate synchrotron-generated x-ray beam into an array of microbeams. As an important step towards the development of a dosimetry protocol for MRT, we have applied the International Atomic Energy Agency’s TRS 398 absorbed dose-to-water protocol to the synchrotron x-ray beam in the case of the broad beam irradiation geometry (i.e. prior to spatial fractionation into microbeams). The very high dose rates observed here mean the ion recombination correction factor, k s , is the most challenging to quantify of all the necessary corrections to apply for ionization chamber based absolute dosimetry. In the course of this study, we have developed a new method, the so called ‘current ramping’ method, to determine k s for the specific irradiation and filtering conditions typically utilized throughout the development of MRT. Using the new approach we deduced an ion recombination correction factor of 1.047 for the maximum ESRF storage ring current (200 mA) under typical beam spectral filtering conditions in MRT. MRT trials are currently underway with veterinary patients at the ESRF that require additional filtering, and we have estimated a correction factor of 1.025 for these filtration conditions for the same ESRF storage ring current. The protocol described herein provides reference dosimetry data for the associated Treatment Planning System utilized in the current veterinary trials and anticipated future human clinical trials.

  9. Absorbed dose measurements in dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA).

    PubMed

    Bezakova, E; Collins, P J; Beddoe, A H

    1997-02-01

    In this study a predominantly film dosimetric method was used to measure the effective dose from posteroanterior (PA) lumbar spine and proximal femur scans performed on a Lunar DPX-L machine. Because of the very low dose rate in scanning mode, the depth dose data were determined using a stationary detector configuration. The characteristic curve for the film (Kodak TMAT-H) was obtained and depth dose measurements were made using slabs of "solid water". The film was calibrated using a superficial X-ray unit (calibrated against a standard traceable to a national standard). To assess the change in film response with beam hardening at depth, the film was exposed to calibration beams of different half value layer (HVL). The HVL of the DXA beam was determined for surface and depth doses using aluminium filters and a diamond detector (an energy independent device). All measurements were performed three times. Beam size was measured using film, and the scan areas and times were determined by scanning phantoms. The dose from a scan was calculated using Dsc = DTscAb/Asc, where D = dose rate (stationary), Tsc = scan time, Ab = beam area, and Asc = scan area. Organ doses were determined using an anatomical atlas and ICRP 23 female reference. All film measurements had good precision (coefficient of variation < 4%). There was little variation in film sensitivity with change in HVL (< 1% change for the first three HVLs) and consequently no corrections were applied to the depth dose data. Skin entrance dose was 11.5 microGy. Effective dose in females was 0.19 microSv for the PA lumbar spine. For the proximal femur scan, the effective dose was 0.14 microSv (ovaries included) and 0.023 microSv (ovaries excluded) for pre-menopausal and pos-menopausal women, respectively.

  10. Absorbed dose determination in kilovoltage X-ray synchrotron radiation using alanine dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Butler, D J; Lye, J E; Wright, T E; Crossley, D; Sharpe, P H G; Stevenson, A W; Livingstone, J; Crosbie, J C

    2016-12-01

    Alanine dosimeters from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK were irradiated using kilovoltage synchrotron radiation at the imaging and medical beam line (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron. A 20 × 20 mm(2) area was irradiated by scanning the phantom containing the alanine through the 1 mm × 20 mm beam at a constant velocity. The polychromatic beam had an average energy of 95 keV and nominal absorbed dose to water rate of 250 Gy/s. The absorbed dose to water in the solid water phantom was first determined using a PTW Model 31014 PinPoint ionization chamber traceable to a graphite calorimeter. The alanine was read out at NPL using correction factors determined for (60)Co, traceable to NPL standards, and a published energy correction was applied to correct for the effect of the synchrotron beam quality. The ratio of the doses determined by alanine at NPL and those determined at the synchrotron was 0.975 (standard uncertainty 0.042) when alanine energy correction factors published by Waldeland et al. (Waldeland E, Hole E O, Sagstuen E and Malinen E, Med. Phys. 2010, 37, 3569) were used, and 0.996 (standard uncertainty 0.031) when factors by Anton et al. (Anton M, Büermann L., Phys Med Biol. 2015 60 6113-29) were used. The results provide additional verification of the IMBL dosimetry.

  11. A fibre optic scintillator dosemeter for absorbed dose measurements of low-energy X-ray-emitting brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Sliski, Alan; Soares, Christopher; Mitch, Michael G

    2006-01-01

    A newly developed dosemeter using a 0.5 mm diameter x 0.5 mm thick cylindrical plastic scintillator coupled to the end of a fibre optic cable is capable of measuring the absorbed dose rate in water around low-activity, low-energy X-ray emitters typically used in prostate brachytherapy. Recent tests of this dosemeter showed that it is possible to measure the dose rate as a function of distance in water from 2 to 30 mm of a (103)Pd source of air-kerma strength 3.4 U (1 U = 1 microGy m(2) h(-1)), or 97 MBq (2.6 mCi) apparent activity, with good signal-to-noise ratio. The signal-to-noise ratio is only dependent on the integration time and background subtraction. The detector volume is enclosed in optically opaque, nearly water-equivalent materials so that there is no polar response other than that due to the shape of the scintillator volume chosen, in this case cylindrical. The absorbed dose rate very close to commercial brachytherapy sources can be mapped in an automated water phantom, providing a 3-D dose distribution with sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The sensitive volume of the detector is 0.5 mm from the end of the optically opaque waterproof housing, enabling measurements at very close distances to sources. The sensitive detector electronics allow the measurement of very low dose rates, as exist at centimeter distances from these sources. The detector is also applicable to mapping dose distributions from more complex source geometries such as eye applicators for treating macular degeneration.

  12. MONTE CARLO STUDY OF THE CARDIAC ABSORBED DOSE DURING X-RAY EXAMINATION OF AN ADULT PATIENT.

    PubMed

    Kadri, O; Manai, K; Alfuraih, A

    2016-12-01

    The computational voxel phantom 'High-Definition Reference Korean-Man (HDRK-Man)' was implemented into the Monte Carlo transport toolkit Geant4. The voxel model, adjusted to the Reference Korean Man, is 171 cm in height and 68 kg in weight and composed of ∼30 million voxels whose size is 1.981 × 1.981 × 2.0854 mm(3) The Geant4 code is then utilised to compute the dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) expressed in absorbed dose per air kerma free in air for >30 tissues and organs, including almost all organs required in the new recommendation of the ICRP 103, due to a broad parallel beam of monoenergetic photons impinging in antero-postero direction with energy ranging from 10 to 150 keV. The computed DCCs of different organs are found to be in good agreement with data published using other simulation codes. Also, the influence of patient size on DCC values was investigated for a representative body size of the adult Korean patient population. The study was performed using five different sizes covering the range of 0.8-1.2 magnification order of the original HDRK-Man. It focussed on the computation of DCC for the human heart. Moreover, the provided DCCs were used to present an analytical parameterisation for the calculation of the cardiac absorbed dose for any arbitrary X-ray spectrum and for those patient sizes. Thus, the present work can be considered as an enhancement of the continuous studies performed by medical physicist as part of quality control tests and radiation protection dosimetry. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Absorbed dose distribution for X-ray beams and beams of electrons from the Therac 10 Neptune linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Tronc, D; Gayet, P

    1980-02-01

    After a brief presentation of the Therac 10 Neptune linear accelerator a complete set of dose distribution numerical values is given. These values define the depths on the axis as a function of the depth dose and define the penumbra (as characterized by the positions of the isodose curve intersections with parallel planes to the phantom surface) for beams of X-rays and for beams of electrons. Measurements of residual X-rays are given for a 10 MeV beam of electrons.

  14. First international comparison of primary absorbed dose to water standards in the medium-energy X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büermann, Ludwig; Guerra, Antonio Stefano; Pimpinella, Maria; Pinto, Massimo; de Pooter, Jacco; de Prez, Leon; Jansen, Bartel; Denoziere, Marc; Rapp, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the results of the first international comparison of primary measurement standards of absorbed dose to water for the medium-energy X-ray range. Three of the participants (VSL, PTB, LNE-LNHB) used their existing water calorimeter based standards and one participant (ENEA) recently developed a new standard based on a water-graphite calorimeter. The participants calibrated three transfer chambers of the same type in terms of absorbed dose to water (NDw) and in addition in terms of air kerma (NK) using the CCRI radiation qualities in the range 100 kV to 250 kV. The additional NK values were intended to be used for a physical analysis of the ratios NDw/NK. All participants had previously participated in the BIPM.RI(I)-K3 key comparison of air kerma standards. Ratios of pairs of NMI's NK results of the current comparison were found to be consistent with the corresponding key comparison results within the expanded uncertainties of 0.6 % - 1 %. The NDw results were analysed in terms of the degrees of equivalence with the comparison reference values which were calculated for each beam quality as the weighted means of all results. The participant's results were consistent with the reference value within the expanded uncertainties. However, these expanded uncertainties varied significantly and ranged between about 1-1.8 % for the water calorimeter based standards and were estimated at 3.7 % for the water-graphite calorimeter. It was shown previously that the ratios NDw/NK for the type of ionization chamber used as transfer chamber in this comparison were very close (within less than 1 %) to the calculated values of (bar muen/ρ)w,ad, the mean values of the water-to-air ratio of the mass-energy-absorption coefficients at the depth d in water. Some of the participant's results deviated significantly from the expected behavior. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of

  15. Structural changes caused by radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis: the effect of X-ray absorbed dose in a fungal multicopper oxidase.

    PubMed

    De la Mora, Eugenio; Lovett, Janet E; Blanford, Christopher F; Garman, Elspeth F; Valderrama, Brenda; Rudino-Pinera, Enrique

    2012-05-01

    X-ray radiation induces two main effects at metal centres contained in protein crystals: radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis and a resulting decrease in metal occupancy. In blue multicopper oxidases (BMCOs), the geometry of the active centres and the metal-to-ligand distances change depending on the oxidation states of the Cu atoms, suggesting that these alterations are catalytically relevant to the binding, activation and reduction of O(2). In this work, the X-ray-determined three-dimensional structure of laccase from the basidiomycete Coriolopsis gallica (Cg L), a high catalytic potential BMCO, is described. By combining spectroscopic techniques (UV-Vis, EPR and XAS) and X-ray crystallography, structural changes at and around the active copper centres were related to pH and absorbed X-ray dose (energy deposited per unit mass). Depletion of two of the four active Cu atoms as well as low occupancies of the remaining Cu atoms, together with different conformations of the metal centres, were observed at both acidic pH and high absorbed dose, correlating with more reduced states of the active coppers. These observations provide additional evidence to support the role of flexibility of copper sites during O(2) reduction. This study supports previous observations indicating that interpretations regarding redox state and metal coordination need to take radiation effects explicitly into account.

  16. Structural changes caused by radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis: the effect of X-ray absorbed dose in a fungal multicopper oxidase

    PubMed Central

    De la Mora, Eugenio; Lovett, Janet E.; Blanford, Christopher F.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Valderrama, Brenda; Rudino-Pinera, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    X-ray radiation induces two main effects at metal centres contained in protein crystals: radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis and a resulting decrease in metal occupancy. In blue multicopper oxidases (BMCOs), the geometry of the active centres and the metal-to-ligand distances change depending on the oxidation states of the Cu atoms, suggesting that these alterations are catalytically relevant to the binding, activation and reduction of O2. In this work, the X-ray-determined three-dimensional structure of laccase from the basidiomycete Coriolopsis gallica (Cg L), a high catalytic potential BMCO, is described. By combining spectroscopic techniques (UV–Vis, EPR and XAS) and X-ray crystallography, structural changes at and around the active copper centres were related to pH and absorbed X-­ray dose (energy deposited per unit mass). Depletion of two of the four active Cu atoms as well as low occupancies of the remaining Cu atoms, together with different conformations of the metal centres, were observed at both acidic pH and high absorbed dose, correlating with more reduced states of the active coppers. These observations provide additional evidence to support the role of flexibility of copper sites during O2 reduction. This study supports previous observations indicating that interpretations regarding redox state and metal coordination need to take radiation effects explicitly into account. PMID:22525754

  17. A graphite calorimeter for absolute measurements of absorbed dose to water: application in medium-energy x-ray filtered beams.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M; Pimpinella, M; Quini, M; D'Arienzo, M; Astefanoaei, I; Loreti, S; Guerra, A S

    2016-02-21

    The Italian National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology (ENEA-INMRI) has designed and built a graphite calorimeter that, in a water phantom, has allowed the determination of the absorbed dose to water in medium-energy x-rays with generating voltages from 180 to 250 kV. The new standard is a miniaturized three-bodies calorimeter, with a disc-shaped core of 21 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness weighing 1.134 g, sealed in a PMMA waterproof envelope with air-evacuated gaps. The measured absorbed dose to graphite is converted into absorbed dose to water by means of an energy-dependent conversion factor obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. Heat-transfer correction factors were determined by FEM calculations. At a source-to-detector distance of 100 cm, a depth in water of 2 g cm(-2), and at a dose rate of about 0.15 Gy min(-1), results of calorimetric measurements of absorbed dose to water, D(w), were compared to experimental determinations, D wK, obtained via an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of air kerma, according to established dosimetry protocols. The combined standard uncertainty of D(w) and D(wK) were estimated as 1.9% and 1.7%, respectively. The two absorbed dose to water determinations were in agreement within 1%, well below the stated measurement uncertainties. Advancements are in progress to extend the measurement capability of the new in-water-phantom graphite calorimeter to other filtered medium-energy x-ray qualities and to reduce the D(w) uncertainty to around 1%. The new calorimeter represents the first implementation of in-water-phantom graphite calorimetry in the kilovoltage range and, allowing independent determinations of D(w), it will contribute to establish a robust system of absorbed dose to water primary standards for medium-energy x-ray beams.

  18. The LNE-LNHB water calorimeter for primary measurement of absorbed dose at low depth in water: application to medium-energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Rapp, B; Perichon, N; Denoziere, M; Daures, J; Ostrowsky, A; Bordy, J-M

    2013-05-07

    Water calorimeters are used to establish absorbed dose standards in several national metrology laboratories involved in ionizing radiation dosimetry. These calorimeters have been first used in high-energy photons of (60)Co or accelerator beams, where the depth of measurement in water is large (5 or 10 cm). The LNE-LNHB laboratory has developed a specific calorimeter which makes measurements at low depth in water (down to 0.5 cm) easier, in order to fulfil the reference conditions required by the international dosimetry protocols for medium-energy x-rays. This new calorimeter was first used to measure the absorbed dose rate in water at a depth of 2 cm for six medium-energy x-ray reference beams with a tube potential from 80 to 300 kV. The relative combined standard uncertainty obtained on the absorbed dose rate to water is lower than 0.8%. An overview of the design of the calorimeter is given, followed by a detailed description of the calculation of the correction factors and the calorimetric measurements.

  19. Structural changes caused by radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis: the effect of X-ray absorbed dose in a fungal multicopper oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    De la Mora, Eugenio; Lovett, Janet E.; Blanford, Christopher F.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Valderrama, Brenda; Rudino-Pinera, Enrique

    2012-05-01

    Radiation-induced reduction, radiolysis of copper sites and the effect of pH value together with the concomitant geometrical distortions of the active centres were analysed in several fungal (C. gallica) laccase structures collected at cryotemperature. This study emphasizes the importance of careful interpretation when the crystallographic structure of a metalloprotein is described. X-ray radiation induces two main effects at metal centres contained in protein crystals: radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis and a resulting decrease in metal occupancy. In blue multicopper oxidases (BMCOs), the geometry of the active centres and the metal-to-ligand distances change depending on the oxidation states of the Cu atoms, suggesting that these alterations are catalytically relevant to the binding, activation and reduction of O{sub 2}. In this work, the X-ray-determined three-dimensional structure of laccase from the basidiomycete Coriolopsis gallica (Cg L), a high catalytic potential BMCO, is described. By combining spectroscopic techniques (UV–Vis, EPR and XAS) and X-ray crystallography, structural changes at and around the active copper centres were related to pH and absorbed X-ray dose (energy deposited per unit mass). Depletion of two of the four active Cu atoms as well as low occupancies of the remaining Cu atoms, together with different conformations of the metal centres, were observed at both acidic pH and high absorbed dose, correlating with more reduced states of the active coppers. These observations provide additional evidence to support the role of flexibility of copper sites during O{sub 2} reduction. This study supports previous observations indicating that interpretations regarding redox state and metal coordination need to take radiation effects explicitly into account.

  20. Impact of X-ray energy on absorbed dose assessed with Monte Carlo simulations in a mouse tumor and in nearest organs irradiated with kilovoltage X-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, M; Mimi, M; Bentourkia, M

    2017-05-01

    Radiotherapy treatments to local tumors are always associated with dose deposit in surrounding tissues and even in distant tissues not traversed by the radiation beams. In the present work, we demonstrate by Monte Carlo simulations the impact of radiation energy on absorbed dose in a lung tumor and in other secondary organs in a digital mouse. We also report the energy difference between simulations of monoenergetic and spectral radiations, and between CT-based and atlas-made digital mouse. We simulated seven monoenergetic and spectral radiation beams from 50keV (or kVp) to 450keV (or kVp). For each energy mode, the beams were generated along seven angles converging on the tumor. We assessed the absorbed dose in ten volumes including the lungs, the heart and the spine. The results showed an increase of absorbed dose as a function of energy with a lowest dose at 100keV. In the secondary organs not traversed by the beams, the spinal cord received doses of 0.78% and 0.07%, and the spinal bone received 2.36% and 0.35% relative to those in the tumor, respectively at 50keV and at 450keV. A region in the heart not traversed by the beams received 2% of the dose to the tumor. The optimal energy to the tumor with relatively reduced doses to other organs was achieved at energies around 200keV. At these energies, the surrounding of the tumor received lesser doses. Monoenergetic radiations were found to be more appropriate to target the tumor than spectral radiations produced by X-ray tubes, and CT-based digital mouse was more realistic than atlas-based mouse since it accounts for tissue heterogeneity. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Calorimetric determination of the absorbed dose to water for medium-energy x-rays with generating voltages from 70 to 280 kV.

    PubMed

    Krauss, A; Büermann, L; Kramer, H-M; Selbach, H-J

    2012-10-07

    For medium energy x-rays produced with tube voltages from 70 to 280 kV, the absorbed dose to water, D(w), has been determined by means of water calorimetry with relative standard uncertainties ranging from 0.45% to 0.98% at 280 and 70 kV. The results were confirmed by Monte Carlo calculations, in which the ratios of D(w) at 5 cm depth in a reference water phantom to the air kerma free in air, K(a), at the same point in space were compared to the corresponding ratios determined experimentally. The general agreement between measurement and calculation was better than 1%. These results confirm earlier investigations in which the absorbed dose to graphite was determined by means of a graphite extrapolation chamber. For the Monte Carlo calculations, an attempt was made to present a complete uncertainty budget, taking into account type B contributions also.

  2. Evaluation of the absorbed dose to the breast using radiochromic film in a dedicated CT mammotomography system employing a quasi-monochromatic x-ray beam.

    PubMed

    Crotty, Dominic J; Brady, Samuel L; Jackson, D'Vone C; Toncheva, Greta I; Anderson, Colin E; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Tornai, Martin P

    2011-06-01

    A dual modality SPECT-CT prototype system dedicated to uncompressed breast imaging (mammotomography) has been developed. The computed tomography subsystem incorporates an ultrathick K-edge filtration technique producing a quasi-monochromatic x-ray cone beam that optimizes the dose efficiency of the system for lesion imaging in an uncompressed breast. Here, the absorbed dose in various geometric phantoms and in an uncompressed and pendant cadaveric breast using a normal tomographic cone beam imaging protocol is characterized using both thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements and ionization chamber-calibrated radiochromic film. Initially, two geometric phantoms and an anthropomorphic breast phantom are filled in turn with oil and water to simulate the dose to objects that mimic various breast shapes having effective density bounds of 100% fatty and glandular breast compositions, respectively. Ultimately, an excised human cadaver breast is tomographically scanned using the normal tomographic imaging protocol, and the dose to the breast tissue is evaluated and compared to the earlier phantom-based measurements. Measured trends in dose distribution across all breast geometric and anthropomorphic phantom volumes indicate lower doses in the medial breast and more proximal to the chest wall, with consequently higher doses near the lateral peripheries and nipple regions. Measured doses to the oil-filled phantoms are consistently lower across all volume shapes due to the reduced mass energy-absorption coefficient of oil relative to water. The mean measured dose to the breast cadaver, composed of adipose and glandular tissues, was measured to be 4.2 mGy compared to a mean whole-breast dose of 3.8 and 4.5 mGy for the oil- and water-filled anthropomorphic breast phantoms, respectively. Assuming rotational symmetry due to the tomographic acquisition exposures, these results characterize the 3D dose distributions in an uncompressed human breast tissue volume for this

  3. Constraining MHD Disk-Winds with X-ray Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Tombesi, F.; Shrader, C. R.; Kazanas, D.; Contopoulos, J.; Behar, E.

    2014-01-01

    From the state-of-the-art spectroscopic observations of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) the robust features of absorption lines (e.g. most notably by H/He-like ions), called warm absorbers (WAs), have been often detected in soft X-rays (< 2 keV). While the identified WAs are often mildly blueshifted to yield line-of-sight velocities up to ~100-3,000 km/sec in typical X-ray-bright Seyfert 1 AGNs, a fraction of Seyfert galaxies such as PG 1211+143 exhibits even faster absorbers (v/ 0.1-0.2) called ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) whose physical condition is much more extreme compared with the WAs. Motivated by these recent X-ray data we show that the magnetically- driven accretion-disk wind model is a plausible scenario to explain the characteristic property of these X-ray absorbers. As a preliminary case study we demonstrate that the wind model parameters (e.g. viewing angle and wind density) can be constrained by data from PG 1211+143 at a statistically significant level with chi-squared spectral analysis. Our wind models can thus be implemented into the standard analysis package, XSPEC, as a table spectrum model for general analysis of X-ray absorbers.

  4. The X-ray Absorber in the X-ray Transient NLS1 WPVS 007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupe, Dirk

    This proposal is for a funding request for an approved XMM-Newton observations of the X-ray transient Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxy WPVS 007. The request is for 4 month of salary for the PI for one year in order to do the data analysis, publish the results, and attend an international AGN meeting. XMM will observe WPVS 007 in June 2010 simultaneously with HST, Chandra, and Swift. The goal is to establish a tight connection between the UV broad absorption line troughs found in FUSE observations and the strong partial covering absorber feature found by Swift. WPVS 007 showed a dramatic transformation into a Broad Absorption line QSO like AGN between a 1996 HST observation and a 2003 FUSE observation. Several Swift monitoring observations have suggested that the absorber may have started to disappear. Therefore it is crucial for our HST COS UV spectroscopy to know what the status of the X-ray absorber is. The XMM observation will provide a well-exposed X-ray spectrum even if WPVS 007 will be in a low flux state. This spectrum will enable us to put constraints on the absorption column density and covering fraction of the partial covering absorber.

  5. Fast Ionized X-ray Absorbers in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, K.; Tombesi, F.; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C.; Behar, E.; Contopoulos, I.

    2015-07-01

    We present a study of X-ray ionization of MHD accretion-disk wind models in an effort to explain the highly-ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) identified as X-ray absorbers recently detected in various sub-classes of Seyfert AGNs. Our primary focus is to show that magnetically-driven outflows are physically plausible candidates to account for the AGN X-ray spectroscopic observations. We calculate its X-ray ionization and the ensuing X-ray absorption line spectra in comparison with an XXM-Newton/EPIC spectrum of the narrow-line Seyfert AGN, PG 1211+143. We find, through identifying the detected features with Fe Kα transitions, that the absorber has a characteristic ionization parameter of log(xi[erg cm/s]) = 5-6 and a hydrogen-equivalent column density on the order of 1e23 cm-2, outflowing at a sub-relativistic velocity of v/c = 0.1-0.2. The best-fit model favors its radial location at R = 200 Rs (Rs is the Schwarzschild radius), with a disk inner truncation radius at Rt = 30Rs. The overall K-shell feature in data is suggested to be dominated by Fe XXV with very little contribution from Fe XXVI and weakly-ionized iron, which is in a good agreement with a series of earlier analysis of the UFOs in various AGNs including PG 1211+143.

  6. X-Ray Absorbed, Broad-Lined, Red AGN and the Cosmic X-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Wilkes, Belinda

    2005-01-01

    We have obtained XMM spectra for five red, 2MASS AGN, selected from a sample observed by Chandra to be X-ray bright and to cover a range of hardness ratios. Our results confirm the presence of substantial absorbing material in three sources which have optical classifications ranging from Type 1 to Type 2, with an intrinsically flat (hard) power law continuum indicated in the other two. The presence of both X-ray absorption and broad optical emission lines with the usual strength suggests either a small (nuclear) absorber or a favored viewing angle so as to cover the X-ray source but not the broad emission line region (BELR). A soft excess is detected in all three Type 1 sources. We speculate that this soft X-ray emission may arise in an extended region of ionized gas, perhaps linked with the polarized (scattered) light which is a feature of these sources. The spectral complexity revealed by XMM emphasizes the limitations of the low S/N Chandra data. Overall, the new XMM results strengthen our conclusions (Wilkes et al. 2002) that the observed X-ray continua of red AGN are unusually hard at energies greater than 2 keV. Whether due to substantial line-of-sight absorption or to an intrinsically hard or reflection-dominated spectrum, these 'red' AGN have an observed spectral form consistent with contributing significantly to the missing had absorbed population of the Cosmic X-ray Background (CXRB). When absorption and or reflection is taken into account, all these AGN have power law slopes typical of broad-line (Type 1) AGN (Gamma approximately 1.9). This appears to resolve the spectral paradox which for so long has existed between the CXRB and the AGN thought to be the dominant contributors. It also suggests two scenarios whereby Type 1 AGN/QSOs may be responsible for a significant fraction of the CXRB at energies above 2 keV: 1) X-ray absorbed AGN/QSOs with visible broad emission lines; 2) AGN/QSOs with complex spectra whose hardness greater than 2 keV is not

  7. Dose in x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kalender, Willi A

    2014-02-07

    Radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) has become a topic of high interest due to the increasing numbers of CT examinations performed worldwide. This review aims to present an overview of current concepts for both scanner output metrics and for patient dosimetry and will comment on their strengths and weaknesses. Controversial issues such as the appropriateness of the CT dose index (CTDI) are discussed in detail. A review of approaches to patient dose assessment presently in practice, of the dose levels encountered and options for further dose optimization are also given and discussed. Patient dose assessment remains a topic for further improvement and for international consensus. All approaches presently in use are based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Estimates for effective dose are established, but they are crude and not patient-specific; organ dose estimates are rarely available. Patient- and organ-specific dose estimates can be provided with adequate accuracy and independent of CTDI phantom measurements by fast MC simulations. Such information, in particular on 3D dose distributions, is important and helpful in optimization efforts. Dose optimization has been performed very successfully in recent years and even resulted in applications with effective dose values of below 1 mSv. In general, a trend towards lower dose values based on technical innovations has to be acknowledged. Effective dose values are down to clearly below 10 mSv on average, and there are a number of applications such as cardiac and pediatric CT which are performed routinely below 1 mSv on modern equipment.

  8. X-ray and radioiodine dose to thyroid follicular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Faw, R.E. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Eckerman, K.F.; Ryman, J.C. )

    1991-01-01

    Radiation doses to the epithelial cells of thyroid follicles have been calculated for internal exposure by radionuclides of iodine and by secondary radiations created as a result of interactions of externally administered x rays with iodine naturally occurring in the thyroid. Calculations were performed for the thyroids of subjects ranging from the newborn to the adult male. Results for internal radionuclides are reported as the dose rate to follicular-cell nuclei per unit specific activity of the radionuclide in the thyroid as a whole, i.e., as the specific S value'' as used in the MIRD method for internal dosimetry. Results for x rays are reported as the response function, i.e., the absorbed dose per unit fluence of primary x rays. Dose rates are subdivided into internal and external components, the former from radiations emitted within the colloid volume of any one follicle, and the latter from radiations emitted throughout the thyroid in follicles surrounding that one follicle. 37 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Optimization of X-ray Absorbers for TES Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyomoto, Naoko; Sadleir, John E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Saab, Tarek; Bandler, Simon; Kilbourne, Caroline; Chervenak, James; Talley, Dorothy; Finkbeiner, Fred; Brekosky, Regis

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the thermal, electrical, and structural properties of Bi and BiCu films that are being developed as X-ray absorbers for transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter arrays for imaging X-ray spectroscopy. Bi could be an ideal material for an X-ray absorber due to its high X-ray stopping power and low heat capacity, but it has a low thermal conductivity, which can result in position dependence of the pulses in the absorber. In order to improve the thermal conductivity, we added Cu layers in between the Bi layers. We measured electrical and thermal conductivities of the films around 0.1 K(sub 1) the operating temperature of the TES calorimeter, to examine the films and to determine the optimal thickness of the Cu layer. From the electrical conductivity measurements, we found that the Cu is more resistive on the Bi than on a Si substrate. Together with an SEM picture of the Bi surface, we concluded that the rough surface of the Bi film makes the Cu layer resistive when the Cu layer is not thick enough t o fill in the roughness. From the thermal conductivity measurements, we determined the thermal diffusion constant to be 2 x l0(exp 3) micrometers squared per microsecond in a film that consists of 2.25 micrometers of Bi and 0.1 micrometers of Cu. We measured the position dependence in the film and found that its thermal diffusion constant is too low to get good energy resolution, because of the resistive Cu layer and/or possibly a very high heat capacity of our Bi films. We show plans to improve the thermal diffusion constant in our BiCu absorbers.

  10. Comparison between absorbed dose to water standards established by water calorimetry at the LNE-LNHB and by application of international air-kerma based protocols for kilovoltage medium energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Perichon, N; Rapp, B; Denoziere, M; Daures, J; Ostrowsky, A; Bordy, J-M

    2013-05-07

    Nowadays, the absorbed dose to water for kilovoltage x-ray beams is determined from standards in terms of air-kerma by application of international dosimetry protocols. New standards in terms of absorbed dose to water has just been established for these beams at the LNE-LNHB, using water calorimetry, at a depth of 2 cm in water in accordance with protocols. The aim of this study is to compare these new standards in terms of absorbed dose to water, to the dose values calculated from the application of four international protocols based on air-kerma standards (IAEA TRS-277, AAPM TG-61, IPEMB and NCS-10). The acceleration potentials of the six beams studied are between 80 and 300 kV with half-value layers between 3.01 mm of aluminum and 3.40 mm of copper. A difference between the two methods smaller than 2.1% was reported. The standard uncertainty of water calorimetry being below 0.8%, and the one associated with the values from protocols being around 2.5%, the results are in good agreement. The calibration coefficients of some ionization chambers in terms of absorbed dose to water, established by application of calorimetry and air-kerma based dosimetry protocols, were also compared. The best agreement with the calibration coefficients established by water calorimetry was found for those established with the AAPM TG-61 protocol.

  11. Survival of mammalian cells exposed to ultrahigh dose rates from a laser-produced plasma x-ray source.

    PubMed

    Tillman, C; Grafström, G; Jonsson, A C; Jönsson, B A; Mercer, I; Mattsson, S; Strand, S E; Svanberg, S

    1999-12-01

    To determine whether intense laser-produced x rays have an increased radiation hazard. Mammalian cells were exposed to x rays from a laser-produced plasma that produced ultrahigh peak absorbed dose rates, up to a factor of 10(10) higher than those produced by conventional x rays used in imaging. The cell survival was studied as a function of the absorbed dose. The survival of mammalian cells exposed to high peak absorbed dose rates with laser-produced x rays was compared with the survival of cells exposed to standard absorbed dose rates with conventional x-ray sources. Comparative survival studies were performed by using a conventional x-ray tube and a cobalt 60 source. The absorbed doses in the irradiation field were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters. Cell survival following irradiation by filtered, laser-produced x rays with a high dose rate was not markedly different from the survival following irradiation by conventional sources. There was, however, a notable difference between the survival after exposure to filtered, laser-produced x rays and the survival after exposure to unfiltered laser-produced x rays. Exposure to filtered, laser-produced x rays with a high dose rate does not lead to increased harm to mammalian cells exposed in vitro compared with the harm from exposure to x rays from conventional sources, which indicates that the use of high-power laser facilities for medical imaging is justified.

  12. X-ray absorbing and mechanical properties of Au-C film for x-ray mask absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Hiroshi; Yamada, Hitomi; Matsui, Teruyuki; Tagawa, Takashi; Morita, Shinzo; Hattori, Shuzo

    1990-05-01

    The X-ray absorption and mechanical properties of gold containing (Au-C) absorber formed on polyimide membrane for X-ray lithography mask have been investigated. The Au-C films were deposited by the same method as the previous investigators(Itoh et al.)1. (1) The compositional dependence of film stress before and after the exposure to SOR radiation has been observed. As a result, the stress in film changed monotonically ranging from compression (-3xlO8N/m2) to tension (l.2xlO8N/m2) with increasing Au content. Zero film stress was observed at Au atomic composition of 30%. Films originally being compressive (-l.5xlO7N/m2) were found to become tensile (l.OxlO8N/m2) after absorbing l500J/cm3 X-ray. This tendency differs from that of the BN film observed by King et al (2) X-ray absorption ratio in Au-C films were determined by measuring the amount of reduced thickness of resist on development after the exposure of X-ray through Au-C films with various composition ratios. It was found that it tended to fall from 92% to 68% with a decrease of Au atomic composition ratio from 0.85 to 0.11 at the constant absorber thickness of 0.5 pm. (3) Au-C films of various atomic composition ratio were patterned with EB lithography using the PMMA(Polyrnethylmethacrylate) resist and Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) with 02 gas. It was found that the etching rate of the film decreases with increasing Au content. The typical obtained value was approximately 100A/min at around 50% to 60% of Au composition and this was about 4 times higher than etching rate of pure Au. It is concluded that the Au-C absorber on polyimide membrane X-ray mask is practical for VLSI use for submicron pattern fabrication.

  13. Fast ionized X-ray absorbers in AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, K.; Tombesi, F.; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C.; Behar, E.; Contopoulos, I.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the physics of the X-ray ionized absorbers often identified as warm absorbers (WAs) and ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) in Seyfert AGNs from spectroscopic studies in the context of magnetically-driven accretion-disk wind scenario. Launched and accelerated by the action of a global magnetic field anchored to an underlying accretion disk around a black hole, outflowing plasma is irradiated and ionized by an AGN radiation field characterized by its spectral energy density (SED). By numerically solving the Grad-Shafranov equation in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) framework, the physical property of the magnetized disk-wind is determined by a wind parameter set, which is then incorporated into radiative transfer calculations with xstar photoionization code under heating-cooling equilibrium state to compute the absorber's properties such as column density N_H, line-of-sight (LoS) velocity v, ionization parameter ξ, among others. Assuming that the wind density scales as n ∝ r-1, we calculate theoretical absorption measure distribution (AMD) for various ions seen in AGNs as well as line spectra especially for the Fe Kα absorption feature by focusing on a bright quasar PG 1211+143 as a case study and show the model's plausibility. In this note we demonstrate that the proposed MHD-driven disk-wind scenario is not only consistent with the observed X-ray data, but also help better constrain the underlying nature of the AGN environment in a close proximity to a central engine.

  14. Fast Ionized X-Ray Absorbers in AGNs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukumura, K.; Tombesi, F.; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C.; Behar, E.; Contopoulos, I.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the physics of the X-ray ionized absorbers often identified as warm absorbers (WAs) and ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) in Seyfert AGNs from spectroscopic studies in the context of magnetically-driven accretion-disk wind scenario. Launched and accelerated by the action of a global magnetic field anchored to an underlying accretion disk around a black hole, outflowing plasma is irradiated and ionized by an AGN radiation field characterized by its spectral energy density (SED). By numerically solving the Grad-Shafranov equation in the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) framework, the physical property of the magnetized disk-wind is determined by a wind parameter set, which is then incorporated into radiative transfer calculations with xstar photoionization code under heating-cooling equilibrium state to compute the absorber's properties such as column density N(sub H), line-of-sight (LoS) velocity v, ionization parameter xi, among others. Assuming that the wind density scales as n varies as r(exp. -1), we calculate theoretical absorption measure distribution (AMD) for various ions seen in AGNs as well as line spectra especially for the Fe K alpha absorption feature by focusing on a bright quasar PG 1211+143 as a case study and show the model's plausibility. In this note we demonstrate that the proposed MHD-driven disk-wind scenario is not only consistent with the observed X-ray data, but also help better constrain the underlying nature of the AGN environment in a close proximity to a central engine.

  15. Evaluation of the medical exposure doses regarding dental examinations with different X-ray instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Chi; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Yu, Cheng-Ching; Chao, Jiunn-Hsing; Hsu, Fang-Yuh

    2015-11-01

    Modern dental X-ray examination that consists of traditional form, panorama, and cone-beamed 3D technologies is one of the most frequent diagnostic applications nowadays. This study used the Rando Phantom and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) to measure the absorbed doses of radiosensitive organs recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and whole body effective doses which were delivered due to dental X-ray examination performed with different types of X-ray instrument. Besides, enamel samples which performed reading with Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) procedure were also used to estimate the tooth doses. EPR is a dose reconstruction method of measuring free radicals induced by radiation exposure to the calcified tissue (mainly in the tooth enamel or bone) to evaluate the accepted high dose. The tooth doses estimated by TLD and EPR methods were compared. Relationships between the tooth doses and effective doses by dental X-ray examinations with different types of X-ray equipment were investigated in this work.

  16. Dose optimization in pediatric cardiac x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gislason, Amber J.; Davies, Andrew G.; Cowen, Arnold R.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The aim of this research was to explore x-ray beam parameters with intent to optimize pediatric x-ray settings in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. This study examined the effects of peak x-ray tube voltage (kVp) and of copper (Cu) x-ray beam filtration independently on the image quality to dose balance for pediatric patient sizes. The impact of antiscatter grid removal on the image quality to dose balance was also investigated. Methods: Image sequences of polymethyl methacrylate phantoms approximating chest sizes typical of pediatric patients were captured using a modern flat-panel receptor based x-ray imaging system. Tin was used to simulate iodine-based contrast medium used in clinical procedures. Measurements of tin detail contrast and flat field image noise provided the contrast to noise ratio. Entrance surface dose (ESD) and effective dose (E) measurements were obtained to calculate the figure of merit (FOM), CNR{sup 2}/dose, which evaluated the dose efficiency of the x-ray parameters investigated. The kVp, tube current (mA), and pulse duration were set manually by overriding the system's automatic dose control mechanisms. Images were captured with 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.4, and 0.9 mm added Cu filtration, for 50, 55, 60, 65, and 70 kVp with the antiscatter grid in place, and then with it removed. Results: For a given phantom thickness, as the Cu filter thickness was increased, lower kVp was favored. Examining kVp alone, lower values were generally favored, more so for thinner phantoms. Considering ESD, the 8.5 cm phantom had the highest FOM at 50 kVp using 0.4 mm of Cu filtration. The 12 cm phantom had the highest FOM at 55 kVp using 0.9 mm Cu, and the 16 cm phantom had highest FOM at 55 kVp using 0.4 mm Cu. With regard to E, the 8.5 and 12 cm phantoms had the highest FOM at 50 kVp using 0.4 mm of Cu filtration, and the 16 cm phantom had the highest FOM at 50 kVp using 0.25 mm Cu. Antiscatter grid removal improved the FOM for a given set of x-ray

  17. Order of magnitude reduction of fluoroscopic x-ray dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Abhinav; Robert, Normand; Machan, Lindsay; Deutsch, Meir; Kisselgoff, David; Babyn, Paul; Rowlands, John A.

    2012-03-01

    The role of fluoroscopic imaging is critical for diagnostic and image guided therapy. However, fluoroscopic imaging can require significant radiation leading to increased cancer risk and non-stochastic effects such as radiation burns. Our purpose is to reduce the exposure and dose to the patient by an order of magnitude in these procedures by use of the region of interest method. Method and Materials: Region of interest fluoroscopy (ROIF) uses a partial attenuator. The central region of the image has full exposure while the image periphery, there to provide context only, has a reduced exposure rate. ROIF using a static partial attenuator has been shown in our previous studies to reduce the dose area product (DAP) to the patient by at least 2.5 times. Significantly greater reductions in DAP would require improvements in flat panel detectors performance at low x-ray exposures or a different x-ray attenuation strategy. Thus we have investigated a second, dynamic, approach. We have constructed an x-ray shutter system allowing a normal x-ray exposure in the region of interest while reducing the number of x-ray exposures in the periphery through the rapid introduction, positioning and removal of an x-ray attenuating shutter to block radiation only for selected frames. This dynamic approach eliminates the DQE(0) loss associated with the use of static partial attenuator applied to every frame thus permitting a greater reduction in DAP. Results: We have compared the two methods by modeling and determined their fundamental limits.

  18. Effects of low-dose X-ray irradiation of eggshells on radical production.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, K

    2014-06-01

    We investigated effects of low-dose X-ray irradiation on eggshells radical production. Eggshells irradiated by low-dose X-ray produced stable radicals. The stable radicals at the central region of the spectrum are the carbonates and CO2(•-) signals. The electron spin resonance (ESR) signals increase with increasing absorbed dose. The estimated radical concentration (spin number) was approximately 3.6 × 10(12) (spins/g) at 10-Gy dose using various known concentrations of TEMPOL (4-hydroxy-2, 2, 6, 6-tretramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl) aqueous solutions. The stable radicals in irradiated eggshells were recognized at the low-level dose (0.10 Gy). In addition, no significant dose rate (0.5-1.5 Gy/min) dependence was found for the radical production.

  19. Measurement of a wide-range of X-ray doses using specialty doped silica fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Sani, S. F.; Hammond, R.; Jafari, S. M.; Wahab, Norfadira; Amouzad Mahdiraji, G.; Siti Shafiqah, A. S.; Abdul Rashid, H. A.; Maah, M. J.; Aldousari, H.; Alkhorayef, M.; Alzimami, M.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    Using six types of tailor-made doped optical fibres, we carry out thermoluminescent (TL) studies of X-rays, investigating the TL yield for doses from 20 mGy through to 50 Gy. Dosimetric parameters were investigated for nominal 8 wt% Ge doped fibres that in two cases were co-doped, using B in one case and Br in the other. A comparative measurement of surface analysis has also been made for non-annealed and annealed capillary fibres, use being made of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Comparison was made with the conventional TL phosphor LiF in the form of the proprietary product TLD-100, including dose response and glow curves investigated for X-rays generated at 60 kVp over a dose range from 2 cGy to 50 Gy. The energy response of the fibres was also performed for X-rays generated at peak accelerating potentials of 80 kVp, 140 kVp, 250 kVp and 6 MV photons for an absorbed dose of 2 Gy. Present results show the samples to be suitable for use as TL dosimeters, with good linearity of response and a simple glow curve (simple trap) distribution. It has been established that the TL performance of an irradiated fibre is not only influenced by radiation parameters such as energy, dose-rate and total dose but also the type of fibre.

  20. The Nature of the UV/X-ray Absorber In PG 2302+029

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabra, Bassem M.; Hamann, Fred; Jannuzi, Buell T.; George, Ian M.; Shields, Joseph C.

    2003-01-01

    We present Chandra X-ray observations of the radio-quiet QSO PG 2302+029. This quasar has a rare system of ultra-high velocity (-56,000 km s(exp -1) UV absorption lines that form in an outflow from the active nucleus. The Chandra data indicate that soft X-ray absorption is also present. We perform a joint UV and X-ray analysis, using photoionization calculations, to determine the nature of the absorbing gas. The UV and X-ray datasets were not obtained simultaneously. Nonetheless, our analysis suggests that the X-ray absorption occurs at high velocities in the same general region as the UV absorber. There are not enough constraints to rule out multi-zone models. In fact, the distinct broad and narrow UV line profiles clearly indicate that multiple zones are present. Our preferred estimates of the ionization and total column density in the X-ray absorber (logU = 1.6, N(sub eta) = 10(exp 22.4) cm (exp -2) over predict the O VI lambda lambda1032,1038 absorption unless the X-ray absorber is also outflowing at approximately 56,000 km s(exp-l), but they over predict the Ne VIII lambda lambda 770,780 absorption at all velocities. If we assume that the X-ray absorbing gas is outflowing at the same velocity of the UV-absorbing wind and that the wind is radiatively accelerated, then the outflow must be launched at a radius of less than or equal to 10(exp 15) cm from the central continuum source. The smallness of this radius casts doubts on the assumption of radiative acceleration.

  1. Establishment of new design criteria for GlidCop® X-ray absorbers

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, Jeff T.; Nudell, Jeremy; Navrotski, Gary; ...

    2017-02-20

    Here, an engineering research program has been conducted at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in order to determine the thermomechanical conditions that lead to crack formation in GlidCop®, a material commonly used to fabricate X-ray absorbers at X-ray synchrotron facilities. This dispersion-strengthened copper alloy is a proprietary material and detailed technical data of interest to the synchrotron community is limited. The results from the research program have allowed new design criteria to be established for GlidCop® X-ray absorbers based upon the thermomechanically induced fatigue behavior of the material. X-ray power from APS insertion devices was used to expose 30 GlidCop®more » samples to 10000 thermal loading cycles each under various beam power conditions, and all of the samples were metallurgically examined for crack presence/geometry. In addition, an independent testing facility was hired to measure temperature-dependent mechanical data and uniaxial mechanical fatigue data for numerous GlidCop® samples. Data from these studies support finite element analysis (FEA) simulation and parametric models, allowing the development of a thermal fatigue model and the establishment of new design criteria so that the thermomechanically induced fatigue life of X-ray absorbers may be predicted. It is also demonstrated how the thermal fatigue model can be used as a tool to geometrically optimize X-ray absorber designs.« less

  2. Establishment of new design criteria for GlidCop(®) X-ray absorbers.

    PubMed

    Collins, Jeff T; Nudell, Jeremy; Navrotski, Gary; Liu, Zunping; Den Hartog, Patric

    2017-03-01

    An engineering research program has been conducted at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in order to determine the thermomechanical conditions that lead to crack formation in GlidCop(®), a material commonly used to fabricate X-ray absorbers at X-ray synchrotron facilities. This dispersion-strengthened copper alloy is a proprietary material and detailed technical data of interest to the synchrotron community is limited. The results from the research program have allowed new design criteria to be established for GlidCop(®) X-ray absorbers based upon the thermomechanically induced fatigue behavior of the material. X-ray power from APS insertion devices was used to expose 30 GlidCop(®) samples to 10000 thermal loading cycles each under various beam power conditions, and all of the samples were metallurgically examined for crack presence/geometry. In addition, an independent testing facility was hired to measure temperature-dependent mechanical data and uniaxial mechanical fatigue data for numerous GlidCop(®) samples. Data from these studies support finite element analysis (FEA) simulation and parametric models, allowing the development of a thermal fatigue model and the establishment of new design criteria so that the thermomechanically induced fatigue life of X-ray absorbers may be predicted. It is also demonstrated how the thermal fatigue model can be used as a tool to geometrically optimize X-ray absorber designs.

  3. Automated Absorber Attachment for X-ray Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S.; Allen, Christine; Kilbourne, Caroline; Miller, Timothy M.; Costen, Nick; Schulte, Eric; Moseley, Samuel J.

    2007-01-01

    Our goal is to develop a method for the automated attachment of large numbers of absorber tiles to large format detector arrays. This development includes the fabrication of high quality, closely spaced HgTe absorber tiles that are properly positioned for pick-and-place by our FC150 flip chip bonder. The FC150 also transfers the appropriate minute amount of epoxy to the detectors for permanent attachment of the absorbers. The success of this development will replace an arduous, risky and highly manual task with a reliable, high-precision automated process.

  4. Automated Hybridization of X-ray Absorber Elements-A Path to Large Format Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S.; Kelley, R.; Allen, C.; Kilbourne, C.; Costen, N.; Miller, T.

    2007-01-01

    In the design of microcalorimeters, it is often desirable to produce the X-ray absorber separately from the detector element. In this case, the attachment of the absorber to the detector element with the required thermal and mechanical characteristics is a major challenge. In such arrays, the attachment has been done by hand. This process is not easily extended to the large format arrays required for future X- ray astronomy missions such as the New x-ray Telescope or NeXT. In this paper we present an automated process for attaching absorber tiles to the surface of a large-scale X-ray detector array. The absorbers are attached with stycast epoxy to a thermally isolating polymer structure made of SU-8. SU-8 is a negative epoxy based photo resist produced by Microchem. We describe the fabrication of the X-ray absorbers and their suspension on a handle die in an adhesive matrix. We describe the production process for the polymer isolators on the detector elements. We have developed a new process for the alignment, and simultaneous bonding of the absorber tiles to an entire detector array. This process uses equipment and techniques used in the flip-chip bonding industry and approaches developed in the fabrication of the XRS-2 instrument. XRS-2 was an X-ray spectrometer that was launched on the Suzaku telescope in July 10, 2005. We describe the process and show examples of sample arrays produced by this process. Arrays with up to 300 elements have been bonded. The present tests have used dummy absorbers made of Si. In future work, we will demonstrate bonding of HgTe absorbers.

  5. Automated Hybridization of X-ray Absorber Elements-A Path to Large Format Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, S.; Kelley, R.; Allen, C.; Kilbourne, C.; Costen, N.; Miller, T.

    2007-01-01

    In the design of microcalorimeters, it is often desirable to produce the X-ray absorber separately from the detector element. In this case, the attachment of the absorber to the detector element with the required thermal and mechanical characteristics is a major challenge. In such arrays, the attachment has been done by hand. This process is not easily extended to the large format arrays required for future X- ray astronomy missions such as the New x-ray Telescope or NeXT. In this paper we present an automated process for attaching absorber tiles to the surface of a large-scale X-ray detector array. The absorbers are attached with stycast epoxy to a thermally isolating polymer structure made of SU-8. SU-8 is a negative epoxy based photo resist produced by Microchem. We describe the fabrication of the X-ray absorbers and their suspension on a handle die in an adhesive matrix. We describe the production process for the polymer isolators on the detector elements. We have developed a new process for the alignment, and simultaneous bonding of the absorber tiles to an entire detector array. This process uses equipment and techniques used in the flip-chip bonding industry and approaches developed in the fabrication of the XRS-2 instrument. XRS-2 was an X-ray spectrometer that was launched on the Suzaku telescope in July 10, 2005. We describe the process and show examples of sample arrays produced by this process. Arrays with up to 300 elements have been bonded. The present tests have used dummy absorbers made of Si. In future work, we will demonstrate bonding of HgTe absorbers.

  6. Exposure Dose Reconstruction from EPR Spectra of Tooth Enamel Exposed to the Combined Effect of X-rays and Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, V. A.; Kuchuro, J. I.

    2014-09-01

    We have used EPR dosimetry on tooth enamel to show that the combined effect of x-rays with effective energy 34 keV and gamma radiation with average energy 1250 keV leads to a significant increase in the reconstructed absorbed dose compared with the applied dose from a gamma source or from an x-ray source or from both sources of electromagnetic radiation. In simulation experiments, we develop an approach to estimating the contribution of diagnostic x-rays to the exposure dose formed in the tooth enamel by the combined effect of x-rays and gamma radiation.

  7. Impact of x-ray dose on track formation and data analysis for CR-39-based proton diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rojas-Herrera, J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Filkins, T.; Steidle, Jeffrey A.; Steidle, Jessica A.; Traynor, N.; Freeman, C.

    2015-12-23

    The nuclear track detector CR-39 is used extensively for charged particle diagnosis, in particular proton spectroscopy, at inertial confinement fusion facilities. These detectors can absorb x-ray doses from the experiments in the order of 1–100 Gy, the effects of which are not accounted for in the previous detector calibrations. X-ray dose absorbed in the CR-39 has previously been shown to affect the track size of alpha particles in the detector, primarily due to a measured reduction in the material bulk etch rate [Rojas-Herrera et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 033501 (2015)]. Similar to the previous findings for alpha particles, protons with energies in the range 0.5–9.1 MeV are shown to produce tracks that are systematically smaller as a function of the absorbed x-ray dose in the CR-39. The reduction of track size due to x-ray dose is found to diminish with time between exposure and etching if the CR-39 is stored at ambient temperature, and complete recovery is observed after two weeks. Lastly, the impact of this effect on the analysis of data from existing CR-39-based proton diagnostics on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility is evaluated and best practices are proposed for cases in which the effect of x rays is significant.

  8. Impact of x-ray dose on track formation and data analysis for CR-39-based proton diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Rinderknecht, H. G. Rojas-Herrera, J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Filkins, T.; Steidle, Jessica A.; Traynor, N.; Freeman, C.; Steidle, Jeffrey A.

    2015-12-15

    The nuclear track detector CR-39 is used extensively for charged particle diagnosis, in particular proton spectroscopy, at inertial confinement fusion facilities. These detectors can absorb x-ray doses from the experiments in the order of 1–100 Gy, the effects of which are not accounted for in the previous detector calibrations. X-ray dose absorbed in the CR-39 has previously been shown to affect the track size of alpha particles in the detector, primarily due to a measured reduction in the material bulk etch rate [Rojas-Herrera et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 033501 (2015)]. Similar to the previous findings for alpha particles, protons with energies in the range 0.5–9.1 MeV are shown to produce tracks that are systematically smaller as a function of the absorbed x-ray dose in the CR-39. The reduction of track size due to x-ray dose is found to diminish with time between exposure and etching if the CR-39 is stored at ambient temperature, and complete recovery is observed after two weeks. The impact of this effect on the analysis of data from existing CR-39-based proton diagnostics on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility is evaluated and best practices are proposed for cases in which the effect of x rays is significant.

  9. Impact of x-ray dose on track formation and data analysis for CR-39-based proton diagnostics

    DOE PAGES

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rojas-Herrera, J.; Zylstra, A. B.; ...

    2015-12-23

    The nuclear track detector CR-39 is used extensively for charged particle diagnosis, in particular proton spectroscopy, at inertial confinement fusion facilities. These detectors can absorb x-ray doses from the experiments in the order of 1–100 Gy, the effects of which are not accounted for in the previous detector calibrations. X-ray dose absorbed in the CR-39 has previously been shown to affect the track size of alpha particles in the detector, primarily due to a measured reduction in the material bulk etch rate [Rojas-Herrera et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 86, 033501 (2015)]. Similar to the previous findings for alpha particles, protonsmore » with energies in the range 0.5–9.1 MeV are shown to produce tracks that are systematically smaller as a function of the absorbed x-ray dose in the CR-39. The reduction of track size due to x-ray dose is found to diminish with time between exposure and etching if the CR-39 is stored at ambient temperature, and complete recovery is observed after two weeks. Furthermore, the impact of this effect on the analysis of data from existing CR-39-based proton diagnostics on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility is evaluated and best practices are proposed for cases in which the effect of x rays is significant.« less

  10. Characteristics of sputtered TaX absorbers for x-ray mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Jeng Tzong; Chu, A.; Ding, J. H.; Su, Shyang

    1999-06-01

    The materials of x-ray absorbers for x-ray mask have been changed from gold and tungsten-based alloys to tantalum (Ta) and Ta-based compounds in x-ray lithography. Different candidates of x-ray absorber, especially Ta-based compounds, were sputtered and evaluated in this study. By incorporating silicon or germanium into tantalum, amorphous TaSi-based and TaGe-based compounds were formed and qualified as the absorber materials. Because the reproducibility of as- deposited stress by tuning the sputtering parameters is not so well for these compounds right after sputtering, we utilized the step annealing by RTA to control the stress such that within +/- MPa is obtainable. Furthermore, with N2 plasma treatment in PECVD chamber the slope of stress with respect to annealing temperature is smaller and posses good stability after long-time exposure to the air. Finally, the etching properties of TaX compounds were compared with and without tri-layer structure of oxide/absorber/oxide. And, 0.35 micrometers patterns are etched successfully with vertical sidewall by Cl2 etchant.

  11. Absorber Materials for Transition-Edge Sensor X-ray Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari-David; Bandler, Simon; Brekosky, Regis; Chervenak, James; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Finkbeiner, Fred; Sadleir, Jack; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kelley, Richard; Kilbourne, Caroline; Porter, F. Scott; Smith, Stephen; Saab, Tarek; Sadleir, Jac,

    2007-01-01

    Arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TES) can provide high spatial and energy resolution necessary for x-ray astronomy. High quantum efficiency and uniformity of response can be achieved with a suitable absorber material, in which absorber x-ray stopping power, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity are relevant parameters. Here we compare these parameters for bismuth and gold. We have fabricated electroplated gold, electroplated gold/electroplated bismuth, and evaporated gold/evaporated bismuth 8x8 absorber arrays and find that a correlation exists between the residual resistance ratio (RRR) and thin film microstructure. This finding indicates that we can tailor absorber material conductivity via microstructure alteration, so as to permit absorber thermalization on timescales suitable for high energy resolution x-ray microcalorimetry. We show that by incorporating absorbers possessing large grain size, including electroplated gold and electroplated gold/electroplated bismuth, into our current Mo/Au TES, devices with tunable heat capacity and energy resolution of 2.3 eV (gold) and 2.1 eV (gold/bismuth) FWHM at 6 keV have been fabricated.

  12. Multi-Absorber Transition-Edge Sensors for X-Ray Astronomy Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. J.; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Busch, S. E.; Chervenak, J. A.; Eckart, M. E.; Ewin, A. J.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kelly, D. P.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We are developing multi-absorber Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs) for applications in x-ray astronomy. These position-sensitive devices consist of multiple x-ray absorbers each with a different thermal coupling to a single readout TES. Heat diffusion between the absorbers and the TES gives rise to a characteristic pulse shape corresponding to each absorber element and enables position discrimination. The development of these detectors is motivated by a desire to maximize focal plane arrays with the fewest number of readout channels. In this contribution we report on the first results from devices consisting of nine) 65 X 65 sq. microns Au x-ray absorbers) 5 microns thick. These are coupled to a single 35 X 35 sq. microns Mo/Au bilayer TES. These devices have demonstrated full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) energy resolution of 2.1 eV at 1.5 keV) 2.5 eV at 5.9 keV and 3.3 eV at 8 keV. This is coupled with position discrimination from pulse shape over the same energy range. We use a finite-element model to reproduce the measured pulse shapes and investigate the detector non-linearity with energy) which impacts on the devices position sensitivity and energy resolution.

  13. Medical x-ray exposure doses as contaminants of atomic bomb doses

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, O.; Antoku, S.; Russell, W.J.; Fujita, S.; Sawada, S.

    1988-03-01

    Since 1967 at the times of their biennial ABCC/RERF radiological examinations, all Adult Health Study (AHS) subjects have been interviewed to determine the exposures to medical x-rays they experienced in institutions other than RERF in order to estimate the numbers of examinations and corresponding doses which they received. These data have been stored on computer tapes together with the doses these subjects received during their radiological examinations in the ABCC/RERF Department of Radiology. Thus, their medical x-ray doses are available along with their atomic bomb doses (tentative 1965 doses revised, T65DR) for assessment of the role of ionizing radiation in the development of diseases. The medical x-ray doses incurred at RERF were assessed by means of phantom dosimetry. Those at other institutions were determined using phantom dosimetry data and results of surveys for trends in radiological examinations in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. By the end of 1982, the average medical x-ray doses to the active bone marrow were 12.04 mGy for A-bomb exposed groups and 8.92 mGy for control groups (not-in-cities); to the male gonads, 2.26 mGy and 1.89 mGy, respectively; and to the female gonads, 17.45 mGy and 12.58 mGy, respectively. Results for Hiroshima and Nagasaki were similar. The main impact of medical x-ray doses was in the lowest T65DR group. Medical x-ray active bone marrow doses ranged from 0.05-500% (mean, 35%) of A-bomb doses in the 10-99 mGy T65DR group. In the 100-999 mGy T65DR group, medical x-ray active bone marrow doses ranged from 0.005-50% (mean, 5%) of their T65DR. In the greater than 1000-mGy T65DR group, medical x-ray exposures were proportionally less. Medical x-ray exposures produced smaller doses to the gonads of males than to those of the females.

  14. Feedback from Mass Outflows in Nearby Active Galactic Nuclei. I. Ultraviolet and X-Ray Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.

    2012-07-01

    We present an investigation into the impact of feedback from outflowing UV and X-ray absorbers in nearby (z < 0.04) active galactic nuclei (AGNs). From studies of the kinematics, physical conditions, and variability of the absorbers in the literature, we calculate the possible ranges in the total mass outflow rate (\\dot{M}_{out}) and kinetic luminosity (L KE) for each AGN, summed over all of its absorbers. These calculations make use of values (or limits) for the radial locations of the absorbers determined from variability, excited-state absorption, and other considerations. From a sample of 10 Seyfert 1 galaxies with detailed photoionization models for their absorbers, we find that 7 have sufficient constraints on the absorber locations to determine \\dot{M}_{out} and L KE. For the low-luminosity AGN NGC 4395, these values are low, although we do not have sufficient constraints on the X-ray absorbers to make definitive conclusions. At least five of the six Seyfert 1s with moderate bolometric luminosities (L bol = 1043 - 1045 erg s-1) have mass outflow rates that are 10-1000 times the mass accretion rates needed to generate their observed luminosities, indicating that most of the mass outflow originates from outside the inner accretion disk. Three of these (NGC 4051, NGC 3516, and NGC 3783) have L KE in the range 0.5%-5% L bol, which is the range typically required by feedback models for efficient self-regulation of black hole and galactic bulge growth. At least two of the other three (NGC 5548, NGC 4151, and NGC 7469) have L KE >~ 0.1%L bol, although these values may increase if radial locations can be determined for more of the absorbers. We conclude that the outflowing UV and X-ray absorbers in moderate-luminosity AGNs have the potential to deliver significant feedback to their environments.

  15. Note: Gratings on low absorbing substrates for x-ray phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, F. J. Schröter, T. J.; Kunka, D.; Meyer, P.; Meiser, J.; Faisal, A.; Khalil, M. I.; Mohr, J.; Birnbacher, L.; Viermetz, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Walter, M.; Schulz, J.

    2015-12-15

    Grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging is on the verge of being applied in clinical settings. To achieve this goal, compact setups with high sensitivity and dose efficiency are necessary. Both can be increased by eliminating unwanted absorption in the beam path, which is mainly due to the grating substrates. Fabrication of gratings via deep X-ray lithography can address this issue by replacing the commonly used silicon substrate with materials with lower X-ray absorption that fulfill certain boundary conditions. Gratings were produced on both graphite and polymer substrates without compromising on structure quality. These gratings were tested in a three-grating setup with a source operated at 40 kVp and lead to an increase in the detector photon count rate of almost a factor of 4 compared to a set of gratings on silicon substrates. As the visibility was hardly affected, this corresponds to a significant increase in sensitivity and therefore dose efficiency.

  16. Modeling X-ray Absorbers in AGNs with MHD-Driven Accretion-Disk Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, D.; Shrader, C. R.; Tombesi, F.; Contopoulos, J.; Behar, E.

    2013-04-01

    We have proposed a systematic view of the observed X-ray absorbers, namely warm absorbers (WAs) in soft X-ray and highly-ionized ultra-fast outflows (UFOs), in the context of magnetically-driven accretion-disk wind models. While potentially complicated by variability and thermal instability in these energetic outflows, in this simplistic model we have calculated 2D kinematic field as well as density and ionization structure of the wind with density profile of 1/r corresponding to a constant column distribution per decade of ionization parameter. In particular we show semi-analytically that the inner layer of the disk-wind manifests itself as the strongly-ionized fast outflows while the outer layer is identified as the moderately-ionized absorbers. The computed characteristics of these two apparently distinct absorbers are consistent with X-ray data (i.e. a factor of ~100 difference in column and ionization parameters as well as low wind velocity vs. near-relativistic flow). With the predicted contour curves for these wind parameters one can constrain allowed regions for the presence of WAs and UFOs.The model further implies that the UFO's gas pressure is comparable to that of the observed radio jet in 3C111 suggesting that the magnetized disk-wind with density profile of 1/r is a viable agent to help sustain such a self-collimated jet at small radii.

  17. An X-ray-absorbed radio-quiet QSO with an intervening strong metal absorption-line system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. J.; Mittaz, J. P. D.; Carrera, F. J.

    2000-02-01

    We find evidence for significant X-ray absorption in the QSO RXJ005734.78-272827.4, along with strong absorption lines in its optical spectrum. We propose that the absorption lines are due to an intervening metal-line system at a redshift of z=0.628, and show that this intervening system is also the probable cause of the X-ray absorption. The intervening absorber is inferred to have an X-ray column of ~1022cm-2. This is the first time that an absorption-line system has been identified with an X-ray absorber in a radio-quiet object.

  18. Effective absorbing column density in the gamma-ray burst afterglow X-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, S.; Bernardini, M. G.; Braito, V.; Cusumano, G.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Melandri, A.; Salvaterra, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S. D.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the scaling relation between the observed amount of absorption in the X-ray spectra of gamma-ray burst afterglows and the absorber redshift. Through dedicated numerical simulations of an ideal instrument, we establish that this dependence has a power-law shape with index 2.4. However, for real instruments, this value depends on their low-energy cut-off, spectral resolution and on the detector spectral response in general. We thus provide appropriate scaling laws for specific instruments. Finally, we discuss the possibility to measure the absorber redshift from X-ray data alone. We find that 105-106 counts in the 0.3-10 keV band are needed to constrain the redshift with 10 per cent accuracy. As a test case, we discuss the XMM-Newton observation of GRB 090618 at z = 0.54. We are able to recover the correct redshift of this burst with the expected accuracy.

  19. Atomic Calculations and Laboratory Measurements Relevant to X-ray Warm Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallman, Tim; Bautista, M.; Palmeri, P.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the atomic calculations and the measurements from the laboratory that are relevant to our understanding of X-Ray Warm Absorbers. Included is a brief discussion of the theoretical and the experimental tools. Also included is a discussion of the challenges, and calculations relevant to dielectronic recombination, photoionization cross sections, and collisional ionization. A review of the models is included, and the sequence that the models were applied.

  20. The XMM-Newton Bright Survey sample of absorbed quasars: X-ray and accretion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballo, L.; Severgnini, P.; Della Ceca, R.; Caccianiga, A.; Vignali, C.; Carrera, F. J.; Corral, A.; Mateos, S.

    2014-11-01

    Although absorbed quasars are extremely important for our understanding of the energetics of the Universe, the main physical parameters of their central engines are still poorly known. In this work, we present and study a complete sample of 14 quasars (QSOs) that are absorbed in the X-rays (column density NH > 4 × 1021 cm-2 and X-ray luminosity L 2-10 keV > 1044 ergs-1; XQSO2) belonging to the XMM-Newton Bright Serendipitous Survey (XBS). From the analysis of their ultraviolet-to-mid-infrared spectral energy distribution, we can separate the nuclear emission from the host galaxy contribution, obtaining a measurement of the fundamental nuclear parameters, like the mass of the central supermassive black hole and the value of Eddington ratio, λ Edd. Comparing the properties of XQSO2s with those previously obtained for the X-ray unabsorbed QSOs in the XBS, we do not find any evidence that the two samples are drawn from different populations. In particular, the two samples span the same range in Eddington ratios, up to λ Edd ˜ 0.5; this implies that our XQSO2s populate the `forbidden region' in the so-called `effective Eddington limit paradigm'. A combination of low grain abundance, presence of stars inwards of the absorber, and/or anisotropy of the disc emission can explain this result.

  1. Construction of an ionization chamber for the measurement of dose of low energy x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Y. B. Alcantara; Jimenez, F. J. Ramirez

    2008-08-11

    We designed and constructed the prototype of an ionization chamber to measure the dose of an X-ray tube with Molybdenum anode. This X-ray tube is located in the Physics department at CINVESTAV and is used for medical physics purposes in the imaging area. The ionization chamber is designed to measure doses on biological samples exposed to X-rays and will be applied in radiation protection studies.

  2. Enhancement of X-ray dose absorption for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sara; Nahar, S.; Pradhan, A.; Barth, R.

    2013-05-01

    A promising technique for cancer treatment is radiation therapy with high-Z (HZ) nanomoities acting as radio-sensitizers attached to tumor cells and irradiated with X-rays. But the efficacy of radiosenstization is highly energy dependent. We study the physical effects in using platinum (Pt) as the radio-sensitizing agent, coupled with commonly employed broadband x-ray sources with mean energies around 100 keV, as opposed to MeV energies produced by clinical linear accelerators (LINAC) used in radiation therapy. Numerical calculations, in vitro, and in vivo studies of F98 rat glioma (brain cancer) demonstrate that irradiation from a medium energy X-ray (MEX) 160 kV source is far more effective than from a high energy x-ray (HEX) 6 MV LINAC. We define a parameter to quantify photoionization by an x-ray source, which thereby provides a measure of subsequent Auger decays. The platinum (Z = 78) results are also relevant to ongoing studies on x-ray interaction with gold (Z = 79) nanoparticles, widely studied as an HZ contrast agent. The present study should be of additional interest for a combined radiation plus chemotherapy treatment since Pt compounds such cis-Pt and carbo-Pt are commonly used in chemotherapy.

  3. The dose response of normoxic polymer gel dosimeters measured using X-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Hill, B; Venning, A; Baldock, C

    2005-07-01

    X-ray CT was used to determine the dose response of normoxic polymer gel dosimeters. Normoxic polymer gel dosimeters were manufactured and irradiated up to 150 Gy. Up to 50 CT images were acquired on a Toshiba Aquilion Multislice CT scanner using protocols for 80 kV and 135 kV to determine dose response. HU-dose sensitivity, the linear regression of data for the HU versus dose for the linear part of the curve up to 60 Gy was 0.38+/-0.07 HU Gy(-1) for 135 kV and 0.37+/-0.01 HU Gy(-1) for 80 kV. Dose resolution was found to be < 1.3 Gy for an absorbed dose range up to 70 Gy for 135 kV, similar to that measured previously for polyacrylamide gel (PAG). Although the HU-dose sensitivity was lower than that previously measured for PAG gel dosimeters it had a greater range of absorbed dose indicating that normoxic polymer gel dosimeters have potential in CT gel dosimetry.

  4. Discovery of Rapidly Moving Partial X-Ray Absorbers Within Cassiopeiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaguchi, K.; Oskinova, L.; Russell, C. M. P.; Petre, R.; Enoto, T.; Morihana, K.; Ishida, M.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma Cassiopeiae is an enigmatic Be star with unusually strong hard X-ray emission. The Suzaku observatory detected six rapid X-ray spectral hardening events called "softness dips" in a approx.100 ks observation in 2011. All the softness dip events show symmetric softness-ratio variations, and some of them have flat bottoms apparently due to saturation. The softness dip spectra are best described by either approx.40% or approx.70% partial covering absorption to kT approx.12 keV plasma emission by matter with a neutral hydrogen column density of approx.(2-8) ×10(exp 21)/sq cm, while the spectrum outside these dips is almost free of absorption. This result suggests the presence of two distinct X-ray-emitting spots in the gamma Cas system, perhaps on a white dwarf (WD) companion with dipole mass accretion. The partial covering absorbers may be blobs in the Be stellar wind, the Be disk, or rotating around the WD companion. Weak correlations of the softness ratios to the hard X-ray flux suggest the presence of stable plasmas at kT approx 0.9 and 5 keV, which may originate from the Be or WD winds. The formation of a Be star and WD binary system requires mass transfer between two stars; gamma Cas may have experienced such activity in the past.

  5. Discovery of Rapidly Moving Partial X-Ray Absorbers Within Cassiopeiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaguchi, K.; Oskinova, L.; Russell, C. M. P.; Petre, R.; Enoto, T.; Morihana, K.; Ishida, M.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma Cassiopeiae is an enigmatic Be star with unusually strong hard X-ray emission. The Suzaku observatory detected six rapid X-ray spectral hardening events called "softness dips" in a approx.100 ks observation in 2011. All the softness dip events show symmetric softness-ratio variations, and some of them have flat bottoms apparently due to saturation. The softness dip spectra are best described by either approx.40% or approx.70% partial covering absorption to kT approx.12 keV plasma emission by matter with a neutral hydrogen column density of approx.(2-8) ×10(exp 21)/sq cm, while the spectrum outside these dips is almost free of absorption. This result suggests the presence of two distinct X-ray-emitting spots in the gamma Cas system, perhaps on a white dwarf (WD) companion with dipole mass accretion. The partial covering absorbers may be blobs in the Be stellar wind, the Be disk, or rotating around the WD companion. Weak correlations of the softness ratios to the hard X-ray flux suggest the presence of stable plasmas at kT approx 0.9 and 5 keV, which may originate from the Be or WD winds. The formation of a Be star and WD binary system requires mass transfer between two stars; gamma Cas may have experienced such activity in the past.

  6. Discovery of Rapidly Moving Partial X-ray Absorbers within Gamma Cassiopeiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, K.; Oskinova, L.; Russell, C. M. P.; Petre, R.; Enoto, T.; Morihana, K.; Ishida, M.

    2016-12-01

    Gamma Cassiopeiae is an enigmatic Be star with unusually strong hard X-ray emission. The Suzaku observatory detected six rapid X-ray spectral hardening events called “softness dips” in a ˜100 ks observation in 2011. All the softness dip events show symmetric softness-ratio variations, and some of them have flat bottoms apparently due to saturation. The softness dip spectra are best described by either ˜40% or ˜70% partial covering absorption to kT ˜ 12 keV plasma emission by matter with a neutral hydrogen column density of ˜(2-8) × 1021 cm-2, while the spectrum outside these dips is almost free of absorption. This result suggests the presence of two distinct X-ray-emitting spots in the γ Cas system, perhaps on a white dwarf (WD) companion with dipole mass accretion. The partial covering absorbers may be blobs in the Be stellar wind, the Be disk, or rotating around the WD companion. Weak correlations of the softness ratios to the hard X-ray flux suggest the presence of stable plasmas at kT ˜ 0.9 and 5 keV, which may originate from the Be or WD winds. The formation of a Be star and WD binary system requires mass transfer between two stars; γ Cas may have experienced such activity in the past.

  7. Low dose hard x-ray contact microscopy assisted by a photoelectric conversion layer

    SciTech Connect

    Gomella, Andrew; Martin, Eric W.; Lynch, Susanna K.; Wen, Han; Morgan, Nicole Y.

    2013-04-15

    Hard x-ray contact microscopy provides images of dense samples at resolutions of tens of nanometers. However, the required beam intensity can only be delivered by synchrotron sources. We report on the use of a gold photoelectric conversion layer to lower the exposure dose by a factor of 40 to 50, allowing hard x-ray contact microscopy to be performed with a compact x-ray tube. We demonstrate the method in imaging the transmission pattern of a type of hard x-ray grating that cannot be fitted into conventional x-ray microscopes due to its size and shape. Generally the method is easy to implement and can record images of samples in the hard x-ray region over a large area in a single exposure, without some of the geometric constraints associated with x-ray microscopes based on zone-plate or other magnifying optics.

  8. Low dose hard x-ray contact microscopy assisted by a photoelectric conversion layer

    PubMed Central

    Gomella, Andrew; Martin, Eric W.; Lynch, Susanna K.; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Wen, Han

    2013-01-01

    Hard x-ray contact microscopy provides images of dense samples at resolutions of tens of nanometers. However, the required beam intensity can only be delivered by synchrotron sources. We report on the use of a gold photoelectric conversion layer to lower the exposure dose by a factor of 40 to 50, allowing hard x-ray contact microscopy to be performed with a compact x-ray tube. We demonstrate the method in imaging the transmission pattern of a type of hard x-ray grating that cannot be fitted into conventional x-ray microscopes due to its size and shape. Generally the method is easy to implement and can record images of samples in the hard x-ray region over a large area in a single exposure, without some of the geometric constraints associated with x-ray microscopes based on zone-plate or other magnifying optics. PMID:23837131

  9. The Radiation Dose Determination of the Pulsed X-ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloichikova, I.; Stuchebrov, S.; Zhaksybayeva, G.; Wagner, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper the radiation dose measurement technique of the pulsed X-ray source RAP-160-5 is described. The dose rate measurement results from the pulsed X-ray beams at the different distance between the pulsed X-ray source focus and the detector obtained with the help of the thermoluminescent detectors DTL-02, the universal dosimeter UNIDOS E equipped with the plane-parallel ionization chamber type 23342, the dosimeter-radiometer DKS-96 and the radiation dosimeter AT 1123 are demonstrated. The recommendations for the dosimetry measurements of the pulsed X-ray generator RAP-160-5 under different radiation conditions are proposed.

  10. Experimental validation of a kilovoltage x-ray source model for computing imaging dose

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, Yannick; Kouznetsov, Alexei; Koger, Brandon; Tambasco, Mauro

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To introduce and validate a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source model and characterization method to compute absorbed dose accrued from kV x-rays. Methods: The authors propose a simplified virtual point source model and characterization method for a kV x-ray source. The source is modeled by: (1) characterizing the spatial spectral and fluence distributions of the photons at a plane at the isocenter, and (2) creating a virtual point source from which photons are generated to yield the derived spatial spectral and fluence distribution at isocenter of an imaging system. The spatial photon distribution is determined by in-air relative dose measurements along the transverse (x) and radial (y) directions. The spectrum is characterized using transverse axis half-value layer measurements and the nominal peak potential (kVp). This source modeling approach is used to characterize a Varian{sup ®} on-board-imager (OBI{sup ®}) for four default cone-beam CT beam qualities: beams using a half bowtie filter (HBT) with 110 and 125 kVp, and a full bowtie filter (FBT) with 100 and 125 kVp. The source model and characterization method was validated by comparing dose computed by the authors’ inhouse software (kVDoseCalc) to relative dose measurements in a homogeneous and a heterogeneous block phantom comprised of tissue, bone, and lung-equivalent materials. Results: The characterized beam qualities and spatial photon distributions are comparable to reported values in the literature. Agreement between computed and measured percent depth-dose curves is ⩽2% in the homogeneous block phantom and ⩽2.5% in the heterogeneous block phantom. Transverse axis profiles taken at depths of 2 and 6 cm in the homogeneous block phantom show an agreement within 4%. All transverse axis dose profiles in water, in bone, and lung-equivalent materials for beams using a HBT, have an agreement within 5%. Measured profiles of FBT beams in bone and lung-equivalent materials were higher than their

  11. Equally sloped X-ray microtomography of living insects with low radiation dose and improved resolution capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shengkun; Fan, Jiadong; Zong, Yunbing; He, You; Zhou, Guangzhao; Sun, Zhibin; Zhang, Jianhua; Huang, Qingjie; Xiao, Tiqiao; Jiang, Huaidong

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional X-ray imaging of living specimens is challenging due to the limited resolution of conventional absorption contrast X-ray imaging and potential irradiation damage of biological specimens. In this letter, we present microtomography of a living specimen combining phase-contrast imaging and a Fourier-based iterative algorithm termed equally sloped tomography. Non-destructive 3D imaging of an anesthetized living yellow mealworm Tenebrio molitor was demonstrated with a relatively low dose using synchrotron generated X-rays. Based on the high-quality 3D images, branching tracheoles and different tissues of the insect in a natural state were identified and analyzed, demonstrating a significant advantage of the technique over conventional X-ray radiography or histotomy. Additionally, the insect survived without problem after a 1.92-s X-ray exposure and subsequent absorbed radiation dose of ˜1.2 Gy. No notable physiological effects were observed after reviving the insect from anesthesia. The improved static tomographic method demonstrated in this letter shows advantage in the non-destructive structural investigation of living insects in three dimensions due to the low radiation dose and high resolution capability, and offers many potential applications in biological science.

  12. Equally sloped X-ray microtomography of living insects with low radiation dose and improved resolution capability

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Shengkun; Fan, Jiadong; Zong, Yunbing; Sun, Zhibin; Zhang, Jianhua; Jiang, Huaidong; He, You; Zhou, Guangzhao; Xiao, Tiqiao; Huang, Qingjie

    2016-03-21

    Three-dimensional X-ray imaging of living specimens is challenging due to the limited resolution of conventional absorption contrast X-ray imaging and potential irradiation damage of biological specimens. In this letter, we present microtomography of a living specimen combining phase-contrast imaging and a Fourier-based iterative algorithm termed equally sloped tomography. Non-destructive 3D imaging of an anesthetized living yellow mealworm Tenebrio molitor was demonstrated with a relatively low dose using synchrotron generated X-rays. Based on the high-quality 3D images, branching tracheoles and different tissues of the insect in a natural state were identified and analyzed, demonstrating a significant advantage of the technique over conventional X-ray radiography or histotomy. Additionally, the insect survived without problem after a 1.92-s X-ray exposure and subsequent absorbed radiation dose of ∼1.2 Gy. No notable physiological effects were observed after reviving the insect from anesthesia. The improved static tomographic method demonstrated in this letter shows advantage in the non-destructive structural investigation of living insects in three dimensions due to the low radiation dose and high resolution capability, and offers many potential applications in biological science.

  13. AN X-RAY WHIM METAL ABSORBER FROM A Mpc-SCALE EMPTY REGION OF SPACE

    SciTech Connect

    Zappacosta, L.; Nicastro, F.; Krongold, Y.; Maiolino, R.

    2012-07-10

    We report a detection of an absorption line at {approx}44.8 A in a >500 ks Chandra HRC-S/LETG X-ray grating spectrum of the blazar H 2356-309. This line can be identified as intervening C V-K{alpha} absorption, at z Almost-Equal-To 0.112, produced by a warm (log T = 5.1 K) intergalactic absorber. The feature is significant at a 2.9{sigma} level (accounting for the number of independent redshift trials). We estimate an equivalent hydrogen column density of log N{sub H} 19.05(Z/Z{sub Sun }){sup -1} cm{sup -2}. Unlike other previously reported FUV/X-ray metal detections of warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM), this C V absorber lies in a region with locally low galaxy density, at {approx}2.2 Mpc from the closest galaxy at that redshift, and therefore is unlikely to be associated with an extended galactic halo. We instead tentatively identify this absorber with an intervening WHIM filament possibly permeating a large-scale, 30 Mpc extended, structure of galaxies whose redshift centroid, within a cylinder of 7.5 Mpc radius centered on the line of sight to H 2356-309, is marginally consistent (at a 1.8{sigma} level) with the redshift of the absorber.

  14. FEEDBACK FROM MASS OUTFLOWS IN NEARBY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. I. ULTRAVIOLET AND X-RAY ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.

    2012-07-01

    We present an investigation into the impact of feedback from outflowing UV and X-ray absorbers in nearby (z < 0.04) active galactic nuclei (AGNs). From studies of the kinematics, physical conditions, and variability of the absorbers in the literature, we calculate the possible ranges in the total mass outflow rate (M-dot{sub out}) and kinetic luminosity (L{sub KE}) for each AGN, summed over all of its absorbers. These calculations make use of values (or limits) for the radial locations of the absorbers determined from variability, excited-state absorption, and other considerations. From a sample of 10 Seyfert 1 galaxies with detailed photoionization models for their absorbers, we find that 7 have sufficient constraints on the absorber locations to determine M-dot{sub out} and L{sub KE}. For the low-luminosity AGN NGC 4395, these values are low, although we do not have sufficient constraints on the X-ray absorbers to make definitive conclusions. At least five of the six Seyfert 1s with moderate bolometric luminosities (L{sub bol} = 10{sup 43} - 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1}) have mass outflow rates that are 10-1000 times the mass accretion rates needed to generate their observed luminosities, indicating that most of the mass outflow originates from outside the inner accretion disk. Three of these (NGC 4051, NGC 3516, and NGC 3783) have L{sub KE} in the range 0.5%-5% L{sub bol}, which is the range typically required by feedback models for efficient self-regulation of black hole and galactic bulge growth. At least two of the other three (NGC 5548, NGC 4151, and NGC 7469) have L{sub KE} {approx}> 0.1%L{sub bol}, although these values may increase if radial locations can be determined for more of the absorbers. We conclude that the outflowing UV and X-ray absorbers in moderate-luminosity AGNs have the potential to deliver significant feedback to their environments.

  15. [Effective dose transmission of diagnostic X-rays through concrete and lead shields].

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideki

    2003-08-01

    When computing the amount of leakage from a diagnostic X-ray room, the transmission data of X-ray beams through the shielding material, which are used in the computation, must agree with the conditions of use of the X-ray equipment. Even if the tube potential is the same, the energy spectrum of generated X-rays depends on conditions such as high voltage rectification and total filtration, and transmission through the shielding material, too, is subject to change. In this paper, we propose a new method of calculation, which uses transmission data of mono-energetic photon beams computed by means of a Monte Carlo simulation, for obtaining effective dose transmission data through the shielding material of an X-ray beam with spectral distribution. We also present effective dose transmission data of primary X-ray beams and 90 degrees scattered X-ray beams through concrete and lead shields as determined by this method. This method, which can calculate the transmission data of X-ray beams with any spectral distribution, is useful in evaluating the leakage dose of diagnostic X-ray facilities.

  16. Monochromatic x-rays for low-dose digital mammography: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Kwon, Young Man; Choi, Byoung-Jung; Son, Hyun Hwa; Ryu, Cheol Woo; Chon, Kwon Su; Park, Seong Hoon; Juhng, Sun Kwan

    2012-12-01

    The feasibility of using monochromatic x-ray imaging generated from an x-ray tube and a multilayer reflector for digital mammography with a low radiation dose was examined. A multilayer mirror was designed to select the x-ray peak with an energy of 21.5 keV generated from an x-ray tube with a tungsten target and was fabricated by the ion-beam sputtering deposition system. Monochromatic x-ray images were obtained from an experimental digital mammography setup with a scanning stage. The performance of the system was evaluated using a breast phantom, a spectrometer, and a radiation dosimeter. We measured the contrast-to-noise ratio and performed the 10% modulation function test to determine image quality and resolution. The monochromatic beam from the multilayer reflector had a full-width-at-half-maximum of 0.9 keV at 21.5 keV, and the reflectivity was 0.70, which was 90% of the designed value. The polychromatic and monochromatic x-rays showed radiation doses of 0.497 and 0.0415 mGy, respectively. The monochromatic x-ray image shows fibers, calcifications, and masses more clearly than the polychromatic x-ray images do. The image contrast of the monochromatic x-rays was 1.85 times higher than that of the polychromatic x-rays. The experimental mammography setup had a spatial resolution of 7 lp/mm with both x-rays. Monochromatic x-rays generated using a multilayer mirror may be a useful diagnostic tool for breast examination by providing high contrast imaging with a low radiation dose.

  17. Modelling of TES X-ray Microcalorimeters with a Novel Absorber Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyomoto, Naoko; Bandler, Simon; Brefosky, Regis; Brown, Ari; Chervenak, James; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Finkbeiner, Frederick; Kelley, Richard; Kilbourne, Caroline; Lindeman, Mark; hide

    2007-01-01

    Our development of a novel x-ray absorber design that has enabled the incorporation of high-conductivity electroplated gold into our absorbers has yielded devices that not only have achieved breakthrough performance at 6 keV, but also are extraordinarily well modelled. We have determined device parameters that reproduce complex impedance curves and noise spectra throughout transition. Observed pulse heights, decay time and baseline energy resolution were in good agreement with simulated results using the same parameters. In the presentation, we will show these results in detail and we will also show highlights of the characterization of our gold/bismuth-absorber devices. We will discuss possible improvement of our current devices and expected performance of future devices using the modelling results.

  18. Modelling of TES X-ray Microcalorimeters with a Novel Absorber Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyomoto, Naoko; Bandler, Simon; Brefosky, Regis; Brown, Ari; Chervenak, James; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Finkbeiner, Frederick; Kelley, Richard; Kilbourne, Caroline; Lindeman, Mark; Porter, Frederick; Saab, Tarek; Sadleir, Jack; Smith, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Our development of a novel x-ray absorber design that has enabled the incorporation of high-conductivity electroplated gold into our absorbers has yielded devices that not only have achieved breakthrough performance at 6 keV, but also are extraordinarily well modelled. We have determined device parameters that reproduce complex impedance curves and noise spectra throughout transition. Observed pulse heights, decay time and baseline energy resolution were in good agreement with simulated results using the same parameters. In the presentation, we will show these results in detail and we will also show highlights of the characterization of our gold/bismuth-absorber devices. We will discuss possible improvement of our current devices and expected performance of future devices using the modelling results.

  19. An X-ray variable absorber within the broad line region in Fairall 51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, J.; Beuchert, T.; Guainazzi, M.; Longinotti, A. L.; Piconcelli, E.; Wilms, J.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Fairall 51 is a polar-scattered Seyfert 1 galaxy, a type of active galaxy believed to represent a bridge between unobscured type-1 and obscured type-2 objects. Fairall 51 has shown complex and variable X-ray absorption, but little is known about its origin. Aims: In our research, we observed Fairall 51 with the X-ray satellite Suzaku in order to constrain a characteristic time scale of its variability. Methods: We performed timing and spectral analysis of four observations separated by 1.5, 2, and 5.5 day intervals. Results: We found that the 0.5-50 keV broadband X-ray spectra are dominated by a primary power-law emission (with the photon index ~2). This emission is affected by at least three absorbers with different ionisations (log ξ ≈ 1-4). The spectrum is shaped further by a reprocessed emission, possibly coming from two regions, the accretion disc and a more distant scattering region. The accretion disc emission is smeared by the relativistic effects, from which we measured the spin of the black hole as a ≈ 0.8 ± 0.2. We found that most of the spectral variability can be attributed to the least ionised absorber whose column density changed by a factor of two between the first (highest-flux) and the last (lowest-flux) observation. Conclusions: A week-long scale of the variability indicates that the absorber is located at the distance ≈0.05 pc from the centre, i.e., in the broad line region.

  20. A partial eclipse of the heart: the absorbed X-ray low state in Mrk 1048

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, M. L.; Schartel, N.; Komossa, S.; Grupe, D.; Santos-Lleó, M.; Fabian, A. C.; Mathur, S.

    2014-11-01

    We present two new XMM-Newton observations of an unprecedented low-flux state in the Seyfert 1 Mrk 1048 (NGC 985), taken in 2013. The X-ray flux below 1 keV drops by a factor of 4-5, whereas the spectrum above 5 keV is essentially unchanged. This points towards an absorption origin for the low state, and we confirm this with spectral fitting, finding that the spectral differences can be well modelled by the addition of a partial covering neutral absorber, with a column density of ˜3 × 1022 cm-2 and a covering fraction of ˜0.6. The optical and UV fluxes are not affected, and indeed are marginally brighter in the more recent observations, suggesting that only the inner regions of the disc are affected by the absorption event. This indicates either that the absorption is due to a cloud passing over the inner disc, obscuring the X-ray source but leaving the outer disc untouched, or that the absorber is dust-free so the UV continuum is unaffected. We use arguments based on the duration of the event and the physical properties of the absorber to constrain its size and location, and conclude that it is most likely a small cloud at ˜1018 cm from the source.

  1. Examination frequency and population dose from medical X-ray examinations in Sudan in 2010.

    PubMed

    Suliman, I I; Ibraheem, S B; Youssif, B E; Abdelgabar, M I; Gafar, R; Elshiekh, E; Ahmed, Nada A; Sulieman, A

    2015-07-01

    This study was performed to estimate examination frequency and collective and per caput effective doses arising from medical X-ray procedures in Sudan, 2010. Information was collected from 30 hospitals performing radiography, computed tomography (CT), fluoroscopy and interventional radiology (IR) procedures. The estimated annual number of examinations was 33 million radiographic X-ray procedures (99 %), 0.34 million CT exams per year (14 % paediatrics CT), 0.02 million fluoroscopy and IR procedures. The estimated annual number of examinations was 326 per 1000 people. The estimated annual collective and per caput effective doses from medical X-ray procedures mount 7197 man Sv and 0.18 mSv, respectively. The study offered the first projection of frequency and population dose from medical X-ray examinations in Sudan and provides estimates of the impact of the medical X-ray procedures at the national level.

  2. The discovery of large amounts of cold, X-ray absorbing matter in cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Johnstone, R. M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Arnaud, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of significant excess absorption in the X-ray spectra of 12 clusters of galaxies is reported. The spectra also require a cooling-flow component, which confirms the results of imaging studies of the clusters showing the strongly peaked emission characteristic of cooling flows. The total mass of absorbing gas is determined on the assumption that it is distributed through the cooling flow region and has cosmic abundance. It is shown that the gas is most likely in the form of small cold clouds. The excess absorption is interpreted as being due to photoelectric absorption in cold gas clouds distributed through the cooling flows.

  3. The discovery of large amounts of cold, X-ray absorbing matter in cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Johnstone, R. M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Arnaud, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of significant excess absorption in the X-ray spectra of 12 clusters of galaxies is reported. The spectra also require a cooling-flow component, which confirms the results of imaging studies of the clusters showing the strongly peaked emission characteristic of cooling flows. The total mass of absorbing gas is determined on the assumption that it is distributed through the cooling flow region and has cosmic abundance. It is shown that the gas is most likely in the form of small cold clouds. The excess absorption is interpreted as being due to photoelectric absorption in cold gas clouds distributed through the cooling flows.

  4. BeppoSAX Observation of NGC 7582: Constraints on the X-Ray Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Fiore, F.; Perola, G. C.; Matt, G.; George, I. M.; Piro, L.; Bassani, L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a BeppoSAX observation of NGC 7582 made during 1998 November and an optical spectrum taken in 1998 October. The new X-ray data reveal a previously unknown hard X-ray component in NGC 7582, peaking close to 20 keV. Rapid variability is observed with correlated changes in the 5-10 and 13-60 keV bands indicating that a single continuum component, produced by the active nucleus, provides the, dominant flux across both bands. Comparison between RXTE and BeppoSAX data reveals changes in the 2 - 10 keV flux on timescales of months. Changes in the nuclear X-ray flux appear unrelated to the gradual decline in optical flux noted since the high-state in 1998 July. The 0.5 - 2 keV flux of NGC 7582 is not significantly variable within the BeppoSAX observation, but has brightened by a factor of approximately 2 since the ASCA observation of 1994. While there is some concern about contamination from spatially-unresolved sources, the long-term variability in soft X-ray flux seems most likely associated with the nucleus or an event within the host galaxy of NGC 7582. The 2 - 100 keV spectrum is well fit by a powerlaw of photon index Gamma = 1.95(sup +0.09, sub -0.18) steeper by Delta.Gamma approximately equal 0.40 than the index during the 1994 ASCA observation. The X-ray continuum is attenuated by a thick absorber of N(H) approximately 1.6 x10(exp 24)/sq cm covering approximately 60(sup +10%, sub -14%) of the nucleus plus a screen with N(sub H) approximately 1.4 x 10(exp 23)/ sq cm covering the entire nucleus. Comparison of the BeppoSAX and ASCA spectra shows an increase in the full screen by Delta.N(sub H) approximately equal 7 x 10(exp 22)/sq cm since 1994, confirming the absorption variability found by Xue et al. The increase in soft X-ray flux between 1994 and 1998 is consistent with the appearance of holes in the full screen allowing approximately < 1% of the nuclear flux to escape, and producing some clear lines-of-sight to the broad-line-region. The data

  5. A Unified View of X-ray Absorbers in AGNs and XRBs with MHD Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Shrader, Chris R.; Tombesi, Francesco; Behar, Ehud; Contopoulos, John

    2016-01-01

    The presence of UV and X-ray absorbers (aka. warm absorbers or WAs) has been long known for decades from extensive spectroscopic studies across diverse AGN populations such as nearby Seyfert galaxies and distant quasars. Furthermore, another class of seemingly distinct type of absorbers, ultra-fast outflows or UFOs, is becoming increasingly known today. Nonetheless, a physical identification of such absorbers, such as geometrical property and physical conditions, is very elusive to date despite the recent state-of-the-art observations. We develop a coherent scenario in which the detected absorbers are driven primarily (if not exclusively) by the action of global magnetic fields originating from a black hole accretion disk. In the context of MHD disk-wind of density profile of n~1/r, it is found that the properties of the observed WAs/UFOs are successfully described assuming a characteristic SED. As a case study, we analyze PG1211+143 and GRO J1655-40 to demonstrate that our wind model can systematically unify apparently diverse absorbers in both AGNs and XRBs in terms of explaining their global behavior as well as individual spectral lines.

  6. X-ray security scanners for personnel and vehicle control: dose quantities and dose values.

    PubMed

    Hupe, Oliver; Ankerhold, Ulrike

    2007-08-01

    After the security related occurrences in the past few years, there is an increasing need for airport security and border controls. In the combat against terror and smuggling, X-rays are used for the screening of persons and vehicles. The exposure of humans to ionising radiation raises the question of justification. To solve this question, reliable and traceable dose values are needed. A research project of the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety was initiated. Its task is to measure the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), and the personal dose equivalent, H(p)(10), for typical types of personnel and vehicle X-ray scanners, using the transmission and/or backscatter method. In the following, the measuring quantities which are to be used for these investigations will be discussed and the measuring instruments will be presented. Furthermore, the experimental set-up is described. For the personnel X-ray scanners investigated, the obtained dose values are in the range from 0.07 to 6 microSv. These values will be compared to the dose values of the natural environmental radiation and some exposures in the field of medicine.

  7. Extracting material parameters from x-ray attenuation: a CT feasibility study using kilovoltage synchrotron x-rays incident upon low atomic number absorbers.

    PubMed

    Kirby, B J; Davis, J R; Grant, J A; Morgan, M J

    2003-10-21

    The work reported here is a feasibility study of the extraction of material parameters from measurements of the linear x-ray attenuation coefficient of low atomic number absorbers. Computed tomography (CT) scans of small samples containing several liquids and solids were carried out with synchrotron radiation at the Australian National Beamline Facility (BL 20B) in Japan. Average values of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient were extracted for each material for x-ray energies ranging from 11 keV to 20.5 keV. The electron density was estimated by applying results derived from a parametrization of the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient first developed by Jackson and Hawkes and extended for this work. Average estimates for the electron density of triethanolamine and acetic acid were made to within +5.3% of the actual value. Other materials examined included furfuraldehyde, perspex and teflon, for which average estimates of the electron density were less than 10% in excess of the calculated value.

  8. 20 percent lower lung cancer mortality with low-dose CT vs chest X-ray

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have found a 20 percent reduction in deaths from lung cancer among current or former heavy smokers who were screened with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) versus those screened by chest X-ray.

  9. Bubble technique for evaluating effective dose of diagnostic X-rays: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien Yi; Yang, Kai Chun; Pan, Lung Kwang

    2009-09-01

    This study examined the feasibility of applying the bubble technique to evaluate effective dose for diagnostic X-rays. A BTI-GAMMA bubble detector from Bubble Technology Industries was used for gamma detection. A multi-slab acrylic (PMMA) phantom was fabricated to quantify the effective dose E based on an ICRP-60 report. Accordingly, the bubble detectors were evaluated through preliminary tests to ascertain both the reproducibility of specific X-ray doses and the linearity of multiple X-ray doses. Qualified bubble detectors were then inserted into a multi-slab acrylic phantom. The positions of the inserted bubbles closely corresponded with the position of represented organs or tissues. The effective dose E of X-ray was determined in 12 organ and tissue samples. The bubble detector was maintained at either 21.5 degrees C (for abdomen AP) or 22 degrees C (for chest PA) to optimize counting, and the assessed effective doses for males and females were 66.75 +/- 10.23 microSv and 66.47 +/- 9.89 microSv, respectively, for each chest PA X-ray exposure. The abdominal AP X-ray exposure doses were 1183.73 +/- 124.29 microSv and 976.70 +/- 120.13 microSv for males and females, respectively. Controlling and holding the bubble detector at an optimal ambient temperature during X-ray exposure was the most important issue in practical application, and the optimal temperature had to be adjusted slightly with incident X-ray to effectively suppress the largest bubbles to enable easy reading.

  10. Study of Multilayer X-ray Absorbers to Improve Detection Efficiency of TES X-ray Microcalorimeter Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, T.; Nagayoshi, K.; Muramatsu, H.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Saito, M.; Homma, T.; Hara, T.; Noda, H.

    2016-07-01

    We report the fabrication and evaluation of the Cu/Bi bilayer absorber with electrodeposition. We designed the Cu/Bi absorber to satisfy the requirements for scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The residual resistivity ratios of films of Cu and Bi with electrodeposition was {5.91± 0.49} and {2.06± 0.33}, respectively; these values are sufficient for the requirements of STEM. We found that the Cu/Bi bilayer absorber TES microcalorimeter experienced a pulse-shape variation and we considered that these variations were caused by the quality of the contact surface between the absorber and TES. In addition, we examined the structure of the absorber using focus ion beam analysis and STEM. The results suggest that an oxidation between the Cu and seed layer, in which the layer is an electrode for electrodeposition, yielded variations. Moreover, thermal simulation suggests that the thermal conduction between the absorber and TES caused variations. The results of this study will improve the process of Bi electrodeposition.

  11. Percent depth doses and X-ray beam characterizations of a fluoroscopic system incorporating copper filtration.

    PubMed

    Wunderle, Kevin A; Godley, Andrew R; Shen, Zhilei Liu; Rakowski, Joseph T; Dong, Frank F

    2017-04-01

    In this investigation, we sought to characterize X-ray beam qualities and quantitate percent depth dose (PDD) curves for fluoroscopic X-ray beams incorporating added copper (Cu) filtration, such as those commonly used in fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI). The intended application of this research is for dosimetry in soft tissue from FGI procedures using these data. All measurements in this study were acquired on a Siemens (Erlangen, Germany) Artis zeego fluoroscope. X-ray beam characteristics of first half-value layer (HVL), second HVL, homogeneity coefficients (HCs), backscatter factors (BSFs) and kVp accuracy and precision were determined to characterize the X-ray beams used for the PDD measurements. A scanning water tank was used to measure PDD curves for 60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp X-ray beams with Cu filtration thicknesses of 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.6, and 0.9 mm at 11 cm, 22 cm, and 42 cm nominal fields of view, in water depths of 0 to 150 mm. X-ray beam characteristics of first HVLs and HCs differed from previous published research of fluoroscopic X-ray beam qualities without Cu filtration. PDDs for 60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp with 0 mm of Cu filtration were comparable to previous published research, accounting for differences in fluoroscopes, geometric orientation, type of ionization chamber, X-ray beam quality, and the water tank used for data collection. PDDs and X-ray beam characteristics for beam qualities with Cu filtration are presented, which have not been previously reported. The data sets of X-ray beam characteristics and PDDs presented in this study can be used to estimate organ or soft tissue doses at depth involving similar beam qualities or to compare with mathematical models. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  12. Broad-band study of hard X-ray-selected absorbed active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rosa, A.; Panessa, F.; Bassani, L.; Bazzano, A.; Bird, A.; Landi, R.; Malizia, A.; Molina, M.; Ubertini, P.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we report on the broad-band X-ray properties of a complete sample of absorbed Seyfert galaxies hard X-ray selected with INTEGRAL. Our sample is composed of 33 sources, of which 15 are newly discovered active galactic nuclei (AGN) above 20 keV (IGR sources), while 18 are already known type 2 AGN ('known'). For 17 sources (15 IGR + 2 'known' sources) we have performed a broad-band analysis using both XMM-Newton, and INTEGRAL-IBIS data. To have a full view of the complete sample we have then complemented the analysis of the 16 remaining sources with already existing broad-band studies in the same range. The high-quality broad-band spectra are well reproduced with an absorbed primary emission with a high-energy cut-off and its scattered fraction below 2-3 keV, plus the Compton reflection features (Compton hump and Fe line emission). This study permitted a very good characterization of the primary continuum and, in turn, of all the spectral features. A high-energy cut-off is found in 30 per cent of the sample, with an average value below 150 keV, suggesting that this feature has to be present in the X-ray spectra of obscured AGN. The hard X-ray selection favours the detection of more obscured sources, with the log NH average value of 23.15 (standard deviation of 0.89). The diagnostic plot NH versus Foss(2-10 keV)/F(20-100 keV) allowed the isolation of the Compton-thick objects, and may represent a useful tool for future hard X-ray observations of newly discovered AGN. We are unable to associate the reflection components (both continuum and Fe line) with the absorbing gas as a torus (as envisaged in the Unified Model), a more complex scenario being necessary. In the Compton-thin sources, a fraction (but not all) of the Fe K line needs to be produced in a gas located closer to the black hole than the Compton-thick torus, and this is possibly associated with the optical broad-line region, responsible also for the absorption. We still need a Compton

  13. An investigation of dose changes for therapeutic kilovoltage X-ray beams with underlying lead shielding.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robin; Healy, Brendan; Holloway, Lois; Baldock, Clive

    2007-07-01

    Kilovoltage x-ray beams are used to treat cancer on or close to the skin surface. Many clinical cases use high atomic number materials as shielding to reduce dose to underlying healthy tissues. In this work, we have investigated the effect on both the surface dose and depth doses in a water phantom with lead shielding at depth in the phantom. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the water phantom and to calculate the surface doses and depth doses using primary x-ray beam spectra derived from an analytical model. The x-ray beams were in the energy range of 75-135 kVp with field sizes of 2, 5 and 8 cm diameter. The lead sheet was located beneath the water surface at depths ranging from 0.5-7.5 cm. The surface dose decreased as the lead was positioned closer to the water surface and as the field size was increased. The variation in surface dose as a function of x-ray beam energy was only small but the maximum reduction occurred for the 100 kVp x-ray beam. For the 8 cm diameter field with the lead at 1 cm depth and using the 100 kVp x-ray beam, the surface dose was reduced to 0.898 of the surface dose in the water phantom only. Measured surface dose changes, using a Farmer-type ionization chamber, agreed with the Monte Carlo calculated doses. Calculated depth doses in water with a lead sheet positioned below the surface showed that the dose fall-off increased as the lead was positioned closer to the water surface as compared to the depth dose in the water phantom only. Monte Carlo calculations of the total x-ray beam spectrum at the water surface showed that the total fluence decreased due to a reduction in backscatter from within the water and very little backscatter from the lead. The mean energy of the x-ray spectrum varied less than 1 keV, with the lead at 1 cm beneath the water phantom surface. As the Monte Carlo calculations showed good agreement with the measured results, this method can be used to verify surface dose changes in clinical situations

  14. The reduction methods of operator's radiation dose for portable dental X-ray machines.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jeong-Yeon; Han, Won-Jeong

    2012-08-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the methods to reduce operator's radiation dose when taking intraoral radiographs with portable dental X-ray machines. Two kinds of portable dental X-ray machines (DX3000, Dexcowin and Rextar, Posdion) were used. Operator's radiation dose was measured with an 1,800 cc ionization chamber (RadCal Corp.) at the hand level of X-ray tubehead and at the operator's chest and waist levels with and without the backscatter shield. The operator's radiation dose at the hand level was measured with and without lead gloves and with long and short cones. The backscatter shield reduced operator's radiation dose at the hand level of X-ray tubehead to 23 - 32%, the lead gloves to 26 - 31%, and long cone to 48 - 52%. And the backscatter shield reduced operator's radiation dose at the operator's chest and waist levels to 0.1 - 37%. When portable dental X-ray systems are used, it is recommended to select X-ray machine attached with a backscatter shield and a long cone and to wear the lead gloves.

  15. A Simple Low-dose X-ray CT Simulation from High-dose Scan.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dong; Huang, Jing; Bian, Zhaoying; Niu, Shanzhou; Zhang, Hua; Feng, Qianjin; Liang, Zhengrong; Ma, Jianhua

    2015-10-01

    Low-dose X-ray computed tomography (CT) simulation from high-dose scan is required in optimizing radiation dose to patients. In this study, we propose a simple low-dose CT simulation strategy in sinogram domain using the raw data from high-dose scan. Specially, a relationship between the incident fluxes of low- and high- dose scans is first determined according to the repeated projection measurements and analysis. Second, the incident flux level of the simulated low-dose scan is generated by properly scaling the incident flux level of high-dose scan via the determined relationship in the first step. Third, the low-dose CT transmission data by energy integrating detection is simulated by adding a statistically independent Poisson noise distribution plus a statistically independent Gaussian noise distribution. Finally, a filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithm is implemented to reconstruct the resultant low-dose CT images. The present low-dose simulation strategy is verified on the simulations and real scans by comparing it with the existing low-dose CT simulation tool. Experimental results demonstrated that the present low-dose CT simulation strategy can generate accurate low-dose CT sinogram data from high-dose scan in terms of qualitative and quantitative measurements.

  16. Gold nanoparticles as dose-enhancement agent for kilovoltage X-ray therapy of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Ra; Kim, Eun-Hee

    2017-05-01

    Melanoma is mainly treated by surgery and rarely with radiation because of the high radioresistance of this tumor. Nevertheless, radiotherapy is the preferred treatment modality for unresectable lesions and avoiding cosmetic disfigurement caused by surgical excision. This study investigated the therapeutic advantage of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for kilovoltage X-ray treatment of melanoma. Commercial AuNPs were evaluated for cytotoxicity and cellular internalization. The sensitivity of human skin melanoma cells to 150 and 450 kVp X-ray exposure was assessed in terms of clonogenicity with or without spherical AuNP treatment. AuNP treatment elicited dose enhancement effect on melanoma cells exposed to kilovoltage X-rays. Treatment with 320 μM 50 nm AuNPs before exposure to 150 kVp X-rays at 2 Gy resulted in clonogenic cell death equivalent to that caused by 4.3 Gy X-rays without AuNP treatment. AuNPs of 50 nm in size can regulate melanoma cells in kilovoltage X-ray treatment by functioning as dose-enhancement agent and thus improving radioresponse of the cells. Melanomas of stages T1-T3 gain therapeutic benefits from 150 kVp X-ray treatment.

  17. Radiation dose and magnification in pelvic X-ray: EOS™imaging system versus plain radiographs.

    PubMed

    Chiron, P; Demoulin, L; Wytrykowski, K; Cavaignac, E; Reina, N; Murgier, J

    2017-09-20

    In plain pelvic X-ray, magnification makes measurement unreliable. The EOS™ (EOS Imaging, Paris France) imaging system is reputed to reproduce patient anatomy exactly, with a lower radiation dose. This, however, has not been assessed according to patient weight, although both magnification and irradiation are known to vary with weight. We therefore conducted a prospective comparative study, to compare: 1) image magnification and 2) radiation dose between the EOS imaging system and plain X-ray. The EOS imaging system reproduces patient anatomy exactly, regardless of weight, unlike plain X-ray. A single-center comparative study of plain pelvic X-ray and 2D EOS radiography was performed in 183 patients: 186 arthroplasties; 104 male, 81 female; mean age 61.3 ± 13.7 years (range, 24-87 years). Magnification and radiation dose (dose-area product: DAP) were compared between the two systems in 186 hips in patients with a mean body-mass index (BMI) of 27.1 ± 5.3kg/m(2) (range, 17.6-42.3kg/m(2)), including 7 with morbid obesity. Mean magnification was zero using the EOS system, regardless of patient weight, compared to 1.15 ± 0.05 (range, 1-1.32) on plain X-ray (p<10(-5)). In patients with BMI <25, mean magnification on plain X-ray was 1.15 ± 0.05 (range, 1-1.25) and, in patients with morbid obesity, 1.22 ± 0.06 (range, 1.18-1.32). The mean radiation dose was 8.19 ± 2.63 dGy/cm(2) (range, 1.77-14.24) with the EOS system, versus 19.38 ± .12.37 dGy/cm(2) (range, 4.77-81.75) with plain X-ray (p<10(-4)). For BMI >40, mean radiation dose was 9.36 ± 2.57 dGy/cm(2) (range, 7.4-14.2) with the EOS system, versus 44.76 ± 22.21 (range, 25.2-81.7) with plain X-ray. Radiation dose increased by 0.20 dGy with each extra BMI point for the EOS system, versus 0.74 dGy for plain X-ray. Magnification did not vary with patient weight using the EOS system, unlike plain X-ray, and radiation dose was 2.5-fold lower. 3, prospective case-control study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS

  18. Absorbed doses from temporomandibular joint radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, S.L.; Lanzetta, M.L.

    1985-06-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used in a tissue-equivalent phantom to measure doses of radiation absorbed by various structures in the head when the temporomandibular joint was examined by four different radiographic techniques--the transcranial, transorbital, and sigmoid notch (Parma) projections and the lateral tomograph. The highest doses of radiation occurred at the point of entry for the x-ray beam, ranging from 112 mrad for the transorbital view to 990 mrad for the sigmoid notch view. Only the transorbital projection a radiation dose to the lens of the eye. Of the four techniques evaluated, the lateral tomograph produced the highest doses to the pituitary gland and the bone marrow, while the sigmoid notch radiograph produced the highest doses to the parotid gland.

  19. Image quality based x-ray dose control in cardiac imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Andrew G.; Kengyelics, Stephen M.; Gislason-Lee, Amber J.

    2015-03-01

    An automated closed-loop dose control system balances the radiation dose delivered to patients and the quality of images produced in cardiac x-ray imaging systems. Using computer simulations, this study compared two designs of automatic x-ray dose control in terms of the radiation dose and quality of images produced. The first design, commonly in x-ray systems today, maintained a constant dose rate at the image receptor. The second design maintained a constant image quality in the output images. A computer model represented patients as a polymethylmetacrylate phantom (which has similar x-ray attenuation to soft tissue), containing a detail representative of an artery filled with contrast medium. The model predicted the entrance surface dose to the phantom and contrast to noise ratio of the detail as an index of image quality. Results showed that for the constant dose control system, phantom dose increased substantially with phantom size (x5 increase between 20 cm and 30 cm thick phantom), yet the image quality decreased by 43% for the same thicknesses. For the constant quality control, phantom dose increased at a greater rate with phantom thickness (>x10 increase between 20 cm and 30 cm phantom). Image quality based dose control could tailor the x-ray output to just achieve the quality required, which would reduce dose to patients where the current dose control produces images of too high quality. However, maintaining higher levels of image quality for large patients would result in a significant dose increase over current practice.

  20. X-Ray Dose in Microfocus Radiographic Inspections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-15

    22 4.6 Thermoluminescent Dosimetry and Other Measurement Methods ................................ 23 4.7 M inim ization of...other materials of interest. One can, in principle, measure dose rates in a package directly if a small sensor such as a thermoluminescent dosimeter...relative dose in silicon with (blue triangles) and without (purple circles) an overlying 0.5-[rm- thick gold layer. 22 4.6 Thermoluminescent Dosimetry and

  1. Generation and dose distribution measurement of flash x-ray in KALI-5000 system

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Rakhee; Roy, Amitava; Mitra, S.; Sharma, A.; Mondal, J.; Mittal, K. C.; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2008-10-15

    Flash x-ray generation studies have been carried out in KALI-5000 Pulse power system. The intense relativistic electron beam has been bombarded on a tantalum target at anode to produce flash x-ray via bremsstrahlung conversion. The typical electron beam parameter was 360 kV, 18 kA, and 100 ns, with a few hundreds of A/cm{sup 2} current density. The x-ray dose has been measured with calcium sulfate:dysposium (CaSO{sub 4}:Dy) thermoluminescent dosimeter and the axial dose distribution has been characterized. It has been observed that the on axis dose falls of with distance {approx}1/x{sup n}, where n varies from 1.8 to 1.85. A maximum on axis dose of 46 mrad has been measured at 1 m distance from the source. A plastic scintillator with optical fiber coupled to a photomultiplier tube has been developed to measure the x-ray pulse width. The typical x-ray pulse width varied from 50 to 80 ns.

  2. Generation and dose distribution measurement of flash x-ray in KALI-5000 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Rakhee; Roy, Amitava; Mitra, S.; Sharma, A.; Mondal, J.; Mittal, K. C.; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2008-10-01

    Flash x-ray generation studies have been carried out in KALI-5000 Pulse power system. The intense relativistic electron beam has been bombarded on a tantalum target at anode to produce flash x-ray via bremsstrahlung conversion. The typical electron beam parameter was 360 kV, 18 kA, and 100 ns, with a few hundreds of A/cm2 current density. The x-ray dose has been measured with calcium sulfate:dysposium (CaSO4:Dy) thermoluminescent dosimeter and the axial dose distribution has been characterized. It has been observed that the on axis dose falls of with distance ˜1/xn, where n varies from 1.8 to 1.85. A maximum on axis dose of 46 mrad has been measured at 1 m distance from the source. A plastic scintillator with optical fiber coupled to a photomultiplier tube has been developed to measure the x-ray pulse width. The typical x-ray pulse width varied from 50 to 80 ns.

  3. Generation and dose distribution measurement of flash x-ray in KALI-5000 system.

    PubMed

    Menon, Rakhee; Roy, Amitava; Mitra, S; Sharma, A; Mondal, J; Mittal, K C; Nagesh, K V; Chakravarthy, D P

    2008-10-01

    Flash x-ray generation studies have been carried out in KALI-5000 Pulse power system. The intense relativistic electron beam has been bombarded on a tantalum target at anode to produce flash x-ray via bremsstrahlung conversion. The typical electron beam parameter was 360 kV, 18 kA, and 100 ns, with a few hundreds of A/cm(2) current density. The x-ray dose has been measured with calcium sulfate:dysposium (CaSO(4):Dy) thermoluminescent dosimeter and the axial dose distribution has been characterized. It has been observed that the on axis dose falls of with distance approximately 1/x(n), where n varies from 1.8 to 1.85. A maximum on axis dose of 46 mrad has been measured at 1 m distance from the source. A plastic scintillator with optical fiber coupled to a photomultiplier tube has been developed to measure the x-ray pulse width. The typical x-ray pulse width varied from 50 to 80 ns.

  4. REDUCTION OF BIOLOGICAL EFFECTIVENESS OF X-RAYS AT VERY HIGH DOSE RATES,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    It has been observed that relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of X-rays or gamma rays is independent of dose rate provided that their delivery ... time is short compared to the recuperation time of the organism. At higher dose rates, however, several effects may modify the RBE. One possible

  5. Reference dose levels for patients undergoing common diagnostic X-ray examinations in Irish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D A; Brennan, P C

    2000-04-01

    Wide variations in patient dose for the same type of X-ray examination have been evident from various international dose surveys. Reference dose levels provide a framework to reduce this variability and aid in the optimization of radiation protection. The aim of this study was to establish, for the first time, a baseline for national reference dose levels in Ireland for four of the most common X-ray examinations: chest, abdomen, pelvis and lumbar spine. Measurements of entrance surface dose using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) for these four X-ray examinations were performed on 10 patients in each of 16 randomly selected hospitals. This represented 42% of Irish hospitals applicable to this study. Results have shown wide variation of mean hospital doses, from a factor of 3 for an anteroposterior lumbar spine to a factor of 23 for the chest X-ray. The difference between maximum and minimum individual patient dose values varied up to a factor of 75. Reasons for these dose variations were complex but, in general, low tube potential, high mAs and low filtration were associated with high-dose hospitals. This study also demonstrated lower reference dose levels of up to 40% when compared with those established by the UK and the Commission of the European Communities for four out of six projections. Only the chest X-ray exhibited a similar reference level to those established elsewhere. This emphasizes the importance of each country establishing its own reference dose levels that are appropriate to their own radiographic techniques and practices in order to optimize patient protection.

  6. Nanoparticle location and material dependent dose enhancement in X-ray radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mainul

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles of high atomic number (Z) materials can act as radiosensitizers to enhance radiation dose delivered to tumors. An analytical approach is used to calculate dose enhancements to tumor endothelial cells and their nuclei for a series of nanoparticles (bismuth, gold and platinum) located at different locations relative to nuclei by considering contributions from both photoelectrons and Auger electrons. The ratio of the dose delivered to cells with and without the nanoparticles is known as the dose enhancement factor (DEF). DEFs depend on material composition, size and location of nanoparticles with respect to the cell and the nucleus. Energy of irradiating X-ray beam affects X-ray absorption by nanoparticles and plays an important role in dose enhancements. For diagnostic X-ray sources, bismuth nanoparticles provide higher dose enhancements than gold and platinum nanoparticles for a given nanoparticle size, concentration and location. The highest DEFs are achieved for nanoparticles located closest to the nucleus where energy depositions from short range Auger electrons are maximum. With nanoparticles ranging in diameter between 2-400 nm, the dose enhancement increases with decrease in particle size. The results are useful in finding optimized conditions for nanoparticle enhanced X-ray radiation therapy of cancer. PMID:23393610

  7. Patient dose and image quality in five standard x-ray examinations.

    PubMed

    Havukainen, R; Pirinen, M

    1993-01-01

    Patient doses and image quality in five standard x-ray examination projections (22-36 measurements per each projection) have been measured, using homogeneous phantoms. The means and range of variation for the entrance skin air kerma values were: abdomen AP 5.2 mGy (1.1-21 mGy), chest PA 0.27 mGy (0.035-0.84 mGy), lumbar spine AP 8.4 mGy (2.9-28 mGy), skull LAT 3.1 mGy (1.1-7.7 mGy), and thoracic spine AP 7.9 mGy (1.3-22 mGy). Considerable variation was found in image quality parameters: film optical densities, image contrasts, and resolutions as well as in exposure values, tube voltages, exposure times, and in half-value thicknesses. The study indicated the need to standardize medical x-ray examination techniques in different x-ray departments. The measuring method can be used for comparing the patient dose and image quality of an individual x-ray unit to the doses and image quality in general use. The results can be used as the reference values for quality control of x-ray equipment.

  8. Do flat detector cardiac X-ray systems convey advantages over image-intensifier-based systems? Study comparing X-ray dose and image quality.

    PubMed

    Davies, Andrew G; Cowen, Arnold R; Kengyelics, Stephen M; Moore, Janet; Sivananthan, Mohan U

    2007-07-01

    The recent introduction of "flat-panel detector" (FD)-based cardiac catheterisation laboratories should offer improvements in image quality and/or dose efficiency over X-ray systems of conventional design. We compared three X-ray systems, one image-intensifier (II)-based system (system A), and two FD-based designs (systems B and C), assessing their image quality and dose efficiency. Phantom measurements were performed to assess dose rates in fluoroscopy and cine acquisition. Phantom dose rates were broadly similar for all systems, with all systems classified as offering "low" dose rates in fluoroscopy on standard phantoms. Patient X-ray dose rate and subjective image quality was assessed for 90 patients. Dose area product (DAP) rates were similar for all systems, except system C, which had a lower DAP rate in fluoroscopy. In terms of subjective image quality, the order of preference was (best to worst): system C, system A, system B. This study indicates that the use of an FD detector does not infer an automatic improvement in image quality or dose efficiency over II based designs. Specification and configuration of all of the components in the X-ray system contribute to the dose levels used and image quality achieved.

  9. Dose to persons assisting voluntarily during X-ray examinations of large animals.

    PubMed

    Hupe, O; Ankerhold, U

    2008-01-01

    Pet owners often assist voluntarily while their pets are being X-rayed during a medical examination. Medical staff members occupationally exposed to radiation are monitored regularly, as they wear personal dosemeters, whereas no dose measurements are carried out on voluntarily assisting persons, as measurements are both cost- and time-intensive. However, the dose limits prescribed in the German radiation protection regulations have to be observed for these volunteers as well. To assist the legislator in deciding whether the German regulation should be changed so that in future the dose of voluntarily assisting persons should also be determined-either by wearing a dosemeter or in another way-investigations with regard to the radiation dose exposure suffered by volunteers were performed within the scope of a research project. The personal dose equivalent Hp(10) for persons assisting knowingly and willingly in X-ray examinations in veterinary medicine was measured for different examination scenarios. Typical exposure situations have been identified and measurements performed in the field of scattered X-rays. The measurements were carried out on animals in veterinary practices and, to verify these measurements, also under laboratory conditions. This paper deals with X-ray examinations of large animals, with the focus especially on horses. The measured personal dose equivalent values of voluntary helpers in equine radiology are in the order of a few microsieverts.

  10. Are there two populations of X-ray absorbers in Seyfert 2 galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelbord, J. M.; Weaver, K. A.

    1998-12-01

    The canonical unified model for Seyfert galaxies (Antonucci, 1993, ARA&A 31, 473) posits the existance of a nuclear torus which blocks the direct line of sight to the central engine of type 2 Seyferts. However, another possibility would be that in at least some Seyfert galaxies the obscuring body could be the disk of the host galaxy (Schmitt et al., 1997, ApJ 477, 623). The column densities of the putative tori should be a few orders of magnitude larger than those of the host galaxy planes, so we would expect a bimodal distribution of NH columns if either of these absorbers could be responsible. Starting with the subset of the Schmitt et al. sample for which ASCA data is available, we are measuring the NH column densities using a variety of spectral models. The resulting distribution of column densities is then interpreted with consideration of both optically observed galactic inclinations and possible nuclear torus orientations implied from observed radio elongation axes. This work is being done as a part of a thesis project to examine the emission and absorption features in the X-ray spectra of a large sample of Seyfert galaxies, and to combine this data with observations made in other wavebands in order to put constraints on the unified model of Seyfert galaxies.

  11. High-dose-rate stroboscopic x-ray generator with a hot-cathode triode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Ichimaru, Toshio; Sakamaki, Kimio; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu

    1997-12-01

    The construction and the fundamental studies of a high-dose- rate stroboscopic x-ray generator utilizing a hot-cathode radiation tube for high-speed radiography are described. This generator consists of the following essential components: a constant high-voltage power supply, an energy-storage oil condenser of about 0.1 (mu) F, a grid pulser, a dc power supply for the filament, and an x-ray tube. The x-ray tube is a glass-enclosed hot-cathode triode and is composed of the following major parts: an anode rod made of copper, a tungsten plate target, an iron focusing electrode, a tungsten hot- cathode (filament), a tungsten grid, and a glass tube body. The electron beams from the cathode are accelerated by both the grid and anode electrodes and are roughly converged to the target by the focusing electrode. In the present work, the storage condenser is charged up to 70 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser are discharged repetitively to the x-ray tube by the grid pulser. Because the cathode current is increased by increasing the positive grid voltage, high-dose-rate repetitive x-rays are then produced. In this generator, the cathode current which is almost equivalent to the tube current is primarily regulated by the filament temperature (fulminate voltage). The pulse widths of x-rays were about 600 ns, and the maximum repetition rate was about 50 kHz. The cathode current was less than 3.1 angstrom, and the x-ray intensity had a value of 35.2 nC/kg at 0.5 m per pulse with a charging voltage of 70 kV and a filament voltage of 12 V.

  12. Dose conversion coefficients calculated using tomographic phantom, KTMAN-2, for X-ray examination of cardiac catheterisation.

    PubMed

    Park, S H; Lee, J K; Lee, C

    2008-01-01

    In this study, organ-absorbed doses and effective doses to patient during interventional radiological procedures were estimated using tomographic phantom, Korean Typical Man-2 (KTMAN-2). Four projections of cardiac catheterisation were simulated for dose calculation by Monte Carlo technique. The parameters of X-ray source and exposure conditions were obtained from literature data. Particle transport was simulated using general purposed Monte Carlo code, MCNPX 2.5.0. Organ-absorbed doses and effective doses were normalised to dose area product (DAP). The effective doses per DAP were between 0.1 and 0.5 mSv Gy(-1) per cm2. The results were compared with those derived from adult stylised phantom. KTMAN-2 received up to 105% higher effective doses than stylised phantom. The dose differences were mainly caused by more realistic internal topology of KTMAN-2 compared to stylised phantom that are closely positioned organs near the heart and shift of abdominal organs to the thoracic region due to supine position. The results of this study showed that tomographic phantoms are more suitable for dose assessment of supine patients undergoing the interventional radiology. The results derived from KTMAN-2 were the first radiation dose data based on non-Caucasian individuals for interventional procedures.

  13. Dose-rate plays a significant role in synchrotron radiation X-ray-induced damage of rodent testes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Heyu; Wang, Ban; Wang, Caixia; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Yingxin; Hong, Yunyi; Fu, Shen; Wu, Fan; Ying, Weihai

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray has significant potential for applications in medical imaging and cancer treatment. However, the mechanisms underlying SR X-ray-induced tissue damage remain unclear. Previous studies on regular X-ray-induced tissue damage have suggested that dose-rate could affect radiation damage. Because SR X-ray has exceedingly high dose-rate compared to regular X-ray, it remains to be determined if dose-rate may affect SR X-ray-induced tissue damage. We used rodent testes as a model to investigate the role of dose-rate in SR X-ray-induced tissue damage. One day after SR X-ray irradiation, we determined the effects of the irradiation of the same dosage at two different dose-rates, 0.11 Gy/s and 1.1 Gy/s, on TUNEL signals, caspase-3 activation and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) of the testes. Compared to those produced by the irradiation at 0.11 Gy/s, irradiation at 1.1 Gy/s produced higher levels of DSBs, TUNEL signals, and caspase-3 activation in the testes. Our study has provided the first evidence suggesting that dose-rate could be a significant factor in SR X-ray-induced tissue damage, which may establish a valuable base for utilizing this factor to manipulate the tissue damage in SR X-ray-based medical applications. PMID:28078052

  14. Dose-rate plays a significant role in synchrotron radiation X-ray-induced damage of rodent testes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Heyu; Wang, Ban; Wang, Caixia; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Yingxin; Hong, Yunyi; Fu, Shen; Wu, Fan; Ying, Weihai

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray has significant potential for applications in medical imaging and cancer treatment. However, the mechanisms underlying SR X-ray-induced tissue damage remain unclear. Previous studies on regular X-ray-induced tissue damage have suggested that dose-rate could affect radiation damage. Because SR X-ray has exceedingly high dose-rate compared to regular X-ray, it remains to be determined if dose-rate may affect SR X-ray-induced tissue damage. We used rodent testes as a model to investigate the role of dose-rate in SR X-ray-induced tissue damage. One day after SR X-ray irradiation, we determined the effects of the irradiation of the same dosage at two different dose-rates, 0.11 Gy/s and 1.1 Gy/s, on TUNEL signals, caspase-3 activation and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) of the testes. Compared to those produced by the irradiation at 0.11 Gy/s, irradiation at 1.1 Gy/s produced higher levels of DSBs, TUNEL signals, and caspase-3 activation in the testes. Our study has provided the first evidence suggesting that dose-rate could be a significant factor in SR X-ray-induced tissue damage, which may establish a valuable base for utilizing this factor to manipulate the tissue damage in SR X-ray-based medical applications.

  15. X-ray tube current modulation and patient doses in chest CT.

    PubMed

    He, Wenjun; Huda, Walter; Magill, Dennise; Tavrides, Emily; Yao, Hai

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how patient effective doses vary as a function of X-ray tube projection angle, as well as the patient long axis, and quantify how X-ray tube current modulation affects patient doses in chest CT examinations. Chest examinations were simulated for a gantry CT scanner geometry with projections acquired for a beam width of 4 cm. PCXMC 2.0.1 was used to calculate patient effective doses at 15° intervals around the patient's isocentre, and at nine locations along the patient long axis. Idealised tube current modulation schemes were modelled as a function of the X-ray tube angle and the patient long axis. Tube current modulations were characterised by the modulation amplitude R, which was allowed to vary between 1.5 and 5. Effective dose maxima occur for anteroposterior projections at the location of the (radiosensitive) breasts. The maximum to minimum ratio of effective doses as a function of the patient long axis was 4.9, and as a function of the X-ray tube angle was 2.1. Doubling the value of R reduces effective doses from longitudinal modulation alone by ∼4% and from angular modulation alone by ∼2%. In chest CT, tube current modulation schemes currently have longitudinal R values of ∼2.2, and angular R values that range between 1.5 and 3.4. Current X-ray tube current modulation schemes are expected to reduce patient effective doses in chest CT examinations by ∼10%, with longitudinal modulation accounting for two-thirds and angular modulation for the remaining one-third.

  16. Mutations induced in Tradescantia by small doses of X-rays and neutrons - Analysis of dose-response curves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, A. H.; Underbrink, A. G.; Rossi, H. H.

    1972-01-01

    Dose-response curves for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs were analyzed after neutron and X-ray irradiation with doses ranging from a fraction of a rad to the region of saturation. The dose-effect relation for neutrons indicates a linear dependence from 0.01 to 8 rads; between 0.25 and 5 rads, a linear dependence is indicated for X-rays also. As a consequence the relative biological effectiveness reaches a constant value (about 50) at low doses. The observations are in good agreement with the predictions of the theory of dual radiation action and support its interpretation of the effects of radiation on higher organisms. The doubling dose of X-rays was found to be nearly 1 rad.

  17. Mutations induced in Tradescantia by small doses of X-rays and neutrons - Analysis of dose-response curves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, A. H.; Underbrink, A. G.; Rossi, H. H.

    1972-01-01

    Dose-response curves for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs were analyzed after neutron and X-ray irradiation with doses ranging from a fraction of a rad to the region of saturation. The dose-effect relation for neutrons indicates a linear dependence from 0.01 to 8 rads; between 0.25 and 5 rads, a linear dependence is indicated for X-rays also. As a consequence the relative biological effectiveness reaches a constant value (about 50) at low doses. The observations are in good agreement with the predictions of the theory of dual radiation action and support its interpretation of the effects of radiation on higher organisms. The doubling dose of X-rays was found to be nearly 1 rad.

  18. Study of high-dose x-ray radiation damage of silicon sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandt, Joern; Fretwurst, Eckhart; Klanner, Robert; Pintilie, Ioana; Zhang, Jiaguo

    2013-05-01

    The high intensity and high repetition rate of the XFEL, the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser presently under construction in Hamburg, results in X-ray doses of up to 1 GGy in silicon sensors for 3 years of operation. Within the AGIPD Collaboration the Hamburg group has systematically studied X-ray-radiation damage using test structures and segmented sensors fabricated on high-ohmic n-type silicon. MOS Capacitors and Gate- Controlled Diodes from 4 vendors with different crystal orientations and different technological parameters, as well as strip sensors have been irradiated in the dose range between 10 kGy and 1 GGy. Current-Voltage, Capacitance/Conductance-Voltage and Thermal Dielectric Relaxation Current measurements were used to extract oxide-charge densities, interface-trap densities and surface-current densities as function of dose and annealing conditions. The results have been implemented into TCAD simulations, and the radiation performance of strip sensors and guard-ring structures simulated and compared to experimental results. Finally, with the help of detailed TCAD simulations, the layout and technological parameters of the AGIPD pixel sensor have been optimized. It is found that the optimization for sensors exposed to high X-ray doses is significantly different than for non-irradiated sensors, and that the specifications of the AGIPD sensor can be met. In 2012 sensors have been ordered, the first batch has been delivered recently, and first results on a comparison between simulations and measurements will be presented.

  19. Soft x-ray-controlled dose deposition in yeast cells: techniques, model, and biological assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Marziale; Batani, Dimitri; Conti, Aldo; Masini, Alessandra; Costato, Michele; Pozzi, Achille; Turcu, I. C. Edmond

    1996-12-01

    A procedure is presented to release soft x-rays onto yeast cell membrane allegedly damaging the resident enzymatic processes connected with fermentation. The damage is expected to be restricted to regulating fermentation processes without interference with respiration. By this technique fermentation is followed leading to CO2 production, and respiration resulting in global pressure measurements. A solid state pressure sensor system has been developed linked to a data acquisition system. Yeast cells cultures have been investigated at different concentrations and with different nutrients. A non-monotone response in CO2 production as a function of the delivered x-ray dose is observed.

  20. The Difference in Backscatter Factors of Diagnostic X-rays by the Difference in the Scattering Medium and in the Objective Dose.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideki; Sakai, Keita; Uchiyama, Mizuki; Suzuki, Kentaro

    The diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) of the general X-ray radiography are defined by the absorbed dose of air at the entrance surface with backscattered radiation from a scattering medium. Generally, the entrance surface dose of the general X-ray radiography is calculated from measured air kerma of primary X-ray multiplied by a backscatter factor (BSF). However, the BSF data employed at present used water for scattering medium, and was calculated based on the water-absorbed dose by incident primary photons and backscattered photons from the scattering medium. In the calculation of air dose at the entrance surface defined in DRLs, there are no theoretical consistencies for using BSF based on water dose, and this may be a cause of calculation error. In this paper, we verified the difference in BSF by the difference in the scattering medium and by the difference in the objective dose by means of the Monte Carlo simulation. In this calculation, the scattering medium was set as water and the soft-tissue, and the objective dose was set as air dose, water dose, soft-tissue dose, and skin dose. The difference in BSF calculated by the respective combination was at most about 1.3% and was less than 1% in most cases. In conclusion, even if the entrance surface dose defined by DRLs of general X-ray radiography is calculated using BSF, which set both the scattering medium and the object substance of the absorbed dose as water, a so big error doesn't show.

  1. [Differential dose albedo for high-energy X-rays on concrete slab].

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideki

    2006-08-20

    We computed the differential dose albedo (alpha(D)) for high-energy X-rays on a concrete slab when the incident angle, reflection angle, and azimuth angle were changed, by means of Monte Carlo simulation. We found that alpha(D) changed with incident, reflection, and azimuth angles to the concrete slab. On the whole, the larger the incident angle, the larger alpha(D) tended to become. If the incident angle and reflection angle were the same, the larger the azimuth angle, the smaller alpha(D) tended to become. When the incident, reflection, and azimuth angles were the same, the smaller the X-ray energy was, the larger alpha(D) became, in the order of 10 MV, 6 MV, and 4 MV X-rays.

  2. Measurements of X-ray doses and spectra produced by picosecond laser-irradiated solid targets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Qiu, Rui; Yu, Minghai; Jiao, Jinlong; Lu, Wei; Yan, Yonghong; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Zhimeng; Zhou, Weimin; Li, Junli; Zhang, Hui

    2017-05-01

    Experiments have shown that high-intensity laser interaction with a solid target can generate significant X-ray doses. This study was conducted to determine the X-ray doses and spectra produced for picosecond laser-irradiated solid targets. The photon doses and X-ray spectra in the laser forward and side directions were measured using an XG III ps 300 TW laser system. For laser intensities of 7×10(18)-4×10(19)W/cm(2), the maximum photon dose was 16.8 mSv at 50cm with a laser energy of ~153J on a 1-mm Ta target. The photon dose in the forward direction increased more significantly with increasing laser intensity than that in the side direction. For photon energies >300keV, the X-ray spectrum can be fit with an effective temperature distribution of the exponential form, dN/dE = k× exp(-E/Tx). The X-ray temperature Tx increased with the laser intensity in the forward direction with values of 0.46-0.75MeV. Tx was less strongly correlated with the laser intensity in the side direction with values of 0.29-0.32MeV. The escaping electron spectrum was also measured. The measured electron temperature was correlated with the electron temperature predicted by the ponderomotive law. The observations in this experiment were also investigated numerically. A good agreement was observed between the experimental and simulation results.

  3. Dose, exposure time, and resolution in Serial X-ray Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Starodub, D; Rez, P; Hembree, G; Howells, M; Shapiro, D; Chapman, H N; Fromme, P; Schmidt, K; Weierstall, U; Doak, R B; Spence, J C

    2007-03-22

    Using detailed simulation and analytical models, the exposure time is estimated for serial crystallography, where hydrated laser-aligned proteins are sprayed across a continuous synchrotron beam. The resolution of X-ray diffraction microscopy is limited by the maximum dose that can be delivered prior to sample damage. In the proposed Serial Crystallography method, the damage problem is addressed by distributing the total dose over many identical hydrated macromolecules running continuously in a single-file train across a continuous X-ray beam, and resolution is then limited only by the available fluxes of molecules and X-rays. Orientation of the diffracting molecules is achieved by laser alignment. We evaluate the incident X-ray fluence (energy/area) required to obtain a given resolution from (1) an analytical model, giving the count rate at the maximum scattering angle for a model protein, (2) explicit simulation of diffraction patterns for a GroEL-GroES protein complex, and (3) the frequency cut off of the transfer function following iterative solution of the phase problem, and reconstruction of a density map in the projection approximation. These calculations include counting shot noise and multiple starts of the phasing algorithm. The results indicate the number of proteins needed within the beam at any instant for a given resolution and X-ray flux. We confirm an inverse fourth power dependence of exposure time on resolution, with important implications for all coherent X-ray imaging. We find that multiple single-file protein beams will be needed for sub-nanometer resolution on current third generation synchrotrons, but not on fourth generation designs, where reconstruction of secondary protein structure at a resolution of 7 {angstrom} should be possible with short (below 100 s) exposures.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a blue-light-absorbing proteorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Wang, Meitian; Gao, Yanyan; Ran, Tingting; Lan, Yanli; Wang, Jian; Xu, Langlai; Wang, Weiwu

    2012-03-01

    Proteorhodopsins (PRs), seven-transmembrane chromoproteins with retinal as a chromophore, are light-driven proton pumps. To elucidate the light-driven proton-pumping mechanism of PRs, a pET28a vector containing the blue-light-absorbing proteorhodopsin (BPR) gene was constructed and the protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The protein was purified by immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC). The purified BPR D97N mutant protein (BPR_D97N) was crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. Preliminary X-ray diffraction data analysis showed that the crystal belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = 161.6, b = 168.6, c = 64.7 Å. A complete data set was collected to 3.3 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation on beamline X06 of the Swiss Light Source (SLS). Molecular replacement was unsuccessful. To solve the structure of BPR_D97N by experimental phasing, selenomethionine-substituted protein crystals were prepared. These crystals diffracted to 3.0 Å resolution and a complete data set was collected on beamline BL17U of the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). Heavy-atom substructure determination and phasing by SAD clearly showed that the crystal contained five molecules in the asymmetric unit, with a V(M) of 3.26 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 62.3%. © 2012 International Union of Crystallography

  5. The integral dose in panoramic intraoral x-ray tube radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Hayami, A.; Fujishita, M.; Sumida, A.; Kanke, M.; Fujiki, T.; Uemura, S.; Fuchihata, H.

    1983-07-01

    A Monte Carlo computer program was developed to estimate the integral dose to the head and thyroid for panoramic intraoral x-ray tube radiography. The advantage of this computer simulation is that it is able to avoid many of the difficulties associated with low-energy and low-dose x-ray dosimetry. The calculations were made for maxillary and mandibular projections separately, using 10 kv. increments between 40 and 60 kv. The results obtained were presented in terms of the integral dose per milliampere second. Typical integral doses for a routine examination of the head are 2.1 mJ. and 8.5 microJ for the thyroid during mandibular radiography and 1.7 microJ for the thyroid during radiography of the maxilla using 55 kv. and 0.5 mAs.

  6. MOSFET dosimeter depth-dose measurements in heterogeneous tissue-equivalent phantoms at diagnostic x-ray energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.K.; Pazik, F.D.; Hintenlang, D.E.; Bolch, W.E.

    2005-10-15

    The objective of the present study was to explore the use of the TN-1002RD metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter for measuring tissue depth dose at diagnostic photon energies in both homogeneous and heterogeneous tissue-equivalent materials. Three cylindrical phantoms were constructed and utilized as a prelude to more complex measurements within tomographic physical phantoms of pediatric patients. Each cylindrical phantom was constructed as a stack of seven 5-cm-diameter and 1-cm-thick discs of materials radiographically representative of either soft tissue (S), bone (B), or lung tissue (L) at diagnostic photon energies. In addition to a homogeneous phantom of soft tissue (SSSSSSS), two heterogeneous phantoms were constructed: SSBBSSS and SBLLBSS. MOSFET dosimeters were then positioned at the interface of each disc, and the phantoms were then irradiated at 66 kVp and 200 mAs. Measured values of absorbed dose at depth were then compared to predicated values of point tissue dose as determined via Monte Carlo radiation transport modeling. At depths exceeding 2 cm, experimental results matched the computed values of dose with high accuracy regardless of the dosimeter orientation (epoxy bubble facing toward or away from the x-ray beam). Discrepancies were noted, however, between measured and calculated point doses near the surface of the phantom (surface to 2 cm depth) when the dosimeters were oriented with the epoxy bubble facing the x-ray beam. These discrepancies were largely eliminated when the dosimeters were placed with the flat side facing the x-ray beam. It is therefore recommended that the MOSFET dosimeters be oriented with their flat sides facing the beam when they are used at shallow depths or on the surface of either phantoms or patients.

  7. The detection of large amounts of cool, x ray absorbing gas in distant clusters of galaxies. What does this mean?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Qingde; Stocke, John T.

    1993-01-01

    We present an x-ray spectral study of 12 distant (z = 0.17-0.54) rich clusters of galaxies observed with the Einstein Observatory Imaging Proportional Counter. These x-ray spectral data show evidence for substantial excess absorptions beyond those expected in the galaxy, indicating the presence of large amounts of x-ray absorbing cool gas in these distant clusters. The mean value of the excess absorptions corresponds to an absorbing gas column density approximately greater than 10(exp 21)/sq cm. We calculate the x-ray luminosities of the clusters with observed fluxes only in the 0.8-3.5 keV band where the fluxes are less effected by the absorptions, and use the temperature-to-luminosity correlation (known only for nearby clusters) to estimate the temperatures of the hot intracluster medium (ICM) in the distant clusters. These temperature estimates, together with the spectral fits, provide further constraints on the column densities in the individual clusters. For the cluster CL 0016+16, the lower limit on the column density is found to be 8 x 10(exp 20)/sq cm at the 99 percent confidence limit. We also show that the ratio of the temperature obtained from the spectral fit to the temperature expected from the correlation tends to decrease with increasing look-back time, indicating possible temperature evolution of the hot ICM in the recent past. The inclusion of this evolutionary effect further increases the absorptions required in fitting the spectra.

  8. Dose properties of x-ray beams produced by laser-wakefield-accelerated electrons.

    PubMed

    Kainz, K K; Hogstrom, K R; Antolak, J A; Almond, P R; Bloch, C D

    2005-01-07

    Given that laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been demonstrated experimentally to accelerate electron beams to energies beyond 25 MeV, it is reasonable to assess the ability of existing LWFA technology to compete with conventional radiofrequency linear accelerators in producing electron and x-ray beams for external-beam radiotherapy. We present calculations of the dose distributions (off-axis dose profiles and central-axis depth dose) and dose rates of x-ray beams that can be produced from electron beams that are generated using state-of-the-art LWFA. Subsets of an LWFA electron energy distribution were propagated through the treatment head elements (presuming an existing design for an x-ray production target and flattening filter) implemented within the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. Three x-ray energy configurations (6 MV, 10 MV and 18 MV) were studied, and the energy width deltaE of the electron-beam subsets varied from 0.5 MeV to 12.5 MeV. As deltaE increased from 0.5 MeV to 4.5 MeV, we found that the off-axis and central-axis dose profiles for x-rays were minimally affected (to within about 3%), a result slightly different from prior calculations of electron beams broadened by scattering foils. For deltaE of the order of 12 MeV, the effect on the off-axis profile was of the order of 10%, but the central-axis depth dose was affected by less than 2% for depths in excess of about 5 cm beyond d(max). Although increasing deltaE beyond 6.5 MeV increased the dose rate at d(max) by more than 10 times, the absolute dose rates were about 3 orders of magnitude below those observed for LWFA-based electron beams at comparable energies. For a practical LWFA-based x-ray device, the beam current must be increased by about 4-5 orders of magnitude.

  9. The effects of x-ray beam hardening on detective quantum efficiency and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this preliminary study was to investigate the effects of x-ray beam hardening on the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and the radiation dose of an inline x-ray imaging system. The ability to decrease the risk of harmful radiation to the patient without compromising the detection capability would more effectively balance the tradeoff between image quality and radiation dose, and therefore benefit the fields of diagnostic x-ray imaging, especially mammography. The DQE and the average glandular dose were both calculated under the same experimental conditions for a range of beam hardening levels, corresponding to no added beam hardening and two thicknesses each of Rhodium (Rh) and Molybdenum (Mo) filters. The dose calculation results demonstrate a reduction of 15% to 24% for the range of beam hardening levels. The comparison of all quantities comprising the DQE exhibit very close correlation between the results obtained without added beam hardening to the results corresponding to the range of beam hardening levels. For the specific experimental conditions utilized in this preliminary study, the results are an indication that the use of beam hardening holds the potential to reduce the radiation dose without decreasing the performance of the system. Future studies will seek to apply this method in a clinical environment and perform a comprehensive image quality evaluation, in an effort to further evaluate the potential of beam hardening to balance the tradeoff between dose and image quality.

  10. Surface-engineered nanomaterials as X-ray absorbing adjuvant agents for Auger-mediated chemo-radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Min; Tsai, De-Hao; Hackley, Vincent A.; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Cook, Robert F.

    2013-05-01

    We report a prototype approach to formulate gold nanoparticle-based X-ray absorbing agents through surface-engineering of a cisplatin pharmacophore with modified polyacrylate. The resulting agents exhibit both chemo-therapeutic potency to cancer cells and Auger-mediated secondary electron emission, showing great potential to improve the therapeutic efficacy of chemo-radiation.We report a prototype approach to formulate gold nanoparticle-based X-ray absorbing agents through surface-engineering of a cisplatin pharmacophore with modified polyacrylate. The resulting agents exhibit both chemo-therapeutic potency to cancer cells and Auger-mediated secondary electron emission, showing great potential to improve the therapeutic efficacy of chemo-radiation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedure. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00333g

  11. Modeling a superficial radiotherapy X-ray source for relative dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Christopher D; LaFontaine, Richard; Poirier, Yannick; Tambasco, Mauro

    2015-05-08

    The purpose of this study was to empirically characterize and validate a kilovoltage (kV) X-ray beam source model of a superficial X-ray unit for relative dose calculations in water and assess the accuracy of the British Journal of Radiology Supplement 25 (BJR 25) percentage depth dose (PDD) data. We measured central axis PDDs and dose profiles using an Xstrahl 150 X-ray system. We also compared the measured and calculated PDDs to those in the BJR 25. The Xstrahl source was modeled as an effective point source with varying spatial fluence and spectra. In-air ionization chamber measurements were made along the x- and y-axes of the X-ray beam to derive the spatial fluence and half-value layer (HVL) measurements were made to derive the spatially varying spectra. This beam characterization and resulting source model was used as input for our in-house dose calculation software (kVDoseCalc) to compute radiation dose at points of interest (POIs). The PDDs and dose profiles were measured using 2, 5, and 15 cm cone sizes at 80, 120, 140, and 150 kVp energies in a scanning water phantom using IBA Farmer-type ionization chambers of volumes 0.65 and 0.13 cc, respectively. The percent difference in the computed PDDs compared with our measurements range from -4.8% to 4.8%, with an overall mean percent difference and standard deviation of 1.5% and 0.7%, respectively. The percent difference between our PDD measurements and those from BJR 25 range from -14.0% to 15.7%, with an overall mean percent difference and standard deviation of 4.9% and 2.1%, respectively - showing that the measurements are in much better agreement with kVDoseCalc than BJR 25. The range in percent difference between kVDoseCalc and measurement for profiles was -5.9% to 5.9%, with an overall mean percent difference and standard deviation of 1.4% and 1.4%, respectively. The results demonstrate that our empirically based X-ray source modeling approach for superficial X-ray therapy can be used to accurately

  12. Note: Studies on target placement in TE(111) cylindrical cavity of electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source for the enhancement of x-ray dose.

    PubMed

    Selvakumaran, T S; Baskaran, R; Singh, A K; Sista, V L S Rao

    2010-03-01

    X-ray source based on electron cyclotron resonance principle has been constructed using TE(111) cylindrical cavity. At present the device is used to provide low energy x-ray field for thermoluminescent dosimeter badge calibration. Theoretical and experimental studies on the effect of target placement inside the TE(111) cylindrical cavity for enhancing the x-ray output are carried out and the results are presented in this note. Optimum target location is identified by theoretical analysis on the electric field distribution inside the cavity using MICROWAVE STUDIO program. By modifying the magnetic field configuration, the resonance region is shifted to the optimum target location. The microwave transmission line is upgraded with a three stub tuner which improves the microwave coupling from the source to the target loaded cavity. Molybdenum target is located at a radial distance of 2.5 cm from the cavity center and the x-ray dose rate is measured at 20 cm from the exit port for different microwave power. With the introduction of the target, the x-ray output has improved nearly from 70% to 160% in the microwave power of 150-500 W.

  13. Note: Studies on target placement in TE{sub 111} cylindrical cavity of electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source for the enhancement of x-ray dose

    SciTech Connect

    Selvakumaran, T. S.; Baskaran, R.; Singh, A. K.; Sista, V. L. S. Rao

    2010-03-15

    X-ray source based on electron cyclotron resonance principle has been constructed using TE{sub 111} cylindrical cavity. At present the device is used to provide low energy x-ray field for thermoluminescent dosimeter badge calibration. Theoretical and experimental studies on the effect of target placement inside the TE{sub 111} cylindrical cavity for enhancing the x-ray output are carried out and the results are presented in this note. Optimum target location is identified by theoretical analysis on the electric field distribution inside the cavity using MICROWAVE STUDIO program. By modifying the magnetic field configuration, the resonance region is shifted to the optimum target location. The microwave transmission line is upgraded with a three stub tuner which improves the microwave coupling from the source to the target loaded cavity. Molybdenum target is located at a radial distance of 2.5 cm from the cavity center and the x-ray dose rate is measured at 20 cm from the exit port for different microwave power. With the introduction of the target, the x-ray output has improved nearly from 70% to 160% in the microwave power of 150-500 W.

  14. X-ray dose reduction by adaptive source equalization and electronic region-of-interest control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burion, Steve; Sandman, Anne; Bechtel, Kate; Solomon, Edward; Funk, Tobias

    2011-03-01

    Radiation dose is particularly a concern in pediatric cardiac fluoroscopy procedures, which account for 7% of all cardiac procedures performed. The Scanning-Beam Digital X-ray (SBDX) fluoroscopy system has already demonstrated reduced dose in adult patients owing to its high-DQE photon-counting detector, reduced detected scatter, and the elimination of the anti-scatter grid. Here we show that the unique flexible illumination platform of the SBDX system will enable further dose area product reduction, which we are currently developing for pediatric patients, but which will ultimately benefit all patients. The SBDX system has a small-area detector array and a large-area X-ray source with up to 9,000 individually-controlled X-ray focal spots. Each focal spot illuminates a small fraction of the full field of view. To acquire a frame, each focal spot is activated for a fixed number of 1-microsecond periods. Dose reduction is made possible by reducing the number of activations of some of the X-ray focal spots during each frame time. This can be done dynamically to reduce the exposure in areas of low patient attenuation, such as the lung field. This spatially-adaptive illumination also reduces the dynamic range in the full image, which is visually pleasing. Dose can also be reduced by the user selecting a region of interest (ROI) where full image quality is to be maintained. Outside the ROI, the number of activations of each X-ray focal spot is reduced and the image gain is correspondingly increased to maintain consistent image brightness. Dose reduction is dependent on the size of the ROI and the desired image quality outside the ROI. We have developed simulation software that is based on real data and can simulate the performance of the equalization and ROI filtration. This software represents a first step toward real-time implementation of these dose-reduction methods. Our simulations have shown that dose area product reductions of 40% are possible using equalization

  15. Patient size and x-ray technique factors in head computed tomography examinations. I. Radiation doses.

    PubMed

    Huda, Walter; Lieberman, Kristin A; Chang, Jack; Roskopf, Marsha L

    2004-03-01

    We investigated how patient age, size and composition, together with the choice of x-ray technique factors, affect radiation doses in head computed tomography (CT) examinations. Head size dimensions, cross-sectional areas, and mean Hounsfield unit (HU) values were obtained from head CT images of 127 patients. For radiation dosimetry purposes patients were modeled as uniform cylinders of water. Dose computations were performed for 18 x 7 mm sections, scanned at a constant 340 mAs, for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV. Values of mean section dose, energy imparted, and effective dose were computed for patients ranging from the newborn to adults. There was a rapid growth of head size over the first two years, followed by a more modest increase of head size until the age of 18 or so. Newborns have a mean HU value of about 50 that monotonically increases with age over the first two decades of life. Average adult A-P and lateral dimensions were 186+/-8 mm and 147+/-8 mm, respectively, with an average HU value of 209+/-40. An infant head was found to be equivalent to a water cylinder with a radius of approximately 60 mm, whereas an adult head had an equivalent radius 50% greater. Adult males head dimensions are about 5% larger than for females, and their average x-ray attenuation is approximately 20 HU greater. For adult examinations performed at 120 kV, typical values were 32 mGy for the mean section dose, 105 mJ for the total energy imparted, and 0.64 mSv for the effective dose. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increases patient doses by about a factor of 5. For the same technique factors, mean section doses in infants are 35% higher than in adults. Energy imparted for adults is 50% higher than for infants, but infant effective doses are four times higher than for adults. CT doses need to take into account patient age, head size, and composition as well as the selected x-ray technique factors.

  16. Relationship between radiation dose reduction and image quality change in photostimulable phosphor luminescence X-ray imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, T; Kawamata, R; Kozai, Y; Kaku, Y; Nakamura, K; Saito, M; Wakao, H; Kashima, I

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to clarify the change in image quality upon X-ray dose reduction and to re-analyse the possibility of X-ray dose reduction in photostimulable phosphor luminescence (PSPL) X-ray imaging systems. In addition, the study attempted to verify the usefulness of multiobjective frequency processing (MFP) and flexible noise control (FNC) for X-ray dose reduction. Methods Three PSPL X-ray imaging systems were used in this study. Modulation transfer function (MTF), noise equivalent number of quanta (NEQ) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were evaluated to compare the basic physical performance of each system. Subjective visual evaluation of diagnostic ability for normal anatomical structures was performed. The NEQ, DQE and diagnostic ability were evaluated at base X-ray dose, and 1/3, 1/10 and 1/20 of the base X-ray dose. Results The MTF of the systems did not differ significantly. The NEQ and DQE did not necessarily depend on the pixel size of the system. The images from all three systems had a higher diagnostic utility compared with conventional film images at the base and 1/3 X-ray doses. The subjective image quality was better at the base X-ray dose than at 1/3 of the base dose in all systems. The MFP and FNC-processed images had a higher diagnostic utility than the images without MFP and FNC. Conclusions The use of PSPL imaging systems may allow a reduction in the X-ray dose to one-third of that required for conventional film. It is suggested that MFP and FNC are useful for radiation dose reduction. PMID:20395461

  17. Low-dose phase contrast tomography with conventional x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, C. K. Endrizzi, M.; Diemoz, P. C.; Olivo, A.; Munro, P. R. T.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) method has been recently further developed to perform tomographic and, thus, volumetric imaging. In this paper, the first tomographic EI XPCi images acquired with a conventional x-ray source at dose levels below that used for preclinical small animal imaging are presented. Methods: Two test objects, a biological sample and a custom-built phantom, were imaged with a laboratory-based EI XPCi setup in tomography mode. Tomographic maps that show the phase shift and attenuating properties of the object were reconstructed, and analyzed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and quantitative accuracy. Dose measurements using thermoluminescence devices were performed. Results: The obtained images demonstrate that phase based imaging methods can provide superior results compared to attenuation based modalities for weakly attenuating samples also in 3D. Moreover, and, most importantly, they demonstrate the feasibility of low-dose imaging. In addition, the experimental results can be considered quantitative within the constraints imposed by polychromaticity. Conclusions: The results, together with the method's dose efficiency and compatibility with conventional x-ray sources, indicate that tomographic EI XPCi can become an important tool for the routine imaging of biomedical samples.

  18. Effect of high-energy X-ray doses on bone elastic properties and residual strains.

    PubMed

    Singhal, A; Deymier-Black, Alix C; Almer, J D; Dunand, D C

    2011-11-01

    Bone X-ray irradiation occurs during medical treatments, sterilization of allografts, space travel and in vitro studies. High doses are known to affect the post-yield properties of bone, but their effect on the bone elastic properties is unclear. The effect of such doses on the mineral-organic interface has also not been adequately addressed. Here, the evolution of elastic properties and residual strains with increasing synchrotron X-ray dose (5-3880 kGy) is examined on bovine cortical bone. It is found that these doses affect neither the degree of nanometer-level load transfer between the hydroxyapatite (HAP) platelets and the collagen up to stresses of -60 MPa nor the microscopic modulus of collagen fibrils (both measured by synchrotron X-ray scattering during repeated in situ loading and unloading). However, the residual elastic strains in the HAP phase decrease markedly with increased irradiation, indicating damage at the HAP-collagen interface. The HAP residual strain also decreases after repeated loading/unloading cycles. These observations can be explained by temporary de-bonding at the HAP/collagen interface (thus reducing the residual strain), followed by rapid re-bonding (so that load transfer capability is not affected). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A detailed analysis of the high-resolution X-ray spectra of NGC 3516: variability of the ionized absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Huerta, E. M.; Krongold, Y.; Jimenez-Bailon, E.; Nicastro, F.; Mathur, S.; Longinotti, A. L.

    2014-09-20

    The 1.5 Seyfert galaxy NGC 3516 presents a strong time variability in X-rays. We re-analyzed the nine observations performed in 2006 October by XMM-Newton and Chandra in the 0.3 to 10 keV energy band. An acceptable model was found for the XMM-Newton data fitting the EPIC-PN and RGS spectra simultaneously; later, this model was successfully applied to the contemporary Chandra high-resolution data. The model consists of a continuum emission component (power law + blackbody) absorbed by four ionized components (warm absorbers), and 10 narrow emission lines. Three absorbing components are warm, producing features only in the soft X-ray band. The fourth ionization component produces Fe XXV and Fe XXVI in the hard-energy band. We study the time response of the absorbing components to the well-detected changes in the X-ray luminosity of this source and find that the two components with the lower ionization state show clear opacity changes consistent with gas close to photoionization equilibrium. These changes are supported by the models and by differences in the spectral features among the nine observations. On the other hand, the two components with higher ionization state do not seem to respond to continuum variations. The response time of the ionized absorbers allows us to constrain their electron density and location. We find that one component (with intermediate ionization) must be located within the obscuring torus at a distance 2.7 × 10{sup 17} cm from the central engine. This outflowing component likely originated in the accretion disk. The three remaining components are at distances larger than 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} cm. Two of the absorbing components in the soft X-rays have similar outflow velocities and locations. These components may be in pressure equilibrium, forming a multi-phase medium, if the gas has metallicity larger than the solar one (≳ 5 Z {sub ☉}). We also search for variations in the covering factor of the ionized absorbers (although partial

  20. X-RAY CHARACTERISTICS OF NGC 3516: A VIEW THROUGH THE COMPLEX ABSORBER

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, T. J.; Miller, L.; Kraemer, S. B.; Reeves, J. N.

    2011-05-20

    We consider new Suzaku data for NGC 3516 taken during 2009 along with other recent X-ray observations of the source. The cumulative characteristics of NGC 3516 cannot be explained without invoking changes in the line-of-sight absorption. Contrary to many other well-studied Seyfert galaxies, NGC 3516 does not show a positive lag of hard X-ray photons relative to soft photons over the timescales sampled. In the context of reverberation models for the X-ray lags, the lack of such a signal in NGC 3516 is consistent with flux variations being dominated by absorption changes. The lack of any reverberation signal in such a highly variable source disfavors intrinsic continuum variability in this case. Instead, the colorless flux variations observed at high flux states for NGC 3516 are suggested to be a consequence of Compton-thick clumps of gas crossing the line of sight.

  1. Low dose digital X-ray imaging with avalanche amorphous selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Goldan, Amir H.; Tousignant, Olivier; Léveillé, Sébastien; Zhao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Active Matrix Flat Panel Imagers (AMFPI) based on an array of thin film transistors (TFT) have become the dominant technology for digital x-ray imaging. In low dose applications, the performance of both direct and indirect conversion detectors are limited by the electronic noise associated with the TFT array. New concepts of direct and indirect detectors have been proposed using avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se), referred to as high gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP). The indirect detector utilizes a planar layer of HARP to detect light from an x-ray scintillator and amplify the photogenerated charge. The direct detector utilizes separate interaction (non-avalanche) and amplification (avalanche) regions within the a-Se to achieve depth-independent signal gain. Both detectors require the development of large area, solid state HARP. We have previously reported the first avalanche gain in a-Se with deposition techniques scalable to large area detectors. The goal of the present work is to demonstrate the feasibility of large area HARP fabrication in an a-Se deposition facility established for commercial large area AMFPI. We also examine the effect of alternative pixel electrode materials on avalanche gain. The results show that avalanche gain > 50 is achievable in the HARP layers developed in large area coaters, which is sufficient to achieve x-ray quantum noise limited performance down to a single x-ray photon per pixel. Both chromium (Cr) and indium tin oxide (ITO) have been successfully tested as pixel electrodes.

  2. Optimizing abdominal CT dose and image quality with respect to x-ray tube voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Walter; Ogden, Kent M.

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the x-ray tube voltage that results in optimum performance for abdominal CT imaging for a range of imaging tasks and patient sizes. Theoretical calculations were performed of the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) for disk shaped lesions of muscle, fat, bone and iodine embedded in a uniform water background. Lesion contrast was the mean Hounsfield Unit value at the effective photon energy, and image noise was determined from the total radiation intensity incident on the CT x-ray detector. Patient size ranging from young infants (10 kg) to oversized adults (120 kg), with CNR values obtained for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV. Patients of varying sizes were modeled as an equivalent cylinder of water, and the mean section dose (D) was determined for each selected x-ray tube kV value at a constant mAs. For each patient size and lesion type, we identified an optimal kV as the x-ray tube voltage that yields a maximum value of the figure of merit (CNR2/D). Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV reduced lesion contrast by 11% for muscle, 21% for fat, 35% for bone and 52% for iodine, and these reductions were approximately independent of patient size. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increased a muscle lesion CNR relative to a uniform water background by a factor of 2.6, with similar trends observed for fat (2.3), bone (1.9) and iodine (1.4). The improvement in lesion CNR with increasing x-ray tube voltage was highest for the largest sized patients. Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV increased the patient dose by a factor of between 5.0 and 6.2 depending on the patient size. For small sized patients (10 and 30 kg) and muscle lesions, best performance is obtained at 80 kV; however, for adults (70 kg) and oversized adults (120 kg), the best performance would be obtained at 140 kV. Imaging fat lesions was best performed at 80 kV for all patients except for oversized adults

  3. New Insights into the Spectral Variability and Physical Conditions of the X-Ray Absorbers in NGC 4151

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, J. D.; Kraemer, S. B.; Turner, T. J.; Crenshaw, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the relationship between the long-term X-ray spectral variability in the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 4151 and its intrinsic absorption, by comparing the 2014 simultaneous ultraviolet/X-ray observations taken with Hubble STIS Echelle and Chandra HETGS with archival observations from Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku. The observations are divided into “high” and “low” states, with the low states showing strong and unabsorbed extended emission at energies below 2 keV. Our X-ray model consists of a broken powerlaw, neutral reflection, and the two dominant absorption components identified by Kraemer et al. (2005, hereafter KRA2005) X-High and D+Ea, which are present in all epochs. The model fittings suggest that the absorbers are very stable, with the principal changes in the intrinsic absorption resulting from variations in the ionization state of the gas as the ionizing continuum varies. However, the low states show evidence of larger column densities in one or both of the absorbers. Among plausible explanations for the column increase, we discuss the possibility of an expanding/contracting X-ray corona. As suggested by KRA2005, there seem to be contributions from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) winds to the mass outflow. Along with the ultra-fast outflow absorber identified by Tombesi et al. (2010), X-High is consistent with being magnetically driven. On the other hand, it is unlikely that D+Ea is part of the MHD flow, and it is possible that it is radiatively accelerated. These results suggest that at a sufficiently large radial distance there is a break point between MHD-dominated and radiatively driven outflows.

  4. Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure of low-Z absorbates using fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Stoehr, J.; Kollin, E.B.; Fischer, D.A.; Hastings, J.B.; Zaera, F.; Sette, F.

    1985-05-01

    Comparison of x-ray fluorescence yield (FY) and electron yield surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra above the S K-edge for c(2 x 2) S on Ni(100) reveals an order of magnitude higher sensitivity of the FY technique. Using FY detection, thiophene (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/S) chemisorption on Ni(100) is studied with S coverages down to 0.08 monolayer. The molecule dissociates at temperatures as low as 100K by interaction with fourfold hollow Ni sites. Blocking of these sites by oxygen leaves the molecule intact.

  5. Collective effective dose in Europe from X-ray and nuclear medicine procedures.

    PubMed

    Bly, R; Jahnen, A; Järvinen, H; Olerud, H; Vassileva, J; Vogiatzi, S

    2015-07-01

    Population doses from radiodiagnostic (X-ray and nuclear medicine) procedures in Europe were estimated based on data collected from 36 European countries. For X-ray procedures in EU and EFTA countries (except Liechtenstein) the collective effective dose is 547,500 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 1.06 mSv per caput. For all European countries included in the survey the collective effective dose is 605,000 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 1.05 mSv per caput. For nuclear medicine procedures in EU countries and EFTA (except Liechtenstein) countries the collective effective dose is 30,700 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 0.06 mSv per caput. For all European countries included in the survey the collective effective dose is 31,100 man Sv, resulting in a mean effective dose of 0.05 mSv per caput. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. A nanovehicle developed for treating deep-seated bacteria using low-dose X-ray.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chien-Lin; Chen, Ming-Hong; Tung, Fu-I; Liu, Tse-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Many non-antibiotic strategies, such as photocatalysis and photodynamic therapy, have been proposed to inhibit and/or kill bacteria. However, these approaches still have drawbacks such as insufficient bacterial specificity and the limited penetration depth of ultraviolet and near-infrared light. To overcome these limitations, we developed a bacteria-specific anti-bacterial technique via using low-dose X-ray. Graphene oxide quantum dots (GQDs, a multifunctional vehicle) conjugated with vancomycin (Van, a bacteria-targeting ligand) were assembled with Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX, a photo/radiation sensitizer) to yield a novel Van-GQDs/PpIX complex that specifically attached to Escherichia coli and efficiently generated intracellular reactive oxygen species following X-ray activation. Delivery using GQDs increased the PpIX/Van ratio in the target bacterial cell, damaged bacterial cell wall, and enhanced X-ray-induced PpIX activation. Hence, this approach allowed for the use of a low-dose X-ray to efficiently activate the Van-GQDs/PpIX complex to exert its bactericidal effects on Escherichia coli without damaging normal cells. Furthermore, the E. coli did not develop resistance to the proposed approach for at least 7 rounds of repeated administration during one week. Thus, this proposed vehicle exhibiting bacteria-specific X-ray-triggered toxicity is a promising alternative to antibiotics for treating serious bacterial infections occurring in deep-seated tissues/organs (e.g., osteomyelitis and peritonitis). Administration of antibiotics is the most common treatment modality for bacterial infections. However, in some cases, patient attributes such as age, health, tolerance to antibiotics do not allow for the use of high-dose antibiotics. In addition, some bacteria develop resistance to antibiotics because of improper and long-term use of these agents. Therefore, non-antibiotic strategies to treat deeply situated bacterial infections, such as osteomyelitis, are urgently

  7. Entrance surface doses to patients undergoing selected diagnostic X-ray examinations in Sudan.

    PubMed

    Suliman, I I; Abbas, N; Habbani, F I

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the entrance surface doses (ESDs) to patients undergoing selected diagnostic X-ray examinations in major Sudanese hospitals. ESD per examination was estimated from X-ray tube output parameters in four hospitals comprising eight X-ray units and a sample of 346 radiographs. Hospital mean ESDs estimated range from 0.17 to 0.27 mGy for chest AP, 1.04-2.26 mGy for Skull AP/PA, 0.83-1.32 mGy for Skull LAT, 1.31-1.89 mGy for Pelvis AP, 1.46-3.33 mGy for Lumbar Spine AP and 2.9-9.9 mGy for Lumbar Spine LAT. With exception of chest PA examination at two hospitals, mean ESDs were found to be within the established international reference doses. The results are useful to national and professional organisations and can be used as a baseline upon which future dose measurements may be compared.

  8. Radiation doses to paediatric patients and comforters undergoing chest X rays.

    PubMed

    Sulieman, A; Vlychou, M; Tsougos, I; Theodorou, K

    2011-09-01

    Pneumonia is an important cause of hospital admission among children in the developed world and it is estimated to be responsible for 3-18 % of all paediatric admissions. Chest X ray is an important examination for pneumonia diagnosis and for evaluation of complications. This study aims to determine the entrance surface dose (ESD), organ, effective doses and propose a local diagnostic reference level. The study was carried out at the university hospital of Larissa, Greece. Patients were divided into three groups: organ and effective doses were estimated using National Radiological Protection Board software. The ESD was determined by thermoluminescent dosemeters for 132 children and 76 comforters. The average ESD value was 55 ± 8 µGy. The effective dose for patients was 11.2 ± 5 µSv. The mean radiation dose for comforter is 22 ± 3 µGy. The radiation dose to the patients is well within dose constraint, in the light of the current practice.

  9. Ionized Absorbers in Active Galactic Nuclei and Very Steap Soft X-Ray Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiore, Fabrizio; White, Nicholas (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Steep soft X-ray (0.1-2 keV) quasars share several unusual properties: narrow Balmer lines, strong Fe II emission, large and fast X-ray variability, and a rather steep 2-10 keV spectrum. These intriguing objects have been suggested to be the analogues of Galactic black hole candidates in the high, soft state. We present here results from ASCA observations for two of these quasars: NAB 0205 + 024 and PG 1244 + 026. Both objects show similar variations (factor of approximately 2 in 10 ks), despite a factor of approximately 10 difference in the 0.5-10 keV luminosity (7.3 x 10(exp 43) erg/s for PG 1244 + 026 and 6.4 x 10(exp 44) erg/s for NAB 0205 + 024, assuming isotropic emission, H(sub 0) = 50.0 and q(sub 0) = 0.0). The X-ray continuum of the two quasars flattens by 0.5-1 going from the 0.1-2 keV band towards higher energies, strengthening recent results on another half-dozen steep soft X-ray active galactic nuclei. PG 1244 + 026 shows a significant feature in the '1-keV' region, which can be described either as a broad emission line centered at 0.95 keV (quasar frame) or as edge or line absorption at 1.17 (1.22) keV. The line emission could be a result of reflection from a highly ionized accretion disc, in line with the view that steep soft X-ray quasars are emitting close to the Eddington luminosity. Photoelectric edge absorption or resonant line absorption could be produced by gas outflowing at a large velocity (0.3-0.6 c).

  10. Normalized organ doses and effective doses to a reference Indian adult male in conventional medical diagnostic x-ray examinations.

    PubMed

    Biju, K; Nagarajan, P S

    2006-03-01

    This work discusses the dose computations of 80 kV diagnostic x-rays made on a mathematical phantom representing an average Indian adult, since it is felt that results based on MIRD adult phantom calculations are not strictly appropriate for the population in India. Normalized organ equivalent doses and effective doses for an Indian adult male have been estimated. Normalization is done with respect to the entrance skin dose of the patient. Twenty common diagnostic x-ray examinations have been considered in this study and the doses are presented. This study would enable estimation of radiation induced detriment to the patient subpopulation in India. Since the external dimensions of the phantom are nearly the same as that of 15-y-old NRPB pediatric phantom, our results are also compared with those of latter and the agreement was found to be satisfactory.

  11. Establishment of a Dose-response Curve for X-ray-Induced Micronuclei in Human Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lusiyanti, Yanti; Alatas, Zubaidah; Syaifudin, Mukh; Purnami, Sofiati

    2016-01-01

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in peripheral blood lymphocytes is an established technique for biodosimetry. The aim of this project was to generate a X-ray induced micronuclei (MN) curve for peripheral blood lymphocytes taken from five healthy donors. The blood samples were irradiated with X-rays of 122 KeV at a dose rate of 0.652 Gy/min to doses of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 Gy. The blood samples were then cultured for 72 h at 37°C and processed following the International Atomic Energy Agency standard procedure with slight modifications. The result showed that the yields of MN frequencies were increased with the increase of radiation dose. Reconstruction of the relationship of MN with dose was fitted to a linear-quadratic model using Chromosome Aberration Calculation Software version 2.0. Due to their advantages, mainly, the dependence on radiation dose and dose rate, despite their limitation, these curves will be useful as alternative method for in vitro dose reconstruction and can support the preparedness for public or occupational radiation overexposure and protection. The results reported here also give us confidence to apply the obtained calibration curve of MN for future biological dosimetry requirements in Indonesia. PMID:28217283

  12. Establishment of a Dose-response Curve for X-ray-Induced Micronuclei in Human Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lusiyanti, Yanti; Alatas, Zubaidah; Syaifudin, Mukh; Purnami, Sofiati

    2016-01-01

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in peripheral blood lymphocytes is an established technique for biodosimetry. The aim of this project was to generate a X-ray induced micronuclei (MN) curve for peripheral blood lymphocytes taken from five healthy donors. The blood samples were irradiated with X-rays of 122 KeV at a dose rate of 0.652 Gy/min to doses of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 Gy. The blood samples were then cultured for 72 h at 37°C and processed following the International Atomic Energy Agency standard procedure with slight modifications. The result showed that the yields of MN frequencies were increased with the increase of radiation dose. Reconstruction of the relationship of MN with dose was fitted to a linear-quadratic model using Chromosome Aberration Calculation Software version 2.0. Due to their advantages, mainly, the dependence on radiation dose and dose rate, despite their limitation, these curves will be useful as alternative method for in vitro dose reconstruction and can support the preparedness for public or occupational radiation overexposure and protection. The results reported here also give us confidence to apply the obtained calibration curve of MN for future biological dosimetry requirements in Indonesia.

  13. Dose estimation and shielding calculation for X-ray hazard at high intensity laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Rui; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Bo; James, C. Liu; Sayed, H. Rokni; Michael, B. Woods; Li, Jun-Li

    2014-12-01

    An ionizing radiation hazard produced from the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets has been observed. Laser-plasma interactions create “hot” electrons, which generate bremsstrahlung X-rays when they interact with ions in the target. However, up to now only limited studies have been conducted on this laser-induced radiological protection issue. In this paper, the physical process and characteristics of the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets are analyzed. The parameters of the radiation sources are discussed, including the energy conversion efficiency from laser to hot electrons, hot electron energy spectrum and electron temperature, and the bremsstrahlung X-ray energy spectrum produced by hot electrons. Based on this information, the X-ray dose generated with high-Z targets for laser intensities between 1014 and 1020 W/cm2 is estimated. The shielding effects of common shielding items such as the glass view port, aluminum chamber wall and concrete wall are also studied using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. This study provides a reference for the dose estimation and the shielding design of high intensity laser facilities.

  14. Unification of X-ray Winds in Seyfert Galaxies: From Ultra-fast Outflows to Warm Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, Francesco; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J.; Nemmen, R.; Braito, V.; Gaspari, M.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2013-04-01

    The existence of ionized X-ray absorbing layers of gas along the line of sight to the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies is a well established observational fact. This material is systematically outflowing and shows a large range in parameters. However, its actual nature and dynamics are still not clear. In order to gain insights into these important issues we performed a literature search for papers reporting the parameters of the soft X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) in 35 type 1 Seyferts and compared their properties to those of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) detected in the same sample. The fraction of sources with WAs is >60%, consistent with previous studies. The fraction of sources with UFOs is >34%, >67% of which also show WAs. The large dynamic range obtained when considering all the absorbers together allows us, for the first time, to investigate general relations among them. In particular, we find significant correlations indicating that the closer the absorber is to the central black hole, the higher the ionization, column, outflow velocity and consequently the mechanical power. The absorbers continuously populate the whole parameter space, with the WAs and the UFOs lying always at the two ends of the distribution. This strongly suggest that these absorbers, often considered of different types, could actually represent parts of a single large-scale stratified outflow observed at different locations from the black hole. The observed parameters and correlations are consistent with both radiation pressure through Compton scattering and MHD processes contributing to the outflow acceleration, the latter playing a major role. Most of the absorbers, especially the UFOs, have a sufficiently high mechanical power to significantly contribute to the AGN feedback.

  15. Measurement of percentage depth dose and lateral beam profile for kilovoltage x-ray therapy beams.

    PubMed

    Li, X A; Ma, C M; Salhani, D

    1997-12-01

    In this work, nine commonly used dosimetry detectors have been investigated to determine suitable relative dosimeters for kilovoltage x-ray beams. By comparison with the Monte Carlo calculated data, it was determined that for the detectors studied the PTW N23342, Markus and NACP parallel-plate chambers are more suitable for the measurement of percentage depth dose (PDD) data for this beam quality range with an uncertainty of about 3%. A diode detector may be used to measure the PDD for the 100 kVp beam, but it is not suitable for higher energies (300 kVp). The Capintec parallel-plate chamber may be adequate for medium-energy photons, but it has a slightly higher uncertainty for low-energy x-rays (100 kVp). For the measurement of beam profiles, diode and film yield incorrect profile tails, which can be corrected using the RK ionization chamber.

  16. A Computer Based File of X-Ray and Electron Beam Central Axis Depth Dose Data for Use in Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Purdy, James A.; Harms, William B.; Fivozinsky, Sherman

    1980-01-01

    The central axis absorbed dose data for x-ray and electron beams generated by linear accelerators in the energy range 4 thru 25 MV are being compiled. The compilation includes specific x-ray beam parameters (surface doses, output factors, percent depth doses, tissue-phantom ratios, and wedge factors) as well as electron beam parameters (percent depth doses and output factors). The compilation includes published data sets of these parameters and those obtained directly from over 100 institutions participating in the study. The data are grouped by accelerator model and input into computer files that provide a standard format suitable for intercomparisons. The software used to construct the computer files and to manipulate the data is discussed. Selected examples of the average values of parameters obtained to date with the standard deviations, the coefficients of variation, and the maximum and minimum values will be presented for several different linear accelerator models.

  17. X-ray dose reduction through adaptive exposure in fluoroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Burion, Steve; Funk, Tobias

    2011-09-11

    X-ray fluoroscopy is widely used for image guidance during cardiac intervention. However, radiation dose in these procedures can be high, and this is a significant concern, particularly in pediatric applications. Pediatrics procedures are in general much more complex than those performed on adults and thus are on average four to eight times longer. Furthermore, children can undergo up to 10 fluoroscopic procedures by the age of 10, and have been shown to have a three-fold higher risk of developing fatal cancer throughout their life than the general population. We have shown that radiation dose can be significantly reduced in adult cardiac procedures by using our scanning beam digital x-ray (SBDX) system-- a fluoroscopic imaging system that employs an inverse imaging geometry (Figure 1, Movie 1 and Figure 2). Instead of a single focal spot and an extended detector as used in conventional systems, our approach utilizes an extended X-ray source with multiple focal spots focused on a small detector. Our X-ray source consists of a scanning electron beam sequentially illuminating up to 9,000 focal spot positions. Each focal spot projects a small portion of the imaging volume onto the detector. In contrast to a conventional system where the final image is directly projected onto the detector, the SBDX uses a dedicated algorithm to reconstruct the final image from the 9,000 detector images. For pediatric applications, dose savings with the SBDX system are expected to be smaller than in adult procedures. However, the SBDX system allows for additional dose savings by implementing an electronic adaptive exposure technique. Key to this method is the multi-beam scanning technique of the SBDX system: rather than exposing every part of the image with the same radiation dose, we can dynamically vary the exposure depending on the opacity of the region exposed. Therefore, we can significantly reduce exposure in radiolucent areas and maintain exposure in more opaque regions. In our

  18. A new approach to account for the medium-dependent effect in model-based dose calculations for kilovoltage x-rays.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Jason M; Ding, George X

    2011-07-07

    This study presents a new approach to accurately account for the medium-dependent effect in model-based dose calculations for kilovoltage (kV) x-rays. This approach is based on the hypothesis that the correction factors needed to convert dose from model-based dose calculations to absorbed dose-to-medium depend on both the attenuation characteristics of the absorbing media and the changes to the energy spectrum of the incident x-rays as they traverse media with an effective atomic number different than that of water. Using Monte Carlo simulation techniques, we obtained empirical medium-dependent correction factors that take both effects into account. We found that the correction factors can be expressed as a function of a single quantity, called the effective bone depth, which is a measure of the amount of bone that an x-ray beam must penetrate to reach a voxel. Since the effective bone depth can be calculated from volumetric patient CT images, the medium-dependent correction factors can be obtained for model-based dose calculations based on patient CT images. We tested the accuracy of this new approach on 14 patients for the case of calculating imaging dose from kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography used for patient setup in radiotherapy, and compared it with the Monte Carlo method, which is regarded as the 'gold standard'. For all patients studied, the new approach resulted in mean dose errors of less than 3%. This is in contrast to current available inhomogeneity corrected methods, which have been shown to result in mean errors of up to -103% for bone and 8% for soft tissue. Since there is a huge gain in the calculation speed relative to the Monte Carlo method (∼two orders of magnitude) with an acceptable loss of accuracy, this approach provides an alternative accurate dose calculation method for kV x-rays.

  19. A new approach to account for the medium-dependent effect in model-based dose calculations for kilovoltage x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlowski, Jason M.; Ding, George X.

    2011-07-01

    This study presents a new approach to accurately account for the medium-dependent effect in model-based dose calculations for kilovoltage (kV) x-rays. This approach is based on the hypothesis that the correction factors needed to convert dose from model-based dose calculations to absorbed dose-to-medium depend on both the attenuation characteristics of the absorbing media and the changes to the energy spectrum of the incident x-rays as they traverse media with an effective atomic number different than that of water. Using Monte Carlo simulation techniques, we obtained empirical medium-dependent correction factors that take both effects into account. We found that the correction factors can be expressed as a function of a single quantity, called the effective bone depth, which is a measure of the amount of bone that an x-ray beam must penetrate to reach a voxel. Since the effective bone depth can be calculated from volumetric patient CT images, the medium-dependent correction factors can be obtained for model-based dose calculations based on patient CT images. We tested the accuracy of this new approach on 14 patients for the case of calculating imaging dose from kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography used for patient setup in radiotherapy, and compared it with the Monte Carlo method, which is regarded as the 'gold standard'. For all patients studied, the new approach resulted in mean dose errors of less than 3%. This is in contrast to current available inhomogeneity corrected methods, which have been shown to result in mean errors of up to -103% for bone and 8% for soft tissue. Since there is a huge gain in the calculation speed relative to the Monte Carlo method (~two orders of magnitude) with an acceptable loss of accuracy, this approach provides an alternative accurate dose calculation method for kV x-rays.

  20. Doses under automatic exposure control (AEC) for direct digital radiographic (DDR) X-ray systems.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Louise; Faulkner, Ronan; Clancy, Conor; Gallagher, Aoife; Devine, Mark; Gorman, Dermot; O'Reilly, Geraldine; Dowling, Anita

    2011-09-01

    Current guidelines quote tolerances for automatic exposure control (AEC) device performance for X-ray systems as 'Baseline ± X %'. However, in the situation where a baseline figure has not yet been achieved, as in the case of commissioning assessments, this tolerance is not relevant. The purpose of this work is to provide mean doses for direct digital radiography (DDR) X-ray system, operating in AEC, against which comparisons can be made. Dose measurements have been recorded under AEC operation on 29 DDR detectors from three different manufacturers. Two different testing protocols were examined: (1) water equivalent phantoms in front of the DDR detector and (2) aluminium block at the tube head. The average patient exit dose, using the aluminium block was 4.6 μGy with the antiscatter grid in place and 4.0 μGy with the grid removed. Using the water phantoms, the average dose was measured at 17.1 μGy with the antiscatter grid in place and 5.4 μGy with grid removed. Based on these results, it is clear that different testing configurations significantly impact on the measured dose.

  1. The effects of x-ray beam hardening on detective quantum efficiency and radiation dose

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this preliminary study was to investigate the effects of x-ray beam hardening on the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and the radiation dose of an inline x-ray imaging system. The DQE and the average glandular dose were both calculated under the same experimental conditions for a range of beam hardening levels, corresponding to no added beam hardening and two thicknesses each of Rhodium (Rh) and Molybdenum (Mo) filters. The dose calculation results demonstrate a reduction of 15% to 24% for the range of beam hardening levels. The comparison of all quantities comprising the DQE exhibit very close correlation between the results obtained without added beam hardening to the results corresponding to the range of beam hardening levels. For the specific experimental conditions utilized in this preliminary study, the results are an indication that the use of beam hardening holds the potential to reduce the radiation dose without decreasing the performance of the system. Future studies will seek to apply this method in a clinical environment and perform a comprehensive image quality evaluation, in an effort to further evaluate the potential of beam hardening to balance the tradeoff between dose and image quality. PMID:25214383

  2. Low dose X -ray effects on catalase activity in animal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Focea, R.; Nadejde, C.; Creanga, D.; Luchian, T.

    2012-12-01

    This study was intended to investigate the effect of low-dose X ray-irradiation upon the activity of catalase (CAT) in freshly excised chicken tissues (liver, kidney, brain, muscle). The tissue samples were irradiated with 0.5Gy and 2Gy respectively, in a 6 MV photon beam produced by a clinical linear accelerator (VARIAN CLINAC 2100SC). The dose rate was of 260.88cGy/min. at 100 cm source to sample distance. The catalase level was assayed spectrophotometrically, based on reaction kinetics, using a catalase UV assay kit (SIGMA). Catalase increased activity in various tissue samples exposed to the studied X ray doses (for example with 24 % in the liver cells, p<0.05) suggested the stimulation of the antioxidant enzyme biosynthesis within several hours after exposure at doses of 0.5 Gy and 2 Gy; the putative enzyme inactivation could also occur (due to the injuries on the hydrogen bonds that ensure the specificity of CAT active site) but the resulted balance of the two concurrent processes indicates the cell ability of decomposing the hydrogen peroxide-with benefits for the cell physiology restoration for the chosen low dose radiation.

  3. Increasing the field of view of x-ray phase contrast imaging using stitched gratings on low absorbent carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiser, J.; Amberger, M.; Willner, M.; Kunka, D.; Meyer, P.; Koch, F.; Hipp, A.; Walter, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Mohr, J.

    2014-03-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging has become a promising biomedical imaging technique for enhancing soft-tissue contrast. In addition to an absorption contrast image it provides two more types of image, a phase contrast and a small-angle scattering contrast image recorded at the same time. In biomedical imaging their combination allows for the conventional investigation of e.g. bone fractures on the one hand and for soft-tissue investigation like cancer detection on the other hand. Among the different methods of X-ray phase contrast imaging the grating based approach, the Talbot-Lau interferometry, has the highest potential for commercial use in biomedical imaging at the moment, because commercially available X-ray sources can be used in a compact setup. In Talbot-Lau interferometers, core elements are phase and absorption gratings with challenging specifications because of their high aspect ratios (structure height over width). For the long grating lamellas structural heights of more than 100 μm together with structural width in the micron range are requested. We are developing a fabrication process based on deep x-ray lithography and electroforming (LIGA) to fabricate these challenging structures. In case of LIGA gratings the structural area is currently limited to several centimeters by several centimeters which limit the field of view in grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging. In order to increase the grating area significantly we are developing a stitching method for gratings using a 625 μm thick silicon wafer as a carrier substrate. In this work we compare the silicon carrier with an alternative one, polyimide, for patient dose reduction and for the use at lower energies in terms of transmission and image reconstruction problems.

  4. Comparison of enhanced device response and predicted x-ray dose enhancement effects on MOS oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Beutler, D.E.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Draper, B.L.; Brown, D.B.; Riewe, L.C.; Rosenstock, H.B.; Knott, D.P.

    1988-12-01

    The response of MOS capacitors to low- and medium-energy x-ray irradiation is investigated as a function of gate material (TaSi or Al), oxide thickness, and electric field. Measured device response is compared with predictions based on discrete ordinates and Monte Carlo code simulations of dose enhancement effects, coupled with recent estimates of electron-hole recombination in MOS oxides. In comparisons of 10-keV x-ray and Co-60 irradiations of Al-gate MOS capacitors at an oxide electric field of 1 MV/cm, it is found that predictions and experiments agree to within better than 20 percent for oxide thicknesses ranging from 35 to 1060 nm. For capacitors having TaSi/Al gates, predictions and experiments agree to within better than 30 percent at 1 MV/cm, with the largest differences occurring for 35-nm gate oxides. At other electric fields, the disagreement between experiment and prediction increases significantly for both Al- and TaSi/Al-gate capacitors, and can be greater than a factor of 2 at applied electric fields below 0.1 MV/cm. For medium energy (-- 100 keV average photon energy) x-ray irradiations, the enhanced device response exhibits a much stronger dependence on endpoint bremsstrahlung energy than expected from TIGERP or CEPXS/ONETRAN simulations. Implications for hardness assurance testing are discussed.

  5. Warm Absorbers in X-rays (WAX), a comprehensive high resolution grating spectral study of a sample of Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, S.; Guainazzi, M.; Dewangan, G.; Chakravorty, S.; Kembhavi, A.

    2014-07-01

    We present results from a homogeneous analysis of the broadband 0.3-10 keV CCD resolution as well as of soft X-ray high-resolution grating spectra of a hard X-ray flux-limited sample of 26 Seyfert galaxies observed with XMM-Newton. We could put a strict lower limit on the detection fraction of 50%. We find a gap in the distribution of the ionisation parameter in the range 0.5absorber flow is probably constituted by a clumpy distribution of discrete clouds. The distribution of the WA column densities for the sources with broad Fe K-alpha lines are similar to those sources which do not have broadened emission lines. Therefore the detected broad Fe K lines are bonafide and not artefacts of ionised absorption in the soft X-rays. The WA parameters show no correlation among themselves, except for one case. The shallow slope of the logξ versus logv_{out} linear regression (0.12± 0.03) is inconsistent with the scaling laws predicted by radiation or magneto-hydrodynamic-driven winds. Our results suggest also that WA and Ultra Fast Outflows (UFOs) do not represent extreme manifestation of the same astrophysical system.

  6. Development of Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detector with High Absorption Yields Utilizing Silicon Pixel Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiki, Shigetomo; Fujii, Go; Ukibe, Masahiro; Kitajima, Yoshinori; Ohkubo, Masataka

    2016-07-01

    A superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) array detector along with silicon pixel absorbers (STJ-SPA) is fabricated to achieve high detection efficiency at X-ray energies below 10 keV. The STJ pixels have dimensions of 100 \\upmu m × 100 \\upmu m and are composed of Nb-Al/AlOX/Al-Nb thin layers. The SPAs are also 100 \\upmu m × 100 \\upmu m and have a depth of 400 \\upmu m, and are isolated from each other by a deep trench with a depth of 350 \\upmu m. The detection efficiency of the STJ-SPA exceeds 95 % at X-ray energies below 10 keV, and its energy resolution is 82 eV FWHM, as measured at the Si K\\upalpha line at 1740 eV. By means of the STJ-SPA detector, the X-ray absorption spectrum of the light element sulfur with a concentration of less than 0.1 wt% in a soda-lime glass sample was successfully acquired.

  7. [Measurement of area of surplus X-ray radiation by dose-area product meter at image intensifier in angiography X-ray units].

    PubMed

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Saijou, Takaya; Nagao, Tatsuji; Ishikawa, Yoshinobu; Mizuno, Shouta; Nakamura, Akirou

    2006-07-20

    The aim of this study was to assess the area of surplus X-ray radiation (surplus area) of three image intensifiers (I.I.) of two angiography X-ray units. Surplus area refers to an area surrounded with a circular collimator and effective field of view (FOV). Dose-area product (DAP) was used to measure surplus X-rays. A ratio of surplus area when based on each FOV showed an 8% to 39.3% increase with expansion of FOV, surplus area showed an 18 cm(2) to 95 cm(2) decrease with FOV. When the circular collimator was narrowed to a degree that could be confirmed partially in effective FOV, the rate of surplus area was decreased almost as much as the rate of scattered radiation. Surface dose was almost unchanged. The radiation exposure of the physician as well as that of the patient was reduced by the reduction of surplus area. The DAP meter, while a tool for patient radiation exposure management, is also highly useful for machinery management such as the measurement of surplus area at the I.I. system.

  8. Bystander effect between zebrafish embryos in vivo induced by high-dose X-rays.

    PubMed

    Choi, V W Y; Ng, C Y P; Kobayashi, A; Konishi, T; Suya, N; Ishikawa, T; Cheng, S H; Yu, K N

    2013-06-18

    We employed embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio, for our studies on the in vivo bystander effect between embryos irradiated with high-dose X-rays and naive unirradiated embryos. The effects on the naive whole embryos were studied through quantification of apoptotic signals at 25 h post fertilization (hpf) through the terminal dUTP transferase-mediated nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay followed by counting the stained cells under a microscope. We report data showing that embryos at 5 hpf subjected to a 4-Gy X-ray irradiation could release a stress signal into the medium, which could induce a bystander effect in partnered naive embryos sharing the same medium. We further demonstrated that this bystander effect (induced through partnering) could be successfully suppressed through the addition of the nitric oxide (NO) scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) into the medium but not through the addition of the CO liberator tricarbonylchloro(glycinato)ruthenium(II) (CORM-3). This shows that NO was involved in the bystander response between zebrafish embryos induced through X-ray irradiation. We also report data showing that the bystander effect could be successfully induced in naive embryos by introducing them into the irradiated embryo conditioned medium (IECM) alone, i.e., without partnering with the irradiated embryos. The IECM was harvested from the medium that had conditioned the zebrafish embryos irradiated at 5 hpf with 4-Gy X-ray until the irradiated embryos developed into 29 hpf. NO released from the irradiated embryos was unlikely to be involved in the bystander effect induced through the IECM because of the short life of NO. We further revealed that this bystander effect (induced through IECM) was rapidly abolished through diluting the IECM by a factor of 2× or greater, which agreed with the proposal that the bystander effect was an on/off response with a threshold.

  9. Paediatric x-ray radiation dose reduction and image quality analysis.

    PubMed

    Martin, L; Ruddlesden, R; Makepeace, C; Robinson, L; Mistry, T; Starritt, H

    2013-09-01

    Collaboration of multiple staff groups has resulted in significant reduction in the risk of radiation-induced cancer from radiographic x-ray exposure during childhood. In this study at an acute NHS hospital trust, a preliminary audit identified initial exposure factors. These were compared with European and UK guidance, leading to the introduction of new factors that were in compliance with European guidance on x-ray tube potentials. Image quality was assessed using standard anatomical criteria scoring, and visual grading characteristics analysis assessed the impact on image quality of changes in exposure factors. This analysis determined the acceptability of gradual radiation dose reduction below the European and UK guidance levels. Chest and pelvis exposures were optimised, achieving dose reduction for each age group, with 7%-55% decrease in critical organ dose. Clinicians confirmed diagnostic image quality throughout the iterative process. Analysis of images acquired with preliminary and final exposure factors indicated an average visual grading analysis result of 0.5, demonstrating equivalent image quality. The optimisation process and final radiation doses are reported for Carestream computed radiography to aid other hospitals in minimising radiation risks to children.

  10. Fetal radiation doses and subsequent risks from X-ray examinations: Should we be concerned?

    PubMed Central

    Chaparian, Ali; Aghabagheri, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pregnant women are sometimes exposed to ionizing radiation in radiology examinations for various reasons. In such cases, the radiation dose to the conceptus and subsequent risks should be estimated. Objective: The purpose of this study was the calculation and presentation of fetal dose and subsequent risks resulted from different X-ray examinations. Materials and Methods: An analytical simulation study was conducted and six common radiographies in different views and three types of special examinations were evaluated. The entrance skin exposure (ESE) was measured using a solid-state dosimeter. A Monte Carlo program was used in order to simulate different views of X-ray examinations and calculate the radiation doses received by the conceptus for every view of each examination. Then the risk of childhood cancer and small head size were calculated for different radiographies. Results: The fetal doses and consequence risks of the small head size and childhood cancer for the radiographs of chest, skull, and sinuses were negligible but the risks of childhood cancer and small head size due to radiographies of abdomen, lumbar spine, and pelvis areas were ponderable. Conclusion: Results of this study can be used for the pregnant women radiographies management. PMID:24639714

  11. [Polymer gel dosimetry--the dose response for X-ray irradiation].

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Takahiro; Usui, Shuji; Hayashi, Shin-Ichiro; Yoshioka, Munenori; Haneda, Kiyofumi

    2012-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimetry has been considered a promising technique for clinical use, but this potential has not yet been fully realized in Japan. One reason may be because the commercialized gel detector, BANG gel, is expensive and it is only produced abroad. A second reason is the difficulty of controlling dose sensitivity of the gel so that it is stable under ordinary clinical conditions. In this work we introduce two types of gel detectors (MAG and PAG) which we produced in-house. First the method of fabrication of gel is presented in detail, then the dose responses of MAG and PAG for X-ray irradiation are evaluating for MRI and X-ray CT scanning. The MAG-type gel is useful in low contrast dosimetry because of the high sensitivity in its dose response (R2). The PAG-type gel is effective for dosimetry in multiple field irradiations because its dose response (CT value) has reproducibility independent of the different irradiation conditions. Finally, we summarize the potential for clinical use of polymer gel dosimetry with these gel detectors.

  12. Radiation Dose to the Skin and to the Gonads from Diagnostic X-Ray Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, H. E.; Olde, G. L.

    1963-01-01

    The design of a study to assess the hazard to patients from radiation received during diagnostic radiological procedures is described. The long-term accumulation of data relating to the skin and gonadal doses received by patients in a large x-ray department has been initiated. This will serve as a model for any situation involving small recurrent radiation doses to a significant proportion of the population. A description is given of the basic dose measurements made and the method used in calculating and recording the skin and gonadal doses for each patient. Although no definite conclusions concerning the presence or absence of a radiation hazard have yet been made, the proposed future course of this study is discussed. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:14079142

  13. A framework for organ dose estimation in x-ray angiography and interventional radiology based on dose-related data in DICOM structured reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Artur; Bujila, Robert; Fransson, Annette; Andreo, Pedro; Poludniowski, Gavin

    2016-04-01

    Although interventional x-ray angiography (XA) procedures involve relatively high radiation doses that can lead to deterministic tissue reactions in addition to stochastic effects, convenient and accurate estimation of absorbed organ doses has traditionally been out of reach. This has mainly been due to the absence of practical means to access dose-related data that describe the physical context of the numerous exposures during an XA procedure. The present work provides a comprehensive and general framework for the determination of absorbed organ dose, based on non-proprietary access to dose-related data by utilizing widely available DICOM radiation dose structured reports. The framework comprises a straightforward calculation workflow to determine the incident kerma and reconstruction of the geometrical relation between the projected x-ray beam and the patient’s anatomy. The latter is difficult in practice, as the position of the patient on the table top is unknown. A novel patient-specific approach for reconstruction of the patient position on the table is presented. The proposed approach was evaluated for 150 patients by comparing the estimated position of the primary irradiated organs (the target organs) with their position in clinical DICOM images. The approach is shown to locate the target organ position with a mean (max) deviation of 1.3 (4.3), 1.8 (3.6) and 1.4 (2.9) cm for neurovascular, adult and paediatric cardiovascular procedures, respectively. To illustrate the utility of the framework for systematic and automated organ dose estimation in routine clinical practice, a prototype implementation of the framework with Monte Carlo simulations is included.

  14. A framework for organ dose estimation in x-ray angiography and interventional radiology based on dose-related data in DICOM structured reports.

    PubMed

    Omar, Artur; Bujila, Robert; Fransson, Annette; Andreo, Pedro; Poludniowski, Gavin

    2016-04-21

    Although interventional x-ray angiography (XA) procedures involve relatively high radiation doses that can lead to deterministic tissue reactions in addition to stochastic effects, convenient and accurate estimation of absorbed organ doses has traditionally been out of reach. This has mainly been due to the absence of practical means to access dose-related data that describe the physical context of the numerous exposures during an XA procedure. The present work provides a comprehensive and general framework for the determination of absorbed organ dose, based on non-proprietary access to dose-related data by utilizing widely available DICOM radiation dose structured reports. The framework comprises a straightforward calculation workflow to determine the incident kerma and reconstruction of the geometrical relation between the projected x-ray beam and the patient's anatomy. The latter is difficult in practice, as the position of the patient on the table top is unknown. A novel patient-specific approach for reconstruction of the patient position on the table is presented. The proposed approach was evaluated for 150 patients by comparing the estimated position of the primary irradiated organs (the target organs) with their position in clinical DICOM images. The approach is shown to locate the target organ position with a mean (max) deviation of 1.3 (4.3), 1.8 (3.6) and 1.4 (2.9) cm for neurovascular, adult and paediatric cardiovascular procedures, respectively. To illustrate the utility of the framework for systematic and automated organ dose estimation in routine clinical practice, a prototype implementation of the framework with Monte Carlo simulations is included.

  15. Determination of Lateral Diffusivity in Single Pixel X-ray Absorbers with Implications for Position Dependent Excess Broadening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saab, T.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Iyomoto, N.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J.; Finkbeiner, F.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J.

    2005-01-01

    An ideal microcalorimeter is characterized by a constant energy resolution across the sensor's dynamic range. Any dependence of pulse shape on the position within the absorber where an event occurs leads to a degradation in resolution that is linear with event s energy (excess broadening). In this paper we present a numerical simulation that was developed to model the variation in pulse shape with position based on the thermal conductivity within the absorber and between the absorber, sensor, and heat bath, for arbitrarily shaped absorbers and sensors. All the parameters required for the simulation can be measured from actual devices. We describe how the thermal conductivity of the absorber material is determined by comparing the results of this model with data taken from a position sensitive detector in which any position dependent effect is purposely emphasized by making a long, narrow absorber that is read out by sensors on both end. Finally, we present the implications for excess broadening given the measured parameters of our X-ray microcalorimeters.

  16. Estimating head and neck tissue dose from x-ray scatter to physicians performing x-ray guided cardiovascular procedures: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Fetterly, Kenneth A; Schueler, Beth A; Grams, Michael P; Sturchio, Glenn M

    2017-03-20

    Physicians performing x-ray guided interventional procedures have a keen interest in radiation safety. Radiation dose to tissues and organs of the head and neck are of particular interest because they are not routinely protected by wearable radiation safety devices. This study was conducted to facilitate estimation of radiation dose to tissues of the head and neck of interventional physicians based on the dose recorded by a personal dosimeter worn on the left collar. Scatter beam qualities maximum energy and HVL were measured for 40 scatter beams emitting from an anthropomorphic patient phantom. Variables of the scatter beams included scatter angle (35° and 90°), primary beam peak tube potential (60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp), and 5 Cu spectral filter thicknesses (0-0.9 mm). Four reference scatter beam qualities were selected to represent the range of scatter beams realized in a typical practice. A general radiographic x-ray tube was tuned to produce scatter-equivalent radiographic beams and used to simultaneously expose the head and neck of an anthropomorphic operator phantom and radiochromic film. The geometric relationship between the x-ray source of the scatter-equivalent beams and the operator phantom was set to mimic that between a patient and physician performing an invasive cardiovascular procedure. Dose to the exterior surface of the operator phantom was measured with both 3 × 3 cm(2) pieces of film and personal dosimeters positioned at the location of the left collar. All films were scanned with a calibrated flatbed scanner, which converted the film's reflective density to dose. Films from the transverse planes of the operator phantom provided 2D maps of the dose distribution within the phantom. These dose maps were normalized by the dose at the left collar, providing 2D percent of left collar dose (LCD) maps. The percent LCD maps were overlain with bony anatomy CT images of the operator phantom and estimates of percent LCD to the left, right and whole

  17. Estimated collective effective dose to the population from X-ray and nuclear medicine examinations in Finland.

    PubMed

    Bly, R; Järvinen, H; Korpela, M H; Tenkanen-Rautakoski, P; Mäkinen, A

    2011-09-01

    The collective effective doses to the population from X-ray and nuclear medicine (NM) examinations in Finland in 2008 and 2009, respectively, were estimated. The estimated collective effective dose per inhabitant was 0.45 mSv from X-ray examinations and 0.03 mSv from NM examinations. The collective effective doses per inhabitant have not changed substantially during the last 10 y. However, proportional dose due to CT examinations has increased from 50 % in 2005 to 58 % in 2009 of the total collective effective dose from all X-ray examinations and proportional dose of PET examinations from 7 to 13 % of the total collective effective dose from NM examinations. The collective effective dose from conventional plain radiography was over 20 % higher when estimated using the new (ICRP 103) tissue weighting factors than that obtained using the old (ICRP 60) tissue weighting factors.

  18. Empirical electro-optical and x-ray performance evaluation of CMOS active pixels sensor for low dose, high resolution x-ray medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, C D; Bohndiek, S E; Royle, G; Blue, A; Liang, H X; Clark, A; Prydderch, M; Turchetta, R; Speller, R

    2007-12-01

    Monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors with high performance have gained attention in the last few years in many scientific and space applications. In order to evaluate the increasing capabilities of this technology, in particular where low dose high resolution x-ray medical imaging is required, critical electro-optical and physical x-ray performance evaluation was determined. The electro-optical performance includes read noise, full well capacity, interacting quantum efficiency, and pixels cross talk. The x-ray performance, including x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detection quantum efficiency, has been evaluated in the mammographic energy range. The sensor is a 525 x 525 standard three transistor CMOS active pixel sensor array with more than 75% fill factor and 25 x 25 microm pixel pitch. Reading at 10 f/s, it is found that the sensor has 114 electrons total additive noise, 10(5) electrons full well capacity with shot noise limited operation, and 34% interacting quantum efficiency at 530 nm. Two different structured CsI:Tl phosphors with thickness 95 and 115 microm, respectively, have been optically coupled via a fiber optic plate to the array resulting in two different system configurations. The sensitivity of the two different system configurations was 43 and 47 electrons per x-ray incident on the sensor. The MTF at 10% of the two different system configurations was 9.5 and 9 cycles/mm with detective quantum efficiency of 0.45 and 0.48, respectively, close to zero frequency at approximately 0.44 microC/kg (1.72 mR) detector entrance exposure. The detector was quantum limited at low spatial frequencies and its performance was comparable with high resolution a: Si and charge coupled device based x-ray imagers. The detector also demonstrates almost an order of magnitude lower noise than active matrix flat panel imagers. The results suggest that CMOS active pixel sensors when coupled

  19. X-ray radiation and the risk of multiple sclerosis: Do the site and dose of exposure matter?

    PubMed Central

    Motamed, Mohammad Reza; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Abbasi, Maryam; Sanei, Mastaneh; Abbaslou, Mina; Meysami, Somayeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The sporadic cases of radiation-activated multiple sclerosis (MS) has been previously described, with a few studies focused on the relationship between radiation and the risk of MS. The aim of our study was to evaluate the association between history of X-ray radiation and MS. Methods: This case-control study was conducted on 150 individuals including 65 MS patients and 85 age- and sex-matched healthy controls enrolled using non-probability convenient sampling. Any history of previous Xray radiation consisted of job-related X-ray exposure, radiotherapy, radiographic evaluations including chest Xray, lumbosacral X-ray, skull X-ray, paranasal sinuses (PNS) X-ray, gastrointestinal (GI) series, foot X-ray and brain CT scanning were recorded and compared between two groups. Statistical analysis was performed using independent t test, Chi square and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve methods through SPSS software. Results: History of both diagnostic [OR=3.06 (95% CI: 1.32-7.06)] and therapeutic [OR=7.54 (95% CI: 1.5935.76) X-ray radiations were significantly higher among MS group. Mean number of skull X-rays [0.4 (SD=0.6) vs. 0.1 (SD=0.3), p=0.004] and brain CT scanning [0.9 (SD=0.8) vs. 0.5 (SD=0.7), p=0.005] was higher in MS group as well as mean of the cumulative X-ray radiation dosage [1.84 (SD=1.70) mSv vs. 1.11 (SD=1.54) mSv; p=0.008]. Conclusion: Our study was one of the first to show higher history of X-ray radiation in patients with MS compared to healthy controls. A possible association was also found between the dose and the site exposed to X-ray radiation and risk of developing MS PMID:25695003

  20. Megavoltage x-ray skin dose variation with an angle using grid carbon fibre couch tops.

    PubMed

    Butson, Martin J; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K N

    2007-10-21

    It is well known that a skin dose from high-energy x-ray radiation varies with the angle of beam incidence or the presence of a radiotherapy linear accelerator couch top material. This note investigates changes produced to the skin dose from a Varian carbon fibre grid couch top at differing angles of incidence for 6 MV x-rays as is often the case clinically. Results have shown that the skin dose can easily be measured using an EBT Gafchromic film whereby the delivered skin dose can be quantified to a high level of spatial resolution, not easily achieved with other skin dose detectors. Results have shown a significant increase in the skin dose specifically at the point of a cross-sectional carbon fibre grid. Values in % of the skin dose increased from approximately 27% (an open area within a 10 cm x 10 cm field) up to 55% (same field size) at the centre of the carbon fibre mesh strip (0 degrees incidence). This is compared to 19% of the skin dose for an open field of a 10 cm x 10 cm beam without the couch material present. At larger angles similar effects occur with values changing from 52% to 75% (60 degrees , 10 cm x 10 cm) in the open area and under the grid, respectively. This produces a wave effect for the skin dose. The average skin dose magnitude increases with the angle of incidence of the beam, ranging from 37.5% to 66% from 0 degrees to 60 degrees (10 x 10 cm), respectively. The symmetric wave nature of the skin dose profile skews to deliver an increased dose on the posterior side of the carbon fibre grid as the angle of incidence increases. Simulated fractional dose delivery on a phantom has shown that over 30 fractions the wave nature of the delivered skin dose is minimized due to the random nature of most patient positioning on the treatment couch. However, some variations are still present as the ratio of the open to grid area is approximately 4:1 and the dose spread is not necessarily completely averaged during a typical fractionated radiotherapy

  1. K-edge digital subtraction imaging with dichromatic x-ray sources: SNR and dose studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnelli, A.; Elleaume, H.; Taibi, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Bravin, A.

    2006-09-01

    The aim of the present work is to analytically evaluate the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the delivered dose in K-edge digital subtraction imaging (KES) using two types of x-ray sources: a monochromatic x-ray source (available at synchrotron radiation facilities and considered as gold standard) and a quasi-monochromatic compact source. The energy separation ΔE between the two monochromatic beams is 1 keV and 4 keV for the two sources, respectively. The evaluation has been performed for both radiography and computed tomography. Different geometries have been studied to mimic clinical situations. In mammography, a pathology perfused by a contrast agent has been modelled; in angiography, a vessel superimposed to a ventricle or a stand-alone artery stenosis has been studied. The SNR and the skin dose have been calculated as a function of the detail diameter, the contrast agent (iodine and gadolinium), and its concentration in the tissues. Results show that for ΔE = 4 keV a slightly higher delivered dose is required to obtain the same SNR with respect to ΔE < 1 keV. A similar study has been performed for KES-CT. Computer simulations of CT images performed with Snark software are shown to validate the analytical calculations.

  2. Effect of X-ray energies on induced photo-neutron doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, N. E.; Ghanim, E. H.; Shinashin, Kh.; El-Sersy, A. R.

    2014-03-01

    Photoneutrons induced by two high energies range from the Elekta medical linear accelerator (10 and 18 MV) were measured by nuclear track detectors (NTDs). CR-39 NTD in contact with converter screen slide films, natural boron of thickness 40 μm coated on the polyester film (BN1). Detectors were exposed at 100 cm SSD with field size 20×20 on the patient table, with chest phantom and with build-up Perspex used for high-energy exposure. CR-39 registers the thermal neutron by the (n-α) reaction with the thin layer of boron and the fast neutron was measured through the (n-p) elastic scattering with the H2 molecules in the CR-39 constituents.It was found that the total neutron dose (thermal and fast) from the 18 MV X-ray is higher than that of 10 MV. The measured thermal neutron dose is relatively smaller than the fast neutron dose in the case of direct exposure at the two X-ray energies. On the other hand, in the case of measurements on phantom and upon the use of build-up Perspex sheets, the ratio of fast to that of thermal is less than that of direct exposure.

  3. Image quality and dose optimization using novel x-ray source filters tailored to patient size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Thomas L.; Cesmeli, Erdogan; Ikhlef, Aziz; Horiuchi, Tetsuya

    2005-04-01

    The expanding set of CT clinical applications demands increased attention to obtaining the maximum image quality at the lowest possible dose. Pre-patient beam shaping filters provide an effective means to improve dose utilization. In this paper we develop and apply characterization methods that lead to a set of filters appropriately matched to the patient. We developed computer models to estimate image noise and a patient size adjusted CTDI dose. The noise model is based on polychromatic X-ray calculations. The dose model is empirically derived by fitting CTDI style dose measurements for a demographically representative set of phantom sizes and shapes with various beam shaping filters. The models were validated and used to determine the optimum IQ vs dose for a range of patient sizes. The models clearly show that an optimum beam shaping filter exists as a function of object diameter. Based on noise and dose alone, overall dose efficiency advantages of 50% were obtained by matching the filter shape to the size of the object. A set of patient matching filters are used in the GE LightSpeed VCT and Pro32 to provide a practical solution for optimum image quality at the lowest possible dose over the range of patient sizes and clinical applications. Moreover, these filters mark the beginning of personalized medicine where CT scanner image quality and radiation dose utilization is truly individualized and optimized to the patient being scanned.

  4. A Search for Photo-ionized Absorbers in High Mass X-ray Binaries: 4U 1907+09

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balman, Solen

    2007-10-01

    In order to further our understanding of the emitting and absorbing material in high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXB) and the accretion states of the sources,we propose a total of 30 ksec XMM-Newton observation of 4U 1907+09 to be conducted as two 15 ksec observations at different binary phases.In two archival ASCA SIS spectra of 4U 1907+09,we found evidence for the presence of 6.9 keV Fe XXVI absorption features at around 2sigma confidence which will yield 5sigma detection with EPIC pn CCDs and the modelling will allow the properties of a photo-ionized absorber to be determined for the first time in a HMXB. Our proposed observation at the chosen phases will for the first time determine spectra at low count rate levels over a factor of 100 difference from the source.

  5. Toward an organ based dose prescription method for the improved accuracy of murine dose in orthovoltage x-ray irradiators

    PubMed Central

    Belley, Matthew D.; Wang, Chu; Nguyen, Giao; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetry is essential when irradiating mice to ensure that functional and molecular endpoints are well understood for the radiation dose delivered. Conventional methods of prescribing dose in mice involve the use of a single dose rate measurement and assume a uniform average dose throughout all organs of the entire mouse. Here, the authors report the individual average organ dose values for the irradiation of a 12, 23, and 33 g mouse on a 320 kVp x-ray irradiator and calculate the resulting error from using conventional dose prescription methods. Methods: Organ doses were simulated in the Geant4 application for tomographic emission toolkit using the MOBY mouse whole-body phantom. Dosimetry was performed for three beams utilizing filters A (1.65 mm Al), B (2.0 mm Al), and C (0.1 mm Cu + 2.5 mm Al), respectively. In addition, simulated x-ray spectra were validated with physical half-value layer measurements. Results: Average doses in soft-tissue organs were found to vary by as much as 23%–32% depending on the filter. Compared to filters A and B, filter C provided the hardest beam and had the lowest variation in soft-tissue average organ doses across all mouse sizes, with a difference of 23% for the median mouse size of 23 g. Conclusions: This work suggests a new dose prescription method in small animal dosimetry: it presents a departure from the conventional approach of assigning a single dose value for irradiation of mice to a more comprehensive approach of characterizing individual organ doses to minimize the error and uncertainty. In human radiation therapy, clinical treatment planning establishes the target dose as well as the dose distribution, however, this has generally not been done in small animal research. These results suggest that organ dose errors will be minimized by calibrating the dose rates for all filters, and using different dose rates for different organs. PMID:24593746

  6. Toward an organ based dose prescription method for the improved accuracy of murine dose in orthovoltage x-ray irradiators

    SciTech Connect

    Belley, Matthew D.; Wang, Chu; Nguyen, Giao; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetry is essential when irradiating mice to ensure that functional and molecular endpoints are well understood for the radiation dose delivered. Conventional methods of prescribing dose in mice involve the use of a single dose rate measurement and assume a uniform average dose throughout all organs of the entire mouse. Here, the authors report the individual average organ dose values for the irradiation of a 12, 23, and 33 g mouse on a 320 kVp x-ray irradiator and calculate the resulting error from using conventional dose prescription methods. Methods: Organ doses were simulated in the Geant4 application for tomographic emission toolkit using the MOBY mouse whole-body phantom. Dosimetry was performed for three beams utilizing filters A (1.65 mm Al), B (2.0 mm Al), and C (0.1 mm Cu + 2.5 mm Al), respectively. In addition, simulated x-ray spectra were validated with physical half-value layer measurements. Results: Average doses in soft-tissue organs were found to vary by as much as 23%–32% depending on the filter. Compared to filters A and B, filter C provided the hardest beam and had the lowest variation in soft-tissue average organ doses across all mouse sizes, with a difference of 23% for the median mouse size of 23 g. Conclusions: This work suggests a new dose prescription method in small animal dosimetry: it presents a departure from the conventional approach of assigninga single dose value for irradiation of mice to a more comprehensive approach of characterizing individual organ doses to minimize the error and uncertainty. In human radiation therapy, clinical treatment planning establishes the target dose as well as the dose distribution, however, this has generally not been done in small animal research. These results suggest that organ dose errors will be minimized by calibrating the dose rates for all filters, and using different dose rates for different organs.

  7. Calculation of dose conversion factors for posterior-anterior chest radiography of adults with a relatively high-energy X-ray spectrum.

    PubMed

    Schultz, F W; Geleijns, J; Zoetelief, J

    1994-08-01

    In a survey of X-ray units as applied for thorax examinations considerable variations were observed in entrance dose among different hospitals in the Leyden region. For the median exposure conditions, i.e. 125 kVp, heavy filtering and large focus-to-skin distance (177.5 cm), absorbed dose distributions have been derived using mathematical phantoms of a standard male or female adult. For relatively high-energy X-rays, back scatter factors were calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. In addition, conversion factors were obtained, relating organ doses to air kerma, free in air. Effective dose equivalent and effective dose were calculated according to ICRP-26 and ICRP-60 recommendations, respectively. The computational procedures were compared with results reported in the literature for a similar exposure configuration but using lower-energy X-rays. Causes of relative differences ranging from -56% to +34% were analysed. In addition to the photon energy spectrum and filtering, the exposure geometry appears to be a very important parameter which can be optimized for the purpose of dose reduction.

  8. Organ Doses to Airline Passengers Screened by X-Ray Backscatter Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Stepusin, Elliott J; Maynard, Matthew R; O'Reilly, Shannon E; Redzovic, Sadije; Bolch, Wesley E; Hintenlang, David E; Borak, Thomas B

    2017-02-01

    Advanced imaging technologies (AIT) are being developed for passenger airline transportation. They are designed to provide enhanced security benefits by identifying objects on passengers that would not be detected by methodologies now used for routine surveillance. X-ray backscatter imaging is one AIT system being considered. Since this technology is based on scanning passengers with ionizing radiation, concern has been raised relating to the health risks associated with these exposures. Recommendations for standards of radiation safety have been proposed by the American National Standards Institute published in ANSI/HPS N43.17-2009. A Monte Carlo based methodology for estimating organ doses received from an X-ray backscatter AIT system is presented. Radiological properties of a reference scanner including beam intensity, geometry and energy spectra were modeled based on previous studies and physical measurements. These parameters were incorporated into a Monte Carlo source subroutine and validated with comparison of simulated versus measured data. One extension of this study was to calculate organ and effective dose on a wide range of potential passengers. Computational phantoms with realistic morphologies were used including adults of 5th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 95th percentile weight, children of 5th, 50th and 95th percentile weight, and the developing fetus of 15, 25, and 38 weeks after conception. Additional sensitivity studies were performed to evaluate effects of passenger positioning within the scanner, energy spectrum and beam geometry, as well as failure mode analyses. Results for routine operations yielded a maximum effective dose to the adult and pediatric passengers of 15 and 25 nSv per screen, respectively. The developing fetus received a maximum organ dose and whole body dose of 16 nGy and 8.5 nGy per screen, respectively. The sensitivity analyses indicated that variations in positioning, energy spectra, and beam geometry yielded a range of effective

  9. Dose-volume histogram comparison between static 5-field IMRT with 18-MV X-rays and helical tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Akihiro; Shibamoto, Yuta; Hattori, Yukiko; Tamura, Takeshi; Iwabuchi, Michio; Otsuka, Shinya; Sugie, Chikao; Yanagi, Takeshi

    2015-03-01

    We treated prostate cancer patients with static 5-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using linac 18-MV X-rays or tomotherapy with 6-MV X-rays. As X-ray energies differ, we hypothesized that 18-MV photon IMRT may be better for large patients and tomotherapy may be more suitable for small patients. Thus, we compared dose-volume parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) in 59 patients with T1-3 N0M0 prostate cancer who had been treated using 5-field IMRT. For these same patients, tomotherapy plans were also prepared for comparison. In addition, plans of 18 patients who were actually treated with tomotherapy were analyzed. The evaluated parameters were homogeneity indicies and a conformity index for the PTVs, and D2 (dose received by 2% of the PTV in Gy), D98, Dmean and V10-70 Gy (%) for OARs. To evaluate differences by body size, patients with a known body mass index were grouped by that index ( <21; 21-25; and >25 kg/m(2)). For the PTV, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans compared with the 5-field IMRT plans. For the rectum, V10 Gy and V60 Gy were higher, whereas V20 Gy and V30 Gy were lower in the tomotherapy plans. For the bladder, all parameters were higher in the tomotherapy plans. However, both plans were considered clinically acceptable. Similar trends were observed in 18 patients treated with tomotherapy. Obvious trends were not observed for body size. Tomotherapy provides equivalent dose distributions for PTVs and OARs compared with 18-MV 5-field IMRT. Tomotherapy could be used as a substitute for high-energy photon IMRT for prostate cancer regardless of body size.

  10. Filtration to reduce paediatric dose for a linear slot-scanning digital X-ray machine.

    PubMed

    Perks, T D; Dendere, R; Irving, B; Hartley, T; Scholtz, P; Lawson, A; Trauernicht, C; Steiner, S; Douglas, T S

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes modelling, application and validation of a filtration technique for a linear slot-scanning digital X-ray system to reduce radiation dose to paediatric patients while preserving diagnostic image quality. A dose prediction model was implemented, which calculates patient entrance doses using variable input parameters. Effective dose is calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation. An added filter of 1.8-mm aluminium was predicted to lower the radiation dose significantly. An objective image quality study was conducted using detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The PTW Normi 4FLU test phantom was used for quantitative assessment, showing that image contrast and spatial resolution were maintained with the proposed filter. A paediatric cadaver full-body imaging trial assessed the diagnostic quality of the images and measured the dose reduction using a 1.8-mm aluminium filter. Assessment by radiologists indicated that diagnostic quality was maintained with the added filtration, despite a reduction in DQE. A new filtration technique for full-body paediatric scanning on the Lodox Statscan has been validated, reducing entrance dose for paediatric patients by 36 % on average and effective dose by 27 % on average, while maintaining image quality.

  11. Unification of X-ray winds in Seyfert galaxies: from ultra-fast outflows to warm absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Nemmen, R. S.; Braito, V.; Gaspari, M.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2013-04-01

    The existence of ionized X-ray absorbing layers of gas along the line of sight to the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies is a well established observational fact. This material is systematically outflowing and shows a large range in parameters. However, its actual nature and dynamics are still not clear. In order to gain insights into these important issues we performed a literature search for papers reporting the parameters of the soft X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) in 35 type 1 Seyferts and compared their properties to those of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) detected in the same sample. The fraction of sources with WAs is >60 per cent, consistent with previous studies. The fraction of sources with UFOs is >34 per cent, >67 per cent of which also show WAs. The large dynamic range obtained when considering all the absorbers together, spanning several orders of magnitude in ionization, column, velocity and distance allows us, for the first time, to investigate general relations among them. In particular, we find significant correlations indicating that the closer the absorber is to the central black hole, the higher the ionization, column, outflow velocity and consequently the mechanical power. In all the cases, the absorbers continuously populate the whole parameter space, with the WAs and the UFOs lying always at the two ends of the distribution. These evidence strongly suggest that these absorbers, often considered of different types, could actually represent parts of a single large-scale stratified outflow observed at different locations from the black hole. The UFOs are likely launched from the inner accretion disc and the WAs at larger distances, such as the outer disc and/or torus. We argue that the observed parameters and correlations are, to date, consistent with both radiation pressure through Compton scattering and magnetohydrodynamic processes contributing to the outflow acceleration, the latter playing a major role. Most of the absorbers, especially the UFOs, show

  12. Unification of X-ray Winds in Seyfert Galaxies: From Ultra-fast Outflows to Warm Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Nemmen, R. S.; Braito, V.; Gaspari, M.; Reynolds, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    The existence of ionized X-ray absorbing layers of gas along the line of sight to the nuclei of Seyfert galaxies is a well established observational fact. This material is systematically outflowing and shows a large range in parameters. However, its actual nature and dynamics are still not clear. In order to gain insights into these important issues we performed a literature search for papers reporting the parameters of the soft X-ray warm absorbers (WAs) in 35 type 1 Seyferts and compared their properties to those of the ultra-fast outflows (UFOs) detected in the same sample. The fraction of sources with WAs is >60 per cent, consistent with previous studies. The fraction of sources with UFOs is >34 per cent, >67 per cent of which also show WAs. The large dynamic range obtained when considering all the absorbers together, spanning several orders of magnitude in ionization, column, velocity and distance allows us, for the first time, to investigate general relations among them. In particular, we find significant correlations indicating that the closer the absorber is to the central black hole, the higher the ionization, column, outflow velocity and consequently the mechanical power. In all the cases, the absorbers continuously populate the whole parameter space, with the WAs and the UFOs lying always at the two ends of the distribution. These evidence strongly suggest that these absorbers, often considered of different types, could actually represent parts of a single large-scale stratified outflow observed at different locations from the black hole. The UFOs are likely launched from the inner accretion disc and the WAs at larger distances, such as the outer disc and/or torus. We argue that the observed parameters and correlations are, to date, consistent with both radiation pressure through Compton scattering and magnetohydrodynamic processes contributing to the outflow acceleration, the latter playing a major role. Most of the absorbers, especially the UFOs, show

  13. The dose received by patients during dental X-ray examination and the technical condition of radiological equipment.

    PubMed

    Bekas, Marcin; Pachocki, Krzysztof A

    2013-01-01

    Implementation of X-ray dental examination is associated with the patients exposure to ionizing radation. The size of the exposure depends on the type of medical procedure, the technical condition of the X-ray unit and selected exposure conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the dose received by patients during dental X-ray examination and the assessment of the technical condition of medical equipment, The study included a total number of 79 dental X-ray units located in the region of Mazovia. The test methods for the assessment of the technical condition of dental X-ray units and measurement of radiation dose received by patients were based on the procedures elaborated in the Department of Radiation Hygiene and Radiobiology in the National Institute of Public Health - National Institute of Hygiene (Warszawa, Poland) accredited for the certification of compliance with PN-EN 17025. The research found that 69.6% fully meets the criteria set out in the Polish legislation regarding the safe use of ionizing radiation in medicine, while 30.4% did not meet some of them. A tenfold difference in the size of the dose received by patients during dental X-ray examinations was discovered. For example, during a radiography of the canine teeth of a child, the recorded entrance surface dose (ESD) ranged from 72.8 to 2430 microGy with the average value of 689.1 microGy. Cases where the dose reference level defined in Polish legislation of 5 mGy was exceeded were also found. CONCKUSIONS: It is essential to constantly monitor the situation regarding the technical condition of X-ray units which affects the size of the population's exposure to ionizing radiation as well as raising dentists' awareness about the effects of X-rays on the human body.

  14. Low-Dose X-ray CT Reconstruction via Dictionary Learning

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiong; Zhang, Lei; Hsieh, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Although diagnostic medical imaging provides enormous benefits in the early detection and accuracy diagnosis of various diseases, there are growing concerns on the potential side effect of radiation induced genetic, cancerous and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic performance is a major challenge in the computed tomography (CT) field. Inspired by the compressive sensing theory, the sparse constraint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT reconstruction. Compared to the discrete gradient transform used in the TV method, dictionary learning is proven to be an effective way for sparse representation. On the other hand, it is important to consider the statistical property of projection data in the low-dose CT case. Recently, we have developed a dictionary learning based approach for low-dose X-ray CT. In this paper, we present this method in detail and evaluate it in experiments. In our method, the sparse constraint in terms of a redundant dictionary is incorporated into an objective function in a statistical iterative reconstruction framework. The dictionary can be either predetermined before an image reconstruction task or adaptively defined during the reconstruction process. An alternating minimization scheme is developed to minimize the objective function. Our approach is evaluated with low-dose X-ray projections collected in animal and human CT studies, and the improvement associated with dictionary learning is quantified relative to filtered backprojection and TV-based reconstructions. The results show that the proposed approach might produce better images with lower noise and more detailed structural features in our selected cases. However, there is no proof that this is true for all kinds of structures. PMID:22542666

  15. Low-dose X-ray CT reconstruction via dictionary learning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Mou, Xuanqin; Zhang, Lei; Hsieh, Jiang; Wang, Ge

    2012-09-01

    Although diagnostic medical imaging provides enormous benefits in the early detection and accuracy diagnosis of various diseases, there are growing concerns on the potential side effect of radiation induced genetic, cancerous and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic performance is a major challenge in the computed tomography (CT) field. Inspired by the compressive sensing theory, the sparse constraint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT reconstruction. Compared to the discrete gradient transform used in the TV method, dictionary learning is proven to be an effective way for sparse representation. On the other hand, it is important to consider the statistical property of projection data in the low-dose CT case. Recently, we have developed a dictionary learning based approach for low-dose X-ray CT. In this paper, we present this method in detail and evaluate it in experiments. In our method, the sparse constraint in terms of a redundant dictionary is incorporated into an objective function in a statistical iterative reconstruction framework. The dictionary can be either predetermined before an image reconstruction task or adaptively defined during the reconstruction process. An alternating minimization scheme is developed to minimize the objective function. Our approach is evaluated with low-dose X-ray projections collected in animal and human CT studies, and the improvement associated with dictionary learning is quantified relative to filtered backprojection and TV-based reconstructions. The results show that the proposed approach might produce better images with lower noise and more detailed structural features in our selected cases. However, there is no proof that this is true for all kinds of structures.

  16. A method for high-energy, low-dose mammography using edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diemoz, Paul C.; Bravin, Alberto; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Ruat, Marie; Grandl, Susanne; Mayr, Doris; Auweter, Sigrid; Mittone, Alberto; Brun, Emmanuel; Ponchut, Cyril; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Coan, Paola; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-12-01

    Since the breast is one of the most radiosensitive organs, mammography is arguably the area where lowering radiation dose is of the uttermost importance. Phase-based x-ray imaging methods can provide opportunities in this sense, since they do not require x-rays to be stopped in tissue for image contrast to be generated. Therefore, x-ray energy can be considerably increased compared to those usually exploited by conventional mammography. In this article we show how a novel, optimized approach can lead to considerable dose reductions. This was achieved by matching the edge-illumination phase method, which reaches very high angular sensitivity also at high x-ray energies, to an appropriate image processing algorithm and to a virtually noise-free detection technology capable of reaching almost 100% efficiency at the same energies. Importantly, while proof-of-concept was obtained at a synchrotron, the method has potential for a translation to conventional sources.

  17. Patient dosimetry activities in the United States: the nationwide evaluation of X-ray trends (NEXT) and tissue dose handbooks.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, O H; Stern, S H; Spelic, D C

    1999-01-01

    In the United States the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in collaboration with the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) and state and local government agencies surveys clinical facilities about X-ray system air kerma and ancillary data related to patient dosimetry for a variety of diagnostic X-ray examinations. The survey program is known as the Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT). The survey utilizes reference patient-equivalent phantoms in the collection of comprehensive technical information. With knowledge of the skin-entrance air kerma, specific tissue doses can be calculated. An overview of NEXT and previously published FDA tissue dose handbooks for diagnostic X-ray examinations is presented.

  18. Physical characteristics of a low-dose gas microstrip detector for orthopedic x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Despres, Philippe; Beaudoin, Gilles; Gravel, Pierre; Guise, Jacques A. de

    2005-04-01

    A new scanning slit gas detector dedicated to orthopedic x-ray imaging is presented and evaluated in terms of its fundamental imaging characteristics. The system is based on the micromesh gaseous structure detector and achieves primary signal amplification through electronic avalanche in the gas. This feature, together with high quantum detection efficiency and fan-beam geometry, allows for imaging at low radiation levels. The system is composed of 1764 channels spanning a width of 44.8 cm and is capable of imaging an entire patient at speeds of up to 15 cm/s. The resolution was found to be anisotropic and significantly affected by the beam quality in the horizontal direction, but otherwise sufficient for orthopedic studies. As a consequence of line-by-line acquisition, the images contain some ripple components due to mechanical vibrations combined with variations in the x-ray tube output power. The reported detective quantum efficiency (DQE) values are relatively low (0.14 to 0.20 at 0.5 mm{sup -1}) as a consequence of a suboptimal collimation geometry. The DQE values were found to be unaffected by the exposure down to 7 {mu}Gy, suggesting that the system is quantum limited even for low radiation levels. A system composed of two orthogonal detectors is already in use and can produce dual-view full body scans at low doses. This device could contribute to reduce the risk of radiation induced cancer in sensitive clientele undergoing intensive x-ray procedures, like young scoliotic women.

  19. Physical characteristics of a low-dose gas microstrip detector for orthopedic x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Després, Philippe; Beaudoin, Gilles; Gravel, Pierre; de Guise, Jacques A

    2005-04-01

    A new scanning slit gas detector dedicated to orthopedic x-ray imaging is presented and evaluated in terms of its fundamental imaging characteristics. The system is based on the micromesh gaseous structure detector and achieves primary signal amplification through electronic avalanche in the gas. This feature, together with high quantum detection efficiency and fan-beam geometry, allows for imaging at low radiation levels. The system is composed of 1764 channels spanning a width of 44.8 cm and is capable of imaging an entire patient at speeds of up to 15 cm/s. The resolution was found to be anisotropic and significantly affected by the beam quality in the horizontal direction, but otherwise sufficient for orthopedic studies. As a consequence of line-by-line acquisition, the images contain some ripple components due to mechanical vibrations combined with variations in the x-ray tube output power. The reported detective quantum efficiency (DQE) values are relatively low (0.14 to 0.20 at 0.5 mm(-1)) as a consequence of a suboptimal collimation geometry. The DQE values were found to be unaffected by the exposure down to 7 microGy, suggesting that the system is quantum limited even for low radiation levels. A system composed of two orthogonal detectors is already in use and can produce dual-view full body scans at low doses. This device could contribute to reduce the risk of radiation induced cancer in sensitive clientele undergoing intensive x-ray procedures, like young scoliotic women.

  20. Optimized Fluoroscopy Setting and Appropriate Project Position Can Reduce X-ray Radiation Doses Rates during Electrophysiology Procedures.

    PubMed

    Hou, Bing-Bo; Yao, Yan; Wu, Ling-Min; Qiao, Yu; Zheng, Li-Hui; Ding, Li-Gang; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Shu

    2015-05-05

    Nonfluoroscopic three-dimensional electroanatomical system is widely used nowadays, but X-ray remains indispensable for complex electrophysiology procedures. This study aimed to evaluate the value of optimized parameter setting and different projection position to reduce X-ray radiation dose rates. From June 2013 to October 2013, 105 consecutive patients who underwent complex ablation were enrolled in the study. After the ablation, the radiation dose rates were measured by two different settings (default setting and optimized setting) with three projection positions (posteroanterior [PA] projection; left anterior oblique [LAO] 30° projection; and LAO 45° projection). The parameter of preset voltage, pulse width, critical voltage, peak voltage, noise reduction, edge enhancement, pulse rate, and dose per frame was modified in the optimized setting. The optimized setting reduced radiation dose rates by 87.5% (1.7 Gy/min vs. 13.6 Gy/min, P < 0.001) in PA, 87.3% (2.5 Gy/min vs. 19.7 Gy/min, P < 0.001) in LAO 30°, 85.9% (3.1 Gy/min vs. 22.1 Gy/min, P < 0.001) in LAO 45°. Increase the angle of projection position will increase the radiation dose rate. We can reduce X-ray radiation dose rates by adjusting the parameter setting of X-ray system. Avoiding oblique projection of large angle is another way to reduce X-ray radiation dose rates.

  1. Determination of the implantation dose in silicon wafers by X-ray fluorescence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Klockenkaemper, R.; Becker, M.; Bubert, H.; Burba, P. ); Palmetshofer, L. )

    1990-08-01

    The ion dose implanted in silicon wafers was determined by X-ray fluorescence analysis after the implantation process. As only near-surface layers below 1-{mu}m thickness were considered, the calibration could be carried out with external standards consisting of thin films of doped gelatine spread on pure wafers. Dose values for Cr and Co were determined between 4 {times} 10{sup 15} and 2 {times} 10{sup 17} atoms/cm{sup 2}, the detection limits being about 3 {times} 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2}. The results are precise and accurate apart from a residual scatter of less than 7%. This was confirmed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after volatilization of the silicon matrix as SiF{sub 4}. It was found that ion-current measurements carried out during the implantation process can have considerable systematic errors.

  2. Evidence for a Circum-Nuclear and Ionised Absorber in the X-ray Obscured Broad Line Radio Galaxy 3C 445

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braito, V.; Reeves, J. N.; Sambruna, R. M.; Gofford, J.

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the results of a Suzaku observation of the Broad Line Radio Galaxy 3C 445. We confirm the results obtained with the previous X-ray observations which unveiled the presence of several soft X-ray emission lines and an overall X-ray emission which strongly resembles a typical Seyfert 2 despite of the optical classification as an unobscured AGN. The broad band spectrum allowed us to measure for the first time the amount of reflection (R approximately 0.9) which together with the relatively strong neutral Fe Ka emission line (EW approximately 100 eV) strongly supports a scenario where a Compton-thick mirror is present. The primary X ray continuum is strongly obscured by an absorber with a column density of NH = 2 - 3 x 10(exp 23) per square centimeter. Two possible scenarios are proposed for the absorber: a neutral partial covering or a mildly ionised absorber with an ionisation parameter log xi approximately 1.0 erg centimeter per second. A comparison with the past and more recent X-ray observations of 3C 445 performed with XMM-Newton and Chandra is presented, which provided tentative evidence that the ionised and outflowing absorber varied. We argue that the absorber is probably associated with an equatorial diskwind located within the parsec scale molecular torus.

  3. Performance Evaluation of a Multichannel All-In-One Phantom Dosimeter for Dose Measurement of Diagnostic X-ray Beam.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyesu; Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Kwon, Guwon; Kim, Mingeon; Kim, Hye Jin; Song, Young Beom; Jang, Kyoung Won; Youn, Won Sik; Lee, Bongsoo

    2015-11-11

    We developed a multichannel all-in-one phantom dosimeter system composed of nine sensing probes, a chest phantom, an image intensifier, and a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor to measure the dose distribution of an X-ray beam used in radiation diagnosis. Nine sensing probes of the phantom dosimeter were fabricated identically by connecting a plastic scintillating fiber (PSF) to a plastic optical fiber (POF). To measure the planar dose distribution on a chest phantom according to exposure parameters used in clinical practice, we divided the top of the chest phantom into nine equal parts virtually and then installed the nine sensing probes at each center of the nine equal parts on the top of the chest phantom as measuring points. Each scintillation signal generated in the nine sensing probes was transmitted through the POFs and then intensified by the image intensifier because the scintillation signal normally has a very low light intensity. Real-time scintillation images (RSIs) containing the intensified scintillation signals were taken by the CMOS image sensor with a single lens optical system and displayed through a software program. Under variation of the exposure parameters, we measured RSIs containing dose information using the multichannel all-in-one phantom dosimeter and compared the results with the absorbed doses obtained by using a semiconductor dosimeter (SCD). From the experimental results of this study, the light intensities of nine regions of interest (ROI) in the RSI measured by the phantom dosimeter were similar to the dose distribution obtained using the SCD. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the planar dose distribution including the entrance surface dose (ESD) can be easily measured by using the proposed phantom dosimeter system.

  4. Performance Evaluation of a Multichannel All-In-One Phantom Dosimeter for Dose Measurement of Diagnostic X-ray Beam

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyesu; Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Kwon, Guwon; Kim, Mingeon; Kim, Hye Jin; Song, Young Beom; Jang, Kyoung Won; Youn, Won Sik; Lee, Bongsoo

    2015-01-01

    We developed a multichannel all-in-one phantom dosimeter system composed of nine sensing probes, a chest phantom, an image intensifier, and a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor to measure the dose distribution of an X-ray beam used in radiation diagnosis. Nine sensing probes of the phantom dosimeter were fabricated identically by connecting a plastic scintillating fiber (PSF) to a plastic optical fiber (POF). To measure the planar dose distribution on a chest phantom according to exposure parameters used in clinical practice, we divided the top of the chest phantom into nine equal parts virtually and then installed the nine sensing probes at each center of the nine equal parts on the top of the chest phantom as measuring points. Each scintillation signal generated in the nine sensing probes was transmitted through the POFs and then intensified by the image intensifier because the scintillation signal normally has a very low light intensity. Real-time scintillation images (RSIs) containing the intensified scintillation signals were taken by the CMOS image sensor with a single lens optical system and displayed through a software program. Under variation of the exposure parameters, we measured RSIs containing dose information using the multichannel all-in-one phantom dosimeter and compared the results with the absorbed doses obtained by using a semiconductor dosimeter (SCD). From the experimental results of this study, the light intensities of nine regions of interest (ROI) in the RSI measured by the phantom dosimeter were similar to the dose distribution obtained using the SCD. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the planar dose distribution including the entrance surface dose (ESD) can be easily measured by using the proposed phantom dosimeter system. PMID:26569252

  5. Suitability of resin-coated photographic paper for skin dose measurement during fluoroscopically-guided X-ray procedures.

    PubMed

    Guibelalde, E; González, L; Vañó, E

    2004-10-01

    The need for mapping skin doses during fluoroscopically-guided X-ray procedures has been described by a number of institutions and experts. Different large photographic or X-ray films placed on the patient's skin have been found to be useful for recording doses up to 1.0-2.0 Gy - depending on the film - and up to 15 Gy using radiochromic films. Though the upper limit of the film sensitivity is seldom exceeded during interventional procedures, the main disadvantage of the X-ray films is still the excessive sensitivity for long, high dose procedures. Radiochromic films show poor definition for doses below 0.5 Gy and are expensive. The goal of the present paper is to analyse the possibilities of using common resin-coated photographic paper for this purpose. Sensitometric curves obtained with different paper types processed in conventional X-ray film automatic processors demonstrate that some of them can be used with better results than X-ray films at a very low cost. Doses from about 10 mGy to near 3.0 Gy can be measured with good accuracy using a variety of glossy photographic papers.

  6. No threshold for the induction of chromosomal damage at clinically relevant low doses of X rays.

    PubMed

    Boei, Jan J W A; Vermeulen, Sylvia; Skubakova, Martina M; Meijers, Matty; Loenen, Wil A M; Wolterbeek, Ron; Mullenders, Leon H F; Vrieling, Harry; Giphart-Gassler, Micheline

    2012-05-01

    The recent steep increase in population dose from radiation-based medical diagnostics, such as computed tomography (CT) scans, requires insight into human health risks, especially in terms of cancer development. Since the induction of genetic damage is considered a prominent cause underlying the carcinogenic potential of ionizing radiation, we quantified the induction of micronuclei and loss of heterozygosity events in human cells after exposure to clinically relevant low doses of X rays. A linear dose-response relationship for induction of micronuclei was observed in human fibroblasts with significantly increased frequencies at doses as low as 20 mGy. Strikingly, cells exposed during S-phase displayed the highest induction, whereas non S-phase cells showed no significant induction below 100 mGy. Similarly, the induction of loss of heterozygosity in human lymphoblastoid cells quantified at HLA loci, was linear with dose and reached significance at 50 mGy. Together the findings favor a linear-no-threshold model for genetic damage induced by acute exposure to ionizing radiation. We speculate that the higher radiosensitivity of S-phase cells might relate to the excessive cancer risk observed in highly proliferative tissues in radiation exposed organisms.

  7. Evaluation of paediatric X-ray doses in Moroccan university hospitals.

    PubMed

    Nfaoui, Khadija; Bentayeb, Farida; El Basraoui, O; de Azevedo, Ana Cecilia Pedrosa

    2010-12-01

    This work evaluates the entrance skin dose (ESD), the body organ dose (BOD) and the effective dose (E) for chest X-ray exposures of paediatric patients. Two Moroccan university hospitals in Rabat, composed of two departments, and one in Casablanca with one paediatric compartment has been considered. For reasons of confidentiality, the departments are named A, B and C. Patients were divided into four age groups: 0-1, 1-5, 5-10 and 10-15 y, so that the results could be compared with previous published data found in the literature. The results have been calculated with the use of the Dose Cal software. Results of mean ESD for the age interval 1-5 y and antero-posterior (AP) projection are: 162 µGy for hospital A, 91 µGy for hospital B and 105 µGy for hospital C. The diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) of 100 µGy for this age range is exceeded in hospital A, while in the other two hospitals results were within the DRL and comparable with the results found in Brazil, Soudan, Nigeria and other radiological centres inpean Countries. The results of BOD and E showed that for the three departments, the BOD varies in the same proportion as the ESD. The highest values are those of hospital A. For the PA examination, the dose is reduced compared with the AP projection, especially for sensitive organs.

  8. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of high dose carbon-implanted steel and titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viviente, J. L.; García, A.; Alonso, F.; Braceras, I.; Oñate, J. I.

    1999-04-01

    A study has been made of the depth dependence of the atomic fraction and chemical bonding states of AISI 440C martensitic stainless steel and Ti-6Al-4V alloy implanted with 75 keV C + at very high doses (above 10 18 ions cm -2), by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with an Ar + sputtering. A Gaussian-like carbon distribution was observed on both materials at the lowest implanted dose. More trapezoidal carbon depth-profiles were found with increasing implanted doses, and a pure carbon layer was observed only on the titanium alloy implanted at the highest dose. The implanted carbon was combined with both base metal and carbon itself to form metallic carbides and graphitic carbon. Furthermore, carbon-enriched carbides were also found by curve fitting the C 1s spectra. The titanium alloy showed a higher carbidic contribution than the steel implanted at the same C + doses. A critical carbon concentrations of about 33 at.% and 23 at.% were measured for the formation of C-C bonds in Ti-6Al-4V and steel samples, respectively. The carbon atoms were bound with metal to form carbidic compounds until these critical concentrations were reached; when this C concentration was exceeded the proportion of C-C bonds increased and resulted in the growth of carbonaceous layers.

  9. Shielding for neutron scattered dose to the fetus in patients treated with 18 MV x-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Roy, S C; Sandison, G A

    2000-08-01

    Neutrons are associated with therapeutic high energy x-ray beams as a contaminant that contributes significant unwanted dose to the patient. Measurement of both photon and neutron scattered dose at the position of a fetus from chest irradiation by a large field 18 MV x-ray beam was performed using an ionization chamber and superheated drop detector, respectively. Shielding construction to reduce this scattered dose was investigated using both lead sheet and borated polyethylene slabs. A 7.35 cm lead shield reduced the scattered photon dose by 50% and the scattered neutron dose by 40%. Adding 10 cm of 5% borated polyethylene to this lead shield reduced the scattered neutron dose by a factor of 7.5 from the unshielded value. When the 5% borated polyethylene was replaced by the same thickness of 30% borated polyethylene there was no significant change in the reduction of neutron scatter dose. The most efficient shield studied reduced the neutron scatter dose by a factor of 10. The results indicate that most of the scattered neutrons present at the position of the fetus produced by an 18 MV x-ray beam are of low energy and in the thermal to 0.57 MeV range since lead is almost transparent to neutrons with energies lower than 0.57 MeV. This article constitutes the first report of an effective shield to reduce neutron dose at the fetus when treating a pregnant woman with a high energy x-ray beam.

  10. Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenberger, J.; Hell, E.; Knüpfer, W.

    2001-06-01

    While X-ray image intensifiers (XII), storage phosphor screens and film-screen systems are still the work horses of medical imaging, large flat panel solid state detectors using either scintillators and amorphous silicon photo diode arrays (FD-Si), or direct X-ray conversion in amorphous selenium are reaching maturity. The main advantage with respect to image quality and low patient dose of the XII and FD-Si systems is caused by the rise of the Detector Quantum Efficiency originating from the application of thick needle-structured phosphor X-ray absorbers. With the detectors getting closer to an optimal state, further progress in medical X-ray imaging requires an improvement of the usable source characteristics. The development of clinical monochromatic X-ray sources of high power would not only allow an improved contrast-to-dose ratio by allowing smaller average photon energies in applications but would also lead to new imaging techniques.

  11. Nanoscale radiation transport and clinical beam modeling for gold nanoparticle dose enhanced radiotherapy (GNPT) using X-rays.

    PubMed

    Zygmanski, Piotr; Sajo, Erno

    2016-01-01

    We review radiation transport and clinical beam modelling for gold nanoparticle dose-enhanced radiotherapy using X-rays. We focus on the nanoscale radiation transport and its relation to macroscopic dosimetry for monoenergetic and clinical beams. Among other aspects, we discuss Monte Carlo and deterministic methods and their applications to predicting dose enhancement using various metrics.

  12. Nanoscale radiation transport and clinical beam modeling for gold nanoparticle dose enhanced radiotherapy (GNPT) using X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Sajo, Erno

    2016-01-01

    We review radiation transport and clinical beam modelling for gold nanoparticle dose-enhanced radiotherapy using X-rays. We focus on the nanoscale radiation transport and its relation to macroscopic dosimetry for monoenergetic and clinical beams. Among other aspects, we discuss Monte Carlo and deterministic methods and their applications to predicting dose enhancement using various metrics. PMID:26642305

  13. Copper filtration in pediatric digital X-ray imaging: its impact on image quality and dose.

    PubMed

    Brosi, Philippe; Stuessi, Anja; Verdun, Francis R; Vock, Peter; Wolf, Rainer

    2011-07-01

    The effect of copper (Cu) filtration on image quality and dose in different digital X-ray systems was investigated. Two computed radiography systems and one digital radiography detector were used. Three different polymethylmethacrylate blocks simulated the pediatric body. The effect of Cu filters of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mm thickness on the entrance surface dose (ESD) and the corresponding effective doses (EDs) were measured at tube voltages of 60, 66, and 73 kV. Image quality was evaluated in a contrast-detail phantom with an automated analyzer software. Cu filters of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mm thickness decreased the ESD by 25-32%, 32-39%, and 40-44%, respectively, the ranges depending on the respective tube voltages. There was no consistent decline in image quality due to increasing Cu filtration. The estimated ED of anterior-posterior (AP) chest projections was reduced by up to 23%. No relevant reduction in the ED was noted in AP radiographs of the abdomen and pelvis or in posterior-anterior radiographs of the chest. Cu filtration reduces the ESD, but generally does not reduce the effective dose. Cu filters can help protect radiosensitive superficial organs, such as the mammary glands in AP chest projections.

  14. Sensitivity and fading of pMOS dosemeters irradiated with X-ray radiation doses from 1 to 100 cGy.

    PubMed

    Pejovic, Svetlana M; Pejovic, Milic M; Stojanov, Dragan; Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the results of pMOS dosemeters sensitivity to X-ray radiation and 28-d fading at room temperature are presented. Two types of dosemeters were used, which differ in gate oxide layer thickness. The sensitivity of pMOS dosemeters with gate oxide layer thickness of 1 µm was followed in the dose intervals of 1 to 10 cGy and 10 to 100 cGy, whereas that of 400 nm was in the interval of 10 to 100 cGy. The sensitivity was characterised by the threshold voltage shift, which was determined as a function of absorbed radiation dose and time after irradiation. Linear dependence between threshold voltage shift and absorbed radiation dose was established, as well as that considerable fading occurs during the first few days after irradiation. The mechanisms responsible for threshold voltage shift during irradiation and latter annealing have been also discussed.

  15. Exposure to Low-Dose X-Ray Radiation Alters Bone Progenitor Cells and Bone Microarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Lima, Florence; Swift, Joshua M; Greene, Elisabeth S; Allen, Matthew R; Cunningham, David A; Braby, Leslie A; Bloomfield, Susan A

    2017-10-01

    Exposure to high-dose ionizing radiation during medical treatment exerts well-documented deleterious effects on bone health, reducing bone density and contributing to bone growth retardation in young patients and spontaneous fracture in postmenopausal women. However, the majority of human radiation exposures occur in a much lower dose range than that used in the radiation oncology clinic. Furthermore, very few studies have examined the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on bone integrity and results have been inconsistent. In this study, mice were irradiated with a total-body dose of 0.17, 0.5 or 1 Gy to quantify the early (day 3 postirradiation) and delayed (day 21 postirradiation) effects of radiation on bone microarchitecture and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Female BALBc mice (4 months old) were divided into four groups: irradiated (0.17, 0.5 and 1 Gy) and sham-irradiated controls (0 Gy). Micro-computed tomography analysis of distal femur trabecular bone from animals at day 21 after exposure to 1 Gy of X-ray radiation revealed a 21% smaller bone volume (BV/TV), 22% decrease in trabecular numbers (Tb.N) and 9% greater trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) compared to sham-irradiated controls (P < 0.05). We evaluated the differentiation capacity of bone marrow stromal cells harvested at days 3 and 21 postirradiation into osteoblast and adipocyte cells. Osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation was decreased when cells were harvested at day 3 postirradiation but enhanced in cells isolated at day 21 postirradiation, suggesting a compensatory recovery process. Osteoclast differentiation was increased in 1 Gy irradiated BMSCs harvested at day 3 postirradiation, but not in those harvested at day 21 postirradiation, compared to controls. This study provides evidence of an early, radiation-induced decrease in osteoblast activity and numbers, as well as a later recovery effect after exposure to 1 Gy of X-rays, whereas osteoclastogenesis was enhanced. A better

  16. Radiation dose fractionation studies with hypoxic cell radiosensitizers using a murine tumor. [X-ray; mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, R.P.

    1982-03-01

    The ability of five nitroimidazoles, metronidazole (MET), misonidazole (MISO), desmethymisonidazole (DMM), SR 2508 and SR 2555, to sensitize the KHT sarcoma to radiation treatment has been compared for drug doses in the range 0-1.5 g/Kg. Single radiation doses or two different daily fractionation schedules (4 fractions of 5 Gy each or 7 fraction of 3 Gy each) were used; the tumor cell survival was determined using either an in vivo or in vitro colony assay. Each radiation (100 kVp X rays at 11 Gy/min) treatment was given locally, 60-70 min (MET) or 30-40 min (other drugs) after either intraperitoneal (MET, MISO, DMM) or intraveous (SR 2508, SR 2555) injection of the drugs; these times have been shown to be optimum for this tumor. For the single doses and both fractionation schedules the tumor cell survival, following the irradiation treatment, declined as the drug dose increased in the range 0 to 0.75 g/Kg for all the drugs, but above this dose level a plateau was reached and the amount of sensitization remained essentially constant. In this plateau region the reduction in survival achieved was similar for single doses and 5 Gy fraction but was less for 3 Gy fractions, indicating that sensitization was smaller for the smaller dose fractions. For the 4 x 5 Gy fractionation schedule the plateau level of survival was lowest for MISO, DMM and SR 2508, slightly higher for SR 2555 and much higher for MET. For the 3 Gy fractions SR 2508 appeared slightly less effective than MISO and DMM.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation estimates of neutron doses to critical organs of a patient undergoing 18 MV x-ray LINAC-based radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Barquero, R.; Edwards, T.M.; Iniguez, M. P.; Vega-Carrillo, H.R.

    2005-12-15

    Absorbed photoneutron dose to patients undergoing 18 MV x-ray therapy was studied using Monte Carlo simulations based on the MCNPX code. Two separate transport simulations were conducted, one for the photoneutron contribution and another for neutron capture gamma rays. The phantom model used was of a female patient receiving a four-field pelvic box treatment. Photoneutron doses were determinate to be higher for organs and tissues located inside the treatment field, especially those closest to the patient's skin. The maximum organ equivalent dose per x-ray treatment dose achieved within each treatment port was 719 {mu}Sv/Gy to the rectum (180 deg. field), 190 {mu}Sv/Gy to the intestine wall (0 deg. field), 51 {mu}Sv/Gy to the colon wall (90 deg. field), and 45 {mu}Sv/Gy to the skin (270 deg. field). The maximum neutron equivalent dose per x-ray treatment dose received by organs outside the treatment field was 65 {mu}Sv/Gy to the skin in the antero-posterior field. A mean value of 5{+-}2 {mu}Sv/Gy was obtained for organs distant from the treatment field. Distant organ neutron equivalent doses are all of the same order of magnitude and constitute a good estimate of deep organ neutron equivalent doses. Using the risk assessment method of the ICRP-60 report, the greatest likelihood of fatal secondary cancer for a 70 Gy dose is estimated to be 0.02% for the pelvic postero-anterior field, the rectum being the organ representing the maximum contribution of 0.011%.

  18. Image quality and dose efficiency of high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging: phantom studies.

    PubMed

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this preliminary study was to perform an image quality comparison of high energy phase sensitive imaging with low energy conventional imaging at similar radiation doses. The comparison was performed with the following phantoms: American College of Radiology (ACR), contrast-detail (CD), acrylic edge and tissue-equivalent. Visual comparison of the phantom images indicated comparable or improved image quality for all phantoms. Quantitative comparisons were performed through ACR and CD observer studies, both of which indicated higher image quality in the high energy phase sensitive images. The results of this study demonstrate the ability of high energy phase sensitive imaging to overcome existing challenges with the clinical implementation of phase contrast imaging and improve the image quality for a similar radiation dose as compared to conventional imaging near typical mammography energies. In addition, the results illustrate the capability of phase sensitive imaging to sustain the image quality improvement at high x-ray energies and for breast simulating phantoms, both of which indicate the potential to benefit fields such as mammography. Future studies will continue to investigate the potential for dose reduction and image quality improvement provided by high energy phase sensitive imaging.

  19. [What future for chest x-ray against ultra-low-dose computed tomography?

    PubMed

    Ohana, M; Ludes, C; Schaal, M; Meyer, E; Jeung, M-Y; Labani, A; Roy, C

    2017-02-01

    Technological improvements, with iterative reconstruction at the foreground, have lowered the radiation dose of a chest CT close to that of a PA and lateral chest x-ray. This ultra-low dose chest CT (ULD-CT) has an image quality that is degraded on purpose, yet remains diagnostic in many clinical indications. Thus, its effectiveness is already validated for the detection and the monitoring of solid parenchymal nodules, for the diagnosis and monitoring of infectious lung diseases and for the screening of pleural lesions secondary to asbestos exposure. Its limitations are the analysis of the mediastinal structures, the severe obesity (BMI>35) and the detection of interstitial lesions. If it can replace the standard chest CT in these indications, all the more in situations where radiation dose is a major problem (young patients, repeated exams, screening), it progressively emerges as a first line alternative for chest radiograph, providing more data at a similar radiation cost. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. A cross-sectional study of the radiation dose and image quality of X-ray equipment used in IVR.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Yohei; Chida, Koichi; Kobayashi, Ryota; Zuguchi, Masayuki

    2016-07-01

    There are case reports of injuries caused by the radiation from interventional radiology (IVR) X-ray systems. Therefore, the management of radiation doses in IVR is important. However, no detailed report has evaluated image quality for a large number of IVR X-ray systems. As a result, it is unclear whether the image quality of the X-ray equipment currently used in IVR procedures is optimal. We compared the entrance surface doses and image quality of multiple IVR X-ray systems. This study was conducted in 2014 at 13 medical facilities using 18 IVR X-ray systems. We evaluated image quality and simultaneously measured the radiation dose. Entrance surface doses for fluoroscopy (duration, 1 min) and cineradiography (duration, 10 s) are measured using a 20-cm-thick acrylic plate and skin dose monitor. The image quality (such as spatial resolution and low-contrast detectability) of both fluoroscopy and cineradiography was evaluated using a QC phantom. For fluoroscopy, the average entrance surface dose using the 20-cm-thick acrylic plate was 13.9 (range 2.1-28.2) mGy/min. For cineradiography, the average entrance surface dose was 24.6 (range 5.1-49.3) mGy/10 s. We found positive correlations between radiation doses and image quality scores, in general, especially for fluoroscopy. The differences in surface dose among the 18 IVR X-ray systems were high (max/min, 9.7-fold for cineradiography; 13.4-fold for fluoroscopy). The differences in image quality scores (spatial resolution, low-contrast detectability, and dynamic range) were also very large. In general, there tended to be a correlation between radiation dose and image quality. Periodical measurements of the radiation dose and image quality of the X-ray equipment used for cineradiography and fluoroscopy in IVR are necessary. The need to minimize patient exposure requires that the dose be reduced to the minimum level that will generate an image with an acceptable degree of noise. PACS number(s): 87.57.C, 87.57.uq, 87

  1. Nonlinear Sinogram Smoothing for Low-Dose X-Ray CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianfang; Li, Xiang; Wang, Jing; Wen, Junhai; Lu, Hongbing; Hsieh, Jiang; Liang, Zhengrong

    2004-10-01

    When excessive quantum noise is present in extremely low dose X-ray CT imaging, statistical properties of the data has to be considered to achieve a satisfactory image reconstruction. Statistical iterative reconstruction with accurate modeling of the noise, rather than a filtered back-projection (FBP) with low-pass filtering, is one way to deal with the problem. Estimating a noise-free sinogram to satisfy the FBP reconstruction for the Radon transform is another way. The benefits of the latter include a higher computation efficiency, more uniform spatial resolution in the reconstructed image, and less modification of the current machine configurations. In a clinic X-ray CT system, the acquired raw data must be calibrated, in addition to the logarithmic transform, to achieve the high diagnostic image quality. The calibrated projection data or sinogram no longer follow a compound Poisson distribution in general, but are close to a Gaussian distribution with signal-dependent variance. In this paper, we first investigated a relatively accurate statistical model for the sinogram data, based on several phantom experiments. Then we developed a penalized likelihood method to smooth the sinogram, which led to a set of nonlinear equations that can be solved by iterated conditional mode (ICM) algorithm within a reasonable computing time. The method was applied to several experimental datasets acquired at 120 kVp, 10 mA/20 mA/50 mA protocols with a GE HiSpeed multi-slice detector CT scanner and demonstrated a significant noise suppression without noticeable sacrifice of the spatial resolution.

  2. Biphasic and triphasic dose responses in zebrafish embryos to low-dose 150 kV X-rays with different levels of hardness

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Eva Yi; Cheng, Shuk Han; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo low-dose responses of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to 150 kV X-rays with different levels of hardness were examined through the number of apoptotic events revealed at 24 h post fertilization by vital dye acridine orange staining. Our results suggested that a triphasic dose response was likely a common phenomenon in living organisms irradiated by X-rays, which comprised an ultra-low-dose inhibition, low-dose stimulation and high-dose inhibition. Our results also suggested that the hormetic zone (or the stimulation zone) was shifted towards lower doses with application of filters. The non-detection of a triphasic dose response in previous experiments could likely be attributed to the use of hard X-rays, which shifted the hormetic zone into an unmonitored ultra-low-dose region. In such cases where the subhormetic zone was missed, a biphasic dose response would be reported instead. PMID:26951078

  3. Measurement of dose reductions for superficial x-rays backscattered from bone interfaces.

    PubMed

    Butson, Martin J; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K N

    2008-09-07

    Accurate measurement and knowledge of dose delivered during superficial x-ray radiotherapy is required for patient dose assessment. Some tumours treated near the surface (within the first few centimetres) can have large posterior bone structures. This can cause perturbations to dose delivered due to changed backscatter contributions from the bony structure as compared to full water or tissue scattering conditions. Measured results have shown that up to 7.5% of Dmax reductions in dose can occur near the water/bone interface for 100 kVp, using 10 cm diameter field sizes when a 1 cm thick slab of bone is located at 2 cm depth. At smaller field sizes such as 2 cm diameter these values reduce to 2% for the same energy. Larger variations (up to 12.5% of maximum) have been seen at the phantom surface when the bone layer is directly behind the point of interest (within 0.5 mm) and smaller effects (up to 5% of maximum) at depths down to 5 cm. Interesting to note is the fact that for larger field sizes, an increase in percentage dose is found at the water/bone interface due to the production of low energy backscattered electrons similar to the effect found in lead. However, they are much smaller in magnitude and thus would not cause any significant dosimetric effects. In the case where large bony structures lie relatively close to the surface and the tissue above this region is being treated, a dosimeter such as radiochromic film can be used to estimate the dose reduction that may occur due to the changed backscatter conditions.

  4. Low-Dose CT of the Paranasal Sinuses: Minimizing X-Ray Exposure with Spectral Shaping.

    PubMed

    Wuest, Wolfgang; May, Matthias; Saake, Marc; Brand, Michael; Uder, Michael; Lell, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Shaping the energy spectrum of the X-ray beam has been shown to be beneficial in low-dose CT. This study's aim was to investigate dose and image quality of tin filtration at 100 kV for pre-operative planning in low-dose paranasal CT imaging in a large patient cohort. In a prospective trial, 129 patients were included. 64 patients were randomly assigned to the study protocol (100 kV with additional tin filtration, 150mAs, 192x0.6-mm slice collimation) and 65 patients to the standard low-dose protocol (100 kV, 50mAs, 128 × 0.6-mm slice collimation). To assess the image quality, subjective parameters were evaluated using a five-point scale. This scale was applied on overall image quality and contour delineation of critical anatomical structures. All scans were of diagnostic image quality. Bony structures were of good diagnostic image quality in both groups, soft tissues were of sufficient diagnostic image quality in the study group because of a high level of noise. Radiation exposure was very low in both groups, but significantly lower in the study group (CTDIvol 1.2 mGy vs. 4.4 mGy, p < 0.001). Spectral optimization (tin filtration at 100 kV) allows for visualization of the paranasal sinus with sufficient image quality at a very low radiation exposure. • Spectral optimization (tin filtration) is beneficial to low-dose parasinus CT • Tin filtration at 100 kV yields sufficient image quality for pre-operative planning • Diagnostic parasinus CT can be performed with an effective dose <0.05 mSv.

  5. Radiation dose reduction in medical x-ray CT via Fourier-based iterative reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Zhao, Yunzhe; Huang, Zhifeng; Fung, Russell; Mao, Yu; Zhu, Chun; Khatonabadi, Maryam; DeMarco, John J; Osher, Stanley J; McNitt-Gray, Michael F; Miao, Jianwei

    2013-03-01

    A Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique, termed Equally Sloped Tomography (EST), is developed in conjunction with advanced mathematical regularization to investigate radiation dose reduction in x-ray CT. The method is experimentally implemented on fan-beam CT and evaluated as a function of imaging dose on a series of image quality phantoms and anonymous pediatric patient data sets. Numerical simulation experiments are also performed to explore the extension of EST to helical cone-beam geometry. EST is a Fourier based iterative algorithm, which iterates back and forth between real and Fourier space utilizing the algebraically exact pseudopolar fast Fourier transform (PPFFT). In each iteration, physical constraints and mathematical regularization are applied in real space, while the measured data are enforced in Fourier space. The algorithm is automatically terminated when a proposed termination criterion is met. Experimentally, fan-beam projections were acquired by the Siemens z-flying focal spot technology, and subsequently interleaved and rebinned to a pseudopolar grid. Image quality phantoms were scanned at systematically varied mAs settings, reconstructed by EST and conventional reconstruction methods such as filtered back projection (FBP), and quantified using metrics including resolution, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs). Pediatric data sets were reconstructed at their original acquisition settings and additionally simulated to lower dose settings for comparison and evaluation of the potential for radiation dose reduction. Numerical experiments were conducted to quantify EST and other iterative methods in terms of image quality and computation time. The extension of EST to helical cone-beam CT was implemented by using the advanced single-slice rebinning (ASSR) method. Based on the phantom and pediatric patient fan-beam CT data, it is demonstrated that EST reconstructions with the lowest scanner flux setting of 39 m

  6. Changes in the electrical properties of pure and doped polymers under the influence of small doses of X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, S. A.; Madi, N. K.; Kassem, M. E.; El-Khatib, A.

    A study has been made of the temperature dependence of the d.c. conductivity of pure and borated low density polyethylene LDPE (4% and 8% borax). The above calculations were carried out before and after X-ray irradiation. The irradiation dose was varied from 0 to 1000 rad. The d.c. electrical conductivity of Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and perspex was measured as a function of temperature ranging from 20°C to 100°C. These samples were irradiated with X-rays of dose 200 rad. The variation of the d.c. conductivity of the treated samples versus temperature was investigated. The results reveal that the d.c. conductivity of LDPE is highly affected by radiation and/or dopant. In addition, the sensitivity of the explored polymers to X-ray irradiation is strongly dependent on its chemical nature.

  7. Imaging doses from the Elekta Synergy X-ray cone beam CT system.

    PubMed

    Amer, A; Marchant, T; Sykes, J; Czajka, J; Moore, C

    2007-06-01

    The Elekta Synergy is a radiotherapy treatment machine with integrated kilovoltage (kV) X-ray imaging system capable of producing cone beam CT (CBCT) images of the patient in the treatment position. The aim of this study is to assess the additional imaging dose. Cone beam CT dose index (CBDI) is introduced and measured inside standard CTDI phantoms for several sites (head: 100 kV, 38 mAs, lung: 120 kV, 152 mAs and pelvis: 130 kV, 456 mAs). The measured weighted doses were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements at various locations in a Rando phantom and at patients' surfaces. The measured CBDIs in-air at the isocentre were 9.2 mGy 100 mAs(-1), 7.3 mGy 100 mAs(-1) and 5.3 mGy 100 mAs(-1) for 130 kV, 120 kV and 100 kV, respectively. The body phantom weighted CBDI were 5.5 mGy 100 mAs(-1) and 3.8 mGy 100 mAs(-1 )for 130 kV and 120 kV. The head phantom weighted CBDI was 4.3 mGy 100 mAs(-1) for 100 kV. The weighted doses for the Christie Hospital CBCT imaging techniques were 1.6 mGy, 6 mGy and 22 mGy for the head, lung and pelvis. The measured CBDIs were used to estimate the total effective dose for the Synergy system using the ImPACT CT Patient Dosimetry Calculator. Measured CBCT doses using the Christie Hospital protocols are low for head and lung scans whether compared with electronic portal imaging (EPI), commonly used for treatment verification, or single and multiple slice CT. For the pelvis, doses are similar to EPI but higher than CT. Repeated use of CBCT for treatment verification is likely and hence the total patient dose needs to be carefully considered. It is important to consider further development of low dose CBCT techniques to keep additional doses as low as reasonably practicable.

  8. Dosimetric study of the effective doses resulting during dental X-ray and panoramic radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shousha, Hany A.; Abd-El Hafez, A. I.; Ahmad, Fawzia

    2011-01-01

    The panoramic image is one of the most commonly used radiographic examinations in dentistry, owing to its low dose and large area for evaluation, including bone and teeth in the same image. Although digital images are usually reported to deliver a lower radiation dose to the patient, conventional images are still available, especially in countries where digital systems are not widely economically available. Dentists should weigh the benefits of dental radiographs against the consequences of increasing a patient's exposure to radiation, the effects of which accumulate from multiple sources over time. The "as low as reasonably achievable" principle should be followed to minimize the exposure to radiation. The purpose of this investigation is to measure the absorbed radiation doses at 12 anatomical sites of a Rando-phantom and calculate the effective doses result from a full-mouth survey and panoramic radiography. Organ-absorbed doses are measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD 100) and effective organ doses (μ Sv) are estimated according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection in 2007. The total effective dose results from the panoramic imaging system have so far been below those obtained using the full-mouth survey technique used in intra-oral radiographic examination.

  9. Low Dose X-Ray Sources and High Quantum Efficiency Sensors: The Next Challenge in Dental Digital Imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Arnav R.; Yang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s). The major challenge encountered to decrease the milliamperes (mA) level in X-ray imaging systems is the quantum noise phenomena. This investigation evaluated dose exposure and image resolution of a low dose X-ray imaging (LDXI) prototype comprising a low mA X-ray source and a novel microlens-based sensor relative to current imaging technologies. Study Design. A LDXI in static (group 1) and dynamic (group 2) modes was compared to medical fluoroscopy (group 3), digital intraoral radiography (group 4), and CBCT scan (group 5) using a dental phantom. Results. The Mann-Whitney test showed no statistical significance (α = 0.01) in dose exposure between groups 1 and 3 and 1 and 4 and timing exposure (seconds) between groups 1 and 5 and 2 and 3. Image resolution test showed group 1 > group 4 > group 2 > group 3 > group 5. Conclusions. The LDXI proved the concept for obtaining a high definition image resolution for static and dynamic radiography at lower or similar dose exposure and smaller pixel size, respectively, when compared to current imaging technologies. Lower mA at the X-ray source and high QE at the detector level principles with microlens could be applied to current imaging technologies to considerably reduce dose exposure without compromising image resolution in the near future. PMID:25574389

  10. Measurement of radiotherapy x-ray skin dose on a chest wall phantom.

    PubMed

    Quach, K Y; Morales, J; Butson, M J; Rosenfeld, A B; Metcalfe, P E

    2000-07-01

    Sufficient skin dose needs to be delivered by a radiotherapy chest wall treatment regimen to ensure the probability of a near surface tumor recurrence is minimized. To simulate a chest wall treatment a hemicylindrical solid water phantom of 7.5 cm radius was irradiated with 6 MV x-rays using 20x20 cm2 and 10x20 cm2 fields at 100 cm source surface distance (SSD) to the base of the phantom. A surface dose profile was obtained from 0 to 180 degrees, in 10 degrees increments around the circumference of the phantom. Dosimetry results obtained from radiochromic film (effective depth of 0.17 mm) were used in the investigation, the superficial doses were found to be 28% (of Dmax) at the 0 degrees beam entry position and 58% at the 90 degrees oblique beam position. Superficial dose results were also obtained using extra thin thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) (effective depth 0.14 mm) of 30% at 0 degrees, 57% at 90 degrees, and a metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detector (effective depth 0.5 mm) of 43% at 0 degrees, 62% at 90 degrees. Because the differences in measured superficial doses were significant and beyond those related to experimental error, these differences are assumed to be mostly attributable to the effective depth of measurement of each detector. We numerically simulated a bolus on/bolus off technique and found we could increase the coverage to the skin. Using an alternate "bolus on," "bolus off" regimen, the skin would receive 36.8 Gy at 0 degrees incidence and 46.4 Gy at 90 degrees incidence for a prescribed midpoint dose of 50 Gy. From this work it is evident that, as the circumference of the phantom is traversed the SSD increases and hence there is an inverse square fluence fall-off, this is more than offset by the increase in skin dose due to surface curvature to a plateau at about 90 degrees. Beyond this angle it is assumed that beam attenuation through the phantom and inverse square fall-off is causing the surface dose to

  11. [Absorbed doses in dental radiology].

    PubMed

    Bianchi, S D; Roccuzzo, M; Albrito, F; Ragona, R; Anglesio, S

    1996-01-01

    The growing use of dento-maxillo-facial radiographic examinations has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies on dosimetry. A thorough review of the literature is presented in this article. Most studies were carried out on tissue equivalent skull phantoms, while only a few were in vivo. The aim of the present study was to evaluate in vivo absorbed doses during Orthopantomography (OPT). Full Mouth Periapical Examination (FMPE) and Intraoral Tube Panoramic Radiography (ITPR). Measurements were made on 30 patients, reproducing clinical conditions, in 46 anatomical sites, with 24 intra- and 22 extra-oral thermoluminiscent dosimeters (TLDS). The highest doses were measured, in orthopantomography, at the right mandibular angle (1899 mu Gy) in FMPE on the right naso-labial fold (5640 mu Gy and in ITPR on the palatal surface of the left second upper molar (1936 mu Gy). Intraoral doses ranged from 21 mu Gy, in orthopantomography, to 4494 mu Gy in FMPE. Standard errors ranged from 142% in ITPR to 5% in orthopantomography. The highest rate of standard errors was found in FMPE and ITPR. The data collected in this trial are in agreement with others in major literature reports. Disagreements are probably due to different exam acquisition and data collections. Such differences, presented comparison in several sites, justify lower doses in FMPE and ITPR. Advantages and disadvantages of in vivo dosimetry of the maxillary region are discussed, the former being a close resemblance to clinical conditions of examination and the latter the impossibility of collecting values in depth of tissues. Finally, both ITPR and FMPE required lower doses than expected, and can be therefore reconsidered relative to their radiation risk.

  12. Evaluation of an X-Ray Dose Profile Derived from an Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeter during Computed Tomographic Fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Sato, Masanori; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate scatter radiation dose to the subject surface during X-ray computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy using the integrated dose ratio (IDR) of an X-ray dose profile derived from an optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) dosimeter. We aimed to obtain quantitative evidence supporting the radiation protection methods used during previous CT fluoroscopy. A multislice CT scanner was used to perform this study. OSL dosimeters were placed on the top and the lateral side of the chest phantom so that the longitudinal direction of dosimeters was parallel to the orthogonal axis-to-slice plane for measurement of dose profiles in CT fluoroscopy. Measurement of fluoroscopic conditions was performed at 120 kVp and 80 kVp. Scatter radiation dose was evaluated by calculating the integrated dose determined by OSL dosimetry. The overall percent difference of the integrated doses between OSL dosimeters and ionization chamber was 5.92%. The ratio of the integrated dose of a 100-mm length area to its tails (−50 to −6 mm, 50 to 6 mm) was the lowest on the lateral side at 80 kVp and the highest on the top at 120 kVp. The IDRs for different measurement positions were larger at 120 kVp than at 80 kVp. Similarly, the IDRs for the tube voltage between the primary X-ray beam and scatter radiation was larger on the lateral side than on the top of the phantom. IDR evaluation suggested that the scatter radiation dose has a high dependence on the position and a low dependence on tube voltage relative to the primary X-ray beam for constant dose rate fluoroscopic conditions. These results provided quantitative evidence supporting the radiation protection methods used during CT fluoroscopy in previous studies. PMID:26151914

  13. Low-dose 4D myocardial perfusion with x-ray micro-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. P.; Badea, C. T.

    2017-03-01

    X-ray CT is widely used, both clinically and pre-clinically, for fast, high-resolution, anatomic imaging; however, compelling opportunities exist to expand its use in functional imaging applications. For instance, temporally-resolved CT data can detail cardiac motion and blood flow dynamics for one-stop cardiovascular CT imaging procedures. In previous work, we demonstrated efficient, low-dose projection acquisition and reconstruction strategies for cardiac micro-CT imaging and for multiple-injection micro-CT perfusion imaging. Here, we extend this previous work with regularization based on rank-sparse kernel regression and on filtration with the Karhunen-Loeve transform. Using a dual source, prospectively gated sampling strategy which produces an approximately uniform distribution of projections, we apply this revised algorithm to the assessment of both myocardial perfusion and cardiac functional metrics from the same set of projection data. We test the algorithm in simulations using a modified version of the MOBY mouse phantom which contains realistic perfusion and cardiac dynamics. The proposed algorithm reduces the reconstruction error by 81% relative to unregularized, algebraic reconstruction. The results confirm our ability to simultaneously solve for cardiac temporal motion and perfusion dynamics. In future work, we will apply the algorithm and sampling protocol to small animal cardiac studies.

  14. Converging Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Kilovoltage X-Rays: Experimental Irradiation of Normal Rabbit Lung and Dose-Volume Analysis With Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo Deloar, Hossain M.; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N.; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. Methods and Materials: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. Results: A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. Conclusions: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  15. Development of a Radiation Dose Reporting Software for X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Aiping

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has experienced tremendous technological advances in recent years and has established itself as one of the most popular diagnostic imaging tools. While CT imaging clearly plays an invaluable role in modern medicine, its rapid adoption has resulted in a dramatic increase in the average medical radiation exposure to the worldwide and United States populations. Existing software tools for CT dose estimation and reporting are mostly based on patient phantoms that contain overly simplified anatomies insufficient in meeting the current and future needs. This dissertation describes the development of an easy-to-use software platform, “VirtualDose”, as a service to estimate and report the organ dose and effective dose values for patients undergoing the CT examinations. “VirtualDose” incorporates advanced models for the adult male and female, pregnant women, and children. To cover a large portion of the ignored obese patients that frequents the radiology clinics, a new set of obese male and female phantoms are also developed and applied to study the effects of the fat tissues on the CT radiation dose. Multi-detector CT scanners (MDCT) and clinical protocols, as well as the most recent effective dose algorithms from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 are adopted in “VirtualDose” to keep pace with the MDCT development and regulatory requirements. A new MDCT scanner model with both body and head bowtie filter is developed to cover both the head and body scanning modes. This model was validated through the clinical measurements. A comprehensive slice-by-slice database is established by deriving the data from a larger number of single axial scans simulated on the patient phantoms using different CT bowtie filters, beam thicknesses, and different tube voltages in the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNPX) code. When compared to the existing CT dose software packages, organ dose data in this

  16. Reducing radiation dose by application of optimized low-energy x-ray filters to K-edge imaging with a photon counting detector.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yu-Na; Lee, Seungwan; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-01-21

    K-edge imaging with photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) can improve image quality compared with conventional energy integrating detectors. However, low-energy x-ray photons below the K-edge absorption energy of a target material do not contribute to image formation in the K-edge imaging and are likely to be completely absorbed by an object. In this study, we applied x-ray filters to the K-edge imaging with a PCXD based on cadmium zinc telluride for reducing radiation dose induced by low-energy x-ray photons. We used aluminum (Al) filters with different thicknesses as the low-energy x-ray filters and implemented the iodine K-edge imaging with an energy bin of 34-48 keV at the tube voltages of 50, 70 and 90 kVp. The effects of the low-energy x-ray filters on the K-edge imaging were investigated with respect to signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and figure of merit (FOM). The highest value of SDNR was observed in the K-edge imaging with a 2 mm Al filter, and the SDNR decreased as a function of the filter thicknesses. Compared to the K-edge imaging with a 2 mm Al filter, the ESAK was reduced by 66%, 48% and 39% in the K-edge imaging with a 12 mm Al filter for 50 kVp, 70 kVp and 90 kVp, respectively. The FOM values, which took into account the ESAK and SDNR, were maximized for 8, 6 to 8 and 4 mm Al filters at 50 kVp, 70 kVp and 90 kVp, respectively. We concluded that the use of an optimal low-energy filter thickness, which was determined by maximizing the FOM, could significantly reduce radiation dose while maintaining image quality in the K-edge imaging with the PCXD.

  17. Patient dose simulations for scanning-beam digital x-ray tomosynthesis of the lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Geoff; Fahrig, Rebecca; Yoon, Sungwon; Krishna, Ganesh; Wilfley, Brian

    2013-11-15

    location. When tumor SNR is held constant (i.e., x-ray fluence is scaled appropriately), SBDX gives 2–10 times less dose than fluoroscopy for the same conditions within the typical range of patient locations. The relative position of the patient (as a percent of SDD) has a much more significant impact on dose than either SDD or patient position. The patient position providing the minimum dose for a given tumor SNR and SDD is approximately the same as the position of maximum tomographic angle.Conclusions: SBDX offers a significant dose advantage over currently used C-arm fluoroscopy. The patient location with lowest dose coincides with the location of maximum tomographic angle. In order to provide adequate space for the patient and for the pulmonologists’ equipment, a SDD of 100 cm is recommended.

  18. Patient dose simulations for scanning-beam digital x-ray tomosynthesis of the lungs

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Geoff; Yoon, Sungwon; Krishna, Ganesh; Wilfley, Brian; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    location. When tumor SNR is held constant (i.e., x-ray fluence is scaled appropriately), SBDX gives 2–10 times less dose than fluoroscopy for the same conditions within the typical range of patient locations. The relative position of the patient (as a percent of SDD) has a much more significant impact on dose than either SDD or patient position. The patient position providing the minimum dose for a given tumor SNR and SDD is approximately the same as the position of maximum tomographic angle. Conclusions: SBDX offers a significant dose advantage over currently used C-arm fluoroscopy. The patient location with lowest dose coincides with the location of maximum tomographic angle. In order to provide adequate space for the patient and for the pulmonologists’ equipment, a SDD of 100 cm is recommended. PMID:24320450

  19. Effects of Medical Diagnostic Low-dose X Rays on Human Lymphocytes: Mitochondrial Membrane Potential, Apoptosis and Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Tungjai, Montree; Phathakanon, Nutnicha; Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy

    2017-05-01

    Low-dose radiation is widely used across the world for the diagnosis of many diseases by means of a variety of imaging technologies. However, the harmful effects of exposure to low-dose radiation during medical examination remain controversial. The authors studied the effects of medical diagnostic low-dose x rays (i.e., 0.03, 0.05, or 0.1 mGy) after an in vitro exposure of human lymphocytes. Cells with no irradiation served as the non-irradiated control group. Three biological indicators were used to determine the effects of medical diagnostic low-dose x rays at 4, 8, 24, 48, and 72 h post-irradiation. These biological endpoints were mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), cell cycle, and apoptosis. Results indicated no changes in the ΔΨm, number of apoptotic cells, and cell cycle in lymphocytes exposed to these low doses of radiation, as compared to the corresponding non-irradiated lymphocytes at all harvest time-points. These results suggested that there were no harmful effects of the diagnostic low-dose x rays when human lymphocytes were exposed in an in vitro condition.

  20. Dose measurement using Al2O3 dosimeter in comparison to LiF:Mg,Ti dosimeter and ionization chamber at low and high energy x-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd; Yahya, Muhammad Hadzmi; Rosnan, Muhammad Syazwan; Abdullah, Reduan; Kadir, Ahmad Bazlie Abdul

    2017-01-01

    The dose measurement using Al2O3 OSL dosimeter (OSLD) was carried out at low and high energy x-ray. The dose at low energy x-ray was measured at 40, 71 and 125 kVp x-ray energies. The dose ar high energy x-ray was measured at 6 and 10 MV x-ray energies measured at the depth of maximum dose (Zmax). The results were compared to that in ionization chamber and LiF: Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD100). The results showed that the dose of OSLD were less in agreement to ionization chamber compared to that in TLD100. The dose of OSLD however was in good agreement to that in ionization chamber at high energy x-ray. The dose measured using OSLD were found to be more consistence at high energy x-ray shown by the standard deviation of the readings. The measurement of x2 showed that the readings of OSLD were close to that in ionization chamber with values of 2.21 and 4.63 for 6 and 10 MV respectively. The results indicated that OSLD is more suitable for dose measurement at high energy x-ray.

  1. Absorbed dose to water: Standards and traceability for radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    Although the need for appropriate quantities and units for ionizing radiation has existed since shortly after discovery of X-rays, the quantities and units in general use today were not completely formalized until about 15 years ago. The development of appropriate national and international standards have also been ongoing. For many years the quantity, exposure, measured in units of roentgen was the national standard and they were also the quantity and units in which radiotherapy was described. With the introduction of megavoltage X-ray and electron-beam equipment and the adoption of the quantity {open_quotes}absorbed-dose{close_quotes} measured in units of rad (or gray) different approaches to calibrating these beams were needed. This was especially the case since the national standard in terms of exposure at a maximum photon energy for {sup 60}Co gamma rays was only available. Since the late 1960s various machine calibration protocols have been published. These protocols have to accommodate changes in modality, energy, quantities and units between the national standard and the user. Because of this, a new definition of traceability is proposed to accommodate the present system. By recording all intercomparisons and parameters used, an auditable calibration chain can be maintained. Even with the introduction of calibration protocols based upon national absorbed dose standards, the proposed traceability definition will still be needed.

  2. Simple Method to Estimate Mean Heart Dose From Hodgkin Lymphoma Radiation Therapy According to Simulation X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Nimwegen, Frederika A. van; Cutter, David J.; Schaapveld, Michael; Rutten, Annemarieke; Kooijman, Karen; Krol, Augustinus D.G.; Janus, Cécile P.M.; Darby, Sarah C.; Leeuwen, Flora E. van; Aleman, Berthe M.P.

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: To describe a new method to estimate the mean heart dose for Hodgkin lymphoma patients treated several decades ago, using delineation of the heart on radiation therapy simulation X-rays. Mean heart dose is an important predictor for late cardiovascular complications after Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treatment. For patients treated before the era of computed tomography (CT)-based radiotherapy planning, retrospective estimation of radiation dose to the heart can be labor intensive. Methods and Materials: Patients for whom cardiac radiation doses had previously been estimated by reconstruction of individual treatments on representative CT data sets were selected at random from a case–control study of 5-year Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (n=289). For 42 patients, cardiac contours were outlined on each patient's simulation X-ray by 4 different raters, and the mean heart dose was estimated as the percentage of the cardiac contour within the radiation field multiplied by the prescribed mediastinal dose and divided by a correction factor obtained by comparison with individual CT-based dosimetry. Results: According to the simulation X-ray method, the medians of the mean heart doses obtained from the cardiac contours outlined by the 4 raters were 30 Gy, 30 Gy, 31 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively, following prescribed mediastinal doses of 25-42 Gy. The absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.85-0.97), indicating excellent agreement. Mean heart dose was 30.4 Gy with the simulation X-ray method, versus 30.2 Gy with the representative CT-based dosimetry, and the between-method absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.87 (95% confidence interval 0.80-0.95), indicating good agreement between the two methods. Conclusion: Estimating mean heart dose from radiation therapy simulation X-rays is reproducible and fast, takes individual anatomy into account, and yields results comparable to the labor

  3. Simple method to estimate mean heart dose from Hodgkin lymphoma radiation therapy according to simulation X-rays.

    PubMed

    van Nimwegen, Frederika A; Cutter, David J; Schaapveld, Michael; Rutten, Annemarieke; Kooijman, Karen; Krol, Augustinus D G; Janus, Cécile P M; Darby, Sarah C; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Aleman, Berthe M P

    2015-05-01

    To describe a new method to estimate the mean heart dose for Hodgkin lymphoma patients treated several decades ago, using delineation of the heart on radiation therapy simulation X-rays. Mean heart dose is an important predictor for late cardiovascular complications after Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treatment. For patients treated before the era of computed tomography (CT)-based radiotherapy planning, retrospective estimation of radiation dose to the heart can be labor intensive. Patients for whom cardiac radiation doses had previously been estimated by reconstruction of individual treatments on representative CT data sets were selected at random from a case-control study of 5-year Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (n=289). For 42 patients, cardiac contours were outlined on each patient's simulation X-ray by 4 different raters, and the mean heart dose was estimated as the percentage of the cardiac contour within the radiation field multiplied by the prescribed mediastinal dose and divided by a correction factor obtained by comparison with individual CT-based dosimetry. According to the simulation X-ray method, the medians of the mean heart doses obtained from the cardiac contours outlined by the 4 raters were 30 Gy, 30 Gy, 31 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively, following prescribed mediastinal doses of 25-42 Gy. The absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.85-0.97), indicating excellent agreement. Mean heart dose was 30.4 Gy with the simulation X-ray method, versus 30.2 Gy with the representative CT-based dosimetry, and the between-method absolute-agreement intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.87 (95% confidence interval 0.80-0.95), indicating good agreement between the two methods. Estimating mean heart dose from radiation therapy simulation X-rays is reproducible and fast, takes individual anatomy into account, and yields results comparable to the labor-intensive representative CT-based method. This simpler method may produce a

  4. Data of low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments

    PubMed Central

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Honaramooz, Ali; Wiebe, Sheldon; Belev, George; Chen, Xiongbiao; Chapman, Dean

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the data of using three phase-based X-ray imaging techniques to characterize biomaterial scaffold and soft tissues in situ, as reported in our study “Low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging techniques for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments” [1]. The examined parameters include the radiation dose, scan time, and image quality, which are all critical to longitudinal in situ live animal assessments. The data presented were obtained from three dimensional imaging of scaffolds in situ cartilage by means of synchrotron-based computed tomography-diffraction enhanced imaging (CT-DEI), analyzer based imaging (CT-ABI), and in-line phase contrast imaging (CT-PCI) at standard and low dose imaging modalities. PMID:26909381

  5. Application of the Monte Carlo method to the analysis of doses and shielding around an X-ray fluorescence equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ródenas, José; Juste, Belén; Gallardo, Sergio; Querol, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    An X-ray fluorescence equipment is used for practical exercises in the laboratory of Nuclear Engineering of the Polytechnic University of Valencia (Spain). This equipment includes a compact X-ray tube, ECLIPSE-III, and a Si-PIN XR-100T detector. The voltage (30 kV), and the current (100 μA) of the tube are low enough so that expected doses around the tube do not represent a risk for students working in the laboratory. Nevertheless, doses and shielding should be evaluated to accomplish the ALARA criterion. The Monte Carlo method has been applied to evaluate the dose rate around the installation provided with a shielding composed by a box of methacrylate. Dose rates calculated are compared with experimental measurements to validate the model. Obtained results show that doses are below allowable limits. Hence, no extra shielding is required for the X-ray beam. A previous Monte Carlo model was also developed to obtain the tube spectrum and validated by comparison with data from manufacturer.

  6. Reliability and Reproducibility of Subject Positioning with EOS Low-Dose Biplanar X-ray.

    PubMed

    Goodbody, Christine; Kedem, Paz; Thompson, Michaela; Do, Huong T; Mintz, Douglas N; Widmann, Roger F; Dodwell, Emily R

    2017-10-01

    EOS low-dose biplanar X-ray used with tantalum bead implantation is an appealing imaging modality to evaluate limb length and physeal growth due its relatively low radiation exposure, excellent inter- and intra-observer reliability, and minimal magnification/shrinkage error. The purpose of this study was to establish the error in total length and inter-bead distances using EOS and tantalum beads due to variable positioning in the EOS gantry, by assessing variation in measurements made on the same subject repeatedly positioning by one positioner (intra-positioner measurement error) and variation in measurements made on the same subject with positioning by multiple positioners (inter-positioner measurement error). Tantalum bead markers were placed about the distal femoral physis of a cadaveric lamb femur. Three investigators positioned the femur in the EOS gantry 10 times, totaling 30 EOS scans. Total limb length and inter-bead distances were measured on AP and lateral views; mean and standard error were calculated. A random effects analysis of variance for nested data was used to determine the proportion of variation due to differences between positioners and differences between positioning by the same positioner. Intra-positioner measurement error ranged from 0.01 to 0.06 mm. Inter-positioner measurement error ranged from 0.00 to 0.09 mm. EOS has relatively low radiation and allows standing assessment of limb length and alignment. In this study, length measurements and inter-bead distances demonstrated minimal error due to positioning in the EOS gantry, documenting that there is minimal error from positioning, minimal magnification/shrinkage error, and exceptional inter and intra-rater reliability. EOS is the preferred method for length and angular measurements, and with tantalum beads, is ideal for measuring growth about the physis.

  7. X-ray dose from pediatric cardiac catheterization: a comparison of materials and methods for measurement or calculation.

    PubMed

    Herron, Brent; Strain, John; Fagan, Thomas; Wright, Linda; Shockley, Heather

    2010-11-01

    Pediatric cardiac catheterization procedures have the potential to transmit high X-ray doses, which may lead to acute effects or latent skin reactions. Direct measurement of radiation dose was facilitated using nanodot dosimeters and radiochromic film. Direct measurement results were compared with vendor-listed dosimetry and calculation using phantom data. Vendor-listed data demonstrated a wide discrepancy with measured data, whereas the calculation reproducibly overestimated the actual dose. A simple formula was derived to calculate the dose using fluoroscopy time, cine frame quantity and average cine mA in a biplane environment.

  8. X-ray to NIR emission from AA Tauri during the dim state. Occultation of the inner disk and gas-to-dust ratio of the absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, P. C.; France, K.; Günther, H. M.; Herczeg, G.; Robrade, J.; Bouvier, J.; McJunkin, M.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2015-12-01

    AA Tau is a well-studied, nearby classical T Tauri star, which is viewed almost edge-on. A warp in its inner disk periodically eclipses the central star, causing a clear modulation of its optical light curve. The system underwent a major dimming event beginning in 2011 caused by an extra absorber, which is most likely associated with additional disk material in the line of sight toward the central source. We present new XMM-Newton X-ray, Hubble Space Telescope FUV, and ground-based optical and near-infrared data of the system obtained in 2013 during the long-lasting dim phase. The line width decrease of the fluorescent H2 disk emission shows that the extra absorber is located at r > 1 au. Comparison of X-ray absorption (NH) with dust extinction (AV), as derived from measurements obtained one inner disk orbit (eight days) after the X-ray measurement, indicates that the gas-to-dust ratio as probed by the NH to AV ratio of the extra absorber is compatible with the ISM ratio. Combining both results suggests that the extra absorber, i.e., material at r > 1 au, has no significant gas excess in contrast to the elevated gas-to-dust ratio previously derived for material in the inner region (≲0.1 au). Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  9. Potential enhancement of warm X-ray dose from a reflexing bremsstrahlung diode

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Halbleib, J.A.; Cooperstein, G.

    1995-08-01

    The potential for generating intense bursts of warm x rays (20 to 60 keV) using electron reflexing diodes on pulsed-power accelerators is evaluated with the TIGER Monte Carlo code, showing that hundreds of kilojoules of warm x rays can be generated under idealized conditions, for a Jupiter (60-MA, 5-MV, 100-ns) class accelerator. The calculations are compared with data from Gamble-II experiments and applied to two suggested Jupiter diode configurations. If the simultaneous irradiation from the high-energy tail of the bremsstrahlung, which accompanies the warm x rays, is a concern then the reflexing technique is shown to be limited to the irradiation of targets thinner than {approximately}400 {mu}m for low-Z targets like aluminum and thinner than {approximately}5 {mu}m for high-Z targets like gold.

  10. Potential enhancement of warm x-ray dose from a reflexing bremsstrahlung diode

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Halbleib, J.A.; Cooperstein, G.; Weber, B.V.

    1995-07-01

    The potential for generating intense bursts of war x rays (20 to 60 keV) using electron reflexing diodes on pulsed-power accelerators is evaluated with the TIGER Monte Carlo code, showing that hundreds of kilojoules of warm x rays can be generated under idealized conditions. The calculation are compared with data from Gamble-II experiments and applied to two suggest Jupiter (60-MA, 5-MV, 100-ns) diode configurations. If the simultaneous irradiation from the high-energy tail of the bremsstrahlung which accompanies the warm x rays is a concern, then the reflexing technique is shown to be limited to the irradiation of targets thinner than {approximately} 400 {mu}m for low-Z targets like aluminum and thinner than {approximately} 5 {mu}m for high-Z targets like gold.

  11. A waveguide electron cyclotron resonance source of X-ray emission for low-dose introscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeichev, K. F.; Ionidi, V. Yu.; Karfidov, D. M.; Lukina, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    It is shown that a "point" target in a conventional evacuated waveguide in the magnetic field of a mirror trap formed by two disk magnets axially magnetized in the direction perpendicular to the electric field vector represents a source of X-ray bremsstrahlung of electrons accelerated in an ECR discharge with a broad range of photon energies up to 0.8 MeV. The dosage rate of the source is ˜1 R/h. The source fed from a conventional microwave oven has small dimensions and a low weight. It is easy-to-use and is suitable as a laboratory tool, in particular, in radiobiology and introscopy. After passing through the object, X-ray emission is recorded by a digital camera with the help of a highly sensitive X-ray fluorescent screen, which converts it into an optical image.

  12. SU-C-204-06: Monte Carlo Dose Calculation for Kilovoltage X-Ray-Psoralen Activated Cancer Therapy (X-PACT): Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mein, S; Gunasingha, R; Nolan, M; Oldham, M; Adamson, J

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: X-PACT is an experimental cancer therapy where kV x-rays are used to photo-activate anti-cancer therapeutics through phosphor intermediaries (phosphors that absorb x-rays and re-radiate as UV light). Clinical trials in pet dogs are currently underway (NC State College of Veterinary Medicine) and an essential component is the ability to model the kV dose in these dogs. Here we report the commissioning and characterization of a Monte Carlo (MC) treatment planning simulation tool to calculate X-PACT radiation doses in canine trials. Methods: FLUKA multi-particle MC simulation package was used to simulate a standard X-PACT radiation treatment beam of 80kVp with the Varian OBI x-ray source geometry. The beam quality was verified by comparing measured and simulated attenuation of the beam by various thicknesses of aluminum (2–4.6 mm) under narrow beam conditions (HVL). The beam parameters at commissioning were then corroborated using MC, characterized and verified with empirically collected commissioning data, including: percent depth dose curves (PDD), back-scatter factors (BSF), collimator scatter factor(s), and heel effect, etc. All simulations were conducted for N=30M histories at M=100 iterations. Results: HVL and PDD simulation data agreed with an average percent error of 2.42%±0.33 and 6.03%±1.58, respectively. The mean square error (MSE) values for HVL and PDD (0.07% and 0.50%) were low, as expected; however, longer simulations are required to validate convergence to the expected values. Qualitatively, pre- and post-filtration source spectra matched well with 80kVp references generated via SPEKTR software. Further validation of commissioning data simulation is underway in preparation for first-time 3D dose calculations with canine CBCT data. Conclusion: We have prepared a Monte Carlo simulation capable of accurate dose calculation for use with ongoing X-PACT canine clinical trials. Preliminary results show good agreement with measured data and hold

  13. Skin dose mapping for non-uniform x-ray fields using a backscatter point spread function

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, Sarath; Xiong, Zhenyu; Shankar, Alok; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2017-01-01

    Beam shaping devices like ROI attenuators and compensation filters modulate the intensity distribution of the x-ray beam incident on the patient. This results in a spatial variation of skin dose due to the variation of primary radiation and also a variation in backscattered radiation from the patient. To determine the backscatter component, backscatter point spread functions (PSF) are generated using EGS Monte-Carlo software. For this study, PSF’s were determined by simulating a 1 mm beam incident on the lateral surface of an anthropomorphic head phantom and a 20 cm thick PMMA block phantom. The backscatter PSF’s for the head phantom and PMMA phantom are curve fit with a Lorentzian function after being normalized to the primary dose intensity (PSFn). PSFn is convolved with the primary dose distribution to generate the scatter dose distribution, which is added to the primary to obtain the total dose distribution. The backscatter convolution technique is incorporated in the dose tracking system (DTS), which tracks skin dose during fluoroscopic procedures and provides a color map of the dose distribution on a 3D patient graphic model. A convolution technique is developed for the backscatter dose determination for the non-uniformly spaced graphic-model surface vertices. A Gafchromic film validation was performed for shaped x-ray beams generated with an ROI attenuator and with two compensation filters inserted into the field. The total dose distribution calculated by the backscatter convolution technique closely agreed with that measured with the film. PMID:28649154

  14. Distinct Sets of lncRNAs are Differentially Modulated after Exposure to High and Low Doses of X Rays.

    PubMed

    Terradas, Mariona; Martín, Marta; Repullès, Joan; Huarte, Maite; Genescà, Anna

    2016-12-01

    High- and low-dose X rays are used in medicine as therapeutic and diagnostic tools, respectively. While the cellular response to high-dose radiation is well known, studies on the effects of low-dose radiation and its ability to trigger a proper DNA damage response have had contradictory results. The functions of many signaling and effector proteins of the DNA damage response (DDR) have been described, and are attributed to well-known DDR pathways. However, there has been little known about the contribution of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) to DDR, although there is recent evidence that lncRNAs may be associated with almost all biological functions, including DDR. In this work, we investigated the participation of lncRNAs in the response to different X-ray doses. By microarray analysis, we observed that in human breast epithelial cells, distinct sets of coding and noncoding transcripts are differentially regulated after moderate- and high-dose irradiation compared to those regulated after low-dose irradiation. While the modulated coding and noncoding genes at low doses relate to cell signaling pathways, those affected by moderate and high doses are mostly enriched for cell cycle regulation and apoptotic pathways. Quantification using qPCR of the lncRNAs identified by microarrays allowed the validation of 75% of those regulated at the higher doses. These results indicate that lncRNA expression is regulated by ionizing radiation and that this expression is dose dependent.

  15. High-resolution, low-dose phase contrast X-ray tomography for 3D diagnosis of human breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunzhe; Brun, Emmanuel; Coan, Paola; Huang, Zhifeng; Sztrókay, Aniko; Diemoz, Paul Claude; Liebhardt, Susanne; Mittone, Alberto; Gasilov, Sergei; Miao, Jianwei; Bravin, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Mammography is the primary imaging tool for screening and diagnosis of human breast cancers, but ∼10–20% of palpable tumors are not detectable on mammograms and only about 40% of biopsied lesions are malignant. Here we report a high-resolution, low-dose phase contrast X-ray tomographic method for 3D diagnosis of human breast cancers. By combining phase contrast X-ray imaging with an image reconstruction method known as equally sloped tomography, we imaged a human breast in three dimensions and identified a malignant cancer with a pixel size of 92 μm and a radiation dose less than that of dual-view mammography. According to a blind evaluation by five independent radiologists, our method can reduce the radiation dose and acquisition time by ∼74% relative to conventional phase contrast X-ray tomography, while maintaining high image resolution and image contrast. These results demonstrate that high-resolution 3D diagnostic imaging of human breast cancers can, in principle, be performed at clinical compatible doses. PMID:23091003

  16. Adjustment function among antioxidant substances in acatalasemic mouse brain and its enhancement by low-dose X-ray irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Nomura, Takaharu; Wang, Da-Hong; Mori, Shuji; Taguchi, Takehito; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Kira, Shohei

    2002-01-01

    The catalase activities in blood and organs of the acatalasemic (C3H/AnLCsbCsb) mouse of the C3H strain are lower than those of the normal (C3H/AnLCsaCsa) mouse. We conducted a study to examine changes in the activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX), the total gluathione content, and the lipid peroxide level in the brain, which is more sensitive to oxidative stress than other organs, at 3, 6, or 24 hr following X-ray irradiation at doses of 0.25, 0.5, or 5.0 Gy to the acatalasemic and the normal mice. No significant change in the lipid peroxide level in the acatalasemic mouse brain was seen under non-irradiation conditions. However, the acatalasemic mouse brain was more damaged than the normal mouse brain by excessive oxygen stress, such as a high-dose (5.0 Gy) X-ray. On the other hand, we found that, unlike 5.0 Gy X-ray, a relatively low-dose (0.5 Gy) irradiation specifically increased the activities of both catalase and GPX in the acatalasemic mouse brain making the activities closer to those in the normal mouse brain. These findings may indicate that the free radical reaction induced by the lack of catalase is more properly neutralized by low dose irradiation.

  17. Absorbed Dose and Dose Equivalent Calculations for Modeling Effective Dose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Andrew; Lee, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    While in orbit, Astronauts are exposed to a much higher dose of ionizing radiation than when on the ground. It is important to model how shielding designs on spacecraft reduce radiation effective dose pre-flight, and determine whether or not a danger to humans is presented. However, in order to calculate effective dose, dose equivalent calculations are needed. Dose equivalent takes into account an absorbed dose of radiation and the biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation. This is important in preventing long-term, stochastic radiation effects in humans spending time in space. Monte carlo simulations run with the particle transport code FLUKA, give absorbed and equivalent dose data for relevant shielding. The shielding geometry used in the dose calculations is a layered slab design, consisting of aluminum, polyethylene, and water. Water is used to simulate the soft tissues that compose the human body. The results obtained will provide information on how the shielding performs with many thicknesses of each material in the slab. This allows them to be directly applicable to modern spacecraft shielding geometries.

  18. Dose and detectability improvements with high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging in comparison to low energy conventional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Yan, Aimin; Ghani, Muhammad; Li, Yuhua; Fajardo, Laurie; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the potential benefits of using high energy x-rays for phase sensitive breast imaging through a comparison with conventional mammography imaging. We compared images of a contrast-detail (CD) phantom acquired on a prototype phase sensitive x-ray imaging system with images acquired on a commercial flat panel digital mammography unit. The phase contrast images were acquired using a micro-focus x-ray source with a 50 μm focal spot at 120 kVp and 4.5 mAs, with a magnification factor of 2.46 and a 50 μm pixel pitch. A phase attenuation duality (PAD)-based phase retrieval algorithm that requires only a single phase contrast image was applied. Conventional digital mammography images were acquired at 27 kVp, 131 mAs and 28 kVp, 54 mAs. For the same radiation dose, both the observer study and SNR/FOM comparisons indicated a large improvement by the phase retrieved image as compared to the clinical system for the larger disk sizes, but the improvement was not enough to detect the smallest disks. Compared to the double dose image acquired with the clinical system, the observer study also indicated that the phase retrieved image provided improved detection capabilities for all disk sizes except the smallest disks. Thus the SNR improvement provided by phase contrast imaging is not yet enough to offset the noise reduction provided by the clinical system at the doubled dose level. However, the potential demonstrated by this study for high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging to improve lesion detection and reduce radiation dose in mammography warrants further investigation of this technique. PMID:24732108

  19. Dose and detectability improvements with high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging in comparison to low energy conventional imaging.

    PubMed

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Yan, Aimin; Ghani, Muhammad; Li, Yuhua; Fajardo, Laurie; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-05-07

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the potential benefits of using high energy x-rays for phase sensitive breast imaging through a comparison with conventional mammography imaging. We compared images of a contrast-detail phantom acquired on a prototype phase sensitive x-ray imaging system with images acquired on a commercial flat panel digital mammography unit. The phase contrast images were acquired using a micro-focus x-ray source with a 50 µm focal spot at 120 kVp and 4.5 mAs, with a magnification factor of 2.46 and a 50 µm pixel pitch. A phase attenuation duality-based phase retrieval algorithm that requires only a single phase contrast image was applied. Conventional digital mammography images were acquired at 27 kVp, 131 mAs and 28 kVp, 54 mAs. For the same radiation dose, both the observer study and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)/figure of merit comparisons indicated a large improvement by the phase retrieved image as compared to the clinical system for the larger disc sizes, but the improvement was not enough to detect the smallest discs. Compared to the double dose image acquired with the clinical system, the observer study also indicated that the phase retrieved image provided improved detection capabilities for all disc sizes except the smallest discs. Thus the SNR improvement provided by phase contrast imaging is not yet enough to offset the noise reduction provided by the clinical system at the doubled dose level. However, the potential demonstrated by this study for high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging to improve lesion detection and reduce radiation dose in mammography warrants further investigation of this technique.

  20. Anomalous greying effect in mice with higher doses of x-rays.

    PubMed

    GALBRAITH, D B; CHASE, H B

    1962-01-12

    Exposure of mouse hair follicles to 1200, 1300, and 1400 r of x-rays results in delay of hair growth, precocious melanogenesis, and disruption of melanocyte distribution. The diversity of greying responses obtained with 1100 to 1700 r appears to be due to inactivation of radiosensitive follicles rather than to tissue replacement or to displacement of external sheath melanocytes into the hair bulb.

  1. 3D global estimation and augmented reality visualization of intra-operative X-ray dose.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Nicolas Loy; Padoy, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The growing use of image-guided minimally-invasive surgical procedures is confronting clinicians and surgical staff with new radiation exposure risks from X-ray imaging devices. The accurate estimation of intra-operative radiation exposure can increase staff awareness of radiation exposure risks and enable the implementation of well-adapted safety measures. The current surgical practice of wearing a single dosimeter at chest level to measure radiation exposure does not provide a sufficiently accurate estimation of radiation absorption throughout the body. In this paper, we propose an approach that combines data from wireless dosimeters with the simulation of radiation propagation in order to provide a global radiation risk map in the area near the X-ray device. We use a multi-camera RGBD system to obtain a 3D point cloud reconstruction of the room. The positions of the table, C-arm and clinician are then used 1) to simulate the propagation of radiation in a real-world setup and 2) to overlay the resulting 3D risk-map onto the scene in an augmented reality manner. By using real-time wireless dosimeters in our system, we can both calibrate the simulation and validate its accuracy at specific locations in real-time. We demonstrate our system in an operating room equipped with a robotised X-ray imaging device and validate the radiation simulation on several X-ray acquisition setups.

  2. Significant Radiation Dose Reduction in the Hybrid Operating Room Using a Novel X-ray Imaging Technology.

    PubMed

    van den Haak, R F F; Hamans, B C; Zuurmond, K; Verhoeven, B A N; Koning, O H J

    2015-10-01

    To prospectively quantify radiation dose change in aortoiliac endovascular procedures in the hybrid operating room (OR) for patients and medical staff with a novel X-ray imaging technology (ClarityIQ technology), and to assess whether procedure or fluoroscopy time or dose of iodinated contrast was affected. A prospective study including 138 patients was performed to compare radiation dose before and after installation of a novel X-ray imaging technology. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) was performed in 37 patients and an endovascular procedure for aortoiliac occlusive disease (AIOD) in 101. Patient radiation dose in air kerma (AK) and dose area product (DAP), patient demographics, and procedural data were recorded. Staff radiation dose was measured with real time personal dosimetry measurements. In both the EVAR and AIOD groups the reference system, ALX (AlluraXper FD20; Philips Healthcare, Best, the Netherlands), was compared with the upgraded X-ray system, CIQ (AlluraClarity FD20; Philips Healthcare). Procedure time, fluoroscopy time, and iodinated contrast dose were recorded. Patient radiation dose reduction in the EVAR group, in median AK, was 56% (ALX = 1,262.5 mGy; CIQ = 556.0 mGy [p < .01]); and in median DAP it was 57% (ALX = 224.4 Gycm(2) and CIQ = 95.8 Gycm(2) [p < .01]). Patient radiation dose reduction in the AIOD group, in median AK, was 76% (ALX = 1,011.0 mGy; CIQ = 248.0 mGy [p < .01]); and in median DAP it was 73% (ALX = 138.1 Gycm(2); CIQ = 38.0 Gycm(2) [p < .01]). Staff dose reduction in the EVAR group was 16% (ALX = 70.1 μSv; CIQ = 59.2 μSv [p = .43]) and in the AIOD group it was 69% (ALX = 96.2 μSv; CIQ = 30.1 μSv [p < .01]). There was no statistically significant difference between patient demographics, procedure time, fluoroscopy time, and iodinated contrast medium use in the two treatment groups before and after installation. A novel X-ray imaging technology in the hybrid OR suite resulted in a significant reduction of patient and

  3. Prunus armeniaca L (apricot) protects rat testes from detrimental effects of low-dose x-rays.

    PubMed

    Ugras, Murat Y; Kurus, Meltem; Ates, Burhan; Soylemez, Haluk; Otlu, Ali; Yilmaz, Ismet

    2010-03-01

    Exposure to low x-ray doses damages the spermatozoa, mainly by late-onset (ie, after 3 months) oxidative stress. Antioxidants ameliorate oxidation and prevent tissue damage. Prunus armeniaca L (apricot), rich in carotenoids and vitamins, is a potent natural antioxidant. We hypothesized that an apricot-rich diet might ameliorate the detrimental effects of low-dose x-rays on testis tissue. A 20% apricot diet was composed isoenergetically to the regular rodent diet. The total phenolic content, reducing power, and antioxidant capacity of both diets were determined. Sprague-Dawley rats received apricot-rich diets before and after x-ray exposure. Regular diets were given to controls. Rats were exposed to 0.2 Gy x-rays at the eighth week and were euthanized at the 20th postexposure week. Testicular oxidative status was determined by tissue thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities. For histologic evaluation, qualitative and quantitative microscopic determinations were performed, and Leydig and Sertoli cell counts and Johnsen scores were measured. The control diet group had significant testicular oxidative stress and mild tissue deterioration. Leydig and Sertoli cell counts, tubule diameters, and Johnsen scores were significantly decreased in the exposure groups. Apricot-rich diet significantly ameliorated the oxidative status and prevented the damage in tubular histology. The protective effects were prominent when the diet was maintained throughout the time course and were partially protected when the diet was initiated after exposure. The natural antioxidant activity of apricot ameliorates the delayed detrimental effects of low-dose irradiation on testis tissue. The high total antioxidant capacity of the apricot deserves further investigation. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Real-time, ray casting-based scatter dose estimation for c-arm x-ray system.

    PubMed

    Alnewaini, Zaid; Langer, Eric; Schaber, Philipp; David, Matthias; Kretz, Dominik; Steil, Volker; Hesser, Jürgen

    2017-03-01

    Dosimetric control of staff exposure during interventional procedures under fluoroscopy is of high relevance. In this paper, a novel ray casting approximation of radiation transport is presented and the potential and limitation vs. a full Monte Carlo transport and dose measurements are discussed. The x-ray source of a Siemens Axiom Artix C-arm is modeled by a virtual source model using single Gaussian-shaped source. A Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation determines the radiation transport from the source to compute scatter from the patient, the table, the ceiling and the floor. A phase space around these scatterers stores all photon information. Only those photons are traced that hit a surface of phantom that represents medical staff in the treatment room, no indirect scattering is considered; and a complete dose deposition on the surface is calculated. To evaluate the accuracy of the approximation, both experimental measurements using Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and a Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation of dose depositing for different tube angulations of the C-arm from cranial-caudal angle 0° and from LAO (Left Anterior Oblique) 0°-90° are realized. Since the measurements were performed on both sides of the table, using the symmetry of the setup, RAO (Right Anterior Oblique) measurements were not necessary. The Geant4-Monte Carlo simulation agreed within 3% with the measured data, which is within the accuracy of measurement and simulation. The ray casting approximation has been compared to TLD measurements and the achieved percentage difference was -7% for data from tube angulations 45°-90° and -29% from tube angulations 0°-45° on the side of the x-ray source, whereas on the opposite side of the x-ray source, the difference was -83.8% and -75%, respectively. Ray casting approximation for only LAO 90° was compared to a Monte Carlo simulation, where the percentage differences were between 0.5-3% on the side of the x-ray source where the highest dose

  5. Contact radiotherapy using a 50 kV X-ray system: Evaluation of relative dose distribution with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE and comparison with measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croce, Olivier; Hachem, Sabet; Franchisseur, Eric; Marcié, Serge; Gérard, Jean-Pierre; Bordy, Jean-Marc

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a dosimetric study concerning the system named "Papillon 50" used in the department of radiotherapy of the Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Nice, France. The machine provides a 50 kVp X-ray beam, currently used to treat rectal cancers. The system can be mounted with various applicators of different diameters or shapes. These applicators can be fixed over the main rod tube of the unit in order to deliver the prescribed absorbed dose into the tumor with an optimal distribution. We have analyzed depth dose curves and dose profiles for the naked tube and for a set of three applicators. Dose measurements were made with an ionization chamber (PTW type 23342) and Gafchromic films (EBT2). We have also compared the measurements with simulations performed using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE. Simulations were performed with a detailed geometrical description of the experimental setup and with enough statistics. Results of simulations are made in accordance with experimental measurements and provide an accurate evaluation of the dose delivered. The depths of the 50% isodose in water for the various applicators are 4.0, 6.0, 6.6 and 7.1 mm. The Monte Carlo PENELOPE simulations are in accordance with the measurements for a 50 kV X-ray system. Simulations are able to confirm the measurements provided by Gafchromic films or ionization chambers. Results also demonstrate that Monte Carlo simulations could be helpful to validate the future applicators designed for other localizations such as breast or skin cancers. Furthermore, Monte Carlo simulations could be a reliable alternative for a rapid evaluation of the dose delivered by such a system that uses multiple designs of applicators.

  6. Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice modulates oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray in mice.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Mohd Khairul Amran; Mohamed, Muhamad Idham; Zakaria, Ainul Mardhiyah; Abdul Razak, Hairil Rashmizal; Saad, Wan Mazlina Md

    2014-01-01

    Watermelon is a natural product that contains high level of antioxidants and may prevent oxidative damage in tissues due to free radical generation following an exposure to ionizing radiation. The present study aimed to investigate the radioprotective effects of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice against oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray exposure in mice. Twelve adult male ICR mice were randomly divided into two groups consisting of radiation (Rx) and supplementation (Tx) groups. Rx received filtered tap water, while Tx was supplemented with 50% (v/v) watermelon juice for 28 days ad libitum prior to total body irradiation by 100 μGy X-ray on day 29. Brain, lung, and liver tissues were assessed for the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibition activities. Results showed significant reduction of MDA levels and AP sites formation of Tx compared to Rx (P < 0.05). Mice supplemented with 50% watermelon juice restore the intracellular antioxidant activities by significantly increased SOD inhibition activities and GSH levels compared to Rx. These findings may postulate that supplementation of 50% watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice could modulate oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray exposure.

  7. Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) Juice Modulates Oxidative Damage Induced by Low Dose X-Ray in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Mohd Khairul Amran; Mohamed, Muhamad Idham; Abdul Razak, Hairil Rashmizal; Saad, Wan Mazlina Md.

    2014-01-01

    Watermelon is a natural product that contains high level of antioxidants and may prevent oxidative damage in tissues due to free radical generation following an exposure to ionizing radiation. The present study aimed to investigate the radioprotective effects of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice against oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray exposure in mice. Twelve adult male ICR mice were randomly divided into two groups consisting of radiation (Rx) and supplementation (Tx) groups. Rx received filtered tap water, while Tx was supplemented with 50% (v/v) watermelon juice for 28 days ad libitum prior to total body irradiation by 100 μGy X-ray on day 29. Brain, lung, and liver tissues were assessed for the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibition activities. Results showed significant reduction of MDA levels and AP sites formation of Tx compared to Rx (P < 0.05). Mice supplemented with 50% watermelon juice restore the intracellular antioxidant activities by significantly increased SOD inhibition activities and GSH levels compared to Rx. These findings may postulate that supplementation of 50% watermelon (Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. and Nakai) juice could modulate oxidative damage induced by low dose X-ray exposure. PMID:24877107

  8. Overall x-ray system simulation model developed for system design and image quality versus patient dose optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, Han

    2003-06-01

    We have developed a full-scale image quality (IQ) simulation model as a tool for X-ray system design, image quality optimization and patient dose reduction. The IQ model supports the (de-)composition of system level requirements and simulates several types of automatic X-ray control technique. The model is implemented in LabVIEW. The X-ray system is modeled in distinguishable components and processes, which allows isolation of sub-systems and exclusion of devices. All relevant patient dose and IQ items such as contrast, sharpness, lag and noise are calculated and additionally combined in IQ "figures of merit" (FOM). Some characteristic application examples will be presented: In a general image magnification study we compare magnification techniques, such as geometric enlargement, image intensifier zooming and digital processing. In an optimization study we apply a new IQ FOM that contains not only imaging properties of the system, but also detail information in terms of material, size and thickness. Combining the IQ simulation model with a Pareto trade-off algorithm appears to be a promising optimization approach. In addition to the mentioned employment, the IQ simulation model is also suitable for comparison studies on the performance of flat detectors versus image intensifier television detectors, application related studies and fine tuning of specific settings and adjustments, design of test objects and development of measuring methods.

  9. Monte Carlo derivation of filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra for dose computation in digital mammography*

    PubMed Central

    Paixão, Lucas; Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; Viloria, Carolina; de Oliveira, Marcio Alves; Teixeira, Maria Helena Araújo; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro

    2015-01-01

    Objective Derive filtered tungsten X-ray spectra used in digital mammography systems by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Materials and Methods Filtered spectra for rhodium filter were obtained for tube potentials between 26 and 32 kV. The half-value layer (HVL) of simulated filtered spectra were compared with those obtained experimentally with a solid state detector Unfors model 8202031-H Xi R/F & MAM Detector Platinum and 8201023-C Xi Base unit Platinum Plus w mAs in a Hologic Selenia Dimensions system using a direct radiography mode. Results Calculated HVL values showed good agreement as compared with those obtained experimentally. The greatest relative difference between the Monte Carlo calculated HVL values and experimental HVL values was 4%. Conclusion The results show that the filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra and the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code can be used for mean glandular dose determination in mammography. PMID:26811553

  10. Thomson scattering laser-electron X-ray source for reduction of patient radiation dose in interventional coronary angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyukov, I. A.; Dyachkov, N. V.; Feshchenko, R. M.; Polunina, A. V.; Popov, N. L.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Vinogradov, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    It was medical applications that stimulated F. Carrol in the early 1990s to start the research of on relativistic Thomson scattering X-ray sources, as a part of the infrastructure of the future society. The possibility to use such a source in interventional cardiology is discussed in this paper. The replacement of X-ray tube by relativistic Thomson scattering Xray source is predicted to lower the patient radiation dose by a factor of 3 while image quality remains the same. The required general characteristics of accelerator and laser units are found. They can be reached by existing technology. A semiempirical method for simulation of medical and technical parameters of interventional coronary angiography systems is suggested.

  11. Novel X-ray image noise reduction technology reduces patient radiation dose while maintaining image quality in coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Ten Cate, T; van Wely, M; Gehlmann, H; Mauti, M; Camaro, C; Reifart, N; Suryapranata, H; de Boer, M J

    2015-11-01

    The consequences of high radiation dose for patient and staff demand constant improvements in X-ray dose reduction technology. This study assessed non-inferiority of image quality and quantified patient dose reduction in interventional cardiology for an anatomy-specific optimised cine acquisition chain combined with advanced real-time image noise reduction algorithms referred to as 'study cine', compared with conventional angiography. Fifty patients underwent two coronary angiographic acquisitions: one with advanced image processing and optimised exposure system settings to enable dose reduction (study cine) and one with standard image processing and exposure settings (reference cine). The image sets of 39 patients (18 females, 21 males) were rated by six experienced independent reviewers, blinded to the patient and image characteristics. The image pairs were randomly presented. Overall 85 % of the study cine images were rated as better or equal quality compared with the reference cine (95 % CI 0.81-0.90). The median dose area product per frame decreased from 55 to 26 mGy.cm(2)/frame (53 % reduction, p < 0.001). This study demonstrates that the novel X-ray imaging technology provides non-inferior image quality compared with conventional angiographic systems for interventional cardiology with a 53 % patient dose reduction.

  12. Radiation dose measurements of an on-board imager X-ray unit using optically-stimulated luminescence dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Smith, Leon; Haque, Mamoon; Morales, Johnny; Hill, Robin

    2015-12-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is now widely used to image radiotherapy patients prior to treatment for the purpose of accurate patient setup. However each CBCT image delivered to a patient increases the total radiation dose that they receive. The measurement of the dose delivered from the CBCT images is not readily performed in the clinic. In this study, we have used commercially available optically stimulated luminescence (OSLD) dosimeters to measure the dose delivered by the Varian OBI on a radiotherapy linear accelerator. Calibration of the OSLDs was achieved by using a therapeutic X-ray unit. The dose delivered by a head CBCT scan was found to be 3.2 ± 0.3 mGy which is similar in magnitude to the dose of a head computed tomography (CT) scan. The results of this study suggest that the radiation hazard associated with CBCT is of a similar nature to that of conventional CT scans. We have also demonstrated that the OSLDs are suitable for these low X-ray dose measurements.

  13. Use of the DBD-FISH technique for detecting DNA breakage in response to high doses of X-rays.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Fernández, José Luis; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to generate a dose-response curve using the DNA breakage detection-fluorescent in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH) test as a biomarker of initial genetic effects induced by high doses of X-rays. A dose-response curve was obtained by measuring the ex vivo responses to increasing doses (0-50 Gy) of X-rays in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of ten healthy donors. The overall dose-response curve was constructed using integrated density (ID; area × fluorescence intensity) as a measure of genetic damage induced by irradiation. The correlation coefficient was high (r = 0.934, b(0) = 10.408, and b(1) = 0.094). One-way ANOVA with the Student-Newman-Keuls test for multiple comparisons showed significant differences among the average ln ID values according to dose. Our results suggest the usefulness of the DBD-FISH technique for measuring intrinsic individual cellular radio sensitivity ex vivo.

  14. Measurement of Entrance Skin Dose and Calculation of Effective Dose for Common Diagnostic X-Ray Examinations in Kashan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Aliasgharzadeh, Akbar; Mihandoost, Ehsan; Masoumbeigi, Mahboubeh; Salimian, Morteza; Mohseni, Mehran

    2015-02-24

    The knowledge of the radiation dose received by the patient during the radiological examination is essential to prevent risks of exposures. The aim of this work is to study patient doses for common diagnostic radiographic examinations in hospitals affiliated to Kashan University of Medical sciences, Iran. The results of this survey are compared with those published by some national and international values. Entrance surface dose (ESD) was measured based on the exposure parameters used for the actual examination and effective dose (ED) was calculated by use of conversion coefficients calculated by Monte Carlo methods. The mean entrance surface dose and effective dose for examinations of the chest (PA, Lat), abdomen (AP), pelvis (AP), lumbar spine (AP, Lat) and skull (AP, Lat) are 0.37, 0.99, 2.01, 1.76, 2.18, 5.36, 1.39 and 1.01 mGy, and 0.04, 0.1, 0.28, 0,28, 0.23, 0.13, 0.01 and 0.01 mSv, respectively. The ESDs and EDs reported in this study, except for examinations of the chest, are generally lower than comparable reference dose values published in the literature. On the basis of the results obtained in this study can conclude that use of newer equipment and use of the proper radiological parameter can significantly reduce the absorbed dose. It is recommended that radiological parameter in chest examinations be revised.

  15. Measurement of Entrance Skin Dose and Calculation of Effective Dose for Common Diagnostic X-Ray Examinations in Kashan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Aliasgharzadeh, Akbar; Mihandoost, Ehsan; Masoumbeigi, Mahboubeh; Salimian, Morteza; Mohseni, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of the radiation dose received by the patient during the radiological examination is essential to prevent risks of exposures. The aim of this work is to study patient doses for common diagnostic radiographic examinations in hospitals affiliated to Kashan University of Medical sciences, Iran. The results of this survey are compared with those published by some national and international values. Entrance surface dose (ESD) was measured based on the exposure parameters used for the actual examination and effective dose (ED) was calculated by use of conversion coefficients calculated by Monte Carlo methods. The mean entrance surface dose and effective dose for examinations of the chest (PA, Lat), abdomen (AP), pelvis (AP), lumbar spine (AP, Lat) and skull (AP, Lat) are 0.37, 0.99, 2.01, 1.76, 2.18, 5.36, 1.39 and 1.01 mGy, and 0.04, 0.1, 0.28, 0,28, 0.23, 0.13, 0.01 and 0.01 mSv, respectively. The ESDs and EDs reported in this study, except for examinations of the chest, are generally lower than comparable reference dose values published in the literature. On the basis of the results obtained in this study can conclude that use of newer equipment and use of the proper radiological parameter can significantly reduce the absorbed dose. It is recommended that radiological parameter in chest examinations be revised. PMID:26156930

  16. Applicability of thermoluminescent dosimeters in X-ray organ dose determination and in the dosimetry of systemic and boron neutron capture radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschan, Agneta Carita

    The main detectors used for clinical dosimetry are ionisation chambers and semiconductors. Thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters are also of interest because of their following advantages: (i)wide useful dose range, (ii)small physical size, (iii)no need for high voltage or cables, i.e. stand alone character, and (iv)tissue equivalence (LiF) for most radiation types. TL detectors can particularly be used for the absorbed dose measurements performed with the aim to investigate cases where dose prediction is difficult and not as part of a routine verification procedure. In this thesis, the applicability of TL detectors was studied in different clinical applications. Particularly, the major phenomena (e.g. energy dependence, sensitivity to high LET radiation, reproducibility) affecting on the precision and accuracy of TL detectors in the dose estimations were considered in this work. In organ dose determinations of diagnostic X-ray examinations, the TL detectors were found to be accurate within 5% (1 S.D.). For in vivo studies using internal irradiation source, i.e. for systemic radiation therapy, a method for determining the absorbed doses to organs was introduced. The TL method developed was found to be able to estimate the absorbed doses to those critical organs near the body surface within 50%. In the mixed neutron-gamma field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), TL detectors were used for gamma dose and neutron fluence measurements. They were found able to measure the neutron dose component with the accuracy of 16%, and therefore to be a useful addition to the activation foils in BNCT neutron dosimetry. The absorbed gamma doses can be measured with TL detectors within 20% in the mixed neutron-gamma field, which enables in vivo measurements at BNCT beams with approximately the same accuracy. In this study, the uncertainties of TL dosimeters were found to be high but not essentially greater than those in other measurement techniques used for clinical dosimetry

  17. Fluorescence imaging of reactive oxygen species by confocal laser scanning microscopy for track analysis of synchrotron X-ray photoelectric nanoradiator dose: X-ray pump-optical probe.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jae Kun; Han, Sung Mi; Kim, Jong Ki

    2016-09-01

    Bursts of emissions of low-energy electrons, including interatomic Coulomb decay electrons and Auger electrons (0-1000 eV), as well as X-ray fluorescence produced by irradiation of large-Z element nanoparticles by either X-ray photons or high-energy ion beams, is referred to as the nanoradiator effect. In therapeutic applications, this effect can damage pathological tissues that selectively take up the nanoparticles. Herein, a new nanoradiator dosimetry method is presented that uses probes for reactive oxygen species (ROS) incorporated into three-dimensional gels, on which macrophages containing iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) are attached. This method, together with site-specific irradiation of the intracellular nanoparticles from a microbeam of polychromatic synchrotron X-rays (5-14 keV), measures the range and distribution of OH radicals produced by X-ray emission or superoxide anions ({\\rm{O}}_2^-) produced by low-energy electrons. The measurements are based on confocal laser scanning of the fluorescence of the hydroxyl radical probe 2-[6-(4'-amino)phenoxy-3H-xanthen-3-on-9-yl] benzoic acid (APF) or the superoxide probe hydroethidine-dihydroethidium (DHE) that was oxidized by each ROS, enabling tracking of the radiation dose emitted by the nanoradiator. In the range 70 µm below the irradiated cell, ^\\bullet{\\rm{OH}} radicals derived mostly from either incident X-ray or X-ray fluorescence of ION nanoradiators are distributed along the line of depth direction in ROS gel. In contrast, {\\rm{O}}_2^- derived from secondary electron or low-energy electron emission by ION nanoradiators are scattered over the ROS gel. ROS fluorescence due to the ION nanoradiators was observed continuously to a depth of 1.5 mm for both oxidized APF and oxidized DHE with relatively large intensity compared with the fluorescence caused by the ROS produced solely by incident primary X-rays, which was limited to a depth of 600 µm, suggesting dose enhancement as well as more

  18. SU-E-J-23: Characteristics of X-Rays From ExacTrac and Patient Dose From Imaging Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation is 1) provide the beam characteristics of x-rays produced by a Novalis TX ExacTrac system; 2) present a method to commission such beams, 3) present radiation dose to patients resulting from the imaging procedures. Methods: The Monte Carlo simulations were used to obtain the characteristics of kV beams and validated by measurements. The calculated beam HVLs, profiles and depth-dose curves were benchmarked against measurements. Twelve different image acquisition protocols were studied. The x-ray tube voltage ranges from 70 - 145 kV and milliampere-second (mAs) ranges from 8 - 80 mAs depending on the selection of Cranium, Head & Neck, Thorax or Abdomen imaging protocols. The beam output of each image acquisition protocol was determined by using an ionization chamber. The air kerma calibration factors of the ion chamber were obtained from an Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory for specified HVLs. Results: The agreements between measured and simulated results were within the uncertainties for HVLs, dose profiles and depth-dose curves. When %dd was normalized at 1 cm depth, its values at depth of 5 cm ranged from 45% to 66% of in water for kV beams range from 70 kVp to 145 kVp respectively. For head images, a typical dose to eye resulting from single projection ranged from 0.008 cGy to 0.025 cGy depending on the cranial image protocols selected. For a single pelvic image the skin dose could reach up to 0.1 cGy from an abdominal protocol. Conclusion: Although multiple pairs of x-ray images are commonly acquired during a daily patient treatment, the imaging doses to patients resulting from the sum of these projected x-rays are generally much less than 0.5 cGy. The knowledge obtained from this investigation can be used to estimate the image dose and optimize the used of the system.

  19. Dose-rate controlled energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic mapping of the metallic components in a biohybrid nanosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuanyuan; Munro, Catherine J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Edwards, Danny J.; Braunschweig, Adam B.; Knecht, Marc R.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we showcase that through precise control of the electron dose rate, state-of-the-art large solid angle energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy mapping in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope is capable of faithful and unambiguous chemical characterization of the Pt and Pd distribution in a peptide-mediated nanosystem. This low-dose-rate recording scheme adds another dimension of flexibility to the design of elemental mapping experiments, and holds significant potential for extending its application to a wide variety of beam sensitive hybrid nanostructures.

  20. Dose-rate controlled energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic mapping of the metallic components in a biohybrid nanosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yuanyuan; Munro, Catherine J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Edwards, Danny J.; Braunschweig, Adam B.; Knecht, Marc R.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2016-06-30

    In this work, we showcase that through precise control of the electron dose rate, state-of-the-art large solid angle energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is capable of faithful and unambiguous chemical characterization of the Pt and Pd distribution in a peptide-mediated nanosystem. This low-dose-rate recording scheme adds another dimension of flexibility to the design of elemental mapping experiments, and holds significant potential for extending its application to a wide variety of beam sensitive hybrid nanostructures.

  1. Differential Impact of Single-Dose Fe Ion and X-Ray Irradiation on Endothelial Cell Transcriptomic and Proteomic Responses.

    PubMed

    Baselet, Bjorn; Azimzadeh, Omid; Erbeldinger, Nadine; Bakshi, Mayur V; Dettmering, Till; Janssen, Ann; Ktitareva, Svetlana; Lowe, Donna J; Michaux, Arlette; Quintens, Roel; Raj, Kenneth; Durante, Marco; Fournier, Claudia; Benotmane, Mohammed A; Baatout, Sarah; Sonveaux, Pierre; Tapio, Soile; Aerts, An

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Radiotherapy is an essential tool for cancer treatment. In order to spare normal tissues and to reduce the risk of normal tissue complications, particle therapy is a method of choice. Although a large part of healthy tissues can be spared due to improved depth dose characteristics, little is known about the biological and molecular mechanisms altered after particle irradiation in healthy tissues. Elucidation of these effects is also required in the context of long term space flights, as particle radiation is the main contributor to the radiation effects observed in space. Endothelial cells (EC), forming the inner layer of all vascular structures, are especially sensitive to irradiation and, if damaged, contribute to radiation-induced cardiovascular disease. Materials and Methods: Transcriptomics, proteomics and cytokine analyses were used to compare the response of ECs irradiated or not with a single 2 Gy dose of X-rays or Fe ions measured one and 7 days post-irradiation. To support the observed inflammatory effects, monocyte adhesion on ECs was also assessed. Results: Experimental data indicate time- and radiation quality-dependent changes of the EC response to irradiation. The irradiation impact was more pronounced and longer lasting for Fe ions than for X-rays. Both radiation qualities decreased the expression of genes involved in cell-cell adhesion and enhanced the expression of proteins involved in caveolar mediated endocytosis signaling. Endothelial inflammation and adhesiveness were increased with X-rays, but decreased after Fe ion exposure. Conclusions: Fe ions induce pro-atherosclerotic processes in ECs that are different in nature and kinetics than those induced by X-rays, highlighting radiation quality-dependent differences which can be linked to the induction and progression of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Our findings give a better understanding of the underlying processes triggered by particle irradiation in ECs, a crucial

  2. SU-D-209-02: Percent Depth Dose Curves for Fluoroscopic X-Ray Beam Qualities Incorporating Copper Filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderle, K; Godley, A; Shen, Z; Dong, F; Rakowski, J

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to quantify percent depth dose (PDD) curves for fluoroscopic x-ray beam qualities incorporating added copper filtration. Methods: A PTW (Freiburg, Germany) MP3 water tank was used with a Standard Imaging (Middleton, WI) Exradin Model 11 Spokas Chamber to measure PDD curves for 60, 80, 100 and 120 kVp x-ray beams with copper filtration ranging from 0.0–0.9 mm at 22cm and 42cm fields of view from 0 to 150 mm of water. A free-in-air monitor chamber was used to normalize the water tank data to fluctuations in output from the fluoroscope. The measurements were acquired on a Siemens (Erlangen, Germany) Artis ZeeGo fluoroscope. The fluoroscope was inverted from the typical orientation providing an x-ray beam originating from above the water tank. The water tank was positioned so that the water level was located at 60cm from the focal spot; which also represents the focal spot to interventional reference plane distance for that fluoroscope. Results: PDDs for 60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp with 0 mm of copper filtration compared well to previously published data by Fetterly et al. [Med Phys, 28, 205 (2001)] for those beam qualities given differences in fluoroscopes, geometric orientation, type of ionization chamber, and the water tank used for data collection. PDDs for 60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp with copper filtration were obtained and are presented, which have not been previously investigated and published. Conclusion: The equipment and processes used to acquire the reported data were sound and compared well with previously published data for PDDs without copper filtration. PDD data for the fluoroscopic x-ray beams incorporating copper filtration can be used as reference data for estimating organ or soft tissue dose at depth involving similar beam qualities or for comparison with mathematical models.

  3. A dual-energy medical instrument for measurement of x-ray source voltage and dose rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhikov, V. D.; Naydenov, S. V.; Volkov, V. G.; Opolonin, O. D.; Makhota, S.; Pochet, T.; Smith, C. F.

    2016-03-01

    An original dual-energy detector and medical instrument have been developed to measure the output voltages and dose rates of X-ray sources. Theoretical and experimental studies were carried out to characterize the parameters of a new scintillator-photodiode sandwich-detector based on specially-prepared zinc selenide crystals in which the low-energy detector (LED) works both as the detector of the low-energy radiation and as an absorption filter allowing the highenergy fraction of the radiation to pass through to the high-energy detector (HED). The use of the LED as a low-energy filter in combination with a separate HED opens broad possibilities for such sandwich structures. In particular, it becomes possible to analyze and process the sum, difference and ratio of signals coming from these detectors, ensuring a broad (up to 106) measurement range of X-ray intensity from the source and a leveling of the energy dependence. We have chosen an optimum design of the detector and the geometry of the component LED and HED parts that allow energy-dependence leveling to within specified limits. The deviation in energy dependence of the detector does not exceed about 5% in the energy range from 30 to 120 keV. The developed detector and instrument allow contactless measurement of the anode voltage of an X-ray emitter from 40 to 140 kV with an error no greater than 3%. The dose rate measurement range is from 1 to 200 R/min. An original medical instrument has passed clinical testing and was recommended for use in medical institutions for X-ray diagnostics.

  4. A synthetic diamond probe for low-energy X-ray dose measurements.

    PubMed

    Assiamah, M; Nam, T L; Keddy, R J

    2007-05-01

    The desirable physical properties of diamond have made the mineral a choice material in radiation measurements. Diamond detectors are currently used extensively in high-energy physics. Their use for low-energy beams such as, for example, in mammography X-ray beams however, has not been fully investigated. This paper describes a diamond probe which has been constructed for the evaluation, as the radiation sensing material, of polycrystalline synthetic diamonds produced by chemical vapour deposition (CVD). The specimens were fabricated in wafer form and so the exposure orientation geometry of the diamond wafers, to give optimum absorption of the incident X-ray beam, was also investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The samples were characterized to obtain information regarding the elemental impurity levels, especially nitrogen, and consequently to establish the material quality. Nitrogen impurities and concentration levels in the diamond lattice have been shown to have a profound effect on the radiation detection properties of diamond. The probe described has the diamond surfaces metallized with titanium, platinum and gold to provide ohmic contacts. The probe was connected independently to both Wellhöfer Dosimetrie (model CU 500) and PTW Unidos E commercial electrometers. In all of the measurements, the incident radiation beam was normal to the edge of the diamond wafer to optimize absorption of the X-ray beam after establishing that this orientation was the optimum geometry. The results of the study are presented in both tabular and graphical forms.

  5. Locally optimized non-local means denoising for low-dose X-ray backscatter imagery.

    PubMed

    Tracey, Brian H; Miller, Eric L; Wu, Yue; Alvino, Christopher; Schiefele, Markus; Al-Kofahi, Omar

    2014-01-01

    While recent years have seen considerable progress in image denoising, the leading techniques have been developed for digital photographs or other images that can have very different characteristics than those encountered in X-ray applications. In particular here we examine X-ray backscatter (XBS) images collected by airport security systems, where images are piecewise smooth and edge information is typically more correlated with objects while texture is dominated by statistical noise in the detected signal. In this paper, we show how multiple estimates for a denoised XBS image can be combined using a variational approach, giving a solution that enhances edge contrast by trading off gradient penalties against data fidelity terms. We demonstrate the approach by combining several estimates made using the non-local means (NLM) algorithm, a widely used patch-based denoising method. The resulting improvements hold the potential for improving automated analysis of low-SNR X-ray imagery and can be applied in other applications where edge information is of interest.

  6. Biphasic and triphasic dose responses in zebrafish embryos to low-dose 150 kV X-rays with different levels of hardness.

    PubMed

    Kong, Eva Yi; Cheng, Shuk Han; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-07-01

    The in vivo low-dose responses of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos to 150 kV X-rays with different levels of hardness were examined through the number of apoptotic events revealed at 24 h post fertilization by vital dye acridine orange staining. Our results suggested that a triphasic dose response was likely a common phenomenon in living organisms irradiated by X-rays, which comprised an ultra-low-dose inhibition, low-dose stimulation and high-dose inhibition. Our results also suggested that the hormetic zone (or the stimulation zone) was shifted towards lower doses with application of filters. The non-detection of a triphasic dose response in previous experiments could likely be attributed to the use of hard X-rays, which shifted the hormetic zone into an unmonitored ultra-low-dose region. In such cases where the subhormetic zone was missed, a biphasic dose response would be reported instead. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  7. High-Resolution Hard X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Spectrometers Based on Superconducting Absorbers Coupled to Superconducting Transition Edge Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    van den Berg, M.; Chow, D.; Loshak, A.; Cunningham, M.F.; Barbee, T.W.; Matthias, F.; Labov, S.E.

    2000-09-21

    We are developing detectors based on bulk superconducting absorbers coupled to superconducting transition edge sensors (TES) for high-resolution spectroscopy of hard X-rays and soft gamma-rays. We have achieved an energy resolution of 70 eV FWHM at 60 keV using a 1 x 1 x 0.25 mm{sup 3} Sn absorber coupled to a Mo/Cu multilayer TES with a transition temperature of 100 mK. The response of the detector is compared with a simple model using only material properties data and characteristics derived from IV-measurements. We have also manufactured detectors using superconducting absorbers with a higher stopping power, such as Pb and Ta. We present our first measurements of these detectors, including the thermalization characteristics of the bulk superconducting absorbers. The differences in performance between the detectors are discussed and an outline of the future direction of our detector development efforts is given.

  8. Algorithm for x-ray beam hardening and scatter correction in low-dose cone-beam CT: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenlei; Rong, Junyan; Gao, Peng; Liao, Qimei; Lu, HongBing

    2016-03-01

    X-ray scatter poses a significant limitation to image quality in cone-beam CT (CBCT), as well as beam hardening, resulting in image artifacts, contrast reduction, and lack of CT number accuracy. Meanwhile the x-ray radiation dose is also non-ignorable. Considerable scatter or beam hardening correction methods have been developed, independently, and rarely combined with low-dose CT reconstruction. In this paper, we combine scatter suppression with beam hardening correction for sparse-view CT reconstruction to improve CT image quality and reduce CT radiation. Firstly, scatter was measured, estimated, and removed using measurement-based methods, assuming that signal in the lead blocker shadow is only attributable to x-ray scatter. Secondly, beam hardening was modeled by estimating an equivalent attenuation coefficient at the effective energy, which was integrated into the forward projector of the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART). Finally, the compressed sensing (CS) iterative reconstruction is carried out for sparse-view CT reconstruction to reduce the CT radiation. Preliminary Monte Carlo simulated experiments indicate that with only about 25% of conventional dose, our method reduces the magnitude of cupping artifact by a factor of 6.1, increases the contrast by a factor of 1.4 and the CNR by a factor of 15. The proposed method could provide good reconstructed image from a few view projections, with effective suppression of artifacts caused by scatter and beam hardening, as well as reducing the radiation dose. With this proposed framework and modeling, it may provide a new way for low-dose CT imaging.

  9. A real-time regional adaptive exposure method for saving dose-area product in x-ray fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Burion, Steve; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Reduction of radiation dose in x-ray imaging has been recognized as a high priority in the medical community. Here the authors show that a regional adaptive exposure method can reduce dose-area product (DAP) in x-ray fluoroscopy. The authors' method is particularly geared toward providing dose savings for the pediatric population. Methods: The scanning beam digital x-ray system uses a large-area x-ray source with 8000 focal spots in combination with a small photon-counting detector. An imaging frame is obtained by acquiring and reconstructing up to 8000 detector images, each viewing only a small portion of the patient. Regional adaptive exposure was implemented by varying the exposure of the detector images depending on the local opacity of the object. A family of phantoms ranging in size from infant to obese adult was imaged in anteroposterior view with and without adaptive exposure. The DAP delivered to each phantom was measured in each case, and noise performance was compared by generating noise arrays to represent regional noise in the images. These noise arrays were generated by dividing the image into regions of about 6 mm{sup 2}, calculating the relative noise in each region, and placing the relative noise value of each region in a one-dimensional array (noise array) sorted from highest to lowest. Dose-area product savings were calculated as the difference between the ratio of DAP with adaptive exposure to DAP without adaptive exposure. The authors modified this value by a correction factor that matches the noise arrays where relative noise is the highest to report a final dose-area product savings. Results: The average dose-area product saving across the phantom family was (42 {+-} 8)% with the highest dose-area product saving in the child-sized phantom (50%) and the lowest in the phantom mimicking an obese adult (23%). Conclusions: Phantom measurements indicate that a regional adaptive exposure method can produce large DAP savings without

  10. The effects of device position on the operator's radiation dose when using a handheld portable X-ray device.

    PubMed

    Makdissi, Jimmy; Pawar, Ravikiran R; Johnson, Ben; Chong, Bun S

    2016-01-01

    Handheld X-ray devices are now offered in dental practice. Handheld X-ray units challenge the concept of a restricted access to the "controlled area" as they are held by the operator. Although an integral lead shield is provided, the distance from the body is variable, dependent on how the device is held. The aim of this article was to investigate the level of operator dose when using a handheld X-ray device in various positions. A NOMAD Pro™ Handheld X-ray system (Aribex Inc., Charlotte, NC) fitted with a remote control and mounted on a tripod was used in this study. A maxillofacial phantom ATOM(®) Max Dental and Diagnostic Phantom, model 711 HN (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA) was used to simulate the patient's head position. A mannequin was used to represent the operator. Pre-calibrated thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) (Qados, Agar Scientific, Stansted, UK) were placed on the mannequin close to the eyes and at the level of thyroid, trunk, waist, hand (right finger + left palm) and feet, and three TLDs were used for background radiation. Three test scenarios were investigated; Position 1, close to operators' body and parallel to the ground; Position 2, away from the body with the arms fully extended (approximately 40 cm distance) and parallel to the ground; Position 3, perpendicular to the ground while the arms are partially extended. 30 exposures each of 1 s were performed in each test. Background radiation was measured at 0.0110 mGy. The highest exposure after subtracting background radiation was recorded on the palm of the left hand (0.0310 mGy) at Position 3. The estimated dose to the operator was calculated based on an average workload of 100 intraoral radiographs weekly for a dental practitioner working 46 weeks a year. There is a negligible increase in operator exposure levels using handheld X-ray devices which remain well below the recommended levels of the Ionizing Radiation Regulations 1999. They could however represent an increase from what

  11. The effects of device position on the operator's radiation dose when using a handheld portable X-ray device

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Ravikiran R; Johnson, Ben; Chong, Bun S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Handheld X-ray devices are now offered in dental practice. Handheld X-ray units challenge the concept of a restricted access to the “controlled area” as they are held by the operator. Although an integral lead shield is provided, the distance from the body is variable, dependent on how the device is held. The aim of this article was to investigate the level of operator dose when using a handheld X-ray device in various positions. Material and Methods: A NOMAD Pro™ Handheld X-ray system (Aribex Inc., Charlotte, NC) fitted with a remote control and mounted on a tripod was used in this study. A maxillofacial phantom ATOM® Max Dental and Diagnostic Phantom, model 711 HN (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA) was used to simulate the patient's head position. A mannequin was used to represent the operator. Pre-calibrated thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) (Qados, Agar Scientific, Stansted, UK) were placed on the mannequin close to the eyes and at the level of thyroid, trunk, waist, hand (right finger + left palm) and feet, and three TLDs were used for background radiation. Three test scenarios were investigated; Position 1, close to operators' body and parallel to the ground; Position 2, away from the body with the arms fully extended (approximately 40 cm distance) and parallel to the ground; Position 3, perpendicular to the ground while the arms are partially extended. 30 exposures each of 1 s were performed in each test. Results: Background radiation was measured at 0.0110 mGy. The highest exposure after subtracting background radiation was recorded on the palm of the left hand (0.0310 mGy) at Position 3. The estimated dose to the operator was calculated based on an average workload of 100 intraoral radiographs weekly for a dental practitioner working 46 weeks a year. Conclusions: There is a negligible increase in operator exposure levels using handheld X-ray devices which remain well below the recommended levels of the Ionizing Radiation

  12. Impact of x-ray dose on the CR-39 response to 1-9 MeV protons with application to proton spectroscopy at OMEGA and NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Herrera, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A.; Rosenberg, M.; Sio, H.

    2014-10-01

    CR-39 is a clear plastic nuclear track detector utilized in many nuclear diagnostics fielded in large-scale inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray fluences in ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. A thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray machine was used to expose CR-39 to various x-ray doses to determine their impact on the CR-39 response to protons. This x-ray machine emits Cu- α line-radiation at 8 keV and has been absolutely calibrated using radiochromic film. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to D3He-protons generated by the MIT Linear Electrostatic Ion Accelerator. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed to x-rays. For example, a dose of 60 +/- 1.3 Gy results in a decrease of 53% in the track diameter, while a dose of 5 +/- 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of 7.5% in the track diameter. Doses of approximately 5Gy are typical on CR-39 detectors used to diagnose ICF implosions at OMEGA and the NIF. The resulting data will be used to evaluate how x-ray doses received by CR-39 in OMEGA and NIF experiments affect the recorded data. This undergraduate research was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, NLUF, LLE, and LLNL.

  13. Comparison of effective radiation doses from X-ray, CT, and PET/CT in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma using a dose monitoring program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeun Yoon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the use of a dose monitoring program for calculating and comparing the diagnostic radiation doses in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed diagnostic and therapeutic imaging studies performed on pediatric patients with neuroblastoma from 2003 to 2014. We calculated the mean effective dose per exam for X-ray, conventional computed tomography (CT), and CT of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) from the data collected using a dose monitoring program (DoseTrack group) since October 2012. Using the data, we estimated the cumulative dose per person and the relative dose from each modality in all patients (Total group). The effective dose from PET was manually calculated for all patients. RESULTS We included 63 patients with a mean age of 3.2±3.5 years; 28 had a history of radiation therapy, with a mean irradiated dose of 31.9±23.2 Gy. The mean effective dose per exam was 0.04±0.19 mSv for X-ray, 1.09±1.11 mSv for CT, and 8.35±7.45 mSv for CT of PET/CT in 31 patients of the Dose-Track group. The mean estimated cumulative dose per patient in the Total group was 3.43±2.86 mSv from X-ray (8.5%), 7.66±6.09 mSv from CT (19.1%), 18.35±13.52 mSv from CT of PET/CT (45.7%), and 10.71±10.05 mSv from PET (26.7%). CONCLUSION CT of PET/CT contributed nearly half of the total cumulative dose in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. The radiation dose from X-ray was not negligible because of the large number of X-ray images. A dose monitoring program can be useful for calculating radiation doses in patients with cancer. PMID:27306659

  14. Comparison of effective radiation doses from X-ray, CT, and PET/CT in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma using a dose monitoring program.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeun Yoon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Myung Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the use of a dose monitoring program for calculating and comparing the diagnostic radiation doses in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. We retrospectively reviewed diagnostic and therapeutic imaging studies performed on pediatric patients with neuroblastoma from 2003 to 2014. We calculated the mean effective dose per exam for X-ray, conventional computed tomography (CT), and CT of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) from the data collected using a dose monitoring program (DoseTrack group) since October 2012. Using the data, we estimated the cumulative dose per person and the relative dose from each modality in all patients (Total group). The effective dose from PET was manually calculated for all patients. We included 63 patients with a mean age of 3.2±3.5 years; 28 had a history of radiation therapy, with a mean irradiated dose of 31.9±23.2 Gy. The mean effective dose per exam was 0.04±0.19 mSv for X-ray, 1.09±1.11 mSv for CT, and 8.35±7.45 mSv for CT of PET/CT in 31 patients of the DoseTrack group. The mean estimated cumulative dose per patient in the Total group was 3.43±2.86 mSv from X-ray (8.5%), 7.66±6.09 mSv from CT (19.1%), 18.35±13.52 mSv from CT of PET/CT (45.7%), and 10.71±10.05 mSv from PET (26.7%). CT of PET/CT contributed nearly half of the total cumulative dose in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. The radiation dose from X-ray was not negligible because of the large number of X-ray images. A dose monitoring program can be useful for calculating radiation doses in patients with cancer.

  15. Low-dose phase-based X-ray imaging techniques for in situ soft tissue engineering assessments.

    PubMed

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Honaramooz, Ali; Wiebe, Sheldon; Belev, George; Chen, Xiongbiao; Chapman, Dean

    2016-03-01

    In tissue engineering, non-invasive imaging of biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in living systems is essential to longitudinal animal studies for assessments without interrupting the repair process. Conventional X-ray imaging is inadequate for use in soft tissue engineering due to the limited absorption difference between the soft tissue and biomaterial scaffolds. X-ray phase-based imaging techniques that derive contrast from refraction or phase effects rather than absorption can provide the necessary contrast to see low-density biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in large living systems. This paper explores and compares three synchrotron phase-based X-ray imaging techniques-computed tomography (CT)-diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), -analyzer based imaging (ABI), and -phase contrast imaging (PCI)-for visualization and characterization of low-density biomaterial scaffolds and tissues in situ for non-invasive soft tissue engineering assessments. Intact pig joints implanted with polycaprolactone scaffolds were used as the model to assess and compare the imaging techniques in terms of different qualitative and quantitative criteria. For long-term in vivo live animal imaging, different strategies for reducing the imaging radiation dose and scan time-reduced number of CT projections, region of interest, and low resolution imaging-were examined with the presented phase-based imaging techniques. The results demonstrated promising capabilities of the phase-based techniques for visualization of biomaterial scaffolds and soft tissues in situ. The low-dose imaging strategies were illustrated effective for reducing the radiation dose to levels appropriate for live animal imaging. The comparison among the imaging techniques suggested that CT-DEI has the highest efficiency in retaining image contrast at considerably low radiation doses.

  16. Impact of new X-ray technology on patient dose in pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantations.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Joris D; Ottervanger, Jan Paul; Delnoy, Peter Paul H M; Lagerweij, Martine C M; Knollema, Siert; Slump, Cornelis H; Jager, Pieter L

    2017-01-01

    New X-ray technology providing new image processing techniques may reduce radiation exposure. The aim of this study was to quantify this radiation exposure reduction for patients during pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation. In this retrospective study, 1185 consecutive patients who had undergone de novo pacemaker or ICD implantation during a 2-year period were included. All implantations in the first year were performed using the reference technology (Allura Xper), whereas in the second year, the new X-ray technology (AlluraClarity) was used. Radiation exposure, expressed as the dose area product (DAP), was compared between the two time periods to determine the radiation exposure reduction for pacemaker and ICD implantations without cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) and with CRT. Procedure duration and contrast volume were used as measures to compare complexity and image quality. The study population consisted of 591 patients who had undergone an implantation using the reference technology, and 594 patients with the new X-ray technology. The two groups did not differ in age, gender, or body mass index. The DAP decreased with 69 % from 16.4 ± 18.5 to 5.2 ± 6.6 Gy cm(2) for the non-CRT implantations (p < 0.001). The DAP decreased with 75 % from 72.1 ± 60.0 to 17.8 ± 17.4 Gy cm(2) for the CRT implantations (p < 0.001). Nevertheless, procedure duration and contrast volume did not differ when using the new technology (p = 0.09 and p = 0.20, respectively). Introduction of new X-ray technology resulted in a radiation exposure reduction of more than 69 % for patients during pacemaker and ICD implantation while image quality was unaffected.

  17. Early effects of low dose 12C6+ ion or X-ray irradiation on human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingtai; Li, Yumin; Zhang, Hong; Xie, Yi; Chen, Xuezhong; Ren, Jinyu; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Zijiang; Liu, Hongliang; Zhang, Yawei

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the acute effects of low dose 12C6+ ions or X-ray radiation on human immune function. The human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) of seven healthy donors were exposed to 0.05 Gy 12C6+ ions or X-ray radiation and cell responses were measured at 24 h after exposure. The cytotoxic activities of HPBL were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT); the percentages of T and NK cells subsets were detected by flow cytometry; mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ were examined by real time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR); and these cytokines protein levels in supernatant of cultured cells were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The results showed that the cytotoxic activity of HPBL, mRNA expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α in HPBL and their protein levels in supernatant were significantly increased at 24 h after exposure to 0.05 Gy 12C6+ ions radiation and the effects were stronger than observed for X-ray exposure. However, there was no significant change in the percentage of T and NK cells subsets of HPBL. These results suggested that 0.05 Gy high linear energy transfer (LET) 12C6+ radiation was a more effective approach to host immune enhancement than that of low LET X-ray. We conclude that cytokines production might be used as sensitive indicators of acute response to LDI.

  18. Simultaneous UV and X-ray Spectroscopy of the Seyfert 1 Galaxy NGC 5548. I: Physical Conditions in the UV Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.; Gabel, J. R.; Kaastra, J. S.; Steenbrugge, K. C.; Brinkman, A. C.; Dunn, J. P.; George, I. M.; Liedahl, D. A.; Paerels, F. B. S.

    2003-01-01

    We present new UV spectra of the nucleus of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548, which we obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph at high spectral resolution, in conjunction with simultaneous Chandra X-ray Observatory spectra. Taking advantage of the low UV continuum and broad emission-line fluxes, we have determined that the deepest UV absorption component covers at least a portion of the inner, high-ionization narrow-line region (NLR). We find nonunity covering factors in the cores of several kinematic components, which increase the column density measurements of N V and C IV by factors of 1.2 to 1.9 over the full-covering case; however, the revised columns have only a minor effect on the parameters derived from our photoionization models. For the first time, we have simultaneous N V and C IV columns for component 1 (at -1040 km/s), and find that this component cannot be an X-ray warm absorber, contrary to our previous claim based on nonsimultaneous observations. We find that models of the absorbers based on solar abundances severely overpredict the O VI columns previously obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectrograph, and present arguments that this is not likely due to variability. However, models that include either enhanced nitrogen (twice solar) or dust, with strong depletion of carbon in either case, are successful in matching all of the observed ionic columns. These models result in substantially lower ionization parameters and total column densities compared to dust-free solar-abundance models, and produce little O VII or O VIII, indicating that none of the UV absorbers are X-ray warm absorbers.

  19. Experimental evaluation of the image quality and dose in digital mammography: Influence of x-ray spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomal, A.; Perez, A. M. M. M.; Silva, M. C.; Poletti, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we studied experimentally the influence of x-ray spectrum on the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the average glandular dose (MDG) for two digital mammography systems: Senographe 2000D (GE Medical Systems) and Lorad Selenia (Hologic), with indirect and direct detector imaging technology, respectively. CNR and MGD were determined using PMMA phantoms simulating breasts with thicknesses of 4 cm and 6 cm. All available anode/filter combinations of the systems were evaluated for a wide range of tube voltages values. Results indicated that the Rh/Rh combination provides the highest image quality with the lower mean glandular dose for the Senographe 2000D system. For the Lorad Selenia system, the W/Ag combination at 30 kV showed the best performance, in terms of dose saving and image quality improvement in relation to all tube voltage range. The comparison between the optimal x-ray spectra and those selected by the AEC mode showed that this automatic selection mechanism could be readjusted to optimize the relationship between image quality and dose.

  20. X-ray calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    X-ray calorimeter instruments for astrophysics have seen rapid development since they were invented in 1984. The prime instrument on all currently planned X-ray spectroscopic observatories is based on calorimeter technology. This relatively simple detection concept that senses the energy of an incident photon by measuring the temperature rise of an absorber material at very low temperatures can form the basis of a very high-performance, non-dispersive spectrometer. State-of-theart calorimeter instruments have resolving powers of over 3000, large simultaneous bandpasses, and near unit efficiency. This coupled with the intrinsic imaging capability of a pixilated X-ray calorimeter array, allows true spectral-spatial instruments to be constructed. This chapter briefly reviews the detection scheme, the state of the art in X-ray calorimeter instruments and the future outlook for this technology.

  1. Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1–5.5 MeV alphas

    DOE PAGES

    Rojas-Herrera, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; ...

    2015-03-01

    The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics fielded at inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray uences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-Kα and Kβ x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1-5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed tomore » x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0 ± 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 ± 2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 ± 1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 ± 5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual effect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.« less

  2. Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1–5.5 MeV alphas

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas-Herrera, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Orozco, D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-03-01

    The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics fielded at inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray uences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-Kα and Kβ x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1-5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed to x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0 ± 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 ± 2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 ± 1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 ± 5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual effect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.

  3. Comprehensive assessment of patient image quality and radiation dose in latest generation cardiac x-ray equipment for percutaneous coronary interventions.

    PubMed

    Gislason-Lee, Amber J; Keeble, Claire; Egleston, Daniel; Bexon, Josephine; Kengyelics, Stephen M; Davies, Andrew G

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to determine whether a reduction in radiation dose was found for percutaneous coronary interventional (PCI) patients using a cardiac interventional x-ray system with state-of-the-art image enhancement and x-ray optimization, compared to the current generation x-ray system, and to determine the corresponding impact on clinical image quality. Patient procedure dose area product (DAP) and fluoroscopy duration of 131 PCI patient cases from each x-ray system were compared using a Wilcoxon test on median values. Significant reductions in patient dose ([Formula: see text]) were found for the new system with no significant change in fluoroscopy duration ([Formula: see text]); procedure DAP reduced by 64%, fluoroscopy DAP by 51%, and "cine" acquisition DAP by 76%. The image quality of 15 patient angiograms from each x-ray system (30 total) was scored by 75 clinical professionals on a continuous scale for the ability to determine the presence and severity of stenotic lesions; image quality scores were analyzed using a two-sample [Formula: see text]-test. Image quality was reduced by 9% ([Formula: see text]) for the new x-ray system. This demonstrates a substantial reduction in patient dose, from acquisition more than fluoroscopy imaging, with slightly reduced image quality, for the new x-ray system compared to the current generation system.

  4. A biosafety evaluation of synchrotron radiation X-ray to skin and bone marrow: single dose irradiation study of rats and macaques.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yifan; Tang, Guanghui; Lin, Hui; Lin, Xiaojie; Jiang, Lu; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Wang, Yongting

    2017-06-01

    Very limited experimental data is available regarding the safe dosages related to synchrotron radiation (SR) procedures. We used young rats and macaques to address bone marrow and skin tolerance to various doses of synchrotron radiation. Rats were subjected to 0, 0.5, 2.5, 5, 25 or 100 Gy local SR X-ray irradiation at left hind limb. Rat blood samples were analyzed at 2-90 days after irradiation. The SR X-ray irradiated skin and tibia were sectioned for morphological examination. For non-human primate study, three male macaques were subjected to 0.5 or 2.5 Gy SR X-ray on crus. Skin responses of macaques were observed. All rats that received SR X-ray irradiation doses greater than 2.5 Gy experienced hair loss and bone-growth inhibition, which were accompanied by decreased number of follicles, thickened epidermal layer, and decreased density of bone marrow cells (p < 0.05). Macaque skin could tolerate 0.5 Gy SR X-ray but showed significant hair loss when the dose was raised above 2.5 Gy. The safety threshold doses of SR X-ray for rat skin, bone marrow and macaque skin are between 0.5 and 2.5 Gy. Our study provided essential information regarding the biosafety of SR X-ray irradiation.

  5. Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1–5.5 MeV alphas

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas-Herrera, J. Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Orozco, D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-03-15

    The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics fielded at inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray fluences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-K{sub α} and K{sub β} x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1–5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed to x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0 ± 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 ± 2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 ± 1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 ± 5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual effect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.

  6. Photon extremity absorbed dose and kerma conversion coefficients for calibration geometries.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G; Hertel, N E

    2007-02-01

    Absorbed dose and dose equivalent conversion coefficients are routinely used in personnel dosimetry programs. These conversion coefficients can be applied to particle fluences or to measured air kerma values to determine appropriate operational monitoring quantities such as the ambient dose equivalent or personal dose equivalent for a specific geometry. For personnel directly handling materials, the absorbed dose to the extremities is of concern. This work presents photon conversion coefficients for two extremity calibration geometries using finger and wrist/arm phantoms described in HPS N13.32. These conversion coefficients have been calculated as a function of photon energy in terms of the kerma and the absorbed dose using Monte Carlo techniques and the calibration geometries specified in HPS N13.32. Additionally, kerma and absorbed dose conversion coefficients for commonly used x-ray spectra and calibration source fields are presented. The kerma values calculated in this work for the x-ray spectra and calibration sources compare well to those listed in HPS N13.32. The absorbed dose values, however, differ significantly for higher energy photons because charged particle equilibrium conditions have not been satisfied for the shallow depth. Thus, the air-kerma-to-dose and exposure-to-dose conversion coefficients for Cs and Co listed in HPS N13.32 overestimate the absorbed dose to the extremities. Applying the conversion coefficients listed in HPS N13.32 for Cs, for example, would result in an overestimate of absorbed dose of 62% for the finger phantom and 55% for the wrist phantom.

  7. Abdominal pediatric cancer surveillance using serial computed tomography: evaluation of organ absorbed dose and effective dose.

    PubMed

    Lam, Diana; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L; McGahan, John P; Stern, Robin; Boone, John M

    2011-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is used extensively in cancer diagnosis, staging, evaluation of response to treatment, and in active surveillance for cancer reoccurrence. A review of CT technology is provided, at a level of detail appropriate for a busy clinician to review. The basis of x-ray CT dosimetry is also discussed, and concepts of absorbed dose and effective dose (ED) are distinguished. Absorbed dose is a physical quantity (measured in milligray [mGy]) equal to the x-ray energy deposited in a mass of tissue, whereas ED uses an organ-specific weighting method that converts organ doses to ED measured in millisieverts (mSv). The organ weighting values carry with them a measure of radiation risk, and so ED (in mSv) is not a physical dose metric but rather is one that conveys radiation risk. The use of CT in a cancer surveillance protocol was used as an example of a pediatric patient who had kidney cancer, with surgery and radiation therapy. The active use of CT for cancer surveillance along with diagnostic CT scans led to a total of 50 CT scans performed on this child in a 7-year period. It was estimated that the patient received an average organ dose of 431 mGy from these CT scans. By comparison, the radiation therapy was performed and delivered 50.4 Gy to the patient's abdomen. Thus, the total dose from CT represented only 0.8% of the patient's radiation dose. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. X-ray image intensifier performance and patient doses for combinations of supplemental beam filters and vascular contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McParland, Brian J.; Boyd, Mark M.

    2001-01-01

    We present an investigation of the fluoroscopic imaging and dosimetric performances of iodine- and gadolinium-based vascular contrast agents in combination with K-absorption edge filters of atomic numbers between 50 (tin) and 82 (lead). These combinations were studied using a theoretical model for a range of diagnostic x-ray spectra (55 to 100 kVp) and for water phantoms representative of thin and thick anatomies. Performance was characterized by radiographic contrast, a derived image quality index, the patient integral and entrance skin doses, and the x-ray tube load. For a given thickness of anatomy, an optimum combination of spectrum kVp, contrast agent and supplemental filter was defined by maximum imaging performance for a minimum or tolerable x-ray tube load and patient dose. It was possible to both improve imaging performance and reduce dose by the use of an appropriate combination of spectrum kVp and filter. For gadolinium-based contrast, performance was optimized with tungsten filtration at 90 kVp for both thin and thick anatomies. It was not possible, however, to optimize the iodinated contrast performance with a single combination of supplemental filter and spectrum kVp. The optimal performance for iodinated contrast was achieved with gadolinium filtration at 60 kVp for thin anatomy and with ytterbium filtration at 80 kVp for thick anatomy. The best performance for thin anatomy was that of the combination of iodinated contrast/gadolinium filter at 60 kVp and the best performance for thick anatomy was that of the combination of gadolinium-based contrast/tungsten filter at 90 kVp.

  9. X-ray image intensifier performance and patient doses for combinations of supplemental beam filters and vascular contrast agents.

    PubMed

    McParland, B J; Boyd, M M

    2001-01-01

    We present an investigation of the fluoroscopic imaging and dosimetric performances of iodine- and gadolinium-based vascular contrast agents in combination with K-absorption edge filters of atomic numbers between 50 (tin) and 82 (lead). These combinations were studied using a theoretical model for a range of diagnostic x-ray spectra (55 to 100 kVp) and for water phantoms representative of thin and thick anatomies. Performance was characterized by radiographic contrast, a derived image quality index, the patient integral and entrance skin doses, and the x-ray tube load. For a given thickness of anatomy, an optimum combination of spectrum kVp, contrast agent and supplemental filter was defined by maximum imaging performance for a minimum or tolerable x-ray tube load and patient dose. It was possible to both improve imaging performance and reduce dose by the use of an appropriate combination of spectrum kVp and filter. For gadolinium-based contrast, performance was optimized with tungsten filtration at 90 kVp for both thin and thick anatomies. It was not possible, however, to optimize the iodinated contrast performance with a single combination of supplemental filter and spectrum kVp. The optimal performance for iodinated contrast was achieved with gadolinium filtration at 60 kVp for thin anatomy and with ytterbium filtration at 80 kVp for thick anatomy. The best performance for thin anatomy was that of the combination of iodinated contrast/gadolinium filter at 60 kVp and the best performance for thick anatomy was that of the combination of gadolinium-based contrast/tungsten filter at 90 kVp.

  10. Insights into spray development from metered-dose inhalers through quantitative X-ray radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Mason-Smith, Nicholas; Duke, Daniel J.; Kastengren, Alan L.; Stewart, Peter J; Traini, Daniela; Young, Paul M; Chen, Yang; Lewis, David; Soria, Julio; Edgington-Mitchell, Daniel M; Honnery, Damon R

    2016-05-01

    Typical methods to study pMDI sprays employ particle sizing or visible light diagnostics, which suffer in regions of high spray density. X-ray techniques can be applied to pharmaceutical sprays to obtain information unattainable by conventional particle sizing and light-based techniques. We present a technique for obtaining quantitative measurements of spray density in pMDI sprays. A monochromatic focused X-ray beam was used to perform quantitative radiography measurements in the near-nozzle region and plume of HFA-propelled sprays. Measurements were obtained with a temporal resolution of 0.184 ms and spatial resolution of 5 mu m. Steady flow conditions were reached after around 30 ms for the formulations examined with the spray device used. Spray evolution was affected by the inclusion of ethanol in the formulation and unaffected by the inclusion of 0.1% drug by weight. Estimation of the nozzle exit density showed that vapour is likely to dominate the flow leaving the inhaler nozzle during steady flow. Quantitative measurements in pMDI sprays allow the determination of nozzle exit conditions that are difficult to obtain experimentally by other means. Measurements of these nozzle exit conditions can improve understanding of the atomization mechanisms responsible for pMDI spray droplet and particle formation.

  11. [Comparison of chest and abdominal x-ray radiation dose and its image quality-a multi-center study].

    PubMed

    Uto, Tomoyuki; Ishiyama, Akihiro; Kimura, Hiroya; Katuragi, Yuji; Masunari, Toyokazu; Shibutani, Takayuki; Ishiki, Koichi; Nakanishi, Ken; Anai, Tatuya; Sumida, Shigeru; Morimatu, Takashi; Miyano, Hideto

    2011-01-01

    While radiography provides us clinically valuable information, it increases the risk of radiation exposure. Previous studies have reported great variations in radiation doses among institutions. It is concerning that radiation doses will increase and vary greatly from institution to institution when digital radiographic modalities become more common. In the present study, we measured chest and abdominal radiation doses at 10 institutions that had X-ray digital imaging systems. Differences in radiation doses among the institutions were evaluated and compared with the previous reports. The image quality at the measured radiation doses were also evaluated. The doses were measured by the same dosimeter, and the image quality at a specific dose was evaluated using the standard deviation of the digital values and Wiener spectrum. Our results indicate that the difference in radiation among institutions was approximately five-fold at a maximum and smaller than the previous reports had indicated. The image quality was improved as the dose was increased. We considered the five-fold difference to be the result of variations in optimum image quality and associated radiation doses among institutions. In summary, evaluating the radiation dose along with the image quality is important to optimize the doses.

  12. The Swift Burst Alert Telescope Detected Seyfert 1 Galaxies: X-Ray Broadband Properties and Warm Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Lisa M.; Veilleux, Sylvain; McKernan, Barry; Kallman, T.

    2012-01-01

    We present results from an analysis of the broadband, 0.3-195 keV, X-ray spectra of 48 Seyfert 1-1.5 sources detected in the very hard X-rays with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). This sample is selected in an all-sky survey conducted in the 14-195 keV band. Therefore, our sources are largely unbiased toward both obscuration and host galaxy properties. Our detailed and uniform model fits to Suzaku/BAT and XMM-Newton/BAT spectra include the neutral absorption, direct power-law, reflected emission, soft excess, warm absorption, and narrow Fe I K[alpha] emission properties for the entire sample. We significantly detect O VII and O VIII edges in 52% of our sample. The strength of these detections is strongly correlated with the neutral column density measured in the spectrum. Among the strongest detections, X-ray grating and UV observations, where available, indicate outflowing material. The ionized column densities of sources with O VII and O VIII detections are clustered in a narrow range with Nwarm [approx] 1021 cm-2, while sources without strong detections have column densities of ionized gas an order of magnitude lower. Therefore, we note that sources without strong detections likely have warm ionized outflows present but at low column densities that are not easily probed with current X-ray observations. Sources with strong complex absorption have a strong soft excess, which may or may not be due to difficulties in modeling the complex spectra of these sources. Still, the detection of a flat [Gamma] [approx] 1 and a strong soft excess may allow us to infer the presence of strong absorption in low signal-to-noise active galactic nucleus spectra. Additionally, we include a useful correction from the Swift BAT luminosity to bolometric luminosity, based on a comparison of our spectral fitting results with published spectral energy distribution fits from 33 of our sources.

  13. The Swift Burst Alert Telescope Detected Seyfert 1 Galaxies: X-Ray Broadband Properties and Warm Absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Lisa M.; Veilleux, Sylvain; McKernan, Barry; Kallman, T.

    2012-01-01

    We present results from an analysis of the broadband, 0.3-195 keV, X-ray spectra of 48 Seyfert 1-1.5 sources detected in the very hard X-rays with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). This sample is selected in an all-sky survey conducted in the 14-195 keV band. Therefore, our sources are largely unbiased toward both obscuration and host galaxy properties. Our detailed and uniform model fits to Suzaku/BAT and XMM-Newton/BAT spectra include the neutral absorption, direct power-law, reflected emission, soft excess, warm absorption, and narrow Fe I K[alpha] emission properties for the entire sample. We significantly detect O VII and O VIII edges in 52% of our sample. The strength of these detections is strongly correlated with the neutral column density measured in the spectrum. Among the strongest detections, X-ray grating and UV observations, where available, indicate outflowing material. The ionized column densities of sources with O VII and O VIII detections are clustered in a narrow range with Nwarm [approx] 1021 cm-2, while sources without strong detections have column densities of ionized gas an order of magnitude lower. Therefore, we note that sources without strong detections likely have warm ionized outflows present but at low column densities that are not easily probed with current X-ray observations. Sources with strong complex absorption have a strong soft excess, which may or may not be due to difficulties in modeling the complex spectra of these sources. Still, the detection of a flat [Gamma] [approx] 1 and a strong soft excess may allow us to infer the presence of strong absorption in low signal-to-noise active galactic nucleus spectra. Additionally, we include a useful correction from the Swift BAT luminosity to bolometric luminosity, based on a comparison of our spectral fitting results with published spectral energy distribution fits from 33 of our sources.

  14. Quantitative comparison of dose distribution in radiotherapy plans using 2D gamma maps and X-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Balosso, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Background The advanced dose calculation algorithms implemented in treatment planning system (TPS) have remarkably improved the accuracy of dose calculation especially the modeling of electrons transport in the low density medium. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of 2D gamma (γ) index to quantify and evaluate the impact of the calculation of electrons transport on dose distribution for lung radiotherapy. Methods X-ray computed tomography images were used to calculate the dose for twelve radiotherapy treatment plans. The doses were originally calculated with Modified Batho (MB) 1D density correction method, and recalculated with anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), using the same prescribed dose. Dose parameters derived from dose volume histograms (DVH) and target coverage indices were compared. To compare dose distribution, 2D γ-index was applied, ranging from 1%/1 mm to 6%/6 mm. The results were displayed using γ-maps in 2D. Correlation between DVH metrics and γ passing rates was tested using Spearman’s rank test and Wilcoxon paired test to calculate P values. Results the plans generated with AAA predicted more heterogeneous dose distribution inside the target, with P<0.05. However, MB overestimated the dose predicting more coverage of the target by the prescribed dose. The γ analysis showed that the difference between MB and AAA could reach up to ±10%. The 2D γ-maps illustrated that AAA predicted more dose to organs at risks, as well as lower dose to the target compared to MB. Conclusions Taking into account of the electrons transport on radiotherapy plans showed a significant impact on delivered dose and dose distribution. When considering the AAA represent the true cumulative dose, a readjusting of the prescribed dose and an optimization to protect the organs at risks should be taken in consideration in order to obtain the better clinical outcome. PMID:27429908

  15. Evaluation of a new very low dose imaging protocol: feasibility and impact on X-ray dose levels in electrophysiology procedures.

    PubMed

    Bourier, Felix; Reents, Tilko; Ammar-Busch, Sonia; Buiatti, Alessandra; Kottmaier, Marc; Semmler, Verena; Telishevska, Marta; Brkic, Amir; Grebmer, Christian; Lennerz, Carsten; Kolb, Christof; Hessling, Gabriele; Deisenhofer, Isabel

    2016-09-01

    This study presents and evaluates the impact of a new lowest-dose fluoroscopy protocol (Siemens AG), especially designed for electrophysiology (EP) procedures, on X-ray dose levels. From October 2014 to March 2015, 140 patients underwent an EP study on an Artis zee angiography system. The standard low-dose protocol was operated at 23 nGy (fluoroscopy) and at 120 nGy (cine-loop), the new lowest-dose protocol was operated at 8 nGy (fluoroscopy) and at 36 nGy (cine-loop). Procedural data, X-ray times, and doses were analysed in 100 complex left atrial and in 40 standard EP procedures. The resulting dose-area products were 877.9 ± 624.7 µGym² (n = 50 complex procedures, standard low dose), 199 ± 159.6 µGym² (n = 50 complex procedures, lowest dose), 387.7 ± 36.0 µGym² (n = 20 standard procedures, standard low dose), and 90.7 ± 62.3 µGym² (n = 20 standard procedures, lowest dose), P < 0.01. In the low-dose and lowest-dose groups, procedure times were 132.6 ± 35.7 vs. 126.7 ± 34.7 min (P = 0.40, complex procedures) and 72.3 ± 20.9 vs. 85.2 ± 44.1 min (P = 0.24, standard procedures), radiofrequency (RF) times were 53.8 ± 26.1 vs. 50.4 ± 29.4 min (P = 0.54, complex procedures) and 10.1 ± 9.9 vs. 12.2 ± 14.7 min (P = 0.60, standard procedures). One complication occurred in the standard low-dose and lowest-dose groups (P = 1.0). The new lowest-dose imaging protocol reduces X-ray dose levels by 77% compared with the currently available standard low-dose protocol. From an operator standpoint, lowest X-ray dose levels create a different, reduced image quality. The new image quality did not significantly affect procedure or RF times and did not result in higher complication rates. Regarding radiological protection, operating at lowest-dose settings should become standard in EP procedures. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Accurate dosimetry in scanning transmission X-ray microscopes via the cross-linking threshold dose of poly(methyl methacrylate).

    PubMed

    Leontowich, Adam F G; Hitchcock, Adam P; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Weigand, Markus; Wang, Jian; Karunakaran, Chithra

    2012-11-01

    The sensitivity of various polymers to radiation damage by soft X-rays has been measured previously with scanning transmission X-ray microscopes. However, the critical dose values reported by different groups for the same material differ by more than 100%. Possible sources of this variability are investigated here for poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) using controlled exposure to monochromatic soft X-rays at 300 eV. Radiation sensitivity, judged by several different criteria, was evaluated as a function of dose rate, pre-exposure thermal treatments and X-ray polarization. Both the measured critical dose and the dose required to initiate negative mode (cross-linking) were observed to depend only on dose, not the other factors explored. A method of determining detector efficiency from the dose required to initiate negative mode in PMMA is outlined. This method was applied to many of the soft X-ray STXMs presently operating to derive the efficiencies of their transmitted X-ray detectors in the C 1s absorption-edge region.

  17. Applications of nonlocal means algorithm in low-dose X-ray CT image processing and reconstruction: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Zeng, Dong; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Jing; Liang, Zhengrong; Ma, Jianhua

    2017-03-01

    Low-dose X-ray computed tomography (LDCT) imaging is highly recommended for use in the clinic because of growing concerns over excessive radiation exposure. However, the CT images reconstructed by the conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) method from low-dose acquisitions may be severely degraded with noise and streak artifacts due to excessive X-ray quantum noise, or with view-aliasing artifacts due to insufficient angular sampling. In 2005, the nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm was introduced as a non-iterative edge-preserving filter to denoise natural images corrupted by additive Gaussian noise, and showed superior performance. It has since been adapted and applied to many other image types and various inverse problems. This paper specifically reviews the applications of the NLM algorithm in LDCT image processing and reconstruction, and explicitly demonstrates its improving effects on the reconstructed CT image quality from low-dose acquisitions. The effectiveness of these applications on LDCT and their relative performance are described in detail.

  18. Skin dose mapping for non-uniform x-ray fields using a backscatter point spread function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, Sarath; Xiong, Zhenyu; Shankar, Alok; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2017-03-01

    Beam shaping devices like ROI attenuators and compensation filters modulate the intensity distribution of the xray beam incident on the patient. This results in a spatial variation of skin dose due to the variation of primary radiation and also a variation in backscattered radiation from the patient. To determine the backscatter component, backscatter point spread functions (PSF) are generated using EGS Monte-Carlo software. For this study, PSF's were determined by simulating a 1 mm beam incident on the lateral surface of an anthropomorphic head phantom and a 20 cm thick PMMA block phantom. The backscatter PSF's for the head phantom and PMMA phantom are curve fit with a Lorentzian function after being normalized to the primary dose intensity (PSFn). PSFn is convolved with the primary dose distribution to generate the scatter dose distribution, which is added to the primary to obtain the total dose distribution. The backscatter convolution technique is incorporated in the dose tracking system (DTS), which tracks skin dose during fluoroscopic procedures and provides a color map of the dose distribution on a 3D patient graphic model. A convolution technique is developed for the backscatter dose determination for the nonuniformly spaced graphic-model surface vertices. A Gafchromic film validation was performed for shaped x-ray beams generated with an ROI attenuator and with two compensation filters inserted into the field. The total dose distribution calculated by the backscatter convolution technique closely agreed with that measured with the film.

  19. NOTE: Variations in skin dose associated with linac bed material at 6 MV x-ray energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butson, Martin J.; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K. N.; Webb, Belinda

    2002-01-01

    Treatment with radiotherapy x-rays at 6 MV energy produces a build-up effect whereby a smaller dose is delivered to the patient's skin compared to the tumour dose. With anterior fields, no material is normally placed over the patient's skin, thus providing the maximum skin sparing possible with the beam configuration used. A posterior beam normally passes through the treatment couch top and increases the dose delivered to the patient's skin. Both the Mylar sheeting and the support ribbing material produce a significant increase in skin dose. Measurements at 6 MV have shown that the basal cell layer dose can be increased by up to 51% of maximum dose with a carbon fibre/Mylar couch and by 28% for a tennis string/Mylar couch when compared to anterior beams. These values are associated with the position of the carbon fibre or tennis string ribbing. Dermal layer doses are increased by up to 30 and 24% of maximum dose for carbon fibre and tennis string, respectively. These values include a combination of dose due to the support ribbing and the Mylar sheeting. Due to the variability in patient positioning on the couch top, these increases would be spread out over the skin surface producing an average increase per unit area at the basal layer of up to 32 and 20% of the maximum, respectively, for carbon fibre and tennis string couch tops and 21 and 12% at the dermal layer compared to dose at Dmax.

  20. Importance of dose settings in the x-ray systems used for interventional radiology: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Vano, E; Sanchez, R; Fernandez, J M; Rosales, F; Garcia, M A; Sotil, J; Hernandez, J; Carrera, F; Ciudad, J; Soler, M M; Ballester, T

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the differences in dose settings among the X-ray units involved in a national survey of patient doses in interventional radiology (IR). The survey was promoted by the National Society of IR and involved 10 centers. As part of the agreed quality control for the survey, entrance doses were measured in a 20-cm-thick acrylic phantom simulating a medium-sized patient. A standard digital subtraction angiography (DSA) imaging protocol for the abdomen was used at the different centers. The center of the phantom was placed at the isocenter of the C-arm system during the measurements to simulate clinical conditions. Units with image intensifiers and flat detectors were involved in the survey. Entrance doses for low, medium, and high fluoroscopy modes and DSA acquisitions were measured for a field of view of 20 cm (or closest). A widespread range of entrance dose values was obtained: 4.5-18.6, 9.2-28.4, and 15.4-51.5 mGy/min in low, medium, and high fluoroscopy mode, respectively, and 0.7-5.0 mGy/DSA image. The ratios between the maximum and the minimum values measured (3-4 for fluoroscopy and 7 for DSA) suggest an important margin for optimization. The calibration factor for the dose-area product meter was also included in the survey and resulted in a mean value of 0.73, with a standard deviation of 0.07. It seems clear that the dose setting for the X-ray systems used in IR requires better criteria and approaches.

  1. Importance of Dose Settings in the X-Ray Systems Used for Interventional Radiology: A National Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Vano, E. Sanchez, R.; Fernandez, J. M.; Rosales, F.; Garcia, M. A.; Sotil, J.; Hernandez, J.; Carrera, F.; Ciudad, J.; Soler, M. M.; Ballester, T.

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the differences in dose settings among the X-ray units involved in a national survey of patient doses in interventional radiology (IR). The survey was promoted by the National Society of IR and involved 10 centers. As part of the agreed quality control for the survey, entrance doses were measured in a 20-cm-thick acrylic phantom simulating a medium-sized patient. A standard digital subtraction angiography (DSA) imaging protocol for the abdomen was used at the different centers. The center of the phantom was placed at the isocenter of the C-arm system during the measurements to simulate clinical conditions. Units with image intensifiers and flat detectors were involved in the survey. Entrance doses for low, medium, and high fluoroscopy modes and DSA acquisitions were measured for a field of view of 20 cm (or closest). A widespread range of entrance dose values was obtained: 4.5-18.6, 9.2-28.4, and 15.4-51.5 mGy/min in low, medium, and high fluoroscopy mode, respectively, and 0.7-5.0 mGy/DSA image. The ratios between the maximum and the minimum values measured (3-4 for fluoroscopy and 7 for DSA) suggest an important margin for optimization. The calibration factor for the dose-area product meter was also included in the survey and resulted in a mean value of 0.73, with a standard deviation of 0.07. It seems clear that the dose setting for the X-ray systems used in IR requires better criteria and approaches.

  2. Patient radiation dose reduction using an X-ray imaging noise reduction technology for cardiac angiography and intervention.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Funatsu, Atsushi; Okada, Tadahisa; Mauti, Maria; Waizumi, Yuki; Yamada, Shinichi

    2016-05-01

    Coronary angiography and intervention can expose patients to high radiation dose. This retrospective study quantifies the patient dose reduction due to the introduction of a novel X-ray imaging noise reduction technology using advanced real-time image noise reduction algorithms and optimized acquisition chain for fluoroscopy and exposure in interventional cardiology. Patient, procedure and radiation dose data were retrospectively collected in the period August 2012-August 2013 for 883 patients treated with the image noise reduction technology (referred as "new system"). The same data were collected for 1083 patients in the period April 2011-July 2012 with a system using state-of-the-art image processing and reference acquisition chain (referred as "reference system"). Procedures were divided into diagnostic (CAG) and intervention (PCI). Acquisition parameters such as fluoroscopy time, volume of contrast medium, number of exposure images and number of stored fluoroscopy images were collected to classify procedure complexity. The procedural dose reduction was investigated separately for three main cardiologists. The new system provides significant dose reduction compared to the reference system. Median DAP values decreased for all procedures (p < 0.0001) from 172.7 to 59.4 Gy cm(2), for CAG from 155.1 to 52.0 Gy cm(2) and for PCI from 229.0 to 85.8 Gy cm(2) with reduction quantified at 66, 66 and 63 %, respectively. Based on median values, the dose reduction for all procedures was 68, 60 and 67 % for cardiologists 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The X-ray imaging technology combining advanced real-time image noise reduction algorithms and anatomy-specific optimized fluoroscopy and cine acquisition chain provides 66 % patient dose reduction in interventional cardiology.

  3. Evaluation of a new very low dose imaging protocol: feasibility and impact on X-ray dose levels in electrophysiology procedures

    PubMed Central

    Reents, Tilko; Ammar-Busch, Sonia; Buiatti, Alessandra; Kottmaier, Marc; Semmler, Verena; Telishevska, Marta; Brkic, Amir; Grebmer, Christian; Lennerz, Carsten; Kolb, Christof; Hessling, Gabriele; Deisenhofer, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study presents and evaluates the impact of a new lowest-dose fluoroscopy protocol (Siemens AG), especially designed for electrophysiology (EP) procedures, on X-ray dose levels. Methods and results From October 2014 to March 2015, 140 patients underwent an EP study on an Artis zee angiography system. The standard low-dose protocol was operated at 23 nGy (fluoroscopy) and at 120 nGy (cine-loop), the new lowest-dose protocol was operated at 8 nGy (fluoroscopy) and at 36 nGy (cine-loop). Procedural data, X-ray times, and doses were analysed in 100 complex left atrial and in 40 standard EP procedures. The resulting dose–area products were 877.9 ± 624.7 µGym² (n = 50 complex procedures, standard low dose), 199 ± 159.6 µGym² (n = 50 complex procedures, lowest dose), 387.7 ± 36.0 µGym² (n = 20 standard procedures, standard low dose), and 90.7 ± 62.3 µGym² (n = 20 standard procedures, lowest dose), P < 0.01. In the low-dose and lowest-dose groups, procedure times were 132.6 ± 35.7 vs. 126.7 ± 34.7 min (P = 0.40, complex procedures) and 72.3 ± 20.9 vs. 85.2 ± 44.1 min (P = 0.24, standard procedures), radiofrequency (RF) times were 53.8 ± 26.1 vs. 50.4 ± 29.4 min (P = 0.54, complex procedures) and 10.1 ± 9.9 vs. 12.2 ± 14.7 min (P = 0.60, standard procedures). One complication occurred in the standard low-dose and lowest-dose groups (P = 1.0). Conclusion The new lowest-dose imaging protocol reduces X-ray dose levels by 77% compared with the currently available standard low-dose protocol. From an operator standpoint, lowest X-ray dose levels create a different, reduced image quality. The new image quality did not significantly affect procedure or RF times and did not result in higher complication rates. Regarding radiological protection, operating at lowest-dose settings should become standard in EP procedures. PMID:26589627

  4. Soft versus hard X-ray emission in active galactic nuclei: partial-covering and warm-plus-cold absorber models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, M. T.; Barcons, X.

    1996-09-01

    We analyse the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) hardness ratio and the 0.5-2-keV to 2-10-keV flux ratio of 65 active galactic nuclei (AGN) for which there are both ROSAT archival observations available and 2-10-keV fluxes, mostly from the HEAO-1 MC-LASS survey. We conclude that the simplest spectral model for the AGN that can accommodate the variety of X-ray colours obtained is a standard power law (with energy spectral index alpha~0.9) plus a ~0.1-keV blackbody, both of which are partially absorbed. In our sample, type 1 AGN require an absorbing column around 10^22 cm^-2 with covering fractions between 20 and 100 per cent, while type 2 AGN display larger columns and ~100 per cent coverage. This simple model also provides a good link between soft and hard AGN X-ray luminosity functions and source counts. We also consider a warm absorber as an alternative model to partial covering and find that the presence of gas in two phases (ionized and neutral) is required.

  5. Low-Dose-Rate Computed Tomography System Utilizing 25 mm/s-Scan Silicon X-ray Diode and Its Application to Iodine K-Edge Imaging Using Filtered Bremsstrahlung Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Ryo; Sato, Eiichi; Yanbe, Yutaka; Chiba, Hiraku; Maeda, Tomoko; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2013-03-01

    A low-dose-rate X-ray computed tomography (CT) system is useful for reducing absorbed dose for patients. The CT system with a tube current of sub-mA was developed using a silicon X-ray diode (Si-XD). The Si-XD is a high-sensitivity Si photodiode (PD) selected for detecting X-ray photons, and the X-ray sensitivity of the Si-XD was twice as high as that of Si-PD cerium-doped yttrium aluminum perovskite [YAP(Ce)]. X-ray photons are directly detected using the Si-XD without a scintillator, and the photocurrent from the diode is amplified using current-voltage and voltage-voltage amplifiers. The output voltage is converted into logical pulses using a voltage-frequency converter with a maximum frequency of 500 kHz, and the frequency is proportional to the voltage. The pulses from the converter are sent to the differentiator with a time constant of 500 ns to generate short positive pulses for counting, and the pulses are counted using a counter card. Tomography is accomplished by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the linear scan. The exposure time for obtaining a tomogram was 5 min at a scan step of 0.5 mm and a rotation step of 3.0°. The tube current and voltage were 0.55 mA and 60 kV, respectively, and iodine K-edge CT was carried out using filtered bremsstrahlung X-ray spectra with a peak energy of 38 keV.

  6. Experimental assessment of the influence of beam hardening filters on image quality and patient dose in volumetric 64-slice X-ray CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Ay, Mohammad Reza; Mehranian, Abolfazl; Maleki, Asghar; Ghadiri, Hossien; Ghafarian, Pardis; Zaidi, Habib

    2013-05-01

    Beam hardening filters have long been employed in X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) to preferentially absorb soft and low-energy X-rays having no or little contribution to image formation, thus allowing the reduction of patient dose and beam hardening artefacts. In this work, we studied the influence of additional copper (Cu) and aluminium (Al) flat filters on patient dose and image quality and seek an optimum filter thickness for the GE LightSpeed VCT 64-slice CT scanner using experimental phantom measurements. Different thicknesses of Cu and Al filters (0.5-1.6mm Cu, 0.5-4mm Al) were installed on the scanner's collimator. A planar phantom consisting of 13 slabs of Cu having different thicknesses was designed and scanned to assess the impact of beam filtration on contrast in the intensity domain (CT detector's output). To assess image contrast and image noise, a cylindrical phantom consisting of a polyethylene cylinder having 16 holes filled with different concentrations of K2HPO4 solution mimicking different tissue types was used. The GE performance and the standard head CT dose index (CTDI) phantoms were also used to assess image resolution characterized by the modulation transfer function (MTF) and patient dose defined by the weighted CTDI. A 100mm pencil ionization chamber was used for CTDI measurement. Finally, an optimum filter thickness was determined from an objective figure of merit (FOM) metric. The results show that the contrast is somewhat compromised with filter thickness in both the planar and cylindrical phantoms. The contrast of the K2HPO4 solutions in the cylindrical phantom was degraded by up to 10% for a 0.68mm Cu filter and 6% for a 4.14mm Al filter. It was shown that additional filters increase image noise which impaired the detectability of low density K2HPO4 solutions. It was found that with a 0.48mm Cu filter the 50% MTF value is shifted by about 0.77lp/cm compared to the case where the filter is not used. An added Cu filter with approximately

  7. Strategies and Scientific Basis of Dose Reduction on State-of-the-Art Multirow Detector X-Ray CT Systems.

    PubMed

    Karamat, Muhammad Irfan

    2015-01-01

    The continued development in multirow detector computed tomography (MDCT) technology accompanied by tremendous enhancement in the clinical utility and rapid increase in the number of MDCT scanners worldwide are causing a steep rise in the number of diagnostic computed tomography (CT) procedures performed each year. The everincreasing use of this X-radiation-based imaging technique has raised radiation protection concerns among the clinical community and general public. To address these concerns, significant efforts have been made by the clinical community as well as industry, research, and government organizations. Because of these efforts, modern MDCT systems are now equipped with a variety of tools that can lead to "radiation dose-optimized" CT images if used properly. This review describes CT dose metrics and their limitations, radiation dose reduction techniques and strategies implemented using modern MDCT scanners, and the role of research and regulatory organizations in developing guidelines and regulations to facilitate the adoption of the dose reduction strategies. An account of further developments required to achieve submillisievert X-ray CT doses and to make X-ray CT a radiation risk-free imaging modality is also given. A detailed description of the scientific basis and controversies surrounding the linear no threshold (LNT) model, which forms the basis of all radiation dose reduction strategies, is also provided in this review. According to the LNT model, there is no amount of radiation that is safe or beneficial for human beings. Based on recent epidemiological studies, despite all of the controversies, the LNT model continues to be the basis of the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle of radiation protection framework in CT.

  8. Development of Laser Plasma X-ray Microbeam Irradiation System and Radiation Biological Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Nishikino, Masaharu; Numasaki, Hodaka; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Teshima, Teruki; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    Laser plasma x-ray source has the features such as ultra short pulse, high brilliance, monochromaticity, and focusing ability. These features are excellent compared with conventional x-ray source. In order to apply the laser plasma x-ray source to the biomedical study and to more closely research the radiobilogical responce of the cancer cell such as radiation induced bystander effect, we have developed x-ray microbeam system using laser plasma x-ray source. The absorbed dose of laser plasma x-ray was estimated with Gafchromic EBT film and DNA double strand breaks on the cells were detected by immunofluorescence staining. When the cells were irradiated with laser plasma x-ray, the circular regions existing γ-H2AX positive cells were clearly identified. The usefulness of the laser plasma x-ray on the radiobiological study was proved in this research.

  9. THE SWIFT BURST ALERT TELESCOPE DETECTED SEYFERT 1 GALAXIES: X-RAY BROADBAND PROPERTIES AND WARM ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, Lisa M.; Veilleux, Sylvain; McKernan, Barry; Kallman, T. R.

    2012-02-01

    We present results from an analysis of the broadband, 0.3-195 keV, X-ray spectra of 48 Seyfert 1-1.5 sources detected in the very hard X-rays with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). This sample is selected in an all-sky survey conducted in the 14-195 keV band. Therefore, our sources are largely unbiased toward both obscuration and host galaxy properties. Our detailed and uniform model fits to Suzaku/BAT and XMM-Newton/BAT spectra include the neutral absorption, direct power-law, reflected emission, soft excess, warm absorption, and narrow Fe I K{alpha} emission properties for the entire sample. We significantly detect O VII and O VIII edges in 52% of our sample. The strength of these detections is strongly correlated with the neutral column density measured in the spectrum. Among the strongest detections, X-ray grating and UV observations, where available, indicate outflowing material. The ionized column densities of sources with O VII and O VIII detections are clustered in a narrow range with N{sub warm} {approx} 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, while sources without strong detections have column densities of ionized gas an order of magnitude lower. Therefore, we note that sources without strong detections likely have warm ionized outflows present but at low column densities that are not easily probed with current X-ray observations. Sources with strong complex absorption have a strong soft excess, which may or may not be due to difficulties in modeling the complex spectra of these sources. Still, the detection of a flat {Gamma} {approx} 1 and a strong soft excess may allow us to infer the presence of strong absorption in low signal-to-noise active galactic nucleus spectra. Additionally, we include a useful correction from the Swift BAT luminosity to bolometric luminosity, based on a comparison of our spectral fitting results with published spectral energy distribution fits from 33 of our sources.

  10. Impact of latest generation cardiac interventional X-ray equipment on patient image quality and radiation dose for trans-catheter aortic valve implantations.

    PubMed

    Gislason-Lee, Amber J; Keeble, Claire; Malkin, Christoper J; Egleston, Daniel; Bexon, Josephine; Kengyelics, Stephen M; Blackman, Daniel; Davies, Andrew G

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the impact on radiation dose and image quality of a new cardiac interventional X-ray system for trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) patients compared to the previously-used cardiac X-ray system. Patient dose and image data were retrospectively collected from a Philips AlluraClarity (new) and Siemens Axion Artis (reference) X-ray system. Patient dose area product (DAP) and fluoroscopy duration of 41 patient cases from each X-ray system were compared using a Wilcoxon test. Ten patient aortograms from each X-ray system were scored by 32 observers on a continuous scale to assess the clinical image quality at the given phase of the TAVI procedure. Scores were dichotomised by acceptability and analysed using a Chi-squared test. Significant reductions in patient dose (p < 0.001) were found for the new system with no significant change in fluoroscopy duration (p = 0.052); procedure DAP reduced by 55%, fluoroscopy DAP by 48% and "cine" acquisition DAP by 61%. There was no significant difference between image quality scores of the two X-ray systems (p = 0.06). The new cardiac X-ray system demonstrated a very significant reduction in patient dose with no loss of clinical image quality. Advances in Knowledge: The huge growth of TAVI may impact on the radiation exposure of cardiac patients and particularly on operators including anaesthetists; cumulative exposure of interventional cardiologists performing high volume TAVI over 30-40 years may be harmful. The Phillips Clarity upgrade including improved image enhancement and optimised X-ray settings significantly reduced radiation without reducing clinically acceptable image quality.

  11. Variations in semiconductor device response in a medium-energy x-ray dose-enhancing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Beutler, D.E.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Beezhold, W.; Knott, D.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Draper, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    A series of experiments was performed to investigate the response of semiconductor devices to medium-energy x-ray irradiation under conditions in which dose-enhancement effects are very important. The response of MOS capacitors to ''dose-enhanced'' radiation can depend on incident radiation spectra, temperature of the device, and oxide electric field. Indeed, the amount of enhanced response can vary by as much as a factor of 10 as these conditions are changed. In such cases, it appears that changes in electron-hole recombination and hole trapping as a function of radiation energy are very important to the interpretation of the results. Therefore, coupled electron/photon transport codes such as the Monte Carlo integrated TIGER series (ITS), which consider only changes in the dose deposited in the device active region, are inadequate, at least in some cases, for predictions of dose-enhancement effects in semiconductor devices. In addition, the response of semiconductor diodes to dose-enhanced radiation appears to be qualitatively different from that of capacitors, and differs markedly in value from code predictions. Hence, an understanding of the modification of incident radiation by its interactions with dose-enhancing materials alone is insufficient to predict the response of semiconductor devices. The dependence of the device response on radiation spectra, electron-hole recombination, and hole transport and trapping, must also be included to assure good simulation fidelity of tests for devices to be used in dose-enhancing environments.

  12. Assessment of effective radiation dose of an extremity CBCT, MSCT and conventional X ray for knee area using MOSFET dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, Juha; Kiljunen, Timo; Wolff, Jan; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess and compare the organ and effective doses in the knee area resulting from different commercially available multislice computed tomography devices (MSCT), one cone beam computed tomography device (CBCT) and one conventional X-ray radiography device using MOSFET dosemeters and an anthropomorphic RANDO knee phantom. Measurements of the MSCT devices resulted in effective doses ranging between 27 and 48 µSv. The CBCT measurements resulted in an effective dose of 12.6 µSv. The effective doses attained using the conventional radiography device were 1.8 µSv for lateral and 1.2 µSv for anterior-posterior projections. The effective dose resulting from conventional radiography was considerably lower than those recorded for the CBCT and MSCT devices. The MSCT effective dose results were two to four times higher than those measured on the CBCT device. This study demonstrates that CBCT can be regarded as a potential low-dose 3D imaging technique for knee examinations.

  13. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  14. Nanoparticle-Assisted Scanning Focusing X-Ray Therapy with Needle Beam X Rays.

    PubMed

    Davidson, R Andrew; Guo, Ting

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we show a new therapeutic approach using 40-120 keV X rays to deliver a radiation dose at the isocenter located many centimeters below the skin surface several hundred times greater than at the skin and how this dose enhancement can be augmented with nanomaterials to create several thousand-fold total dose enhancement effect. This novel approach employs a needle X-ray beam directed at the isocenter centimeters deep in the body while continuously scanning the beam to cover a large solid angle without overlapping at the skin. A Monte Carlo method was developed to simulate an X-ray dose delivered to the isocenter filled with X-ray absorbing and catalytic nanoparticles in a water phantom. An experimental apparatus consisting of a moving plastic phantom irradiated with a stationary 1 mm needle X-ray beam was built to test the theoretical predictions. X-ray films were used to characterize the dose profiles of the scanning X-ray apparatus. Through this work, it was determined that the X-ray dose delivered to the isocenter in a treatment voxel (t-voxel) underneath a 5 cm deep high-density polyethylene (HDPE) phantom was 295 ± 48 times greater than the surface dose. This measured value was in good agreement with the theoretical predicted value of 339-fold. Adding X-ray-absorbing nanoparticles, catalytic nanoparticles or both into the t-voxel can further augment the dose enhancement. For example, we predicted that adding 1 weight percentage (wp) of gold into water could increase the effective dose delivered to the target by onefold. Dose enhancement using 1 mm X-ray beam could reach about 1,600-fold in the t-voxel when 7.5 wp of 88 nm diameter silica-covered gold nanoparticles were added, which we showed in a previously published study can create a dose enhancement of 5.5 ± 0.46-fold without scanning focusing enhancement. Based on the experimental data from that study, mixing 0.02 wp 2.5 nm diameter small tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride (THPC

  15. Technical Note: Nanometric organic photovoltaic thin film detectors for dose monitoring in diagnostic x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Elshahat, Bassem; Gill, Hardeep Singh; Kumar, Jayant; Filipyev, Ilya; Zygmanski, Piotr; Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew; Hesser, Jürgen; Sajo, Erno

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To fabricate organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells with nanometric active layers sensitive to ionizing radiation and measure their dosimetric characteristics in clinical x-ray beams in the diagnostic tube potential range of 60–150 kVp. Methods: Experiments were designed to optimize the detector’s x-ray response and find the best parameter combination by changing the active layer thickness and the area of the electrode. The OPV cell consisted of poly (3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl): [6,6]-phenyl C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester photoactive donor and acceptor semiconducting organic materials sandwiched between an aluminum electrode as an anode and an indium tin oxide electrode as a cathode. The authors measured the radiation-induced electric current at zero bias voltage in all fabricated OPV cells. Results: The net OPV current as a function of beam potential (kVp) was proportional to kVp{sup −0.5} when normalized to x-ray tube output, which varies with kVp. Of the tested configurations, the best combination of parameters was 270 nm active layer thicknesses with 0.7 cm{sup 2} electrode area, which provided the highest signal per electrode area. For this cell, the measured current ranged from approximately 0.7 to 2.4 nA/cm{sup 2} for 60–150 kVp, corresponding to about 0.09 nA–0.06 nA/mGy air kerma, respectively. When compared to commercial amorphous silicon thin film photovoltaic cells irradiated under the same conditions, this represents 2.5 times greater sensitivity. An additional 40% signal enhancement was observed when a 1 mm layer of plastic scintillator was attached to the cells’ beam-facing side. Conclusions: Since both OPVs can be produced as flexible devices and they do not require external bias voltage, they open the possibility for use as thin film in vivo detectors for dose monitoring in diagnostic x-ray imaging.

  16. [DNA double-strand breaks in human lymphocytes after single irradiation by low doses of pulsed X-rays: non-linear dose-response relationship].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, S A; Stepanova, E Iu; Kutenkov, O P; Belenko, A A; Zharkova, L P; Bol'shakov, M A; Lebedev, I N; Rostov, V V

    2012-01-01

    Effects of ionizing radiation registered in cells after low dose irradiation are still poorly understood. A pulsed mode of irradiation is even more problematic in terms of predicting the radiation-induced response in cells. Thus, the aim of this paper was to study and analyze the effects of dose and frequency of pulsed X-rays on the frequency of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks and their repair kinetics in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. Analysis of radiation-induced gammaH2AX and 53BP1 repair foci was used to assess the DNA damage in these cells. The dose-response curve of radiation-induced foci of both proteins has shown deviations from linearity to a higher effect in the 12-32 mGy dose range and a lower effect at 72 mGy. The dose-response curve was linear at doses higher than 100 mGy. The number of radiation-induced gammaH2AX and 53BP1 foci depended on the frequency of X-ray pulses: the highest effect was registered at 13 pulses per second. Moreover, slower repair kinetics was observed for those foci induced by very low doses with a nonlinear dose-response relationship.

  17. Determination of conversion factors from air kerma to operational dose equivalent quantities for low-energy X-ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Hakanen, Arvi; Kosunen, Antti; Pöyry, Paula; Tapiovaara, Markku

    2007-01-01

    The conversion coefficients from air kerma to ICRU operational dose equivalent quantities for STUK's realisation of the X-radiation qualities N-15 to N-60 of the ISO narrow (N) spectrum series were determined by utilising X-ray spectrum measurements. The pulse-height spectra were measured using a planar high-purity germanium spectrometer and unfolded to fluence spectra using Monte Carlo generated data of the spectrometer response. To verify the measuring and unfolding method, the first and second half-value layers and the air kerma rate were calculated from the fluence spectra and compared with the values measured using an ionisation chamber. For each radiation quality, the spectrum was characterised by the parameters given in ISO 4037-1. The conversion coefficients from the air kerma to the ICRU operational quantities Hp(10), Hp(0.07), H'(0.07) and H*(10) were calculated using monoenergetic conversion coefficients at zero angle of incidence. The results are discussed with respect to ISO 4037-4, and compared with published results for low-energy X-ray spectra.

  18. Physical dose distribution due to multi-sliced kV X-ray beam in labeled tissue-like media: an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, M; Kakuee, O R; Fathollahi, V; Shahvar, A; Mohati, M; Ghafoori, M

    2011-02-01

    Radiotherapy remains a major modality of cancer therapy. Thanks to high flux and high brilliance of synchrotron-generated X-ray, laboratory research with planar microscopically thin X-ray beam promise exciting new opportunities for treatment of cancer. High tolerance of normal tissues at doses up to several hundred Gy in a single dose fraction and preferential damage of tumors at very high doses have been uniquely observed in animal models exposed to microbeams. The fact that beams as thick as 0.68 mm could retain a part of these effects, opens the possibility that the required beam can be produced by high power X-ray tubes besides a dedicated synchrotron. Fortunately, dose distribution due to kilovolt X-rays could be enhanced by the introduction of high-Z contrast agents to tissue-like media. In this work, dose deposition in a phantom--partially loaded with Au and I as contrast agents--irradiated by multi-sliced kV X-ray beam was experimentally investigated in the peak and valley regions both on the surface and in the depth of phantom. The results of experimental dosimetry using Gaf-chromic films were compared with corresponding Monte-Carlo simulation. Relative reduction in the deposited dose in the peak regions downstream the area containing contrast agents in comparison with the adjacent areas was experimentally observed.

  19. Radiation dose and cancer risk in patients undergoing multiple radiographs in intravenous urography X-ray examinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suliman, I. I.; Al-Jabri, Amna J.; Badawi, A. A.; Halato, M. A.; Alzimami, K.; Sulieman, A.

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of the this study was to measure the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and body organs, and the effective doses in intravenous urography (IVU) X-ray examinations in Sudanese hospitals. Seventy-two patients who underwent IVU multiple radiographs from five hospitals (six rooms) were examined. ESAK was calculated from incident air kerma (Ki) using patient exposure parameters and tube output Y(d). Dose calculations were performed using CALDOSE X 5.1 Monte Carlo-based software. Risk of cancer induction (4-8) and mortality per million (2-4) varied. The gallbladder, colon, stomach, gonads and uterus received organ doses of 5.3, 3.6, 3.2, 0.61, and 0.8 mGy, respectively. ESAK values ranged from 6.6 to 15.3 mGy (effective doses: 0.70-1.6 mSv). Mean ESAK fall slightly above the diagnostic reference level. Several optimization strategies to improve dose performance were discussed. Reducing the number of radiographs and the use of technique charts according to patient sizes and anatomic areas are among the most important dose optimization tools in IVU.

  20. Comparison of adverse effects of proton and X-ray chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer using an adaptive dose-volume histogram analysis.

    PubMed

    Makishima, Hirokazu; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Yamanashi, Koichi; Sekiguchi, Takao; Mizumoto, Masashi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2015-05-01

    Cardiopulmonary late toxicity is of concern in concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for esophageal cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the benefit of proton beam therapy (PBT) using clinical data and adaptive dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis. The subjects were 44 patients with esophageal cancer who underwent definitive CCRT using X-rays (n = 19) or protons (n = 25). Experimental recalculation using protons was performed for the patient actually treated with X-rays, and vice versa. Target coverage and dose constraints of normal tissues were conserved. Lung V5-V20, mean lung dose (MLD), and heart V30-V50 were compared for risk organ doses between experimental plans and actual treatment plans. Potential toxicity was estimated using protons in patients actually treated with X-rays, and vice versa. Pulmonary events of Grade ≥2 occurred in 8/44 cases (18%), and cardiac events were seen in 11 cases (25%). Risk organ doses in patients with events of Grade ≥2 were significantly higher than for those with events of Grade ≤1. Risk organ doses were lower in proton plans compared with X-ray plans. All patients suffering toxicity who were treated with X-rays (n = 13) had reduced predicted doses in lung and heart using protons, while doses in all patients treated with protons (n = 24) with toxicity of Grade ≤1 had worsened predicted toxicity with X-rays. Analysis of normal tissue complication probability showed a potential reduction in toxicity by using proton beams. Irradiation dose, volume and adverse effects on the heart and lung can be reduced using protons. Thus, PBT is a promising treatment modality for the management of esophageal cancer.

  1. Methods of calculating radiation absorbed dose.

    PubMed

    Wegst, A V

    1987-01-01

    The new tumoricidal radioactive agents being developed will require a careful estimate of radiation absorbed tumor and critical organ dose for each patient. Clinical methods will need to be developed using standard imaging or counting instruments to determine cumulated organ activities with tracer amounts before the therapeutic administration of the material. Standard MIRD dosimetry methods can then be applied.

  2. Entrance surface dose and image quality: comparison of adult chest and abdominal X-ray examinations in general practitioner clinics, public and private hospitals in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hambali, Ahmad Shariff; Ng, Kwan-Hoong; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet; Wang, Hwee-Beng; Jamal, Noriah; Spelic, David C; Suleiman, Orhan H

    2009-01-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the entrance surface dose (ESD) and image quality of adult chest and abdominal X-ray examinations conducted at general practitioner (GP) clinics, and public and private hospitals in Malaysia. The surveyed facilities were randomly selected within a given category (28 GP clinics, 20 public hospitals and 15 private hospitals). Only departmental X-ray units were involved in the survey. Chest examinations were done at all facilities, while only hospitals performed abdominal examinations. This study used the x-ray attenuation phantoms and protocols developed for the Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) survey program in the United States. The ESD was calculated from measurements of exposure and clinical geometry. An image quality test tool was used to evaluate the low-contrast detectability and high-contrast detail performance under typical clinical conditions. The median ESD value for the adult chest X-ray examination was the highest (0.25 mGy) at GP clinics, followed by private hospitals (0.22 mGy) and public hospitals (0.17 mGy). The median ESD for the adult abdominal X-ray examination at public hospitals (3.35 mGy) was higher than that for private hospitals (2.81 mGy). Results of image quality assessment for the chest X-ray examination show that all facility types have a similar median spatial resolution and low-contrast detectability. For the abdominal X-ray examination, public hospitals have a similar median spatial resolution but larger low-contrast detectability compared with private hospitals. The results of this survey clearly show that there is room for further improvement in performing chest and abdominal X-ray examinations in Malaysia.

  3. Evaluation of scattered radiation emitted from X-ray security scanners on occupational dose to airport personnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalah, Entesar; Fakhry, Angham; Mukhtar, Asma; Al Salti, Farah; Bader, May; Khouri, Sara; Al-Zahmi, Reem

    2017-06-01

    Based on security issues and regulations airports are provided with luggage cargo scanners. These scanners utilize ionizing radiation that in principle present health risks toward humans. The study aims to investigate the amount of backscatter produced by passenger luggage and cargo toward airport personnel who are located at different distances from the scanners. To approach our investigation a Thermo Electron Radeye-G probe was used to quantify the backscattered radiation measured in terms of dose-rate emitted from airport scanners, Measurements were taken at the entrance and exit positions of the X-ray tunnel at three different distances (0, 50, and 100 cm) for two different scanners; both scanners include shielding curtains that reduce scattered radiation. Correlation was demonstrated using the Pearson coefficient test. Measurements confirmed an inverse relationship between dose rate and distance. An estimated occupational accumulative dose of 0.88 mSv/y, and 2.04 mSv/y were obtained for personnel working in inspection of carry-on, and cargo, respectively. Findings confirm that the projected dose of security and engineering staff are being well within dose limits.

  4. Variations in semiconductor device response in a medium-energy x-ray dose-enhancing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Beutler, D.E.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Beezhold, W.; Knott, D.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Draper, B.L.

    1987-12-01

    The authors performed a series of experiments to investigate the response of semiconductor devices to medium-energy x-ray irradiation under conditions in which dose-enhancement effects are very important. They find that the response of MOS capacitors to the same ''dose-enhanced'' radiation depends not only on the increased dose, but also on the incident radiation spectra, device temperature and processing, and/or oxide thickness and electric field. In many cases, these dependencies cannot be explained simply in terms of existing knowledge of basic mechanisms of radiation effects on MOS devices (for example, electron-hole recombination and hole transport and trapping), or by present Monte Carlo electron/photon transport codes such as the Integrated Tiger Series (ITS). In addition, the response of semiconductor diodes to the ''dose-enhanced'' radiation appears to be qualitatively different from that of MOS capacitors, and differs markedly in value from the ITS code predictions. These results demonstrate that an improved understanding of semiconductor device response to ''enhanced'' radiation is needed to assure simulation fidelity of tests of devices to be used in dose-enhancing environments.

  5. Alignment of low-dose X-ray fluorescence tomography images using differential phase contrast

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Young Pyo; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; O’Halloran, Thomas V.; Que, Emily L.; Bleher, Reiner; Vogt, Stefan; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2014-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence nanotomography provides unprecedented sensitivity for studies of trace metal distributions in whole biological cells. Dose fractionation, in which one acquires very low dose individual projections and then obtains high statistics reconstructions as signal from a voxel is brought together (Hegerl & Hoppe, 1976 ▶), requires accurate alignment of these individual projections so as to correct for rotation stage runout. It is shown here that differential phase contrast at 10.2 keV beam energy offers the potential for accurate cross-correlation alignment of successive projections, by demonstrating that successive low dose, 3 ms per pixel, images acquired at the same specimen position and rotation angle have a narrower and smoother cross-correlation function (1.5 pixels FWHM at 300 nm pixel size) than that obtained from zinc fluorescence images (25 pixels FWHM). The differential phase contrast alignment resolution is thus well below the 700 nm × 500 nm beam spot size used in this demonstration, so that dose fractionation should be possible for reduced-dose, more rapidly acquired, fluorescence nanotomography experiments. PMID:24365941

  6. Dose-response of x-ray-induced anaphase aberrations in the mitotic root tip chromosomes of allium

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, T.H.; Lee, K.H.; Kong, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    A simplified Allium root mitotic chromosome aberration assay by using only the aberrant anaphases (fragments, laggards and bridges) as the end-points were developed by Rank and Nielsen (1993) for screening water soluble chemicals and complex mixtures. A dose-response curve was established by Meir et al., (1994) using a known clastogen, 4-nitroquinolene-N-oxide between the dose range of 0.1-0.5 ug/ml. In order to further validate this assay for clastogen detection, a series of X-ray dose response experiments was carried out. Allium roots were germinated in tapwater for 48 h and treated with a series of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 R (80 Kvp, 5 ma, dose rate 60 R/min) dosages. After an 18 hr recovery time, the root tips were hydrolyzed in 45% acetic and 1 N HC1 acid (9:1 ratio) solution under 50{degrees} C for 5 min and stained with aceto-carmine. Each of the data points were derived from scoring 7-10 slides (15-50 anaphases/slide). The corrrelation coefficient, slope and intercept values of the dose-response curve are: 0.954, 0.515 and 1.155 respectively.

  7. Sinogram restoration for ultra-low-dose x-ray multi-slice helical CT by nonparametric regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lu; Siddiqui, Khan; Zhu, Bin; Tao, Yang; Siegel, Eliot

    2007-03-01

    During the last decade, x-ray computed tomography (CT) has been applied to screen large asymptomatic smoking and nonsmoking populations for early lung cancer detection. Because a larger population will be involved in such screening exams, more and more attention has been paid to studying low-dose, even ultra-low-dose x-ray CT. However, reducing CT radiation exposure will increase noise level in the sinogram, thereby degrading the quality of reconstructed CT images as well as causing more streak artifacts near the apices of the lung. Thus, how to reduce the noise levels and streak artifacts in the low-dose CT images is becoming a meaningful topic. Since multi-slice helical CT has replaced conventional stop-and-shoot CT in many clinical applications, this research mainly focused on the noise reduction issue in multi-slice helical CT. The experiment data were provided by Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16-Slice helical CT. It included both conventional CT data acquired under 120 kvp voltage and 119 mA current and ultra-low-dose CT data acquired under 120 kvp and 10 mA protocols. All other settings are the same as that of conventional CT. In this paper, a nonparametric smoothing method with thin plate smoothing splines and the roughness penalty was proposed to restore the ultra-low-dose CT raw data. Each projection frame was firstly divided into blocks, and then the 2D data in each block was fitted to a thin-plate smoothing splines' surface via minimizing a roughness-penalized least squares objective function. By doing so, the noise in each ultra-low-dose CT projection was reduced by leveraging the information contained not only within each individual projection profile, but also among nearby profiles. Finally the restored ultra-low-dose projection data were fed into standard filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm to reconstruct CT images. The rebuilt results as well as the comparison between proposed approach and traditional method were given in the results and

  8. An indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain for low dose x-ray imaging: SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Dan; Rowlands, J. A.; Egami, N.; Takiguchi, Y.; Nanba, M.; Honda, Y.; Ohkawa, Y.; Kubota, M.; Tanioka, K.; Suzuki, K.; Kawai, T.

    2008-03-01

    An indirect flat-imager with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging with high resolution. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI (Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The charge image created by HARP is read out by electron beams generated by the FEA. The proposed detector is called SAPHIRE (Scintillator Avalanche Photoconductor with HIgh Resolution Emitter readout). The avalanche gain of HARP depends on both a-Se thickness and applied electric field E Se. At E Se of > 80 V/μm, the avalanche gain can enhance the signal at low dose (e.g. fluoroscopy) and make the detector x-ray quantum noise limited down to a single x-ray photon. At high exposure (e.g. radiography), the avalanche gain can be turned off by decreasing E Se to < 70 V/μm. In this paper the imaging characteristics of the FEA readout method, including the spatial resolution and noise, were investigated experimentally using a prototype optical HARP-FEA image sensor. The potential x-ray imaging performance of SAPHIRE, especially the aspect of programmable gain to ensure wide dynamic range and x-ray quantum noise limited performance at the lowest exposure in fluoroscopy, was investigated.

  9. Scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout for low dose x-ray imaging: lag.

    PubMed

    Lia, Dan; Zhao, Wei; Nanba, Masakazu; Egami, Norifomi

    2009-09-01

    A new concept of indirect conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated. It is referred to as scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The present work investigates the temporal performance, i.e., lag, of SAPHIRE. Since the temporal performance of the x-ray detection materials, i.e., the structured scintillator and avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor, has been studied previously, the investigation is focused on lag due to the FEA readout method. The principle of FEA readout is similar to that of scanning electron beam readout used in camera tubes, where the dominant source of lag is the energy spread of electrons. Since the principles of emission and beam focusing methods for FEA are different from thermionic emission used in camera tubes, its electron beam energy spread and hence lag is expected to be different. In the present work, the energy spread of the electrons emitted from a FEA was investigated theoretically by analyzing different contributing factors due to the FEA design and operations: The inherent energy spread of field emission, the FEA driving pulse delay, and the angular distribution of emitted electrons. The electron energy spread determined the beam acceptance characteristic curve of the photoconductive target, i.e., the accepted beam current (I(a)) as a function of target potential (V(t)), from which lag could be calculated numerically. Lag calculation was performed using FEA parameters of two prototype HARP-FEA image sensors, and the results were compared with experimental measurements. Strategies for reducing lag in SAPHIRE were proposed and analyzed. The theoretical analysis shows that the dominant factor for lag is the angular distribution of electrons emitted from the FEA. The first frame lags for two prototype sensors with 4 and 25 microm HARP layer thicknesses were 62.1% and 9.1%, respectively. A lag clearance

  10. Influence of the X-ray beam quality on the dose increment in CT with iodinated contrast medium.

    PubMed

    Amato, Ernesto; Asero, Grazia; Leotta, Salvatore; Auditore, Lucrezia; Salamone, Ignazio; Mannino, Giovanni; Privitera, Salvatore; Gueli, Anna

    2016-01-01

    In computed tomography (CT), the image contrast is given by the difference in X-ray attenuation in the various tissues of the patient and contrast media are used to enhance image contrast in anatomic regions characterized by similar attenuation coefficients. Aim of the present work is to enlarge the range of applicability of the method previously introduced for organ dosimetry in contrast-enhanced CT, by studying the effects of X-ray beam quality on the parameters of the model. Furthermore, an experimental method for the evaluation of the attenuation properties of iodinated solutions is proposed. Monte Carlo simulations of anthropomorphic phantoms were carried out to determine a bi-parametrical (a and b) analytical relationship between iodine concentration and dose increase in organs of interest as a function of the tube kilo-voltage peak potential (kVp) and filtration. Experimental measurements of increments in Hounsfield Units (HU) were conducted in several CT scanners, at all the kVp available, in order to determine the parameter γ which relates the HU increment with the iodine mass fraction. A cylindrical phantom that can be filled with iodine solutions provided with an axial housing for a pencil ionization chamber was designed and assembled in order to measure the attenuation properties of iodine solutions under irradiation of a CT scanner and to obtain a further validation of Monte Carlo simulations. The simulation-derived parameters of the model, a and b, are only slightly dependent upon the tube kilo-voltage peak potential and filtration, while such scanner-dependent features influence mainly the experimentally-derived γ parameter. Relative dose variations registered by the ionization chamber inside the iodine-filled cylindrical phantom decrease when the X-ray mean energy increases, and reaches about 50% for 10 mg/ml of iodine. The dosimetric method for contrast-enhanced CT can be applied to all CT scanners by adopting average simulative parameters and

  11. Dual-gate photo thin-film transistor: a “smart” pixel for high- resolution and low-dose X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Ou, Hai; Chen, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Since its emergence a decade ago, amorphous silicon flat panel X-ray detector has established itself as a ubiquitous platform for an array of digital radiography modalities. The fundamental building block of a flat panel detector is called a pixel. In all current pixel architectures, sensing, storage, and readout are unanimously kept separate, inevitably compromising resolution by increasing pixel size. To address this issue, we hereby propose a “smart” pixel architecture where the aforementioned three components are combined in a single dual-gate photo thin-film transistor (TFT). In other words, the dual-gate photo TFT itself functions as a sensor, a storage capacitor, and a switch concurrently. Additionally, by harnessing the amplification effect of such a thin-film transistor, we for the first time created a single-transistor active pixel sensor. The proof-of-concept device had a W/L ratio of 250μm/20μm and was fabricated using a simple five-mask photolithography process, where a 130nm transparent ITO was used as the top photo gate, and a 200nm amorphous silicon as the absorbing channel layer. The preliminary results demonstrated that the photocurrent had been increased by four orders of magnitude due to light-induced threshold voltage shift in the sub-threshold region. The device sensitivity could be simply tuned by photo gate bias to specifically target low-level light detection. The dependence of threshold voltage on light illumination indicated that a dynamic range of at least 80dB could be achieved. The "smart" pixel technology holds tremendous promise for developing high-resolution and low-dose X-ray imaging and may potentially lower the cancer risk imposed by radiation, especially among paediatric patients.

  12. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: Spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Zhao, Wei

    2008-07-01

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator/HARP (SHARP) combination is read out by the electron beams emitted from the FEA. The proposed detector is called scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The programmable avalanche gain of HARP can improve the low dose performance of indirect FPI while the FEA can be made with pixel sizes down to 50 μm. Because of the avalanche gain, a high resolution type of CsI (Tl), which has not been widely used in indirect FPI due to its lower light output, can be used to improve the high spatial frequency performance. The purpose of the present article is to investigate the factors affecting the spatial resolution of SAPHIRE. Since the resolution performance of the SHARP combination has been well studied, the focus of the present work is on the inherent resolution of the FEA readout method. The lateral spread of the electron beam emitted from a 50 μm×50 μm pixel FEA was investigated with two different electron-optical designs: mesh-electrode-only and electrostatic focusing. Our results showed that electrostatic focusing can limit the lateral spread of electron beams to within the pixel size of down to 50 μm. Since electrostatic focusing is essentially independent of signal intensity, it will provide excellent spatial uniformity. © 2008 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: Spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Zhao, Wei

    2008-01-01

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator∕HARP (SHARP) combination is read out by the electron beams emitted from the FEA. The proposed detector is called scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The programmable avalanche gain of HARP can improve the low dose performance of indirect FPI while the FEA can be made with pixel sizes down to 50 μm. Because of the avalanche gain, a high resolution type of CsI (Tl), which has not been widely used in indirect FPI due to its lower light output, can be used to improve the high spatial frequency performance. The purpose of the present article is to investigate the factors affecting the spatial resolution of SAPHIRE. Since the resolution performance of the SHARP combination has been well studied, the focus of the present work is on the inherent resolution of the FEA readout method. The lateral spread of the electron beam emitted from a 50 μm×50 μm pixel FEA was investigated with two different electron-optical designs: mesh-electrode-only and electrostatic focusing. Our results showed that electrostatic focusing can limit the lateral spread of electron beams to within the pixel size of down to 50 μm. Since electrostatic focusing is essentially independent of signal intensity, it will provide excellent spatial uniformity. PMID:18697540

  14. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Zhao, Wei

    2008-07-01

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator/HARP (SHARP) combination is read out by the electron beams emitted from the FEA. The proposed detector is called scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The programmable avalanche gain of HARP can improve the low dose performance of indirect FPI while the FEA can be made with pixel sizes down to 50 microm. Because of the avalanche gain, a high resolution type of CsI (Tl), which has not been widely used in indirect FPI due to its lower light output, can be used to improve the high spatial frequency performance. The purpose of the present article is to investigate the factors affecting the spatial resolution of SAPHIRE. Since the resolution performance of the SHARP combination has been well studied, the focus of the present work is on the inherent resolution of the FEA readout method. The lateral spread of the electron beam emitted from a 50 microm x 50 microm pixel FEA was investigated with two different electron-optical designs: mesh-electrode-only and electrostatic focusing. Our results showed that electrostatic focusing can limit the lateral spread of electron beams to within the pixel size of down to 50 microm. Since electrostatic focusing is essentially independent of signal intensity, it will provide excellent spatial uniformity.

  15. SAPHIRE (scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout) for low dose x-ray imaging: Spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Li Dan; Zhao Wei

    2008-07-15

    An indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with programmable avalanche gain and field emitter array (FEA) readout is being investigated for low-dose and high resolution x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator, e.g., thallium (Tl) doped cesium iodide (CsI), to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor (HARP). The charge image created by the scintillator/HARP (SHARP) combination is read out by the electron beams emitted from the FEA. The proposed detector is called scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout (SAPHIRE). The programmable avalanche gain of HARP can improve the low dose performance of indirect FPI while the FEA can be made with pixel sizes down to 50 {mu}m. Because of the avalanche gain, a high resolution type of CsI (Tl), which has not been widely used in indirect FPI due to its lower light output, can be used to improve the high spatial frequency performance. The purpose of the present article is to investigate the factors affecting the spatial resolution of SAPHIRE. Since the resolution performance of the SHARP combination has been well studied, the focus of the present work is on the inherent resolution of the FEA readout method. The lateral spread of the electron beam emitted from a 50 {mu}mx50 {mu}m pixel FEA was investigated with two different electron-optical designs: mesh-electrode-only and electrostatic focusing. Our results showed that electrostatic focusing can limit the lateral spread of electron beams to within the pixel size of down to 50 {mu}m. Since electrostatic focusing is essentially independent of signal intensity, it will provide excellent spatial uniformity.

  16. X-ray dose response of calcite-A comprehensive analysis for optimal application in TL dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, J. M.; Wary, G.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of various annealing treatments on dosimetric characteristics of orange calcite (CaCO3) mineral has been studied in detail. Quantitative analysis on the dose response shows that the 573 K annealed sample showed sublinear dose response from 10 mGy to 1 Gy. The fading and reproducibility of this sample are also good enough for dosimetric application. However, a specific annealing treatment after irradiation shows some significant improvements in the dosimetric characteristics of the sample. The 773 K pre-annealed sample, after X-ray irradiation post-annealing at 340 K for 6 min provides linear dose response from 10 mGy to 3.60 Gy, very less fading and good reproducibility. Moreover, this sample after post-annealing at 380 K for 6 min shows linear dose response from 10 mGy to 5.40 Gy when analyzed from the ∼408 K thermoluminescence (TL) glow peak. Analysis of TL glow curves confirmed that the 1.30 eV trap center in calcite crystal is the most effective trapping site for dosimetric application.

  17. Inhibitory effects of prior low-dose X-ray irradiation on carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatopathy in acatalasemic mice.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Kataoka, Takahiro; Nomura, Takaharu; Taguchi, Takehito; Wang, Da-Hong; Mori, Shuji; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Kira, Shohei

    2004-03-01

    The catalase activities in blood and organs of the acatalasemic (C3H/AnLCs(b)Cs(b)) mouse of C3H strain are lower than those of the normal (C3H/AnLCs (a)Cs(a)) mouse. We examined the effects of prior low-dose (0.5 Gy) X-ray irradiation, which reduced the oxidative damage under carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatopathy in the acatalasemic or normal mice. The acatalasemic mice showed a significantly lower catalase activity and a significantly higher glutathione peroxidase activity compared with those in the normal mice. Moreover, low-dose irradiation increased the catalase activity in the acatalasemic mouse liver to a level similar to that of the normal mouse liver. Pathological examinations and analyses of blood glutamic oxaloacetic and glutamic pyruvic transaminase activity and lipid peroxide levels showed that carbon tetrachloride induced hepatopathy was inhibited by low-dose irradiation. These findings may indicate that the free radical reaction induced by the lack of catalase and the administration of carbon tetrachloride is more properly neutralized by high glutathione peroxidase activity and low-dose irradiation in the acatalasemic mouse liver.

  18. The elimination of low-dose hypersensitivity in Chinese hamster V79-379A cells by pretreatment with X rays or hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Marples, B.; Joiner, M.C.

    1995-02-01

    To explain increased radioresistance over the X-ray dose range {approximately} 0.5-1 Gy an inducible radioprotective mechanism triggered by DNA damage was proposed; hypersensitivity to doses {much_lt} Gy reflected the response prior to the activation of this system. To test this hypothesis, cells were pre-exposed to DNA-damaging agents in an attempt to induce the process prematurely. An increase in survival was evident at X-ray doses below 0.3 Gy after a priming treatment of X rays (0.05, 0.2, 1 Gy) given 6 h earlier. The protective effect was found to be transitory, requiring time for development and diminishing after two to three cell cycle times. Cycloheximide administered in the interval between the priming and challenge doses of X rays abolished the protection conferred by pretreatment, indicating the involvement of de novo protein synthesis. Oxidative damage by nontoxic doses of hydrogen peroxide (10{sup {minus}4} M, but not 10{sup {minus}6} M) also produced a protective effect against subsequent X irradiation. These experiments indicate survival in the hyper-radiosensitive region ({much_lt}0.5 Gy) can be modified by pretreatment with agents known to affect DNA repair. In addition, the development of increased radioresistance after single doses of X rays was inhibited by cycloheximide treatment. These studies provide evidence to support the explanations proposed previously for the phenomena of increased radioresistance and hyper-radiosensitivity observed at very low X-ray doses. 57 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. X-ray dose estimation from cathode ray tube monitors by Monte Carlo calculation.

    PubMed

    Khaledi, Navid; Arbabi, Azim; Dabaghi, Moloud

    2015-04-01

    Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) monitors are associated with the possible emission of bremsstrahlung radiation produced by electrons striking the monitor screen. Because of the low dose rate, accurate dosimetry is difficult. In this study, the dose equivalent (DE) and effective dose (ED) to an operator working in front of the monitor have been calculated using the Monte Carlo (MC) method by employing the MCNP code. The mean energy of photons reaching the operator was above 17 keV. The phantom ED was 454 μSv y (348 nSv h), which was reduced to 16 μSv y (12 nSv h) after adding a conventional leaded glass sheet. The ambient dose equivalent (ADE) and personal dose equivalent (PDE) for the head, neck, and thorax of the phantom were also calculated. The uncertainty of calculated ED, ADE, and PDE ranged from 3.3% to 10.7% and 4.2% to 14.6% without and with the leaded glass, respectively.

  20. Calculation of organ doses in x-ray examinations of premature babies.

    PubMed

    Smans, Kristien; Tapiovaara, Markku; Cannie, Mieke; Struelens, Lara; Vanhavere, Filip; Smet, Marleen; Bosmans, Hilde

    2008-02-01

    Lung disease represents one of the most life-threatening conditions in prematurely born children. In the evaluation of the neonatal chest, the primary and most important diagnostic study is the chest radiograph. Since prematurely born children are very sensitive to radiation, those radiographs may lead to a significant radiation detriment. Knowledge of the radiation dose is therefore necessary to justify the exposures. To calculate doses in the entire body and in specific organs, computational models of the human anatomy are needed. Using medical imaging techniques, voxel phantoms have been developed to achieve a representation as close as possible to the anatomical properties. In this study two voxel phantoms, representing prematurely born babies, were created from computed tomography- and magnetic resonance images: Phantom 1 (1910 g) and Phantom 2 (590 g). The two voxel phantoms were used in Monte Carlo calculations (MCNPX) to assess organ doses. The results were compared with the commercially available software package PCXMC in which the available mathematical phantoms can be downsized toward the prematurely born baby. The simple phantom-scaling method used in PCXMC seems to be sufficient to calculate doses for organs within the radiation field. However, one should be careful in specifying the irradiation geometry. Doses in organs that are wholly or partially outside the primary radiation field depend critically on the irradiation conditions and the phantom model.

  1. Calculation of organ doses in x-ray examinations of premature babies

    SciTech Connect

    Smans, Kristien; Tapiovaara, Markku; Cannie, Mieke; Struelens, Lara; Vanhavere, Filip; Smet, Marleen; Bosmans, Hilde

    2008-02-15

    Lung disease represents one of the most life-threatening conditions in prematurely born children. In the evaluation of the neonatal chest, the primary and most important diagnostic study is the chest radiograph. Since prematurely born children are very sensitive to radiation, those radiographs may lead to a significant radiation detriment. Knowledge of the radiation dose is therefore necessary to justify the exposures. To calculate doses in the entire body and in specific organs, computational models of the human anatomy are needed. Using medical imaging techniques, voxel phantoms have been developed to achieve a representation as close as possible to the anatomical properties. In this study two voxel phantoms, representing prematurely born babies, were created from computed tomography- and magnetic resonance images: Phantom 1 (1910 g) and Phantom 2 (590 g). The two voxel phantoms were used in Monte Carlo calculations (MCNPX) to assess organ doses. The results were compared with the commercially available software package PCXMC in which the available mathematical phantoms can be downsized toward the prematurely born baby. The simple phantom-scaling method used in PCXMC seems to be sufficient to calculate doses for organs within the radiation field. However, one should be careful in specifying the irradiation geometry. Doses in organs that are wholly or partially outside the primary radiation field depend critically on the irradiation conditions and the phantom model.

  2. CALDose_X—a software tool for the assessment of organ and tissue absorbed doses, effective dose and cancer risks in diagnostic radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, R.; Khoury, H. J.; Vieira, J. W.

    2008-11-01

    CALDose_X is a software tool that provides the possibility of calculating incident air kerma (INAK) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK), two important quantities used in x-ray diagnosis, based on the output of the x-ray equipment. Additionally, the software uses conversion coefficients (CCs) to assess the absorbed dose to organs and tissues of the human body, the effective dose as well as the patient's cancer risk for radiographic examinations. The CCs, ratios between organ or tissue absorbed doses and measurable quantities, have been calculated with the FAX06 and the MAX06 phantoms for 34 projections of 10 commonly performed x-ray examinations, for 40 combinations of tube potential and filtration ranging from 50 to 120 kVcp and from 2.0 to 5.0 mm aluminum, respectively, for various field positions, for 29 selected organs and tissues and simultaneously for the measurable quantities, INAK, ESAK and kerma area product (KAP). Based on the x-ray irradiation parameters defined by the user, CALDose_X shows images of the phantom together with the position of the x-ray beam. By using true to nature voxel phantoms, CALDose_X improves earlier software tools, which were mostly based on mathematical MIRD5-type phantoms, by using a less representative human anatomy.

  3. Traceable Quantitative Raman Microscopy and X-ray Fluorescence Analysis as Nondestructive Methods for the Characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Absorber Films.

    PubMed

    Zakel, Sabine; Pollakowski, Beatrix; Streeck, Cornelia; Wundrack, Stefan; Weber, Alfons; Brunken, Stefan; Mainz, Roland; Beckhoff, Burckhardt; Stosch, Rainer

    2016-02-01

    The traceability of measured quantities is an essential condition when linking process control parameters to guaranteed physical properties of a product. Using Raman spectroscopy as an analytical tool for monitoring the production of Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 thin-film solar cells, proper calibration with regard to chemical composition and lateral dimensions is a key prerequisite. This study shows how the multiple requirements of calibration in Raman microscopy might be addressed. The surface elemental composition as well as the integral elemental composition of the samples is traced back by reference-free X-ray fluorescence analysis. Reference Raman spectra are then generated for the relevant Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 related compounds. The lateral dimensions are calibrated with the help of a novel dimensional standard whose regular structures have been traced back to the International System of Units by metrological scanning force microscopy. On this basis, an approach for the quantitative determination of surface coverage values from lateral Raman mappings is developed together with a complete uncertainty budget. Raman and X-ray spectrometry have here been proven as complementary nondestructive methods combining surface sensitivity and in-depth information on elemental and species distribution for the reliable quality control of Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 absorbers and Cu(In1-xGax)3Se5 surface layer formation. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. CT-guided brachytherapy of prostate cancer: reduction of effective dose from X-ray examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanin, Dmitriy B.; Biryukov, Vitaliy A.; Rusetskiy, Sergey S.; Sviridov, Pavel V.; Volodina, Tatiana V.

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most effective and informative diagnostic method. Though the number of CT scans among all radiographic procedures in the USA and European countries is 11% and 4% respectively, CT makes the highest contribution to the collective effective dose from all radiographic procedures, it is 67% in the USA and 40% in European countries [1-5]. Therefore it is necessary to understand the significance of dose value from CT imaging to a patient . Though CT dose from multiple scans and potential risk is of great concern in pediatric patients, this applies to adults as well. In this connection it is very important to develop optimal approaches to dose reduction and optimization of CT examination. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its publications recommends radiologists to be aware that often CT image quality is higher than it is necessary for diagnostic confidence[6], and there is a potential to reduce the dose which patient gets from CT examination [7]. In recent years many procedures, such as minimally invasive surgery, biopsy, brachytherapy and different types of ablation are carried out under guidance of computed tomography [6;7], and during a procedures multiple CT scans focusing on a specific anatomic region are performed. At the Clinics of MRRC different types of treatment for patients with prostate cancer are used, incuding conformal CT-guided brachytherapy, implantation of microsources of I into the gland under guidance of spiral CT [8]. So, the purpose of the study is to choose optimal method to reduce radiation dose from CT during CT-guided prostate brachytherapy and to obtain the image of desired quality.

  5. X-ray scalpel—a new device for targeted x-ray brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutman, George; Strumban, Emil; Sozontov, Evgeny; Jenrow, Kenneth

    2007-03-01

    The basic design and performance of a novel x-ray scalpel device for interstitial radiosurgery are reported. The x-ray scalpel is comprised of a capillary optics collimator conjugated with a high brilliance microfocus x-ray tube and a thin hollow needle (tip) attached to the collimator. The device is capable of producing a high dose rate (about 140 Gy min-1 in water-like absorber at the exit window), 0.7 mm diameter, quasi-parallel beam that can be delivered to a targeted site by a minimally invasive procedure. Contrary to insertable x-ray tubes or radionuclides used in brachytherapy and complying with the 1/r2 radiation attenuation law, the dose rate for a quasi-parallel beam decreases with distance as μ exp(-μr), where μ is the energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficient in the exposed medium. Moreover, the shape, energy and the dose attenuation curve of the x-ray beam can be adjusted. Two versions of the x-ray scalpel device (5.4 keV and 20.2 keV) are described. We present results from our first test of the x-ray scalpel as a controllable source of focal radiation for producing radiation necrosis in rat brain tissue. Irradiation was transdurally delivered to the rat cerebral cortex for 10 min at a dose rate of 20 Gy min-1.

  6. MiR-34a is up-regulated in response to low dose, low energy X-ray induced DNA damage in breast cells.

    PubMed

    Stankevicins, Luiza; Almeida da Silva, Ana Paula; Ventura Dos Passos, Flavia; Dos Santos Ferreira, Evelin; Menks Ribeiro, Maria Cecilia; G David, Mariano; J Pires, Evandro; Ferreira-Machado, Samara Cristina; Vassetzky, Yegor; de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; de Moura Gallo, Claudia Vitoria

    2013-10-05

    MicroRNAs are non-coding RNAs involved in the regulation of gene expression including DNA damage responses. Low doses of low energy X-ray radiation, similar to those used in mammographic exams, has been described to be genotoxic. In the present work we investigated the expression of miR-34a; a well described p53-regulated miRNA implicated in cell responses to X-ray irradiation at low doses. Non-cancerous breast cell line MCF-10A and cancerous T-47D and MCF-7 cell lines were submitted to a low-energy X-ray irradiation (ranging from 28-30 Kv) using a dose of 5 Gy. The expression level of miR-34a, let-7a and miR-21 was assessed by qRT-PCR at 4 and 24 hours post-irradiation. DNA damage was then measured by comet assay and micronuclei estimation in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines, where an increase of miR-34a levels could be observed after irradiation. The rate of apoptotic cells was estimated by nuclear staining and fluorescence microscopy. These experiments were also performed at low doses (3; 12 and 48 mGy) in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines. We have observed an increase in miR-34a expression 4 hours post-irradiation at 5 Gy in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines while its level did not change in T-47D, a breast cancer cell line bearing non-functional p53. At low doses, miR-34a was up-regulated in non-tumoral MCF-10A to a higher extent as compared to MCF-7. MiR-34a levels decreased 24 hours post-irradiation. We have also observed DNA damage and apoptosis at low-energy X-ray irradiation at low doses and the high dose in MCF-10A and MCF-7 4 and 24 hours post-irradiation relative to the mock control. Low energy X-ray is able to promote DNA strand breaks and miR-34a might be involved in cell responses to low energy X-ray DNA damage. MiR-34a expression correlates with X-ray dose, time after irradiation and cell type. The present study reinforces the need of investigating consequences of low dose X-ray irradiation of breast cells.

  7. MiR-34a is up-regulated in response to low dose, low energy X-ray induced DNA damage in breast cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are non-coding RNAs involved in the regulation of gene expression including DNA damage responses. Low doses of low energy X-ray radiation, similar to those used in mammographic exams, has been described to be genotoxic. In the present work we investigated the expression of miR-34a; a well described p53-regulated miRNA implicated in cell responses to X-ray irradiation at low doses. Methods Non-cancerous breast cell line MCF-10A and cancerous T-47D and MCF-7 cell lines were submitted to a low-energy X-ray irradiation (ranging from 28–30 Kv) using a dose of 5 Gy. The expression level of miR-34a, let-7a and miR-21 was assessed by qRT-PCR at 4 and 24 hours post-irradiation. DNA damage was then measured by comet assay and micronuclei estimation in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines, where an increase of miR-34a levels could be observed after irradiation. The rate of apoptotic cells was estimated by nuclear staining and fluorescence microscopy. These experiments were also performed at low doses (3; 12 and 48 mGy) in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines. Results We have observed an increase in miR-34a expression 4 hours post-irradiation at 5 Gy in MCF-10A and MCF-7 cell lines while its level did not change in T-47D, a breast cancer cell line bearing non-functional p53. At low doses, miR-34a was up-regulated in non-tumoral MCF-10A to a higher extent as compared to MCF-7. MiR-34a levels decreased 24 hours post-irradiation. We have also observed DNA damage and apoptosis at low-energy X-ray irradiation at low doses and the high dose in MCF-10A and MCF-7 4 and 24 hours post-irradiation relative to the mock control. Conclusion Low energy X-ray is able to promote DNA strand breaks and miR-34a might be involved in cell responses to low energy X-ray DNA damage. MiR-34a expression correlates with X-ray dose, time after irradiation and cell type. The present study reinforces the need of investigating consequences of low dose X-ray irradiation of breast cells. PMID

  8. WE-E-18A-01: Large Area Avalanche Amorphous Selenium Sensors for Low Dose X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Scheuermann, J; Goldan, A; Zhao, W; Tousignant, O; Leveille, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A large area indirect flat panel imager (FPI) with avalanche gain is being developed to achieve x-ray quantum noise limited low dose imaging. It uses a thin optical sensing layer of amorphous selenium (a-Se), known as High-Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP), to detect optical photons generated from a high resolution x-ray scintillator. We will report initial results in the fabrication of a solid-state HARP structure suitable for a large area FPI. Our objective is to establish the blocking layer structures and defect suppression mechanisms that provide stable and uniform avalanche gain. Methods: Samples were fabricated as follows: (1) ITO signal electrode. (2) Electron blocking layer. (3) A 15 micron layer of intrinsic a-Se. (4) Transparent hole blocking layer. (5) Multiple semitransparent bias electrodes to investigate avalanche gain uniformity over a large area. The sample was exposed to 50ps optical excitation pulses through the bias electrode. Transient time of flight (TOF) and integrated charge was measured. A charge transport simulation was developed to investigate the effects of varying blocking layer charge carrier mobility on defect suppression, avalanche gain and temporal performance. Results: Avalanche gain of ∼200 was achieved experimentally with our multi-layer HARP samples. Simulations using the experimental sensor structure produced the same magnitude of gain as a function of electric field. The simulation predicted that the high dark current at a point defect can be reduced by two orders of magnitude by blocking layer optimization which can prevent irreversible damage while normal operation remained unaffected. Conclusion: We presented the first solid state HARP structure directly scalable to a large area FPI. We have shown reproducible and uniform avalanche gain of 200. By reducing mobility of the blocking layers we can suppress defects and maintain stable avalanche. Future work will optimize the blocking layers to prevent lag

  9. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC.

    PubMed

    Israngkul-Na-Ayuthaya, Isra; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Pengvanich, Phongpheath

    2015-11-01

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed (28)Al, (24)Na, (54)Mn and (60)Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is (28)Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several (28)Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received.

  10. Evaluation of equivalent dose from neutrons and activation products from a 15-MV X-ray LINAC

    PubMed Central

    Israngkul-Na-Ayuthaya, Isra; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Pengvanich, Phongpheath

    2015-01-01

    A high-energy photon beam that is more than 10 MV can produce neutron contamination. Neutrons are generated by the [γ,n] reactions with a high-Z target material. The equivalent neutron dose and gamma dose from activation products have been estimated in a LINAC equipped with a 15-MV photon beam. A Monte Carlo simulation code was employed for neutron and photon dosimetry due to mixed beam. The neutron dose was also experimentally measured using the Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) under various conditions to compare with the simulation. The activation products were measured by gamma spectrometer system. The average neutron energy was calculated to be 0.25 MeV. The equivalent neutron dose at the isocenter obtained from OSL measurement and MC calculation was 5.39 and 3.44 mSv/Gy, respectively. A gamma dose rate of 4.14 µSv/h was observed as a result of activations by neutron inside the treatment machine. The gamma spectrum analysis showed 28Al, 24Na, 54Mn and 60Co. The results confirm that neutrons and gamma rays are generated, and gamma rays remain inside the treatment room after the termination of X-ray irradiation. The source of neutrons is the product of the [γ,n] reactions in the machine head, whereas gamma rays are produced from the [n,γ] reactions (i.e. neutron activation) with materials inside the treatment room. The most activated nuclide is 28Al, which has a half life of 2.245 min. In practice, it is recommended that staff should wait for a few minutes (several 28Al half-lives) before entering the treatment room after the treatment finishes to minimize the dose received. PMID:26265661

  11. Suzaku View of X-Ray Spectral Variability of the Radio Galaxy Centaurus A: Partial Covering Absorber, Reflector, and Possible Jet Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukazawa, Yasushi; Hiragi, Kazuyoshi; Yamazaki, Syoko; Mizuno, Motohiro; Hayashi, Kazuma; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Nishino, Sho; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Ohno, Masanori

    2011-12-01

    We observed a nearby radio galaxy, Centaurus A (Cen A), three times with Suzaku in 2009 and measured the wide-band X-ray spectral variability more accurately than previous measurements. The Cen A was in an active phase in 2009, and the flux became higher by a factor of 1.5-2.0 and the spectrum became harder than that in 2005. The Fe-K line intensity increased by 20%-30% from 2005 to 2009. The correlation of the count rate between the XIS 3-8 keV and PIN 15-40 keV band showed a complex behavior with a deviation from a linear relation. The wide-band X-ray continuum in 2-200 keV can be fitted with an absorbed power-law model plus a reflection component, or a power law with a partial covering Compton-thick absorption. The difference spectra between high and low flux periods in each observation were reproduced by a power law with a partial covering Compton-thick absorption. Such a Compton-thick partial covering absorber was observed for the first time in Cen A. The power-law photon index of the difference spectra in 2009 is almost the same as that of the time-averaged spectra in 2005, but steeper by ~0.2 than that of the time-averaged spectra in 2009. This suggests an additional hard power-law component with a photon index of <1.6 in 2009. This hard component could be a lower part of the inverse-Compton-scattered component from the jet, whose gamma-ray emission has recently been detected with the Fermi Large Area Telescope.

  12. The relative biological effectiveness of low-dose mammography quality X rays in the human breast MCF-10A cell line.

    PubMed

    Mills, Caitlin E; Thome, Christopher; Koff, David; Andrews, David W; Boreham, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    Mammography is used to screen a large fraction of the population for breast cancer, and mammography quality X rays are speculated to be more damaging than the higher energy X rays used for other diagnostic procedures. The radiation dose delivered to breast cells as a result of these screening exposures may be a concern. The purpose of this current study was to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of low-energy mammography X rays for radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks evaluated using a highly sensitive automated 53BP1 assay. Automation of the 53BP1 assay enabled the quantification and analysis of meaningful image-based features, including foci counting, within the cell nuclei. Nontumorigenic, human breast epithelial MCF-10A cells were irradiated in the low-dose range with approximately 3-30 mGy of 29 kVp mammography X rays or (137)Cs (662 keV) gamma rays. The induction and resolution of the 53BP1 foci did not differ significantly between exposures to (137)Cs gamma rays and 29 kVp X rays. The RBE was calculated to be 1.1 with a standard deviation of 0.2 for the initial number of radiation-induced double-strand breaks. The radiation dose from a single mammogram did not yield a significant change in the number of detectable foci. However, analysis of additional features revealed subtle differences in the distribution of 53BP1 throughout the nuclei after exposure to the different radiation qualities. A single mammogram was sufficient to alter the distribution of 53BP1 within the nuclear area, but not into discrete foci, while a dose-matched gamma exposure was not sufficient to alter the distribution of 53BP1. Our results indicate that exposure to clinically relevant doses of low-energy mammography quality X rays does not induce more DNA double-strand breaks than exposure to higher energy photons.

  13. Comparison of six phantoms for entrance skin dose evaluation in 11 standard X-ray examinations.

    PubMed

    Compagnone, Gaetano; Pagan, Laura; Bergamini, Carlo

    2005-01-01

    Entrance skin dose (ESD) is an important parameter for assessing the dose received by a patient in a single radiographic exposure. The most useful way to evaluate ESD is either by direct measurement on phantoms using an ionization chamber or using calculations based on a mathematical model. We compared six phantoms (three anthropomorphic, two physical, and one mathematical) in 11 standard clinical examinations (anterior-posterior (AP) abdomen, posterior-anterior (PA) chest, AP chest, lateral (LAT) chest, AP lumbar spine, LAT lumbar spine, LAT lumbo-sacral joint, AP pelvis, PA skull, LAT skull, and AP urinary tract) for two reasons: to determine the conversion factors to use for ESDs measured on different phantoms and to validate the mathematical model used. First, a comparison was done between the three anthropomorphic phantoms (Alderson Rando, chest RSD-77SPL, and 3M skull) and the two physical phantoms (Uniform and AAPM 31); for each examination we obtained "relative entrance skin dose factors." Second, we compared these five phantoms with the mathematical phantom: the overall accuracy of the model was better than 14%. Total mathematical model and total ionization chamber uncertainties, calculated by quadratic propagation of errors of the single components, were estimated to be on the order of +/-12% and +/-3%, respectively. To reduce the most significant source of uncertainty, the overall accuracy of the model was recalculated using new backscatter factors. The overall accuracy of the model improved: better than 12%. For each examination an anthropomorphic phantom was considered as the gold standard relative to the physical phantoms. In this way, it was possible to analyze the variations in phantom design and characteristics. Finally, the mathematical model was validated by more than 400 measurements taken on different phantoms and using a variety of radiological equipment. We conclude that the mathematical model can be used satisfactorily in ESD evaluations

  14. Visibility of microcalcification in cone beam breast CT: Effects of x-ray tube voltage and radiation dose

    SciTech Connect

    Lai Chaojen; Shaw, Chris C.; Chen, Lingyun; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Liu Xinming; Han Tao; Wang Tianpeng; Yang, Wei T.; Whitman, Gary J.; Tu Shuju

    2007-07-15

    Mammography is the only technique currently used for detecting microcalcification (MC) clusters, an early indicator of breast cancer. However, mammographic images superimpose a three-dimensional compressed breast image onto two-dimensional projection views, resulting in overlapped anatomical breast structures that may obscure the detection and visualization of MCs. One possible solution to this problem is the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with a flat-panel (FP) digital detector. Although feasibility studies of CBCT techniques for breast imaging have yielded promising results, they have not shown how radiation dose and x-ray tube voltage affect the accuracy with which MCs are detected by CBCT experimentally. We therefore conducted a phantom study using a FP-based CBCT system with various mean glandular doses and kVp values. An experimental CBCT scanner was constructed with a data acquisition rate of 7.5 frames/s. 10.5 and 14.5 cm diameter breast phantoms made of gelatin were used to simulate uncompressed breasts consisting of 100% glandular tissue. Eight different MC sizes of calcium carbonate grains, ranging from 180-200 {mu}m to 355-425 {mu}m, were used to simulate MCs. MCs of the same size were arranged to form a 5x5 MC cluster and embedded in the breast phantoms. These MC clusters were positioned at 2.8 cm away from the center of the breast phantoms. The phantoms were imaged at 60, 80, and 100 kVp. With a single scan (360 deg.), 300 projection images were acquired with 0.5x, 1x, and 2x mean glandular dose limit for 10.5 cm phantom and with 1x, 2x, and 4x for 14.5 cm phantom. A Feldkamp algorithm with a pure ramp filter was used for image reconstruction. The normalized noise level was calculated for each x-ray tube voltage and dose level. The image quality of the CBCT images was evaluated by counting the number of visible MCs for each MC cluster for various conditions. The average percentage of the visible MCs was computed and plotted as a function

  15. Visibility of microcalcification in cone beam breast CT: effects of X-ray tube voltage and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chao-Jen; Shaw, Chris C; Chen, Lingyun; Altunbas, Mustafa C; Liu, Xinming; Han, Tao; Wang, Tianpeng; Yang, Wei T; Whitman, Gary J; Tu, Shu-Ju

    2007-07-01

    Mammography is the only technique currently used for detecting microcalcification (MC) clusters, an early indicator of breast cancer. However, mammographic images superimpose a three-dimensional compressed breast image onto two-dimensional projection views, resulting in overlapped anatomical breast structures that may obscure the detection and visualization of MCs. One possible solution to this problem is the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with a flat-panel (FP) digital detector. Although feasibility studies of CBCT techniques for breast imaging have yielded promising results, they have not shown how radiation dose and x-ray tube voltage affect the accuracy with which MCs are detected by CBCT experimentally. We therefore conducted a phantom study using a FP-based CBCT system with various mean glandular doses and kVp values. An experimental CBCT scanner was constructed with a data acquisition rate of 7.5 frames/s. 10.5 and 14.5 cm diameter breast phantoms made of gelatin were used to simulate uncompressed breasts consisting of 100% glandular tissue. Eight different MC sizes of calcium carbonate grains, ranging from 180-200 microm to 355-425 microm, were used to simulate MCs. MCs of the same size were arranged to form a 5 x 5 MC cluster and embedded in the breast phantoms. These MC clusters were positioned at 2.8 cm away from the center of the breast phantoms. The phantoms were imaged at 60, 80, and 100 kVp. With a single scan (360 degrees), 300 projection images were acquired with 0.5 x, 1x, and 2x mean glandular dose limit for 10.5 cm phantom and with 1x, 2x, and 4x for 14.5 cm phantom. A Feldkamp algorithm with a pure ramp filter was used for image reconstruction. The normalized noise level was calculated for each x-ray tube voltage and dose level. The image quality of the CBCT images was evaluated by counting the number of visible MCs for each MC cluster for various conditions. The average percentage of the visible MCs was computed and plotted as a

  16. Performance of an X-Ray Microcalorimeter with a 240 Micron Absorber and a 50 Micron TES Bilayer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miniussi, Antoine R.; Adams, Joseph S.; Bandler, Simon R.; Chervenak, James A.; Datesman, Aaron M.; Eckart, Megan E.; Ewin, Audrey J.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We have been developing superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters for a variety of potential astrophysics missions, including Athena. The X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) instrument on this mission requires close-packed pixels on a 0.25 mm pitch, and high quantum efficiency between 0.2 and 12 keV. The traditional approach within our group has been to use square TES bilayers on molybdenum and gold that are between 100 and 140 microns in size, deposited on silicon nitride membranes to provide a weak thermal conductance to a 50 mK heat bath temperature. It has been shown that normal metal stripes on top of the bilayer are needed to keep the unexplained noise at a level consistent with the expected based upon estimates for the non-equilibrium non-linear Johnson noise.In this work we describe a new approach in which we use a square TES bilayer that is 50 microns in size. While the weak link effect is much stronger in this size of TES, we have found that excellent spectral performance can be achieved without the need for any normal metal strips on top of the TES. A spectral performance of 1.58 eV at 6 KeV has been achieved, the best resolution seen in any of our devices with this pixel size. The absence of normal metal stripes has led to more uniform transition shapes, and more reliable excellent spectral performance. The smaller TES size has meant that that the thermal conductance to the heat bath, determined by the perimeter length of the TES and the membrane thickness, is lower than on previous devices, and thus has a lower count rate capability. This is an advantage for low count-rate applications where the slower speed enables easier multiplexing in the read-out, thus potential higher multiplexing factors. In order to recover the higher count rate capabilities, a potential path exits using thicker silicon nitride membranes to increase the thermal conductance to the heat bath.

  17. A laser-driven undulator x-ray source: simulation of image formation and dose deposition in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Schlattl, Helmut; Grüner, Florian; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    Since overcoming some of the inherent limitations of x-ray tubes becomes increasingly harder, it is important to consider new ways of x-ray generation and to study their applications in the field of medical imaging. In the present work we investigate a novel table-top-sized x-ray source, developed in a joint project within the Cluster of Excellence "Munich Center for Advanced Photonics". It uses laser-accelerated electrons emitting x-ray radiation in a short period undulator. This source has the potential to deliver tunable x-rays with a very narrow spectral bandwidth. The main purpose of this contribution is to investigate the performance of this source in the field of mammography and to compare it to that of conventional x-ray tubes. We simulated the whole imaging process from the electron beam dynamics through the generation of the synchrotron radiation in the undulator up to the x-ray-matter interaction and detection in the mammographic setting. A Monte Carlo simulation of the absorption and scattering processes based on the Geant4 software toolkit has been developed that uses a high-resolution voxel phantom of the female breast for the accurate simulation of mammography. We present simulated mammograms generated by using quasi-monochromatic undulator radiation and by using the polychromatic spectrum of a conventional x-ray tube.

  18. X-ray optics: Diamond brilliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, Stephen M.; Colella, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    Most materials either absorb or transmit X-rays. This is useful for imaging but makes it notoriously difficult to build mirrors for reflective X-ray optics. A demonstration of the high X-ray reflectivity of diamond could provide a timely solution to make the most of the next generation of free-electron lasers.

  19. A Model of Regularization Parameter Determination in Low-Dose X-Ray CT Reconstruction Based on Dictionary Learning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Tao; Zheng, Jian; Li, Ming; Lu, Yanfei; You, Jiali; Guan, Yihui

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, X-ray computed tomography (CT) is becoming widely used to reveal patient's anatomical information. However, the side effect of radiation, relating to genetic or cancerous diseases, has caused great public concern. The problem is how to minimize radiation dose significantly while maintaining image quality. As a practical application of compressed sensing theory, one category of methods takes total variation (TV) minimization as the sparse constraint, which makes it possible and effective to get a reconstruction image of high quality in the undersampling situation. On the other hand, a preliminary attempt of low-dose CT reconstruction based on dictionary learning seems to be another effective choice. But some critical parameters, such as the regularization parameter, cannot be determined by detecting datasets. In this paper, we propose a reweighted objective function that contributes to a numerical calculation model of the regularization parameter. A number of experiments demonstrate that this strategy performs well with better reconstruction images and saving of a large amount of time.

  20. Bone mineral density assessment using the EOS low-dose X-ray device: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Sapin, E; Briot, K; Kolta, S; Gravel, P; Skalli, W; Roux, C; Mitton, D

    2008-11-01

    To predict bone strength in the case of osteoporosis, it could be a real benefit to assess the three-dimensional (3D) geometry and the bone mineral density (BMD) with a single low-dose X-ray device, such as the EOS system (Biospace Med, Paris, France). EOS 3D reconstructions of the spine have already been validated. Thus, this study aims at evaluating the accuracy of this low-dose system as a densitometer first ex vivo. The European Spine Phantom (ESP) (number 129) was scanned ten times using both the EOS and a Hologic device (Hologic, Inc., Massachusetts, USA). Accuracy was given by the sum of the systematic error (difference between BMDs assessed and true values given by the phantom manufacturer) and the random error (coefficient of variation). EOS BMDs and Hologic BMDs of 41 ex-vivo vertebrae were calculated and compared. The reproducibility of the method evaluating the EOS BMD was assessed giving the coefficient of variation of three measurements of the 41 vertebrae. The accuracy of the EOS system is below 5.2 per cent, versus 7.2 per cent for the Hologic system in the same conditions. EOS BMDs are significantly higher than Hologic BMDs, but they are strongly correlated. The reproducibility of the method of assessment is equal to 0.95 per cent. The EOS system is accurate for ex-vivo BMD assessments, which is promising regarding the use of this new system to predict vertebral strength.

  1. Early effects comparison of X-rays delivered at high-dose-rate pulses by a plasma focus device and at low dose rate on human tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Virelli, A; Zironi, I; Pasi, F; Ceccolini, E; Nano, R; Facoetti, A; Gavoçi, E; Fiore, M R; Rocchi, F; Mostacci, D; Cucchi, G; Castellani, G; Sumini, M; Orecchia, R

    2015-09-01

    A comparative study has been performed on the effects of high-dose-rate (DR) X-ray beams produced by a plasma focus device (PFMA-3), to exploit its potential medical applications (e.g. radiotherapy), and low-DR X-ray beams produced by a conventional source (XRT). Experiments have been performed at 0.5 and 2 Gy doses on a human glioblastoma cell line (T98G). Cell proliferation rate and potassium outward currents (IK) have been investigated by time lapse imaging and patch clamp recordings. The results showed that PFMA-3 irradiation has a greater capability to reduce the proliferation rate activity with respect to XRT, while it does not affect IK of T98G cells at any of the dose levels tested. XRT irradiation significantly reduces the mean IK amplitude of T98G cells only at 0.5 Gy. This work confirms that the DR, and therefore the source of radiation, is crucial for the planning and optimisation of radiotherapy applications.

  2. Assessment of the effects of CT dose in averaged x-ray CT images of a dose-sensitive polymer gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairn, T.; Kakakhel, M. B.; Johnston, H.; Jirasek, A.; Trapp, J. V.

    2015-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio achievable in x-ray computed tomography (CT) images of polymer gels can be increased by averaging over multiple scans of each sample. However, repeated scanning delivers a small additional dose to the gel which may compromise the accuracy of the dose measurement. In this study, a NIPAM-based polymer gel was irradiated and then CT scanned 25 times, with the resulting data used to derive an averaged image and a "zero-scan" image of the gel. Comparison between these two results and the first scan of the gel showed that the averaged and zero-scan images provided better contrast, higher contrast-to- noise and higher signal-to-noise than the initial scan. The pixel values (Hounsfield units, HU) in the averaged image were not noticeably elevated, compared to the zero-scan result and the gradients used in the linear extrapolation of the zero-scan images were small and symmetrically distributed around zero. These results indicate that the averaged image was not artificially lightened by the small, additional dose delivered during CT scanning. This work demonstrates the broader usefulness of the zero-scan method as a means to verify the dosimetric accuracy of gel images derived from averaged x-ray CT data.

  3. Effect of reduction of the pulse rates of fluoroscopy and CINE-acquisition on x-ray dose and angiographic image quality during invasive cardiovascular procedures.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Christopher T; Gadey, Gautam; Jeon, Cathy; Piemonte, Thomas; Waxman, Sergio; Resnic, Frederic

    2014-08-01

    Reducing digital pulse rates (PR) are known to reduce total energy during invasive cardiovascular procedures, which likely has benefits for patients and staff. Physicians may be reluctant to reduce these parameters because they fear a decline in image quality that could affect procedural outcomes. We sought to assess the effect of default rates of fluoroscopy (Fluoro) and CINE-acquisition (CINE) on total x-ray dose and image quality during invasive cardiovascular procedures. We retrospectively reviewed procedures done with 2 default PRs: a standard dose cohort (PR, 15 for Fluoro and CINE), and a reduced dose cohort (PR, 10 for Fluoro and CINE). Total x-ray dose, Fluoro time, and contrast use were compared between groups. A blinded angiographic image quality assessment was then performed using an objective 10-point angiographic quality score. There were no significant differences between cohorts for fluoroscopy time or contrast use. The reduced dose cohort has a significant reduction in mean total x-ray dose (PR 15, 1763.1 mGy; PR 10, 1179.1 mGy; P<0.0001). When adjusted for potential confounders, a 38% reduction in total x-ray dose was identified (P<0.0001). There was no difference in adjusted angiographic quality score between the cohorts (PR 15, 7.90; PR 10, 8.00; P=0.67), indicating no decline in image quality with PR reduction. Reducing default PRs during invasive cardiovascular procedures yields large and significant reductions in total x-ray energy with no decline in angiographic image quality. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. NEURAL NETWORK MODELLING OF CARDIAC DOSE CONVERSION COEFFICIENT FOR ARBITRARY X-RAY SPECTRA.

    PubMed

    Kadri, O; Manai, K

    2016-12-01

    In this article, an approach to compute the dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) is described for the computational voxel phantom 'High-Definition Reference Korean-Man' (HDRK-Man) using artificial neural networks (ANN). For this purpose, the voxel phantom was implemented into the Monte Carlo (MC) transport toolkit GEANT4, and the DCCs for more than 30 tissues and organs, due to a broad parallel beam of monoenergetic photons with energy ranging from 15 to 150 keV by a step of 5 keV, were calculated. To study the influence of patient size on DCC values, DCC calculation was performed, for a representative body size population, using five different sizes covering the range of 80-120 % magnification of the original HDRK-Man. The focus of the present study was on the computation of DCC for the human heart. ANN calculation and MC simulation results were compared, and good agreement was observed showing that ANNs can be used as an efficient tool for modelling DCCs for the computational voxel phantom. ANN approach appears to be a significant advance over the time-consuming MC methods for DCC calculation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Combining Acceleration Techniques for Low-Dose X-Ray Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, image quality in low-dose computed tomography has been greatly improved by various compressive sensing- (CS-) based reconstruction methods. However, these methods have some disadvantages including high computational cost and slow convergence rate. Many different speed-up techniques for CS-based reconstruction algorithms have been developed. The purpose of this paper is to propose a fast reconstruction framework that combines a CS-based reconstruction algorithm with several speed-up techniques. First, total difference minimization (TDM) was implemented using the soft-threshold filtering (STF). Second, we combined TDM-STF with the ordered subsets transmission (OSTR) algorithm for accelerating the convergence. To further speed up the convergence of the proposed method, we applied the power factor and the fast iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm to OSTR and TDM-STF, respectively. Results obtained from simulation and phantom studies showed that many speed-up techniques could be combined to greatly improve the convergence speed of a CS-based reconstruction algorithm. More importantly, the increased computation time (≤10%) was minor as compared to the acceleration provided by the proposed method. In this paper, we have presented a CS-based reconstruction framework that combines several acceleration techniques. Both simulation and phantom studies provide evidence that the proposed method has the potential to satisfy the requirement of fast image reconstruction in practical CT.

  6. Assessing image quality and dose reduction of a new x-ray computed tomography iterative reconstruction algorithm using model observers

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu Kupinski, Matthew A.; Fan, Jiahua; Sainath, Paavana; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: A number of different techniques have been developed to reduce radiation dose in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. In this paper, the authors will compare task-based measures of image quality of CT images reconstructed by two algorithms: conventional filtered back projection (FBP), and a new iterative reconstruction algorithm (IR). Methods: To assess image quality, the authors used the performance of a channelized Hotelling observer acting on reconstructed image slices. The selected channels are dense difference Gaussian channels (DDOG).A body phantom and a head phantom were imaged 50 times at different dose levels to obtain the data needed to assess image quality. The phantoms consisted of uniform backgrounds with low contrast signals embedded at various locations. The tasks the observer model performed included (1) detection of a signal of known location and shape, and (2) detection and localization of a signal of known shape. The employed DDOG channels are based on the response of the human visual system. Performance was assessed using the areas under ROC curves and areas under localization ROC curves. Results: For signal known exactly (SKE) and location unknown/signal shape known tasks with circular signals of different sizes and contrasts, the authors’ task-based measures showed that a FBP equivalent image quality can be achieved at lower dose levels using the IR algorithm. For the SKE case, the range of dose reduction is 50%–67% (head phantom) and 68%–82% (body phantom). For the study of location unknown/signal shape known, the dose reduction range can be reached at 67%–75% for head phantom and 67%–77% for body phantom case. These results suggest that the IR images at lower dose settings can reach the same image quality when compared to full dose conventional FBP images. Conclusions: The work presented provides an objective way to quantitatively assess the image quality of a newly introduced CT IR algorithm. The performance of the

  7. NIH-funded study shows 20 percent reduction in lung cancer mortality with low-dose CT compared to chest X-ray: | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have found a 20 percent reduction in deaths from lung cancer among current or former heavy smokers who were screened with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) versus those screened by chest X-ray. The primary research results from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) were published online today in the New England Journal of Medicine. |

  8. The efficacy of x-ray doses on murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1) in pure culture, half-shell oyster, salmon sushi, and tuna salad

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    n this investigation, we determined the efficacy of X-ray doses on reducing a human norovirus (HuNoV) surrogate [murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1)] in pure culture, half-shell oyster, salmon sushi and tuna salad. The pure culture (phosphate-buffer saline, pH 7.4), half-shell oyster, salmon sushi and tuna s...

  9. Study of radiation effects on the cell structure and evaluation of the dose delivered by x-ray and {alpha}-particles microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kosior, Ewelina; Cloetens, Peter; Deves, Guillaume; Ortega, Richard; Bohic, Sylvain

    2012-12-24

    Hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy and magnified phase contrast imaging are combined to study radiation effects on cells. Experiments were performed on freeze-dried cells at the nano-imaging station ID22NI of the European synchrotron radiation facility. Quantitative phase contrast imaging provides maps of the projected mass and is used to evaluate the structural changes due to irradiation during X-ray fluorescence experiments. Complementary to phase contrast imaging, scanning transmission ion microscopy is performed and doses of all the experiments are compared. We demonstrate the sensitivity of the proposed approach to study radiation-induced damage at the sub-cellular level.

  10. Evaluation of the radiation dose to a phantom for various X-ray exposure factors performed using the dose area product in digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweon, D. C.; Chung, W. K.; Dong, K. R.; Lee, J. W.; Choi, J. W.; Goo, E. H.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, S. G.; Cho, J. H.; Chung, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study is to measure the dose area product (DAP) in digital radiography by using a DAP meter to determine the X-ray exposure. Pediatric X-ray examinations can be obtained for any radiographic examinations using the selected radiographic examination parameters (kVp and mAs), the DAP information recorded. The best peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) at a fixed tube voltage of 70 kVp was obtained at tube currents of 20 and 32 mA, whereas the best PSNR at a fixed tube current of 25 mA was obtained at a tube voltage of 73 kVp. The fixed tube voltage of 70 kVp and the fixed tube current of 25 mA could help to obtain the best image quality and depict the spatial resolution of an anthropomorphic torso phantom radiographic examination. The normalized data over the DAP were provided to determine the patient dose from radiography.

  11. Stem cells and neural signalling: the case of neoblast recruitment and plasticity in low dose X-ray treated planarians.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Leonardo; Iacopetti, Paola; Salvetti, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    Planarians (Platyhelminthes) possess an abundant population of adult stem cells, the neoblasts, capable to give rise to both somatic and germ cells. Although neoblasts share similar morphological features, several pieces of evidence suggest that they constitute a heterogeneous population of cells with distinct ultrastructural and molecular features. We found that in planarians treated with low X-ray doses (5 Gy), only a few neoblasts survive. Among these cells, those located close to the nervous system activate an intense proliferation program and migrate to reconstitute the whole complex neoblast population. This phenomenon is inhibited by the substance P receptor antagonist spantide, and accompanied by the up-regulation of a number of genes implicated in neuronal signalling and plasticity, suggesting that signals of neural origin modulate neoblast proliferation and/or migration. Here, we review these findings and the literature available on the influence of the nervous system on stem cell activity, both in planarians and vertebrates, and we propose 5 Gy-treated planarians as a unique model system to study the influence of neural signalling on stem cell biology.

  12. Photo neutron dose equivalent rate in 15 MV X-ray beam from a Siemens Primus Linac.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, A; Pourfallah, T Allahverdi; Akbari, M R; Babapour, H; Shahidi, M

    2015-01-01

    Fast and thermal neutron fluence rates from a 15 MV X-ray beams of a Siemens Primus Linac were measured using bare and moderated BF3 proportional counter inside the treatment room at different locations. Fluence rate values were converted to dose equivalent rate (DER) utilizing conversion factors of American Association of Physicist in Medicine's (AAPM) report number 19. For thermal neutrons, maximum and minimum DERs were 3.46 × 10(-6) (3 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size) and 8.36 × 10(-8) Sv/min (in maze, 40 × 40 field size), respectively. For fast neutrons, maximum DERs using 9" and 3" moderators were 1.6 × 10(-5) and 1.74 × 10(-5) Sv/min (2 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size), respectively. By changing the field size, the variation in thermal neutron DER was more than the fast neutron DER and the changes in fast neutron DER were not significant in the bunker except inside the radiation field. This study showed that at all points and distances, by decreasing field size of the beam, thermal and fast neutron DER increases and the number of thermal neutrons is more than fast neutrons.

  13. Estimates of Average Glandular Dose with Auto-modes of X-ray Exposures in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Izdihar; Chelliah, Kanaga K; Mustafa, Nawal

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this research was to examine the average glandular dose (AGD) of radiation among different breast compositions of glandular and adipose tissue with auto-modes of exposure factor selection in digital breast tomosynthesis. This experimental study was carried out in the National Cancer Society, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between February 2012 and February 2013 using a tomosynthesis digital mammography X-ray machine. The entrance surface air kerma and the half-value layer were determined using a 100H thermoluminescent dosimeter on 50% glandular and 50% adipose tissue (50/50) and 20% glandular and 80% adipose tissue (20/80) commercially available breast phantoms (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems, Inc., Norfolk, Virginia, USA) with auto-time, auto-filter and auto-kilovolt modes. The lowest AGD for the 20/80 phantom with auto-time was 2.28 milliGray (mGy) for two dimension (2D) and 2.48 mGy for three dimensional (3D) images. The lowest AGD for the 50/50 phantom with auto-time was 0.97 mGy for 2D and 1.0 mGy for 3D. The AGD values for both phantoms were lower against a high kilovolt peak and the use of auto-filter mode was more practical for quick acquisition while limiting the probability of operator error.

  14. Estimates of Average Glandular Dose with Auto-modes of X-ray Exposures in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Izdihar; Chelliah, Kanaga K.; Mustafa, Nawal

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this research was to examine the average glandular dose (AGD) of radiation among different breast compositions of glandular and adipose tissue with auto-modes of exposure factor selection in digital breast tomosynthesis. Methods: This experimental study was carried out in the National Cancer Society, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between February 2012 and February 2013 using a tomosynthesis digital mammography X-ray machine. The entrance surface air kerma and the half-value layer were determined using a 100H thermoluminescent dosimeter on 50% glandular and 50% adipose tissue (50/50) and 20% glandular and 80% adipose tissue (20/80) commercially available breast phantoms (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems, Inc., Norfolk, Virginia, USA) with auto-time, auto-filter and auto-kilovolt modes. Results: The lowest AGD for the 20/80 phantom with auto-time was 2.28 milliGray (mGy) for two dimension (2D) and 2.48 mGy for three dimensional (3D) images. The lowest AGD for the 50/50 phantom with auto-time was 0.97 mGy for 2D and 1.0 mGy for 3D. Conclusion: The AGD values for both phantoms were lower against a high kilovolt peak and the use of auto-filter mode was more practical for quick acquisition while limiting the probability of operator error. PMID:26052465

  15. Dose-response curve of EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films to synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Thomas A. D.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews, Kenneth L. II; Ham, Kyungmin; Dugas, Joseph P.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: This work investigates the dose-response curves of GAFCHROMIC{sup Registered-Sign} EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films using synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams. EBT2 film is being utilized for dose verification in photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) synchrotron facility. Methods: Monochromatic beams of 25, 30, and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements were used to determine the dose delivered to films irradiated at depths from 0.7 to 8.5 cm in a 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 Multiplication-Sign 10-cm{sup 3} polymethylmethacrylate phantom. AAPM TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Films were digitized using an Epson 1680 Professional flatbed scanner and analyzed using the net optical density (NOD) derived from the red channel. A dose-response curve was obtained at 35 keV for EBT film, and at 25, 30, and 35 keV for EBT2 and EBT3 films. Calibrations of films for 4 MV x-rays were obtained for comparison using a radiotherapy accelerator at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center. Results: The sensitivity (NOD per unit dose) of EBT film at 35 keV relative to that for 4-MV x-rays was 0.73 and 0.76 for doses 50 and 100 cGy, respectively. The sensitivity of EBT2 film at 25, 30, and 35 keV relative to that for 4-MV x-rays varied from 1.09-1.07, 1.23-1.17, and 1.27-1.19 for doses 50-200 cGy, respectively. For EBT3 film the relative sensitivity was within 3% of unity for all three monochromatic x-ray beams. Conclusions: EBT and EBT2 film sensitivity showed strong energy dependence over an energy range of 25 keV-4 MV, although this dependence becomes weaker for larger doses. EBT3 film shows weak energy dependence, indicating that it would be a better dosimeter for kV x-ray beams where beam hardening effects can result in large changes in the effective energy.

  16. Technical Note: Scanning of parallel-plate ionization chamber and diamond detector for measurements of water-dose profiles in the vicinity of a narrow x-ray microbeam.

    PubMed

    Nariyama, Nobuteru

    2017-09-22

    Scanning of dosimeters facilitates dose distribution measurements with fine spatial resolutions. This paper presents a method of conversion of the scanning results to water-dose profiles and provides an experimental verification. An Advanced Markus chamber and a diamond detector were scanned at a resolution of 6 μm near the beam edges during irradiation with a 25-μm-wide white narrow x-ray beam from a synchrotron radiation source. For comparison, GafChromic films HD-810 and HD-V2 were also irradiated. The conversion procedure for the water dose values was simulated with Monte Carlo photon-electron transport code as a function of the x-ray incidence position. This method was deduced from nonstandard beam reference-dosimetry protocols used for high-energy x-rays. Among the calculated nonstandard beam correction factors, Pwall , which is the ratio of the absorbed dose in the sensitive volume of the chamber with water wall to that with a polymethyl methacrylate wall, was found to be the most influential correction factor in most conditions. The total correction factor ranged from 1.7 to 2.7 for the Advanced Markus chamber and from 1.15 to 1.86 for the diamond detector as a function of the x-ray incidence position. The water dose values obtained with the Advanced Markus chamber and the HD-810 film were in agreement in the vicinity of the beam, within 35% and 18% for the upper and lower sides of the beam, respectively. The beam width obtained from the diamond detector was greater, and the doses out of the beam were smaller than the doses of the others. The comparison between the Advanced Markus chamber and HD-810 revealed that the dose obtained with the scanned chamber could be converted to the water dose around the beam by applying nonstandard beam reference-dosimetry protocols. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Planetary X ray experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    Design studies for an X-ray experiment using solid state detectors and for an experiment using a proportional counter for investigating Jovian and Saturnian magnetospheres are reported. Background counting rates through the forward aperture and leakage fluxes are discussed for each design. It is concluded that the best choice of instrument appears to have following the characteristics: (1) two separate multiwire proportional counters for redundancy; (2) passive collimation to restrict the field to about 5 deg, wiregrid modulation collimation to about 0.1 deg angular resolution; (3) no active shielding system around the counter body; and (4) light passive shielding around any portion of the counter body exposed to space to absorb most of the cosmic X-ray background.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation-based feasibility study of a dose-area product meter built into a collimator for diagnostic X-ray.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yongsu; Kim, Hyunji; Park, MinSeok; Kim, Jungsu; Seo, Deoknam; Choi, Inseok; Jeong, Hoiwoun; Kim, Jungmin

    2014-12-01

    According to the International Electro-technical Commission, manufacturers of X-ray equipment should indicate the number of radiation doses to which a patient can be exposed. Dose-area product (DAP) meters are readily available devices that provide dose indices. Collimators are the most commonly employed radiation beam restrictors in X-ray equipment. DAP meters are attached to the lower surface of a collimator. A DAP meter consists of a chamber and electronics. This separation makes it difficult for operators to maintain the accuracy of a DAP meter. Developing a comprehensive system that has a DAP meter in place of a mirror in the collimator would be effective for measuring, recording the dose and maintaining the quality of the DAP meter. This study was conducted through experimental measurements and a simulation. A DAP meter built into a collimator was found to be feasible when its reading was multiplied by a correction factor.

  19. Low-Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Barry D.; Held, Kathryn D.

    2002-06-01

    This project is part of the DOE research program on the biological effects of low dose and dose rate ionizing radiation. This DOE program is designed to support and conduct science that can impact the subsequent development of health risk policy for low dose radiation exposures in the US. The overall, long-term goal of this project is to increase understanding of the responses of cells to the low doses of ionizing radiation typically encountered in environmental level exposures. To achieve this objective, we couple use of a unique focused soft X-ray facility for low dose irradiation of individual cells or irradiation of specific subcellular regions of cells with studies of the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in cells. The project includes seven specific goals: (1) Determine the response of individual cells to low doses of ionizing radiation from a focused soft X-ray beam with a 250 nm diameter beam spot. (2) Determine the response of cells to ROS generated by chemical agents in a fashion that mimics the endogenous cellular generation of ROS. (3) Study the interaction between cellular oxidative processes and ionizing radiation. (4) Determine the importance of the subcellular distribution of ROS from focused soft X-rays on cellular response. (5) Determine whether damage deposited in individual cells by focused soft X-rays or by chemically-generated ROS can elicit a response in other, surrounding, untreated cells, a ''bystander'' effect. (6) Quantify the low dose response and the targets involved in the genomic instability phenotype in cells exposed to low LET radiation and the relationship with the bystander response. (7) Develop tissue explant systems for the measurement of low dose effects in multicellular systems.

  20. Evidence that the oxygen enhancement ratio for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs may approach unity at very low x-ray doses

    SciTech Connect

    Underbrink, A.G.; Woch, B.

    1980-11-01

    Experimental evidence was found that the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) for pink somatic mutations in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone 02 appears to reach unity at X-ray doses of 2 to 3 rad. There is also a small segment on the dose-response curves from about 3 to 10 rad where the OER appears to be dose-dependent. At higher doses the aerated and hypoxic curves are parallel, and the OER is 3.2 up to doses where the mutation frequency reaches a plateau.

  1. Comparison of radiation dose, workflow, patient comfort and financial break-even of standard digital radiography and a novel biplanar low-dose X-ray system for upright full-length lower limb and whole spine radiography.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Tobias J; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Schwab, Alexander; Pankalla, Katja; Buck, Florian M

    2013-07-01

    To compare the radiation dose, workflow, patient comfort, and financial break-even of a standard digital radiography and a biplanar low-dose X-ray system. A standard digital radiography system (Ysio, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) was compared with a biplanar X-ray unit (EOS, EOS imaging, Paris, France) consisting of two X-ray tubes and slot-scanning detectors, arranged at an angle of 90° allowing simultaneous vertical biplanar linear scanning in the upright patient position. We compared data of standing full-length lower limb radiographs and whole spine radiographs of both X-ray systems. Dose-area product was significantly lower for radiographs of the biplanar X-ray system than for the standard digital radiography system (e.g. whole spine radiographs; standard digital radiography system: 392.2 ± 231.7 cGy*cm(2) versus biplanar X-ray system: 158.4 ± 103.8 cGy*cm(2)). The mean examination time was significantly shorter for biplanar radiographs compared with standard digital radiographs (e.g. whole spine radiographs: 449 s vs 248 s). Patients' comfort regarding noise was significantly higher for the standard digital radiography system. The financial break-even point was 2,602 radiographs/year for the standard digital radiography system compared with 4,077 radiographs/year for the biplanar X-ray unit. The biplanar X-ray unit reduces radiation exposure and increases subjective noise exposure to patients. The biplanar X-ray unit demands a higher number of examinations per year for the financial break-even point, despite the lower labour cost per examination due to the shorter examination time.

  2. Low-Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Barry D.; Held, Kathryn D.

    2001-06-01

    This project is part of the DOE research program on the biological effects of low dose and dose rate ionizing radiation. This DOE program is designed to support and conduct science that can impact the subsequent development of health risk policy for low dose radiation exposures in the US. The overall, long-term goal of this project is to increase understanding of the responses of cells to the low doses of ionizing radiation typically encountered in environmental level exposures. To achieve this objective, we couple use of a unique focused soft X-ray facility for low dose irradiation of individual cells or irradiation of specific subcellular regions of cells with studies of the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in cells. The project includes seven specific goals: (1) Determine the response of individual cells to low doses of ionizing radiation from a focused soft X-ray beam with a 250 nm diameter beam spot. (2) Determine the response of cells to ROS generated by chemical agents in a fashion that mimics the endogenous cellular generation of ROS. (3) Study the interaction between cellular oxidative processes and ionizing radiation. (4) Determine the importance of the subcellular distribution of ROS from focused soft X-rays on cellular response. (5) Determine whether damage deposited in individual cells by focused soft X-rays or by chemically-generated ROS can elicit a response in other, surrounding, untreated cells, a ''bystander'' effect. (6) Quantify the low dose response and the targets involved in the genomic instability phenotype in cells exposed to low LET radiation and the relationship with the bystander response.

  3. Studies on best dose of X-ray for Hep-2 cells by using FTIR, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renming; Tang, Weiyue; Kang, Yipu; Si, Minzhen

    2009-08-15

    We report here the use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy, and flow cytometry (FCM) to analysis the best dose of X-ray for human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (Hep-2). Our analysis indicates specific FTIR and UV-vis spectral differences between X-irradiated and normal Hep-2 cells. In addition, striking spectral differences are seen in FTIR spectra in the ratios at 2925/2958 and 1654/1542 cm(-1). These two ratios of the X-irradiated cells for 8 Gy dose group with value of 1.07+/-0.025 and 1.184+/-0.013, respectively, were more notable (mean+/-S.D., n=5, P<0.05) compared with that of the cells for the controls. UV-vis absorption spectra analysis shows X-ray irradiation disturbed the metabolism of phenylalanine and tyrosine intracellular, maybe, which was caused by cell cycle arrest. Spectroscopy analysis suggests 8 Gy is a better dose of X-ray for lowering the canceration degree of Hep-2 cells. Moreover, FCM analysis shows the apoptosis of X-irradiated cells depended on the radiation dose to some extent, but it was not linear. The total apoptosis ratio with value of (20.793+/-1.133)% (P<0.01, n=5) for the 12 Gy dose group was the maximum, however, the maximum apoptosis ratio per Gray (total apoptosis ratio/radiation dose) was the cells of the 2 Gy dose group with value of (4.887+/-0.211)% (P<0.05, n=5). Our data suggest that Hep-2 cells are given 2 Gy radiation of X-ray once a time, 8 Gy per week (accumulatively), the effect for lowering the canceration degree and restraining the proliferation of Hep-2 cells will be better.

  4. SU-D-207-07: Implementation of Full/half Bowtie Filter Model in a Commercial Treatment Planning System for Kilovoltage X-Ray Imaging Dose Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S; Alaei, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To implement full/half bowtie filter models in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) to calculate kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imaging dose of Varian On-Board Imager (OBI) cone beam CT (CBCT) system. Methods: Full/half bowtie filters of Varian OBI were created as compensator models in Pinnacle TPS (version 9.6) using Matlab software (version 2011a). The profiles of both bowtie filters were acquired from the manufacturer, imported into the Matlab system and hard coded in binary file format. A Pinnacle script was written to import each bowtie filter data into a Pinnacle treatment plan as a compensator. A kV x-ray beam model without including the compensator model was commissioned per each bowtie filter setting based on percent depth dose and lateral profile data acquired from Monte Carlo simulations. To validate the bowtie filter models, a rectangular water phantom was generated in the planning system and an anterior/posterior beam with each bowtie filter was created. Using the Pinnacle script, each bowtie filter compensator was added to the treatment plan. Lateral profile at the depth of 3cm and percent depth dose were measured using an ion chamber and compared with the data extracted from the treatment plans. Results: The kV x-ray beams for both full and half bowtie filter have been modeled in a commercial TPS. The difference of lateral and depth dose profiles between dose calculations and ion chamber measurements were within 6%. Conclusion: Both full/half bowtie filter models provide reasonable results in kV x-ray dose calculations in the water phantom. This study demonstrates the possibility of using a model-based treatment planning system to calculate the kV imaging dose for both full and half bowtie filter modes. Further study is to be performed to evaluate the models in clinical situations.

  5. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top ...

  6. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top ...

  7. Comparison of dicentric dose response curves of 6MV LINAC X-rays and (60)Co γ-rays for biodosimetry application.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A Arul Anantha; Bakkiam, D; Sonwani, Swetha; Seenisamy, R; Sivasubramanian, K; Venkatraman, B

    2017-11-01

    In vitro Dicentric (DC) dose response curves of 6MV X-rays (3Gy/min) and (60)Co γ-rays (0.63Gy/min) were generated and compared (intra-laboratory) to understand their similarities and differences. Human peripheral blood samples exposed to ten different doses (0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5Gy) of 6MV X-rays and (60)Co γ-rays were subjected to Dicentric Chromosome Assay (DCA) and dicentrics, excess acentric fragments (AF) and chromatid breaks (CB) were scored. Totally about 31,553 metaphase spreads were scored for the purpose. Dose response curves of both radiation qualities were almost same except for a 13.8% higher β value for 6MV X-rays. However, blind tests results revealed that both these curves are biologically equivalent and exhibited good dose prediction accuracy for the entire dose range. This demonstrated the feasibility of interchangeable use of these curves in biodosimetry. Consequently it has been suggested that LINAC facilities worldwide can be roped in for biodosimetry capacity augmentation towards managing nuclear emergency situations involving γ-radiation exposures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genome-wide screen of DNA methylation changes induced by low dose X-ray radiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingzi; Zhang, Youwei; Xu, Kai; Mao, Xiaobei; Xue, Lijun; Liu, Xiaobei; Yu, Hongjun; Chen, Longbang; Chu, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms play a key role in non-targeted effects of radiation. The purpose of this study was to investigate global hypomethylation and promoter hypermethylation of particular genes induced by low dose radiation (LDR). Thirty male BALB/c mice were divided into 3 groups: control, acutely exposed (0.5 Gy X-rays), and chronic exposure for 10 days (0.05Gy/d×10d). High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and MeDIP-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) were used to study methylation profiles. DNMT1 and MBD2 expression was determined by qPCR and western blot assays. Methylation and expression of Rad23b and Ddit3 were determined by bisulfate sequencing primers (BSP) and qPCR, respectively. The results show that LDR induced genomic hypomethylation in blood 2 h postirraditaion, but was not retained at 1-month. DNMT1 and MBD2 were downregulated in a tissue-specific manner but did not persist. Specific hypermethylation was observed for 811 regions in the group receiving chronic exposure, which covered almost all key biological processes as indicated by GO and KEGG pathway analysis. Eight hypermethylated genes (Rad23b, Tdg, Ccnd1, Ddit3, Llgl1, Rasl11a, Tbx2, Scl6a15) were verified by MeDIP-qPCR. Among them, Rad23b and Ddit3 gene displayed tissue-specific methylation and downregulation, which persisted for 1-month postirradiation. Thus, LDR induced global hypomethylation and tissue-specific promoter hypermethylation of particular genes. Promoter hypermethylation, rather than global hypomethylation, was relatively stable. Dysregulation of methylation might be correlated with down-regulation of DNMT1 and MBD2, but much better understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in this process will require further study.

  9. Adaptive-weighted Total Variation Minimization for Sparse Data toward Low-dose X-ray Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Ma, Jianhua; Fan, Yi; Liang, Zhengrong

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that by minimizing the total variation (TV) of the to-be-estimated image with some data and other constraints, a piecewise-smooth X-ray computed tomography (CT) can be reconstructed from sparse-view projection data without introducing noticeable artifacts. However, due to the piecewise constant assumption for the image, a conventional TV minimization algorithm often suffers from over-smoothness on the edges of the resulting image. To mitigate this drawback, we present an adaptive-weighted TV (AwTV) minimization algorithm in this paper. The presented AwTV model is derived by considering the anisotropic edge property among neighboring image voxels, where the associated weights are expressed as an exponential function and can be adaptively adjusted by the local image-intensity gradient for the purpose of preserving the edge details. Inspired by the previously-reported TV-POCS (projection onto convex sets) implementation, a similar AwTV-POCS implementation was developed to minimize the AwTV subject to data and other constraints for the purpose of sparse-view low-dose CT image reconstruction. To evaluate the presented AwTV-POCS algorithm, both qualitative and quantitative studies were performed by computer simulations and phantom experiments. The results show that the presented AwTV-POCS algorithm can yield images with several noticeable gains, in terms of noise-resolution tradeoff plots and full width at half maximum values, as compared to the corresponding conventional TV-POCS algorithm. PMID:23154621

  10. Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Lee

    2014-07-02

    This is the Final Progress Report for DOE-funded research project DE-PS02-08ER08-01 titled “Non-Invasive Early Detection and Molecular Analysis of Low X-ray Dose Effects in the Lens”. The project focuses on the effects of low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation on the ocular lens. The lens is an exquisitely radiosensitive tissue with a highly-ordered molecular structure that is amenable to non-invasive optical study from the periphery. These merits point to the lens as an ideal target for laser-based molecular biodosimetry (MBD). Following exposure to different types of ionizing radiations, the lens demonstrates molecular changes (e.g., oxidation, racemization, crosslinkage, truncation, aggregation, etc.) that impact the structure and function of the long-lived proteins in the cytosol of lens fiber cells. The vast majority of proteins in the lens comprise the highly-ordered crystallins. These highly conserved lens proteins are amongst the most concentrated and stable in the body. Once synthesized, the crystallins are retained in the fiber cell cytoplasm for life. Taken together, these properties point to the lens as an ideal system for quantitative in vivo MBD assessment using quasi-elastic light scattering (QLS) analysis. In this project, we deploy a purpose-designed non-invasive infrared laser QLS instrument as a quantitative tool for longitudinal assessment of pre-cataractous molecular changes in the lenses of living mice exposed to low-dose low-LET radiation compared to non-irradiated sham controls. We hypothesize that radiation exposure will induce dose-dependent changes in the molecular structure of matrix proteins in the lens. Mechanistic assays to ascertain radiation-induced molecular changes in the lens focus on protein aggregation and gene/protein expression patterns. We anticipate that this study will contribute to our understanding of early molecular changes associated with radiation-induced tissue pathology. This study also affords potential for

  11. Reduction in Radiation Dose in a Pediatric Cardiac Catheterization Lab Using the Philips AlluraClarity X-ray System.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Patrick M; Harrison, David; Badran, Sarah; Takao, Cheryl M; Ing, Frank F

    2017-08-02

    The objective of this study was to compare radiation doses and imaging quality using Philips AlluraClarity (Philips Healthcare, Best, The Netherlands) X-ray system and an older generation reference system. AlluraClarity is a new generation fluoroscopy system designed to reduce radiation without compromising image quality, but reports of its use in pediatric patients are limited. Dose area products (DAP, mGy cm(2)) and DAP/kg were compared in patients catheterized using Allura Xper and AlluraClarity systems over a year of use for each. Randomly selected studies from each system were assessed for image quality. The 430 patients imaged with Clarity were larger than the 332 imaged with Xper (median BSA: 0.74 vs. 0.64 m(2), p = 0.06), and median total fluoroscopic times (TFT) were similar (15.8 vs. 16.1 min, p = 0.37). Median DAPs were 8661 mGy cm(2) (IQR: 18,300 mGy cm(2)) and 4523 mGy cm(2) (IQR: 11,596 mGy cm(2)) with Xper and Clarity, respectively (p < 0.001). There was a reduction in median DAP in all procedure categories. After adjustment for BSA, TFT, and procedure type, using Clarity was associated with a 57.5% (95% CI 51.5-62.8%, p < 0.001) reduction in DAP for all procedures. Reductions did not significantly differ by weight (<10 kg, 10-40 kg, ≥ 40 kg). There was an adjusted percent reduction in DAP for each procedure category ranging from 39.0% (95% CI 25.6-50.1%, p < 0.001) for cardiac biopsies with or without coronary angiography to 67.6% (95% CI 61.2-72.8%, p < 0.001) for device occlusions. Mean overall imaging quality scores (4.3 ± 0.8 with Clarity vs. 4.4 ± 0.6 with Xper, p = 0.62) and scores based on specific quality parameters were similar in the two groups. Use of AlluraClarity substantially reduced radiation doses compared to the older generation reference system without compromising imaging quality in a pediatric cardiac catheterization lab.

  12. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  13. Chest X Ray?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Chest X Ray A chest x ray is a fast and painless imaging test that ... tissue scarring, called fibrosis. Doctors may use chest x rays to see how well certain treatments are working ...

  14. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  15. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  16. Skull x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - head; X-ray - skull; Skull radiography; Head x-ray ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Radiography of skull, chest, and cervical spine - diagnostic. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. ...

  17. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... you about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  18. New absorbed dose measurement with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Onizuka, Ryota; Hioki, Kazunari; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Yamashita, Yusuke

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new dosimetry with cylindrical water phantoms for multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). The ionization measurement was performed with a Farmer ionization chamber at the center and four peripheral points in the body-type and head-type cylindrical water phantoms. The ionization was converted to the absorbed dose using a 60Co absorbed-dose-to-water calibration factor and Monte Carlo (MC) -calculated correction factors. The correction factors were calculated from MDCT (Brilliance iCT, 64-slice, Philips Electronics) modeled with GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) software based on the EGSnrc MC code. The spectrum of incident x-ray beams and the configuration of a bowtie filter for MDCT were determined so that calculated photon intensity attenuation curves for aluminum (Al) and calculated off-center ratio (OCR) profiles in air coincided with those measured. The MC-calculated doses were calibrated by the absorbed dose measured at the center in both cylindrical water phantoms. Calculated doses were compared with measured doses at four peripheral points and the center in the phantom for various beam pitches and beam collimations. The calibration factors and the uncertainty of the absorbed dose determined using this method were also compared with those obtained by CTDIair (CT dose index in air). Calculated Al half-value layers and OCRs in air were within 0.3% and 3% agreement with the measured values, respectively. Calculated doses at four peripheral points and the centers for various beam pitches and beam collimations were within 5% and 2% agreement with measured values, respectively. The MC-calibration factors by our method were 44-50% lower than values by CTDIair due to the overbeaming effect. However, the calibration factors for CTDIair agreed within 5% with those of our method after correction for the overbeaming effect. Our method makes it possible to directly measure the absorbed dose for MDCT and is more robust and accurate than the

  19. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1996-01-01

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  20. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, R.B.

    1996-05-21

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  1. Evaluation of the occupational X-rays dose of the medical staff in a cardiac catheterization laboratory using an acrylic phantom and semiconductor dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lung Fa; Kittipayak, Samrit; Yen, Shan Lin; Pan, Lung Kwang; Lin, Cheng Hsun

    2016-01-01

    The occupational X-rays doses of medical staff in a cardiac catheterization laboratory were evaluated. Four customized acrylic phantoms were used to simulate a patient, medical doctor, assistant, and radiologist to evaluate the in-situ X-rays exposure dose using semiconductor dosimeters. The exposure dose was measured under three scenarios that were preset to imply: no shielding, moderate shielding and complete shielding for the medical staff in the laboratory. The doses were applied by changing the dose area product (DAP) from 11,000 to 500,000mGy·cm(2) in 14 increments. The estimated annual occupational doses for doctors, assistants and radiologists in scenarios I, II, and III were: I) 35.03, 7.78, 1.95; II) 1.95, 0.78, 0.06; and III) 0.19, 0.10, 0.05cSv, respectively. The derived linear regression line of the exposure dose with respect to the DAP were extrapolated to obtain the minimum detectable level (MDL) of DAP for triggering the staff dosimeters. Accordingly, the minimum annual dose was estimated as 0.05cSv. Additional shielding provided measurable protection to the staff. The protective clothing used in scenarios II and III can reduce the original dose from scenario I to ∼3% (scenario II) and ∼0.5% (scenario III). The annual occupational dose also changed with the various X-rays energy settings. The annual dose increased to 126% when the preset X-rays energy was changed from 70 to 100kVp. The semiconductor dosimeter proved to be an adequate tool for measuring low doses and low dose rates under these circumstances. The dose can be reduce of I) 35.03, 7.78, 1.95; to II) 1.95, 0.78, 0.06 (∼3%); or III) 0.19, 0.10, 0.05 (∼0.5%)cSv, respectively according to different protective scenarios.

  2. Mean glandular dose coefficients (D(g)N) for x-ray spectra used in contemporary breast imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Nosratieh, Anita; Hernandez, Andrew; Shen, Sam Z; Yaffe, Martin J; Seibert, J Anthony; Boone, John M

    2015-09-21

    To develop tables of normalized glandular dose coefficients D(g)N for a range of anode-filter combinations and tube voltages used in contemporary breast imaging systems. Previously published mono-energetic D(g)N values were used with various spectra to mathematically compute D(g)N coefficients. The tungsten anode spectra from TASMICS were used; molybdenum and rhodium anode-spectra were generated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The spectra were filtered with various thicknesses of Al, Rh, Mo or Cu. An initial half value layer (HVL) calculation was made using the anode and filter material. A range of the HVL values was produced with the addition of small thicknesses of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as a surrogate for the breast compression paddle, to produce a range of HVL values at each tube voltage. Using a spectral weighting method, D(g)N coefficients for the generated spectra were calculated for breast glandular densities of 0%, 12.5%, 25%, 37.5%, 50% and 100% for a range of compressed breast thicknesses from 3 to 8 cm. Eleven tables of normalized glandular dose (D(g)N) coefficients were produced for the following anode/filter combinations: W + 50 μm Ag, W + 500 μm Al, W + 700 μm Al, W + 200 μm Cu, W + 300 μm Cu, W + 50 μm Rh, Mo + 400 μm Cu, Mo + 30 μm Mo, Mo + 25 μm Rh, Rh + 400 μm Cu and Rh + 25 μm Rh. Where possible, these results were compared to previously published D(g)N values and were found to be on average less than 2% different than previously reported values.Over 200 pages of D(g)N coefficients were computed for modeled x-ray system spectra that are used in a number of new breast imaging applications. The reported values were found to be in excellent agreement when compared to published values.

  3. Mean Glandular dose coefficients (DgN) for x-ray spectra used in contemporary breast imaging systems

    PubMed Central

    Nosratieh, Anita; Hernandez, Andrew; Shen, Sam Z.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Seibert, J. Anthony; Boone, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop tables of normalized glandular dose coefficients DgN for a range of anode–filter combinations and tube voltages used in contemporary breast imaging systems. Methods Previously published mono-energetic DgN values were used with various spectra to mathematically compute DgN coefficients. The tungsten anode spectra from TASMICS were used; Molybdenum and Rhodium anode-spectra were generated using MCNPx Monte Carlo code. The spectra were filtered with various thicknesses of Al, Rh, Mo or Cu. An initial HVL calculation was made using the anode and filter material. A range of the HVL values was produced with the addition of small thicknesses of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as a surrogate for the breast compression paddle, to produce a range of HVL values at each tube voltage. Using a spectral weighting method, DgN coefficients for the generated spectra were calculated for breast glandular densities of 0%, 12.5%, 25%, 37.5%, 50% and 100% for a range of compressed breast thicknesses from 3 to 8 cm. Results Eleven tables of normalized glandular dose (DgN) coefficients were produced for the following anode/filter combinations: W + 50 μm Ag, W + 500 μm Al, W + 700 μm Al, W + 200 μm Cu, W + 300 μm Cu, W + 50 μm Rh, Mo + 400 μm Cu, Mo + 30 μm Mo, Mo + 25 μm Rh, Rh + 400 μm Cu and Rh + 25 μm Rh. Where possible, these results were compared to previously published DgN values and were found to be on average less than 2% different than previously reported values. Conclusion Over 200-pages of DgN coefficients were computed for modeled x-ray system spectra that are used in a number of new breast imaging applications. The reported values were found to be in excellent agreement when compared to published values. PMID:26348995

  4. Comparison of x-ray films and low-dose computed tomographic scans: demonstration of asbestos-related changes in 2760 nuclear weapons workers screened for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Miller, Albert; Widman, Shannon A; Miller, Jeffrey A; Manowitz, Amy; Markowitz, Steven B

    2013-07-01

    Increased availability and technical improvements of computed tomographic (CT) scanning encourages its use for detecting asbestos-related disease. We compared low-dose scans and x-ray films in 2760 workers potentially exposed to asbestos, to assess their ability to detect interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pleural thickening (PT). A total of 2760 nuclear workers received radiography and CT scanning (2006 to 2009). X-ray films were read by a B reader for ILD and PT and CT scans by a thoracic radiologist, using a protocol for nodules, ILD, and PT. Of the 2760 workers, 271 showed circumscribed PT on CT scans, and 73 on x-ray films, 54 (74%) of which were confirmed on CT scans; 76 showed ILD on CT scans, and 15 on x-ray film, 10 (67%) of which were confirmed on CT scans. Radiographic readings of PT and ILD were generally confirmed on CT scans. Computed tomographic scans detected three to five times more cases; the majority were minor.

  5. Method for dose-reduced 3D catheter tracking on a scanning-beam digital x-ray system using dynamic electronic collimation

    PubMed Central

    Dunkerley, David A. P.; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system capable of tomosynthesis-based 3D catheter tracking. This work proposes a method of dose-reduced 3D tracking using dynamic electronic collimation (DEC) of the SBDX scanning x-ray tube. Positions in the 2D focal spot array are selectively activated to create a region-of-interest (ROI) x-ray field around the tracked catheter. The ROI position is updated for each frame based on a motion vector calculated from the two most recent 3D tracking results. The technique was evaluated with SBDX data acquired as a catheter tip inside a chest phantom was pulled along a 3D trajectory. DEC scans were retrospectively generated from the detector images stored for each focal spot position. DEC imaging of a catheter tip in a volume measuring 11.4 cm across at isocenter required 340 active focal spots per frame, versus 4473 spots in full-FOV mode. The dose-area-product (DAP) and peak skin dose (PSD) for DEC versus full field-of-view (FOV) scanning were calculated using an SBDX Monte Carlo simulation code. DAP was reduced to 7.4% to 8.4% of the full-FOV value, consistent with the relative number of active focal spots (7.6%). For image sequences with a moving catheter, PSD was 33.6% to 34.8% of the full-FOV value. The root-mean-squared-deviation between DEC-based 3D tracking coordinates and full-FOV 3D tracking coordinates was less than 0.1 mm. The 3D distance between the tracked tip and the sheath centerline averaged 0.75 mm. Dynamic electronic collimation can reduce dose with minimal change in tracking performance. PMID:27375314

  6. Method for dose-reduced 3D catheter tracking on a scanning-beam digital x-ray system using dynamic electronic collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkerley, David A. P.; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2016-03-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system capable of tomosynthesis-based 3D catheter tracking. This work proposes a method of dose-reduced 3D tracking using dynamic electronic collimation (DEC) of the SBDX scanning x-ray tube. Positions in the 2D focal spot array are selectively activated to create a regionof- interest (ROI) x-ray field around the tracked catheter. The ROI position is updated for each frame based on a motion vector calculated from the two most recent 3D tracking results. The technique was evaluated with SBDX data acquired as a catheter tip inside a chest phantom was pulled along a 3D trajectory. DEC scans were retrospectively generated from the detector images stored for each focal spot position. DEC imaging of a catheter tip in a volume measuring 11.4 cm across at isocenter required 340 active focal spots per frame, versus 4473 spots in full-FOV mode. The dose-area-product (DAP) and peak skin dose (PSD) for DEC versus full field-of-view (FOV) scanning were calculated using an SBDX Monte Carlo simulation code. DAP was reduced to 7.4% to 8.4% of the full-FOV value, consistent with the relative number of active focal spots (7.6%). For image sequences with a moving catheter, PSD was 33.6% to 34.8% of the full-FOV value. The root-mean-squared-deviation between DEC-based 3D tracking coordinates and full-FOV 3D tracking coordinates was less than 0.1 mm. The 3D distance between the tracked tip and the sheath centerline averaged 0.75 mm. Dynamic electronic collimation can reduce dose with minimal change in tracking performance.

  7. MCNP simulation of absorbed energy and dose by iodinated contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wenjun; Mah, Eugene; Huda, Walter; Yao, Hai

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the absorbed dose and energy by iodinated contrast medium in diagnostic radiology. A simulation geometry in which an inner sphere (d = 0.2cm, 1cm, 5cm) filled with iodinated contrast medium (or water) is located at the center of a 20cm diameter water sphere was used in simulations performed with MCNP5 codes. Monoenergetic x-rays with energies ranging from 40 to 80keV from a cone beam source were utilized and contrast medium concentration ranged from 100 to 1mg/ml. Absorbed dose ratio (RD) to inner sphere and total absorbed energies ratio (RE) to the whole phantom with and without iodinated contrast medium were investigated. The maximum RD was ~13 for the 0.2cm diameter sphere with 100mg/ml contrast medium. The maximum RE was ~1.05 for the 5cm diameter contrast sphere at 80keV with 100mg/ml contrast medium. Under the same incident photon energy, increasing the inner sphere size from 0.2cm to 5cm caused a ~63% increase in the RD on average. Decreasing the contrast medium concentration from 100 to 10 mg/ml caused a decrease of RD of ~ 76%. A conclusion was reached that although local absorbed dose increase caused by iodinated contrast agent could be high; the increase in total absorbed energy is negligible.

  8. TU-F-CAMPUS-I-02: Validation of a CT X-Ray Source Characterization Technique for Dose Computation Using An Anthropomorphic Thorax Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Sommerville, M; Tambasco, M; Poirier, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To experimentally validate a rotational kV x-ray source characterization technique by computing CT dose in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom using an in-house dose computation algorithm (kVDoseCalc). Methods: The lateral variation in incident energy spectra of a GE Optima big bore CT scanner was found by measuring the HVL along the internal, full bow-tie filter axis. The HVL and kVp were used to generate the x-ray spectra using Spektr software, while beam fluence was derived by dividing the integral product of the spectra and in-air mass-energy absorption coefficients by in-air dose measurements along the bow-tie filter axis. Beams produced by the GE Optima scanner were modeled at 80 and 140 kVp tube settings. kVDoseCalc calculates dose by solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation using a combination of deterministic and stochastic methods. Relative doses in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom (E2E SBRT Phantom) irradiated by the GE Optima scanner were measured using a (0.015 cc) PTW Freiburg ionization chamber, and compared to computations from kVDoseCalc. Results: The agreement in relative dose between dose computation and measurement for points of interest (POIs) within the primary path of the beam was within experimental uncertainty for both energies, however points outside the primary beam were not. The average absolute percent difference for POIs within the primary path of the beam was 1.37% and 5.16% for 80 and 140 kVp, respectively. The minimum and maximum absolute percent difference for both energies and all POIs within the primary path of the beam was 0.151% and 6.41%, respectively. Conclusion: The CT x-ray source characterization technique based on HVL measurements and kVp can be used to accurately compute CT dose in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom.

  9. Photoneutron depth dose equivalent distributions in high-energy X-ray medical accelerators by a novel position-sensitive dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, Amir; Sohrabi, Mehdi

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to; (1) investigate employing a novel position-sensitive mega-size polycarbonate (MSPC) dosimeter for photoneutron (PN) depth, profile and dose equivalent distributions studies in a multilayer polyethylene phantom in a Siemens ONCOR accelerator, and (2) develop depth dose equivalent distribution matrix data at different depths and positions of the phantom for patient PN dose equivalent determination and in particular for PN secondary cancer risk estimation. Position-sensitive MSPC dosimeters were successfully exposed at 9 different depths of the phantom in a 10×10cm(2) X-ray field. The dosimeters were processed in mega-size electrochemical chambers at optimum conditions. Each MSPC dosimeter was placed at a known phantom depth for PN depth dose equivalents and profiles on transverse, longitudinal and diagonal axes and isodose equivalent distribution studies in and out of the X-ray beam. PN dose equivalent distributions at any depth showed the highest value at the beam central axis and decreases as the distance increases. PN dose equivalent at any position studied in the axes has a maximum value on the phantom surface which decreases as depth increases due to flux reduction by multi-elastic scattering interactions. Extensive PN dose equivalent matrix data at different depths and positions in the phantom were determined. The position-sensitive MSPC dosimeters proved to be highly efficient for PN depth, profile and isodose equivalent distribution studies. The extensive data obtained highly assists for determining PN dose equivalent of a patient undergoing high-energy X-ray therapy and for PN secondary cancer risk estimation. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A convolution/superposition method using primary and scatter dose kernels formed for energy bins of X-ray spectra reconstructed as a function of off-axis distance: a theoretical study on 10-MV X-ray dose calculations in thorax-like phantoms.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Akira; Kimura, Shigenobu; Sutoh, Kohji; Kamimura, Kazuo; Sasamori, Makoto; Komai, Fumio; Seino, Morio; Terashima, Singo; Kubota, Mamoru; Hirota, Junichi; Hosokawa, Yoichiro

    2011-07-01

    A convolution/superposition method is proposed for use with primary and scatter dose kernels formed for energy bins of X-ray spectra reconstructed as a function of off-axis distance. It should be noted that the number of energy bins is usually about ten, and that the reconstructed X-ray spectra can reasonably be applied to media with a wide range of effective Z numbers, ranging from water to lead. The study was carried out for 10-MV X-ray doses in water and thorax-like phantoms with the use of open-jaw-collimated fields. The dose calculations were made separately for primary, scatter, and electron contamination dose components, for which we used two extended radiation sources: one was on the X-ray target and the other on the flattening filter. To calculate the in-air beam intensities at points on the isocenter plane for a given jaw-collimated field, we introduced an in-air output factor (OPF(in-air)) expressed as the product of the off-center jaw-collimator scatter factor (off-center S (c)), the source off-center ratio factor (OCR(source)), and the jaw-collimator radiation reflection factor (RRF(c)). For more accurate dose calculations, we introduce an electron spread fluctuation factor (F (fwd)) to take into account the angular and spatial spread fluctuation for electrons traveling through different media.

  11. Localized Dose Enhancement to Tumor Blood Vessel Endothelial Cells via Megavoltage X-rays and Targeted Gold Nanoparticles: New Potential for External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Berbeco, Ross I.; Ngwa, Wilfred; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Tumor endothelial cell damage during radiation therapy may contribute significantly to tumor eradication and treatment efficacy. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) delivered preferentially to the walls of tumor blood vessels produce low-energy, short-range photoelectrons during external beam radiotherapy, boosting dose to the tumor microvasculature. In this study dosimetry at the single-cell level is used to estimate the anticipated AuNP-mediated dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cells during 6-MV X-ray irradiation. Methods and Materials: Endothelial cells are modeled as thin slabs with 100-nm-diameter AuNPs attached within the blood vessel. The number of photoelectrons emitted per AuNP per gray of X-rays is computed at multiple points along the external beam central axis by use of a Monte Carlo-generated energy fluence spectrum. The energy deposited from AuNP emissions to the endothelium is calculated based on an analytic method incorporating the energy-loss formula of Cole. The endothelial dose enhancement factor (EDEF) is the ratio of the overall (externally plus internally generated) dose to endothelial cells in the presence of AuNPs to the dose without AuNPs (from the external beam only). Results: At 20-cm depth, the EDEF is 1.7 (70% dose increase) for an intravascular AuNP concentration of 30 mg/g. Most of this dose enhancement arises from the low-energy (approximately 100 keV) portion of the linear accelerator X-ray spectrum. Furthermore, for AuNP concentrations ranging from 7 to 140 mg/g, EDEF values of 1.2 to 4.4 (20-340% dose increase) are calculated. Conclusions: In contrast to calculations assuming that AuNPs distributed homogeneously throughout the target volume (macrodosimetry), our cellular microdosimetry calculations predict a major dose enhancement to tumor microvasculature from conventional linear accelerator X-rays. This effect may enable the delivery of ablative therapeutic doses to these sensitive microstructures while maintaining

  12. Linear accelerator x-ray sources with high duty cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Condron, Cathie; Brown, Craig; Gozani, Tsahi; Langeveld, Willem G. J.; Hernandez, Michael

    2013-04-19

    X-ray cargo inspection systems typically use a several-MV pulsed linear accelerator (linac) to produce a bremsstrahlung spectrum of x rays by bombarding a target with electrons. The x rays traverse the cargo and are detected by a detector array. Spectroscopy of the detected x rays is very desirable: if one can determine the spectrum of the transmitted x rays, one can determine the Z of the material they traversed. Even in relatively low-dose modes of operation, thousands of x rays arrive at each detector element during each pulse, unless the x rays are heavily absorbed or scattered by the cargo. For portal or fixed-site systems, dose rates, and therefore x-ray count rates, are even higher. Because of the high x-ray count rate, spectroscopy is impractical in conventional cargo inspection systems, except in certain special cases. For a mobile system, typical pulse durations are a few microseconds, and the number of pulses is on the order of 100 per second, leading to a duty factor of about 0.04%. Clearly, a linear accelerator x-ray source with much higher duty factor would be useful, since then the same number of x rays could be spread out over time, reducing the x-ray count rate. In this paper, we explore the possibility of designing a linear accelerator system, using more or less Conventional Off the Shelf (COTS) components, capable of duty cycles of 1% or greater. A survey was conducted of available linac RF source options and, given the possibilities, calculations were performed for suitable beam centerline designs. Keeping in mind that the size and cost of the accelerator system should be practical for use in a mobile cargo inspection system, only a few options are shown to be reasonably feasible, both requiring the use of klystrons instead of the magnetrons used in conventional systems. An S-Band design appears clearly possible, and there is also a promising X-Band design.

  13. The impact of x-ray tube stabilization on localized radiation dose in axial CT scans: initial results in CTDI phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Cody, Dianna D.

    2016-10-01

    Rise, fall, and stabilization of the x-ray tube output occur immediately before and after data acquisition on some computed tomography (CT) scanners and are believed to contribute additional dose to anatomy facing the x-ray tube when it powers on or off. In this study, we characterized the dose penalty caused by additional radiation exposure during the rise, stabilization, and/or fall time (referred to as overscanning). A 32 cm CT dose-index (CTDI) phantom was scanned on three CT scanners: GE Healthcare LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare Discovery CT750 HD, and Siemens Somatom Definition Flash. Radiation exposure was detected for various x-ray tube start acquisition angles using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed in the peripheral chamber hole at the phantom’s 12 o’clock position. Scan rotation time, ionization chamber location, phantom diameter, and phantom centering were varied to quantify their effects on the dose penalty caused by overscanning. For 1 s single, axial rotations, CTDI at the 12 o’clock chamber position (CTDI100, 12:00) was 6.1%, 4.0%, and 4.4% higher when the start angle of the x-ray tube was aligned at the top of the gantry (12 o’clock) versus when the start angle was aligned at 9 o’clock for the Siemens Flash, GE CT750 HD, and GE VCT scanner, respectively. For the scanners’ fastest rotation times (0.285 s for the Siemens and 0.4 s for both GE scanners), the dose penalties increased to 22.3%, 10.7%, and 10.5%, respectively, suggesting a trade-off between rotation speed and the dose penalty from overscanning. In general, overscanning was shown to have a greater radiation dose impact for larger diameter phantoms, shorter rotation times, and to peripheral phantom locations. Future research is necessary to determine an appropriate method for incorporating the localized dose penalty from overscanning into standard dose metrics, as well as to assess the impact on organ dose.

  14. A study on the dependence of exposure dose reduction and image evaluation on the distance from the dental periapical X-ray machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Kyu-Ji; Shin, Jae-Woo; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Lim, Chang-Seon; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Kim, Young-Jae

    2013-11-01

    Reducing the exposure dose from a periapical X-ray machine is an important aim in dental radiography. Although the radiation exposure dose is generally low, any radiation exposure is harmful to the human body. Therefore, this study developed a method that reduces the exposure dose significantly compared to that encountered in a normal procedure, but still produces an image with a similar resolution. The correlation between the image resolution and the exposure dose of the proposed method was examined with increasing distance between the dosimeter and the X-ray tube. The results were compared with those obtained from the existing radiography method. When periapical radiography was performed once according to the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), the measured skin surface dose was low at 7 mGy or below. In contrast, the skin surface dose measured using the proposed method was only 1.57 mGy, showing a five-fold reduction. These results suggest that further decreases in dose might be achieved using the proposed method.

  15. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will ...

  16. SU-F-18C-13: Low-Dose X-Ray CT Reconstruction Using a Hybrid First-Order Method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L; Lin, W; Jin, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel reconstruction method for X-ray CT that can lead to accurate reconstruction at significantly reduced dose levels combining low X-ray incident intensity and few views of projection data. Methods: The noise nature of the projection data at low X-ray incident intensity was modeled and accounted by the weighted least-squares (WLS) criterion. The total variation (TV) penalty was used to mitigate artifacts caused by few views of data. The first order primal-dual (FOPD) algorithm was used to minimize TV in image domain, which avoided the difficulty of the non-smooth objective function. The TV penalized WLS reconstruction was achieved by alternated FOPD TV minimization and projection onto convex sets (POCS) for data fidelity constraints. The proposed FOPD-POCS method was evaluated using the FORBILD jaw phantom and the real cadaver head CT data. Results: The quantitative measures, root mean square error (RMSE) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), demonstrate the superior denoising capability of WLS over LS-based TV iterative reconstruction. The improvement of RMSE (WLS vs. LS) is 15%∼21% and that of CNR is 17%∼72% when the incident counts per ray are ranged from 1×10{sup 5} to 1×10{sup 3}. In addition, the TV regularization can accurately reconstruct images from about 50 views of the jaw phantom. The FOPD-POCS reconstruction reveals more structural details and suffers fewer artifacts in both the phantom and real head images. The FOPD-POCS method also shows fast convergence at low X-ray incident intensity. Conclusion: The new hybrid FOPD-POCS method, based on TV penalized WLS, yields excellent image quality when the incident X-ray intensity is low and the projection views are limited. The reconstruction is computationally efficient since the FOPD minimization of TV is applied only in the image domain. The characteristics of FOPD-POCS can be exploited to significantly reduce radiation dose of X-ray CT without compromising accuracy for diagnosis

  17. A Comparative Study Using Numerical Methods for Surface X Ray Doses with Conventional and Digital Radiology Equipment in Pediatric Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Posa Ioan; Florin, Georgescu Remus; Virgil, Ciobanu; Antonescu, Elisabeta

    2011-09-01

    The place of the study is a pediatrics clinic which realizes a great variety of emergency, ambulatory ad hospital examinations. The radiology compartment respects work procedures and a system to ensure the quality of X ray examinations. The results show a constant for the programmator of the digital detector machine for the tension applied to the tube. For the screen-film detector machine the applied tension increases proportionally with the physical development of the child considering the trunk thickness.

  18. A Comparative Study Using Numerical Methods for Surface X Ray Doses with Conventional and Digital Radiology Equipment in Pediatric Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Dan, Posa Ioan; Florin, Georgescu Remus; Virgil, Ciobanu; Antonescu, Elisabeta

    2011-09-14

    The place of the study is a pediatrics clinic which realizes a great variety of emergency, ambulatory ad hospital examinations. The radiology compartment respects work procedures and a system to ensure the quality of X ray examinations. The results show a constant for the programmator of the digital detector machine for the tension applied to the tube. For the screen-film detector machine the applied tension increases proportionally with the physical development of the child considering the trunk thickness.

  19. Low Dose High Energy X-ray In-Line Phase Sensitive Imaging Prototype: Investigation of Optimal Geometric Conditions and Design Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Ghani, Muhammad. U.; Yan, Aimin; Wong, Molly. D.; Li, Yuhua; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the optimization of a high energy in-line phase sensitive x-ray imaging prototype under different geometric and operating conditions for mammography application. A phase retrieval algorithm based on phase attenuation duality (PAD) was applied to the phase contrast images acquired by the prototype. Imaging performance was investigated at four magnification values of 1.67, 2, 2.5 and 3 using an acrylic edge, an American College of Radiology (ACR) mammography phantom and contrast detail (CD) phantom with tube potentials of 100, 120 and 140 kVp. The ACR and CD images were acquired at the same mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.29 mGy with a computed radiography (CR) detector of 43.75 µm pixel pitch at a fixed source to image distance (SID) of 170 cm. The x-ray tube focal spot size was kept constant as 7 µm while a 2.5 mm thick aluminum (Al) filter was used for beam hardening. The performance of phase contrast and phase retrieved images were compared with computer simulations based on the relative phase contrast factor (RPF) at high x-ray energies. The imaging results showed that the x-ray tube operated at 100 kVp under the magnification of 2.5 exhibits superior imaging performance which is in accordance to the computer simulations. As compared to the phase contrast images, the phase retrieved images of the ACR and CD phantoms demonstrated improved imaging contrast and target discrimination. We compared the CD phantom images acquired in conventional contact mode with and without the anti-scatter grid using the same prototype at 1.295 mGy and 2.59 mGy using 40 kVp, a 25 µm rhodium (Rh) filter. At the same radiation dose, the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for both the large and small discs, while compared to the double dose image acquired in conventional mode, the observer study also indicated that the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for the large discs. This

  20. Low dose high energy x-ray in-line phase sensitive imaging prototype: Investigation of optimal geometric conditions and design parameters.

    PubMed